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Sample records for 427-1111 tty toll

  1. 75 FR 65359 - Common Formats for Patient Safety Data Collection and Event Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ...; Telephone (toll free): (866) 403-3697; Telephone (local): (301) 427-1111; TTY (toll free): (866) 438-7231... 1.1 includes updated event descriptions, forms, and technical specifications for software...

  2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tti2 Regulates PIKK Proteins and Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kyle S.; Duennwald, Martin L.; Karagiannis, Jim; Genereaux, Julie; McCarton, Alexander S.; Brandl, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The TTT complex is composed of the three essential proteins Tel2, Tti1, and Tti2. The complex is required to maintain steady state levels of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) proteins, including mTOR, ATM/Tel1, ATR/Mec1, and TRRAP/Tra1, all of which serve as regulators of critical cell signaling pathways. Due to their association with heat shock proteins, and with newly synthesized PIKK peptides, components of the TTT complex may act as cochaperones. Here, we analyze the consequences of depleting the cellular level of Tti2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that yeast expressing low levels of Tti2 are viable under optimal growth conditions, but the cells are sensitive to a number of stress conditions that involve PIKK pathways. In agreement with this, depleting Tti2 levels decreased expression of Tra1, Mec1, and Tor1, affected their localization and inhibited the stress responses in which these molecules are involved. Tti2 expression was not increased during heat shock, implying that it does not play a general role in the heat shock response. However, steady state levels of Hsp42 increase when Tti2 is depleted, and tti2L187P has a synthetic interaction with exon 1 of the human Huntingtin gene containing a 103 residue polyQ sequence, suggesting a general role in protein quality control. We also find that overexpressing Hsp90 or its cochaperones is synthetic lethal when Tti2 is depleted, an effect possibly due to imbalanced stoichiometry of a complex required for PIKK assembly. These results indicate that Tti2 does not act as a general chaperone, but may have a specialized function in PIKK folding and/or complex assembly. PMID:27172216

  3. Using a TTY to contact clinical graduate programs.

    PubMed

    Olkin, R; Shafton-Bias, E

    1997-10-01

    This study investigated accessibility of 177 APA-accredited clinical and counseling programs to deaf applicants via TTY phone lines, what happened when we called these numbers, and where these phone lines connected. We were able to obtain TTY phone numbers for 135 schools, of which we could successfully reach 86 schools using a TTY alone. Most of these lines (60%) were connected to campus disabled student services, and none connected directly to the APA-accredited programs or the departments in which they were housed. Comments from university personnel underscore the difficulties facing deaf applicants. We argue that the difficulties deaf applicants encounter when trying to contact programs constitute significant barriers to the application process. We give six specific recommendations for expanding access to programs.

  4. 78 FR 15682 - Notification of Proposed Production Activity TTI, Inc.; Subzone 196A (Electromechanical and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Notification of Proposed Production Activity TTI, Inc.; Subzone 196A (Electromechanical and Circuit Protection Devices Production/ Kitting); Fort Worth, TX TTI, Inc. (TTI), operator of Subzone 196A, submitted a notification of proposed production activity for its facilities located in...

  5. 78 FR 37203 - Authorization of Production Activity; Subzone 196A; TTI, Inc. (Electromechanical and Circuit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Authorization of Production Activity; Subzone 196A; TTI, Inc. (Electromechanical and Circuit Protection Devices Production/Kitting); Fort Worth, Texas On February 13, 2013, TTI, Inc. submitted a notification of proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board for...

  6. Toll-Booth Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    NASA's Technology Application Team at Stanford Research Institute searched available information and suggested a transfer of clean-room technology employing the use of the same laminar flow techniques found in environmental control systems of clean rooms used for contamination-free assembly of precision aerospace equipment. That information, from technology originally developed by NASA and the Energy Research & Development Administration was incorporated in the design of a prototype toll booth purifier. The draft-free design includes a "diffusor", which blows clean air out the toll booth doorway, thus retarding the infiltration of contaminated air. The net effect is a decrease in the toll collector's inhalation of exhaust fumes. The Washington Department of Highways installed the prototype system in a toll booth at the Evergreen Point Bridge near Seattle. After a successful two-year test, the department now has equipped all 10 of the bridge's toll booths with the air purifiers.

  7. Applicability of a microbial Time Temperature Indicator (TTI) for monitoring spoilage of modified atmosphere packed minced meat.

    PubMed

    Vaikousi, Hariklia; Biliaderis, Costas G; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2009-08-15

    The applicability of a microbial Time Temperature Indicator (TTI) prototype, based on the growth and metabolic activity of a Lactobacillus sakei strain developed in a previous study, in monitoring quality of modified atmosphere packed (MAP) minced beef was evaluated at conditions simulating the chill chain. At all storage temperatures examined (0, 5, 10, 15 degrees C), the results showed that lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were the dominant bacteria and can be used as a good spoilage index of MAP minced beef. The end of product's shelf life as revealed by the sensory evaluation coincided with a LAB population level of 7 log(10) CFU/g. For all temperatures tested, the growth of L. sakei in the TTI resembled closely the growth of LAB in the meat product, with similar temperature dependence of the micro(max) and thus similar activation energy values calculated as 111.90 and 106.90 kJ/mol, for the two systems, respectively. In addition, the end point of TTI colour change coincided with the time of sensory rejection point of the beef product during its storage under isothermal chilled temperature conditions. The estimated activation energy, E(alpha), values obtained for parameters related to the response of DeltaE (total colour change of the TTI) describing the kinetics of colour change of the TTI during isothermal storage (i.e. the maximum specific rate of DeltaEpsilon evolution curve, micro(DeltaEpsilon), and also the reciprocal of t(i), time at which half of the maximum DeltaEpsilon is reached), were 112.77 and 127.28 kJ/mol, respectively. Finally, the application of the microbial TTI in monitoring the quality deterioration of MAP minced beef due to spoilage was further evaluated under dynamic conditions of storage, using two separate low temperature periodic changing scenarios, resembling the actual conditions occurring in the distribution chill chain. The results showed that the end point of TTI, after storage at those fluctuating temperature conditions, was noted very

  8. Development of Health Education Learning Module in Bac.TSE-LDPE Programme in TTI: Needs Analysis Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ujang, Alijah; Alias, Norlidah; Siraj, Saedah

    2015-01-01

    This study is to explore the need to develop learning modules of health education for trainee teachers in the Bachelor Of Teaching (Hons)(Special Education-Learning Disabilities For Primary Education) Programme (Bac.TSE-LDPE) in the Teacher Training Institute (TTI). The questionnaire uses the Likert scale with the close ended questions analysed by…

  9. German Deaf People Using Text Communication: Short Message Service, TTY, Relay Services, Fax, and E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Des; Power, Mary R.; Rehling, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    An online survey of German deaf people demonstrated that they use text communication through Short Message Service (SMS), e-mail, fax, and telephone typewriters (TTY) to communicate within communities of deaf and hearing people. SMS is used most, with more than 96% of respondents having access to a mobile phone. Most use is intrinsic and directed…

  10. Toll Bar on Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Dave

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 2007 the United Kingdom experienced some of the heaviest rainfall since records began. Toll Bar in South Yorkshire featured prominently in media coverage as the village and the homes surrounding it began to flood. Many people lost everything: their homes, their furniture, their possessions. In an effort to come to terms with what…

  11. German deaf people using text communication: short message service, TTY, relay services, fax, and e-mail.

    PubMed

    Power, Des; Power, Mary R; Rehling, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    An online survey of German deaf people demonstrated that they use text communication through Short Message Service (SMS), e-mail, fax, and telephone typewriters (TTY) to communicate within communities of deaf and hearing people. SMS is used most, with more than 96% of respondents having access to a mobile phone. Most use is intrinsic and directed toward sociability (keeping in contact, and making arrangements with friends and family). However, there is some instrumental use (getting tasks or business accomplished, making appointments, and obtaining information). German survey respondents wanted a better relay service, more connectivity among the various technologies, and full interactivity in making calls by any technology. In comparison with an Australian sample, German deaf people could not rely on extensive relay services connecting people with a TTY to hearing telephone subscribers for calls of either a social or business nature.

  12. Evidence for tty Production and Measurement of (σ tt)γ/(σtt)

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-31

    Using data corresponding to 6.0 fb-1 of pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector, we present a cross section measurement of top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, ttγ. The events are selected by looking for a lepton (ell), a photon (γ), significant transverse momentum imbalance (ET), large total transverse energy, and three or more jets, with at least one identified as containing a b quark (b). The ttγ sample requires the photon to have 10 GeV or more of transverse energy, and to be in the central region. Using an event selectionmore » optimized for the ttγ candidate sample we measure the production cross section of tt (σtt), and the ratio of cross sections of the two samples. Control samples in the dilepton+photon and lepton+photon+ET, channels are constructed to aid in decay product identification and background measurements. We observe 30 ttγ candidate events compared to the standard model expectation of 26.9 ± 3.4 events. We measure the ttγ cross section (σtt) to be 0.18 ± 0.08 pb, and the ratio of σttγ to σtt to be 0.024 ± 0.009. Assuming no tty production, we observe a probability of 0.0015 of the background events alone producing 30 events or more, corresponding to 3.0 standard deviations.« less

  13. Radiation takes its Toll

    PubMed Central

    Ratikan, Josephine A.; Micewicz, Ewa D.; Xie, Michael W.; Schaue, Dörthe

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recognize and respond to universal molecular patterns on invading microorganisms allows our immune system to stay on high alert, sensing danger to our self-integrity. Our own damaged cells and tissues in pathological situations activate similar warning systems as microbes. In this way, the body is able to mount a response that is appropriate to the danger. Toll-like receptors are at the heart of this pattern recognition system that initiates innate pro-oxidant, pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and ultimately bridges recognition of danger to adaptive immunity. The acute inflammatory lesions that are formed segue into resolution of inflammation, repair and healing or, more dysfunctionally, into chronic inflammation, autoimmunity, excessive tissue damage and carcinogenesis. Redox is at the nexus of this decision making process and is the point at which ionizing radiation initially intercepts to trigger similar responses to self-damage. In this review we discuss our current understanding of how radiation-damaged cells interact with Toll-like receptors and how the immune systems interprets these radiation-induced danger signals in the context of whole-body exposures and during local tumor irradiation. PMID:25819030

  14. Modelling spoilage of fresh turbot and evaluation of a time-temperature integrator (TTI) label under fluctuating temperature.

    PubMed

    Nuin, Maider; Alfaro, Begoña; Cruz, Ziortza; Argarate, Nerea; George, Susie; Le Marc, Yvan; Olley, June; Pin, Carmen

    2008-10-31

    Kinetic models were developed to predict the microbial spoilage and the sensory quality of fresh fish and to evaluate the efficiency of a commercial time-temperature integrator (TTI) label, Fresh Check(R), to monitor shelf life. Farmed turbot (Psetta maxima) samples were packaged in PVC film and stored at 0, 5, 10 and 15 degrees C. Microbial growth and sensory attributes were monitored at regular time intervals. The response of the Fresh Check device was measured at the same temperatures during the storage period. The sensory perception was quantified according to a global sensory indicator obtained by principal component analysis as well as to the Quality Index Method, QIM, as described by Rahman and Olley [Rahman, H.A., Olley, J., 1984. Assessment of sensory techniques for quality assessment of Australian fish. CSIRO Tasmanian Regional Laboratory. Occasional paper n. 8. Available from the Australian Maritime College library. Newnham. Tasmania]. Both methods were found equally valid to monitor the loss of sensory quality. The maximum specific growth rate of spoilage bacteria, the rate of change of the sensory indicators and the rate of change of the colour measurements of the TTI label were modelled as a function of temperature. The temperature had a similar effect on the bacteria, sensory and Fresh Check kinetics. At the time of sensory rejection, the bacterial load was ca. 10(5)-10(6) cfu/g. The end of shelf life indicated by the Fresh Check label was close to the sensory rejection time. The performance of the models was validated under fluctuating temperature conditions by comparing the predicted and measured values for all microbial, sensory and TTI responses. The models have been implemented in a Visual Basic add-in for Excel called "Fish Shelf Life Prediction (FSLP)". This program predicts sensory acceptability and growth of spoilage bacteria in fish and the response of the TTI at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions. The program is freely

  15. Testing treatments interactive (TTi): helping to equip the public to promote better research for better health care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaolong; Chalmers, Iain

    2015-05-01

    Testing Treatments is a book written to help everyone understand why testing treatments is so important, why treatment tests have to be fair, and how everyone can help to promote better research for better health care. The book proved to be very popular and its second edition has already been translated into a dozen languages, with more translations in the pipeline. The texts of the original English and all the translations are feely downloadable from Testing Treatments interactive at www.testingtreatments.org. The editors of all the different language websites have established an TTi Editorial Alliance, to share experiences and provide each other with mutual support. The TTi Editorial Alliance seeks to promote a world in which health professionals, patients and the public use reliable research to inform their health decisions. Its missions are (i) To promote a global network, involving members of the public in partnership with professionals, to communicate and discuss basic principles and general knowledge about testing treatments; (ii) to help the public increase critical thinking and skills in accessing, apprehending, appraising and using research evidence; and (iii) to help patients and the public to participate more actively in health research.

  16. Application and validation of the TTI based chill chain management system SMAS (Safety Monitoring and Assurance System) on shelf life optimization of vacuum packed chilled tuna.

    PubMed

    Tsironi, Theofania; Gogou, Eleni; Velliou, Eirini; Taoukis, Petros S

    2008-11-30

    The objective of the study was to establish a validated kinetic model for growth of spoilage bacteria on vacuum packed tuna slices in the temperature range of 0 to 15 degrees C and to evaluate the applicability of the TTI (Time Temperature Integrators) based SMAS (Safety Monitoring and Assurance System) system to improve tuna product quality at the time of consumption in comparison to the conventional First In First Out (FIFO) approach. The overall measurements of total flora and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on the tuna samples used in a laboratory simulated field test were in close agreement with the predictions of the developed kinetic model. The spoilage profile of the TTI bearing products, handled with SMAS, was improved. Three out of the thirty products that were handled randomly, according to the FIFO approach, were already spoiled at the time of consumption (logN(LAB)>6.5) compared to no spoiled products when handled with the SMAS approach.

  17. Motif of misfit layer compounds (SnS) xTS 2 (T=Ti, V, Nb, Ta) in the matrix of SnS 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, S. P.

    1999-09-01

    The possibility of T (T=Ti, V, Nb, Ta) insertion in the layer matrix of SnS 2 (when T≪Sn) presents a special case of intercalation for the specific interactions that are inherent in the misfit layer compounds (SnS) xTS 2 ( x≈1). FT Raman spectra of T xSnS 2 (T=Ti, V) with x≪1 testify to the SnS 2 matrix that is invariable with respect to a charge transfer from T to SnS 2 layers as compared with the pristine SnS 2. At the same time the T xSnS 2 structure ( x≪1) taken as a whole has substantial features in the UV-IR spectra as compared with the pristine SnS 2 but is still a semiconductor at least in the case of T=Ti. This points out in the cluster manner of TS 2 insertion in the matrix of SnS 2 with the interactions that are typical of the misfit layer compounds (SnS) xTS 2 in which metallic conductivity occurs in the TS 2 layers.

  18. [Innate immunity, Toll receptor and sepsis].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl

    2003-01-01

    The innate immune response is the first line of defense against infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize bacterial lipopolysaccharide and other pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Intracellular signals initiated by interaction between Toll receptors and specific PAMPs results in inflammatory response. Sepsis and septic shock are the result of an exaggerated inflammatory systemic response induced by innate immune dysregulation.

  19. Tailored and Integrated Web-Based Tools for Improving Psychosocial Outcomes of Cancer Patients: The DoTTI Development Framework

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Jamie; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Tzelepis, Flora; Henskens, Frans; Paul, Christine; Stevenson, William

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective communication with cancer patients and their families about their disease, treatment options, and possible outcomes may improve psychosocial outcomes. However, traditional approaches to providing information to patients, including verbal information and written booklets, have a number of shortcomings centered on their limited ability to meet patient preferences and literacy levels. New-generation Web-based technologies offer an innovative and pragmatic solution for overcoming these limitations by providing a platform for interactive information seeking, information sharing, and user-centered tailoring. Objective The primary goal of this paper is to discuss the advantages of comprehensive and iterative Web-based technologies for health information provision and propose a four-phase framework for the development of Web-based information tools. Methods The proposed framework draws on our experience of constructing a Web-based information tool for hematological cancer patients and their families. The framework is based on principles for the development and evaluation of complex interventions and draws on the Agile methodology of software programming that emphasizes collaboration and iteration throughout the development process. Results The DoTTI framework provides a model for a comprehensive and iterative approach to the development of Web-based informational tools for patients. The process involves 4 phases of development: (1) Design and development, (2) Testing early iterations, (3) Testing for effectiveness, and (4) Integration and implementation. At each step, stakeholders (including researchers, clinicians, consumers, and programmers) are engaged in consultations to review progress, provide feedback on versions of the Web-based tool, and based on feedback, determine the appropriate next steps in development. Conclusions This 4-phase framework is evidence-informed and consumer-centered and could be applied widely to develop Web-based programs

  20. Evidence for tty Production and Measurement of (σ tt)γ/(σtt)

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-31

    Using data corresponding to 6.0 fb-1 of pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector, we present a cross section measurement of top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, ttγ. The events are selected by looking for a lepton (ell), a photon (γ), significant transverse momentum imbalance (ET), large total transverse energy, and three or more jets, with at least one identified as containing a b quark (b). The ttγ sample requires the photon to have 10 GeV or more of transverse energy, and to be in the central region. Using an event selection optimized for the ttγ candidate sample we measure the production cross section of tt (σtt), and the ratio of cross sections of the two samples. Control samples in the dilepton+photon and lepton+photon+ET, channels are constructed to aid in decay product identification and background measurements. We observe 30 ttγ candidate events compared to the standard model expectation of 26.9 ± 3.4 events. We measure the ttγ cross section (σtt) to be 0.18 ± 0.08 pb, and the ratio of σttγ to σtt to be 0.024 ± 0.009. Assuming no tty production, we observe a probability of 0.0015 of the background events alone producing 30 events or more, corresponding to 3.0 standard deviations.

  1. Occupational Noise Exposure among Toll Tellers at Toll Plaza in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, Sharifah Nadya Syed; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md; Ya, Tuan Mohammad Yusoff Shah Tuan; Saidin, Hamidi

    2010-10-01

    Toll tellers working at toll plaza have potential of exposure to high noise from the vehicles especially for the peak level of sound emitted by the heavy vehicles. However, occupational exposures in this workplace have not been adequately characterized and identified. Occupational noise exposure among toll tellers at toll plaza was assessed using Sound Level Meter, Noise Dosimeter and through questionnaire survey. These data were combined to estimate the work shift exposure level and health impacts to the toll tellers by using statistical analysis. Noise Dosimeter microphone was located at the hearing zone of the toll teller which working inside the toll booth and full-period measurements were collected for each work shift. The measurements were taken at 20 toll booths from 6.00 am to 2.00 pm for 5 days. 71 respondents participated in the survey to identify the symptoms of noise induced hearing loss and other health related problems among toll tellers. Results of this study indicated that occupational noise exposure among toll tellers for Mean Continuous Equivalent Level, Leq was 79.2±1.4 dB(A), Mean Maximum Level, Lmax was 107.8±3.6 dB(A) and Mean Peak Level, Lpeak was 136.6±9.9 dB. The Peak Level reported statistically significantly at 140 dB, the level of TLV recommended by ACGIH. The research findings indicated that the primary risk exposure to toll tellers comes from noise that emitted from heavy vehicles. Most of the toll tellers show symptoms of noise induced hearing loss and annoyed by the sources of noise at the toll plaza.

  2. Hello IM, Goodbye TTY

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Lori; Peters, Tom

    2006-01-01

    According to the National Association of the Deaf, there are approximately 28 million deaf and hearing-impaired people in the U.S.--roughly 10 percent of the total population. This hearing-impaired population may be even more isolated than the visually impaired community. Although technology is making it easier for libraries to provide effective…

  3. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made...

  4. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made...

  5. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made...

  6. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made...

  7. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made...

  8. Test Procedures for Toll Call Certification Alternatives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-07

    REPORT 4 PERIOD COVERED (U) Test Procedures for Toll CallFia Se86-Ar7 Certification AlternativesFiaSe86-Ar7 6. PERFORMING ORG . REPORT NUMBER 1. AUTHOR(e...toll call sampling is to use the toll call 21 a a C3a En L~a cmaL-a Lna ac C3 a cc u _3 to a- aa aL 4r C14 I Lo a_ V ’ Iara a D r- w U 4 c * a I’ aDUJ

  9. FASTSAT-HSV01 Synergistic Observations of the Magnetospheric Response During Active Periods: MINI-ME, PISA and TTI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casas, Joseph C.; Collier, Michael R.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Sigwarth, John B.; Boudreaux, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    potentially contribute to space weather research in a synergistic manner. MINI-ME, a neutral atom imager, will observe the neutral atom inputs to ionospheric heating which can be important during high levels of magnetospheric activity. PISA, a plasma impedance spectrometer, will measure simultaneously the local electron densities and temperatures as well as measure small scale density structure (500 m spatial scale) during these active periods. TTI, a thermospheric imager, will remotely determine the thermospheric temperature response to this magnetospheric activity. Together, these observations will contribute significantly to a comprehensive understanding of the flow of energy through and the response of the storm-time terrestrial magnetosphere.

  10. FASTSAT-HSV01 synergistic observations of the magnetospheric response during active periods: MINI-ME, PISA and TTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Joseph; Collier, Michael; Rowland, Douglas; Sigwarth, John; Boudreaux, Mark

    potentially contribute to space weather research in a synergistic manner. MINI-ME, a neutral atom imager, will observe the neutral atom inputs to ionospheric heating which can be important during high levels of magnetospheric activity. PISA, a plasma impedance spec-trometer, will measure simultaneously the local electron densities and temperatures as well as measure small scale density structure (500 m spatial scale) during these active periods. TTI, a thermospheric imager, will remotely determine the thermospheric temperature response to this magnetospheric activity. Together, these observations will contribute significantly to a comprehensive understanding of the flow of energy through and the response of the storm-time terrestrial magnetosphere.

  11. Toll-like receptor 7 mediates pruritus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Park, Chul-Kyu; Berta, Temugin; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2010-12-01

    Toll-like receptors are typically expressed in immune cells to regulate innate immunity. We found that functional Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) was expressed in C-fiber primary sensory neurons and was important for inducing itch (pruritus), but was not necessary for eliciting mechanical, thermal, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in mice. Our results indicate that TLR7 mediates itching and is a potential therapeutic target for anti-itch treatment in skin disease conditions.

  12. RAGE on the Toll Road?

    PubMed

    Lin, Li

    2006-10-01

    Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are cellular pattern-recognizing receptors (PRRs) that recognize the molecular patterns of pathogens. After engaging the pathogenic patterned ligands, the cytosolic portion of the TLRs in monocytes and macrophages, recruits adaptor proteins, via a receptor-driven signaling cascade, activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB, leading to the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, which trigger inflammation. Such rapid, innate cellular responses serve as the first line of host defense against infection by pathogens, and also stimulate the adaptive immune system to clear the invading microbes. Increasing evidence suggests that TLRs also recognize host-derived ligands, linking this group of PRRs to diseases that may not have an etiology that is associated directly with infections. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are nonenzymatically glycated or oxidated proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that are formed in the environment of oxidant stress and hyperglycemia. Binding of AGEs to their receptor RAGE initiates cellular signals that activate NF-kappaB, which results in transcription of proinflammatory factors. RAGE can also interact with other endogenous ligands generated by cell death and tissue injuries. RAGE has been implicated in chronic diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurodisorders, cancers, as well as aging. This review discusses the possible role of RAGE as a PRR that may use signaling mechanisms parallel to TLRs', to solicit inflammatory reactions. Thus, in this scenario, RAGE may play a prominent role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis in the context of complex disease progression.

  13. Uncovering the 2010 Haiti earthquake death toll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, J. E.; Khazai, B.; Wenzel, F.

    2013-05-01

    Casualties are estimated for the 12 January 2010 earthquake in Haiti using various reports calibrated by observed building damage states from satellite imagery and reconnaissance reports on the ground. By investigating various damage reports, casualty estimates and burial figures, for a one year period from 12 January 2010 until 12 January 2011, there is also strong evidence that the official government figures of 316 000 total dead and missing, reported to have been caused by the earthquake, are significantly overestimated. The authors have examined damage and casualties report to arrive at their estimation that the median death toll is less than half of this value (±137 000). The authors show through a study of historical earthquake death tolls, that overestimates of earthquake death tolls occur in many cases, and is not unique to Haiti. As death toll is one of the key elements for determining the amount of aid and reconstruction funds that will be mobilized, scientific means to estimate death tolls should be applied. Studies of international aid in recent natural disasters reveal that large distributions of aid which do not match the respective needs may cause oversupply of help, aggravate corruption and social disruption rather than reduce them, and lead to distrust within the donor community.

  14. A health survey of toll booth workers

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, P.; Orris, P.; Buckley, L. )

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of respiratory and other health problems in a cohort of highway toll booth workers was surveyed by mailed questionnaire. In a low proportion of respondents (43.2%), a high prevalence of central nervous system complaints (headaches, irritability, or anxiety, and unusual tiredness), mucous membrane irritation (eye irritation, nasal congestion, and dry throat), and musculoskeletal problems (joint and back pains) was found. We believe these symptoms are reflective of the acute irritant and central nervous system effects of exposure to motor vehicle exhaust. The musculoskeletal complaints are likely the result of bending, reaching, and leaning out of the toll booth. The need for in-depth evaluation of the ventilation systems and the ergonomic and job stressors of work at toll booths is suggested by these results.

  15. 47 CFR 63.65 - Closure of public toll station where another toll station of applicant in the community will...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... toll station to be retained; (2) Description of service area affected, including approximate population and character of the business of the community; (3) Average number of toll telephone messages...

  16. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise...

  17. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise...

  18. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise...

  19. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise...

  20. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise...

  1. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  2. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  3. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  4. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  5. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  6. Enhanced antimicrobial peptide-induced activity in the mollusc Toll-2 family through evolution via tandem Toll/interleukin-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jun; Chen, Yihong; Jin, Min; Ren, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Toll receptors play an important role in the innate immunity of invertebrates. All reported Tolls have only one Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain at the C-terminal. In this study, numerous Tolls with tandem TIRs at the C-terminal were found in molluscs. Such Tolls presented an extra TIR (TIR-1) compared with Toll-I. Thus, Toll-I might be the ancestor of tandem TIRs containing Toll. To test this hypothesis, 83 Toll-I and Toll-2 (most have two TIRs, but others seem to be the evolutionary intermediates) genes from 29 shellfish species were identified. These Tolls were divided into nine groups based on phylogenetic analyses. A strong correlation between phylogeny and motif composition was found. All Toll proteins contained the TIR-2 domain, whereas the TIR-1 domain only existed in some Toll-2 protein, suggesting that TIR-1 domain insertion may play an important role in Toll protein evolution. Further analyses of functional divergence and adaptive evolution showed that some of the critical sites responsible for functional divergence may have been under positive selection. An additional intragenic recombination played an important role in the evolution of the Toll-I and Toll-2 genes. To investigate the functional difference of Toll-I and Toll-2, over expression of Hcu_Toll-I or Hcu_Toll-2-2 in Drosophila S2 cells was performed. Results showed that Hcu_Toll-2-2 had stronger antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity than Hcu_Toll-I. Therefore, enhanced AMP-induced activity resulted from tandem TIRs in Toll-2s of molluscs during evolution history. PMID:27429771

  7. Toll-like Receptor-7 Mediates Pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Park, Chul-Kyu; Berta, Temugin; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are typically expressed in immune cells to regulate innate immunity. Here we report that functional TLR7 is expressed in C-fiber primary sensory neurons and important for inducing itch (pruritis) but not necessary for eliciting mechanical, thermal, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in mice. Thus, we have uncovered TLR7 as a novel itch mediator and a potential therapeutic target for anti-itch treatment in skin disease conditions. PMID:21037581

  8. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology... technology. (a) Any toll agency operating a toll facility pursuant to authority under a 1604 toll program... agency using electronic toll collection technology must develop and implement reasonable methods...

  9. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology... technology. (a) Any toll agency operating a toll facility pursuant to authority under a 1604 toll program... agency using electronic toll collection technology must develop and implement reasonable methods...

  10. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology... technology. (a) Any toll agency operating a toll facility pursuant to authority under a 1604 toll program... agency using electronic toll collection technology must develop and implement reasonable methods...

  11. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology... technology. (a) Any toll agency operating a toll facility pursuant to authority under a 1604 toll program... agency using electronic toll collection technology must develop and implement reasonable methods...

  12. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... location and use of such methods do not create unsafe operating conditions on the toll facility. (b) A toll... electronic toll collection technology must develop, implement, and make publicly available privacy...

  13. A Toll-like receptor in horseshoe crabs.

    PubMed

    Inamori, Kei-ichiro; Ariki, Shigeru; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2004-04-01

    Non-self-recognition of invading microbes relies on the pattern-recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) derived from microbial cell-wall components. Insects and mammals conserve a signaling pathway of the innate immune system through cell-surface receptors called Tolls and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are an important trigger of the horseshoe crab's innate immunity to infectious microorganisms. Horseshoe crabs' granular hemocytes respond specifically to LPS stimulation, inducing the secretion of various defense molecules from the granular hemocytes. Here, we show a cDNA which we named tToll, coding for a TLR identified from hemocytes of the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. tToll is most closely related to Drosophila Toll in both domain architecture and overall length. Human TLRs have been suggested to contain numerous PAMP-binding insertions located in the leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) of their ectodomains. However, the LRRs of tToll contained no obvious PAMP-binding insertions. Furthermore, tToll was non-specifically expressed in horseshoe crab tissues. These observations suggest that tToll does not function as an LPS receptor on granular hemocytes.

  14. Mincle suppresses Toll-like receptor 4 activation.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Mahmood, Syed Kashif; Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Ochi, Atsuo; Batel, Jennifer; Deutsch, Michael; Barilla, Rocky; Seifert, Lena; Pachter, H Leon; Daley, Donnele; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Miller, George

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of Toll-like receptor responses is critical for limiting tissue injury and autoimmunity in both sepsis and sterile inflammation. We found that Mincle, a C-type lectin receptor, regulates proinflammatory Toll-like receptor 4 signaling. Specifically, Mincle ligation diminishes Toll-like receptor 4-mediated inflammation, whereas Mincle deletion or knockdown results in marked hyperresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide in vitro, as well as overwhelming lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation in vivo. Mechanistically, Mincle deletion does not up-regulate Toll-like receptor 4 expression or reduce interleukin 10 production after Toll-like receptor 4 ligation; however, Mincle deletion decreases production of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent inhibitory intermediate suppressor of cytokine signaling 1, A20, and ABIN3 and increases expression of the Toll-like receptor 4 coreceptor CD14. Blockade of CD14 mitigates the increased sensitivity of Mincle(-/-) leukocytes to Toll-like receptor 4 ligation. Collectively, we describe a major role for Mincle in suppressing Toll-like receptor 4 responses and implicate its importance in nonmycobacterial models of inflammation.

  15. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  16. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  17. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  18. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  19. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  20. Conventional and Non-Conventional Drosophila Toll Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Scott A.; Wasserman, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Toll in Drosophila and of the remarkable conservation in pathway composition and organization catalyzed a transformation in our understanding of innate immune recognition and response. At the center of that picture is a cascade of interactions in which specific microbial cues activate Toll receptors, which then transmit signals driving transcription factor nuclear localization and activity. Experiments gave substance to the vision of pattern recognition receptors, linked phenomena in development, gene regulation, and immunity into a coherent whole, and revealed a rich set of variations for identifying non-self and responding effectively. More recently, research in Drosophila has illuminated the positive and negative regulation of Toll activation, the organization of signaling events at and beneath membranes, the sorting of information flow, and the existence of non-conventional signaling via Toll-related receptors. Here, we provide an overview of the Toll pathway of flies and highlight these ongoing realms of research. PMID:23632253

  1. Concentrations of ultrafine particles at a highway toll collection booth and exposure implications for toll collectors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Cheng-Hsiung; Huang, Hsiao-Lin; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2010-12-15

    Research regarding the magnitude of ultrafine particle levels at highway toll stations is limited. This study measured ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles at a highway toll station from October 30 to November 1 and November 5 to November 6, 2008. A scanning mobility particle sizer was used to measure ultrafine particle concentrations at a ticket/cash tollbooth. Levels of hourly average ultrafine particles at the tollbooth were about 3-6 times higher than those in urban backgrounds, indicating that a considerable amount of ultrafine particles are exhausted from passing vehicles. A bi-modal size distribution pattern with a dominant mode at about <6 nm and a minor mode at about 40 nm was observed at the tollbooth. The high amounts of nanoparticles in this study can be attributed to gas-to-particle reactions in fresh fumes emitted directly from vehicles. The influences of traffic volume, wind speed, and relative humidity on ultrafine particle concentrations were also determined. High ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles existed under low wind speed, low relative humidity, and high traffic volume. Although different factors account for high ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles at the tollbooth, measurements indicate that toll collectors who work close to traffic emission sources have a high exposure risk.

  2. Mycobacterial signaling through toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Joyoti; Shin, Dong-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2012-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have helped to decipher molecular networks dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, in mycobacteria-infected macrophages. Stimulation of TLRs by mycobacteria and their antigenic components rapidly induces intracellular signaling cascades involved in the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, which play important roles in orchestrating proinflammatory responses and innate defense through generation of a variety of antimicrobial effector molecules. Recent studies have provided evidence that mycobacterial TLR-signaling cross talks with other intracellular antimicrobial innate pathways, the autophagy process and functional vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling. In this article we describe recent advances in the recognition, responses, and regulation of mycobacterial signaling through TLRs. PMID:23189273

  3. Toll gates: An emerging therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Maheaswari, Rajendran; Sivasankar, Kiruthika; Subbarayan, Sathya

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune system forms the first line of defense against microbial infections, as it exerts an immediate response. Innate immunity works through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which functions as primary sensors of pathogens. TLR activates multiple signaling cascades leading to the induction of genes responsible for the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferon. Thus, they induce antimicrobial responses and also have an instructive role in adaptive immunity. However, TLR-mediated inflammation is said to be responsible for many of the destructive host responses in inflammatory diseases like periodontitis. Hence, therapeutics targeting TLRs are being used to treat disease such as HIV, Hepatitis B, asthma etc. Recently, synthetic TLR agonists are tried as novel vaccine adjuvant in treating periodontal diseases. This paper reviews the scope of TLR-based therapeutics in treating periodontitis. PMID:25624622

  4. A novel Toll like receptor with two TIR domains (HcToll-2) is involved in regulation of antimicrobial peptide gene expression of Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qian; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Zhong, Xue; Song, Xiao-Jun; Ma, Fei; Hui, Kai-Min; Wang, Wen; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2014-07-01

    Animal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in innate immunity. Toll proteins are generally transmembrane proteins. In this study, an atypical Toll-like receptor (HcToll-2) was identified from the triangle-shell pearl mussel Hyriopsis cumingii, which belongs to phylum Mollusca. Unlike the typical Toll like receptors with extracellular leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), transmembrane, and intracellular Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains, HcToll-2 has two homologous TIR domains located at the C-terminal (designated as HcTIR1 and HcTIR2) and lacks a transmembrane domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HcTIR1 was clustered with TIR of sea anemone Toll, and HcTIR2 was clustered with TIR of Drosophila Toll. HcToll-2 mRNA could be detected in the hepatopancreas and was upregulated after challenge with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Recombinant HcLRR protein with GST tag could bind to bacteria and also to LPS and PGN. Over-expression of both HcTIR1 and HcTIR2 induced drosomycin genes in Drosophila S2 cells. RNAi analysis showed that HcToll-2 was required for the expression of theromacin, which is a cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide (AMP) gene. This research is the first report of an atypical Toll-like receptor HcToll-2 involved in antibacterial immunity through induction of AMP expression.

  5. 26 CFR 49.4252-2 - Toll telephone service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... subscriber for toll telephone service furnished to the hotel or its guests, but no tax attaches to any charge made by the hotel for service rendered in placing the calls for its guests. (c) Cross reference....

  6. 26 CFR 49.4252-2 - Toll telephone service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... subscriber for toll telephone service furnished to the hotel or its guests, but no tax attaches to any charge made by the hotel for service rendered in placing the calls for its guests. (c) Cross reference....

  7. 26 CFR 49.4252-2 - Toll telephone service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... subscriber for toll telephone service furnished to the hotel or its guests, but no tax attaches to any charge made by the hotel for service rendered in placing the calls for its guests. (c) Cross reference....

  8. 26 CFR 49.4252-2 - Toll telephone service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... subscriber for toll telephone service furnished to the hotel or its guests, but no tax attaches to any charge made by the hotel for service rendered in placing the calls for its guests. (c) Cross reference....

  9. Delivering Career Information on a Toll-Free Hotline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snipes, Juanita K.; McDaniels, Carl

    1982-01-01

    Reviews some of the uses of the phone in crisis situations and describes a popular toll-free career information hotline in Virginia. Provides a profile of the mostly adult users along with a user evaluation of the service. (Author)

  10. Annual Death Toll from Alzheimer's Nearly Doubles in 15 Years

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163957.html Annual Death Toll From Alzheimer's Nearly Doubles in 15 Years ... to success in treating other leading causes of death, and partly due to increasing awareness that AD [ ...

  11. TSCA Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Toll Manufacturing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet provides information on existing Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) regulations to persons who are involved in toll manufacturing of chemical substances which may be subject to the CDR rule.

  12. 33 CFR 402.10 - Schedule of tolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Column 2 Column 3 1. Subject to item 3, for complete transit of the Seaway, a composite toll, comprising... manifest or other document, as follows: (a) bulk cargo 1.0012 0.6834. (b) general cargo 2.4124 1.0936. (c... of the U.S. portion of tolls for commercial vessels is waived by law (33 U.S.C. 998a(a)). 3...

  13. Toll road crashes of commercial and passenger motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Braver, Elisa R; Solomon, Mark G; Preusser, David F

    2002-05-01

    Revenue-collection data from toll roads allow for accurate estimates of miles driven by vehicle type and, when combined with crash data, valid estimates of crash involvements per mile driven. Data on vehicle-miles traveled and collisions were obtained from toll road authorities in Florida. Kansas, and New York. In addition, state crash files and published vehicle-miles of travel were obtained for toll roads in Illinois. Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Large commercial motor vehicles were significantly underinvolved in single-vehicle crashes on all state toll roads. In five states, commercial motor vehicles were significantly overinvolved in multiple-vehicle crashes relative to passenger vehicles; the exceptions were Kansas, where they had significantly lower multiple-vehicle involvement rates, and Indiana. where there were no significant differences in multiple-vehicle involvements by vehicle type. The risk of commercial motor vehicle involvement in multiple-vehicle crashes resulting in deaths or serious injuries was double that of passenger vehicles in the two states (Ohio and Pennsylvania) that identified serious injuries. Whether crash rates, on toll roads of commercial motor vehicles are higher or lower than those of passenger vehicles appears to depend on the type of crash, specific toll road. and traffic density.

  14. Hyperfine Fields at 51V in Heusler Alloys Co2T1-xVxGa (T{=}Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe) and Estimation of Magnetic Moments of the Constituent Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Masayuki; Nagahama, Masatoshi; Satohira, Shin-ichi

    1990-12-01

    The hyperfine fields Hhf in the ferromagnetic alloys Co2T1-xVxGa (T{=}Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe) were measured by NMR spin-echo technique at 4.2 K as a function of x. Hhf(V) on V impurity at b sites (x≃0) was determined to be -41, -40± 2, -15 and -38± 3 kOe for T{=}Ti, Cr, Mn and Fe, respectively. We estimated from these values, assuming V to be non magnetic, the magnetic moments of the atoms in Co2CrGa and Co2FeGa with the use of the measured saturation moments. It was found that for the two alloys the same moments were obtained also from Hhf(Mn) on Mn impurity instead of V by assuming that the magnetic moment of Mn impurity in these alloys is the same as the Mn moment in Co2MnGa. The estimated moments of Cr and Fe were found to be consistent with Hhf(Co).

  15. Toll receptor response to white spot syndrome virus challenge in giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii).

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinling; Zhao, Lingling; Jin, Min; Li, Tingting; Wu, Lei; Chen, Yihong; Ren, Qian

    2016-10-01

    Toll receptors are evolutionary ancient families of pattern recognition receptors with crucial roles in invertebrate innate immune response. In this study, we identified a Toll receptor (MrToll) from giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii). The full-length cDNA of MrToll is 4257 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 1367 amino acids. MrToll contains 17 LRR domains, a transmembrane domain, and a TIR domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MrToll was grouped with Drosophila Toll7 and other arthropod Tolls. The transcripts of MrToll are mainly distributed in the heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine. A low level of MrToll expression can be detected in hemocytes and the lymphoid organ. MrToll expression in gills was gradually upregulated to the highest level from 24 h to 48 h during the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. The expression levels of the crustin (Cru) genes Cru3 and Cru7 in gills were relatively lower than those of Cru2 and Cru4. The expression levels of Cru3 and Cru7 were inhibited after the RNA interference of MrToll in gills during the WSSV challenge. The anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) genes ALF2, ALF3, ALF4, and ALF5 were also regulated by MrToll in gills during the virus challenge. These findings suggest that MrToll may contribute to the innate immune defense of M. rosenbergii against WSSV.

  16. Toll-like receptors and cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Coati, Ilaria; Miotto, Serena; Zanetti, Irene; Alaibac, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Innate immune cells recognize highly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Previous studies have demonstrated that PRRs also recognize endogenous molecules, termed damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that are derived from damaged cells. PRRs include Toll-like receptors (TLRs), scavenger receptors, C-type lectin receptors and nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors. To date, 10 TLRs have been identified in humans and each receptor responds to a different ligand. The recognition of PAMPS or DAMPs by TLRs leads to the activation of signaling pathways and cellular responses with subsequent pro-inflammatory cytokine release, phagocytosis and antigen presentation. In the human skin, TLRs are expressed by keratinocytes and melanocytes: The main cells from which skin cancers arise. TLRs 1–6 and 9 are expressed in keratinocytes, while TLRs 2–5, 7, 9 and 10 have been identified in melanocytes. It is hypothesized that TLRs may present a target for melanoma therapies. In this review, the involvement of TLRs in the pathogenesis and treatment of melanoma was discussed. PMID:27900049

  17. Galileo or for whom the bell tolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legat, K.; Hofmann-Wellenhof, B.

    2000-10-01

    Satellite-based navigation rapidly evolved into an efficient tool extensively used in a wide variety of civilian applications covering numerous modes of transportation, communication, administration, geodesy, agriculture, and many others. The current systems globally available are the US Global Positioning System (GPS) and the conceptually very similar Russian Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS). Considering the worldwide applications, GPS clearly predominates over GLONASS. However, GPS and GLONASS are mainly under military control of single nations and, also critical, do not fulfill certain performance requirements of the civil users, especially in terms of safety-critical applications. Thus, augmentations to the current systems and even completely new systems are under investigation. These are usually summarized under the abbreviation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs). The various types of GNSS are described where emphasis is put on the future US and European contributions to the second-generation GNSS, i.e., the modernized GPS and the definition of the new European Galileo system. These two systems may be characterized as "compatible competitors"—thus, one might ask for whom the bell tolls.

  18. Toll-Like Receptors of Deuterostome Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Satake, Honoo; Sekiguchi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Defensive systems against pathogens are responsible not only for survival or lifetime of an individual but also for the evolution of a species. Innate immunity is expected to be more important for invertebrates than mammals, given that adaptive immunity has not been acquired in the former. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been shown to play a crucial role in host defense of pathogenic microbes in innate immunity of mammals. Recent genome-wide analyses have suggested that TLR or their related genes are conserved in invertebrates. In particular, numerous TLR-related gene candidates were detected in deuterostome invertebrates, including a sea urchin (222 TLR-related gene candidates) and amphioxus (72 TLR-related gene candidates). Molecular phylogenetic analysis verified that most of sea urchin or amphioxus TLR candidates are paralogous, suggesting that these organisms expanded TLR-related genes in a species-specific manner. In contrast, another deuterostome invertebrate, the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, was found to possess only two TLR genes. Moreover, Ciona TLRs, Ci-TLR1 and Ci-TLR2, were shown to possess “hybrid” functionality of mammalian TLRs. Such functionality of Ci-TLRs could not be predicted by sequence comparison with vertebrate TLRs, indicating confounding evolutionary lineages of deuterostome invertebrate TLRs or their candidates. In this review article, we present recent advances in studies of TLRs or their candidates among deuterostome invertebrates, and provide insight into an evolutionary process of TLRs. PMID:22566918

  19. [Hugo Toll - physician, author, and health debater with firm views].

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Peter M

    2004-01-01

    The Swedish physician Hugo Toll (1858-1943) was brought up as the son of a farmer in mid-Sweden. He was a talented young medical student at the University of Uppsala. After finishing his studies Hugo Toll spent some years as a surgeon in the US, working in Minnesota. Before settling down again in Sweden Toll toured many European countries to increase his knowledge in medical matters and public health issues. In his laborous years of work he spent time in Stockholm, running a private practice, and later on as a headmaster at Ersta School of Nursing, outside Stockholm. Through many years Hugo Toll devoted much time and efforts to writing and lecturing on public health, healthy lifestyle matters, and other topics related to medicine. As many other authors of this time, he also included views based on racial biology and the positive health selection of future parents. At this time some Swedish physicians were more or less openly committed to Nazi ideology, such as Ake Berglund, Herman Lundborg and Gösta Häggqvist. Other physicians were never members of any Nazi party, or did not see themselves as believers in any similar ideology. However, in their lectures and writings, a mixture of ideas upon public health were revealed, some of them also related to Nazi ideology. My impression is that Hugo Toll, although an elderly man and almost blind in the 1930's, was one of many Swedish physicians and debaters with ideas that other, more ideologically determined physicians with strong political views could make use of. Therefore, in current times we can learn from the experience of Hugo Toll that physicians with strong beliefs in public health and a healthy lifestyle can provide arguments that others can use in a different context for darker purposes.

  20. Toll-like receptor agonists in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors related to the Drosophila Toll protein. TLR activation alerts the immune system to microbial products and initiates innate and adaptive immune responses. The naturally powerful immunostimulatory property of TLR agonists can be exploited for active immunotherapy against cancer. Antitumor activity has been demonstrated in several cancers, and TLR agonists are now undergoing extensive clinical investigation. This review discusses recent advances in the field and highlights potential opportunities for the clinical development of TLR agonists as single agent immunomodulators, vaccine adjuvants and in combination with conventional cancer therapies. PMID:20563267

  1. The Toll pathway is required in the epidermis for muscle development in the Drosophila embryo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halfon, M. S.; Keshishian, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Toll signaling pathway functions in several Drosophila processes, including dorsal-ventral pattern formation and the immune response. Here, we demonstrate that this pathway is required in the epidermis for proper muscle development. Previously, we showed that the zygotic Toll protein is necessary for normal muscle development; in the absence of zygotic Toll, close to 50% of hemisegments have muscle patterning defects consisting of missing, duplicated and misinserted muscle fibers (Halfon, M.S., Hashimoto, C., and Keshishian, H., Dev. Biol. 169, 151-167, 1995). We have now also analyzed the requirements for easter, spatzle, tube, and pelle, all of which function in the Toll-mediated dorsal-ventral patterning pathway. We find that spatzle, tube, and pelle, but not easter, are necessary for muscle development. Mutations in these genes give a phenotype identical to that seen in Toll mutants, suggesting that elements of the same pathway used for Toll signaling in dorsal-ventral development are used during muscle development. By expressing the Toll cDNA under the control of distinct Toll enhancer elements in Toll mutant flies, we have examined the spatial requirements for Toll expression during muscle development. Expression of Toll in a subset of epidermal cells that includes the epidermal muscle attachment cells, but not Toll expression in the musculature, is necessary for proper muscle development. Our results suggest that signals received by the epidermis early during muscle development are an important part of the muscle patterning process.

  2. Drosophila Dicer-2 has an RNA interference–independent function that modulates Toll immune signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaowei; Wu, Di; Liu, Yongxiang; Xia, Xiaoling; Gong, Wanyun; Qiu, Yang; Yang, Jie; Zheng, Ya; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Yu-Feng; Xiang, Ye; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Dicer-2 is the central player for small interfering RNA biogenesis in the Drosophila RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Intriguingly, we found that Dicer-2 has an unconventional RNAi-independent function that positively modulates Toll immune signaling, which defends against Gram-positive bacteria, fungi, and some viruses, in both cells and adult flies. The loss of Dicer-2 expression makes fruit flies more susceptible to fungal infection. We further revealed that Dicer-2 posttranscriptionally modulates Toll signaling because Dicer-2 is required for the proper expression of Toll protein but not for Toll protein stability or Toll mRNA transcription. Moreover, Dicer-2 directly binds to the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of Toll mRNA via its PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille) domain and is required for protein translation mediated by Toll 3′UTR. The loss of Toll 3′UTR binding activity makes Dicer-2 incapable of promoting Toll signaling. These data indicate that the interaction between Dicer-2 and Toll mRNA plays a pivotal role in Toll immune signaling. In addition, we found that Dicer-2 is also required for the Toll signaling induced by two different RNA viruses in Drosophila cells. Consequently, our findings uncover a novel RNAi-independent function of Dicer-2 in the posttranscriptional regulation of Toll protein expression and signaling, indicate an unexpected intersection of the RNAi pathway and the Toll pathway, and provide new insights into Toll immune signaling, Drosophila Dicer-2, and probably Dicer and Dicer-related proteins in other organisms. PMID:26601278

  3. Consumer Experiences Calling Toll-Free Corporate Hotlines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Charles L.; Smart, Denise T.

    1994-01-01

    Finds that dimensions that contribute to caller satisfaction (of toll-free corporate hotlines) included operator characteristics such as knowledge, courtesy, and interest; specific behaviors such as apologizing for a problem, thanking the consumer for calling, and encouraging them to call again; and reducing time placed on "hold." (SR)

  4. Role of Toll-Like Receptors in Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Biyikli, Oguz Oben; Baysak, Aysegul; Ece, Gulfem; Oz, Adnan Tolga; Ozhan, Mustafa Hikmet; Berdeli, Afig

    2016-01-01

    Background One-third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Investigation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has revealed new information regarding the immunopathogenesis of this disease. Toll-like receptors can recognize various ligands with a lipoprotein structure in the bacilli. Toll-like receptor 2 and TLR-4 have been identified in association with tuberculosis infection. Objectives The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between TLR polymorphism and infection progress. Methods Twenty-nine patients with a radiologically, microbiologically, and clinically proven active tuberculosis diagnosis were included in this 25-month study. Toll-like receptor 2 and TLR-4 polymorphisms and allele distributions were compared between these 29 patients and 100 healthy control subjects. Peripheral blood samples were taken from all patients. Genotyping of TLR-2, TLR-4, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor was performed. The extraction step was completed with a Qiagen mini blood purification system kit (Qiagen, Ontario, Canada) using a peripheral blood sample. The genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results In total, 19 of the 29 patients with tuberculosis infection had a TLR-2 polymorphism, and 20 of the 100 healthy subjects had a TLR-2 polymorphism (P < 0.001). The TLR-4 polymorphism and interferon-γ allele distributions were not statistically correlated. Conclusions Toll-like receptor 2 polymorphism is a risk factor for tuberculosis infection. The limiting factor in this study was the lack of investigation of the interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α levels, which are important in the development of infection. Detection of lower levels of these cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, especially among patients with TLR-2 defects, will provide new data that may support the results of this study. PMID:27942355

  5. Recognition of lipopeptide patterns by Toll-like receptor 2-Toll-like receptor 6 heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin Young; Nan, Xuehua; Jin, Mi Sun; Youn, Suk-Jun; Ryu, Young Hee; Mah, Shinjee; Han, Seung Hyun; Lee, Hayyoung; Paik, Sang-Gi; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2009-12-18

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) initiates potent immune responses by recognizing diacylated and triacylated lipopeptides. Its ligand specificity is controlled by whether it heterodimerizes with TLR1 or TLR6. We have determined the crystal structures of TLR2-TLR6-diacylated lipopeptide, TLR2-lipoteichoic acid, and TLR2-PE-DTPA complexes. PE-DTPA, 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, is a synthetic phospholipid derivative. Two major factors contribute to the ligand specificity of TLR2-TLR1 or TLR2-TLR6 heterodimers. First, the lipid channel of TLR6 is blocked by two phenylalanines. Simultaneous mutation of these phenylalanines made TLR2-TLR6 fully responsive not only to diacylated but also to triacylated lipopeptides. Second, the hydrophobic dimerization interface of TLR2-TLR6 is increased by 80%, which compensates for the lack of amide lipid interaction between the lipopeptide and TLR2-TLR6. The structures of the TLR2-lipoteichoic acid and the TLR2-PE-DTPA complexes demonstrate that a precise interaction pattern of the head group is essential for a robust immune response by TLR2 heterodimers.

  6. Targeting the Toll of Drug Abuse: The Translational Potential of Toll-Like Receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Bachtell, Ryan; Hutchinson, Mark R; Wang, Xiaohui; Rice, Kenner C; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that glial proinflammatory activation importantly contributes to the rewarding and reinforcing effects of a variety of drugs of abuse, including cocaine, methamphetamine, opioids, and alcohol. It has recently been proposed that glia are recognizing, and becoming activated by, such drugs as a CNS immunological response to these agents being xenobiotics; that is, substances foreign to the brain. Activation of glia, primarily microglia, by various drugs of abuse occurs via toll like receptor 4 (TLR4). The detection of such xenobiotics by TLR4 results in the release of glial neuroexcitatory and neurotoxic substances. These glial products of TLR4 activation enhance neuronal excitability within brain reward circuitry, thereby enhancing their rewarding and reinforcing effects. Indeed, selective pharmacological blockade of TLR4 activation, such as with the non-opioid TLR4 antagonist (+)-naltrexone, suppresses a number of indices of drug reward/reinforcement. These include: conditioned place preference, self-administration, drugprimed reinstatement, incubation of craving, and elevations of nucleus accumbens shell dopamine. Notably, TLR4 blockade fails to alter self-administration of food, indicative of a selective effect on drugs of abuse. Genetic disruption of TLR4 signaling recapitulates the effects of pharmacological TLR4 blockade, providing converging lines of evidence of a central importance of TLR4. Taken together, multiple lines of evidence converge to raise TLR4 as a promising therapeutic target for drug abuse.

  7. Standardization and Interoperability Problems of European Electronic Tolling Service (EETS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacki, Gabriel; Mitraszewska, Izabella; Kamiński, Tomasz; Potapczuk, Włodzimierz; Kallweit, Thomas

    The paper refers to some standardization and interoperability problems of the European Electronic Toll Service (EETS) implementation in European Union. The existing EETS systems in the European Union member states are not interoperable due to many differences among them. European Commission has taken bold steps to address that issue. The first one was the 2004/52/EC Directive on the interoperability in the Community. The second one was the decision to launch Europe's own Galileo system. The third was the EC decision from 6th October 2009, based on Research Charging Interoperability (RCI) and the Common Electronic Fee Collection System for a Road Tolling European Service(CESARE) projects. Furthermore, the Motor Transport Institute researches, concerning the mentioned matters have been presented too.

  8. Environmental lead exposure to toll booth workers in Hong Kong

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, T.C.; Wong, L.T.L.; Lam, C.W.K.

    1988-01-01

    A survey of workers in the Lion Rock Tunnel toll booths was conducted, as they were regarded as a high risk group in lead exposure due to high density of vehicular traffic. The exposure of the workers to lead was determined by continuous sapling of air around the breathing zone of workers inside the booths. Blood lead concentration of 50 workers showed a mean of 0.65 {mu}mol/L and the mean urine lead concentration was 0.14 {mu}mol/L. Other tests, such as urinary amino-levulinic acid (ALA), erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and hemoglobin concentration (Hb), were also preformed. The blood lead concentrations and other biological parameters of the toll-booth workers were acceptable and may be attributed to the recent legislation to lower the lead content in petrol and to the good preventive measures taken by the management.

  9. 1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SE. CHICAGO SKYWAY TOLL BRIDGE (HAER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SE. CHICAGO SKYWAY TOLL BRIDGE (HAER No. IL-145) IS TOWARD RIGHT OF FRAME; PITTSBURGH, FORT WAYNE & CHICAGO RAILWAY BRIDGE IS JUST LEFT OF GRAIN ELEVATOR; PAIR OF LAKE SHORE & MICHIGAN SOUTHERN RAILWAY BRIDGES (HAER No. IL-161) ARE TOWARD LEFT OF FRAME. - Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway, Calumet River Bridge, Spanning Calumet River, east of Chicago Skyway (I-90), Chicago, Cook County, IL

  10. Alternate transcription of the Toll-like receptor signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Christine A; Chalk, Alistair M; Forrest, Alistair; Taylor, Darrin; Waddell, Nic; Schroder, Kate; Himes, S Roy; Faulkner, Geoffrey; Lo, Sandra; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kawaji, Hideya; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Katayama, Shintaro; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Hume, David A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2006-01-01

    Background Alternate splicing of key signaling molecules in the Toll-like receptor (Tlr) cascade has been shown to dramatically alter the signaling capacity of inflammatory cells, but it is not known how common this mechanism is. We provide transcriptional evidence of widespread alternate splicing in the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, derived from a systematic analysis of the FANTOM3 mouse data set. Functional annotation of variant proteins was assessed in light of inflammatory signaling in mouse primary macrophages, and the expression of each variant transcript was assessed by splicing arrays. Results A total of 256 variant transcripts were identified, including novel variants of Tlr4, Ticam1, Tollip, Rac1, Irak1, 2 and 4, Mapk14/p38, Atf2 and Stat1. The expression of variant transcripts was assessed using custom-designed splicing arrays. We functionally tested the expression of Tlr4 transcripts under a range of cytokine conditions via northern and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The effects of variant Mapk14/p38 protein expression on macrophage survival were demonstrated. Conclusion Members of the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway are highly alternatively spliced, producing a large number of novel proteins with the potential to functionally alter inflammatory outcomes. These variants are expressed in primary mouse macrophages in response to inflammatory mediators such as interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide. Our data suggest a surprisingly common role for variant proteins in diversification/repression of inflammatory signaling. PMID:16507160

  11. Study on effect of toll station on the traffic flow on three-line road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang-yu; Li, Wen-bo; Feng, Yu-jie

    2013-03-01

    Based on the NaSch Model, a new three-line cellular automata model emphasizing toll station on the high ways is built to discuss the impact of different amount of toll stations on the traffic flow. The models are as follows: Firstly, the process of cars driving is simulated. Secondly, the process of pulling station is simulated. In this part, two Cellular Automata Models are built separately for two cases, three tollbooths in the toll station and four tollbooths. The result shows that when the density of cars is on medium level, comparing with the toll station with three tollbooths, the toll station with four tollbooths can remit the traffic congestion effectively, but when the density of cars is too high or too low, the toll station with three tollbooths can do better.

  12. Toll-like receptor sensing of human herpesvirus infection

    PubMed Central

    West, John A.; Gregory, Sean M.; Damania, Blossom

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are evolutionarily conserved pathogen sensors that constitute the first line of defense in the human immune system. Herpesviruses are prevalent throughout the world and cause significant disease in the human population. Sensing of herpesviruses via TLRs has only been documented in the last 10 years and our understanding of the relationship between these sentinels of the immune system and herpesvirus infection has already provided great insight into how the host cell responds to viral infection. This report will summarize the activation and modulation of TLR signaling in the context of human herpesvirus infections. PMID:23061052

  13. 77 FR 19010 - Zone J Tolling Co., LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ...-000] Zone J Tolling Co., LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market- Based Rate Filing Includes... proceeding of Zone J Tolling Co., LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an...

  14. Toll pathway modulates TNF-induced JNK-dependent cell death in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenxi; Chen, Changyan; Dai, Jianli; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Yujun; Li, Wenzhe; Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Xue, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Signalling networks that control the life or death of a cell are of central interest in modern biology. While the defined roles of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway in regulating cell death have been well-established, additional factors that modulate JNK-mediated cell death have yet to be fully elucidated. To identify novel regulators of JNK-dependent cell death, we performed a dominant-modifier screen in Drosophila and found that the Toll pathway participates in JNK-mediated cell death. Loss of Toll signalling suppresses ectopically and physiologically activated JNK signalling-induced cell death. Our epistasis analysis suggests that the Toll pathway acts as a downstream modulator for JNK-dependent cell death. In addition, gain of JNK signalling results in Toll pathway activation, revealed by stimulated transcription of Drosomycin (Drs) and increased cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of Dorsal. Furthermore, the Spätzle (Spz) family ligands for the Toll receptor are transcriptionally upregulated by activated JNK signalling in a non-cell-autonomous manner, providing a molecular mechanism for JNK-induced Toll pathway activation. Finally, gain of Toll signalling exacerbates JNK-mediated cell death and promotes cell death independent of caspases. Thus, we have identified another important function for the evolutionarily conserved Toll pathway, in addition to its well-studied roles in embryonic dorso-ventral patterning and innate immunity.

  15. Toll pathway modulates TNF-induced JNK-dependent cell death in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chenxi; Chen, Changyan; Dai, Jianli; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Yujun; Li, Wenzhe; Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Xue, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Signalling networks that control the life or death of a cell are of central interest in modern biology. While the defined roles of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway in regulating cell death have been well-established, additional factors that modulate JNK-mediated cell death have yet to be fully elucidated. To identify novel regulators of JNK-dependent cell death, we performed a dominant-modifier screen in Drosophila and found that the Toll pathway participates in JNK-mediated cell death. Loss of Toll signalling suppresses ectopically and physiologically activated JNK signalling-induced cell death. Our epistasis analysis suggests that the Toll pathway acts as a downstream modulator for JNK-dependent cell death. In addition, gain of JNK signalling results in Toll pathway activation, revealed by stimulated transcription of Drosomycin (Drs) and increased cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of Dorsal. Furthermore, the Spätzle (Spz) family ligands for the Toll receptor are transcriptionally upregulated by activated JNK signalling in a non-cell-autonomous manner, providing a molecular mechanism for JNK-induced Toll pathway activation. Finally, gain of Toll signalling exacerbates JNK-mediated cell death and promotes cell death independent of caspases. Thus, we have identified another important function for the evolutionarily conserved Toll pathway, in addition to its well-studied roles in embryonic dorso-ventral patterning and innate immunity. PMID:26202785

  16. The human adaptor SARM negatively regulates adaptor protein TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Carty, Michael; Goodbody, Rory; Schröder, Martina; Stack, Julianne; Moynagh, Paul N; Bowie, Andrew G

    2006-10-01

    Toll-like receptors discriminate between different pathogen-associated molecules and activate signaling cascades that lead to immune responses. The specificity of Toll-like receptor signaling occurs by means of adaptor proteins containing Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domains. Activating functions have been assigned to four TIR adaptors: MyD88, Mal, TRIF and TRAM. Here we characterize a fifth TIR adaptor, SARM, as a negative regulator of TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signaling. Expression of SARM blocked gene induction 'downstream' of TRIF but not of MyD88. SARM associated with TRIF, and 'knockdown' of endogenous SARM expression by interfering RNA led to enhanced TRIF-dependent cytokine and chemokine induction. Thus, the fifth mammalian TIR adaptor SARM is a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor signaling.

  17. Dynamic BMP signaling polarized by Toll patterns the dorsoventral axis in a hemimetabolous insect

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Lena; Chen, Yen-Ta; Drechsler, Axel; Lynch, Jeremy A; Panfilio, Kristen A; Lässig, Michael; Berg, Johannes; Roth, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Toll-dependent patterning of the dorsoventral axis in Drosophila represents one of the best understood gene regulatory networks. However, its evolutionary origin has remained elusive. Outside the insects Toll is not known for a patterning function, but rather for a role in pathogen defense. Here, we show that in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus, whose lineage split from Drosophila's more than 350 million years ago, Toll is only required to polarize a dynamic BMP signaling network. A theoretical model reveals that this network has self-regulatory properties and that shallow Toll signaling gradients are sufficient to initiate axis formation. Such gradients can account for the experimentally observed twinning of insect embryos upon egg fragmentation and might have evolved from a state of uniform Toll activity associated with protecting insect eggs against pathogens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05502.001 PMID:25962855

  18. 78 FR 69939 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be...

  19. 78 FR 11277 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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  20. 78 FR 56269 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be...

  1. 78 FR 64063 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be...

  2. 77 FR 67735 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone...

  3. 78 FR 36304 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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    2013-06-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be held...

  4. 78 FR 3500 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer.... (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee...

  5. 78 FR 41193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be held...

  6. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be held...

  7. 78 FR 15126 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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    2013-03-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be held...

  8. 77 FR 74920 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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  9. 78 FR 78517 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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  10. 78 FR 29207 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

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    2013-05-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be held...

  11. 23 CFR 661.49 - Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., and Toll Road IRR bridges? 661.49 Section 661.49 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges? Yes. Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges are eligible for funding as described in § 661.37(b)....

  12. 23 CFR 661.49 - Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., and Toll Road IRR bridges? 661.49 Section 661.49 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges? Yes. Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges are eligible for funding as described in § 661.37(b)....

  13. 25 CFR 170.131 - How can a tribe find out more about designing and operating a toll facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How can a tribe find out more about designing and... Eligibility Toll, Ferry and Airport Facilities § 170.131 How can a tribe find out more about designing and operating a toll facility? Information on designing and operating a toll highway, bridge or tunnel...

  14. 25 CFR 170.131 - How can a tribe find out more about designing and operating a toll facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can a tribe find out more about designing and... Eligibility Toll, Ferry and Airport Facilities § 170.131 How can a tribe find out more about designing and operating a toll facility? Information on designing and operating a toll highway, bridge or tunnel...

  15. [Innate immunity: cutaneous expression of Toll-like receptors].

    PubMed

    Musette, Philippe; Auquit Auckbur, Isabelle; Begon, Edouard

    2006-02-01

    Toll receptors were first identified as an essential molecule for embryonic patterning in Drosophila and were subsequently shown to be a key in antibacterial and antifungal immunity in adult flies. Toll receptors have been conserved throughout evolution. In mammals, TLRs have been implicated in both inflammatory responses and innate host defense to pathogens. The 11 different TLRs recognize conserved molecular patterns of microbial pathogens termed pathogen-specific molecular patterns (PAMPs), that permit to confer responsiveness to a wide variety of pathogens. Endogenous ligands are also able to activate TLRs. All adult tissue is capable to express at least one of member of TLR family, but a largest repertoire of TLRs is found in tissues exposed to the external environment. The TLR activation induce the NF-kappaB translocation to the nucleus and cytokine secretion. Since the primary function of skin is to provide an effective barrier against outside agression, it is likely that keratinocytes may play a role in a rapid and efficient host defence system, and the fact that keratinocytes are capable of expressing a wide variety of TLRs is subsequently not surprising.

  16. A Method for Estimation of Death Tolls in Disastrous Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, C.; Tien, Y.; Teng, T.

    2004-12-01

    Fatality tolls caused by the disastrous earthquake are the one of the most important items among the earthquake damage and losses. If we can precisely estimate the potential tolls and distribution of fatality in individual districts as soon as the earthquake occurrences, it not only make emergency programs and disaster management more effective but also supply critical information to plan and manage the disaster and the allotments of disaster rescue manpower and medicine resources in a timely manner. In this study, we intend to reach the estimation of death tolls caused by the Chi-Chi earthquake in individual districts based on the Attributive Database of Victims, population data, digital maps and Geographic Information Systems. In general, there were involved many factors including the characteristics of ground motions, geological conditions, types and usage habits of buildings, distribution of population and social-economic situations etc., all are related to the damage and losses induced by the disastrous earthquake. The density of seismic stations in Taiwan is the greatest in the world at present. In the meantime, it is easy to get complete seismic data by earthquake rapid-reporting systems from the Central Weather Bureau: mostly within about a minute or less after the earthquake happened. Therefore, it becomes possible to estimate death tolls caused by the earthquake in Taiwan based on the preliminary information. Firstly, we form the arithmetic mean of the three components of the Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) to give the PGA Index for each individual seismic station, according to the mainshock data of the Chi-Chi earthquake. To supply the distribution of Iso-seismic Intensity Contours in any districts and resolve the problems for which there are no seismic station within partial districts through the PGA Index and geographical coordinates in individual seismic station, the Kriging Interpolation Method and the GIS software, The population density depends on

  17. Application potential of toll-like receptors in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ming; Chen, Xi; Ye, Kangruo; Yao, Yuanfei; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptors (TLRs), as the most important pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity, play a pivotal role in inducing immune response through recognition of microbial invaders or specific agonists. Recent studies have suggested that TLRs could serve as important regulators in the development of a variety of cancer. However, increasing evidences have shown that TLRs may display quite opposite outcomes in cancer development. Although several potential therapeutic Toll-like receptor ligands have been found, the mechanism and therapy prospect of TLRs in cancer development has to be further elucidated to accelerate the clinical application. By performing a systematic review of the present findings on TLRs in cancer immunology, we attempted to evaluate the therapeutic potential of TLRs in cancer therapy and elucidate the potential mechanism of cancer progress regulated by TLR signaling and the reported targets on TLRs for clinical application. An electronic databases search was conducted in PubMed, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database from their inception to February 1, 2016. The following keywords were used to search the databases: Toll-like receptors, cancer therapy, therapeutic target, innate immunity. Of 244 studies that were identified, 97 nonrelevant studies were excluded. In total, 147 full-text articles were assessed, and from these, 54 were excluded as they did not provide complete key information. Thus, 93 studies were considered eligible and included in the analysis. According to the data from the included trials, 14 TLR ligands (77.8%) from 82 studies have been demonstrated to display antitumor property in various cancers, whereas 4 ligands (22.2%) from 11 studies promote tumors. Among them, only 3 TLR ligands have been approved for cancer therapy, and 9 ligands were in clinical trials. In addition, the potential mechanism of recently reported targets on TLRs for clinical application was also

  18. Newly identified PcToll4 regulates antimicrobial peptide expression in intestine of red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Li, Tingting; Jin, Min; Yin, Shaowu; Hui, Kai-Min; Ren, Qian

    2017-02-14

    Tolls or Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have an essential role in initiating innate immune responses against pathogens. In this study, a novel Toll gene, PcToll4, was first identified from the intestinal transcriptome of the freshwater crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. The PcToll4 cDNA is 4849bp long with a 3036bp open reading frame that encodes a 1011-amino acid protein. PcToll4 contains a signal peptide, 13 LRR domains, 3 LRR TYP domains, 2 LRR CT domains, an LRR NT domain, a transmembrane region, and a TIR domain. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that PcToll4 mRNA was detected in all tested tissues, and the expression of PcToll4 in the intestine was significantly upregulated after white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. Overexpression of PcToll4 in Drosophila Schneider 2 (S2) cells activates the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of Drosophila, including metchnikowin, drosomycin, attacin A, and shrimp Penaeidin-4. Results of RNA interference by siRNA also showed that PcToll4 regulates the expressions of 5 anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) in the intestine of crayfish. Our findings suggest that PcToll4 is important for the innate immune responses of P. clarkii because this gene regulates the expressions of AMPs against WSSV.

  19. Toll-like receptors are key players in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Daniela S; Soria, Javier A; Gaviglio, Emilia A; Rodriguez-Galan, Maria C; Iribarren, Pablo

    2011-10-01

    The activation of innate immune response is initiated by engagement of pattern-recognition receptors (PPRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These receptors are expressed in peripheral leukocytes and in many cell types in the central nervous system (CNS). The expression of TLRs in CNS was mainly studied in astrocytes and microglial cells. However, new evidence indicates that these receptors may play an important role in neuronal homeostasis. The expression of TLRs in the CNS is variable and can be modulated by multiple factors, including pro-inflammatory molecules, which are elevated in neurodegenerative diseases and can increase the expression of TLRs in CNS cells. Moreover, activation of TLRs induces the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, TLRs have been shown to play a role in several aspects of neurodegenerative diseases. Here we will discuss results reported in the recent literature concerning the participation of TLRs in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Toll-like Receptors at the Ocular Surface

    PubMed Central

    Pearlman, Eric; Johnson, Angela; Adhikary, Gautam; Sun, Yan; Chinnery, Holly R.; Fox, Todd; Kester, Mark; Mcmenamin, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) family of pathogen recognition molecules has an important role in recognizing microbial pathogens and microbial breakdown products. Activation of TLRs in the corneal epithelium induces CXC chemokine production and recruitment of neutrophils to the corneal stroma. Although essential for pathogen killing, neutrophils can cause extensive tissue damage, leading to visual impairment and blindness. In this review, we examine the role of TLRs in microbial keratitis and in noninfectious corneal inflammation, most commonly associated with contact lens wear. We present recent findings on TLR signaling pathways in the cornea, including MyD88- and TRIF-dependent responses and discuss the role of resident macrophages and dendritic cells. Finally, we examine the potential for targeting the TLR pathway as a potential therapeutic intervention for microbial keratitis and contact lens-associated corneal inflammation. PMID:18781257

  1. Malaria tolerance – for whom the cell tolls?

    PubMed Central

    Boutlis, Craig S.; Yeo, Tsin W.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2009-01-01

    How is it that individuals exposed to intense malaria transmission can tolerate the presence of malaria parasites in their blood at levels that would produce fever in others? In light of evidence discounting a role for nitric oxide or antibodies to plasmodial glycosylphosphatidylinositols in maintaining this tolerant state, refractoriness to toxin-induced Toll-like receptor-mediated signalling has emerged as a likely explanation that links malarial and bacterial endotoxin tolerance. Understanding the mechanisms underlying tolerance and the potential for cross-tolerization has significant implications for understanding the potential for anti-toxic vaccine strategies, as well as interactions between different malaria species and between malaria and other human parasites. PMID:16784889

  2. Toll-like receptors in antiviral innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Sandra N.; Li, Kui

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are fundamental sensor molecules of the host innate immune system, which detect conserved molecular signatures of a wide range of microbial pathogens and initiate innate immune responses via distinct signaling pathways. Various TLRs are implicated in the early interplay of host cells with invading viruses, which regulates viral replication and/or host responses, ultimately impacting on viral pathogenesis. To survive the host innate defense mechanisms, many viruses have developed strategies to evade or counteract signaling through the TLR pathways, creating an advantageous environment for their propagation. Here we review the current knowledge of the roles TLRs play in antiviral innate immune responses, discuss examples of TLR-mediated viral recognition, and describe strategies used by viruses to antagonize the host antiviral innate immune responses. PMID:24316048

  3. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge CG

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved ‘pathogen-associated molecular patterns’ of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release ‘danger-associated molecular patterns’ that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy. PMID:25620999

  4. Toll-like receptors as therapeutic targets for cancer.

    PubMed

    Holldack, Johanna

    2014-04-01

    Stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to activate the innate immune system has been a legitimate therapeutic strategy for some years. TLRs 3, 4, 7, 8 and 9 are all validated targets for cancer and a number of companies are developing agonists and vaccine adjuvants. TLR7 in particular has established proof-of-concept as a target in the topical treatment of bladder and skin cancers. However, the development of systemic treatments targeting TLR7 for most other cancers has proved difficult owing to cardiotoxicity or myelosuppression. Tantalisingly, recent animal data have demonstrated that a new class of modified TLR7 agonists can be administered systemically with a good toxicology profile, opening up this target in therapeutic interventions for systemic cancers.

  5. Toll-Like Receptors: Role in Dermatological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Aswin; Flach, Tracy L.; Shi, Yan; Mydlarski, P. Régine

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a class of conserved receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) present in microbes. In humans, at least ten TLRs have been identified, and their recognition targets range from bacterial endotoxins to lipopeptides, DNA, dsRNA, ssRNA, fungal products, and several host factors. Of dermatological interest, these receptors are expressed on several skin cells including keratinocytes, melanocytes, and Langerhans cells. TLRs are essential in identifying microbial products and are known to link the innate and adaptive immune systems. Over the years, there have been significant advances in our understanding of TLRs in skin inflammation, cutaneous malignancies, and defence mechanisms. In this paper, we will describe the association between TLRs and various skin pathologies and discuss proposed TLR therapeutics. PMID:20847936

  6. Traffic-related air quality assessment for open road tolling highway facility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Yu, Dan

    2008-09-01

    Open road tolling (ORT) design has been considered as an effective means of smoothing highway traffic and reducing travel delay on toll highways. In this paper it is demonstrated that ORT can also achieve significant air quality benefits over the conventional toll plaza design. The near roadside carbon monoxide (CO) concentration levels can be reduced by up to 37%, and diesel particulate matter (DPM) emissions can decrease by as much as 58%. These large expected air quality benefits have great implications to the regional efforts of reducing mobile source air pollution toward achieving attainment status and healthier living environment.

  7. Crosstalk between toll-like receptors and hypoxia-dependent pathways in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Crifo, Bianca; Taylor, Cormac T

    2016-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in shaping the host immune response to infection and inflammation. Tissue hypoxia is a common microenvironmental feature of infected and inflamed tissues. Furthermore, hypoxia significantly impacts the development of immune and inflammatory responses through the regulation of host innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we will discuss current knowledge in relation to the crosstalk that exists between toll-like receptor- and hypoxia-dependent signaling pathways in health and disease.

  8. Alcohol resistance in Drosophila is modulated by the Toll innate immune pathway

    PubMed Central

    Troutwine, Benjamin R.; Ghezzi, Alfredo; Pietrzykowski, Andrzej Z.; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has shown that alcohol alters the activity of the innate immune system and that changes in innate immune system activity can influence alcohol-related behaviors (Cui et al., 2014; Vetreno & Crews, 2014). Here we show that the Toll innate immune signaling pathway modulates the level of alcohol resistance in Drosophila. In humans, a low level of response to alcohol is correlated with increased risk of developing an alcohol use disorder (Schuckit, 1994). The Toll signaling pathway was originally discovered in, and has been extensively studied in Drosophila. The Toll pathway is a major regulator of innate immunity in Drosophila, and mammalian Toll-like receptor signaling has been implicated in alcohol responses. Here, we use Drosophila-specific genetic tools to test eight genes in the Toll signaling pathway for effects on the level of response to ethanol. We show that increasing the activity of the pathway increases ethanol resistance while decreasing pathway activity reduces ethanol resistance. Furthermore, we show that gene products known to be outputs of innate immune signaling are rapidly induced following ethanol exposure. The interaction between the Toll signaling pathway and ethanol is rooted in the natural history of Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:26916032

  9. Combined prediction model of death toll for road traffic accidents based on independent and dependent variables.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhong-xiang; Lu, Shi-sheng; Zhang, Wei-hua; Zhang, Nan-nan

    2014-01-01

    In order to build a combined model which can meet the variation rule of death toll data for road traffic accidents and can reflect the influence of multiple factors on traffic accidents and improve prediction accuracy for accidents, the Verhulst model was built based on the number of death tolls for road traffic accidents in China from 2002 to 2011; and car ownership, population, GDP, highway freight volume, highway passenger transportation volume, and highway mileage were chosen as the factors to build the death toll multivariate linear regression model. Then the two models were combined to be a combined prediction model which has weight coefficient. Shapley value method was applied to calculate the weight coefficient by assessing contributions. Finally, the combined model was used to recalculate the number of death tolls from 2002 to 2011, and the combined model was compared with the Verhulst and multivariate linear regression models. The results showed that the new model could not only characterize the death toll data characteristics but also quantify the degree of influence to the death toll by each influencing factor and had high accuracy as well as strong practicability.

  10. Alcohol resistance in Drosophila is modulated by the Toll innate immune pathway.

    PubMed

    Troutwine, B R; Ghezzi, A; Pietrzykowski, A Z; Atkinson, N S

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of evidence has shown that alcohol alters the activity of the innate immune system and that changes in innate immune system activity can influence alcohol-related behaviors. Here, we show that the Toll innate immune signaling pathway modulates the level of alcohol resistance in Drosophila. In humans, a low level of response to alcohol is correlated with increased risk of developing an alcohol use disorder. The Toll signaling pathway was originally discovered in, and has been extensively studied in Drosophila. The Toll pathway is a major regulator of innate immunity in Drosophila, and mammalian Toll-like receptor signaling has been implicated in alcohol responses. Here, we use Drosophila-specific genetic tools to test eight genes in the Toll signaling pathway for effects on the level of response to ethanol. We show that increasing the activity of the pathway increases ethanol resistance whereas decreasing the pathway activity reduces ethanol resistance. Furthermore, we show that gene products known to be outputs of innate immune signaling are rapidly induced following ethanol exposure. The interaction between the Toll signaling pathway and ethanol is rooted in the natural history of Drosophila melanogaster.

  11. 78 FR 44627 - HOME Investment Partnerships Program: Improving Performance and Accountability; Updating Property...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... 7164, Washington, DC 20410; telephone number 202-708- 2684 (this is not a toll-free number). Persons with hearing or speech impairments may access this number through TTY by calling the toll-free...

  12. A novel vertebrates Toll-like receptor counterpart regulating the anti-microbial peptides expression in the freshwater crayfish, Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Chen, Yi-Hong; Dai, Yun-Jia; Tan, Jing-Min; Huang, Ying; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Ren, Qian

    2015-03-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in regulation of anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) expression. A novel vertebrates TLR counterpart named PcToll, was firstly identified from the freshwater crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PcToll together with Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae Toll9 were clustered with human Tolls. PcToll was mainly expressed in hepatopancreas and gills and it also could be detected in hemocytes, heart, stomach and intestine. PcToll was upregulated in hemocytes and gills post 24 h Vibrio anguillarum challenge. In hepatopancreas and intestine, the highest expression level of PcToll could be observed at 12 h V. anguillarum challenge. In hemocytes, PcToll went up post 24 h Staphylococcus aureus challenge and in gills, the expression level of PcToll showed no obvious change from 2 to 24 h S. aureus challenge. In hepatopancreas post 12 h S. aureus challenge, PcToll was upregulated and it showed obvious upregulation post 12 h S. aureus challenge in intestine. RNAi results showed that PcToll was involved in regulation of crustins (Cru1, Cru2), anti-lipopolysaccharide factor 2 (ALF2) and lysozyme 1 (Lys1) expression. Overexpression of PcToll in Drosophila S2 cells could induce Drosophila Attacin (Atta), Metchnikowin (Mtk), Drosomycin (Drs) and shrimp Penaeidin (PEN4) expression. From the results, it could be speculated that PcToll might play important roles in crayfish innate immune defense.

  13. Toll-like receptor signaling in primary immune deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Paul J.; Simchoni, Noa; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize common microbial or host-derived macromolecules and have important roles in early activation of the immune system. Patients with primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) affecting TLR signaling can elucidate the importance of these proteins to the human immune system. Defects in interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-4 and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) lead to susceptibility to infections with bacteria, while mutations in nuclear factor-κB essential modulator (NEMO) and other downstream mediators generally induce broader susceptibility to bacteria, viruses, and fungi. In contrast, TLR3 signaling defects are specific for susceptibility to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis. Other PIDs induce functional alterations of TLR signaling pathways, such as common variable immunodeficiency in which plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) defects enhance defective responses of B cells to shared TLR agonists. Dampening of TLR responses is seen for TLRs 2 and 4 in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Enhanced TLR responses, meanwhile, are seen for TLRs 5 and 9 in CGD, TLRs 4, 7/8, and 9 in XLA, TLRs 2 and 4 in hyper IgE syndrome, and for most TLRs in adenosine deaminase deficiency. PMID:25930993

  14. Cathepsins are required for Toll-like receptor 9 responses

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Fumi; Saitoh, Shin-ichiroh; Fukui, Ryutaroh; Kobayashi, Toshihiko; Tanimura, Natsuko; Konno, Kazunori; Kusumoto, Yutaka; Akashi-Takamura, Sachiko; Miyake, Kensuke

    2008-03-14

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) recognize a variety of microbial products and activate defense responses. Pathogen sensing by TLR2/4 requires accessory molecules, whereas little is known about a molecule required for DNA recognition by TLR9. After endocytosis of microbes, microbial DNA is exposed and recognized by TLR9 in lysosomes. We here show that cathepsins, lysosomal cysteine proteases, are required for TLR9 responses. A cell line Ba/F3 was found to be defective in TLR9 responses despite enforced TLR9 expression. Functional cloning with Ba/F3 identified cathepsin B/L as a molecule required for TLR9 responses. The protease activity was essential for the complementing effect. TLR9 responses were also conferred by cathepsin S or F, but not by cathepsin H. TLR9-dependent B cell proliferation and CD86 upregulation were apparently downregulated by cathepsin B/L inhibitors. Cathepsin B inhibitor downregulated interaction of CpG-B with TLR9 in 293T cells. These results suggest roles for cathepsins in DNA recognition by TLR9.

  15. Comparative studies of Toll-like receptor signalling using zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Zakia; Wiegertjes, Geert F; Veneman, Wouter J; Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P

    2014-09-01

    Zebrafish model systems for infectious disease are increasingly used for the functional analysis of molecular pattern recognition processes. These studies benefit from the high conservation level of all innate immune factors in vertebrates. Zebrafish studies are strategically well positioned for this because of the ease of comparisons with studies in other fish species of which the immune system also has been intensively studied, but that are currently still less amendable to detailed genetic or microscopic studies. In this paper we focus on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling factors, which currently are the best characterized in mammalian systems. We review the knowledge on TLR signalling in the context of recent advances in zebrafish studies and discuss possibilities for future approaches that can complement studies in cell cultures and rodent models. A focus in these comparisons is the role of negative control mechanisms in immune responses that appear very important in a whole organism to keep adverse systemic responses in check. We also pay much attention to comparisons with studies in common carp that is highly related to zebrafish and that because of its large body mass can complement immune studies in zebrafish.

  16. The Role of Toll-Like Receptors in Hematopoietic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Monlish, Darlene A.; Bhatt, Sima T.; Schuettpelz, Laura G.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of pattern recognition receptors that shape the innate immune system by identifying pathogen-associated molecular patterns and host-derived damage-associated molecular patterns. TLRs are widely expressed on both immune cells and non-immune cells, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, effector immune cell populations, and endothelial cells. In addition to their well-known role in the innate immune response to acute infection or injury, accumulating evidence supports a role for TLRs in the development of hematopoietic and other malignancies. Several hematopoietic disorders, including lymphoproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes, which possess a high risk of transformation to leukemia, have been linked to aberrant TLR signaling. Furthermore, activation of TLRs leads to the induction of a number of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which can promote tumorigenesis by driving cell proliferation and migration and providing a favorable microenvironment for tumor cells. Beyond hematopoietic malignancies, the upregulation of a number of TLRs has been linked to promoting tumor cell survival, proliferation, and metastasis in a variety of cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and lung. This review focuses on the contribution of TLRs to hematopoietic malignancies, highlighting the known direct and indirect effects of TLR signaling on tumor cells and their microenvironment. In addition, the utility of TLR agonists and antagonists as potential therapeutics in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies is discussed. PMID:27733853

  17. The evolution of vertebrate Toll-like receptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roach, J.C.; Glusman, G.; Rowen, L.; Kaur, A.; Purcell, M.K.; Smith, K.D.; Hood, L.E.; Aderem, A.

    2005-01-01

    The complete sequences of Takifugu Toll-like receptor (TLR) loci and gene predictions from many draft genomes enable comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis. Strong selective pressure for recognition of and response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns has maintained a largely unchanging TLR recognition in all vertebrates. There are six major families of vertebrate TLRs. This repertoire is distinct from that of invertebrates. TLRs within a family recognize a general class of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Most vertebrates have exactly one gene ortholog for each TLR family. The family including TLR1 has more species-specific adaptations than other families. A major family including TLR11 is represented in humans only by a pseudogene. Coincidental evolution plays a minor role in TLR evolution. The sequencing phase of this study produced finished genomic sequences for the 12 Takifugu rubripes TLRs. In addition, we have produced > 70 gene models, including sequences from the opossum, chicken, frog, dog, sea urchin, and sea squirt. ?? 2005 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  18. Toll-like receptors in skin infections and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yuping; Gallo, Richard L

    2008-09-01

    The skin is the ultimate example of the function of innate immunity, it alerts the host of danger by many systems including sensing pathogen-associated molecule patterns (PAMPs) through Toll-like receptors and other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), yet normally provides defense without inflammation. The skin responds rapidly to invading microbes by producing antimicrobial peptides or other antimicrobial intermediates before cytokine release results in inflammation. To achieve maximal immune responses for clearing invading microbes, the activation of select PRRs in skin then initiates and shapes adaptive immune responses through the activation of dendritic cells and recruitment of T cell subsets. Importantly, cross-talk between TLRs can influence this system in several ways including augmenting or suppressing the immune response. As a consequence of their pivotal role, TLR responses need to be tightly controlled by associated negative regulators or negative feedback loops to prevent detrimental effects from TLRs overactivation. This review focuses on describing the involvement of TLRs in the development of skin infections and inflammatory diseases, and highlights the potential application of TLR agonists or antagonists in these skin diseases.

  19. Toll-Like Receptor Pathways in Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Qing; Szodoray, Peter; Zeher, Margit

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a family of chronic systemic inflammatory disorders, characterized by the dysregulation of the immune system which finally results in the break of tolerance to self-antigen. Several studies suggest that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an essential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. TLRs belong to the family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize a wide range of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). TLRs are type I transmembrane proteins and located on various cellular membranes. Two main groups have been classified based on their location; the extracelluar group referred to the ones located on the plasma membrane while the intracellular group all located in endosomal compartments responsible for the recognition of nucleic acids. They are released by the host cells and trigger various intracellular pathways which results in the production of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, as well as the expression of co-stimulatory molecules to protect against invading microorganisms. In particular, TLR pathway-associated proteins, such as IRAK, TRAF, and SOCS, are often dysregulated in this group of diseases. TLR-associated gene expression profile analysis together with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assessment could be important to explain the pathomechanism driving autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize recent findings on TLR pathway regulation in various autoimmune diseases, including Sjögren's syndrome (SS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and psoriasis.

  20. Origin of Toll-like receptor-mediated innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Kanzok, Stefan M; Hoa, Ngo T; Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Luna, Coralia; Huang, Yaming; Malacrida, Anna R; Zheng, Liangbiao

    2004-04-01

    Toll-related receptors (TLR) have been found in four animal phyla: Nematoda, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, and Chordata. No TLR has been identified thus far in acoelomates. TLR genes play a pivotal role in the innate immunity in both fruit fly and mammals. The prevailing view is that TLR-mediated immunity is ancient. The two pseudocoelomate TLRs, one each from Caenorhabditis elegans and Strongyloides stercoralis, were distinct from the coelomate ones. Further, the only TLR gene (Tol-1) in Ca. elegans did not appear to play a role in innate immunity. We argue that TLR-mediated innate immunity developed only in the coelomates, after they split from pseudocoelomates and acoelomates. We hypothesize that the function of TLR-mediated immunity is to prevent microbial infection in the body cavity present only in the coelomates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that almost all arthropod TLRs form a separate cluster from the mammalian counterparts. We further hypothesize that TLR-mediated immunity developed independently in the protostomia and deuterostomia coelomates.

  1. α-Synuclein Alters Toll-Like Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Béraud, Dawn; Twomey, Margaret; Bloom, Benjamin; Mittereder, Andrew; Ton, Vy; Neitzke, Katherine; Chasovskikh, Sergey; Mhyre, Timothy R.; Maguire-Zeiss, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease, an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, the accumulation of α-synuclein in Lewy bodies and neurites, and neuroinflammation. While the exact etiology of sporadic Parkinson's disease remains elusive, a growing body of evidence suggests that misfolded α-synuclein promotes inflammation and oxidative stress resulting in neurodegeneration. α-Synuclein has been directly linked to microglial activation in vitro and increased numbers of activated microglia have been reported in an α-synuclein overexpressing mouse model prior to neuronal loss. However, the mechanism by which α-synuclein incites microglial activation has not been fully described. Microglial activation is governed in part, by pattern recognition receptors that detect foreign material and additionally recognize changes in homeostatic cellular conditions. Upon proinflammatory pathway initiation, activated microglia contribute to oxidative stress through release of cytokines, nitric oxide, and other reactive oxygen species, which may adversely impact adjacent neurons. Here we show that microglia are directly activated by α-synuclein in a classical activation pathway that includes alterations in the expression of toll-like receptors. These data suggest that α-synuclein can act as a danger-associated molecular pattern. PMID:21747756

  2. Mechanisms of disease: Toll-like receptors in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Stefan; Ertl, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann

    2007-08-01

    The innate immune system detects highly conserved, relatively invariant structural motifs of pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been identified as the primary innate immune receptors. TLRs distinguish between different patterns of pathogens and activate a rapid innate immune response; however, TLRs can also be activated by host-derived molecules. In addition to being expressed in immune cells, TLRs are expressed in other tissues, such as those of the cardiovascular system. TLRs could, therefore, be a key link between cardiovascular disease development and the immune system. Indeed, evidence that TLR activation contributes to the development and progression of atherosclerosis, cardiac dysfunction in sepsis, and congestive heart failure, is convincing. Although much has been learned about TLR activation in cellular components of the cardiovascular system, the role individual TLR family members have in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases and hence in clinical practice remains to be defined. Here we review the rapid progress that has been made in this field, which has improved our understanding of vascular as well as myocardial TLR function in basic and clinical science.

  3. Toll-like receptors in pathophysiology of liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kiziltas, Safak

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that participate in host defense by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns alongside inflammatory processes by recognizing damage associated molecular patterns. Given constant exposure to pathogens from gut, strict control of TLR-associated signaling pathways is essential in the liver, which otherwise may lead to inappropriate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and interferons and may generate a predisposition to several autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. The liver is considered to be a site of tolerance induction rather than immunity induction, with specificity in hepatic cell functions and distribution of TLR. Recent data emphasize significant contribution of TLR signaling in chronic liver diseases via complex immune responses mediating hepatocyte (i.e., hepatocellular injury and regeneration) or hepatic stellate cell (i.e., fibrosis and cirrhosis) inflammatory or immune pathologies. Herein, we review the available data on TLR signaling, hepatic expression of TLRs and associated ligands, as well as the contribution of TLRs to the pathophysiology of hepatic diseases. PMID:27917262

  4. Trial Watch: Toll-like receptor agonists in oncological indications.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Fernando; Vacchelli, Erika; Obrist, Florine; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Cremer, Isabelle; Henrik Ter Meulen, Jan; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an evolutionarily conserved group of enzymatically inactive, single membrane-spanning proteins that recognize a wide panel of exogenous and endogenous danger signals. Besides constituting a crucial component of the innate immune response to bacterial and viral pathogens, TLRs appear to play a major role in anticancer immunosurveillance. In line with this notion, several natural and synthetic TLR ligands have been intensively investigated for their ability to boost tumor-targeting immune responses elicited by a variety of immunotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic interventions. Three of these agents are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or equivalent regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients: the so-called bacillus Calmette-Guérin, monophosphoryl lipid A, and imiquimod. However, the number of clinical trials testing the therapeutic potential of both FDA-approved and experimental TLR agonists in cancer patients is stably decreasing, suggesting that drug developers and oncologists are refocusing their interest on alternative immunostimulatory agents. Here, we summarize recent findings on the use of TLR agonists in cancer patients and discuss how the clinical evaluation of FDA-approved and experimental TLR ligands has evolved since the publication of our first Trial Watch dealing with this topic.

  5. Toll gates to periodontal host modulation and vaccine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George

    2009-01-01

    Summary Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are central mediators of innate antimicrobial and inflammatory responses and play instructive roles in the development of the adaptive immune response. Thus when stimulated by certain agonists, TLRs serve as adjuvant receptors that link innate and adaptive immunity. However, when excessively activated or inadequately controlled during an infection, TLRs may contribute to immunopathology associated with inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis. Moreover, certain microbial pathogens appear to exploit aspects of TLR signalling in ways that enhance their adaptive fitness. The diverse and important roles played by TLRs suggest that therapeutic manipulation of TLR signalling may have implications in the control of infection, attenuation of inflammation, and the development of vaccine adjuvants for the treatment of periodontitis. Successful application of TLR-based therapeutic modalities in periodontitis would require highly selective and precisely targeted intervention. This would in turn necessitate precise characterization of TLR signalling pathways in response to periodontal pathogens, as well as development of effective and specific agonists or antagonists of TLR function and signalling. This review summarizes the current status of TLR biology as it relates to periodontitis, and evaluates the potential of TLR-based approaches for host-modulation therapy in this oral disease. PMID:19878475

  6. Toll-like receptor signaling in cell proliferation and survival

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinyan; Jiang, Song; Tapping, Richard I.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important sensors of foreign microbial components as well as products of damaged or inflamed self tissues. Upon sensing these molecules, TLRs initiate a series of downstream signaling events that drive cellular responses including the production of cytokines, chemokines and other inflammatory mediators. This outcome results from the intracellular assembly of protein complexes that drive phosphorylation and other signaling cascades ultimately leading to chromatin remodeling and transcription factor activation. In addition to driving inflammatory responses, TLRs also regulate cell proliferation and survival which serves to expand useful immune cells and integrate inflammatory responses and tissue repair processes. In this context, central TLR signaling molecules, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), play key roles. In addition, four major groups of transcription factors which are targets of TLR activation also control cell fate. This review focuses on the role of TLR signaling as it relates to cell proliferation and survival. This topic not only has important implications for understanding host defense and tissue repair, but also cancer which is often associated with conditions of chronic inflammation. PMID:19775907

  7. The role of toll like receptors in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Amirchaghmaghi, Elham; Taghavi, Seyed Abdolvahab; Shapouri, Farnaz; Saeidi, Shaghayegh; Rezaei, Abbas; Aflatoonian, Reza

    2013-10-01

    For many years, the innate immunity was of less interest than the adaptive immunity because it was perceived to have secondary importance in the functionality of the immune system. During the past decades, with the advancement of knowledge about innate immune system, interest in innate immunity has grown dramatically and thus its function has been extensively studied. Innate immunity plays fundamental roles in the initiation and induction of adaptive immune responses. It consists of several cells and receptors including natural killer (NK) cells, macrophages (MQs), dendritic cells (DCs) and pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Two decades ago, Toll like receptors (TLRs) family was known as one of the important PRRs with unique functions especially in protection against invading pathogens. Since the female reproductive tract has access to the outside environment and has a unique interaction with different pathogens whether invading microorganisms or normal flora, allogenic sperm and semi allogenic fetus, it has an essential need for effective immune responses. It has therefore been suggested that TLRs may play important roles in the immune regulation of the female reproductive tract. In addition, it has been demonstrated that immune disturbance may be responsible for some adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia (PE), recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Our focus in this review is to show the importance of TLRs in pregnancy with emphasis on the expression of these receptors in different tissues related to pregnancy.

  8. The Role of Toll Like Receptors in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Amirchaghmaghi, Elham; Taghavi, Seyed Abdolvahab; Shapouri, Farnaz; Saeidi, Shaghayegh; Rezaei, Abbas; Aflatoonian, Reza

    2013-01-01

    For many years, the innate immunity was of less interest than the adaptive immunity because it was perceived to have secondary importance in the functionality of the immune system. During the past decades, with the advancement of knowledge about innate immune system, interest in innate immunity has grown dramatically and thus its function has been extensively studied. Innate immunity plays fundamental roles in the initiation and induction of adaptive immune responses. It consists of several cells and receptors including natural killer (NK) cells, macrophages (MQs), dendritic cells (DCs) and pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Two decades ago, Toll like receptors (TLRs) family was known as one of the important PRRs with unique functions especially in protection against invading pathogens. Since the female reproductive tract has access to the outside environment and has a unique interaction with different pathogens whether invading microorganisms or normal flora, allogenic sperm and semi allogenic fetus, it has an essential need for effective immune responses. It has therefore been suggested that TLRs may play important roles in the immune regulation of the female reproductive tract. In addition, it has been demonstrated that immune disturbance may be responsible for some adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia (PE), recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Our focus in this review is to show the importance of TLRs in pregnancy with emphasis on the expression of these receptors in different tissues related to pregnancy. PMID:24520479

  9. Role of Toll-like receptors in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, Harshini; Pollock, Carol; Panchapakesan, Usha

    2014-05-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of kidney failure and its increasing prevalence and incidence has imposed global socio-economic stress on healthcare systems worldwide. Although historically considered a metabolic disorder, recent studies have established that inflammatory responses are central to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. TLRs (Toll-like receptors) are a family of pattern recognition receptors responsible for the initiation of inflammatory and immune responses. The regulation of TLR2 and TLR4 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various kidney diseases, and emerging evidence shows their involvement in the perpetuation of inflammation in the diabetic kidney. The present review focuses on the relative contributions of TLR2 and TLR4 in recognizing endogenous ligands relevant to diabetic nephropathy and their subsequent activation of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), which results in the synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, we discuss the pro-inflammatory signalling pathways of TLR2 and TLR4, in which their interruption or blockade may prove to be important therapeutic targets, potentially translated into clinical treatments for diabetic nephropathy. Currently, inhibitors to TLR2 and TLR4 are undergoing clinical trials in various inflammatory models of disease, but none in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Given the existing literature, there is a fundamental necessity to undertake trials in patients with diabetic nephropathy with a focus on renal end points.

  10. Phosphoinositide turnover in Toll-like receptor signaling and trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Tu Le, Oanh Thi; Ngoc Nguyen, Tu Thi; Lee, Sang Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Lipid components in biological membranes are essential for maintaining cellular function. Phosphoinositides, the phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PI), regulate many critical cell processes involving membrane signaling, trafficking, and reorganization. Multiple metabolic pathways including phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases and phospholipases tightly control spatio-temporal concentration of membrane phosphoinositides. Metabolizing enzymes responsible for PI 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) production or degradation play a regulatory role in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and trafficking. These enzymes include PI 4-phosphate 5-kinase, phosphatase and tensin homolog, PI 3-kinase, and phospholipase C. PI(4,5)P2 mediates the interaction with target cytosolic proteins to induce their membrane translocation, regulate vesicular trafficking, and serve as a precursor for other signaling lipids. TLR activation is important for the innate immune response and is implicated in diverse pathophysiological disorders. TLR signaling is controlled by specific interactions with distinct signaling and sorting adaptors. Importantly, TLR signaling machinery is differentially formed depending on a specific membrane compartment during signaling cascades. Although detailed mechanisms remain to be fully clarified, phosphoinositide metabolism is promising for a better understanding of such spatio-temporal regulation of TLR signaling and trafficking. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(7): 361-368] PMID:24856829

  11. 76 FR 38383 - Revised Public Utility Filing; Requirements for Electric Quarterly Reports; Notice of Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... EQR redesign with software implementation now adopting an XML technical approach. A tentative agenda...@ferc.gov or via phone at (866) 208-3676 (toll-free). For TTY, contact (202) 502-8659. For additional... accessibility@ferc.gov or call toll free (866) 208- 3372 (voice) or 202-502-8659 (TTY), or send a fax to...

  12. Spasmodic Dysphonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD 20892-3456 Toll-free voice: (800) 241-1044 Toll-free TTY: (800) 241-1055 Email: nidcdinfo@ ... questions in English or Spanish. Voice: (800) 241-1044 TTY: (800) 241-1055 nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov ...

  13. Ear Infections in Children

    MedlinePlus

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  14. Vocal Fold Paralysis

    MedlinePlus

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  15. Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis or Laryngeal Papillomatosis

    MedlinePlus

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  16. Auditory Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

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  17. Apraxia of Speech

    MedlinePlus

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  18. Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis

    MedlinePlus

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  19. Hoarseness

    MedlinePlus

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  20. Ménière's Disease

    MedlinePlus

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  1. Communication Considerations for Parents of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    MedlinePlus

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  2. What Is Voice? What Is Speech? What Is Language?

    MedlinePlus

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  3. Taking Care of Your Voice

    MedlinePlus

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  4. Pendred Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

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  5. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

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  6. Your Baby's Hearing and Communicative Development Checklist

    MedlinePlus

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  7. Sudden Deafness

    MedlinePlus

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  8. Dysphagia

    MedlinePlus

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  9. Otosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD 20892-3456 Toll-free voice: (800) 241-1044 Toll-free TTY: (800) 241-1055 Email: nidcdinfo@ ... questions in English or Spanish. Voice: (800) 241-1044 TTY: (800) 241-1055 nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov ...

  10. Balance Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD 20892-3456 Toll-free voice: (800) 241-1044 Toll-free TTY: (800) 241-1055 Email: nidcdinfo@ ... questions in English or Spanish. Voice: (800) 241-1044 TTY: (800) 241-1055 nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov ...

  11. Transgenic cloned sheep overexpressing ovine toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shoulong; Li, Guiguan; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Cui, Maosheng; Guo, Yong; Liu, Guoshi; Li, Guangpeng; Feng, Jianzhong; Lian, Zhengxing

    2013-07-01

    An ovine fetal fibroblast cell line highly expressing TLR4 was established by inserting TLR4 into a reconstructive p3S-LoxP plasmid. Transgenic sheep overexpressing TLR4 were produced by transferring TLR4-transfected fetal fibroblasts into metaphase (M)II-stage enucleated oocytes (using SCNT). Because reconstructed embryos derived from MII-stage enucleated oocytes matured in vivo using a delayed-activated method had a higher pregnancy rate (18.52%) than that from MII-stage enucleated oocytes matured in vitro, the former procedure was used. Nine TLR4-transgenic live births were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis. Increased expression of TLR4 at mRNA and protein levels in ear tissues of transgenic lambs were verified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively. More toll-like receptor 4 protein was expressed by peripheral blood monocytes and/or macrophages collected from 3-month-old TLR4-transgenic than nontransgenic lambs at 0, 1, and 4 hours after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Furthermore, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor α secreted by monocytes and/or macrophages of TLR4-transgenic lambs were significantly higher at 1 hour. Therefore, lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses from monocytes and/or macrophages occurred sooner in TLR4-transgenic lambs, consistent with an enhanced host immune response. In conclusion, transgenic sheep overexpressing TLR4 are a primary model to investigate the role of transgenic animals in disease resistance and have potential for breeding sheep with disease resistance.

  12. Microbiota regulates type 1 diabetes through Toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Michael P.; Volchkov, Pavel; Kobayashi, Koichi S.; Chervonsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Deletion of the innate immune adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D) results in microbiota-dependent protection from the disease: MyD88-negative mice in germ-free (GF), but not in specific pathogen-free conditions develop the disease. These results could be explained by expansion of particular protective bacteria (“specific lineage hypothesis”) or by dominance of negative (tolerizing) signaling over proinflammatory signaling (“balanced signal hypothesis”) in mutant mice. Here we found that colonization of GF mice with a variety of intestinal bacteria was capable of reducing T1D in MyD88-negative (but not wild-type NOD mice), favoring the balanced signal hypothesis. However, the receptors and signaling pathways involved in prevention or facilitation of the disease remained unknown. The protective signals triggered by the microbiota were revealed by testing NOD mice lacking MyD88 in combination with knockouts of several critical components of innate immune sensing for development of T1D. Only MyD88- and TIR-domain containing adapter inducing IFN β (TRIF) double deficient NOD mice developed the disease. Thus, TRIF signaling (likely downstream of Toll-like receptor 4, TLR4) serves as one of the microbiota-induced tolerizing pathways. At the same time another TLR (TLR2) provided prodiabetic signaling by controlling the microbiota, as reduction in T1D incidence caused by TLR2 deletion was reversed in GF TLR2-negative mice. Our results support the balanced signal hypothesis, in which microbes provide signals that both promote and inhibit autoimmunity by signaling through different receptors, including receptors of the TLR family. PMID:26216961

  13. Toll like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Mike; Lee, Stephanie J; Müller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLR) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) we have investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs3764879, which is located on the X chromosome, was significantly associated with outcome at the Bonferroni corrected level P≤0.001. Male hemizygosity and female homozygosity for the minor allele were significantly associated with disease free survival (DFS) (hazard ratio (HR) 1.47 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.85); P=0.001). Further analysis stratified by donor sex due to confounding by sex, was suggestive for associations with overall survival (male donor: HR 1.41 (95% CI 1.09–1.83), P=0.010); female donor: (HR 2.78 (95% CI 1.43–5.41), P=0.003), DFS (male donor: HR 1.45 (95% CI 1.12–1.87), P=0.005; female donor: HR 2.34 (95% CI 1.18–4.65), P=0.015) and treatment related mortality (male donor: HR 1.49 (95% CI 1.09–2.04), P=0.012; female donor: HR 3.12 (95% CI 1.44–6.74), P=0.004). In conclusion our findings suggest that the minor allele of TLR8 rs3764879 of the donor is associated with outcome after myeloablative conditioned allogeneic HCT. PMID:25464115

  14. Leishmania RNA virus: when the host pays the toll

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Mary-Anne; Ronet, Catherine; Zangger, Haroun; Beverley, Stephen M.; Fasel, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    The presence of an RNA virus in a South American subgenus of the Leishmania parasite, L. (Viannia), was detected several decades ago but its role in leishmanial virulence and metastasis was only recently described. In Leishmania guyanensis, the nucleic acid of Leishmania RNA virus (LRV1) acts as a potent innate immunogen, eliciting a hyper-inflammatory immune response through toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). The resultant inflammatory cascade has been shown to increase disease severity, parasite persistence, and perhaps even resistance to anti-leishmanial drugs. Curiously, LRVs were found mostly in clinical isolates prone to infectious metastasis in both their human source and experimental animal model, suggesting an association between the viral hyperpathogen and metastatic complications such as mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL). MCL presents as chronic secondary lesions in the mucosa of the mouth and nose, debilitatingly inflamed and notoriously refractory to treatment. Immunologically, this outcome has many of the same hallmarks associated with the reaction to LRV: production of type 1 interferons, bias toward a chronic Th1 inflammatory state and an impaired ability of host cells to eliminate parasites through oxidative stress. More intriguing, is that the risk of developing MCL is found almost exclusively in infections of the L. (Viannia) subtype, further indication that leishmanial metastasis is caused, at least in part, by a parasitic component. LRV present in this subgenus may contribute to the destructive inflammation of metastatic disease either by acting in concert with other intrinsic “metastatic factors” or by independently preying on host TLR3 hypersensitivity. Because LRV amplifies parasite virulence, its presence may provide a unique target for diagnostic and clinical intervention of metastatic leishmaniasis. Taking examples from other members of the Totiviridae virus family, this paper reviews the benefits and costs of endosymbiosis, specifically

  15. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Mike; Lee, Stephanie J; Müller, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLRs) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), we investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs3764879, which is located on the X chromosome, was significantly associated with outcome at the Bonferroni-corrected level P ≤ .001. Male hemizygosity and female homozygosity for the minor allele were significantly associated with disease-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.47 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.16 to 1.85]; P = .001). Further analysis stratified by donor sex due to confounding by sex was suggestive for associations with overall survival (male donor: HR, 1.41 [95% CI, 1.09 to 1.83], P = .010; female donor: HR, 2.78 [95% CI, 1.43 to 5.41], P = .003), disease-free survival (male donor: HR, 1.45 [95% CI, 1.12 to 1.87], P = .005; female donor: HR, 2.34 [95% CI, 1.18 to 4.65], P = .015), and treatment-related mortality (male donor: HR, 1.49 [95% CI, 1.09 to 2.04], P = .012; female donor: HR, 3.12 [95% CI, 1.44 to 6.74], P = .004). In conclusion, our findings suggest that the minor allele of TLR8 rs3764879 of the donor is associated with outcome after myeloablative conditioned allogeneic HCT.

  16. Toll-like Receptor 7 Rapidly Relaxes Human Airways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Gregory D.; Proskocil, Becky J.; Fryer, Allison D.; Jacoby, David B.; Kaufman, Elad H.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 8 detect respiratory virus single-stranded RNA and trigger an innate immune response. We recently described rapid TLR7-mediated bronchodilation in guinea pigs. Objectives: To characterize TLR7 expression and TLR7-induced airway relaxation in humans and in eosinophilic airway inflammation in guinea pigs. To evaluate the relaxant effects of other TLRs. Methods: Human airway smooth muscle strips were contracted with methacholine in vitro, and responses to TLR7 and TLR8 agonists were assessed. TLR7-mediated nitric oxide production was measured using a fluorescent indicator, and TLR7 expression was characterized using immunofluorescence. TLR7 signaling was also evaluated in ovalbumin-challenged guinea pigs. Measurements and Main Results: The TLR7 agonist imiquimod (R837) caused rapid dose-dependent relaxation of methacholine-contracted human airways in vitro. This was blocked by the TLR7 antagonist IRS661 and by inhibiting nitric oxide production but not by inhibiting prostaglandin production. TLR7 activation markedly increased fluorescence of a nitric oxide detector. TLR7 was expressed on airway nerves, but not airway smooth muscle, implicating airway nerves as the source of TLR7-induced nitric oxide production. TLR7-mediated relaxation persisted in inflamed guinea pigs airways in vivo. The TLR8 agonists polyuridylic acid and polyadenylic acid also relaxed human airways, and this was not blocked by the TLR7 antagonist or by blocking nitric oxide or prostaglandin production. No other TLRs relaxed the airways. Conclusions: TLR7 is expressed on airway nerves and mediates relaxation of human and animal airways through nitric oxide production. TLR7-mediated bronchodilation may be a new therapeutic strategy in asthma. PMID:23924358

  17. Toll Mediated Infection Response Is Altered by Gravity and Spaceflight in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Katherine; Kleinhesselink, Kurt; George, Michael D.; Morgan, Rachel; Smallwood, Tangi; Hammonds, Ann S.; Fuller, Patrick M.; Saelao, Perot; Alley, Jeff; Gibbs, Allen G.; Hoshizaki, Deborah K.; von Kalm, Laurence; Fuller, Charles A.; Beckingham, Kathleen M.; Kimbrell, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Space travel presents unlimited opportunities for exploration and discovery, but requires better understanding of the biological consequences of long-term exposure to spaceflight. Immune function in particular is relevant for space travel. Human immune responses are weakened in space, with increased vulnerability to opportunistic infections and immune-related conditions. In addition, microorganisms can become more virulent in space, causing further challenges to health. To understand these issues better and to contribute to design of effective countermeasures, we used the Drosophila model of innate immunity to study immune responses in both hypergravity and spaceflight. Focusing on infections mediated through the conserved Toll and Imd signaling pathways, we found that hypergravity improves resistance to Toll-mediated fungal infections except in a known gravitaxis mutant of the yuri gagarin gene. These results led to the first spaceflight project on Drosophila immunity, in which flies that developed to adulthood in microgravity were assessed for immune responses by transcription profiling on return to Earth. Spaceflight alone altered transcription, producing activation of the heat shock stress system. Space flies subsequently infected by fungus failed to activate the Toll pathway. In contrast, bacterial infection produced normal activation of the Imd pathway. We speculate on possible linkage between functional Toll signaling and the heat shock chaperone system. Our major findings are that hypergravity and spaceflight have opposing effects, and that spaceflight produces stress-related transcriptional responses and results in a specific inability to mount a Toll-mediated infection response. PMID:24475130

  18. Toll mediated infection response is altered by gravity and spaceflight in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Katherine; Kleinhesselink, Kurt; George, Michael D; Morgan, Rachel; Smallwood, Tangi; Hammonds, Ann S; Fuller, Patrick M; Saelao, Perot; Alley, Jeff; Gibbs, Allen G; Hoshizaki, Deborah K; von Kalm, Laurence; Fuller, Charles A; Beckingham, Kathleen M; Kimbrell, Deborah A

    2014-01-01

    Space travel presents unlimited opportunities for exploration and discovery, but requires better understanding of the biological consequences of long-term exposure to spaceflight. Immune function in particular is relevant for space travel. Human immune responses are weakened in space, with increased vulnerability to opportunistic infections and immune-related conditions. In addition, microorganisms can become more virulent in space, causing further challenges to health. To understand these issues better and to contribute to design of effective countermeasures, we used the Drosophila model of innate immunity to study immune responses in both hypergravity and spaceflight. Focusing on infections mediated through the conserved Toll and Imd signaling pathways, we found that hypergravity improves resistance to Toll-mediated fungal infections except in a known gravitaxis mutant of the yuri gagarin gene. These results led to the first spaceflight project on Drosophila immunity, in which flies that developed to adulthood in microgravity were assessed for immune responses by transcription profiling on return to Earth. Spaceflight alone altered transcription, producing activation of the heat shock stress system. Space flies subsequently infected by fungus failed to activate the Toll pathway. In contrast, bacterial infection produced normal activation of the Imd pathway. We speculate on possible linkage between functional Toll signaling and the heat shock chaperone system. Our major findings are that hypergravity and spaceflight have opposing effects, and that spaceflight produces stress-related transcriptional responses and results in a specific inability to mount a Toll-mediated infection response.

  19. Spn1 Regulates the GNBP3-Dependent Toll Signaling Pathway in Drosophila melanogaster▿

    PubMed Central

    Fullaondo, Ane; García-Sánchez, Susana; Sanz-Parra, Arantza; Recio, Emma; Lee, So Young; Gubb, David

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila genome encodes 29 serpins, most of unknown function. We show here that Spn1 is an active protease inhibitor of the serpin superfamily. Spn1 inhibits trypsin in vitro and regulates the Toll-mediated immune response in vivo. Expression of the Toll-dependent transcripts Drosomycin and IM1 is increased in Spn1 null mutants. Overexpression of Spn1 reduces the induction of Drosomycin upon immune challenge with fungi but not Gram-positive bacteria. Similar reductions in Drosomycin levels are observed in the psh, spz, and grass mutants of the Toll signaling pathway. These results support a role of Spn1 as a repressor of Toll activation upon fungal infection. Epistatic analysis places Spn1 upstream of Spätzle processing enzyme and Grass, in the fungal cell wall-activated side branch of the pathway. Overexpression of the pattern recognition receptor GNBP3 activates the β-1,3-glucan-sensitive side branch of the Toll pathway. The resultant increased Drosomycin level is reduced by concomitant overexpression of Spn1, confirming that Spn1 regulates the fungal cell wall side branch. Spn1 null mutants show altered susceptibility to fungal infection compared to the wild type, demonstrating a requirement for Spn1 in the fine regulation of the immune response. PMID:21576362

  20. An Effector Peptide Family Required for Drosophila Toll-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, recognition of an invading pathogen activates the Toll or Imd signaling pathway, triggering robust upregulation of innate immune effectors. Although the mechanisms of pathogen recognition and signaling are now well understood, the functions of the immune-induced transcriptome and proteome remain much less well characterized. Through bioinformatic analysis of effector gene sequences, we have defined a family of twelve genes – the Bomanins (Boms) – that are specifically induced by Toll and that encode small, secreted peptides of unknown biochemical activity. Using targeted genome engineering, we have deleted ten of the twelve Bom genes. Remarkably, inactivating these ten genes decreases survival upon microbial infection to the same extent, and with the same specificity, as does eliminating Toll pathway function. Toll signaling, however, appears unaffected. Assaying bacterial load post-infection in wild-type and mutant flies, we provide evidence that the Boms are required for resistance to, rather than tolerance of, infection. In addition, by generating and assaying a deletion of a smaller subset of the Bom genes, we find that there is overlap in Bom activity toward particular pathogens. Together, these studies deepen our understanding of Toll-mediated immunity and provide a new in vivo model for exploration of the innate immune effector repertoire. PMID:25915418

  1. 23 CFR 661.49 - Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., and Toll Road IRR bridges? 661.49 Section 661.49 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.49 Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges? Yes....

  2. 23 CFR 661.49 - Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., and Toll Road IRR bridges? 661.49 Section 661.49 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.49 Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges? Yes....

  3. 26 CFR 49.4254-2 - Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones. 49.4254-2 Section 49.4254-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Communications § 49.4254-2 Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated...

  4. 26 CFR 49.4254-2 - Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones. 49.4254-2 Section 49.4254-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Communications § 49.4254-2 Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated...

  5. 26 CFR 49.4254-2 - Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones. 49.4254-2 Section 49.4254-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Communications § 49.4254-2 Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated...

  6. 26 CFR 49.4254-2 - Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones. 49.4254-2 Section 49.4254-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Communications § 49.4254-2 Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated...

  7. Toll Receptors Instruct Axon and Dendrite Targeting and Participate in Synaptic Partner Matching in a Drosophila Olfactory Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Alex; Hong, Weizhe; Favaloro, Vincenzo; Luo, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Our understanding of the mechanisms that establish wiring specificity of complex neural circuits is far from complete. During Drosophila olfactory circuit assembly, axons of 50 olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) classes and dendrites of 50 projection neuron (PN) classes precisely target to 50 discrete glomeruli, forming parallel information-processing pathways. Here we show that Toll-6 and Toll-7, members of the Toll receptor family best known for functions in innate immunity and embryonic patterning, cell-autonomously instruct the targeting of specific classes of PN dendrites and ORN axons, respectively. The canonical ligands and downstream partners of Toll receptors in embryonic patterning and innate immunity are not required for the function of Toll-6/Toll-7 in wiring specificity, nor are their cytoplasmic domains. Interestingly, both Toll-6 and Toll-7 participate in synaptic partner matching between ORN axons and PN dendrites. Our investigations reveal that olfactory circuit assembly involves dynamic and long-range interactions between PN dendrites and ORN axons. PMID:25741726

  8. 76 FR 6190 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee will... Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small...

  9. 76 FR 2196 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed...: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll... Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free will be held Tuesday, February 22, 2011, at 9...

  10. Toll receptors instruct axon and dendrite targeting and participate in synaptic partner matching in a Drosophila olfactory circuit.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alex; Hong, Weizhe; Favaloro, Vincenzo; Luo, Liqun

    2015-03-04

    Our understanding of the mechanisms that establish wiring specificity of complex neural circuits is far from complete. During Drosophila olfactory circuit assembly, axons of 50 olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) classes and dendrites of 50 projection neuron (PN) classes precisely target to 50 discrete glomeruli, forming parallel information-processing pathways. Here we show that Toll-6 and Toll-7, members of the Toll receptor family best known for functions in innate immunity and embryonic patterning, cell autonomously instruct the targeting of specific classes of PN dendrites and ORN axons, respectively. The canonical ligands and downstream partners of Toll receptors in embryonic patterning and innate immunity are not required for the function of Toll-6/Toll-7 in wiring specificity, nor are their cytoplasmic domains. Interestingly, both Toll-6 and Toll-7 participate in synaptic partner matching between ORN axons and PN dendrites. Our investigations reveal that olfactory circuit assembly involves dynamic and long-range interactions between PN dendrites and ORN axons.

  11. Induction of Direct Antimicrobial Activity Through Mammalian Toll-Like Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma-Uszynski, Sybille; Stenger, Steffen; Takeuchi, Osamu; Ochoa, Maria Teresa; Engele, Matthias; Sieling, Peter A.; Barnes, Peter F.; Röllinghoff, Martin; Bölcskei, Pal L.; Wagner, Manfred; Akira, Shizuo; Norgard, Michael V.; Belisle, John T.; Godowski, Paul J.; Bloom, Barry R.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2001-02-01

    The mammalian innate immune system retains from Drosophila a family of homologous Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that mediate responses to microbial ligands. Here, we show that TLR2 activation leads to killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis in both mouse and human macrophages, through distinct mechanisms. In mouse macrophages, bacterial lipoprotein activation of TLR2 leads to a nitric oxide-dependent killing of intracellular tubercle bacilli, but in human monocytes and alveolar macrophages, this pathway was nitric oxide-independent. Thus, mammalian TLRs respond (as Drosophila Toll receptors do) to microbial ligands and also have the ability to activate antimicrobial effector pathways at the site of infection.

  12. Subversion of Toll-like receptor signaling by a unique family of bacterial Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Cirl, Christine; Wieser, Andreas; Yadav, Manisha; Duerr, Susanne; Schubert, Sören; Fischer, Hans; Stappert, Dominik; Wantia, Nina; Rodriguez, Nuria; Wagner, Hermann; Svanborg, Catharina; Miethke, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Pathogenic microbes have evolved sophisticated molecular strategies to subvert host defenses. Here we show that virulent bacteria interfere directly with Toll-like receptor (TLR) function by secreting inhibitory homologs of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. Genes encoding TIR domain containing-proteins (Tcps) were identified in Escherichia coli CFT073 (TcpC) and Brucella melitensis (TcpB). We found that TcpC is common in the most virulent uropathogenic E. coli strains and promotes bacterial survival and kidney pathology in vivo. In silico analysis predicted significant tertiary structure homology to the TIR domain of human TLR1, and we show that the Tcps impede TLR signaling through the myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) adaptor protein, owing to direct binding of Tcps to MyD88. Tcps represent a new class of virulence factors that act by inhibiting TLR- and MyD88-specific signaling, thus suppressing innate immunity and increasing virulence.

  13. The immune responses triggered by CpG ODNs in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei are associated with LvTolls.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Lingling; Yue, Feng; Yi, Qilin; Huang, Mengmeng; Liu, Rui; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2014-03-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) represent a kind of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) as well as a novel adjuvant that activate the innate immune system through interaction with Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in mammals. In the present study, the synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, CpG ODN 2395, was employed to investigate the interactive mode of CpG ODNs with three known Tolls (LvToll1-3) from shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. The mature peptides of extracellular domains of LvTolls (LvToll-ECDs) were recombinant expressed and their binding activities to CpG ODN 2395 were further examined by ELISA. rLvToll1-ECD and rLvToll3-ECD exhibited affinity to CpG ODN 2395 in a dose-dependent manner when their concentrations ranged from 0.25 to 2.00 μmol/L, while rLvToll2-ECD did not show any binding activities to CpG ODN 2395 in tested concentrations. Additionally, after the stimulation of CpG ODN 2395, the luciferase activities of HEK293T cells transfected with LvToll1-mosaic or LvToll3-mosaic were significantly increased to 2.38-fold (p<0.01) and 1.56-fold (p<0.01), while that in the HEK293T cells transfected with LvToll2-mosaic declined to 0.41-fold. The TNF-α activities were significantly enhanced (p<0.01), and a significant increase (p<0.05) of the NO production was observed at 12h post CpG ODN 2395 stimulation. Moreover, the induced TNF-α activities and increased NO production triggered by CpG ODN 2395 were abolished after the treatment of chloroquine (CQ). The uptake of CpG ODN 2395 by shrimp haemocytes was investigated using the laser scanning confocal microscope, and CpG ODN 2395 was observed to be internalized by the haemocytes and distributed in the cytoplasm with aggregated signals around the nucleuses. It suggested that the interactions of CpG ODNs with LvToll1 and LvToll3 as well as the mature of endosomes in the haemocytes of shrimp L. vannamei were indispensable for the triggering of immune responses by CpG ODNs, and the results provided a foundation

  14. Hepatocyte Toll-like receptor 4 regulates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and thought to contribute to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) is a key mediator of pro-inflammatory responses. Mice lacking Tlr4s are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammat...

  15. Online Education as a Toll Good: An Examination of the South Carolina Virtual School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauh, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Education has long been considered merit good; however, inequitable distribution has made it more akin to a toll good. This was most recently demonstrated by Henry, Fortner, and Thompson (2010). Choice requirements designed to remedy the inequitable distribution of education, have largely been confined to brick and mortar schools. Subsequently,…

  16. Burn Enhances Toll-Like Receptor Induced Responses by Circulating Leukocytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-30

    mole- cules shared among members of a particular class of microbes (e.g., LPS from Gram-negative pathogens and ssRNA from RNA viruses), a wide range...lipoproteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis . Cell Immunol 2009; 258: 29-37. [10] Cairns B, Maile R, Barnes CM, Frelinger JA and Meyer AA. Increased Toll

  17. 77 FR 8328 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of...

  18. 77 FR 21156 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

    ... soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of...

  19. 77 FR 37102 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... improving customer service at the Internal Revenue Service. DATES: The meeting will be held Tuesday, July 3... No: 2012-14968] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION:...

  20. 77 FR 47165 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of...

  1. 77 FR 30590 - Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee. AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of...

  2. 77 FR 40411 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of...

  3. 76 FR 77892 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of...

  4. Analysis of a National Toll Free Suicide Crisis Line in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Sue-Ann; Broom, Yvonne

    2007-01-01

    The first national toll free suicide crisis line for South Africa was launched in October 2003 with the aim of providing a service dedicated to the prevention of suicide in this country. The intervention was motivated by South Africa's suicide rate which had risen higher than the global suicide rate, with the majority of attempted suicides…

  5. Combating Drug Abuse by Targeting Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    to preserve the desired effects of   3   opioids ( pain -relief) while diminishing unwanted effects (analgesic tolerance and reward...significant progress anticipated in the coming project period. 15. SUBJECT TERMS toll like receptor 4 (TLR4); TLR4 agonists non- opioid (+)-naloxone and...naltrexone; drug abuse; glial activation; therapeutic approach to treating drug abuse; opioids ; cocaine 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  6. Mapping of the toll like receptor family in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Toll Like Receptors (TLRs) are key elements of the innate response to pathogens. They recognize Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs) and activate the host defense responses. As such, they are candidate genes for disease resistance. In teleost, eight homologs of the endothermic vertebra...

  7. DIESEL EXHAUST ENHANCES TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 3 EXPRESSION AND SIGNALING IN RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our previous studies have shown that prior exposure of respiratory epithelial cells to an aqueous-trapped solution of DE (DEas) enhances the susceptibility to Influenza infections. Here we examined the effect of DEas on the toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) pathway, which is responsib...

  8. The Emotional Toll of Obligation and Teachers' Disengagement from the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Melanie D.; Phelan, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Obligation, or the binding responsibility to respond to the other, both lends teaching its moral integrity, but also takes an enormous emotional toll on those who teach. Obligation is of particular importance today given that education is increasingly being restructured by ideologies of the market and managerialism that seek to minimize the moral…

  9. Activation of Toll-like receptor 3 induces apoptosis of oral squamous carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qingqiong; Hu, Shuiqing; Yan, Ming; Sun, Zujun; Chen, Wantao; Chen, Fuxiang

    2012-08-01

    Toll-like receptors are well known as molecular sensors of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. They control activation of the innate immune response and subsequently shape the adaptive immune response. Recent publications have demonstrated that Toll-like receptors also play important roles in multiple human cancers, yet their function in oral squamous cell carcinoma remains unclear. In this study, we showed that both oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and tissues from oral squamous carcinoma patients express relatively high levels of Toll-like receptor 3. We also found that synthetic dsRNA-polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid, a Toll-like receptor 3 ligand, induced apoptosis of oral squamous carcinoma cells mainly via Toll-like receptor 3, through interferon-β production and activation of caspases 3 and 9. Moreover, in an oral squamous cell carcinoma xenograft mouse model, we demonstrated for the first time that activation of Toll-like receptor 3 inhibited oral squamous cell carcinoma tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, the direct proapoptotic activity of Toll-like receptor 3 in human oral squamous carcinoma cells may make this protein a viable therapeutic target in the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  10. A family of human receptors structurally related to Drosophila Toll

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Fernando L.; Hardiman, Gary; Timans, Jackie C.; Kastelein, Robert A.; Bazan, J. Fernando

    1998-01-01

    The discovery of sequence homology between the cytoplasmic domains of Drosophila Toll and human interleukin 1 receptors has sown the conviction that both molecules trigger related signaling pathways tied to the nuclear translocation of Rel-type transcription factors. This conserved signaling scheme governs an evolutionarily ancient immune response in both insects and vertebrates. We report the molecular cloning of a class of putative human receptors with a protein architecture that is similar to Drosophila Toll in both intra- and extracellular segments. Five human Toll-like receptors—named TLRs 1–5—are probably the direct homologs of the fly molecule and, as such, could constitute an important and unrecognized component of innate immunity in humans. Intriguingly, the evolutionary retention of TLRs in vertebrates may indicate another role—akin to Toll in the dorsoventralization of the Drosophila embryo—as regulators of early morphogenetic patterning. Multiple tissue mRNA blots indicate markedly different patterns of expression for the human TLRs. By using fluorescence in situ hybridization and sequence-tagged site database analyses, we also show that the cognate Tlr genes reside on chromosomes 4 (TLRs 1, 2, and 3), 9 (TLR4), and 1 (TLR5). Structure prediction of the aligned Toll-homology domains from varied insect and human TLRs, vertebrate interleukin 1 receptors and MyD88 factors, and plant disease-resistance proteins recognizes a parallel β/α fold with an acidic active site; a similar structure notably recurs in a class of response regulators broadly involved in transducing sensory information in bacteria. PMID:9435236

  11. [Characteristics and influencing factors of air pollution in and out of the highway toll gates].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Jun; Chen, Ke-Liang; Zhang, Lan-Jun; Leng, Guang-Yi

    2007-08-01

    During June and July 2003, CO, NO2, THC and PM10 were sampled at the four highway toll gates in Chongqing. Air temperature, air pressure, wind velocity and traffic flow were also monitored simultaneously. The relation between air pollution parameters and influencing factors was analyzed by applying the methods of bivariate correlation and partial correlation. As shown in the monitoring result, the outdoor average concentrations of CO and PM10 exceed indoor ones, but NO2 and THC are reverse. The average concentrations of CO and NO2 at the toll gates don't exceed the indoor and outdoor air quality standards except for the toll gate in Chongqing and Chayuan. One-hour average concentrations of outdoor and indoor THC are 7.728 mg/m3 and 7.216 mg/m3 respectively, and exceed ten times of the indoor air quality standard. One-hour average concentrations of indoor and outdoor PM10 change acutely respectively, and the their maximum concentrations are 0.631 mg/m3 and 0.217 mg/m3 which exceed indoor air quality standard and the second class of ambient air quality standard. Polluting state of Chongqing toll is the worst among the four sampled tolls, and three indexes are bigger than others. Indoor and outdoor air pollutants have correlativity. Correlations of CO, PM10 and NO2 are significant at the 0.01 level respectively, and correlations between indoor and outdoor THC are significant at the 0.05 level. In the influencing factors analysis, traffic flow is significantly correlative with NO2, THC and PM10 (p < 0.01 or 0.01 < p < 0.05), and not significantly correlative with CO (p > 0.01). Air pressure and ambient temperature are predominating factors which influencing the concentration variation, and wind speed is a minor meteorological factor influencing the fluctuations of the data.

  12. Are serum eosinophilic cationic protein levels of toll collectors affected by diesel exhaust exposure?

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin, Cahit; Arbak, Peri; Yavuz, Ozlem; Balbay, Ege Gulec; Balbay, Oner; Annakkaya, Ali Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There are few studies on the diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) / eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) level relationship. This study aimed to detect ECP levels in a highly DE exposed group, named as toll collectors. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, levels of serum ECP, rates of respiratory symptoms, mean levels of respiratory functions, smoking status, and variations in peak expiratory flow (PEF) during weekends and working days were compared for 68 toll collectors (TC) (range of age, 24-48 years) and 28 controls (range of age, 25-61 years). All subjects in the study group were men. Results: No significant difference was observed in terms of symptoms and smoking rates between the toll collectors and control group. The number of toll collectors [12/68 (17.7%) vs 1/28 (3.5%)] with diurnal PEF variability in the working period was higher than that of controls (p=0.058). Mean ECP level of toll collectors was higher than that of controls (32.8 vs 21.4 ng/L), but the difference was not significant. Mean ECP levels were higher in subjects experiencing diurnal PEF variability during work and off-work periods (34.9 vs 28.3 ng/L, p=0.410). Conclusions: Serial PEF measurements combined with serum ECP measurements did not add a new tool to detect the sensitivity of workers dealing with DE. Much more diesel exhaust exposed workers should be included to search for cheap and available methods when evaluating airway. PMID:27882015

  13. 25 CFR 170.130 - How can tribes use Federal highway funds for toll and ferry facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ferry facilities? (a) A tribe can use Federal-aid highway funds, including IRR Program funds, to study... toll facility, these funds will cover a maximum of 80 percent of the project cost. In this case,...

  14. Toll-like receptors and chronic inflammation in rheumatic diseases: new developments.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Leo A B; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Dinarello, Charles A; O'Neill, Luke; Netea, Mihai G

    2016-06-01

    In the past few years, new developments have been reported on the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in chronic inflammation in rheumatic diseases. The inhibitory function of TLR10 has been demonstrated. Receptors that enhance the function of TLRs, and several TLR inhibitors, have been identified. In addition, the role of the microbiome and TLRs in the onset of rheumatic diseases has been reported. We review novel insights on the role of TLRs in several inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, gout and Lyme arthritis, with a focus on the signalling mechanisms mediated by the Toll-IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain, the exogenous and endogenous ligands of TLRs, and the current and future therapeutic strategies to target TLR signalling in rheumatic diseases.

  15. Toll-like receptors recognize distinct proteinase-resistant glycoconjugates in Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh; Hara, Hiromitsu; Fujimoto, Shuji

    2015-03-01

    Campylobacter jejuni causes gastroenteritis and autoimmune neuropathy Guillain-Barré syndrome. The mechanism by which C. jejuni infection results in such the hyperimmunity is not completely understood. Host immunity plays an important role in the disease pathogenesis; however, little is known how immune system recognizes this human pathogen. In this study, we report that Toll-like receptors recognize distinct proteinase K-resistant glycoconjugates in C. jejuni and Escherichia coli. Lipopolysaccharide is solely proteinase-resistant glycoconjugate in E. coli. In contrast, C. jejuni possesses at least five different components that are resistant to proteinase digestion and are capable of inducing NF-κB activation through TLR2 and TLR4. Possession of multiple activators of Toll-like receptors may be the unique strategy of C. jejuni to trigger hyperimmunity.

  16. Methods to Investigate the Role of Toll-Like Receptors in Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marc; Goebeler, Matthias; Martin, Stefan F

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact disease is a common inflammatory skin disease resulting from hyperresponsiveness to harmless nonprotein substances such as metals, fragrances, or rubber. Recent research has highlighted a prominent role of Toll-like receptors, particularly TLR4 in contact allergen-induced innate immune activation that crucially contributes to the pathogenesis of this disease. Here we describe several methods to investigate the role of Toll-like receptors in contact allergen-induced pro-inflammatory responses. These include expansion of disease-relevant human primary cells including endothelial cells and keratinocytes and their manipulation of TLR signaling by transfection, retroviral infection and RNA interference, basic methods to induce contact hypersensitivity in mice, and protocols for adoptive transfer of hapten-stimulated dendritic cells and T cells from TLR-deficient mice to wild-type mice and vice versa wild-type mice to TLR-deficient mice in order to explore cell-specific roles of TLRs in contact hypersensitivity responses.

  17. Contribution of toll-like receptor signaling pathways to breast tumorigenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, La Creis R; Rogers, Erica N; Yeyeodu, Susan T; Jones, Dominique Z; Kimbro, K Sean

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that anomalies in the inflammatory and immune response pathways are essential to tumorigenesis. However, tumor-based innate immunity initiated by transformed breast epithelia tissues has received much less attention. This review summarizes published reports on the role of the toll-like receptor signaling pathway on breast cancer risk, disease progression, survival, and disease recurrence. Specifically, we discuss the underlying biological mechanisms that contribute to the tumorigenic and/or anti-tumorigenic properties of toll-like receptors and their associated agonists in relation to breast tumorigenesis and cancer treatment. Further, we use results from preclinical, clinical, and population-based studies as prompts for the exploration of new and more effective breast cancer therapies. As the knowledge base of innate immunity’s involvement in breast cancer progression increases, current and new immune-modifying strategies will be refined to effectively treat breast cancer. PMID:24648757

  18. Effectiveness of the toll-free line for public insurance programs.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Cynthia M

    2005-03-01

    Toll-free lines for public insurance programs are a major point of entry to inquire about information. More than 1 million Californians are eligible for public insurance programs based on income but not yet enrolled. In 2000 and 2002, a "mystery-shopper" survey was conducted to ascertain overall effectiveness and interlanguage variation for information provided in Armenian, Cantonese, English, Farsi, Hmong, Khmer, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese. Although the 2002 study showed statistically significant improvements from 2000, many constructs remained problematic. In 2002, for example, statistically significant interlanguage variation was identified in discussing and checking eligibility for the program. Specifically, Spanish and Armenian callers were less likely than other language callers to have eligibility checked or deemed eligible. Removing barriers to enrollment in public insurance programs often requires political solutions, but improving customer service for the toll-free line necessitates efficiency and a focus on continuous quality improvement.

  19. Traffic flow through multi-lane tollbooths on a toll highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komada, Kazuhito; Nagatani, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    We study the traffic states and queuing occurring in traffic flow on a toll highway with multi-lane tollgates. The traffic states change with increasing density and varying number of tollgates. When the manual-collection vehicles sort themselves into the tollgates, the queues occur just in front of the tollgates if the vehicular density is higher than a critical value. The queuing in front of tollgates is induced by the competition between the lane expansion and slowdown effects. When the lane expansion effect is superior to the slowdown effect, no queuing occurs. We derive the fundamental diagrams (current-density diagrams) for the traffic flow on the toll highway. The current saturates at the nearest tollgate at a low density and the saturation extends to the next-nearest tollgate with increasing density.

  20. Toll-like receptor 8: augmentation of innate immunity in platinum resistant ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Brueseke, Taylor J; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecologic cancer, with 15,000 anticipated deaths within the United States alone in 2012, and new treatment strategies are needed. Ovarian cancer tumors are known to host an immunosuppressive microenvironment. This suppression may be reversible via activation of the innate immune response. Toll-like receptor 8 activates innate immunity while simultaneously inhibiting the effects of regulatory T cells within the ovarian cancer tumors. VTX-2337 is a novel small molecule ligand of Toll-like receptor 8 and is currently the subject of a Phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG)-3003 for patients with recurrent platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. We look forward to the results of this trial as support for the paradigm of process therapy in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:23723721

  1. Fueling the fire in acute kidney injury: endothelial cells collect their Toll.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Timothy A; Dagher, Pierre C

    2011-02-01

    Chen et al. demonstrate endothelial expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the outer medulla of the kidney early in the course of ischemic acute kidney injury. Furthermore, they provide data that support the hypothesis that activation of endothelial TLR4 in the early extension phase of AKI by damage-associated molecular pattern molecules released from injured tubules results in endothelial activation. This activation can serve to amplify inflammation and tubular damage.

  2. Phylogeny of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling: Adapting the Innate Response

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Jeffrey M.; Racioppi, Luigi; Jones, Corbin D.; Masci, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    The Toll-like receptors represent a largely evolutionarily conserved pathogen recognition machinery responsible for recognition of bacterial, fungal, protozoan, and viral pathogen associated microbial patterns and initiation of inflammatory response. Structurally the Toll-like receptors are comprised of an extracellular leucine rich repeat domain and a cytoplasmic Toll/Interleukin 1 receptor domain. Recognition takes place in the extracellular domain where as the cytoplasmic domain triggers a complex signal network required to sustain appropriate immune response. Signal transduction is regulated by the recruitment of different intracellular adaptors. The Toll-like receptors can be grouped depending on the usage of the adaptor, MyD88, into MyD88-dependent and MyD88 independent subsets. Herein, we present a unique phylogenetic analysis of domain regions of these receptors and their cognate signaling adaptor molecules. Although previously unclear from the phylogeny of full length receptors, these analyses indicate a separate evolutionary origin for the MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signaling pathway and provide evidence of a common ancestor for the vertebrate and invertebrate orthologs of the adaptor molecule MyD88. Together these observations suggest a very ancient origin of the MyD88-dependent pathway Additionally we show that early duplications gave rise to several adaptor molecule families. In some cases there is also strong pattern of parallel duplication between adaptor molecules and their corresponding TLR. Our results further support the hypothesis that phylogeny of specific domains involved in signaling pathway can shed light on key processes that link innate to adaptive immune response. PMID:23326591

  3. Interaction between Cannabinoid System and Toll-Like Receptors Controls Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the endocannabinoid system consisting of cannabinoid receptors, endogenous ligands, and biosynthetic and metabolizing enzymes, interest has been renewed in investigating the promise of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Abundant evidence indicates that cannabinoids modulate immune responses. An inflammatory response is triggered when innate immune cells receive a danger signal provided by pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns engaging pattern-recognition receptors. Toll-like receptor family members are prominent pattern-recognition receptors expressed on innate immune cells. Cannabinoids suppress Toll-like receptor-mediated inflammatory responses. However, the relationship between the endocannabinoid system and innate immune system may not be one-sided. Innate immune cells express cannabinoid receptors and produce endogenous cannabinoids. Hence, innate immune cells may play a role in regulating endocannabinoid homeostasis, and, in turn, the endocannabinoid system modulates local inflammatory responses. Studies designed to probe the interaction between the innate immune system and the endocannabinoid system may identify new potential molecular targets in developing therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory diseases. This review discusses the endocannabinoid system and Toll-like receptor family and evaluates the interaction between them. PMID:27597805

  4. Association of Toll-like receptors 2, 3, and 4 genes polymorphisms with periapical pathosis risk

    PubMed Central

    Özan, Ülkü; Ocak, Zeynep; Özan, Fatih; Oktay, Elif-Aybala; Şahman, Halil; Yikilgan, İhsan; Oruçoğlu, Hasan; Er, Kürşat

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the role of gene variations of Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2, 3, and 4 on genetic susceptibility to periapical pathosis. Material and Methods One hundred patients were included in the study and divided into two groups as follows; Control Group (n=50) that have root canal treatment and no periapical lesion, Patient Group (n=50) that have root canal treatment and periapical lesion. TLR2 Arg753Gln, TLR3 (c.1377C/T) and TLR4 Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms were genotyped by using PCR-RFLP. Genotypical analysis of control and patient groups were investigated to disclose whether there is any association between periapical lesions and gene variations. Results There are no significant statistical differences between control and patient groups according to TLR 2 and 4 gene sequence. On the contrary, CC allele detected 74% for TLR 3 in patient group, and this difference was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.005). Conclusions According to these results, it can be suggested that patients with Toll-like receptor 3 gene polymorphisms could be susceptible to periapical pathosis. Key words:Toll-like receptors, periapical pathosis, endodontics. PMID:27031066

  5. Toll-8/Tollo negatively regulates antimicrobial response in the Drosophila respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Akhouayri, Idir; Turc, Claire; Royet, Julien; Charroux, Bernard

    2011-10-01

    Barrier epithelia that are persistently exposed to microbes have evolved potent immune tools to eliminate such pathogens. If mechanisms that control Drosophila systemic responses are well-characterized, the epithelial immune responses remain poorly understood. Here, we performed a genetic dissection of the cascades activated during the immune response of the Drosophila airway epithelium i.e. trachea. We present evidence that bacteria induced-antimicrobial peptide (AMP) production in the trachea is controlled by two signalling cascades. AMP gene transcription is activated by the inducible IMD pathway that acts non-cell autonomously in trachea. This IMD-dependent AMP activation is antagonized by a constitutively active signalling module involving the receptor Toll-8/Tollo, the ligand Spätzle2/DNT1 and Ect-4, the Drosophila ortholog of the human Sterile alpha and HEAT/ARMadillo motif (SARM). Our data show that, in addition to Toll-1 whose function is essential during the systemic immune response, Drosophila relies on another Toll family member to control the immune response in the respiratory epithelium.

  6. A role for the adaptor proteins TRAM and TRIF in toll-like receptor 2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Nadra J; Vladimer, Gregory I; Stenvik, Jørgen; Orning, M Pontus A; Zeid-Kilani, Maria V; Bugge, Marit; Bergstroem, Bjarte; Conlon, Joseph; Husebye, Harald; Hise, Amy G; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Espevik, Terje; Lien, Egil

    2015-02-06

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in sensing invading microbes by host innate immunity. TLR2 recognizes bacterial lipoproteins/lipopeptides, and lipopolysaccharide activates TLR4. TLR2 and TLR4 signal via the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor adaptors MyD88 and MAL, leading to NF-κB activation. TLR4 also utilizes the adaptors TRAM and TRIF, resulting in activation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3. Here, we report a new role for TRAM and TRIF in TLR2 regulation and signaling. Interestingly, we observed that TLR2-mediated induction of the chemokine Ccl5 was impaired in TRAM or TRIF deficient macrophages. Inhibition of endocytosis reduced Ccl5 release, and the data also suggested that TRAM and TLR2 co-localize in early endosomes, supporting the hypothesis that signaling may occur from an intracellular compartment. Ccl5 release following lipoprotein challenge additionally involved the kinase Tbk-1 and Irf3, as well as MyD88 and Irf1. Induction of Interferon-β and Ccl4 by lipoproteins was also partially impaired in cells lacking TRIF cells. Our results show a novel function of TRAM and TRIF in TLR2-mediated signal transduction, and the findings broaden our understanding of how Toll/interleukin-1 receptor adaptor proteins may participate in signaling downstream from TLR2.

  7. A Geography-Specific Approach to Estimating the Distributional Impact of Highway Tolls: An Application to the Puget Sound Region of Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Plotnick, Robert D.; Romich, Jennifer; Thacker, Jennifer; Dunbar, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    This study contributes to the debate about tolls’ equity impacts by examining the potential economic costs of tolling for low-income and non-low-income households. Using data from the Puget Sound metropolitan region in Washington State and GIS methods to map driving routes from home to work, we examine car ownership and transportation patterns among low-income and non-low-income households. We follow standard practice of estimating tolls’ potential impact only on households with workers who would drive on tolled and non-tolled facilities. We then redo the analysis including broader groups of households. We find that the degree of regressivity is quite sensitive to the set of households included in the analysis. The results suggest that distributional analyses of tolls should estimate impacts on all households in the relevant region in addition to impacts on just users of roads that are currently tolled or likely to be tolled. PMID:21818172

  8. Sleep Deprivation and Divergent Toll-like Receptor-4 Activation of Cellular Inflammation in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Judith E.; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard; Witarama, Tuff; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Yokomizo, Megumi; Seeman, Teresa E.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Sleep disturbance and aging are associated with increases in inflammation, as well as increased risk of infectious disease. However, there is limited understanding of the role of sleep loss on age-related differences in immune responses. This study examines the effects of sleep deprivation on toll-like receptor activation of monocytic inflammation in younger compared to older adults. Design, Setting, and Participants: Community-dwelling adults (n = 70) who were categorized as younger (25–39 y old, n = 21) and older (60–84 y old, n = 49) participants, underwent a sleep laboratory-based experimental partial sleep deprivation (PSD) protocol including adaptation, an uninterrupted night of sleep, sleep deprivation (sleep restricted to 03:00–07:00), and recovery. Measurement and Results: Blood samples were obtained each morning to measure toll-like receptor-4 activation of monocyte intracellular production of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Partial sleep deprivation induced a significant increase in the production of IL-6 and/or TNF-α that persisted after a night of recovery sleep (F(2,121.2) = 3.8, P < 0.05). Age moderated the effects of sleep loss, such that younger adults had an increase in inflammatory cytokine production that was not present in older adults (F(2,121.2) = 4.0, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Older adults exhibit reduced toll-like receptor 4 stimulated cellular inflammation that, unlike in younger adults, is not activated after a night of partial sleep loss. Whereas sleep loss increases cellular inflammation in younger adults and may contribute to inflammatory disorders, blunted toll-like receptor activation in older adults may increase the risk of infectious disease seen with aging. Citation: Carroll JE, Carrillo C, Olmstead R, Witarama T, Breen EC, Yokomizo M, Seeman TE, Irwin MR. Sleep deprivation and divergent toll-like receptor-4 activation of cellular inflammation in aging. SLEEP

  9. High mobility group box 1/toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling promotes progression of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yanqiu; Zhou, Tao; Gao, Yanjing; Zhang, Zongli; Li, Li; Liu, Lin; Shi, Wenna; Su, Lihui; Cheng, Baoquan

    2017-03-01

    High mobility group box 1 and toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling pathway have been indicated to have oncogenic effects in many cancers. However, the role of high mobility group box 1/toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling pathway in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that high mobility group box 1, toll-like receptor 4, and myeloid differentiation factor 88 were overexpressed in gastric cancer tumors compared with the adjacent non-tumor tissues. The overexpression of high mobility group box 1, toll-like receptor 4, and myeloid differentiation factor 88 were correlated with tumor-node-metastasis stage (p = 0.0068, p = 0.0063, p = 0.0173) and lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0272, p = 0.0382, and p = 0.0495). Furthermore, we observed that knockdown of high mobility group box 1 by high mobility group box 1-small interfering RNA suppressed the expression of toll-like receptor 4 and myeloid differentiation factor 88. Blockage of high mobility group box 1/toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling by high mobility group box 1-small interfering RNA resulted in elevation of apoptotic ratio and inhibition of cell growth, migration, and invasion by upregulating Bax expression and downregulating Bcl-2, matrix metalloproteinase-2, nuclear factor kappa B/p65 expression, and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B/p65 in gastric cancer cells. Our findings suggest that high mobility group box 1/toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling pathway may contribute to the development and progression of gastric cancer via the nuclear factor kappa B pathway and it also represents a novel potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  10. The Drosophila PRR GNBP3 assembles effector complexes involved in antifungal defenses independently of its Toll pathway activation function

    PubMed Central

    Matskevich, Alexey A.; Quintin, Jessica; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Drosophila Toll signalling pathway controls the systemic antifungal host response. Gram-negative binding protein 3 (GNBP3), a member of the β-Glucan recognition protein (βGRP) family, senses fungal infections and activates this pathway. A second detection system perceives the activity of proteolytic fungal virulence factors and redundantly activates Toll. GNBP3hades mutant flies succumb more rapidly to Candida albicans and to entomopathogenic fungal infections than wild type (WT) flies, despite normal triggering of the Toll pathway via the virulence detection system. These observations suggest that GNBP3 triggers antifungal defenses that are not dependent on activation of the Toll pathway. Here, we show that GNBP3 agglutinates fungal cells. Furthermore, it can activate melanization in a Toll-independent manner. Melanization is likely to be an essential defense against some fungal infections since the entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana inhibits the activity of the main melanization enzymes, the phenol oxidases. Finally, we show that GNBP3 assembles “attack complexes”, which comprise PO and the serpin NEC. We propose that Drosophila GNBP3 targets fungi immediately at the inception of the infection by bringing effector molecules in direct contact with the invading microorganisms. PMID:20201042

  11. The Drosophila PRR GNBP3 assembles effector complexes involved in antifungal defenses independently of its Toll-pathway activation function.

    PubMed

    Matskevich, Alexey A; Quintin, Jessica; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2010-05-01

    The Drosophila Toll-signaling pathway controls the systemic antifungal host response. Gram-negative binding protein 3 (GNBP3), a member of the beta-glucan recognition protein family senses fungal infections and activates this pathway. A second detection system perceives the activity of proteolytic fungal virulence factors and redundantly activates Toll. GNBP3(hades) mutant flies succumb more rapidly to Candida albicans and to entomopathogenic fungal infections than WT flies, despite normal triggering of the Toll pathway via the virulence detection system. These observations suggest that GNBP3 triggers antifungal defenses that are not dependent on activation of the Toll pathway. Here, we show that GNBP3 agglutinates fungal cells. Furthermore, it can activate melanization in a Toll-independent manner. Melanization is likely to be an essential defense against some fungal infections given that the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana inhibits the activity of the main melanization enzymes, the phenol oxidases. Finally, we show that GNBP3 assembles "attack complexes", which comprise phenoloxidase and the necrotic serpin. We propose that Drosophila GNBP3 targets fungi immediately at the inception of the infection by bringing effector molecules in direct contact with the invading microorganisms.

  12. PcToll3 was involved in anti-Vibrio response by regulating the expression of antimicrobial peptides in red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jiang-Feng; Wei, Shun; Wang, Yu-Qing; Dai, Yun-Jia; Tu, Jia-Gang; Zhao, Li-Juan; Li, Xin-Cang; Qin, Qi-Wei; Chen, Nan; Lin, Li

    2016-10-01

    Tolls and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in host immune defenses by regulating the expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and cytokines, but the functional differences of crustacean Tolls from Drosophila Tolls or Mammal TLRs are largely unknown. A novel Toll receptor, named PcToll3, was identified from red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. It was widely expressed in all detected tissues, and its transcript in hemocytes was up-regulated at 12 h after Vibrio parahemolyticus (Vibrio) injection or at 24 h post white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. After knockdown of PcToll3, the activity of bacterial clearance was inhibited, and the expression levels of AMPs including Crustin1 (Cru1), Anti-lippopolysaccharide factor 1 (ALF1), and Lysozymes1 (Lys1), which could be up-regulated by Vibrio, were all affected. Meanwhile, PcToll3 silencing influenced the expression of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (PcMyd88), tumor necrosis factor-associated factor 6 (PcTRAF6), and PcDorsal, which were the counterparts of Drosophila Toll signaling pathway. Interestingly, PcToll3 silencing inhibited translocation of PcDorsal from cytoplasm to nucleus. Furthermore, the knockdown of PcDorsal also impaired the expression of AMPs after Vibrio challenge. Hence, we concluded that, besides participating in antiviral immunity, PcToll3 might also regulate the expression of Cru1 and Lys1 to participate in anti-Vibrio immune responses by promoting PcDorsal translocation into nucleus.

  13. Evaluation of public opinion about congestion pricing and tolls. Final research report

    SciTech Connect

    Ulberg, C.; MacFarland, G.

    1995-09-01

    The two primary objectives of the research were (1) to assess public attitudes in the Puget Sound Region toward tolls, congestion pricing, and other forms of market-based transportation pricing (e.g., gas taxes, VMT charges, parking fees) and (2) to explore various ways to present information to the public so that people will feel adequately informaed to decide whether to support pricing system. A third objective that developed out of early research stages was to measure how the level of acceptance of pricing changes (for or against) as understanding increases.

  14. Trial Watch: Immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor agonists in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, Kristina; Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Cremer, Isabelle; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Špíšek, Radek; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating preclinical evidence indicates that Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists efficiently boost tumor-targeting immune responses (re)initiated by most, if not all, paradigms of anticancer immunotherapy. Moreover, TLR agonists have been successfully employed to ameliorate the efficacy of various chemotherapeutics and targeted anticancer agents, at least in rodent tumor models. So far, only three TLR agonists have been approved by regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients. Moreover, over the past decade, the interest of scientists and clinicians in these immunostimulatory agents has been fluctuating. Here, we summarize recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of TLR agonists for cancer therapy.

  15. Virtual Screening Approaches towards the Discovery of Toll-Like Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Regidor, Lucía; Zarioh, Malik; Ortega, Laura; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles

    2016-01-01

    This review aims to summarize the latest efforts performed in the search for novel chemical entities such as Toll-like receptor (TLR) modulators by means of virtual screening techniques. This is an emergent research field with only very recent (and successful) contributions. Identification of drug-like molecules with potential therapeutic applications for the treatment of a variety of TLR-regulated diseases has attracted considerable interest due to the clinical potential. Additionally, the virtual screening databases and computational tools employed have been overviewed in a descriptive way, widening the scope for researchers interested in the field. PMID:27618029

  16. The great escape: microbiotal LPS takes a toll on the liver.

    PubMed

    Weiss, David S

    2012-09-01

    The interaction between the intestinal microbiota and host is much more complex than previously appreciated, and we are now learning that it can have an impact on extraintestinal human diseases. In this issue of the journal (beginning on page 1090), Lin and colleagues present important data linking the microbiota, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and toll-like receptor (TLR)4 with hepatitis in a mouse model. These provocative results and those from other recent studies highlight the microbiota as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in several liver diseases.

  17. Toll-like receptors in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases: recent and emerging translational developments

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Laura; O’Reilly, Steven C

    2016-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are defined as the loss of self-tolerance in which an inflammatory response to self-antigens occurs, which are a significant global burden. Toll-like receptors are key pattern recognition receptors, which integrate signals leading to the activation of transcription factors and ultimately proinflammatory cytokines. Recently, it has become apparent that these are at the nexus of autoinflammatory diseases making them viable and attractive drug targets. The aim of this review was to evaluate the role of innate immunity in autoinflammatory conditions alongside the role of negative regulation while suggesting possible therapeutic targets. PMID:27579291

  18. Selection, Preparation, and Evaluation of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a membrane-spanning receptor protein that functions in complex with its accessory protein MD-2, is an intriguing target for therapeutic development. Herein, we report the identification of a series of novel TLR4 inhibitors and the development of a robust, enantioselective synthesis using an unprecedented Mannich type reaction to functionalize a pyrazole ring. In silico and cellular assay results demonstrated that compound 1 and its analogues selectively block TLR4 activation in live cells. Animal model tests showed that 1 and its derivatives could potentiate morphine-induced analgesia in vivo, presumably by attenuating the opioid-induced TLR4 activation. PMID:20824192

  19. Disseminated cysticercosis: clinical spectrum, Toll-like receptor-4 gene polymorphisms and role of albendazole

    PubMed Central

    Qavi, Abdul; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita; Kumar, Neeraj; Malhotra, Kiran Preet; Srivastava, Pradeep Kumar; Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we describe clinical and imaging spectrum, and the natural course of patients with disseminated cysticercosis. How albendazole affects the course of disease has also been evaluated. We assessed the Toll-like receptor-4 gene polymorphisms, to know the reason for the apparently higher prevalence of disseminated cysticercosis in India. Sixty consecutive patients with disseminated cysticercosis were enrolled. Sixty age-and-sex-matched healthy controls were also enrolled for the purpose of genetic study. Twenty patients, who gave consent, were treated with albendazole along with corticosteroids. Forty patients did not give consent for antiparasitic therapy. Assessment for Toll-like receptor-4 gene polymorphisms (Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile genes) was done. Patients were followed for 6 months. We also performed a literature search of cases published in English language using PubMed electronic database and analyzed 56 cases thus available. There was an increased risk (6.63 fold and 4.61 fold) of disseminated cysticercosis in the presence of Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms in Toll-like receptor-4, respectively. The allelic frequency of Gly (11% vs. 3%, P = 0.024, odds ratio [OR] = 3.52) and Ile alleles (11% vs. 2%, P = 0.009, OR = 4.738) in disseminated cysticercosis was high. Albendazole resulted in complete disappearance of all cerebral lesions in 35% (7/20) patients and reduction in lesion load in remaining 65% (13/20) patients. No significant change in number of cysticercal lesion was noted in patients who did not receive albendazole. No major adverse reaction following antiparasitic treatment was noted. Three deaths were recorded in patients who did not receive antiparasitic treatment. Of the 56 cases reported in PubMed, 33 patients received antiparasitic treatment with follow-up data available for 31 patients. Most (24) of these patients received albendazole. A significant clinical and/or imaging improvements, on follow up, were observed in

  20. Traffic flow on a toll highway with electronic and traditional tollgates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komada, Kazuhito; Masukura, Shuichi; Nagatani, Takashi

    2009-12-01

    We study the traffic states and jams occurring in traffic flow on a two-lane toll highway with electronic and manual (traditional) tollgates. The electronic and manual collection vehicles sort themselves into their respective lanes at low density, while they mix at each tollgate at high density. We derive the fundamental diagrams (flow-density diagrams) for the electronic and manual collection vehicles. The traffic states change with increasing density and varying the ratio. Dynamical phase transitions occur. It is shown that the fundamental diagrams for the two tollgates depend greatly on the density and fraction of both vehicles.

  1. Trial Watch: Immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor agonists in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Iribarren, Kristina; Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Cremer, Isabelle; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Špíšek, Radek; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulating preclinical evidence indicates that Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists efficiently boost tumor-targeting immune responses (re)initiated by most, if not all, paradigms of anticancer immunotherapy. Moreover, TLR agonists have been successfully employed to ameliorate the efficacy of various chemotherapeutics and targeted anticancer agents, at least in rodent tumor models. So far, only three TLR agonists have been approved by regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients. Moreover, over the past decade, the interest of scientists and clinicians in these immunostimulatory agents has been fluctuating. Here, we summarize recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of TLR agonists for cancer therapy. PMID:27141345

  2. Innate immunity, Toll-like receptors, and atherosclerosis: mouse models and methods.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and aberrant lipid metabolism represent hallmarks of atherosclerosis. Innate immunity critically depends upon Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling. Recent data directly implicate signalling by TLR4 and TLR2 in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The role that TLRs play in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis can be assessed by using several animal models, which provide a double genetic deficiency in TLRs and molecules implicated in the lipid metabolism, such as ApoE or LDL receptor. Furthermore, a more recent technique, such as the bone marrow transplantation (BMT), can be a useful and straightforward method to elucidate the role of stromal versus hematopoietic cells in the acceleration of the atheroma.

  3. Toll-like receptor genes (TLRs) from Capitella capitata and Helobdella robusta (Annelida).

    PubMed

    Davidson, Charis R; Best, Natalie M; Francis, Joseph W; Cooper, Edwin L; Wood, Todd Charles

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an important part of the innate immunity system and are found throughout the animal kingdom, but have not yet been reported in annelids. We searched shotgun reads of the genomes of the leech Helobdella and polychaete Capitella for TLR homologs. We found 105 TLR homologs in Capitella and 16 in Helobdella. The deduced phylogeny of these sequences, together with TLRs from other animal phyla, reveals three major clades. One clade consists of a mixture of both vertebrates and invertebrates, including sequences from Capitella and Helobdella, while the other two clades contain only invertebrate TLRs.

  4. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Wild Type Homozygozity of Polymorphisms +896 and +1196 Is Associated with High Gastrin Serum Levels and Peptic Ulcer Risk.

    PubMed

    Pohjanen, Vesa-Matti; Koivurova, Olli-Pekka; Huhta, Heikki; Helminen, Olli; Mäkinen, Johanna M; Karhukorpi, Jari M; Joensuu, Tapio; Koistinen, Pentti O; Valtonen, Jarno M; Niemelä, Seppo E; Karttunen, Riitta A; Karttunen, Tuomo J

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 is a part of the innate immune system and recognizes Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide. The goal of this study was to analyze the role of Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms +896 (rs4986790) and +1196 (rs4986791) in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori related gastroduodenal diseases in relation to gastric secretion and inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms, serum gastrin-17 and pepsinogen I and II concentrations were determined, and gastroscopies with histopathological analyses were performed to 216 dyspeptic patients. As genotype controls, 179 controls and 61 gastric cancer patients were studied. In our study, the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 polymorphisms were in total linkage disequilibrium. The homozygous wild types displayed higher gastrin-17 serum concentrations than the mutants (p = 0.001) and this effect was independent of Helicobacter pylori. The homozygous wild types also displayed an increased risk for peptic ulcers (OR: 4.390). Toll-like receptor 4 genotypes did not show any association with Helicobacter pylori positivity or the features of gastric inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 expression was seen in gastrin and somatostatin expressing cells of antral mucosa by immunohistochemistry. Our results suggest a role for Toll-like receptor 4 in gastric acid regulation and that the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 wild type homozygozity increases peptic ulcer risk via gastrin secretion.

  5. 75 FR 69363 - HUD Multifamily Rental Projects: Regulatory Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

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  11. Ex vivo genome-wide RNAi screening of the Drosophila Toll signaling pathway elicited by a larva-derived tissue extract.

    PubMed

    Kanoh, Hirotaka; Kuraishi, Takayuki; Tong, Li-Li; Watanabe, Ryo; Nagata, Shinji; Kurata, Shoichiro

    2015-11-13

    Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), so-called "danger signals," play important roles in host defense and pathophysiology in mammals and insects. In Drosophila, the Toll pathway confers damage responses during bacterial infection and improper cell-fate control. However, the intrinsic ligands and signaling mechanisms that potentiate innate immune responses remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that a Drosophila larva-derived tissue extract strongly elicits Toll pathway activation via the Toll receptor. Using this extract, we performed ex vivo genome-wide RNAi screening in Drosophila cultured cells, and identified several signaling factors that are required for host defense and antimicrobial-peptide expression in Drosophila adults. These results suggest that our larva-derived tissue extract contains active ingredients that mediate Toll pathway activation, and the screening data will shed light on the mechanisms of damage-related Toll pathway signaling in Drosophila.

  12. 75 FR 18228 - Notice of Change in Definitions and Modification to Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP)

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  13. 77 FR 26218 - Federal Housing Administration (FHA): Section 232 Healthcare Facility Insurance Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

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  14. Functional polymorphisms in Toll-like receptor genes for innate immunity in farm animals.

    PubMed

    Novák, Karel

    2014-01-15

    The exploitation of the genetic factors affecting the health status of farm animals represents an alternative approach to controlling the diseases caused by microbial pathogens. The determination of innate immunity based on the genotype of the germplasm cells is a constraint for specificity but becomes an advantage in breeding schemes. The structural deviations among Toll-like receptors (TLRs), as the most frequently studied innate immunity components, have been documented at all levels, i.e., interspecific, inter- and intravarietal, in the main farm species. The current computational methods facilitate the prediction of the functional consequences of the observed mutations. Subsequently, these predictions can be verified through immunological responsiveness and population-wide association studies. The frequency and haplotype grouping of individual polymorphisms are used to track the origin and selection coefficient as independent indicators of functional changes. The Toll-like receptor variants associated with mastitis and mycobacterial infection have been identified in cattle, consequently, the targeting of these proteins in breeding could contribute to disease control. The range of infections affected by TLR polymorphisms suggests that the improvement of innate resistance is feasible in more species. Thus, the traditional breeds and wild populations should be regarded as the resources of genetic variability accessible for these purposes.

  15. Toll-like receptor 3 increases allergic and irritant contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Naomi; Tamagawa-Mineoka, Risa; Ueta, Mayumi; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Katoh, Norito

    2015-02-01

    There is increasing recognition of the role of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) in noninfectious inflammatory diseases, but the function of TLR3 in inflammatory skin diseases is unclear. We investigated the functions of TLR3 in allergic and irritant contact dermatitis (ICD). The contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response was lower in Toll-like receptor 3 knockout (Tlr3 KO) mice, and was greater in TLR3 transgenic (Tg) mice than in wild-type (WT) mice after challenge with 2,4,6-trinitro-1-chlorobenzene. Adoptive transfer of immunized lymph node cells from Tlr3 KO mice induced CHS in WT recipients. In contrast, adoptive transfer of those from WT mice did not fully induce CHS in Tlr3 KO recipients. The ICD reaction following croton oil application was lower in Tlr3 KO mice, and was greater in TLR3 Tg mice than in WT mice. Maturation, migration, and antigen presentation of dendritic cells and proliferation of lymphocytes between WT mice and Tlr3 KO mice were comparable. These results show that TLR3 enhances antigen-independent skin inflammation in the elicitation phase of allergic contact dermatitis and in ICD.

  16. The toll of the gridiron: damage-associated molecular patterns and hypertension in American football

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Cameron G.; Webb, R. Clinton

    2016-01-01

    American football has unequivocally been linked to elevations in blood pressure and hypertension, especially in linemen. However, the mechanisms of this increase cannot be attributed solely to increased body weight and associated cardiometabolic risk factors (e.g.,dyslipidemia or hyperglycemia). Therefore, understanding the etiology of football-associated hypertension is essential for improving the quality of life in this mostly young population, as well as for lowering the potential for chronic disease in the future. We propose that inflammatogenic damage–associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released into the circulation from football-induced musculoskeletal trauma activate pattern-recognition receptors of the innate immune system—specifically, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and mitochondrial (mt)DNA which activate Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 and -9, respectively. Previously, we observed that circulating levels of these 2 DAMPs are increased in hypertension, and activation of TLR4 and -9 causes endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. Therefore, our novel hypothesis is that musculoskeletal injury from repeated hits in football players, particularly in linemen, leads to elevated circulating HMGB1 and mtDNA to activate TLRs on endothelial cells leading to impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation, increased vascular tone, and hypertension.—McCarthy, C. G., Webb, R. C. The toll of the gridiron: damage-associated molecular patterns and hypertension in American football. PMID:26316270

  17. Toll-interacting protein inhibits HIV-1 infection and regulates viral latency.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Kuang, Wen-Dong; Qu, Di; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-06-24

    HIV-1 latency is mainly characterized by a reversible silencing of long-terminal repeat (LTR)-driven transcription of provirus. The existing of repressive factors has been described to contribute to transcription silencing of HIV-1. Toll-interacting protein (Tollip) has been identified as a repressor of Toll like receptors (TLR)-mediated signaling. Our previous study has found that Tollip inhibited NF-κB-dependent HIV-1 promoter LTR-driven transcription, indicating the potential role of Tollip in governing viral latency. In this study, by using HIV-1 latently infected Jurkat T-cell and central memory CD4(+) T-cells, we demonstrate the role of Tollip in regulating HIV-1 latency, as the knock-down of Tollip promoted HIV-1 reactivation from both HIV-1 latently infected Jurkat CD4(+) T cells and primary central memory T cells (TCM). Moreover, we found that the activities of LTRs derived from multiple HIV-1 subtypes could be repressed by Tollip; Knock-down of Tollip promoted HIV-1 transcription and infection in CD4(+) T cells. Our data indicate a key role of Tollip in suppressing HIV-1 infection and regulating viral latency, which provides a potential host target for combating HIV-1 infection and latency.

  18. Patents for Toll-like receptor ligands as radiation countermeasures for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Pollard, Harvey B

    2015-01-01

    Acute radiation exposure induces apoptosis of tissues in the hematopoietic, digestive, cutaneous, cardiovascular and nervous systems; extensive apoptosis of these tissues ultimately leads to acute radiation syndrome. A novel strategy for developing radiation countermeasures has been to imitate the genetic mechanisms acquired by radiation-resistant tumors. Two mechanisms that underlie this ability of tumor cells are the p53 and NF-κB pathways. The loss of p53 function results in the inactivation of pro-apoptotic control mechanisms, while constitutive activation of NF-κB results in the up-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes. Various Toll-like receptor ligands are capable of up regulating the NF-κB pathway, which increases radio-resistance and reduces radiation-induced apoptosis in various tissues. Several Toll-like receptor ligands have been patented and are currently under development as radiation countermeasures for acute radiation syndrome. Ongoing studies suggest that a few of these attractive agents are progressing well along the US FDA approval pathway to become radiation countermeasures.

  19. Patents for Toll-like receptor ligands as radiation countermeasures for acute radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay K; Pollard, Harvey B

    2015-01-01

    Acute radiation exposure induces apoptosis of tissues in the hematopoietic, digestive, cutaneous, cardiovascular and nervous systems; extensive apoptosis of these tissues ultimately leads to acute radiation syndrome. A novel strategy for developing radiation countermeasures has been to imitate the genetic mechanisms acquired by radiation-resistant tumors. Two mechanisms that underlie this ability of tumor cells are the p53 and NF-κB pathways. The loss of p53 function results in the inactivation of pro-apoptotic control mechanisms, while constitutive activation of NF-κB results in the up-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes. Various Toll-like receptor ligands are capable of up regulating the NF-κB pathway, which increases radio-resistance and reduces radiation-induced apoptosis in various tissues. Several Toll-like receptor ligands have been patented and are currently under development as radiation countermeasures for acute radiation syndrome. Ongoing studies suggest that a few of these attractive agents are progressing well along the US FDA approval pathway to become radiation countermeasures. PMID:26135043

  20. Repurposed transcriptomic data facilitate discovery of innate immunity toll-like receptor (TLR) Genes across Lophotrochozoa.

    PubMed

    Halanych, Kenneth M; Kocot, Kevin M

    2014-10-01

    The growing volume of genomic data from across life represents opportunities for deriving valuable biological information from data that were initially collected for another purpose. Here, we use transcriptomes collected for phylogenomic studies to search for toll-like receptor (TLR) genes in poorly sampled lophotrochozoan clades (Annelida, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Phoronida, and Entoprocta) and one ecdysozoan clade (Priapulida). TLR genes are involved in innate immunity across animals by recognizing potential microbial infection. They have an extracellular leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain connected to a transmembrane domain and an intracellular toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. Consequently, these genes are important in initiating a signaling pathway to trigger defense. We found at least one TLR ortholog in all but two taxa examined, suggesting that a broad array of lophotrochozoans may have innate immune systems similar to those observed in vertebrates and arthropods. Comparison to the SMART database confirmed the presence of both the LRR and the TIR protein motifs characteristic of TLR genes. Because we looked at only one transcriptome per species, discovery of TLR genes was limited for most taxa. However, several TRL-like genes that vary in the number and placement of LRR domains were found in phoronids. Additionally, several contigs contained LRR domains but lacked TIR domains, suggesting they were not TLRs. Many of these LRR-containing contigs had other domains (e.g., immunoglobin) and are likely involved in innate immunity.

  1. Coxsackievirus B3 induces viral myocarditis by upregulating toll-like receptor 4 expression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhao; Cai, Tian-Zhi; Lu, Yan; Liu, Wen-Jun; Cheng, Man-Li; Ji, Yu-Qiang

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the potential pathogenesis of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced viral myocarditis and the promising protective effect of silencing RNA (small interfering RNA, siRNA). One hundred and twenty mice were included in the study, and 30 mice were intraperitoneally inoculated with CVB3 to establish an acute viral myocarditis model. The survival rate was observed for the CVB3-infected mouse model (MOD), and myocardial injury was examined by HE (hematoxylin and eosin) staining assay. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot assay were selected to detect the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression in myocardial tissues. The TLR4 gene was silenced for the MOD mice, and the effects of this treatment were observed. The results indicate that the expression of TLR4 mRNA and the protein significantly and persistently increased during the progression of CVB3-induced myocarditis. The activities of cardiac enzymes including CK, LDH, AST, and CK-MB were also enhanced in CVB3-induced myocardial tissues. Interestingly, when the TLR4 gene was silenced, the CVB3-induced TLR4 production was significantly decreased and the severity of myocarditis was significantly lessened. In conclusion, CVB3 may induce viral myocarditis by upregulating toll-like receptor 4 expression. The viral myocarditis can be ameliorated by silencing the TLR4 gene in the CVB3 viral myocarditis model, which may be a feasible therapeutic method for treatment of viral myocarditis.

  2. Calpain A modulates Toll responses by limited Cactus/IκB proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fontenele, Marcio; Lim, Bomyi; Oliveira, Danielle; Buffolo, Márcio; Perlman, David H.; Schupbach, Trudi; Araujo, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent cysteine proteases of the calpain family are modulatory proteases that cleave their substrates in a limited manner. Among their substrates, calpains target vertebrate and invertebrate IκB proteins. Because proteolysis by calpains potentially generates novel protein functions, it is important to understand how this affects NFκB activity. We investigate the action of Calpain A (CalpA) on the Drosophila melanogaster IκB homologue Cactus in vivo. CalpA alters the absolute amounts of Cactus protein. Our data indicate, however, that CalpA uses additional mechanisms to regulate NFκB function. We provide evidence that CalpA interacts physically with Cactus, recognizing a Cactus pool that is not bound to Dorsal, a fly NFκB/Rel homologue. We show that proteolytic cleavage by CalpA generates Cactus fragments lacking an N-terminal region required for Toll responsiveness. These fragments are generated in vivo and display properties distinct from those of full-length Cactus. We propose that CalpA targets free Cactus, which is incorporated into and modulates Toll-responsive complexes in the embryo and immune system. PMID:23864715

  3. Toll-like receptor signaling: a perspective to develop vaccine against leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rakesh K; Srivastava, Ankita; Singh, Nisha

    2012-09-06

    The toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the sentinel factor of the innate immunity, which are essential for host defense. These receptors detect the presence of conserved molecular patterns of potentially pathogenic microorganisms and contribute in both, cellular as well as humoral immune responses. Leishmania is an intracellular pathogen that silently invades host immune system. After phagocytosis, it divides and proliferates in the harmful environment of host macrophages by down-regulating its vital effector functions. In leishmaniasis, the outcome of the infection basically relies on the skewed balance between Th1/Th2 immune responses. Lots of work have been done and on progress but still characterization of either preventive or prophylactic candidate antigen/s is far from satisfactory. How does Leishmania regulate host innate immune system? Still it is unanswered. TLRs play very important role during inflammatory process of various diseases such as cancer, bacterial and viral infections but TLR signaling is comparatively less explained in leishmanial infection. In the context to Th1/Th2 dichotomy, identification of leishmanial antigens that modulate toll-like receptor signaling will certainly help in the development of future vaccine. This review will initially describe global properties of TLRs, and later will discuss their role in the pathogenesis of leishmaniasis.

  4. Identification of a Toll-like receptor 1 in guinea fowl (Agelastes niger).

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanhua; Ruan, Wenke; Cui, Defeng; Li, Huanrong

    2012-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns, thus playing important roles in host defense. This study determined the first sequence of a TLR1 type 1 in the guinea fowl (GFTLR1). The open reading frame of GFTLR1 type 1 contains 2,115 nucleotides and encodes 705 amino acids. Amino acid analysis indicated that GFTLR1 type 1 shares 92.3 % homology with the green jungle fowl, 92.1 % with the chicken, 90.4 % with the turkey, and 84.4 % with Cooper's hawk. Genetic patterns were identified within the TLR1 type 1 of the chicken and the guinea fowl. GFTLR1 type 1 was found to have 92 polymorphic amino acid sites, of which 16 were in the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain, 3 in a C-terminal LRR domain, and 6 in a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain. The data showed that avian TLR1 type 1 genes are under purifying selection and highly conserved, because dN/dS was less than 1.

  5. Role of Toll-Interacting Protein Gene Polymorphisms in Leprosy Mexican Patients

    PubMed Central

    Montoya-Buelna, Margarita; Tovar-Cuevas, Alvaro J.; Alvarado-Navarro, Anabell; Valle, Yeminia; Padilla-Gutierrez, Jorge R.; Muñoz-Valle, Jose F.; Figuera-Villanueva, Luis E.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Leprosy is a debilitating infectious disease of human skin and nerves. Genetics factors of the host play an important role in the disease susceptibility. Toll-interacting protein (TOLLIP) is an inhibitory adaptor protein within the toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, which recognizes structurally conserved molecular patterns of microbial pathogens, initiating immune responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of variants in the TOLLIP gene with susceptibility to leprosy in Mexican patients. Methods. TOLLIP polymorphisms were studied using a case-control design of Mexican patients with lepromatous leprosy (LL). The polymorphisms of TOLLIP at loci −526 C>G (rs5743854), 1309956C>T (rs3750920), 1298430C>A (rs5744015), and 1292831 G>A (rs3750919) were analyzed by PCR, with sequence-specific primers in LL patients and healthy subjects (HS) as controls. Results. Genotype distributions were in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium for all sites except for rs3750920. Neither genotype nor allele frequencies were statistically different between LL patients and controls (P > 0.05). The maximum pairwise D' coefficient reached was 0.44 of linkage (P = 0.01) for all the polymorphisms except for rs5743854. The three loci haplotype comparison yielded no significant differences between groups. Conclusions. Just the individuals with genotype C/C of rs3750920 have a trend of protective effect to developing LL. PMID:24294608

  6. Human Milk Components Modulate Toll-Like Receptor-Mediated Inflammation.

    PubMed

    He, YingYing; Lawlor, Nathan T; Newburg, David S

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is central to innate immunity. Aberrant expression of TLRs is found in neonatal inflammatory diseases. Several bioactive components of human milk modulate TLR expression and signaling pathways, including soluble toll-like receptors (sTLRs), soluble cluster of differentiation (sCD) 14, glycoproteins, small peptides, and oligosaccharides. Some milk components, such as sialyl (α2,3) lactose and lacto-N-fucopentaose III, are reported to increase TLR signaling; under some circumstances this might contribute toward immunologic balance. Human milk on the whole is strongly anti-inflammatory, and contains abundant components that depress TLR signaling pathways: sTLR2 and sCD14 inhibit TLR2 signaling; sCD14, lactadherin, lactoferrin, and 2'-fucosyllactose attenuate TLR4 signaling; 3'-galactosyllactose inhibits TLR3 signaling, and β-defensin 2 inhibits TLR7 signaling. Feeding human milk to neonates decreases their risk of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis. Thus, the TLR regulatory components found in human milk hold promise as benign oral prophylactic and therapeutic treatments for the many gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders mediated by abnormal TLR signaling.

  7. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of duck Toll-like receptor 5.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dan; Pan, Zhiming; Kang, Xilong; Wang, Jing; Song, Li; Jiao, Xinan

    2014-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) is responsible for the recognition of bacterial flagellin in vertebrates. In this study, we cloned the single-exon TLR5 gene of the Maya breed of Common Shelduck (Tadorna tadorna). The TLR5 open reading frame is 2580 bp in length and encodes an 859-amino acid protein. The putative amino acid sequence of duck TLR5 consisted of a signal peptide sequence, 11 leucine-rich repeat domains, a leucine-rich repeat C-terminal domain, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular Toll-interleukin-1 receptor domain. The duck TLR5 gene was highly expressed in the lung, bone marrow, spleen, and liver; moderately expressed in kidney, small intestine, large intestine, and brain. A plasmid expressing duck TLR5 was constructed and transfected into HEK293T cells, and expression was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay. HEK293T cells transfected with duck TLR5- and NF-κB-luciferase-containing plasmids significantly responded to flagellin from Salmonella typhimurium, indicating that it is a functional TLR5 homolog.

  8. Lifestyle and host defense mechanisms of the dung beetle, Euoniticellus intermedius: the toll signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hull, Rodney; Alaouna, Mohamed; Khanyile, Lucky; Byrne, Marcus; Ntwasa, Monde

    2013-01-01

    The dung beetle, Euoniticellus intermedius (Reiche) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is an important ecological and agricultural agent. Their main activity, the burying of dung, improves quality of the soil and reduces pests that could cause illness in animals. E. intermedius are therefore important for agriculture and for good maintenance of the environment, and are regarded as effective biological control agents for parasites of the gastrointestinal tract in livestock. The ability of E. intermedius to co-exist comfortably with many microorganisms, some of which are important human pathogens, stimulated our interest in its host defense strategies. The aim of this study was to investigate the Toll signaling pathway, which is strongly activated by fungi. Gene expression associated with fungal infection was analyzed by using 2-D gel electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy. Furthermore, the partial adult transcriptome was investigated for the presence of known immune response genes by using high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics. The results presented here suggest that E. intermedius responds to fungal challenge via the Toll signaling pathway.

  9. Innate immunity and toll-like receptors: clinical implications of basic science research.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Maria T; Arditi, Moshe

    2004-04-01

    Humans are constantly exposed to a wide variety of microorganisms that can cause infection. In self-defense, the human host has evolved complex protective mechanisms, and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have emerged as a central point in defense. These receptors bind molecular structures that are expressed by microbes but are not expressed by the human host, eg, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Activation of these receptors initiates an inflammatory cascade that attempts to clear the offending pathogen and set in motion a specific adaptive immune response. Defects in sensing of pathogens may predispose the host to recurrent infections. The relative rarity of these syndromes of defective innate immunity, however, speaks to the redundancy in sensing of pathogens by the innate immune system. More common, polymorphisms in TLR4 are associated with increased predisposition to severe and recurrent infections but protection against atherosclerotic disease due to diminished inflammation. Toll-like receptor signaling may also contribute to the pathophysiology of disease and injure the host by activating a deleterious immune response such as in sepsis or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The focus of this article is to describe the role of TLRs in the innate immune response in health and disease.

  10. Human Milk Components Modulate Toll-Like Receptor–Mediated Inflammation12

    PubMed Central

    He, YingYing; Lawlor, Nathan T

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is central to innate immunity. Aberrant expression of TLRs is found in neonatal inflammatory diseases. Several bioactive components of human milk modulate TLR expression and signaling pathways, including soluble toll-like receptors (sTLRs), soluble cluster of differentiation (sCD) 14, glycoproteins, small peptides, and oligosaccharides. Some milk components, such as sialyl (α2,3) lactose and lacto-N-fucopentaose III, are reported to increase TLR signaling; under some circumstances this might contribute toward immunologic balance. Human milk on the whole is strongly anti-inflammatory, and contains abundant components that depress TLR signaling pathways: sTLR2 and sCD14 inhibit TLR2 signaling; sCD14, lactadherin, lactoferrin, and 2′-fucosyllactose attenuate TLR4 signaling; 3′-galactosyllactose inhibits TLR3 signaling, and β-defensin 2 inhibits TLR7 signaling. Feeding human milk to neonates decreases their risk of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis. Thus, the TLR regulatory components found in human milk hold promise as benign oral prophylactic and therapeutic treatments for the many gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders mediated by abnormal TLR signaling. PMID:26773018

  11. Selenium and Other Elements in Water and Adjacent Rock and Sediment of Toll Gate Creek, Aurora, Arapahoe County, Colorado, December 2003 through March 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, J.R.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    Streamwater and solid samples (rock, unconsolidated sediment, stream sediment, and efflorescent material) in the Toll Gate Creek watershed, Colorado, were collected and analyzed for major and trace elements to determine trace-element concentrations and stream loads from December 2003 through March 2004, a period of seasonally low flow. Special emphasis was given to selenium (Se) concentrations because historic Se concentrations exceeded current (2004) stream standards. The goal of the project was to assess the distribution of Se concentration and loads in Toll Gate Creek and to determine the potential for rock and unconsolidated sediment in the basin to be sources of Se to the streamwater. Streamwater samples and discharge measurements were collected during December 2003 and March 2004 along Toll Gate Creek and its two primary tributaries - West Toll Gate Creek and East Toll Gate Creek. During both sampling periods, discharge ranged from 2.5 liters per second to 138 liters per second in the watershed. Discharge was greater in March 2004 than December 2003, but both periods represent low flow in Toll Gate Creek, and results of this study should not be extended to periods of higher flow. Discharge decreased moving downstream in East Toll Gate Creek but increased moving downstream along West Toll Gate Creek and the main stem of Toll Gate Creek, indicating that these two streams gain flow from ground water. Se concentrations in streamwater samples ranged from 7 to 70 micrograms per liter, were elevated in the upstream-most samples, and were greater than the State stream standard of 4.6 micrograms per liter. Se loads ranged from 6 grams per day to 250 grams per day, decreased in a downstream direction along East Toll Gate Creek, and increased in a downstream direction along West Toll Gate Creek and Toll Gate Creek. The largest Se-load increases occurred between two sampling locations on West Toll Gate Creek during both sampling periods and between the two sampling

  12. 77 FR 38050 - Pepco Holdings, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Limited Waiver

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  18. Structural characterisation of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) and Toll-like receptor 6 (TLR6) in elephant and harbor seals.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Sally; Gibson, Amanda J; García, Ana Rubio; Contreras, Guillermo Sanchez; Rossen, John W; Werling, Dirk; Offord, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Pinnipeds are a diverse clade of semi-aquatic mammals, which act as key indicators of ecosystem health. Their transition from land to marine environments provides a complex microbial milieu, making them vulnerable to both aquatic and terrestrial pathogens, thereby contributing to pinniped population decline. Indeed, viral pathogens such as influenza A virus and phocine distemper virus (PDV) have been identified as the cause of several of these mass mortality events. Furthermore, bacterial infection with mammalian Brucella sp. and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains have also been observed in marine mammals, posing further risk to both co-habiting endangered species and public health. During these disease outbreaks, mortality rates have varied amongst different pinniped species. Analyses of innate immune receptors at the host-pathogen interface have previously identified variants which may drive these species-specific responses. Through a combination of both sequence- and structure-based methods, this study characterises members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 1 superfamily from both harbour and elephant seals, identifying variations which will help us to understand these species-specific innate immune responses, potentially aiding the development of specific vaccine-adjuvants for these species.

  19. Association of Toll-Like Receptor 3 and Toll-Like Receptor 9 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms with Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Hepatic Fibrosis in Egyptian Patients.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Rania A; Omran, Dalia; Mokhtar, Doha A; Zakaria, Zinab; Ezzat, Sameera; Soliman, Mohamed A; Mobarak, Lamiaa; El-Sweesy, Hossam; Emam, Ghada

    2017-01-16

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are recognized as fundamental contributors to the immune system function against infections. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents a global health problem especially in Egypt having the highest HCV prevalence worldwide where HCV infection is a continuing epidemic. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association between genetic variation in TLR-3 and TLR-9 and HCV infection and hepatic fibrosis in chronic HCV-positive Egyptian patients. The present study included 100 naïve chronic HCV-positive patients and 100 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Genotyping of TLR-3 (_7 C/A [rs3775296]), TLR-3 (c.1377C/T [rs3775290]) and TLR-9 (1237T/C [rs5743836]) were done by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Frequency of polymorphic genotypes in TLR-3 (_7 C/A), TLR-3 (c.1377C/T) and TLR-9 (1237T/C) were not significantly different between studied HCV-positive patients and controls with P values 0.121, 0.112, and 0.683, respectively. TLR-3 c.1377 T-allele was associated with advanced stage of hepatic fibrosis (P = 0.003).

  20. Enteric Viruses Ameliorate Gut Inflammation via Toll-like Receptor 3 and Toll-like Receptor 7-Mediated Interferon-β Production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Young; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Eugene; Cheon, Jae Hee; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Yeji; Lee, Su-Hyun; Seo, Sang-Uk; Shin, Seung-Ho; Choi, Sun Shim; Kim, Bumseok; Chang, Sun-Young; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Bae, Jin-Woo; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2016-04-19

    Metagenomic studies show that diverse resident viruses inhabit the healthy gut; however, little is known about the role of these viruses in the maintenance of gut homeostasis. We found that mice treated with antiviral cocktail displayed more severe dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis compared with untreated mice. DSS-induced colitis was associated with altered enteric viral abundance and composition. When wild-type mice were reconstituted with Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) or TLR7 agonists or inactivated rotavirus, colitis symptoms were significantly ameliorated. Mice deficient in both TLR3 and TLR7 were more susceptible to DSS-induced experimental colitis. In humans, combined TLR3 and TLR7 genetic variations significantly influenced the severity of ulcerative colitis. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells isolated from inflamed mouse colon produced interferon-β in a TLR3 and TLR7-dependent manner. These results imply that recognition of resident viruses by TLR3 and TLR7 is required for protective immunity during gut inflammation.

  1. FATTY ACIDS MODULATE TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 4 ACTIVATION THROUGH REGULATION OF RECEPTOR DIMERIZATION AND RECRUITMENT INTO LIPID RAFTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The saturated fatty acids acylated on Lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or bacterial lipoproteins play critical roles in ligand recognition and receptor activation for Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2. The results from our previous studies (J Biol Chem 2003, 2004) demonstrated that saturated ...

  2. Functional Insights from the Crystal Structure of the N-Terminal Domain of the Prototypical Toll Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gangloff, Monique; Arnot, Christopher J.; Lewis, Miranda; Gay, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Drosophila melanogaster Toll is the founding member of an important family of pathogen-recognition receptors in humans, the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family. In contrast, the prototypical receptor is a cytokine-like receptor for Spätzle (Spz) protein and plays a dual role in both development and immunity. Here, we present the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of the receptor that encompasses the first 201 amino acids at 2.4 Å resolution. To our knowledge, the cysteine-rich cap adopts a novel fold unique to Toll-1 orthologs in insects and that is not critical for ligand binding. However, we observed that an antibody directed against the first ten LRRs blocks Spz signaling in a Drosophila cell-based assay. Supplemented by point mutagenesis and deletion analysis, our data suggests that the region up to LRR 14 is involved in Spz binding. Comparison with mammalian TLRs reconciles previous contradictory findings about the mechanism of Toll activation. PMID:23245851

  3. A Toll receptor–FoxO pathway represses Pavarotti/MKLP1 to promote microtubule dynamics in motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan

    2016-01-01

    FoxO proteins are evolutionarily conserved regulators of neuronal structure and function, yet the neuron-specific pathways within which they act are poorly understood. To elucidate neuronal FoxO function in Drosophila melanogaster, we first screened for FoxO’s upstream regulators and downstream effectors. On the upstream side, we present genetic and molecular pathway analyses indicating that the Toll-6 receptor, the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain adaptor dSARM, and FoxO function in a linear pathway. On the downstream side, we find that Toll-6–FoxO signaling represses the mitotic kinesin Pavarotti/MKLP1 (Pav-KLP), which itself attenuates microtubule (MT) dynamics. We next probed in vivo functions for this novel pathway and found that it is essential for axon transport and structural plasticity in motoneurons. We demonstrate that elevated expression of Pav-KLP underlies transport and plasticity phenotypes in pathway mutants, indicating that Toll-6–FoxO signaling promotes MT dynamics by limiting Pav-KLP expression. In addition to uncovering a novel molecular pathway, our work reveals an unexpected function for dynamic MTs in enabling rapid activity-dependent structural plasticity. PMID:27502486

  4. Structure of the Toll-Spätzle complex, a molecular hub in Drosophila development and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Parthier, Christoph; Stelter, Marco; Ursel, Christian; Fandrich, Uwe; Lilie, Hauke; Breithaupt, Constanze; Stubbs, Milton T.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila Toll receptors are involved in embryonic development and the immune response of adult flies. In both processes, the only known Toll receptor ligand is the human nerve growth factor-like cystine knot protein Spätzle. Here we present the crystal structure of a 1:1 (nonsignaling) complex of the full-length Toll receptor ectodomain (ECD) with the Spätzle cystine knot domain dimer. The ECD is divided into two leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains, each of which is capped by cysteine-rich domains. Spätzle binds to the concave surface of the membrane-distal LRR domain, in contrast to the flanking ligand interactions observed for mammalian Toll-like receptors, with asymmetric contributions from each Spätzle protomer. The structure allows rationalization of existing genetic and biochemical data and provides a framework for targeting the immune systems of insects of economic importance, as well as a variety of invertebrate disease vectors. PMID:24733933

  5. ROLE OF TOLL LIKE RECEPTORS ON PULMONARY INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES TO SIZE FRACTIONATED COMBUSTION AND AMBIENT AIR PARTICLES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    C3H/HeJ mice feature a single point mutation in the Toll like receptor 4 gene which renders these animals resistant to a number of pro-inflammatory agents including lipopolysaccharide and ozone. This study compared pulmonary inflammatory responses in endotoxin resistant (C3H/HeJ...

  6. Toll-like receptor signaling increases production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in bovine macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activation of macrophages can occur through Toll-like receptor (TLR) recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMP). Recently, it has been discovered that TLR signaling can increase 1alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp27B1) expression in human and mouse macrophages. The enzymatic activity of 1alp...

  7. GENES, IN ADDITION TO TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 2, PLAY A ROLE IN ANTIBACTERIAL DEFENSE TO STREPTOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streptococcus infection in human populations continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. To evaluate the effect of genetic background and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) on antibacterial defense to streptococcal infection, eight genetically diverse strains of mic...

  8. 76 FR 37196 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed... of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small ] Business/Self Employed... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee...

  9. 76 FR 22170 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed... of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee...

  10. 76 FR 56880 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed... of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee...

  11. 76 FR 10942 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed... of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee...

  12. 76 FR 37893 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed... of Meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee...

  13. 76 FR 17996 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed... of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

  14. 76 FR 46897 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed... of Meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee...

  15. Tactical Target Identification (TTI) Laboratory Simulation. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    was a much more difficult task. Some form of lineal to raster conversion package had to be constructed to allow display of the aircraft files. The image...DX, DY) LVECT is a lineal to raster conversion routine that "draws" a straight line in the graphic buffer between (CX, CY) and (CX+DX, CY+DY). LVECT...are calculated from these values. 3.2.5 VECTOR.FTN The three vector algebra routines UNITV, DOTP and CROSSP are used without change from their RT-1l

  16. Application potential of toll-like receptors in cancer immunotherapy: Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Chen, Xi; Ye, Kangruo; Yao, Yuanfei; Li, Yu

    2016-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), as the most important pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity, play a pivotal role in inducing immune response through recognition of microbial invaders or specific agonists. Recent studies have suggested that TLRs could serve as important regulators in the development of a variety of cancer. However, increasing evidences have shown that TLRs may display quite opposite outcomes in cancer development. Although several potential therapeutic Toll-like receptor ligands have been found, the mechanism and therapy prospect of TLRs in cancer development has to be further elucidated to accelerate the clinical application. By performing a systematic review of the present findings on TLRs in cancer immunology, we attempted to evaluate the therapeutic potential of TLRs in cancer therapy and elucidate the potential mechanism of cancer progress regulated by TLR signaling and the reported targets on TLRs for clinical application. An electronic databases search was conducted in PubMed, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database from their inception to February 1, 2016. The following keywords were used to search the databases: Toll-like receptors, cancer therapy, therapeutic target, innate immunity. Of 244 studies that were identified, 97 nonrelevant studies were excluded. In total, 147 full-text articles were assessed, and from these, 54 were excluded as they did not provide complete key information. Thus, 93 studies were considered eligible and included in the analysis. According to the data from the included trials, 14 TLR ligands (77.8%) from 82 studies have been demonstrated to display antitumor property in various cancers, whereas 4 ligands (22.2%) from 11 studies promote tumors. Among them, only 3 TLR ligands have been approved for cancer therapy, and 9 ligands were in clinical trials. In addition, the potential mechanism of recently reported targets on TLRs for clinical application was also evaluated

  17. Genetic Screen in Drosophila Larvae Links ird1 Function to Toll Signaling in the Fat Body and Hemocyte Motility

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Martin R.; Anderl, Ines; Vo, Hoa T. M.; Valanne, Susanna; Yang, Hairu; Kronhamn, Jesper; Rämet, Mika; Rusten, Tor Erik

    2016-01-01

    To understand how Toll signaling controls the activation of a cellular immune response in Drosophila blood cells (hemocytes), we carried out a genetic modifier screen, looking for deletions that suppress or enhance the mobilization of sessile hemocytes by the gain-of-function mutation Toll10b (Tl10b). Here we describe the results from chromosome arm 3R, where five regions strongly suppressed this phenotype. We identified the specific genes immune response deficient 1 (ird1), headcase (hdc) and possibly Rab23 as suppressors, and we studied the role of ird1 in more detail. An ird1 null mutant and a mutant that truncates the N-terminal kinase domain of the encoded Ird1 protein affected the Tl10b phenotype, unlike mutations that affect the C-terminal part of the protein. The ird1 null mutant suppressed mobilization of sessile hemocytes, but enhanced other Tl10b hemocyte phenotypes, like the formation of melanotic nodules and the increased number of circulating hemocytes. ird1 mutants also had blood cell phenotypes on their own. They lacked crystal cells and showed aberrant formation of lamellocytes. ird1 mutant plasmatocytes had a reduced ability to spread on an artificial substrate by forming protrusions, which may explain why they did not go into circulation in response to Toll signaling. The effect of the ird1 mutation depended mainly on ird1 expression in hemocytes, but ird1-dependent effects in other tissues may contribute. Specifically, the Toll receptor was translocated from the cell membrane to intracellular vesicles in the fat body of the ird1 mutant, and Toll signaling was activated in that tissue, partially explaining the Tl10b-like phenotype. As ird1 is otherwise known to control vesicular transport, we conclude that the vesicular transport system may be of particular importance during an immune response. PMID:27467079

  18. Red blood cell alloimmunization is influenced by the delay between Toll-like receptor agonist injection and transfusion.

    PubMed

    Elayeb, Rahma; Tamagne, Marie; Bierling, Philippe; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Vingert, Benoît

    2016-02-01

    Murine models of red blood cell transfusion show that inflammation associated with viruses or methylated DNA promotes red blood cell alloimmunization. In vaccination studies, the intensity of antigen-specific responses depends on the delay between antigen and adjuvant administration, with a short delay limiting immune responses. In mouse models of alloimmunization, the delay between the injection of Toll-like receptor agonists and transfusion is usually short. In this study, we hypothesized that the timing of Toll-like receptor 3 agonist administration affects red blood cell alloimmunization. Poly(I:C), a Toll-like receptor 3 agonist, was administered to B10BR mice at various time points before the transfusion of HEL-expressing red blood cells. For each time point, we measured the activation of splenic HEL-presenting dendritic cells, HEL-specific CD4(+) T cells and anti-HEL antibodies in serum. The phenotype of activated immune cells depended on the delay between transfusion and Toll-like receptor-dependent inflammation. The production of anti-HEL antibodies was highest when transfusion occurred 7 days after agonist injection. The proportion of HEL-presenting CD8α(+) dendritic cells producing interleukin-12 was highest in mice injected with poly(I:C) 3 days before transfusion. Although the number of early-induced HEL-specific CD4(+) T cells was similar between groups, a high proportion of these cells expressed CD134, CD40 and CD44 in mice injected with poly(I:C) 7 days before transfusion. This study clearly shows that the delay between transfusion and Toll-like receptor-induced inflammation influences the immune response to transfused red blood cells.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock proteins use diverse Toll-like receptor pathways to activate pro-inflammatory signals.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Yonca; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Hayrapetian, Linda; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Spallek, Ralf; Singh, Mahavir; Arditi, Moshe

    2005-06-03

    Although the Toll-like receptors used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis membrane and secreted factors are known, the pathways activated by M. tuberculosis heat shock proteins are not. An efficient immune response against the intracellular pathogen M. tuberculosis is critically dependent on rapid detection of the invading pathogen by the innate immune system and coordinated activation of the adaptive immune response. Macrophage phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis is accompanied by activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB and secretion of inflammatory mediators that play an important role in granuloma formation and immune protection during M. tuberculosis infection. The interaction between M. tuberculosis and the various Toll-like receptors is complex, and it appears that distinct mycobacterial components may interact with different members of the Toll-like receptor family. Here we show that recombinant, purified, mycobacterial heat shock proteins 65 and 70 induce NF-kappaB activity in a dose-dependent manner in human endothelial cells. Furthermore, we show that whereas mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 signals exclusively through Toll-like receptor 4, heat shock protein 70 also signals through Toll-like receptor 2. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 65-induced NF-kappaB activation was MyD88-, TIRAP-, TRIF-, and TRAM-dependent and required the presence of MD-2. A better understanding of the recognition of mycobacterial heat shock proteins and their role in the host immune response to the pathogen may open the way to a better understanding of the immunological processes induced by this important human pathogen and the host-pathogen interactions and may help in the rational design of more effective vaccines or vaccine adjuvants.

  20. Toll-like receptor 2 ligands promote microglial cell death by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Daniela S; Soria, Javier A; Gaviglio, Emilia A; Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Cancela, Liliana M; Rodriguez-Galan, Maria C; Wang, Ji Ming; Iribarren, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Microglial cells are phagocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) and become activated in pathological conditions, resulting in microgliosis, manifested by increased cell numbers and inflammation in the affected regions. Thus, controlling microgliosis is important to prevent pathological damage to the brain. Here, we evaluated the contribution of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) to microglial survival. We observed that activation of microglial cells with peptidoglycan (PGN) from Staphylococcus aureus and other TLR2 ligands results in cell activation followed by the induction of autophagy and autophagy-dependent cell death. In C57BL/6J mice, intracerebral injection of PGN increased the autophagy of microglial cells and reduced the microglial/macrophage cell number in brain parenchyma. Our results demonstrate a novel role of TLRs in the regulation of microglial cell activation and survival, which are important for the control of microgliosis and associated inflammatory responses in the CNS.

  1. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Contributes to Defense against Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Michael J.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Burns, William J.; Varga, Matthew G.; Peek, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a common nosocomial pathogen capable of causing severe diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality in impaired hosts. Pattern recognition receptors, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), play a key role in pathogen detection and function to alert the immune system to infection. Here, we examine the role for TLR9 signaling in response to A. baumannii infection. In a murine model of A. baumannii pneumonia, TLR9−/− mice exhibit significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lungs, increased extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination, and more severe lung pathology compared with those in wild-type mice. Following systemic A. baumannii infection, TLR9−/− mice have significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lungs, as well as decreased proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production. These results demonstrate that TLR9-mediated pathogen detection is important for host defense against the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:26238713

  2. Racial bias in federal nutrition policy, Part II: Weak guidelines take a disproportionate toll.

    PubMed Central

    Bertron, P.; Barnard, N. D.; Mills, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many diet-related chronic diseases take a disproportionate toll among members of racial minorities. Research shows the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and heart disease is higher among various ethnic groups compared with whites. The Guidelines and the Food Guide Pyramid, however, promote the use of multiple servings of meats and dairy products each day and do not encourage replacing these foods with vegetables, legumes, fruits, and grains. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans encourage a 30% caloric reduction in fat intake and make no provision for further reductions for those who wish to minimize health risks. Abundant evidence has shown that regular exercise combined with diets lower in fat and richer in plant products than is encouraged by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans are associated with reduced risk of these chronic conditions. While ineffective Dietary Guidelines potentially put all Americans at unnecessary risk, this is particularly true for those groups hardest hit by chronic disease. PMID:10333669

  3. Near-toll quality digital speech transmission in the mobile satellite service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townes, S. A.; Divsalar, D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses system considerations for near-toll quality digital speech transmission in a 5 kHz mobile satellite system channel. Tradeoffs are shown for power performance versus delay for a 4800 bps speech compression system in conjunction with a 16 state rate 2/3 trellis coded 8PSK modulation system. The suggested system has an additional 150 ms of delay beyond the propagation delay and requires an E(b)/N(0) of about 7 dB for a Ricean channel assumption with line-of-sight to diffuse component ratio of 10 assuming ideal synchronization. An additional loss of 2 to 3 dB is expected for synchronization in fading environment.

  4. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Contributes to Defense against Acinetobacter baumannii Infection.

    PubMed

    Noto, Michael J; Boyd, Kelli L; Burns, William J; Varga, Matthew G; Peek, Richard M; Skaar, Eric P

    2015-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a common nosocomial pathogen capable of causing severe diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality in impaired hosts. Pattern recognition receptors, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), play a key role in pathogen detection and function to alert the immune system to infection. Here, we examine the role for TLR9 signaling in response to A. baumannii infection. In a murine model of A. baumannii pneumonia, TLR9(-/-) mice exhibit significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lungs, increased extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination, and more severe lung pathology compared with those in wild-type mice. Following systemic A. baumannii infection, TLR9(-/-) mice have significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lungs, as well as decreased proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production. These results demonstrate that TLR9-mediated pathogen detection is important for host defense against the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

  5. Arterial Catheterization and Infection: Toll-like receptors in defense against microorganisms and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Hambsch, Zakary J.; Kerfeld, Mitchell J.; Kirkpatrick, Daniel R.; McEntire, Dan M.; Reisbig, Mark D.; Youngblood, Charles F.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Radial artery catheterization has become a preferred route over femoral artery catheterization, in order to monitor the blood pressure of hemodynamically unstable patients or for repeated sampling of arterial blood gases. While the incidence of catheter-related infection is lower in the radial artery than the femoral artery, infection remains a major issue that requires attention. In this review of the literature, we discuss infectious complications of radial artery catheterization, with a focus on various risk factors and establishing the most common causative agents. We also critically review the role of the innate immune system involving Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in host-defense, with the goal of establishing a common pathway used by the innate immune system via TLRs to combat the pathogens that most commonly cause infection in radial artery catheterization. If this pathway can be therapeutically manipulated to preemptively attack pathogenic agents, immunomodulation may be an option in reducing the incidence of infection in this procedure. PMID:26271949

  6. Mapping toll-like receptor signaling pathway genes of Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri) with FISH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bosong; Zhao, Liang; Liao, Huan; Cheng, Jie; Lian, Shanshan; Li, Xuan; Huang, Xiaoting; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-12-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in the innate immune system. Studies on TLR signaling pathway genes in Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri) have mainly focused on sequence analysis and expression profiling, no research has been carried out on their localization. The chromosomal position of TLR signaling pathway genes can be valuable for assemblying scallop genome and analysizing gene regulatory networks. In the present study, five key TLR signaling pathway genes ( CfTLR, CfMyd88, CfTRAF6, CfNFκB, and CfIκB) containing bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) were isolated and physically mapped through fluorescence in situ hybridization on five non-homologous chromosome pairs, showing a similar distribution to another five model species. The isolation and mapping of these key immune genes of C. farreri will aid to the research on innate immunity, assignment of interested genes to chromosomes, and integration of physical, linkage and cytogenetic maps of this species.

  7. Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms in dengue virus-infected children.

    PubMed

    Djamiatun, Kis; Ferwerda, Bart; Netea, Mihai G; van der Ven, André J A M; Dolmans, Wil M V; Faradz, Sultana M H

    2011-08-01

    Differential viral recognition by cells bearing Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) polymorphisms Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile may influence susceptibility and severity of dengue virus infection. In central Java, Indonesia, we investigated 201 children with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and 179 healthy controls. Patients and controls were mostly ethnic Javanese. A nearly complete cosegregation of the two mutations was observed. The TLR4 299/399 genotype was found in five patients and four controls. Prevalence of the TLR4 299/399 genotype did not differ significantly between controls and DHF patients or between patients with different severities of DHF. Also, vascular leakage in patients with different TLR4 genotypes did not differ. Thus, the 299/399 TLR4 haplotype has only minor influence on susceptibility and severity of complicated dengue virus infection.

  8. The emerging role of Toll-like receptor 4 in myocardial inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y; Lv, J; Jiang, S; Ma, Z; Wang, D; Hu, W; Deng, C; Fan, C; Di, S; Sun, Y; Yi, W

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of pattern recognition receptors involved in cardiovascular diseases. Notably, numerous studies have demonstrated that TLR4 activates the expression of several of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes that play pivotal roles in myocardial inflammation, particularly myocarditis, myocardial infarction, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and heart failure. In addition, TLR4 is an emerging target for anti-inflammatory therapies. Given the significance of TLR4, it would be useful to summarize the current literature on the molecular mechanisms and roles of TLR4 in myocardial inflammation. Thus, in this review, we first introduce the basic knowledge of the TLR4 gene and describe the activation and signaling pathways of TLR4 in myocardial inflammation. Moreover, we highlight the recent progress of research on the involvement of TLR4 in myocardial inflammation. The information reviewed here may be useful to further experimental research and to increase the potential of TLR4 as a therapeutic target. PMID:27228349

  9. The role of Toll-like receptors in retinal ischemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Qin; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are commonly referred to a series of evolutionary conserved receptors which recognize and respond to various microbes and endogenous ligands. Growing evidence has demonstrated that the expression of TLRs in the retina is regulated during retinal ischemic diseases, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). TLRs can be expressed in multiple cells in the retina, such as glial cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), as well as photoreceptor cells and endothelium cells. Activation of TLRs in retina could initiate a complex signal transduction cascade, induce the production of inflammatory cytokines and regulate the level of co-stimulatory molecules, which play prominent roles in the pathogenesis of retinal ischemic diseases. In this review, we summarized current studies about the relationship between TLRs and ischemic retinopathy. A greater understanding of the effect of TLRs on ischemic injuries may contribute to the development of specific TLR targeted therapeutic strategies in these conditions. PMID:27672603

  10. The role of Toll-like receptors in retinal ischemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Qin; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are commonly referred to a series of evolutionary conserved receptors which recognize and respond to various microbes and endogenous ligands. Growing evidence has demonstrated that the expression of TLRs in the retina is regulated during retinal ischemic diseases, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). TLRs can be expressed in multiple cells in the retina, such as glial cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), as well as photoreceptor cells and endothelium cells. Activation of TLRs in retina could initiate a complex signal transduction cascade, induce the production of inflammatory cytokines and regulate the level of co-stimulatory molecules, which play prominent roles in the pathogenesis of retinal ischemic diseases. In this review, we summarized current studies about the relationship between TLRs and ischemic retinopathy. A greater understanding of the effect of TLRs on ischemic injuries may contribute to the development of specific TLR targeted therapeutic strategies in these conditions.

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of Toll-like receptors and susceptibility to infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Skevaki, C; Pararas, M; Kostelidou, K; Tsakris, A; Routsias, J G

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the best-studied family of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), whose task is to rapidly recognize evolutionarily conserved structures on the invading microorganisms. Through binding to these patterns, TLRs trigger a number of proinflammatory and anti-microbial responses, playing a key role in the first line of defence against the pathogens also promoting adaptive immunity responses. Growing amounts of data suggest that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the various human TLR proteins are associated with altered susceptibility to infection. This review summarizes the role of TLRs in innate immunity, their ligands and signalling and focuses on the TLR SNPs which have been linked to infectious disease susceptibility. PMID:25560985

  12. Toll-like receptor modulation in cardiovascular disease: a target for intervention?

    PubMed

    Földes, Gábor; von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Stefan D

    2006-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) form a family of pattern recognition receptors that have emerged as key mediators of innate immunity. These receptors sense invading microbes and initiate the immune response. TLR-mediated inflammation is an important pathogenic link between innate immunity and a diverse panel of clinical disorders. Among the processes in which TLRs play a role are cardiovascular disorders such as cardiac ischaemia, coronary artery disease, ventricular remodelling, cancer angiogenesis or transplant rejection. From these, many important opportunities for disease modification through TLR signalling manipulation can be imagined. Their role as potential targets for therapeutic intervention is just beginning to be appreciated and this article reviews the current status of these treatment strategies for cardiovascular disease.

  13. Recognition of herpes simplex viruses: toll-like receptors and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yijie; He, Bin

    2014-03-20

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) are human pathogens that establish lytic and latent infections. Reactivation from latency occurs intermittently, which represents a lifelong source of recurrent infection. In this complex process, HSV triggers and neutralizes innate immunity. Therefore, a dynamic equilibrium between HSV and the innate immune system determines the outcome of viral infection. Detection of HSV involves pathogen recognition receptors that include Toll-like receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors, and cytosolic DNA sensors. Moreover, innate components or pathways exist to sense membrane fusion upon viral entry into host cells. Consequently, this surveillance network activates downstream transcription factors, leading to the induction of type I interferon and inflammatory cytokines. Not surprisingly, with the capacity to establish chronic infection HSV has evolved strategies that modulate or evade innate immunity. In this review, we describe recent advances pertinent to the interplay of HSV and the induction of innate immunity mediated by pathogen recognition receptors or pathways.

  14. Unleashing the potential of NOD- and Toll-like agonists as vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Maisonneuve, Charles; Bertholet, Sylvie; Philpott, Dana J.; De Gregorio, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    Innate immunity confers an immediate nonspecific mechanism of microbial recognition through germ line-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Of these, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) have shaped our current understanding of innate regulation of adaptive immunity. It is now recognized that PRRs are paramount in instructing an appropriate adaptive immune response. Their ligands have been the focus of adjuvant research with the goal of generating modern vaccine combinations tailored to specific pathogens. In this review we will highlight the recent findings in the field of adjuvant research with a particular focus on the potential of TLR and NLR ligands as adjuvants and their influence on adaptive immune responses. PMID:25136133

  15. CPG-7909 (PF-3512676, ProMune): toll-like receptor-9 agonist in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Murad, Yanal M; Clay, Timothy M; Lyerly, H Kim; Morse, Michael A

    2007-08-01

    Stimulation of toll-like receptor (TLR)9 activates human plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B cells, and induces potent innate immune responses in preclinical tumor models and in patients. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) are TLR9 agonists that show promising results as vaccine adjuvants and in the treatment of cancers, infections, asthma and allergy. PF-3512676 (ProMune) was developed as a TLR9 agonist for the treatment of cancer as monotherapy and as an adjuvant in combination with chemo- and immunotherapy. Phase I and II trials have tested this drug in several hematopoietic and solid tumors. Pfizer has initiated Phase III trials to test PF-3512676 in combination with standard chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer.

  16. The Role of Toll-Like Receptor 4 in Infectious and Noninfectious Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Molteni, Monica; Gemma, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) belongs to the family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). They are highly conserved receptors that recognize conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), thus representing the first line of defense against infections. TLR4 has been long recognized as the sensing receptor for gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, it also binds endogenous molecules produced as a result of tissue injury. Hence, TLR4 represents a key receptor on which both infectious and noninfectious stimuli converge to induce a proinflammatory response. TLR4-mediated inflammation, triggered by exogenous or endogenous ligands, is also involved in several acute and chronic diseases, having a pivotal role as amplifier of the inflammatory response. This review focuses on the research progress about the role of TLR4 activation in infectious and noninfectious (e.g., sterile) inflammation and the effects of TLR4 signaling in some pathological conditions. PMID:27293318

  17. Molecular cloning and tissue-specific expression of Toll-like receptor 5 gene from turkeys.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, V P; Biswas, Moanaro; Raj, Gopal Dhinakar; Raja, A; Kumanan, A K; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2011-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a family of transmembrane and cytosolic proteins, detect microbial patterns, initiating innate immune responses in various organisms. Although they are abundant, genetic characterization and functional differences of TLRs in economically important avian species such as chickens and turkeys have not been investigated in detail. In this study, the putative TLR5 coding region from turkey genome was sequenced, and its homology to other vertebrate species was analyzed. Secondary structure analysis revealed protein motifs typical of the chicken TLR5 protein structure, with 97% amino acid identity between them. mRNA expression profiling in adult turkeys revealed abundant TLR5 expression in a broad range of tissues. Stimulation with the TLR5 ligand flagellin resulted in the production of the inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and nitric oxide in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. To our knowledge, this is the first complete turkey TLR5 coding DNA sequence reported in sequence databases.

  18. Diversity in the Toll-like receptor genes of the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2015-03-01

    The Tasmanian devil is an endangered marsupial species that has survived several historical bottlenecks and now has low genetic diversity. Here we characterize the Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes and their diversity in the Tasmanian devil. TLRs are a key innate immune gene family found in all animals. Ten TLR genes were identified in the Tasmanian devil genome. Unusually low levels of diversity were found in 25 devils from across Tasmania. We found two alleles at TLR2, TLR3 and TLR6. The other seven genes were monomorphic. The insurance population, which safeguards the species from extinction, has successfully managed to capture all of these TLR alleles, but concerns remain for the long-term survival of this species.

  19. Toll-like receptor signaling is functional in immune cells of the endangered Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Patchett, Amanda L; Latham, Roger; Brettingham-Moore, Kate H; Tovar, Cesar; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2015-11-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a fatally transmissible cancer that threatens the Tasmanian devil population. As Tasmanian devils do not produce an immune response against DFTD cells, an effective vaccine will require a strong adjuvant. Activation of innate immune system cells through toll-like receptors (TLRs) could provide this stimulation. It is unknown whether marsupials, including Tasmanian devils, express functional TLRs. We isolated RNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and, with PCR, detected transcripts for TLRs 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 13. Stimulation of the mononuclear cells with agonists to these TLRs increased the expression of downstream TLR signaling products (IL1α, IL6, IL12A and IFNβ). Our data provide the first evidence that TLR signaling is functional in the mononuclear cells of the Tasmanian devil. Future DFTD vaccination trials will incorporate TLR agonists to enhance the immune response against DFTD.

  20. Ubiquitination and de-ubiquitination: role in regulation of signaling by Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Emily L; Doherty, Terence M; Karahashi, Hisae; Arditi, Moshe

    2006-01-01

    Signaling by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has attracted accelerating attention over the past decade because of the central role of TLR signaling in both innate and adaptive immunity. In addition, TLR signaling is now increasingly implicated in a remarkably wide range of diseases that are either caused, or accompanied, by dysregulated inflammation. Much has been learned about the basic signaling framework and participants, as well as how signaling is turned off and fine-tuned. Here, we summarize key aspects of TLR signaling, focusing on interaction with the anti-inflammatory TGF-beta signaling network. We propose that ubiquitination and de-ubiquitination of TLR pathway components may be a mechanism by which predominantly anti-inflammatory input is integrated into the host response to fine-tune inflammation in accordance with the needs of host defenses.

  1. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Activation in Cancer Progression and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oblak, Alja; Jerala, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has been the focus of intense research since the late 19th century when Coley observed that bacterial components can contribute to cancer regression by eliciting an antitumor immune response. Successful activation and maturation of tumor-specific immune cells is now known to be mediated by bacterial endotoxin, which activates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). TLR4 is expressed on a variety of immune as well as tumor cells, but its activation can have opposing effects. While TLR4 activation can promote antitumor immunity, it can also result in increased tumor growth and immunosuppression. Nevertheless, TLR4 engagement by endotoxin as well as by endogenous ligands represents notable contribution to the outcome of different cancer treatments, such as radiation or chemotherapy. Further research of the role and mechanisms of TLR4 activation in cancer may provide novel antitumor vaccine adjuvants as well as TLR4 inhibitors that could prevent inflammation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:22110526

  2. MicroRNAs: New Regulators of Toll-Like Receptor Signalling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaobing; Jing, Zhizhong; Cheng, Guofeng

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a critical family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), are responsible for the innate immune responses via signalling pathways to provide effective host defence against pathogen infections. However, TLR-signalling pathways are also likely to stringently regulate tissue maintenance and homeostasis by elaborate modulatory mechanisms. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key regulators and as an essential part of the networks involved in regulating TLR-signalling pathways. In this review, we highlight our understanding of the regulation of miRNA expression profiles by TLR-signalling pathways and the regulation of TLR-signalling pathways by miRNAs. We focus on the roles of miRNAs in regulating TLR-signalling pathways by targeting multiple molecules, including TLRs themselves, their associated signalling proteins and regulatory molecules, and transcription factors and functional cytokines induced by them, at multiple levels. PMID:24772440

  3. Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Value Pricing and Tolling Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) have launched the free, web-based Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). The TSDC (www.nrel.gov/tsdc) preserves respondent anonymity while making vital transportation data available to a broad group of users through secure, online access. The TSDC database provides free-of-charge web-based access to valuable transportation data that can be used for: Location and time-of-day variable tolling research, Mileage-based fee analysis, Travel demand modeling and transit planning, Congestion mitigation research, and Validating transportation data from other sources. The TSDC's two levels of access make composite data available with simple online registration, and allow researchers to use detailed spatial data after completing a straight forward application process.

  4. DAT isn’t all that: cocaine reward and reinforcement requires Toll Like Receptor 4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Northcutt, A.L.; Hutchinson, M.R.; Wang, X.; Baratta, M.V.; Hiranita, T.; Cochran, T.A.; Pomrenze, M.B.; Galer, E.L.; Kopajtic, T.A.; Li, C.M.; Amat, J.; Larson, G.; Cooper, D.C.; Huang, Y.; O’Neill, C.E.; Yin, H.; Zahniser, N.R.; Katz, J.L.; Rice, K.C.; Maier, S.F.; Bachtell, R.K.; Watkins, L.R.

    2014-01-01

    The initial reinforcing properties of drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, are largely attributed to their ability to activate the mesolimbic dopamine system. Resulting increases in extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) are traditionally thought to result from cocaine’s ability to block dopamine transporters (DATs). Here we demonstrate that cocaine also interacts with the immunosurveillance receptor complex, Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4), on microglial cells to initiate central innate immune signaling. Disruption of cocaine signaling at TLR4 suppresses cocaine-induced extracellular dopamine in the NAc, as well as cocaine conditioned place preference and cocaine self-administration. These results provide a novel understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying cocaine reward/reinforcement that includes a critical role for central immune signaling, and offer a new target for medication development for cocaine abuse treatment. PMID:25644383

  5. Toll Like Receptor 4 Affects the Cerebral Biochemical Changes Induced by MPTP Treatment.

    PubMed

    Conte, Carmela; Roscini, Luca; Sardella, Roccaldo; Mariucci, Giuseppina; Scorzoni, Stefania; Beccari, Tommaso; Corte, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are still unclear. However, multiple lines of evidence suggest a critical role of the toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) in inflammatory response and neuronal death. Neuroinflammation may be associated with the misfolding and aggregation of proteins accompanied by a change in their secondary structure. Recent findings also suggest that biochemical perturbations in cerebral lipid content could contribute to the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including PD. Thus, it is of great importance to determine the biochemical changes that occur in PD. In this respect, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy represents a useful tool to detect molecular alterations in biological systems in response to stress stimuli. By relying upon FTIR approach, this study was designed to elucidate the potential role of TLR4 in biochemical changes induced by methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxin in a mouse model of PD. The analysis of the FTIR spectra was performed in different brain regions of both wild type (WT) and toll like receptor 4-deficient (TLR4(-/-)) mice. It revealed that each brain region exhibited a characteristic molecular fingerprint at baseline, with no significant differences between genotypes. Conversely, WT and TLR4(-/-) mice showed differential biochemical response to MPTP toxicity, principally related to lipid and protein composition. These differences appeared to be characteristic for each brain area. Furthermore, the present study showed that WT mice resulted more vulnerable than TLR4(-/-) animals to striatal dopamine (DA) depletion following MPTP treatment. These results support the hypothesis of a possible involvement of TLR4 in biochemical changes occurring in neurodegeneration.

  6. Lipopolysaccharides belonging to different Salmonella serovars are differentially capable of activating Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Chessa, Daniela; Spiga, Luisella; De Riu, Nicola; Delaconi, Paola; Mazzarello, Vittorio; Ganau, Giulia; Rubino, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar (serotype) Abortusovis is a member of the Enterobacteriaceae. This serotype is naturally restricted to ovine species and does not infect humans. Limited information is available about the immune response of sheep to S. Abortusovis. S. Abortusovis, like Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi, causes a systemic infection in which, under natural conditions, animals are not able to raise a rapid immune response. Failure to induce the appropriate response allows pathogens to reach the placenta and results in an abortion. Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that are specific to bacteria and are not synthesized by the host. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of receptors that specifically recognize PAMPs. As a first step, we were able to identify the presence of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on the ovine placenta by using an immunohistochemistry technique. To our knowledge, this is the first work describing the interaction between S. Abortusovis LPS and TLR4. Experiments using an embryonic cell line (HEK293) transfected with human and ovine TLR4s showed a reduction of interleukin 8 (IL-8) production by S. Abortusovis and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi upon LPS stimulation compared to Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Identical results were observed using heat-killed bacteria instead of LPS. Based on data obtained with TLR4 in vitro stimulation, we demonstrated that the serotype S. Abortusovis is able to successfully evade the immune system whereas S. Typhimurium and other serovars fail to do so.

  7. BURN-INDUCED ACUTE LUNG INJURY REQUIRES A FUNCTIONAL TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 4

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Michael; Cheadle, Gerald; Peterson, Carrie; Loomis, William; Putnam, James; Wolf, Paul; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian; Bansal, Vishal; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-01-01

    The role of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a component of the innate immune system, in the development of burn-induced acute lung injury (ALI) has not been completely defined. Recent data suggested that an intact TLR4 plays a major role in the development of organ injury in sterile inflammation. We hypothesized that burn-induced ALI is a TLR4-dependent process. Male C57BL/6J (TLR4 wild-type [WT]) and C57BL/10ScN (TLR4 knockout [KO]) mice were subjected to a 30% total body surface area steam burn. Animals were killed at 6 and 24 h after the insult. Lung specimens were harvested for histological examination after hematoxylin-eosin staining. In addition, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 immunostaining was performed. Lung MPO was measured by an enzymatic assay. Total lung keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant (IL-8) content was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot was performed to quantify phosphorylated IκBα, phosphorylated nuclear factor κB p65 (NF-κBp65), and high mobility group box 1 expression. Acute lung injury, characterized by thickening of the alveolar-capillary membrane, hyaline membrane formation, intraalveolar hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration, was seen in WT but not KO animals at 24 h. Myeloperoxidase and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 immunostaining of KO animals was also similar to sham but elevated in WT animals. In addition, a reduction in MPO enzymatic activity was observed in KO mice as well as a reduction in IL-8 levels compared with their WT counterparts. Burn-induced ALI develops within 24 h after the initial thermal insult in our model. Toll-like receptor 4 KO animals were clearly protected and had a much less severe lung injury. Our data suggest that burn-induced ALI is a TLR4-dependent process. PMID:21330948

  8. Crystal structure of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain of human IL-1RAPL.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed A; Brint, Elizabeth K; O'Neill, Luke A J; Tong, Liang

    2004-07-23

    The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain is conserved in the intracellular regions of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin-1 receptors (IL-1Rs) as well as in several cytoplasmic adapter molecules. This domain has crucial roles in signal transduction by these receptors for host immune response. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.3-A resolution of the TIR domain of human IL-1RAPL, the first structure of a TIR domain of the IL-1R superfamily. There are large structural differences between this TIR domain and that of TLR1 and TLR2. Helix alphaD in IL-1RAPL is almost perpendicular to its equivalent in TLR1 or TLR2. The BB loop contains a hydrogen bond unique to IL-1RAPL between Thr residues at the 8th and 10th positions. The structural and sequence diversity among these domains may be important for specificity in the signal transduction by these receptors. A dimer of the TIR domain of IL-1RAPL is observed in the crystal, although this domain is monomeric in solution. Residues in the dimer interface are mostly unique to IL-1RAPL, which is consistent with the distinct functional roles of this receptor. Our functional studies show IL-1RAPL can activate JNK but not the ERK or the p38 MAP kinases, whereas its close homolog, TIGIRR, cannot activate JNK. Deletion mutagenesis studies show that the activation of JNK by IL-1RAPL does not depend on the integrity of its TIR domain, suggesting a distinct mechanism of signaling through this receptor.

  9. Expression of a Toll Signaling Regulator Serpin in a Mycoinsecticide for Increased Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linzhi; Keyhani, Nemat O.; Tang, Guirong; Tian, Chuang; Lu, Ruipeng; Wang, Xin; Pei, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Serpins are ubiquitously distributed serine protease inhibitors that covalently bind to target proteases to exert their activities. Serpins regulate a wide range of activities, particularly those in which protease-mediated cascades are active. The Drosophila melanogaster serpin Spn43Ac negatively controls the Toll pathway that is activated in response to fungal infection. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana offers an environmentally friendly alternative to chemical pesticides for insect control. However, the use of mycoinsecticides remains limited in part due to issues of efficacy (low virulence) and the recalcitrance of the targets (due to strong immune responses). Since Spn43Ac acts to inhibit Toll-mediated activation of defense responses, we explored the feasibility of a new strategy to engineer entomopathogenic fungi with increased virulence by expression of Spn43Ac in the fungus. Compared to the 50% lethal dose (LD50) for the wild-type parent, the LD50 of B. bassiana expressing Spn43Ac (strain Bb::S43Ac-1) was reduced ∼3-fold, and the median lethal time against the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella) was decreased by ∼24%, with the more rapid proliferation of hyphal bodies being seen in the host hemolymph. In vitro and in vivo assays showed inhibition of phenoloxidase (PO) activation in the presence of Spn43Ac, with Spn43Ac-mediated suppression of activation by chymotrypsin, trypsin, laminarin, and lipopolysaccharide occurring in the following order: chymotrypsin and trypsin > laminarin > lipopolysaccharide. Expression of Spn43Ac had no effect on the activity of the endogenous B. bassiana-derived cuticle-degrading protease (CDEP-1). These results expand our understanding of Spn43Ac function and confirm that suppression of insect immune system defenses represents a feasible approach to engineering entomopathogenic fungi for greater efficacy. PMID:24837378

  10. Toll-like receptors are part of the innate immune defense system of sponges (demospongiae: Porifera).

    PubMed

    Wiens, Matthias; Korzhev, Michael; Perovic-Ottstadt, Sanja; Luthringer, Bérengère; Brandt, David; Klein, Stefanie; Müller, Werner E G

    2007-03-01

    During evolution and with the emergence of multicellular animals, the need arose to ward off foreign organisms that threaten the integrity of the animal body. Among many different receptors that participate in the recognition of microbial invaders, toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an essential role in mediating the innate immune response. After binding distinct microbial components, TLRs activate intracellular signaling cascades that result in an induced expression of diverse antimicrobial molecules. Because sponges (phylum Porifera) are filter feeders, they are abundantly exposed to microorganisms that represent a potential threat. Here, we describe the identification, cloning, and deduced protein sequence from 3 major elements of the poriferan innate response (to bacterial lipopeptides): the TLR, the IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-4-like protein (IRAK-4l), and a novel effector caspase from the demosponge Suberites domuncula. Each molecule shares significant sequence similarity with its homologues in higher Metazoa. Sequence homologies were found in particular within the family-specific domains toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance (TLR family), Ser/Thr/Tyr kinase domain (IRAK family), and CASc (caspase family). In addition, in situ hybridization and immunohistological analyses revealed an abundance of SDTLR (TLR) transcripts in epithelial layers of the sponge surface (exopinacoderm and endopinacoderm). Furthermore, it is shown that both SDTLR and SDIRAK-4 like (IRAK) are expressed constitutively, regardless of treatment with synthetic triacyl lipopeptide Pam(3)Cys-Ser-(Lys)(4). In contrast, SDCASL (caspase) expression is highly Pam(3)Cys-Ser-(Lys)(4) inducible. However, blocking of the lipopeptide with recombinant TLR prior to its application completely prevented the induced expression of this poriferan caspase. These results underscore that the phylogenetically oldest extant metazoan phylum is provided already with the signaling pathways of the antimicrobial

  11. The potential role of Toll-like receptors in programming of vascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jennifer A.; Webb, R. Clinton

    2014-01-01

    The developmental origins of metabolic syndrome have been established through the consistent observation that small-for-gestational age and large-for-gestational age fetuses have an increased risk for hypertension and related metabolic disorders later in life. These phenotypes have been reproduced in various species subjected to a range of intrauterine insults and ongoing research is directed towards understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms. Current evidence suggests that the creation of a pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant intrauterine milieu is a common thread among prenatal factors that impact upon fetal size. Furthermore, studies demonstrate that a shift in fetal redox status consequent to environmental cues persists after birth and drives the progression of vascular dysfunction and hypertension in postnatal life. Toll-like receptor signaling has emerged as a key link between inflammation and oxidative stress and pathogenic contributor to hypertension, insulin resistance and obesity, in both human patients and animal models of disease. Thus, Toll-like receptor activation and dysregulation of its signaling components represent potential molecular underpinnings of programmed hypertension and related disorders in those subjected to sub-optimal intrauterine conditions, yet their contributions to developmental programming remain unexplored. We propose that danger signals mobilized by the placenta or fetal tissues during complicated pregnancy activate the fetal innate immune system through TLRs and thereby potentiate the generation of reactive oxygen species and orchestrate fetal adaptive responses, including changes in gene expression which later translate to vascular dysfunction. Further, we suggest that after birth, continual activation of TLR signaling propagates vascular oxidative stress and thereby accelerates the advancement of hypertension and heart failure. PMID:23485061

  12. Dynamic evolution of toll-like receptor multigene families in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Katherine M; Rast, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a large and long-lived invertebrate, provides a new perspective on animal immunity. Analysis of this genome uncovered a highly complex immune system in which the gene families that encode homologs of the pattern recognition receptors that form the core of vertebrate innate immunity are encoded in large multigene families. The sea urchin genome contains 253 Toll-like receptor (TLR) sequences, more than 200 Nod-like receptors and 1095 scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains, a 10-fold expansion relative to vertebrates. Given their stereotypic protein structure and simple intron-exon architecture, the TLRs are the most tractable of these families for more detailed analysis. A role for these receptors in immune defense is suggested by their similarity to TLRs in other organisms, sequence diversity, and expression in immunologically active tissues, including phagocytes. The complexity of the sea urchin TLR multigene families is largely derived from expansions independent of those in vertebrates and protostomes, although a small family of TLRs with structure similar to that of Drosophila Toll can be traced to an ancient eumetazoan ancestor. Several other echinoderm sequences are now available, including Lytechinus variegatus, as well as partial sequences from two other sea urchin species. Here, we present an analysis of the invertebrate deuterostome TLRs with emphasis on the echinoderms. Representatives of most of the S. purpuratus TLR subfamilies and homologs of the mccTLR sequences are found in L. variegatus, although the L. variegatus TLR gene family is notably smaller (68 TLR sequences). The phylogeny of these genes within sea urchins highlights lineage-specific expansions at higher resolution than is evident at the phylum level. These analyses identify quickly evolving TLR subfamilies that are likely to have novel immune recognition functions and other, more stable, subfamilies that may

  13. Toll-like receptor-2, but not Toll-like receptor-4, is essential for development of oviduct pathology in chlamydial genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Darville, Toni; O'Neill, Joshua M; Andrews, Charles W; Nagarajan, Uma M; Stahl, Lynn; Ojcius, David M

    2003-12-01

    The roles of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 in the host inflammatory response to infection caused by Chlamydia trachomatis have not been elucidated. We examined production of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in wild-type TLR2 knockout (KO), and TLR4 KO murine peritoneal macrophages infected with the mouse pneumonitis strain of C. trachomatis. Furthermore, we compared the outcomes of genital tract infection in control, TLR2 KO, and TLR4 KO mice. Macrophages lacking TLR2 produced significantly less TNF-alpha and IL6 in response to active infection. In contrast, macrophages from TLR4 KO mice consistently produced higher TNF-alpha and IL-6 responses than those from normal mice on in vitro infection. Infected TLR2-deficient fibroblasts had less mRNA for IL-1, IL-6, and macrophage-inflammatory protein-2, but TLR4-deficient cells had increased mRNA levels for these cytokines compared with controls, suggesting that ligation of TLR4 by whole chlamydiae may down-modulate signaling by other TLRs. In TLR2 KO mice, although the course of genital tract infection was not different from that of controls, significantly lower levels of TNF-alpha and macrophage-inflammatory protein-2 were detected in genital tract secretions during the first week of infection, and there was a significant reduction in oviduct and mesosalpinx pathology at late time points. TLR4 KO mice responded to in vivo infection similarly to wild-type controls and developed similar pathology. TLR2 is an important mediator in the innate immune response to C. trachomatis infection and appears to play a role in both early production of inflammatory mediators and development of chronic inflammatory pathology.

  14. RNAi knock-down of shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Toll gene and immune deficiency gene reveals their difference in regulating antimicrobial peptides transcription.

    PubMed

    Hou, Fujun; He, Shulin; Liu, Yongjie; Zhu, Xiaowen; Sun, Chengbo; Liu, Xiaolin

    2014-06-01

    NF-κB dependent antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are of critical importance in protecting insects or mammals from microorganisms infection. However, we still do not make clear signaling pathways in regulating AMPs expression in shrimps. In this study, RNAi approach was used to study differences between Toll signaling pathway and immune deficiency signaling pathway in regulating the transcription of NF-κB dependent AMPs post bacteria challenge. Results showed that the transcription level of anti-lipopolysaccharide factor was highly suppressed in Litopenaeus vannamei immune deficiency (LvIMD) silenced shrimps by gene specific dsRNA compared to Litopenaeus vannamei Toll (LvToll) silenced shrimps with or without Vibrio anguillarum and Micrococcus lysodeikticus challenge. Conversely the transcription level of penaeidin3a was significantly suppressed in LvToll silenced shrimps compared to LvIMD silenced shrimps. However, no obvious difference was found in regulating the transcription of CrustinP. Meanwhile, we found that silencing LvToll both down regulated the transcription of Dorsal and Relish while silencing LvIMD only down regulated the transcription of Relish. At last, shrimp survival experiment showed that post V. anguillarum challenge high mortality was found both in LvToll and LvIMD silenced groups while post M. lysodeikticus challenge we saw high mortality only in LvToll silenced group. Hence, we conclude that shrimp L. vannamei Toll pathway and IMD pathway might be different in regulating the transcription of NF-κB dependent AMPs and responding to bacteria challenge but not independent of each other.

  15. Advances in the design and delivery of peptide subunit vaccines with a focus on Toll-like receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Black, Matthew; Trent, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew; Olive, Colleen

    2010-01-01

    Considerable success has been made with many peptide antigen formulations, and peptide-based vaccines are emerging as the next generation of prophylactic and remedial immunotherapy. However, finding an optimal platform balancing all of the requirements for an effective, specific and safe immune response remains a major challenge for many infectious and chronic diseases. This review outlines how peptide immunogenicity is influenced by the way in which peptides are presented to the immune system, underscoring the need for multifunctional delivery systems that couple antigen and adjuvant into a single construct. Particular attention is given to the ability of Toll-like receptor agonists to act as adjuvants. A survey of recent approaches to developing peptide antigen delivery systems is given, many of which incorporate Toll-like receptor agonists into the design. PMID:20109027

  16. The influence of economic incentives linked to road safety indicators on accidents: the case of toll concessions in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Thais; Vassallo, José Manuel; Herraiz, Israel

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this paper is to evaluate whether the incentives incorporated in toll highway concession contracts in order to encourage private operators to adopt measures to reduce accidents are actually effective at improving safety. To this end, we implemented negative binomial regression models using information about highway characteristics and accident data from toll highway concessions in Spain from 2007 to 2009. Our results show that even though road safety is highly influenced by variables that are not managed by the contractor, such as the annual average daily traffic (AADT), the percentage of heavy vehicles on the highway, number of lanes, number of intersections and average speed; the implementation of these incentives has a positive influence on the reduction of accidents and injuries. Consequently, this measure seems to be an effective way of improving safety performance in road networks.

  17. Correlation of serum toll like receptor 9 and trace elements with lipid peroxidation in the patients of breast diseases.

    PubMed

    Karki, Kanchan; Pande, Deepti; Negi, Reena; Khanna, Seema; Khanna, Ranjana S; Khanna, Hari D

    2015-04-01

    Toll-like receptors are recognized as redox sensitive receptor proteins and have been implicated in cellular response to oxidative stress. Altered pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance leads to an increased oxidative damage and consequently play an important role in breast diseases. The study was designed to access the oxidative stress status by quantification of byproducts generated during lipid peroxidation and inadequate trace elements during oxidative damage and its effects on the toll like receptor (TLR) activity in patients of breast diseases. Decreased levels of selenium, copper, zinc, magnesium and iron with elevated levels of malondialdehyde (marker of lipid peroxidation) were accompanied by decreased TLR activity in patients of benign breast diseases as well as breast carcinoma. A similar pattern was observed with the advancement of disease and its subsequent progression in breast carcinoma patients. Results of multinomial regression analysis suggest benign breast disease patients are at higher risk of developing breast cancer with high odds ratio of lipid damage.

  18. Expression and activation of toll-like receptor 3 and toll-like receptor 4 on human corneal epithelial and conjunctival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are recognized as important contributors to the initiation and modulation of the inflammatory response in the eye. This study investigated the precise expression patterns and functionality of TLRs in human corneal epithelial cells (HCE) and in conjunctival fibroblasts (HCF). Methods The cell surface expression of TLRs 2-4, TLR7 and TLR9 in HCE and HCF was examined by flow cytometry with or without stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C). The mRNA expression of the TLRs was determined by real-time PCR. The protein content levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured in HCE and HCF using multiplex fluorescent bead immunoassay (FBI). Results The surface expression of TLR3 and TLR4 was detected on both HCE and HCF. Following incubation with LPS, the percentage of HCE cells staining for TLR4 decreased from 10.18% to 0.62% (P < 0.001). Incubation with poly I:C lowered the percentage of HCE cells positive for TLR3 from 10.44% to 2.84% (P < 0.001). The mRNA expression of TLRs2, 4, 7 and 9 was detected in HCE only. Activation of HCE with LPS complex elicited protein secretion up to 4.51 ± 0.85-fold higher levels of IL-6 (P < 0.05), 2.5 ± 0.36-fold IL-8 (P > 0.05), 4.35 ± 1.12-fold IL-1β (P > 0.05) and 29.35 ± 2.3-fold TNFα (P < 0.05) compared to cells incubated in medium. Conclusions HCF and HCE both express TLRs that respond to specific ligands by increasing cytokine expression. Following activation, the surface expression of TLR3 and TLR4 on HCE is decreased, thus creating a negative feedback loop, mitigating the effect of TLR activation. PMID:24491080

  19. Determinants of Divergent Adaptive Immune Responses after Airway Sensitization with Ligands of Toll-Like Receptor 5 or Toll-Like Receptor 9

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda M.; Ji, Ming; Sinha, Meenal; Dong, Matthew B.; Ren, Xin; Wang, Yanli; Lowell, Clifford A.; Ghosh, Sankar; Locksley, Richard M.; DeFranco, Anthony L.

    2016-01-01

    Excessive type 2 helper T cell responses to environmental antigens can cause immunopathology such as asthma and allergy, but how such immune responses are induced remains unclear. We studied this process in the airways by immunizing mice intranasally with the antigen ovalbumin together with either of two Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. We found the TLR5 ligand flagellin promoted a type 2 helper T cell response, whereas, a TLR9 ligand CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ODN) promoted a type 1 helper T cell response. CpG ODN induced mRNA encoding interleukin (IL)-12 p40, whereas, flagellin caused IL-33 secretion and induced mRNAs encoding IL-1 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). By using mice deficient in the TLR and IL-1R signaling molecule, myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88), in conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and alveolar macrophages (AMs), and by cell sorting different lung populations after 2 hours of in vivo stimulation, we characterized the cell types that rapidly produced inflammatory cytokines in response to TLR stimulation. CpG ODN was likely recognized by TLR9 on cDCs and AMs, which made mRNA encoding IL-12. IL-12 was necessary for the subsequent innate and adaptive interferon-γ production. In contrast, flagellin stimulated multiple cells of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origin, including AMs, DCs, monocytes, and lung epithelial cells. AMs were largely responsible for IL-1α, whereas lung epithelial cells made TSLP. Multiple hematopoietic cells, including AMs, DCs, and monocytes contributed to other cytokines, including IL-1β and TNFα. MyD88-dependent signals, likely through IL-1R and IL-33R, and MyD88-independent signals, likely from TSLP, were necessary in cDCs for promotion of the early IL-4 response by CD4 T cells in the draining lymph node. Thus, the cell types that responded to TLR ligands were a critical determinant of the innate cytokines produced and the character of the resulting adaptive immune response in the

  20. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of goose Toll-like receptor 5.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qiang; Pan, Zhiming; Geng, Shizhong; Kang, Xilong; Huang, Jinlin; Sun, Xiaolin; Li, Qiuchun; Cai, Yinqiang; Jiao, Xinan

    2012-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that are vital to activation of the innate immune system in response to invading pathogens through their recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). TLR5 is responsible for the recognition of bacterial flagellin in vertebrates. In this study, we cloned the goose TLR5 gene using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The open reading frame (ORF) of goose TLR5 cDNA is 2583 bp in length and encodes an 860 amino acid protein. The entire coding region of the TLR5 gene was successfully amplified from genomic DNA and contained a single exon. The putative amino acid sequence of goose TLR5 consisted of a signal peptide sequence, 11 leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains, a leucine-rich repeat C-terminal (LRR-CT) domain, a transmembrane domain and an intracellular Toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The amino acid sequence of goose TLR5 shared 50.5% identity with human (Homo sapiens), 49.8% with mouse (Mus musculus) and 82.7% with chicken (Gallus gallus). The goose TLR5 gene was highly expressed in the spleen, liver and brain; moderately expressed in PBMCs, kidney, lung, heart, bone marrow, small intestine and large intestine; and minimally expressed in the cecum. HEK293 cells transfected with goose TLR5 and NF-κB-luciferase containing plasmids significantly responded to flagellin from Salmonella typhimurium indicating that it is a functional TLR5 homologue. In response to infection with S. enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE), the level of TLR5 mRNA significantly increased over the control in PBMCs at 1 d post infection (p.i.) and was slightly elevated in the spleen at 1 d or 3 d p.i. IL-6 was expressed below control levels in PBMCs but was upregulated in the spleen. In contrast to IL-6, an evident decrease in the expression level of IL-8 was observed in both PBMCs and spleens at 1 d or 3 d p.i. SE challenge also resulted in an increase in the mRNA expression of IL-18 and IFN-γ in PBMCs

  1. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Is a Regulator of Monocyte and Electroencephalographic Responses to Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Wisor, Jonathan P.; Clegern, William C.; Schmidt, Michelle A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep loss triggers changes in inflammatory signaling pathways in the brain and periphery. The mechanisms that underlie these changes are ill-defined. The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activates inflammatory signaling cascades in response to endogenous and pathogen-associated ligands known to be elevated in association with sleep loss. TLR4 is therefore a possible mediator of some of the inflammation-related effects of sleep loss. Here we describe the baseline electroencephalographic sleep phenotype and the biochemical and electroencephalographic responses to sleep loss in TLR4-deficient mice. Design, Measurements and Results: TLR4-deficient mice and wild type controls were subjected to electroencephalographic and electromyographic recordings during spontaneous sleep/wake cycles and during and after sleep restriction sessions of 3, 6, and 24-h duration, during which sleep was disrupted by an automated sleep restriction system. Relative to wild type control mice, TLR4-deficient mice exhibited an increase in the duration of the primary daily waking bout occurring at dark onset in a light/dark cycle. The amount of time spent in non-rapid eye movement sleep by TLR4-deficient mice was reduced in proportion to increased wakefulness in the hours immediately after dark onset. Subsequent to sleep restriction, EEG measures of increased sleep drive were attenuated in TLR4-deficient mice relative to wild-type mice. TLR4 was enriched 10-fold in brain cells positive for the cell surface marker CD11b (cells of the monocyte lineage) relative to CD11b-negative cells in wild type mouse brains. To assess whether this population was affected selectively by TLR4 knockout, flow cytometry was used to count F4/80- and CD45-positive cells in the brains of sleep deprived and time of day control mice. While wild-type mice exhibited a significant reduction in the number of CD11b-positive cells in the brain after 24-h sleep restriction, TLR4-deficient mice did not. Conclusion

  2. Diversity in the Toll-Like Receptor Genes of the African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus)

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Desiré Lee; Vermaak, Elaine; Roelofse, Marli; Kotze, Antoinette

    2016-01-01

    The African penguin, Spheniscus demersus, is listed as Endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species due to the drastic reduction in population numbers over the last 20 years. To date, the only studies on immunogenetic variation in penguins have been conducted on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. It was shown in humans that up to half of the genetic variability in immune responses to pathogens are located in non-MHC genes. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are now increasingly being studied in a variety of taxa as a broader approach to determine functional genetic diversity. In this study, we confirm low genetic diversity in the innate immune region of African penguins similar to that observed in New Zealand robin that has undergone several severe population bottlenecks. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity across TLRs varied between ex situ and in situ penguins with the number of non-synonymous alterations in ex situ populations (n = 14) being reduced in comparison to in situ populations (n = 16). Maintaining adaptive diversity is of vital importance in the assurance populations as these animals may potentially be used in the future for re-introductions. Therefore, this study provides essential data on immune gene diversity in penguins and will assist in providing an additional monitoring tool for African penguin in the wild, as well as to monitor diversity in ex situ populations and to ensure that diversity found in the in situ populations are captured in the assurance populations. PMID:27760133

  3. Flagellin a toll-like receptor 5 agonist as an adjuvant in chicken vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Bajwa, Preety; Deb, Rajib; Chellappa, Madhan Mohan; Dey, Sohini

    2014-03-01

    Chicken raised under commercial conditions are vulnerable to environmental exposure to a number of pathogens. Therefore, regular vaccination of the flock is an absolute requirement to prevent the occurrence of infectious diseases. To combat infectious diseases, vaccines require inclusion of effective adjuvants that promote enhanced protection and do not cause any undesired adverse reaction when administered to birds along with the vaccine. With this perspective in mind, there is an increased need for effective better vaccine adjuvants. Efforts are being made to enhance vaccine efficacy by the use of suitable adjuvants, particularly Toll-like receptor (TLR)-based adjuvants. TLRs are among the types of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize conserved pathogen molecules. A number of studies have documented the effectiveness of flagellin as an adjuvant as well as its ability to promote cytokine production by a range of innate immune cells. This minireview summarizes our current understanding of flagellin action, its role in inducing cytokine response in chicken cells, and the potential use of flagellin as well as its combination with other TLR ligands as an adjuvant in chicken vaccines.

  4. The evolution of bat nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Zepeda-Mendoza, M Lisandra; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Méndez-Ojeda, Maria L; Arias, Carlos F; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-12-01

    We characterized the nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors (TLR) of a New World bat species, the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), and through a comparative molecular evolutionary approach searched for general adaptation patterns among the nucleic acid-sensing TLRs of eight different bats species belonging to three families (Pteropodidae, Vespertilionidae and Phyllostomidae). We found that the bat TLRs are evolving slowly and mostly under purifying selection and that the divergence pattern of such receptors is overall congruent with the species tree, consistent with the evolution of many other mammalian nuclear genes. However, the chiropteran TLRs exhibited unique mutations fixed in ligand-binding sites, some of which involved nonconservative amino acid changes and/or targets of positive selection. Such changes could potentially modify protein function and ligand-binding properties, as some changes were predicted to alter nucleic acid binding motifs in TLR 9. Moreover, evidence for episodic diversifying selection acting specifically upon the bat lineage and sublineages was detected. Thus, the long-term adaptation of chiropterans to a wide variety of environments and ecological niches with different pathogen profiles is likely to have shaped the evolution of the bat TLRs in an order-specific manner. The observed evolutionary patterns provide evidence for potential functional differences between bat and other mammalian TLRs in terms of resistance to specific pathogens or recognition of nucleic acids in general.

  5. Toll-like receptor 2 activation depends on lipopeptide shedding by bacterial surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hanzelmann, Dennis; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Hertlein, Tobias; Stevanovic, Stefan; Macek, Boris; Wolz, Christiane; Götz, Friedrich; Otto, Michael; Kretschmer, Dorothee; Peschel, Andreas

    2016-07-29

    Sepsis caused by Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is a major fatal disease but its molecular basis remains elusive. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been implicated in the orchestration of inflammation and sepsis but its role appears to vary for different pathogen species and clones. Accordingly, Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates differ substantially in their capacity to activate TLR2. Here we show that strong TLR2 stimulation depends on high-level production of phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptides in response to the global virulence activator Agr. PSMs are required for mobilizing lipoproteins, the TLR2 agonists, from the staphylococcal cytoplasmic membrane. Notably, the course of sepsis caused by PSM-deficient S. aureus is similar in wild-type and TLR2-deficient mice, but TLR2 is required for protection of mice against PSM-producing S. aureus. Thus, a crucial role of TLR2 depends on agonist release by bacterial surfactants. Modulation of this process may lead to new therapeutic strategies against Gram-positive infections.

  6. Toll-like receptor 2 activation depends on lipopeptide shedding by bacterial surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Hanzelmann, Dennis; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Hertlein, Tobias; Stevanovic, Stefan; Macek, Boris; Wolz, Christiane; Götz, Friedrich; Otto, Michael; Kretschmer, Dorothee; Peschel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis caused by Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is a major fatal disease but its molecular basis remains elusive. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been implicated in the orchestration of inflammation and sepsis but its role appears to vary for different pathogen species and clones. Accordingly, Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates differ substantially in their capacity to activate TLR2. Here we show that strong TLR2 stimulation depends on high-level production of phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptides in response to the global virulence activator Agr. PSMs are required for mobilizing lipoproteins, the TLR2 agonists, from the staphylococcal cytoplasmic membrane. Notably, the course of sepsis caused by PSM-deficient S. aureus is similar in wild-type and TLR2-deficient mice, but TLR2 is required for protection of mice against PSM-producing S. aureus. Thus, a crucial role of TLR2 depends on agonist release by bacterial surfactants. Modulation of this process may lead to new therapeutic strategies against Gram-positive infections. PMID:27470911

  7. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bo Yoon; Kim, Seon Beom; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Park, Hyun; Kim, Sung Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE). MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumoricidal properties of macrophages. MFE activated macrophages through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKinase) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways downstream from toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. MFE was shown to exhibit cytotoxicity of CT26 cells via the activated macrophages, even though MFE did not directly affect CT26 cells. In a xenograft mouse model, MFE significantly enhanced anti-cancer activity combined with 5-fluorouracil and markedly promoted splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and IFN-γ production. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels were significantly increased. These results indicate the indirect anti-cancer activity of MFE through improved immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling. M. alba L. fruit extract might be a potential anti-tumor immunomodulatory candidate chemotherapy agent. PMID:26473845

  8. Immune Adjuvant Effect of Molecularly-defined Toll-Like Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Toussi, Deana N.; Massari, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine efficacy is optimized by addition of immune adjuvants. However, although adjuvants have been used for over a century, to date, only few adjuvants are approved for human use, mostly aimed at improving vaccine efficacy and antigen-specific protective antibody production. The mechanism of action of immune adjuvants is diverse, depending on their chemical and molecular nature, ranging from non-specific effects (i.e., antigen depot at the immunization site) to specific activation of immune cells leading to improved host innate and adaptive responses. Although the detailed molecular mechanism of action of many adjuvants is still elusive, the discovery of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has provided new critical information on immunostimulatory effect of numerous bacterial components that engage TLRs. These ligands have been shown to improve both the quality and the quantity of host adaptive immune responses when used in vaccine formulations targeted to infectious diseases and cancer that require both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. The potential of such TLR adjuvants in improving the design and the outcomes of several vaccines is continuously evolving, as new agonists are discovered and tested in experimental and clinical models of vaccination. In this review, a summary of the recent progress in development of TLR adjuvants is presented. PMID:26344622

  9. Bradykinin promotes Toll like receptor-4 expression in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio; Hernández-Bermúdez, Cristina

    2012-12-01

    Bacterial infections are a potent mechanism for enzymatic generation of kinins such as bradykinin (BK), a universal mediator for inducing inflammatory reaction by associating with the B2 receptor and stimulating liberation of arachidonic acid and synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In this study we evaluate the role of bradykinin in regulating the expression of TLR4 receptor in human gingival fibroblasts. We examine the ability of bradykinin to modulate inflammatory response of human gingival fibroblasts to Gram-negative components and evaluated the role of Toll-like receptors (TLR)-4 in the co-operation between bradykinin and bacterial pathogens. We show that treatment with bradykinin promotes TLR4 receptor expression in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and amplifies inflammatory responses to the bacterial components of Gram-negative bacteria. The TLR4 expression induced by bradykinin was blocked with Hoe 140, a B2R antagonist. When HGF cells were incubated with BK resulted of an increased in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and prostaglandin E2 synthesis. Bradykinin and lipopolysaccharide, a specific TLR4 ligand stimulated COX-2 expression. In other series of experiments we found that ERK, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, protein kinase C and NFkB are involved in BK promoted-increased in TLR4 expression. The results demonstrate that bradykinin up-regulates the expression of TLR4 and promotes an additive increase in inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharides.

  10. γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase is an endogenous activator of Toll-like receptor 4-mediated osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Sawako; Into, Takeshi; Suzuki, Keiko; Miyauchi, Mutsumi; Takata, Takashi; Shibayama, Keigo; Niida, Shumpei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation-associated bone destruction, which is observed in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis, is mediated by excessive osteoclastogenesis. We showed previously that γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT), an enzyme involved in glutathione metabolism, acts as an endogenous activator of such pathological osteoclastogenesis, independent of its enzymatic activity. GGT accumulation is clinically observed in the joints of RA patients, and, in animals, the administration of recombinant GGT to the gingival sulcus as an in vivo periodontitis model induces an increase in the number of osteoclasts. However, the underlying mechanisms of this process remain unclear. Here, we report that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) recognizes GGT to activate inflammation-associated osteoclastogenesis. Unlike lipopolysaccharide, GGT is sensitive to proteinase K treatment and insensitive to polymyxin B treatment. TLR4 deficiency abrogates GGT-induced osteoclastogenesis and activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling in precursor cells. Additionally, GGT does not induce osteoclastogenesis in cells lacking the signaling adaptor MyD88. The administration of GGT to the gingival sulcus induces increased osteoclastogenesis in wild-type mice, but does not induce it in TLR4-deficient mice. Our findings elucidate a novel mechanism of inflammation-associated osteoclastogenesis, which involves TLR4 recognition of GGT and subsequent activation of MyD88-dependent signaling. PMID:27775020

  11. Acute kidney injury: what part do toll-like receptors play?

    PubMed Central

    Vallés, Patricia G; Lorenzo, Andrea Gil; Bocanegra, Victoria; Vallés, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system plays an important role as a first response to tissue injury. This first response is carried out via germline-encoded receptors. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the first identified and best studied family of pattern recognition receptors. TLRs are expressed on a variety of cell types, including epithelial cells, endothelia, dendritic cells, monocytes/macrophages, and B- and T-cells. TLRs initiate innate immune responses and concurrently shape the subsequent adaptive immune response. They are sensors of both pathogens, through the exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and tissue injury, through the endogenous danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). TLR signaling is critical in defending against invading microorganisms; however, sustained receptor activation is also implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Ischemic kidney injury involves early TLR-driven immunopathology, and the resolution of inflammation is needed for rapid regeneration of injured tubule cells. Notably, the activation of TLRs also has been implicated in epithelial repair. This review focuses on the role of TLRs and their endogenous ligands within the inflammatory response of acute kidney injury. PMID:24971030

  12. Toll-like receptors: the swiss army knife of immunity and vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Jennifer K; Mansell, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Innate immune cells have a critical role in defense against infection and disease. Central to this is the broad specificity with which they can detect pathogen-associated patterns and danger-associated patterns via the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) they express. Several families of PRRs have been identified including: Toll-like receptors (TLRs), C-type lectin-like receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain–like receptors. TLRs are one of the most largely studied families of PRRs. The binding of ligands to TLRs on antigen presenting cells (APCs), mainly dendritic cells, leads to APC maturation, induction of inflammatory cytokines and the priming of naive T cells to drive acquired immunity. Therefore, activation of TLRs promotes both innate inflammatory responses and the induction of adaptive immunity. Consequently, in the last two decades mounting evidence has inextricably linked TLR activation with the pathogenesis of immune diseases and cancer. It has become advantageous to harness these aspects of TLR signaling therapeutically to accelerate and enhance the induction of vaccine-specific responses and also target TLRs with the use of biologics and small molecule inhibitors for the treatment of disease. In these respects, TLRs may be considered a ‘Swiss Army' knife of the immune system, ready to respond in a multitude of infectious and disease states. Here we describe the latest advances in TLR-targeted therapeutics and the use of TLR ligands as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:27350884

  13. Interplay between Inflammation and Stemness in Cancer Cells: The Role of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Da-Wei; Huang, Li-Rung; Chen, Ya-Wen; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small population of cancer cells that exhibit stemness. These cells contribute to cancer metastasis, treatment resistance, and relapse following therapy; therefore, they may cause malignancy and reduce the success of cancer treatment. Nuclear factor kappa B- (NF-κB-) mediated inflammatory responses increase stemness in cancer cells, and CSCs constitutively exhibit higher NF-κB activation, which in turn increases their stemness. These opposite effects form a positive feedback loop that further amplifies inflammation and stemness in cancer cells, thereby expanding CSC populations in the tumor. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) activate NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses when stimulated by carcinogenic microbes and endogenous molecules released from cells killed during cancer treatment. NF-κB activation by extrinsic TLR ligands increases stemness in cancer cells. Moreover, it was recently shown that increased NF-κB activity and inflammatory responses in CSCs may be caused by altered TLR signaling during the enrichment of stemness in cancer cells. Thus, the activation of TLR signaling by extrinsic and intrinsic factors drives a positive interplay between inflammation and stemness in cancer cells.

  14. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms, inflammatory and infectious diseases, allergies, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Andrei E

    2013-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germ-line-encoded innate immune sensors that recognize conserved microbial structures and host alarmins and signal expression of MHC proteins, costimulatory molecules, and inflammatory mediators by macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and other cell types. These processes activate immediate and early mechanisms of innate host defense, as well as initiate and orchestrate adaptive immune responses. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the TLR genes have been associated with altered susceptibility to infectious, inflammatory, and allergic diseases, and have been found to play a role in tumorigenesis. Critical advances in our understanding of innate immune functions and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have uncovered complex interactions of genetic polymorphisms within TLRs and environmental factors. However, conclusions obtained in the course of such analyses are restricted by limited power of many studies that is likely to explain controversial findings. Further, linkages to certain ethnic backgrounds, gender, and the presence of multigenic effects further complicate the interpretations of how the TLR SNPs affect immune responses. For many TLRs, the molecular mechanisms by which SNPs impact receptor functions remain unknown. In this review, I have summarized current knowledge about the TLR polymorphisms, their impact on TLR signaling, and associations with various inflammatory, infectious, allergic diseases and cancers, and discussed the directions of future scientific research.

  15. Herpes virus entry mediator synergizes with Toll-like receptor mediated neutrophil inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Haselmayer, Philipp; Tenzer, Stefan; Kwon, Byoung S; Jung, Gundram; Schild, Hansjörg; Radsak, Markus P

    2006-01-01

    In microbial infections polymorphnuclear neutrophils (PMN) constitute a major part of the innate host defence, based upon their ability to rapidly accumulate in inflamed tissues and clear the site of infection from microbial pathogens by their potent effector mechanisms. The recently described transmembrane receptor herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) is a member of the tumour necrosis factor receptor super family and is expressed on many haematopoietic cells, including T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, monocytes and PMN. Interaction of HVEM with the natural ligand LIGHT on T cells has a costimulatory effect, and increases the bactericidal activity of PMN. To further characterize the function of HVEM on PMN, we evaluated the effect of receptor ligation on human PMN effector functions using an agonistic monoclonal antibody. Here we demonstrate that activation of HVEM causes activation of neutrophil effector functions, including respiratory burst, degranulation and release of interleukin-8 in synergy with ligands for Toll-like receptors or GM-CSF. In addition, stimulation via HVEM enhanced neutrophil phagocytic activity of complement opsonized, but not of non-opsonized, particles. In conclusion, these results indicate a new, as yet unknown, participation of HVEM in the innate immune response and points to a new link between innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:17067315

  16. Peptides targeting Toll-like receptor signalling pathways for novel immune therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gomariz, R P; Gutiérrez-Cañas, I; Arranz, A; Carrión, M; Juarranz, Y; Leceta, J; Martínez, C

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of key proteins that permit mammals to detect microbes and endogenous molecules, which are present in body fluids, cell membranes and cytoplasm. They confer mechanisms to the host for maintaining homeostasis, activating innate immunity and inducing signals that lead to the activation of adaptive immunity. TLR signalling induces the expression of pro-inflammatory and anti-viral genes through different and intricate pathways. However, persistent signalling can be dangerous and all members of the TLR family are involved in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic inflammation, autoimmunity, allergy, cancer and aging. The pharmaceutical industry has begun intensive work developing novel immunotherapeutic approaches based on both activation and inhibition of TLR triggering. Further, clinical trials are pending to evaluate TLR agonists as novel vaccine adjuvants and for the treatment of infectious diseases, allergic diseases and asthma. Since systemic, metabolic and neuroendocrine changes are elicited by inflammation, TLR activity is susceptible of regulation by hormones and neuroendocrine factors. Neuroendocrine mediators are important players in modulating different phases of TLR regulation contributing to the endogenous control of homeostasis through local, regional and systemic routes. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is an important signal molecule of the neuroendocrine-immune network that has recently emerged as a potential candidate for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders by controlling innate and adaptive immunity. This review shows current advances in the understanding of TLR modulation by VIP that could contribute to the use of this natural peptide as a therapeutic tool.

  17. Cleavage of Toll-like receptor 3 by cathepsins B and H is essential for signaling.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cattaneo, Alejandra; Gobert, François-Xavier; Müller, Mélanie; Toscano, Florent; Flores, Marcella; Lescure, Aurianne; Del Nery, Elaine; Benaroch, Philippe

    2012-06-05

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 is an endosomal TLR that mediates immune responses against viral infections upon activation by its ligand double-stranded RNA, a replication intermediate of most viruses. TLR3 is expressed widely in the body and activates both the innate and adaptive immune systems. However, little is known about how TLR3 intracellular trafficking and maturation are regulated. Here we show that newly synthesized endogenous TLR3 is transported through the ER and Golgi apparatus to endosomes, where it is rapidly cleaved. TLR3 protein expression is up-regulated by its own ligand, leading to the accumulation of its cleaved form. In agreement with its proposed role as a transporter, UNC93B1 expression is required for TLR3 cleavage and signaling. Furthermore, TLR3 signaling and cleavage are sensitive to cathepsin inhibition. Cleavage occurs between aa 252 and 346, and results in a functional receptor that signals upon activation. A truncated form of TLR3 lacking the N-terminal 345 aa also signals from acidic compartments in response to ligand activation. Screening of the human cathepsin family by RNA interference identified cathepsins B and H as key mediators of TLR3 processing. Taken together, our data indicate that TLR3 proteolytic processing is essential for its function, and suggest a mechanism of tight control of TLR3 signaling and thus immunity.

  18. Innate Immunity in the Adult Mammalian Heart: For Whom the Cell Tolls

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Douglas L.; Topkara, Veli K.; Evans, Sarah; Barger, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the heart possesses an intrinsic system that is intended to delimit tissue injury, as well as orchestrate homoeostatic responses within the heart. The extant literature suggests that this intrinsic stress response is mediated, at least in part, by a family of pattern recognition receptors that belong to the innate immune system, including CD14, the soluble pattern recognition receptor for lipopolysaccharide, and Toll like receptors-2, 3, 4, and 6. Although this intrinsic stress response system provides a short-term adaptive response to tissue injury, the beneficial effects of this phylogenetically ancient system may be lost if myocardial expression of these molecules either becomes sustained and/or excessive, in which case the salutary effects of activation of these pathways may be contravened by the known deleterious effects of inflammatory signaling. Herein we present new information with regard to activation of innate immune gene expression in the failing human heart. Taken together, these new observations provide provisional evidence that the innate immune system is activated in human heart failure, raising the interesting possibility that this pathway may represent a target for the development of novel heart failure therapeutics. PMID:20697548

  19. Divergent Functions of Toll-like Receptors during Bacterial Lung Infections

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Pankaj; Batra, Sanjay; Zemans, Rachel L.; Downey, Gregory P.

    2014-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections caused by bacteria are a major cause of death in humans irrespective of sex, race, or geography. Indeed, accumulated data indicate greater mortality and morbidity due to these infections than cancer, malaria, or HIV infection. Successful recognition of, followed by an appropriate response to, bacterial pathogens in the lungs is crucial for effective pulmonary host defense. Although the early recruitment and activation of neutrophils in the lungs is key in the response against invading microbial pathogens, other sentinels, such as alveolar macrophages, epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and CD4+ T cells, also contribute to the elimination of the bacterial burden. Pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain–like receptors, are important for recognizing and responding to microbes during pulmonary infections. However, bacterial pathogens have acquired crafty evasive strategies to circumvent the pattern recognition receptor response and thus establish infection. Increased understanding of the function of TLRs and evasive mechanisms used by pathogens during pulmonary infection will deepen our knowledge of immunopathogenesis and is crucial for developing effective therapeutic and/or prophylactic measures. This review summarizes current knowledge of the multiple roles of TLRs in bacterial lung infections and highlights the mechanisms used by pathogens to modulate or interfere with TLR signaling in the lungs. PMID:25033332

  20. Structure and function of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domains.

    PubMed

    Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-02-01

    The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domain is a protein-protein interaction domain consisting of 125-200 residues, widely distributed in animals, plants and bacteria but absent from fungi, archea and viruses. In plants and animals, these domains are found in proteins with functions in innate immune pathways, while in bacteria, some TIR domain-containing proteins interfere with the innate immune pathways in the host. TIR domains function as protein scaffolds, mostly involving self-association and homotypic interactions with other TIR domains. In the last 15 years, the three-dimensional structures of TIR domains from several mammalian, plant and bacterial proteins have been reported. These structures, jointly with functional data including the identification of interacting proteins, have started to provide insight into the molecular basis of the assembly of animal and plant immune signaling complexes, and for host immunosuppression by bacterial pathogens. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the structures of the TIR domains and how the structure relates to function.

  1. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Engagement Mediates Prolyl Endopeptidase Release from Airway Epithelia via Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Szul, Tomasz; Bratcher, Preston E; Fraser, Kyle B; Kong, Michele; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Ingersoll, Sarah; Sztul, Elizabeth; Rangarajan, Sunil; Blalock, J Edwin; Xu, Xin; Gaggar, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Proteases are important regulators of pulmonary remodeling and airway inflammation. Recently, we have characterized the enzyme prolyl endopeptidase (PE), a serine peptidase, as a critical protease in the generation of the neutrophil chemoattractant tripeptide Pro-Gly-Pro (PGP) from collagen. However, PE has been characterized as a cytosolic enzyme, and the mechanism mediating PE release extracellularly remains unknown. We examined the role of exosomes derived from airway epithelia as a mechanism for PE release and the potential extracellular signals that regulate the release of these exosomes. We demonstrate a specific regulatory pathway of exosome release from airway epithelia and identify PE as novel exosome cargo. LPS stimulation of airway epithelial cells induces release of PE-containing exosomes, which is significantly attenuated by small interfering RNA depletion of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). These differences were recapitulated upon intratracheal LPS administration in mice competent versus deficient for TLR4 signaling. Finally, sputum samples from subjects with cystic fibrosis colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa demonstrate elevated exosome content and increased PE levels. This TLR4-based mechanism highlights the first report of nonstochastic release of exosomes in the lung and couples TLR4 activation with matrikine generation. The increased quantity of these proteolytic exosomes in the airways of subjects with chronic lung disease highlights a new mechanism of injury and inflammation in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders.

  2. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 antagonist (+)-naloxone protects mice from inflammation-induced preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Peck Yin; Dorian, Camilla L.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Olson, David M.; Rice, Kenner C.; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M.; Robertson, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation by bacterial infection, or by sterile inflammatory insult is a primary trigger of spontaneous preterm birth. Here we utilize mouse models to investigate the efficacy of a novel small molecule TLR4 antagonist, (+)-naloxone, the non-opioid isomer of the opioid receptor antagonist (−)-naloxone, in infection-associated preterm birth. Treatment with (+)-naloxone prevented preterm delivery and alleviated fetal demise in utero elicited by i.p. LPS administration in late gestation. A similar effect with protection from preterm birth and perinatal death, and partial correction of reduced birth weight and postnatal mortality, was conferred by (+)-naloxone administration after intrauterine administration of heat-killed E. coli. Local induction by E. coli of inflammatory cytokine genes Il1b, Il6, Tnf and Il10 in fetal membranes was suppressed by (+)-naloxone, and cytokine expression in the placenta, and uterine myometrium and decidua, was also attenuated. These data demonstrate that inhibition of TLR4 signaling with the novel TLR4 antagonist (+)-naloxone can suppress the inflammatory cascade of preterm parturition, to prevent preterm birth and perinatal death. Further studies are warranted to investigate the utility of small molecule inhibition of TLR-driven inflammation as a component of strategies for fetal protection and delaying preterm birth in the clinical setting. PMID:27819333

  3. Toll-like receptor 3 gene polymorphisms in South African Blacks with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pirie, F J; Pegoraro, R; Motala, A A; Rauff, S; Rom, L; Govender, T; Esterhuizen, T M

    2005-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes is the consequence of exposure of genetically susceptible individuals to specific environmental precipitants. The innate immune system provides the initial response to exogenous antigen and links with the adaptive immune system. The aim of this study was to assess the role of polymorphisms occurring in the cytoplasmic region of toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 gene and immediate 5' sequence, in subjects of Zulu descent with type 1 diabetes in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Seventy-nine subjects with type 1 diabetes and 74 healthy normal glucose tolerant gender-matched control subjects were studied. Parts of exon 4 and exon 3/intron 3 of the TLR3 gene were studied by polymerase chain reaction, direct sequencing and restriction enzyme digestion with Bts 1. Of the nine polymorphisms studied, a significant association with type 1 diabetes was found for the major allele in the 2593 C/T polymorphism and for the minor alleles in the 2642 C/A and 2690 A/G polymorphisms, which were found to be in complete linkage disequilibrium. Correction of the P-values for the number of alleles studied, however, rendered the results no longer significant. These results suggest that polymorphisms in the TLR3 gene, which is part of the innate immune system, may be associated with type 1 diabetes in this population.

  4. Effects of age, gender, and immunosuppressive agents on in vivo toll-like receptor pathway responses.

    PubMed

    Khan, Niamat; Summers, Colin W; Helbert, Matthew R; Arkwright, Peter D

    2010-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important in the initiation of immune responses in both health and disease. How TLR activity alters with age, gender, and also with immunosuppressive agents is still largely unexplored. We studied TLR activity in 49 healthy individuals as well as in 26 patients receiving immunosuppressive drugs. TLR activity did not alter significantly between the ages of 2 and 67 years. However, females had twice the TLR7 ligand-induced interferon-I response of males (OR [95% CI] 2.7 [1.4-5.1]), whereas TLR3 and four activities were not significantly different between the sexes. The T-cell immunosuppressant agents cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and azathioprine, as well as low dose glucocorticosteroids did not significantly alter TLR pathway responses. In contrast, high dose glucocorticosteroids reduced in vivo TLR responses by 70%-90%. We suggest that gender differences in TLR responses may help to explain the female preponderance of some autoimmune disorders. Furthermore, an understanding the effects of immunosuppressive agents on TLR-pathway activity should allow more focused therapy for autoimmune disorders.

  5. Berberine reduces Toll-like receptor-mediated macrophage migration by suppression of Src enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei-Erh; Ying Chang, Miao; Wei, Jyun-Yan; Chen, Yen-Jen; Maa, Ming-Chei; Leu, Tzeng-Horng

    2015-06-15

    Berberine is an isoquinoline with anti-inflammatory activity. We previously demonstrated that there was a loop of signal amplification between nuclear factor kappa B and Src for macrophage mobility triggered by the engagement of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). The simultaneous suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, and cell mobility in berberine-treated macrophages suggested Src might be a target of berberine. Indeed, th reduced migration, greatly suppressed Src induction in both protein and RNA transcript by berberine were observed in macrophages exposed to LPS, peptidoglycan, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, and CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides. In addition to Src induction, berberine also inhibited LPS-mediated Src activation in Src overexpressing macrophages and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (a nitric oxide donor) could partly restore it. Moreover, berberine suppressed Src activity in fibronectin-stimulated macrophages and in v-Src transformed cells. These results implied that by effectively reducing Src expression and activity, berberine inhibited TLR-mediated cell motility in macrophages.

  6. A Comparative Review of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression and Functionality in Different Animal Species

    PubMed Central

    Vaure, Céline; Liu, Yuanqing

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) belong to the pattern recognition receptor (PRR) family, a key component of the innate immune system. TLRs detect invading pathogens and initiate an immediate immune response to them, followed by a long-lasting adaptive immune response. Activation of TLRs leads to the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and the expression of co-stimulatory molecules. TLR4 specifically recognizes bacterial lipopolysaccharide, along with several other components of pathogens and endogenous molecules produced during abnormal situations, such as tissue damage. Evolution across species can lead to substantial diversity in the TLR4’s affinity and specificity to its ligands, the TLR4 gene and cellular expression patterns and tissue distribution. Consequently, TLR4 functions vary across different species. In recent years, the use of synthetic TLR agonists as adjuvants has emerged as a realistic therapeutic goal, notably for the development of vaccines against poorly immunogenic targets. Given that an adjuvanted vaccine must be assessed in pre-clinical animal models before being tested in humans, the extent to which an animal model represents and predicts the human condition is of particular importance. This review focuses on the current knowledge on the critical points of divergence between human and the mammalian species commonly used in vaccine research and development (non-human primate, mouse, rat, rabbit, swine, and dog), in terms of molecular, cellular, and functional properties of TLR4. PMID:25071777

  7. Reduced cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in Toll-like receptor 4 deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Canxiang; Yang Qingwu . E-mail: yangqwmlys@hotmail.com; Lv Fenglin; Cui Jie; Fu Huabin; Wang Jingzhou

    2007-02-09

    Inflammatory reaction plays an important role in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, its mechanism is still unclear. Our study aims to explore the function of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. We made middle cerebral artery ischemia-reperfusion model in mice with line embolism method. Compared with C3H/OuJ mice, scores of cerebral water content, cerebral infarct size and neurologic impairment in C3H/Hej mice were obviously lower after 6 h ischemia and 24 h reperfusion. Light microscopic and electron microscopic results showed that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in C3H/Hej mice was less serious than that in C3H/OuJ mice. TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 contents in C3H/HeJ mice were obviously lower than that in C3H/OuJ mice with ELISA. The results showed that TLR4 participates in the process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury probably through decrease of inflammatory cytokines. TLR4 may become a new target for prevention of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Our study suggests that TLR4 is one of the mechanisms of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury besides its important role in innate immunity.

  8. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonists: Chemical Feature Based Pharmacophore Identification and Molecular Docking Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lidan; Zhang, Liangren; Sun, Gang; Wang, Zhanli; Yu, Yongchun

    2013-01-01

    Chemical feature based pharmacophore models were generated for Toll-like receptors 7 (TLR7) agonists using HypoGen algorithm, which is implemented in the Discovery Studio software. Several methods tools used in validation of pharmacophore model were presented. The first hypothesis Hypo1 was considered to be the best pharmacophore model, which consists of four features: one hydrogen bond acceptor, one hydrogen bond donor, and two hydrophobic features. In addition, homology modeling and molecular docking studies were employed to probe the intermolecular interactions between TLR7 and its agonists. The results further confirmed the reliability of the pharmacophore model. The obtained pharmacophore model (Hypo1) was then employed as a query to screen the Traditional Chinese Medicine Database (TCMD) for other potential lead compounds. One hit was identified as a potent TLR7 agonist, which has antiviral activity against hepatitis virus in vitro. Therefore, our current work provides confidence for the utility of the selected chemical feature based pharmacophore model to design novel TLR7 agonists with desired biological activity. PMID:23526932

  9. Role of toll-like receptor 4 in the inflammation reaction surrounding silicone prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Auquit-Auckbur, Isabelle; Caillot, Frédérique; Arnoult, Christophe; Menard, Jean-François; Drouot, Laurent; Courville, Philippe; Tron, François; Musette, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    The inflammation which occurs around the silicone prosthesis is a complex process that can provoke the failure of the device and compromise the health of the implanted patient. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are transmembrane proteins, are now known to act in the innate immune response and in endogenous inflammation. The aim of our study was to assess the role of TLR4 in the foreign body reaction to a silicone shell prosthesis. Disks of shell silicone prosthesis were implanted in the subcutaneous tissue of C57BL6-TLR4-/- and C57BL6-WT mice. At day 14, inflammatory cell infiltrate and vessel sections around the prosthesis were less numerous in TLR4-/- than in WT mice. A histomorphometric analysis showed that the capsule around the implant was 1.96-fold less thick in depleted TLR4 than in wild-type mice. In addition, vascular endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor 1 were underexpressed in the surrounding tissue of the prosthesis in TLR4-/- mice. Our study suggests, from this foreign body response model against silicone in mice, that TLR4 plays a key role in the reaction process around silicone implants.

  10. Molecular Regulation of Toll-like Receptors in Asthma and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Li; Lucas, Kurt; Fortuna, Christopher A.; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Best, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have both been historically associated with significant morbidity and financial burden. These diseases can be induced by several exogenous factors, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) (e.g., allergens and microbes). Endogenous factors, including reactive oxygen species, and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) recognized by toll-like receptors (TLRs), can also result in airway inflammation. Asthma is characterized by the dominant presence of eosinophils, mast cells, and clusters of differentiation (CD)4+ T cells in the airways, while COPD typically results in the excessive formation of neutrophils, macrophages, and CD8+ T cells in the airways. In both asthma and COPD, in the respiratory tract, TLRs are the primary proteins of interest associated with the innate and adaptive immune responses; hence, multiple treatment options targeting TLRs are being explored in an effort to reduce the severity of the symptoms of these disorders. TLR-mediated pathways for both COPD and asthma have their similarities and differences with regards to cell types and the pro-inflammatory cytotoxins present in the airway. Because of the complex TLR cascade, a variety of treatments have been used to minimize airway hypersensitivity and promote bronchodilation. Although unsuccessful at completely alleviating COPD and severe asthmatic symptoms, new studies are focused on possible targets within the TLR cascade to ameliorate airway inflammation. PMID:26617525

  11. Toll-like receptors: key activators of leucocytes and regulator of haematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    McGettrick, Anne F; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2007-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a critical role in the induction of the immune response to invading pathogens. The detection of pathogens by TLRs initiates a signalling cascade that results in the activation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and interferon regulatory factors leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and type 1 interferons. Five cytoplasmic adaptors, MyD88, Mal, Trif, TRAM and SARM, are utilized by the TLRs to activate these signalling pathways. Through the years the main focus of research has been on the activation and function of TLRs in monocytic cells. This review discusses several additional roles of TLRs. TLR activation plays a role in influencing the differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells. Their activation also prevents apoptosis in neutrophils following pathogen invasion. B cells and T cells proliferation and differentiation is influenced by TLR activation and the possible therapeutic benefits of using TLR ligands for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia will also be discussed.

  12. Toll-like Receptors in the Vascular System: Sensing the Dangers Within

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Cameron G.; Webb, R. Clinton

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are components of the innate immune system that respond to exogenous infectious ligands (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMPs) and endogenous molecules that are released during host tissue injury/death (damage-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs). Interaction of TLRs with their ligands leads to activation of downstream signaling pathways that induce an immune response by producing inflammatory cytokines, type I interferons (IFN), and other inflammatory mediators. TLR activation affects vascular function and remodeling, and these molecular events prime antigen-specific adaptive immune responses. Despite the presence of TLRs in vascular cells, the exact mechanisms whereby TLR signaling affects the function of vascular tissues are largely unknown. Cardiovascular diseases are considered chronic inflammatory conditions, and accumulating data show that TLRs and the innate immune system play a determinant role in the initiation and development of cardiovascular diseases. This evidence unfolds a possibility that targeting TLRs and the innate immune system may be a novel therapeutic goal for these conditions. TLR inhibitors and agonists are already in clinical trials for inflammatory conditions such as asthma, cancer, and autoimmune diseases, but their study in the context of cardiovascular diseases is in its infancy. In this article, we review the current knowledge of TLR signaling in the cardiovascular system with an emphasis on atherosclerosis, hypertension, and cerebrovascular injury. Furthermore, we address the therapeutic potential of TLR as pharmacological targets in cardiovascular disease and consider intriguing research questions for future study. PMID:26721702

  13. SARM: a novel Toll-like receptor adaptor, is functionally conserved from arthropod to human.

    PubMed

    Belinda, Loh Wei-Ching; Wei, Wang Xiao; Hanh, Bui Thi Hong; Lei, Luan Xiao; Bow, Ho; Ling, Ding Jeak

    2008-03-01

    Sterile-alpha and Armadillo motif containing protein (SARM) was recently identified as the fifth member of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor family. Whilst the Caenorhabditis elegans SARM homologue, TIR-1, is crucial for efficient immune responses against bacterial infections, human SARM was demonstrated to function as a specific inhibitor of TRIF-dependent TLR signaling. The opposing role of SARM in C. elegans and human is intriguing, prompting us to seek clarification on the enigmatic function of SARM in an ancient species which relies solely on innate immunity for survival. Here, we report the discovery of a primitive but functional SARM (CrSARM) in the immune defense of a "living fossil", the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. CrSARM shares numerous signature motifs and displays significant homology with vertebrate and invertebrate SARM homologues. CrSARM downregulates TRIF-dependent TLR signaling suggesting the conservation of SARM function from horseshoe crab to human. During infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, CrSARM is rapidly upregulated within 3h and strongly repressed at 6h, coinciding with the timing of bacterial clearance, thus demonstrating its dynamic role in innate immunity. Furthermore, yeast-two-hybrid screening revealed several potential interaction partners of CrSARM implying the role of SARM in downregulating TLR signaling events. Altogether, our study shows that, although C. elegans SARM upregulates immune signaling, its disparate role as a suppressor of TLR signaling, specifically via TRIF and not MyD88, is well-conserved from horseshoe crab to human.

  14. Expression of antimicrobial peptides and toll-like receptors is increased in tinea and pityriasis versicolor.

    PubMed

    Brasch, J; Mörig, A; Neumann, B; Proksch, E

    2014-03-01

    In superficial tinea and pityriasis versicolor, the causative fungi are for the most part confined to the stratum corneum which is barely reached by leukocytes. Therefore, a role of non-cellular components in the epidermal antifungal defence was suggested. To investigate the presence of such factors in these infections, the expression of human beta defensins 2 and 3 (hBD-2, hBD-3), RNase 7, psoriasin, toll-like receptors 2, 4 and 9 (TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9) and dectin 2 was analysed by use of immunostainings in skin biopsies. We found that hBD2, hBD3, psoriasin, RNase7, TLR2 and TLR4 were significantly more often expressed in distinct layers of lesional epidermis as compared with uninfected epidermis. In both infections but not in normal skin, hBD2 and hBD3 were commonly expressed within the stratum corneum and in the stratum granulosum. Similarly, psoriasin was seen more often in the upper skin layers of both infections as compared with normal skin. No significant differences between normal and infected skin were found for the expression of TLR9 and dectin 2. Our findings clearly show the expression of specific antimicrobial proteins and defence-related ligands in superficial tinea as well as in pityriasis versicolor, suggesting that these factors contribute to fungal containment.

  15. Reduced bioenergetics and toll-like receptor 1 function in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in aging.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; Guo, Xiuyang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yuan, Xiaoling; Chen, Shu; Malawista, Stephen E; Bockenstedt, Linda K; Allore, Heather G; Montgomery, Ruth R

    2014-02-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decline in immune function (immunosenescence) resulting in an increased susceptibility to viral and bacterial infections. Here we show reduced expression of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and an underlying age-dependent deficiency in PMN bioenergetics. In older (>65 years) adults, stimulation through TLR1 led to lower activation of integrins (CD11b and CD18), lower production of the chemokine IL-8, and lower levels of the phosphorylated signaling intermediate p38 MAP kinase than in PMN from younger donors (21-30 years). In addition, loss of CD62L, a marker of PMN activation, was reduced in PMN of older adults stimulated through multiple pathways. Rescue of PMN from apoptosis by stimulation with TLR1 was reduced in PMN from older adults. In seeking an explanation for effects of aging across multiple pathways, we examined PMN energy utilization and found that glucose uptake after stimulation through TLR1 was dramatically lower in PMN of older adults. Our results demonstrate a reduction in TLR1 expression and TLR1-mediated responses in PMN with aging, and reduced efficiency of bioenergetics in PMN. These changes likely contribute to reduced PMN efficiency in aging through multiple aspects of PMN function and suggest potential therapeutic opportunities.

  16. Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) modulation by synthetic and natural compounds: an update

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Francesco; Calabrese, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), together with MD-2, binds bacterial endotoxins (E) with high affinity, triggering formation of the activated homodimer (E-MD-2-TLR4)2. Activated TLR4 induces intracellular signaling leading to activation of transcription factors that result in cytokine and chemokine production and initiation of inflammatory and immune responses. TLR4 also responds to endogenous ligands called danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Increased sensitivity to infection and a variety of immune pathologies have been associated with either too little or too much TLR4 activation. We review here the molecular mechanisms of TLR4 activation (agonism) or inhibition (antagonism) by small organic molecules of both natural and synthetic origin. The role of co-receptors MD-2 and CD14 in the TLR4 modulation process is also discussed. Recent achievements in the field of chemical TLR4 modulation are reviewed, with special focus on non-classical TLR4 ligands with a chemical structure different from lipid A. PMID:24188011

  17. Toll-like receptor 4 decoy, TOY, attenuates gram-negative bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Keehoon; Lee, Jung-Eun; Kim, Hak-Zoo; Kim, Ho Min; Park, Beom Seok; Hwang, Seong-Ik; Lee, Jie-Oh; Kim, Sun Chang; Koh, Gou Young

    2009-10-09

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane glycolipid, induces sepsis through its interaction with myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). To block interaction between LPS/MD-2 complex and TLR4, we designed and generated soluble fusion proteins capable of binding MD-2, dubbed TLR4 decoy receptor (TOY) using 'the Hybrid leucine-rich repeats (LRR) technique'. TOY contains the MD-2 binding ectodomain of TLR4, the LRR motif of hagfish variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR), and the Fc domain of IgG1 to make it soluble, productive, and functional. TOY exhibited strong binding to MD-2, but not to the extracellular matrix (ECM), resulting in a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in vivo. TOY significantly extended the lifespan, when administered in either preventive or therapeutic manners, in both the LPS- and cecal ligation/puncture-induced sepsis models in mice. TOY markedly attenuated LPS-triggered NF-kappaB activation, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and thrombus formation in multiple organs. Taken together, the targeting strategy for sequestration of LPS/MD-2 complex using the decoy receptor TOY is effective in treating LPS- and bacteria-induced sepsis; furthermore, the strategy used in TOY development can be applied to the generation of other novel decoy receptor proteins.

  18. Chemotherapy-induced mucositis: the role of the gastrointestinal microbiome and toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Daniel W; Stringer, Andrea M; Gibson, Rachel J

    2013-01-01

    Alimentary mucositis is a major clinical problem. Patients with mucositis are at significantly increased risk of infection and are often hospitalized for prolonged periods. More importantly, these patients often have to undergo reductions in their cytotoxic therapy, which may lead to reduced survival. Unfortunately, there are very limited therapeutic options for mucositis and no effective prevention. The human gut microbiome is receiving increased attention as a key player in the pathogenesis of alimentary mucositis with recent literature suggesting that changes in bacteria lead to mucositis. The bacteria which are found throughout the gut are tightly regulated by the toll-like receptor (TLR) family which currently has 13 known members. TLRs play a critical role in gut homeostasis and bacterial regulation. Furthermore, TLRs play a critical role in the regulation of nuclear factor kappa B, a key regulator of alimentary mucositis. However to date, no research has clearly identified a link between TLRs and alimentary mucositis. This critical literature review seeks to correct this.

  19. Interplay between Inflammation and Stemness in Cancer Cells: The Role of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Da-Wei; Huang, Li-Rung; Chen, Ya-Wen; Huang, Chi-Ying F.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small population of cancer cells that exhibit stemness. These cells contribute to cancer metastasis, treatment resistance, and relapse following therapy; therefore, they may cause malignancy and reduce the success of cancer treatment. Nuclear factor kappa B- (NF-κB-) mediated inflammatory responses increase stemness in cancer cells, and CSCs constitutively exhibit higher NF-κB activation, which in turn increases their stemness. These opposite effects form a positive feedback loop that further amplifies inflammation and stemness in cancer cells, thereby expanding CSC populations in the tumor. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) activate NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses when stimulated by carcinogenic microbes and endogenous molecules released from cells killed during cancer treatment. NF-κB activation by extrinsic TLR ligands increases stemness in cancer cells. Moreover, it was recently shown that increased NF-κB activity and inflammatory responses in CSCs may be caused by altered TLR signaling during the enrichment of stemness in cancer cells. Thus, the activation of TLR signaling by extrinsic and intrinsic factors drives a positive interplay between inflammation and stemness in cancer cells. PMID:28116318

  20. Antagonistic effect of toll-like receptor signaling and bacterial infections on transplantation tolerance*

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Tongmin; Ahmed, Emily; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Chong, Anita

    2009-01-01

    The induction of donor-specific tolerance remains a major goal in the field of transplantation immunology. Therapies that target costimulatory molecules can induce tolerance to heart and pancreatic islet allografts in mouse models, but fail to do so following transplantation of skin or intestinal allografts. We have proposed that organs colonized by commensal bacteria such as skin, lung and intestine may be resistant to such therapies as a result of bacterial translocation at the time of transplantation, which may promote antigen-presenting cell (APC) maturation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, consequently enhancing responses of alloreactive T cells. Our results indicate that the inability to sense signaling by most toll-like receptors (TLRs), as well as by interleukin (IL)-1R and IL-18R, as a result of genetic ablation of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) promotes the acceptance of skin allografts. Conversely, TLR signals and infections by a model bacterium, Listeria monocytogenes (LM), at the time of transplantation can prevent the induction of transplantation tolerance. The effects of the TLR9 agonist CpG are MyD88-dependent, while the pro-rejection capacity of LM depends on the intracellular sensing of LM and the production of type I interferon (IFN). Therefore, transiently targeting these innate, pro-inflammatory pathways may have therapeutic value to promote transplantation tolerance. PMID:19424015

  1. Discovery of Imidazoquinolines with Toll-Like Receptor 7/8 Independent Cytokine Induction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key targets in the design of immunomodulating agents for use as vaccine adjuvants and anticancer treatments. The imidazoquinolines, imiquimod and resiquimod, have been shown to activate TLR-7 and -8, which in turn induce cytokine production as part of the innate immune response. Herein, we report the synthesis and discovery of a C7-methoxycarbonyl derivative of imiquimod that stimulates cytokine production but is devoid of TLR-7/8 activity. Data are presented that shows that this analogue not only induces IL-12p40 and TNF production, similar to that of imiquimod and resiquimod, but greatly enhances the production of IL-1β, a key cytokine involved in the activation of CD4 T cells. It is further demonstrated that TLR-7/8 activation can be recovered by the addition of a C2-alkyl substituent to this newly discovered analogue. The results support the existence of an alternative mechanism of action by which imidazoquinolines can stimulate cytokine production. PMID:22837811

  2. Differential Toll-Like Receptor-Signalling of Burkholderia pseudomallei Lipopolysaccharide in Murine and Human Models.

    PubMed

    Weehuizen, Tassili A F; Prior, Joann L; van der Vaart, Thomas W; Ngugi, Sarah A; Nepogodiev, Sergey A; Field, Robert A; Kager, Liesbeth M; van 't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; Wiersinga, W Joost

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis and is a CDC category B bioterrorism agent. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 impairs host defense during pulmonary B.pseudomallei infection while TLR4 only has limited impact. We investigated the role of TLRs in B.pseudomallei-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammation. Purified B.pseudomallei-LPS activated only TLR2-transfected-HEK-cells during short stimulation but both HEK-TLR2 and HEK-TLR4-cells after 24 h. In human blood, an additive effect of TLR2 on TLR4-mediated signalling induced by B.pseudomallei-LPS was observed. In contrast, murine peritoneal macrophages recognized B.pseudomallei-LPS solely through TLR4. Intranasal inoculation of B.pseudomallei-LPS showed that both TLR4-knockout(-/-) and TLR2x4-/-, but not TLR2-/- mice, displayed diminished cytokine responses and neutrophil influx compared to wild-type controls. These data suggest that B.pseudomallei-LPS signalling occurs solely through murine TLR4, while in human models TLR2 plays an additional role, highlighting important differences between specificity of human and murine models that may have important consequences for B.pseudomallei-LPS sensing by TLRs and subsequent susceptibility to melioidosis.

  3. Disordered Toll-like receptor 2 responses in the pathogenesis of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Gabrilovich, M I; Walrath, J; van Lunteren, J; Nethery, D; Seifu, M; Kern, J A; Harding, C V; Tuscano, L; Lee, H; Williams, S D; Mackay, W; Tomashefski, J F; Silver, R F

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that the granulomatous disorder sarcoidosis is not caused by a single pathogen, but rather results from abnormal responses of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to conserved bacterial elements. Unsorted bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from patients with suspected pulmonary sarcoidosis and healthy non-smoking control subjects were stimulated with representative ligands of TLR-2 (in both TLR-2/1 and TLR-2/6 heterodimers) and TLR-4. Responses were determined by assessing resulting production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6. BAL cells from patients in whom sarcoidosis was confirmed displayed increased cytokine responses to the TLR-2/1 ligand 19-kDa lipoprotein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (LpqH) and decreased responses to the TLR-2/6 agonist fibroblast stimulating ligand-1 (FSL)-1. Subsequently, we evaluated the impact of TLR-2 gene deletion in a recently described murine model of T helper type 1 (Th1)-associated lung disease induced by heat-killed Propionibacterium acnes. As quantified by blinded scoring of lung pathology, P. acnes-induced granulomatous pulmonary inflammation was markedly attenuated in TLR-2(-/-) mice compared to wild-type C57BL/6 animals. The findings support a potential role for disordered TLR-2 responses in the pathogenesis of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  4. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Toll-Interacting Protein in the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, Yutaka; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kurihara, Kenta; Nakata, Kazuaki; Narabayashi, Hikari; Hamamoto, Yuji; Suzuki, Makoto; Tsuda, Masato; Hanazawa, Shigemasa; Hosono, Akira; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses against gut microbiota should be minimized to avoid unnecessary inflammation at mucosal surface. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of Toll-interacting protein (Tollip), an inhibitor of TLRs and IL-1 family cytokine-related intracellular signaling, in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). Comparable mRNA expression was observed in murine small and large IECs (S-IECs and L-IECs). However, Tollip protein was only detected in L-IECs, but not in S-IECs. Similar results were obtained in germ-free mice, indicating that L-IEC-specific TOLLIP expression does not depend on bacterial colonization. Next, to understand the mechanisms underlying the post-transcriptional repression of Tollip, 3´-UTR-mediated translational regulation was evaluated. The region +1876/+2398 was responsible for the repression of Tollip expression. This region included the target sequence of miR-31. The inhibition of miR-31 restored the 3´-UTR-meditaed translational repression. In addition, miR-31 expression was significantly higher in S-IECs than in L-IECs, suggesting that miR-31 represses the translation of Tollip mRNA in S-IECs. Collectively, we conclude that the translation of Tollip is inhibited in S-IECs, at least in part, by miR-31 to yield L-IEC-specific high-level expression of the Tollip protein, which may contribute to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. PMID:27741296

  5. MAP1S Protein Regulates the Phagocytosis of Bacteria and Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Leyuan; Zhang, Tingting; Han, Fang; Cleveland, Joseph; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Li, Yu; Zhang, Dekai

    2016-01-15

    Phagocytosis is a critical cellular process for innate immune defense against microbial infection. The regulation of phagocytosis process is complex and has not been well defined. An intracellular molecule might regulate cell surface-initiated phagocytosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood (1). In this study, we found that microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S), a protein identified recently that is involved in autophagy (2), is expressed primarily in macrophages. MAP1S-deficient macrophages are impaired in the phagocytosis of bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MAP1S interacts directly with MyD88, a key adaptor of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), upon TLR activation and affects the TLR signaling pathway. Intriguingly, we also observe that, upon TLR activation, MyD88 participates in autophagy processing in a MAP1S-dependent manner by co-localizing with MAP1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3 or LC3). Therefore, we reveal that an intracellular autophagy-related molecule of MAP1S controls bacterial phagocytosis through TLR signaling.

  6. Toll-like receptor-2 deficiency induces schizophrenia-like behaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Jin; Lee, Jee Youn; Kim, Sang Jeong; Choi, Se-Young; Yune, Tae Young; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the immune system contributes to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. Here, we demonstrated that toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, a family of pattern-recognition receptors, is involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia-like symptoms. Psychotic symptoms such as hyperlocomotion, anxiolytic-like behaviors, prepulse inhibition deficits, social withdrawal, and cognitive impairments were observed in TLR-2 knock-out (KO) mice. Ventricle enlargement, a hallmark of schizophrenia, was also observed in TLR-2 KO mouse brains. Levels of p-Akt and p-GSK-3α/β were markedly higher in the brain of TLR-2 KO than wild-type (WT) mice. Antipsychotic drugs such as haloperidol or clozapine reversed behavioral and biochemical alterations in TLR-2 KO mice. Furthermore, p-Akt and p-GSK-3α/β were decreased by treatment with a TLR-2 ligand, lipoteichoic acid, in WT mice. Thus, our data suggest that the dysregulation of the innate immune system by a TLR-2 deficiency may contribute to the development and/or pathophysiology of schizophrenia-like behaviors via Akt-GSK-3α/β signaling. PMID:25687169

  7. Gene expression induced by Toll-like receptors in macrophages requires the transcription factor NFAT5.

    PubMed

    Buxadé, Maria; Lunazzi, Giulia; Minguillón, Jordi; Iborra, Salvador; Berga-Bolaños, Rosa; Del Val, Margarita; Aramburu, José; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2012-02-13

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) engage networks of transcriptional regulators to induce genes essential for antimicrobial immunity. We report that NFAT5, previously characterized as an osmostress responsive factor, regulates the expression of multiple TLR-induced genes in macrophages independently of osmotic stress. NFAT5 was essential for the induction of the key antimicrobial gene Nos2 (inducible nitric oxide synthase [iNOS]) in response to low and high doses of TLR agonists but is required for Tnf and Il6 mainly under mild stimulatory conditions, indicating that NFAT5 could regulate specific gene patterns depending on pathogen burden intensity. NFAT5 exhibited two modes of association with target genes, as it was constitutively bound to Tnf and other genes regardless of TLR stimulation, whereas its recruitment to Nos2 or Il6 required TLR activation. Further analysis revealed that TLR-induced recruitment of NFAT5 to Nos2 was dependent on inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) β activity and de novo protein synthesis, and was sensitive to histone deacetylases. In vivo, NFAT5 was necessary for effective immunity against Leishmania major, a parasite whose clearance requires TLRs and iNOS expression in macrophages. These findings identify NFAT5 as a novel regulator of mammalian anti-pathogen responses.

  8. Gene expression induced by Toll-like receptors in macrophages requires the transcription factor NFAT5

    PubMed Central

    Buxadé, Maria; Lunazzi, Giulia; Minguillón, Jordi; Iborra, Salvador; Berga-Bolaños, Rosa; del Val, Margarita; Aramburu, José

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) engage networks of transcriptional regulators to induce genes essential for antimicrobial immunity. We report that NFAT5, previously characterized as an osmostress responsive factor, regulates the expression of multiple TLR-induced genes in macrophages independently of osmotic stress. NFAT5 was essential for the induction of the key antimicrobial gene Nos2 (inducible nitric oxide synthase [iNOS]) in response to low and high doses of TLR agonists but is required for Tnf and Il6 mainly under mild stimulatory conditions, indicating that NFAT5 could regulate specific gene patterns depending on pathogen burden intensity. NFAT5 exhibited two modes of association with target genes, as it was constitutively bound to Tnf and other genes regardless of TLR stimulation, whereas its recruitment to Nos2 or Il6 required TLR activation. Further analysis revealed that TLR-induced recruitment of NFAT5 to Nos2 was dependent on inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) β activity and de novo protein synthesis, and was sensitive to histone deacetylases. In vivo, NFAT5 was necessary for effective immunity against Leishmania major, a parasite whose clearance requires TLRs and iNOS expression in macrophages. These findings identify NFAT5 as a novel regulator of mammalian anti-pathogen responses. PMID:22312110

  9. Modulation of Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells Activity by Toll-Like Receptors: Implications on Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    DelaRosa, Olga; Lombardo, Eleuterio

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are of special interest as therapeutic agents in the settings of both chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Toll-like receptors (TLR) ligands have been linked with the perpetuation of inflammation in a number of chronic inflammatory diseases due to the permanent exposure of the immune system to TLR-specific stimuli. Therefore, MSCs employed in therapy can be potentially exposed to TLR ligands, which may modulate MSC therapeutic potential in vivo. Recent results demonstrate that MSCs are activated by TLR ligands leading to modulation of the differentiation, migration, proliferation, survival, and immunosuppression capacities. However inconsistent results among authors have been reported suggesting that the source of MSCs, TLR stimuli employed or culture conditions play a role. Notably, activation by TLR ligands has not been reported to modulate the “immunoprivileged” phenotype of MSCs which is of special relevance regarding the use of allogeneic MSC-based therapies. In this review, we discuss the available data on the modulation of MSCs activity through TLR signalling. PMID:20628526

  10. NOD2 and Toll-Like Receptors Are Nonredundant Recognition Systems of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Recognition of M. tuberculosis by pattern recognition receptors is crucial for activation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. In the present study, we demonstrate that nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are two nonredundant recognition mechanisms of M. tuberculosis. CHO cell lines transfected with human TLR2 or TLR4 were responsive to M. tuberculosis. TLR2 knock-out mice displayed more than 50% defective cytokine production after stimulation with mycobacteria, whereas TLR4-defective mice also released 30% less cytokines compared to controls. Similarly, HEK293T cells transfected with NOD2 responded to stimulation with M. tuberculosis. The important role of NOD2 for the recognition of M. tuberculosis was demonstrated in mononuclear cells of individuals homozygous for the 3020insC NOD2 mutation, who showed an 80% defective cytokine response after stimulation with M. tuberculosis. Finally, the mycobacterial TLR2 ligand 19-kDa lipoprotein and the NOD2 ligand muramyl dipeptide synergized for the induction of cytokines, and this synergism was lost in cells defective in either TLR2 or NOD2. Together, these results demonstrate that NOD2 and TLR pathways are nonredundant recognition mechanisms of M. tuberculosis that synergize for the induction of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:16322770

  11. Association of Toll-Like Receptor 3 Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Mashael R.; Matou-Nasri, Sabine; Abdo, Ayman A.; Sanai, Faisal M.; Alkahtani, Saad; Alarifi, Saud; Alkahtane, Abdullah A.; Al-Yahya, Hamad; Ali, Daoud; Alessia, Mohammed S.; Alshahrani, Bushra; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N.

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays a key role in innate immunity by recognizing pathogenic, double-stranded RNAs. Thus, activation of TLR3 is a major factor in antiviral defense and tumor eradication. Although downregulation of TLR3 gene expression has been mainly reported in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), the influence of TLR3 genotype on the risk of HCV infection, HCV-related cirrhosis, and/or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be determined. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the TLR3 gene and their associations with HCV-related disease risk were investigated in a Saudi Arabian population in this study. Eight TLR3 SNPs were analyzed in 563 patients with HCV, which consisted of 437 patients with chronic HCV infections, 88 with HCV-induced liver cirrhosis, and 38 with HCC. A total of 599 healthy control subjects were recruited to the study. Among the eight TLR3 SNPs studied, the rs78726532 SNP was strongly associated with HCV infection when compared to that in healthy control subjects. The rs5743314 was also strongly associated with HCV-related liver disease progression (cirrhosis and HCC). In summary, these results indicate that distinct genetic variants of TLR3 SNPs are associated with HCV infection and HCV-mediated liver disease progression in the Saudi Arabian population. PMID:28127569

  12. Toll-Like Receptor Polymorphisms, Inflammatory and Infectious Diseases, Allergies, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germ-line-encoded innate immune sensors that recognize conserved microbial structures and host alarmins and signal expression of MHC proteins, costimulatory molecules, and inflammatory mediators by macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and other cell types. These processes activate immediate and early mechanisms of innate host defense, as well as initiate and orchestrate adaptive immune responses. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the TLR genes have been associated with altered susceptibility to infectious, inflammatory, and allergic diseases, and have been found to play a role in tumorigenesis. Critical advances in our understanding of innate immune functions and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have uncovered complex interactions of genetic polymorphisms within TLRs and environmental factors. However, conclusions obtained in the course of such analyses are restricted by limited power of many studies that is likely to explain controversial findings. Further, linkages to certain ethnic backgrounds, gender, and the presence of multigenic effects further complicate the interpretations of how the TLR SNPs affect immune responses. For many TLRs, the molecular mechanisms by which SNPs impact receptor functions remain unknown. In this review, I have summarized current knowledge about the TLR polymorphisms, their impact on TLR signaling, and associations with various inflammatory, infectious, allergic diseases and cancers, and discussed the directions of future scientific research. PMID:23675778

  13. Toll-Like Receptors in Liver Fibrosis: Cellular Crosstalk and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ling; Seki, Ekihiro

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that distinguish conserved microbial products, also known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), from host molecules. Liver is the first filter organ between the gastrointestinal tracts and the rest of the body through portal circulation. Thus, the liver is a major organ that must deal with PAMPs and microorganisms translocated from the intestine and to respond to the damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from injured organs. These PAMPs and DAMPs preferentially activate TLR signaling on various cell types in the liver inducing the production of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines that initiate and prolong liver inflammation, thereby leading to fibrosis. We summarize recent findings on the role of TLRs, ligands, and intracellular signaling in the pathophysiology of liver fibrosis due to different etiology, as well as to highlight the potential role of TLR signaling in liver fibrosis associated with hepatitis C infection, non-alcoholic and alcoholic steatoheoatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and cystic fibrosis. PMID:22661952

  14. Candida albicans phospholipomannan triggers inflammatory responses of human keratinocytes through Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Chen, Qing; Shen, Yongnian; Liu, Weida

    2009-07-01

    The Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in the recognition of Candida albicans components and activation of innate immunity. Phospholipomannan (PLM), a glycolipid, is expressed at the surface of C. albicans cell wall, which acts as a member of the pathogen-associated molecular patterns family. In this study, we sought to clarify whether C. albicans-native PLM could induce an inflammation response in human keratinocytes and to determine the underlying mechanisms. Exposure of cultured human primary keratinocytes to PLM led to the increased gene expression and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6) and chemokines (IL-8). PLM hydrolysed with beta-d-mannoside mannohydrolase failed to induce gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8. PLM up-regulated the mRNA and protein levels of TLR2, whereas the mRNA level of TLR4 was not altered. Keratinocytes challenged with PLM resulted in the activation of NF-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) including p38. Anti-TLR2 neutralizing antibody, NFkappaB and p38MAPK inhibitors blocked the PLM-induced secretion of IL-6, IL-8 in keratinocytes, but no such effect was observed in pretreatment with anti-TLR4-neutralizing antibody and lipopolysaccharide inhibitor (polymyxin B). These data suggest C. albicans-native PLM may contribute to the inflammatory responses of cutaneous candidiasis in the TLR2-NF-kappaB and p38MAPK signalling pathway dependent manner.

  15. A conserved Toll-like receptor is required for Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tenor, Jennifer L; Aballay, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Pathogen recognition through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is crucial in order to mount an appropriate immune response against microorganisms. On the basis of a lack of evidence indicating that Caenorhabditis elegans uses TLRs to elicit an immune response and on the absence of genes encoding Rel-like transcription factors in its genome, it is believed that TLR-mediated immunity arose after coelomates split from pseudocoelomates and acoelomates. Here, we show that C. elegans tol-1(nr2033) mutants are killed by the human pathogen Salmonella enterica, which causes a significant pharyngeal invasion in the absence of TOL-1-mediated immunity. We also show that TOL-1 is required for the correct expression of ABF-2, which is a defensin-like molecule expressed in the pharynx, and heat-shock protein 16.41, which is also expressed in the pharynx and is part of a HSP family of proteins required for C. elegans immunity. The results indicate that TOL-1 has a direct role in defence response to certain Gram-negative bacteria and indicate that part of the TLR-mediated immunity might be evolutionarily conserved. PMID:17975555

  16. A conserved Toll-like receptor is required for Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Tenor, Jennifer L; Aballay, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Pathogen recognition through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is crucial in order to mount an appropriate immune response against microorganisms. On the basis of a lack of evidence indicating that Caenorhabditis elegans uses TLRs to elicit an immune response and on the absence of genes encoding Rel-like transcription factors in its genome, it is believed that TLR-mediated immunity arose after coelomates split from pseudocoelomates and acoelomates. Here, we show that C. elegans tol-1(nr2033) mutants are killed by the human pathogen Salmonella enterica, which causes a significant pharyngeal invasion in the absence of TOL-1-mediated immunity. We also show that TOL-1 is required for the correct expression of ABF-2, which is a defensin-like molecule expressed in the pharynx, and heat-shock protein 16.41, which is also expressed in the pharynx and is part of a HSP family of proteins required for C. elegans immunity. The results indicate that TOL-1 has a direct role in defence response to certain Gram-negative bacteria and indicate that part of the TLR-mediated immunity might be evolutionarily conserved.

  17. Nitric oxide increases susceptibility of toll-like receptor-activated macrophages to spreading Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Caroline; Thomas, Stacey; Filak, Holly; Henson, Peter M.; Lenz, Laurel L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation activates macrophages to resist intracellular pathogens. Yet, the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) causes lethal infections in spite of innate immune cell activation. Lm uses direct cell-cell spread to disseminate within its host. Here, we have shown that TLR-activated macrophages killed cell-free Lm but failed to prevent infection by spreading Lm. Instead, TLR signals increased the efficiency of Lm spread from “donor” to “recipient” macrophages. This enhancement required nitric oxide (NO) production by nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS2). NO increased Lm escape from secondary vacuoles in recipient cells and delayed maturation of phagosomes containing membrane-like particles that mimic Lm-containing pseudopods. NO also promoted Lm spread during systemic in vivo infection, as inhibition of NOS2 with 1400W reduced spread-dependent Lm burdens in mouse livers. These findings reveal a mechanism by which pathogens capable of cell-cell spread can avoid the consequences of innate immune cell activation by TLR stimuli. PMID:22542147

  18. Kidney Expression of Toll Like Receptors in Lupus Nephritis: Quantification and Clinicopathological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Francesca; Bombardieri, Michele; Valesini, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The study aimed at locating and quantifying Toll Like Receptor (TLR) 3, 7, 8, and 9 expression in kidney of patients with lupus nephritis (LN) and correlating them with clinicopathological features. Methods. Kidney sections from 26 LN patients and 4 controls were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using anti-human TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 polyclonal antibodies; the number of TLR-positive nuclei/mm2 was evaluated on digitalized images. Results. Compared to controls, LN showed a significantly higher amount of glomerular and tubulointerstitial TLR9 (p = 0.003 and p = 0.007), whole and tubulointerstitial TLR3 (p = 0.026 and p = 0.031), and a higher tubulointerstitial TLR7 (p = 0.022). TLR9 positively correlated with activity index (p = 0.0063) and tubular TLR7 with chronicity index (p = 0.026). TLR9 positively correlated with Renal-SLEDAI (p = 0.01). Conclusions. This is the first study quantifying kidney expressions of TLRs in LN patients; the results show an overexpression of TLR3, TLR7, and TLR9 and demonstrate a correlation with clinicopathological indices supporting a role of these mediators in the pathogenesis of LN. PMID:27635115

  19. Starring role of toll-like receptor-4 activation in the gut-liver axis

    PubMed Central

    Carotti, Simone; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Umberto; Morini, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of the term “gut-liver axis”, many studies have focused on the functional links of intestinal microbiota, barrier function and immune responses to liver physiology. Intestinal and extra-intestinal diseases alter microbiota composition and lead to dysbiosis, which aggravates impaired intestinal barrier function via increased lipopolysaccharide translocation. The subsequent increased passage of gut-derived product from the intestinal lumen to the organ wall and bloodstream affects gut motility and liver biology. The activation of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) likely plays a key role in both cases. This review analyzed the most recent literature on the gut-liver axis, with a particular focus on the role of TLR-4 activation. Findings that linked liver disease with dysbiosis are evaluated, and links between dysbiosis and alterations of intestinal permeability and motility are discussed. We also examine the mechanisms of translocated gut bacteria and/or the bacterial product activation of liver inflammation and fibrogenesis via activity on different hepatic cell types. PMID:26600967

  20. Divergent functions of Toll-like receptors during bacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Baral, Pankaj; Batra, Sanjay; Zemans, Rachel L; Downey, Gregory P; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2014-10-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections caused by bacteria are a major cause of death in humans irrespective of sex, race, or geography. Indeed, accumulated data indicate greater mortality and morbidity due to these infections than cancer, malaria, or HIV infection. Successful recognition of, followed by an appropriate response to, bacterial pathogens in the lungs is crucial for effective pulmonary host defense. Although the early recruitment and activation of neutrophils in the lungs is key in the response against invading microbial pathogens, other sentinels, such as alveolar macrophages, epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and CD4(+) T cells, also contribute to the elimination of the bacterial burden. Pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors, are important for recognizing and responding to microbes during pulmonary infections. However, bacterial pathogens have acquired crafty evasive strategies to circumvent the pattern recognition receptor response and thus establish infection. Increased understanding of the function of TLRs and evasive mechanisms used by pathogens during pulmonary infection will deepen our knowledge of immunopathogenesis and is crucial for developing effective therapeutic and/or prophylactic measures. This review summarizes current knowledge of the multiple roles of TLRs in bacterial lung infections and highlights the mechanisms used by pathogens to modulate or interfere with TLR signaling in the lungs.

  1. Toll-like receptor 4-dependent contribution of the immune system to anticancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; Tesniere, Antoine; Obeid, Michel; Ortiz, Carla; Criollo, Alfredo; Mignot, Grégoire; Maiuri, M Chiara; Ullrich, Evelyn; Saulnier, Patrick; Yang, Huan; Amigorena, Sebastian; Ryffel, Bernard; Barrat, Franck J; Saftig, Paul; Levi, Francis; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Mira, Jean-Paul; Chompret, Agnès; Joulin, Virginie; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Bourhis, Jean; André, Fabrice; Delaloge, Suzette; Tursz, Thomas; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2007-09-01

    Conventional cancer treatments rely on radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Such treatments supposedly mediate their effects via the direct elimination of tumor cells. Here we show that the success of some protocols for anticancer therapy depends on innate and adaptive antitumor immune responses. We describe in both mice and humans a previously unrecognized pathway for the activation of tumor antigen-specific T-cell immunity that involves secretion of the high-mobility-group box 1 (HMGB1) alarmin protein by dying tumor cells and the action of HMGB1 on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expressed by dendritic cells (DCs). During chemotherapy or radiotherapy, DCs require signaling through TLR4 and its adaptor MyD88 for efficient processing and cross-presentation of antigen from dying tumor cells. Patients with breast cancer who carry a TLR4 loss-of-function allele relapse more quickly after radiotherapy and chemotherapy than those carrying the normal TLR4 allele. These results delineate a clinically relevant immunoadjuvant pathway triggered by tumor cell death.

  2. Network Analysis of Neurodegenerative Disease Highlights a Role of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thanh-Phuong; Morine, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant advances in the study of the molecular mechanisms altered in the development and progression of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs), the etiology is still enigmatic and the distinctions between diseases are not always entirely clear. We present an efficient computational method based on protein-protein interaction network (PPI) to model the functional network of NDs. The aim of this work is fourfold: (i) reconstruction of a PPI network relating to the NDs, (ii) construction of an association network between diseases based on proximity in the disease PPI network, (iii) quantification of disease associations, and (iv) inference of potential molecular mechanism involved in the diseases. The functional links of diseases not only showed overlap with the traditional classification in clinical settings, but also offered new insight into connections between diseases with limited clinical overlap. To gain an expanded view of the molecular mechanisms involved in NDs, both direct and indirect connector proteins were investigated. The method uncovered molecular relationships that are in common apparently distinct diseases and provided important insight into the molecular networks implicated in disease pathogenesis. In particular, the current analysis highlighted the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway as a potential candidate pathway to be targeted by therapy in neurodegeneration. PMID:24551850

  3. Human platelets express Toll-like receptor 3 and respond to poly I:C.

    PubMed

    Anabel, Antonio-Santos; Eduardo, Pérez-Campos; Pedro Antonio, Hernández-Cruz; Carlos, Solórzano-Mata; Juana, Narváez-Morales; Honorio, Torres-Aguilar; Nicolás, Villegas-Sepúlveda; Sergio Roberto, Aguilar-Ruiz

    2014-12-01

    Platelets functions in hemostasis have been widely studied. Currently, growing evidence shows that platelets have also a role in the immune innate response. Recently, protein expression of Toll-like receptors (TLR's) 2, 4, 7, 8, and 9, and the presence of TLRs 1 and 6 mRNA in human platelets was described. Up to now the functionality of TLR-2, 4 and 9 in human platelets has been demonstrated. Due to the relevance of TLRs functions to PAMPS (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) recognizing, we evaluated the presence of TLR3 in human platelets founding low percentages of platelets expressing surface or intracellular TLR3 protein. The activation with thrombin induced an increase in the percentage of platelets expressing surface TLR3 and higher levels of TLR3 expression in the whole population. Human platelets responded to poly I:C by increasing [Ca(2+)]i, the percentages of cells expressing TLR4 and CD62P, and by releasing CXCL4 and IL-1β in comparison to unstimulated platelets. These results demonstrate that human platelets express TLR3 and are capable of responding to poly I:C, suggesting that these cells might influence the immune innate response when detecting viral dsRNA.

  4. Conservation of toll-like receptor signaling pathways in teleost fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, M.K.; Smith, K.D.; Aderem, A.; Hood, L.; Winton, J.R.; Roach, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    In mammals, toll-like receptors (TLR) recognize ligands, including pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and respond with ligand-specific induction of genes. In this study, we establish evolutionary conservation in teleost fish of key components of the TLR-signaling pathway that act as switches for differential gene induction, including MYD88, TIRAP, TRIF, TRAF6, IRF3, and IRF7. We further explore this conservation with a molecular phylogenetic analysis of MYD88. To the extent that current genomic analysis can establish, each vertebrate has one ortholog to each of these genes. For molecular tree construction and phylogeny inference, we demonstrate a methodology for including genes with only partial primary sequences without disrupting the topology provided by the high-confidence full-length sequences. Conservation of the TLR-signaling molecules suggests that the basic program of gene regulation by the TLR-signaling pathway is conserved across vertebrates. To test this hypothesis, leukocytes from a model fish, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), were stimulated with known mammalian TLR agonists including: Diacylated and triacylated forms of lipoprotein, flagellin, two forms of LPS, synthetic double-stranded RNA, and two imidazoquinoline compounds (loxoribine and R848). Trout leukocytes responded in vitro to a number of these agonists with distinct patterns of cytokine expression that correspond to mammalian responses. Our results support the key prediction from our phylogenetic analyses that strong selective pressure of pathogenic microbes has preserved both TLR recognition and signaling functions during vertebrate evolution. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioconjugation of Small Molecules to RNA Impedes Its Recognition by Toll-Like Receptor 7

    PubMed Central

    Hellmuth, Isabell; Freund, Isabel; Schlöder, Janine; Seidu-Larry, Salifu; Thüring, Kathrin; Slama, Kaouthar; Langhanki, Jens; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Eigenbrod, Tatjana; Krumb, Matthias; Röhm, Sandra; Peneva, Kalina; Opatz, Till; Jonuleit, Helmut; Dalpke, Alexander H.; Helm, Mark

    2017-01-01

    A fundamental mechanism of the innate immune system is the recognition, via extra- and intracellular pattern-recognition receptors, of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. A prominent example is represented by foreign nucleic acids, triggering the activation of several signaling pathways. Among these, the endosomal toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is known to be activated by single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), which can be specifically influenced through elements of sequence structure and posttranscriptional modifications. Furthermore, small molecules TLR7 agonists (smTLRa) are applied as boosting adjuvants in vaccination processes. In this context, covalent conjugations between adjuvant and vaccines have been reported to exhibit synergistic effects. Here, we describe a concept to chemically combine three therapeutic functions in one RNA bioconjugate. This consists in the simultaneous TLR7 stimulation by ssRNA and smTLRa as well as the therapeutic function of the RNA itself, e.g., as a vaccinating or knockdown agent. We have hence synthesized bioconjugates of mRNA and siRNA containing covalently attached smTLRa and tested their function in TLR7 stimulation. Strikingly, the bioconjugates displayed decreased rather than synergistically increased stimulation. The decrease was distinct from the antagonistic action of an siRNA bearing a Gm motive, as observed by direct comparison of the effects in the presence of otherwise stimulatory RNA. In summary, these investigations showed that TRL7 activation can be impeded by bioconjugation of small molecules to RNA. PMID:28392787

  6. The innate immune system, toll-like receptors and dermal wound healing: A review.

    PubMed

    Portou, M J; Baker, D; Abraham, D; Tsui, J

    2015-08-01

    Wound healing is a complex physiological process comprised of discrete but inter-related and overlapping stages, requiring exact timing and regulation to successfully progress, yet occurs spontaneously in response to injury. It is characterised by four phases, coagulation, inflammation, proliferation and remodelling. Each phase is predominated by particular cell types, cytokines and chemokines. The innate immune system represents the first line of defence against invading microorganisms. It is entirely encoded with the genome, and comprised of a cellular response with specificity provided by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs are activated by exogenous microbial pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), initiating an immune response through the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and further specialist immune cell recruitment. TLRs are also activated by endogenous molecular patterns termed damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). These ligands, usually shielded from the immune system, act as alarm signals alerting the immune system to damage and facilitate the normal wound healing process. TLRs are expressed by cells essential to wound healing such as keratinocytes and fibroblasts, however the specific role of TLRs in this process remains controversial. This article reviews the current knowledge on the potential role of TLRs in dermal wound healing where inflammation arising from pathogenic activation of these receptors appears to play a role in chronic ulceration associated with diabetes, scar hypertrophy and skin fibrosis.

  7. Toll-like receptor 3 activation is required for normal skin barrier repair following UV damage.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Andrew W; Kuo, I-Hsin; Bernard, Jamie J; Yoshida, Takeshi; Williams, Michael R; Hung, Nai-Jung; Yu, Benjamin D; Beck, Lisa A; Gallo, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    UV damage to the skin leads to the release of noncoding RNA (ncRNA) from necrotic keratinocytes that activates Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). This release of ncRNA triggers inflammation in the skin following UV damage. Recently, TLR3 activation was also shown to aid wound repair and increase the expression of genes associated with permeability barrier repair. Here, we sought to test whether skin barrier repair after UVB damage is dependent on the activation of TLR3. We observed that multiple ncRNAs induced expression of skin barrier repair genes, that the TLR3 ligand Poly (I:C) also induced expression and function of tight junctions, and that the ncRNA U1 acts in a TLR3-dependent manner to induce expression of skin barrier repair genes. These observations were shown to have functional relevance as Tlr3-/- mice displayed a delay in skin barrier repair following UVB damage. Combined, these data further validate the conclusion that recognition of endogenous RNA by TLR3 is an important step in the program of skin barrier repair.

  8. Toll-like receptor 3 activation is required for normal skin barrier repair following UV damage

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Andrew W.; Kuo, I-Hsin; Bernard, Jamie J.; Yoshida, Takeshi; Williams, Michael R.; Hung, Nai-Jung; Yu, Benjamin D.; Beck, Lisa A.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) damage to the skin leads to the release of noncoding RNA (ncRNA) from necrotic keratinocytes that activates toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). This release of ncRNA triggers inflammation in the skin following UV damage. Recently, TLR3 activation was also shown to aid wound repair and increase expression of genes associated with permeability barrier repair. Here, we sought to test if skin barrier repair after UVB damage is dependent on the activation of TLR3. We observed that multiple ncRNAs induced expression of skin barrier repair genes, that the TLR3 ligand Poly (I:C) also induced expression and function of tight junctions, and that the ncRNA U1 acts in a TLR3-dependent manner to induce expression of skin barrier repair genes. These observations were shown to have functional relevance as Tlr3−/− mice displayed a delay in skin barrier repair following UVB damage. Combined, these data further validate the conclusion that recognition of endogenous RNA by TLR3 is an important step in the program of skin barrier repair. PMID:25118157

  9. The Troll in Toll: Mal and Tram as bridges for TLR2 and TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, Frederick J; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2007-08-01

    Signaling by two of the most important bacteria-sensing TLRs, TLR2 and TLR4, involves two adaptor proteins, MyD88 adaptor-like (Mal) and Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor-inducing IFN-beta (Trif)-related adaptor molecule (TRAM). Recently, new insights into the functioning of these two adapters have emerged. Mal is required by both TLRs to act as a bridge to recruit the adaptor MyD88, leading ultimately to NF-kappaB activation. Similarly, TRAM acts as a bridge to recruit TRIF to the TLR4 complex, leading to activation of the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3. Consistent with Mal and TRAM being key points of control, recent evidence suggests that they are subject to regulation by phosphorylation. Further, a variant in Mal in humans has been found to protect against multiple infectious diseases. Finally, another TIR domain-containing adaptor, sterile alpha and HEAT/armadillo motif protein (SARM), has been shown to act as an inhibitor of TRIF-dependent signaling. These recent discoveries add to the complexity of TLR signaling and highlight specific control mechanisms for TLR2 and TLR4 signaling.

  10. The molecular structure of the Toll-like receptor 3 ligand-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jessica K.; Botos, Istvan; Hall, Pamela R.; Askins, Janine; Shiloach, Joseph; Segal, David M.; Davies, David R.

    2005-01-01

    Innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) act as sentinels of the innate immune system, sensing a variety of ligands from lipopolysaccharide to flagellin to dsRNA through their ligand-binding domain that is composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). Ligand binding initiates a signaling cascade that leads to the up-regulation of inflammation mediators. In this study, we have expressed and crystallized the ectodomain (ECD) of human TLR3, which recognizes dsRNA, a molecular signature of viruses, and have determined the molecular structure to 2.4-Å resolution. The overall horseshoe-shaped structure of the TLR3-ECD is formed by 23 repeating LRRs that are capped at each end by specialized non-LRR domains. The extensive β-sheet on the molecule's concave surface forms a platform for several modifications, including insertions in the LRRs and 11 N-linked glycans. The TLR3-ECD structure indicates how LRR loops can establish distinct pathogen recognition receptors. PMID:16043704

  11. The complement system and toll-like receptors as integrated players in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hovland, Anders; Jonasson, Lena; Garred, Peter; Yndestad, Arne; Aukrust, Pål; Lappegård, Knut T; Espevik, Terje; Mollnes, Tom E

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent medical advances, atherosclerosis is a global burden accounting for numerous deaths and hospital admissions. Immune-mediated inflammation is a major component of the atherosclerotic process, but earlier research focus on adaptive immunity has gradually switched towards the role of innate immunity. The complement system and toll-like receptors (TLRs), and the crosstalk between them, may be of particular interest both with respect to pathogenesis and as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis. Animal studies indicate that inhibition of C3a and C5a reduces atherosclerosis. In humans modified LDL-cholesterol activate complement and TLRs leading to downstream inflammation, and histopathological studies indicate that the innate immune system is present in atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, clinical studies have demonstrated that both complement and TLRs are upregulated in atherosclerotic diseases, although interventional trials have this far been disappointing. However, based on recent research showing an intimate interplay between complement and TLRs we propose a model in which combined inhibition of both complement and TLRs may represent a potent anti-inflammatory therapeutic approach to reduce atherosclerosis.

  12. Role of Toll-like receptors in Helicobacter pylori infection and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sinéad M

    2014-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects the stomachs of approximately half of the world’s population. Although infection induces an immune response that contributes to chronic gastric inflammation, the response is not sufficient to eliminate the bacterium. H. pylori infection causes peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Disease outcome is linked to the severity of the host inflammatory response. Gastric epithelial cells represent the first line of innate immune defence against H. pylori, and respond to infection by initiating numerous cell signalling cascades, resulting in cytokine induction and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the gastric mucosa. Pathogen recognition receptors of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family mediate many of these cell signalling events. This review discusses recent findings on the role of various TLRs in the recognition of H. pylori in distinct cell types, describes the TLRs responsible for the recognition of individual H. pylori components and outlines the influence of innate immune activation on the subsequent development of the adaptive immune response. The mechanistic identification of host mediators of H. pylori-induced pathogenesis has the potential to reveal drug targets and opportunities for therapeutic intervention or prevention of H. pylori-associated disease by means of vaccines or immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:25133016

  13. Toll like receptor 2 and 4 polymorphisms in malaria endemic populations of India.

    PubMed

    Bali, Prerna; Pradhan, Sabyasachi; Sharma, Divya; Adak, Tridibes

    2013-02-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) play a pivotal role in recognizing the invading malaria parasite Plasmodium, thus genetic makeup of the exposed population can be of utmost importance for its predisposition to malaria. In this study 264 malaria patients from seven different eco epidemiological regions of India were genotyped for TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms using DNA sequencing methods. No variation was observed at residue positions 677 and 753 in TLR2 whereas residue positions 299 and 399 in TLR4 were highly polymorphic. The GC haplotype (Asp299Gly/Thr399Thr) was observed at the highest frequency in populations of East Singhbhum, Vizianagaram and North Goa and absent in Kolkata, Dakshin Kannada and Nicobar district. All polymorphisms were in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. Populations of Kolkata, Nicobar district, Sundergarh and Dakshin Kannada were observed to be closely related. TLR2 polymorphism was absent in the Indian population and an overall heterogeneous pattern of TLR4 polymorphism can be attributed to genetic drift. However it can be inferred that GC haplotype is under the process of natural selection in the Indian population and one of the factors contributing to its selection could be predominance of Plasmodium falciparum in these regions.

  14. The role of toll-like receptors (TLRs) in urinary tract infections (UTIs)

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are caused by different types of microbial agents such as uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and Candida albicans. The presence of strong physical barriers may prevent the breach of pathogens into the urinary tract. However, sometimes the pathogenic microorganisms may pass through the barriers and stimulate the innate and adaptive responses. Among a variety of innate immune responses, Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) are one of the most unique and interesting molecules regarding UTIs. Thus, the authors have focused their attention on the role of TLRs in urinary tract defense against pathogenic microbial agents such as UPEC and C.albicans through this literature review. Material and methods Several papers regarding UTIs and TLRs including original and review articles were searched by PubMed and Google Scholar. They were studied and the most important aspects in association with the role of TLRs in UTIs were extracted. Additionally, this paper was prepared using the experience of the authors. Results The TLRs 2, 4 and 5 are the most functional molecules that contribute to urinary tract defense system and UTIs. It is incredible that TLRs are able to detect and recognize different parts of microbial components relating to the same pathogen. Besides, the flexibility of the TLR molecules may lead to identification of different types of microorganisms with different signaling pathways. Conclusions Our knowledge associated with TLRs and their activities against microbial causative agents of UTIs may help us to prevent, control and treat UTIs at a higher quality level. PMID:28127459

  15. Toll-like receptor 2 activation and comedogenesis: implications for the pathogenesis of acne

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acne is a common disorder of the human pilosebaceous unit, yet the mechanisms underlying hyperkeratinisation and subsequent inflammation (comedogenesis) remain to be determined, although cutaneous pathogens are implicated. Previously, it was reported that the release of the cytokine interleukin-1α (IL-1α) by keratinocytes of the sebaceous duct was pivotal in the life cycle of the comedone, mediating both its development and its spontaneous resolution. Toll-like receptors are a family of molecules that recognise pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) presented by microorganisms, initiating a signalling cascade terminating in the release of antimicrobial compounds and cytokines. Methods We used ex vivo sebaceous gland and primary monolayer keratinocyte culture, alongside ELISAs, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and RT-PCR to investigate the contribution of TLR activation to acne pathogenesis. Results We found TLR2 to be expressed in basal and infundibular keratinocytes, and sebaceous glands, and its activation provoked the release of IL-1α from primary human keratinocytes in vitro. The exposure of microdissected human sebaceous glands to PAMPs specific for TLR2 in vitro resulted in a pattern of IL-1α like cornification after seven days of exposure. Conclusions TLR activation and secretion of IL-1α from keratinocytes may be initiating steps in comedogenesis and, therefore, critical to the pathophysiology of acne. PMID:24011352

  16. Toll-like receptor 9 deficiency impacts sensory and motor behaviors.

    PubMed

    Khariv, Veronika; Pang, Kevin; Servatius, Richard J; David, Brian T; Goodus, Matthew T; Beck, Kevin D; Heary, Robert F; Elkabes, Stella

    2013-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) mediate the induction of the innate immune system in response to pathogens, injury and disease. However, they also play non-immune roles and are expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) during prenatal and postnatal stages including adulthood. Little is known about their roles in the CNS in the absence of pathology. Several members of the TLR family have been implicated in the development of neural and cognitive function although the contribution of TLR9 to these processes has not been well defined. The current studies were undertaken to determine whether developmental TLR9 deficiency affects motor, sensory or cognitive functions. We report that TLR9 deficient (TLR9(-/-)) mice show a hyper-responsive sensory and motor phenotype compared to wild type (TLR9(+/+)) controls. This is indicated by hypersensitivity to thermal stimuli in the hot plate paw withdrawal test, enhanced motor-responsivity under anxious conditions in the open field test and greater sensorimotor reactivity in the acoustic startle response. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response was also enhanced, which indicates abnormal sensorimotor gating. In addition, subtle, but significant, gait abnormalities were noted in the TLR9(-/-) mice on the horizontal balance beam test with higher foot slip numbers than TLR9(+/+) controls. In contrast, spatial learning and memory, assessed by the Morris water maze, was similar in the TLR9(-/-) and TLR9(+/+) mice. These findings support the notion that TLR9 is important for the appropriate development of sensory and motor behaviors.

  17. Structural analogs of pulmonary surfactant phosphatidylglycerol inhibit toll-like receptor 2 and 4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Pitchaimani; Numata, Mari; Berry, Karin Zemski; Fickes, Rachel; Leslie, Christina C; Murphy, Robert C; Voelker, Dennis R

    2016-06-01

    The pulmonary surfactant phospholipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG), potently inhibits toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 signaling from the cell surface of macrophages. Analogs of POPG that vary in polar head group length, hydroxylation, and alkyl branching were synthesized using a phospholipase D-catalyzed transphosphatidylation reaction and a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine substrate. Lipid analogs with C3 and C4 alkyl head group length (POP-propanol and POP-butanol) are less effective than POPG as TLR2 and TLR4 antagonists. However, adding a hydroxyl group at the alkyl chain 3- or 4-position (POP-propanediols or POP-butanediols) greatly increased their inhibitory effects against TLR2 and TLR4. POP-2',2'-dimethylpropanediol is a weak inhibitor of TLR2 and TLR4 activation that results in arachidonic acid release, but an effective inhibitor of TLR4 activation that results in TNF-α production. Addition of an amino group at the alkyl-2 position (POP-2'-aminopropanediol) completely abolished the antagonism of TLRs 2 and 4. Multiple analogs strongly bind to the TLR4 coreceptors, cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14) and myeloid differentiation 2, but competition for di[3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonyl]-lipid A binding to CD14 is the best predictor of biological activity at the cellular level. Collectively, these findings identify new compounds for antagonizing TLR2 and TLR4 activation and define structural properties of POPG analogs for discriminating between two TLR systems.

  18. Higher Expression of Toll-like Receptors 3, 7, 8, and 9 in Pityriasis Rosea

    PubMed Central

    El-Ela, Mostafa Abou; El-Komy, Mohamed; Hay, Rania Abdel; Hegazy, Rehab; Sharobim, Amin; Rashed, Laila; Amr, Khalda

    2017-01-01

    Background Pityriasis rosea (PR) is a common papulosquamous skin disease in which an infective agent may be implicated. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in immune responses and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. Our aim was to determine the possible roles of TLRs 3, 7, 8, and 9 in the pathogenesis of PR. Methods Twenty-four PR patients and 24 healthy individuals (as controls) were included in this case control study. All recruits were subjected to routine laboratory investigations. Biopsies were obtained from one active PR lesion and from healthy skin of controls for the detection of TLR 3, 7, 8, and 9 gene expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results This study included 24 patients (8 females and 16 males) with active PR lesions, with a mean age of 28.62 years. Twenty four healthy age- and sex-matched individuals were included as controls (8 females and 16 males, with a mean age of 30.83 years). The results of the routine laboratory tests revealed no significant differences between both groups. Significantly elevated expression of all studied TLRs were detected in PR patients relative to healthy controls (p < .001). Conclusions TLRs 3, 7, 8, and 9 might be involved in the pathogenesis of PR. PMID:28192646

  19. Toll-like receptor agonists promote prolonged triglyceride storage in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-ling; Morales-Rosado, Joel; Ray, Jessica; Myers, Timothy G; Kho, Terry; Lu, Mingfang; Munford, Robert S

    2014-01-31

    Macrophages in infected tissues may sense microbial molecules that significantly alter their metabolism. In a seeming paradox, these critical host defense cells often respond by increasing glucose catabolism while simultaneously storing fatty acids (FA) as triglycerides (TAG) in lipid droplets. We used a load-chase strategy to study the mechanisms that promote long term retention of TAG in murine and human macrophages. Toll-like receptor (TLR)1/2, TLR3, and TLR4 agonists all induced the cells to retain TAG for ≥3 days. Prolonged TAG retention was accompanied by the following: (a) enhanced FA uptake and FA incorporation into TAG, with long lasting increases in acyl-CoA synthetase long 1 (ACSL1) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 (DGAT2), and (b) decreases in lipolysis and FA β-oxidation that paralleled a prolonged drop in adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). TLR agonist-induced TAG storage is a multifaceted process that persists long after most early pro-inflammatory responses have subsided and may contribute to the formation of "lipid-laden" macrophages in infected tissues.

  20. [Structural Analyses of Toll-like Receptor Sensing Single-stranded Nucleic Acids and Its Application].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of pattern-recognition receptors that recognize microbial components and initiate subsequent immune responses. TLR7 and TLR8 recognize single-stranded (ss)RNA and initiate innate immune responses. Moreover, several small-molecule compounds have been identified as TLR7 and TLR8 activators. We determined the crystal structures of unliganded and ligand-induced activated human TLR8 dimers. Upon ligand stimulation, the TLR8 dimer was reorganized such that the two C-termini were brought into proximity. Ligand binding induces reorganization of the TLR8 dimer, which enables downstream signaling processes. To elucidate how TLR8 recognizes its natural ligand, ssRNA, as well as how the receptor can be activated by ssRNA that is structurally and chemically very different from the chemical ligands, we performed crystallographic studies of TLR8 in complex with ssRNA. TLR8 recognizes, at distinct sites, uridine and small oligonucleotides derived from the degradation of ssRNA. Uridine bound the site on the dimerization interface where small chemical ligands are recognized, whereas short oligonucleotides bound a newly identified site. Based on structural information, new compounds have been developed. We describe the crystal structure of a newly developed agonist, C2-butyl furo[2,3-c]quinolone.

  1. The Yin and Yang of Toll-like Receptors in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pradere, Jean-Philippe; Dapito, Dianne H.; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of non-self molecular patterns by pattern recognition receptors is a cornerstone of innate immunity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) exert a key role in recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) but have also been implicated in the recognition of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). As such, TLRs regulate a wide range of biological responses including inflammatory and immune responses during carcinogenesis. The high expression of TLRs by antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells, and their ability to induce anti-tumor mediators such as type I interferon has led to efforts to utilize TLR agonists in tumor therapy in order to convert the often tolerant immune response towards anti-tumor responses. However, TLRs are also increasingly recognized as regulators of tumor-promoting inflammation and promoters of tumor survival signals. Here, we will review in detail the dichotomous role of TLRs in tumor biology, focusing on relevant TLR-dependent pro- and anti-tumor pathways, and discuss clinical applications of TLR-targeted therapies for tumor prevention and treatment. PMID:23934186

  2. Toll-like receptors in prostate infection and cancer between bench and bedside

    PubMed Central

    Gambara, Guido; Cesaris, Paola; Nunzio, Cosimo; Ziparo, Elio; Tubaro, Andrea; Filippini, Antonio; Riccioli, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Toll-Like receptors (TLRs) are a family of evolutionary conserved transmembrane proteins that recognize highly conserved molecules in pathogens. TLR-expressing cells represent the first line of defence sensing pathogen invasion, triggering innate immune responses and subsequently priming antigen-specific adaptive immunity. In vitro and in vivo studies on experimental cancer models have shown both anti- and pro-tumoural activity of different TLRs in prostate cancer, indicating these receptors as potential targets for cancer therapy. In this review, we highlight the intriguing duplicity of TLR stimulation by pathogens: their protective role in cases of acute infections, and conversely their negative role in favouring hyperplasia and/or cancer onset, in cases of chronic infections. This review focuses on the role of TLRs in the pathophysiology of prostate infection and cancer by exploring the biological bases of the strict relation between TLRs and prostate cancer. In particular, we highlight the debated question of how reliable mutations or deregulated expression of TLRs are as novel diagnostic or prognostic tools for prostate cancer. So far, the anticancer activity of numerous TLR ligands has been evaluated in clinical trials only in organs other than the prostate. Here we review recent clinical trials based on the most promising TLR agonists in oncology, envisaging a potential application also in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:23551576

  3. Toll-like receptor signalling in regenerative myogenesis: friend and foe.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Sajedah M; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration in normal and diseased muscle is regulated by multiple factors and cells present in the injured muscle micro-environment. In addition to muscle progenitor cells, several immunocytes participate in the regenerative response. Among them, macrophages are one of the most important components of the immune response that governs the step-wise progression of muscle regeneration. The initial role of macrophages is to phagocytose muscle cell debris and later, through their transition to an anti-inflammatory phenotype, they promote regeneration. However, in several genetic muscle disorders, continuous muscle injury disrupts the balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory macrophages, leading to an overall inflammatory milieu and inhibition of muscle regeneration. Accumulating evidence suggests that Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated signalling plays an important role in the regulation of macrophage phenotypes during regenerative myogenesis in response to both acute and chronic muscle injury. Here, we discuss the role of TLR signalling in regulating macrophage phenotypes and skeletal muscle regeneration in healthy and diseased muscle. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Regulation of Wound Healing and Organ Fibrosis by Toll-like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Huebener, Peter; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic injury often triggers maladaptive wound healing responses leading to the development of tissue fibrosis and subsequent organ malfunction. Inflammation is a key component of the wound healing process and promotes the development of organ fibrosis. Here, we review the contribution of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to wound healing with a particular focus on their role in liver, lung, kidney, skin and myocardial fibrosis. We discuss the role of TLRs on distinct cell populations that participate in the repair process following tissue injury, and the contribution of exogenous and endogenous TLR ligands to the wound healing response. Systemic review of the literature shows that TLRs promote tissue repair and fibrosis in many settings, albeit with profound differences between organs. In particular, TLRs exert a pronounced effect on fibrosis in organs with higher exposure to bacterial TLR ligands, such as the liver. Targeting TLR signaling at the ligand or receptor level may represent a novel strategy for the prevention of maladaptive wound healing and fibrosis in chronically injured organs. PMID:23220258

  5. Toll-like receptor 2 senses hepatitis C virus core protein but not infectious viral particles

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Marco; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Jilg, Nikolaus; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Wakita, Takaji; Hafkemeyer, Peter; Blum, Hubert E.; Barth, Heidi; Henneke, Philipp; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pathogen recognition molecules activating the innate immune system. Cell surface expressed TLRs, such as TLR2 and TLR4 have been shown to play an important role in human host defenses against viruses through sensing of viral structural proteins. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether TLR2 and TLR4 participate in inducing antiviral immunity against hepatitis C virus by sensing viral structural proteins. We studied TLR2 and TLR4 activation by cell-culture derived infectious virions (HCVcc) and serum-derived virions in comparison to purified recombinant HCV structural proteins and enveloped virus-like particles. Incubation of TLR2 or TLR4 transfected cell lines with recombinant core protein resulted in activation of TLR2-dependent signaling. In contrast, neither infectious virions nor enveloped HCV-like particles triggered TLR2 and TLR4 signaling. These findings suggest that monomeric HCV core protein but not intact infectious particles are sensed by TLR2. Impairment of core-TLR interaction in infectious viral particles may contribute to escape from innate antiviral immune responses. PMID:20375602

  6. Bioinformatics analysis of the structural and evolutionary characteristics for toll-like receptor 15

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinlan; Chang, Fen

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play important role in the innate immune system. TLR15 is reported to have a unique role in defense against pathogens, but its structural and evolution characterizations are still poorly understood. In this study, we identified 57 completed TLR15 genes from avian and reptilian genomes. TLR15 clustered into an individual clade and was closely related to family 1 on the phylogenetic tree. Unlike the TLRs in family 1 with the broken asparagine ladders in the middle, TLR15 ectodomain had an intact asparagine ladder that is critical to maintain the overall shape of ectodomain. The conservation analysis found that TLR15 ectodomain had a highly evolutionarily conserved region on the convex surface of LRR11 module, which is probably involved in TLR15 activation process. Furthermore, the protein–protein docking analysis indicated that TLR15 TIR domains have the potential to form homodimers, the predicted interaction interface of TIR dimer was formed mainly by residues from the BB-loops and αC-helixes. Although TLR15 mainly underwent purifying selection, we detected 27 sites under positive selection for TLR15, 24 of which are located on its ectodomain. Our observations suggest the structural features of TLR15 which may be relevant to its function, but which requires further experimental validation. PMID:27257554

  7. The Toll-Like Receptor Agonist Imiquimod Is Active against Prions

    PubMed Central

    Beringue, Vincent; Soubigou, Flavie; Pang, Yanhong; Desban, Nathalie; Massacrier, Catherine; Morel, Yannis; Paturel, Carine; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Bouaziz, Serge; Sanyal, Suparna; Galons, Hervé; Blondel, Marc; Voisset, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Using a yeast-based assay, a previously unsuspected antiprion activity was found for imiquimod (IQ), a potent Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonist already used for clinical applications. The antiprion activity of IQ was first detected against yeast prions [PSI+] and [URE3], and then against mammalian prion both ex vivo in a cell-based assay and in vivo in a transgenic mouse model for prion diseases. In order to facilitate structure-activity relationship studies, we conducted a new synthetic pathway which provides a more efficient means of producing new IQ chemical derivatives, the activity of which was tested against both yeast and mammalian prions. The comparable antiprion activity of IQ and its chemical derivatives in the above life forms further emphasizes the conservation of prion controlling mechanisms throughout evolution. Interestingly, this study also demonstrated that the antiprion activity of IQ and IQ-derived compounds is independent from their ability to stimulate TLRs. Furthermore, we found that IQ and its active chemical derivatives inhibit the protein folding activity of the ribosome (PFAR) in vitro. PMID:23977222

  8. Diversity in the Toll-Like Receptor Genes of the African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus).

    PubMed

    Dalton, Desiré Lee; Vermaak, Elaine; Roelofse, Marli; Kotze, Antoinette

    2016-01-01

    The African penguin, Spheniscus demersus, is listed as Endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species due to the drastic reduction in population numbers over the last 20 years. To date, the only studies on immunogenetic variation in penguins have been conducted on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. It was shown in humans that up to half of the genetic variability in immune responses to pathogens are located in non-MHC genes. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are now increasingly being studied in a variety of taxa as a broader approach to determine functional genetic diversity. In this study, we confirm low genetic diversity in the innate immune region of African penguins similar to that observed in New Zealand robin that has undergone several severe population bottlenecks. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity across TLRs varied between ex situ and in situ penguins with the number of non-synonymous alterations in ex situ populations (n = 14) being reduced in comparison to in situ populations (n = 16). Maintaining adaptive diversity is of vital importance in the assurance populations as these animals may potentially be used in the future for re-introductions. Therefore, this study provides essential data on immune gene diversity in penguins and will assist in providing an additional monitoring tool for African penguin in the wild, as well as to monitor diversity in ex situ populations and to ensure that diversity found in the in situ populations are captured in the assurance populations.

  9. Allergic rhinitis and genetic components: focus on Toll-like receptors (TLRs) gene polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhiwei; Rennie, Donna C; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2010-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis represents a global health issue affecting 10% to 25% of the population worldwide. Over the years, studies have found that allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, are associated with immunological responses to antigens driven by a Th2-mediated immune response. Because Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses to a broad variety of antigens, the association between polymorphisms of TLRs and allergic diseases has been the focus in many animal and human studies. Although the etiology of allergic rhinitis is still unknown, extensive research over the years has confirmed that the underlying causes of allergic diseases are due to many genetic and environmental factors, along with the interactions among them, which include gene–environment, gene–gene, and environment–environment interactions. Currently, there is great inconsistency among studies mainly due to differences in genetic background and unique gene–environment interactions. This paper reviews studies focusing on the association between TLR polymorphisms and allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, which would help researchers better understand the role of TLR polymorphisms in the development of allergic rhinitis, and ultimately lead to more efficient therapeutic interventions being developed. PMID:23776356

  10. Toll-like receptor 7 affects the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sokho; Park, Surim; Kim, Bumseok; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-06-09

    Recently, a possible link between toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and liver disease was suggested, although it was limited to fibrosis. Based on this report, we investigated whether TLR7 has a pivotal role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The TLR7 signaling pathway, which is activated by imiquimod (TLR7 ligand) naturally, induced autophagy and released insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) into medium from hepatocytes. Lipid accumulation induced by unsaturated fatty acid (UFA; arachidonic acid:oleic acid = 1:1) in hepatocytes, was attenuated in TLR7 and autophagy activation. Interestingly, TLR7 activation attenuated UFA-induced lipid peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal (4-HNE). To clarify a possible pathway between TLR7 and lipid peroxidation, we treated hepatocytes with MDA and 4-HNE. MDA and 4-HNE induced 2-folds lipid accumulation in UFA-treated hepatocytes via blockade of the TLR7 signaling pathway's IGF-1 release compared to only UFA-treated hepatocytes. In vivo experiments carried out with TLR7 knockout mice produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. In conclusion, TLR7 prevents progression of NAFLD via induced autophagy and released IGF-1 from liver. These findings suggest a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NAFLD.

  11. Toll-like receptor 7 affects the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sokho; Park, Surim; Kim, Bumseok; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a possible link between toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and liver disease was suggested, although it was limited to fibrosis. Based on this report, we investigated whether TLR7 has a pivotal role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The TLR7 signaling pathway, which is activated by imiquimod (TLR7 ligand) naturally, induced autophagy and released insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) into medium from hepatocytes. Lipid accumulation induced by unsaturated fatty acid (UFA; arachidonic acid:oleic acid = 1:1) in hepatocytes, was attenuated in TLR7 and autophagy activation. Interestingly, TLR7 activation attenuated UFA-induced lipid peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal (4-HNE). To clarify a possible pathway between TLR7 and lipid peroxidation, we treated hepatocytes with MDA and 4-HNE. MDA and 4-HNE induced 2-folds lipid accumulation in UFA-treated hepatocytes via blockade of the TLR7 signaling pathway’s IGF-1 release compared to only UFA-treated hepatocytes. In vivo experiments carried out with TLR7 knockout mice produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. In conclusion, TLR7 prevents progression of NAFLD via induced autophagy and released IGF-1 from liver. These findings suggest a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NAFLD. PMID:27279075

  12. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in aquatic animals: signaling pathways, expressions and immune responses.

    PubMed

    Rauta, Pradipta R; Samanta, Mrinal; Dash, Hirak R; Nayak, Bismita; Das, Surajit

    2014-01-01

    The innate system's recognition of non-self and danger signals is mediated by a limited number of germ-line encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are single, non-catalytic, membrane-spanning PRRs present in invertebrates and vertebrates. They act by specifically recognizing PAMPs of a variety of microbes and activate signaling cascades to induce innate immunity. A large number of TLRs have been identified in various aquatic animals of phyla Cnidaria, Annelida, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata and Chordata. TLRs of aquatic and warm-blooded higher animals exhibit some distinctive features due to their diverse evolutionary lineages. However, majority of them share conserve signaling pathways in pathogen recognition and innate immunity. Functional analysis of novel TLRs in aquatic animals is very important in understanding the comparative immunology between warm-blooded and aquatic animals. In additions to innate immunity, recent reports have highlighted the additional roles of TLRs in adaptive immunity. Therefore, vaccines against many critical diseases of aquatic animals may be made more effective by supplementing TLR activators which will stimulate dendritic cells. This article describes updated information of TLRs in aquatic animals and their structural and functional relationship with warm-blooded animals.

  13. Reptile Toll-like receptor 5 unveils adaptive evolution of bacterial flagellin recognition

    PubMed Central

    Voogdt, Carlos G. P.; Bouwman, Lieneke I.; Kik, Marja J. L.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; van Putten, Jos P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are ancient innate immune receptors crucial for immune homeostasis and protection against infection. TLRs are present in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish but have not been functionally characterized in reptiles despite the central position of this animal class in vertebrate evolution. Here we report the cloning, characterization, and function of TLR5 of the reptile Anolis carolinensis (Green Anole lizard). The receptor (acTLR5) displays the typical TLR protein architecture with 22 extracellular leucine rich repeats flanked by a N- and C-terminal leucine rich repeat domain, a membrane-spanning region, and an intracellular TIR domain. The receptor is phylogenetically most similar to TLR5 of birds and most distant to fish TLR5. Transcript analysis revealed acTLR5 expression in multiple lizard tissues. Stimulation of acTLR5 with TLR ligands demonstrated unique responsiveness towards bacterial flagellin in both reptile and human cells. Comparison of acTLR5 and human TLR5 using purified flagellins revealed differential sensitivity to Pseudomonas but not Salmonella flagellin, indicating development of species-specific flagellin recognition during the divergent evolution of mammals and reptiles. Our discovery of reptile TLR5 fills the evolutionary gap regarding TLR conservation across vertebrates and provides novel insights in functional evolution of host-microbe interactions. PMID:26738735

  14. Endothelial cell Toll-like receptor 4 regulates fibrosis associated angiogenesis in liver

    PubMed Central

    Jagavelu, K; Routray, C; Shergill, U; O’Hara, SP; Faubion, W; Shah, VH

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis defines the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vascular endothelial networks and corresponds with the wound healing process that is typified by the process of liver fibrosis. Liver fibrosis is also associated with increased endotoxin within the gut lumen and its associated portal circulation. However, the interrelationship of gut endotoxin and its receptor, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), with liver fibrosis and associated angiogenesis remains incompletely defined. RESULT Here we provide evidence, using complementary genetic, molecular, and pharmacologic approaches that the pattern recognition receptor that recognizes endotoxin, TLR4, expressed on liver endothelial cells (LEC), regulates angiogenic responses both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies reveal a key role for a cognate TLR4 effector protein, MyD88 in this process which culminates in extracellular protease production that regulates LEC invasive capacity, a key step in angiogenesis. Furthermore TLR4 dependent angiogenesis in vivo corresponds with fibrosis in complementary liver models of fibrosis. CONCLUSION These studies provide evidence that the TLR4 pathway in LEC regulates angiogenesis through its MyD88 effector protein by regulating extracellular protease production and that this process is linked to the development of liver fibrosis. PMID:20564354

  15. Ectodomain Architecture Affects Sequence and Functional Evolution of Vertebrate Toll-like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinlan; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Yin, Deling

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are crucial components of innate immunity that specifically recognize diverse pathogen-associated molecular patterns from pathogens. The continuous hydrogen-bond network (asparagine ladder) formed among the asparagine residues on the concave surfaces of neighboring leucine-rich repeat modules assists in stabilizing the overall shape of TLR ectodomains responsible for ligand recognition. Analysis of 28 types of vertebrate TLRs showed that their ectodomains possessed three types of architectures: a single-domain architecture with an intact asparagine ladder, a three-domain architecture with the ladder interrupted in the middle, and a trans-three-domain architecture with the ladder broken in both termini. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, the three vertebrate TLR architectures arose during early evolution. The 1428 vertebrate TLRs can be divided into eight families based on sequence and structural differences. TLRs ligand specificities are affected by their ectodomain architectures. Three-domain TLRs bind hydrophobic ligands, whereas single-domain and trans-three-domain TLRs mainly recognize hydrophilic ligands. Analysis of 39 vertebrate genomes suggested that the number of single-domain TLR genes in terrestrial vertebrate genomes decreased by half compared to aquatic vertebrate genomes. Single-domain TLR genes underwent stronger purifying selective pressures than three-domain TLR genes in mammals. Overall, ectodomain architecture influences the sequence and functional evolution of vertebrate TLRs. PMID:27216145

  16. Association between toll-like receptors expression and major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yi-Yung; Kang, Hong-Yo; Huang, Kai-Wei; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2014-12-15

    Accumulating evidences suggest that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) were involved in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. TLR4 was thought to be associated with major depressive disorder in animal model, but the others were still unknown. In order to examine TLR1-9 mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood and their relationships with the psychopathology of major depressive disorder, 30 patients with major depressive disorder were compared with 29 healthy controls. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) was used to assess the severity of major depression. The mRNA expression levels of TLRs were examined in parallel with a housekeeping gene using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Analysis of covariance with age and body mass index adjustment revealed a significantly higher expression of TLR3, 4, 5 and 7 mRNA but lower expression of TLR1 and 6 in patients with major depressive disorder as compared with healthy controls. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that TLR4 was an independent risk factor relating to severity of major depression. These findings suggest that TLRs, especially TLR4, may be involved in the psychopathology of major depression.

  17. Toll-like receptors in systemic lupus erythematosus: potential for personalized treatment

    PubMed Central

    Celhar, Teja; Fairhurst, Anna-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of tolerance to self-nuclear antigens. The symptoms of SLE, progression of pathology and the array of autoantibodies present in the serum differ significantly from patient to patient, which calls for a personalized approach to treatment. SLE is polygenic and strongly influenced by gender, ethnicity, and environmental factors. Data from genome-wide association studies suggests that polymorphisms in as many as 100 genes contribute to SLE susceptibility. Recent research has focused on genes associated with Toll-like receptors (TLRs), type I interferons, immune regulation pathways, and immune-complex clearance. TLR7 and TLR9 have been extensively studied using lupus-prone mouse models. In multiple systems overexpression of TLR7 drives disease progression but interestingly, a loss of TLR9 results in an almost identical phenotype. While TLR7 overexpression has been linked to human SLE, the possible role of TLR9 in human disease remains elusive. In the present review, we focus on TLR polymorphisms and TLR expression in SLE patients and discuss their potential as biomarkers for individualized treatment. PMID:25538618

  18. Non-cell-autonomous Neurotoxicity of α-synuclein Through Microglial Toll-like Receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changyoun; Lee, He-Jin; Masliah, Eliezer; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2016-06-01

    Synucleinopathies are a collection of neurological diseases that are characterized by deposition of α-synuclein aggregates in neurons and glia. These diseases include Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy. Although it has been increasingly clear that α-synuclein is implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and other synucleinopathies, the precise mechanism underlying the disease process remains to be unraveled. The past studies on how α-synuclein exerts pathogenic actions have focused on its direct, cell-autonomous neurotoxic effects. However, recent findings suggested that there might be indirect, non-cell-autonomous pathways, perhaps through the changes in glial cells, for the pathogenic actions of this protein. Here, we present evidence that α-synuclein can cause neurodegeneration through a non-cell-autonomous manner. We show that α-synuclein can be secreted from neurons and induces inflammatory responses in microglia, which in turn secreted neurotoxic agents into the media causing neurodegeneration. The neurotoxic response of microglia was mediated by activation of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), a receptor for neuron-derived α-synuclein. This work suggests that TLR2 is the key molecule that mediates non-cell-autonomous neurotoxic effects of α-synuclein, hence a candidate for the therapeutic target.

  19. Toll-like receptor 7 mediates early innate immune responses to malaria.

    PubMed

    Baccarella, Alyssa; Fontana, Mary F; Chen, Eunice C; Kim, Charles C

    2013-12-01

    Innate immune recognition of malaria parasites is the critical first step in the development of the host response. At present, Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is thought to play a central role in sensing malaria infection. However, we and others have observed that Tlr9(-/-) mice, in contrast to mice deficient in the downstream adaptor, Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MYD88), exhibit few deficiencies in immune function during early infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi, implying that another MYD88-dependent receptor also contributes to the antimalarial response. Here we use candidate-based screening to identify TLR7 as a key sensor of early P. chabaudi infection. We show that TLR7 mediates a rapid systemic response to infection through induction of cytokines such as type I interferons (IFN-I), interleukin 12, and gamma interferon. TLR7 is also required for induction of IFN-I by other species and strains of Plasmodium, including an etiological agent of human disease, P. falciparum, suggesting that malaria parasites harbor a common pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) recognized by TLR7. In contrast to the nonredundant requirement for TLR7 in early immune activation, sensing through both TLR7 and TLR9 was required for proinflammatory cytokine production and immune cell activation during the peak of parasitemia. Our findings indicate that TLR7 plays a central role in early immune activation during malaria infection, whereas TLR7 and TLR9 contribute combinatorially to immune responses as infection progresses.

  20. The toll of the gridiron: damage-associated molecular patterns and hypertension in American football.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cameron G; Webb, R Clinton

    2016-01-01

    American football has unequivocally been linked to elevations in blood pressure and hypertension, especially in linemen. However, the mechanisms of this increase cannot be attributed solely to increased body weight and associated cardiometabolic risk factors (e.g.,dyslipidemia or hyperglycemia). Therefore, understanding the etiology of football-associated hypertension is essential for improving the quality of life in this mostly young population, as well as for lowering the potential for chronic disease in the future. We propose that inflammatogenic damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released into the circulation from football-induced musculoskeletal trauma activate pattern-recognition receptors of the innate immune system-specifically, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and mitochondrial (mt)DNA which activate Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 and -9, respectively. Previously, we observed that circulating levels of these 2 DAMPs are increased in hypertension, and activation of TLR4 and -9 causes endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. Therefore, our novel hypothesis is that musculoskeletal injury from repeated hits in football players, particularly in linemen, leads to elevated circulating HMGB1 and mtDNA to activate TLRs on endothelial cells leading to impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation, increased vascular tone, and hypertension.

  1. Thrombomodulin promotes diabetic wound healing by regulating toll-like receptor 4 expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Lai, Chao-Han; Chen, Po-Ku; Cho, Chia-Fong; Hsu, Yun-Yan; Wang, Kuan-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Ling; Chang, Bi-Ing; Liu, Shi-Kai; Wu, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Keratinocyte-expressed thrombomodulin (TM) and the released soluble TM (sTM) have been demonstrated to promote wound healing. However, the effects of high glucose on TM expression in keratinocytes and the role of TM in diabetic ulcer remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that expressions of TM and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were both downregulated in high-glucose cultured human keratinocytes and in skin keratinocytes of diabetic patients. In addition, the wound-triggered upregulation of TM and sTM production was abolished in both high-glucose cultured human keratinocytes and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse skin. Furthermore, supplementation of recombinant sTM could increase TLR4 expression and promote cutaneous wound healing in both high-glucose cultured human keratinocytes and diabetic mice. However, in Tlr4-deleted mice, which exhibited delayed wound healing, the therapeutic benefit of recombinant sTM was abrogated. Moreover, our results showed that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression in keratinocytes was dose-dependently upregulated by glucose, and TNF-α treatment downregulated the expression of TM and TLR4. Taken together, high-glucose environment reduces the expression of TM and TLR4 in keratinocytes possibly through the action of TNF-α, and recombinant sTM can increase the TLR4 expression and promote wound healing under diabetic condition.

  2. Role of Toll-like receptors in the development of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Hironori; Ono, Satoshi; Efron, Philip A; Scumpia, Philip O; Moldawer, Lyle L; Mochizuki, Hidetaka

    2008-03-01

    The outcome of sepsis and septic shock has not significantly improved in recent decades despite the development of numerous drugs and supportive care therapies. To reduce sepsis-related mortality, a better understanding of molecular mechanism(s) associated with the development of sepsis and sepsis-related organ injury is essential. There is increasing evidence that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in the mediation of systemic responses to invading pathogens during sepsis. However, the role of TLRs in the development of sepsis and in sepsis-related organ injury remains debatable. In this review, we focus on the biological significance of TLRs during sepsis. Medline was searched for pertinent publications relating to TLRs, with emphasis on their clinical and pathophysiological importance in sepsis. In addition, a summary of the authors' own experimental data from this field was set in the context of current knowledge regarding TLRs. In both animal models and human sepsis, TLRs are highly expressed on monocytes/macrophages, and this TLR expression may not simply be a ligand-specific response in such an environment. The fact that TLR signaling enables TLRs to recognize harmful mediators induced by invading pathogens may be associated with a positive feedback loop for the inflammatory response among different cell populations. This mechanism(s) may contribute to the organ dysfunction and mortality that occurs in sepsis. A better understanding of TLR biology may unveil novel therapeutic approaches for sepsis.

  3. Induction of cytokines and chemokines by Toll-like receptor signaling: strategies for control of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zeytun, Ahmet; Chaudhary, Anu; Pardington, Paige; Cary, R; Gupta, Goutam

    2010-01-01

    Recognition of the pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) by host Toll-like receptors (TLR) is an important component of the innate immune response for countering against invading viruses, bacteria, and fungi. Upon PAMP recognition, the TLR induces intracellular signaling cascades that involve adapter, signalosome, and transcription factor complexes and result in the production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. An inflammatory response for a short duration can be beneficial because it helps to clear the infectious agent. However, prolonged inflammation can be detrimental because it may cause host toxicity and tissue damage. Indeed, excessive production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines via TLR pathways is often associated with many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Therefore, fine control of inflammation in the TLR pathway is highly desirable for effective host defense. In this article, we review intrinsic control mechanisms that include a balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, production of host effectors, and regulation at the level of adapter, signalosome, and transcription factor complexes in the TLR pathways. We also discuss how understanding of the TLR signaling steps leads to the development of small-molecule drugs that can interfere with the formation of active adapter, signalosome, and adapter complexes.

  4. Reptile Toll-like receptor 5 unveils adaptive evolution of bacterial flagellin recognition.

    PubMed

    Voogdt, Carlos G P; Bouwman, Lieneke I; Kik, Marja J L; Wagenaar, Jaap A; van Putten, Jos P M

    2016-01-07

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are ancient innate immune receptors crucial for immune homeostasis and protection against infection. TLRs are present in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish but have not been functionally characterized in reptiles despite the central position of this animal class in vertebrate evolution. Here we report the cloning, characterization, and function of TLR5 of the reptile Anolis carolinensis (Green Anole lizard). The receptor (acTLR5) displays the typical TLR protein architecture with 22 extracellular leucine rich repeats flanked by a N- and C-terminal leucine rich repeat domain, a membrane-spanning region, and an intracellular TIR domain. The receptor is phylogenetically most similar to TLR5 of birds and most distant to fish TLR5. Transcript analysis revealed acTLR5 expression in multiple lizard tissues. Stimulation of acTLR5 with TLR ligands demonstrated unique responsiveness towards bacterial flagellin in both reptile and human cells. Comparison of acTLR5 and human TLR5 using purified flagellins revealed differential sensitivity to Pseudomonas but not Salmonella flagellin, indicating development of species-specific flagellin recognition during the divergent evolution of mammals and reptiles. Our discovery of reptile TLR5 fills the evolutionary gap regarding TLR conservation across vertebrates and provides novel insights in functional evolution of host-microbe interactions.

  5. Characterization of Toll-like receptors 1-10 in spotted hyenas.

    PubMed

    Flies, Andrew S; Maksimoski, Matthew T; Mansfield, Linda S; Weldele, Mary L; Holekamp, Kay E

    2014-06-01

    Previous research has shown that spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) regularly survive exposure to deadly pathogens such as rabies, canine distemper virus, and anthrax, suggesting that they have robust immune defenses. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved molecular patterns and initiate a wide range of innate and adaptive immune responses. TLR genes are evolutionarily conserved, and assessing TLR expression in various tissues can provide insight into overall immunological organization and function. Studies of the hyena immune system have been minimal thus far due to the logistical and ethical challenges of sampling and preserving the immunological tissues of this and other long-lived, wild species. Tissue samples were opportunistically collected from captive hyenas humanely euthanized for a separate study. We developed primers to amplify partial sequences for TLRs 1-10, sequenced the amplicons, compared sequence identity to those in other mammals, and quantified TLR expression in lymph nodes, spleens, lungs, and pancreases. Results show that hyena TLR DNA and protein sequences are similar to TLRs in other mammals, and that TLRs 1-10 were expressed in all tissues tested. This information will be useful in the development of new assays to understand the interactions among the hyena immune system, pathogens, and the microbial communities that inhabit hyenas.

  6. Toll-Like Receptor Expression in the Blood and Brain of Patients and a Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    St-Amour, Isabelle; Saint-Pierre, Martine; Lamontagne-Proulx, Jérôme; Kriz, Jasna; Barker, Roger A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence supports a role for the immune system in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Importantly, recent preclinical studies are now suggesting a specific contribution of inflammation to the α-synuclein-induced pathology seen in this condition. Methods: We used flow cytometry and western blots to detect toll-like receptor 2 and 4 expression in blood and brain samples of Parkinson’s disease patients and mice overexpressing human α-synuclein. To further assess the effects of α-synuclein overexpression on the innate immune system, we performed a longitudinal study using Thy1.2-α-synuclein mice that expressed a bicistronic DNA construct (reporter genes luciferase and green fluorescent protein) under the transcriptional control of the murine toll-like receptor 2 promoter. Results: Here, we report increases in toll-like receptors 2 and 4 expression in circulating monocytes and of toll-like receptor 4 in B cells and in the caudate/putamen of Parkinson’s disease patients. Monthly bioluminescence imaging of Thy1.2-α-synuclein mice showed increasing toll-like receptor 2 expression from 10 months of age, although no change in toll-like receptor 2 and 4 expression was observed in the blood and brain of these mice at 12 months of age. Dexamethasone treatment starting at 5 months of age for 1 month significantly decreased the microglial response in the brain of these mice and promoted functional recovery as observed using a wheel-running activity test. Conclusion: Our results show that toll-like receptors 2 and 4 are modulated in the blood and brain of Parkinson’s disease patients and that overexpression of α-synuclein leads to a progressive microglial response, the inhibition of which has a beneficial impact on some motor phenotypes of an animal model of α-synucleinopathy. PMID:25522431

  7. Toll-like receptor 8 and 9 polymorphisms in Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Engin, Aynur; Arslan, Serdal; Kizildag, Sibel; Oztürk, Hasret; Elaldi, Nazif; Dökmetas, Ilyas; Bakir, Mehmet

    2010-11-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute viral hemorrhagic fever. The clinical course and outcome of the CCHF infection are different in humans. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of pathogen recognition receptors. TLR8 and TLR9 contribute to the recognition of viruses. We investigated frequency of TLR8 Met1Val, TLR8 -129C/G, TLR9 -1486T/C and TLR9 2458G/A polymorphisms in CCHF patients and healthy controls. Our study was conducted between June 1 and August 31, 2007 in Cumhuriyet University Hospital, Turkey. TLR genotypes were detected using the PCR-RFLP assay in 85 CCHF patients and 171 healthy controls. We found that heterozygous plus homozygous mutant genotypes frequency for TLR8 Met1Val and for TLR9 -1486T/C were significantly higher in CCHF patients than controls (p = 0.038 and p = 0.009, respectively). The frequency of TLR8 -129G/G genotype in the fatal CCHF patients was significantly higher than that of the non-fatal patients (p = 0.026). The frequency of TLR9 -1486C/C genotype was significantly higher in fatal CCHF patients than in healthy controls (p = 0.009) and in patients with severe disease compared to non-severe disease (p = 0.044). Our findings suggest that TLR8 Met1Val, TLR8 -129C/G, and TLR9 -1486T/C polymorphisms are important on clinical course of CCHF disease.

  8. Resistin competes with lipopolysaccharide for binding to toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Tarkowski, Andrej; Bjersing, Jan; Shestakov, Andrey; Bokarewa, Maria I

    2010-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of cellular structures activated by recognition of pathogen associated molecular sequences. The activation of TLRs triggers a variety of intracellular mechanisms aiming to protect the host from the invading microorganisms. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main ligand for TLR4. Here we show that resistin, a cystein-rich protein believed to regulate carbohydrate metabolism, competes with LPS for binding to TLR4. Binding of recombinant resistin to human myeloid and epithelial cells was assessed by flow cytometry and its co-precipitation with TLR4 was demonstrated. Antibodies against TLR4 abolished resistin binding to human leucocytes and cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to resistin stimulation. In contrast, isotype-matched murine IgG or TLR2 antibodies were unable to prevent binding of resistin to the cells. Similarly, TLR4-dependent pattern of resistin binding was observed in epithelial cell line HEK293 (human epithelial kidney cell), where TLR4 transfected, but not myeloid differentiation factor 2/CD14-transfected, TLR2 transfected or HEKnull cells, responded functionally to resistin stimulation. Intracellular signalling of resistin was assessed using inhibitors of transcription factors mitogen activated protein kinases, nuclear factor-kappaB, phosphoinositide 3-kinase and siRNA targeting TLR4 and human myeloid differentiation factor 88. Results demonstrate that TLR4 serves as a receptor for the pro-inflammatory effects of resistin in human cells. This may partly explain the multifunctional role of resistin in chronic inflammation, atherosclerosis and insulin resistance.

  9. Diverse Toll-like receptors mediate cytokine production by Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Ra; Kim, Dong-Jae; Han, Seung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Jung; Lee, Jun-Young; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2014-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) orchestrate a repertoire of immune responses in macrophages against various pathogens. Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are two important periodontal pathogens. In the present study, we investigated TLR signaling regulating cytokine production of macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans. TLR2 and TLR4 are redundant in the production of cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) in F. nucleatum- and A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected macrophages. The production of cytokines by macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans infection was impaired in MyD88-deficient macrophages. Moreover, cytokine concentrations were lower in MyD88-deficient macrophages than in TLR2/TLR4 (TLR2/4) double-deficient cells. An endosomal TLR inhibitor, chloroquine, reduced cytokine production in TLR2/4-deficient macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, and DNA from F. nucleatum or A. actinomycetemcomitans induced IL-6 production in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), which was abolished by chloroquine. Western blot analysis revealed that TLR2/4 and MyD88 were required for optimal activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, with different kinetics. An inhibitor assay showed that NF-κB and all MAPKs (p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK], and Jun N-terminal protein kinase [JNK]) mediate F. nucleatum-induced production of cytokines in macrophages, whereas NF-κB and p38, but not ERK and JNK, are involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans-mediated cytokine production. These findings suggest that multiple TLRs may participate in the cytokine production of macrophages against periodontal bacteria.

  10. Targeting Toll-like receptor 4 prevents cobalt-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Helen; Mawdesley, Amy Elizabeth; Holland, James Patrick; Kirby, John Andrew; Deehan, David John; Tyson-Capper, Alison Jane

    2016-02-16

    Cobalt-chrome alloy is a widely used biomaterial in joint replacements, dental implants and spinal rods. Although it is an effective and biocompatible material, adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) have arisen in a minority of patients, particularly in those with metal-on-metal bearing hip replacements. There is currently no treatment for ARMD and once progressive, early revision surgery of the implant is necessary. Therapeutic agents to prevent, halt or reverse ARMD would therefore be advantageous. Cobalt ions activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an innate immune receptor responsible for inflammatory responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulting in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We hypothesised that anti-TLR4 neutralising antibodies, reported to inhibit TLR4-mediated inflammation, could prevent the inflammatory response to cobalt ions in an in vitro macrophage cell culture model. This study shows that a monoclonal anti-TLR4 antibody inhibited cobalt-mediated increases in pro-inflammatory IL8, CCL20 and IL1A expression, as well as IL-8 secretion. In contrast, a polyclonal antibody did not prevent the effect of cobalt ions on either IL-8 or IL1A expression, although it did have a small effect on the CCL20 response. Interestingly, both antibodies inhibited cobalt-mediated neutrophil migration although the greater effect was observed with the monoclonal antibody. In summary our data shows that a monoclonal anti-TLR4 antibody can inhibit cobalt-mediated inflammatory responses while a polyclonal antibody only inhibits the effect of specific cytokines. Anti-TLR4 antibodies have therapeutic potential in ARMD although careful antibody design is required to ensure that the LPS response is preserved.

  11. Toll-like receptor 2 modulates the proinflammatory milieu in Staphylococcus aureus-induced brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Kielian, Tammy; Haney, Anessa; Mayes, Patrick M; Garg, Sarita; Esen, Nilufer

    2005-11-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is a pattern recognition receptor (PRR) that plays an important role in innate immune recognition of conserved structural motifs on a wide array of pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus. To ascertain the functional significance of TLR2 in the context of central nervous system (CNS) parenchymal infection, we evaluated the pathogenesis of S. aureus-induced experimental brain abscess in TLR2 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. The expression of several proinflammatory mediators, including inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2, was significantly attenuated in brain abscesses of TLR2 KO mice compared to WT mice during the acute phase of infection. Conversely, interleukin-17 (IL-17), a cytokine produced by activated and memory T cells, was significantly elevated in lesions of TLR2 KO mice, suggesting an association between innate and adaptive immunity in brain abscess. Despite these differences, brain abscess severity in TLR2 KO and WT animals was similar, with comparable mortality rates, bacterial titers, and blood-brain barrier permeability, implying a role for alternative PRRs. Expression of the phagocytic PRRs macrophage scavenger receptor type AI/AII and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) was increased in brain abscesses of both TLR2 KO and WT mice compared to uninfected animals. However, LOX-1 induction in brain abscesses of TLR2 KO mice was significantly attenuated compared to WT animals, revealing that the TLR2-dependent signal(s) influence LOX-1 expression. Collectively, these findings reveal the complex nature of gram-positive bacterial recognition in the CNS which occurs, in part, through engagement of TLR2 and highlight the importance of receptor redundancy for S. aureus detection in the CNS.

  12. Evidence of activation of the Toll-like receptor-4 proinflammatory pathway in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    García-Bueno, Borja; Gassó, Patricia; MacDowell, Karina S.; Callado, Luis F.; Mas, Sergi; Bernardo, Miguel; Lafuente, Amalia; Meana, J. Javier; Leza, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alterations in the innate immune/inflammatory system may underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, but we do not understand the mechanisms involved. The main agents of innate immunity are the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which detect molecular patterns associated with damage and pathogens. The TLR first reported was TLR4, and it is still the most studied one. Methods We aimed to describe putative modifications to the TLR4 proinflammatory pathway using 2 different strategies in 2 cohorts of patients with schizophrenia and matched controls: 1) quantification of protein and mRNA expression in postmortem prefrontal cortex samples from 30 patients with schizophrenia and 30 controls, and 2) identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with the risk of schizophrenia using whole blood samples from 214 patients with schizophrenia and 216 controls. Results We found evidence of alterations in the expression of the initial elements of the TLR4 signalling pathway (TLR4, Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 [MyD88] and nuclear factor-κ B [NF-κB]) in the PFC of patients with schizophrenia. These alterations seem to depend on the presence/absence of antipsychotic treatment at death. Moreover, a polymorphism within the MyD88 gene was significantly associated with schizophrenia risk. Limitations The use of 2 different approaches in 2 different cohorts, the lack of a complementary neuropsychiatric group, the possible confounding effects of antipsychotic treatment and suicide are the main limitations of our study. Conclusion The evidence from this dual approach suggests there is an altered innate immune response in patients with chronic schizophrenia in which the TLR4 proinflammatory pathway could be affected. Improved understanding of the stimuli and mechanisms responsible for this response could lead to improved schizophrenia treatment and better control of the side effects of current antipsychotics. PMID:27070349

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Hip1 Dampens Macrophage Proinflammatory Responses by Limiting Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation▿

    PubMed Central

    Madan-Lala, Ranjna; Peixoto, Katia Vitorello; Re, Fabio; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a highly successful human pathogen that evades host innate immunity by interfering with macrophage functions. In addition to avoiding macrophage microbicidal activities, M. tuberculosis triggers secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in macrophages. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines induced by clinical M. tuberculosis isolates are thought to play an important role in determining tuberculosis disease progression and severity, but the mechanisms by which M. tuberculosis modulates the magnitude of inflammatory responses remain unclear. Here we show that M. tuberculosis restricts robust macrophage activation and dampens proinflammatory responses through the cell envelope-associated serine hydrolase Hip1 (hydrolase important for pathogenesis 1). By transcriptionally profiling macrophages infected with either wild-type or hip1 mutant bacteria, we found that the hip1 mutant induced earlier and significantly higher levels of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We show that increased activation of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)- and MyD88-dependent signaling pathways mediates the enhanced cytokine secretion induced by the hip1 mutant. Thus, Hip1 restricts the onset and magnitude of proinflammatory cytokines by limiting TLR2-dependent activation. We also show that Hip1 dampens TLR2-independent activation of the inflammasome and limits secretion of interleukin-18 (IL-18). Dampening of TLR2 signaling does not require viable M. tuberculosis or phagocytosis but does require Hip1 catalytic activity. We propose that M. tuberculosis restricts proinflammatory responses by masking cell surface interactions between TLR2 agonists on M. tuberculosis and TLR2 on macrophages. This strategy may allow M. tuberculosis to evade early detection by host immunity, delay the onset of adaptive immune responses, and accelerate disease progression. PMID:21947769

  14. Leishmania pifanoi proteoglycolipid complex P8 induces macrophage cytokine production through Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Shanta M; Colmenares, Maria; Pestana, Karen Goldsmith; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2008-05-01

    The P8 proteoglycolipid complex (P8 PGLC) is a glyconjugate expressed by Leishmania mexicana complex parasites. We previously have shown that vaccination with P8 PGLC provides protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis in susceptible BALB/c mice. However, the biological importance of this complex remains unknown. Here we show that P8 PGLC localizes to the surface of Leishmania pifanoi amastigotes and that upon exposure to macrophages, P8 PGLC binds and induces inflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNAs such as tumor necrosis factor alpha and RANTES early after stimulation. Our studies indicate that cytokine and chemokine induction is dependent upon Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Interestingly, key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (such as interleukin-6 [IL-6], macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta, and beta interferon [IFN-beta]) that can be induced through TLR4 activation were not induced or only slightly upregulated by P8 PGLC. Activation by P8 PGLC does not occur in the presence of TLR4 alone and requires both CD14 and myeloid differentiation protein 2 for signaling; this requirement may be responsible for the limited TLR4 response. This is the first characterization of a TLR4 ligand for Leishmania. In vitro experiments indicate that L. pifanoi amastigotes induce lower levels of cytokines in macrophages in the absence of TLR4; however, notably higher IL-10/IFN-gamma ratios were found for TLR4-deficient mice than for BALB/c mice. Further, increased levels of parasites persist in BALB/c mice deficient in TLR4. Taken together, these results suggest that TLR4 recognition of Leishmania pifanoi amastigotes is important for the control of infection and that this is mediated, in part, through the P8 PGLC.

  15. The activation of liver X receptors inhibits toll-like receptor-9-induced foam cell formation.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Morello, Silvana; Chen, Shuang; Bonavita, Eduardo; Pinto, Aldo

    2010-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are related to foam cell formation (FCF), key event in the establishment/progression of atherosclerosis. The activation of TLR2 and TLR4 can increase FCF. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of TLR9 in FCF. Murine macrophages were treated with CpG-ODN, TLR9 agonist, and oxidized particles of LDL (Paz-PC) and FCF was analyzed by means of Oil Red O staining. The administration of CpG-ODN plus Paz-PC onto macrophages increased the amount of lipid droplets, correlated to increased levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IFNbeta, and IP-10. The underlying mechanism by which TLR9 ligation influenced Paz-PC in the FCF was NF-kappaB- and IRF7-dependent, as observed by higher levels of phosphorylated IkappaBalpha, increased nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit, lower levels of the total IKKalpha protein and higher release of interferon-dependent cytokines, such as IP-10. Liver X receptors (LXRs) regulate lipid cellular transport and negatively modulate TLR-dependent signaling pathways. Indeed, the addition of GW3965, synthetic LXRs agonist, significantly reduced FCF after CpG-ODN plus Paz-PC stimulation. In this condition, we observed decreased levels of the nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit, related to the higher presence of LXRalpha into the nucleus. TNF-alpha, IP-10, and IFNbeta levels were reduced by the administration of GW3965 following CpG-ODN and Paz-PC treatment. In conclusion, the activation of TLR9 facilitates the formation of foam cells in an NF-kappaB- and IRF7-dependent manner, countered by the activation of LXRs. This study further support LXRs as potential anti-atherosclerotic target.

  16. Role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 in experimental Bacillus cereus endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Novosad, Billy D; Astley, Roger A; Callegan, Michelle C

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus cereus causes a uniquely rapid and blinding intraocular infection, endophthalmitis. B. cereus replicates in the eye, synthesizes numerous toxins, and incites explosive intraocular inflammation. The mechanisms involved in the rapid and explosive intraocular immune response have not been addressed. Because Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are integral to the initial recognition of organisms during infection, we hypothesized that the uniquely explosive immune response observed during B. cereus endophthalmitis is directly influenced by the presence of TLR2, a known gram-positive pathogen recognition receptor. To address this hypothesis, we compared the courses of experimental B. cereus endophthalmitis in wild type C57BL/6J mice to that of age-matched homozygous TLR2(-/-) mice. Output parameters included analysis of bacterial growth, inflammatory cell (PMN) infiltration, cytokine/chemokine kinetics, retinal function testing, and histology, with N≥4 eyes/assay/time point/mouse strain. B. cereus grew at similar rates to10(8) CFU/eye by 12 h, regardless of the mouse strain. Retinal function was preserved to a greater degree in infected TLR2(-/-) eyes compared to that of infected wild type eyes, but infected eyes of both mouse strains lost significant function. Retinal architecture was preserved in infected TLR2(-/-) eyes, with limited retinal and vitreal cellular infiltration compared to that of infected wild type eyes. Ocular myeloperoxidase activities corroborated these results. In general, TNFα, IFNγ, IL6, and KC were detected in greater concentrations in infected wild type eyes than in infected TLR2(-/-) eyes. The absence of TLR2 resulted in decreased intraocular proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine levels and altered recruitment of inflammatory cells into the eye, resulting in less intraocular inflammation and preservation of retinal architecture, and a slightly greater degree of retinal function. These results demonstrate TLR2 is an important component of the

  17. Role of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Graft-versus-Host Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Sanfang; Zhong, Danli; Xie, Weixin; Huang, Wenfa; Jiang, Yangyang; Li, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and infection are major complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) and the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in HSCT patients. Recent work has demonstrated that the two complications are interdependent. GVHD occurs when allo-reactive donor T lymphocytes are activated by major histocompatibility antigens or minor histocompatibility antigens on host antigen-presenting cells (APCs), with the eventual attack of recipient tissues or organs. Activation of APCs is important for the priming of GVHD and is mediated by innate immune signaling pathways. Current evidence indicates that intestinal microbes and innate pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) on host APCs, including both Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), are involved in the pathogenesis of GVHD. Patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or total body irradiation before allo-HSCT are susceptible to aggravated gastrointestinal epithelial cell damage and the subsequent translocation of bacterial components, followed by the release of endogenous dangerous molecules, termed pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which then activate the PRRs on host APCs to trigger local or systemic inflammatory responses that modulate T cell allo-reactivity against host tissues, which is equivalent to GVHD. In other words, infection can, to some extent, accelerate the progression of GVHD. Therefore, the intestinal flora’s PAMPs can interact with TLRs to activate and mature APCs, subsequently activate donor T cells with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and eventually, induce GVHD. In the present article, we summarize the current perspectives on the understanding of different TLR signaling pathways and their involvement in the occurrence of GVHD. PMID:27529218

  18. Systemic Toll-Like Receptor Stimulation Suppresses Experimental Allergic Asthma and Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pham Van, Linh; Bardel, Emilie; Gomez Alcala, Alejandro; Jeannin, Pascale; Akira, Shizuo; Bach, Jean-François; Thieblemont, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Background Infections may be associated with exacerbation of allergic and autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, epidemiological and experimental data have shown that some microorganisms can also prevent these pathologies. This observation is at the origin of the hygiene hypothesis according to which the decline of infections in western countries is at the origin of the increased incidence of both Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases and Th2-mediated allergic diseases over the last decades. We have tested whether Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation can recapitulate the protective effect of infectious agents on allergy and autoimmunity. Methods and Findings Here, we performed a systematic study of the disease-modifying effects of a set of natural or synthetic TLR agonists using two experimental models, ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma and spontaneous autoimmune diabetes, presenting the same genetic background of the non obese diabetic mouse (NOD) that is highly susceptible to both pathologies. In the same models, we also investigated the effect of probiotics. Additionally, we examined the effect of the genetic invalidation of MyD88 on the development of allergic asthma and spontaneous diabetes. We demonstrate that multiple TLR agonists prevent from both allergy and autoimmunity when administered parenterally. Probiotics which stimulate TLRs also protect from these two diseases. The physiological relevance of these findings is further suggested by the major acceleration of OVA-induced asthma in MyD88 invalidated mice. Our results strongly indicate that the TLR-mediated effects involve immunoregulatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and different subsets of regulatory T cells, notably CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells for TLR4 agonists and NKT cells for TLR3 agonists. Conclusions/Significance These observations demonstrate that systemic administration of TLR ligands can suppress both allergic and autoimmune responses. They provide a

  19. Stabilized immune modulatory RNA compounds as agonists of Toll-like receptors 7 and 8

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tao; Kandimalla, Ekambar R.; Yu, Dong; Bhagat, Lakshmi; Li, Yukui; Wang, Daqing; Zhu, FuGang; Tang, Jimmy X.; Putta, Mallikarjuna R.; Cong, YanPing; Trombino, Anthony F.; Sullivan, Tim; Agrawal, Sudhir

    2007-01-01

    Viral and synthetic single-stranded RNAs are the ligands for Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR8. However, single-stranded RNA is rapidly degraded by ubiquitous RNases, and the studies reported to date have used RNA with lipid carriers. To overcome nuclease susceptibility of RNA, we have synthesized several RNAs incorporating a range of chemical modifications. The present study describes one pool of RNA compounds, referred to as stabilized immune modulatory RNA (SIMRA) compounds, in which two RNA segments are attached through their 3′ ends. SIMRA compounds showed greater stability in human serum compared with linear RNA and activated human TLR8, but not TLR7, in HEK293 cells without using lipid carriers. Interestingly, another set of SIMRA compounds containing 7-deazaguanosine substituted for natural guanosine activated human TLR7 and TLR8. Additionally, TLR7- and TLR8-activating compounds, but not the compounds that activated only TLR8, stimulated mouse immune cells in vitro and in vivo and produced dose-dependent T helper 1-type cytokines. Both types of compounds activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but only TLR7- and TLR8-activating compounds activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells and produced high levels of IFN-α. In monkeys, s.c. administration of both types of SIMRA compounds induced transient changes in peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils, and activated T lymphocytes, monocytes, and NK cells. Both types of compounds induced IFN-γ-inducible protein 10, but only the 7-deazaguanosine-containing compound that activated both TLR7 and TLR8 induced IFN-α in monkeys. This is a comprehensive study of RNA-based compounds containing structures and synthetic stimulatory motifs in mouse, monkey, and human systems without using lipid carriers. PMID:17698957

  20. Role of toll-like receptors and their adaptors in adjuvant immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Seya, Tsukasa; Akazawa, Takashi; Uehori, Junji; Matsumoto, Misako; Azuma, Ichiro; Toyoshima, Kumao

    2003-01-01

    The potentiation of immune responses to tumor-associated antigen (Ag) is a pivotal issue in immunotherapy for cancer and thus requires the use of adjuvants, which are involved in efficient antibody (Ab) production and killer cell induction. The efficacy for tumor regression of a number of adjuvants that have been applied to immunotherapy in humans and tumor-bearing animal models has been tested without understanding of the function of adjuvants. Recent findings on the function of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and their adaptors facilitated the elucidation of the molecular basis of adjuvant activity. TLR signaling was found to induce interferons (IFNs), chemokines and proinflammatory cytokines and mature dendritic cells (DCs) for enhanced efficiency in antigen presentation. The mediators then play a crucial role in the organization of acquired immunity and, together with matured DCs, activate cytotoxic T cells (CTL) and NK cells. These TLR outputs vary among adjuvants, which may depend on adjuvant-specific selection of appropriate sets of TLRs and their adaptors. Here we review how a variety of host immune responses are induced by an individual adjuvant to confer an adjuvant-specific anti-tumor immunity. We elaborate specifically on two adjuvants, BCG-cell wall skeleton and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The former activates TLR2/4 on DCs and induces tumor-specific CTL allowing general application to patients with surgically dissected cancer and improving prognosis, while the latter activates TLR3 on DCs to release type 1 IFN that induces tumor cell apoptosis and NK-mediated tumor cytotoxicity.

  1. Age-related changes in expression and function of Toll-like receptors in human skin.

    PubMed

    Iram, Nousheen; Mildner, Michael; Prior, Marion; Petzelbauer, Peter; Fiala, Christian; Hacker, Stefan; Schöppl, Alice; Tschachler, Erwin; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2012-11-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) initiate innate immune responses and direct subsequent adaptive immunity. They play a major role in cutaneous host defense against micro-organisms and in the pathophysiology of several inflammatory skin diseases. To understand the role of TLRs in the acquisition of immunological competence, we conducted a comprehensive study to evaluate TLR expression and function in the developing human skin before and after birth and compared it with adults. We found that prenatal skin already expresses the same spectrum of TLRs as adult skin. Strikingly, many TLRs were significantly higher expressed in prenatal (TLRs 1-5) and infant and child (TLRs 1 and 3) skin than in adult skin. Surprisingly, neither dendritic cell precursors in prenatal skin nor epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells in adult skin expressed TLRs 3 and 6, whereas the staining pattern and intensity of both TLRs in fetal basal keratinocytes was almost comparable to those of adults. Stimulation of primary human keratinocytes from fetal, neonatal and adult donors with selected TLR agonists revealed that the synthetic TLR3 ligand poly (I:C) specifically, mimicking viral double-stranded RNA, induced a significantly enhanced secretion of CXCL8/IL8, CXCL10/IP-10 and TNFα in fetal and neonatal keratinocytes compared with adult keratinocytes. This study demonstrates quantitative age-specific modifications in TLR expression and innate skin immune reactivity in response to TLR activation. Thus, antiviral innate immunity already in prenatal skin may contribute to protect the developing human body from viral infections in utero in a scenario where the adaptive immune system is not yet fully functional.

  2. Toll-like receptors on human mesenchymal stem cells drive their migration and immunomodulating responses.

    PubMed

    Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Coffelt, Seth B; Waterman, Ruth S; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B

    2008-01-01

    Adult human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are under study as therapeutic delivery agents that assist in the repair of damaged tissues. To achieve the desired clinical outcomes for this strategy requires a better understanding of the mechanisms that drive the recruitment, migration, and engraftment of hMSCs to the targeted tissues. It is known that hMSCs are recruited to sites of stress or inflammation to fulfill their repair function. It is recognized that toll-like receptors (TLRs) mediate stress responses of other bone marrow-derived cells. This study explored the role of TLRs in mediating stress responses of hMSCs. Accordingly, the presence of TLRs in hMSCs was initially established by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays. Flow cytometry and fluorescence immunocytochemical analyses confirmed these findings. The stimulation of hMSCs with TLR agonists led to the activation of downstream signaling pathways, including nuclear factor kappaB, AKT, and MAPK. Consequently, activation of these pathways triggered the induction and secretion of cytokines, chemokines, and related TLR gene products as established from cDNA array, immunoassay, and cytokine antibody array analyses. Interestingly, the unique patterns of affected genes, cytokines, and chemokines measured identify these receptors as critical players in the clinically established immunomodulation observed for hMSCs. Lastly, hMSC migration was promoted by TLR ligand exposure as demonstrated by transwell migration assays. Conversely, disruption of TLRs by neutralizing TLR antibodies compromised hMSC migration. This study defines a novel TLR-driven stress and immune modulating response for hMSCs that is critical to consider in the design of stem cell-based therapies.

  3. Toll-Like Receptors on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Drive their Migration and Immunomodulating Responses

    PubMed Central

    Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Coffelt, Seth B.; Waterman, Ruth S.; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Adult human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are under study as therapeutic delivery agents that assist in the repair of damaged tissues. To achieve the desired clinical outcomes for this strategy requires a better understanding of the mechanisms that drive the recruitment, migration and engraftment of hMSCs to the targeted tissues. It is known that hMSCs are recruited to sites of stress or inflammation to fulfill their repair function. It is recognized that toll-like receptors (TLRs) mediate stress responses of other bone marrow-derived cells. This study explored the role of TLRs in mediating stress responses of hMSCs. Accordingly, the presence of TLRs in hMSCs was established initially by RT-PCR assays. Flow cytometry and fluorescence immunocytochemical analyses confirmed these findings. The stimulation of hMSCs with TLR agonists led to the activation of downstream signaling pathways, including NF-κB, AKT and MAPK. Consequently, activation of these pathways triggered the induction and secretion of cytokines, chemokines and related TLR gene products as established from cDNA array, immunoassay and cytokine antibody array analyses. Interestingly, the unique patterns of affected genes, cytokines and chemokines measured, identify these receptors as critical players in the clinically established immunomodulation, observed for hMSCs. Lastly, hMSCs migration was promoted by TLR ligand exposure as demonstrated by transwell migration assays. Conversely, disruption of TLRs by neutralizing TLR antibodies compromised hMSCs migration. This study defines a novel TLR-driven stress and immune modulating response for hMSCs that is critical to consider in the design of stem cell-based therapies. PMID:17916800

  4. Anti-radiation damage effect of polyethylenimine as a toll-like receptor 5 targeted agonist.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Xing, Yaling; Qian, Yuanyu; Chen, Xiaojuan; Tu, Jian; Ren, Lening; Wang, Kai; Chen, Zhongbin

    2013-03-01

    A number of agents are now available for use in protecting against ionizing radiation. These radiation-protective agents, however, have many adverse effects. Efforts have been made to develop new radiation-protective agents for medical application. Here, we investigated whether a compound, polyethylenimine (PEI), which activates Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5)-mediated NF-kB signaling pathways, could have an anti-radiation effect on a mouse model. First, a cell-based screening model for an agonist of TLR5-mediated NF-kB pathway was established and then validated by activation of TLR5-mediated NF-kB luciferase reporter activity with a known TLR5 agonist, flagellin. We found that PEI induced dose-dependent activation of the TLR5-mediated NF-kB pathway, indicating that PEI is indeed a TLR5 agonist. Furthermore, the anti-radiation effect of polyethylenimine was assessed using a γ-ray total body irradiation (TBI) mouse model. Compared with the irradiation control, both survival time and survival rate were significantly improved in mice that received either a low dose of polyethylenimine (P= 0.019) or a high dose of polyethylenimine (P< 0.001). We also observed a positive correlation between animal body weight and survival time in mice that received a low dose of polyethylenimine, a high dose of polyethylenimine and amifostine, over a period of 30 days, r= 0.42 (P< 0.02), 0.72 (P< 0.0001) and 0.95 (P< 0.0001), respectively, while a negative correlation between animal body weight and survival time was observed in the irradiation control (r= -0.89; P< 0.0001). These results indicate that polyethylenimine is a new TLR5 agonist with potential application in offering protection for patients receiving radiotherapy or in radiation-related accidents.

  5. Immunostimulatory bioactivity of algal polysaccharides from Chlorella pyrenoidosa activates macrophages via Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Jeyashoke, Narumon; Yeh, Chin-Hsi; Song, Yuan-Jaw; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Chao, Louis Kuoping

    2010-01-27

    Much research suggests that a dietary supplement of Chlorella pyrenoidosa may be helpful to human health, but the molecular mechanism involved remains unclear. The aim of this research was to investigate the effects of certain hot-water-soluble polysaccharides from Chlorella pyrenoidosa (CWSP) on cytokine production, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression, and costimulatory molecule expression in macrophages. We demonstrated that CWSP induced IL-1beta secretion in macrophages via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mediated protein kinase signaling pathways. In addition, CWSP also stimulated the cell surface expression of HLA-DA, -DB, and -DC, and HLA-DR, -DP, and -DQ as well as the expression of costimulatory family molecules such as CD80 and CD86 in macrophages. Furthermore, we demonstrated that preinjection of C57BL/6J mice with CWSP increased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-1beta secretion into serum in vivo. This outcome was consistent with the corresponding outcome for cells treated with CWSP in vitro. Our current results provide support for the possible use of CWSP as a modulation agent of immune responses in humans and certain animal species. Finally, in using GC-MS to analyze the polysaccharides, we found that the major monosaccharides of CWSP were rhamnose (31.8%), glucose (20.42%), galactose (10.28%), mannose (5.23%), and xylose (1.27%). This study is the first to report the molecular mechanism of immune-modulated signal transduction in vitro from the polysaccharides of Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

  6. Toll-like receptor 4-positive macrophages protect mice from Pasteurella pneumotropica-induced pneumonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Marcia L.; Mosier, Derek A.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-positive macrophages in early recognition and clearance of pulmonary bacteria. TLR4 is a trans-membrane receptor that is the primary recognition molecule for lipopolysaccharide of gram-negative bacteria. The TLR4(Lps-del) mouse strains C57BL10/ScN (B10) and STOCK Abb(tm1) TLR4(Lps-del) Slc11a1(s)(B10 x C2D) are susceptible to pulmonary infections and develop pneumonia when naturally or experimentally infected by the opportunistic bacterium Pasteurella pneumotropica. Since these mice have the TLR4(Lps-del) genotype, we hypothesized that reconstitution of mice with TLR4-positive macrophages would provide resistance to this bacterium. A cultured macrophage cell line (C2D macrophages) and bone marrow cells from C2D mice were adoptively transferred to B10 and B10 x C2D mice by intraperitoneal injection. C2D macrophages increased B10 and B10 x C2D mouse resistance to P. pneumotropica. In C2D-recipient mice there was earlier transcription of tumor necrosis factor alpha and chemokines JE and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) in the lungs of B10 and B10 x C2D mice, and there was earlier transcription of KC and MIP-1alpha in B10 x C2D mice. In addition, the course of inflammation following experimental Pasteurella challenge was altered in C2D recipients. C2D macrophages also protected B10 x C2D mice, which lack CD4(+) T cells. These data indicate that macrophages are critical for pulmonary immunity and can provide host resistance to P. pneumotropica. This study indicates that TLR4-positive macrophages are important for early recognition and clearance of pulmonary bacterial infections.

  7. Toll-like receptor 4 deficiency impairs microglial phagocytosis of degenerating axons.

    PubMed

    Rajbhandari, Labchan; Tegenge, Million Adane; Shrestha, Shiva; Ganesh Kumar, Nishant; Malik, Adeel; Mithal, Aditya; Hosmane, Suneil; Venkatesan, Arun

    2014-12-01

    Microglia are rapidly activated in the central nervous system (CNS) in response to a variety of injuries, including inflammation, trauma, and stroke. In addition to modulation of the innate immune response, a key function of microglia is the phagocytosis of dying cells and cellular debris, which can facilitate recovery. Despite emerging evidence that axonal debris can pose a barrier to regeneration of new axons in the CNS, little is known of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie clearance of degenerating CNS axons. We utilize a custom micropatterned microfluidic system that enables robust microglial-axon co-culture to explore the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in microglial phagocytosis of degenerating axons. We find that pharmacologic and genetic disruption of TLR4 blocks induction of the Type-1 interferon response and inhibits phagocytosis of axon debris in vitro. Moreover, TLR4-dependent microglial clearance of unmyelinated axon debris facilitates axon outgrowth. In vivo, microglial phagocytosis of CNS axons undergoing Wallerian degeneration in a dorsal root axotomy model is impaired in adult mice in which TLR4 has been deleted. Since purinergic receptors can influence TLR4-mediated signaling, we also explored a role for the microglia P2 receptors and found that the P2X7R contributes to microglial clearance of degenerating axons. Overall, we identify TLR4 as a key player in axonal debris clearance by microglia, thus creating a more permissive environment for axonal outgrowth. Our findings have significant implications for the development of protective and regenerative strategies for the many inflammatory, traumatic, and neurodegenerative conditions characterized by CNS axon degeneration.

  8. Variants in toll-like receptor 9 gene influence susceptibility to tuberculosis in a Mexican population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection begins with the recognition of mycobacterial structural components by toll like receptors (TLRs) and other pattern recognition receptors. Our objective was to determine the influence of TLRs polymorphisms in the susceptibility to develop tuberculosis (TB) in Amerindian individuals from a rural area of Oaxaca, Mexico with high TB incidence. Methods We carried out a case–control association community based study, genotyping 12 polymorphisms of TLR2, TLR4, TLR6 and TLR9 genes in 90 patients with confirmed pulmonary TB and 90 unrelated exposed but asymptomatic household contacts. Results We found a significant increase in the frequency of the allele A of the TLR9 gene polymorphism rs352139 (A>G) in the group of TB patients (g.f. = 0.522) when compared with controls (g.f. = 0.383), (Pcorr = 0.01, OR = 1.75). Under the recessive model (A/G + A/A vs G/G) this polymorphism was also significantly associated with TB (Pcorr = 0.01, OR= 2.37). The association of the SNP rs352139 was statistically significant after adjustment by age, gender and comorbidities by regression logistic analysis (Dominant model: p value = 0.016, OR = 2.31; Additive model: p value = 0.023, OR = 1.68). The haplotype GAA of TLR9 SNPs was also associated with TB susceptibility (Pcorr = 0.02). Differences in the genotype or allele frequencies of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 polymorphisms between TB patients and healthy contacts were not detected. Conclusions Our study suggests that the allele A of the intronic polymorphism rs352139 on TLR9 gene might contribute to the risk of developing TB in Mexican Amerindians. PMID:24053111

  9. Role of gut microbiota and Toll-like receptors in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kouichi; Ohnishi, Hirohide

    2014-01-01

    Emerging data have shown a close association between compositional changes in gut microbiota and the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The change in gut microbiota may alter nutritional absorption and storage. In addition, gut microbiota are a source of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, and their compositional change can also increase the amount of TLR ligands delivered to the liver. TLR ligands can stimulate liver cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, the gut-liver axis has attracted much interest, particularly regarding the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The abundance of the major gut microbiota, including Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, has been considered a potential underlying mechanism of obesity and NAFLD, but the role of these microbiota in NAFLD remains unknown. Several reports have demonstrated that certain gut microbiota are associated with the development of obesity and NAFLD. For instance, a decrease in Akkermansia muciniphila causes a thinner intestinal mucus layer and promotes gut permeability, which allows the leakage of bacterial components. Interventions to increase Akkermansia muciniphila improve the metabolic parameters in obesity and NAFLD. In children, the levels of Escherichia were significantly increased in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) compared with those in obese control. Escherichia can produce ethanol, which promotes gut permeability. Thus, normalization of gut microbiota using probiotics or prebiotics is a promising treatment option for NAFLD. In addition, TLR signaling in the liver is activated, and its downstream molecules, such as proinflammatory cytokines, are increased in NAFLD. To data, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9 have been shown to be associated with the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Therefore, gut microbiota and TLRs are targets for NAFLD treatment. PMID:24966608

  10. Cardiolipins Act as a Selective Barrier to Toll-Like Receptor 4 Activation in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Coats, Stephen R.; Hashim, Ahmed; Paramonov, Nikolay A.; Curtis, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intestinal homeostasis mechanisms must protect the host intestinal tissue from endogenous lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) produced by the intestinal microbiota. In this report, we demonstrate that murine intestinal fecal lipids effectively block Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) responses to naturally occurring Bacteroidetes sp. LPS. Cardiolipin (CL) represents a significant proportion of the total intestinal and fecal lipids and, furthermore, potently antagonizes TLR4 activation by reducing LPS binding at the lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), CD14, and MD-2 steps of the TLR4 signaling pathway. It is further demonstrated that intestinal lipids and CL are less effective at neutralizing more potent Enterobacteriaceae-type LPS, which is enriched in feces obtained from mice with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-treated inflammatory bowel disease. The selective inhibition of naturally occurring LPS structures by intestinal lipids may represent a novel homeostasis mechanism that blocks LPS activation in response to symbiotic but not dysbiotic microbial communities. IMPORTANCE The guts of animals harbor a variety of Gram-negative bacteria associated with both states of intestinal health and states of disease. Environmental factors, such as dietary habits, can drive the microbial composition of the host animal's intestinal bacterial community toward a more pathogenic state. Both beneficial and harmful Gram-negative bacteria are capable of eliciting potentially damaging inflammatory responses from the host intestinal tissues via a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-dependent pathway. Physical mucosal barriers and antibodies produced by the intestinal immune system protect against the undesired inflammatory effects of LPS, although it is unknown why some bacteria are more effective at overcoming the protective barriers than others. This report describes the discovery of a lipid-type protective barrier in the intestine that reduces the deleterious effects of LPSs from beneficial

  11. Cinnamaldehyde suppresses toll-like receptor 4 activation mediated through the inhibition of receptor oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyung S; Lee, Jun K; Choi, Yong J; Saitoh, Shin I; Miyake, Kensuke; Hwang, Daniel H; Lee, Joo Y

    2008-01-15

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a critical role in induction of innate immune and inflammatory responses by recognizing invading pathogens or non-microbial endogenous molecules. TLRs have two major downstream signaling pathways, MyD88- and TRIF-dependent pathways leading to the activation of NFkappaB and IRF3 and the expression of inflammatory mediators. Deregulation of TLR activation is known to be closely linked to the increased risk of many chronic diseases. Cinnamaldehyde (3-phenyl-2-propenal) has been reported to inhibit NFkappaB activation induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli and to exert anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial effects. However, the underlying mechanism has not been clearly identified. Our results showed that cinnamaldehyde suppressed the activation of NFkappaB and IRF3 induced by LPS, a TLR4 agonist, leading to the decreased expression of target genes such as COX-2 and IFNbeta in macrophages (RAW264.7). Cinnamaldehyde did not inhibit the activation of NFkappaB or IRF3 induced by MyD88-dependent (MyD88, IKKbeta) or TRIF-dependent (TRIF, TBK1) downstream signaling components. However, oligomerization of TLR4 induced by LPS was suppressed by cinnamaldehyde resulting in the downregulation of NFkappaB activation. Further, cinnamaldehyde inhibited ligand-independent NFkappaB activation induced by constitutively active TLR4 or wild-type TLR4. Our results demonstrated that the molecular target of cinnamaldehyde in TLR4 signaling is oligomerization process of receptor, but not downstream signaling molecules suggesting a novel mechanism for anti-inflammatory activity of cinnamaldehyde.

  12. Differential involvement of IFN-beta in Toll-like receptor-stimulated dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Katsuaki; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Iwabe, Tomio; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo

    2002-10-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) can activate dendritic cells (DC) through common signaling pathways requiring a cytoplasmic adapter, MyD88. However, the signaling is differentially regulated among TLR family members. TLR4 can activate MyD88-deficient bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC), and lead to induction of IFN-inducible genes and up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40, implying that the MyD88-independent signaling pathway functions downstream of TLR4. Because these effects can also be induced by type I IFN, we have analyzed whether type I IFN is involved in TLR4-induced responses. In response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), IFN-beta gene expression was augmented in both wild-type and MyD88-deficient BMDC. Expression of all IFN-inducible genes except immune-responsive gene 1 (IRG1) was abolished and CD40 up-regulation was decreased in LPS-stimulated BMDC lacking either IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFN-alpha/betaR) or signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1). Similar to the LPS response, TLR9 signaling can also induce expression of IFN-beta and IFN-inducible genes, and up-regulation of CD40. However, all these effects were MyD88 dependent. Thus, in TLR4 signaling, IFN-beta expression can be induced either by the MyD88-dependent or -independent pathway, whereas, in TLR9 signaling, it is dependent on MyD88. In CpG DNA-stimulated DC, expression of IFN-inducible genes except IRG1 was dependent on type I IFN signaling as in LPS-stimulated DC. However, in contrast to TLR4 signaling, TLR9 signaling requires type I IFN signaling for CD40 up-regulation. Taken together, this study demonstrates differential involvement of type I IFN in TLR4- and TLR9-induced effects on DC.

  13. The heterogeneous allelic repertoire of human toll-like receptor (TLR) genes.

    PubMed

    Georgel, Philippe; Macquin, Cécile; Bahram, Seiamak

    2009-11-17

    Toll-Like Receptors (TLR) are critical elements of the innate arm of the vertebrate immune system. They constitute a multigenic family of receptors which collectively bind a diverse array of--exogeneous as well as endogeneous--ligands. An exponential burst of knowledge has defined their biological role in fight against infections and generation/modulation of auto-immune disorders. Hence, they could at least be conceptually recognized--despite being structurally unrelated - as innate counterparts to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecules--equally recognizing antigenic ligands (albeit structurally more homogeneous i.e., peptides), again derived from self and/or non-self sources--preeminent this time in adaptive immunity. Our great disparities in face of infections and/or susceptibility to auto-immune diseases have provoked an intense search for genetic explanations, in part satisfied by the extraordinary MHC allelic repertoire. An equally in-depth and systematic analysis of TLR diversity is lacking despite numerous independent reports of a growing number of SNPs within these loci. The work described here aims at providing a preliminary picture of the allelic repertoire--and not purely SNPs--of all 10 human TLR coding sequences (with exception of TLR3) within a single cohort of up to 100 individuals. It appears from our work that TLR are unequally polymorphic: TLR2 (DNA alleles: 7/protein alleles: 3), 4 (4/3), 7 (6/3), 8 (9/2) and 9 (8/3) being comparatively least diverse whereas TLR1 (11/10), 5 (14/12), 6 (10/8) and 10 (15/10) show a substantial number of alleles. In addition to allelic assignment of a large number of SNPs, 10 new polymorphic positions were hereby identified. Hence this work depicts a first overview of the diversity of almost all human TLR genes, a prelude for large-scale population genetics as well as genetic association studies.

  14. Histone Deacetylase 7 Promotes Toll-like Receptor 4-dependent Proinflammatory Gene Expression in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Shakespear, Melanie R.; Hohenhaus, Daniel M.; Kelly, Greg M.; Kamal, Nabilah A.; Gupta, Praveer; Labzin, Larisa I.; Schroder, Kate; Garceau, Valerie; Barbero, Sheila; Iyer, Abishek; Hume, David A.; Reid, Robert C.; Irvine, Katharine M.; Fairlie, David P.; Sweet, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Broad-spectrum inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) constrain Toll-like receptor (TLR)-inducible production of key proinflammatory mediators. Here we investigated HDAC-dependent inflammatory responses in mouse macrophages. Of the classical Hdacs, Hdac7 was expressed at elevated levels in inflammatory macrophages (thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages) as compared with bone marrow-derived macrophages and the RAW264 cell line. Overexpression of a specific, alternatively spliced isoform of Hdac7 lacking the N-terminal 22 amino acids (Hdac7-u), but not the Refseq Hdac7 (Hdac7-s), promoted LPS-inducible expression of Hdac-dependent genes (Edn1, Il-12p40, and Il-6) in RAW264 cells. A novel class IIa-selective HDAC inhibitor reduced recombinant human HDAC7 enzyme activity as well as TLR-induced production of inflammatory mediators in thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages. Both LPS and Hdac7-u up-regulated the activity of the Edn1 promoter in an HDAC-dependent fashion in RAW264 cells. A hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1 binding site in this promoter was required for HDAC-dependent TLR-inducible promoter activity and for Hdac7- and HIF-1α-mediated trans-activation. Coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that both Hdac7-u and Hdac7-s interacted with HIF-1α, whereas only Hdac7-s interacted with the transcriptional repressor CtBP1. Thus, Hdac7-u positively regulates HIF-1α-dependent TLR signaling in macrophages, whereas an interaction with CtBP1 likely prevents Hdac7-s from exerting this effect. Hdac7 may represent a potential inflammatory disease target. PMID:23853092

  15. Neuroprotection of donepezil against morphine-induced apoptosis is mediated through Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Shafie, Alireza; Moradi, Farshid; Izadpanah, Esmael; Mokarizadeh, Aram; Moloudi, Mohammad Raman; Nikzaban, Mehrnoush; Hassanzadeh, Kambiz

    2015-10-05

    Previously, we had shown that donepezil provides anti-apoptotic effects associated with the prevention of morphine tolerance to the analgesic effect. In this regard, the present study aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms involved in this effect considering the possible role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2,4, and the balance between pre-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl family proteins. To this end, male Wistar rats received daily morphine in combination with either normal saline or donepezil (0.5, 1, or 1.5 mg/kg, ip). The analgesic effect was assessed by the plantar test apparatus. The latency was recorded when the animal responded to the light stimulus. On the 15th day, when no significant difference was observed between morphine and saline groups in terms of analgesia, the frontal cortex and lumbar spinal cord of the animals were dissected. Then, TLR2 and 4, Bcl2, and Bax mRNA fold changes were calculated using Real-time PCR method. The results indicated no significant analgesic effect in the morphine group compared with the saline treated animals after 15 days of injection, while daily co-administration of donepezil with morphine preserved significant analgesia. Moreover, Quantitative PCR showed that morphine significantly increased TLRs and Bax gene expressions and decreased the anti-apoptotic Bcl2. In contrast, donepezil prevented these morphine induced changes in the mentioned gene expressions. Taken together, the results suggest that the neuroprotective effects of donepezil in attenuating morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis are mediated by preventing morphine-induced changes in TLR2 and 4 gene expressions.

  16. Toll-like receptor-4 pathway is required for the pathogenesis of human chronic endometritis

    PubMed Central

    JU, JINFEN; LI, LIANGPENG; XIE, JINGYAN; WU, YAN; WU, XI; LI, WEIHON

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signal transduction is a central component of the primary innate immune response to pathogenic challenge. TLR4, a member of the TLR family, is highly expressed in the endometrial cells of the uterus and could thus be a key link between human chronic endometritis (CE) and the immune system. However, the exact biological function of TLR4 in human CE remains largely unexplored. The present study aimed to examine the role of TLR4 in human CE. A comprehensive expression and activation analysis of TLR4 in the endometrial cells of the uterus from patients with human CE (n=25) and normal endometrial (NE) tissue (n=15) was performed. Western blot analyses demonstrated that compared with NE, the protein expression TLR4 markedly increased in human CE. Endometrial tissue scrapings were also used for total RNA extraction and were transcribed and amplified by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that significant upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and downregulation of IL-10 mRNA was observed in CE compared with the NE group. Furthermore, the protein of the signaling adapter myeloid differentiation factor-88 and the accessory molecules (TNF receptor associated factor 6 and transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1) were also detected in all the assayed tissues. Of note, differential expression (CE versus NE) was observed by immunoblotting at each level of the nuclear factor-κB signaling cascade, including inhibitor κBα and P65 (all P<0.05). The altered TLR4 and its corresponding downstream signaling molecules in CE cells may be of relevance for the progression of the human CE. These findings indicate that the evaluation of expression patterns of TLR4 holds promise for the treatment of human CE. PMID:25371751

  17. Lipopolysaccharide and toll-like receptor 4 in dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts.

    PubMed

    Tivers, M S; Lipscomb, V J; Smith, K C; Wheeler-Jones, C P D; House, A K

    2015-12-01

    Surgical attenuation of a congenital portosystemic shunt (CPSS) results in increased portal vein perfusion, liver growth and clinical improvement. Portal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is implicated in liver regeneration via toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 mediated cytokine activation. The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with LPS in dogs with CPSS. Plasma LPS concentrations were measured in the peripheral and portal blood using a limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. LPS concentration was significantly greater in the portal blood compared to peripheral blood in dogs with CPSS (P = 0.046) and control dogs (P = 0.002). LPS concentrations in the peripheral (P = 0.012) and portal (P = 0.005) blood of dogs with CPSS were significantly greater than those of control dogs. The relative mRNA expression of cytokines and TLRs was measured in liver biopsies from dogs with CPSS using quantitative PCR. TLR4 expression significantly increased following partial CPSS attenuation (P = 0.020). TLR4 expression was significantly greater in dogs that tolerated complete CPSS attenuation (P = 0.011) and those with good portal blood flow on pre-attenuation (P = 0.004) and post-attenuation (P = 0.015) portovenography. Serum interleukin (IL)-6 concentration was measured using a canine specific ELISA and significantly increased 24 h following CPSS attenuation (P < 0.001). Portal LPS was increased in dogs with CPSS, consistent with decreased hepatic clearance. TLR4 mRNA expression was significantly associated with portal blood flow and increased following surgery. These findings support the concept that portal LPS delivery is important in the hepatic response to surgical attenuation. Serum IL-6 significantly increased following surgery, consistent with LPS stimulation via TLR4, although this increase might be non-specific.

  18. Regulation of toll-like receptor 3 activation by S100A9

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Su-Yu; Segovia, Jesus A.; Chang, Te-Hung; Shil, Niraj K.; Pokharel, Swechha M.; Kannan, T.R.; Baseman, Joel B.; Defrêne, Joan; Pagé, Nathalie; Cesaro, Annabelle; Tessier, Philippe A.; Bose, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of viral dsRNA by endosomal toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) activates innate immune response during virus infection. Trafficking of TLR3 to the endo-lysosomal (EL) compartment arising from fusion of late endosome (LE) with lysosome is required for recognition and detection of Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMP). PAMP detection results in activation of TLR3-dependent signaling cascade. Existing knowledge about the mechanism(s) and cellular factor(s) governing TLR3 trafficking is limited. In the current study we have identified intracellular S100A9 protein as a critical regulator of TLR3 trafficking. S100A9 was required for maturation of TLR3 containing early endosome (EE) into LE, the compartment that fuses with lysosome to form EL compartment. Drastic reduction in cytokine production was observed in S100A9 knockout (KO) primary macrophages following RNA virus infection and treatment of cells with polyIC (a dsRNA mimetic that acts as a TLR3 agonist). Mechanistic studies revealed co-localization and interaction of S100A9 with TLR3 following polyIC treatment. S100A9-TLR3 interaction was critical for maturation of TLR3 containing EE into LE since TLR3 could not be detected in the LE of polyIC treated S100A9 KO macrophages. Subsequently, TLR3 failed to co-localize with its agonist (i.e. biotin-labeled polyIC) in S100A9 deficient macrophages. The in vivo physiological role of S100A9 was evident from loss of cytokine production in polyIC treated S100A9 KO mice. Thus, we have identified intracellular S100A9 as a regulator of TLR3 signaling and demonstrated that S100A9 functions during pre-TLR3 activation stages by facilitating maturation of TLR3 containing EE into LE. PMID:26385519

  19. Role of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) 2 in Experimental Bacillus cereus Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Novosad, Billy D.; Astley, Roger A.; Callegan, Michelle C.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus cereus causes a uniquely rapid and blinding intraocular infection, endophthalmitis. B. cereus replicates in the eye, synthesizes numerous toxins, and incites explosive intraocular inflammation. The mechanisms involved in the rapid and explosive intraocular immune response have not been addressed. Because Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are integral to the initial recognition of organisms during infection, we hypothesized that the uniquely explosive immune response observed during B. cereus endophthalmitis is directly influenced by the presence of TLR2, a known Gram-positive pathogen recognition receptor. To address this hypothesis, we compared the courses of experimental B. cereus endophthalmitis in wild type C57BL/6J mice to that of age-matched homozygous TLR2-/- mice. Output parameters included analysis of bacterial growth, inflammatory cell (PMN) infiltration, cytokine/chemokine kinetics, retinal function testing, and histology, with N≥4 eyes/assay/time point/mouse strain. B. cereus grew at similar rates to108 CFU/eye by 12 h, regardless of the mouse strain. Retinal function was preserved to a greater degree in infected TLR2-/- eyes compared to that of infected wild type eyes, but infected eyes of both mouse strains lost significant function. Retinal architecture was preserved in infected TLR2-/- eyes, with limited retinal and vitreal cellular infiltration compared to that of infected wild type eyes. Ocular myeloperoxidase activities corroborated these results. In general, TNFα, IFNγ, IL6, and KC were detected in greater concentrations in infected wild type eyes than in infected TLR2-/- eyes. The absence of TLR2 resulted in decreased intraocular proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine levels and altered recruitment of inflammatory cells into the eye, resulting in less intraocular inflammation and preservation of retinal architecture, and a slightly greater degree of retinal function. These results demonstrate TLR2 is an important component of the initial

  20. Potentiation and tolerance of toll-like receptor priming in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Koch, Stephen R; Lamb, Fred S; Hellman, Judith; Sherwood, Edward R; Stark, Ryan J

    2017-02-01

    Repeated challenge of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alters the response to subsequent LPS exposures via modulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Whether activation of other TLRs can modulate TLR4 responses, and vice versa, remains unclear. Specifically with regards to endothelial cells, a key component of innate immunity, the impact of TLR cross-modulation is unknown. We postulated that TLR2 priming (via Pam3Csk4) would inhibit TLR4-mediated responses while TLR3 priming (via Poly I:C) would enhance subsequent TLR4-inflammatory signaling. We studied human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and neonatal human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). Cells were primed with a combination of Poly I:C (10 μg/ml), Pam3Csk4 (10 μg/ml), or LPS (100 ng/ml), then washed and allowed to rest. They were then rechallenged with either Poly I:C, Pam3Csk4 or LPS. Endothelial cells showed significant tolerance to repeated LPS challenge. Priming with Pam3Csk4 also reduced the response to secondary LPS challenge in both cell types, despite a reduced proinflammatory response to Pam3Csk4 in HMVECs compared to HUVECs. Poly I:C priming enhanced inflammatory and interferon producing signals upon Poly I:C or LPS rechallenge, respectively. Poly I:C priming induced interferon regulatory factor 7, leading to enhancement of interferon production. Finally, both Poly I:C and LPS priming induced significant changes in receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 activity. Pharmacological inhibition of receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 or interferon regulatory factor 7 reduced the potentiated phenotype of TLR3 priming on TLR4 rechallenge. These results demonstrate that in human endothelial cells, prior activation of TLRs can have a significant impact on subsequent exposures and may contribute to the severity of the host response.

  1. Toll-like receptor responses to Peste des petits ruminants virus in goats and water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, Sakthivel; Biswas, Moanaro; Vignesh, Ambothi R; Ramya, R; Raj, Gopal Dhinakar; Tirumurugaan, Krishnaswamy G; Raja, Angamuthu; Kataria, Ranjit S; Parida, Satya; Elankumaran, Subbiah; Subbiah, Elankumaran

    2014-01-01

    Ovine rinderpest or goat plague is an economically important and contagious viral disease of sheep and goats, caused by the Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). Differences in susceptibility to goat plague among different breeds and water buffalo exist. The host innate immune system discriminates between pathogen associated molecular patterns and self antigens through surveillance receptors known as Toll like receptors (TLR). We investigated the role of TLR and cytokines in differential susceptibility of goat breeds and water buffalo to PPRV. We examined the replication of PPRV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of Indian domestic goats and water buffalo and demonstrated that the levels of TLR3 and TLR7 and downstream signalling molecules correlation with susceptibility vs resistance. Naturally susceptible goat breeds, Barbari and Tellichery, had dampened innate immune responses to PPRV and increased viral loads with lower basal expression levels of TLR 3/7. Upon stimulation of PBMC with synthetic TLR3 and TLR7 agonists or PPRV, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines were found to be significantly higher while immunosuppressive interleukin (IL) 10 levels were lower in PPRV resistant Kanni and Salem Black breeds and water buffalo at transcriptional level, correlating with reduced viralloads in infected PBMC. Water buffalo produced higher levels of interferon (IFN) α in comparison with goats at transcriptional and translational levels. Pre-treatment of Vero cells with human IFNα resulted in reduction of PPRV replication, confirming the role of IFNα in limiting PPRV replication. Treatment with IRS66, a TLR7 antagonist, resulted in the reduction of IFNα levels, with increased PPRV replication confirming the role of TLR7. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of TLR7 of these goat breeds did not show any marked nucleotide differences that might account for susceptibility vs resistance to PPRV. Analyzing other host genetic factors might provide

  2. Local Interleukin-1-Driven Joint Pathology Is Dependent on Toll-Like Receptor 4 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Koenders, Marije I.; van den Brand, Ben T.; van de Loo, Fons A.J.; van den Berg, Wim B.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory destructive diseases through the recognition of endogenous ligands produced on either inflammation or degeneration of the extracellular matrix. The presence of endogenous TLR agonists has been reported in rheumatoid joints. In the present study, we investigated the significance of TLR2 and TLR4 activation by locally- produced endogenous ligands in the severity of joint inflammation and destruction. Local joint pathology independent of systemic immune activation was induced by overexpression of interleukin (IL)-1 and TNF in naive joints using adenoviral gene transfer. Here, we report that at certain doses, IL-1-induced local joint inflammation, cartilage proteoglycan depletion, and bone erosion are dependent on TLR4 activation, whereas TLR2 activation is not significantly involved. In comparison, tumor necrosis factor α-driven joint pathology seemed to be less dependent on TLR2 and TLR4. The severity of IL-1-induced bone erosion and irreversible cartilage destruction was markedly reduced in TLR4−/− mice, even though the degree of inflammation was similar, suggesting uncoupled processes. Furthermore, the expression of cathepsin K, a marker for osteoclast activity, induced by IL-1β was dependent on TLR4. Overexpression of IL-1β in the joint as well as ex vivo IL-1 stimulation of patellae provoked the release of endogenous TLR4 agonists capable of inducing TLR4-mediated cytokine production. These data emphasize the potential relevance of TLR4 activation in rheumatoid arthritis, particularly with respect to IL-1-mediated joint pathology. PMID:19834062

  3. Chronic exposure to indoxacarb and pulmonary expression of toll-like receptor-9 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sandeep; Mukhopadhyay, C. S.; Sethi, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Chronic exposure to indoxacarb and pulmonary expression of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR-9) in mice. Materials and Methods: In this study, healthy male Swiss albino mice (n=30) aging 8-10 weeks were used to evaluate TLR-9 expression in lungs of mice following indoxacarb exposure with and without lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Indoxacarb was administered orally dissolved in groundnut oil at 4 and 2 mg/kg/day for 90 days. On day 91, five animals from each group were challenged with LPS/normal saline solution at 80 µg/animal. The lung tissues were processed for real time and immunohistochemical studies. Results: LPS resulted increase in fold change m-RNA expression level of TLR-9 as compare to control, while indoxacarb (4 mg/kg) alone and in combination with LPS resulted 16.21-fold change and 29.4-fold change increase in expression of TLR-9 m-RNA, respectively, as compared to control. Similarly, indoxacarb (2 mg/kg) alone or in combination with LPS also altered TLR-9 expression. Further at protein level control group showed minimal expression of TLR-9 in lungs as compare to other groups, however, LPS group showed intense positive staining in bronchial epithelium as well as in alveolar septal cells. Indoxacarb at both doses individually showed strong immuno-positive reaction as compare to control, however when combined with LPS resulted intense staining in airway epithelium as compare to control. Conclusion: Chronic oral administration of indoxacarb for 90 days (4 and 2 mg/kg) alters expression of TLR-9 at m-RNA and protein level and co-exposure with LPS exhibited synergistic effect. PMID:27956782

  4. Toll-like receptor 2 activation and serum amyloid A regulate smooth muscle cell extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Christopher A.; Best, Michael; Rich, Celeste B.; Stone, Phillip J.

    2017-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells contribute to extracellular matrix remodeling during atherogenesis. De-differentiated, synthetic smooth muscle cells are involved in processes of migration, proliferation and changes in expression of extracellular matrix components, all of which contribute to loss of homeostasis accompanying atherogenesis. Elevated levels of acute phase proteins, including serum amyloid A (SAA), are associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis. Although infection with periodontal and respiratory pathogens via activation of inflammatory cell Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 has been linked to vascular disease, little is known about smooth muscle cell TLR2 in atherosclerosis. This study addresses the role of SAA and TLR2 activation on smooth muscle cell matrix gene expression and insoluble elastin accumulation. Cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells were treated with SAA or TLR2 agonists and the effect on expression of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and tropoelastin studied. SAA up-regulated MMP9 expression. Tropoelastin is an MMP9 substrate and decreased tropoelastin levels in SAA-treated cells supported the concept of extracellular matrix remodeling. Interestingly, SAA-induced down-regulation of tropoelastin was not only evident at the protein level but at the level of gene transcription as well. Contributions of proteasomes, nuclear factor κ B and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β on regulation of MMP9 vs. tropoleastin expression were revealed. Effects on Mmp9 and Eln mRNA expression persisted with long-term SAA treatment, resulting in decreased insoluble elastin accumulation. Interestingly, the SAA effects were TLR2-dependent and TLR2 activation by bacterial ligands also induced MMP9 expression and decreased tropoelastin expression. These data reveal a novel mechanism whereby SAA and/or infection induce changes in vascular elastin consistent with atherosclerosis. PMID:28257481

  5. Toll-like receptor 2 agonist exacerbates renal injury in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fanglin; Zhang, Ningyu; Li, Zhiming; Deng, Lihua; Zhang, Jianjie; Zhou, Yunfeng

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is a ligand-activated membrane-bound receptor, which induces an inflammatory response, thus serving a crucial role in the pathogenesis of DN. The present study aimed to determine whether a TLR2 agonist, Pam3CysSK4, modulates the development of DN. A mouse model of DN was induced using streptozotocin (STZ) and, following the confirmation of hyperglycemia, mice were treated with or without Pam3CysSK4. Pathological and functional markers, including the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, expression of TLR2, inflammatory infiltration, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were assessed. STZ-treated mice exhibited elevated blood glucose levels and increased serum creatinine levels, which increased further following Pam3CysSK4 treatment. In addition, Pam3CysSK4 treatment was observed to increase podocyte foot process formation. Furthermore, STZ-induced renal glomerular sclerosis was significantly exacerbated in Pam3CysSK4-treated mice. Pam3CysSK4-treated mice also exhibited increased levels of collagen IV following renal immunostaining, associated with increased macrophage infiltration. Renal expression of TLR2 was markedly elevated in STZ-induced mice; this was further increased in Pam3CysSK4-treated mice, accompanied by upregulation of proinflammatory genes and activation of NF-κB. This indicates that enhanced renal expression of TLR2 is associated with inflammatory infiltration in DN and demonstrates that renal injury was exacerbated by the TLR2 agonist in diabetic mice.

  6. A toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) variant is associated with asthma severity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Qin-Fu; Zhao, Yu-Miao; Li, Dan-Dan; Shi, Xiao-Ya; Zhao, Jun-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a complex airways disease resulting from the input of both biological and environmental factors. Previous studies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which produces a protein involved in regulating T cell populations, have presented conflicting results regarding its role in asthma severity. In the current study, individuals with asthma were genotyped for variants of TLR4, and the genotypes were compared with asthma severity and T cell subpopulations. TLR4 rs11536879 (A>G) and rs1927907 (G>A) genotypes were determined in 350 asthma patients using TaqMan. Asthma severity was graded by clinical symptoms, and blood markers and lung function measures were also collected. T cell subpopulations were identified from peripheral blood by flow cytometry. No significant correlations were observed between genotypes at TLR4 rs11536879 or rs1927907 and eosinophil counts, total serum IgE, serum hypersensitive C-reactive protein, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%), or FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) in asthma patients (P > 0.05). However, the GG genotype of rs1927907 was correlated with higher asthma severity (P < 0.05). No associations were detected between genotypes at rs11536879 or rs1927907 and CD4+CD25high regulatory T cell counts in peripheral blood from asthmatic patients (P > 0.05), but the rs1927907 genotype was associated with TLR4 expression on the surface of CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells (P < 0.05). Therefore, the TLR4 variant rs1927907 appears to be related to asthma severity and TLR4 expression on the surface of CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells, suggesting the potential influence of TLR4 on T cell population balances. PMID:26221339

  7. Expression and functionality of Toll-like receptor 3 in the megakaryocytic lineage

    PubMed Central

    D’Atri, L. P.; Etulain, J.; Rivadeneyra, L.; Lapponi, M. J.; Centurion, M.; Cheng, K.; Yin, H.; Schattner, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background In addition to their key role in hemostasis, platelets and megakaryocytes also regulate immune and inflammatory responses, in part through their expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Among the TLRs, TLR3 recognizes double-stranded (ds) RNA associated with viral infection. Thrombocytopenia is a frequent complication of viral infection. However, the expression and functionality of TLR3 in megakaryocytes and platelets is not yet well understood. Objective To study the expression and functionality of TLR3 in the megakaryocytic lineage. Methods and Results RT-PCR, flow cytometric, and immunofluorescence assays showed that TLR3 is expressed in CD34+ cells, megakaryocytes, and platelets. Immunoblotting assays showed that stimulation of megakaryocytes with two synthetic agonists of TLR3, Poly(I:C) and Poly(A:U), activated the NF-κB, PI3K/Akt, ERK1/2, and p38 pathways. TLR3-megakaryocyte activation resulted in reduced platelet production in vitro and IFN-β release through the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways. TLR3 ligands potentiated the aggregation mediated by classical platelet agonists. This effect was also observed for ATP release, but not for P-selectin or CD40L membrane exposure, indicating that TLR3 activation was not involved in alpha granule release. In addition, TLR3 agonists induced activation of the NF-κB, PI3K/Akt, and ERK1/2 pathways in platelets. Reduction of platelet production and platelet fibrinogen binding mediated by Poly(I:C) or Poly(A:U) were prevented by the presence of an inhibitor of TLR3/dsRNA complex. Conclusions Our findings indicate that functional TLR3 is expressed in CD34+ cells, megakaryocytes, and platelets, and suggest a potential role for this receptor in the megakaryo/thrombopoiesis alterations that occur in viral infections. PMID:25594115

  8. Toll-like receptor 2-mediated alternative activation of microglia is protective after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Stirling, David P; Cummins, Karen; Mishra, Manoj; Teo, Wulin; Yong, V Wee; Stys, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Improving neurological outcome after spinal cord injury is a major clinical challenge because axons, once severed, do not regenerate but 'dieback' from the lesion site. Although microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the brain and spinal cord respond rapidly to spinal cord injury, their role in subsequent injury or repair remains unclear. To assess the role of microglia in spinal cord white matter injury we used time-lapse two-photon and spectral confocal imaging of green fluorescent protein-labelled microglia, yellow fluorescent protein-labelled axons, and Nile Red-labelled myelin of living murine spinal cord and revealed dynamic changes in white matter elements after laser-induced spinal cord injury in real time. Importantly, our model of acute axonal injury closely mimics the axonopathy described in well-characterized clinically relevant models of spinal cord injury including contusive-, compressive- and transection-based models. Time-lapse recordings revealed that microglia were associated with some acute pathophysiological changes in axons and myelin acutely after laser-induced spinal cord injury. These pathophysiological changes included myelin and axonal spheroid formation, spectral shifts in Nile Red emission spectra in axonal endbulbs detected with spectral microscopy, and 'bystander' degeneration of axons that survived the initial injury, but then succumbed to secondary degeneration. Surprisingly, modulation of microglial-mediated release of neurotoxic molecules failed to protect axons and myelin. In contrast, sterile stimulation of microglia with the specific toll-like receptor 2 agonist Pam2CSK4 robustly increased the microglial response to ablation, reduced secondary degeneration of central myelinated fibres, and induced an alternative (mixed M1:M2) microglial activation profile. Conversely, Tlr2 knock out: Thy1 yellow fluorescent protein double transgenic mice experienced greater axonal dieback than littermate controls. Thus, promoting an alternative

  9. Effect of smoking on the genetic makeup of toll-like receptors 2 and 6

    PubMed Central

    Kohailan, Muhammad; Alanazi, Mohammad; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Alamri, Abdullah; Parine, Narasimha Reddy; Alhadheq, Abdullah; Basavarajappa, Santhosh; Abdullah Al-Kheraif, Abdul Aziz; Semlali, Abdelhabib

    2016-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for lung cancer, asthma, and oral cancer, and is central to the altered innate immune responsiveness to infection. Many hypotheses have provided evidence that cigarette smoking induces more genetic changes in genes involved in the development of many cigarette-related diseases. This alteration may be from single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in innate immunity genes, especially the toll-like receptors (TLRs). Objective In this study, the genotype frequencies of TLR2 and TLR6 in smoking and nonsmoking population were examined. Methods Saliva samples were collected from 177 smokers and 126 nonsmokers. The SNPs used were rs3804100 (1350 T/C, Ser450Ser) and rs3804099 (597 T/C, Asn199Asn) for TLR2 and rs3796508 (979 G/A, Val327Met) and rs5743810 (745 T/C, Ser249Pro) for TLR6. Results Results showed that TLR2 rs3804100 has a significant effect in short-term smokers (OR =2.63; P=0.04), and this effect is not observed in long-term smokers (>5 years of smoking). Therefore, this early mutation may be repaired by the DNA repair system. For TLR2 rs3804099, the variation in genotype frequencies between the smokers and control patients was due to a late mutation, and its protective role appears only in long-term smokers (OR =0.40, P=0.018). In TLR6 rs5743810, the TT genotype is significantly higher in smokers than in nonsmokers (OR =6.90). The effect of this SNP is observed in long-term smokers, regardless of the smoking regime per day. Conclusion TLR2 (rs3804100 and rs3804099) and TLR6 (rs5743810) can be used as a potential index in the diagnosis and prevention of more diseases caused by smoking. PMID:27920557

  10. Insights into the Relationship between Toll Like Receptors and Gamma Delta T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Asif Amin; Patil, Rushikesh Sudam; Chiplunkar, Shubhada Vivek

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is an important aspect of cancer biology that contributes to tumor initiation, tumor progression and responses to therapy. The composition and characteristics of the tumor microenvironment vary widely and are important in determining the anti-tumor immune response. Successful immunization requires activation of both innate and adaptive immunity. Generally, immune system is compromised in patients with cancer due to immune suppression, loss of tumor antigen expression and dysfunction of antigen presenting cells (APC). Thus, therapeutic immunization leading to cancer regression remains a significant challenge. Certain cells of the immune system, including dendritic cells (DCs) and gamma delta (γδ) T cells are capable of driving potent anti-tumor responses. The property of MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity, high potential of cytokine release, tissue tropism and early activation in infections and malignant disease makes γδ T cells as an emerging candidate for immunotherapy. Various strategies are being developed to enhance anti-tumor immune responses of γδ T cells and DCs one of them is the use of novel adjuvants like toll like receptors (TLR) agonists, which enhance γδ T cell function directly or through DC activation, which has ability to prime γδ T cells. TLR agonists are being used clinically either alone or in combination with tumor antigens and has shown initial success in both enhancing immune responses and eliciting anti-tumor activity. TLR activated γδ T cells and DCs nurture each other’s activation. This provides a potent base for first line of defense and manipulation of the adaptive response against pathogens and cancer. The available data provides a strong rationale for initiating combinatorial therapy for the treatment of diseases and this review will summarize the application of adjuvants (TLRs) for boosting immune response of γδ T cells to treat cancer and infectious diseases and their use in combinatorial therapy

  11. Toll-like receptor-2 and -4 are associated with hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Jun; Wang, Chao; Song, Guangyao; Zang, Sha-Sha; Liu, Yi-Xuan; Li, Ling

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that toll-like receptors (TLRs) contribute to insulin resistance, and that fatty acids have a role in TLR activation. Other studies have found that TLR2 and TLR4 upregulation is consistent with an increase in serum lipid. Therefore, it was hypothesized that TLRs are associated with hyperlipidemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether TLR2 or TLR4 was associated with hyperlipidemia and to provide novel targets for hyperlipidemia therapy. Volunteers were selected at the Medical Examination Center of Hebei General Hospital (Shijiazhuang, China), including 43 patients with high triglyceride (TG) levels, 84 with high total cholesterol (TC) levels and 55 with high TG and high TC levels. In addition, 68 healthy volunteers were selected as a control group. For the animal study, the TLR gene and protein levels were assessed in the skeletal muscle of rats fed a high‑fat diet. As expected, TLR2 and TLR4 gene expression were upregulated when TC increased, TG increased, or TC and TG increased. In rats fed a high‑fat diet, the levels of gene and protein expression in the skeletal muscle of the two TLRs were all increased compared with the control group, this was consistent with an increase in TC and TG. In addition, in drug treatment groups the mRNA and protein expression levels of TLR in the skeletal muscle of rats fed a high fat diet were decreased, as were the TC and TG levels. In conclusion, these findings suggest that TLR2 and TLR4 are associated with hyperlipidemia.

  12. Comprehensive Logic Based Analyses of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signal Transduction Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Padwal, Mahesh Kumar; Sarma, Uddipan; Saha, Bhaskar

    2014-01-01

    Among the 13 TLRs in the vertebrate systems, only TLR4 utilizes both Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-domain-containing adapter interferon-β-inducing Factor (TRIF) adaptors to transduce signals triggering host-protective immune responses. Earlier studies on the pathway combined various experimental data in the form of one comprehensive map of TLR signaling. But in the absence of adequate kinetic parameters quantitative mathematical models that reveal emerging systems level properties and dynamic inter-regulation among the kinases/phosphatases of the TLR4 network are not yet available. So, here we used reaction stoichiometry-based and parameter independent logical modeling formalism to build the TLR4 signaling network model that captured the feedback regulations, interdependencies between signaling kinases and phosphatases and the outcome of simulated infections. The analyses of the TLR4 signaling network revealed 360 feedback loops, 157 negative and 203 positive; of which, 334 loops had the phosphatase PP1 as an essential component. The network elements' interdependency (positive or negative dependencies) in perturbation conditions such as the phosphatase knockout conditions revealed interdependencies between the dual-specific phosphatases MKP-1 and MKP-3 and the kinases in MAPK modules and the role of PP2A in the auto-regulation of Calmodulin kinase-II. Our simulations under the specific kinase or phosphatase gene-deficiency or inhibition conditions corroborated with several previously reported experimental data. The simulations to mimic Yersinia pestis and E. coli infections identified the key perturbation in the network and potential drug targets. Thus, our analyses of TLR4 signaling highlights the role of phosphatases as key regulatory factors in determining the global interdependencies among the network elements; uncovers novel signaling connections; identifies potential drug targets for infections. PMID:24699232

  13. Activation of Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Attenuates Adaptive Thermogenesis via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Okla, Meshail; Wang, Wei; Kang, Inhae; Pashaj, Anjeza; Carr, Timothy; Chung, Soonkyu

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive thermogenesis is the cellular process transforming chemical energy into heat in response to cold. A decrease in adaptive thermogenesis is a contributing factor to obesity. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the compromised adaptive thermogenesis in obese subjects have not yet been elucidated. In this study we hypothesized that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation and subsequent inflammatory responses are key regulators to suppress adaptive thermogenesis. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6 mice were either fed a palmitate-enriched high fat diet or administered with chronic low-dose LPS before cold acclimation. TLR4 stimulation by a high fat diet or LPS were both associated with reduced core body temperature and heat release. Impairment of thermogenic activation was correlated with diminished expression of brown-specific markers and mitochondrial dysfunction in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT). Defective sWAT browning was concomitant with elevated levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. Consistently, TLR4 activation by LPS abolished cAMP-induced up-regulation of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in primary human adipocytes, which was reversed by silencing of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Moreover, the inactivation of ER stress by genetic deletion of CHOP or chemical chaperone conferred a resistance to the LPS-induced suppression of adaptive thermogenesis. Collectively, our data indicate the existence of a novel signaling network that links TLR4 activation, ER stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby antagonizing thermogenic activation of sWAT. Our results also suggest that TLR4/ER stress axis activation may be a responsible mechanism for obesity-mediated defective brown adipose tissue activation. PMID:26370079

  14. Toll-like receptor 4 D299G polymorphism in metabolic disorders: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Belforte, F S; Coluccio Leskow, F; Poskus, E; Penas Steinhardt, A

    2013-04-01

    The toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a key role in the activation of innate immune response participating in the recognition of lipopolysaccharides. Changes in the innate immune response are involved in the pathogenesis of some metabolic disorders such as metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (Met-S and T2DM). It has been recently shown the role of gut microbiota in the perpetuation of both insulin resistance and low-grade chronic inflammation. Some studies have reported that TLR4 D299G polymorphism is associated with metabolic disorders, however results have been inconsistent. Two recent meta-analyses showed that D299G is associated with inflammatory bowel disease and gastrointestinal cancers risk, two pathological states in which the luminal microbial flora-host cells interaction may be implicated. We conducted a systemic review of the published data considering all eligible published studies (six studies with 1696 cases and 3388 controls for D299G) and a meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the association between TLR4 D299G polymorphism and the risk for metabolic disorders. Five studies were identified for T2DM: three corresponding to Caucasian populations and two to mixed populations. The remaining study analyzed Met-S in a Caucasian population. We observed a significant association between D299G polymorphism and metabolic disorders (T2DM and Met-S) risk (OR = 0.566, 95 % CI: 0.347-0.925, p = 0.023) particularly in Caucasians. No association was found in mixed population subgroup. Our meta-analysis identified that the AG/GG genotypes of D299G are associated with decreased metabolic disorders risk.

  15. Developmental expression of Toll-like receptors in the guinea pig lung

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lingjie; Yang, Jiali; Yang, Li; Shi, Juan; Xue, Jing; Li, Yong; Liu, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    The guinea pig is a useful model for investigating infectious and non-infectious lung diseases due to the sensitivity of its respiratory system and susceptibility to infectious agents. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important components of the innate immune response and are critical for lung immune function. In the present study, the differentiation of epithelial cells in the guinea pig lung was examined during gestation by studying anatomic morphology and the major epithelial cell types using cell type-specific markers. The developmental expression of all 9 TLRs and the TLR signaling adaptors myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF-6) were investigated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting analysis. The formation of lung lobes in guinea pigs was observed at 45 days of gestation (dGA), along with the expression of the basal cell marker keratin 14 and the alveolar type II cell marker pro-surfactant protein. However, the cube cell marker secretoglobin family1A member 1 and ciliated cell marker b-tubulin IV were only detected in the lungs from 52 dGA onward. The expression levels of all TLRs, MyD88 and TRAF-6 were determined in lung tissues harvested from embryos, newborn, postnatal and adult animals. The expression levels of all TLR signaling components displayed similar dynamic expression patterns with gestation age and postnatal maturation time, except for TLR-4 and TLR-7. mRNA expression levels of TLR components were significantly increased in the lungs at 45 and 52 dGA, compared with later developmental stages. These results suggest that TLR expression in the guinea pig lung is developmentally regulated, enhancing the understanding of lung biology in guinea pig models. PMID:28098883

  16. Practical techniques for detection of Toll-like receptor-4 in the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Ungaro, Ryan; Abreu, Maria T; Fukata, Masayuki

    2009-01-01

    The human intestine has evolved in the presence of a diverse array of luminal microorganisms. In order to maintain intestinal homeostasis, mucosal immune responses to theses microorganisms must be tightly regulated. The intestine needs to be able to respond to pathogenic organisms while at the same time maintain tolerance to normal commensal flora. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in this delicate balance. TLRs are transmembrane noncatalytic receptor proteins that induce activation of innate and adaptive immune responses to microorganisms by recognizing structurally conserved molecular patterns of microbes. Expression of TLRs by intestinal epithelial cell is normally down-regulated to maintain immune tolerance to the luminal microorganisms.One of the challenges of TLR research in the human intestine is that it is difficult for many experimental methods to detect very low expression of TLRs within the intestinal mucosa. Quantitative methods such as PCR are limited in their ability to detect TLR expression by specific cell types within a tissue sample, which can be important when studying the contribution of TLR signaling to pathological conditions. In this regard, immunohistochemistry (IHC) is advantageous in that one can visualize the distribution and localization of target proteins within both normal and pathologic parts of a given tissue sample. We found that a subset of human colorectal cancers over-express TLR4 by means of immunofluorescence (IF) and IHC methods. Localization of TLR4 within cancer tissue often appears to be patchy, making IHC an appropriate way to examine these changes. We will describe our current techniques to detect TLR4 in paraffin-embedded human large intestine sections. Establishing a practical IHC technique that may provide consistent results between laboratories will significantly enhance understanding of the role of TLRs in human intestinal health and disease.

  17. Toll-like receptor 4 promotes fibrosis in bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, X X; Jiang, D Y; Huang, X X; Guo, S L; Yuan, W; Dai, H P

    2015-12-21

    The specific role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis of mice, a model of human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, has not been characterized. We injected bleomycin intratracheally into TLR4 knockout (TLR4(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) mice. Twenty-one days after injection, mice were sacrificed and their lungs were harvested for pathological, hydroxyproline, mRNA expression, and collagen I analyses. Body weight changes and mortality were observed. Light microscopy showed that lung fibrosis was minimal in TLR4(-/-) compared to that in WT mice on day 21 after bleomycin instillation. The Ashcroft score was significantly lower in TLR4(-/-) than in WT mice (3.667 ± 0.730 vs 4.945 ± 0.880, P < 0.05). Hydroxyproline content was significantly lower in TLR4(-/-) than in WT mice on day 21 after bleomycin injection (0.281 ± 0.022 vs 0.371 ± 0.047, P < 0.05). Compared to WT mice, bleomycin-treated TLR4(-/-) mice expressed significantly lower type I collagen mRNA levels (mesenchymal marker; 11.069 ± 2.627 vs 4.589 ± 1.440, P < 0.05). Collagen I was significantly lower in TLR4(-/-) than in WT mice (0.838 ± 0.352 vs 2.427 ± 0.551, P < 0.05). Bleomycin-treated TLR4(-/-) mice had a significantly lower mortality rate on day 21 than WT mice (33 vs 75%, P < 0.05). Body weight reduction was lower in TLR4(-/-) mice than in WT mice; this difference was not statistically significant (-3.735 ± 5.276 vs -6.698 ± 3.218, P > 0.05). Thus, bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is TLR4-dependent and TLR4 promoted fibrosis in bleomycin-challenged mice.

  18. Toll-Like Receptors Expression in Follicular Cells of Patients with Poor Ovarian Response

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Seyed Abdolvahab; Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Karimian, Leili; Joghataie, Mohammad Taghi; Aflatoonian, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor ovarian response (POR) to gonadotropin stimulation has led to a significant decline in success rate of fertility treatment. The immune system may play an important role in pathophysiology of POR by dysfunctions of cytokines and the growth factor network, and the presence of ovarian auto-antibodies. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of toll-like receptors (TLR) 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 genes in follicular cells and concentration of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), as major parts of innate immunity, in follicular fluid (FF) obtained from POR women in comparison with normal women. Materials and Methods In this case-control study, 20 infertile POR patients and 20 normal women took part in this study and underwent controlled ovarian stimulation. The FF was obtained from the largest follicle (>18 mm). The FF was centrifuged and cellular pellet was then used for evaluation of expression of TLRs and COX2 genes by real-time PCR. FF was used for quantitative analysis for IL-6, IL-8 and MIF by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results TLR1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and COX2 gene expression were significantly higher in POR (p<0.05). Concentration of IL-6, IL-8 and MIF proteins was significantly increased in POR compared with normal women (p<0.05). Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that the immune system may be involved in pathophysiology of POR through TLRs. PMID:25083184

  19. Racial Variation in Toll-like Receptor Variants Among Women With Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Brandie D.; Darville, Toni; Ferrell, Robert E.; Ness, Roberta B.; Haggerty, Catherine L.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Racial disparities exist in gynecological diseases. Variations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes may alter signaling following microbial recognition. Methods. We explored genotypic differences in 6 functional variants in 4 TLR genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR6) and the adaptor molecule TIRAP between 205 African American women and 51 white women with clinically suspected pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). A permutated P < .007 was used to assess significance. Associations between race and endometritis and/or upper genital tract infection (UGTI) were explored. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results. The TT genotype for TLR1 rs5743618, the GG genotype for TLR1 rs4833095, the CC genotype for TLR2 rs3804099, the TLR6 rs5743810 T allele, and the CC genotype for TIRAP rs8177374 significantly differed between races (P < .007). African American race was associated with endometritis and/or UGTI (OR, 4.2 [95% CI, 2.0–8.7]; P = .01). Among African Americans, the TLR6 rs5743810 T allele significantly decreased endometritis and/or UGTI (OR, 0.4 [95% CI, .2–.9]; P = .04). Additionally, rs5743618, rs4833095, and rs8177374 increased endometritis and/or UGTI, albeit not significantly. Conclusions. Among women with PID, TLR variants that increase inflammation are associated with African American race and may mediate the relationship between race and endometritis and/or UGTI. PMID:23255565

  20. Toll-like receptor recognition of bacteria in fish: ligand specificity and signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Kong, Xianghui; Zhou, Chuanjiang; Li, Li; Nie, Guoxing; Li, Xuejun

    2014-12-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognize the conserved molecular structure of pathogens and trigger the signaling pathways that activate immune cells in response to pathogen infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the first and best characterized innate immune receptors. To date, at least 20 TLR types (TLR1, 2, 3, 4, 5M, 5S, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, and 26) have been found in more than a dozen of fish species. However, of the TLRs identified in fish, direct evidence of ligand specificity has only been shown for TLR2, TLR3, TLR5M, TLR5S, TLR9, TLR21, and TLR22. Some studies have suggested that TLR2, TLR5M, TLR5S, TLR9, and TLR21 could specifically recognize PAMPs from bacteria. In addition, other TLRs including TLR1, TLR4, TLR14, TLR18, and TLR25 may also be sensors of bacteria. TLR signaling pathways in fish exhibit some particular features different from that in mammals. In this review, the ligand specificity and signal pathways of TLRs that recognize bacteria in fish are summarized. References for further studies on the specificity for recognizing bacteria using TLRs and the following reactions triggered are discussed. In-depth studies should be continuously performed to identify the ligand specificity of all TLRs in fish, particularly non-mammalian TLRs, and their signaling pathways. The discovery of TLRs and their functions will contribute to the understanding of disease resistance mechanisms in fish and provide new insights for drug intervention to manipulate immune responses.