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Sample records for 420-500 nanometer nm

  1. 0.1-nanometer resolution positioning stage for sub-10 nm scanning probe lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorbringer-Doroshovets, Nataliya; Balzer, Felix; Fuessl, Roland; Manske, Eberhard; Kaestner, Marcus; Schuh, Andreas; Zoellner, Jens-Peter; Hofer, Manuel; Guliyev, Elshad; Ahmad, Ahmad; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2013-03-01

    High Performance Single Nanometer Lithography (SNL) is an enabling technology for beyond CMOS and future nanoelectronics. To keep on with scaling down nanoelectronic components, novel instrumentation for nanometer precise placement, overlay alignment and measurement are an essential pre-requirement to realize Next Generation Lithography (NGL) systems. In particular, scanning probe based methods for surface modification and lithography are an emerging method for producing sub-10 nm features. In this study, we demonstrate nano-scale lithography using a scanning probe based method in combination with a Nanopositioning and Nanomeasuring Machine. The latter one has a measuring range of 25 mm x 25 mm x 5 mm, 0.1 nanometer resolution and outstanding nanometer accuracy. The basic concept consists of a special arrangement allowing Abbe error free measurements in all axes over the total scan range. Furthermore, the Nanopositioning and Nanomeasuring Machine is able to store the exact location that can be found again with an accuracy of less than 2.5 nanometers. This system is also predestinated for critical dimension, quality and overlay control. The integrated scanning probe lithography is based on electric-field-induced patterning of calixarene. As a result, repeated step response tests are presented in this paper.

  2. Heterogeneous nanometer-scale Joule and Peltier effects in sub-25 nm thin phase change memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Pop, Eric; King, William P.

    2014-09-01

    We measure heterogeneous power dissipation in phase change memory (PCM) films of 11 and 22 nm thin Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) by scanning Joule expansion microscopy (SJEM), with sub-50 nm spatial and ˜0.2 K temperature resolution. The heterogeneous Joule and Peltier effects are explained using a finite element analysis (FEA) model with a mixture of hexagonal close-packed and face-centered cubic GST phases. Transfer length method measurements and effective media theory calculations yield the GST resistivity, GST-TiW contact resistivity, and crystal fraction of the GST films at different annealing temperatures. Further comparison of SJEM measurements and FEA modeling also predicts the thermopower of thin GST films. These measurements of nanometer-scale Joule, thermoelectric, and interface effects in PCM films could lead to energy-efficient designs of highly scaled PCM technology.

  3. Thermal and electrical conduction in ultrathin metallic films: 7 nm down to sub-nanometer thickness.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huan; Xu, Shen; Wang, Xinwei; Mei, Ning

    2013-08-12

    For ultrathin metallic films (e.g., less than 5 nm), no knowledge is yet available on how electron scattering at surface and grain boundaries reduces the electrical and thermal transport. The thermal and electrical conduction of metallic films is characterized down to 0.6 nm average thickness. The electrical and thermal conductivities of 0.6 nm Ir film are reduced by 82% and 50% from the respective bulk values. The Lorenz number is measured as 7.08 × 10⁻⁸ W Ω K⁻², almost a twofold increase of the bulk value. The Mayadas-Shatzkes model is used to interpret the experimental results and reveals very strong electron reflection (>90%) at grain boundaries.

  4. Resolving three-dimensional shape of sub-50 nm wide lines with nanometer-scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Attota, Ravikiran Dixson, Ronald G.

    2014-07-28

    We experimentally demonstrate that the three-dimensional (3-D) shape variations of nanometer-scale objects can be resolved and measured with sub-nanometer scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes by analyzing 4-D optical data using the through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) method. These initial results show that TSOM-determined cross-sectional (3-D) shape differences of 30 nm–40 nm wide lines agree well with critical-dimension atomic force microscope measurements. The TSOM method showed a linewidth uncertainty of 1.22 nm (k = 2). Complex optical simulations are not needed for analysis using the TSOM method, making the process simple, economical, fast, and ideally suited for high volume nanomanufacturing process monitoring.

  5. Nanometal plasmonpolaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akjouj, Abdellatif; Lévêque, Gae¨tan; Szunerits, Sabine; Pennec, Yan; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Boukherroub, Rabah; Dobrzyński, Leonard

    2013-03-01

    A nanometal is a nanometric metallic structure. A plasmon is a collective excitation of an electron gas. A plasmon polariton is a plasmon coupled to an electromagnetic wave. Whereas plasmons in bulk metal do not couple to light fields, a thin metal film can sustain surface polaritons when excited by light. This can be achieved via an evanescent prism coupling, the help of surface corrugations to ensure momentum matching, etc. Such surface polaritons propagate as coherent electron oscillations parallel to the metal surface and decay exponentially perpendicular to it. Thus, the electromagnetic energy is confined to dimensions below the diffraction limit perpendicular to the metal surface. Corrugations can further act as light scattering centers for surface plasmons, allowing for the fabrication of interesting optical devices such as an all-optical transistor. This surface science report reviews the present literature on surface polaritons in nanostructures and waveguides. Models, computer simulations and experiments are reviewed and illustrated by simple comprehensive examples. Experimental and theoretical studies of short and long range sensing using plasmonic nanostructures are in particular considered. Some applications for nanometals are outlined. The interactions between metallic particles and films due to the interactions between several localized and delocalized surface plasmons are among the examples. Applications to fluorescence extraction in the interaction between near-field and matter are also included here. Nevertheless this report cannot be an exhaustive one. This would be an endless task. It leaves space for future Surface Science Reports issues by colleagues whose achievements do not appearhere.

  6. Piezochromic Phenomena of Nanometer Voids Formed by Mono-Dispersed Nanometer Powders Compacting Process

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lihong; Wan, Caixia; Zhou, Jianren; Wang, Yiguang; Wang, Liang; Ai, Yanling; Zhao, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Piezochromism describes a tendency of certain materials changing colors when they are subjected to various pressure levels. It occurs particularly in some polymers or inorganic materials, such as in palladium complexes. However, piezochromism is generally believed to work at high pressure range of 0.1–10 GPa. This research work focused on unique piezochromism responses of the nanometer voids formed by the 5–20 nm inorganic ISOH nanometer powders. It was discovered that microstructures of the nanometer voids could change color at very low pressures of only 0.002–0.01 GPa; its sensitivity to pressure was increased by tens of times. It is believed that the uniform microstructures of nanometer powders contributed to the material's high sensitivity of piezochromic phenomena. One factor which quantum optical change caused by nanometer voids affected the quantum confinement effect; another is surface Plasmon Resonance of great difference dielectric property between conductive ITO powder and insulation hydroxide. PMID:24115999

  7. New Sub-nanometer Spectral Estimates of the 0-5 nm Solar Soft X-Ray Irradiance at Mars Using the Extreme UltraViolet Monitor (EUVM) Onboard MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, E.; Eparvier, F. G.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Peterson, W. K.; Mitchell, D. L.; Xu, S.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Extreme UltraViolet Monitor (EUVM) onboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) probe at Mars characterizes the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) input into the Martian atmosphere. EUVM measures solar irradiance at 0-7 nm, 17-22 nm and 121.6 nm at a nominal 1 second cadence. These bands were selected to capture variability originating at different heights in the solar atmosphere; and are used to drive the Flare Irradiance Solar Model at Mars (FISM-M) that is a model of the solar spectrum from 0.1-190 nm with 1 nm resolution and produced routinely as the EUVM Level 3 data product. The 0-5 nm range of the solar spectrum is of particular aeronomic interest because the primary species of the Mars upper atmosphere have Auger transitions in this range. When an Auger transition is excited by incident SXR radiation, secondary electrons are emitted with sufficient energy to further ionize the atmosphere. Because these transitions are highly structured, sub-nm resolution of the solar spectrum is needed in the 0-5 nm range to fully constrain the solar input and more accurately characterize the energetics of the upper atmosphere. At Earth, .1 nm resolution estimates of the solar 0-5 nm range are produced by the X-ray Photometer System (XPS) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite by combining broad-band SXR measurements with solar flare temperature measurements to drive an atomic physics based forward model of solar coronal emissions. This spectrum has been validated with other models as well as with photo-electron and day glow measurements at Earth. Similar to XPS, the EUVM 0-7 nm and 17-22 nm bands can be used to produce an XPS-like model at Mars, but with reduced precision due to differences in the available bands. We present first results of this technique applied to a set of solar flares observed by MAVEN EUVM and Earth assets. In addition to comparing EUVM and Earth-asset derived 0-5 nm solar spectra to

  8. Glass ceramic ZERODUR enabling nanometer precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Nieder, Johannes; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The IC Lithography roadmap foresees manufacturing of devices with critical dimension of < 20 nm. Overlay specification of single digit nanometer asking for nanometer positioning accuracy requiring sub nanometer position measurement accuracy. The glass ceramic ZERODUR® is a well-established material in critical components of microlithography wafer stepper and offered with an extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), the tightest tolerance available on market. SCHOTT is continuously improving manufacturing processes and it's method to measure and characterize the CTE behavior of ZERODUR® to full fill the ever tighter CTE specification for wafer stepper components. In this paper we present the ZERODUR® Lithography Roadmap on the CTE metrology and tolerance. Additionally, simulation calculations based on a physical model are presented predicting the long term CTE behavior of ZERODUR® components to optimize dimensional stability of precision positioning devices. CTE data of several low thermal expansion materials are compared regarding their temperature dependence between - 50°C and + 100°C. ZERODUR® TAILORED 22°C is full filling the tight CTE tolerance of +/- 10 ppb / K within the broadest temperature interval compared to all other materials of this investigation. The data presented in this paper explicitly demonstrates the capability of ZERODUR® to enable the nanometer precision required for future generation of lithography equipment and processes.

  9. Displacement field measurement in the nanometer range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrel, Yves; Fournier, Nicolas

    1996-09-01

    The grid method is a classical tool for displacement measurement, which provides field data. This method has benefited very much from the phase-shifting technique in recent years. Two examples of applications of this method in the nanometer range are presented. The first one concerns the materials science: it is shown that microgrids observed by SEM can provide displacement field data with an accuracy of a few nanometers. The second one concerns the measurement of a rigid-body displacement. In this case, displacement data can be averaged over the whole field, drastically increasing the sensitivity. It is shown that a sensitivity of 7 nm can be achieved by using a coarse grid with 8 lines per mm. This sensitivity corresponds to 1/18000 of the grid pitch.

  10. KINOFORM LENSES - TOWARD NANOMETER RESOLUTION.

    SciTech Connect

    STEIN, A.; EVANS-LUTTERODT, K.; TAYLOR, A.

    2004-10-23

    While hard x-rays have wavelengths in the nanometer and sub-nanometer range, the ability to focus them is limited by the quality of sources and optics, and not by the wavelength. A few options, including reflective (mirrors), diffractive (zone plates) and refractive (CRL's) are available, each with their own limitations. Here we present our work with kinoform lenses which are refractive lenses with all material causing redundant 2{pi} phase shifts removed to reduce the absorption problems inherently limiting the resolution of refractive lenses. By stacking kinoform lenses together, the effective numerical aperture, and thus the focusing resolution, can be increased. The present status of kinoform lens fabrication and testing at Brookhaven is presented as well as future plans toward achieving nanometer resolution.

  11. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Holt, Jason; Noy, Aleksandr; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  12. Performance of a Nanometer Resolution BPM System

    SciTech Connect

    Walston, S.; Chung, C.; Fitsos, P.; Gronberg, J.; Meller, R.; Vogel, V.; Hayano, H.; Honda, Y.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Kolomensky, Y.; Orimoto, T.; Boogert, S.; Frisch, J.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; Ross, M.; Smith, S.; Smith, T.; White, G.; Slater, M.; /Cambridge U. /University Coll. London

    2007-04-24

    International Linear Collider (ILC) interaction region beam sizes and component position stability requirements will be as small as a few nanometers. It is important to the ILC design effort to demonstrate that these tolerances can be achieved ideally using beam-based stability measurements. It has been estimated that RF cavity beam position monitors (BPMs) could provide position measurement resolutions of less than one nanometer and could form the basis of the desired beam-based stability measurement. We have developed a high resolution RF cavity BPM system. A triplet of these BPMs has been installed in the extraction line of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. The three BPMs are rigidly mounted inside an alignment frame on variable-length struts which allow movement in position and angle. We have developed novel methods for extracting the position and tilt information from the BPM signals including a calibration algorithm which is immune to beam jitter. To date, we have been able to demonstrate a resolution of approximately 20 nm over a dynamic range of +/- 20 microns. We report on the progress of these ongoing tests.

  13. PERFORMANCE OF A NANOMETER RESOLUTION BPM SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Walston, S; Chung, C; Fitsos, P; Gronberg, J; Meller, R; Vogel, V; Hayano, H; Honda, Y; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J; Kolomensky, Y; Orimoto, T; Boogert, S; Frisch, J; May, J; McCormick, D; Ross, M; Smith, S; Smith, T; Slater, M; Thomson, M; Ward, D; Lyapin, A; Malton, S; Miller, D; White, G

    2006-06-21

    International Linear Collider (ILC) interaction region beam sizes and component position stability requirements will be as small as a few nanometers. It is important to the ILC design effort to demonstrate that these tolerances can be achieved--ideally using beam-based stability measurements. It has been estimated that RF cavity beam position monitors (BPMs) could provide position measurement resolutions of less than one nanometer and could form the basis of the desired beam-based stability measurement. We have developed a high resolution RF cavity BPM system. A triplet of these BPMs has been installed in the extraction line of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. The three BPMs are rigidly mounted inside an alignment frame on variable-length struts which allow movement in position and angle. We have developed novel methods for extracting the position and tilt information from the BPM signals including a calibration algorithm which is immune to beam jitter. To date, we have been able to demonstrate a resolution of approximately 20 nm over a dynamic range of +/- 20 microns. We report on the progress of these ongoing tests.

  14. Performance of a Nanometer Resolution BPM System

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, V; Hayano, H; Honda, Y; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J; Kolomensky, Y; Orimoto, T; Chung, C; Fitsos, P; Gronberg, J; Walston, S; White, G; Frisch, J; May, J; McCormick, D; Ross, M; Smith, S; Smith, T; Slater, M; Ward, D; Boogert, S; Lyapin, A; Malton, S; Miller, D

    2005-10-14

    International Linear Collider (ILC) interaction region beam sizes and component position stability requirements will be as small as a few nanometers. it is important to the ongoing ILC design effort to demonstrate that these tolerances can be achieved--ideally using beam-based stability measurements. It has been estimated that an RF cavity BPM with modern waveform processing could provide a position measurement resolution of less than one nanometer. Such a system could form the basis of the desired beam-based stability measurement, as well as be used for other specialized purposes. They have developed a high resolution RF cavity BPM and associated electronics. A triplet comprised of these BPMs has been installed in the extraction line of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. The three BPMs are rigidly mounted inside an alignment frame on six variable-length struts which can be used to move the BPMs in position and angle. they have developed novel methods for extracting the position and tilt information from the BPM signals including a robust calibration algorithm which is immune to beam jitter. To date, they have been able to demonstrate a resolution of approximately 20 nm over a dynamic range of {+-} 20 {micro}m. They report on the progress of these ongoing tests.

  15. Nanometer-scale embossing of polydimethylsiloxane.

    PubMed

    Hoh, Maria; Werbin, Jeffrey L; Dumas, Julie K; Heinz, William F; Hoh, Jan H

    2010-02-16

    Microstructured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is an important and widely used material in biology and chemistry. Here we report that micrometer- and nanometer-scale features can be introduced into the surface of PDMS in a process that is functionally equivalent to embossing. We show that surface features <50 nm can be replicated onto the surface of previously cured PDMS at room temperature and at low pressure. This type of embossing can be performed on samples in solution. It also allows one template to be used for many different types of microstructures by changing the embossing time or serial embossing at different alignments. The balance between elastic and plastic properties of the PDMS has the effect of high-pass filtering the features that are captured and produces a sample that is suitable for sensitive surface characterization technologies such as atomic force microscopy. These findings extend the applications of PDMS as well as open the possibility for new uses.

  16. Status of the nanometer comparator at PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluegge, Jens; Koening, Rainer G.

    2001-10-01

    Due to increasing demands on the photolithography of integrated circuits and the progress of interferometric linear encoders, length measurement systems with a reproducibility under 3 nm are used in industry today, whereas the connection to the unit of length exhibits an uncertainty of about 25 nm. To resolve this problem a new one dimensional length comparator, the nanometer comparator, was developed in a cooperation between the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the Dr. Johannes Heidenhain GmbH and Werth Me#technik GmbH. The nanometer comparator will be able to perform one dimensional calibrations of photo masks, line-graduation scales, incremental linear encoders and laser interferometers in one axis up to a maximum length of 610 mm. To ensure the highest level of measurement performance, the interferometer is completely located in vacuum using metal bellows, whilst the calibration objects can be mounted under atmospheric conditions. The interferometer set-up compensates the dilatation and the bending of the granite base and minimizes the measurement circle of the comparator. This will minimize the influence of thermal and mechanical distortions. The interferometer design can be used with a heterodyne or a homodyne signal detection electronics. Due to their high power dissipation, the laser is arranged far apart from the comparator and light is fed to the interferometers by means of glass fibers. The light source is a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser frequency stabilized by an iodine absorption line. Different measuring systems for the structure localization can be attached to an universal sensor carrier on a solid bridge above the measuring carriage. Incremental reading heads and two photoelectric microscopes are now available for this purpose.

  17. Free-Space Nanometer Wiring via Nanotip Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Kizuka, Tokushi; Ashida, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Relentless efforts in semiconductor technology have driven nanometer-scale miniaturization of transistors, diodes, and interconnections in electronic chips. Free-space writing enables interconnections of stacked modules separated by an arbitrary distance, leading to ultimate integration of electronics. We have developed a free-space method for nanometer-scale wiring on the basis of manipulating a metallic nanotip while applying a bias voltage without radiative heating, lithography, etching, or electrodeposition. The method is capable of fabricating wires with widths as low as 1–6 nm and lengths exceeding 200 nm with a breakdown current density of 8 TA/m2. Structural evolution and conduction during wire formation were analyzed by direct atomistic visualization using in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. PMID:26306613

  18. Metastability at the nanometer scale

    SciTech Connect

    Desre, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    Under constraints and at the nanometer scale, transitory metastable states can be generated in multicomponents materials. Examples illustrating such specific states are presented. They concern (1) the crystalline nucleation in a growing undercooled liquid droplet formed from a liquid parent phase; (2) the suppression of intermetallic nucleation in solid solutions or glasses subjected to sharp concentration gradients; (3) the nanocrystalline transitory state preceding amorphization by ball milling. In connection with this latter example, a thermodynamic model for the nanocrystal to glass transition, based on a hypothesis of a topological disorder wetting at the nanograin boundaries, is proposed.

  19. Functional nanometer-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tsz On Mario

    Nanometer-scale structures have properties that are fundamentally different from their bulk counterparts. Much research effort has been devoted in the past decades to explore new fabrication techniques, model the physical properties of these structures, and construct functional devices. The ability to manipulate and control the structure of matter at the nanoscale has made many new classes of materials available for the study of fundamental physical processes and potential applications. The interplay between fabrication techniques and physical understanding of the nanostructures and processes has revolutionized the physical and material sciences, providing far superior properties in materials for novel applications that benefit society. This thesis consists of two major aspects of my graduate research in nano-scale materials. In the first part (Chapters 3--6), a comprehensive study on the nanostructures based on electrospinning and thermal treatment is presented. Electrospinning is a well-established method for producing high-aspect-ratio fibrous structures, with fiber diameter ranging from 1 nm--1 microm. A polymeric solution is typically used as a precursor in electrospinning. In our study, the functionality of the nanostructure relies on both the nanostructure and material constituents. Metallic ions containing precursors were added to the polymeric precursor following a sol-gel process to prepare the solution suitable for electrospinning. A typical electrospinning process produces as-spun fibers containing both polymer and metallic salt precursors. Subsequent thermal treatments of the as-spun fibers were carried out in various conditions to produce desired structures. In most cases, polymer in the solution and the as-spun fibers acted as a backbone for the structure formation during the subsequent heat treatment, and were thermally removed in the final stage. Polymers were also designed to react with the metallic ion precursors during heat treatment in some

  20. First Observation of Mechanochromism at the Nanometer Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Carpick, R.W.; Sasaki, D.Y.; Burns, A.R.

    1999-07-07

    A mechanically-induced color transition (''mechanochromism'') in polydiacetylene thin films has been generated at the nanometer scale using the tips of two different scanning probe microscopes. A blue-to-red chromatic transition in polydiacetylene molecular trilayer films, polymerized from 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (poly-PCDA), was found to result from shear forces acting between the tip and the poly-PCDA molecules, as independently observed with near-field scanning optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Red domains were identified by a fluorescence emission signature. Transformed regions as small as 30 nm in width were observed with AFM. The irreversibly transformed domains preferentially grow along the polymer backbone direction. Significant rearrangement of poly-PCDA bilayer segments is observed by AFM in transformed regions. The removal of these segments appears to be a characteristic feature of the transition. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of nanometer-scale mechanochromism in any material.

  1. Electrochemistry at Nanometer-Scaled Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, John J.; Bo Zhang; White, Henry S.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical studies using nanometer-scaled electrodes are leading to better insights into electrochemical kinetics, interfacial structure, and chemical analysis. Various methods of preparing electrodes of nanometer dimensions are discussed and a few examples of their behavior and applications in relatively simple electrochemical experiments…

  2. Implementing registration measurements on photomasks at the Nanometer Comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köning, Rainer; Weichert, Christoph; Przebierala, Bernd; Flügge, Jens; Haessler-Grohne, Wolfgang; Bosse, Harald

    2012-09-01

    Due to the introduction of double patterning schemes in the production processes of the semiconductor industry and the corresponding stringent specifications of the placement errors of the optical images of mask features (1.2 nm (3σ)) in the lithographic projection process, significant improvements of the registration measurements on photomasks are required. The Nanometer Comparator of the PTB, a one-dimensional vacuum-interference length comparator, has already demonstrated measurement reproducibility at this level on line scales and linear encoders, and therefore this comparator should also be applied for placement metrology on photomasks. Because a photomask is a relatively thin plate which is supported almost at its ends, the bending influence is much larger than for line scales and precautions had to be taken to reduce the influence of the sample support on the measurements results. A new sample mount was built, which exhibits mechanical alignment aids. In addition the position deviations caused by the mask bending were corrected by means of finite element calculations. Measurements performed with the Nanometer Comparator on a high-quality mask showed a maximum deviation of measured feature positions from the common mean of below 0.5 nm and a reproducibility of 0.2 nm. These results suggest that the use of a one-dimensional calibration of mask measuring machines allows us to perform traceable registration measurements with sufficient accuracy.

  3. Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Yen, Chi-Fu; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2012-06-15

    We describe a new technique, standing wave axial nanometry (SWAN), to image the axial location of a single nanoscale fluorescent object with sub-nanometer accuracy and 3.7 nm precision. A standing wave, generated by positioning an atomic force microscope tip over a focused laser beam, is used to excite fluorescence; axial position is determined from the phase of the emission intensity. We use SWAN to measure the orientation of single DNA molecules of different lengths, grafted on surfaces with different functionalities.

  4. Fabrication of metallic electrodes with nanometer separation by electromigration

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.; Lim, A.K.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Park, J.; McEuen, P.L.

    1999-07-01

    A simple yet highly reproducible method to fabricate metallic electrodes with nanometer separation is presented. The fabrication is achieved by passing a large electrical current through a gold nanowire defined by electron-beam lithography and shadow evaporation. The current flow causes the electromigration of gold atoms and the eventual breakage of the nanowire. The breaking process yields two stable metallic electrodes separated by {approximately}1 nm with high efficiency. These electrodes are ideally suited for electron-transport studies of chemically synthesized nanostructures, and their utility is demonstrated here by fabricating single-electron transistors based on colloidal cadmium selenide nanocrystals. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. New electron optical column with large field for nanometer e-beam lithography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Hiroya; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Saitou, Norio

    1995-05-01

    An electron beam lithography system for nanometer devices has been developed. The target specifications of the system are a Gaussian beam diameter of 10 nm and a beam current of 1 nA, an acceleration voltage of 50 kV, a 500 micrometers X 500 micrometers deflection field and an overlay accuracy of 10 nm (3(sigma) ). To realize such high performance, the following two technologies have been developed for the design of the electron optical column: (1) a low aberration objective lens system with a one stage electrostatic deflector and (2) a thermal field emission (TFE) gun system with a low energy spread and a high brightness Zr/O/W cathode. The exposed results shown are a 30 nm isolated line and a 40 nm lines and spaces. An overlay accuracy of 10 nm are also obtained. This system is capable of being put into practical use in the fabrication of nanometer devices.

  6. Nanometer-scale organic thin film transistors from self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Vuillaume, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    A survey of the most interesting results on nanometer-scale organic thin film transistors (nano-OTFT) is presented. Additionally, we discuss our recent results on the properties of end-group functionalized organic self-assembled monolayers and on their use in the fabrication of nanometer-scale field-effect transistors. Nanometer-scale organic transistors (channel length 30 nm) were fabricated, with a self-assembled monolayer as gate insulator. The carrier transport in these transistors, as a function of the channel length, was investigated, and a transition from a dispersive to a ballistic transport at a channel length of 200 nm was observed. On a molecular scale, alkyl monolayers functionalized at their omega-ends by aromatic moieties were prepared. A high anisotropic conductivity in molecular insulator/semiconductor heterostructures of monolayer thickness was observed. These molecular architectures provide a basis for the building blocks of molecular transistors.

  7. Role of excess manganese in the formation of properties of nanometer-sized manganite powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, G. Ya.; Novokhatska, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    It has been revealed for the first time that the introduction of excess manganese to a charge when preparing nanometer-sized manganite powders exhibiting the colossal magnetoresistance effect leads to the formation of a single-phase material with the crystallite sizes 15-25 nm that are two time smaller than those in manganite powders produced without excess manganese.

  8. Fabrication of 10nm diameter carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Radenovic, Aleksandra; Trepagnier, Eliane; Csencsits, Roseann; Downing, Kenneth H; Liphardt, Jan

    2008-09-25

    The addition of carbon to samples, during imaging, presents a barrier to accurate TEM analysis, the controlled deposition of hydrocarbons by a focused electron beam can be a useful technique for local nanometer-scale sculpting of material. Here we use hydrocarbon deposition to form nanopores from larger focused ion beam (FIB) holes in silicon nitride membranes. Using this method, we close 100-200nm diameter holes to diameters of 10nm and below, with deposition rates of 0.6nm per minute. I-V characteristics of electrolytic flow through these nanopores agree quantitatively with a one dimensional model at all examined salt concentrations.

  9. Interferometry at the PTB Nanometer Comparator: design, status and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flügge, J.; Weichert, Ch.; Hu, H.; Köning, R.; Bosse, H.; Wiegmann, A.; Schulz, M.; Elster, C.; Geckeler, R. D.

    2008-10-01

    To minimize the measurement uncertainty of one dimensional length measurements on line scales, linear encoders and interferometers the PTB in cooperation with the Dr. Johannes Heidenhain GmbH had built up a new length comparator. The Nanometer Comparator [1,2] has already proven its performance during the measurements of incremental encoders and line scales with an expanded measurement uncertainty of below 5 nm [3,4,5]. Due to the introduction of double and multiple exposure in advanced lithography techniques the overlay and registration metrology requirements will drastically increase so that reference metrology tools need to be developed further to be able to follow the resulting decrease of the specifications. Therefore, the PTB further develops the new 1D vacuum comparator to add a measurement possibility for straightness and to reach a measurement accuracy in the sub nanometer range [6]. One key development will be the interferometric measurement of all six degrees of freedom of the measurement slide of the comparator. A new multi axis heterodyne interferometer electronics and optical interferometer designs minimizing nonlinearities by spatially separated beams are under development.

  10. Progress on glass ceramic ZERODUR enabling nanometer precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Nieder, Johannes; Weber, Peter; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The Semiconductor Industry is making continuous progress in shrinking feature size developing technologies and process to achieve < 10 nm feature size. The required Overlay specification for successful production is in the range one nanometer or even smaller. Consequently, materials designed into metrology systems of exposure or inspection tools need to fulfill ever tighter specification on the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). The glass ceramic ZERODUR® is a well-established material in critical components of microlithography wafer stepper and offered with an extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion, the tightest tolerance available on market. SCHOTT is continuously improving manufacturing processes and it's method to measure and characterize the CTE behavior of ZERODUR®. This paper is focusing on the "Advanced Dilatometer" for determination of the CTE developed at SCHOTT in the recent years and introduced into production in Q1 2015. The achievement for improving the absolute CTE measurement accuracy and the reproducibility are described in detail. Those achievements are compared to the CTE measurement accuracy reported by the Physikalische Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the National Metrology Institute of Germany. The CTE homogeneity is of highest importance to achieve nanometer precision on larger scales. Additionally, the paper presents data on the short scale CTE homogeneity and its improvement in the last two years. The data presented in this paper will explain the capability of ZERODUR® to enable the extreme precision required for future generation of lithography equipment and processes.

  11. Research of the Additional Losses Occurring in Optical Fiber at its Multiple Bends in the Range Waves 1310nm, 1550nm and 1625nm Long

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, A. V.; Gorlov, N. I.; Alkina, A. D.; Mekhtiev, A. D.; Kovtun, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Article is devoted to research of the additional losses occurring in the optical fiber at its multiple bends in the range waves of 1310 nanometers, 1550 nanometers and 1625 nanometers long. Article is directed on creation of the external factors methods which allow to estimate and eliminate negative influence. The automated way of calculation of losses at a bend is developed. Results of scientific researches are used by engineers of “Kazaktelekom” AS for practical definition of losses service conditions. For modeling the Wolfram|Alpha environment — the knowledge base and a set of computing algorithms was chosen. The greatest losses are noted on wavelength 1310nm and 1625nm. All dependences are nonlinear. Losses with each following excess are multiplicative.

  12. Atomistic Insight on the Charging Energetics in Sub-nanometer Pore Supercacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Rui; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Feng, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Electrodes featuring sub-nanometer pores can significantly enhance the capacitance and energy density of supercapacitors. However, ions must pay an energy penalty to enter sub-nanometer pores as they have to shed part of their solvation shell. The magnitude of such energy penalty plays a key role in determining the accessibility and charging/discharging of these sub-nanometer pores. Here we report on the atomistic simulation of Na+ and Cl ions entering a polarizable slit pore with a width of 0.82 nm. We show that the free energy penalty for these ions to enter the pore is less than 14 kJ/mol for both Na+ and Cl ions. The surprisingly small energy penalty is caused by the van der Waals attractions between ion and pore walls, the image charge effects, the moderate (19-26%) de-hydration of the ions inside the pore, and the strengthened interactions between ions and their hydration water molecules in the sub-nanometer pore. The results provide strong impetus for further developing nanoporous electrodes featuring sub- nanometer pores.

  13. Imaging high-speed friction at the nanometer scale

    PubMed Central

    Thorén, Per-Anders; de Wijn, Astrid S.; Borgani, Riccardo; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Friction is a complicated phenomenon involving nonlinear dynamics at different length and time scales. Understanding its microscopic origin requires methods for measuring force on nanometer-scale asperities sliding at velocities reaching centimetres per second. Despite enormous advances in experimental technique, this combination of small length scale and high velocity remain elusive. We present a technique for rapidly measuring the frictional forces on a single asperity over a velocity range from zero to several centimetres per second. At each image pixel we obtain the velocity dependence of both conservative and dissipative forces, revealing the transition from stick-slip to smooth sliding friction. We explain measurements on graphite using a modified Prandtl–Tomlinson model, including the damped elastic deformation of the asperity. With its improved force sensitivity and small sliding amplitude, our method enables rapid and detailed surface mapping of the velocity dependence of frictional forces with less than 10 nm spatial resolution. PMID:27958267

  14. Imaging high-speed friction at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Thorén, Per-Anders; de Wijn, Astrid S; Borgani, Riccardo; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B

    2016-12-13

    Friction is a complicated phenomenon involving nonlinear dynamics at different length and time scales. Understanding its microscopic origin requires methods for measuring force on nanometer-scale asperities sliding at velocities reaching centimetres per second. Despite enormous advances in experimental technique, this combination of small length scale and high velocity remain elusive. We present a technique for rapidly measuring the frictional forces on a single asperity over a velocity range from zero to several centimetres per second. At each image pixel we obtain the velocity dependence of both conservative and dissipative forces, revealing the transition from stick-slip to smooth sliding friction. We explain measurements on graphite using a modified Prandtl-Tomlinson model, including the damped elastic deformation of the asperity. With its improved force sensitivity and small sliding amplitude, our method enables rapid and detailed surface mapping of the velocity dependence of frictional forces with less than 10 nm spatial resolution.

  15. Imaging high-speed friction at the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorén, Per-Anders; de Wijn, Astrid S.; Borgani, Riccardo; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B.

    2016-12-01

    Friction is a complicated phenomenon involving nonlinear dynamics at different length and time scales. Understanding its microscopic origin requires methods for measuring force on nanometer-scale asperities sliding at velocities reaching centimetres per second. Despite enormous advances in experimental technique, this combination of small length scale and high velocity remain elusive. We present a technique for rapidly measuring the frictional forces on a single asperity over a velocity range from zero to several centimetres per second. At each image pixel we obtain the velocity dependence of both conservative and dissipative forces, revealing the transition from stick-slip to smooth sliding friction. We explain measurements on graphite using a modified Prandtl-Tomlinson model, including the damped elastic deformation of the asperity. With its improved force sensitivity and small sliding amplitude, our method enables rapid and detailed surface mapping of the velocity dependence of frictional forces with less than 10 nm spatial resolution.

  16. Absolute Measurements of Radiation Damage in Nanometer Thick Films

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    We address the problem of absolute measurements of radiation damage in films of nanometer thicknesses. Thin films of DNA (~ 2–160nm) are deposited onto glass substrates and irradiated with varying doses of 1.5 keV X-rays under dry N2 at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. For each different thickness, the damage is assessed by measuring the loss of the supercoiled configuration as a function of incident photon fluence. From the exposure curves, the G-values are deduced, assuming that X-ray photons interacting with DNA, deposit all of their energy in the film. The results show that the G-value (i.e., damage per unit of deposited energy) increases with film thickness and reaches a plateau at 30±5 nm. This thickness dependence provides a correction factor to estimate the actual G-value for films with thicknesses below 30nm thickness. Thus, the absolute values of damage can be compared with that of films of any thickness under different experimental conditions. PMID:22562941

  17. Optical coefficients of nanometer-thick copper and gold films in microwave frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorin, I.; Orlikovsky, N.; Rogozhin, A.; Tatarintsev, A.; Pronin, S.; Andreev, V.; Vdovin, V.

    2016-12-01

    Ultrathin (1-10 nm) Cu and Au films were prepared on the silicon and quartz substrates by magnetron sputtering at room temperature. We measured the transmission coefficient of the films at a wavelength of 3cm and analyzed a surface morphology of these films. It was shown that the films with thicknesses less than 7.5 nm (Au) and 3 nm (Cu) are almost transparent for microwaves. This effect is explained by quick oxidation of Cu and the complex surface morphology of nanometer thick films. The Au film morphology is evolved with increasing average Au thickness d from hemispherical islands initially (1.0 nmnm) to partially coalesced worm-like island structures (d=10 nm).

  18. Nanometer-scale fabrication of hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) films with post exposure baking.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kang, Se-Koo; Yeom, Geun-Young; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2013-03-01

    A nanometer-scale grating structure with a 60-nm-wide gap and 200-nm-wide ridge has been successfully demonstrated on a silicon-on-insulator substrate by using a 220-nm-thick hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) negative tone electron beam resist. A post exposure baking (PEB) process and hot development process with low concentration (3.5 wt%) of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution were introduced to realize the grating pattern. To study the effects of post exposure baking on the HSQ resist, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were carried out. From the FT-IR and XPS analyses, it was verified that a thin SiO2 with high cross-linked network structure was formed on the HSQ surface during the PEB step. This SiO2 layer prevents the formation of unwanted bonds on the HSQ surface, which results in clearly defined grating structures with a 60-nm-gap and 200-nm-wide-ridge on the 220-nm-thick HSQ resist. The nanometer-scale grating pattern was successfully transfered to the 280-nm-thick silicon layer of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate by using inductively-coupled-plasma-reactive-ion-etching (ICP-RIE).

  19. Nanometer-Scale Water-Soluble Macrocycles from Nanometer-Sized Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gothard, Chris M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the unnatural amino acids m-Abc2K and o-Abc2K as nanometersized building blocks for the creation of water-soluble macrocycles with well-defined shapes. m-Abc2K and o-Abc2K are homologues of the nanometer-sized amino acid Abc2K, which we recently introduced for the synthesis of water-soluble molecular rods of precise length. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 7272]. Abc2K is linear (180°), m-Abc2K creates a 120° angle, and o-Abc2K creates a 60° angle. m-Abc2K and o-Abc2K are derivatives of 3’-amino-[1,1’-biphenyl]-4-carboxylic acid and 2’-amino-[1,1’-biphenyl]-4-carboxylic acid, with two propyloxyammonium side chains for water solubility. m-Abc2K and o-Abc2K are prepared as Fmoc-protected derivatives Fmoc-m-Abc2K(Boc)-OH (1a) and Fmoc-o-Abc2K(Boc)-OH (1b). These derivatives can be used alone or in conjunction with Fmoc-Abc2K(Boc)-OH (1c) as ordinary amino acids in Fmoc-based solid-phase peptide synthesis. Building blocks 1a–c were used to synthesize macrocyclic “triangles” 9a–c, “parallelograms” 10a,b, and hexagonal “rings” 11a–d. The macrocycles range from a trimer to a dodecamer, with ring sizes from 24 to 114 atoms, and are 1–4 nm in size. Molecular modeling studies suggest that all the macrocycles except 10b should have well-defined triangle, parallelogram, and ring shapes if all of the amide linkages are trans and the ortho-alkoxy substituents are intramolecularly hydrogen bonded to the amide NH groups. The macrocycles have good water solubility and are readily characterized by standard analytical techniques, such as RP-HPLC, ESI-MS, and NMR spectroscopy. 1H and 13C NMR studies suggest that the macrocycles adopt conformations with all trans-amide linkages in CD3OD, that the “triangles” and “parallelograms” maintain these conformations in D2O, and that the “rings” collapse to form conformations with cis-amide linkages in D2O. PMID:20020731

  20. Biosafety of the application of biogenic nanometal powders in husbandry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatolievna Nazarova, Anna; Dmitrievna Polischuk, Svetlana; Anatolievna Stepanova, Irina; Ivanovich Churilov, Gennady; Chau Nguyen, Hoai; Buu Ngo, Quoc

    2014-03-01

    Effects of iron and copper nanopowders (particle size of 20-40 nm) were investigated on rabbits of 1 month age and heifers of 6 months. For introduction of nanometals into the animal's ration, the mixed fodder was treated with the nanometal powder suspension in such a way: 0.08 mg of nanoiron per kg of animal's body weight and 0.04 mg kg-1 for nanocopper. The weight gain of the heifers who received nanoiron and nanocopper after 8 months was 22.4 and 10.7% higher than that of the control, respectively. For the rabbits who received nano Fe and Cu after 3 months, the weight gain was 11.7 and 7.3% compared to the control, respectively. Under the action of metal nanopowders morphological indices of blood were changed in comparison with the control: after 8 months the quantity of erythrocytes increased by 19.6%, hemoglobin by 17.1% and leukocytes by 7.6%. There was a realignment in leukocytic formula: the quantity of lymphocytes increased by 9% compared to the control. Biogenic metals in superdispersive state were able to stimulate immune, enzymatic and humoral systems of the animal's organism, promoting metabolism. Adding Co and Cu metal nanopowders to the bull-calves’ fodder rations increased content of Ca by 31.8 and 0%, Fe by 38.8 and 37.5%, K by 19.2 and 15.3%, Mg by 17.6 and 23.5%, Mn by 9.8 and 45% and Na by 20.5 and 8.8%, respectively, compared to control. Metal nanopowders improved the quality indices and meat productivity of black-white bull-calves, expressed in intensive growth of muscle, tissue and more nutritious meat. The conducted veterinary-sanitary expertise showed that the supplements based on iron, cobalt and copper nanopowders can be used as safe bioactive supplements in animal husbandry.

  1. Nanometer displacement measurement using Fresnel diffraction.

    PubMed

    Khorshad, Ali Akbar; Hassani, Khosrow; Tavassoly, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-07-20

    We introduce a relatively simple and efficient optical technique to measure nanoscale displacement based on visibility variations of the Fresnel diffraction fringes from a two-dimensional phase step. In this paper we use our technique to measure electromechanical expansions by a thin piezoelectric ceramic and also thermal changes in the diameter of a tungsten wire. Early results provide convincing evidence that sensitivity up to a few nanometers can be achieved, and our technique has the potential to be used as a nanodisplacement probe.

  2. Fundamental science of nanometer-size clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcoxon, J.P.; Newcomer, P.P.; Samara, G.A.; Venturini, E.L.; Williamson, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This research has produced a variety of monodisperse, nanometer-size clusters (nanoclusters for short), characterized their size and crystal structure and developed a scientific understanding of the size dependence of their physical properties. Of specific interest were the influence of quantum electronic confinement on the optical properties, magnetic properties, and dielectric properties. These properties were chosen both for their potential practical impact on various applications identified in the National Critical Technologies list (e.g., catalysis, information storage, sensors, environmental remediation, ...) as well as for their importance to the fundamental science of clusters. An Executive Summary provides a description of the major highlights.

  3. Application of maximum-likelihood estimation in optical coherence tomography for nanometer-class thickness estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinxin; Yuan, Qun; Tankam, Patrice; Clarkson, Eric; Kupinski, Matthew; Hindman, Holly B.; Aquavella, James V.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2015-03-01

    In biophotonics imaging, one important and quantitative task is layer-thickness estimation. In this study, we investigate the approach of combining optical coherence tomography and a maximum-likelihood (ML) estimator for layer thickness estimation in the context of tear film imaging. The motivation of this study is to extend our understanding of tear film dynamics, which is the prerequisite to advance the management of Dry Eye Disease, through the simultaneous estimation of the thickness of the tear film lipid and aqueous layers. The estimator takes into account the different statistical processes associated with the imaging chain. We theoretically investigated the impact of key system parameters, such as the axial point spread functions (PSF) and various sources of noise on measurement uncertainty. Simulations show that an OCT system with a 1 μm axial PSF (FWHM) allows unbiased estimates down to nanometers with nanometer precision. In implementation, we built a customized Fourier domain OCT system that operates in the 600 to 1000 nm spectral window and achieves 0.93 micron axial PSF in corneal epithelium. We then validated the theoretical framework with physical phantoms made of custom optical coatings, with layer thicknesses from tens of nanometers to microns. Results demonstrate unbiased nanometer-class thickness estimates in three different physical phantoms.

  4. Decreased lung carcinoma cell density on select polymer nanometer surface features for lung replacement therapies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; Chun, Young Wook; Webster, Thomas J

    2010-05-13

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) has been widely used as a biomaterial in regenerative medicine because of its biocompatibility and biodegradability properties. Previous studies have shown that cells (such as bladder smooth muscle cells, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts) respond differently to nanostructured PLGA surfaces compared with nanosmooth surfaces. The purpose of the present in vitro research was to prepare PLGA films with various nanometer surface features and determine whether lung cancer epithelial cells respond differently to such topographies. To create nanosurface features on PLGA, different sized (190 nm, 300 nm, 400 nm, and 530 nm diameter) polystyrene beads were used to cast polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds which were used as templates to create nanofeatured PLGA films. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images and root mean square roughness (RMS) values indicated that the intended spherical surface nanotopographies on PLGA with RMS values of 2.23, 5.03, 5.42, and 36.90 nm were formed by employing 190, 300, 400, and 530 nm beads. A solution evaporation method was also utilized to modify PLGA surface features by using 8 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 0.62 nm) and 4 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 2.23 nm) PLGA in chloroform solutions. Most importantly, lung cancer epithelial cells adhered less on the PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 0.62, 2.23, and 5.42 nm after four hours of culture compared with any other PLGA surface created here. After three days, PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 0.62 nm had much lower cell density than any other sample. In this manner, PLGA with specific nanometer surface features may inhibit lung cancer cell density which may provide an important biomaterial for the treatment of lung cancer (from drug delivery to regenerative medicine).

  5. Sub-nanometer flattening of 45 cm long, 45 actuator x-ray deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Poyneer, Lisa A; McCarville, Thomas; Pardini, Tommaso; Palmer, David; Brooks, Audrey; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Macintosh, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    We have built a 45 cm long x-ray deformable mirror (XDM) of super-polished single-crystal silicon that has 45 actuators along the tangential axis. After assembly, the surface height error was 19 nm rms. With use of high-precision visible-light metrology and precise control algorithms, we have actuated the XDM and flattened its entire surface to 0.7 nm rms controllable figure error. This is, to our knowledge, the first sub-nanometer active flattening of a substrate longer than 15 cm.

  6. Application of nanometer material in ultraviolet prevention thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Aihong; Tang, Xuejiao

    2013-03-01

    To mankind, ultraviolet ray from the sun is harmful and beneficial. But, in daily life, a lot of occasions, we hope to block the ultraviolet ray. Some people studied the nanometer particles which can block Ultraviolet ray. In this paper, the protection performance of nanometer particles, prapared by sol-gel method, added into polypropylene sour to ultraviolet has been studied. In order to improve the ultraviolet blocking of the thin film, more than one kind of nanometer particles are added into the polypropylene sour, the protection performance of the thin film is strengthened. When the ratio of the volume of 2% nanometer Al2O3 sol to the volume of 3% nanometer Fe2O3 sol is 1:3, the shielding effect on the ultraviolet including UVC, UVB and UVA band is significant. When the ratio of the volume of 2% nanometer Al2O3 sol to the volume of 2% nanometer Y2O3 sol is 1:3, the shielding effect on the UVC is the best. When the ratio of the volume of 2% nanometer Al2O3 sol to the volume of 1% nanometer ZnO sol is 1:2, the shielding effect on the UVC is the best. When the ratio of the volume of 3% nanometer Fe2O3 sol to the volume of 1% nanometer ZnO sol is 1:1, the shielding effect on the UVC is the best. To UVB and UVA, the shielding effect of 3% nanometer Fe2O3 single component is the best.When the ratio of the volume of 3% nanometer Fe2O3 sol to the volume of 2% nanometer Y2O3 sol is 1:2, the shielding effect on the UVC is the best. To UVB and UVA, the shielding effect of 3% nanometer Fe2O3 single component is the best.When the ratio of the volume of 1% nanometer ZnO sol to the volume of 2% nanometer Y2O3 sol is 1:2, the shielding effect on the ultraviolet including UVC, UVB and UVA band is significant.

  7. Nanometer resolution optical coherence tomography using broad bandwidth XUV and soft x-ray radiation

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Silvio; Rödel, Christian; Blinne, Alexander; Zastrau, Ulf; Wünsche, Martin; Hilbert, Vinzenz; Glaser, Leif; Viefhaus, Jens; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul; Förster, Eckhart; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive technique for cross-sectional imaging. It is particularly advantageous for applications where conventional microscopy is not able to image deeper layers of samples in a reasonable time, e.g. in fast moving, deeper lying structures. However, at infrared and optical wavelengths, which are commonly used, the axial resolution of OCT is limited to about 1 μm, even if the bandwidth of the light covers a wide spectral range. Here, we present extreme ultraviolet coherence tomography (XCT) and thus introduce a new technique for non-invasive cross-sectional imaging of nanometer structures. XCT exploits the nanometerscale coherence lengths corresponding to the spectral transmission windows of, e.g., silicon samples. The axial resolution of coherence tomography is thus improved from micrometers to a few nanometers. Tomographic imaging with an axial resolution better than 18 nm is demonstrated for layer-type nanostructures buried in a silicon substrate. Using wavelengths in the water transmission window, nanometer-scale layers of platinum are retrieved with a resolution better than 8 nm. XCT as a nondestructive method for sub-surface tomographic imaging holds promise for several applications in semiconductor metrology and imaging in the water window. PMID:26860894

  8. Nanometer resolution optical coherence tomography using broad bandwidth XUV and soft x-ray radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Fuchs, Silvio; Rödel, Christian; Blinne, Alexander; ...

    2016-02-10

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive technique for cross-sectional imaging. It is particularly advantageous for applications where conventional microscopy is not able to image deeper layers of samples in a reasonable time, e.g. in fast moving, deeper lying structures. However, at infrared and optical wavelengths, which are commonly used, the axial resolution of OCT is limited to about 1 μm, even if the bandwidth of the light covers a wide spectral range. Here, we present extreme ultraviolet coherence tomography (XCT) and thus introduce a new technique for non-invasive cross-sectional imaging of nanometer structures. XCT exploits the nanometerscale coherence lengthsmore » corresponding to the spectral transmission windows of, e.g., silicon samples. The axial resolution of coherence tomography is thus improved from micrometers to a few nanometers. Tomographic imaging with an axial resolution better than 18 nm is demonstrated for layer-type nanostructures buried in a silicon substrate. Using wavelengths in the water transmission window, nanometer-scale layers of platinum are retrieved with a resolution better than 8 nm. As a result, XCT as a nondestructive method for sub-surface tomographic imaging holds promise for several applications in semiconductor metrology and imaging in the water window.« less

  9. Nanometer resolution optical coherence tomography using broad bandwidth XUV and soft x-ray radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Silvio; Rödel, Christian; Blinne, Alexander; Zastrau, Ulf; Wünsche, Martin; Hilbert, Vinzenz; Glaser, Leif; Viefhaus, Jens; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul; Förster, Eckhart; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2016-02-10

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive technique for cross-sectional imaging. It is particularly advantageous for applications where conventional microscopy is not able to image deeper layers of samples in a reasonable time, e.g. in fast moving, deeper lying structures. However, at infrared and optical wavelengths, which are commonly used, the axial resolution of OCT is limited to about 1 μm, even if the bandwidth of the light covers a wide spectral range. Here, we present extreme ultraviolet coherence tomography (XCT) and thus introduce a new technique for non-invasive cross-sectional imaging of nanometer structures. XCT exploits the nanometerscale coherence lengths corresponding to the spectral transmission windows of, e.g., silicon samples. The axial resolution of coherence tomography is thus improved from micrometers to a few nanometers. Tomographic imaging with an axial resolution better than 18 nm is demonstrated for layer-type nanostructures buried in a silicon substrate. Using wavelengths in the water transmission window, nanometer-scale layers of platinum are retrieved with a resolution better than 8 nm. As a result, XCT as a nondestructive method for sub-surface tomographic imaging holds promise for several applications in semiconductor metrology and imaging in the water window.

  10. Nanometer resolution optical coherence tomography using broad bandwidth XUV and soft x-ray radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Silvio; Rödel, Christian; Blinne, Alexander; Zastrau, Ulf; Wünsche, Martin; Hilbert, Vinzenz; Glaser, Leif; Viefhaus, Jens; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul; Förster, Eckhart; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive technique for cross-sectional imaging. It is particularly advantageous for applications where conventional microscopy is not able to image deeper layers of samples in a reasonable time, e.g. in fast moving, deeper lying structures. However, at infrared and optical wavelengths, which are commonly used, the axial resolution of OCT is limited to about 1 μm, even if the bandwidth of the light covers a wide spectral range. Here, we present extreme ultraviolet coherence tomography (XCT) and thus introduce a new technique for non-invasive cross-sectional imaging of nanometer structures. XCT exploits the nanometerscale coherence lengths corresponding to the spectral transmission windows of, e.g., silicon samples. The axial resolution of coherence tomography is thus improved from micrometers to a few nanometers. Tomographic imaging with an axial resolution better than 18 nm is demonstrated for layer-type nanostructures buried in a silicon substrate. Using wavelengths in the water transmission window, nanometer-scale layers of platinum are retrieved with a resolution better than 8 nm. XCT as a nondestructive method for sub-surface tomographic imaging holds promise for several applications in semiconductor metrology and imaging in the water window.

  11. Nanometer resolution optical coherence tomography using broad bandwidth XUV and soft x-ray radiation.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Silvio; Rödel, Christian; Blinne, Alexander; Zastrau, Ulf; Wünsche, Martin; Hilbert, Vinzenz; Glaser, Leif; Viefhaus, Jens; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul; Förster, Eckhart; Paulus, Gerhard G

    2016-02-10

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive technique for cross-sectional imaging. It is particularly advantageous for applications where conventional microscopy is not able to image deeper layers of samples in a reasonable time, e.g. in fast moving, deeper lying structures. However, at infrared and optical wavelengths, which are commonly used, the axial resolution of OCT is limited to about 1 μm, even if the bandwidth of the light covers a wide spectral range. Here, we present extreme ultraviolet coherence tomography (XCT) and thus introduce a new technique for non-invasive cross-sectional imaging of nanometer structures. XCT exploits the nanometerscale coherence lengths corresponding to the spectral transmission windows of, e.g., silicon samples. The axial resolution of coherence tomography is thus improved from micrometers to a few nanometers. Tomographic imaging with an axial resolution better than 18 nm is demonstrated for layer-type nanostructures buried in a silicon substrate. Using wavelengths in the water transmission window, nanometer-scale layers of platinum are retrieved with a resolution better than 8 nm. XCT as a nondestructive method for sub-surface tomographic imaging holds promise for several applications in semiconductor metrology and imaging in the water window.

  12. A differential Michelson interferometer with orthogonal single frequency laser for nanometer displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Wang, Bin

    2017-04-01

    A novel differential Michelson laser interferometer is proposed to eliminate the influence of environmental fluctuations for nanometer displacement measurement. This differential interferometer consists of two homodyne interferometers in which two orthogonal single frequency beams share common reference arm and partial measurement arm. By modulating the displacement of the common reference arm with a piezoelectric transducer, the common-mode displacement drift resulting from the environmental disturbances can be well suppressed and the measured displacement as differential-mode displacement signal is achieved. In addition, a phase difference compensation method is proposed for accurately determining the phase difference between interference signals by correcting the time interval according to the average speed in one cycle of interference signal. The nanometer displacement measurement experiments were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed interferometer and show that precision displacement measurement with standard deviation less than 1 nm has been achieved.

  13. Towards nanometer-spaced silicon contacts to proteins.

    PubMed

    Schukfeh, Muhammed I; Sepunaru, Lior; Behr, Pascal; Li, Wenjie; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David; Tornow, Marc

    2016-03-18

    A vertical nanogap device (VND) structure comprising all-silicon contacts as electrodes for the investigation of electronic transport processes in bioelectronic systems is reported. Devices were fabricated from silicon-on-insulator substrates whose buried oxide (SiO2) layer of a few nanometers in thickness is embedded within two highly doped single crystalline silicon layers. Individual VNDs were fabricated by standard photolithography and a combination of anisotropic and selective wet etching techniques, resulting in p(+) silicon contacts, vertically separated by 4 or 8 nm, depending on the chosen buried oxide thickness. The buried oxide was selectively recess-etched with buffered hydrofluoric acid, exposing a nanogap. For verification of the devices' electrical functionality, gold nanoparticles were successfully trapped onto the nanogap electrodes' edges using AC dielectrophoresis. Subsequently, the suitability of the VND structures for transport measurements on proteins was investigated by functionalizing the devices with cytochrome c protein from solution, thereby providing non-destructive, permanent semiconducting contacts to the proteins. Current-voltage measurements performed after protein deposition exhibited an increase in the junctions' conductance of up to several orders of magnitude relative to that measured prior to cytochrome c immobilization. This increase in conductance was lost upon heating the functionalized device to above the protein's denaturation temperature (80 °C). Thus, the VND junctions allow conductance measurements which reflect the averaged electronic transport through a large number of protein molecules, contacted in parallel with permanent contacts and, for the first time, in a symmetrical Si-protein-Si configuration.

  14. Sub-nanometer glass surface dynamics induced by illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-06-21

    Illumination is known to induce stress and morphology changes in opaque glasses. Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) has a smaller bandgap than the crystal. Thus, we were able to excite with 532 nm light a 1 μm amorphous surface layer on a SiC crystal while recording time-lapse movies of glass surface dynamics by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Photoexcitation of the a-SiC surface layer through the transparent crystal avoids heating the STM tip. Up to 6 × 10{sup 4} s, long movies of surface dynamics with 40 s time resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution were obtained. Clusters of ca. 3-5 glass forming units diameter are seen to cooperatively hop between two states at the surface. Photoexcitation with green laser light recruits immobile clusters to hop, rather than increasing the rate at which already mobile clusters hop. No significant laser heating was observed. Thus, we favor an athermal mechanism whereby electronic excitation of a-SiC directly controls glassy surface dynamics. This mechanism is supported by an exciton migration-relaxation-thermal diffusion model. Individual clusters take ∼1 h to populate states differently after the light intensity has changed. We believe the surrounding matrix rearranges slowly when it is stressed by a change in laser intensity, and clusters serve as a diagnostic. Such cluster hopping and matrix rearrangement could underlie the microscopic mechanism of photoinduced aging of opaque glasses.

  15. Flow and evaporation in single micrometer and nanometer scale pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, A. E.; Yang, C.; Siwy, Z. S.; Taborek, P.; Toimil-Molares, M. E.

    2014-07-21

    We report measurements of pressure driven flow of fluids entering vacuum through a single pipe of micrometer or nanometer scale diameter. Nanopores were fabricated by etching a single ion track in polymer or mica foils. A calibrated mass spectrometer was used to measure the flow rates of nitrogen and helium through pipes with diameter ranging from 10 μm to 31 nm. The flow of gaseous and liquid nitrogen was studied near 77 K, while the flow of helium was studied from the lambda point (2.18 K) to above the critical point (5.2 K). Flow rates were controlled by changing the pressure drop across the pipe in the range 0–31 atm. When the pressure in the pipe reached the saturated vapor pressure, an abrupt flow transition was observed. A simple viscous flow model is used to determine the position of the liquid/vapor interface in the pipe. The observed mass flow rates are consistent with no slip boundary conditions.

  16. Structural peculiarities of single crystal diamond needles of nanometer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orekhov, Andrey S.; Tuyakova, Feruza T.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Loginov, Artem B.; Chuvilin, Andrey L.; Obraztsov, Alexander N.

    2016-11-01

    Diamond is attractive for various applications due to its unique mechanical and optical properties. In particular, single crystal diamond needles with high aspect ratios and sharp apexes of nanometer size are demanded for different types of optical sensors including optically sensing tip probes for scanning microscopy. This paper reports on electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy characterization of the diamond needles having geometrically perfect pyramidal shapes with rectangular atomically flat bases with (001) crystallography orientation, 2-200 nm sharp apexes, and with lengths from about 10-160 μm. The needles were produced by selective oxidation of (001) textured polycrystalline diamond films grown by chemical vapor deposition. Here we study the types and distribution of defects inside and on the surface of the single crystal diamond needles. We show that sp3 type point defects are incorporated into the volume of the diamond crystal during growth, while the surface of the lateral facets is enriched by multiple extended defects. Nitrogen addition to the reaction mixture results in increase of the growth rate on {001} facets correlated with the rise in the concentration of sp3 type defects.

  17. The use of nanometer tetrabasic lead sulfate as positive active material additive for valve regulated lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Xiaoshi; Wang, Dianlong; Hu, Chiyu; Tang, Shenzhi; Zhu, Junsheng; Guo, Chenfeng

    2014-12-01

    Conventional tetrabasic lead sulfate used as positive active material additive shows the results of the low effective lead dioxide conversion rate due to the large grain size and crossed the crystal structure. In this paper, we study on a type of nanometer tetrabasic lead sulfate. Through the XRD and SEM test and Material Studio software calculation, the purity of tetrabasic lead sulfate is very high, the grain size of the nanometer 4BS is almost unanimous, and can be controlled below 200 nm. When charged and discharged in 1.75 V-2.42 V with the current density of 40 mA g-1, 80 mA g-1 and 160 mA g-1, the effective lead dioxide conversion rate of nanometer 4BS after formation can achieve to 83.48%, 71.42%, and 66.96%. Subsequently, the nanometer 4BS as additive is added to positive paste of lead-acid battery. When the batteries are tested galvanostatically between 1.75 V and 2.42 V at 0.25 C charge and 0.5 C discharge rates at room temperature. The ratio of adding nanometer 4BS is 0%, 1% and 4% and the initial discharge specific capacities are 60 mAh g-1, 65 mAh g-1 and 68 mAh g-1. After 80 cycles, the initial discharge capacity of positive active material with 1% nanometer 4BS decreased less than 10%, while adding 4% nanometer 4BS, the initial discharge capacity doesn't decrease obviously.

  18. Nanometer size field effect transistors for terahertz detectors.

    PubMed

    Knap, W; Rumyantsev, S; Vitiello, M S; Coquillat, D; Blin, S; Dyakonova, N; Shur, M; Teppe, F; Tredicucci, A; Nagatsuma, T

    2013-05-31

    Nanometer size field effect transistors can operate as efficient resonant or broadband terahertz detectors, mixers, phase shifters and frequency multipliers at frequencies far beyond their fundamental cut-off frequency. This work is an overview of some recent results concerning the application of nanometer scale field effect transistors for the detection of terahertz radiation.

  19. Thermoelectric device with multiple, nanometer scale, elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Borshchevsky, Alexander (Inventor); Herman, Jennifer (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A thermoelectric device formed of nanowires on the nm scale. The nanowires are preferably of a size that causes quantum confinement effects within the wires. The wires are connected together into a bundle to increase the power density.

  20. Helium Ion Imaging and Milling at the Nanometer Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Bin

    2009-03-01

    The helium ion microscope (HeIM) is a new, powerful instrument for nano-metrology and nanotechnology. As an emerging imaging and measurement tool it offers several advantages over the traditional scanning electron microscope (SEM) currently in use in research and manufacturing facilities across the world. First, resolution 2 to 4 times better than that from comparable SEMs is theoretically possible, due to the very high source brightness and the short wavelength of the helium ions. Ion images with unprecedented resolution have been routinely collected on a wide range of samples with sub-nanometer features. More importantly, the interaction volume of the helium ion beam in the sample is substantially different in its size and shape from that of the electron beam in an SEM. As a consequence, the signals generated, especially secondary electrons, reveal more surface details. Imaging by the HeIM can further benefit from the superb depth of field and the fact that He ion imaging is less susceptible to sample charging. In addition, it is possible to compensate for charging by the use of an electron flood gun. Scattered He ions produced as a result of Rutherford scattering of the incident ions on the target nuclei can provide material contrast information that can be used for quantitative compositional analysis. Beyond imaging, the HeIM is a potent tool for milling and modifying surface structures at the nanometer scale, due to the relatively low mass of the helium ion, the narrow ion beam, and especially the low beam currents. It is possible to drill close to 10 nm diameter holes and mill other nanoscale structures that cannot be fabricated with any other method. It is expected that, as with the electron beam, it is feasible to expose resist and deposit various materials with He ion beam irradiation. The work is at its exploratory stage, and likely soon will yield more exciting results. This presentation will report on some of the newest research work on the NIST helium

  1. Optical spectroscopy of sputtered nanometer-thick yttrium iron garnet films

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubisova-Liskova, Eva Visnovsky, Stefan; Chang, Houchen; Wu, Mingzhong

    2015-05-07

    Nanometer (nm)-thick yttrium iron garnet (Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, YIG) films present interest for spintronics. This work employs spectral ellipsometry and magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) spectra to characterize nm-thick YIG films grown on single-crystal Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} substrates by magnetron sputtering. The thickness (t) of the films ranges between 10 nm and 40 nm. Independent on t, the polar MOKE hysteresis loops saturate in the field of about 1.8 kOe, consistent with the saturation magnetization in bulk YIG (4πM{sub s} ≈ 1.75 kG). The MOKE spectrum measured at photon energies between 1.3 eV and 4.5 eV on the 38-nm-thick film agrees with that measured on single-crystal YIG bulk materials. The MOKE spectrum of the 12-nm-thick film still preserves the structure of the bulk YIG but its amplitude at lower photon energies is modified due to the fact that the radiation penetration depth exceeds 20 nm. The t dependence of the MOKE amplitude is consistent with MOKE calculations. The results indicate that the films are stoichiometric, strain free, without Fe{sup 2+}, and preserve bulk YIG properties down to t ≈ 10 nm.

  2. A current-driven nanometer water pump.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiaye; Yang, Keda

    2016-03-04

    The design of a water pump, which has huge potential for applications in nanotechnology and daily life, is the dream of many scientists. In this paper, we successfully design a nanometer water pump by using molecular dynamics simulations. Ions of either sodium or chlorine in a narrow channel will generate electric current under electric fields, which then drives the water through a wider channel, similar to recent experimental setups. Considerable water flux is achieved within small field strengths that are accessible by experimentation. Of particular interest, is that for sodium the water flux increases almost linearly with field strengths; while for chlorine there exists a critical field strength, the water flux exhibits a plateau before the critical value and increases linearly after it. This result follows the behavior of ion velocity, which is related to friction behavior. We also estimate the power and energy consumption for such a pump, and compare it to the macroscopic mechanical pumps. A further comparison suggests that different ions will have different pumping abilities. This study not only provides new, significant results with possible connection to existing research, but has tremendous potential application in the design of nanofluidic devices.

  3. A current-driven nanometer water pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jiaye; Yang, Keda

    2016-03-01

    The design of a water pump, which has huge potential for applications in nanotechnology and daily life, is the dream of many scientists. In this paper, we successfully design a nanometer water pump by using molecular dynamics simulations. Ions of either sodium or chlorine in a narrow channel will generate electric current under electric fields, which then drives the water through a wider channel, similar to recent experimental setups. Considerable water flux is achieved within small field strengths that are accessible by experimentation. Of particular interest, is that for sodium the water flux increases almost linearly with field strengths; while for chlorine there exists a critical field strength, the water flux exhibits a plateau before the critical value and increases linearly after it. This result follows the behavior of ion velocity, which is related to friction behavior. We also estimate the power and energy consumption for such a pump, and compare it to the macroscopic mechanical pumps. A further comparison suggests that different ions will have different pumping abilities. This study not only provides new, significant results with possible connection to existing research, but has tremendous potential application in the design of nanofluidic devices.

  4. Study of nanometer-thick graphite film for high-power EUVL pellicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mun Ja; Jeon, Hwan Chul; Chalykh, Roman; Kim, Eokbong; Na, Jihoon; Kim, Byung-Gook; Kim, Heebom; Jeon, Chanuk; Kim, Seul-Gi; Shin, Dong-Wook; Kim, Taesung; Kim, Sooyoung; Lee, Jung Hun; Yoo, Ji-Beom

    2016-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography has received much attention in the semiconductor industry as a promising candidate to extend dimensional scaling beyond 10nm. Recently EUV pellicle introduction is required to improve particle level inside scanner for EUV mass production. We demonstrate that a new pellicle material, nanometer-thick graphite film (NGF), is one of the best candidates of EUV pellicle membrane. A NGF pellicle with excellent thermal (ɛ≥0.4 @R.T, <100nm), mechanical (415MPa @~100nm), chemical and optical (24hrs durability under exposure of EUV/H2 at 4W/cm2 with pH2~5Pa) properties can be a promising and superb candidate for EUV pellicle membrane compared to Si pellicles with capping layers.

  5. Shape Reconstruction Based on a New Blurring Model at the Micro/Nanometer Scale

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yangjie; Wu, Chengdong; Wang, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Real-time observation of three-dimensional (3D) information has great significance in nanotechnology. However, normal nanometer scale observation techniques, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning probe microscopy (SPM), have some problems to obtain 3D information because they lack non-destructive, intuitive, and fast imaging ability under normal conditions, and optical methods have not widely used in micro/nanometer shape reconstruction due to the practical requirements and the imaging limitations in micro/nano manipulation. In this paper, a high resolution shape reconstruction method based on a new optical blurring model is proposed. Firstly, the heat diffusion physics equation is analyzed and the optical diffraction model is modified to directly explain the basic principles of image blurring resulting from depth variation. Secondly, a blurring imaging model is proposed based on curve fitting of a 4th order polynomial curve. The heat diffusion equations combined with the blurring imaging are introduced, and their solution is transformed into a dynamic optimization problem. Finally, the experiments with a standard nanogrid, an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and a microlens have been conducted. The experiments prove that the proposed method can reconstruct 3D shapes at the micro/nanometer scale, and the minimal reconstruction error is 3 nm. PMID:26927129

  6. Large area Germanium Tin nanometer optical film coatings on highly flexible aluminum substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lichuan; Zhang, Dainan; Zhang, Huaiwu; Fang, Jue; Liao, Yulong; Zhou, Tingchuan; Liu, Cheng; Zhong, Zhiyong; Harris, Vincent G.

    2016-01-01

    Germanium Tin (GeSn) films have drawn great interest for their visible and near-infrared optoelectronics properties. Here, we demonstrate large area Germanium Tin nanometer thin films grown on highly flexible aluminum foil substrates using low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Ultra-thin (10–180 nm) GeSn film-coated aluminum foils display a wide color spectra with an absorption wavelength ranging from 400–1800 nm due to its strong optical interference effect. The light absorption ratio for nanometer GeSn/Al foil heterostructures can be enhanced up to 85%. Moreover, the structure exhibits excellent mechanical flexibility and can be cut or bent into many shapes, which facilitates a wide range of flexible photonics. Micro-Raman studies reveal a large tensile strain change with GeSn thickness, which arises from lattice deformations. In particular, nano-sized Sn-enriched GeSn dots appeared in the GeSn coatings that had a thickness greater than 50 nm, which induced an additional light absorption depression around 13.89 μm wavelength. These findings are promising for practical flexible photovoltaic and photodetector applications ranging from the visible to near-infrared wavelengths. PMID:27667259

  7. Large area Germanium Tin nanometer optical film coatings on highly flexible aluminum substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lichuan; Zhang, Dainan; Zhang, Huaiwu; Fang, Jue; Liao, Yulong; Zhou, Tingchuan; Liu, Cheng; Zhong, Zhiyong; Harris, Vincent G.

    2016-09-01

    Germanium Tin (GeSn) films have drawn great interest for their visible and near-infrared optoelectronics properties. Here, we demonstrate large area Germanium Tin nanometer thin films grown on highly flexible aluminum foil substrates using low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Ultra-thin (10–180 nm) GeSn film-coated aluminum foils display a wide color spectra with an absorption wavelength ranging from 400–1800 nm due to its strong optical interference effect. The light absorption ratio for nanometer GeSn/Al foil heterostructures can be enhanced up to 85%. Moreover, the structure exhibits excellent mechanical flexibility and can be cut or bent into many shapes, which facilitates a wide range of flexible photonics. Micro-Raman studies reveal a large tensile strain change with GeSn thickness, which arises from lattice deformations. In particular, nano-sized Sn-enriched GeSn dots appeared in the GeSn coatings that had a thickness greater than 50 nm, which induced an additional light absorption depression around 13.89 μm wavelength. These findings are promising for practical flexible photovoltaic and photodetector applications ranging from the visible to near-infrared wavelengths.

  8. Large area Germanium Tin nanometer optical film coatings on highly flexible aluminum substrates.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lichuan; Zhang, Dainan; Zhang, Huaiwu; Fang, Jue; Liao, Yulong; Zhou, Tingchuan; Liu, Cheng; Zhong, Zhiyong; Harris, Vincent G

    2016-09-26

    Germanium Tin (GeSn) films have drawn great interest for their visible and near-infrared optoelectronics properties. Here, we demonstrate large area Germanium Tin nanometer thin films grown on highly flexible aluminum foil substrates using low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Ultra-thin (10-180 nm) GeSn film-coated aluminum foils display a wide color spectra with an absorption wavelength ranging from 400-1800 nm due to its strong optical interference effect. The light absorption ratio for nanometer GeSn/Al foil heterostructures can be enhanced up to 85%. Moreover, the structure exhibits excellent mechanical flexibility and can be cut or bent into many shapes, which facilitates a wide range of flexible photonics. Micro-Raman studies reveal a large tensile strain change with GeSn thickness, which arises from lattice deformations. In particular, nano-sized Sn-enriched GeSn dots appeared in the GeSn coatings that had a thickness greater than 50 nm, which induced an additional light absorption depression around 13.89 μm wavelength. These findings are promising for practical flexible photovoltaic and photodetector applications ranging from the visible to near-infrared wavelengths.

  9. Resistive switching in a few nanometers thick tantalum oxide film formed by a metal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, Takeo; Samukawa, Seiji

    2015-04-27

    Resistive switching in a Cu/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Pt structure that consisted of a few nanometer-thick Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} film was demonstrated. The Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} film with thicknesses of 2–5 nm was formed with a combination of Ta metal film deposition and neutral oxygen particle irradiation at room temperature. The device exhibited a bipolar resistive switching with a threshold voltage of 0.2 V and multilevel switching operation.

  10. Formation of nanometer-size wires using infiltration into latent nuclear tracks

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.; Felter, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    Nanometer-size wires having a cross-sectional dimension of less than 8 nm with controllable lengths and diameters are produced by infiltrating latent nuclear or ion tracks formed in trackable materials with atomic species. The trackable materials and atomic species are essentially insoluble in each other, thus the wires are formed by thermally driven, self-assembly of the atomic species during annealing, or re-crystallization, of the damage in the latent tracks. Unlike conventional ion track lithography, the inventive method does not require etching of the latent tracks.

  11. Structure and magnetic properties of Co-P films of nanometer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chzhan, A. V.; Patrin, G. S.; Kiparisov, S. Ya.; Seredkin, V. A.; Pal'Chik, M. G.

    2010-06-01

    The main features of the formation of chemically deposited thin polycrystalline Co-P films of nanometer thickness have been determined experimentally. Changes in the surface structure of films with different thicknesses have been determined using an atomic force microscope. It has been established that at thicknesses smaller than 10 nm the films represent a set of weakly connected nuclei of crystallites with random orientations of easy axes. The subsequent increase in the thickness of films leads to the formation of a uniform polycrystalline layer. Estimates are given, which make it possible to determine the magnetic state of crystallites for the case of their weak magnetic interaction.

  12. Surface Structure of Nanometer-Sized Zinc Ferrite Particles by the Anomalous X-ray Scattering (AXS) Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Eiichiro; Okuda, Kaneharu; Waseda, Yoshio; Saito, Toshihiko

    1992-10-01

    The atomic structure of nanometer-sized zinc ferrite particles has been studied with the anomalous x-ray scattering (AXS) method as well as the ordinary x-ray diffraction. The analysis of the peak broadening indicated that little microstrain exists in these nanometer-sized particles, and the average size of the particles is estimated to be 4 nm. Since the ratio of atoms located on the surface increases extremely in such fine particles, the contribution of these surface atoms to the x-ray scattering intensity was evaluated. The interference function Qi (Q) for the surface atoms appears to be similar to that of the zinc-ferrite glass. The experimental intensity is successfully explained by using a simple particle model consisting of the about 0.2 nm thick surface layer having a glass-like structure and the internal atoms having the ferrite crystalline structure.

  13. Towards nanometer-spaced silicon contacts to proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schukfeh, Muhammed I.; Sepunaru, Lior; Behr, Pascal; Li, Wenjie; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David; Tornow, Marc

    2016-03-01

    A vertical nanogap device (VND) structure comprising all-silicon contacts as electrodes for the investigation of electronic transport processes in bioelectronic systems is reported. Devices were fabricated from silicon-on-insulator substrates whose buried oxide (SiO2) layer of a few nanometers in thickness is embedded within two highly doped single crystalline silicon layers. Individual VNDs were fabricated by standard photolithography and a combination of anisotropic and selective wet etching techniques, resulting in p+ silicon contacts, vertically separated by 4 or 8 nm, depending on the chosen buried oxide thickness. The buried oxide was selectively recess-etched with buffered hydrofluoric acid, exposing a nanogap. For verification of the devices’ electrical functionality, gold nanoparticles were successfully trapped onto the nanogap electrodes’ edges using AC dielectrophoresis. Subsequently, the suitability of the VND structures for transport measurements on proteins was investigated by functionalizing the devices with cytochrome c protein from solution, thereby providing non-destructive, permanent semiconducting contacts to the proteins. Current-voltage measurements performed after protein deposition exhibited an increase in the junctions’ conductance of up to several orders of magnitude relative to that measured prior to cytochrome c immobilization. This increase in conductance was lost upon heating the functionalized device to above the protein’s denaturation temperature (80 °C). Thus, the VND junctions allow conductance measurements which reflect the averaged electronic transport through a large number of protein molecules, contacted in parallel with permanent contacts and, for the first time, in a symmetrical Si-protein-Si configuration.

  14. Cell biology of the future: Nanometer-scale cellular cartography.

    PubMed

    Taraska, Justin W

    2015-10-26

    Understanding cellular structure is key to understanding cellular regulation. New developments in super-resolution fluorescence imaging, electron microscopy, and quantitative image analysis methods are now providing some of the first three-dimensional dynamic maps of biomolecules at the nanometer scale. These new maps--comprehensive nanometer-scale cellular cartographies--will reveal how the molecular organization of cells influences their diverse and changeable activities.

  15. Contact angle hysteresis at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Delmas, Mathieu; Monthioux, Marc; Ondarçuhu, Thierry

    2011-04-01

    Using atomic force microscopy with nonconventional carbon tips, the pinning of a liquid contact line on individual nanometric defects was studied. This mechanism is responsible for the occurrence of the contact angle hysteresis. The presence of weak defects which do not contribute to the hysteresis is evidenced for the first time. The dissipated energy associated with strong defects is also measured down to values in the range of kT, which correspond to defect sizes in the order of 1 nm.

  16. Nanometer Scale Morphology of Bacteriogenic Mn Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, M.; Obraztsova, A.; Tebo, B. M.; Bargar, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    Manganese oxides, which are ubiquitous in surface waters, soils, and sediments, are believed to result from the bacterially catalyzed oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(IV). Bacteriogenic Mn oxides exhibit high surface areas and degrade or oxidize a variety of organic and inorganic compounds. Via these reactions, Mn oxides influence the biogeochemical cycling of micronutrients and help to control the composition of natural waters. Recent EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and WAXS (wide angle X-ray scattering) investigations of bacteriogenic Mn oxides indirectly suggest that particles are as small as 10 or 20 nm , . However, no detailed systematic quantitative measurements of bacteriogenic Mn oxide particle sizes and morphology have been reported. We have characterized manganese oxides produced by the marine sporeforming bacterium Bacillus sp., strain SG-1 using SAXS (small angle X-ray scattering) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy). TEM measurements indicate that the particles are layered structures having basal-plane widths of several hundred nm. WAXS measurements indicate that particles are extremely thin, ~1nm thick, which corresponds to a single Mn oxide layer. The particles appear to have particularly high aspect ratios, with the majority of all structural MnO6 octahedral units exposed to solution. Furthermore, it follows that basal plane sites are the overwhelmingly dominant surface binding sites. Particles with such small dimensions often have properties that are intermediate between those of molecular clusters and bulk materials. Therefore, the reactivity of natural manganese oxides is expected to differ substantially from that of synthetic crystalline analogs.

  17. The Coronal Magnetic Field, Signatures of Coronal Holes and Silicon Nanometer Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbal, S. R.; Arndt, M. B.; Nayfeh, M.; Arnaud, J.; Woo, R.

    2003-12-01

    The near-infrared part of the solar spectrum is where some of the strongest coronal forbidden lines are formed. Polarized emission in these lines offers the only tool currently known for the inference of the direction of the coronal magnetic field. The first successful observations of the polarized emission from the 1074.7 nm Fe XIII line were made by Eddy, Lee and Emerson during the eclipse of 1966 in a limited region of the corona. The only subsequent polarimetric observations in this line were carried out with the coronagraph at Sac Peak from 1977-1980. We report on the first successful polarimetric measurements of the 1074.7 nm line in a field of view extending out to 3.5 solar radii which were made during the total solar eclipse of 21 June 2001. In addition to confirming earlier results of the predominance of a radial direction of the coronal magnetic field, these measurements yielded the first polarimetric signature of coronal holes, and the signature of nanometer size dust grains in the corona. These observations suggest the existence of a rich coronal spectrum of narrow lines in the near-infared produced by the fluorescence of silicon nanometer dust grains in the inner corona. This work was funded by NSF grant ATM-0003661 and NASA grant NAG5-10873 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  18. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (<5 mm) synthetic vascular graft materials exhibit poor long-term patency due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Tissue engineered solutions have yielded functional vascular tissue, but some require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  19. Ultra-high vacuum scanning thermal microscopy for nanometer resolution quantitative thermometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeongtae; Jeong, Wonho; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2012-05-22

    Understanding energy dissipation at the nanoscale requires the ability to probe temperature fields with nanometer resolution. Here, we describe an ultra-high vacuum (UHV)-based scanning thermal microscope (SThM) technique that is capable of quantitatively mapping temperature fields with ∼15 mK temperature resolution and ∼10 nm spatial resolution. In this technique, a custom fabricated atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever, with a nanoscale Au-Cr thermocouple integrated into the tip of the probe, is used to measure temperature fields of surfaces. Operation in an UHV environment eliminates parasitic heat transport between the tip and the sample enabling quantitative measurement of temperature fields on metal and dielectric surfaces with nanoscale resolution. We demonstrate the capabilities of this technique by directly imaging thermal fields in the vicinity of a 200 nm wide, self-heated, Pt line. Our measurements are in excellent agreement with computational results-unambiguously demonstrating the quantitative capabilities of the technique. UHV-SThM techniques will play an important role in the study of energy dissipation in nanometer-sized electronic and photonic devices and the study of phonon and electron transport at the nanoscale.

  20. Optical field enhancement of nanometer-sized gaps at near-infrared frequencies.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae Sung; Kang, Taehee; Singh, Dilip K; Bahk, Young-Mi; Lee, Hyunhwa; Choi, Soo Bong; Kim, Dai-Sik

    2015-02-23

    We report near-field and far-field measurements of transmission through nanometer-sized gaps at near-infrared frequencies with varying the gap size from 1 nm to 10 nm. In the far-field measurements, we excluded direct transmission on the metal film surface via interferometric method. Kirchhoff integral formalism was used to relate the far-field intensity to the electric field at the nanogaps. In near-field measurements, field enhancement factors of the nanogaps were quantified by measuring transmission of the nanogaps using near-field scanning optical microscopy. All the measurements produce similar field enhancements of about ten, which we put in the context of comparing with the giant field enhancements in the terahertz regime.

  1. Direct observation of nanometer-scale Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Xiong, Feng; Hong, Sungduk; King, William P.; Pop, Eric

    2013-05-01

    We measure power dissipation in phase change memory (PCM) devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy (SJEM) with ˜50 nm spatial and 0.2 K temperature resolution. The temperature rise in the Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is dominated by Joule heating, but at the GST-TiW contacts it is a combination of Peltier and current crowding effects. Comparison of SJEM and electrical measurements with simulations of the PCM devices uncovers a thermopower of ˜350 μV K-1 and a contact resistance of ˜2.0 × 10-8 Ω m2 (to TiW) for 25 nm thick films of face centered-cubic crystalline GST. Knowledge of such nanometer-scale Joule, Peltier, and current crowding effects is essential for energy-efficient design of future PCM technology.

  2. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of gold nanoparticles supported on copper foil with graphene as a nanometer gap.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Quan; Zhu, Xupeng; Chen, Yiqin; Duan, Huigao

    2016-02-19

    Gaps with single-nanometer dimensions (<10 nm) between metallic nanostructures enable giant local field enhancements for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Monolayer graphene is an ideal candidate to obtain a sub-nanometer gap between plasmonic nanostructures. In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to achieve a sub-nanometer gap by dewetting a gold film supported on monolayer graphene grown on copper foil. The Cu foil can serve as a low-loss plasmonically active metallic film that supports the imaginary charge oscillations, while the graphene can not only create a stable sub-nanometer gap for massive plasmonic field enhancements but also serve as a chemical enhancer. We obtained higher SERS enhancements in this graphene-gapped configuration compared to those in Au nanoparticles on Cu film or on graphene-SiO2-Si. Also, the Raman signals measured maintained their fine features and intensities over a long time period, indicating the stability of this Au-graphene-Cu hybrid configuration as an SERS substrate.

  3. Sub-10 nm nanopantography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Siyuan; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Economou, Demetre J.

    2015-11-01

    Nanopantography, a massively parallel nanopatterning method over large areas, was previously shown to be capable of printing 10 nm features in silicon, using an array of 1000 nm-diameter electrostatic lenses, fabricated on the substrate, to focus beamlets of a broad area ion beam on selected regions of the substrate. In the present study, using lens dimensional scaling optimized by computer simulation, and reduction in the ion beam image size and energy dispersion, the resolution of nanopantography was dramatically improved, allowing features as small as 3 nm to be etched into Si.

  4. Capillary adhesion at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Robbins, Mark O

    2014-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the capillary adhesion from a nonvolatile liquid meniscus between a spherical tip and a flat substrate. The atomic structure of the tip, the tip radius, the contact angles of the liquid on the two surfaces, and the volume of the liquid bridge are varied. The capillary force between the tip and substrate is calculated as a function of their separation h. The force agrees with continuum predictions based on macroscopic theory for h down to ∼5 to 10 nm. At smaller h, the force tends to be less attractive than predicted and has strong oscillations. This oscillatory component of the capillary force is completely missed in the macroscopic theory, which only includes contributions from the surface tension around the circumference of the meniscus and the pressure difference over the cross section of the meniscus. The oscillation is found to be due to molecular layering of the liquid confined in the narrow gap between the tip and substrate. This effect is most pronounced for large tip radii and/or smooth surfaces. The other two components considered by the macroscopic theory are also identified. The surface tension term, as well as the meniscus shape, is accurately described by the macroscopic theory for h down to ∼1 nm, but the capillary pressure term is always more positive than the corresponding continuum result. This shift in the capillary pressure reduces the average adhesion by a factor as large as 2 from its continuum value and is found to be due to an anisotropy in the pressure tensor. The component in the plane of the substrate is consistent with the capillary pressure predicted by the macroscopic theory (i.e., the Young-Laplace equation), but the normal pressure that determines the capillary force is always more positive than the continuum counterpart.

  5. Advanced Electrochemistry of Individual Metal Clusters Electrodeposited Atom by Atom to Nanometer by Nanometer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeon; Dick, Jeffrey E; Bard, Allen J

    2016-11-15

    Metal clusters are very important as building blocks for nanoparticles (NPs) for electrocatalysis and electroanalysis in both fundamental and applied electrochemistry. Attention has been given to understanding of traditional nucleation and growth of metal clusters and to their catalytic activities for various electrochemical applications in energy harvesting as well as analytical sensing. Importantly, understanding the properties of these clusters, primarily the relationship between catalysis and morphology, is required to optimize catalytic function. This has been difficult due to the heterogeneities in the size, shape, and surface properties. Thus, methods that address these issues are necessary to begin understanding the reactivity of individual catalytic centers as opposed to ensemble measurements, where the effect of size and morphology on the catalysis is averaged out in the measurement. This Account introduces our advanced electrochemical approaches to focus on each isolated metal cluster, where we electrochemically fabricated clusters or NPs atom by atom to nanometer by nanometer and explored their electrochemistry for their kinetic and catalytic behavior. Such approaches expand the dimensions of analysis, to include the electrochemistry of (1) a discrete atomic cluster, (2) solely a single NP, or (3) individual NPs in the ensemble sample. Specifically, we studied the electrocatalysis of atomic metal clusters as a nascent electrocatalyst via direct electrodeposition on carbon ultramicroelectrode (C UME) in a femtomolar metal ion precursor. In addition, we developed tunneling ultramicroelectrodes (TUMEs) to study electron transfer (ET) kinetics of a redox probe at a single metal NP electrodeposited on this TUME. Owing to the small dimension of a NP as an active area of a TUME, extremely high mass transfer conditions yielded a remarkably high standard ET rate constant, k(0), of 36 cm/s for outer-sphere ET reaction. Most recently, we advanced nanoscale

  6. Magnetic structures of nanometer scale Dy, Cr and Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Robinson, R.A.; Lawson, A.C.; Kwei, G.H.; Sickafus, K.E. ); Eastman, J.A. ); Burkel, E. . Sektion Physik, Lehrstuhl Peisl)

    1992-10-01

    Materials composed of nanometer-sized structures are becoming technologically relevant as the sizes of electronic devices approach the nanometer scale. Questions as to the performance and durability of these devices can be partially addressed through the characterization and understanding of the magnetic structures and properties of nanometer-sized materials. The purpose of the present work is to understand the relationship between the microstructure of nanocrystalline materials and their magnetic structures and properties. This paper summarizes three separate experiments: (1) an X-ray diffraction and anomalous absorption (XANES) study of nanocrystalline Dy, (2) neutron diffraction measurements of the magnetic structure of nanocrystalline Cr, and (3) the measurement of the magnetization density of a single twist grain boundary in Ni.

  7. Study on the neotype zirconia's implant coated nanometer hydroxyapatite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. W.; Yang, D. W.

    2007-07-01

    In recent years, biologic ceramics is a popular material of implants and bioactive surface modification of dental implant became a research emphasis, which aims to improve bioactivity of implants materials and acquire firmer implants-bone interface. The zirconia ceramic has excellent mechanical properties and nanometer HA ceramics is a bioceramic well known for its bioactivity, therefore, nanometer HA ceramics coating on zirconia, allows combining the excellent mechanical properties of zirconia substrates with its bioactivity. This paper shows a new method for implant shape design and bioactive modification of dental implants surface. Zirconia's implant substrate was prepared by sintered method, central and lateral tunnels were drilled in the zirconia hollow porous cylindrical implants by laser processing. The HA powders and needle-like HA crystals were made by a wet precipitation and calcining method. Its surface was coated with nanometer HA ceramics which was used brush HA slurry and vacuum sintering. Mechanical testing results revealed that the attachment strength of nanometer HA ceramics coated zirconia samples is high. SEM and interface observation after inserted experiment indicated that calcium and phosphor content increased and symmetrically around coated implant-bone tissue interface. A significantly higher affinity index was demonstrated in vivo by histomorphometric evaluation in coated versus uncoated implants. SEM analysis demonstrated better bone adhesion to the material in coated implant at any situation. In addition, the hollow porous cylindrical implant coated with nanometer HA ceramics increase the interaction of bone and implant, the new bone induced into the surface of hollow porous cylindrical implant and through the most tunnels filled into central hole. The branch-like structure makes the implant and bone a body, which increased the contact area and decreased elastic ratio. Therefore, the macroscopical and microcosmic nested structure of

  8. Effect of Substrates on Film Hardness Measurements of Nanometer Thick Amorphous Carbon Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasaka, Hiroki; Ito, Hiroki; Nakano, Masayuki; Ohshio, Shigeo; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    Amorphous carbon film (a-C:H) applications, such as hard disks, require films with nanometer thicknesses. In an indentation test, the obtained hardness values of these films are affected by substrates. On the indentation tests, we studied the effect of substrate hardness on films less than 200 nm in thickness. a-C:H and Si doped a-C:H (a-C:Si:H) films were deposited by electron cyclotron resonance plasma chemical vapor deposition onto aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) substrates. The film thicknesses were approximately 140 nm. The hardnesses of the a-C:H film and substrates were obtained using a high-resolution indentation tester (pico-dentor) with a Vickers tip whose depth resolution was 0.04 nm. Maximum indentation loads were varied from 0.01 to 0.5 mN. The Martens hardnesses of films on the Al and Si substrates were 600 and 7000 N/mm2, respectively. On the a-C:Si:H film deposited on the Al substrate, the hardnesses increased from 1600 to 3900 N/mm2 with decreasing indentation load. The hardnesses of the films deposited on the Si substrate decreased from 5300 to 3500 N/mm2 when the maximum indentation loads were reduced. The effect of the substrates increased with the maximum load increasing. From these findings, the actual hardness value was determined to be 3600 N/mm2. These results indicate that the high-resolution indentation test achieved hardness estimations for nanometer-thick films with certain hardnesses.

  9. NXT:1980Di immersion scanner for 7nm and 5nm production nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Roelof; Weichselbaum, Stefan; Droste, Richard; McLaren, Matthew; Koek, Bert; de Boeij, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Immersion scanners remain the critical lithography workhorses in semiconductor device manufacturing. When progressing towards the 7nm device node for logic and D18 device node for DRAM production, pattern-placement and layer-to-layer overlay requirements keep progressively scaling down and consequently require system improvements in immersion scanners. The on-product-overlay requirements are approaching levels of only a few nanometers, imposing stringent requirements on the scanner tool design in terms of reproducibility, accuracy and stability. In this paper we report on the performance of the NXT:1980Di immersion scanner. The NXT:1980Di builds upon the NXT:1970Ci, that is widely used for 16nm, 14nm and 10nm high-volume manufacturing. We will discuss the NXT:1980Di system- and sub-system/module enhancements that drive the scanner overlay, focus and productivity performance. Overlay, imaging, focus, productivity and defectivity data will be presented for multiple tools. To further reduce the on-product overlay system performance, alignment sensor contrast improvements as well as active reticle temperature conditioning are implemented on the NXT:1980Di. Reticle temperature conditioning will reduce reticle heating overlay and the higher contrast alignment sensor will improve alignment robustness for processed alignment targets. Due to an increased usage of multiple patterning techniques, an increased number of immersion exposures is required. NXT:1980Di scanner design modifications raised productivity levels from 250wph to 275wph. This productivity enhancement provides lower cost of ownership (CoO) for customers using immersion technology.

  10. Long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy for nanometer-scale imaging in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of morphological dynamics of live cells with nanometer resolution under physiological conditions is highly desired, but challenging. It has been demonstrated that high-speed atomic force microscopy is a powerful technique for visualizing dynamics of biomolecules under physiological conditions. However, application of high-speed atomic force microscopy for imaging larger objects such as live mammalian cells has been complicated because of the collision between the cantilever and samples. Here, we demonstrate that attaching an extremely long (~3 μm) and thin (~5 nm) tip by amorphous carbon to the cantilever allows us to image the surface structure of live cells with the spatiotemporal resolution of nanometers and seconds. We demonstrate that long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy is capable of imaging morphogenesis of filopodia, membrane ruffles, pit formation, and endocytosis in COS-7, HeLa cells and hippocampal neurons. PMID:25735540

  11. Mechanical properties and characteristics of nanometer-sized precipitates in hot-rolled low-carbon ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-pei; Zhao, Ai-min; Zhao, Zheng-zhi; Huang, Yao; Li, Liang; He, Qing

    2014-03-01

    The microstructures and properties of hot-rolled low-carbon ferritic steel have been investigated by optical microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and tensile tests after isothermal transformation from 600°C to 700°C for 60 min. It is found that the strength of the steel decreases with the increment of isothermal temperature, whereas the hole expansion ratio and the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries increase. A large amount of nanometer-sized carbides were homogeneously distributed throughout the material, and fine (Ti, Mo)C precipitates have a significant precipitation strengthening effect on the ferrite phase because of their high density. The nanometer-sized carbides have a lattice parameter of 0.411-0.431 nm. After isothermal transformation at 650°C for 60 min, the ferrite phase can be strengthened above 300 MPa by precipitation strengthening according to the Ashby-Orowan mechanism.

  12. Long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy for nanometer-scale imaging in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2015-03-01

    Visualization of morphological dynamics of live cells with nanometer resolution under physiological conditions is highly desired, but challenging. It has been demonstrated that high-speed atomic force microscopy is a powerful technique for visualizing dynamics of biomolecules under physiological conditions. However, application of high-speed atomic force microscopy for imaging larger objects such as live mammalian cells has been complicated because of the collision between the cantilever and samples. Here, we demonstrate that attaching an extremely long (~3 μm) and thin (~5 nm) tip by amorphous carbon to the cantilever allows us to image the surface structure of live cells with the spatiotemporal resolution of nanometers and seconds. We demonstrate that long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy is capable of imaging morphogenesis of filopodia, membrane ruffles, pit formation, and endocytosis in COS-7, HeLa cells and hippocampal neurons.

  13. Dispersion characteristics of nanometer-scaled silicon nitride suspended membrane waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandan, Bian; Xun, Lei; Shaowu, Chen

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the dispersion properties of nanometer-scaled silicon nitride suspended membrane waveguides around the communication wavelength and systematically study their relationship with the key structural parameters of the waveguide. The simulation results show that a suspended membrane waveguide can realize anomalous dispersion with a relatively thinner silicon nitride thickness in the range of 400 to 600 nm, whereas, for the same membrane thickness, a conventional rib or strip silicon nitride waveguide cannot support anomalous dispersion. In particular, a waveguide with 400 nm silicon nitride thickness and deep etch depth (r = 0.05) exhibits anomalous dispersion around the communication wavelength when the waveguide width ranges from 990 to 1255 nm, and the maximum dispersion is 22.56 ps/(nm·km). This specially designed anomalous dispersion silicon nitride waveguide is highly desirable for micro-resonator based optical frequency combs due to its potential to meet the phase-matching condition required for cascaded four-wave-mixing. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61435002, 61527823 61321063).

  14. PLGA nanometer surface features manipulate fibronectin interactions for improved vascular cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Miller, Derick C; Haberstroh, Karen M; Webster, Thomas J

    2007-06-01

    The largest cause of mortality in the Western world is atherosclerotic vascular disease. Many of these diseases require synthetic vascular grafts; however, their patency rate is only 30% in small (<6 mm) diameter vascular grafts after 5 years of implantation. In an effort to increase small diameter vascular graft success, researchers have been designing random nanostructured surface features which enhance vascular cell functions. However, for the present study, highly-controllable, nanostructured features on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces were formulated. To create ordered nanostructured roughness on PLGA surfaces, either 500, 200, or 100 nm polystyrene nanospheres were separately placed onto mica. These were then used as a template for creating an inverse poly(dimethylsiloxane) mold which was utilized to cast PLGA. Compared to all other PLGA films formulated, AFM results demonstrated greater initial fibronectin spreading on PLGA which possessed spherical 200 nm features. Compared to smooth PLGA, PLGA with 500 or 100 nm surface features, results further showed that PLGA with 200 nm spherical features promoted vascular cell (specifically, endothelial, and smooth muscle cell) adhesion. In this manner, the present study demonstrated a specific nanometer surface feature size that promoted fibronectin spreading and subsequent vascular cell adhesion; criteria critical to vascular graft success.

  15. Two-dimensional low-coherence interferometry for the characterization of nanometer wafer topographies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taudt, Ch.; Baselt, T.; Nelsen, B.; Aßmann, H.; Greiner, A.; Koch, E.; Hartmann, P.

    2016-05-01

    Within this work a scan-free, low-coherence interferometry approach for surface profilometry with nm-precision is presented. The basic setup consist of a Michelson-type interferometer which is powered by a super-continuum light-source (Δλ= 400-1700 nm). The introduction of an element with known dispersion delivers a controlled phase variation which can be detected in the spectral domain and used to reconstruct height differences on a sample. In order to enable scan-free measurements, the interference signal is spectrally decomposed with a grating and imaged onto a two-dimensional detector. One dimension of this detector records spectral, and therefore height information, while the other dimension stores the spatial position of the corresponding height values. In experiments on a height standard, it could be shown that the setup is capable of recording multiple height steps of 101 nm over a range of 500 m with an accuracy of about 11.5 nm. Further experiments on conductive paths of a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensor demonstrated that the approach is also suitable to precisely characterize nanometer-sized structures on production-relevant components. The main advantage of the proposed measurement approach is the possibility to collect precise height information over a line on a surface without the need for scanning. This feature makes it interesting for a production-accompanying metrology.

  16. Properties of antibacterial polypropylene/nanometal composite fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Melt spinning of polypropylene fibers containing silver and zinc nanoparticles was investigated. The nanometals were generally uniformly dispersed in polypropylene, but aggregation of these materials was observed on fiber surface and in fiber cross-sections. The mechanical properties of the resulted...

  17. Substrate comprising a nanometer-scale projection array

    DOEpatents

    Cui, Yi; Zhu, Jia; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Connor, Stephen T; Yu, Zongfu; Fan, Shanhui; Burkhard, George

    2012-11-27

    A method for forming a substrate comprising nanometer-scale pillars or cones that project from the surface of the substrate is disclosed. The method enables control over physical characteristics of the projections including diameter, sidewall angle, and tip shape. The method further enables control over the arrangement of the projections including characteristics such as center-to-center spacing and separation distance.

  18. Nanometal Skin of Plasmonic Heterostructures for Highly Efficient Near-Field Scattering Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Vecchione, Antonio; Pesce, Giuseppe; di Girolamo, Rocco; Malafronte, Anna; Sasso, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    In this work, atomic force microscopy probes are functionalized by virtue of self-assembling monolayers of block copolymer (BCP) micelles loaded either with clusters of silver nanoparticles or bimetallic heterostructures consisting of mixed species of silver and gold nanoparticles. The resulting self-organized patterns allow coating the tips with a sort of nanometal skin made of geometrically confined nanoislands. This approach favors the reproducible engineering and tuning of the plasmonic properties of the resulting structured tip by varying the nanometal loading of the micelles. The newly conceived tips are applied for experiments of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) spectroscopy and scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM). TERS and s-SNOM probe characterizations on several standard Raman analytes and patterned nanostructures demonstrate excellent enhancement factor with the possibility of fast scanning and spatial resolution <12 nm. In fact, each metal nanoisland consists of a multiscale heterostructure that favors large scattering and near-field amplification. Then, we verify the tips to allow challenging nongap-TER spectroscopy on thick biosamples. Our approach introduces a synergistic chemical functionalization of the tips for versatile inclusion and delivery of plasmonic nanoparticles at the tip apex, which may promote the tuning of the plasmonic properties, a large enhancement, and the possibility of adding new degrees of freedom for tip functionalization.

  19. Nanometal Skin of Plasmonic Heterostructures for Highly Efficient Near-Field Scattering Probes

    PubMed Central

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Vecchione, Antonio; Pesce, Giuseppe; Di Girolamo, Rocco; Malafronte, Anna; Sasso, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In this work, atomic force microscopy probes are functionalized by virtue of self-assembling monolayers of block copolymer (BCP) micelles loaded either with clusters of silver nanoparticles or bimetallic heterostructures consisting of mixed species of silver and gold nanoparticles. The resulting self-organized patterns allow coating the tips with a sort of nanometal skin made of geometrically confined nanoislands. This approach favors the reproducible engineering and tuning of the plasmonic properties of the resulting structured tip by varying the nanometal loading of the micelles. The newly conceived tips are applied for experiments of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) spectroscopy and scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM). TERS and s-SNOM probe characterizations on several standard Raman analytes and patterned nanostructures demonstrate excellent enhancement factor with the possibility of fast scanning and spatial resolution <12 nm. In fact, each metal nanoisland consists of a multiscale heterostructure that favors large scattering and near-field amplification. Then, we verify the tips to allow challenging nongap-TER spectroscopy on thick biosamples. Our approach introduces a synergistic chemical functionalization of the tips for versatile inclusion and delivery of plasmonic nanoparticles at the tip apex, which may promote the tuning of the plasmonic properties, a large enhancement, and the possibility of adding new degrees of freedom for tip functionalization. PMID:27502178

  20. Nanometer figure correction of x-ray mirrors using multiple spring actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Josep; Colldelram, Carles; Ruget, Claude; Ribó, Llibert; Pedreira, Pablo; de la Rubia, Pedro; Martín-Nuño, Carlos; Úbeda, David; Tomàs, Albert

    2016-09-01

    We present an X-ray mirror bender that includes multiple spring actuators that introduce a controlled deformation of the mirror substrate capable of correcting residual figure errors on the mirror, below one nanometer. For usual mirror dimensions, this requires applying correcting forces with resolution and stability in the order of 0.01 N, and a range up to 20 N, depending on the initial figure error of the mirror. To obtain the required stability, the actuators need to compensate intrinsic mechanical instabilities, such as thermal drifts or the limited repeatability of parts that move during the adjustment of the figure. The concept we propose uses weak springs that allow reducing all these effects below noticeable values. Additional considerations on friction and parasitic components of the force are accounted. The system also includes two independent bending actuators with a larger force range to generate the mean elliptic figure of the mirror. Metrology tests of the performances of the system show that the correctors are repeatable within 0.01 N, and reach much higher resolution. A prototype of the bender has been used to correct the figure error of a 500 mm long mirror below one nanometer (root mean square). The agreement to the predicted figure is better than 0.08 nm rms.

  1. Mechanical properties of organic matter in shales mapped at the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliyahu, M.; Emmanuel, S.; Day-Stirrat, R. J.; Macaulay, C.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanical properties of organic matter strongly influence the way in which shales deform and fracture. However, the response of organic matter to mechanical stresses is not well understood, representing a critical obstacle to assessing oil and gas production in shale formations. Little is known about the mechanical properties of organic matter in fine grained rocks primarily because it often occupies tiny nanometer-scale voids between the mineral grains which cannot be accessed using standard mechanical testing techniques. Here, we report on the use of a new atomic force microscopy technique (PeakForce QNM) to map the mechanical properties of organic and inorganic components at the nanometer scale. We find that the method can identify different phases such as pyrite, quartz, clays, and organic matter. Furthermore, within the organic component Young's modulus values ranged from 0 - 25 GPa; in 3 different samples - all of which come from thermally mature Type II/III source rocks in the dry gas window - a modal value of 15-16 GPa was measured, with additional peaks measured at ≤ 10 GPa. In addition, the maps suggest that some porous organic macerals possess a soft core surrounded by a harder outer shell 50 - 100 nm thick. Our results demonstrate that the method represents a powerful new petrographic tool with which to characterize the mechanical properties of organic-rich sedimentary rocks.

  2. Subnanometer and nanometer catalysts, method for preparing size-selected catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vajda, Stefan , Pellin, Michael J.; Elam, Jeffrey W [Elmhurst, IL; Marshall, Christopher L [Naperville, IL; Winans, Randall A [Downers Grove, IL; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz [Roggentin, GR

    2012-04-03

    Highly uniform cluster based nanocatalysts supported on technologically relevant supports were synthesized for reactions of top industrial relevance. The Pt-cluster based catalysts outperformed the very best reported ODHP catalyst in both activity (by up to two orders of magnitude higher turn-over frequencies) and in selectivity. The results clearly demonstrate that highly dispersed ultra-small Pt clusters precisely localized on high-surface area supports can lead to affordable new catalysts for highly efficient and economic propene production, including considerably simplified separation of the final product. The combined GISAXS-mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool to monitor the evolution of size and shape of nanocatalyst at action under realistic conditions. Also provided are sub-nanometer gold and sub-nanometer to few nm size-selected silver catalysts which possess size dependent tunable catalytic properties in the epoxidation of alkenes. Invented size-selected cluster deposition provides a unique tool to tune material properties by atom-by-atom fashion, which can be stabilized by protective overcoats.

  3. Subnanometer and nanometer catalysts, method for preparing size-selected catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vajda, Stefan [Lisle, IL; Pellin, Michael J [Naperville, IL; Elam, Jeffrey W [Elmhurst, IL; Marshall, Christopher L [Naperville, IL; Winans, Randall A [Downers Grove, IL; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz [Roggentin, GR

    2012-03-27

    Highly uniform cluster based nanocatalysts supported on technologically relevant supports were synthesized for reactions of top industrial relevance. The Pt-cluster based catalysts outperformed the very best reported ODHP catalyst in both activity (by up to two orders of magnitude higher turn-over frequencies) and in selectivity. The results clearly demonstrate that highly dispersed ultra-small Pt clusters precisely localized on high-surface area supports can lead to affordable new catalysts for highly efficient and economic propene production, including considerably simplified separation of the final product. The combined GISAXS-mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool to monitor the evolution of size and shape of nanocatalyst at action under realistic conditions. Also provided are sub-nanometer gold and sub-nanometer to few nm size-selected silver catalysts which possess size dependent tunable catalytic properties in the epoxidation of alkenes. Invented size-selected cluster deposition provides a unique tool to tune material properties by atom-by-atom fashion, which can be stabilized by protective overcoats.

  4. Albuquerque, NM, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Albuquerque, NM (35.0N, 106.5W) is situated on the edge of the Rio Grande River and flood plain which cuts across the image. The reddish brown surface of the Albuquerque Basin is a fault depression filled with ancient alluvial fan and lake bed sediments. On the slopes of the Manzano Mountains to the east of Albuquerque, juniper and other timber of the Cibola National Forest can be seen as contrasting dark tones of vegetation.

  5. Digital image processing of nanometer-size metal particles on amorphous substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soria, F.; Artal, P.; Bescos, J.; Heinemann, K.

    1989-01-01

    The task of differentiating very small metal aggregates supported on amorphous films from the phase contrast image features inherently stemming from the support is extremely difficult in the nanometer particle size range. Digital image processing was employed to overcome some of the ambiguities in evaluating such micrographs. It was demonstrated that such processing allowed positive particle detection and a limited degree of statistical size analysis even for micrographs where by bare eye examination the distribution between particles and erroneous substrate features would seem highly ambiguous. The smallest size class detected for Pd/C samples peaks at 0.8 nm. This size class was found in various samples prepared under different evaporation conditions and it is concluded that these particles consist of 'a magic number' of 13 atoms and have cubooctahedral or icosahedral crystal structure.

  6. Green laser interferometric metrology system with sub-nanometer periodic nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shijie; Wei, Haoyun; Zhu, Minhao; Li, Yan

    2016-04-10

    This paper describes the design and realization of a heterodyne laser interferometer system that is applicable to metrology comparison. In this research, an iodine-stabilized Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm served as the light source. Two spatially separated beams with different offset frequencies are generated by two acousto-optic modulators to prevent any source mixing and polarization leakage. The interferometry components are integrated to a monolithic prism to reduce the difficulty of the light path adjustment and to guarantee the measuring accuracy. The experimental results show there is a sub-nanometer periodic nonlinearity, which mainly results from the ghost reflection. Placed in a vacuum chamber, the interferometer is applicable for measuring comparison using a piezo nanopositioner and a precision translation stage. Finally, a commercial interferometer is calibrated with the interferometer system.

  7. Strain mapping at nanometer resolution using advanced nano-beam electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdol, V. B.; Ercius, P.; Ophus, C.; Ciston, J.; Gammer, C. E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov; Jin, X. G.; Minor, A. M. E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov

    2015-06-22

    We report on the development of a nanometer scale strain mapping technique by means of scanning nano-beam electron diffraction. Only recently possible due to fast acquisition with a direct electron detector, this technique allows for strain mapping with a high precision of 0.1% at a lateral resolution of 1 nm for a large field of view reaching up to 1 μm. We demonstrate its application to a technologically relevant strain-engineered GaAs/GaAsP hetero-structure and show that the method can even be applied to highly defected regions with substantial changes in local crystal orientation. Strain maps derived from atomically resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy images were used to validate the accuracy, precision and resolution of this versatile technique.

  8. Enhanced catalytic activity of sub-nanometer titania clusters confined inside double-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Pan, Xiulian; Liu, Jingyue Jimmy; Qian, Weizhong; Wei, Fei; Huang, Yuying; Bao, Xinhe

    2011-07-18

    Sub-nanometer titania clusters have been homogeneously dispersed within double-wall carbon nantubes (DWNTs) with an inner diameter ranging from 1.0 to 1.5 nm. The confined titania exhibits a much higher activity than the titania particles attached on the outside walls of the DWNTs (the outside titania) in the epoxidation of propylene by H(2)O(2). XPS, XANES and Raman spectroscopy data suggest electron transfer from titanium to the inner surfaces of the DWNTs. In contrast, no electron transfer has been observed for the outside titania. We also found that the extent of this confinement-induced electron transfer is temperature dependent. The enhanced activity of the confined titania clusters is likely attributed to their small sizes and the interaction with the DWNT surface. The synthesis method that we developed here can be readily applied to incorporation of other metal/metal oxide nanoparticles into carbon nanotubes.

  9. Nanometer resolution imaging and tracking of fluorescent molecules with minimal photon fluxes.

    PubMed

    Balzarotti, Francisco; Eilers, Yvan; Gwosch, Klaus C; Gynnå, Arvid H; Westphal, Volker; Stefani, Fernando D; Elf, Johan; Hell, Stefan W

    2017-02-10

    We introduce MINFLUX, a concept for localizing photon emitters in space. By probing the emitter with a local intensity minimum of excitation light, MINFLUX minimizes the fluorescence photons needed for high localization precision. In our experiments, 22 times fewer fluorescence photons are required as compared to popular centroid localization. In superresolution microscopy, MINFLUX attained ~1-nm precision, resolving molecules only 6 nanometers apart. MINFLUX tracking of single fluorescent proteins increased the temporal resolution and the number of localizations per trace by a factor of 100, as demonstrated with diffusing 30S ribosomal subunits in living Escherichia coli As conceptual limits have not been reached, we expect this localization modality to break new ground for observing the dynamics, distribution, and structure of macromolecules in living cells and beyond.

  10. Superhydrophilic TiO2 thin film by nanometer scale surface roughness and dangling bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-02-01

    A remarkable enhancement in the hydrophilic nature of titanium dioxide (TiO2) films is obtained by surface modification in DC-glow discharge plasma. Thin transparent TiO2 films were coated on glass substrate by sol-gel dip coating method, and exposed in DC-glow discharge plasma. The plasma exposed TiO2 film exhibited a significant change in its wetting property contact angle, which is a representative of wetting property, has reduced to considerable limits 3.02° and 1.85° from its initial value 54.40° and 48.82° for deionized water and ethylene glycol, respectively. It is elucidated that the hydrophilic property of plasma exposed TiO2 films dependent mainly upon nanometer scale surface roughness. Variation, from 4.6 nm to 19.8 nm, in the film surface roughness with exposure time was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Analysis of variation in the values of contact angle and surface roughness with increasing plasma exposure time reveal that the surface roughness is the main factor which makes the modified TiO2 film superhydrophilic. However, a contribution of change in the surface states, to the hydrophilic property, is also observed for small values of the plasma exposure time. Based upon nanometer scale surface roughness and dangling bonds, a variation in the surface energy of TiO2 film from 49.38 to 88.92 mJ/m2 is also observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show change in the surface states of titanium and oxygen. The observed antifogging properties are the direct results of the development of the superhydrophilic wetting characteristics to TiO2 films.

  11. Artificial submicron or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and electron microscope speckle photography

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhanwei; Xie Huimin; Fang Daining; Dai Fulong; Wang Weining; Fang Yan

    2007-03-15

    In this article, a novel artificial submicro- or nanometer speckle fabricating technique is proposed by taking advantage of submicro or nanometer particles. In the technique, submicron or nanometer particles were adhered to an object surface by using ultrasonic dispersing technique. The particles on the object surface can be regarded as submicro or nanometer speckle by using a scanning electronic microscope at a special magnification. In addition, an electron microscope speckle photography (EMSP) method is developed to measure in-plane submicron or nanometer deformation of the object coated with the artificial submicro or nanometer speckles. The principle of artificial submicro or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and the EMSP method are discussed in detail in this article. Some typical applications of this method are offered. The experimental results verified that the artificial submicro or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and EMSP method is feasible.

  12. Triple Modulator-Chicane Scheme for Seeding Sub-Nanometer X-Ray Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2011-07-06

    We propose a novel triple modulator-chicane (TMC) scheme to convert external input seed to shorter wavelengths. In the scheme high power seed lasers are used in the first and third modulator while only very low power seed is used in the second modulator. By properly choosing the parameters of the lasers and chicanes, we show that ultrahigh harmonics can be generated in the TMC scheme while simultaneously keeping the energy spread growth much smaller than beam's initial slice energy spread. As an example we show the feasibility of generating significant bunching at 1 nm and below from a low power ({approx} 100 kW) high harmonic generation seed at 20 nm assisted by two high power ({approx} 100 MW) UV lasers at 200 nm while keeping the energy spread growth within 40%. The supreme up-frequency conversion efficiency of the proposed TMC scheme together with its unique advantage in maintaining beam energy spread opens new opportunities for generating fully coherent x-rays at sub-nanometer wavelength from external seeds.

  13. Pseudopotential-based electron quantum transport: Theoretical formulation and application to nanometer-scale silicon nanowire transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jingtian Vandenberghe, William G.; Fu, Bo; Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2016-01-21

    We present a formalism to treat quantum electronic transport at the nanometer scale based on empirical pseudopotentials. This formalism offers explicit atomistic wavefunctions and an accurate band structure, enabling a detailed study of the characteristics of devices with a nanometer-scale channel and body. Assuming externally applied potentials that change slowly along the electron-transport direction, we invoke the envelope-wavefunction approximation to apply the open boundary conditions and to develop the transport equations. We construct the full-band open boundary conditions (self-energies of device contacts) from the complex band structure of the contacts. We solve the transport equations and present the expressions required to calculate the device characteristics, such as device current and charge density. We apply this formalism to study ballistic transport in a gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire field-effect transistor with a body-size of 0.39 nm, a gate length of 6.52 nm, and an effective oxide thickness of 0.43 nm. Simulation results show that this device exhibits a subthreshold slope (SS) of ∼66 mV/decade and a drain-induced barrier-lowering of ∼2.5 mV/V. Our theoretical calculations predict that low-dimensionality channels in a 3D GAA architecture are able to meet the performance requirements of future devices in terms of SS swing and electrostatic control.

  14. Micrometer- and Nanometer-Sized Polymeric Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstrom, Magnus; Berggren, Magnus; Inganas, Olle

    1995-03-01

    A method for the fabrication of micrometer- and submicrometer-sized polymeric light-emitting diodes is presented. Such diodes have a variety of applications. Light sources of dimensions around 100 nanometers are required for subwavelength, near-field optical microscopy. Another possible application is patterning on the micrometer and nanometer scale. The diodes have been made in the form of a sandwich structure, with the conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene) polymerized in the pores of commercially available microfiltration membranes defining the hole-injecting contacts, poly[3-(4-octylphenyl)-2,2'-bithiophene] as the light-emitting layer, and a thin film of calcium-aluminum as the electron injector.

  15. Programmable nanometer-scale electrolytic metal deposition and depletion

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu [Oak Ridge, TN; Greenbaum, Elias [Oak Ridge, TN

    2002-09-10

    A method of nanometer-scale deposition of a metal onto a nanostructure includes the steps of: providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart; and depositing metal on at least one of the nanostructures by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal deposition. Moreover, a method of nanometer-scale depletion of a metal from a nanostructure includes the steps of providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart, at least one of the nanostructures having a metal disposed thereon; and depleting at least a portion of the metal from the nanostructure by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal depletion. A bypass circuit enables ultra-finely controlled deposition.

  16. Low-Cost Sensors Deliver Nanometer-Accurate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    As part of a unique partnership program, Kennedy Space Center collaborated with a nearby business school to allow MBA students to examine and analyze the market potential for a selection of NASA-patented technologies. Following the semester, a group of students decided to form Winter Park, Florida-based Juntura Group Inc. to license and sell a technology they had worked with: a sensor capable of detecting position changes as small as 10 nanometers-approximately the thickness of a cell wall.

  17. Frequency scanning interferometry with nanometer precision using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode under scanning speed control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuma, Seiichi

    2015-12-01

    Frequency scanning interferometry technique with a nanometer precision using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode (VCSEL) is presented. Since the frequency scanning of the VCSEL is linearized by the phase-locked-loop technique, the gradient of the interference fringe order can be precisely determined using linear least squares fitting. This enables a length measurement with a precision better than a quarter wavelength, and the absolute fringe number including the integer part at the atomic transition spectrum (rubidium-D2 line) is accurately determined. The validity of the method is demonstrated by excellent results of block gauge measurement with a root mean square error better than 5 nm.

  18. White light emission from transparent SiO2 glass prepared from nanometer-sized silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, Takashi; Yamada, Tomoko

    2004-08-01

    We report that nanometer-sized silicon-dioxide particles are sintered to optical transparency at temperatures even below 1000°C, forming nonporous bulk silica glass. The resultant silica glass exhibits visible emission, which appears white to the naked eye, in the wavelength range from ˜400to˜700nm at room temperature under ultraviolet excitation. The observed emission is quite stable after prolonged exposure to the atmosphere and shows no appreciable light-induced degradation. The present photoluminescence characteristics are found to be basically different from those reported previously for silica nanoparticles and silica-based porous materials.

  19. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY: Reduction of proximity effect in fabricating nanometer-spaced nanopillars by two-step exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhang; Renping, Zhang; Weihua, Han; Jian, Liu; Xiang, Yang; Ying, Wang; Chian Chiu, Li; Fuhua, Yang

    2009-11-01

    A two-step exposure method to effectively reduce the proximity effect in fabricating nanometer-spaced nanopillars is presented. In this method, nanopillar patterns on poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) were partly cross-linked in the first-step exposure. After development, PMMA between nanopillar patterns was removed, and hence the proximity effect would not take place there in the subsequent exposure. In the second-step exposure, PMMA masks were completely cross-linked to achieve good resistance in inductively coupled plasma etching. Accurate pattern transfer of rows of nanopillars with spacing down to 40 nm was realized on a silicon-on-insulator substrate.

  20. Electrical properties of sub-100 nm SiGe nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamawandi, B.; Noroozi, M.; Jayakumar, G.; Ergül, A.; Zahmatkesh, K.; Toprak, M. S.; Radamson, H. H.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the electrical properties of SiGe nanowires in terms of process and fabrication integrity, measurement reliability, width scaling, and doping levels were investigated. Nanowires were fabricated on SiGe-on oxide (SGOI) wafers with thickness of 52 nm and Ge content of 47%. The first group of SiGe wires was initially formed by using conventional I-line lithography and then their size was longitudinally reduced by cutting with a focused ion beam (FIB) to any desired nanometer range down to 60 nm. The other nanowire group was manufactured directly to a chosen nanometer level by using sidewall transfer lithography (STL). It has been shown that the FIB fabrication process allows manipulation of the line width and doping level of nanowires using Ga atoms. The resistance of wires thinned by FIB was 10 times lower than STL wires which shows the possible dependency of electrical behavior on fabrication method. Project support by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research “SSF” (No. EM-011-0002) and the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (No. TÜBİTAK).

  1. Graphene nanoribbon field effect transistor for nanometer-size on-chip temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banadaki, Yaser M.; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharifi, Safura

    2016-04-01

    Graphene has been extensively investigated as a promising material for various types of high performance sensors due to its large surface-to-volume ratio, remarkably high carrier mobility, high carrier density, high thermal conductivity, extremely high mechanical strength and high signal-to-noise ratio. The power density and the corresponding die temperature can be tremendously high in scaled emerging technology designs, urging the on-chip sensing and controlling of the generated heat in nanometer dimensions. In this paper, we have explored the feasibility of a thin oxide graphene nanoribbon (GNR) as nanometer-size temperature sensor for detecting local on-chip temperature at scaled bias voltages of emerging technology. We have introduced an analytical model for GNR FET for 22nm technology node, which incorporates both thermionic emission of high-energy carriers and band-to-band-tunneling (BTBT) of carriers from drain to channel regions together with different scattering mechanisms due to intrinsic acoustic phonons and optical phonons and line-edge roughness in narrow GNRs. The temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) of GNR FET-based temperature sensor shows approximately an order of magnitude higher TCR than large-area graphene FET temperature sensor by accurately choosing of GNR width and bias condition for a temperature set point. At gate bias VGS = 0.55 V, TCR maximizes at room temperature to 2.1×10-2 /K, which is also independent of GNR width, allowing the design of width-free GNR FET for room temperature sensing applications.

  2. Nanometer-Scale Pore Characteristics of Lacustrine Shale, Songliao Basin, NE China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Yang, Jinxiu; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Shuangfang

    2015-01-01

    In shale, liquid hydrocarbons are accumulated mainly in nanometer-scale pores or fractures, so the pore types and PSDs (pore size distributions) play a major role in the shale oil occurrence (free or absorbed state), amount of oil, and flow features. The pore types and PSDs of marine shale have been well studied; however, research on lacustrine shale is rare, especially for shale in the oil generation window, although lacustrine shale is deposited widely around the world. To investigate the relationship between nanometer-scale pores and oil occurrence in the lacustrine shale, 10 lacustrine shale core samples from Songliao Basin, NE China were analyzed. Analyses of these samples included geochemical measurements, SEM (scanning electron microscope) observations, low pressure CO2 and N2 adsorption, and high-pressure mercury injection experiments. Analysis results indicate that: (1) Pore types in the lacustrine shale include inter-matrix pores, intergranular pores, organic matter pores, and dissolution pores, and these pores are dominated by mesopores and micropores; (2) There is no apparent correlation between pore volumes and clay content, however, a weak negative correlation is present between total pore volume and carbonate content; (3) Pores in lacustrine shale are well developed when the organic matter maturity (Ro) is >1.0% and the pore volume is positively correlated with the TOC (total organic carbon) content. The statistical results suggest that oil in lacustrine shale mainly occurs in pores with diameters larger than 40 nm. However, more research is needed to determine whether this minimum pore diameter for oil occurrence in lacustrine shale is widely applicable. PMID:26285123

  3. Nanometer-Scale Pore Characteristics of Lacustrine Shale, Songliao Basin, NE China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Yang, Jinxiu; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Shuangfang

    2015-01-01

    In shale, liquid hydrocarbons are accumulated mainly in nanometer-scale pores or fractures, so the pore types and PSDs (pore size distributions) play a major role in the shale oil occurrence (free or absorbed state), amount of oil, and flow features. The pore types and PSDs of marine shale have been well studied; however, research on lacustrine shale is rare, especially for shale in the oil generation window, although lacustrine shale is deposited widely around the world. To investigate the relationship between nanometer-scale pores and oil occurrence in the lacustrine shale, 10 lacustrine shale core samples from Songliao Basin, NE China were analyzed. Analyses of these samples included geochemical measurements, SEM (scanning electron microscope) observations, low pressure CO2 and N2 adsorption, and high-pressure mercury injection experiments. Analysis results indicate that: (1) Pore types in the lacustrine shale include inter-matrix pores, intergranular pores, organic matter pores, and dissolution pores, and these pores are dominated by mesopores and micropores; (2) There is no apparent correlation between pore volumes and clay content, however, a weak negative correlation is present between total pore volume and carbonate content; (3) Pores in lacustrine shale are well developed when the organic matter maturity (Ro) is >1.0% and the pore volume is positively correlated with the TOC (total organic carbon) content. The statistical results suggest that oil in lacustrine shale mainly occurs in pores with diameters larger than 40 nm. However, more research is needed to determine whether this minimum pore diameter for oil occurrence in lacustrine shale is widely applicable.

  4. Mass-producible and efficient optical antennas with CMOS-fabricated nanometer-scale gap.

    PubMed

    Seok, Tae Joon; Jamshidi, Arash; Eggleston, Michael; Wu, Ming C

    2013-07-15

    Optical antennas have been widely used for sensitive photodetection, efficient light emission, high resolution imaging, and biochemical sensing because of their ability to capture and focus light energy beyond the diffraction limit. However, widespread application of optical antennas has been limited due to lack of appropriate methods for uniform and large area fabrication of antennas as well as difficulty in achieving an efficient design with small mode volume (gap spacing < 10nm). Here, we present a novel optical antenna design, arch-dipole antenna, with optimal radiation efficiency and small mode volume, 5 nm gap spacing, fabricated by CMOS-compatible deep-UV spacer lithography. We demonstrate strong surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) signal with an enhancement factor exceeding 108 from the arch-dipole antenna array, which is two orders of magnitude stronger than that from the standard dipole antenna array fabricated by e-beam lithography. Since the antenna gap spacing, the critical dimension of the antenna, can be defined by deep-UV lithography, efficient optical antenna arrays with nanometer-scale gap can be mass-produced using current CMOS technology.

  5. Effective method to study the thickness-dependent dielectric functions of nanometal thin film.

    PubMed

    Hu, Er-Tao; Cai, Qing-Yuan; Zhang, Rong-Jun; Wei, Yan-Feng; Zhou, Wen-Chao; Wang, Song-You; Zheng, Yu-Xiang; Wei, Wei; Chen, Liang-Yao

    2016-11-01

    A new method for measuring the dielectric functions change with the thickness of nanometal thin films was proposed. To confirm the accuracy and reliability of the method, a nano-thin wedge-shaped gold (Au) film with continuously varied thicknesses was designed and prepared on K9 glass by direct-current-sputtering (DC-sputtering). The thicknesses and the dielectric functions in the wavelength range of 300-1100 nm of the nano-thin Au films were obtained by fitting the ellipsometric parameters with the Drude and critical points model. Results show that while the real part of the dielectric function (ϵ1) changes marginally with increasing film thickness, the imaginary part (ϵ2) decreases drastically with the film thickness, approaching a stable value when the film thickness increases up to about 42 nm. This method is particularly useful in the study of thickness-dependent optical properties of nano-thin film.

  6. Three-dimensional integrated circuits for lab-on-chip dielectrophoresis of nanometer scale particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Samuel J.; Noyola, Arnaldo J.; Levitan, Steven P.; Chiarulli, Donald M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a mixed-technology micro-system for electronically manipulating and optically detecting virusscale particles in fluids that is designed using 3D integrated circuit technology. During the 3D fabrication process, the top-most chip tier is assembled upside down and the substrate material is removed. This places the polysilicon layer, which is used to create geometries with the process' minimum feature size, in close proximity to a fluid channel etched into the top of the stack. By taking advantage of these processing features inherent to "3D chip-stacking" technology, we create electrode arrays that have a gap spacing of 270 nm. Using 3D CMOS technology also provides the ability to densely integrate analog and digital control circuitry for the electrodes by using the additional levels of the chip stack. We show simulations of the system with a physical model of a Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus, which has a radius of approximately 125 nm, being dielectrophoretically arranged into striped patterns. We also discuss how these striped patterns of trapped nanometer scale particles create an effective diffraction grating which can then be sensed with macro-scale optical techniques.

  7. Nanometer-size hard magnetic ferrite exhibiting high optical-transparency and nonlinear optical-magnetoelectric effect

    PubMed Central

    Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi; Namai, Asuka; Imoto, Kenta; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Tarora, Waka; Nakagawa, Kosuke; Komine, Masaya; Miyamoto, Yasuto; Nasu, Tomomichi; Oka, Syunsuke; Tokoro, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Development of nanometer-sized magnetic particles exhibiting a large coercive field (Hc) is in high demand for densification of magnetic recording. Herein, we report a single-nanosize (i.e., less than ten nanometers across) hard magnetic ferrite. This magnetic ferrite is composed of ε-Fe2O3, with a sufficiently high Hc value for magnetic recording systems and a remarkably high magnetic anisotropy constant of 7.7 × 106 erg cm−3. For example, 8.2-nm nanoparticles have an Hc value of 5.2 kOe at room temperature. A colloidal solution of these nanoparticles possesses a light orange color due to a wide band gap of 2.9 eV (430 nm), indicating a possibility of transparent magnetic pigments. Additionally, we have observed magnetization-induced second harmonic generation (MSHG). The nonlinear optical-magnetoelectric effect of the present polar magnetic nanocrystal was quite strong. These findings have been demonstrated in a simple iron oxide, which is highly significant from the viewpoints of economic cost and mass production. PMID:26439914

  8. Driven DNA Transport into an Asymmetric Nanometer-Scale Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; Misakian, Martin; Robertson, Baldwin; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2000-10-01

    To understand the mechanism by which individual DNA molecules enter nanometer-scale pores, we studied the concentration and voltage dependence of polynucleotide-induced ionic-current blockades of a single α-hemolysin ion channel. We find that the blockade frequency is proportional to the polymer concentration, that it increases exponentially with the applied potential, and that DNA enters the pore more readily through the entrance that has the larger vestibule. We also measure the minimum value of the electrical potential that confines a modified polymer inside the pore against random diffusion and repulsive forces.

  9. Carbon Nanotubules: Building Blocks for Nanometer-Scale Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnott, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    The proposed work consisted of two projects: the investigation of fluid permeation and diffusion through ultrafiltration membranes composed of carbon nanotubules and the design and study of molecular transistors composed of nanotubules. The progress made on each project is summarized and also discussion about additional projects, one of which is a continuation of work supported by another grant, is included. The first project was Liquid Interactions within a Nanotubule Membrane. The second was the design of nanometer-scale hydrocarbon electronic devices. The third was the investigation of Mechanical properties of Nanotubules and Nanotubule bundles. The fourth project was to investigate the growth mechanisms of Carbon Nanotubules.

  10. Probing colloidal physics on the nanometer length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainis, Sunil; Vollmer, Frank

    2009-03-01

    The sharp spectral features associated with ultra-high Q microresonator modes are sensitive to changes in the local environment and surface of the resonator [1]. Microresonator cavities have been used to detect the binding of single molecules [2] and viruses in an aqueous medium. We report on recent experiments that use microresonators to access colloidal physics on the nanometer length scale. We examine shifts in the resonator as a function of bulk ionic strengths and surface adsorption in a colloid. [3pt] [1] S. Arnold et al., Nature Methods 5, 591 - 596 (2008)[0pt] [2] A. M. Armani, et al. Science 317, 783-787 (2007).

  11. Probing single nanometer-scale pores with polymeric molecular rulers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; DiMarzio, Edmund A.; Wang, Qian; Stanford, Vincent M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2010-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that individual molecules of single-stranded DNA can be driven electrophoretically through a single Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin ion channel. Polynucleotides thread through the channel as extended chains and the polymer-induced ionic current blockades exhibit stable modes during the interactions. We show here that polynucleotides can be used to probe structural features of the α-hemolysin channel itself. Specifically, both the pore length and channel aperture profile can be estimated. The results are consistent with the channel crystal structure and suggest that polymer-based "molecular rulers" may prove useful in deducing the structures of nanometer-scale pores in general.

  12. Photocatalysis effect of nanometer TiO2 and TiO2-coated ceramic plate on Hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Zan, Ling; Fa, Wenjun; Peng, Tianyou; Gong, Zhen-Kui

    2007-02-01

    The photocatalysis effect of nanometer TiO2 particles and TiO2-coated ceramic plate on Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) was investigated. The ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) standard method was used to assess the efficiency of TiO2 material to destroy the HBsAg. The research has shown that the suspension of TiO2 (0.5g/L) can destroy most of the HBsAg under the irradiation of mercury lamp, with the light intensity of 0.6mW/cm(2) at 365nm wavelength, or under the sunlight irradiation for a few hours. TiO2-coated ceramic plates can also destroy the HBsAg under the irradiation of mercury lamp, with the light intensity of 0.05mW/cm(2) at 365nm wavelength or under the room daylight for a few hours.

  13. Understanding batteries on the micro- and nanometer scale

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In order to understand performance limitations and failure mechanisms of batteries, one has to investigate processes on the micro- and nanometer scale. A typical failure mechanism in lithium metal batteries is dendritic growth. During discharge, lithium is stripped of the anode surface and migrates to the cathode. During charge, lithium is deposited back on the anode. Repeated cycling can result in stripping and re-deposition that roughens the surface. The roughening of the surface changes the electric field and draws more metal to spikes that are beginning to grow. These can grow with tremendous mechanical force, puncture the separator, and directly connect the anode with the cathode which can create an internal short circuit. This can lead to an uncontrolled discharge reaction, which heats the cell and causes additional exothermic reactions leading to what is called thermal runaway. ORNL has developed a new technology called liquid electron microscopy. In a specially designed sample holder micro-chamber with electron-transparent windows, researchers can hold a liquid and take images of structures and particles at nanometer size. It's the first microscope holder of its kind used to investigate the inside of a battery while cycled.

  14. iPAINT: a general approach tailored to image the topology of interfaces with nanometer resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloi, A.; Vilanova, N.; Albertazzi, L.; Voets, I. K.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding interfacial phenomena in soft materials such as wetting, colloidal stability, coalescence, and friction warrants non-invasive imaging with nanometer resolution. Super-resolution microscopy has emerged as an attractive method to visualize nanostructures labeled covalently with fluorescent tags, but this is not amenable to all interfaces. Inspired by PAINT we developed a simple and general strategy to overcome this limitation, which we coin `iPAINT: interface Point Accumulation for Imaging in Nanoscale Topography'. It enables three-dimensional, sub-diffraction imaging of interfaces irrespective of their nature via reversible adsorption of polymer chains end-functionalized with photo-activatable moieties. We visualized model dispersions, emulsions, and foams with ~20 nm and ~3° accuracy demonstrating the general applicability of iPAINT to study solid/liquid, liquid/liquid and liquid/air interfaces. iPAINT thus broadens the scope of super-resolution microscopy paving the way for non-invasive, high-resolution imaging of complex soft materials.Understanding interfacial phenomena in soft materials such as wetting, colloidal stability, coalescence, and friction warrants non-invasive imaging with nanometer resolution. Super-resolution microscopy has emerged as an attractive method to visualize nanostructures labeled covalently with fluorescent tags, but this is not amenable to all interfaces. Inspired by PAINT we developed a simple and general strategy to overcome this limitation, which we coin `iPAINT: interface Point Accumulation for Imaging in Nanoscale Topography'. It enables three-dimensional, sub-diffraction imaging of interfaces irrespective of their nature via reversible adsorption of polymer chains end-functionalized with photo-activatable moieties. We visualized model dispersions, emulsions, and foams with ~20 nm and ~3° accuracy demonstrating the general applicability of iPAINT to study solid/liquid, liquid/liquid and liquid/air interfaces. i

  15. Generation Of 369.4-Nanometers Second Harmonic From A Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Angelyn P.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1995-01-01

    Experimental laser system features polarization feedback scheme maintaining frequency lock. Generates light at wavelength of 369.4 nanometers by second-harmonic generation from 738.8-nanometers laser diode. System prototype of source of 369.4-nanometers radiation used to optically pump 2S1/2 ' 2P1/2 transition in 171Yb+ ions in lightweight, low-power trapped-ion frequency-standard apparatus.

  16. Nanometer-sized dynamic entities in an aqueous system

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Zolnierczuk, Piotr A.; Ohl, Michael E.

    2015-01-05

    Using neutron spin-echo and backscattering spectroscopy, we have found that at low temperatures water molecules in an aqueous solution engage in center-of-mass dynamics that are different from both the main structural relaxations and the well-known localized motions in the transient cages of the nearest neighbor molecules. While the latter localized motions are known to take place on the picosecond time scale and Angstrom length scale, the slower motions that we have observed are found on the nanosecond time scale and nanometer length scale. They are associated with the slow secondary relaxations, or excess wing dynamics, in glass-forming liquids. Our approach, therefore, can be applied to probe the characteristic length scale of the dynamic entities associated with slow dynamics in glass-forming liquids, which presently cannot be studied by other experimental techniques.

  17. Nanometer-sized dynamic entities in an aqueous system

    DOE PAGES

    Mamontov, Eugene; Zolnierczuk, Piotr A.; Ohl, Michael E.

    2015-01-05

    Using neutron spin-echo and backscattering spectroscopy, we have found that at low temperatures water molecules in an aqueous solution engage in center-of-mass dynamics that are different from both the main structural relaxations and the well-known localized motions in the transient cages of the nearest neighbor molecules. While the latter localized motions are known to take place on the picosecond time scale and Angstrom length scale, the slower motions that we have observed are found on the nanosecond time scale and nanometer length scale. They are associated with the slow secondary relaxations, or excess wing dynamics, in glass-forming liquids. Our approach,more » therefore, can be applied to probe the characteristic length scale of the dynamic entities associated with slow dynamics in glass-forming liquids, which presently cannot be studied by other experimental techniques.« less

  18. Carbon Nanotubules: Building Blocks for Nanometer-Scale Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnott, Susan B.

    1997-01-01

    Proximal probe technology has provided researchers with new ways to investigate and manipulate matter on the nanometer scale. We have studied, through molecular dynamics simulations, using a many-body empirical potential, the indentation of a hydrogen-terminated, diamond (111 ) surface, with a proximal probe tip that consists of an open, hydrogen-terminated, (10,10) carbon nanotubule. The simulations showed that upon indenting 1.8 A, the tubule deforms but returns to its original shape upon retraction. The Young's modulus of the tubule was determined using the predicted Euler buckling force and was found to be comparable to measured and calculated values. In a second series of simulations, an open (10, 10) nanotubule was heated to 4500 K and allowed to close. We find that at this temperature the resulting cap contains numerous imperfections, including some not mentioned previously in the literature.

  19. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, J.E.; Kelly, T.F.

    1999-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains. 20 figs.

  20. Tunable nanometer electrode gaps by MeV ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheang-Wong, J.-C.; Narumi, K.; Schuermann, G. M.; Aziz, M. J.; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2012-04-09

    We report the use of MeV ion-irradiation-induced plastic deformation of amorphous materials to fabricate electrodes with nanometer-sized gaps. Plastic deformation of the amorphous metal Pd{sub 80}Si{sub 20} is induced by 4.64 MeV O{sup 2+} ion irradiation, allowing the complete closing of a sub-micrometer gap. We measure the evolving gap size in situ by monitoring the field emission current-voltage (I-V) characteristics between electrodes. The I-V behavior is consistent with Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. We show that using feedback control on this signal permits gap size fabrication with atomic-scale precision. We expect this approach to nanogap fabrication will enable the practical realization of single molecule controlled devices and sensors.

  1. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains.

  2. Sub-nanometer periodic nonlinearity error in absolute distance interferometers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongxing; Huang, Kaiqi; Hu, Pengcheng; Zhu, Pengfei; Tan, Jiubin; Fan, Zhigang

    2015-05-01

    Periodic nonlinearity which can result in error in nanometer scale has become a main problem limiting the absolute distance measurement accuracy. In order to eliminate this error, a new integrated interferometer with non-polarizing beam splitter is developed. This leads to disappearing of the frequency and/or polarization mixing. Furthermore, a strict requirement on the laser source polarization is highly reduced. By combining retro-reflector and angel prism, reference and measuring beams can be spatially separated, and therefore, their optical paths are not overlapped. So, the main cause of the periodic nonlinearity error, i.e., the frequency and/or polarization mixing and leakage of beam, is eliminated. Experimental results indicate that the periodic phase error is kept within 0.0018°.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Materials with Nanometer Scale Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    William D. Nix

    2004-10-31

    We have been engaged in research on the mechanical properties of materials with nanometer-scale microstructural dimensions. Our attention has been focused on studying the mechanical properties of thin films and interfaces and very small volumes of material. Because the dimensions of thin film samples are small (typically 1 mm in thickness, or less), specialized mechanical testing techniques based on nanoindentation, microbeam bending and dynamic vibration of micromachined structures have been developed and used. Here we report briefly on some of the results we have obtained over the past three years. We also give a summary of all of the dissertations, talks and publications completed on this grant during the past 15 years.

  4. Mass Spectrometry of Atmospheric Aerosol: 1 nanometer to 1 micron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsnop, D. R.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Kulmala, M. T.

    2010-12-01

    The role of aerosol particles remains the largest uncertainty in quantitatively assessing past, current and future climate change. The principal reason for that uncertainty arises from the need to characterize and model composition and size dependent aerosol processes, ranging from nanometer to micron scales. Aerosol mass spectrometry results have shown that about half the sub-micron aerosol composition is composed of highly oxygenated organics that are not well understood in terms of photochemical reaction mechanisms (Jimenez et al, 2009). This work has included application of high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS) in order to determine elemental and functional group composition of complex organic components. Recently, we have applied similar ToFMS to determine the composition of ambient ions, molecules and clusters, potentially involved in formation and growth of nano-particles (Junninen et al, 2010). Observed organic anions (molecular weight range 200-500 Th) have similar chemical composition as the least volatile secondary organics observed in fine particles; while organic cations are dominated by amines and pyridines. During nucleation events, anions are dominated by sulphuric acid cluster ions (Ehn et al, 2010). In both nanometer and micrometer size ranges, the goal to elucidate the roles of inorganic and organic species, particularly how particle evolution and physical properties depend on mixed compositions. Recent results will be discussed, including ambient and experimental chamber observations. Ehn et al, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 10, 14897-14946, 2010 Jimenez et al, Science, 326, 1525-1529, 2009 Junninen et al, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 3, 1039-1053, 2010

  5. Three-dimensional nanometer scale analyses of precipitate structures and local compositions in titanium aluminide engineering alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstl, Stephan S. A.

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) alloys are among the fastest developing class of materials for use in high temperature structural applications. Their low density and high strength make them excellent candidates for both engine and airframe applications. Creep properties of TiAl alloys, however, have been a limiting factor in applying the material to a larger commercial market. In this research, nanometer scale compositional and structural analyses of several TiAl alloys, ranging from model Ti-Al-C ternary alloys to putative commercial alloys with 10 components are investigated utilizing three dimensional atom probe (3DAP) and transmission electron microscopies. Nanometer sized borides, silicides, and carbide precipitates are involved in strengthening TiAl alloys, however, chemical partitioning measurements reveal oxygen concentrations up to 14 at. % within the precipitate phases, resulting in the realization of oxycarbide formation contributing to the precipitation strengthening of TiAl alloys. The local compositions of lamellar microstructures and a variety of precipitates in the TiAl system, including boride, silicide, binary carbides, and intermetallic carbides are investigated. Chemical partitioning of the microalloying elements between the alpha2/gamma lamellar phases, and the precipitate/gamma-matrix phases are determined. Both W and Hf have been shown to exhibit a near interfacial excess of 0.26 and 0.35 atoms nm-2 respectively within ca. 7 nm of lamellar interfaces in a complex TiAl alloy. In the case of needle-shaped perovskite Ti3AlC carbide precipitates, periodic domain boundaries are observed 5.3+/-0.8 nm apart along their growth axis parallel to the TiAl[001] crystallographic direction with concomitant composition variations after 24 hrs. at 800°C.

  6. Whole-cell imaging at nanometer resolutions using fast and slow focused helium ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Udalagama, Chammika N B; Chen, Ce-Belle; Bettiol, Andrew A; Pickard, Daniel S; Venkatesan, T; Watt, Frank

    2011-10-05

    Observations of the interior structure of cells and subcellular organelles are important steps in unraveling organelle functions. Microscopy using helium ions can play a major role in both surface and subcellular imaging because it can provide subnanometer resolutions at the cell surface for slow helium ions, and fast helium ions can penetrate cells without a significant loss of resolution. Slow (e.g., 10-50 keV) helium ion beams can now be focused to subnanometer dimensions (∼0.25 nm), and keV helium ion microscopy can be used to image the surfaces of cells at high resolutions. Because of the ease of neutralizing the sample charge using a flood electron beam, surface charging effects are minimal and therefore cell surfaces can be imaged without the need for a conducting metallic coating. Fast (MeV) helium ions maintain a straight path as they pass through a cell. Along the ion trajectory, the helium ion undergoes multiple electron collisions, and for each collision a small amount of energy is lost to the scattered electron. By measuring the total energy loss of each MeV helium ion as it passes through the cell, we can construct an energy-loss image that is representative of the mass distribution of the cell. This work paves the way to use ions for whole-cell investigations at nanometer resolutions through structural, elemental (via nuclear elastic backscattering), and fluorescence (via ion induced fluorescence) imaging.

  7. Fabrication of 200 nanometer period centimeter area hard x-ray absorption gratings by multilayer deposition

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, S K; Liu, C; Morgan, N Y; Xiao, X; Gomella, A A; Mazilu, D; Bennett, E E; Assoufid, L; de Carlo, F; Wen, H

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design and fabrication trials of x-ray absorption gratings of 200 nm period and up to 100:1 depth-to-period ratios for full-field hard x-ray imaging applications. Hard x-ray phase-contrast imaging relies on gratings of ultra-small periods and sufficient depth to achieve high sensitivity. Current grating designs utilize lithographic processes to produce periodic vertical structures, where grating periods below 2.0 μm are difficult due to the extreme aspect ratios of the structures. In our design, multiple bilayers of x-ray transparent and opaque materials are deposited on a staircase substrate, and mostly on the floor surfaces of the steps only. When illuminated by an x-ray beam horizontally, the multilayer stack on each step functions as a micro-grating whose grating period is the thickness of a bilayer. The array of micro-gratings over the length of the staircase works as a single grating over a large area when continuity conditions are met. Since the layers can be nanometers thick and many microns wide, this design allows sub-micron grating periods and sufficient grating depth to modulate hard x-rays. We present the details of the fabrication process and diffraction profiles and contact radiography images showing successful intensity modulation of a 25 keV x-ray beam. PMID:23066175

  8. Three-Dimensional Nanometer Features of Direct Current Electrical Trees in Low-Density Polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Pallon, Love K H; Nilsson, Fritjof; Yu, Shun; Liu, Dongming; Diaz, Ana; Holler, Mirko; Chen, Xiangrong R; Gubanski, Stanislaw; Hedenqvist, Mikael S; Olsson, Richard T; Gedde, Ulf W

    2017-03-08

    Electrical trees are one reason for the breakdown of insulating materials in electrical power systems. An understanding of the growth of electrical trees plays a crucial role in the development of reliable high voltage direct current (HVDC) power grid systems with transmission voltages up to 1 MV. A section that contained an electrical tree in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) has been visualized in three dimensions (3D) with a resolution of 92 nm by X-ray ptychographic tomography. The 3D imaging revealed prechannel-formations with a lower density with the width of a couple of hundred nanometers formed around the main branch of the electrical tree. The prechannel structures were partially connected with the main tree via paths through material with a lower density, proving that the tree had grown in a step-by-step manner via the prestep structures formed in front of the main channels. All the prechannel structures had a size well below the limit of the Paschen law and were thus not formed by partial discharges. Instead, it is suggested that the prechannel structures were formed by electro-mechanical stress and impact ionization, where the former was confirmed by simulations to be a potential explanation with electro-mechanical stress tensors being almost of the same order of magnitude as the short-term modulus of low-density polyethylene.

  9. Nanometer-scale imaging and pore-scale fluid flow modeling inchalk

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, Liviu; Silin, Dmitriy; Radmilovich, Velimir

    2005-08-23

    For many rocks of high economic interest such as chalk,diatomite, tight gas sands or coal, nanometer scale resolution is neededto resolve the 3D-pore structure, which controls the flow and trapping offluids in the rocks. Such resolutions cannot be achieved with existingtomographic technologies. A new 3D imaging method, based on serialsectioning and using the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technology has beendeveloped. FIB allows for the milling of layers as thin as 10 nanometersby using accelerated Ga+ ions to sputter atoms from the sample surface.After each milling step, as a new surface is exposed, a 2D image of thissurface is generated. Next, the 2D images are stacked to reconstruct the3D pore or grain structure. Resolutions as high as 10 nm are achievableusing this technique. A new image processing method uses directmorphological analysis of the pore space to characterize thepetrophysical properties of diverse formations. In addition to estimationof the petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability, relativepermeability and capillary pressures), the method is used for simulationof fluid displacement processes, such as those encountered in variousimproved oil recovery (IOR) approaches. Computed with the new methodcapillary pressure curves are in good agreement with laboratory data. Themethod has also been applied for visualization of the fluid distributionat various saturations from the new FIB data.

  10. Detecting the topographic, chemical and magnetic contrast at surfaces with nanometer spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, H.; Zanin, D. A.; de Pietro, L. G.; Vindigni, A.; Ramsperger, U.; Pescia, D.; Microstructure Research Team

    2015-03-01

    Since the mid of the 1980s and over the past few decades various conventional electron spectroscopies were combined with electron spin sensitivity to investigate the magnetic properties of surfaces and thin films, evolving into the Scanning-Electron-Microscopy with Polarization Analysis (SEMPA) technique, which made it possible to directly observe the re-entrant transitions of magnetic-domain patterns in thin films of Fe on Cu(001) with several tens of nm resolution. The possibility of resolving magnetic-textures in direct space at atomic scale may trigger both fundamental perspectives and novel applications. Inspired by the Russell Young topografiner we redesigned the SEMPA setup by replacing the primary electron beam source and the probing method. We dubbed this new technique Near Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (NFESEM). Recently, we have used NFESEM to map the surface of some metals and semiconductors with nanometer lateral resolution. We report here on the latest results showing energy-resolved surface images and the first attempt to endowing this technique with the polarisation analysis of the detected secondary electrons by using of a Mott-detector, emphasizing the true potential of this new technique.

  11. Preparation of nanometer-sized black iron oxide pigment by recycling of blast furnace flue dust.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lazhen; Qiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Yong; Tan, Junru

    2010-05-15

    Blast furnace (BF) flue dust is one of pollutants emitted by iron and steel plants. The recycling of BF flue dust can not only reduce pollution but also bring social and environmental benefits. In this study, leaching technique was employed to the treatment of BF flue dust at first. A mixed solution of ferrous and ferric sulfate was obtained and used as raw material to prepare nanometer-sized black iron oxide pigment (Fe(3)O(4), magnetite) with NaOH as precipitant. The optimal technological conditions including total iron ion concentration, Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) mole ratio, precipitant concentration and reaction temperature were studied and discussed carefully. The spectral reflectance and oil absorption were used as major parameters to evaluate performance of pigment. Furthermore, Fe(3)O(4) particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Under optimized conditions obtained pigment has low average spectral reflectance (<4%), good oil absorption ( approximately 23%), high black intensity, and narrow size distribution 60-70 nm.

  12. Structure and electrochemical properties of nanometer Cu substituted α-nickel hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Zhu, Yanjuan; Zhang, Zhongju; Xu, Qingsheng; Zhao, Weiren; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Han, Quanyong

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Cu substituted α-nickel hydroxide was prepared by ultrasonic assisted precipitation. ► The XRD peaks are anisotropic broadening. ► The electrode for 0.9 wt.% Cu has the highest capacity of 310 mAh/g at 0.2 C. -- Abstract: Nanometer Cu-substituted α-nickel hydroxide was synthesized by means of ultrasonic-assisted precipitation. Particle size distribution (PSD) measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) were used to characterize the physical properties of the synthesized samples. The results indicate that the average particle size of the samples is about 96–110 nm and the XRD diffraction peaks are anisotropic broadening. The crystal grains are mainly polycrystal structure with columnar or needle-like morphology, containing many defects. With increase of Cu content, the shape of primary particles transform from columnar to needle-like. The influences of doping amounts of Cu on the electrochemical performance were investigated through constant current charge/discharge and cyclic voltammetric measurements. The specific capacity increases initially and then decreases with increasing Cu-doping ratio, the electrode C containing 0.9 wt.% Cu shows the maximum discharge capacity of 310 mAh/g at 0.2 C, and it has the lowest charging voltage, higher discharge voltage plateau, better cycle performance and larger proton diffusion coefficient than the other electrodes.

  13. Preparation and properties of nanometer silk fibroin peptide/polyvinyl alcohol blend films for cell growth.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qin; Chen, Zhongmin; Hao, Xuefei; Zhu, Qiangsong; Zhou, Yucheng

    2013-10-01

    Nanometer silk fibroin peptide (Nano-SFP) was prepared from silkworm cocoons through the process of dissolution, dialysis and enzymolysis. For comparison, silk fibroin was decomposed with α-chymotrypsin, trypsin and neutrase, respectively. From the SEM and particle size analysis results, the Nano-SFP prepared by neutrase was found to be the most desirable at about 50-200 nm. Nano-SFP/polyvinyl alcohol films (Nano-SFP/PVA) were prepared by blending Nano-SFP and PVA in water with different weight ratios of 10/90, 20/80, 30/70, and 40/60. The films were characterized by IR, SEM, TG, DSC and tensile strength test for investigating their structure, surface morphology, thermostability, and mechanical property. The results showed that Nano-SFP inserted in the PVA films with small linear particles, and Nano-SFP/PVA films exhibited smooth surface, good thermostability and tensile strength. The growth of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells on films with and without Nano-SFP was investigated with MTT colorimetric assay to assess the films' ability to promote cell growth. It was observed that the Nano-SFP improved cell adhesion on the film surface, and the ability of promoting cell growth increased with the increasing content of Nano-SFP in the blend films. Nano-SFP/PVA film with the ratio of 30/70 was concluded to have the best properties.

  14. A Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) for Rapid Measurement of High-concentration Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hee-Siew; Chen, Da-Ren; Pui, David Y. H.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a fast-response nanometer aerosol size analyzer (nASA) that is capable of scanning 30 size channels between 3 and 100 nm in a total time of 3 s. The analyzer includes a bipolar charger (Po210), an extended-length nanometer differential mobility analyzer (Nano-DMA), and an electrometer (TSI 3068). This combination of components provides particle size spectra at a scan rate of 0.1 s per channel free of uncertainties caused by response-time-induced smearing. The nASA thus offers a fast response for aerosol size distribution measurements in high-concentration conditions and also eliminates the need for applying a de-smearing algorithm to resulting data. In addition, because of its thermodynamically stable means of particle detection, the nASA is useful for applications requiring measurements over a broad range of sample pressures and temperatures. Indeed, experimental transfer functions determined for the extended-length Nano-DMA using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique indicate the nASA provides good size resolution at pressures as low as 200 Torr. Also, as was demonstrated in tests to characterize the soot emissions from the J85-GE engine of a T-38 aircraft, the broad dynamic concentration range of the nASA makes it particularly suitable for studies of combustion or particle formation processes. Further details of the nASA performance as well as results from calibrations, laboratory tests and field applications are presented below.

  15. A Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) for Rapid Measurement of High-Concentration Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Hee-Siew; Chen, Da-Ren; Pui, David Y. H.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a fast-response Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) that is capable of scanning 30 size channels between 3 and 100 nm in a total time of 3 seconds. The analyzer includes a bipolar charger (P0210), an extended-length Nanometer Differential Mobility Analyzer (Nano-DMA), and an electrometer (TSI 3068). This combination of components provides particle size spectra at a scan rate of 0.1 second per channel free of uncertainties caused by response-time-induced smearing. The nASA thus offers a fast response for aerosol size distribution measurements in high-concentration conditions and also eliminates the need for applying a de-smearing algorithm to resulting data. In addition, because of its thermodynamically stable means of particle detection, the nASA is useful for applications requiring measurements over a broad range of sample pressures and temperatures. Indeed, experimental transfer functions determined for the extended-length Nano-DMA using the Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) technique indicate the nASA provides good size resolution at pressures as low as 200 Torr. Also, as was demonstrated in tests to characterize the soot emissions from the J85-GE engine of a T38 aircraft, the broad dynamic concentration range of the nASA makes it particularly suitable for studies of combustion or particle formation processes. Further details of the nASA performance as well as results from calibrations, laboratory tests and field applications are presented.

  16. Nanometer-thin TiO2 enhances skeletal muscle cell phenotype and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ishizaki, Ken; Sugita, Yoshihiko; Iwasa, Fuminori; Minamikawa, Hajime; Ueno, Takeshi; Yamada, Masahiro; Suzuki, Takeo; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Background The independent role of the surface chemistry of titanium in determining its biological properties is yet to be determined. Although titanium implants are often in contact with muscle tissue, the interaction of muscle cells with titanium is largely unknown. This study tested the hypotheses that the surface chemistry of clinically established microroughened titanium surfaces could be controllably varied by coating with a minimally thin layer of TiO2 (ideally pico-to-nanometer in thickness) without altering the existing topographical and roughness features, and that the change in superficial chemistry of titanium is effective in improving the biological properties of titanium. Methods and results Acid-etched microroughened titanium surfaces were coated with TiO2 using slow-rate sputter deposition of molten TiO2 nanoparticles. A TiO2 coating of 300 pm to 6.3 nm increased the surface oxygen on the titanium substrates in a controllable manner, but did not alter the existing microscale architecture and roughness of the substrates. Cells derived from rat skeletal muscles showed increased attachment, spread, adhesion strength, proliferation, gene expression, and collagen production at the initial and early stage of culture on 6.3 nm thick TiO2-coated microroughened titanium surfaces compared with uncoated titanium surfaces. Conclusion Using an exemplary slow-rate sputter deposition technique of molten TiO2 nanoparticles, this study demonstrated that titanium substrates, even with microscale roughness, can be sufficiently chemically modified to enhance their biological properties without altering the existing microscale morphology. The controllable and exclusive chemical modification technique presented in this study may open a new avenue for surface modifications of titanium-based biomaterials for better cell and tissue affinity and reaction. PMID:22114483

  17. Study of program defects of 22nm nanoimprint template with an advanced e-beam inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraka, Takaaki; Mizuochi, Jun; Nakanishi, Yuko; Yusa, Satoshi; Sasaki, Shiho; Kurihara, Masaaki; Toyama, Nobuhito; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya; Xiao, Hong; Kuan, Chiyan; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Zhao, Yan; Jau, Jack

    2009-10-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a candidate of alternative, low cost of ownership lithography solution for deep nano-meter device manufacturing12. For the NIL template pattern making, we have been developing the processes with 100keV SB EB writer and 50keV VSB EB writer to achieve the fine resolution of near 20nm1-7. However, inspection of nanoimprint template posed a big challenge to inspection system due to the small geometry, 1x comparing to 4x of Optical mask and EUV mask. Previous studies of nanoimprint template inspection were performed indirectly on a stamped wafer and/or on a round quartz wafer13. Electron beam inspection (EBI) systems have been widely used in semiconductor fabs in nanometer technology nodes. Most commonly EBI applications are electrical defects, or voltage contrast (VC) defects detection and monitoring8-11. In this study, we used a mask EBI system developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI) to directly inspect a NIL template with line/space and hole patterns half pitched from 22nm to 90nm and with program defects sized from 4nm to 92nm. Capability of inspection with 10nm pixel size has been demonstrated and capability of capturing program defects sized 12nm and smaller has been shown. This study proved the feasibility of EBI as inspection solution of nanoimprint template for 22nmHP and beyond.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Scanning Probe for Surface Profiling of DUV and 193 nm Photoresist Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Stevens, Ramsey M. D.; Barber, Jabulani; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Sanchez, Martha I.; Larson, Carl; Hinsberg, William D.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The continual scaling down of semiconductors to 100 nm and below necessitates a characterization technique to resolve high aspect ratio features in the nanoscale regime. This paper reports the use of atomic force microscope coupled with high aspect ratio multi-walled carbon nanotube scanning probe tip for the purpose of imaging surface profile of photoresists. Multi-walled carbon nanotube tips used in this work are 5-10 nm in diameter and about a micron long. Their exceptional mechanical strength and ability to reversibly buckle enable to resolve steep, deep nanometer-scale features. Images of photoresist patterns generated by 257 nm interference lithography as well as 193 nm lithography are presented to demonstrate multi-walled carbon nanotube scanning probe tip for applications in metrology.

  19. Surface forces of colloidal particles from micrometer to nanometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jeong-Min

    2003-10-01

    Surface forces of colloidal particles play critical roles in the macroscopic behavior of particulate systems such as dispersion and coagulation, adhesion and coating, and the rheological behavior of ceramic slurries. As particle size is decreased from micrometer to nanometer range, surface forces are increasingly important. Polyelectrolytes are the chemical additives commonly used to efficiently control the stabilization of the colloidal system. Their conformations on the solid surfaces as well as the interactions between the adsorbed polyelectrolytes are important issues in colloidal processing. Most experimental and theoretical approaches to the surface forces are based on particle sizes in the micrometer range. However, nanoparticles at close proximity or high solids loading are expected to show different behavior than what can be estimated from conventional theories such as continuum or mean field theories. My study examined the effect of pH, ionic strength, and molecular weight of the polyelectrolytes on the surface forces of colloidal particles by the interplay with the adsorption, turbidity, and direct surface force measurement in terms of the conformation on the solid surfaces. The colloid probe technique based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) is well established for micron size particles; and could be extended for nanosize particles by using carbon nanotubes as proximal probes. Nanotubes with their high aspect ratio avoid the contribution from cone shapes that happens with AFM tips. The difference in particle size significantly influences surface forces for sterically dispersed colloidal systems.

  20. Characterization of a superlubricity nanometer interface by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunsheng; Yang, Xing; Liu, Bingqi; Dong, Hualai; Zheng, Quanshui

    2016-08-01

    Despite being known for almost two decades, the use of micro-/nano-electromechanical systems in commercial applications remains a challenge because of stiction, friction, and the wear of the interface. Superlubricity may be the solution to these challenges. In this paper, we study factors affecting the realization of superlubricity. Raman spectroscopy and other methods were used to characterize a graphite interface which can realize superlubricity and another graphite interface which cannot realize superlubricity. Raman spectra of the interfaces were obtained with the mapping mode and then processed to obtain the Raman images of the characteristic peaks. The Raman spectra provided the distribution of the surface defects and probed defects. Combined with atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the Raman spectra show that the sp3 carbons and carbon-oxygen bond stuck at the edge of the graphite mesa are some of the determinants of large-area superlubricity realization. The characterization results can also be used to understand the friction and wear of large-area superlubricity, which are important for development and application of superlubricity. Furthermore, the methods used in this study are useful techniques and tools for the mechanism analysis of other nanometer interfaces.

  1. Depositing nanometer-sized particles of metals onto carbon allotropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Fallbach, Michael J. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Delozier, Donavon M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for depositing nanometer-sized metal particles onto a substrate in the absence of aqueous solvents, organic solvents, and reducing agents, and without any required pre-treatment of the substrate, includes preparing an admixture of a metal compound and a substrate by dry mixing a chosen amount of the metal compound with a chosen amount of the substrate; and supplying energy to the admixture in an amount sufficient to deposit zero valance metal particles onto the substrate. This process gives rise to a number of deposited metallic particle sizes which may be controlled. The compositions prepared by this process are used to produce polymer composites by combining them with readily available commodity and engineering plastics. The polymer composites are used as coatings, or they are used to fabricate articles, such as free-standing films, fibers, fabrics, foams, molded and laminated articles, tubes, adhesives, and fiber reinforced articles. These articles are well-suited for many applications requiring thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, antibacterial activity, catalytic activity, and combinations thereof.

  2. Characterization of a superlubricity nanometer interface by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunsheng; Yang, Xing; Liu, Bingqi; Dong, Hualai; Zheng, Quanshui

    2016-08-12

    Despite being known for almost two decades, the use of micro-/nano-electromechanical systems in commercial applications remains a challenge because of stiction, friction, and the wear of the interface. Superlubricity may be the solution to these challenges. In this paper, we study factors affecting the realization of superlubricity. Raman spectroscopy and other methods were used to characterize a graphite interface which can realize superlubricity and another graphite interface which cannot realize superlubricity. Raman spectra of the interfaces were obtained with the mapping mode and then processed to obtain the Raman images of the characteristic peaks. The Raman spectra provided the distribution of the surface defects and probed defects. Combined with atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the Raman spectra show that the sp(3) carbons and carbon-oxygen bond stuck at the edge of the graphite mesa are some of the determinants of large-area superlubricity realization. The characterization results can also be used to understand the friction and wear of large-area superlubricity, which are important for development and application of superlubricity. Furthermore, the methods used in this study are useful techniques and tools for the mechanism analysis of other nanometer interfaces.

  3. Remote optical sensing on the nanometer scale with a bowtie aperture nano-antenna on a fiber tip of scanning near-field optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Atie, Elie M.; Xie, Zhihua; El Eter, Ali; Salut, Roland; Baida, Fadi I.; Grosjean, Thierry; Nedeljkovic, Dusan; Tannous, Tony

    2015-04-13

    Plasmonic nano-antennas have proven the outstanding ability of sensing chemical and physical processes down to the nanometer scale. Sensing is usually achieved within the highly confined optical fields generated resonantly by the nano-antennas, i.e., in contact to the nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate the sensing capability of nano-antennas to their larger scale environment, well beyond their plasmonic confinement volume, leading to the concept of “remote” (non contact) sensing on the nanometer scale. On the basis of a bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) integrated at the apex of a SNOM (Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy) fiber tip, we introduce an ultra-compact, moveable, and background-free optical nanosensor for the remote sensing of a silicon surface (up to distance of 300 nm). Sensitivity of the BNA to its large scale environment is high enough to expect the monitoring and control of the spacing between the nano-antenna and a silicon surface with sub-nanometer accuracy. This work paves the way towards an alternative class of nanopositioning techniques, based on the monitoring of diffraction-free plasmon resonance, that are alternative to nanomechanical and diffraction-limited optical interference-based devices.

  4. Hyperbranched polyglycerols on the nanometer and micrometer scale.

    PubMed

    Steinhilber, Dirk; Seiffert, Sebastian; Heyman, John A; Paulus, Florian; Weitz, David A; Haag, Rainer

    2011-02-01

    We report the preparation of polyglycerol particles on different length scales by extending the size of hyperbranched polyglycerols (3 nm) to nanogels (32 nm) and microgels (140 and 220 μm). We use miniemulsion templating for the preparation of nanogels and microfluidic templating for the preparation of microgels, which we obtain through a free-radical polymerization of hyperbranched polyglycerol decaacrylate and polyethylene glycol-diacrylate. The use of mild polymerization conditions allows yeast cells to be encapsulated into the resultant microgels with cell viabilities of approximately 30%.

  5. Zernike Phase Contrast Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Tomography for Structure Determination at Nanometer and Sub-Nanometer Resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Kazuyoshi; Liu, Xiangan; Danev, Radostin; Jakana, Joanita; Schmid, Michael F.; King, Jonathan; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Chiu, Wah

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron microscopy (ZPC-cryoEM) is an emerging technique which is capable of producing higher image contrast than conventional cryoEM. By combining this technique with advanced image processing methods, we achieved subnanometer resolution for two biological specimens: 2-D bacteriorhodopsin crystal and epsilon15 bacteriophage. For an asymmetric reconstruction of epsilon15 bacteriophage, ZPC-cryoEM can reduce the required amount of data by a factor of ~3 compared to conventional cryoEM. The reconstruction was carried out to 13 Å resolution without the need to correct the contrast transfer function. New structural features at the portal vertex of the epsilon15 bacteriophage are revealed in this reconstruction. Using ZPC cryo-electron tomography (ZPC-cryoET), a similar level of data reduction and higher resolution structures of epsilon15 bacteriophage can be obtained relative to conventional cryoET. These results show quantitatively the benefits of ZPC-cryoEM and -cryoET for structural determinations of macromolecular machines at nanometer and subnanometer resolutions. PMID:20696391

  6. The Necessity for β-Carotene in the 518 Nanometer Absorbance Change 1

    PubMed Central

    Strichartz, Gary R.

    1971-01-01

    The identity of the pigment responsible for the light-induced 518 nanometer absorbance change was investigated by extraction and reconstitution of spinach chloroplasts. Heptane extraction of carotene and quinones from lyophilized chloroplasts removes absorbance changes at 518 and 475 nanometers activated by both laser flash and continuous illumination. Some electron transport activity is always present, even in carotene- and quinone-depleted chloroplasts, but the light-induced pH increase disappears following the first extraction step. Readdition of pure β-carotene partially restores the 518 and 475 nanometer absorbance changes. PMID:16657837

  7. Nanometer-thin solid-state nanopores by cold ion beam sculpting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Aaron T.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2012-05-01

    Recent work on protein nanopores indicates that single molecule characterization (including DNA sequencing) is possible when the length of the nanopore constriction is about a nanometer. Solid-state nanopores offer advantages in stability and tunability, but a scalable method for creating nanometer-thin solid-state pores has yet to be demonstrated. Here we demonstrate that solid-state nanopores with nanometer-thin constrictions can be produced by "cold ion beam sculpting," an original method that is broadly applicable to many materials, is easily scalable, and requires only modest instrumentation.

  8. Selective surface activation of a functional monolayer for the fabrication of nanometer scale thiol patterns and directed self-assembly of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fresco, Zachary M; Fréchet, Jean M J

    2005-06-15

    Application of a voltage bias between the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and a silicon substrate causes the localized modification of a specially designed self-assembled monolayer (SAM), transforming a surface-bound thiocarbonate into a surface-bound thiol. The resulting surface-bound thiols are used to direct the patternwise self-assembly of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). This methodology is applied to deposit individual AuNPs onto a surface with nanometer precision and to produce 10 nm lines of closely spaced AuNPs that are a single nanoparticle in width.

  9. Combining dissimilar materials at nanometer scale for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2010-04-01

    The development of next-generation energy resources that are reliable and economically/environmentally acceptable is a key to harnessing and providing the resources essential for the life of mankind. Our research focuses on the development of novel semiconductor platforms that would significantly benefit energy harvesting, in particular, from light and heat. In these critical applications, traditional semiconductor solid-state devices, such as photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric (TE) devices based on a stack of single-crystal semiconductor thin films or single-crystal bulk semiconductor have several drawbacks, for instance; scalability-limits arise when ultra-large-scale implementation is envisioned for PV devices and performance-limits arise for TE devices in which the interplay of both electronic and phonon systems is important. In our research, various types of nanometer-scale semiconductor structures (e.g., nanowires and nanoparticles) coupled to or embedded within a micrometer-scale semiconductor structure (i.e., semiconductor nanomicrometer hybrid platforms) are explored to build a variety of non-conventional PV and TE devices. Two core projects are to develop semiconductor nano-micrometer hybrid platforms based on (1) an ensemble of single-crystal semiconductor nanowires connected to non-single-crystal semiconductor surfaces and (2) semimetallic nanoparticles embedded within a single-crystal semiconductor. The semiconductor nano-micrometer hybrid platforms are studied within the context of their basic electronic, optical, and thermal properties, which will be further assessed and validated by comparison with theoretical approaches to draw comprehensive pictures of physicochemical properties of these semiconductor platforms.

  10. Local mechanical spectroscopy with nanometer-scale lateral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulevey, F.; Gremaud, G.; Sémoroz, A.; Kulik, A. J.; Burnham, N. A.; Dupas, E.; Gourdon, D.

    1998-05-01

    A new technique has been developed to probe the viscoelastic and anelastic properties of submicron phases of inhomogeneous materials. The measurement gives information related to the internal friction and to the variations of the dynamic modulus of nanometer-sized volumes. It is then the nanoscale equivalent to mechanical spectroscopy, a well-known macroscopic technique for materials studies, also sometimes called dynamic mechanical (thermal) analysis. The technique is based on a scanning force microscope, using the principle of scanning local-acceleration microscopy (SLAM), and allows the sample temperature to be changed. It is called variable-temperature SLAM, abbreviated T-SLAM. According to a recent proposition to systematize names of scanning probe microscope based methods, this technique should be included in the family of "mechanothermal analysis with scanning microscopy." It is suited for studying defect dynamics in nanomaterials and composites by locating the dissipative mechanisms in submicron phases. The primary and secondary relaxations, as well as the viscoplasticity, were observed in bulk PVC. The wide range of phenomena demonstrate the versatility of the technique. A still unexplained increase of the stiffness with increasing temperature was observed just below the glass transition. All of these observations, although their interpretation in terms of physical events is still tentative, are in agreement with global studies. This technique also permits one to image the variations of the local elasticity or of the local damping at a fixed temperature. This enables the study of, for instance, the homogeneity of phase transitions in multiphased materials, or of the interface morphologies and properties. As an illustration, the homogeneity of the glass transition temperature of PVC in a 50/50 wt % PVC/PB polymer blend has been demonstrated. Due to the small size of the probed volume, T-SLAM gives information on the mechanical properties of the near

  11. Nanometer-thick flat lens with adjustable focus

    SciTech Connect

    Son, T. V.; Haché, A.; Ba, C. O. F.; Vallée, R.

    2014-12-08

    We report laser beam focusing by a flat, homogeneous film with a thickness of less than 100 nm. The effect relies on refractive index changes occurring in vanadium dioxide as it undergoes a phase transition from insulator to metal. Phase front curvature is achieved by means of temperature gradients, and adjustable focal lengths from infinity to 30 cm are attained.

  12. Microbes make average 2 nanometer diameter crystalline UO2 particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Banfield, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    It is well known that phylogenetically diverse groups of microorganisms are capable of catalyzing the reduction of highly soluble U(VI) to highly insoluble U(IV), which rapidly precipitates as uraninite (UO2). Because biological uraninite is highly insoluble, microbial uranyl reduction is being intensively studied as the basis for a cost-effective in-situ bioremediation strategy. Previous studies have described UO2 biomineralization products as amorphous or poorly crystalline. The objective of this study is to characterize the nanocrystalline uraninite in detail in order to determine the particle size, crystallinity, and size-related structural characteristics, and to examine the implications of these for reoxidation and transport. In this study, we obtained U-contaminated sediment and water from an inactive U mine and incubated them anaerobically with nutrients to stimulate reductive precipitation of UO2 by indigenous anaerobic bacteria, mainly Gram-positive spore-forming Desulfosporosinus and Clostridium spp. as revealed by RNA-based phylogenetic analysis. Desulfosporosinus sp. was isolated from the sediment and UO2 was precipitated by this isolate from a simple solution that contains only U and electron donors. We characterized UO2 formed in both of the experiments by high resolution-TEM (HRTEM) and X-ray absorption fine structure analysis (XAFS). The results from HRTEM showed that both the pure and the mixed cultures of microorganisms precipitated around 1.5 - 3 nm crystalline UO2 particles. Some particles as small as around 1 nm could be imaged. Rare particles around 10 nm in diameter were also present. Particles adhere to cells and form colloidal aggregates with low fractal dimension. In some cases, coarsening by oriented attachment on \\{111\\} is evident. Our preliminary results from XAFS for the incubated U-contaminated sample also indicated an average diameter of UO2 of 2 nm. In nanoparticles, the U-U distance obtained by XAFS was 0.373 nm, 0.012 nm

  13. Accurate in-line CD metrology for nanometer semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perng, Baw-Ching; Shieh, Jyu-Horng; Jang, S.-M.; Liang, M.-S.; Huang, Renee; Chen, Li-Chien; Hwang, Ruey-Lian; Hsu, Joe; Fong, David

    2006-03-01

    The need for absolute accuracy is increasing as semiconductor-manufacturing technologies advance to sub-65nm nodes, since device sizes are reducing to sub-50nm but offsets ranging from 5nm to 20nm are often encountered. While TEM is well-recognized as the most accurate CD metrology, direct comparison between the TEM data and in-line CD data might be misleading sometimes due to different statistical sampling and interferences from sidewall roughness. In this work we explore the capability of CD-AFM as an accurate in-line CD reference metrology. Being a member of scanning profiling metrology, CD-AFM has the advantages of avoiding e-beam damage and minimum sample damage induced CD changes, in addition to the capability of more statistical sampling than typical cross section metrologies. While AFM has already gained its reputation on the accuracy of depth measurement, not much data was reported on the accuracy of CD-AFM for CD measurement. Our main focus here is to prove the accuracy of CD-AFM and show its measuring capability for semiconductor related materials and patterns. In addition to the typical precision check, we spent an intensive effort on examining the bias performance of this CD metrology, which is defined as the difference between CD-AFM data and the best-known CD value of the prepared samples. We first examine line edge roughness (LER) behavior for line patterns of various materials, including polysilicon, photoresist, and a porous low k material. Based on the LER characteristics of each patterning, a method is proposed to reduce its influence on CD measurement. Application of our method to a VLSI nanoCD standard is then performed, and agreement of less than 1nm bias is achieved between the CD-AFM data and the standard's value. With very careful sample preparations and TEM tool calibration, we also obtained excellent correlation between CD-AFM and TEM for poly-CDs ranging from 70nm to 400nm. CD measurements of poly ADI and low k trenches are also

  14. Alternating-current induced thermal fatigue of gold interconnects with nanometer-scale thickness and width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lijuan; Ling, Xue; Li, Xide

    2011-10-01

    With dramatic reduction in sizes of microelectronic devices, the characteristic width and thickness of interconnects in large-scale integrated circuits have reached nanometer scale. Thermal fatigue damage of so small interconnects has attracted more and more attentions. In this work, thermal fatigue of Au interconnects, 35 nm thick and 0.1-5 μm wide, is investigated by applying various alternating current densities to generate cycling temperature and strain in them. A multi-probe measuring system is installed in a scanning electron microscope and a probe-type temperature sensor is for the first time introduced into the system for real-time measuring the temperatures on the pads of the tested interconnects. A one-dimensional heat conduction equation, which uses measured temperatures on the pads as boundary conditions and includes a term of heat dissipation through the interface between the interconnect and the oxidized silicon substrate, is proposed to calculate the time-resolved temperature distribution along the Au interconnects. The measured fatigue lifetimes are presented versus current density and thermal cyclic strain, and the results show that narrower Au lines are more reliable. The failure mechanism of those Au interconnects differs from what is observed in thick interconnects with relatively larger grain size. Topography change caused by localized plasticity on the less-constrained surfaces of the interconnects have not been observed. Instead, grain growing and reorienting due to local temperature varying appear, and grain boundary migration and mergence take place during high temperature fatigue in such thin and narrow interconnects. These results seem to reflect a strain-induced boundary migration mechanism, and the damage morphology also suggests that fatigue of the interconnects with decreased grain size and film thickness is controlled by diffusive mechanisms and interface properties rather than by dislocation glide. Open circuit eventually took

  15. Sub-nanometer dimensions control of core/shell nanoparticles prepared by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. J.; Verheijen, M. A.; Bol, A. A.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2015-03-01

    Bimetallic core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) are the subject of intense research due to their unique electronic, optical and catalytic properties. Accurate and independent control over the dimensions of both core and shell would allow for unprecedented catalytic performance. Here, we demonstrate that both core and shell dimensions of Pd/Pt core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) supported on Al2O3 substrates can be controlled at the sub-nanometer level by using a novel strategy based on atomic layer deposition (ALD). From the results it is derived that the main conditions for accurate dimension control of these core/shell NPs are: (i) a difference in surface energy between the deposited core metal and the substrate to obtain island growth; (ii) a process yielding linear growth of the NP cores with ALD cycles to obtain monodispersed NPs with a narrow size distribution; (iii) a selective ALD process for the shell metal yielding a linearly increasing thickness to obtain controllable shell growth exclusively on the cores. For Pd/Pt core/shell NPs it is found that a minimum core diameter of 1 nm exists above which the NP cores are able to catalytically dissociate the precursor molecules for shell growth. In addition, initial studies on the stability of these core/shell NPs have been carried out, and it has been demonstrated that core/shell NPs can be deposited by ALD on high aspect ratio substrates such as nanowire arrays. These achievements show therefore that ALD has significant potential for the preparation of tuneable heterogeneous catalyst systems.

  16. Laser-induced damage of TiO2/SiO2 high reflector at 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianke; Ma, Jianyong; Xiu, Cheng; Fan, Zhengxiu; Jin, Yunxia; Zhao, Yuanan; He, Hongbo; Shao, Jianda; Huang, Huolin; Zhang, Feng; Wu, Zhengyun

    2008-04-01

    A high laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) TiO2/SiO2 high reflector (HR) at 1064nm is deposited by e-beam evaporation. The HR is characterized by optical properties, surface, and cross section structure. LIDT is tested at 1064nm with a 12ns laser pulse in the one-on-one mode. Raman technique and scanning electron Microscope are used to analyze the laser-induced modification of HR. The possible damage mechanism is discussed. It is found that the LIDT of HR is influenced by the nanometer precursor in the surface, the intrinsic absorption of film material, the compactness of the cross section and surface structure, and the homogeneity of TiO2 layer. Three typical damage morphologies such as flat-bottom pit, delamination, and plasma scald determine well the nanometer defect initiation mechanism. The laser-induced crystallization consists well with the thermal damage nature of HR.

  17. [Electronic and structural properties of individual nanometer-size supported metallic clusters]. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Reifenberger, R.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under contract DOE-FCO2-84ER45162. During the past ten years, our study of electron emission from laser-illuminated field emission tips has taken on a broader scope by addressing problems of direct interest to those concerned with the unique physical and chemical properties of nanometer-size clusters. The work performed has demonstrated that much needed data can be obtained on individual nanometer-size clusters supported on a wide-variety of different substrates. The work was performed in collaboration with R.P. Andres in the School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. The Multiple Expansion Cluster Source developed by Andres and his students was essential for producing the nanometer-size clusters studied. The following report features a discussion of these results. This report provides a motivation for studying the properties of nanometer-size clusters and summarizes the results obtained.

  18. Oxidation-induced structural changes in sub-nanometer platinum supported on alumina

    DOE PAGES

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Blom, Douglas Allen; ...

    2015-06-26

    Platinum supported on alumina is an essential component of emission treatment catalysts used in transportation. Theoretical, experimental, and mechanistic aspects of platinum particles supported on a variety of supports have been extensively studied; however, available experimental information on the behavior of single vs. sub-nanometer platinum is extremely limited. To bridge the knowledge gap between single supported platinum and well-formed supported platinum nanoparticles, we have carried out synthesis, characterization, and CO and NO oxidation studies of sub-nanometer platinum supported on α, θ, and γ-Al2O3 and monitored changes in structure upon exposure to CO and NO oxidation conditions. Furthermore, we find thatmore » sub-nanometer Pt is highly effective for CO oxidation due to high platinum dispersion but is not very efficient as NO oxidation catalyst. Lastly, sub-nanometer platinum agglomerates rapidly under CO or NO oxidation conditions to form nanoparticles.« less

  19. Oxidation-induced structural changes in sub-nanometer platinum supported on alumina

    SciTech Connect

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Blom, Douglas Allen; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar

    2015-06-26

    Platinum supported on alumina is an essential component of emission treatment catalysts used in transportation. Theoretical, experimental, and mechanistic aspects of platinum particles supported on a variety of supports have been extensively studied; however, available experimental information on the behavior of single vs. sub-nanometer platinum is extremely limited. To bridge the knowledge gap between single supported platinum and well-formed supported platinum nanoparticles, we have carried out synthesis, characterization, and CO and NO oxidation studies of sub-nanometer platinum supported on α, θ, and γ-Al2O3 and monitored changes in structure upon exposure to CO and NO oxidation conditions. Furthermore, we find that sub-nanometer Pt is highly effective for CO oxidation due to high platinum dispersion but is not very efficient as NO oxidation catalyst. Lastly, sub-nanometer platinum agglomerates rapidly under CO or NO oxidation conditions to form nanoparticles.

  20. Quality metric for accurate overlay control in <20nm nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Dana; Amit, Eran; Cohen, Guy; Amir, Nuriel; Har-Zvi, Michael; Huang, Chin-Chou Kevin; Karur-Shanmugam, Ramkumar; Pierson, Bill; Kato, Cindy; Kurita, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    The semiconductor industry is moving toward 20nm nodes and below. As the Overlay (OVL) budget is getting tighter at these advanced nodes, the importance in the accuracy in each nanometer of OVL error is critical. When process owners select OVL targets and methods for their process, they must do it wisely; otherwise the reported OVL could be inaccurate, resulting in yield loss. The same problem can occur when the target sampling map is chosen incorrectly, consisting of asymmetric targets that will cause biased correctable terms and a corrupted wafer. Total measurement uncertainty (TMU) is the main parameter that process owners use when choosing an OVL target per layer. Going towards the 20nm nodes and below, TMU will not be enough for accurate OVL control. KLA-Tencor has introduced a quality score named `Qmerit' for its imaging based OVL (IBO) targets, which is obtained on the-fly for each OVL measurement point in X & Y. This Qmerit score will enable the process owners to select compatible targets which provide accurate OVL values for their process and thereby improve their yield. Together with K-T Analyzer's ability to detect the symmetric targets across the wafer and within the field, the Archer tools will continue to provide an independent, reliable measurement of OVL error into the next advanced nodes, enabling fabs to manufacture devices that meet their tight OVL error budgets.

  1. Fabrication of GaAs nanometer scale structures by dry etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, Tatsuro; Chuang, Chih-Li; Khitrova, Galina; Warren, Mial E.; Chavez-Pirson, Arturo; Gibbs, Hyatt M.; Sarid, Dror; Gallagher, Mark J.

    1990-10-01

    Nanometer-sized features as small as 400Ahave been fabricated in single-quantum-well GaAs/A1GaAs heterostructures for studies of quantum confinement effects in quantum dots. The features have been fabricated by dry-etching techniques using nanometer-sized etch masks by a novel surface deposition of colloidally-suspended spherical particles. SEM was used to examine the feature size.

  2. Transverse Mercator with an accuracy of a few nanometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karney, Charles F. F.

    2011-08-01

    Implementations of two algorithms for the transverse Mercator projection are described; these achieve accuracies close to machine precision. One is based on the exact equations of Thompson and Lee and the other uses an extension of Krüger's series for the mapping to higher order. The exact method provides an accuracy of 9 nm over the entire ellipsoid, while the errors in the series method are less than 5 nm within 3900 km of the central meridian. In each case, the meridian convergence and scale are also computed with similar accuracy. The speed of the series method is competitive with other less accurate algorithms and the exact method is about five times slower.

  3. Experiment studies of iodinated oil nanometer ferrofluid retention in rabbit liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Lin, R; Lin, Y; Wu, R H

    2005-01-01

    To study possibility for iodinated oil nanometer ferrofluid retention in rabbit liver. 131I- iodinated oil nanometer ferrofluid were injected into liver right lobe through portal vein in 5 rabbits... - calibrate meter showed continuous.. counts in the region injected. Then the relative metabolic parameters were calculated. Left lobe livers, right lobe livers and lungs of the rabbits were examined in pathology, and the right lobe livers were examined by electron microscope. Five rabbits injected purely 131Iiodinated oil were designated as control group. Single metabolic mode was found in the rabbits in nanometer ferrofluid group. The biological half-life of 131I- iodinated oil nanometer ferrofluid was not different from control group's slow metabolic portion. But control group's rapid metabolic portion were eliminated in a higher speed, range from 8% to 44%. More damage was found in nanometer ferrofluid group's right lobe livers. 131I- iodinated oil nanometer ferrofluid possess the opportunity of local retention in human body and further study is worthwhile.

  4. Measuring nanometer, three-dimensional motions with light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Charles Quentin

    Computational motion analysis of images from a light microscope is used to explore mechanics in the microscopic worlds of cells and man-made micromachines. Images of a moving target are taken using a strobe light and a CCD camera attached to a microscope. Temporal sequences of stop-action images are recorded at multiple planes of focus to characterize three-dimensional motions. We demonstrate that motion resolution is limited by the motion detection algorithm. The largest source of error in gradient-based and matching algorithms is statistical bias. We present a new algorithm with errors that are typically smaller than 0.02 pixels. With this algorithm and our video microscopy system, we can measure motions of submicrometer targets with nanometer accuracy. The system has been used to study both hearing structures and man-made micromachines. Analysis of electrically- induced motions of a microfabricated accelerometer and a microfabricated angular velocity sensor allow visualization and quantification of complex modes of motion that limit the performance of these sensors. Pilot studies demonstrate that the system can also measure sound-induced motions of the human stapes, where it can resolve complex modes of motion thought to be important for loud sounds and for certain middle-ear pathologies. The system has also been used to measure mechanical deformations in the mouse tectorial membrane, a gelatinous inner-ear structure that has previously been a difficult target of study. Our major application has been the study of sound-induced motions of sensory cells and accessory structures in the ear of a lizard. Our results, while still preliminary, are the first direct measurements of sound-induced motions of hair bundles and their overlying tectorial membrane. They indicate that the tectorial membrane does not move as a rigid body but has significant shear throughout its thickness. Therefore, the relative motion between the tectorial membrane and the reticular lamina is

  5. Synthesis of nanometer-sized sodalite without adding organic additives.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Morozumi, Kazumasa; Kimura, Riichiro; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Okubo, Tatsuya

    2008-06-01

    Aggregates (80 nm) of sodalite nanocrystals with crystallite sizes ranging from 20 to 40 nm have been synthesized from a sodium aluminosilicate solution at low temperature, without adding any organic additives, while paying attention to the key factors for the synthesis of nanosized zeolite crystals. The physical properties of nanosized sodalite crystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, 29Si solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, and N2 adsorption. As expected, the external surface area of nanosized sodalite crystals is significantly increased compared with that of microsized sodalite crystals. The size of synthesized sodalite crystals can be controlled from 20 nm to 10 microm. It is found that the preparation of a homogeneous aluminosilicate solution followed by the formation of an aluminosilicate hard gel by adjusting the initial composition, for example, SiO2/Al2O3 and Na2O/H2O ratios, is critical for synthesis.

  6. Scatterometry for semiconductor sub-micrometer and nanometer critical dimension metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Assaad, Rayan M.

    Scatterometry1 is one optical measurement technique that has been explored extensively for semiconductor sub-micrometer dimensional metrology. The technique refers to the measurements of reflected power upon the interaction of an incident beam with some periodic surface (grating). The characteristics of the diffractive surface affect directly the acquired measurements. Therefore it is possible to resolve some information about the grating line profile and dimensions from the measurements, which is referred to as the inverse scatterometry problem. As technology is continuously pushing lithographic processes to sub-nanometer precision2, aspects of the inverse scatterometry problem related to the accurate estimation and modeling of errors and the enhancement of the optimization methods become of great importance. For this purpose the effects of measurement errors on the estimated grating profile are analyzed in this dissertation and optimization methods are proposed to improve the accuracies in the estimated geometrical parameters for various grating profiles in real experimental conditions. A technique based on the information content analysis of the measurement data is further suggested to reduce the number of measurements required without the loss in the solution accuracies resulting in lower cost and more suitable real time implementation. Theoretical and experimental results are presented to validate these studies where the solutions to the profile parameters are accomplished by implementing a linear regression technique3. In addition a new scheme is proposed to address resolving more difficult profile parameters with sub-wavelength dimensions (sub-100 nm) that are until now subject to ongoing investigation with inconclusive results. The proposed approach consists of using a large number of angular reflectance measurements with linearly polarized TM incidence. In the case where the profile dimensions are many times smaller than the light wavelength, the parameter

  7. Three-dimensional deep sub-wavelength defect detection using λ = 193 nm optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Bryan M; Sohn, Martin Y; Goasmat, Francois; Zhou, Hui; Vladár, András E; Silver, Richard M; Arceo, Abraham

    2013-11-04

    Optical microscopy is sensitive both to arrays of nanoscale features and to their imperfections. Optimizing scattered electromagnetic field intensities from deep sub-wavelength nanometer scale structures represents an important element of optical metrology. Current, well-established optical methods used to identify defects in semiconductor patterning are in jeopardy by upcoming sub-20 nm device dimensions. A novel volumetric analysis for processing focus-resolved images of defects is presented using simulated and experimental examples. This new method allows defects as narrow as (16 ± 2) nm (k = 1) to be revealed using 193 nm light with focus and illumination conditions optimized for three-dimensional data analysis. Quantitative metrics to compare two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging indicate possible fourfold improvements in sensitivity using these methods.

  8. Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) Metrology for 45/32 nm Technology Generations

    SciTech Connect

    Nutsch, A.; Pfitzner, L.

    2007-09-26

    In-plane geometrical defects on wafer surfaces following Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) processing in the lateral millimeter range and in vertical dimensions in the nanometer range are of increasing importance. They will become a severe yield limiting factor in the 32 nm generations and below. At the wafer edge these defects are known as edge roll off (ERO). The feasibility of measuring flatness and geometry of bare silicon wafers and patterned wafers from different process steps as e.g. shallow trench isolation (STI) and interconnect metallization was successfully demonstrated using wave front sensing. The used wave front sensing methods were according to Makyoh and Shack Hartmann. The specifications achieved were for the Makyoh method a lateral resolution of 2.4 mm and for Shack Hartmann method 1.1 mm. The vertical resolution was 100 nm for the Makyoh method and 50 nm for the Shack Hartmann method.

  9. MEMS Actuators for Tuning Nanometer-scale Airgaps in Heterostructures and Optical Instrumentation for Glacier Ice Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wing Shan

    MEMS Actuators for Tuning Nanometer-scale Airgaps in Heterostructures: We developed a new actuator microstructure to control the spacing between closely spaced surfaces. Creating and controlling nanometer gaps is of interest in areas such as plasmonics and quantum electronics. For example, energy states in quantum well heterostructures can be tuned by adjusting the physical coupling distance between wells. Unfortunately, such an application calls for active control of a nano-scale air gap between surfaces which are orders of magnitude larger, which is difficult due to stiction forces. A vertical electrostatic wedge actuator was designed to control the air gap between two closely spaced quantum wells in a collapsed cantilever structure. A six-mask fab- rication process was developed and carried out on an InGaAs/InP quantum well het- erostructure on an InP substrate. Upon actuation, the gap spacing between the surfaces was tuned over a maximum range of 55 nm from contact with an applied voltage of 60 V. Challenges in designing and fabricating the device are discussed. Optical Instrumentation for Glacier Ice Studies: We explored new optical instrumentation for glacier ice studies. Glacier ice, such as that of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, is formed by the accumulation of snowfall over hundreds of thousands of years. Not all snowfalls are the same. Their isotopic compositions vary according to the planet's climate at the time, and may contain part of the past atmosphere. The physical properties and chemical content of the ice are therefore proxies of Earth's climate history. In this work, new optical methods and instrumentation based on light scattering and polarization were developed to more efficiently study glacier ice. Field deployments in Antarctica of said instrumentation and results acquired are presented.

  10. AC driven magnetic domain quantification with 5 nm resolution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenghua; Li, Xiang; Dong, Dapeng; Liu, Dongping; Saito, H.; Ishio, S.

    2014-01-01

    As the magnetic storage density increases in commercial products, e.g. the hard disc drives, a full understanding of dynamic magnetism in nanometer resolution underpins the development of next-generation products. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is well suited to exploring ferromagnetic domain structures. However, atomic resolution cannot be achieved because data acquisition involves the sensing of long-range magnetostatic forces between tip and sample. Moreover, the dynamic magnetism cannot be characterized because MFM is only sensitive to the static magnetic fields. Here, we develop a side-band magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to locally observe the alternating magnetic fields in nanometer length scales at an operating distance of 1 nm. Variations in alternating magnetic fields and their relating time-variable magnetic domain reversals have been demonstrated by the side-band MFM. The magnetic domain wall motions, relating to the periodical rotation of sample magnetization, are quantified via micromagnetics. Based on the side-band MFM, the magnetic moment can be determined locally in a volume as small as 5 nanometers. The present technique can be applied to investigate the microscopic magnetic domain structures in a variety of magnetic materials, and allows a wide range of future applications, for example, in data storage and biomedicine. PMID:25011670

  11. Fabrication of a nanometer thick nitrogen delta doped layer at the sub-surface region of (100) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Michaelson, Shaul; Saguy, Cecile; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-11-01

    In this letter, we report on the proof of a concept of an innovative delta doping technique to fabricate an ensemble of nitrogen vacancy centers at shallow depths in (100) diamond. A nitrogen delta doped layer with a concentration of ˜1.8 × 1020 cm-3 and a thickness of a few nanometers was produced using this method. Nitrogen delta doping was realized by producing a stable nitrogen terminated (N-terminated) diamond surface using the RF nitridation process and subsequently depositing a thin layer of diamond on the N-terminated diamond surface. The concentration of nitrogen on the N-terminated diamond surface and its stability upon exposure to chemical vapor deposition conditions are determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The SIMS profile exhibits a positive concentration gradient of 1.9 nm/decade and a negative gradient of 4.2 nm/decade. The proposed method offers a finer control on the thickness of the delta doped layer than the currently used ion implantation and delta doping techniques.

  12. Novel nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating for boron powders by direct pyrolysis of coronene without solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, ShuJun; Song, MingHui; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    A 3 nm coronene coating and a 4 nm amorphous carbon coating with a uniform shell-core encapsulation structure for nanosized boron (B) powders are formed by a simple process in which coronene is directly mixed with boron particles without a solvent and heated at 520 °C for 1 h or at 630 °C for 3 h in a vacuum-sealed silica tube. Coronene has a melting point lower than its decomposition temperature, which enables liquid coronene to cover B particles by liquid diffusion and penetration without the need for a solvent. The diffusion and penetration of coronene can extend to the boundaries of particles and to inside the agglomerated nanoparticles to form a complete shell-core encapsulated structure. As the temperature is increased, thermal decomposition of coronene on the B particles results in the formation of a uniform amorphous carbon coating layer. This novel and simple nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating method can possibly be applied to many other powders; thus, it has potential applications in many fields at low cost.

  13. Novel nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating for boron powders by direct pyrolysis of coronene without solvent.

    PubMed

    Ye, ShuJun; Song, MingHui; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-30

    A 3 nm coronene coating and a 4 nm amorphous carbon coating with a uniform shell-core encapsulation structure for nanosized boron (B) powders are formed by a simple process in which coronene is directly mixed with boron particles without a solvent and heated at 520 °C for 1 h or at 630 °C for 3 h in a vacuum-sealed silica tube. Coronene has a melting point lower than its decomposition temperature, which enables liquid coronene to cover B particles by liquid diffusion and penetration without the need for a solvent. The diffusion and penetration of coronene can extend to the boundaries of particles and to inside the agglomerated nanoparticles to form a complete shell-core encapsulated structure. As the temperature is increased, thermal decomposition of coronene on the B particles results in the formation of a uniform amorphous carbon coating layer. This novel and simple nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating method can possibly be applied to many other powders; thus, it has potential applications in many fields at low cost.

  14. High power 938 nanometer fiber laser and amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, Jay W.; Liao, Zhi Ming; Beach, Raymond J.; Drobshoff, Alexander D.; Payne, Stephen A.; Pennington, Deanna M.; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Calia, Domenico Bonaccini; Taylor, Luke

    2006-05-02

    An optical fiber amplifier includes a length of silica optical fiber having a core doped with neodymium, a first cladding and a second cladding each with succeeding lower refractive indices, where the first cladding diameter is less than 10 times the diameter of the core. The doping concentration of the neodymium is chosen so that the small signal absorption for 816 nm light traveling within the core is less than 15 dB/m above the other fiber losses. The amplifier is optically pumped with one laser into the fiber core and with another laser into the first cladding.

  15. Computer simulation of the 30-nanometer chromatin fiber.

    PubMed Central

    Wedemann, Gero; Langowski, Jörg

    2002-01-01

    A new Monte Carlo model for the structure of chromatin is presented here. Based on our previous work on superhelical DNA and polynucleosomes, it reintegrates aspects of the "solenoid" and the "zig-zag" models. The DNA is modeled as a flexible elastic polymer chain, consisting of segments connected by elastic bending, torsional, and stretching springs. The electrostatic interaction between the DNA segments is described by the Debye-Hückel approximation. Nucleosome core particles are represented by oblate ellipsoids; their interaction potential has been parameterized by a comparison with data from liquid crystals of nucleosome solutions. DNA and chromatosomes are linked either at the surface of the chromatosome or through a rigid nucleosome stem. Equilibrium ensembles of 100-nucleosome chains at physiological ionic strength were generated by a Metropolis-Monte Carlo algorithm. For a DNA linked at the nucleosome stem and a nucleosome repeat of 200 bp, the simulated fiber diameter of 32 nm and the mass density of 6.1 nucleosomes per 11 nm fiber length are in excellent agreement with experimental values from the literature. The experimental value of the inclination of DNA and nucleosomes to the fiber axis could also be reproduced. Whereas the linker DNA connects chromatosomes on opposite sides of the fiber, the overall packing of the nucleosomes leads to a helical aspect of the structure. The persistence length of the simulated fibers is 265 nm. For more random fibers where the tilt angles between two nucleosomes are chosen according to a Gaussian distribution along the fiber, the persistence length decreases to 30 nm with increasing width of the distribution, whereas the other observable parameters such as the mass density remain unchanged. Polynucleosomes with repeat lengths of 212 bp also form fibers with the expected experimental properties. Systems with larger repeat length form fibers, but the mass density is significantly lower than the measured value. The

  16. Large-scale fabrication of 4-nm-channel vertical protein-based ambipolar transistors.

    PubMed

    Mentovich, Elad D; Belgorodsky, Bogdan; Kalifa, Itsik; Cohen, Hagai; Richter, Shachar

    2009-04-01

    We suggest a universal method for the mass production of nanometer-sized molecular transistors. This vertical-type device was fabricated using conventional photolithography and self-assembly methods and was processed in parallel fashion. We used this transistor to investigate the transport properties of a single layer of bovine serum albumin protein. This 4-nm-channel device exhibits low operating voltages, ambipolar behavior, and high gate sensitivity. The operation mechanism of this new device is suggested, and the charge transfer through the protein layer was explored.

  17. Direct Patterning of CdSe Quantum Dots into Sub-100 nm Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, Meredith J.; Templeton, Joseph L.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2010-03-02

    Ordered, two-dimensional cadmium selenide (CdSe) arrays have been fabricated on indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes using the pattern replication in nonwetting templates (PRINT) process. CdSe quantum dots (QDs) with an average diameter of 2.7 nm and a pyridine surface ligand were used for patterning. The PRINT technique utilizes a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) elastomeric mold that is tolerant of most organic solvents, thus allowing solutions of CdSe QDs in 4-picoline to be used for patterning without significant deformation of the mold. Nanometer-scale diffraction gratings have been successfully replicated with CdSe QDs.

  18. On the high-field transport and its temperature dependence in deca-nanometer fully depleted silicon-on-insulator field-effect-transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masaharu; Cai, Jin; Haensch, Wilfried

    2011-08-01

    Low-temperature characterization has been performed on fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (FDSOI) field-effect-transistor (FET) with gate length (Lg) down to 25 nm to clarify transport mechanisms that determine device performance in deca-nanometer scale. Linear drain current of FDSOI FET follows Lg-1 scaling down to 25 nm Lg, where mobility dominates, while saturation drain current largely deviates from Lg-1 scaling. Temperature dependence of effective source velocity at high drain voltage (Vds) is weaker than that at low Vds in short Lg and is consistent with that of saturation velocity. Drift velocity measurement revealed velocity overshooting behavior at high lateral field, indicating further Lg scaling benefit.

  19. Jupiter's Belt-Zone Boundary (Methane filter, 732 nm)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mosaic of a belt-zone boundary near Jupiter's equator. The images that make up the four quadrants of this mosaic were taken within a few minutes of each other and show Jupiter's appearance at 732 nanometers (nm). Sunlight at 732 nm is weakly absorbed by atmospheric methane. This absorption lowers the total amount of scattered light detected by the Galileo spacecraft while enhancing the fraction that comes from higher in Jupiter's atmosphere where less methane is present. The features of the lower ammonia cloud deck that are seen at 756 nm remain visible, but features in the higher, diffuse cloud are made more apparent.

    The bowed shape of the clouds in the center of the image is created by a combination of stretching in the eastward direction by strong winds and stretching in the north-south direction by weaker winds. The precise shape of the bow and the eastward wind speeds can be measured. The north-south wind speeds, too small to be directly measured, then can be calculated. These images may provide the first indirect measurement of Jupiter's north-south winds.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  20. Characterization of nanometer-thick polycrystalline silicon with phonon-boundary scattering enhanced thermoelectric properties and its application in infrared sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huchuan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Lee, Chengkuo

    2015-01-14

    Although significantly reducing the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires has been reported, it remains a challenge to integrate silicon nanowires with structure materials and electrodes in the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. In this paper, we investigated the thermal conductivity of nanometer-thick polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) theoretically and experimentally. By leveraging the phonon-boundary scattering, the thermal conductivity of 52 nm thick poly-Si was measured as low as around 12 W mK(-1) which is only about 10% of the value of bulk single crystalline silicon. The ZT of n-doped and p-doped 52 nm thick poly-Si was measured as 0.067 and 0.024, respectively, while most previously reported data had values of about 0.02 and 0.01 for a poly-Si layer with a thickness of 0.5 μm and above. Thermopile infrared sensors comprising 128 pairs of thermocouples made of either n-doped or p-doped nanometer-thick poly-Si strips in a series connected by an aluminium (Al) metal interconnect layer are fabricated using microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology. The measured vacuum specific detectivity (D*) of the n-doped and p-doped thermopile infrared (IR) sensors are 3.00 × 10(8) and 1.83 × 10(8) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1) for sensors of 52 nm thick poly-Si, and 5.75 × 10(7) and 3.95 × 10(7) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1) for sensors of 300 nm thick poly-Si, respectively. The outstanding thermoelectric properties indicate our approach is promising for diverse applications using ultrathin poly-Si technology.

  1. Focal Spots of Size λ/23 Open Up Far-Field Florescence Microscopy at 33 nm Axial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyba, Marcus; Hell, Stefan W.

    2002-04-01

    We report spots of excited molecules of 33 nm width created with focused light of λ = 760 nm wavelength and conventional optics along the optic axis. This is accomplished by exciting the molecules with a femtosecond pulse and subsequent depletion of their excited state with red-shifted, picosecond-pulsed, counterpropagating, coherent light fields. The λ/23 ratio constitutes what is to our knowledge the sharpest spatial definition attained with freely propagating electromagnetic radiation. The sub-diffraction spots enable for the first time far-field fluorescence microscopy with resolution at the tens of nanometer scale, as demonstrated in images of membranes of bacillus megaterium.

  2. Patterning at the 10 nanometer length scale using a strongly segregating block copolymer thin film and vapor phase infiltration of inorganic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jonathan W.; Li, Zhaodong; Black, Charles T.; Sweat, Daniel P.; Wang, Xudong; Gopalan, Padma

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the use of self-assembled thin films of the cylinder-forming block copolymer poly(4-tert-butylstyrene-block-2-vinylpyridine) to pattern high density features at the 10 nm length scale. This material's large interaction parameter facilitates pattern formation in single-digit nanometer dimensions. This block copolymer's accessible order-disorder transition temperature allows thermal annealing to drive the assembly of ordered 2-vinylpyridine cylinders that can be selectively complexed with the organometallic precursor trimethylaluminum. This unique chemistry converts organic 2-vinylpyridine cylinders into alumina nanowires with diameters ranging from 8 to 11 nm, depending on the copolymer molecular weight. Graphoepitaxy of this block copolymer aligns and registers sub-12 nm diameter nanowires to larger-scale rectangular, curved, and circular features patterned by optical lithography. The alumina nanowires function as a robust hard mask to withstand the conditions required for patterning the underlying silicon by plasma etching. We conclude with a discussion of some of the challenges that arise with using block copolymers for patterning at sub-10 nm feature sizes.In this work, we demonstrate the use of self-assembled thin films of the cylinder-forming block copolymer poly(4-tert-butylstyrene-block-2-vinylpyridine) to pattern high density features at the 10 nm length scale. This material's large interaction parameter facilitates pattern formation in single-digit nanometer dimensions. This block copolymer's accessible order-disorder transition temperature allows thermal annealing to drive the assembly of ordered 2-vinylpyridine cylinders that can be selectively complexed with the organometallic precursor trimethylaluminum. This unique chemistry converts organic 2-vinylpyridine cylinders into alumina nanowires with diameters ranging from 8 to 11 nm, depending on the copolymer molecular weight. Graphoepitaxy of this block copolymer aligns and

  3. Short-Period RF Undulator for a SASE Nanometer source

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2001-12-21

    Analysis is described towards development of a RF undulator with a period < 1 cm, an undulator parameter K of the order of unity, and a gap greater than 2.25 mm. The application for the undulator is for a SASE source to produce 1 nm wavelength radiation using a low energy electron beam in the range 1-2 GeV. Particle orbit calculations in a conventional standing-wave resonator configuration show that the presence of a co-propagating component of RF field can cause deleterious motion for the undulating electrons that can seriously degrade their radiation spectrum. To obviate this problem, resonator designs were devised in which only the counter-propagating field components interact with the particles. Two resonator configurations with the same undulator parameter K = 0.4 have been devised and are described in this report.

  4. Pulse shortening via Relativistic Transparency of Nanometer Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, R. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Wu, H.-C.; Gautier, D. C.; Jung, D.; Hoerlein, R.; Offermann, D.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Letzring, S.; Yin, L.; Albright, B.; Fernandez, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2010-11-01

    Intense lasers drive plasma electrons to velocities approaching light-speed. Increase of the electron mass causes optical transparency in otherwise classically over-dense plasma. Simulations indicate relativistic transparency can produce near-single-cycle rise time light pulses. It also lies enables a new mechanism for laser-based ion-acceleration yielding energy increases over earlier approaches. A direct signature of transparency is pulse-shortening thru over-dense plasmas in which relativistic intensity induces transmission. Using nm C foils (LMU) and the high-contrast Trident laser (LANL) we have made auto-correlation measurements showing >2x transmitted pulse duration reduction at intensities corresponding to ˜20-fold increase in electron mass. Spectral measurements agree with pulse shortening thru the target, and 1-D particle-in-cell simulations support the measurements.

  5. Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Based Topographical Imaging and Nanometer Scale Resolved Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Nikiforov, Maxim; Bradshaw, James A; Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    Nanometer scale proximal probe thermal desorption/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (TD/ESI-MS) was demonstrated for molecular surface sampling of caffeine from a thin film using a 30 nm diameter nano-thermal analysis (nano-TA) probe tip in an atomic force microscope (AFM) coupled via a vapor transfer line and ESI interface to a MS detection platform. Using a probe temperature of 350 C and a spot sampling time of 30 s, conical desorption craters 250 nm in diameter and 100 nm deep were created as shown through subsequent topographical imaging of the surface within the same system. Automated sampling of a 5 x 2 array of spots, with 2 m spacing between spots, and real time selective detection of the desorbed caffeine using tandem mass spectrometry was also demonstrated. Estimated from the crater volume (~2x106 nm3), only about 10 amol (2 fg) of caffeine was liberated from each thermal desorption crater in the thin film. These results illustrate a relatively simple experimental setup and means to acquire in automated fashion sub-micrometer scale spatial sampling resolution and mass spectral detection of materials amenable to TD. The ability to achieve MS-based chemical imaging with 250 nm scale spatial resolution with this system is anticipated.

  6. Linear and nonlinear optical characterization of self-assembled, large-area gold nanosphere metasurfaces with sub-nanometer gaps.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Jake; Maldonado, Melissa; Charipar, Nicholas; Trammell, Scott A; Nita, Rafaela; Naciri, Jawad; Pique, Alberto; Ratna, Banahalli; Gomes, Anderson S L

    2016-11-28

    We created centimeter-scale area metasurfaces consisting of a quasi-hexagonally close packed monolayer of gold nanospheres capped with alkanethiol ligands on glass substrates using a directed self-assembly approach. We experimentally characterized the morphology and the linear and nonlinear optical properties of metasurfaces. We show these metasurfaces, with interparticle gaps of 0.6 nm, are modeled well using a classical (without charge transfer) description. We find a large dispersion of linear refractive index, ranging from values less than vacuum, 0.87 at 600 nm, to Germanium-like values of 4.1 at 880 nm, determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Nonlinear optical characterization was carried out using femtosecond Z-scan and we observe saturation behavior of the nonlinear absorption (NLA) and nonlinear refraction (NLR). We find a negative NLR from these metasurfaces two orders of magnitude larger (n2,sat = -7.94x10-9 cm2/W at Isat,n2 = 0.43 GW/cm2) than previous reports on gold nanostructures at similar femtosecond time scales. We also find the magnitude of the NLA comparable to the largest values reported (β2,sat = -0.90x105 cm/GW at Isat,β2 = 0.34 GW/cm2). Precise knowledge of the index of refraction is of crucial importance for emerging dispersion engineering technologies. Furthermore, utilizing this directed self-assembly approach enables the nanometer scale resolution required to develop the unique optical response and simultaneously provides high-throughput for potential device realization.

  7. Nanometer-scale features in dolomite from Pennsylvanian rocks, Paradox Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gournay, Jonas P.; Kirkland, Brenda L.; Folk, Robert L.; Lynch, F. Leo

    1999-07-01

    Scanning electron microscopy reveals an association between early dolomite in the Pennsylvanian Desert Creek (Paradox Fm.) and small (approximately 0.1 μm) nanometer-scale textures, termed `nannobacteria'. Three diagenetically distinct dolomites are present: early dolomite, limpid dolomite, and baroque dolomite. In this study, only the early dolomite contained nanometer-scale features. These textures occur as discrete balls and rods, clumps of balls, and chains of balls. Precipitation experiments demonstrate that these textures may be the result of precipitation in an organic-rich micro-environment. The presence of these nanometer-scale textures in Pennsylvanian rocks suggests that these early dolomites precipitated in organic-rich, bacterial environments.

  8. Hydrodynamic forces involving deformable interfaces at nanometer separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manica, Rogério; Connor, Jason N.; Dagastine, Raymond R.; Carnie, Steven L.; Horn, Roger G.; Chan, Derek Y. C.

    2008-03-01

    A model is developed to describe the dynamic forces acting between two deformable drops, or between one drop and a solid surface, when they are in relative axisymmetric motion at separations of ≲100nm in a Newtonian liquid. Forces arise from hydrodynamic pressure in the draining liquid film that separates the interfaces and from disjoining pressure due to repulsive or attractive surface forces. Predictions of the model are successfully compared with recent experimental measurements of the force between two micrometer-scale surfactant stabilized decane drops in water in an atomic force microscope [S. L. Carnie, D. Y. C. Chan, C. Lewis, R. Manica, and R. R. Dagastine, Langmuir 21, 2912 (2005); R. R. Dagastine, R. Manica, S. L. Carnie, D. Y. C. Chan, G. W. Stevens, and F. Grieser, Science 313, 210 (2006)] and with subnanometer resolution measurements of time-dependent deformations of a millimeter-scale mercury drop approaching a flat mica surface in a modified surface force apparatus [J. N. Connor and R. G. Horn, Faraday Discuss. 123, 193 (2003); R. G. Horn, M. Asadullah, and J. N. Connor, Langmuir 22, 2610 (2006)]. Special limits of the model applicable to small and moderate deformation regimes are also studied to elucidate the key physical ingredients that contribute to the characteristic behavior of dynamic collisions involving fluid interfaces.

  9. Nanometer sized tantalum pentoxide fibers prepared by electrospinning

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmaraj, N.; Kim, H.Y.

    2006-03-09

    Novel, porous tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) nanofibers with 150-250 nm diameter were obtained by high temperature calcination of the as-electrospun tantalum pentoxide/poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) composite fibers prepared by sol-gel processing and electrospinning technique. Surface analysis, structure and elemental composition of these as-electrospun and as-calcinated Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanofibers have been studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and FT-IR. High-resolution FE-SEM images showed the porous nature of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanofibers. EDX analysis revealed the perfect stoichiometry of the nanofibers as Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. A linear correlation was noted between the calcination temperature and orthorhombic crystalline phase evolution of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}.

  10. Photonic nanojet-enhanced nanometer-scale germanium photodiode.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mehdi; Simpson, Jamesina J

    2013-08-01

    A design challenge for photodiodes yielding both high speed and responsivity is the necessity to concentrate incident light into a subwavelength active volume region. Photonic nanojets have been reported in the literature as a means to focus an incident plane wave to a subwavelength-waist propagating beam with applications ranging from next-generation DVDs to characterizing subwavelength features within dielectric targets. In the present work, a new application of photonic nanojets is proposed, focusing electromagnetic energy into a photodiode. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain solutions are conducted to determine the advantages of photonic nanojet-enhanced photodiodes at near-infrared wavelengths (1310 nm). We find that photonic nanojets provide a factor of 26 increase in the volume-integrated electric field within the subwavelength active volume of the photodiode of size 0.0045 μm³. Furthermore, this increase is achieved independent of the incident polarization and over a broad bandwidth. Photonic nanojets may thus serve as an attractive alternative to plasmonics for some applications.

  11. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  12. High Temperature Mechanical Behavior of Polycrystalline Alumina from Mixed Nanometer and Micrometer Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2001-01-01

    Sintered aluminum oxide materials were formed using commercial methods from mechanically mixed powders of nano-and micrometer alumina. The powders were consolidated at 1500 and 1600 C with 3.2 and 7.2 ksi applied stress in argon. The conventional micrometer sized powders failed to consolidate. While 100 percent nanometer-sized alumina and its mixture with the micrometer powders achieved less than 99 percent density. Preliminary high temperature creep behavior indicates no super-plastic strains. However high strains (less than 0.65 percent) were generated in the nanometer powder, due to cracks and linked voids initiated by cavitation.

  13. Plasma wave oscillations in nanometer field effect transistors for terahertz detection and emission.

    PubMed

    Knap, W; Teppe, F; Dyakonova, N; Coquillat, D; Lusakowski, J

    2008-09-24

    The channel of a field effect transistor can act as a resonator for plasma waves propagating in a two-dimensional electron gas. The plasma frequency increases with reduction of the channel length and can reach the terahertz (THz) range for nanometer size transistors. Recent experimental results show these transistors can be potential candidates for a new class of THz detectors and emitters. This work gives an overview of our recent relevant experimental results. We also outline unresolved problems and questions concerning THz detection and emission by nanometer transistors.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of nanometer-sized gaps in suspended few-layer graphene devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumetti, S.; Martini, L.; Candini, A.

    2017-02-01

    Graphene nanodevices, such as ultra-narrow constrictions and nanometer-spaced gaps, are emerging as appealing candidates for various applications, ranging from advanced quantum devices to single-molecule junctions and even DNA sequencing. Here, we present the realization and characterization of nanometer-sized gaps in suspended few-layer graphene devices via feedback-controlled electroburning at room temperature. By analyzing the electrical behavior after the electroburning process, we identify two distinct regimes for the resulting devices, deriving a simple yet effective quantitative criterion to determine the complete opening of the nanogaps.

  15. Study and Considerations of Nanometer and Nano-radian Surface Profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.; Qian, K.

    2010-10-18

    A Nanometer and Nano-radian Surface Profiler (NSP) is under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Nanometer and nano-radian accuracy is required for newest state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation optics and highprecision optical measurement. This test accuracy must be maintained in larger angle test range. In order to reach this accuracy we have to remove all error sources as much as possible or to reduce them to nano-radian level. We present the approaches in optimized optical system designing, scanning optical head mode selection, non-tilted reference method, quality control of optical components, and temperature stabilization. Some considerations and preliminary measurements are presented.

  16. A Compact "Water Window" Microscope with 60 nm Spatial Resolution for Applications in Biology and Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Torrisi, Alfio; Nawaz, Muhammad F; Bartnik, Andrzej; Adjei, Daniel; Vondrová, Šárka; Turňová, Jana; Jančarek, Alexandr; Limpouch, Jiří; Vrbová, Miroslava; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2015-10-01

    Short illumination wavelength allows an extension of the diffraction limit toward nanometer scale; thus, improving spatial resolution in optical systems. Soft X-ray (SXR) radiation, from "water window" spectral range, λ=2.3-4.4 nm wavelength, which is particularly suitable for biological imaging due to natural optical contrast provides better spatial resolution than one obtained with visible light microscopes. The high contrast in the "water window" is obtained because of selective radiation absorption by carbon and water, which are constituents of the biological samples. The development of SXR microscopes permits the visualization of features on the nanometer scale, but often with a tradeoff, which can be seen between the exposure time and the size and complexity of the microscopes. Thus, herein, we present a desk-top system, which overcomes the already mentioned limitations and is capable of resolving 60 nm features with very short exposure time. Even though the system is in its initial stage of development, we present different applications of the system for biology and nanotechnology. Construction of the microscope with recently acquired images of various samples will be presented and discussed. Such a high resolution imaging system represents an interesting solution for biomedical, material science, and nanotechnology applications.

  17. Physiological effects of nanoparticles on fish: a comparison of nanometals versus metal ions.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Benjamin J; Handy, Richard D

    2011-08-01

    The use of nanoscale materials is growing exponentially, but there are also concerns about the environmental hazard to aquatic biota. Metal-containing engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are an important group of these new materials, and are often made of one metal (e.g., Cu-NPs and Ag-NPs), metal oxides (e.g., ZnO and TiO(2) NPs), or composite of several metals. The physiological effects and toxicity of trace metals in the traditional dissolved form are relatively well known and the overall aim of this review was to use our existing conceptual framework of metal toxicity in fish to compare and contrast the effects of nanometals. Conceptually, there are some fundamental differences that relate to bioavailability and uptake. The chemistry and behaviour of nanometals involves dynamic aspects of aggregation theory, rather than the equilibrium models traditionally used for free metal ions. Some NPs, such as Cu-NPs, may also release free metal ions from the surface of the particle. Biological uptake of NPs is not likely via ion transporters, but endocytosis is a possible uptake mechanism. The body distribution, metabolism, and excretion of nanometals is poorly understood and hampered by a lack of methods for measuring NPs in tissues. Although data sets are still limited, emerging studies on the acute toxicity of nanometals have so far shown that these materials can be lethal to fish in the mg-μgl(-1) range, depending on the type of material. Evidence suggests that some nanometals can be more acutely toxic to some fish than dissolved forms. For example, juvenile zebrafish have a 48-h LC(50) of about 0.71 and 1.78mgl(-1) for nano- and dissolved forms of Cu respectively. The acute toxicity of metal NPs is not always explained, or only partly explained, by the presence of free metal ions; suggesting that other novel mechanisms may be involved in bioavailability. Evidence suggests that nanometals can cause a range of sublethal effects in fish including respiratory toxicity

  18. Core level photoionization on free sub-10-nm nanoparticles using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Meinen, Jan; Leisner, Thomas; Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Eritt, Markus; Antonsson, Egill; Langer, Burkhard; Ruehl, Eckart

    2010-08-15

    A novel instrument is presented, which permits studies on singly charged free nanoparticles in the diameter range from 1 to 30 nm using synchrotron radiation in the soft x-ray regime. It consists of a high pressure nanoparticle source, a high efficiency nanoparticle beam inlet, and an electron time-of-flight spectrometer suitable for probing surface and bulk properties of free, levitated nanoparticles. We show results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study near the Si L{sub 3,2}-edge on 8.2 nm SiO{sub 2} particles prepared in a nanoparticle beam. The possible use of this apparatus regarding chemical reactions on the surface of nanometer-sized particles is highlighted. This approach has the potential to be exploited for process studies on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry.

  19. Photo-induced persistent inversion of germanium in a 200-nm-deep surface region.

    PubMed

    Prokscha, T; Chow, K H; Stilp, E; Suter, A; Luetkens, H; Morenzoni, E; Nieuwenhuys, G J; Salman, Z; Scheuermann, R

    2013-01-01

    The controlled manipulation of the charge carrier concentration in nanometer thin layers is the basis of current semiconductor technology and of fundamental importance for device applications. Here we show that it is possible to induce a persistent inversion from n- to p-type in a 200-nm-thick surface layer of a germanium wafer by illumination with white and blue light. We induce the inversion with a half-life of ~12 hours at a temperature of 220 K which disappears above 280 K. The photo-induced inversion is absent for a sample with a 20-nm-thick gold capping layer providing a Schottky barrier at the interface. This indicates that charge accumulation at the surface is essential to explain the observed inversion. The contactless change of carrier concentration is potentially interesting for device applications in opto-electronics where the gate electrode and gate oxide could be replaced by the semiconductor surface.

  20. Sub-10 nm nano-gap device for single-cluster transport measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, J. Morel, R.; Vila, L.; Brenac, A.; Marty, A.; Notin, L.; Beigné, C.

    2014-02-17

    We present a versatile procedure for the fabrication of single electron transistor (SET) devices with nanometer-sized clusters and embedded back gate electrode. The process uses sputtering gas-aggregation for the growth of clusters and e-beam lithography with double angle shadow-edge deposition to obtain electrodes separated by nano-gaps with width below 10 nm. The nano-gap width is easily controlled only by geometrical factors such as deposited thin film thickness and evaporation angles. The usefulness of this technique is demonstrated by measuring the SET behavior of a device with a 4 nm cobalt cluster embedded in alumina, where the Coulomb blockade and incremental cluster charging can be readily identified without resorting to the differential conductivity.

  1. Sub-180 nm generation with borate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Chen; Yoshimura, Masashi; Tsunoda, Jun; Kaneda, Yushi; Imade, Mamoru; Sasaki, Takatomo; Mori, Yusuke

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrated a new scheme for the generation of 179 nm vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) light with an all-solid-state laser system. It was achieved by mixing the deep-ultraviolet (DUV) of 198.8 nm and the infrared (IR) of 1799.9 nm. While CsB3O5 (CBO) did not satisfy the phase-matching at around 180 nm, 179 nm output was generated with LiB3O5 (LBO) for the first time. The phase-matching property of LBO at around 180 nm was also investigated. There was small deviation from theoretical curve in the measurement, which is still considered reasonable.

  2. Patterning at the 10 nanometer length scale using a strongly segregating block copolymer thin film and vapor phase infiltration of inorganic precursors

    DOE PAGES

    Choi, Jonathan W.; Li, Zhaodong; Black, Charles T.; ...

    2016-05-04

    Here in this work, we demonstrate the use of self-assembled thin films of the cylinder-forming block copolymer poly(4-tert-butylstyrene-block-2-vinylpyridine) to pattern high density features at the 10 nm length scale. This material's large interaction parameter facilitates pattern formation in single-digit nanometer dimensions. This block copolymer's accessible order–disorder transition temperature allows thermal annealing to drive the assembly of ordered 2-vinylpyridine cylinders that can be selectively complexed with the organometallic precursor trimethylaluminum. This unique chemistry converts organic 2-vinylpyridine cylinders into alumina nanowires with diameters ranging from 8 to 11 nm, depending on the copolymer molecular weight. Graphoepitaxy of this block copolymer aligns andmore » registers sub-12 nm diameter nanowires to larger-scale rectangular, curved, and circular features patterned by optical lithography. The alumina nanowires function as a robust hard mask to withstand the conditions required for patterning the underlying silicon by plasma etching. Lastly, we conclude with a discussion of some of the challenges that arise with using block copolymers for patterning at sub-10 nm feature sizes.« less

  3. Patterning at the 10 nanometer length scale using a strongly segregating block copolymer thin film and vapor phase infiltration of inorganic precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jonathan W.; Li, Zhaodong; Black, Charles T.; Sweat, Daniel P.; Wang, Xudong; Gopalan, Padma

    2016-05-04

    Here in this work, we demonstrate the use of self-assembled thin films of the cylinder-forming block copolymer poly(4-tert-butylstyrene-block-2-vinylpyridine) to pattern high density features at the 10 nm length scale. This material's large interaction parameter facilitates pattern formation in single-digit nanometer dimensions. This block copolymer's accessible order–disorder transition temperature allows thermal annealing to drive the assembly of ordered 2-vinylpyridine cylinders that can be selectively complexed with the organometallic precursor trimethylaluminum. This unique chemistry converts organic 2-vinylpyridine cylinders into alumina nanowires with diameters ranging from 8 to 11 nm, depending on the copolymer molecular weight. Graphoepitaxy of this block copolymer aligns and registers sub-12 nm diameter nanowires to larger-scale rectangular, curved, and circular features patterned by optical lithography. The alumina nanowires function as a robust hard mask to withstand the conditions required for patterning the underlying silicon by plasma etching. Lastly, we conclude with a discussion of some of the challenges that arise with using block copolymers for patterning at sub-10 nm feature sizes.

  4. New single-molecule speckle microscopy reveals modification of the retrograde actin flow by focal adhesions at nanometer scales.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Mizuno, Hiroaki; Smith, Matthew B; Ryan, Gillian L; Kiuchi, Tai; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Watanabe, Naoki

    2014-04-01

    Speckle microscopy directly visualizes the retrograde actin flow, which is believed to promote cell-edge protrusion when linked to focal adhesions (FAs). However, it has been argued that, due to rapid actin turnover, the use of green fluorescent protein-actin, the lack of appropriate analysis algorithms, and technical difficulties, speckle microscopy does not necessarily report the flow velocities of entire actin populations. In this study, we developed a new, user-friendly single-molecule speckle (SiMS) microscopy using DyLight dye-labeled actin. Our new SiMS method enables in vivo nanometer-scale displacement analysis with a low localization error of ±8-8.5 nm, allowing accurate flow-velocity measurement for actin speckles with lifetime <5 s. In lamellipodia, both short- and long-lived F-actin molecules flow with the same speed, indicating they are part of a single actin network. These results do not support coexistence of F-actin populations with different flow speeds, which is referred to as the lamella hypothesis. Mature FAs, but not nascent adhesions, locally obstruct the retrograde flow. Interestingly, the actin flow in front of mature FAs is fast and biased toward FAs, suggesting that mature FAs attract the flow in front and actively remodel the local actin network.

  5. Investigation on etch characteristics of nanometer-sized magnetic tunnel junction stacks using a HBr/Ar plasma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ho; Xiao, Yu Bin; Kong, Seon Mi; Chung, Chee Won

    2011-07-01

    The etch characteristics of CoFeB magnetic films and magnetic-tunnel-junction (MTJ) stacks masked with Ti films were investigated using an inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching in a HBr/Ar gas mix. The etch rate, etch selectivity, and etch profile of the CoFeB films were obtained as a function of the HBr concentration. As the HBr gas was added to Ar, the etch rate of the CoFeB films, and the etch selectivity to the Ti hard mask, gradually decreased, but the etch profile of the CoFeB films was improved. The effects of the HBr concentration and etch parameters on the etch profile of the MTJ stacks with a nanometer-sized 70 x 100 nm2 pattern were explored. At 10% HBr concentration, low ICP RF power, and low DC-bias voltage, better etch profiles of the MTJ stacks were obtained without redeposition. It was confirmed that the protective layer containing hydrogen, and the surface bombardment of the Ar ions, played a key role in obtaining a steep sidewall angle in the etch profile. Fine-pattern transfer of the MTJ stacks with a high degree of anisotropy was achieved using a HBr/Ar gas chemistry.

  6. Imaging of chromosomes at nano-meter scale resolution using scanning near-field optical/atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Toshio; Shichirii, Motoharu; Fukushi, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Kobori, Toshiro; Hagiwara, Shoji; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2002-12-01

    Topographic and fluorescent images of whole barley chromosomes stained with YOYO-1 were observed simultaneously by scanning near-field optical/ atomic force microscopy (SNOM/AFM). The chromosome was relatively smooth and flat in the topographic images and no significant difference in height was present between regions of high fluorescent and low fluorescent intensity in the chromosomes. The telomeric region, labeled by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method, was also observed by SNOM/AFM at high resolution, and fluorescent signals of the telomeric region were clearly defined on the topographic image of chromatin fibers on the chromosome at the nano-meter scale level. Although the telomeric signals were usually visualized as a single fluorescent region at the end of sister chromatids by conventional light microscopy, they were observed separately as two fluorescent regions, less than 100-200 nm distance, using the SNOM/AFM. The SNOM/AFM offers great potential in identifying particular single gene location on chromosomes in the near future.

  7. Structural study of nanometer-sized iron crystallites in single crystalline iron-MgO composite films.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Nagao, M; Yoshizaki, F; Mihama, K

    1989-07-01

    Single crystalline composite films of iron and MgO are prepared by a simultaneous vacuum deposition technique. The structures of the composite films, especially of the iron crystallites embedded, are studied by high-resolution electron microscopy and nanometer-area electron diffraction. The alpha-iron (b.c.c.) crystallites of 1 nm in size are epitaxially embedded in single crystalline MgO films, the orientation being (011)[100]Fe parallel (001)[100]MgO and (001)[110]Fe parallel (001)[100]MgO. A heat treatment of the as-grown films at 500-1,000 degrees C brings about a phase transformation of the crystallites from alpha-iron to gamma-iron (f.c.c.), followed by a grain growth of alpha-iron and finally the growth of the spinel, MgFe2O4. The gamma-iron crystallites transformed are circular plates and have strains at the periphery to accommodate the surrounding MgO-matrix. The magnetic property of the composite films is also reported.

  8. Nanometer-film analysis by the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy method: the effects of laser focus to sample distance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuxiang; Zhong, Shilei; Shan, Fukai; Lu, Yuan; Sun, Xin; Liu, Zhe; Sheng, Pengpeng

    2015-05-20

    In order to develop a method to analyze metal elements in thin-film samples rapidly, directly and without sample preparation, and to understand the mechanism of laser-film interaction and plasma formation and evolution, a laboratory laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy system was established recently for nanometer-film analysis. ZrO(2) films prepared on silicon chips by a sol-gel process were employed in the following experiment and their thickness was about 40 nm. By the initial investigation that we carried out, the stability of this system was verified and the relative standard deviation of the target peak was found to be lower than 1.6% with the help of a position system. The influences of different experimental parameters, such as laser energy, laser focus to sample distance (LFTSD) settings, and gate delay, were studied under conditions of room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The experimental results show that the LFTSD was one of the most important parameters for plasma formation and spectral collection in comparison with other parameters by means of plasma spectra and images. So the effects of the LFTSD on the spectra, plasma evolution, and craters are specially discussed in this paper. At last, we calculated the plasma temperature and electron density under optimal parameters for quantitative analysis. The result shows that the established system is available for qualitative and quantitative analysis of films under conditions of single pulse and low ablation energy.

  9. Fabrication of a Carbon Nanotube-Embedded Silicon Nitride Membrane for Studies of Nanometer-Scale Mass Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, J K; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D; Bakajin, O

    2004-08-25

    A membrane consisting of multiwall carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for fluid mechanics studies on the nanometer scale. Characterization by tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is free of large voids. An upper limit to the diffusive flux of D{sub 2}O of 2.4x10-{sup 8} mole/m{sup 2}-s was determined, indicating extremely slow transport. By contrast, hydrodynamic calculations of water flow across a nanotube membrane of similar specifications predict a much higher molar flux of 1.91 mole/m{sup 2}-s, suggesting that the nanotubes produced possess a 'bamboo' morphology. The carbon nanotube membranes were used to make nanoporous silicon nitride membranes, fabricated by sacrificial removal of the carbon. Nitrogen flow measurements on these structures give a membrane permeance of 4.7x10{sup -4} mole/m{sup 2}-s-Pa at a pore density of 4x10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. Using a Knudsen diffusion model, the average pore size of this membrane is estimated to be 66 nm, which agrees well with TEM observations of the multiwall carbon nanotube outer diameter. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications inseparations and chemical sensing.

  10. New single-molecule speckle microscopy reveals modification of the retrograde actin flow by focal adhesions at nanometer scales

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Mizuno, Hiroaki; Smith, Matthew B.; Ryan, Gillian L.; Kiuchi, Tai; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Watanabe, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Speckle microscopy directly visualizes the retrograde actin flow, which is believed to promote cell-edge protrusion when linked to focal adhesions (FAs). However, it has been argued that, due to rapid actin turnover, the use of green fluorescent protein–actin, the lack of appropriate analysis algorithms, and technical difficulties, speckle microscopy does not necessarily report the flow velocities of entire actin populations. In this study, we developed a new, user-friendly single-molecule speckle (SiMS) microscopy using DyLight dye-labeled actin. Our new SiMS method enables in vivo nanometer-scale displacement analysis with a low localization error of ±8–8.5 nm, allowing accurate flow-velocity measurement for actin speckles with lifetime <5 s. In lamellipodia, both short- and long-lived F-actin molecules flow with the same speed, indicating they are part of a single actin network. These results do not support coexistence of F-actin populations with different flow speeds, which is referred to as the lamella hypothesis. Mature FAs, but not nascent adhesions, locally obstruct the retrograde flow. Interestingly, the actin flow in front of mature FAs is fast and biased toward FAs, suggesting that mature FAs attract the flow in front and actively remodel the local actin network. PMID:24501425

  11. First-principles study of nanometer-sharp domain walls in ferromagnetic Fe monolayers under in-plane strain.

    PubMed

    Shimada, T; Okuno, J; Ishii, Y; Kitamura, T

    2012-03-07

    We investigated a nanometer-sharp magnetic domain wall (DW) structure in a free-standing Fe(110) monolayer and studied the crucial role of in-plane strain using fully unconstrained noncollinear ab initio spin-density-functional theory calculations within the generalized gradient approximation. The DW width is calculated to be 0.86 nm. A precise vector-field description of the magnetization density revealed that a noncollinear character in the DW was spatially confined between atoms, whereas a collinear and high magnetization density was localized around each atom. In the rapid rotation of magnetic moments in the DW, we found an electron rearrangement from the d(zx) and d(x(2)-y(2)) states to the d(xy), d(yz) and d(z(2)) states due to a shift of band structures. Applied tensile and compressive in-plane strains both bring about narrower DWs in the monolayer except when the strain is small. The strain dependence of the DW width is discussed in terms of both exchange interaction and magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  12. NANOMETER DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ARE NEUROTOXIC TO DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS THROUGH MICROGLIAL ACTIVATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    NANOMETER DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ARE NEUROTOXIC TO DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS THROUGH MICROGLIAL ACTIVATION. M.L. Block1,2, X. Wu1, P. Zhong1, G. Li1, T. Wang1, J.S. Hong1 & B.Veronesi.2
    1The Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, NIEHS, RTP, NC and 2 National Health and Envi...

  13. Ultra-sensitive plasmonic nanometal scattering immunosensor based on optical control in the evanescent field layer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungah; Park, Guenyoung; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Kang, Seong Ho

    2015-01-15

    Novel, fluorescence-free detection of biomolecules on nanobiochips was investigated based on plasmonic nanometal scattering in the evanescent field layer (EFL) using total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy. The plasmonic scattering of nanometals bonded to biomolecules was observed at different wavelengths by an electromagnetic field in the EFL. The changes in the scattering of nanometals on the gold-nanopatterned chip in response to the immunoreaction between silver nanoparticles and antibodies allowed fluorescence-free detection of biomolecules on the nanobiochips. Under optimized conditions, the TIRS immunoassay chip detected different amounts of immobilized antigen, i.e., human cardiac troponin I. The sandwich immuno-reaction was quantitatively analyzed in the dynamic range of 720 zM-167 fM. The limit of detection (S/N=4) was 600 zM, which was ~140 times lower than limits obtained by previous total internal reflection fluorescence and dark field methods. These results demonstrate the possibility for a fluorescence-free biochip nanoimmunoassay based on the scattering of nanometals in the EFL.

  14. Green synthesis of noble nanometals (Au, Pt, Pd) using glycerol under microwave irradiation conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    A newer application of glycerol in the field of nanomaterials synthesis has been developed from both the economic and environmental points of view. Glycerol can act as a reducing agent for the fabrication of noble nanometals, such as Au, Pt, and Pd, under microwave irradiation. T...

  15. Preparation of high-strength nanometer scale twinned coating and foil

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Xinghang; Misra, Amit; Nastasi, Michael A.; Hoagland, Richard G.

    2006-07-18

    Very high strength single phase stainless steel coating has been prepared by magnetron sputtering onto a substrate. The coating has a unique microstructure of nanometer spaced twins that are parallel to each other and to the substrate surface. For cases where the coating and substrate do not bind strongly, the coating can be peeled off to provide foil.

  16. Two-Dimensional Measurement of n+-p Asymmetrical Junctions in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Using AFM-Based Electrical Techniques with Nanometer Resolution: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Li, J. V.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Heath, J. T.

    2011-07-01

    Lateral inhomogeneities of modern solar cells demand direct electrical imaging with nanometer resolution. We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based electrical techniques provide unique junction characterizations, giving a two-dimensional determination of junction locations. Two AFM-based techniques, scanning capacitance microscopy/spectroscopy (SCM/SCS) and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), were significantly improved and applied to the junction characterizations of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells. The SCS spectra were taken pixel by pixel by precisely controlling the tip positions in the junction area. The spectra reveal distinctive features that depend closely on the position relative to the electrical junction, which allows us to indentify the electrical junction location. In addition, SKPFM directly probes the built-in potential over the junction area modified by the surface band bending, which allows us to deduce the metallurgical junction location by identifying a peak of the electric field. Our results demonstrate resolutions of 10-40 nm, depending on the techniques (SCS or SKPFM). These direct electrical measurements with nanometer resolution and intrinsic two-dimensional capability are well suited for investigating the junction distribution of solar cells with lateral inhomogeneities.

  17. Vesicle membrane fluctuations at nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejia; Bae, Sung Chul; Min, Chang-Ki; Granick, Steve; Granick Group Team

    2011-03-01

    We measure membrane thermal fluctuations with nanometer spatial resolution and microsecond time resolution, extending a scattering technique used at the Curie Institute to study red blood cell dynamics (Timo Betz et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 106, 15320, 2009). A laser beam is focused at the leading edge of a phospholipid vesicle membrane and the forward scattered light is detected by a quadrant photodiode. The measurements over 4 orders of magnitude of frequency allow quantification of more complete fluctuation spectra than competing methods, and therefore fuller understanding of the vesicle membrane mechanics. As a proof of concept, we quantify how adsorbed nanoparticles stiffen giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs).

  18. Development of X-Y servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuators for position control with high response, large stroke and nanometer accuracy.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Mao-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to develop a X-Y dual-axial intelligent servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuator for position control with high response, large stroke (250 mm, 200 mm) and nanometer accuracy (20 nm). In each axis, the rodless pneumatic actuator serves to position in coarse stroke and the piezoelectric actuator compensates in fine stroke. Thus, the overall control systems of the single axis become a dual-input single-output (DISO) system. Although the rodless pneumatic actuator has relatively larger friction force, it has the advantage of mechanism for multi-axial development. Thus, the X-Y dual-axial positioning system is developed based on the servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuator. In addition, the decoupling self-organizing fuzzy sliding mode control is developed as the intelligent control strategies. Finally, the proposed novel intelligent X-Y dual-axial servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuators are implemented and verified experimentally.

  19. Composition Analysis of III-Nitrides at the Nanometer Scale: Comparison of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Atom Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonef, Bastien; Lopez-Haro, Miguel; Amichi, Lynda; Beeler, Mark; Grenier, Adeline; Robin, Eric; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Mollard, Nicolas; Mouton, Isabelle; Monroy, Eva; Bougerol, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    The enhancement of the performance of advanced nitride-based optoelectronic devices requires the fine tuning of their composition, which has to be determined with a high accuracy and at the nanometer scale. For that purpose, we have evaluated and compared energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) in terms of composition analysis of AlGaN/GaN multilayers. Both techniques give comparable results with a composition accuracy better than 0.6 % even for layers as thin as 3 nm. In case of EDX, we show the relevance of correcting the X-ray absorption by simultaneous determination of the mass thickness and chemical composition at each point of the analysis. Limitations of both techniques are discussed when applied to specimens with different geometries or compositions.

  20. Simultaneous three-wavelength continuous wave laser at 946 nm, 1319 nm and 1064 nm in Nd:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yanfei; Zhao, Lianshui; Zhai, Pei; Xia, Jing; Fu, Xihong; Li, Shutao

    2013-01-01

    A continuous-wave (cw) diode-end-pumped Nd:YAG laser that generates simultaneous laser at the wavelengths 946 nm, 1319 nm and 1064 nm is demonstrated. The optimum oscillation condition for the simultaneous three-wavelength operation has been derived. Using the separation of the three output couplers, we obtained the maximum output powers of 0.24 W at 946 nm, 1.07 W at 1319 nm and 1.88 W at 1064 nm at the absorbed pump power of 11.2 W. A total output power of 3.19 W for the three-wavelength was achieved at the absorbed pump power of 11.2 W with optical conversion efficiency of 28.5%.

  1. New antireflective coatings for 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gu; Guerrero, Douglas J.; Dobson, Norman

    1998-06-01

    New bottom antireflective coatings (BARCs) for 193 nm lithography have been recently developed by Brewer Science Inc. Copolymers of benzyl methacrylate (or benzyl acrylate) and hydroxypropyl methacrylate have been synthesized and used as a main component in 193 nm BARCs. The acrylic copolymers have strong absorbance at 193 nm UV light wavelength. The 193 nm BARCs were formulated in safe solvents such as ethyl lactate and formed by spin-on coating process. Thermosetting of the 193 nm BARCs limited their intermixing with photoresists. These 193 nm BARCs had optical density of about 10 micrometers -1, k equals 0.35, and n equals 1.81. Preliminary oxygen plasma etch rates were > 1.5 times DUV resists. Good profiles at small feature sizes (< 0.20 micrometers ) were achieved with tested photoresists.

  2. Tracing temperature in a nanometer size region in a picosecond time period

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kaoru; Kitayama, Takumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuda, Makoto; Sataka, Masao; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Toulemonde, Marcel; Bouffard, Serge; Kimura, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Irradiation of materials with either swift heavy ions or slow highly charged ions leads to ultrafast heating on a timescale of several picosecond in a region of several nanometer. This ultrafast local heating result in formation of nanostructures, which provide a number of potential applications in nanotechnologies. These nanostructures are believed to be formed when the local temperature rises beyond the melting or boiling point of the material. Conventional techniques, however, are not applicable to measure temperature in such a localized region in a short time period. Here, we propose a novel method for tracing temperature in a nanometer region in a picosecond time period by utilizing desorption of gold nanoparticles around the ion impact position. The feasibility is examined by comparing with the temperature evolution predicted by a theoretical model. PMID:26293488

  3. Nanolithography and nanochemistry: probe-related patterning techniques and chemical modification for nanometer-sized devices.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Daan; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2004-05-03

    The size regime for devices produced by photolithographic techniques is limited. Therefore, other patterning techniques have been intensively studied to create smaller structures. Scanning-probe-based patterning techniques, such as dip-pen lithography, local force-induced patterning, and local-probe oxidation-based techniques are highly promising because of their relative ease and widespread availability. The latter of these is especially interesting because of the possibility of producing nanopatterns for a broad range of chemical and physical modification and functionalization processes; both the production of nanometer-sized electronic devices and the formation of devices involving (bio)molecular recognition and sensor applications is possible. This Review highlights the development of various scanning probe systems and the possibilities of local oxidation methods, as well as giving an overview of state-of-the-art nanometer-sized devices, and a view of future development.

  4. Formation and properties of 3D metamaterial composites fabricated using nanometer scale laser lithography (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokes, Sharka M.; Perkins, Frank K.; Glembocki, Orest J.

    2015-08-01

    Metamaterials designed for the visible or near IR wavelengths require patterning on the nanometer scale. To achieve this, e-beam lithography is used, but it is extremely difficult and can only produce 2D structures. A new alternative technique to produce 2D and 3D structures involves laser fabrication using the Nanoscribe 3D laser lithography system. This is a direct laser writing technique which can form arbitrary 3D nanostructures on the nanometer scale and is based on multi-photon polymerization. We are creating 2D and 3D metamaterials via this technique, and subsequently conformally coating them using Atomic Layer Deposition of oxides and Ag. We will discuss the optical properties of these novel composite structures and their potential for dual resonant metamaterials.

  5. Optical-fiber frequency domain interferometer with nanometer resolution and centimeter measuring range.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jidong; Tao, Tianjiong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2013-11-01

    A new optical-fiber frequency domain interferometer (OFDI) device for accurate measurement of the absolute distance between two stationary objects, with centimeter measuring range and nanometer resolution, has been developed. Its working principle and on-line data processing method were elaborated. The new OFDI instrument was constructed all with currently available commercial communication products. It adopted the wide-spectrum amplified spontaneous emission light as the light source and optical-fiber tip as the test probe. Since this device consists of only fibers or fiber coupled components, it is very compact, convenient to operate, and easy to carry. By measuring the single-step length of a translation stage and the thickness of standard gauge blocks, its ability in implementing nanometer resolution and centimeter measuring range on-line measurements was validated.

  6. Tracing temperature in a nanometer size region in a picosecond time period.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kaoru; Kitayama, Takumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuda, Makoto; Sataka, Masao; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Toulemonde, Marcel; Bouffard, Serge; Kimura, Kenji

    2015-08-21

    Irradiation of materials with either swift heavy ions or slow highly charged ions leads to ultrafast heating on a timescale of several picosecond in a region of several nanometer. This ultrafast local heating result in formation of nanostructures, which provide a number of potential applications in nanotechnologies. These nanostructures are believed to be formed when the local temperature rises beyond the melting or boiling point of the material. Conventional techniques, however, are not applicable to measure temperature in such a localized region in a short time period. Here, we propose a novel method for tracing temperature in a nanometer region in a picosecond time period by utilizing desorption of gold nanoparticles around the ion impact position. The feasibility is examined by comparing with the temperature evolution predicted by a theoretical model.

  7. Nanometer-scale surface modification of Ti6Al4V alloy for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianhui; Luan, Ben Li

    2008-01-01

    This communication presents a novel technology to enhance the biocompatibility of bioinert Ti6Al4V alloy as implant materials for orthopaedic application. The surface of Ti6Al4V alloy was electrochemically activated in NaOH solution to create a porous structure with nanometer topographic features and an alkaline environment, thus promoting the formation of bone-like hydroxyapatite coating and enhancing the bonding strength of the coating. This innovative activation process was proved to be effective and essential. The activated surface was confirmed to be pure TiO2 and the formed coating was characterized of pure hydroxyapatite with a nanometer-scaled grain size structure by means of XPS, FESEM/SEM/EDX, XRD, and TEM techniques.

  8. Ion Exclusion by Sub 2-nm Carbon Nanotube Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-04-09

    Carbon nanotubes offer an outstanding platform for studying molecular transport at nanoscale, and have become promising materials for nanofluidics and membrane technology due to their unique combination of physical, chemical, mechanical, and electronic properties. In particular, both simulations and experiments have proved that fluid flow through carbon nanotubes of nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast compared to what continuum hydrodynamic theories would predict when applied on this length scale, and also, compared to conventional membranes with pores of similar size, such as zeolites. For a variety of applications such as separation technology, molecular sensing, drug delivery, and biomimetics, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In particular, for water desalination, coupling the enhancement of the water flux with selective ion transport could drastically reduce the cost of brackish and seawater desalting. In this work, we study the ion selectivity of membranes made of aligned double-walled carbon nanotubes with sub-2 nm diameter. Negatively charged groups are introduced at the opening of the carbon nanotubes by oxygen plasma treatment. Reverse osmosis experiments coupled with capillary electrophoresis analysis of permeate and feed show significant anion and cation rejection. Ion exclusion declines by increasing ionic strength (concentration) of the feed and by lowering solution pH; also, the highest rejection is observed for the A{sub m}{sup Z{sub A}} C{sub n}{sup Z{sub C}} salts (A=anion, C=cation, z= valence) with the greatest Z{sub A}/Z{sub C} ratio. Our results strongly support a Donnan-type rejection mechanism, dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion

  9. Pattern transfer processes for 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Seiro; Furukawa, Takamitsu; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Irie, Shigeo; Itani, Toshiro

    2002-07-01

    We describe and evaluate three kinds of pattern transfer processes that are suitable for 157-nm lithography. These transfer processes are 1) a hard mask (HM) process using SiO as a HM material, 2) a HM process using an organic bottom anti-reflecting coating (BARC)/SiN structure, and 3) a bi- layer process using a silicon-containing resist and an organic film as the bottom layer. In all of these processes, the underlayer fo the resist acts as an anti-reflecting layer. For the HM processes, we patterned a newly developed fluorine-containing resist using a 157-nm microstepper, and transferred the resist patterns to the hard mask by reactive ion etching (RIE) with minimal critical dimension shift. Using the HM pattern, we then fabricated a 65nm Wsi/poly-Si gate pattern using a high-NA microstepper (NA=0.85). With the bi-layer process, we transferred a 60nm 1:1 lines and spaces pattern of a newly developed silicon-containing resist to a 300nm-thick organic film by RIE. The fabrication of a 65nm 1:1 gate pattern and 60nm 1:1 organic film patten clearly demonstrated that 157-nm lithography is the best candidate for fabricating sub-70nm node devices.

  10. Can DUV take us below 100 nm?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finders, Jo; Jorritsma, Louis; Eurlings, Mark; Moerman, Richard; van Greevenbroek, Henk; van Schoot, Jan B.; Flagello, Donis G.; Socha, Robert J.; Stammler, Thomas

    2001-09-01

    Currently, the 130 nm SIA node is being implemented at leading edge semiconductor manufacturing facilities. Previously, this node appeared to be the insertion point for 193 nm lithography. However, it is evident that for the majority of applications 248 nm will be the wavelength of choice. This once again raises the question how far DUV lithography (248 nm) will take us. To investigate this, overlay, imaging and productivity related issues have to be considered. Although these items become more and more linked at low k1-factors (e.g. overlay and imaging), this paper will focus on some of the imaging related topics.

  11. Lithography strategy for 65-nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodovsky, Yan A.; Schenker, Richard E.; Allen, Gary A.; Tejnil, Edita; Hwang, David H.; Lo, Fu-Chang; Singh, Vivek K.; Gleason, Robert E.; Brandenburg, Joseph E.; Bigwood, Robert M.

    2002-07-01

    Intel will start high volume manufacturing (HVM) of the 65nm node in 2005. Microprocessor density and performance trends will continue to follow Moore's law and cost-effective patterning solutions capable of supporting it have to be found, demonstrated and developed during 2002-2004. Given the uncertainty regarding the readiness and respective capabilities of 157nm and 193nm lithography to support 65nm technology requirements, Intel is developing both lithographic options and corresponding infrastructure with the intent to use both options in manufacturing. Development and use of dual lithographic options for a given technology node in manufacturing is not a new paradigm for Intel: whenever introduction of a new exposure wavelength presented excessive risk to the manufacturing schedule, Intel developed parallel patterning approaches in time for the manufacturing ramp. Both I-line and 248nm patterning solutions were developed and successfully used in manufacturing of the 350nm node at Intel. Similarly, 248nm and 193nm patterning solutions were fully developed for 130nm node high volume manufacturing.

  12. Scaling carbon nanotube complementary transistors to 5-nm gate lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Chenguang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Xiao, Mengmeng; Yang, Yingjun; Zhong, Donglai; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2017-01-01

    High-performance top-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT FETs) with a gate length of 5 nanometers can be fabricated that perform better than silicon complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) FETs at the same scale. A scaling trend study revealed that the scaled CNT-based devices, which use graphene contacts, can operate much faster and at much lower supply voltage (0.4 versus 0.7 volts) and with much smaller subthreshold slope (typically 73 millivolts per decade). The 5-nanometer CNT FETs approached the quantum limit of FETs by using only one electron per switching operation. In addition, the contact length of the CNT CMOS devices was also scaled down to 25 nanometers, and a CMOS inverter with a total pitch size of 240 nanometers was also demonstrated.

  13. Photoluminescence decay dynamics of transparent silica glass prepared from nanometer-sized silica particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tomoko; Uchino, Takashi

    2005-08-22

    The time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) decays are measured for transparent amorphous silica prepared from solid-phase sintering of nanometer-sized silica particles, which has recently been shown to exhibit a unique white PL emission under ultraviolet excitation [T. Uchino and T. Yamada, Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 1164 (2004)]. Unlike usual PL processes observed in normal silica glass, it is shown that the present PL results from trapping-controlled migration of photoexcited carriers and their radiative recombination.

  14. Photoluminescence decay dynamics of transparent silica glass prepared from nanometer-sized silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Tomoko; Uchino, Takashi

    2005-08-01

    The time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) decays are measured for transparent amorphous silica prepared from solid-phase sintering of nanometer-sized silica particles, which has recently been shown to exhibit a unique white PL emission under ultraviolet excitation [T. Uchino and T. Yamada, Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 1164 (2004)]. Unlike usual PL processes observed in normal silica glass, it is shown that the present PL results from trapping-controlled migration of photoexcited carriers and their radiative recombination.

  15. Imaging and manipulation of nanometer-size liquid droplets by scanning polarization force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.; Carpick, R.W.; Salmeron, M.; Xiao, X.

    1996-03-01

    Using atomic force microscopy in noncontact mode, we have imaged nanometer-size liquid droplets of KOH water solutions on the surfaces of highly oriented pyrolitic graphite and mica. On graphite the droplets prefer to be adsorbed on atomic step edges. Droplets on the same step tend to be evenly spaced and of similar size. The droplets can be manipulated by the atomic force microscopy tip allowing the controllable formation of droplet patterns on the surface. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  16. Rigid lipid membranes and nanometer clefts: motifs for the creation of molecular landscapes.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangtao; Fudickar, Werner; Skupin, Marc; Klyszcz, Andreas; Draeger, Christian; Lauer, Matthias; Fuhrhop, Jürgen-Hinrich

    2002-06-03

    Amphiphilic lipids associate in water spontaneously to form micelles, vesicles, monolayers, or biological membranes. These aggregates are soft and their shape can be changed easily. They behave like complex fluids because they are merely held together by weak, nondirected forces. The most important characteristic of these monolayers is their ability to dissolve hydrophobic molecules in the form of freely movable monomers. The fluid molecular layers are not suitable to anchor the components of chain reactions. However, if the alkyl chains are replaced by rigid skeletons or if the head groups are connected through intermolecular interactions, the aggregates become rigid and their fluid solvent character is lost. The construction of chiral surfaces by synkinesis (synthesis of noncovalent compounds) and of enzyme-type surface clefts of defined size can now be carried out by using rigid lipid membranes. Monolayers and nanometer pores on solid substrates attain sharp edges, and upright nanometer columns on smooth surfaces no longer dissipate. Five examples illustrate the advantages of using rigid molecular assemblies: 1) Cationic domains of rigid edge amphiphiles in fluid membranes act as manipulable ion channels. 2) Spherical micelles, micellar helical fibers, and vesicular tubes can be dried and stored as stable material. Molecular landscapes form on smooth surfaces. 3) alpha,omega-Diamide bolaamphiphiles form rigid nanometer-thick walls on smooth surfaces and these barriers cannot be penetrated by amines. Around steroids and porphyrins, they form rigid nanometer clefts whose walls and water-filled centers can be functionalized. 4) The structure of rigid oligophenylene- and quinone monolayers on electrodes can be changed drastically and reversibly by changing the potential. 5) 10(10) Porphyrin cones on a 1-cm2 gold electrode can be controlled individually by AFM- and STM-tips and investigated by electrochemical, photochemical, and mechanical means. In summary, rigid

  17. Measurements of the imaginary part of the refractive index between 300 and 700 nanometers for mount st. Helens ash.

    PubMed

    Patterson, E M

    1981-02-20

    The absorption properties, expressed as a wavelength-dependent imaginary index of refraction, of the Mount St. Helens ash from the 18 May 1980 eruption were measured between 300 and 700 nanometers by diffuse reflectance techniques. The measurements were made for both surface and stratospheric samples. The stratospheric samples show imaginary index values that decrease from approximately 0.01 to 0.02 at 300 nanometers to about 0.0015 at 700 nanometers. The surface samples show less wavelength variation in imaginary refractive index over this spectral range.

  18. Measurements of the imaginary part of the refractive index between 300 and 700 nanometers for Mount St. Helens ash

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption properties, expressed as a wavelength-dependent imaginary index of refraction, of the Mount St. Helens ash from the 18 May 1980 eruption were measured between 300 and 700 nanometers by diffuse reflectance techniques. The measurements were made for both surface and stratospheric samples. The stratospheric samples show imaginary index values that decrease from approximately 0.01 to 0.02 at 300 nanometers to about 0.0015 at 700 nanometers. The surface samples show less wavelength variation in imaginary refractive index over this spectral range.

  19. Concentration and size distribution of particulate oxalate in marine and coastal atmospheres - Implication for the increased importance of oxalate in nanometer atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tianfeng; Li, Kai; Zhu, Yujiao; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong

    2016-10-01

    In literature, particulate oxalate has been widely studied in the total suspended particles (TSP), particles <10 μm or 2.5 μm (PM10 and PM2.5) and size-segregated particles >100 nm. In this article, we measured oxalate's concentrations in size-segregated atmospheric particles down to 10 nm or 56 nm during eight campaigns performed at a semi-urban coastal site, over the marginal seas of China and from the marginal seas to the northwest Pacific Ocean (NWPO) in 2012-2015. When the sum of the oxalate's concentration in particles <10 μm was used for intercomparison, the lowest average values of 0.05-0.06 μg m-3 were observed during the two campaigns performed at NWPO. The highest average value of 0.38 μg m-3 was observed at the coastal site during a heavy pollution event. Mode analysis results of particulate oxalate and the correlation between oxalate and sulfate suggested that the elevated concentrations of oxalate in PM10 were mainly related to enhanced in-cloud formation of oxalate via anthropogenic precursors. Size distribution data in the total of 136 sets of samples also showed approximately 80% of particulate oxalate's mass existing in atmospheric particles >100 nm. Consistent with previous studies, particulate oxalate in particles >100 nm was a negligible ionic component when comparing to particulate SO42- in the same size range. However, the mole ratios of oxalate/sulfate in particles <100 nm were generally increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude. In approximately 30% of the samples, the mole ratios in atmospheric particles <56 nm were larger than 0.5. Moreover, during Campaign 5, the oxalate's concentrations in <56 nm particles were substantially increased on the days in presence of new particle formation events. These results strongly imply the importance of oxalate in nanometer atmospheric particles, but not in >100 nm atmospheric particles such as PM2.5, PM10, TSP, etc.

  20. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of corrosion passivation and nanometer-scale lithography with self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamborini, Francis Patrick

    SAMs. We also used SAMs as resists in STM lithography experiments. An Ag-coated STM tip was used to remove thiol molecules selectively under the tip on a SAM-modified Au surface. Electrodes as small as 25 nm x 25 nm that were embedded within a SAM resist were formed in this way. Next, Ag was electrochemically deposited from the tip into the pattern previously made within the SAM. Nanometer-sized metal deposits were created on the surface in a controlled fashion with this two-step approach. The nano-scale electrochemical cell was completed by nanodroplets of water condensed between the tip and the surface. The deposition mechanism was determined to be electrochemical because patterning wasn't possible in dry environments and the potential at which deposits occurred was dependent on the metal on the tip.

  1. Investigation of cascade-induced re-solution from nanometer sized coherent precipitates in dilute Fe-Cu alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Certain, A.; Lee Voigt, H.-J.; Allen, T. R.; Wirth, B. D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to investigate the re-solution of copper atoms from coherent, nanometer-sized copper precipitates in a body-centered cubic iron matrix. The molecular dynamics simulations used Finnis-Sinclair type interatomic potentials to describe the Fe-Cu system. Precipitate diameters of 1, 3 and 5 nm were studied, with primary knock-on atom (PKA) from 1 to 100 keV, although the majority of the cascade simulations and analysis of solute re-solution were performed for cascades of 10 or 20 keV. The simulation results provide an assessment of the re-solution on a per-atom basis as a function of precipitate size, cascade location and energy. Smaller sized precipitates, with a larger surface to volume ratio, experienced larger re-solution on a per-atom basis than larger precipitates. Re-solution was observed to occur predominantly in the initial ballistic stages of the cascades when atomic collisions occur at high kinetic energy. A minimum PKA energy of around 1 keV was required to produce re-solution, and the amount of re-solution appears to saturate for PKA energies above approximately 10 keV, indicating that the MD results are representative of the energy range of interest. A model for prompt, cascade induced solute atom re-solution has been derived, following the approach used to describe fission gas bubble re-solution, and the parameters for describing copper atom re-solution are provided.

  2. Surface modification of nanometer size TiO2 with salicylic acid for photocatalytic degradation of 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Cai, Wen-Lian; Han, Ai-Qin; Xie, Yu-Kun

    2006-07-31

    The efficiency of photocatalytic reactions was limited by the wide band-gap of TiO(2) and the high degree of electron-hole recombination inherent in photocatalytic process, as well as by the limited adsorption capability of photocatalysts. In order to increase the overall efficiency, the surface of nanometer size TiO(2) was simply and fast modified by chemical adsorption in saturated solution of salicylic acid. A stable, light yellow surface complex was formed quickly, which has obvious absorption in the region from 320 to 420 nm. Through surface modification, the adsorption efficiency of 4-nitrophenol by TiO(2) was enhanced from 42 to 84%. The photocatalytic efficiency was tested on the degradation of 4-nitrophenol. The influences of catalyst and its dosage, pH value, and 4-nitrophenol concentration on the degradation were investigated. Under such photodegradation conditions as initial pH 4.0, 4-nitrophenol 5 mg l(-1), catalyst 100 mg, and irradiation time 160 min with 160 W high-pressure mercury lamp, the degradation efficiency of 4-nitrophenol by TiO(2) was increased from 39.5 to 79.3% after surface modification, and furthermore, the degradation efficiency could be enhanced to 91.1% if the concentration of 4-nitrophenol was not more than 1 mg l(-1). Compared with the pure TiO(2), surface modification led not only to improve the surface coverage of 4-nitrophenol, but also to increase the light utilization. Both of these factors were crucial for the photocatalytic activity of heterogeneous photocatalysis, especially for photodegradation of aromatic pollutants.

  3. Advanced Characterization: 3D chemistry and structure at sub-nm resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Rye, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    This work has started the process of extending nanometer-scale comprehensive microanalysis to the 3rd dimension by combining full x-ray spectral imaging with previously developed computed tomography techniques whereby we acquire a series of spectral images for a large number of projections of the same specimen in the transmission electron microscope and then analyze the composite computed tomographic spectral image data prior to application of existing tomographic reconstruction software. We have demonstrated a needle-shaped specimen geometry (shape/size and preparation method) by focused ion beam preparation and acquisition and analysis of a complete tomographic spectral image on a test material consisting of fine-grained Ni with sub-10 nm alumina particles.

  4. Single nanoparticle photothermal tracking (SNaPT) of 5-nm gold beads in live cells.

    PubMed

    Lasne, David; Blab, Gerhard A; Berciaud, Stéphane; Heine, Martin; Groc, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim

    2006-12-15

    Tracking individual nano-objects in live cells during arbitrary long times is a ubiquitous need in modern biology. We present here a method for tracking individual 5-nm gold nanoparticles on live cells. It relies on the photothermal effect and the detection of the Laser Induced Scattering around a NanoAbsorber (LISNA). The key point for recording trajectories at video rate is the use of a triangulation procedure. The effectiveness of the method is tested against single fluorescent molecule tracking in live COS7 cells on subsecond timescales. We further demonstrate recordings for several minutes of AMPA receptors trajectories on the plasma membrane of live neurons. Single Nanoparticle Photothermal Tracking has the unique potential to record arbitrary long trajectory of membrane proteins using nonfluorescent nanometer-sized labels.

  5. Nanofiltration of Electrolyte Solutions by Sub-2nm Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Kim, S; In, J B; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-03-13

    Both MD simulations and experimental studies have shown that liquid and gas flow through carbon nanotubes with nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast. For applications in separation technology, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In this work, we use pressure-driven filtration experiments to study ion exclusion in silicon nitride/sub-2-nm CNT composite membranes as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and ion valence. We show that carbon nanotube membranes exhibit significant ion exclusion at low salt concentration. Our results support a rejection mechanism dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

  6. Printing of sub-100-nm metal nanodot arrays by carbon nanopost stamps.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ho; Cho, Byungjin; Yoon, Seungha; Jeong, Huisu; Jon, Sangyong; Jung, Gun Young; Cho, Beong Ki; Lee, Takhee; Kim, Won Bae

    2011-07-26

    This work reports an efficient method to fabricate hexagonally patterned metal nanodot arrays at the sub-100-nm scale, which is based on contact printing via novel nanometer-scaled stamps. Vertically aligned carbon nanoposts, supported by hexagonally ordered nanochannels of anodic aluminum oxide templates, are employed as the stamping platform to directly transfer controlled metal nanodot arrays. Using the fabrication platform, a number of patterned metal nanodot arrays made of Au, Cu, Ni, Ag, Pt, Al, and Ti can be contact-printed over large substrate areas in ambient conditions. The size, density, and interdistance of the printed nanodots are controllable with a tight correspondence to the mother stamp geometries, which can be precisely tuned by modifying the pore dimensions of the alumina matrixes. An advanced example of contact printing of metal nanoparticles is successfully demonstrated by the controlled formation of nanodot arrays in a specific area.

  7. Simultaneous triple 914 nm, 1084 nm, and 1086 nm operation of a diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yanfei; Xia, Jing; Liu, Huilong; Pu, Xiaoyun

    2014-10-01

    We report a diode-pumped continuous-wave (cw) triple-wavelength Nd:YVO4 laser operating at 914, 1084, and 1086 nm. A theoretical analysis has been introduced to determine the threshold conditions for simultaneous triple-wavelength laser. Using a T-shaped cavity, we realized an efficient triple-wavelength operation at 4F3/2→4I9/2 and 4F3/2→4I11/2 transitions for Nd:YVO4 crystal, simultaneously. At an absorbed pump power of 16 W (or 25 W of incident pump power), the maximum output power was 2.3 W, which included 914 nm, 1084 nm, and 1086 nm three wavelengths, and the optical conversion efficiency with respect to the absorbed pump power was 14.4%.

  8. Final report on the torque comparison EURAMET.M.T-S2, measurand torque: 10 N.m, 20 N.m, 40 N.m, 60 N.m, 80 N.m, and 100 N.m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röske, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the EURAMET comparison EURAMET.M.T-S2 was to compare the measuring capabilities up to 100 N.m of a reference-type torque calibration machine of ZAG, Slovenia, with the torque standard machine of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) acting as pilot laboratory. A very stable TT1 torque transducer with well-known properties and two torque measuring bridges was used as travelling standard. According to the technical protocol, torque steps of at least 10 N.m, 20 N.m, 40 N.m, 60 N.m, 80 N.m, and 100 N.m had to be measured both in clockwise and anticlockwise directions. For each of the torque steps and both senses of direction of the torque vector, En values were calculated. The results are in general in good agreement with the claimed measurement uncertainties except for the very first measurement at ZAG with additional support and four plate couplings. It seems to be sufficient in a vertical set-up (vertical torque axis) to use only two flexible couplings and there is no need for a further support between the transducers. The measurements with two couplings fulfill the requirement to the En value and support ZAG's claimed uncertainties of measurement. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. Superlattice of stress domains in nanometer-size semiconductor devices predicted from atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Ebbsjö, Ingvar; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Kodiyalam, Sanjay; Madhukar, Anupam; Nakano, Aiichiro; Omeltchenko, Andrey; Walsh, Phillip; Vashishta, Priya

    2001-03-01

    Semiconductor industry association estimates pixel sizes in next generation devices to be on the order of 70 nm by the year of 2008. Although recent measurements of local strain distributions2 and strain relaxation in nano wires have reached 100-nm spatial resolution, experimental tools for determining stresses for sub 100 nm, feature sizes are still to be developed4. On the other hand, recent developments in efficient simulation algorithms on state-of-the-art parallel computers5 enable us to gain valuable information on interface structure and atomic level stresses in nanopixels of < 100 nm size. Here, we present results for a 27.5-million atom molecular-dynamics simulations of a 70 nm x 70 nm crystalline silicon nanopixel covered with amorphous silicon nitride and placed on a 140 nm x 140 nm crystalline silicon substrate. The stresses parallel to the silicon/silicon nitride interface exhibit a hexagonal superlattice of stress domains with a lattice constant of 12.8 (±1.8) nm. From our analysis of the 70 nm x 70 nm pixel and on comparing with a smaller 25 nm x 25 nm nanopixel, we conclude that for square pixels the superlattice constant is independent of the pixel size and is entirely determined by the mismatch between silicon and silicon nitride. Such stress inhomogeneity with values of up to ±2 GPa will have a significant impact on the performance of semiconductor devices with sub 100 nm features.

  10. Sub-70-nm pattern fabrication using an alternating phase-shifting mask in 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, Shigeo; Kanda, Noriyoshi; Watanabe, Kunio; Suganaga, Toshifumi; Itani, Toshiro

    2002-07-01

    In Selete, we have developed various resolution-enhancement technologies (RETs) such as the alternating phase shifting mask (alt-PSM), attenuated-PSM (att-PSM), and off-axis illumination (OAI). The alt-PSM, for example, reduces the k1 factor and extends the lithographic performance. A problem concerning the alt-PSM is the difference in the transmitted light intensities of the non-phase-shifting region and the phase-shifting region which can cause critical-dimension (CD) placement error. The transmitted light intensities of the two regions can be made equal by side-etching, in which the quartz (Qz) is undercut by wet-etching at the side of the transmitting region. We sought to optimize the mask structure in terms of a high numerical aperture (NA) through a simulation using two kinds of structures with a 157 nm exposure wavelength. The structures were a single-trench structure and a dual-trench structure, with each trench dug in the transmitting region. To attain a high NA (NA equals 0.85), we tried to optimize the parameters of the Cr film thickness, the amount of the undercut (side-etching), and the phase shift. The evaluated line pattern sizes were 70 nm (line/space size equals 70/70 nm, 70/140 nm, 70/210 nm, and 70/350 nm) and 50 nm (line/space size equals 50/50 nm, 50/100 nm, 50/150 nm, and 50/250 nm) at the wafer. Further, using the optimized mask, we calculated the lithographic margin of a sub 70 nm pattern through a simulation. For the 70 nm line patterns, we found that it will be difficult to fabricate precisely a 70 nm line patten using a mask with a single- trench structure. And we also found that the most suitable conditions for the dual-trench structure mask were a 90 nm undercut, a 100 nm Cr film thickness, and a 180 degree(s) phase shift. The exposure latitude at a depth of focus (DOF) of 0.3 micrometers , simulated using the optimized mask, was 5.3% for the 70/70 nm pattern, 3.6% for 70/140 nm 16.0% for 70/210 nm, and 29.3% for 70/350 nm. As the pitch

  11. Improvement on ball-milling composite process of metal matrix micro-nanometer powder using nanosuspension as the precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyu; Zhou, Jianzhong; Li, Xiangfeng; Shen, Qing; Cheng, Man

    2014-12-01

    The wet ball-milling preparation of metal matrix micro-nanometer powder using nanosuspension as the precursor can well solve the agglomeration of nanoscale component, but the micro-nanometer powder prepared by the method can hardly meet the requirement of powder feeding in laser cladding process and its composite effect is still not desirable enough. Aiming at the problem, the ball-milling composite process of metal matrix micro-nanometer powder using nanosuspension as the precursor was analyzed. It has been found that the morphological diversity of original micron powder is the main influencing factor of the deliverability and the composite effect of micro-nanometer powder. In addition, the deposition of the compounding powder in the bottom of ball-milling tank also has some negative influences on the composite effect. Accordingly, two improving measures namely the micron powder pretreatment with Ball Mill Reshaping + Screening and the additional stirring during ball-milling process are proposed and experimented. Results show that the micron powder pretreatment could significantly improve the composite effect and the deliverability of micro-nanometer powder, and the additional stirring could further improve the composite effect of micro-nanometer powder.

  12. Sub-10 nm nanopantography

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Siyuan Donnelly, Vincent M. E-mail: economou@uh.edu; Economou, Demetre J. E-mail: economou@uh.edu; Ruchhoeft, Paul

    2015-11-09

    Nanopantography, a massively parallel nanopatterning method over large areas, was previously shown to be capable of printing 10 nm features in silicon, using an array of 1000 nm-diameter electrostatic lenses, fabricated on the substrate, to focus beamlets of a broad area ion beam on selected regions of the substrate. In the present study, using lens dimensional scaling optimized by computer simulation, and reduction in the ion beam image size and energy dispersion, the resolution of nanopantography was dramatically improved, allowing features as small as 3 nm to be etched into Si.

  13. Anisotropic Shear Viscosity of Photoaligned Liquid Crystal Confined in Submicrometer-to-Nanometer-Scale Gap Widths Revealed with Simultaneously Measured Molecular Orientation.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shintaro; Imura, Yuuichi; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Zhang, Hedong

    2015-10-20

    In the context of the use of liquid crystals (LCs) as lubricants and lubricant additives, this study investigates the anisotropic shear viscosity of LCs confined in nanometer-sized gap widths subject to both shearing and photoalignment. The photoalignment is achieved using anisotropically dimerized polyvinyl cinnamate (PVCi) films coated on substrates. We simultaneously measure the viscosity and order parameter of a liquid crystal (4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl) confined and sheared in the gap range of 500 nm down to a few nm. We achieve this simultaneous measurement using an original method that combines a highly sensitive viscosity measurement and a sensitive birefringence measurement. When the LC is sheared in the same direction as the photoalignment (parallel shearing), the order parameter, which is around 0.3 in the bulk state, increases up to around 0.4 at a gap width of less than 50 nm and the viscosity is smaller than half the bulk viscosity. We consider that this increase in the order parameter is due to the highly ordered photoaligned LC layer near the PVCi film, and the viscosity decrease is due to shear thinning of this layer enhanced by both confinement and molecular ordering. In addition, we observe a gradual decrease in viscosity starting at a gap of less than around 300 nm in the parallel shearing. Based on the apparent slip model, we show that the LC layer near the PVCi film can also cause this gradual viscosity decrease. In contrast, when the LC is sheared in the direction perpendicular to the photoalignment direction (perpendicular shearing), the viscosity increases as the gap decreases. We speculate that this is due to the rotational motion of the LC molecules caused by the competing effect of shear alignment and photoalignment. We believe our findings can significantly contribute to a better understanding of the confined LCs utilized for lubrication.

  14. Gallup, NM, CARE Grant Success Story

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A CARE Grant, Level II award, was made to Gallup, NM to focus on cleaning up the waste stream, reuse and recycling of materials, and reclaiming land for these purposes through outreach, education and organization.

  15. Recent progress in 193-nm antireflective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meador, James D.; Guerrero, Douglas J.; Xu, Gu; Shao, Xie; Dobson, Norman; Claypool, James B.; Nowak, Kelly A.

    1999-06-01

    This paper presents the chemistries and properties of organic, spin-on, bottom antireflective coatings (BARCs) that are designed for 193 nm lithography. All of the BARCs are thermosetting and use dye-attached/incorporated polymers. A first generation product, NEXT, will soon be commercialized. NEXT is built form i-line and deep-UV chemistries with the polymeric constituent being a substitute novolac. This product provide outstanding resolution of 0.16 micrometers L/S with several 193 nm photoresists. Second generation chemical platforms under study include acrylics, polyesters, and polyethers with the 193 nm absorbing chromophore being an aromatic function. The performance of selected BARCs from the four platforms is described, including: optical properties, 193 nm litho, plasma etch rates, Prolith modeling data, spin-bowl and waste line compatibility, and ambient stability.

  16. Effects of amines on formation of sub-3 nm particles and their subsequent growth

    SciTech Connect

    Yu H.; McGraw R.; Lee S.-H.

    2012-01-28

    Field observations and quantum chemical calculations suggest that amines can be important for formation of nanometer size particles. Amines and ammonia often have common atmospheric emission sources and the similar chemical and physical properties. While the effects of ammonia on aerosol nucleation have been previously investigated, laboratory studies of homogeneous nucleation involving amines are lacking. We have made kinetics studies of multicomponent nucleation (MCN) with sulfuric acid, water, ammonia and amines under conditions relevant to the atmosphere. Low concentrations of aerosol precursors were measured with chemical ionization mass spectrometers (CIMS) to provide constrained precursor concentrations needed for nucleation. Particle sizes larger than {approx}2 nm were measured with a nano-differential mobility analyzer (nano-DMA), and number concentrations of particles larger than {approx}1 nm were measured with a particle size magnifier (PSM). Our observations provide the laboratory evidence that amines indeed can participate in aerosol nucleation and growth at the molecular cluster level. The enhancement of particle number concentrations due to several atmospherically relevant amine compounds and ammonia were related to the basicity of these compounds, indicating that acid-base reactions may contribute to the formation of sub-3 nm particles.

  17. Live Bacterial Physiology Visualized with 5 nm Resolution Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Nelson, Edward M; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Damiano, John; Timp, Gregory

    2016-02-23

    It is now possible to visualize at nanometer resolution the infection of a living biological cell with virus without compromising cell viability using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). To provide contrast while preserving viability, Escherichia coli and P1 bacteriophages were first positively stained with a very low concentration of uranyl acetate in minimal phosphate medium and then imaged with low-dose STEM in a microfluidic liquid flow cell. Under these conditions, it was established that the median lethal dose of electrons required to kill half the tested population was LD50 = 30 e(-)/nm(2), which coincides with the disruption of a wet biological membrane, according to prior reports. Consistent with the lateral resolution and high-contrast signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) inferred from Monte Carlo simulations, images of the E. coli membrane, flagella, and the bacteriophages were acquired with 5 nm resolution, but the cumulative dose exceeded LD50. On the other hand, with a cumulative dose below LD50 (and lower SNR), it was still possible to visualize the infection of E. coli by P1, showing the insertion of viral DNA within 3 s, with 5 nm resolution.

  18. Enhanced endothelial cell density on NiTi surfaces with sub-micron to nanometer roughness.

    PubMed

    Samaroo, Harry D; Lu, Jing; Webster, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    The shape memory effect and superelastic properties of NiTi (or Nitinol, a nickel-titanium alloy) have already attracted much attention for various biomedical applications (such as vascular stents, orthodontic wires, orthopedic implants, etc). However, for vascular stents, conventional approaches have required coating NiTi with anti-thrombogenic or antiinflammatory drug-eluting polymers which as of late have proven problematic for healing atherosclerotic blood vessels. Instead of focusing on the use of drug-eluting anti-thrombogenic or anti-inflammatory proteins, this study focused on promoting the formation of a natural antithrombogenic and anti-inflammatory surface on metallic stents: the endothelium. In this study, we synthesized various NiTi substrates with different micron to nanometer surface roughness by using dissimilar dimensions of constituent NiTi powder. Endothelial cell adhesion on these compacts was compared with conventional commercially pure (cp) titanium (Ti) samples. The results after 5 hrs showed that endothelial cells adhered much better on fine grain (< 60 microm) compared with coarse grain NiTi compacts (< 100 microm). Coarse grain NiTi compacts and conventional Ti promoted similar levels of endothelial cell adhesion. In addition, cells proliferated more after 5 days on NiTi with greater sub-micron and nanoscale surface roughness compared with coarse grain NiTi. In this manner, this study emphasized the positive pole that NiTi with sub-micron to nanometer surface features can play in promoting a natural anti-thrombogenic and anti-inflammatory surface (the endothelium) on a vascular stent and, thus, suggests that more studies should be conducted on NiTi with sub-micron to nanometer surface features.

  19. Grinding model and material removal mechanism of medical nanometer zirconia ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongkun; Li, Changhe; Jia, Dongzhou; Wang, Sheng; Li, Runze; Qi, Xiaoxiao

    2014-01-01

    Many patents have been devoted to developing medical nanometer zirconia ceramic grinding techniques that can significantly improve both workpiece surface integrity and grinding quality. Among these patents is a process for preparing ceramic dental implants with a surface for improving osseo-integration by sand abrasive finishing under a jet pressure of 1.5 bar to 8.0 bar and with a grain size of 30 µm to 250 µm. Compared with other materials, nano-zirconia ceramics exhibit unmatched biomedical performance and excellent mechanical properties as medical bone tissue and dentures. The removal mechanism of nano-zirconia materials includes brittle fracture and plastic removal. Brittle fracture involves crack formation, extension, peeling, and chipping to completely remove debris. Plastic removal is similar to chip formation in metal grinding, including rubbing, ploughing, and the formation of grinding debris. The materials are removed in shearing and chipping. During brittle fracture, the grinding-led transverse and radial extension of cracks further generate local peeling of blocks of the material. In material peeling and removal, the mechanical strength and surface quality of the workpiece are also greatly reduced because of crack extension. When grinding occurs in the plastic region, plastic removal is performed, and surface grinding does not generate grinding fissures and surface fracture, producing clinically satisfactory grinding quality. With certain grinding conditions, medical nanometer zirconia ceramics can be removed through plastic flow in ductile regime. In this study, we analyzed the critical conditions for the transfer of brittle and plastic removal in nano-zirconia ceramic grinding as well as the high-quality surface grinding of medical nanometer zirconia ceramics by ELID grinding.

  20. Enhanced endothelial cell density on NiTi surfaces with sub-micron to nanometer roughness

    PubMed Central

    Samaroo, Harry D; Lu, Jing; Webster, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    The shape memory effect and superelastic properties of NiTi (or Nitinol, a nickel-titanium alloy) have already attracted much attention for various biomedical applications (such as vascular stents, orthodontic wires, orthopedic implants, etc). However, for vascular stents, conventional approaches have required coating NiTi with anti-thrombogenic or anti-inflammatory drug-eluting polymers which as of late have proven problematic for healing atherosclerotic blood vessels. Instead of focusing on the use of drug-eluting anti-thrombogenic or anti-inflammatory proteins, this study focused on promoting the formation of a natural anti-thrombogenic and anti-inflammatory surface on metallic stents: the endothelium. In this study, we synthesized various NiTi substrates with different micron to nanometer surface roughness by using dissimilar dimensions of constituent NiTi powder. Endothelial cell adhesion on these compacts was compared with conventional commercially pure (cp) titanium (Ti) samples. The results after 5 hrs showed that endothelial cells adhered much better on fine grain (<60 μm) compared with coarse grain NiTi compacts (<100 μm). Coarse grain NiTi compacts and conventional Ti promoted similar levels of endothelial cell adhesion. In addition, cells proliferated more after 5 days on NiTi with greater sub-micron and nanoscale surface roughness compared with coarse grain NiTi. In this manner, this study emphasized the positive pole that NiTi with sub-micron to nanometer surface features can play in promoting a natural anti-thrombogenic and anti-inflammatory surface (the endothelium) on a vascular stent and, thus, suggests that more studies should be conducted on NiTi with sub-micron to nanometer surface features. PMID:18488418

  1. Ballistic-Electron-Emission Microscopy Techniques for Nanometer-scale Characterization of Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. D.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Hecht, M. H.; Manion, S. J.; Milliken, A. M.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconductor interface properties are among the most important phenomena in materials science and technology. The study of metal/semiconductor Schottky barrier interfaces has been the primary focus of a large research and development community for decades. Throughout the long history of interface investigation, the study of interface defect electronic properties have been seriously hindered by the fundamental experimental difficulty of probing subsurface structures. A new method, Ballistic-Electron-Emission Microscopy (BEEM), has been developed which not only enables spectroscopic probing of subsurface interface properties, but also, provides nanometer-resolution imaging capabilities. BEEM employs Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and a unique spatially localized ballistic electron spectroscopy method...

  2. Nanometer-Scale Dissection of Chromosomes by Atomic Force Microscopy Combined with Heat-Denaturing Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Kazumi; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shichiri, Motoharu; Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Toshio; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a method for dissecting chromosome fragments with a size of a few hundred nanometers by atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using this method, we demonstrated reproducible dissections of silkworm chromosomes in the pachytene phase. The dissected fragments were successfully recovered on the cantilever tips, as confirmed by fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent stained chromosomes. To recover dissected chromosome fragments from a larger chromosome, such as the human metaphase chromosome of a somatic cell, heat denaturation was found to be effective. Further improvements in this method may lead to a novel tool for isolating valuable genes and/or investigating local genome structures in the near future.

  3. Linewidth oscillations in a nanometer-size double-slit interference experiment with single electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Barrachina, R. O.; Fremont, F.; Fossez, K.; Gruyer, D.; Helaine, V.; Lepailleur, A.; Leredde, A.; Maclot, S.; Scamps, G.; Chesnel, Jean-Yves

    2010-06-15

    In this article we provide experimental evidence of an interference phenomenon that, to the best of our knowledge, has so far not been observed with either matter or light. In a nanometer-sized version of Feynman's famous two-slit 'thought' experiment with single electrons, we managed to observe that the width of a quasi-monochromatic line oscillates with the detection angle. Furthermore, we find that it occurs in counterphase with the line intensity. We discuss the underlying mechanism that produces this unexpected result.

  4. Fabrication of nanometer-sized protein patterns using atomic force microscopy and selective immobilization.

    PubMed Central

    Wadu-Mesthrige, K; Amro, N A; Garno, J C; Xu, S; Liu , G

    2001-01-01

    A new methodology is introduced to produce nanometer-sized protein patterns. The approach includes two main steps, nanopatterning of self-assembled monolayers using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanolithography and subsequent selective immobilization of proteins on the patterned monolayers. The resulting templates and protein patterns are characterized in situ using AFM. Compared with conventional protein fabrication methods, this approach is able to produce smaller patterns with higher spatial precision. In addition, fabrication and characterization are completed in near physiological conditions. The adsorption configuration and bioreactivity of the proteins within the nanopatterns are also studied in situ. PMID:11259301

  5. Elastic deformation of nanometer-sized metal crystals in graphitic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Rodríguez-Manzo, J. A.; Banhart, F.

    2006-12-01

    The elastic deformation of nanometer-sized metal crystals is achieved by encapsulating them in carbon nanotubes or carbon onions. Electron irradiation of these core-shell particles leads to high pressure in their center due to a shrinkage of the graphitic shells. Pressures in the range of 10-30GPa are found by measuring the decrease in lattice spacings in the encapsulated metal crystals. Hence, it is quantitatively shown how closed graphitic shells can be applied as compression cells on the nanoscale.

  6. Computational study of nanometer-scale self-propulsion enabled by asymmetric chemical catalysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunfeng; Huang, Liping; Brenner, Donald W

    2009-07-07

    We present a detailed analysis of the self-propulsion of a model nanometer-scale motor by reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The nanomotor is decorated with catalysts on only one side that promotes exothermic reactions of the surrounding fuel. Unidirectional drift of the nanomotor is observed that is superimposed on its Brownian motion. The motor response upon the application of external loads is also investigated and the thermodynamic efficiency is calculated. It is shown that the propulsion of our nanomotor can be understood by a momentum transfer model which is akin to rocket propulsion.

  7. Electron-Beam Mapping of Vibrational Modes with Nanometer Spatial Resolution.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, C; Aoki, T; Rez, P; Chang, S L Y; Lovejoy, T C; Krivanek, O L

    2016-12-16

    We demonstrate that a focused beam of high-energy electrons can be used to map the vibrational modes of a material with a spatial resolution of the order of one nanometer. Our demonstration is performed on boron nitride, a polar dielectric which gives rise to both localized and delocalized electron-vibrational scattering, either of which can be selected in our off-axial experimental geometry. Our experimental results are well supported by our calculations, and should reconcile current controversy regarding the spatial resolution achievable in vibrational mapping with focused electron beams.

  8. Electron-Beam Mapping of Vibrational Modes with Nanometer Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, C.; Aoki, T.; Rez, P.; Chang, S. L. Y.; Lovejoy, T. C.; Krivanek, O. L.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that a focused beam of high-energy electrons can be used to map the vibrational modes of a material with a spatial resolution of the order of one nanometer. Our demonstration is performed on boron nitride, a polar dielectric which gives rise to both localized and delocalized electron-vibrational scattering, either of which can be selected in our off-axial experimental geometry. Our experimental results are well supported by our calculations, and should reconcile current controversy regarding the spatial resolution achievable in vibrational mapping with focused electron beams.

  9. Research on key techniques of nanometer scale macro-micro dual-drive precision positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaohui; Du, Ruxu

    2007-12-01

    With the development of science and technology, high precision of positioning platform is needed in many areas, for example, cell fusing in biology and precision surgery in medical area. In such areas, both high efficiency and high precision are needed in some cases, for example, semiconductor processing equipment, super precision lathe etc. In a word, precision positioning platform becomes an important tool in exploring microscope world. Precision positioning platform is a key element in microscope operation. Macro/micro dual-drive precision positioning is a key technique in high-efficiency high-precision area. By such techniques, large distance and high precision can get. In order to realize nanometer scale macro/micro dual-drive precision positioning there are some key problems. First, system structure of macro/micro combination precision positioning platform is worthy to work on. Another key work is realization method of micrometer scale macroscope motion and nanometer scale microscope motion. The third is mechanics, drive, detection and control techniques in nanometer scale positioning of piezoelectric ceramics drive, in which realization of nanometer scale microscope positioning and micro drive is important by solving hysteresis, creep deformation and non-linearity in piezoelectric ceramics driving. To solve hysteresis problem, instead of traditional Preisach algorithm, a new type hysteresis model with simple computation and identification is needed. The inverse model is also easily to get. So we can present new control method to solve hysteresis and creep deformation problem based on this inverse model. Another way, hysteresis and creep deformation problem exist in traditional voltage-feedback power source for piezoelectric ceramics. To solve this problem, a new type current feedback power source for piezoelectric ceramics is presented. In the end, a macro-micro dual-drive super precision positioning mechanism is presented. Combining macro with micro

  10. Development of a laser synthetic wavelength interferometer for large displacement measurement with nanometer accuracy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Benyong; Yan, Liping; Yao, Xiguo; Yang, Tao; Li, Dacheng; Dong, Wenjun; Li, Chaorong; Tang, Weihua

    2010-02-01

    A laser synthetic wavelength interferometer that is capable of achieving large displacement measurement with nanometer accuracy is developed. The principle and the signal processing method of the interferometer are introduced. The displacement measurement experiments and the comparisons with a commercial interferometer both in small and large ranges are performed in order to verify the performance of the interferometer. Experimental results show that the average errors and standard deviations of the interferometer are in accordance with those obtained from the commercial interferometer. The resolution and the nonlinearity of the interferometer are also discussed in detail. These results show that the development of the interferometer is reasonable and feasible.

  11. Fabrication of sub-10 nm metal nanowire arrays with sub-1 nm critical dimension control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shuang; Lin, Peng; Xia, Qiangfei

    2016-11-01

    Sub-10 nm metal nanowire arrays are important electrodes for building high density emerging ‘beyond CMOS’ devices. We made Pt nanowire arrays with sub-10 nm feature size using nanoimprint lithography on silicon substrates with 100 nm thick thermal oxide. We further studied the critical dimension (CD) evolution in the fabrication procedure and achieved 0.4 nm CD control, providing a viable solution to the imprint lithography CD challenge as specified by the international technology roadmap for semiconductors. Finally, we fabricated Pt/TiO2/Pt memristor crossbar arrays with the 8 nm electrodes, demonstrating great potential in dimension scaling of this emerging device.

  12. Method to grow carbon thin films consisting entirely of diamond grains 3-5 nm in size and high-energy grain boundaries

    DOEpatents

    Carlisle, John A.; Auciello, Orlando; Birrell, James

    2006-10-31

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) having an average grain size between 3 and 5 nanometers (nm) with not more than about 8% by volume diamond having an average grain size larger than 10 nm. A method of manufacturing UNCD film is also disclosed in which a vapor of acetylene and hydrogen in an inert gas other than He wherein the volume ratio of acetylene to hydrogen is greater than 0.35 and less than 0.85, with the balance being an inert gas, is subjected to a suitable amount of energy to fragment at least some of the acetylene to form a UNCD film having an average grain size of 3 to 5 nm with not more than about 8% by volume diamond having an average grain size larger than 10 nm.

  13. The research progress of metrological 248nm deep ultraviolent microscope inspection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-xin; Li, Qi; Gao, Si-tian; Shi, Yu-shu; Li, Wei; Li, Shi

    2016-01-01

    In lithography process, the precision of wafer pattern to a large extent depends on the geometric dimensioning and tolerance of photomasks when accuracy of lithography aligner is certain. Since the minimum linewidth (Critical Dimension) of the aligner exposing shrinks to a few tens of nanometers in size, one-tenth of tolerance errors in fabrication may lead to microchip function failure, so it is very important to calibrate these errors of photomasks. Among different error measurement instruments, deep ultraviolent (DUV) microscope because of its high resolution, as well as its advantages compared to scanning probe microscope restrained by measuring range and scanning electron microscope restrained by vacuum environment, makes itself the most suitable apparatus. But currently there is very few DUV microscope adopting 248nm optical system, means it can attain 80nm resolution; furthermore, there is almost no DUV microscope possessing traceable calibration capability. For these reason, the National Institute of Metrology, China is developing a metrological 248nm DUV microscope mainly consists of DUV microscopic components, PZT and air supporting stages as well as interferometer calibration framework. In DUV microscopic component, the Köhler high aperture transmit condenser, DUV splitting optical elements and PMT pinhole scanning elements are built. In PZT and air supporting stages, a novel PZT actuating flexural hinge stage nested separate X, Y direction kinematics and a friction wheel driving long range air supporting stage are researched. In interferometer framework, a heterodyne multi-pass interferometer measures XY axis translation and Z axis rotation through Zerodur mirror mounted on stage. It is expected the apparatus has the capability to calibrate one dimensional linewidths and two dimensional pitches ranging from 200nm to 50μm with expanded uncertainty below 20nm.

  14. 810nm, 980nm, 1470nm and 1950nm diode laser comparison: a preliminary "ex vivo" study on oral soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Sozzi, Michele; Selleri, Stefano; Vescovi, Paolo; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2015-02-01

    The introduction of diode lasers in dentistry has several advantages, mainly consisting on the reduced size, reduced cost and possibility to beam delivering by optical fibers. At the moment the two diode wavelengths normally utilized in the dental field are 810 and 980 nm for soft tissues treatments. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of four different diode wavelengths: 810, 980, 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser for the ablation of soft tissues. Several samples of veal tongue were exposed to the four different wavelengths, at different fluences. The internal temperature of the soft tissues, in the area close to the beam, was monitored with thermocouple during the experiment. The excision quality of the exposed samples have been characterized by means of an optical microscope. Tissue damages and the cut regularity have been evaluated on the base of established criteria. The lowest thermal increase was recorded for 1950 nm laser. Best quality and speed of incision were obtained by the same wavelength. By evaluating epithelial, stromal and vascular damages for all the used wavelengths, the best result, in terms of "tissue respect", have been obtained for 1470 and 1950 nm exposures. From the obtained results 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser showed to be the best performer wavelengths among these used in this "ex vivo" study, probably due to their greatest affinity to water.

  15. Radiation Failures in Intel 14nm Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossev, Dobrin P.; Duncan, Adam R.; Gadlage, Matthew J.; Roach, Austin H.; Kay, Matthew J.; Szabo, Carl; Berger, Tammy J.; York, Darin A.; Williams, Aaron; LaBel, K.; Ingalls, James D.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the 14 nm Intel Broadwell 5th generation core series 5005U-i3 and 5200U-i5 was mounted on Dell Inspiron laptops, MSI Cubi and Gigabyte Brix barebones and tested with Windows 8 and CentOS7 at idle. Heavy-ion-induced hard- and catastrophic failures do not appear to be related to the Intel 14nm Tri-Gate FinFET process. They originate from a small (9 m 140 m) area on the 32nm planar PCH die (not the CPU) as initially speculated. The hard failures seem to be due to a SEE but the exact physical mechanism has yet to be identified. Some possibilities include latch-ups, charge ion trapping or implantation, ion channels, or a combination of those (in biased conditions). The mechanism of the catastrophic failures seems related to the presence of electric power (1.05V core voltage). The 1064 nm laser mimics ionization radiation and induces soft- and hard failures as a direct result of electron-hole pair production, not heat. The 14nm FinFET processes continue to look promising for space radiation environments.

  16. Cleanability evaluation of ceramic glazes with nanometer far-infrared materials using contact angle measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Liang, Jinsheng; Di, Xingfu; Tang, Qingguo

    2014-05-01

    The cleanability of easy-to-clean ceramic glazes doped with nanometer far-infrared materials was compared with that of some high-quality household ceramic glazes from the market. The cleanability was evaluated by the contact angle measurement using a sessile drop method with a Dataphysics OCA-30 contact angle analyzer. The results showed that the difference of contact angles of water on the glazes before soiling and after cleaning could be used as a parameter for evaluating the cleanability of the glazes. The relationship between cleanability and surface properties, such as surface free energy and surface topography, was investigated. The surface free energy of the samples and their components were calculated using van Oss acid-base approach. By measuring advancing and receding contact angles, the contact angle hysteresis of the ceramic glazes due to the surface topography was investigated. It was shown that the cleanability of ceramic glazes containing nanometer far-infrared materials (NFIM) is better than that of household ceramic glazes from market, due to a higher ratio of electron-acceptor parameter to electron-donor parameter, which led to the effect of water hydration as well as better hydrophilic property and increased smoothness. The contact angle measurement not only accurately evaluates the cleanability of the ceramic glazes, but also has a contribution to the study of cleanability theory. Moreover, this method is simple, convenient and less sample-consumption.

  17. Constitutive models for linear compressible viscoelastic flows of simple liquids at nanometer length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debadi; Sader, John E.

    2015-05-01

    Simple bulk liquids such as water are commonly assumed to be Newtonian. While this assumption holds widely, the fluid-structure interaction of mechanical devices at nanometer scales can probe the intrinsic molecular relaxation processes in a surrounding liquid. This was recently demonstrated through measurement of the high frequency (20 GHz) linear mechanical vibrations of bipyramidal nanoparticles in simple liquids [Pelton et al., "Viscoelastic flows in simple liquids generated by vibrating nanostructures," Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 244502 (2013)]. In this article, we review and critically assess the available constitutive equations for compressible viscoelastic flows in their linear limits—such models are required for analysis of the above-mentioned measurements. We show that previous models, with the exception of a very recent proposal, do not reproduce the required response at high frequency. We explain the physical origin of this recent model and show that it recovers all required features of a linear viscoelastic flow. This constitutive equation thus provides a rigorous foundation for the analysis of vibrating nanostructures in simple liquids. The utility of this model is demonstrated by solving the fluid-structure interaction of two common problems: (1) a sphere executing radial oscillations in liquid, which depends strongly on the liquid compressibility and (2) the extensional mode vibration of bipyramidal nanoparticles in liquid, where the effects of liquid compressibility are negligible. This highlights the importance of shear and compressional relaxation processes, as a function of flow geometry, and the impact of the shear and bulk viscosities on nanometer scale flows.

  18. Fabricating Nanometer-Thick Simultaneously Oleophobic/Hydrophilic Polymer Coatings via a Photochemical Approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjin; Dugan, Michael; Urbaniak, Brian; Li, Lei

    2016-07-05

    The simultaneously oleophobic/hydrophilic coatings are highly desirable in antifogging, oil-water separation, and detergent-free cleaning. However, such coatings require special chemical structure, i.e., perfluorinated backbone and polar end-groups, and are too expensive for real-life application. Here, we have developed an UV-based photochemical approach to make nanometer-thick perfluoropolyethers without polar end-groups, which are not intrinsically simultaneously oleophobic/hydrophilic but cost-effective, become simultaneously oleophobic/hydrophilic. The contact angle, ellipsometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicated that the UV irradiation results in the covalent bonding between the polymer and the substrate, which renders more ordered packing of polymer chains and thus the appropriately small interchain distance. As a result, the small water molecules penetrate the polymer network while large oil molecules do not. As a result, the oil contact angle is larger than the water contact angle and the coating shows the simultaneous oleophobicity/hydrophilicity. Moreover, we also demonstrated that this nanometer-thick simultaneously oleophobic/hydrophilic coating has improved long-term antifogging performance and detergent-free cleaning capability and is mechanically robust. The photochemical approach established here potentially can be applied on many other polymers and greatly accelerate the development and application of simultaneously oleophobic/hydrophilic coatings.

  19. Polymer Droplet Dynamic Wetting Measurement at the Nanometer Scale on Smooth Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleymaniha, Mohammadreza; Felts, Jonathan Robert; Anml Team

    2016-11-01

    Fluid spreading is a complex phenomenon driven strongly by intermolecular forces that requires nanometer scale microscopy to observe and understand. We present a technique for measuring molten polymer spreading dynamics with nanometer scale spatial resolution at elevated temperatures on sapphire, silicon oxide and mica using tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experimental setup is used to measure the spreading dynamics of polystyrene droplets with 2 μ m diameters at 115-175 C. Custom image processing algorithms realize the droplet height, radius, volume and contact angle of the droplet over time. The contact angle evolution followed a power law with time with experimental exponent values of -0.26, -0.08, and -0.2 for sapphire, silicon oxide, and mica, respectively at 115 C. The non-zero steady state contact angles result in a slower evolution of contact angle with time compared to Tanner's Law, as expected. We observe local crystallinity on the molten droplet surface, where crystalline structures appear to nucleate at the contact line and migrate toward the top of the droplet. Increasing the temperature from 115 C to 175 C reduced surface crystallinity from 35% to 12%, consistent with increasingly energetically favorable amorphous phase as the temperature approaches the melting temperature. This platform provides a way to measure spreading dynamics of extremely small volumes of heterogeneously complex fluids not possible through other means. Dr.Jonathan Felts is the principal investigator of the ANML research group in Mechanical Engineering Department of Texas A&M University.

  20. Nanometer-Scale Compositional Structure in III-V Semiconductor Heterostructures Characterized by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Allerman, A.A.; Bi, W.G.; Biefeld, R.M.; Tu, C.W.; Yu, E.T.; Zuo, S.L.

    1998-11-10

    Nanometer-scale compositional structure in InAsxP1.InNYAsxPl.x-Y/InP, grown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy and in InAsl-xPJkAsl$b#InAs heterostructures heterostructures grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition has been characterized using cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy. InAsxP1-x alloy layers are found to contain As-rich and P-rich clusters with boundaries formed preferentially within (T 11) and (111) crystal planes. Similar compositional structure is observed within InNYAsxP1-x-Y alloy layers. Imaging of InAsl-xp@Asl#bY superlattices reveals nanometer-scale clustering within both the hAsI-.p and InAsl$bY alloy layers, with preferential alignment of compositional features in the direction. Instances are observed of compositional structure correlated across a heterojunction interface, with regions whose composition corresponds to a smaller unstrained lattice, constant relative to the surrounding alloy material appearing to propagate across the interface.

  1. Sub-nanometer interferometry and precision turning for large optical fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Klingmann, J L; Sommargren, G E

    1999-04-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we have the unique combination of precision turning and metrology capabilities critical to the fabrication of large optical elements. We have developed a self-referenced interferometer to measure errors in aspheric optics to sub- nanometer accuracy over 200-millimeter apertures, a dynamic range of 5{approximately}10. We have utilized diamond turning to figure optics for X-ray to IR wavelengths and, with fast-tool-servo technology, can move optical segments from off-axis to on-axis. With part capacities to 2.3-meters diameter and the metrology described above, segments of very large, ultra-lightweight mirrors can potentially be figured to final requirements. precision of diamond-turning will carryover although the surface finish may be degraded. Finally, the most critical component of a fabrication process is the metrology that enables an accurate part. Well characterized machines are very repeatable and part accuracy must come from proper metrology. A self- referencing interferometer has been developed that can measure accurately to sub-nanometer values. As with traditional interferometers, measurements are fast and post- processed data provides useful feedback to the user. The simplicity of the device allows it to be used on large optics and systems.

  2. Understanding the effect of size and shape of gold nanomaterials on nanometal surface energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Soumyadipta; Moulik, Satya Priya; Bhattacharya, Subhash Chandra

    2017-04-01

    Gold Nanomaterials (GNMs) interact with fluorophores via electromagnetic coupling under excitation. In this particular work we carried out (to the best of our knowledge for the first time) a comprehensive study of systematic quenching of a blue emitter 2-Anthracene Sulfonate (2-AS) in the presence of gold nanoparticles of different size and shape. We synthesized gold nanomaterials of four different dimensions [nanoparticle (0D), nanorod (1D), nanotriangle (2D) and nanobipyramids (3D)] and realized the underlying effect on the emitting dipole in terms of steady and time resolved fluorescence. Nanometal Surface Energy Transfer (NSET) has already been proved to be the best long range spectroscopic ruler so far. Many attempts have been made to understand the interaction between a fluorescent molecule and gold nanomaterials. But not a single model can interpret alone the interaction phenomena. We have opted three different models to compare the experimental and theoretical data. Due to the presence of size dependent absorptivity and dielectric function, modified CPS-Kuhn model was proved to be the worthiest to comprehend variance of behavior of an emitting dipole in close proximity to nanometal surface by coupling with the image dipole of gold nanomaterials.

  3. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  4. 14nm M1 triple patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiao; Ghosh, Pradiptya; Abercrombie, David; LaCour, Pat; Kanodia, Suniti

    2012-03-01

    With 20nm production becoming a reality, research has started to focus on the technology needs for 14nm. The LELE double patterning used in 20nm production will not be able to resolve M1 for 14nm. Main competing enabling technologies for the 14nm M1 are SADP, EUV, and LELELE (referred as LE3 thereafter) triple patterning. SADP has a number of concerns of 1. density, as a layout geometry needs to stay complete as a whole, and can not be broken; 2. the complexity in SADP mask generation and debug feedback to designers; 3. the subtraction nature of the trim mask further complicates OPC and yield. While EUV does not share those concerns, it faces significant challenges on the manufacturing equipment side. Of the SADP concerns, LE3 only shares that of complexity involved in mask generation and intuitive debug feedback mechanism. It does not require a layout geometry to stay as a whole, and it benefits from the affinity to LELE which is being deployed for 20nm production. From a process point of view, this benefit from affinity to LELE is tremendous due to the data and knowledge that have been collected and will be coming from the LELE deployment. In this paper, we first recount the computational complexity of the 3-colorability problem which is an integral part of a LE3 solution. We then describe graph characteristics that can be exploited such that 3-colorability is equivalent under divide-and-conquer. Also outlined are heuristics, which are generally applied in solving computationally intractable problems, for the 3-colorability problem, and the importance in choosing appropriate worst-case exponential runtime algorithms. This paper concludes with a discussion on the new hierarchical problem that faces 3-colorability but not 2-colorability and proposals for non-3-colorability feedback mechanism.

  5. Study of precision weak-link stage systems with large travel range and sub-nanometer-scale resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Shu Deming; Maser, Jorg

    2010-06-23

    To use x-ray optics with nanometer resolution limit, scanning x-ray nanoprobes with corresponding mechanical positioning capability need to be designed. In particular, positioning stages with both sub-nanometer resolution and a positioning/scanning range of several millimeters are required. Based on our design of precision weak-link stages with interferometric encoders for the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) hard x-ray nanoprobe at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Sector 26, we have developed a new two-dimensional (2-D) weak-link stage system for nanopositioning of a specimen holder. This system provides sub-nanometer resolution, coupled with sub-nanometer metrology at a travel range of several millimeters. The 2-D weak-link stage system is designed with high structure stiffness using laminar overconstrained weak-link mechanisms [4-6]. In this paper we present the study of a linear precision weak-link stage system with sub-centimeter travel range and sub-nanometer positioning resolution. Design of a rotary weak-link stage system with 10-nrad resolution and 10-degree-level travel range is also discussed in this paper.

  6. Comparative study of Nd:KGW lasers pumped at 808 nm and 877 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ke; Ge, Wen-Qi; Zhao, Tian-Zhuo; He, Jian-Guo; Feng, Chen-Yong; Fan, Zhong-Wei

    2015-10-01

    The laser performance and thermal analysis of Nd:KGW laser continuously pumped by 808 nm and 877 nm are comparatively investigated. Output power of 670 mW and 1587 mW, with nearly TEM00 mode, are achieved respectively at 808 nm pump and 877 nm pump. Meanwhile, a high-power passively Q-switched Nd:KGW/Cr4+:YAG laser pumped at 877 nm is demonstrated. An average output power of 1495 mW is obtained at pump power of 5.22 W while the laser is operating at repetition of 53.17 kHz. We demonstrate that 877 nm diode laser is a more potential pump source for Nd:KGW lasers.

  7. Synthesis of fluorinated materials for 193-nm immersion lithography and 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Yoshida, T.; Hayamai, T.; Araki, Takayuki; Aoyama, H.; Hagiwara, T.; Itani, Toshiro; Fujii, Kiyoshi

    2005-05-01

    Various fluorinated polymers were synthesized for application in 193-nm immersion lithography with the goal of improving 157-nm photoresist performance. Their fundamental properties were characterized, such as transparency at 193-nm and 157-nm (wavelength) and solubility in water and a standard alkaline developer. High transparency, i.e., absorbance better than 0.3 μm-1 at 193-nm wavelength, was achieved. The dissolution behaviors of them were studied by using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) method. We find that the dissolution rate of Poly(norbornene-2-fluoro-2-hexafluoroalchol) (PNB1FVIP) in 0.065N tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) was >200 times (nm/s) faster than that of the copolymer of tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) and norbornene-2-fluoro-2-hexafluoroalchol (TFE/NB1FVIP). A resist based on TFE/NB1FVIP was able to delineate 75 nm dense lines by exposure at 193-nm (wavelength) with an alternating phase shift mask using a 0.75 NA ArF scanner. The dissolution rates of the fluoropolymers in water and a 0.262N and 0.065 TMAH can be controlled by optimizing counter monomers containing hexafluoroisopropanol (HFA) unit, carboxylic acid unit and so on. In addition, we have collect water contact angle data. This data shows that fluoropolymers can be used as resist cover materials for 193-nm immersion lithography.

  8. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

  9. Radiation Tolerance of 65nm CMOS Transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Krohn, M.; Bentele, B.; Christian, D. C.; ...

    2015-12-11

    We report on the effects of ionizing radiation on 65 nm CMOS transistors held at approximately -20°C during irradiation. The pattern of damage observed after a total dose of 1 Grad is similar to damage reported in room temperature exposures, but we observe less damage than was observed at room temperature.

  10. The 503nm pigment of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kamitakahara, Joyce R.; Polglase, W. J.

    1970-01-01

    The yield of cell protein was one-third less for streptomycin-dependent Escherichia coli B than for the wild-type parent strain when both were grown aerobically on a medium with limiting glucose, but anaerobically the yield of protein was similar for both strains. The transient pigment absorbing at 503nm that is known to be present in E. coli and other organisms was not detectable in streptomycin-dependent mutants nor in a non-dependent (energy-deficient) revertant. When wild-type E. coli B was grown on limiting glucose–salts medium containing 2,4 dinitrophenol, the yield of cell protein was decreased and formation of the 503nm pigment was inhibited. Fumarase, aconitase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were de-repressed in E. coli B cells grown with excess of glucose in a medium containing 2,4-dinitrophenol. In air-oxidized, wild-type E. coli B cells, the 503nm pigment appeared before reduced cytochromes when gluconate was the substrate but failed to appear when succinate was the substrate. The results provide evidence for a role of the 503nm pigment in aerobic energy metabolism, possibly as an electron acceptor from NADPH. PMID:4395501

  11. [Nanometer-size titanium dioxide separation/preconcentration and ICP-AES for the determination of Cd, Co and Zn].

    PubMed

    Shi, Ta-qing; Liang, Pei; Li, Jing; Lu, Han-bing

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption behavior of Cd, Co and Zn on nanometer-size TiQ2 was investigated. At pH 9.0, Cd, Co and Zn were retained on the nanometer-size TiO2, then eluted with 0.1 mol x L(-1) HNO3 and determined by ICP-AES. The adsorption capacities of nanometer TiO2 were found to be 8.1, 6.9 and 15.1 mg x g(-1) for Cd, Co and Zn respectively. The detection limits (3sigma) for Cd, Co and Zn are 5.1, 3.4 and 2.9 ng x mL(-1) respectively. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of trace Cd, Co and Zn in environmental samples with satisfactory results.

  12. Breakdown of the Hume-Rothery Rules in Sub-Nanometer-Sized Ta-Containing Bimetallic Small Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyajima, Ken; Fukushima, Naoya; Himeno, Hidenori; Yamada, Akira; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2009-11-01

    The Hume-Rothery rules are empirical rules to predict the solid solubility of metals. We examined whether the rules hold for sub-nanometer-sized small particles. We prepared bimetallic cluster ions in the gas phase by a double laser ablation technique. Taking advantage of the magic compositions of the bimetallic cluster ions relating to the distinguished stabilities, the coalescence or the segregation of Ta and another element in the sub-nanometer-sized clusters was discussed. It was found that W, Nb, and Mo readily coalesce with Ta, while Ag, Al, Au, Co, Cu, Fe, Hf, Ni, Pt, Ti, and V are segregated from Ta. On the basis of these results, we concluded that the Hume-Rothery rules do not hold for sub-nanometer-sized particles.

  13. Size effect of nanometer vacuum gap thermionic power conversion device with CsI coated graphite electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Ik; Jeong, Yong Hoon; No, Hee-Cheon; Hannebauer, Rob; Yoo, Sang-Keun

    2009-11-01

    Cesium iodide (CsI) coated graphite is a good candidate for an electrode material of a thermionic power generation device due to its low work function. In this letter, a thermionic device with a nanometer-scale vacuum gap between a CsI coated graphite emitter and a collector will be investigated while considering various gap-size effects. It is shown that a nanometer scale gap-size not only affects electron transport but also photon transport, and that all of these effects must be taken into account when estimating the device's performance.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Thorium spectrum from 250nm to 5500nm (Redman+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, S. L.; Nave, G.; Sansonetti, C. J.

    2014-04-01

    We observed the spectrum of a commercial sealed Th/Ar HCL running at 25mA for almost 15hr starting on 2011 November 2. The region of observation was limited to between 8500/cm and 28000/cm (360nm and 1200nm) by the sensitivity of the silicon photodiode detector. (5 data files).

  15. Top-Down Nanofabrication and Characterization of 20 nm Silicon Nanowires for Biosensing Applications.

    PubMed

    M Nuzaihan, M N; Hashim, U; Md Arshad, M K; Rahim Ruslinda, A; Rahman, S F A; Fathil, M F M; Ismail, Mohd H

    2016-01-01

    A top-down nanofabrication approach is used to develop silicon nanowires from silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers and involves direct-write electron beam lithography (EBL), inductively coupled plasma-reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE) and a size reduction process. To achieve nanometer scale size, the crucial factors contributing to the EBL and size reduction processes are highlighted. The resulting silicon nanowires, which are 20 nm in width and 30 nm in height (with a triangular shape) and have a straight structure over the length of 400 μm, are fabricated precisely at the designed location on the device. The device is applied in biomolecule detection based on the changes in drain current (Ids), electrical resistance and conductance of the silicon nanowires upon hybridization to complementary target deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). In this context, the scaled-down device exhibited superior performances in terms of good specificity and high sensitivity, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 fM, enables for efficient label-free, direct and higher-accuracy DNA molecules detection. Thus, this silicon nanowire can be used as an improved transducer and serves as novel biosensor for future biomedical diagnostic applications.

  16. Top-Down Nanofabrication and Characterization of 20 nm Silicon Nanowires for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    M. N, M. Nuzaihan; Hashim, U.; Md Arshad, M. K.; Ruslinda, A. Rahim; Rahman, S. F. A.; Fathil, M. F. M.; Ismail, Mohd. H.

    2016-01-01

    A top-down nanofabrication approach is used to develop silicon nanowires from silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers and involves direct-write electron beam lithography (EBL), inductively coupled plasma-reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE) and a size reduction process. To achieve nanometer scale size, the crucial factors contributing to the EBL and size reduction processes are highlighted. The resulting silicon nanowires, which are 20 nm in width and 30 nm in height (with a triangular shape) and have a straight structure over the length of 400 μm, are fabricated precisely at the designed location on the device. The device is applied in biomolecule detection based on the changes in drain current (Ids), electrical resistance and conductance of the silicon nanowires upon hybridization to complementary target deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). In this context, the scaled-down device exhibited superior performances in terms of good specificity and high sensitivity, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 fM, enables for efficient label-free, direct and higher-accuracy DNA molecules detection. Thus, this silicon nanowire can be used as an improved transducer and serves as novel biosensor for future biomedical diagnostic applications. PMID:27022732

  17. Formation processes of nanometer sized particles in low pressure Ar/CH{sub 4} rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Beckers, J.; Vacaresse, G. D. G. J.; Stoffels, W. W.

    2008-09-07

    In this paper, formation and growth processes of nanometer and micrometer sized dust particles in low pressure Ar/CH{sub 4} rf (13.56 MHz) plasmas are investigated as function of temperature in the range 25-100 deg. C. During experiments the pressure was typically 0.8 mbar and the forward power to the plasma was {approx}70 Watt. Measuring the fundamental voltage, current and phase angle together with their harmonics (up to the fourth) gives a good method to monitor the creation and growth of these dust particles in time. Furthermore, laser light scattering measurements are performed to give information about the dust particle density. It has been shown that dust particle formation in these conditions depends greatly on temperature.

  18. Microstructure-interface-property relationships in nanometer-period x-ray multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tai Dung

    1996-12-01

    The microstructure - interface - property relationships in nanometer-period x-ray multilayer mirrors (W/C, WC/C, Cr/C, CrC/C, Cu/C, Ru/C, and Ru/B4C) were studied using cross-sectional high resolution TEM and x-ray scattering. Microstructural and morphological evolution of as-prepared multilayers, and their behavior under thermal activation were discussed in terms of the materials thermodynamic and kinetic properties. Effects of the microstructural and the morphological evolution in reactive- component (W-C, Cr-C, and Ru-B4C) and conjugate-component (Ru-C and Cu-C) multilayers on the normal incidence reflectance and long term stability of the mirrors are presented.

  19. Figuring large optics at the sub-nanometer level: compensation for coating and gravity distortions.

    PubMed

    Gensemer, Stephen; Gross, Mark

    2015-11-30

    Large, precision optics can now be manufactured with surface figures specified at the sub-nanometer level. However, coatings and gravity deform large optics, and there are limits to what can be corrected by clever compensation. Instead, deformations caused by stress from optical mounts and deposited coatings must be incorporated into the optical design. We demonstrate compensation of coating stress on a 370mm substrate to λ/200 by a process of coating and annealing. We also model the same process and identify the leading effects that must be anticipated in fabrication of optics for future gravitational wave detectors and other applications of large, precisely figured optics, and identify the limitations inherent in using coatings to compensate for these deformations.

  20. Measuring nanometer distances in nucleic acids using a sequence-independent nitroxide probe

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Peter Z; Haworth, Ian S; Cai, Qi; Kusnetzow, Ana K; Grant, Gian Paola G; Price, Eric A; Sowa, Glenna Z; Popova, Anna; Herreros, Bruno; He, Honghang

    2008-01-01

    This protocol describes the procedures for measuring nanometer distances in nucleic acids using a nitroxide probe that can be attached to any nucleotide within a given sequence. Two nitroxides are attached to phosphorothioates that are chemically substituted at specific sites of DNA or RNA. Inter-nitroxide distances are measured using a four-pulse double electron–electron resonance technique, and the measured distances are correlated to the parent structures using a Web-accessible computer program. Four to five days are needed for sample labeling, purification and distance measurement. The procedures described herein provide a method for probing global structures and studying conformational changes of nucleic acids and protein/nucleic acid complexes. PMID:17947978

  1. Nanometer-Scale Chemistry of a Calcite Biomineralization Template: Implications for Skeletal Composition and Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Branson, Oscar; Bonnin, Elisa A.; Perea, Daniel E.; Spero, Howard J.; Zhu, Zihua; Winters, Maria; Hönisch, Bärbel; Russell, Ann D.; Fehrenbacher, Jennifer S.; Gagnon, Alexander C.

    2016-10-28

    Biomineralizing organisms exhibit exquisite control over skeletal morphology and composition. The promise of understanding and harnessing this feat of natural engineering has motivated an intense search for the mechanisms that direct in vivo mineral self-assembly. We used atom probe tomography, a sub-nanometer 3D chemical mapping technique, to examine the chemistry of a buried organic-mineral interface in biomineral calcite from a marine foraminifer. The chemical patterns at this interface capture the processes of early biomineralization, when the shape, mineralogy, and orientation of skeletal growth are initially established. Sodium is enriched by a factor of nine on the organic side of the interface. Based on this pattern, we suggest that sodium plays an integral role in early biomineralization, potentially altering interfacial energy to promote crystal nucleation, and that interactions between organic surfaces and electrolytes other than calcium or carbonate could be a crucial aspect of CaCO3 biomineralization.

  2. Three-dimensional nanometer-scale optical cavities of indefinite medium

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jie; Yang, Xiaodong; Yin, Xiaobo; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Miniaturization of optical cavities has numerous advantages for enhancing light–matter interaction in quantum optical devices, low-threshold lasers with minimal power consumption, and efficient integration of optoelectronic devices at large scale. However, the realization of a truly nanometer-scale optical cavity is hindered by the diffraction limit of the nature materials. In addition, the scaling of the photon life time with the cavity size significantly reduces the quality factor of small cavities. Here we theoretically present an approach to achieve ultrasmall optical cavities using indefinite medium with hyperbolic dispersion, which allows propagation of electromagnetic waves with wave vectors much larger than those in vacuum enabling extremely small 3D cavity down to (λ/20)3. These cavities exhibit size-independent resonance frequencies and anomalous scaling of quality factors in contrast to the conventional cavities, resulting in nanocavities with both high Q/Vm ratio and broad bandwidth. PMID:21709266

  3. Reduced responses of macrophages on nanometer surface features of altered alumina crystalline phases.

    PubMed

    Khang, Dongwoo; Liu-Snyder, Peishan; Pareta, Rajesh; Lu, Jing; Webster, Thomas J

    2009-06-01

    Extensive prolonged interactions of inflammatory cells (such as macrophages) at the host-implant interface may lead to implant failure. While previous studies have shown increased in vitro and in vivo bone cell adhesion, proliferation and mineralization on nanophase compared to currently implanted ceramics, few studies have been conducted to elucidate inflammatory cell responses on such nanophase ceramics. Controlling surface feature size and corresponding surface roughness on implants may clearly alter immune cell responses, which would be an extremely important consideration for the use of nanostructured materials as improved biomaterials. In this study, reduced macrophage density was observed on alumina (Al(2)O(3)) compacts with greater nanometer surface roughness accompanied by changes in crystallinity for up to 24 h in culture. Since alumina is a commonly used ceramic in orthopedic applications, this in vitro study continues to support the use of nanophase ceramics as improved orthopedic implants by demonstrating reduced macrophage responses.

  4. Strategies for Probing Nanometer-Scale Electrocatalysts: From Single Particles to Catalyst-Membrane Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Korzeniewski, Carol

    2014-01-20

    The project primary objectives are to prepare and elucidate the promoting properties of materials that possess high activity for the conversion of hydrogen and related small molecules (water, oxygen, carbon monoxide and methanol) in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. One area of research has focused on the study of catalyst materials. Protocols were developed for probing the structure and benchmarking the activity of Pt and Pt bimetallic nanometer-scale catalyst against Pt single crystal electrode standards. A second area has targeted fuel cell membrane and the advancement of simple methods mainly based on vibrational spectroscopy that can be applied broadly in the study of membrane structure and transport properties. Infrared and Raman methods combined with least-squares data modeling were applied to investigate and assist the design of robust, proton conductive membranes, which resist reactant crossover.

  5. Development of Highly Reactive Nanometer Fe-Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, James A.; Linehan, John C.; Matson, Dean W.; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Bekhazi, Jacky; Alnajjar, Mikhail S.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes research involving the liquefaction of coal and the removal of oxygen from coal product constituents. Subbituminous Coal and early stage coal liquefaction products contain a substantial fraction of hydroxy-substituted aromatic hydrocarbons (phenols). An important reaction for upgrading of coal-derived organic materials is to remove oxygen groups. This paper describes the hydro-deoxygenation of naphthols and the liquefaction of subbituminous Wyodak coal using a catalyst prepared by in-situ sulfidation of nanometer scale 6-line iron ferrihydrite. The FeS catalyst enables the conversion of naphthol in substantial yields to tetralin and naphthalene at 400 degrees C in 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene. The kinetics and procedures to observe coal liquefaction and hydro-deoxygenation, and the effects of in-situ sulfidation on conversion kinetics are described.

  6. Experimental verification of nanometer level optical pathlength control on a flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neal, Michael; Eldred, Daniel; Liu, Dankai; Redding, David

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental facility being developed for demonstration and validation of control concepts arising out of NASA's Control Structure Interaction program. The facility is meant to be a ground testbed with relevance to a broad class of precision optical space systems. The objective of the experimental program is to investigate a multilayer control approach to the maintenance of nanometer-level optical pathlength stability in the presence of external disturbances and multiple structural resonances. The facility is designed to explore the effect of applying, separately and in combinations, structural vibration suppression, vibration isolation, and active optical articulation. This paper describes the testbed facility, the structure, optics, sensors, actuators, and real-time computer and program development environment. Initial optical articulation experimental results are presented.

  7. Non-equilibrium Green function method: theory and application in simulation of nanometer electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Van-Nam

    2014-09-01

    We review fundamental aspects of the non-equilibrium Green function method in the simulation of nanometer electronic devices. The method is implemented into our recently developed computer package OPEDEVS to investigate transport properties of electrons in nano-scale devices and low-dimensional materials. Concretely, we present the definition of the four real-time Green functions, the retarded, advanced, lesser and greater functions. Basic relations among these functions and their equations of motion are also presented in detail as the basis for the performance of analytical and numerical calculations. In particular, we review in detail two recursive algorithms, which are implemented in OPEDEVS to solve the Green functions defined in finite-size opened systems and in the surface layer of semi-infinite homogeneous ones. Operation of the package is then illustrated through the simulation of the transport characteristics of a typical semiconductor device structure, the resonant tunneling diodes.

  8. Nanometer-scale structural, tribological, and optical properties of ultrathin poly(diacetylene) films

    SciTech Connect

    CARPICK,ROBERT W.; SASAKI,DARRYL Y.; BURNS,ALAN R.

    2000-04-17

    The ability to create organized ultrathin films using organic molecules provides systems whose chemical, mechanical, and optical properties can be controlled for specific applications. In particular, polymerization of oriented mono- and multi-layer films containing the diacetylene group has produced a variety of robust, highly oriented, and environmentally responsive films with unique chromatic properties. These two-dimensional poly(diacetylene) (PDA) films, where the conjugation runs parallel to the film surface, have previously been prepared in a variety of forms. Of particular interest is the optical absorption of PDA due to its {pi}-conjugated backbone. A wide variety of PDA materials, including bulk crystals, thin films, and solutions, exhibit a chromatic transition involving a significant shift in absorption from low to high energy bands of the visible spectrum, thus the PDA appears to transform from a blue to a red color. In addition, the red form is highly fluorescent, while the blue form is not. This transition can be brought about by heat binding of specific biological targets and applied stress (mechanochromism), among others. In this paper, the authors discuss the Langmuir deposition of ultrathin PDA films and the subsequent measurement of their structural, optical, and mechanical properties at the nanometer scale. By altering the head group functionality, the authors can choose between mono- and tri-layer PDA film structures. Measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM) reveal strongly anisotropic friction properties that are correlated with the orientation of the conjugated polymer backbone orientation. Furthermore, the authors can use the AFM tip or a near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) tip to locally convert the PDA from the blue form to the red form via applied stress. This represents the first time that mechanochromism has been observed at the nanometer scale. Dramatic structural changes are associated with this mechanochromic

  9. Efficient 1645-nm Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, York E.; Setzler, Scott D.; Snell, Kevin J.; Budni, Peter A.; Pollak, Thomas M.; Chicklis, E. P.

    2004-05-01

    We report a resonantly fiber-laser-pumped Er:YAG laser operating at the eye-safe wavelength of 1645 nm, exhibiting 43% optical efficiency and 54% incident slope efficiency and emitting 7-W average power when repetitively Q switched at 10 kHz. To our knowledge, this is the best performance (conversion efficiency and average power) obtained from a bulk solid-state Q-switched erbium laser. At a 1.1-kHz pulse repetition frequency the laser produces 3.4-mJ pulses with a corresponding peak power of 162 kW. Frequency doubling to produce 822.5-nm, 4.7-kW pulses at 10 kHz was performed to demonstrate the laser's utility.

  10. DNA Charge Transport over 34 nm

    PubMed Central

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Renfrew, Sara E.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular wires show promise in nanoscale electronics but the synthesis of uniform, long conductive molecules is a significant challenge. DNA of precise length, by contrast, is easily synthesized, but its conductivity has not been explored over the distances required for nanoscale devices. Here we demonstrate DNA charge transport (CT) over 34 nm in 100-mer monolayers on gold. Multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100-mer DNA yield sizable electrochemical signals from a distal, covalent Nile Blue redox probe. Significant signal attenuation upon incorporation of a single base pair mismatch demonstrates that CT is DNA-mediated. Efficient cleavage of these 100-mers by a restriction enzyme indicates that the DNA adopts a native conformation that is accessible to protein binding. Similar electron transfer rates are measured through 100-mer and 17-mer monolayers, consistent with rate-limiting electron tunneling through the saturated carbon linker. This DNA-mediated CT distance of 34 nm surpasses most reports of molecular wires. PMID:21336329

  11. Radiation Status of Sub-65 nm Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-scaled complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) includes commercial foundry capabilities at and below the 65 nm technology node Radiation evaluations take place using standard products and test characterization vehicles (memories, logic/latch chains, etc.) NEPP focus is two-fold: (1) Conduct early radiation evaluations to ascertain viability for future NASA missions (i.e. leverage commercial technology development). (2) Uncover gaps in current testing methodologies and mechanism comprehension -- early risk mitigation.

  12. Binary 193nm photomasks aging phenomenon study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaye, Félix; Sartelli, Luca; Pogliani, Carlo; Gough, Stuart; Sundermann, Frank; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Hidenori, Yoshioka; Charras, Nathalie; Brochard, Christophe; Thivolle, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    193nm binary photomasks are still used in the semiconductor industry for the lithography of some critical layers for the nodes 90nm and 65nm, with high volumes and over long period. These 193nm binary masks seem to be well-known but recent studies have shown surprising degrading effects, like Electric Field induced chromium Migration (EFM) [1] or chromium migration [2] [3] . Phase shift Masks (PSM) or Opaque MoSi On Glass (OMOG) might not be concerned by these effects [4] [6] under certain conditions. In this paper, we will focus our study on two layers gate and metal lines. We will detail the effects of mask aging, with SEM top view pictures revealing a degraded chromium edge profile and TEM chemical analyses demonstrating the growth of a chromium oxide on the sidewall. SEMCD measurements after volume production indicated a modified CD with respect to initial CD data after manufacture. A regression analysis of these CD measurements shows a radial effect, a die effect and an isolated-dense effect. Mask cleaning effectiveness has also been investigated, with sulphate or ozone cleans, to recover the mask quality in terms of CD. In complement, wafer intrafield CD measurements have been performed on the most sensitive structure to monitor the evolution of the aging effect on mask CD uniformity. Mask CD drift have been correlated with exposure dose drift and isolated-dense bias CD drift on wafers. In the end, we will try to propose a physical explanation of this aging phenomenon and a solution to prevent from it occurring.

  13. Laser damage database at 1064 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer, F.; Gonzales, R.P.; Morgan, A.J.

    1990-03-01

    In conjunction with our diversification of laser damage testing capabilities, we have expanded upon a database of threshold measurements and parameter variations at 1064 nm. This includes all tests at low pulse-repetition frequencies (PRF) ranging from single shots to 120 Hz. These tests were conducted on the Reptile laser facility since 1987 and the Variable Pulse Laser (VPL) facility since 1988. Pulse durations ranged from 1 to 16 ns. 10 refs., 14 figs.

  14. 3 Watt CW OPO tunable 604nm to 616nm for quantum optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Angus; Halfmann, Thomas; Mieth, Simon

    2012-06-01

    A continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (CW OPO) pumped by a fiber laser has been developed which emits up to 3 Watts of single longitudinal mode radiation tunable in the wavelength range 604nm to 616nm. The device is a modified version of the ``Argos'' Model 2400 commercial product by Lockheed Martin Aculight. A 15 Watt 1064nm fiber laser pumps a CW OPO based upon periodically-poled Lithium Niobate (PPLN). A short section of the nonlinear crystal is poled to allow efficient intracavity sum frequency generation (SFG) between the OPO pump and signal wavelengths to generate orange radiation. The device can be coarsely tuned by matching the poling periods and temperature within the nonlinear crystal to phase-match both OPO and SFG processes simultaneously. Fine mode-hop-free tuning of the orange wavelength of up to 100GHz range can be achieved by applying a voltage to a PZT which tunes the pump laser. By similar intracavity conversion schemes, the system offers the potential of providing high power at wavelengths from 600nm to 1400nm in addition to the direct signal and idler wavelength ranges from 1400nm to 4630nm. Such capability comes without the complexity and reliability issues which are inherent in dye and Ti:Sapphire systems. Details of the OPO system performance and its use in quantum optics applications will be provided.

  15. Phase transformation of molecular beam epitaxy-grown nanometer-thick Gd₂O₃ and Y₂O₃ on GaN.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Hsin; Wu, Shao-Yun; Lee, Chih-Hsun; Lai, Te-Yang; Lee, Yi-Jun; Chang, Pen; Hsu, Chia-Hung; Huang, Tsung-Shiew; Kwo, J Raynien; Hong, Minghwei

    2013-02-01

    High quality nanometer-thick Gd₂O₃ and Y₂O₃ (rare-earth oxide, R₂O₃) films have been epitaxially grown on GaN (0001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The R₂O₃ epi-layers exhibit remarkable thermal stability at 1100 °C, uniformity, and highly structural perfection. Structural investigation was carried out by in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and ex-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) with synchrotron radiation. In the initial stage of epitaxial growth, the R₂O₃ layers have a hexagonal phase with the epitaxial relationship of R₂O₃ (0001)(H)<1120>(H)//GaN(0001)(H)<1120>(H). With the increase in R₂O₃ film thickness, the structure of the R₂O₃ films changes from single domain hexagonal phase to monoclinic phase with six different rotational domains, following the R₂O₃ (201)(M)[020](M)//GaN(0001)(H)<1120>(H) orientational relationship. The structural details and fingerprints of hexagonal and monoclinic phase Gd₂O₃ films have also been examined by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Approximate 3-4 nm is the critical thickness for the structural phase transition depending on the composing rare earth element.

  16. Polymer Physics Prize Lecture: Self-assemblies of Giant Molecular Shape Amphiphiles as a New Platform for Engineering Structures with Sub-Nanometer Feature Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2013-03-01

    Utilizing nano-building blocks rather than atoms to construct and engineer new structures is a fresh approach to design and develop functional materials for the purpose of transferring and amplifying microscopic functionality to macroscopic materials' property. As one of the important elements of these nano-building blocks, giant molecular shape amphiphiles (GMSAs) provide a latest platform for generating self-assembled ordered structures at nanometer scale, which are stabilized by collective physical bonds (such as collective hydrogen bonding). In this talk, two topics will be focused on. First, composed of functionalized hydrophilic molecular nanoparticles as the heads with rigid shape and fixed volume, and tethered polymer chains as the tails (such as giant molecular surfactants and lipids and other topologies), these GMSAs of various architectures can self-assemble into highly diversified, thermodynamically stable microstructures at sub-10 nm length scale in the bulk, thin film and solution states. Second, GMSAs could also be constructed solely from nanoparticles interconnected via different numbers of the rigid linkages in specific symmetry, simulating the overall shapes of small molecules but with sizes that are one-order of magnitude larger in length and three-order of magnitude larger in volume. Giant crystal structures can then be obtained from this class of ``giant molecules'' via supramolecular crystallization. These findings are not only scientifically intriguing in understanding the physical principles underlying their self-assembly, but also technologically relevant in industrial applications.

  17. Highly crystallized nanometer-sized zeolite a with large Cs adsorption capability for the decontamination of water.

    PubMed

    Torad, Nagy L; Naito, Masanobu; Tatami, Junichi; Endo, Akira; Leo, Sin-Yen; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Wu, Kevin C-W; Wakihara, Toru; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2014-03-01

    Nanometer-sized zeolite A with a large cesium (Cs) uptake capability is prepared through a simple post-milling recrystallization method. This method is suitable for producing nanometer-sized zeolite in large scale, as additional organic compounds are not needed to control zeolite nucleation and crystal growth. Herein, we perform a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) study to evaluate the uptake ability of Cs ions by zeolite, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. In comparison to micrometer-sized zeolite A, nanometer-sized zeolite A can rapidly accommodate a larger amount of Cs ions into the zeolite crystal structure, owing to its high external surface area. Nanometer-sized zeolite is a promising candidate for the removal of radioactive Cs ions from polluted water. Our QCM study on Cs adsorption uptake behavior provides the information of adsorption kinetics (e.g., adsorption amounts and rates). This technique is applicable to other zeolites, which will be highly valuable for further consideration of radioactive Cs removal in the future.

  18. Ultraviolet spectra of quenched carbonaceous composite derivatives: Comparison to the '217 nanometer' interstellar absorption feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, Akira; Wada, Setsuko; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Narisawa, Takatoshi; Nakagawa, Hidehiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    QCCs (quenched carbonaceous composite) are amorphus carbonaceous material formed from a hydrocarbon plasma. We present the UV-visible spectra of 'filmy QCC; (obtained outside of the beam ejected from the hydrocarbon plasma) and 'dark QCC' (obtained very near to the beam) for comparison to the stellar extinction curve. When filmy QCC is heated to 500-700 C (thermally altered), the wavelength of the absorption maximum increases form 204 nm to 220-222 nm. The dark QCC has an absorption maximum at 217-222 nm. In addition, the thermally altered filmy QCC has a slope change at about 500 nm which resmbles that in the interstellar extinction curve. The resemblance of the extinction curve of the QCCs to that of the interstellar medium suggests that QCC derivatives may be representative of the type of interstellar material that produces the 217 nm interstellar medium feature. The peak extinction of the dark QCC is higher than the average interstellar extinction curve while that of the thermally altered filmy QCC is lower, so that a mixture of dark and thermally altered filmy QCC can match the peak extinction observed in the interstellar medium. It is shown from electron micrographs that most of the thermally altered flimy QCC is in the form of small grainy structure less than 4 nm in diameter. This shows that the structure unit causing the 217-222 nm feature in QCC is very small.

  19. Real-Time Imaging of Plant Cell Wall Structure at Nanometer Scale, with Respect to Cellulase Accessibility and Degradation Kinetics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, S. Y.

    2012-05-01

    Presentation on real-time imaging of plant cell wall structure at nanometer scale. Objectives are to develop tools to measure biomass at the nanometer scale; elucidate the molecular bases of biomass deconstruction; and identify factors that affect the conversion efficiency of biomass-to-biofuels.

  20. 75 FR 81437 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Taos, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... Taos, NM. Decommissioning of the Ski non-directional beacon (NDB) at Taos Regional Airport, Taos, NM... Taos, NM area. Decommissioning of the Ski NDB and cancellation of the NDB approach at Taos...

  1. Deep ultraviolet (254 nm) focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Erdem; Vashaei, Zahra; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2011-10-01

    We report the synthesis, fabrication and testing of a 320 × 256 focal plane array (FPA) of back-illuminated, solarblind, p-i-n, AlxGa1-xN-based detectors, fully realized within our research laboratory. We implemented a novel pulsed atomic layer deposition technique for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of crackfree, thick, and high Al composition AlxGa1-xN layers. Following the growth, the wafer was processed into a 320 × 256 array of 25 μm × 25 μm pixels on a 30 μm pixel-pitch and surrounding mini-arrays. A diagnostic mini-array was hybridized to a silicon fan-out chip to allow the study of electrical and optical characteristics of discrete pixels of the FPA. At a reverse bias of 1 V, an average photodetector exhibited a low dark current density of 1.12×10-8 A/cm2. Solar-blind operation is observed throughout the array with peak detection occurring at wavelengths of 256 nm and lower and falling off three orders of magnitude by 285 nm. After indium bump deposition and dicing, the FPA is hybridized to a matching ISC 9809 readout integrated circuit (ROIC). By developing a novel masking technology, we significantly reduced the visible response of the ROIC and thus the need for external filtering to achieve solar- and visible-blind operation is eliminated. This allowed the FPA to achieve high external quantum efficiency (EQE): at 254 nm, average pixels showed unbiased peak responsivity of 75 mA/W, which corresponds to an EQE of ~37%. Finally, the uniformity of the FPA and imaging properties are investigated.

  2. Laser-induced bulk damage of silica glass at 355nm and 266nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, R.; Aramomi, S.

    2016-12-01

    Laser processing machines using Nd:YAG 3rd harmonic wave (355 nm) and 4th harmonic wave (266 nm) have been developed and put into practical use lately. Due to this, optical elements with high laser durability to 355 nm and 266 nm are required. Silica glass is the optical element which has high UV transmission and high laser durability. Laser-induced surface damage of the silica glass has been studied in detail, but we hardly have the significant knowledge of laserinduced bulk damage. This knowledge is required in order to evaluate the silica glass itself. That is because cracks and scratches on the surface give rise to a higher possibility of damage. Therefore, we studied the laser durability of a variety of the silica glass samples by 1-on-1 and S-on-1 laser-induced bulk damage threshold (LIDT) at 355 nm and 266 nm. In this study, we gained knowledge in three areas about bulk damage to the silica glass. First, the LIDT became lower as shot counts increased. Second, the LIDT decreased as the hydroxyl content in the silica glass increased. Last, the LIDT became higher as the hydrogen concentration in the silica glass increased. Under the UV irradiation, impurities are generated and the silica glass absorbs more light. Therefore, the LIDT decreased as shot counts increased. Also, the hydroxyl in particular generates more impurities, so damage easily occurs. On the other hand, the hydrogen reacts with impurities and absorption is suppressed. Based on these results, we can improve laser durability at 355 nm and 266 nm by reducing the hydroxyl content and increasing the hydrogen concentration in the silica glass.

  3. Yb fiber amplifier at 972.5 nm with frequency quadrupling to 243.1 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkley, Z.; Rasor, C.; Cooper, S. F.; Brandt, A. D.; Yost, D. C.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a continuous-wave ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier which produces 6.3 W at a wavelength of 972.5 nm. We frequency-quadruple this source in two resonant doubling stages to generate 530 mW at 243.1 nm. Radiation at this wavelength is required to excite the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and could therefore find application in experimental studies of hydrogen and anti-hydrogen.

  4. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-01

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  5. Photolysis of formic acid at 355 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Denhi; Bautista, Teonanacatl; Guerrero, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2015-05-01

    Formic acid is well known as a food additive and recently an application on fuel cell technology has emerged. In this work we have studied the dissociative ionization process by multiphoton absorption of formic acid molecules at 355nm wavelength photons, using TOF spectrometry in reflectron mode (R-TOF). Some of the most abundant ionic fragments produced are studied at different settings of the laser harmonic generator. The dependence of the products on these conditions is reported. This work was supported by CONACYT Project 165410 and PAPIIT IN102613 and IN101215.

  6. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    SciTech Connect

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-15

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  7. Nonlinear absorption properties of DKDP crystal at 263 nm and 351 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiangxu; Zhu, Qihua; Feng, Bin; Li, Fuquan; Feng, Xi; Wang, Fang; Han, Wei; Wang, Liquan

    2017-02-01

    At the wavelength of 263 nm and 351 nm, the nonlinear absorption curves of 66% deuterated DKDP crystal were measured in the geometries of beam polarizing along the optics axis (E∥Z) and perpendicular to it (E⊥Z). The results indicate that the nonlinear absorption in the E⊥Z geometry is stronger than that in the E∥Z geometry. The nonlinear absorptions at 263 nm and 351 nm are identified to two- and three-photon absorption, respectively. The theoretical fits to the experimental data yields the two-photon absorption coefficients of 0.32 ± 0.03 cm/GW (E⊥Z geometry) and 0.17 ± 0.02 cm/GW (E∥Z geometry) at 263 nm, and the three-photon absorption coefficients of (8.1 ± 1.1) × 10-4 cm3/GW2 (E⊥Z geometry) and (2.2 ± 0.5) × 10-4 cm3/GW2 (E∥Z geometry) at 351 nm.

  8. Physical and chemical characterization of fly ashes from Swiss waste incineration plants and determination of the ash fraction in the nanometer range.

    PubMed

    Buha, Jelena; Mueller, Nicole; Nowack, Bernd; Ulrich, Andrea; Losert, Sabrina; Wang, Jing

    2014-05-06

    Waste incineration had been identified as an important source of ultrafine air pollutants resulting in elaborated treatment systems for exhaust air. Nowadays, these systems are able to remove almost all ultrafine particles. However, the fate of ultrafine particles caught in the filters has received little attention so far. Based on the use of engineered nano-objects (ENO) and their transfer into the waste stream, it can be expected that not only combustion generated nanoparticles are found in fly ashes but that many ENO finally end up in this matrix. A more detailed characterization of the nanoparticulate fraction of fly ashes is therefore needed. Physical and chemical characterizations were performed for fly ashes from five selected waste incineration plants (WIPs) with different input materials such as municipal waste, wood and sewage sludge. The intrinsic densities of the fly ashes were in the range of 2.7-3.2 g/cm(3). When the fly ash particle became airborne, the effective density depended on the particle size, increasing from 0.7-0.8 g/cm(3) for 100-150 nm to 2 g/cm(3) for 350-500 nm. The fly ash samples were fractionated at 2 μm, yielding fine fractions (<2 μm) and coarse fractions (>2 μm). The size distributions of the fine fractions in the airborne form were further characterized, which allowed calculation of the percentage of the fly ash particles below 100 nm. We found the highest mass-based percentage was about 0.07%; the number percentage in the fine fraction was in the range of 4.8% to 22%. Comparison with modeling results showed that ENO may constitute a considerable part of the fly ash particles below 100 nm. Chemical analyses showed that for the municipal waste samples Ca and Al were present in higher concentrations in the coarse fraction; for the mixed wood and sludge sample the P concentration was higher in the coarse fraction; for most other samples and elements they were enriched in the fine fraction. Electron microscopic images of fly ashes

  9. DNA charge transport over 34 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Renfrew, Sara E.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-03-01

    Molecular wires show promise in nanoscale electronics, but the synthesis of uniform, long conductive molecules is a significant challenge. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of precise length, by contrast, is synthesized easily, but its conductivity over the distances required for nanoscale devices has not been explored. Here we demonstrate DNA charge transport (CT) over 34 nm in 100-mer monolayers on gold. Multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100-mer DNA yield sizable electrochemical signals from a distal, covalent Nile Blue redox probe. Significant signal attenuation upon incorporation of a single base-pair mismatch demonstrates that CT is DNA-mediated. Efficient cleavage of these 100-mers by a restriction enzyme indicates that the DNA adopts a native conformation accessible to protein binding. Similar electron-transfer rates measured through 100-mer and 17-mer monolayers are consistent with rate-limiting electron tunnelling through the saturated carbon linker. This DNA-mediated CT distance of 34 nm surpasses that of most reports of molecular wires.

  10. Low-intensity LED (625 and 405 nm) and laser (805 nm) killing of Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchina, Elena S.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2009-02-01

    In the present work we have investigated in vitro sensitivity of microorganisms P. acnes and S. epidermidis to action of red (625 nm and 405 nm) and infrared (805 nm) radiations in combination with photosensitizes Methylene Blue and Indocyanine Green.

  11. Probing Local Ionic Dynamics in Functional Oxides: From Nanometer to Atomic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Vacancy-mediated electrochemical reactions in oxides underpin multiple applications ranging from electroresistive memories, to chemical sensors to energy conversion systems such as fuel cells. Understanding the functionality in these systems requires probing reversible (oxygen reduction/evolution reaction) and irreversible (cathode degradation and activation, formation of conductive filaments) electrochemical processes. In this talk, I summarize recent advances in probing and controlling these transformations locally on nanometer level using scanning probe microscopy. The localized tip concentrates the electric field in the nanometer scale volume of material, inducing local transition. Measured simultaneously electromechanical response (piezoresponse) or current (conductive AFM) provides the information on the bias-induced changes in material. Here, I illustrate how these methods can be extended to study local electrochemical transformations, including vacancy dynamics in oxides such as titanates, LaxSr1-xCoO3, BiFeO3, and YxZr1-xO2. The formation of electromechanical hysteresis loops and their bias-, temperature- and environment dependences provide insight into local electrochemical mechanisms. In materials such as lanthanum-strontium cobaltite, mapping both reversible vacancy motion and vacancy ordering and static deformation is possible, and can be corroborated by post mortem STEM/EELS studies. In ceria, a broad gamut of electrochemical behaviors is observed as a function of temperature and humidity. The possible strategies for elucidation ionic motion at the electroactive interfaces in oxides using high-resolution electron microscopy and combined ex-situ and in-situ STEM-SPM studies are discussed. In the second part of the talk, probing electrochemical phenomena on in-situ grown surfaces with atomic resolution is illustrated. I present an approach based on the multivariate statistical analysis of the coordination spheres of individual atoms to reveal

  12. Electronic Structures of Supported Nanometer-Size Clusters Using Field Emission Energy Analyzer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mong-Ea.

    The discrete energy states of a nanometer-size gold cluster have been measured using energy-resolved field emission microscopy. The clusters were prepared in a multiple expansion cluster source (MECS) which is capable of producing nanometer-size clusters with a narrow size distribution. An individual cluster was deposited on a tungsten field emission tip which was then transferred under vacuum into a UHV field emission chamber. A 127^circ differential energy analyzer with 80 meV resolution was used to measure the energy distribution of electrons emitted from the individual cluster. Several peaks are observed in the field emission energy distributions. A simple model will be presented to explain the structure observed and relate the observed peaks to discrete energy levels of the Au cluster. As a next example of such 'single cluster' experiments, we will discuss the evidence for electron emission from the first quantum charge state of a metal cluster. This charge state is located at an energy e^2 /2C above the highest filled electronic state of the neutral cluster and becomes populated at high rates of electron emission. We will also investigate the electrons emission rates of cluster and tungsten tips. The emission rates of cluster tips are not as stable as those of tungsten tip and do not obey Poisson distributions. The reduced chi^2 test shows two different geometrical structures of a small cluster and indicates quasimelting of this cluster. Another interesting topic to study is electron emission from the newly discovered C_{60 } molecule. C_{60} dust has been heated near a tungsten tip situated in an ultra high vacuum chamber. The rate of cluster deposition was found to greatly increase when the tip was biased positive with respect to the oven potential. These experiments have shown that with care, individual C_ {60} can be deposited on a field emitter and studied using field emission microscopy techniques. Size estimates of the field emission image indicate

  13. Wavefield characterization of nearly diffraction-limited focused hard x-ray beam with size less than 10 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Takashi; Mimura, Hidekazu; Handa, Soichiro; Yokoyama, Hikaru; Imai, Shota; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2010-12-15

    In situ wavefront compensation is a promising method to realize a focus size of only a few nanometers for x-ray beams. However, precise compensation requires evaluation of the wavefront with an accuracy much shorter than the wavelength. Here, we characterized a one-dimensionally focused beam with a width of 7 nm at 20 keV using a multilayer mirror. We demonstrate that the wavefront can be determined precisely from multiple intensity profiles measured around the beamwaist. We compare the phase profiles recovered from intensity profiles measured under the same mirror condition but with three different aperture sizes and find that the accuracy of phase retrieval is as small as {lambda}/12.

  14. TCSPC FLIM in the wavelength range from 800 nm to 1700 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Shcheslavsky, Vladislav

    2016-03-01

    Excitation and detection in the wavelength range above 800nm is a convenient and relatively inexpensive way to increase the penetration depth in optical microscopy. Moreover, detection at long wavelength avoids the problem that tissue autofluorescence contaminates the signals from endogenous fluorescence probes. FLIM at NIR wavelength may therefore be complementary to multiphoton microscopy, especially if the lifetimes of NIR fluorophores report biological parameters of the tissue structures they are bound to. Unfortunately, neither the excitation sources nor the detectors of standard confocal and multiphoton laser scanning systems are directly suitable for excitation and detection of NIR fluorescence. Most of these problems can be solved, however, by using ps diode lasers or Ti:Sapphire lasers at their fundamental wavelength, and NIR-sensitive detectors. With NIR-sensitive PMTs the detection wavelength range can be extended up to 900 nm, with InGaAs SPAD detectors up to 1700 nm. Here, we demonstrate the use of a combination of laser scanning, multi-dimensional TCSPC, and advanced excitation sources and detectors for FLIM at up to 1700 nm. The performance was tested at tissue samples incubated with NIR dyes. The fluorescence lifetimes generally get shorter with increasing absorption and emission wavelengths of the dyes. For the cyanine dye IR1061, absorbing around 1060 nm, the lifetime was found to be as short as 70 ps. Nevertheless the fluorescence decay could still be clearly detected. Almost all dyes showed clear lifetime changes depending on the binding to different tissue constituents.

  15. Comparison of 980-nm and 1070-nm in endovenous laser treatment (EVLT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaloglu, Nermin; Tabakoglu, Ozgur; Ergenoglu, Mehmet U.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2009-07-01

    The use of endovenous laser treatment for varicose veins has been increasing in recent years. It is a safer technique than surgical vein stripping. Its complications (e.g. bruising, pain) are less than the complications of surgical vein stripping. But best parameters such as optimum wavelength, power, and application duration are still under investigation to clarify uncertainties about this technique. To prevent its complications and improve its clinical outcomes, the exact mechanism of it has to be known. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of different laser wavelengths on endovenous laser therapy. In this study 980-nm diode laser and 1070-nm fiber laser were used. Human veins were irradiated with 980-nm and 1070-nm lasers at 8 W and 10 W to find the optimal power and wavelength. After laser application, remarkable shrinkage was observed. Inner and outer diameters of the veins also narrowed for both of the laser types. 10 W of 980-nm laser application led to better shrinkage results.

  16. Dual illumination OCT at 1050nm and 840nm for whole eye segment imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanhui; Qin, Lin; Dai, Cuixia; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2014-11-01

    We presented an improved dual channel dual focus spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with two illuminations at 840 nm and 1050 nm for whole eye segment imaging and biometry in vivo. The two light beams were coupled and optically optimized to scan the anterior and posterior segment of the eye simultaneously. This configuration with dichroic mirrors integrated in the sample arm enables us to acquire images from the anterior segment and retina effectively with minimum loss of sample signal. In addition, the full resolved complex (FRC) method was applied to double the imaging depth for the whole anterior segment imaging by eliminating the mirror image. The axial resolution for 1050 nm and 840 nm OCT was 14 μm and 8 μm in air, respectively. Finally, the system was successfully tested in imaging the unaccommodated and accommodated eyes. The preliminary results demonstrated the significant improvements comparing with our previous dual channel SD-OCT configuration in which the two probing beams had the same central wavelength of 840 nm.

  17. 308-nm excimer laser in endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liesenhoff, Tim

    1992-06-01

    Root canal preparation was performed on 20 extracted human teeth. After opening the coronal pulp, the root canals were prepared by 308 nm excimer laser only. All root canals were investigated under SEM after separation in the axial direction. By sagittal separation of the mandibles of freshly slaughtered cows, it was possible to get access to the tissues and irradiate under optical control. Under irradiation of excimer laser light, tissue starts to fluoresce. It was possible to demonstrate that each tissue (dentin, enamel, bone, pulpal, and connective tissue) has a characteristic spectral pattern. The SEM analyses showed that it is well possible to prepare root canals safely. All organic soft tissue has been removed by excimer laser irradiation. There was no case of via falsa. The simultaneous spectroscopic identification of the irradiated tissue provides a safe protection from overinstrumentation. First clinical trials on 20 patients suffering of chronical apical parodontitis have been carried out successfully.

  18. Microscope illumination systems for 157 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesch, Alexander; Uhlendorf, Kristina; Deparnay, Arnaud; Erdmann, Lars; Kuschnerus, Peter; Engel, Thomas; Brunner, Robert

    2003-05-01

    The image quality of an inspection microscope depends strongly on the performance of the illumination system. Especially in the case of laser-based illumination it is necessary to transform the original beam profile into a homogeneous light spot with a flat top field distribution. Simultaneously, speckles caused by the coherence of the laser have to be reduced. Here we discuss different ways to homogenize the multi mode beam profile of a pulsed compact 157 nm excimer laser. A variety of setups, combining dynamic acting diffusers, microlens arrays and primary lenses were realized and characterized in several geometrical arrangements. The homogenizers were evaluated and characterized especially with respect to the statistical behavior on the integrated pulse number.

  19. Transfer of motion through a microelectromechanical linkage at nanometer and microradian scales

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Craig R.; McGray, Craig D.; Geist, Jon; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.; Stavis, Samuel M.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical linkages are fundamentally important for the transfer of motion through assemblies of parts to perform work. Whereas their behavior in macroscale systems is well understood, there are open questions regarding the performance and reliability of linkages with moving parts in contact within microscale systems. Measurement challenges impede experimental studies to answer such questions. In this study, we develop a novel combination of optical microscopy methods that enable the first quantitative measurements at nanometer and microradian scales of the transfer of motion through a microelectromechanical linkage. We track surface features and fluorescent nanoparticles as optical indicators of the motion of the underlying parts of the microsystem. Empirical models allow precise characterization of the electrothermal actuation of the linkage. The transfer of motion between translating and rotating links can be nearly ideal, depending on the operating conditions. The coupling and decoupling of the links agree with an ideal kinematic model to within approximately 5%, and the rotational output is perfectly repeatable to within approximately 20 microradians. However, stiction can result in nonideal kinematics, and input noise on the scale of a few millivolts produces an asymmetric interaction of electrical noise and mechanical play that results in the nondeterministic transfer of motion. Our study establishes a new approach towards testing the performance and reliability of the transfer of motion through assemblies of microscale parts, opening the door to future studies of complex microsystems. PMID:27840694

  20. Positive feedback can lead to dynamic nanometer-scale clustering on cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrens, Martijn; Rein ten Wolde, Pieter; Mugler, Andrew

    2014-11-28

    Clustering of molecules on biological membranes is a widely observed phenomenon. A key example is the clustering of the oncoprotein Ras, which is known to be important for signal transduction in mammalian cells. Yet, the mechanism by which Ras clusters form and are maintained remains unclear. Recently, it has been discovered that activated Ras promotes further Ras activation. Here we show using particle-based simulation that this positive feedback is sufficient to produce persistent clusters of active Ras molecules at the nanometer scale via a dynamic nucleation mechanism. Furthermore, we find that our cluster statistics are consistent with experimental observations of the Ras system. Interestingly, we show that our model does not support a Turing regime of macroscopic reaction-diffusion patterning, and therefore that the clustering we observe is a purely stochastic effect, arising from the coupling of positive feedback with the discrete nature of individual molecules. These results underscore the importance of stochastic and dynamic properties of reaction diffusion systems for biological behavior.

  1. Nanometer Scale Titanium Surface Texturing Are Detected by Signaling Pathways Involving Transient FAK and Src Activations

    PubMed Central

    Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Jimbo, Ryo; Hayashi, Mariko; Andersson, Martin; Alves, Gutemberg; Takamori, Esther R.; Beltrão, Paulo J.; Coelho, Paulo G.; Granjeiro, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is known that physico/chemical alterations on biomaterial surfaces have the capability to modulate cellular behavior, affecting early tissue repair. Such surface modifications are aimed to improve early healing response and, clinically, offer the possibility to shorten the time from implant placement to functional loading. Since FAK and Src are intracellular proteins able to predict the quality of osteoblast adhesion, this study evaluated the osteoblast behavior in response to nanometer scale titanium surface texturing by monitoring FAK and Src phosphorylations. Methodology Four engineered titanium surfaces were used for the study: machined (M), dual acid-etched (DAA), resorbable media microblasted and acid-etched (MBAA), and acid-etch microblasted (AAMB). Surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thereafter, those 4 samples were used to evaluate their cytotoxicity and interference on FAK and Src phosphorylations. Both Src and FAK were investigated by using specific antibody against specific phosphorylation sites. Principal Findings The results showed that both FAK and Src activations were differently modulated as a function of titanium surfaces physico/chemical configuration and protein adsorption. Conclusions It can be suggested that signaling pathways involving both FAK and Src could provide biomarkers to predict osteoblast adhesion onto different surfaces. PMID:24999733

  2. Fracture of perfect and defective graphene at the nanometer scale: Is graphene the strongest material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The basic relationships between the linear elastic and nonlinear fracture properties given by a local bond-breaking model and Griffith's criterion are used to characterize the two-dimensional (2D) mechanical properties of an intrinsic and a defective graphene, respectively. The analytical 2D models describe the localized bond-breaking in perfect monolayers and the failure of defective graphene by the global energy balance concept. From the experimental data, density functional theory calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and continuum 2D models, a consistent set of 2D mechanical properties consisting of Young's modulus, fracture strength, fracture toughness, line (edge) energy, and critical strain energy release rate can be obtained. The critical fracture stress shows a linear dependence on the square root of the effective defect length from the subnanometer to the micrometer scale. The lower limit of fracture toughness and strain energy release rate is essentially independent of the defect size for vacancies, slits, and pre-cracks in the nanometer range. In the subnanometer range, the direct bond breaking and Griffith models deliver a consistent description of mode I fracture by a uniaxial tension. The promising results suggest an extension of the continuum models to other fracture modes such as the failure by shear load.

  3. Colorimetric monitoring of nanometer distance changes in DNA-templated plasmon rulers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lermusiaux, Laurent; Bidault, Sebastien

    2016-03-01

    The nanometer-scale sensitivity of plasmon coupling allows the translation of minute morphological changes in nanostructures into macroscopic optical signals. In particular, single nanostructure scattering spectroscopy provides a direct estimation of interparticle distances in gold nanoparticle (AuNP) dimers linked by a short DNA double-strand [M. P. Busson et al, Nano Lett. 11, 5060 (2011)]. We demonstrate here that this spectroscopic information can be inferred from simple widefield measurements on a calibrated color camera [L. Lermusiaux et al, ACS Nano 9, 978 (2015)]. This allows us to analyze the influence of electrostatic and steric interparticle interactions on the morphology of DNA-templated AuNP groupings. Furthermore, polarization-resolved measurements on a color CCD provide a parallel imaging of AuNP dimer orientations. We apply this spectroscopic characterization to identify dimers featuring two different conformations of the same DNA template. In practice, the biomolecular scaffold contains a hairpin-loop that opens after hybridization to a specific DNA sequence and increases the interparticle distance [L. Lermusiaux et al, ACS Nano 6, 10992 (2012)]. These results open exciting perspectives for the parallel sensing of single specific DNA strands using plasmon rulers. We discuss the limits of this approach in terms of the physicochemical stability and reactivity of these nanostructures and demonstrate the importance of engineering the AuNP surface chemistry, in particular using amphiphilic ligands [L. Lermusiaux and S. Bidault, Small (2015), in press].

  4. Drift-insensitive distributed calibration of probe microscope scanner in nanometer range: Virtual mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapshin, Rostislav V.

    2016-08-01

    A method of distributed calibration of a probe microscope scanner is suggested. The main idea consists in a search for a net of local calibration coefficients (LCCs) in the process of automatic measurement of a standard surface, whereby each point of the movement space of the scanner can be characterized by a unique set of scale factors. Feature-oriented scanning (FOS) methodology is used as a basis for implementation of the distributed calibration permitting to exclude in situ the negative influence of thermal drift, creep and hysteresis on the obtained results. Possessing the calibration database enables correcting in one procedure all the spatial systematic distortions caused by nonlinearity, nonorthogonality and spurious crosstalk couplings of the microscope scanner piezomanipulators. To provide high precision of spatial measurements in nanometer range, the calibration is carried out using natural standards - constants of crystal lattice. One of the useful modes of the developed calibration method is a virtual mode. In the virtual mode, instead of measurement of a real surface of the standard, the calibration program makes a surface image "measurement" of the standard, which was obtained earlier using conventional raster scanning. The application of the virtual mode permits simulation of the calibration process and detail analysis of raster distortions occurring in both conventional and counter surface scanning. Moreover, the mode allows to estimate the thermal drift and the creep velocities acting while surface scanning. Virtual calibration makes possible automatic characterization of a surface by the method of scanning probe microscopy (SPM).

  5. Review: bioanalytical applications of biomolecule-functionalized nanometer-sized doped silica particles.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Dietmar; Tang, Dianping; Niessner, Reinhard

    2009-08-04

    Recent research has looked to develop innovative and powerful novel biofunctionalized nanometer-sized silica particles, controlling and tailoring their properties in a very predictable manner to meet the needs of specific applications. The silica shells of these particles facilitate a wide variety of surface reactions and allow conjugation with biomolecules like proteins and DNA. There exist a multitude of possible applications of fabricated nanoparticles in biotechnology and medicine. In particular, they have proved to be highly useful for biosensing, assay labelling, bioimaging, and in research on a variety of molecular tags in cellular and molecular biology. Techniques commonly rely on the use of silica-coated semiconductor quantum dots, organic dyes, magnetic particles, and Raman active particles. Inorganic-biological hybrid particles combine the properties of both materials, i.e., the spectroscopic characteristics of the entrapped nanocrystal, and the biomolecular function of the conjugated entity. Rather than being exhaustive, this review focuses on selected examples to illustrate novel concepts and promising applications. Approaches described include the encoding of silica nanoparticles with different groups, and conjugation with various biological entities. Further, promising applications in bioanalysis are considered and discussed.

  6. Deformation Behavior in Medium Mn Steel of Nanometer-Sized α' + γ Lamellar Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Yoon-Uk; Kim, Dong Hwi; Heo, Nam Hoe; Hong, Chang Wan; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2016-12-01

    Yielding and work-hardening phenomena in an Fe-10.62Mn-2.84Al-0.17C-0.5Mo steel, which is composed of nanometer-sized lamellae of α' and γ, are described on the basis of the Hall-Petch relations. Unlike the general expectation, yielding in the steel, which consists of lamellae of α' and mechanically stable γ, occurs through the propagation of pileup dislocations from α' to γ. However, when γ is mechanically unstable, yielding occurs through the stress-assisted martensitic transformation (SAMT) within the unstable γ region, resulting in a low YS of about 500 MPa. The overall prominent work-hardening behavior of this steel after yielding is due to the active SAMT, which does not accompany the increase in mobile dislocation density and so causes the high elastic strain rate. The carbon partitioning treatment increases the SAMT starting strength to about 980 MPa, which is caused by the mechanical stabilization of γ. The overall low work-hardening behavior of this case is mainly attributed to the active propagation of pile-up dislocation from α' to γ which causes the high plastic strain rate through the abrupt increase of mobile dislocation density.

  7. Enhanced Signal and Quantitative Detection of Anti-Interferon-Gamma Antibody by Using a Nanometer Biolinker

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Pei-I; Lee, Adam Shih-Yuan; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Chung, Ming-Han; Liu, Meng-Wei; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-01-01

    For rapid screening and quantification of an antisera antibody, a nanometer bithiophene-based conductive biolinker can enhanced signal performance and can be used to verify the interaction of an anti-IFN-γ antibody with an IFN-γ protein. The experimental measurements take a generic approach which takes advantage of the functionality of thiophene-based linkers for biosensors. Effects associated with using bithiophene as a biolinker for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy are examined in this paper. By using an atomic force microscope (AFM), it was observed that the morphology of the bithiophene modified gold sensor surface became smoother than the original gold surface. We compared the response and concentration of the anti-IFN-γ antibody on a bithiophene-coated and dextran-coated biochip as well as on different thickness-modified surfaces under SPR relevant conditions. The results indicate that a response to IFN-γ molecules immobilized on a sensor using a bithiophene biolinker improved more than 8-fold when compared to that of a sensor using a dextran biolinker. Furthermore, the regeneration ability of the sensor surface shows good repeatability as only less than a 1% decrease was found after repeating the experimental work over 6 cycles. The characteristics provided us with a good platform for rapid screening, real-time monitoring and quantitative concentration of the autoimmune antibody activities. PMID:27459633

  8. Mobility of nanometer-size solutes in water driven by electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the mobility of nanometer-size solutes in water in a uniform external electric field. General arguments are presented to show that a closed surface cutting a volume from a polar liquid will carry an effective non-zero surface charge density when preferential orientation of dipoles exists in the interface. This effective charge will experience a non-vanishing drag in an external electric field even in the absence of free charge carriers. Numerical simulations of model solutes are used to estimate the magnitude of the surface charge density. We find it to be comparable to the values typically reported from the mobility measurements. Hydrated ions can potentially carry a significant excess of the effective charge due to over-polarization of the interface. As a result, the electrokinetic charge can significantly deviate from the physical charge of free charge carriers. We propose to test the model by manipulating the polarizability of hydrated semiconductor nanoparticles with light. The inversion of the mobility direction can be achieved by photoexcitation, which increases the nanoparticle polarizability and leads to an inversion of the dipolar orientations of water molecules in the interface.

  9. Ultra-High Density Single Nanometer-Scale Anodic Alumina Nanofibers Fabricated by Pyrophosphoric Acid Anodizing

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Nishinaga, Osamu; Nakajima, Daiki; Kawashima, Jun; Natsui, Shungo; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-01-01

    Anodic oxide fabricated by anodizing has been widely used for nanostructural engineering, but the nanomorphology is limited to only two oxides: anodic barrier and porous oxides. Therefore, the discovery of an additional anodic oxide with a unique nanofeature would expand the applicability of anodizing. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a third-generation anodic oxide, specifically, anodic alumina nanofibers, by anodizing in a new electrolyte, pyrophosphoric acid. Ultra-high density single nanometer-scale anodic alumina nanofibers (1010 nanofibers/cm2) consisting of an amorphous, pure aluminum oxide were successfully fabricated via pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The nanomorphologies of the anodic nanofibers can be controlled by the electrochemical conditions. Anodic tungsten oxide nanofibers can also be fabricated by pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The aluminum surface covered by the anodic alumina nanofibers exhibited ultra-fast superhydrophilic behavior, with a contact angle of less than 1°, within 1 second. Such ultra-narrow nanofibers can be used for various nanoapplications including catalysts, wettability control, and electronic devices. PMID:25491282

  10. Sub-nanometer resolution of an organic semiconductor crystal surface using friction force microscopy in water.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Carlos; Varghese, Shinto; Yoon, Seong-Jun; Park, Soo Young; Gierschner, Johannes; Gnecco, Enrico; Pina, Carlos M

    2016-04-06

    Organic semiconductors (OSC) are attracting much interest for (opto)electronic applications, such as photovoltaics, LEDs, sensors or solid state lasers. In particular, crystals formed by small π-conjugated molecules have shown to be suitable for constructing OSC devices. However, the (opto)electronic properties are complex since they depend strongly on both the mutual orientation of molecules as well as the perfection of bulk crystal surfaces. Hence, there is an urgent need to control nano-topographic OSC features in real space. Here we show that friction force microscopy in water is a very suitable technique to image the free surface morphology of an OSC single crystal (TDDCS) with sub-nanometer resolution. We demonstrate the power of the method by direct correlation to the structural information extracted from combined single crystal (SC-) and specular (s-) XRD studies, which allows us to identify the pinning centers encountered in the stick-slip motion of the probing tip with the topmost methyl groups on the TDDCS surface.

  11. Probing dynamics and pinning of single vortices in superconductors at nanometer scales.

    PubMed

    Embon, L; Anahory, Y; Suhov, A; Halbertal, D; Cuppens, J; Yakovenko, A; Uri, A; Myasoedov, Y; Rappaport, M L; Huber, M E; Gurevich, A; Zeldov, E

    2015-01-07

    The dynamics of quantized magnetic vortices and their pinning by materials defects determine electromagnetic properties of superconductors, particularly their ability to carry non-dissipative currents. Despite recent advances in the understanding of the complex physics of vortex matter, the behavior of vortices driven by current through a multi-scale potential of the actual materials defects is still not well understood, mostly due to the scarcity of appropriate experimental tools capable of tracing vortex trajectories on nanometer scales. Using a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference microscope we report here an investigation of controlled dynamics of vortices in lead films with sub-Angstrom spatial resolution and unprecedented sensitivity. We measured, for the first time, the fundamental dependence of the elementary pinning force of multiple defects on the vortex displacement, revealing a far more complex behavior than has previously been recognized, including striking spring softening and broken-spring depinning, as well as spontaneous hysteretic switching between cellular vortex trajectories. Our results indicate the importance of thermal fluctuations even at 4.2 K and of the vital role of ripples in the pinning potential, giving new insights into the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation and electromagnetic response of superconductors.

  12. Transfer of motion through a microelectromechanical linkage at nanometer and microradian scales.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Craig R; McGray, Craig D; Geist, Jon; Aksyuk, Vladimir A; Stavis, Samuel M

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical linkages are fundamentally important for the transfer of motion through assemblies of parts to perform work. Whereas their behavior in macroscale systems is well understood, there are open questions regarding the performance and reliability of linkages with moving parts in contact within microscale systems. Measurement challenges impede experimental studies to answer such questions. In this study, we develop a novel combination of optical microscopy methods that enable the first quantitative measurements at nanometer and microradian scales of the transfer of motion through a microelectromechanical linkage. We track surface features and fluorescent nanoparticles as optical indicators of the motion of the underlying parts of the microsystem. Empirical models allow precise characterization of the electrothermal actuation of the linkage. The transfer of motion between translating and rotating links can be nearly ideal, depending on the operating conditions. The coupling and decoupling of the links agree with an ideal kinematic model to within approximately 5%, and the rotational output is perfectly repeatable to within approximately 20 microradians. However, stiction can result in nonideal kinematics, and input noise on the scale of a few millivolts produces an asymmetric interaction of electrical noise and mechanical play that results in the nondeterministic transfer of motion. Our study establishes a new approach towards testing the performance and reliability of the transfer of motion through assemblies of microscale parts, opening the door to future studies of complex microsystems.

  13. Growth of nanometer thin ice films from water vapor studied using scanning polarization force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, H.; Salmeron, M.

    1999-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the growth and morphology of ice films on the cleavage surface of mica. Measurements performed in contact, as well as in noncontact operation modes of the microscope, allowed us to distinguish the solid and liquid parts of the film. At temperatures below {minus}30&hthinsp;{degree}C, supercooled water droplets formed on top of a thin (nanometer range) ice layer in contact with the substrate. After annealing, a contiguous flat film was formed. Between {minus}20 and {minus}10&hthinsp;{degree}C and at a relative humidity of {approximately}83{percent}, the film consisted of a solid ice layer {approximately}7 {Angstrom} thick, covered by a liquid-like layer 50{plus_minus}5&hthinsp;{Angstrom} thick. When the temperature was raised above 0&hthinsp;{degree}C, droplets formed, which subsequently evaporated. Comparison of results obtained in the various AFM operation modes allowed us to conclude the existence of a liquid-like layer on the ice surface. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Effective nanometer airgap of NEMS devices using negative capacitance of ferroelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Masuduzzaman, Muhammad; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2014-06-11

    Nanoelectromechnical system (NEMS) is seen as one of the most promising candidates for next generation extreme low power electronics that can operate as a versatile switch/memory/sensor/display element. One of the main challenges toward this goal lies in the fabrication difficulties of ultrascaled NEMS required for high density integrated circuits. It is generally understood that fabricating and operating a NEMS with an airgap below a few nanometer will be extremely challenging due to surface roughness, nonideal forces, tunneling, etc. Here, we show that by cascading a NEMS with a ferroelectric capacitor, operating in the negative capacitance regime, the effective airgap can be reduced by almost an order of magnitude, without the need to reduce the airgap physically. This would not only reduce the pull-in voltage to sub-1 V regime, but also would offer a set of characteristics which are difficult/impossible to achieve otherwise. For example, one can reduce/increase the classical travel range, flip the traditional stable-unstable regime of the electrode, get a negative pull-out voltage, and thus, center the hysteresis around zero volt. Moreover, one can also operate the combination as an effective ferroelectric memory with much reduced switching voltages. These characteristics promise dramatic saving in power for NEMS-based switching, memory, and other related applications.

  15. The Apparent Thermal Conductivity of Liquids Containing Solid Particles of Nanometer Dimensions: A Critique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertsinidou, Georgia; Assael, Marc J.; Wakeham, William A.

    2015-07-01

    There have been conflicting statements in the literature of the last twenty years about the behavior of the apparent thermal conductivity of two- or three-phase systems comprising solid particles with nanometer dimensions suspended in fluids. It has been a feature of much of the work that these multiphase systems have been treated as if a single-phase fluid and that the thermodynamic characteristics of the system have varied even though the systems have been given the same name. These so-called nanofluids have been the subject of a large number of investigations by a variety of different experimental techniques. In the current paper, we critically evaluate the studies of seven of the simplest particulate/fluid systems: Cu, CuO, , and suspended in water and ethylene glycol. Our conclusion is that when results for exactly the same thermodynamic system are obtained with proven experimental techniques, the apparent thermal conductivity of the nanofluid exhibits no behavior that is unexpected and inconsistent with a simple model of conduction in stationary, multiphase systems. The wider variety of behavior that has been reported in the literature for these systems is therefore attributed to ill-characterization of the thermodynamic system and/or the application of experimental techniques of unproven validity.

  16. Probing Rubber Cross-Linking Generation of Industrial Polymer Networks at Nanometer Scale.

    PubMed

    Gabrielle, Brice; Gomez, Emmanuel; Korb, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-23

    We present improved analyses of rheometric torque measurements as well as (1)H double-quantum (DQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) buildup data on polymer networks of industrial compounds. This latter DQ NMR analysis allows finding the distribution of an orientation order parameter (Dres) resulting from the noncomplete averaging of proton dipole-dipole couplings within the cross-linked polymer chains. We investigate the influence of the formulation (filler and vulcanization systems) as well as the process (curing temperature) ending to the final polymer network. We show that DQ NMR follows the generation of the polymer network during the vulcanization process from a heterogeneous network to a very homogeneous one. The time variations of microscopic Dres and macroscopic rheometric torques present power-law behaviors above a threshold time scale with characteristic exponents of the percolation theory. We observe also a very good linear correlation between the kinetics of Dres and rheometric data routinely performed in industry. All these observations confirm the description of the polymer network generation as a critical phenomenon. On the basis of all these results, we believe that DQ NMR could become a valuable tool for investigating in situ the cross-linking of industrial polymer networks at the nanometer scale.

  17. Raman identification of edge alignment of bilayer graphene down to the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Qiao-Qiao; Han, Wen-Peng; Lu, Yan; Shi, Wei; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Mikhaylushkin, Arkady S; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2014-07-07

    The ideal edges of bilayer graphene (BLG) are that the edges of the top and bottom graphene layers (GLs) of BLG are well-aligned. Actually, the alignment distance between the edges of the top and bottom GLs of a real BLG can be as large as the submicrometer scale or as small as zero, which cannot be distinguished using an optical microscope. Here, we present a detailed Raman study on BLG at its edges. If the alignment distance of the top and bottom GLs of BLG is larger than the laser spot, the measured D mode at the edge of the top GL of BLG shows a similar spectral profile to that of disordered BLG. If the alignment distance is smaller than the laser spot, the D mode at a real BLG edge shows three typical spectral profiles similar to that at the edge of SLG, that of the well-aligned edge of BLG, or a combination of both. We show the sensitivity and ability of Raman spectroscopy to acquire the alignment distance between two edges of top and bottom GLs of BLG as small as several nanometers, which is far beyond the diffraction limit of a laser spot. This work opens the possibility to probe the edge alignment of multi-layer graphene.

  18. Sinusoidal phase-modulating self-mixing interferometer with nanometer resolution and improved measurement velocity range.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Hao, Hui; Guo, Dongmei; Wang, Ming; Chen, Xuzong

    2015-09-10

    A new signal-processing method based on an electronic frequency down-conversion technique has been introduced into a sinusoidal phase-modulating, self-mixing interferometer. The developed interferometer employs an electro-optical crystal placed in the external cavity of a He-Ne laser to generate the sinusoidal phase modulation with high modulation rate and ultralow insertion loss. Phase quadrature signals which have been amplitude-modulated by the sine and cosine functions, respectively, of the measured displacement can be extracted from the high-density optical fringes through the use of dual-channel multiplier/filter circuits. Therefore, the displacement of the external target can be retrieved from the phase quadrature signals with nanometer resolution and high computational efficiency. Moreover, a much-improved measurement speed from 2.5 to 22  mm/s has been realized owing to the simplified signal-processing method. The performance of the proposed interferometer has been experimentally verified by comparison to an Agilent 5529A dual-frequency laser interferometer. The measurement results from the two instruments agree well, and we therefore expect that our new technique offers a powerful instrument for high-speed metrology sciences.

  19. Suppression of cucumber powdery mildew by UV-B is affected by background light quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brief (5-10 min) exposure to UV-B radiation (280-300 nm) suppressed powdery mildew (Podosphaera xanthii) on Cucumis sativus. The effect was enhanced by red light (600-660 nm), but offset by blue light (420-500 nm) and UV-A (300-420 nm). Compared to untreated controls, 2 h red light from specific lig...

  20. Measurement of 100 nm and 60 nm Particle Standards by Differential Mobility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, George W.; Donnelly, Michelle K.; Hagwood, Charles R.; Kukuck, Scott R.; Hackley, Vincent A.; Pui, David Y. H.

    2006-01-01

    The peak particle size and expanded uncertainties (95 % confidence interval) for two new particle calibration standards are measured as 101.8 nm ± 1.1 nm and 60.39 nm ± 0.63 nm. The particle samples are polystyrene spheres suspended in filtered, deionized water at a mass fraction of about 0.5 %. The size distribution measurements of aerosolized particles are made using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) system calibrated using SRM® 1963 (100.7 nm polystyrene spheres). An electrospray aerosol generator was used for generating the 60 nm aerosol to almost eliminate the generation of multiply charged dimers and trimers and to minimize the effect of non-volatile contaminants increasing the particle size. The testing for the homogeneity of the samples and for the presence of multimers using dynamic light scattering is described. The use of the transfer function integral in the calibration of the DMA is shown to reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of the peak particle size compared to the approach based on the peak in the concentration vs. voltage distribution. A modified aerosol/sheath inlet, recirculating sheath flow, a high ratio of sheath flow to the aerosol flow, and accurate pressure, temperature, and voltage measurements have increased the resolution and accuracy of the measurements. A significant consideration in the uncertainty analysis was the correlation between the slip correction of the calibration particle and the measured particle. Including the correlation reduced the expanded uncertainty from approximately 1.8 % of the particle size to about 1.0 %. The effect of non-volatile contaminants in the polystyrene suspensions on the peak particle size and the uncertainty in the size is determined. The full size distributions for both the 60 nm and 100 nm spheres are tabulated and selected mean sizes including the number mean diameter and the dynamic light scattering mean diameter are computed. The use of these particles for calibrating DMAs and for

  1. Squeezing Millimeter Waves through a Single, Nanometer-wide, Centimeter-long Slit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoshu; Park, Hyeong-Ryeol; Lindquist, Nathan C.; Shaver, Jonah; Pelton, Matthew; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate broadband non-resonant squeezing of terahertz (THz) waves through an isolated 2-nm-wide, 2-cm-long slit (aspect ratio of 107), representing a maximum intensity enhancement factor of one million. Unlike resonant nanogap structures, a single, effectively infinitely-long slit passes incident electromagnetic waves with no cutoff, enhances the electric field within the gap with a broad 1/f spectral response, and eliminates interference effects due to finite sample boundaries and adjacent elements. To construct such a uniform, isolated slit that is much longer than the millimeter-scale spot of a THz beam, we use atomic layer lithography to pattern vertical nanogaps in a metal film over an entire 4-inch wafer. We observe an increasing field enhancement as the slit width decreases from 20 nm to 2 nm, in agreement with numerical calculations. PMID:25342288

  2. Transmission Microscopy with Nanometer Resolution Using a Deterministic Single Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Georg; Groot-Berning, Karin; Wolf, Sebastian; Ulm, Stefan; Couturier, Luc; Dawkins, Samuel T.; Poschinger, Ulrich G.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand; Singer, Kilian

    2016-07-01

    We realize a single particle microscope by using deterministically extracted laser-cooled 40Ca+ ions from a Paul trap as probe particles for transmission imaging. We demonstrate focusing of the ions to a spot size of 5.8 ±1.0 nm and a minimum two-sample deviation of the beam position of 1.5 nm in the focal plane. The deterministic source, even when used in combination with an imperfect detector, gives rise to a fivefold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio as compared with conventional Poissonian sources. Gating of the detector signal by the extraction event suppresses dark counts by 6 orders of magnitude. We implement a Bayes experimental design approach to microscopy in order to maximize the gain in spatial information. We demonstrate this method by determining the position of a 1 μ m circular hole structure to a precision of 2.7 nm using only 579 probe particles.

  3. Atomic-scale studies of nanometer-sized graphene on semiconducting surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, Justin; Ritter, Kyle; He, Kevin; Lyding, Joseph

    2008-03-01

    We have performed atomic level studies of graphene on semiconducting surfaces using ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM) [1]. By mechanically exfoliating graphite and using an in-situ dry contact transfer technique [2], we observe predominantly single and double layers of atomically clean graphene with lateral dimensions of 2-20 nm. Room temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements of the 2-10 nm monolayer pieces display a size-dependent energy gap ranging from 0.1-1 eV, while monolayers with lateral dimensions of 20 nm exhibit a finite density of states at the Fermi level. [1] K.A. Ritter and J.W. Lyding, Nanotechnology, in press (http://arxiv.org/pdf/0711.0050). [2] P.M. Albrecht and J.W. Lyding, APL 83, 5029 (2003).

  4. Resist Thinning Effect on Nanometer-Scale Line-Edge Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzaki, Kenichi; Yamaguchi, Toru; Nagase, Masao; Yamazaki, Kenji; Namatsu, Hideo

    2002-11-01

    The thickness dependence of the roughness of ultrathin ({≤q} 100 nm) electron-beam resist (ZEP520) was investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The roughness (linewidth fluctuations of line patterns) increased with decreasing resist thickness, especially below 30 nm. On the other hand, polymer aggregates, which are well observed in conventional resists, existed in compressed form even in this ultrathin film. In addition, the dissolution rate of the resist tended to be faster with thickness reduction. Both the existence of polymer aggregates and the fast dissolution of the entire resist polymer possibly caused the larger roughness in the ultrathin resist films.

  5. Nanometer-scale ablation using focused, coherent extreme ultraviolet/soft x-ray light

    SciTech Connect

    Menoni, Carmen S; Rocca, Jorge J; Vaschenko, Georgiy; Bloom, Scott; Anderson, Erik H; Chao, Weilun; Hemberg, Oscar

    2011-04-26

    Ablation of holes having diameters as small as 82 nm and having clean walls was obtained in a poly(methyl methacrylate) on a silicon substrate by focusing pulses from a Ne-like Ar, 46.9 nm wavelength, capillary-discharge laser using a freestanding Fresnel zone plate diffracting into third order is described. Spectroscopic analysis of light from the ablation has also been performed. These results demonstrate the use of focused coherent EUV/SXR light for the direct nanoscale patterning of materials.

  6. Soft X-ray microscope with nanometer spatial resolution and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachulak, P. W.; Torrisi, A.; Bartnik, A.; Wegrzynski, L.; Fok, T.; Patron, Z.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2016-12-01

    A compact size microscope based on nitrogen double stream gas puff target soft X-ray source, which emits radiation in water-window spectral range at the wavelength of λ = 2.88 nm is presented. The microscope employs ellipsoidal grazing incidence condenser mirror for sample illumination and silicon nitride Fresnel zone plate objective for object magnification and imaging. The microscope is capable of capturing water-window images of objects with 60 nm spatial resolution and exposure time as low as a few seconds. Details about the microscopy system as well as some examples of different applications from various fields of science, are presented and discussed.

  7. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.

  8. Evaluation of the Diode laser (810nm,980nm) on dentin tubule diameter following internal bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Salim, Soheil; Sarraf, Pegah; Javad-Kharazifard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diode laser irradiation and bleaching materials on the dentinal tubule diameter after laser bleaching. Material and Methods The dentin discs of 40 extracted third molar were used in this experiment. Each disc surface was divided into two halves by grooving. Half of samples were laser bleached at different wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Other half of each disc with no laser bleaching remained as a negative control. Dentin discs were assigned randomly into four groups (n=10) with following hydrogen peroxide and diode laser wavelength specifications; Group 1 (30% - 810 nm), group 2 (30% - 980 nm), group 3 (46% - 810 nm) and group 4 (46% - 980 nm). All specimens were sent for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis in order to measure tubular diameter in laser treated and control halves. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). Results A significant reduction in dentin tubule diameter was observed in groups 1, 2 and 4. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4 after bleaching. Conclusions The SEM results showed that diode laser was able to reduce dentin tubule diameter and its effect on dentin was dependent on chemical action of bleaching material. Key words:Laser, diode, dentin, tubule, diameter. PMID:27398172

  9. THE SPECTRUM OF THORIUM FROM 250 nm TO 5500 nm: RITZ WAVELENGTHS AND OPTIMIZED ENERGY LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Redman, Stephen L.; Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.

    2014-03-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly, and doubly ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19, 874 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40, 000 cm{sup –1} to 1800 cm{sup –1}). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer and Engleman and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. We also found a large scatter with respect to the thorium line list of Lovis and Pepe. We anticipate that our Ritz wavelengths will lead to improved measurement accuracy for current and future spectrographs that make use of thorium-argon or thorium-neon lamps as calibration standards.

  10. The Spectrum of Thorium from 250 nm to 5500 nm: Ritz Wavelengths and Optimized Energy Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.

    2014-03-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly, and doubly ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19, 874 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40, 000 cm-1 to 1800 cm-1). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer & Engleman and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. We also found a large scatter with respect to the thorium line list of Lovis & Pepe. We anticipate that our Ritz wavelengths will lead to improved measurement accuracy for current and future spectrographs that make use of thorium-argon or thorium-neon lamps as calibration standards.

  11. Optical constants determination of neodymium and gadolinium in the 3-nm to 100-nm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjornrattanawanich, B.; Windt, D. L.; Uspenskii, Y. A.; Seely, J. F.

    2006-08-01

    The optical constants (n, k) of the wavelength-dependent index of refraction N = n+ik = 1-δ+ik of Nd (Neodymium) and Gd (Gadolinium) are determined in the wavelength range of 3 nm to 100 nm by the transmittance method using synchrotron radiation. Nd and Gd films with thicknesses ranging from 5 nm to 180 nm were fabricated on Si photodiodes (which served as the coating substrates as well as the detectors) and capped with Si layers to protect these reactive rare earth elements from oxidation. The imaginary part (k) obtained directly from the transmittance measurement is used in the derivation of the real part (δ) of the complex index of refraction N through the Kramers- Kronig integral. The measured optical constants are used in the design of currently developed Nd- and Gd-based multilayers for solar imaging applications. Our results on Nd and Gd optical constants and the reflectance of some Nd- and Gd-based multilayers are presented.

  12. Characterization of LANDSAT Panels Using the NIST BRDF Scale from 1100 nm to 2500 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Tsai, Benjamin K.; Allen, David W.; Cooksey, Catherine; Yoon, Howard; Hanssen, Leonard; Zeng, Jinan; Fulton, Linda; Biggar, Stuart; Markham, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Many earth observing sensors depend on white diffuse reflectance standards to derive scales of radiance traceable to the St Despite the large number of Earth observing sensors that operate in the reflective solar region of the spectrum, there has been no direct method to provide NIST traceable BRDF measurements out to 2500 rim. Recent developments in detector technology have allowed the NIST reflectance measurement facility to expand the operating range to cover the 250 nm to 2500 nm range. The facility has been modified with and additional detector using a cooled extended range indium gallium arsenide (Extended InGaAs) detector. Measurements were made for two PTFE white diffuse reflectance standards over the 1100 nm to 2500 nm region at a 0' incident and 45' observation angle. These two panels will be used to support the OLI calibration activities. An independent means of verification was established using a NIST radiance transfer facility based on spectral irradiance, radiance standards and a diffuse reflectance plaque. An analysis on the results and associated uncertainties will be discussed.

  13. Evaluation of EUV resist performance below 20nm CD using helium ion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Diederik; van Veldhoven, Emile; van Langen-Suurling, Anja; Alkemade, Paul F. A.; Wuister, Sander; Hoefnagels, Rik; Verspaget, Coen; Meessen, Jeroen; Fliervoet, Timon

    2014-04-01

    For the introduction of EUV lithography, development of high performance EUV resists is of key importance. This development involves studies into resist sensitivity, resolving power and pattern uniformity. We have used a sub-nanometer-sized 30 keV helium ion beam to expose chemically amplified (CAR) EUV resists. There are similarities in the response of resists to He+ ions and EUV photons: both excite Secondary Electrons with similar energy distributions.The weak backscattering of the He+ ions results in ultra-low proximity effects. This fact enables the exposure of dense and detailed patterns by focused He+ ion beams without the need for proximity correction. This paper presents contact holes and lines at 40-nm pitch in an EUV CAR resist. We have used resist sensitivity, contrast, resolution (CD) and pattern fidelity (LCDU, LWR and dose-to-print) as metrics for a comparison of SHIBL with EUVL. We show that Scanning Helium Ion Beam Lithography (SHIBL) can be a useful and economically attractive technology to (pre-)screen novel EUV resists prior to their final performance evaluation in an EUV scanner.

  14. Sub-40nm high-volume manufacturing overlay uncorrectable error evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluswamy, Pary; Khurana, Ranjan; Orf, Bryan; Keller, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Circuit layout and design rules have continued to shrink to the point where a few nanometers of pattern misalignment can negatively impact process capability and device yields. As wafer processes and film stacks have become more complex, overlay and alignment performance in high-volume manufacturing (HVM) have become increasingly sensitive to process and tool variations experienced by incoming wafers. Current HVM relies on overlay control via advanced process control (APC) feedback, single-exposure tool grid stability, scanner-to-scanner matching, correction models, sampling strategies, overlay mark design, and metrology. However, even with improvements to those methods, a large fraction of the uncorrectable errors (i.e., residuals) still remains. While lower residuals typically lead to increased yield performance, it is difficult to achieve in HVM due to the large combinations of wafer history in terms of prior tools, recipes, and ongoing process conversions. Hence, it is critical to understand the effect of residual errors on measurement sampling and model parameters to enable process control. In this study, we investigate the following: residual errors of sub-40nm processes as a function of correction models, sensitivity of the model parameters to residue, and the impact of data quality.

  15. Nanometer-scale displacement measurement with high resolution using dual cavity Fabry-Pérot interferometer for biomimetic robots.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    A sensor of a biomimetic robot has to measure very small environmental changes such as, nanometer scale strains or displacements. Fiber optic sensor can be also one of candidates for the biomimetic sensor because the sensor is like thread and the shape of the sensor is similar to muscle fiber. A fiber optic interferometer, which is an optical-based sensor, can measure displacement precisely, so such device has been widely studied for the measurement of displacement on a nanometer-scale. Especially, a Quadrature Phase-Shifted Fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer (QPS-FFPI) uses phase-information for this measurement, allowing it to provide a precision result with high resolution. In theory, the QPS-FFPI generates two sinusoidal signals of which the phase difference should be 90 degrees for the exact measurement of the displacement. In order to guarantee the condition of the phase difference, the relative adjustment of the cavities of the optical fibers is required. However, with such precise adjustment it is very hard to fix the proper difference of the two cavities for quadrature-phase-shifting. In this paper, a dual-cavity FFPI is newly proposed to measure the displacement on a nanometer-scale with a specific type of signal processing. In the signal processing, a novel phase-compensation algorithm is applied to force the phase difference to be exactly 90 degrees without any physical adjustment. As a result, the paper shows that the phase-compensated dual-cavity FFPI can effectively measure nanometer-scale displacement with high resolution under dynamic conditions.

  16. Maskless plasmonic lithography at 22 nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liang; Park, Yongshik; Xiong, Yi; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wang, Yuan; Zeng, Li; Xiong, Shaomin; Rho, Junsuk; Sun, Cheng; Bogy, David B; Zhang, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Optical imaging and photolithography promise broad applications in nano-electronics, metrologies, and single-molecule biology. Light diffraction however sets a fundamental limit on optical resolution, and it poses a critical challenge to the down-scaling of nano-scale manufacturing. Surface plasmons have been used to circumvent the diffraction limit as they have shorter wavelengths. However, this approach has a trade-off between resolution and energy efficiency that arises from the substantial momentum mismatch. Here we report a novel multi-stage scheme that is capable of efficiently compressing the optical energy at deep sub-wavelength scales through the progressive coupling of propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) and localized surface plasmons (LSPs). Combining this with airbearing surface technology, we demonstrate a plasmonic lithography with 22 nm half-pitch resolution at scanning speeds up to 10 m/s. This low-cost scheme has the potential of higher throughput than current photolithography, and it opens a new approach towards the next generation semiconductor manufacturing.

  17. Faster qualification of 193-nm resists for 100-nm development using photo cell monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chris M.; Kallingal, Chidam; Zawadzki, Mary T.; Jeewakhan, Nazneen N.; Kaviani, Nazila N.; Krishnan, Prakash; Klaum, Arthur D.; Van Ess, Joel

    2003-05-01

    The development of 100-nm design rule technologies is currently taking place in many R&D facilities across the world. For some critical alyers, the transition to 193-nm resist technology has been required to meet this leading edge design rule. As with previous technology node transitions, the materials and processes available are undergoing changes and improvements as vendors encounter and solve problems. The initial implementation of the 193-nm resits process did not meet the photolithography requirements of some IC manufacturers due to very high Post Exposure Bake temperature sensitivity and consequently high wafer to wafer CD variation. The photoresist vendors have been working to improve the performance of the 193-nm resists to meet their customer's requirements. Characterization of these new resists needs to be carried out prior to implementation in the R&D line. Initial results on the second-generation resists evaluated at Cypress Semicondcutor showed better CD control compared to the aelrier resist with comparable Depth of Focus (DOF), Exposure Latitute, Etch Resistance, etc. In addition to the standard lithography parameters, resist characterization needs to include defect density studies. It was found that the new resists process with the best CD control, resulted in the introduction of orders of magnitude higher yield limiting defects at Gate, Contact adn Local Interconnect. The defect data were shared with the resists vendor and within days of the discovery the resist vendor was able to pinpoint the source of the problem. The fix was confirmed and the new resists were successfully released to production. By including defect monitoring into the resist qualification process, Cypress Semiconductor was able to 1) drive correction actions earlier resulting in faster ramp and 2) eliminate potential yield loss. We will discuss in this paper how to apply the Micro Photo Cell Monitoring methodology for defect monitoring in the photolithogprhay module and the

  18. Nanometal particle reagents for sensitive, MEMS based fiber-optic, multi-analyte, immuno-biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bin

    Integration of nanotechnology to medical diagnostics has brought a new era to public health practice. An excellent example is the utilization of unique optoelectronic properties of nanoparticles to develop highly sensitive biosensing devices for point-of-care (POC) disease diagnosis/prognosis. Fluorophore mediated, immuno-biosensors are important disease detection tools. The property of intra-molecular fluorescence quenching of most fluorophores, however, limits the sensitivity of this type of sensors. A plasmon-rich nanometal particle (NMP) can transfer the lone pair electrons of a fluorophore, which normally participate in the fluorescence self-quenching, to its surface plasmon field, resulting in artificial fluorescence enhancement. The enhancement was found to depend on the metal type, the particle size, the distance between a particle and a fluorophore, and the quantum yield of a fluorophore. Some biocompatible solvents were also found to increase the fluorescence emission efficiency via effective dipole coupling between the fluorophore and the solvent molecule. The application of solvents in inmuno-sensing could additionally improve the fluorescence light retrieval by the conformational change of the protein complexes in solvent. The mixture of the NMP and the solvent, which we defined as nanometal particle reagent (NMPR), provided even higher enhancements. Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) kill 1 person in every 6 seconds. Among the CVDs, acute myocardial infarction (AMI; commonly known as heart attack) is the most dangerous and time-sensitive killer. A rapid and accurate AMI diagnosis is crucial for saving many lives. For this purpose, a fluorophore mediated, immuno-reaction based, multi-cardiac-marker sensing device was developed, to quantify four myocardium-specific proteins simultaneously, accurately, rapidly, and user-friendly. The four cardiac markers of our choice were myoglobin (MG), C-reactive protein (CRP), cardiac troponin I (cTnI), and B

  19. [Preparation of Fe(3+) -doped TiO2 nanometer thin film and study on its photocatalytic performances].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huai-Li; Zhang, Jun-Hua; Li, Hong; Li, Zhi-Liang

    2005-12-01

    In the present paper, Fe(3+) -doped TiO2 nanometer thin films were prepared on the surface of glass by sol-gel processing. Effects of ferro-dopant, PEG addition levels, and the number of layers on transmittance and photocatalytic degradability were then respectively investigated. Meanwhile some relative mechanisms of the effects were discussed. It was shown that the photocatalytic activity of the films could be promoted by ferro-dopant, and the rate of degradation was 1.38 times that without ferro-dopant. Moreover, the optimal photocatalytic activity and transmittance were obtained by adding 0.1 g (0.13 wt%) PEG to the sol precursor. In addition, the TiO2 nanometer thin films with 2 to 5 layers all had better transmittance, and the best one for practical application had two layers. The glass coated with TiO2 nanometer thin film shows potential and wide application value in construction industry, lamps manufacture, urban lighting engineering, etc. because of its remarkable abilities of self-purification, economy in energy, and environmental protection.

  20. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Pop, Eric; King, William P.

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K-1. This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  1. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Pop, Eric; King, William P.

    2014-09-15

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K{sup −1}. This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  2. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Kyle L; Pop, Eric; King, William P

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K(-1). This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  3. Core-shell-like Au sub-nanometer clusters in Er-implanted silica.

    PubMed

    Maurizio, Chiara; Cesca, Tiziana; Perotto, Giovanni; Kalinic, Boris; Michieli, Niccolò; Scian, Carlo; Joly, Yves; Battaglin, Giancarlo; Mazzoldi, Paolo; Mattei, Giovanni

    2015-05-21

    The very early steps of Au metal cluster formation in Er-doped silica have been investigated by high-energy resolution fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (HERFD-XAS). A combined analysis of the near-edge and extended part of the experimental spectra shows that Au cluster nucleation starts from a few Au and O atoms covalently interconnected, likely in the presence of embryonic Au-Au correlation. The first Au clusters, characterized by a well defined Au-Au coordination distance, form upon 400 °C inert annealing. The estimated upper limit of the Gibbs free energy for the associated heterogeneous nucleation is 0.06 eV per atom, suggesting that the Au nucleation is assisted by matrix defects, most likely non-bridging oxygen atoms. The experimental results indicate that the formed subnanometer Au clusters can be applied as effective core-shell systems in which the Au atoms of the 'core' develop a metallic character, whereas the Au atoms in the 'shell' can retain a partially covalent bond with O atoms of the silica matrix. High structural disorder at the Au site is found upon neutral annealing at a moderate temperature (600 °C), likely driven by the configurational disorder of the defective silica matrix. A suitable choice of the Au concentration and annealing temperature allows tailoring of the Au cluster size in the sub-nanometer range. The interaction of the Au cluster surface with the surrounding silica matrix is likely responsible for the infrared luminescence previously reported on the same systems.

  4. Passive micromechanical tags. An investigation into writing information at nanometer resolution on micrometer size objects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmieder, R.W.; Bastasz, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have completed a 3-year study of the technology related to the development of micron-sized passive micromechanical tags. The project was motivated by the discovery in 1990 by the present authors that low energy, high charge state ions (e.g., Xe{sup +44}) can produce nanometer-size damage sites on solid surfaces, and the realization that a pattern of these sites represents information. It was envisioned that extremely small, chemically inert, mechanical tags carrying a large label could be fabricated for a variety of applications, including tracking of controlled substances, document verification, process control, research, and engineering. Potential applications exist in the data storage, chemical, food, security, and other industries. The goals of this project were fully accomplished, and they are fully documented here. The work was both experimental and developmental. Most of the experimental effort was a search for appropriate tag materials. Several good materials were found, and the upper limits of information density were determined (ca. 10{sup 12} bit/cm{sup 2}). Most of the developmental work involved inventing systems and strategies for using these tags, and compiling available technologies for implementing them. The technology provided herein is application-specific: first, the application must be specified, then the tag can be developed for it. The project was not intended to develop a single tag for a single application or for all possible applications. Rather, it was meant to provide the enabling technology for fabricating tags for a range of applications. The results of this project provide sufficient information to proceed directly with such development.

  5. New Computing Devices and the Drive toward Nanometer-scale Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    In recent decades, we have become used to the idea of exponentially compounding improvements in manufacturing precision. These improvements are driven in large part by the economic imperative to continuously shrink the devices of information technology, particularly the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect transistor. However, CMOS technology is clearly approaching some important physical limits. Since roughly 2003, the inability to reduce supply voltages according to constant-field scaling rules, combined with economic constraints on areal power density and total power, has forced designers to limit clock frequencies even as devices have continued to shrink. New channel materials, new device structures, and novel circuits cannot fundamentally alter this new status quo. The device physics must change in a more fundamental way if we are to realize fast digital logic with very low power dissipation. The continued vitality of the information technology revolution and the continued push of manufacturing precision toward nanometer dimensions, will depend on it. Fortunately, there is no shortage of new digital switch concepts based on physical principles which avoid the fundamental voltage-scaling limit of the field-effect transistor. The Nanoelectronics Research Initiative (NRI) is a consortium of leading semiconductor companies established in 2005 to guide and fund fundamental research at U.S. universities with the goal of finding the ``next switch'' to replace the CMOS transistor for storing and manipulating digital information. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) have partnered with NRI to fund this research. To date, NRI has funded the exploration of many novel device concepts, and has guided research comparing the capabilities of these devices. Although no single device has yet emerged as a clear winner with the potential to eclipse the field-effect transistor, results are

  6. Modification and patterning of nanometer-thin poly(ethylene glycol) films by electron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Meyerbröker, Nikolaus; Zharnikov, Michael

    2013-06-12

    In this study, we analyzed the effect of electron irradiation on highly cross-linked and nanometer-thin poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) films and, in combination with electron beam lithography (EBL), tested the possibility to prepare different patterns on their basis. Using several complementary spectroscopic techniques, we demonstrated that electron irradiation results in significant chemical modification and partial desorption of the PEG material. The initially well-defined films were progressively transformed in carbon-enriched and oxygen-depleted aliphatic layers with, presumably, still a high percentage of intermolecular cross-linking bonds. The modification of the films occurred very rapidly at low doses, slowed down at moderate doses, and exhibited a leveling off behavior at higher doses. On the basis of these results, we demonstrated the fabrication of wettability patterns and sculpturing complex 3D microstructures on the PEG basis. The swelling behavior of such morphological patterns was studied in detail, and it was shown that, in contrast to the pristine material, irradiated areas of the PEG films reveal an almost complete absence of the hydrogel-typical swelling behavior. The associated sealing of the irradiated areas allows a controlled deposition of objects dissolved in water, such as metal nanoparticles or fluorophores, into the surrounding, pristine areas, resulting in the formation of nanocomposite patterns. In contrast, due to the distinct protein-repelling properties of the PEG films, proteins are exclusively adsorbed onto the irradiated areas. This makes such films a suitable platform to prepare protein-affinity patterns in a protein-repelling background.

  7. Exploring soil organic matter-mineral interactions: mechanistic insights at the nanometer and molecular length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomb, C.; Qafoku, N. P.; Grate, J. W.; Hufschmid, R.; Browning, N.; De Yoreo, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    With elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere due to anthropogenic emissions and disruption to the carbon cycle, the effects of climate change are being accelerated. Approximately 80% of Earth's terrestrial organic carbon is stored in soil, and the residence time of this carbon can range from hours to millenia. Understanding the dynamics of this carbon pool in the carbon cycle is crucial to both predicting climate and sustaining ecosystem services. Soil organic carbon is known to be strongly associated with high surface area clay minerals. The nature of these interactions is not well understood primarily due to the heterogeneity of soil, as much of the current knowledge relies on experiments that take a top-down approach using bulk experimental measurements. Our work seeks to probe physical, chemical, and molecular-level interactions at the organic-mineral interface using a bottom-up approach that establishes a model system where complexity can be built in systematically. By performing in situ techniques such as dynamic force spectroscopy, a technique where organic molecules can be brought into contact with mineral surfaces in a controlled manner using an atomic force microscope, we demonstrate the ability to mechanistically probe the energy landscape of individual organic molecules with mineral surfaces. We demonstrate the ability to measure the binding energies of soil-inspired organic functional groups (including carboxylic acid, amine, methyl, and phosphate) with clay and mineral surfaces as a function of solution chemistry. This effort can provide researchers with both guiding principles about carbon dynamics at the sub-nanometer length scale and insights into early aggregation events, where organic-mineral interactions play a significant role.

  8. Electrolytes in a nanometer slab-confinement: ion-specific structure and solvation forces.

    PubMed

    Kalcher, Immanuel; Schulz, Julius C F; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2010-10-28

    We study the liquid structure and solvation forces of dense monovalent electrolytes (LiCl, NaCl, CsCl, and NaI) in a nanometer slab-confinement by explicit-water molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, implicit-water Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and modified Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theories. In order to consistently coarse-grain and to account for specific hydration effects in the implicit methods, realistic ion-ion and ion-surface pair potentials have been derived from infinite-dilution MD simulations. The electrolyte structure calculated from MC simulations is in good agreement with the corresponding MD simulations, thereby validating the coarse-graining approach. The agreement improves if a realistic, MD-derived dielectric constant is employed, which partially corrects for (water-mediated) many-body effects. Further analysis of the ionic structure and solvation pressure demonstrates that nonlocal extensions to PB (NPB) perform well for a wide parameter range when compared to MC simulations, whereas all local extensions mostly fail. A Barker-Henderson mapping of the ions onto a charged, asymmetric, and nonadditive binary hard-sphere mixture shows that the strength of structural correlations is strongly related to the magnitude and sign of the salt-specific nonadditivity. Furthermore, a grand canonical NPB analysis shows that the Donnan effect is dominated by steric correlations, whereas solvation forces and overcharging effects are mainly governed by ion-surface interactions. However, steric corrections to solvation forces are strongly repulsive for high concentrations and low surface charges, while overcharging can also be triggered by steric interactions in strongly correlated systems. Generally, we find that ion-surface and ion-ion correlations are strongly coupled and that coarse-grained methods should include both, the latter nonlocally and nonadditive (as given by our specific ionic diameters), when studying electrolytes in highly inhomogeneous situations.

  9. Resist Materials for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography: Toward Low-Cost Single-Digit-Nanometer Patterning.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Paul D; Olynick, Deirdre L; Ogletree, D Frank; Naulleau, Patrick P

    2015-10-14

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is the leading technology for enabling miniaturization of computational components over the next decade. Next-generation resists will need to meet demanding performance criteria of 10 nm critical dimension, 1.2 nm line-edge roughness, and 20 mJ cm(-2) exposure dose. Here, the current state of the development of EUV resist materials is reviewed. First, pattern formation in resist materials is described and the Hansen solubility sphere (HSS) is used as a framework for understanding the pattern-development process. Then, recent progress in EUVL resist chemistry and characterization is discussed. Incremental advances are obtained by transferring chemically amplified resist materials developed for 193 nm lithography to EUV wavelengths. Significant advances will result from synthesizing high-absorbance resist materials using heavier atoms. In the framework of the HSS model, these materials have significant room for improvement and thus offer great promise as high-performance EUV resists for patterning of sub-10 nm features.

  10. Organic light-emitting diodes incorporating nanometer thick films of europium-cored complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Gregory D.; Carlson, Brenden; Jiang, Xuezhong; Jen, Alex K. Y.; Dalton, Larry R.

    2002-11-01

    Europium cored complexes may be used as a source of red emission in light emitting diodes. Novel europium cored complexes have been synthesized and incorporated into organic light emitting diodes (OLED's). These complexes emit red light at 615 nm with a full width half maximum (FWHM) of less than 5 nm. The europium complexes consist of one equivalent of europium chelated to three equivalents of a nonsymmetrical β-diketone ligand. The Claissen condensation of a polycyclic aromatic sensitizer and an ester of a fluorinated carboxylic acid create the ligands. The use of a sensitizer such as phenanthrene results in a ligand that has an emission band that directly overlaps with the absorption band of europium. The use of fluorinated chains improves the overall processibility as well as the charge transfer capability of the resulting metal cored complex. The europium core is further encapsulated by the inclusion of an additional polycyclic aromatic compound such as 4, 7 diphenyl - 1, 10 phenanthroline. Emission of 615 nm light is accomplished through excitation of the ligand and efficient Forrester energy transfer to the europium complex. A multiple layer device consisting of a substrate of indium tin oxide, followed by thin layers of BTPD-PFCB (with a thickness of 20nm), a polymer blend containing the europium complex (30 nm), followed by a layer of calcium (50nm) and finally a protective layer of silver (120 nm). The polymer blends were either poly(n-vinyl carbazole)(PVK) or poly vinyl naphthalene (PVN). The device performance was further improved by the incorporation of another lanthanide metal complex. These complexes were based upon similar ligands surrounding gadolinium. In these devices, there is a Dexter energy transfer as well as the Forster energy transfer. For the devices that are based on a PVN:PBD as a polymer host, the lowest turn on voltage was 12.0 volts. The devices that use PVK:TPD devices was 178 cd/m2 with an external quantum efficiency of 0.61%.For

  11. Precise electrochemical fabrication of sub-20 nm solid-state nanopores for single-molecule biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, Mariam; Ivanov, Aleksandar; Hong, Jongin; Kuhn, Phillip; Instuli, Emanuele; Edel, Joshua B.; Albrecht, Tim

    2010-11-01

    It has recently been shown that solid-state nanometer-scale pores ('nanopores') can be used as highly sensitive single-molecule sensors. For example, electrophoretic translocation of DNA, RNA and proteins through such nanopores has enabled both detection and structural analysis of these complex biomolecules. Control over the nanopore size is critical as the pore must be comparable in size to the analyte molecule in question. The most widely used fabrication methods are based on focused electron or ion beams and thus require (scanning) transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam (FIB) instrumentation. Even though very small pores have been made using these approaches, several issues remain. These include the requirement of being restricted to rather thin, mechanically less stable membranes, particularly for pore diameters in the single-digit nanometer range, lack of control of the surface properties at and inside the nanopore, and finally, the fabrication cost. In the proof-of-concept study, we report on a novel and simple route for fabricating metal nanopores with apparent diameters below 20 nm using electrodeposition and real-time ionic current feedback in solution. This fabrication approach inserts considerable flexibility into the kinds of platforms that can be used and the nanopore membrane material. Starting from much larger pores, which are straightforward to make using FIB or other semiconductor fabrication methods, we electrodeposit Pt at the nanopore interface while monitoring its ionic conductance at the same time in a bi-potentiostatic setup. Due to the deposition of Pt, the nanopore decreases in size, resulting in a decrease of the pore conductance. Once a desired pore conductance has been reached, the electrodeposition process is stopped by switching the potential of the membrane electrode and the fabrication process is complete. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these pores can be used for single-biomolecule analysis, such as that of

  12. Precise electrochemical fabrication of sub-20 nm solid-state nanopores for single-molecule biosensing.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Mariam; Ivanov, Aleksandar; Hong, Jongin; Kuhn, Phillip; Instuli, Emanuele; Edel, Joshua B; Albrecht, Tim

    2010-11-17

    It has recently been shown that solid-state nanometer-scale pores ('nanopores') can be used as highly sensitive single-molecule sensors. For example, electrophoretic translocation of DNA, RNA and proteins through such nanopores has enabled both detection and structural analysis of these complex biomolecules. Control over the nanopore size is critical as the pore must be comparable in size to the analyte molecule in question. The most widely used fabrication methods are based on focused electron or ion beams and thus require (scanning) transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam (FIB) instrumentation. Even though very small pores have been made using these approaches, several issues remain. These include the requirement of being restricted to rather thin, mechanically less stable membranes, particularly for pore diameters in the single-digit nanometer range, lack of control of the surface properties at and inside the nanopore, and finally, the fabrication cost. In the proof-of-concept study, we report on a novel and simple route for fabricating metal nanopores with apparent diameters below 20 nm using electrodeposition and real-time ionic current feedback in solution. This fabrication approach inserts considerable flexibility into the kinds of platforms that can be used and the nanopore membrane material. Starting from much larger pores, which are straightforward to make using FIB or other semiconductor fabrication methods, we electrodeposit Pt at the nanopore interface while monitoring its ionic conductance at the same time in a bi-potentiostatic setup. Due to the deposition of Pt, the nanopore decreases in size, resulting in a decrease of the pore conductance. Once a desired pore conductance has been reached, the electrodeposition process is stopped by switching the potential of the membrane electrode and the fabrication process is complete. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these pores can be used for single-biomolecule analysis, such as that of

  13. Distributed Humidity Sensing in PMMA Optical Fibers at 500 nm and 650 nm Wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Liehr, Sascha; Breithaupt, Mathias; Krebber, Katerina

    2017-03-31

    Distributed measurement of humidity is a sought-after capability for various fields of application, especially in the civil engineering and structural health monitoring sectors. This article presents a method for distributed humidity sensing along polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) polymer optical fibers (POFs) by analyzing wavelength-dependent Rayleigh backscattering and attenuation characteristics at 500 nm and 650 nm wavelengths. Spatially resolved humidity sensing is obtained from backscatter traces of a dual-wavelength optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR). Backscatter dependence, attenuation dependence as well as the fiber length change are characterized as functions of relative humidity. Cross-sensitivity effects are discussed and quantified. The evaluation of the humidity-dependent backscatter effects at the two wavelength measurements allows for distributed and unambiguous measurement of relative humidity. The technique can be readily employed with low-cost standard polymer optical fibers and commercial OTDR devices.

  14. Polarization properties of lidar scattering from clouds at 347 nm and 694 nm.

    PubMed

    Pal, S R; Carswell, A I

    1978-08-01

    The polarization characteristics of lidar scattering from cumulus and low-lying shower clouds have been measured with a system operating at 694 nm (red) and 347 nm (blue). The backscatter profiles of the polarization components as well as of the total intensity of the return are presented and discussed for the two wavelengths. The linear depolarization ratio delta, which can be used as a measure of the unpolarized multiple scattering, has been obtained at both wavelengths. This quantity has a very low value at cloud base for both wavelengths and increases with pulse penetration. The blue registers generally higher values of a within the cloud. The measured total intensity backscatter functions for both wavelengths are presented and discussed in relation to theoretical calculations of cloud models.

  15. Novel 980-nm and 490-nm light sources using vertical cavity lasers with extended coupled cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, John G.; Mooradian, Aram; Lewis, Alan; Shchegrov, Andrei V.; Strzelecka, Eva M.; Lee, Dicky; Watson, Jason P.; Liebman, Michael K.; Carey, Glen P.; Umbrasas, Arvydas; Amsden, Charles A.; Cantos, Brad D.; Hitchens, William R.; Heald, David L.; Doan, Vincent V.; Cannon, J. L.

    2003-04-01

    We have developed novel electrically pumped, surface-emitting lasers emitting at 980 nm with an extended coupled cavity. The concept is scalable from monolithic low power devices all the way to high power extended cavity lasers. The latter have demonstrated 1W cw multi-mode and 0.5 W cw in a TEM00 mode and a single frequency, with 90% coupling efficiency into a single-mode fiber. By inserting a nonlinear optical medium in the external cavity, efficient and compact frequency doubling has been achieved with CW output powers 5-40 mW demonstrated at 490 nm. The latter devices are especially noteworthy due to their very low noise, sub 10 μrad beam pointing stability combined with small size, low power consumption and high efficiency.

  16. A 15 W 1152 nm Raman fiber laser with 6 nm spectral width for Ho3+-doped crystal's pumping source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiuyan; Jiang, Huawei

    2016-12-01

    A 11.5 W 1152 nm Raman fiber laser with 6 nm spectral width was demonstrated based on the resonator constructed with one fiber loop mirror and one fiber Bragg grating. By mans of experimental measurement and theoretical calculation, the reflectivity of the fiber loop mirror was confirmed as 0.93. The Yb3+-doped 1090 nm fiber length was about 5 m. When the maximum pumping power of 976 nm laser was 54.8 W, 32.2 W 1090 nm laser was obtained and the optical to optical conversion efficiency from 1090 nm to 1152 nm light was 48%. Finally, the 1152 nm Raman fiber laser was used for pumping Ho3+:LLF crystal, and the 1194 nm fluorescence emission peak was detected for the first time.

  17. Investigations of a dual seeded 1178nm Raman laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Matthew; Henry, Leanne J.; Klopfer, Michael; Jain, Ravinder

    2016-03-01

    The leakage of 1121 nm power from a resonator cavity because of spectral broadening seriously degrades the performance of a Raman resonator by reducing the 1121 nm circulating power and the 1178 nm output power. Therefore, it is important to understand the conditions which minimize 1121 nm power leakage, maximize 1121 intracavity and 1178 nm output power while enabling a manageable Stimulated Brillouin Scattering gain for narrow linewidth systems. It was found that cavity lengths longer than approximately 40 m didn't result in significantly more 1121 nm linewidth broadening. Relative to the high reflectivity bandwidth of the fiber Bragg gratings, it was found that 4 nm FBGs seemed to optimize 1178 nm amplification while minimizing the amount of 1121 nm power leakage. A two stage high power 1178 nm Raman system was built and 20 W of 1178 nm output power was achieved with a polarization extinction ratio of 21 and nearly diffraction limited beam quality. Linewidth broadening was found to increase as the 1178 nm output increased and was approximately 8 GHz when the 1178 nm output power was 20 W. Because of the linewidth broadening, a co-pumped second Stokes Raman laser system is not useful for the sodium guidestar laser application which requires narrow linewidth.

  18. Multi-watt 589nm fiber laser source

    SciTech Connect

    DAWSON, J W; DROBSHOFF, A D; BEACH, R J; MESSERLY, M J; PAYNE, S A; BROWN, A; PENNINGTON, D M; BAMFORD, D J; SHARPE, S J; COOK, D J

    2006-01-19

    We have demonstrated 3.5W of 589nm light from a fiber laser using periodically poled stoichiometric Lithium Tantalate (PPSLT) as the frequency conversion crystal. The system employs 938nm and 1583nm fiber lasers, which were sum-frequency mixed in PPSLT to generate 589nm light. The 938nm fiber laser consists of a single frequency diode laser master oscillator (200mW), which was amplified in two stages to >15W using cladding pumped Nd{sup 3+} fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifiers operate at 938nm and minimize amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing a specialty fiber design, which maximizes the core size relative to the cladding diameter. This design allows the 3-level laser system to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the competing 1088nm 4-level laser transition. At 15W, the 938nm laser has an M{sup 2} of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >15:1). The 1583nm fiber laser consists of a Koheras 1583nm fiber DFB laser that is pre-amplified to 100mW, phase modulated and then amplified to 14W in a commercial IPG fiber amplifier. As a part of our research efforts we are also investigating pulsed laser formats and power scaling of the 589nm system. We will discuss the fiber laser design and operation as well as our results in power scaling at 589nm.

  19. Multi-watt 589nm fiber laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Jay W.; Drobshoff, Alex D.; Beach, Raymond J.; Messerly, Michael J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Brown, Aaron; Pennington, Deanna M.; Bamford, Douglas J.; Sharpe, Scott J.; Cook, David J.

    2006-02-01

    We have demonstrated 3.5W of 589nm light from a fiber laser using periodically poled stoichio-metric Lithium Tantalate (PPSLT) as the frequency conversion crystal. The system employs 938nm and 1583nm fiber lasers, which were sum-frequency mixed in PPSLT to generate 589nm light. The 938nm fiber laser consists of a single frequency diode laser master oscillator (200mW), which was amplified in two stages to >15W using cladding pumped Nd 3+ fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifiers operate at 938nm and minimize amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing a specialty fiber design, which maximizes the core size relative to the cladding diameter. This design allows the 3-level laser system to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the 1088nm 4-level laser transition. At 15W, the 938nm laser has an M2 of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >15:1). The 1583nm fiber laser consists of a Koheras 1583nm fiber DFB laser that is pre-amplified to 100mW, phase modulated and then amplified to 14W in a commercial IPG fiber amplifier. As a part of our research efforts we are also investigating pulsed laser formats and power scaling of the 589nm system. We will discuss the fiber laser design and operation as well as our results in power scaling at 589nm.

  20. TUNABLE DIODE LASER MEASUREMENTS OF NO2 NEAR 670 NM AND 395 NM. (R823933)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two single-mode diode lasers were used to record high-resolution absorption spectra of NO2 (dilute in Ar) near 670.2 and 394.5 nm over a range of temperatures (296 to 774 K) and total pressures (2.4 x 10(-2) to 1 atm). A commercial InGaAsP laser was tuned 1.3 cm(-1) at a repetiti...

  1. Measuring carbon and N2 fixation in field populations of colonial and free-living unicellular cyanobacteria using nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry(1).

    PubMed

    Foster, Rachel A; Sztejrenszus, Saar; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2013-06-01

    Unicellular cyanobacteria are now recognized as important to the marine N and C cycles in open ocean gyres, yet there are few direct in situ measurements of their activities. Using a high-resolution nanometer scale secondary ion mass spectrometer (nanoSIMS), single cell N2 and C fixation rates were estimated for unicellular cyanobacteria resembling N2 fixer Crocosphaera watsonii. Crocosphaera watsonii-like cells were observed in the subtropical North Pacific gyre (22°45' N, 158°0' W) as 2 different phenotypes: colonial and free-living. Colonies containing 3-242 cells per colony were observed and cell density in colonies increased with incubation time. Estimated C fixation rates were similarly high in both phenotypes and unexpectedly for unicellular cyanobacteria 85% of the colonial cells incubated during midday were also enriched in (15) N above natural abundance. Highest (15) N enrichment and N2 fixation rates were found in cells incubated overnight where up to 64% of the total daily fixed N in the upper surface waters was attributed to both phenotypes. The colonial cells retained newly fixed C in a sulfur-rich matrix surrounding the cells and often cells of both phenotypes possessed areas (<1 nm) of enriched (15) N and (13) C resembling storage granules. The nanoSIMS imaging of the colonial cells also showed evidence for a division of N2 and C fixation activity across the colony where few individual cells (<34%) in a given colony were enriched in both (15) N and (13) C above the colony average. Our results provide new insights into the ecophysiology of unicellular cyanobacteria.

  2. Role of W and Mn for reliable 1X nanometer-node ultra-large-scale integration Cu interconnects proved by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, K.; Shimizu, H.; Momose, T.; Shimogaki, Y.; Tu, Y.; Takamizawa, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Inoue, K.; Nagai, Y.

    2014-09-29

    We used atom probe tomography (APT) to study the use of a Cu(Mn) as a seed layer of Cu, and a Co(W) single-layer as reliable Cu diffusion barriers for future interconnects in ultra-large-scale integration. The use of Co(W) layer enhances adhesion of Cu to prevent electromigration and stress-induced voiding failures. The use of Cu(Mn) as seed layer may enhance the diffusion barrier performance of Co(W) by stuffing the Cu diffusion pass with Mn. APT was used to visualize the distribution of W and Mn in three dimensions with sub-nanometer resolution. W was found to segregate at the grain boundaries of Co, which prevents diffusion of Cu via the grain boundaries. Mn was found to diffuse from the Cu(Mn) layer to Co(W) layer and selectively segregate at the Co(W) grain boundaries with W, reinforcing the barrier properties of Co(W) layer. Hence, a Co(W) barrier coupled with a Cu(Mn) seed layer can form a sufficient diffusion barrier with film that is less than 2.0-nm-thick. The diffusion barrier behavior was preserved following a 1-h annealing at 400 °C. The underlayer of the Cu interconnects requires a large adhesion strength with the Cu, as well as low electrical resistivity. The use of Co(W) has previously been shown to satisfy these requirements, and addition of Mn is not expected to deteriorate these properties.

  3. Electron-induced single event upsets in 28 nm and 45 nm bulk SRAMs

    DOE PAGES

    Trippe, J. M.; Reed, R. A.; Austin, R. A.; ...

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence of single electron-induced upsets in commercial 28 nm and 45 nm CMOS SRAMs from a monoenergetic electron beam. Upsets were observed in both technology nodes when the SRAM was operated in a low power state. The experimental cross section depends strongly on both bias and technology node feature size, consistent with previous work in which SRAMs were irradiated with low energy muons and protons. Accompanying simulations demonstrate that δ-rays produced by the primary electrons are responsible for the observed upsets. Additional simulations predict the on-orbit event rates for various Earth and Jovian environmentsmore » for a set of sensitive volumes representative of current technology nodes. The electron contribution to the total upset rate for Earth environments is significant for critical charges as high as 0.2 fC. This value is comparable to that of sub-22 nm bulk SRAMs. Similarly, for the Jovian environment, the electron-induced upset rate is larger than the proton-induced upset rate for critical charges as high as 0.3 fC.« less

  4. A robust 45 nm gate-length CMOSFET for 90 nm Hi-speed technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, K. Y.; Chan, V.; Rengarajan, R.; Lee, H. K.; Rovedo, N.; Lim, E. H.; Yang, S.; Jamin, F.; Nguyen, P.; Lin, W.; Lai, C. W.; Teh, Y. W.; Lee, J.; Kim, L.; Luo, Z.; Ng, H.; Sudijono, J.; Wann, C.; Yang, I.

    2006-04-01

    We have developed a robust 45 nm gate-length CMOSFET for 90 nm node high performance application. Aggressive gate length and gate dielectric scaling along with optimized strain engineering enable high performance device similar to 65 nm node CMOSFET [Nakahara Y, et al. IEDM Tech Dig 2003;281] We have utilized oxy-nitride gate with post-nitridation anneal, high ramp rate spike anneal, low temperature spacer scheme and stress controlled SiN contact etch stop liner process in order to improve drive current as well as transistor short-channel roll-off. In particular, we will focus on the study of middle-of-line (MOL) process parameters, (i.e. MOL thermal expense and mechanical stress from contact etch stop liner) on transistor performance and reliability. Based on the study, we have obtained device exhibit drive-current of 900/485 μA/μm for NMOSFET and PMOSFET, respectively, at standard supply voltage of 1 V.

  5. Electron-induced single event upsets in 28 nm and 45 nm bulk SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Trippe, J. M.; Reed, R. A.; Austin, R. A.; Sierawski, B. D.; Weller, R. A.; Funkhouser, E. D.; King, M. P.; Narasimham, B.; Bartz, B.; Baumann, R.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Labello, R.; Nichols, J.; Weeden-Wright, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence of single electron-induced upsets in commercial 28 nm and 45 nm CMOS SRAMs from a monoenergetic electron beam. Upsets were observed in both technology nodes when the SRAM was operated in a low power state. The experimental cross section depends strongly on both bias and technology node feature size, consistent with previous work in which SRAMs were irradiated with low energy muons and protons. Accompanying simulations demonstrate that δ-rays produced by the primary electrons are responsible for the observed upsets. Additional simulations predict the on-orbit event rates for various Earth and Jovian environments for a set of sensitive volumes representative of current technology nodes. The electron contribution to the total upset rate for Earth environments is significant for critical charges as high as 0.2 fC. This value is comparable to that of sub-22 nm bulk SRAMs. Similarly, for the Jovian environment, the electron-induced upset rate is larger than the proton-induced upset rate for critical charges as high as 0.3 fC.

  6. Mechanism of cyanoacetylene photochemistry at 185 and 254 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, D. W.; Ferris, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    The role of cyanoacetylene (HC3N) in the atmospheric photochemistry of Titan and its relevance to polymer formation are discussed. Investigation of the relative light absorption of HC3N, acetylene (C2H2), and diacetylene (C4H2) revealed that HC3N is an important absorber of UV light in the 205- to 225-nanometer wavelength region in Titan's polar regions. Laboratory studies established that photolysis of C2H2 initiates the polymerization of HC3N even though the HC3N is not absorbing the UV light. Quantum yield measurements establish that HC3N is 2-5 times as reactive as C2H2 for polymer formation. Photolysis of HC3N with 185-nanometer light in the presence of N2, H2, Ar, or CF4 results in a decrease in the yield of 1,3,5-tricyanobenzene (1,3,5-tcb), while photolysis in the presence of CH4, C2H6, or n-C4H10 results in an increase in 1,3,5-tcb. The rate of loss of HC3N is increased by all gases except H2, where it is unchanged. It was not possible to detect 1,3,5-tcb as a photoproduct when the partial pressure of HC3N was decreased to 1 torr. Photolysis of HC3N with 254-nanometer light in the presence of H2 or N2 results in the formation of 1,2,4-tcb, while photolysis in the presence of CH4, C2H6, or n-C4H10 results in the formation of increasing amounts of 1,3,5-tcb. Mechanisms for the formation of polymers are presented.

  7. Sub-nanometer tuning of mode-locked pulse by mechanical strain on tapered fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Harith; Faruki, Md Jahid; Tiu, Zian Cheak; Thambiratnam, K.

    2017-03-01

    A tunable mode-locked fiber laser based on the non-linear polarization rotation (NPR) technique is proposed and demonstrated. A passively generated mode-locked output is obtained with a repetition rate of about 70 ns and an average output power of 0.7 mW, as well as a laser efficiency of 0.53%. The mode-locked pulses can be tuned over a span of 4.4 nm, from 1560.6 nm to 1556.2, corresponding to a stretching of the tapered fiber from 0 to 100 μm in 10 μm increments. The pulses have an average signal-to-noise ratio of about 41 dB in the frequency domain, indicating a highly stable mode-locked output. The system can repeat and reverse the generation of these pulses, a crucial criterion of many communications and sensing applications.

  8. Molecular dynamics study of the thermal behavior of nanometer-sized au hollow cubes.

    PubMed

    Delogu, Francesco

    2008-04-03

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to study the thermal response of an Au hollow cube with a side about 8 nm long and walls about 3 nm thick. The gradual temperature rise determines the occurrence of a hierarchical sequence of melting transitions regarding atoms with a progressively increasing number of nearest neighbors. Atoms located at the cube edges are thus seen to undergo melting first, then followed by surface and grain boundary species, and finally by atoms in bulklike regions of cube walls. A percolating liquidlike framework connecting external and internal surfaces is formed in the temperature range within which grain boundaries are partially molten. Such framework represents a preferential diffusion path for liquidlike species.

  9. Formation of copper and silver nanometer dimension clusters in silica by the sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, G.; Tapfer, L.; Catalano, M.; Battaglin, G.; Caccavale, F.; Gonella, F.; Mazzoldi, P.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    1996-06-01

    Ag and Cu (pure and/or mixture) nanoclusters doped silica films were prepared by the sol-gel process. In the case of Ag and Cu codoped silica films, Cu/Ag molar ratio was 1, 2, and 3 at constant (Ag+Cu)/SiO2 molar ratio of 0.175. Separated Ag and Cu nanoclusters are formed in the silica matrix. The size of the clusters and their distribution are dependent on the film composition. Optical absorption was measured from 185 to 800 nm. Intensity-dependent nonlinear refractive index was measured for pure Cu and Ag-Cu (1:1 molar ratio) samples using z-scan technique in the wavelength range from 570 to 596 nm. The measured nonlinear refractive index is of the order of 10-13 m2/W at a pulse repetition rate of 15.2 MHz.

  10. Strong Plasmon Reflection at Nanometer-Size Gaps in Monolayer Graphene on SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmenko, Alexey B.; Chen, Jiaining; Nesterov, Maxim L.; Nikitin, Alexey Yu.; Thongrattanasiri, Sukosin; Alonso-Gonzalez, Pablo; Slipchenko, Tetiana M.; Speck, Florian; Ostler, Markus; Seyller, Thomas; Crassee, Iris; Koppens, Frank H. L.; Martin-Moreno, Luis; Garcia de Abajo, F. Javier; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2014-03-01

    Tip-enhanced infrared near-field microscopy is used to study propagating plasmons in epitaxial quasi-free-standing monolayer graphene on silicon carbide. We observe that plasmons are strongly reflected at graphene gaps at the steps between the substrate terraces. For the step height of only 1.5 nm, which is two orders of magnitude smaller than the plasmon wavelength, the reflection signal reaches 20 percent of its value at graphene edges, and it approaches 0.5 for steps of 5 nm. We support this observation with extensive numerical simulations and give physical rationale for this intriguing phenomenon. Our work suggests that plasmon propagation in graphene-based circuits can be controlled using ultracompact nanostructures. J. Chen et al., Nano Lett., DOI: 10.1021/nl403622t (2013).

  11. Condensed Mitotic Chromosome Structure at Nanometer Resolution Using PALM and EGFP- Histones

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Shao, Lin; Boulanger, Jerome; Kervrann, Charles; Carlton, Peter M.; Kner, Peter; Agard, David; Sedat, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and related fluorescent biological imaging methods are capable of providing very high spatial resolutions (up to 20 nm). Two major demands limit its widespread use on biological samples: requirements for photoactivatable/photoconvertible fluorescent molecules, which are sometimes difficult to incorporate, and high background signals from autofluorescence or fluorophores in adjacent focal planes in three-dimensional imaging which reduces PALM resolution significantly. We present here a high-resolution PALM method utilizing conventional EGFP as the photoconvertible fluorophore, improved algorithms to deal with high levels of biological background noise, and apply this to imaging higher order chromatin structure. We found that the emission wavelength of EGFP is efficiently converted from green to red when exposed to blue light in the presence of reduced riboflavin. The photon yield of red-converted EGFP using riboflavin is comparable to other bright photoconvertible fluorescent proteins that allow <20 nm resolution. We further found that image pre-processing using a combination of denoising and deconvolution of the raw PALM images substantially improved the spatial resolution of the reconstruction from noisy images. Performing PALM on Drosophila mitotic chromosomes labeled with H2AvD-EGFP, a histone H2A variant, revealed filamentous components of ∼70 nm. This is the first observation of fine chromatin filaments specific for one histone variant at a resolution approximating that of conventional electron microscope images (10–30 nm). As demonstrated by modeling and experiments on a challenging specimen, the techniques described here facilitate super-resolution fluorescent imaging with common biological samples. PMID:20856676

  12. Robustness of digital approach to mismatch compensation in analog circuits realized in nanometer technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, Zbigniew; Wysokiński, Piotr

    2013-07-01

    In this papers, a fully differential operational transconductance amplifier (OTA) implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology is analyzed to determine which component of the calibration circuitry is most susceptible to manufacturing process disturbances and thus impairs robustness of the calibration methodology. The average offset voltage of the OTA can be significantly reduced. It has been shown that effectiveness of the calibration methodology is limited by the offset voltage of the comparator that calculates sign of the OTA offset voltage.

  13. Determination of trace lead in water samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration with nanometer titanium dioxide immobilized on silica gel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Liang, Pei

    2008-03-21

    Nanometer titanium dioxide immobilized on silica gel (immobilized nanometer TiO2) was prepared by sol-gel method and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The adsorptive capability of immobilized nanometer TiO2 for lead was assessed in this work using column method. It was found that lead can be quantitatively retained by immobilized nanometer TiO2 in the pH range 4-7, then eluted completely with 1.0molL(-1) HCl. The adsorption capacity of immobilized nanometer TiO2 for Pb was found to be 3.16mgg(-1). A new method has been developed for the determination of trace lead based on preconcentration with a microcolumn packed with immobilized nanometer TiO2 prior to its determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The detection limit of this method for Pb was 9.5ngL(-1) with an enrichment factor of 50, and the relative standard deviations (R.S.D.s) was 3.2% at the 10ngmL(-1) Pb level. The method was validated using a certified reference material, and was applied for the determination of trace lead in water samples.

  14. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy imaging of surface plasmons at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Colliex, Christian; Kociak, Mathieu; Stéphan, Odile

    2016-03-01

    Since their first realization, electron microscopes have demonstrated their unique ability to map with highest spatial resolution (sub-atomic in most recent instruments) the position of atoms as a consequence of the strong scattering of the incident high energy electrons by the nuclei of the material under investigation. When interacting with the electron clouds either on atomic orbitals or delocalized over the specimen, the associated energy transfer, measured and analyzed as an energy loss (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) gives access to analytical properties (atom identification, electron states symmetry and localization). In the moderate energy-loss domain (corresponding to an optical spectral domain from the infrared (IR) to the rather far ultra violet (UV), EELS spectra exhibit characteristic collective excitations of the rather-free electron gas, known as plasmons. Boundary conditions, such as surfaces and/or interfaces between metallic and dielectric media, generate localized surface charge oscillations, surface plasmons (SP), which are associated with confined electric fields. This domain of research has been extraordinarily revived over the past few years as a consequence of the burst of interest for structures and devices guiding, enhancing and controlling light at the sub-wavelength scale. The present review focuses on the study of these surface plasmons with an electron microscopy-based approach which associates spectroscopy and mapping at the level of a single and well-defined nano-object, typically at the nanometer scale i.e. much improved with respect to standard, and even near-field, optical techniques. After calling to mind some early studies, we will briefly mention a few basic aspects of the required instrumentation and associated theoretical tools to interpret the very rich data sets recorded with the latest generation of (Scanning)TEM microscopes. The following paragraphs will review in more detail the results obtained on simple planar and

  15. Measurement of replication structures at the nanometer scale using super-resolution light microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baddeley, D.; Chagin, V. O.; Schermelleh, L.; Martin, S.; Pombo, A.; Carlton, P. M.; Gahl, A.; Domaing, P.; Birk, U.; Leonhardt, H.; Cremer, C.; Cardoso, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    DNA replication, similar to other cellular processes, occurs within dynamic macromolecular structures. Any comprehensive understanding ultimately requires quantitative data to establish and test models of genome duplication. We used two different super-resolution light microscopy techniques to directly measure and compare the size and numbers of replication foci in mammalian cells. This analysis showed that replication foci vary in size from 210 nm down to 40 nm. Remarkably, spatially modulated illumination (SMI) and 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) both showed an average size of 125 nm that was conserved throughout S-phase and independent of the labeling method, suggesting a basic unit of genome duplication. Interestingly, the improved optical 3D resolution identified 3- to 5-fold more distinct replication foci than previously reported. These results show that optical nanoscopy techniques enable accurate measurements of cellular structures at a level previously achieved only by electron microscopy and highlight the possibility of high-throughput, multispectral 3D analyses. PMID:19864256

  16. Hyperbolic metamaterial-based near-field thermophotovoltaic system for hundreds of nanometer vacuum gap.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seokmin; Lim, Mikyung; Lee, Seung S; Lee, Bong Jae

    2016-03-21

    Artificially designed hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) possesses extraordinary electromagnetic features different from those of naturally existing materials. In particular, the dispersion relation of waves existing inside the HMM is hyperbolic rather than elliptical; thus, waves that are evanescent in isotropic media become propagating in the HMM. This characteristic of HMMs opens a novel way to spectrally control the near-field thermal radiation in which evanescent waves in the vacuum gap play a critical role. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the performance of a near-field thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion system in which a W/SiO2-multilayer-based HMM serves as the emitter at 1000 K and InAs works as the TPV cell at 300 K. By carefully designing the thickness of constituent materials of the HMM emitter, the electric power of the near-field TPV devices can be increased by about 6 times at 100-nm vacuum gap as compared to the case of the plain W emitter. Alternatively, in regards to the electric power generation, HMM emitter at experimentally achievable 100-nm vacuum gap performs equivalently to the plain W emitter at 18-nm vacuum gap. We show that the enhancement mechanism of the HMM emitter is due to the coupled surface plasmon modes at multiple metal-dielectric interfaces inside the HMM emitter. With the minority carrier transport model, the optimal p-n junction depth of the TPV cell has also been determined at various vacuum gaps.

  17. Nanometer scale fabrication and optical response of InGaN/GaN quantum disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yi-Chun; Higo, Akio; Kiba, Takayuki; Thomas, Cedric; Chen, Shula; Lee, Chang Yong; Tanikawa, Tomoyuki; Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Katayama, Ryuji; Shojiki, Kanako; Takayama, Junichi; Yamashita, Ichiro; Murayama, Akihiro; Chi, Gou-Chung; Yu, Peichen; Samukawa, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we demonstrate homogeneously distributed In0.3Ga0.7N/GaN quantum disks (QDs), with an average diameter below 10 nm and a high density of 2.1 × 1011 cm-2, embedded in 20 nm tall nanopillars. The scalable top-down fabrication process involves the use of self-assembled ferritin bio-templates as the etch mask, spin coated on top of a strained In0.3Ga0.7N/GaN single quantum well (SQW) structure, followed by a neutral beam etch (NBE) method. The small dimensions of the iron cores inside ferritin and nearly damage-free process enabled by the NBE jointly contribute to the observation of photoluminescence (PL) from strain-relaxed In0.3Ga0.7N/GaN QDs at 6 K. The large blueshift of the peak wavelength by over 70 nm manifests a strong reduction of the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) within the QD structure, which also agrees well with the theoretical prediction using a 3D Schrödinger equation solver. The current results hence pave the way towards the realization of large-scale III-N quantum structures using the combination of bio-templates and NBE, which is vital for the development of next-generation lighting and communication devices.

  18. Experiences with Opto-Mechanical Systems that Affect Optical Surfaces at the Sub-Nanometer Level

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L C; Taylor, J S

    2008-04-03

    Projection optical systems built for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) demonstrated the ability to produce, support and position reflective optical surfaces for achieving transmitted wavefront errors of 1 nm or less. Principal challenges included optical interferometry, optical manufacturing processes, multi-layer coating technology and opto mechanics. Our group was responsible for designing, building and aligning two different projection optical systems: a full-field, 0.1 NA, four-mirror system for 70 nm features and a small-field, 0.3 NA, two-mirror system for 30 nm features. Other than physical size and configuration, the two systems were very similar in the way they were designed, built and aligned. A key difference exists in the optic mounts, driven primarily by constraints from the metrology equipment used by different optics manufacturers. As mechanical stability and deterministic position control of optics will continue to play an essential role in future systems, we focus our discussion on opto-mechanics and primarily the optic mounts.

  19. Sizing Individual Au Nanoparticles in Solution with Sub-Nanometer Resolution.

    PubMed

    German, Sean R; Hurd, Timothy S; White, Henry S; Mega, Tony L

    2015-07-28

    Resistive-pulse sensing has generated considerable interest as a technique for characterizing nanoparticle suspensions. The size, charge, and shape of individual particles can be estimated from features of the resistive pulse, but the technique suffers from an inherent variability due to the stochastic nature of particles translocating through a small orifice or channel. Here, we report a method, and associated automated instrumentation, that allows repeated pressure-driven translocation of individual particles back and forth across the orifice of a conical nanopore, greatly reducing uncertainty in particle size that results from streamline path distributions, particle diffusion, particle asphericity, and electronic noise. We demonstrate ∼0.3 nm resolution in measuring the size of nominally 30 and 60 nm radius Au nanoparticles of spherical geometry; Au nanoparticles in solution that differ by ∼1 nm in radius are readily distinguished. The repetitive translocation method also allows differentiating particles based on surface charge density, and provides insights into factors that determine the distribution of measured particle sizes.

  20. Measurement of replication structures at the nanometer scale using super-resolution light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Baddeley, D; Chagin, V O; Schermelleh, L; Martin, S; Pombo, A; Carlton, P M; Gahl, A; Domaing, P; Birk, U; Leonhardt, H; Cremer, C; Cardoso, M C

    2010-01-01

    DNA replication, similar to other cellular processes, occurs within dynamic macromolecular structures. Any comprehensive understanding ultimately requires quantitative data to establish and test models of genome duplication. We used two different super-resolution light microscopy techniques to directly measure and compare the size and numbers of replication foci in mammalian cells. This analysis showed that replication foci vary in size from 210 nm down to 40 nm. Remarkably, spatially modulated illumination (SMI) and 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) both showed an average size of 125 nm that was conserved throughout S-phase and independent of the labeling method, suggesting a basic unit of genome duplication. Interestingly, the improved optical 3D resolution identified 3- to 5-fold more distinct replication foci than previously reported. These results show that optical nanoscopy techniques enable accurate measurements of cellular structures at a level previously achieved only by electron microscopy and highlight the possibility of high-throughput, multispectral 3D analyses.

  1. Cell projection use in maskless lithography for 45nm and 32nm logic nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manakli, S.; Komami, H.; Takizawa, M.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Pain, L.

    2009-03-01

    Due to the ever-increasing cost of equipment and mask complexity, the use of optical lithography for integrated circuit manufacturing is increasingly more complex and expensive. Recent workshops and conferences in semiconductor lithography underlined that one alternative to support sub-32nm technologies is mask-less lithography option using electron beam technology. However, this direct write approach based on variable shaped beam principle (VSB) is not sufficient in terms of throughput, i.e. of productivity. New direct write techniques like multibeam systems are under development, but these solutions will not be mature before 2012. The use of character/cell projection (CP) on industrial VSB tools is the first step to deal with the throughput concerns. This paper presents the status of the CP technology and evaluates its possible use for the 45nm and 32nm logic nodes. It will present standard cell and SRAM structures that are printed as single characters using the CP technique. All experiments are done using the Advantest tool (F3000) which can project up to 100 different cells per layer. Cell extractions and design have been performed with the design and software solution developed by D2S. In this paper, we first evaluate the performance gain that can be obtained with the CP approach compared to the standard VSB approach. This paper also details the patterning capability obtained by using the CP concept. An evaluation of the CD uniformity and process stability is also presented. Finally this paper discusses about the improvements of this technique to address high resolution and to improve the throughput concerns.

  2. Manufacturability of 2x-nm devices with EUV tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawarayama, Kazuo; Nakajima, Yumi; Kyoh, Suigen; Aoyama, Hajime; Matsunaga, Kentaro; Magoshi, Shunko; Tanaka, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yumi; Mori, Ichiro

    2011-04-01

    Due to the promising development status of EUVL as a practical lithography technology for the 2x-nm node, we are continuing to evaluate its process liability using the EUV1 at Selete, which has an Off-Axis illumination capability. The resolution limit of the EUV1 for L&S patterns is currently 18 nm for dipole illumination, and 16 nm for aggressive dipole illumination. This study examined the critical points of EUVL for device manufacturing through wafer processes. The yield obtained from electrical measurements indicates the maturity of the technology, including the resist process, the tool, and the mask. Optimization of the resist and RIE processes significantly improved the yield. The final yields obtained from electrical measurements were 100% for hp 30 nm, 70% for hp 28 nm, and 40% for hp 26 nm. These results demonstrate EUV lithography to be a practical technology that is now suitable for 2x nm semiconductor manufacture.

  3. Extracellular dynamics at nm resolution in live cells.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2008-01-01

    We are all voyagers in time and space, and throughout history of human civilization, our quest to understand Nature has fueled our imagination to make the necessary inventions that further our perception of Nature, perceptions beyond the natural limits of our senses. For example, the invention of various telescopes for observing distant objects, and microscopes for perceiving the very small, has enabled discoveries of distant galaxies and planets light years away, and of the micrometer-size unit of life-the "Cell," and of its nanometer-size subcellular organelles. The story of cell secretion, a fundamental process as old as life itself, occurs in all organisms-from the simple yeast to cells in humans. In the last 15 years, primarily using the atomic force microscope-a force spectroscope, a detailed understanding of the molecular machinery and mechanism of secretion in cells has come to light. This has led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the underlying mechanism of cell secretion. The journey leading to the discovery of the "porosome," a nanometer-size structure at the cell plasma membrane-the universal secretory machinery, and its structure and dynamics in live cells, is briefly discussed in this chapter.

  4. Ultraviolet 320 nm laser excitation for flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William; Stickland, Lynn; Koschorreck, Marco

    2017-02-27

    Although multiple lasers and high-dimensional analysis capability are now standard on advanced flow cytometers, ultraviolet (UV) lasers (usually 325-365 nm) remain an uncommon excitation source for cytometry. This is primarily due to their cost, and the small number of applications that require this wavelength. The development of the Brilliant Ultraviolet (BUV fluorochromes, however, has increased the importance of this formerly niche excitation wavelength. Historically, UV excitation was usually provided by water-cooled argon- and krypton-ion lasers. Modern flow cytometers primary rely on diode pumped solid state lasers emitting at 355 nm. While useful for all UV-excited applications, DPSS UV lasers are still large by modern solid state laser standards, and remain very expensive. Smaller and cheaper near UV laser diodes (NUVLDs) emitting at 375 nm make adequate substitutes for 355 nm sources in many situations, but do not work as well with very short wavelength probes like the fluorescent calcium chelator indo-1. In this study, we evaluate a newly available UV 320 nm laser for flow cytometry. While shorter in wavelength that conventional UV lasers, 320 is close to the 325 nm helium-cadmium wavelength used in the past on early benchtop cytometers. A UV 320 nm laser was found to excite almost all Brilliant Ultraviolet dyes to nearly the same level as 355 nm sources. Both 320 nm and 355 nm sources worked equally well for Hoechst and DyeCycle Violet side population analysis of stem cells in mouse hematopoetic tissue. The shorter wavelength UV source also showed excellent excitation of indo-1, a probe that is not compatible with NUVLD 375 nm sources. In summary, a 320 nm laser module made a suitable substitute for conventional 355 nm sources. This laser technology is available in a smaller form factor than current 355 nm units, making it useful for small cytometers with space constraints. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  5. Sidewall spacer quadruple patterning for 15nm half-pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ping; Chen, Yongmei; Chen, Yijian; Miao, Liyan; Sun, Shiyu; Kim, Sung-Woo; Berger, Ami; Mao, Daxin; Bencher, Christ; Hung, Raymond; Ngai, Chris

    2011-04-01

    193nm immersion lithography, with the single-exposure resolution limitation of half-pitch 38nm, has extended its patterning capability to about 20nm using the double-patterning technique[1]. Despite the non-trivial sub-20nm patterning challenges, several NAND Flash manufacturers are already pursuing for sub-16nm patterning technology. 25nm NAND flash memory has already begun production in 2010, and given the typical 2-year scaling cycle, sub-16nm NAND devices should see pilot or mass production as early as 2014. Using novel patterning techniques such as sidewall spacer quadruple patterning (upon 120nm to 128nm pitch using dry ArF lithography) or triple patterning (upon 90nm pitch using immersion ArF lithography), we are able to extend optical lithography to sub-16nm half-pitch and demonstrate the lithographic performance that can nearly meet the ITRS roadmap requirements. In this paper, we conduct an in-depth review and demonstration of sidewall spacer quadruple patterning; including 300mm wafer level data of the mean values and CDU along with a mathematical assessment of the various data pools for sub-16nm lines and spaces. By understanding which processes (lithography, deposition, and etch) define the critical dimension of each data pool, we can make predictions of CDU capability for the sidewall spacer quad patterning. Our VeritySEM4i CD SEM tool demonstrated high measurement yield during fully automated measurements, which enables accurate lines, spaces and CDU measurements of the sub-16nm. The patterns generated from the sidewall spacer quadruple patterning techniques are used as a hardmask to transfer sub-16nm lines and spaces patterns to underneath amorphous silicon and silicon oxide layers, or poly silicon layer for 1X STI or poly gate applications.

  6. SCIL nanoimprint solutions: high-volume soft NIL for wafer scale sub-10nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorkamp, R.; Verschuuren, M. A.; van Brakel, R.

    2016-10-01

    yield. Soft stamps, usually based on silicone rubber, behave fundamentally different compared to rigid stamps on the macro-, micro- and nanometer level. The main limitation of traditional silicones is that they are too soft to support sub-micron features against surface tension based stamp deformation and collapse [4] and handling a soft stamp to achieve accurate feature placement on wafer scales to allow overlay alignment with sub-100nm overlay accuracy.

  7. Measurements of Stokes parameters of materials at 1064-nm and 532-nm wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Songxin; Narayanan, Ram M.; Kalshoven, James E., Jr.

    2001-09-01

    Laser radar systems have found wide applications in the field of remote sensing. Reflectance as well as polarization features are used together for applications ranging from environmental monitoring to target classification. The Stokes parameters are ideal quantities for characterizing the above features because they provide useful information on both light intensity and polarization state. The University of Nebraska is currently refurbishing an airborne multi-wavelength laser radar system based on the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) developed Airborne Laser Polarimetric Sensor (ALPS). The system uses a Nd:YAG laser operating at wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, and contains four channels at each wavelength to measure the polarization states. This system was used to measure the Stokes parameters of backscattered laser light from different materials. These included canvas tarp, white paper, plywood, concrete, aluminum plate and anodized aluminum plate. The data provide an understanding of the polarized scattering properties of various materials, and are expected to be useful in developing target discrimination algorithms.

  8. Production of nanometer-size GaAs nanocristals by nanosecond laser ablation in liquid.

    PubMed

    Abderrafi, Kamal; Jiménez, Ernesto; Ben, Teresa; Molina, Sergio I; Ibáñez, Rafael; Chirvony, Vladimir; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports the formation and characterization of spherical GaAs quantum dots obtained by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in a liquid (ethanol or methanol). The produced bare GaAs nanoparticles demonstrate rather narrow size distribution which depends on the applied laser power density (from 4.25 to 13.9 J/cm2 in our experiments) and is as low as 2.5 nm for the highest power used. The absolute value of the average diameter also decreases significantly, from 13.7 to 8.7 nm, as the laser power increases in this interval. Due to the narrow nanoparticle size dispersion achieved at the highest laser powers two absorption band edges are clearly distinguishable at about 1.72 and 3.15 eV which are ascribed to E0 and E1 effective optical transitions, respectively. A comparison of the energies with those known for bulk GaAs allows one to conclude that an average diameter of the investigated GaAs nanoparticles is close to 10 nm, i.e., they are quantum dots. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images show that the bare GaAs nanoparticles are nanocrystalline, but many of them exhibit single/multiple twin boundary defects or even polycrystallinity. The formation of the GaAs crystalline core capped with a SiO2 shell was demonstrated by HRTEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Effective band edges can be better distinguished in SiO2 capped nanoparticles than in bare ones, In both cases the band edges are correlated with size quantum confinement effect.

  9. Self-assembly based nanometer-scale patterning for nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramohan, Abhishek; Sibirev, Nikolai; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.; Mendis, Budhika; Petty, Mike C.; Gallant, Andrew J.; Zeze, Dagou A.

    2015-08-01

    Periodic nanostructure arrays have been ubiquitously exploited lately due to their properties and prospective applications in production of templates for self-induced and gold (Au)-catalysed nanowires (NWs), because this approach is relatively cheap, time-efficient and do not require electron beam lithography. The technique consists creating nanoholes in SiO2 to expose the silicon Si (111) beneath where self-induced NWs can nucleate, while nanodots deposited onto the Si (111) surface serve as catalyst seeds. For Au-catalysed NWs, a monolayer of self-assembled polystyrene nanospheres (PNS 300nm) was created on a 2 inch Si wafer by spin coating and later etched for a short time before a very thin Au-catalyst layer was deposited. In turn, for self-induced, PNS monolayer was created onto a SiO2-Si substrate. A longer etch was required to reduce PNS diameter significantly to leave relatively larger spacing where chromium is blanket deposited. PNS were lifted off by sonicating the samples in toluene produce the periodic arrays of nanodots and nanoholes, respectively. The underlying SiO2 was etched further through the nanoholes to uncover the Si below. 200 nm holes and 30-70 nm dots were demonstrated through the bespoke methods. The patterned substrates served as master templates, subsequently copied using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to produce a flexible stamp for nanoimprint lithography. A bilayer resist lift off process was developed to print the replicated nanodots or nanoholes on large-area substrates onto which III-V NWs can be grown.

  10. Nanometer-scale crystallization of thin HfO2 films studied by HF-chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Shinji; Miyata, Noriyuki; Migita, Shinji; Horikawa, Tsuyoshi; Toriumi, Akira

    2005-05-01

    We used a HF-chemical etching process to examine crystalline structures in thin HfO2 films grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition at 350-550°C. Nanometer-scale crystalline HfO2 nuclei were identified from all the HfO2 films. The nucleus density exponentially increased with increasing deposition temperature, but the diameter of the nuclei did not depend on the deposition temperature. We propose that the crystallization of thin HfO2 film during growth proceeds in a patchwork process with the increase of the crystalline HfO2 nuclei.

  11. Giant Peltier Effect in a Submicron-Sized Cu-Ni/Au Junction with Nanometer-Scale Phase Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, Atsushi; Kodzuka, Masaya; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yuasa, Shinji; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Ando, Koji; Takanashi, Koki; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Hono, Kazuhiro; Fukushima, Akio

    2010-06-01

    We observed a giant Peltier effect in a submicron Cu-Ni/Au junction. The Peltier coefficient was evaluated to be 480 mV at room temperature from the balance between Joule heating and the Peltier cooling effect in the junction, which is 40 times that expected from the Seebeck coefficients of bulk Au and Cu-Ni alloy. This giant cooling effect lowered the inner temperature of the junction by 160 K. Microstructure analysis with a three-dimensional atom probe suggested that the giant Peltier effect possibly originated from nanometer-scale phase separation in the Cu-Ni layer.

  12. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced electrical degradation in deca-nanometer MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yao; Yang, Zhimei; Gong, Min; Gao, Bo; Li, Yun; Lin, Wei; Li, Jinbo; Xia, Zhuohui

    2016-09-01

    In this work, degradation of the electrical characteristics of 65 nm nMOSFETs under swift heavy ion irradiation is investigated. It was found that a heavy ion can generate a localized region of physical damage (ion latent track) in the gate oxide. This is the likely cause for the increased gate leakage current and soft breakdown (SBD) then hard breakdown (HBD) of the gate oxide. Except in the case of HBD, the devices retain their functionality but with degraded transconductance. The degraded gate oxide exhibits early breakdown behavior compatible with the model of defect generation and percolation path formation in the percolation model.

  13. PHILOSOPHY FOR NSLS-II DESIGN WITH SUB-NANOMETER HORIZONTAL EMITTANCE.

    SciTech Connect

    OZAKI,S.; BENGTSSON, J.; KRAMER, S.L.; KRINSKY, S.; LITVINENKO, V.N.

    2007-06-25

    NSLS-II at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a new third-generation storage ring light source, whose construction is on the verge of being approved by DOE. When completed, NSLS-II with its ability to provide users with a wide range of spectrum, ranging from IR to ultra-high brightness hard x-ray beams will replace the existing two (20+ years old) NSLS light sources. While presenting an overview of the NSLS-II accelerator system, this paper focuses on the strategy and development of a novel <1 nm emittance light source.

  14. Microdeflectometry--a novel tool to acquire three-dimensional microtopography with nanometer height resolution.

    PubMed

    Häusler, Gerd; Richter, Claus; Leitz, Karl-Heinz; Knauer, Markus C

    2008-02-15

    We introduce "microdeflectometry," a novel technique for measuring the microtopography of specular surfaces. The primary data are the local slope of the surface under test. Measuring the slope instead of the height implies high information efficiency and extreme sensitivity to local shape irregularities. The lateral resolution can be better than 1 microm, whereas the resulting height resolution is in the range of 1nm. Microdeflectometry can be supplemented by methods to expand the depth of field, with the potential to provide quantitative 3D imaging with scanning-electron-microscope-like features.

  15. Real space mapping of Li-ion transport in amorphous Si anodes with nanometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Kim, Yoongu; Adamczyk, Leslie; Tselev, Alexander; Ivanov, Ilia N; Dudney, Nancy J; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2010-09-08

    The electrical bias driven Li-ion motion in silicon anode materials in thin film battery heterostructures is investigated using electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), which is a newly developed scanning probe microscopy based characterization method. ESM utilizes the intrinsic link between bias-controlled Li-ion concentration and molar volume of electrode materials, providing the capability for studies on the sub-20 nm scale, and allows the relationship between Li-ion flow and microstructure to be established. The evolution of Li-ion transport during the battery charging is directly observed.

  16. Real Space Mapping of Li-Ion Transport in Amorphous Si Anodes with Nanometer Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Kim, Yoongu; Adamczyk, Leslie A; Tselev, Alexander; Ivanov, Ilia N; Dudney, Nancy J; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2010-01-01

    The electrical bias driven Li-ion motion in silicon anode materials in thin film battery heterostructures is investigated using electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), which is a newly developed scanning probe microscopy based characterization method. ESM utilizes the intrinsic link between bias-controlled Li-ion concentration and molar volume of electrode materials, providing the capability for studies on the sub-20 nm scale, and allows the relationship between Li-ion flow and microstructure to be established. The evolution of Li-ion transport during the battery charging is directly observed.

  17. Expression of NM23 in human melanoma progression and metastasis.

    PubMed Central

    Easty, D. J.; Maung, K.; Lascu, I.; Véron, M.; Fallowfield, M. E.; Hart, I. R.; Bennett, D. C.

    1996-01-01

    NM23 is a putative metastasis-suppressor gene for some human cancers. Here we have studied NM23 expression during melanoma progression using Northern blotting and immunocytochemistry. There was no significant difference in the average amounts of NM23 mRNA between cell lines derived from metastatic and primary melanomas. The level of NM23 mRNA was also determined for three pairs of poorly metastatic parental (P) and their highly metastatic variant (M) cell lines; the ratios for M/P were 1.2, 0.98 and 0.80. Next we used immunocytochemistry to study NM23 protein in normal skin, benign naevi and primary and metastatic melanomas. Melanocytes in all normal skin and benign samples were positive for NM23; however most primary melanomas (7/11) were not stained by the antibody. All metastatic melanoma samples (5/5) were positively stained. Findings were similar with an antiserum reactive with both forms of NM23 (H1 and H2), and with an antibody specific for NM23-H1. No relationship was apparent between NM23 immunoreactivity in primary tumours and their aggressiveness or prognosis. Hence, in contrast to the situation described for murine melanoma, the amount of NM23 mRNA or protein in human melanoma did not correlate inversely with metastasis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8679442

  18. Nanometer-Scale Permeabilization and Osmotic Swelling Induced by 5-ns Pulsed Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Sözer, Esin B; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Romeo, Stefania; Vernier, P Thomas

    2017-02-01

    High-intensity nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) permeabilize cell membranes. Although progress has been made toward an understanding of the mechanism of nsPEF-induced membrane poration, the dependence of pore size and distribution on pulse duration, strength, number, and repetition rate remains poorly defined experimentally. In this paper, we characterize the size of nsPEF-induced pores in living cell membranes by isosmotically replacing the solutes in pulsing media with polyethylene glycols and sugars before exposing Jurkat T lymphoblasts to 5 ns, 10 MV/m electric pulses. Pore size was evaluated by analyzing cell volume changes resulting from the permeation of osmolytes through the plasma membrane. We find that pores created by 5 ns pulses have a diameter between 0.7 and 0.9 nm at pulse counts up to 100 with a repetition rate of 1 kHz. For larger number of pulses, either the pore diameter or the number of pores created, or both, increase with increasing pulse counts. But the prevention of cell swelling by PEG 1000 even after 2000 pulses suggests that 5 ns, 10 MV/m pulses cannot produce pores with a diameter larger than 1.9 nm.

  19. Microscope objective production: on the way from the micrometer scale to the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sure, Thomas; Heil, Joachim; Wesner, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    Cemented doublets and triplets, which are the principle parts in high quality, high numerical aperture (NA) objectives, can not be used for objectives working at wavelengths of 248 nm and shorter, because the optical cement can not withstand the high photon energies. We will show that high NA deep UV objectives can be designed and built successfully with the help of air spaced doublets. Assuring Strehl ratios above 95% enforces very tight tolerances. For example the distance error of the lens vertex to its mount has to be <1 μm. This calls for a new manufacturing precision never realized before in series production. We show how a white light Mirau interferometer can be used to measure lens vertex positions with an accuracy of +/-200 nm. We also demonstrate how the fine-tuning process can be optimized by using a "simulated star test," where the point-spread function is calculated in real time with a FFT-algorithm from the optical path difference data, acquired by a Twyman-Green interferometer.

  20. Nanometer scale elemental analysis in the helium ion microscope using time of flight spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Klingner, N; Heller, R; Hlawacek, G; von Borany, J; Notte, J; Huang, J; Facsko, S

    2016-03-01

    Time of flight backscattering spectrometry (ToF-BS) was successfully implemented in a helium ion microscope (HIM). Its integration introduces the ability to perform laterally resolved elemental analysis as well as elemental depth profiling on the nm scale. A lateral resolution of ≤54nm and a time resolution of Δt≤17ns(Δt/t≤5.4%) are achieved. By using the energy of the backscattered particles for contrast generation, we introduce a new imaging method to the HIM allowing direct elemental mapping as well as local spectrometry. In addition laterally resolved time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) can be performed with the same setup. Time of flight is implemented by pulsing the primary ion beam. This is achieved in a cost effective and minimal invasive way that does not influence the high resolution capabilities of the microscope when operating in standard secondary electron (SE) imaging mode. This technique can thus be easily adapted to existing devices. The particular implementation of ToF-BS and ToF-SIMS techniques are described, results are presented and advantages, difficulties and limitations of this new techniques are discussed.

  1. Sub-nanometer-scale measurements of the interaction of ultrafast soft x-ray free-electron-laser pulses with matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S; Chapman, H; Krzywinski, J; Sobierajski, R; London, R; Bionta, R; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Nietubyc, R; Juha, L; Kuba, J; Bajt, S; Spiller, E; Baker, S; Kjornrattanawanich, B; Gullikson, E; Tschentscher, T; Plonjes, E; Toleikis, S

    2006-08-02

    Femtosecond pulses from soft-x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) [1] are ideal for directly probing matter at atomic length scales and timescales of atomic motion. An important component of understanding ultrafast phenomena of light-matter interactions is concerned with the onset of atomic motion which is impeded by the atoms inertia. This delay of structural changes will enable atomic-resolution flash-imaging [2-3] to be performed at upcoming x-ray FELs [4-5] with pulses intense enough to record the x-ray scattering from single molecules [6]. We explored this ultrafast high-intensity regime with the FLASH soft-x-ray FEL [7-8] by measuring the reflectance of nanostructured multilayer mirrors using pulses with fluences far in excess of the mirrors damage threshold. Even though the nanostructures were ultimately completely destroyed, we found that they maintained their integrity and reflectance characteristics during the 25-fs-long pulse, with no evidence for any structural changes during that time over lengths greater than 3 {angstrom}. In the recently built FLASH FEL [7], x-rays are produced from short electron pulses oscillating in a periodic magnet array, called an undulator, by the principle of self-amplification of spontaneous emission [9-10]. The laser quality of the x-ray pulses can be quantified by the peak spectral brilliance of the source, which is 10{sup 28} photons/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1% bandwidth) [8]; this is up to seven orders of magnitude higher than modern third-generation synchrotron sources. For our studies, the machine operated with pulses of 25 fs duration at a wavelength of 32.5 nm and energies up to 21 {micro}J. We focused these pulses to 3 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} onto our nanostructured samples, resulting in an the unprecedented heating rate of 5 x 10{sup 18} K/s, while probing the irradiated structures at the nanometer length scale. The x-ray reflectivity of periodic nanometer-scale multilayers [11] is very sensitive to changes in the atomic

  2. Segmentation of the macular choroid in OCT images acquired at 830nm and 1060nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sieun; Beg, Mirza F.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2013-06-01

    Retinal imaging with optical coherence tomography (OCT) has rapidly advanced in ophthalmic applications with the broad availability of Fourier domain (FD) technology in commercial systems. The high sensitivity afforded by FD-OCT has enabled imaging of the choroid, a layer of blood vessels serving the outer retina. Improved visualization of the choroid and the choroid-sclera boundary has been investigated using techniques such as enhanced depth imaging (EDI), and also with OCT systems operating in the 1060-nm wavelength range. We report on a comparison of imaging the macular choroid with commercial and prototype OCT systems, and present automated 3D segmentation of the choroid-scleral layer using a graph cut algorithm. The thickness of the choroid is an important measurement to investigate for possible correlation with severity, or possibly early diagnosis, of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.

  3. A precise measurement of lunar spectral irradiance from 450 nm to 1000 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, C. E.; Lykke, K.; Woodward, J. T.; Smith, A. W.

    2013-12-01

    Although the Moon is our nearest celestial neighbor, our knowledge of its absolute spectral irradiance is an order of magnitude less precise than our knowledge of the best-calibrated stars, including the Sun. A precise determination of the Moon's absolute spectral irradiance has the potential to improve on-orbit calibrations of Earth-observing instruments and extend atmospheric monitoring techniques based on Sun photometry to nighttime measurements based on lunar spectrophotometry. Observations of the Moon have already been used to track changes in satellite sensor response at the sub-percent level, relying on a model of lunar irradiance developed by the United States Geological Survey to predict time-dependent changes in lunar irradiance. The absolute scale of this model, however, is not known accurately enough to allow the Moon to specify an absolute scale for instrument response on orbit or to bridge gaps in various climate data records. We report initial measurements of lunar spectral irradiance with an uncertainty below 1 % from 420 nm to 1000 nm and compare them with the USGS model. Our measurement uncertainty meets the radiometric calibration requirement for many climate data records derived from satellite images, including those for vegetation, aerosols, and snow and ice albedo. It therefore opens the possibility of using the Moon as a calibration standard to bridge gaps in satellite coverage and validate atmospheric retrieval algorithms. Our measurement technique also yields detailed information about the atmosphere at the measurement site, suggesting that lunar observations are a possible solution for aerosol monitoring during the polar winter and can provide nighttime measurements to complement aerosol data collected with Sun photometers. Our measurement, made with a novel apparatus, is an order of magnitude more accurate than the previous state-of-the-art and has continuous spectral coverage, removing the need to interpolate between filter passbands.

  4. Sub-10 nm patterning using EUV interference lithography.

    PubMed

    Päivänranta, Birgit; Langner, Andreas; Kirk, Eugenie; David, Christian; Ekinci, Yasin

    2011-09-16

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is currently considered as the leading technology for high-volume manufacturing below sub-20 nm feature sizes. In parallel, EUV interference lithography based on interference transmission gratings has emerged as a powerful tool for industrial and academic research. In this paper, we demonstrate nanopatterning with sub-10 nm resolution using this technique. Highly efficient and optimized molybdenum gratings result in resolved line/space patterns down to 8 nm half-pitch and show modulation down to 6 nm half-pitch. These results show the performance of optical nanopatterning in the sub-10 nm range and currently mark the record for photon-based lithography. Moreover, an efficient phase mask completely suppressing the zeroth-order diffraction and providing 50 nm line/space patterns over large areas is evaluated. Such efficient phase masks pave the way towards table-top EUV interference lithography systems.

  5. Liquid-borne Nanoparticle Characterization and its Application to Nanometer-rated Liquid Filter Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Tsz Yan

    Nanoparticles are often found in liquid-borne dispersed phases, in addition to the airborne and surface-borne phases. Characterization techniques for nanoparticles are needed for the environmental, health and safety studies of nanomaterials. The objectives of this thesis are to 1) explore methods for characterizing liquid-borne nanoparticles and 2) apply these methods to study nanoparticle filtration problems. In Chapter 2, calibration results of the Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) technique in our lab are reported. The concentration measurements agree well with that estimated by suspension mass concentration within the range of 108-1010 particles/ml. The particles generally have a most probable size of 100-200 nm. The filtration systems of the AWM and EDM processes were found to remove of 70 and 90 % the nanoparticles present, respectively. However, the particle concentration of the filtered water from the AWM was still four times higher than that found in regular tap water. These nanoparticles are mostly agglomerated, according to the microscopy analysis. Since AWM and EDM are widely used, the handling and disposal of used filters collected with nanoparticles, release of nanoparticles to the sewer and potential use of higher performance filters for these processes will deserve further considerations. The development of an aerosolization technique to measure liquid-borne nanoparticles down to 30 nm and its application to filter evaluation is discussed in Chapter 3. This technique involves dispersing nanoparticle suspensions into airborne form with an atomizer or electrospray aerosol generator, and measuring the size and concentration by a differential mobility analyzer coupled to a condensation particle counter. With the electrospray aerosol generator, residue particles can be controlled to be less than 10 nm, allowing particles as small as 30 nm to be clearly distinguished from the size distribution measurements. Comparing to NTA, the aerosolization

  6. Friction measurements of nanometer-thick lubricant films using ultra-smooth sliding pins treated with gas cluster ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Renguo; Zhang, Hedong; Mitsuya, Yasunaga; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Itoh, Shintaro

    2013-09-01

    Friction properties of nanometer-thick lubricant films confined between two ultra-smooth solid surfaces are crucial to the practical performance of technologically advanced mechanical devices such as micro-electro-mechanical systems and hard disk drives. In this work, we applied argon gas cluster ion beam (Ar-GCIB) treatments to obtain ultra-smooth sliding pins for pin-on-disk tests of nanometer-thick perfluoropolyether (PFPE) lubricant films coated on magnetic disk surfaces. The GCIB treatments effectively smoothed the pin surfaces, and increases in the Ar dose decreased surface roughness. An ultra-smooth surface with a maximum peak height (Rp) less the monolayer lubricant film thickness was achieved when the Ar dose was increased to 8 × 1016 ions/cm2. We observed that both surface roughness and film thickness affected the friction coefficients of the PFPE films. To quantitatively describe the interplay of surface roughness and film thickness, we introduced two roughness characteristics: the ratio of film thickness to the surface’s root-mean-square roughness (h/σ), and a surface-pattern parameter (γ), defined as the ratio of correlation lengths in two orthogonal directions. We infer that a fixed γ and higher h/σlead to lower friction coefficients, while a fixed h/σand higher γ induce higher friction coefficients.

  7. [Study on preparation of lanthanum-doped TiO2 nanometer thin film materials and its photocatalytic activity].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huai-li; Tang, Ming-fang; Gong, Ying-kun; Deng, Xiao-jun; Wu, Bang-hua

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, lanthanum-doped TiO2 nanometer film materials coated on glass were prepared in Ti(OBu)4 precursor solutions by sol-gel processing. Transmittance and photocatalytic activity were respectively investigated and tested for these nanometer thin films prepared with different amount of lanthanum (La), different amount of polyethylene glycol (PEG), and different coating layer times. Some reactive mechanisms were also discussed. For one layer La-addition had little effect on the film transmissivity; but the photocatalytic activity was significantly improved due to La-addition. With increasing PEG, the transmittance of the film decreased for one layer film; but its photocatalytic activity did not rise. Increasing layer number did not affect the transmissivity of multilayer film. After coating two times, increasing layer number did not significantly improve the photocatalytic activity. The highest photocatalytic activity and best transmissivity were obtained for two layer TiO2 film when the dosage of lanthanum was 0.5 g and the dosage of polyethylene was 0.2 g in the precursor solutions. These materials will probably be used in the protection of environment, waste water treatment, and air purification.

  8. 32nm node technology development using interference immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Harry; McCafferty, Diane; Markoya, Louis; Hendrickx, Eric; Hermans, Jan; Ronse, Kurt

    2005-05-01

    The 38nm and 32nm lithography nodes are the next major targets for optical lithography on the Semiconductor Industry Roadmap. The recently developed water-based immersion lithography using ArF illumination will be able to provide an optical solution for lithography at the 45nm node, but it will not be able to achieve the 38nm or the 32nm nodes as currently defined. To achieve these next lithographic nodes will require new, very high refractive index fluids to replace the water used in current immersion systems. This paper describes tests and experiments using an interference immersion lithography test jig to develop key technology for the 32nm node. Interference imaging printers have been available for years, and with the advent of Immersion Lithography, they have a new use. Interference immersion image printing offers users a rapid, cost-effective way to develop immersion lithography, particularly at extremely high resolutions. Although it can never replace classical lens-based lithography systems for semiconductor device production, it does offer a way to develop resist and fluid technology at a relatively low cost. Its simple image-forming format offers easy access to the basic physics of advanced imaging. Issues such as: Polarization of the image forming light rays; Fluid/resist interaction during exposure; Topcoat film performance; and the Line Edge Roughness (LER) of resists at extremely high resolutions can all be readily studied. Experiments are described and results are provided for work on: 32nm imaging tests; high refractive index fluid testing using 193nm wavelength at resolutions well beyond current lens-based system capabilities; and polarization configuration testing on 45nm, 38nm, and 32nm L/S features. Results on the performance of resists and topcoats are reported for 32nm L/S features.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of 10 nm thick piezoelectric AlN films with high c-axis orientation for miniaturized nanoelectromechanical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Zaghloul, Usama; Piazza, Gianluca

    2014-06-23

    The scaling of piezoelectric nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) is challenged by the synthesis of ultrathin and high quality piezoelectric films on very thin electrodes. We report the synthesis and characterization of the thinnest piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) films (10 nm) ever deposited on ultrathin platinum layers (2–5 nm) using reactive sputtering. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and fast Fourier transform analyses confirmed the proper crystal orientation, fine columnar texture, and the continuous lattice structure within individual grains in the deposited AlN nanometer thick films. The average extracted d{sub 31} piezoelectric coefficient for the synthesized films is −1.73 pC/N, which is comparable to the reported values for micron thick and highly c-axis oriented AlN films. The 10 nm AlN films were employed to demonstrate two different types of optimized piezoelectric nanoactuators. The unimorph actuators exhibit vertical displacements as large as 1.1 μm at 0.7 V for 25 μm long and 30 nm thick beams. These results have a great potential to realize miniaturized NEMS relays with extremely low voltage, high frequency resonators, and ultrasensitive sensors.

  10. Detection limits of 405 nm and 633 nm excited PpIX fluorescence for brain tumor detection during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Niklas; Götz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Hollnburger, Bastian; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    5-aminolevulinic-acid-(5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may be used to improve stereotactic brain tumor biopsies. In this study, the sensitivity of PpIX-based tumor detection has been investigated for two potential excitation wavelengths (405 nm, 633 nm). Using a 200 μm fiber in contact with semi-infinite optical phantoms containing ink and Lipovenös, PpIX detection limits of 4.0 nM and 200 nM (relating to 1 mW excitation power) were determined for 405 nm and 633 nm excitation, respectively. Hence, typical PpIX concentrations in glioblastomas of a few μM should be well detectable with both wavelengths. Additionally, blood layers of selected thicknesses were placed between fiber and phantom. Red excitation was shown to be considerably less affected by blood interference: A 50 μm blood layer, for instance, blocked the 405- nm-excited fluorescence completely, but reduced the 633-nm-excited signal by less than 50%. Ray tracing simulations demonstrated that - without blood layer - the sensitivity advantage of 405 nm rises for decreasing fluorescent volume from 50-fold to a maximum of 100-fold. However, at a tumor volume of 1 mm3, which is a typical biopsy sample size, the 633-nm-excited fluorescence signal is only reduced by about 10%. Further simulations revealed that with increasing fiber-tumor distance, the signal drops faster for 405 nm. This reduces the risk of detecting tumor tissue outside the needle's coverage, but diminishes the overlap between optically and mechanically sampled volumes. While 405 nm generally offers a higher sensitivity, 633 nm is more sensitive to distant tumors and considerably superior in case of blood-covered tumor tissue.

  11. Formation of 42 nm polysilicon nanogap structure by using size expansion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazwa, T.; Hashim, U.; Dhahi, Th. S.; Mohamad, S. N.

    2012-06-01

    The simple least-cost polysilicon nanogap fabrication without using complex nanolithography process is presented. As a process of preparing a nanogap electrode comes out in recent years, new technology has been developed at a fast speed in the prospect of measuring and applying the characteristics of nano-particle or the like as well as materials having the size of nanometer scale, such as protein and DNA. However, it is very difficult to prepare the nanogap of 50 nm or less due to the limitation of its process when the conventional semiconductor process technologies are used. Poly-silicon material is selected as a nanogap electrode using conventional silicon process is proposed in this research. Then, without employing complicated technology, a nanogap can be formed by using simple photolithography process, etching and deposition. First mask is assigned for the formation of lateral nanogap poly-silicon structure electrode and the second mask is for pad fabrication. Conventional photolithography technique is used to fabricate this nanogap (NG) based on the standard CMOS technology and characterization of its conductivity together with its effect during sensing is investigated in this research. By employing low-cost thermal oxidation process, 160 dies with 6 different groups of microgap structures will be going to expand to certain maximum growth. A method of preparing a nanogap electrode according to the present innovation has an advantage of preparing a nanogap electrode that can be easily prepared in a consistent manner. In the future, many patterns with a predetermined shape can be produced. The optimization result of this research will be used as a benchmark for the higher innovation of nanobiosensor detection for wider aspect of molecules.

  12. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2000-01-01

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  13. Sub-nanometer linewidth perfect absorption in visible band induced by Bloch surface wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Jiawei; Liu, Wenxing; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Ren, Naifei; Ding, Guilin; Chen, Mingyang; Yao, Hongbing

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate the unity absorption of visible light with an ultra-narrow 0.1 nm linewidth. It arises from the Bloch surface wave resonance in alternating TiO2/SiO2 multilayers. The total absorption and narrow linewidth are explained from the radiative and absorptive damping, which are quantitatively determined by the temporal coupled mode theory. When a silver film with proper thickness is added to the absorber, the perfect absorption is achieved with only 3 structural bilayers, in contrast with 8 bilayers required without Ag. Furthermore, significant field enhancement and an ultrahigh 2600/RIU sensing figure-of-merit are simultaneously obtained at resonance, which might facilitate applications in nonlinear optical devices and high resolution refractive index sensing.

  14. Antibacterial Mechanism of 405-Nanometer Light-Emitting Diode against Salmonella at Refrigeration Temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the antibacterial mechanism of 405 ± 5-nm light-emitting diode (LED) illumination against Salmonella at 4°C in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) by determining endogenous coproporphyrin content, DNA oxidation, damage to membrane function, and morphological change. Gene expression levels, including of oxyR, recA, rpoS, sodA, and soxR, were also examined to understand the response of Salmonella to LED illumination. The results showed that Salmonella strains responded differently to LED illumination, revealing that S. enterica serovar Enteritidis (ATCC 13076) and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Saintpaul (ATCC 9712) were more susceptible and resistant, respectively, than the 16 other strains tested. There was no difference in the amounts of endogenous coproporphyrin in the two strains. Compared with that in nonilluminated cells, the DNA oxidation levels in illuminated cells increased. In illuminated cells, we observed a loss of efflux pump activity, damage to the glucose uptake system, and changes in membrane potential and integrity. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a disorganization of chromosomes and ribosomes due to LED illumination. The levels of the five genes measured in the nonilluminated and illuminated S Saintpaul cells were upregulated in PBS at a set temperature of 4°C, indicating that increased gene expression levels might be due to a temperature shift and nutrient deficiency rather than to LED illumination. In contrast, only oxyR in S Enteritidis cells was upregulated. Thus, different sensitivities of the two strains to LED illumination were attributed to differences in gene regulation.IMPORTANCE Bacterial inactivation using visible light has recently received attention as a safe and environmentally friendly technology, in contrast with UV light, which has detrimental effects on human health and the environment. This study was designed to understand how 405 ± 5-nm light-emitting diode (LED

  15. Unusual extinction spectra of nanometer-sized silver particles arranged in two-dimensional arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Chumanov, G.; Sokolov, K.; Cotton, T.M. |

    1996-03-28

    Two-dimensional arrays of 1000 A silver particles were prepared by adsorption from colloidal suspensions onto glass slides derivatized with (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane. By variation of the concentration of the colloidal suspensions, slides with different interparticle distances were obtained, and their extinction spectra were measured in water. A blue shift (up to 90 nm) and sharpening of the peak corresponding to the plasmon resonance was observed as the distance between particles decreased to a value comparable to, or less than, their diameter. The angular dependence of the extinction spectra was studied for s- and p-polarized light. The data are interpreted to result from coherent coupling of the plasmon resonances in closely spaced silver particles upon irradiation with light. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  16. The Quest for Greater Chemical Energy Storage: A Deceiving Game of Nanometer Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, C. Michael

    2015-06-01

    It is well known that modern energetic materials based on organic chemistry have nearly reached a plateau in performance with only ~ 40% improvement realized over the past half century. This fact has stimulated research on alternative chemical energy storage schema in various US government funded ``High Energy Density Materials'' (HEDM) programs since the 1950's. These efforts have examined a wide range of phenomena such as free radical stabilization, metallic hydrogen, metastable helium, polynitrogens, extended molecular solids, nanothermites, and others. In spite of the substantial research investments, significant improvements in energetic material performance have not been forthcoming. In this talk we will survey various fundamental modes of chemical energy storage, lesson's learned in the various HEDM programs, and areas that are being explored currently. A recurring theme in all of this work is the challenge to successfully manipulate and stabilize matter at the ~ 1 nm scale.

  17. Measurement of the transition probability of the C III 190.9 nanometer intersystem line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.; Fang, Z.; Gibbons, T. T.; Parkinson, W. H.; Smith, Peter L.

    1993-01-01

    A radio-frequency ion trap has been used to store C(2+) ions created by electron bombardment of CO. The transition probability for the 2s2p 3Po1-2s2 1S0 intersystem line of C m has been measured by recording the radiative decay at 190.9 nm. The measured A-value is 121 +/- 7/s and agrees, within mutual uncertainty limits, with that of Laughlin et al. (1978), but is 20 percent larger than that of Nussbaumer and Storey (1978). The effective collision mixing rate coefficient among the fine structure levels of 3Po and the combined quenching and charge transfer rate coefficients out of the 3Po1 level with the CO source gas have also been measured.

  18. Spin waves in micro-structured yttrium iron garnet nanometer-thick films

    SciTech Connect

    Jungfleisch, Matthias B. Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Wanjun; Wu, Stephen M.; Pearson, John E.; Bhattacharya, Anand; Hoffmann, Axel; Chang, Houchen; Wu, Mingzhong; Sklenar, Joseph; Ketterson, John B.

    2015-05-07

    We investigated the spin-wave propagation in a micro-structured yttrium iron garnet waveguide of 40 nm thickness. Utilizing spatially-resolved Brillouin light scattering microscopy, an exponential decay of the spin-wave amplitude of (10.06 ± 0.83) μm was observed. This leads to an estimated Gilbert damping constant of α=(8.79±0.73)×10{sup −4}, which is larger than damping values obtained through ferromagnetic resonance measurements in unstructured films. The theoretically calculated spatial interference of waveguide modes was compared to the spin-wave pattern observed experimentally by means of Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy.

  19. Nanometer-scale striped surface terminations on fractured SrTiO(3) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Guisinger, Nathan P; Santos, Tiffany S; Guest, Jeffrey R; Chien, Te-Yu; Bhattacharya, Anand; Freeland, John W; Bode, Matthias

    2009-12-22

    Using cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy on in situ fractured SrTiO(3), one of the most commonly used substrates for the growth of complex oxide thin films and superlattices, atomically smooth terraces have been observed on (001) surfaces. Furthermore, it was discovered that fracturing this material at room temperature results in the formation of stripe patterned domains having characteristic widths ( approximately 10 to approximately 20 nm) of alternating surface terminations that extend over a long range. Spatial characterization utilizing spectroscopy techniques revealed a strong contrast in the electronic structure of the two domains. Combining these results with topographic data, we are able to assign both TiO(2) and SrO terminations to their respective domains. The results of this experiment reveal that fracturing this material leads to reproducibly flat surfaces that can be characterized at the atomic-scale and suggest that this technique can be utilized for the study of technologically relevant complex oxide interfaces.

  20. Nanometals for Solar-to-Chemical Energy Conversion: From Semiconductor-Based Photocatalysis to Plasmon-Mediated Photocatalysis and Photo-Thermocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianguang; Liu, Lequan; Ouyang, Shuxin; Xu, Hua; Wang, Defa; Zhao, Naiqin; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-08-01

    Nanometal materials play very important roles in solar-to-chemical energy conversion due to their unique catalytic and optical characteristics. They have found wide applications from semiconductor photocatalysis to rapidly growing surface plasmon-mediated heterogeneous catalysis. The recent research achievements of nanometals are reviewed here, with regard to applications in semiconductor photocatalysis, plasmonic photocatalysis, and plasmonic photo-thermocatalysis. As the first important topic discussed here, the latest progress in the design of nanometal cocatalysts and their applications in semiconductor photocatalysis are introduced. Then, plasmonic photocatalysis and plasmonic photo-thermocatalysis are discussed. A better understanding of electron-driven and temperature-driven catalytic behaviors over plasmonic nanometals is helpful to bridge the present gap between the communities of photocatalysis and conventional catalysis controlled by temperature. The objective here is to provide instructive information on how to take the advantages of the unique functions of nanometals in different types of catalytic processes to improve the efficiency of solar-energy utilization for more practical artificial photosynthesis.

  1. Evaluation of dental pulp repair using low level laser therapy (688 nm and 785 nm) morphologic study in capuchin monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretel, H.; Oliveira, J. A.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Ramalho, L. T. O.

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) 688 nm and 785 nm accelerate dentin barrier formation and repair process after traumatic pulp exposure. The sample consisted of 45 premolars of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) with pulp exposure Class V cavities. All premolars were treated with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), divided in groups of 15 teeth each, and analyzed on 7th, 25th, and 60th day. Group GI - only Ca(OH)2, GII - laser 688 nm, and GIII - laser 785 nm. Laser beam was used in single and punctual dose with the parameters: continuous, 688 nm and 785 nm wavelength, tip's area of 0.00785 cm2, power 50 mW, application time 20 s, dose 255 J/cm2, energy 2 J. Teeth were capped with Ca(OH)2, Ca(OH)2 cement and restored with amalgam. All groups presented pulp repair. On 25th day the thickness of the formed dentin barrier was different between the groups GI and GII (p < 0.05) and between groups GI and GIII (p < 0.01). On 60th day there was difference between GI and GIII (p < 0.01). It may be concluded that, LLLT 688 nm and 785 nm accelerated dentin barrier formation and consequently pulp repair process, with best results using infrared laser 785 nm.

  2. Scattering matrices of martian dust analogs at 488 nm and 647 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowska, Dominika D.; Muñoz, Olga; Moreno, Fernando; Ramos, José L.; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Wurm, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    We present measurements of the complete scattering matrix as a function of the scattering angle of five martian dust analogs, namely montmorillonite, two palagonite (JSC-1) samples, basalt, and calcite. The measurements are performed at 488 and 647 nm, covering the scattering angle range from 3° to 177°. The experimental scattering matrices are compared with results of Lorenz-Mie calculations performed for the same size distributions and refractive indices as our analog samples. As expected, we find that scattering matrices of realistic polydispersions of dust particles cannot be replaced by such calculated matrices. In contrast, the measured phase functions for our martian dust analogs may be considered a good approximation for martian dust at the studied wavelengths. Further, because of the sensitivity of polarimetry to particle microphysics, spectro-polarimetric observations from the martian surface appear to be a powerful diagnostic tool to infer the composition of the dust in the martian atmosphere. To facilitate the use of the experimental matrices for multiple-scattering calculations with polarization included, we compute the corresponding synthetic scattering matrices based on the measurements and defined in the full angle range from 0° to 180°.

  3. On high speed transmission with the 850nm VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkiewicz, Jarosław P.; Chorchos, Łukasz; Puerta Ramirez, Rafael; Vegas Olmos, Juan Jose; Ledentsov, Nikolay

    2016-09-01

    One of the key research challenges is development of energy efficient high bit rate data interconnects. The most promising solutions are based on 850 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) and multi mode fibre (MMF). In this paper options to realize energy efficient 850 nm data interconnects are discussed and evaluated.

  4. Electron beam inspection of 16nm HP node EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Takeya; Narukawa, Shogo; Abe, Tsukasa; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Hayashi, Naoya; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Lin, Chia-Wen; Zhao, Yan; Kuan, Chiyan; Jau, Jack

    2012-11-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is the most promising solution for 16nm HP node semiconductor device manufacturing and beyond. The fabrication of defect free EUV mask is one of the most challenging roadblocks to insert EUVL into high volume manufacturing (HVM). To fabricate and assure the defect free EUV masks, electron beam inspection (EBI) tool will be likely the necessary tool since optical mask inspection systems using 193nm and 199nm light are reaching a practical resolution limit around 16nm HP node EUV mask. For production use of EBI, several challenges and potential issues are expected. Firstly, required defect detection sensitivity is quite high. According to ITRS roadmap updated in 2011, the smallest defect size needed to detect is about 18nm for 15nm NAND Flash HP node EUV mask. Secondly, small pixel size is likely required to obtain the high sensitivity. Thus, it might damage Ru capped Mo/Si multilayer due to accumulated high density electron beam bombardments. It also has potential of elevation of nuisance defects and reduction of throughput. These challenges must be solved before inserting EBI system into EUV mask HVM line. In this paper, we share our initial inspection results for 16nm HP node EUV mask (64nm HP absorber pattern on the EUV mask) using an EBI system eXplore® 5400 developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI). In particularly, defect detection sensitivity, inspectability and damage to EUV mask were assessed. As conclusions, we found that the EBI system has capability to capture 16nm defects on 64nm absorber pattern EUV mask, satisfying the sensitivity requirement of 15nm NAND Flash HP node EUV mask. Furthermore, we confirmed there is no significant damage to susceptible Ru capped Mo/Si multilayer. We also identified that low throughput and high nuisance defect rate are critical challenges needed to address for the 16nm HP node EUV mask inspection. The high nuisance defect rate could be generated by poor LWR and stitching errors during EB writing

  5. Thin bilayer resists for 193-nm and future photolithography II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishiro, Yoshi; Hyatt, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Bilayer, Si-containing resists are a technique of interest and a strong candidate to replace chemical vapor deposition (CVD) hardmask processes for small critical dimensions (CDs). Previously, we proposed a very thin film approach using bilayer resists for future lithography, defined the requirements for the resists, and demonstrated 55nm transferred patterns with high aspect ratios using 2-beam interferometer exposure. In this paper, we have demonstrated smaller-than- 60nm transferred patterns with a high numerical aperture (NA) scanner, as well as 45nm and 40nm transferred patterns with a 2-beam system using a 20% Si-containing thin bilayer resist. Immersion scanner exposure and a 35nm CD with 2- beam system were also studied.

  6. Applications of the 308-nm excimer laser in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, A.; Kemeny, L.

    2006-05-01

    Excimer lasers contain a mixture of a noble inert gas and a halogen, which form excited dimers only in the activated state. High-energy current is used to produce these dimers, which have a very short lifetime, and after their fast dissociation they release the excitation energy through ultraviolet photons. The application of these lasers proved to be successful in medicine, including the field of ophthalmology, cardiology, angiology, dentistry, orthopaedics, and, in recent years, dermatology. For medical purposes, the 193-nm argon fluoride, the 248-nm krypton fluoride, the 351-nm xenon fluoride, and the 308-nm xenon chloride lasers are used. Recently, the 308-nm xenon chloride laser has gained much attention as a very effective treatment modality in dermatological disorders. It was successfully utilized in psoriasis; later, it proved to be useful in handling other lightsensitive skin disorders and even in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review summarizes the possible applications of this promising tool in dermatology.

  7. In situ probing the interior of single bacterial cells at nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boyin; Hemayet Uddin, Md; Ng, Tuck Wah; Paterson, David L.; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian; Fu, Jing

    2014-10-01

    We report a novel approach to probe the interior of single bacterial cells at nanometre resolution by combining focused ion beam (FIB) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). After removing layers of pre-defined thickness in the order of 100 nm on the target bacterial cells with FIB milling, AFM of different modes can be employed to probe the cellular interior under both ambient and aqueous environments. Our initial investigations focused on the surface topology induced by FIB milling and the hydration effects on AFM measurements, followed by assessment of the sample protocols. With fine-tuning of the process parameters, in situ AFM probing beneath the bacterial cell wall was achieved for the first time. We further demonstrate the proposed method by performing a spatial mapping of intracellular elasticity and chemistry of the multi-drug resistant strain Klebsiella pneumoniae cells prior to and after it was exposed to the ‘last-line’ antibiotic polymyxin B. Our results revealed increased stiffness occurring in both surface and interior regions of the treated cells, suggesting loss of integrity of the outer membrane from polymyxin treatments. In addition, the hydrophobicity measurement using a functionalized AFM tip was able to highlight the evident hydrophobic portion of the cell such as the regions containing cell membrane. We expect that the proposed FIB-AFM platform will help in gaining deeper insights of bacteria-drug interactions to develop potential strategies for combating multi-drug resistance.

  8. Nanometer-scale probing of spin waves using single electron spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sar, Toeno; Casola, Francesco; Walsworth, Ronald; Yacoby, Amir

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a new approach to exploring magnetic excitations in correlated-electron systems, based on single electronic spins in atom-like defects diamond known as nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers. We demonstrate the power of this approach by detecting spin-wave excitations in a ferromagnetic microdisc with nanoscale spatial sensitivity over a broad range of frequencies and magnetic fields. We show how spin-wave resonances can be exploited for on-chip amplification of microwave magnetic fields, allowing strongly increased spin manipulation rates and single-spin magnetometry with enhanced sensitivity. Finally, we show the possibility to detect the magnetic spin noise produced by a thin (~ 30 nm) layer of a patterned ferromagnet. For the interpretation of our results, we develop a general framework describing single-spin stray field detection in terms of a filter function sensitive mostly to spin fluctuations with wavevector ~ 1 / d , where d is the NV-ferromagnet distance. Our results pave the way towards quantitative and non-perturbative detection of spectral properties in nanomagnets, establishing NV center magnetometry as an emergent probe of collective spin dynamics in condensed matter.

  9. Analyzing Single Giant Unilamellar Vesicles With a Slotline-Based RF Nanometer Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yan; Kenworthy, Anne K.; Edidin, Michael; Divan, Ralu; Rosenmann, Daniel; Wang, Pingshan

    2016-03-11

    Novel techniques that enable reagent free detection and analysis of single cells are of great interest for the development of biological and medical sciences, as well as point-of-care health service technologies. Highly sensitive and broadband RF sensors are promising candidates for such a technique. In this paper, we present a highly sensitive and tunable RF sensor, which is based on interference processes and built with a 100-nm slotline structure. The highly concentrated RF fields, up to ~ 1.76×107 V/m, enable strong interactions between giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and fields for high-sensitivity operations. We also provide two modeling approaches to extract cell dielectric properties from measured scattering parameters. GUVs of different molecular compositions are synthesized and analyzed with the RF sensor at ~ 2, ~ 2.5, and ~ 2.8 GHz with an initial |S21|min of ~ -100 dB. Corresponding GUV dielectric properties are obtained. Finally, a one-dimensional scanning of single GUV is also demonstrated.

  10. Analyzing Single Giant Unilamellar Vesicles With a Slotline-Based RF Nanometer Sensor

    DOE PAGES

    Cui, Yan; Kenworthy, Anne K.; Edidin, Michael; ...

    2016-03-11

    Novel techniques that enable reagent free detection and analysis of single cells are of great interest for the development of biological and medical sciences, as well as point-of-care health service technologies. Highly sensitive and broadband RF sensors are promising candidates for such a technique. In this paper, we present a highly sensitive and tunable RF sensor, which is based on interference processes and built with a 100-nm slotline structure. The highly concentrated RF fields, up to ~ 1.76×107 V/m, enable strong interactions between giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and fields for high-sensitivity operations. We also provide two modeling approaches to extractmore » cell dielectric properties from measured scattering parameters. GUVs of different molecular compositions are synthesized and analyzed with the RF sensor at ~ 2, ~ 2.5, and ~ 2.8 GHz with an initial |S21|min of ~ -100 dB. Corresponding GUV dielectric properties are obtained. Finally, a one-dimensional scanning of single GUV is also demonstrated.« less

  11. New method for introducing nanometer flux pinning centers into single domain YBCO bulk superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. M.; Wang, Miao

    2013-10-01

    Single domain YBCO superconductors with different additions of Bi2O3 have been fabricated by top seeded infiltration and growth process (TSIG). The effect of Bi2O3 additions on the growth morphology, microstructure and levitation force of the YBCO bulk superconductor has been investigated. The results indicate that single domain YBCO superconductors can be fabricated with the additions of Bi2O3 less than 2 wt%; Bi2O3 can be reacted with Y2BaCuO5 and liquid phase and finally form Y2Ba4CuBiOx(YBi2411) nanoscale particles; the size of the YBi2411 particles is about 100 nm, which can act as effective flux pinning centers. It is also found that the levitation force of single domain YBCO bulks is increasing from 13 N to 34 N and decreasing to 11 N with the increasing of Bi2O3 addition from 0.1 wt% to 0.7 wt% and 2 wt%. This result is helpful for us to improve the physical properties of REBCO bulk superconductors.

  12. Disinfection effects of undoped and silver-doped ceria powders of nanometer crystallite size

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Dah-Shyang; Yang, Tzu-Sen; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Peng, Pei-Wen; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Being endowed with an ability of capturing and releasing oxygen, the ceria surface conventionally assumes the role of catalyzing redox reactions in chemistry. This catalytic effect also makes possible its cytotoxicity toward microorganisms at room temperature. To study this cytotoxicity, we synthesized the doped and undoped ceria particles of 8–9 nm in size using an inexpensive precipitation method and evaluated their disinfecting aptitudes with the turbidimetric and plate count methods. Among the samples being analyzed, the silver-doped ceria exhibits the highest sterilization ability, yet the undoped ceria is the most intriguing. The disinfection effect of undoped ceria is moderate in magnitude, demanding a physical contact between the ceria surface and bacteria cell wall, or the redox catalysis that can damage the cell wall and result in the cell killing. Evidently, this effect is short-range and depends strongly on dispersion of the nanoparticles. In contrast, the disinfection effects of silver-doped ceria reach out several millimeters since it releases silver ions to poison the surrounding microorganisms. Additionally, the aliovalent silver substitution creates more ceria defects. The synergetic combination, silver poisoning and heterogeneous redox catalysis, lifts and extends the disinfecting capability of silver-doped ceria to a superior level. PMID:27330294

  13. Surface and grain boundary interdiffusion in nanometer-scale LSMO/BFO bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Virendra; Gaur, Anurag; Choudhary, R. J.; Gupta, Mukul

    2016-05-01

    Epitaxial 150 nm thick LSMO/BFO bilayer is deposited on STO (100) substrate by pulsed laser deposition, to study magnetoelectric effect. Unexpected low value of room temperature magnetization in bilayer indicates towards the possibility of interdiffusion. Further, sharp fall in the value of TC (53 K) also added our anxiety towards possible interdiffusion in BFO/LSMO system. Low-angle x-ray diffraction technique is used to investigate interdiffusion phenomena, and the temperature-dependent interdiffusivity is obtained by accurately monitoring the decay of the first-order modulation peak as a function of annealing time. It has been found that the diffusivity at different temperatures follows Arrhenius-type behavior. X-ray reflection (XRR) pattern obtained for the bilayer could not be fitted in the Parratt's formalism, which confirms the interdiffusion in it. Depth profiles of 209Bi, 56Fe ions measured by secondary ion mass spectroscope (SIMS) further substantiate the diffusion of these ions from upper BFO layer into lower LSMO layer.

  14. Disinfection effects of undoped and silver-doped ceria powders of nanometer crystallite size.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Dah-Shyang; Yang, Tzu-Sen; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Peng, Pei-Wen; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Being endowed with an ability of capturing and releasing oxygen, the ceria surface conventionally assumes the role of catalyzing redox reactions in chemistry. This catalytic effect also makes possible its cytotoxicity toward microorganisms at room temperature. To study this cytotoxicity, we synthesized the doped and undoped ceria particles of 8-9 nm in size using an inexpensive precipitation method and evaluated their disinfecting aptitudes with the turbidimetric and plate count methods. Among the samples being analyzed, the silver-doped ceria exhibits the highest sterilization ability, yet the undoped ceria is the most intriguing. The disinfection effect of undoped ceria is moderate in magnitude, demanding a physical contact between the ceria surface and bacteria cell wall, or the redox catalysis that can damage the cell wall and result in the cell killing. Evidently, this effect is short-range and depends strongly on dispersion of the nanoparticles. In contrast, the disinfection effects of silver-doped ceria reach out several millimeters since it releases silver ions to poison the surrounding microorganisms. Additionally, the aliovalent silver substitution creates more ceria defects. The synergetic combination, silver poisoning and heterogeneous redox catalysis, lifts and extends the disinfecting capability of silver-doped ceria to a superior level.

  15. Nanometer-scale striped surface terminations on fractured SrTiO{sub 3} surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Guisinger, N. P.; Santos, T. S.; Guest, J. R.; Chien, T.-Y; Bhattacharya, A.; Freeland, J. W.; Bode, M.

    2009-12-01

    Using cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy on in situ fractured SrTiO{sub 3}, one of the most commonly used substrates for the growth of complex oxide thin films and superlattices, atomically smooth terraces have been observed on (001) surfaces. Furthermore, it was discovered that fracturing this material at room temperature results in the formation of stripe patterned domains having characteristic widths ({approx}10 to {approx}20 nm) of alternating surface terminations that extend over a long range. Spatial characterization utilizing spectroscopy techniques revealed a strong contrast in the electronic structure of the two domains. Combining these results with topographic data, we are able to assign both TiO{sub 2} and SrO terminations to their respective domains. The results of this experiment reveal that fracturing this material leads to reproducibly flat surfaces that can be characterized at the atomic-scale and suggest that this technique can be utilized for the study of technologically relevant complex oxide interfaces.

  16. Wavelength dependence on the forensic analysis of glass by nanosecond 266 nm and 1064 nm laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, Erica M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-05-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be used for the chemical characterization of glass to provide evidence of an association between a fragment found at a crime scene to a source of glass of known origin. Two different laser irradiances, 266 nm and 1064 nm, were used to conduct qualitative and quantitative analysis of glass standards. Single-pulse and double-pulse configurations and lens-to-sample-distance settings were optimized to yield the best laser-glass coupling. Laser energy and acquisition timing delays were also optimized to result in the highest signal-to-noise ratio corresponding to the highest precision and accuracy. The crater morphology was examined and the mass removed was calculated for both the 266 nm and 1064 nm irradiations. The analytical figures of merit suggest that the 266 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths are capable of good performance for the forensic chemical characterization of glass. The results presented here suggest that the 266 nm laser produces a better laser-glass matrix coupling, resulting in a better stoichiometric representation of the glass sample. The 266 nm irradiance is therefore recommended for the forensic analysis and comparison of glass samples.

  17. Variation of cell spreading on TiO2 film modified by 775 nm and 388 nm femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, M.; Shinonaga, T.; Sato, Y.; Chen, P.; Nagai, A.; Hanawa, T.

    2014-03-01

    Titanium (Ti) is one of the most used biomaterials in metals. However, Ti is typically artificial materials. Thus, it is necessary for improving the biocompatibility of Ti. Recently, coating of the titanium dioxides (TiO2) film on Ti plate has been proposed to improve biocompatibility of Ti. We have developed coating method of the film on Ti plate with an aerosol beam. Periodic structures formation on biomaterials was also a useful method for improving the biocompatibility. Direction of cell spreading might be controlled along the grooves of periodic microstructures. In our previous study, periodic nanostructures were formed on the film by femtosecond laser irradiation at fundamental wave (775 nm). Period of the periodic nanostructures was about 230 nm. In cell test, cell spreading along the grooves of the periodic nanostructures was observed although it was not done for the film without the periodic nanostructures. Then, influence of the period of the periodic nanostructures on cell spreading has not been investigated yet. The period might be changed by changing the laser wavelength. In this study, the periodic nanostructures were created on the film with femtosecond laser at 775nm and 388 nm, respectively. After cell test, cell spreading along the grooves of the periodic nanostructures was observed on 775 nm and 388nm laser irradiated areas. Distribution of direction of cell spreading on laser irradiated area was also examined. These results suggested that controlling the cell spreading on periodic nanostructures with period of 230 nm was better than that with period of 130 nm.

  18. A continuous wave 10 W cryogenic fiber amplifier at 1015 nm and frequency quadrupling to 254 nm.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, R; Koglbauer, A; Bachor, P; Diehl, T; Kolbe, D; Stappel, M; Walz, J

    2013-09-23

    A stable, continuous wave, single frequency fiber amplifier system at 1015 nm with 10 W output power is presented. It is based on a large mode double clad fiber cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature. The amplified light is frequency quadrupled to 254 nm and used for spectroscopy of the 6¹S → 6³P transition in mercury.

  19. Adiabatic nanofocusing on ultrasmooth single-crystalline gold tapers creates a 10-nm-sized light source with few-cycle time resolution.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Slawa; Piglosiewicz, Björn; Sadiq, Diyar; Shirdel, Javid; Lee, Jae Sung; Vasa, Parinda; Park, Namkyoo; Kim, Dai-Sik; Lienau, Christoph

    2012-07-24

    We demonstrate adiabatic nanofocusing of few-cycle light pulses using ultrasharp and ultrasmooth single-crystalline gold tapers. We show that the grating-induced launching of spectrally broad-band surface plasmon polariton wavepackets onto the shaft of such a taper generates isolated, point-like light spots with 10 fs duration and 10 nm diameter spatial extent at its very apex. This nanofocusing is so efficient that nanolocalized electric fields inducing strong optical nonlinearities at the tip end are reached with conventional high repetition rate laser oscillators. We use here the resulting second harmonic to fully characterize the time structure of the localized electric field in frequency-resolved interferometric autocorrelation measurements. Our results strongly suggest that these nanometer-sized ultrafast light spots will enable new experiments probing the dynamics of optical excitations of individual metallic, semiconducting, and magnetic nanostructures.

  20. Motion picture imaging of a nanometer-thick liquid film dewetting by ellipsometric microscopy with a submicrometer lateral resolution.

    PubMed

    Fukuzawa, Kenji; Yoshida, Tomohiko; Itoh, Shintaro; Zhang, Hedong

    2008-10-21

    We visualized the detwetting of a nanometer-thick unstable liquid film on a nanotextured solid surface with a high lateral spatial resolution. The dewetting was imaged as a motion picture at a submicrometer spatial resolution and a frame rate of 4 frames/s, using ellipsometric microscopy in a vertical objective configuration. The observation revealed that the dewetting process significantly depends on the sign of the disjoining pressure Pi. When Pi is negative, the film rupture due to the spinodal dewetting proceeds to droplet formation in a single step, whereas, when Pi is positive, the film rupture due to the spinodal dewetting stops when the pressure of the thicker region balances with that of the thinner region, and then the heterogeneous grooves are nucleated and grow. The dewetting process dependence on the sign of Pi can be found in systems other than that reported here because the sign of Pi changes at the local maximum of the surface energy.