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Sample records for 43-foot-long s0 truss

  1. STS-110 S0 Truss Removed From Cargo Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Backdropped against the blackness of space and the Earth's horizon, the S0 (S-zero) truss is removed from Atlantis' cargo bay and onto the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) by Astronauts Ellen Ochoa, STS-110 mission specialist, and Daniel W. Bursch, Expedition Four flight engineer, using the ISS' Canadarm2. Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, prepared the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long S0 truss and preparing the first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000-pound S0 truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the STS-110 mission included the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and it was the first time all of a Shuttle crew's spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  2. STS-112 crew in front of S0 Truss Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building, the STS-112 crew stands under the S0 Integrated Truss Structure, waiting to be transported to the launch pad for mission STS-110. From left are Mission Specialist David Wolf, Pilot Pam ela Melroy; Commander Jeffrey Ashby; and Mission Specialist Piers Sellers. Mission STS-112 will be ferrying the S1 ITS to the International Space Station on its scheduled Aug. 15 flight. The S1 truss will be attached to the S0 truss

  3. STS-110 payload S0 Truss is moved to payload canister in O&C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building, an overhead crane carries the Integrated Truss Structure S0 from its workstand toward the payload canister. The S0 truss will be transported to the launch pad for mission STS-110. Part of the payload, the S0 truss will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS), at the center of the 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field on the ISS. The S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' on the 11-day mission. Launch is scheduled for April 4.

  4. STS-110 payload S0 Truss is lifted into payload changeout room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The payload canister with the S0 Integrated Truss Structure arrives at the launch pad for transfer to Space Shuttle Atlantis's payload bay. Part of the payload on mission STS-110, the S0 truss will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS). The S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' on the 11-day mission. Launch is scheduled for April 4.

  5. STS-110 payload S0 Truss in Payload Changeout Room at LC-39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the payload changeout room, workers watch as the doors of the payload canister open to reveal the S0 Integrated Truss Structure. The truss will be moved into the PCR and then transferred to Space Shuttle Atlantis's payload bay. Part of the payload on mission STS-110, the S0 truss will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS). The S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' on the 11-day mission. Launch is scheduled for April 4.

  6. STS-110 payload S0 Truss is moved to payload canister in O&C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building, the Integrated Truss Structure S0 is ready to be moved to the payload canister for transport to the launch pad for mission STS-110. Part of the payload, the S0 truss will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS), at the center of the 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field on the ISS. The S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' on the 11-day mission. Launch is scheduled for April 4.

  7. STS-110 payload S0 Truss is moved to payload canister in O&C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building, an overhead crane carries the Integrated Truss Structure S0 to the payload canister which will transport it to the launch pad for mission STS-110. Seen below the truss is the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Donatello, currently not in use. The S0 truss will be part of the payload on Space Shuttle Atlantis. The S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' on the 11-day mission, becoming the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS). Launch is scheduled for April 4.

  8. STS-110 S0 Truss in O&C building ready for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Operations and Checkout Building, the Integrated Truss Structure S0 is ready for transport to the launch pad on mission STS-110. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day mission will feature Space Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet.

  9. A Super Guppy aircraft delivers the S0 truss to KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The 'Super Guppy' transport aircraft approaches the runway at the KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. On board is the S0 (S Zero) truss segment, from Boeing in Huntington Beach, Calif. The truss segment, which will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS), is a 44- by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch. It will be at the center of the 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field on the ISS. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 truss on-orbit. During processing at KSC, the S0 truss will have installed the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108.

  10. STS-110 payload S0 Truss is moved to payload canister in O&C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Operations and Checkout Building watch as the Integrated Truss Structure S0 is lowered into the payload canister. The S0 truss will soon be on its way to the launch pad for mission STS-110. Part of the payload on Space Shuttle Atlantis, the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' on the 11-day mission, becoming the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS). Launch is scheduled for April 4.

  11. STS-110 payload S0 Truss is lifted into payload changeout room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the launch pad, the payload canister with the S0 Integrated Truss Structure moves up the Rotating Service Structure to the payload changeout room for transfer to Space Shuttle Atlantis's payload bay. Part of the payload on mission STS-110, the S0 truss will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS). The S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' on the 11-day mission. Launch is scheduled for April 4.

  12. STS-110 payload S0 Truss is lifted into payload changeout room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the launch pad, the payload canister with the S0 Integrated Truss Structure is lifted up the Rotating Service Structure to the payload changeout room for transfer to Space Shuttle Atlantis's payload bay. Part of the payload on mission STS-110, the S0 truss will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS). The S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' on the 11-day mission. Launch is scheduled for April 4.

  13. A Super Guppy aircraft delivers the S0 truss to KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    After landing at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, the 'Super Guppy' transport aircraft opens to reveal its cargo, a S0 (S Zero) truss segment, from Boeing in Huntington Beach, Calif. The truss segment, which will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS), is a 44- by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch. It will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. During processing at KSC, the S0 truss will have installed the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108.

  14. A Super Guppy aircraft delivers the S0 truss to KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, workers watch as a S0 (S Zero) truss segment built for the International Space Station (ISS) is moved out of the 'Super Guppy' aircraft that brought it to KSC from Boeing in Huntington Beach, Calif. At right a cameraman records the exercise. The truss segment, which will become the backbone of the orbiting ISS, is a 44- by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch. It will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. During processing at KSC, the Canadian Mobile Transporter will be installed on the S0 truss, followed by power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108.

  15. A Super Guppy aircraft delivers the S0 truss to KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, the 'Super Guppy' transport aircraft touches down on the runway. On board the aircraft is the S0 (S Zero) truss segment, from Boeing in Huntington Beach, Calif. The truss segment, which will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS), is a 44- by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch. It will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on- orbit. During processing at KSC, the S0 truss will have installed the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108.

  16. STS-110 payload S0 Truss is moved to payload canister in O&C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Integrated Truss Structure S0 arrives at the payload canister in the Operations and Checkout Building for transfer to the launch pad for mission STS-110. Part of the payload on Space Shuttle Atlantis, the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' on the 11-day mission, becoming the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS). Launch is scheduled for April 4.

  17. STS-110 payload S0 Truss is lifted into payload changeout room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the launch pad, workers prepare the payload canister for its lift to the payload changeout room above. Part of the payload on mission STS-110, the S0 truss will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS). The S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' on the 11-day mission. Launch is scheduled for April 4.

  18. STS-110 crew in front of S0 truss in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-110 crew poses under the Integrated Truss Structure S0, ready for transport to the launch pad. Standing left to right are Mission Specialist Jerry Ross, Pilot Stephen Frick, Mission Specialist Lee Morin, Commander Michael Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Ellen Ochoa and Steven Smith. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day STS-110 mission will feature Space Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet.

  19. STS-110 M.S. Morin and Walheim with S0 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-110 Mission Specialists Lee Morin and Rex Walheim look up at the S0 Integrated Truss Structure, part of the payload on their mission to the International Space Station. Crew members are at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that include the payload familiarization and a simulated launch countdown. Mission STS-110 is scheduled for launch April 4.

  20. A crane is lowered toward the S0 truss to transfer it to a workstand in the

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside the Operations and Checkout Bldg. (O&C), workers (at left) watch over the maneuvering of the overhead crane toward the S0 truss segment below it. The S0 truss will undergo processing in the O&C during which the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes will be installed. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. A 44- by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch, the truss will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108.

  1. A crane moves toward the S0 truss to transfer it to a workstand in the O&C Bldg.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside the Operations and Checkout Bldg. (O&C), an overhead crane is centered over the S0 truss segment before lowering. The crane will move it to a workstand in the O&C where it will undergo processing. In the foreground is the protective cover just removed. During the processing, the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes will be installed. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. A 44- by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch, the truss will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108.

  2. International Space Station Sports a New Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This close-up view of the International Space Station (ISS), newly equipped with its new 27,000-pound S0 (S-zero) truss, was photographed by an astronaut aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-110 during its ISS flyaround mission while pulling away from the ISS. The STS-110 mission prepared the Station for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long S0 truss and preparing the first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and was the first time all of a shuttle crew's spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  3. International Space Station Sports a New Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This close-up view of the International Space Station (ISS), newly equipped with its new 27,000- pound S0 (S-zero) truss, was photographed by an astronaut aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-110 mission following its undocking from the ISS. The STS-110 mission prepared the Station for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long S0 truss and preparing the first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and was the first time all of a shuttle crew's spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  4. International Space Station Sports a New Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This close-up view of the International Space Station (ISS), newly equipped with its new 27,000-pound S0 (S-zero) truss, was photographed by an astronaut aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-110 upon its ISS flyaround mission while pulling away from the ISS. The STS-110 mission prepared the Station for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long S0 truss and preparing the first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the station and was the first time all of a Shuttle crew's spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  5. International Space Station Sports a New Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This close-up view of the International Space Station (ISS), newly equipped with its new 27,000-pound S0 (S-zero) truss, was photographed by an astronaut aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-110 mission following its undocking from the ISS. The STS-110 mission prepared the Station for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long S0 truss and preparing the first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and was the first time all of a Shuttle crew's spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  6. International Space Station Sports a New Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This close-up view of the International Space Station (ISS), newly equipped with its new 27,000-pound S0 (S-zero) truss, was photographed by an astronaut aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-110 during its ISS flyaround mission while pulling away from the ISS. The STS-110 mission prepared the Station for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long S0 truss and preparing the first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000-pound S0 truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and was the first time all of a Shuttle crew's spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  7. STS-110 Astronaut Morin Totes S0 Keel Pins During EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Hovering in space some 240 miles above the blue and white Earth, STS-110 astronaut M.E. Morin participates in his first ever and second of four scheduled space walks for the STS-110 mission. He is seen toting one of the S0 (S-Zero) keel pins which were removed from their functional position on the truss and attached on the truss' exterior for long term stowage. The 43-foot-long, 27,000 pound S0 truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the International Space Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. The mission completed the installations and preparations of the S0 truss and the Mobile Transporter within four space walks. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver space walkers around the Station and was the first time all of a shuttle crew's space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis STS-110 mission was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  8. P1 Truss Radiator assembly processing at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers prepare to attach an overhead crane to the radiator assembly that just arrived. The radiator is part of the payload on mission STS-113, which also includes the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, on the International Space Station. Once delivered, the will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002

  9. P1 Truss Radiator assembly processing at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers oversee the lowering of the newly arrived radiator assembly onto a workstand. The radiator is part of the payload on mission STS-113, which also includes the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, on the International Space Station. Once delivered, the will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002

  10. P1 Truss Radiator assembly processing at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane moves the newly arrived radiator assembly toward a workstand. The radiator is part of the payload on mission STS-113, which also includes the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, on the International Space Station. Once delivered, the will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002

  11. P1 Truss Radiator assembly processing at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers help guide the newly arrived radiator assembly onto a workstand. The radiator is part of the payload on mission STS-113, which also includes the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, on the International Space Station. Once delivered, the will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002

  12. STS-112 S1 Truss is transported to the payload canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An overhead crane moves the S1 Integrated Truss Structure toward the payload canister, which will transport it to Atlantis. The first starboard truss segment, the S1 will be attached to the Central truss segment, the S0 Truss, on the International Space Station during mission STS-112. Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2.

  13. STS-112 S1 Truss is transported to the payload canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The S1 Integrated Truss Structure is lowered into the payload canister for transport to Atlantis. The first starboard truss segment, the S1 will be attached to the Central truss segment, the S0 Truss, on the International Space Station during mission STS-112. Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2.

  14. STS-112 S1 Truss is transported to the payload canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An overhead crane moves the S1 Integrated Truss Structure toward the payload canister below, which will transport it to Atlantis. The first starboard truss segment, the S1 will be attached to the Central truss segment, the S0 Truss, on the International Space Station during mission STS-112. Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2.

  15. Newly Installed S-1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three sessions of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). Its primary mission was to install the Starboard (S1) Integrated Truss Structure and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the International Space Station (ISS). The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space Station's railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts. This is a view of the newly installed S1 Truss as photographed during the mission's first scheduled EVA. The Station's Canadarm2 is in the foreground. Visible are astronauts Piers J. Sellers (lower left) and David A. Wolf (upper right), both STS-112 mission specialists.

  16. STS-113 Mission Specialists review data on the P1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-113 Mission Specialists John Herrington (left) and Michael Lopez-Alegria (right) look over the P1 Integrated Truss Structure, the primary payload for the mission. The P1 truss will be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, during spacewalks. The payload also includes the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002

  17. STS-113 Mission Specialists review data on the P1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-113 Mission Specialists John Herrington (left) and Michael Lopez-Alegria (right) look over the P1 Integrated Truss Structure, the primary payload for the mission. The P1 truss will be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, during spacewalks. The payload also includes the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002.

  18. STS-113 Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria looks over the P1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-113 Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria looks over the P1 Integrated Truss Structure, the primary payload for the mission. The P1 truss will be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, during spacewalks. The payload also includes the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002.

  19. STS-112 S1 Truss is transported to the payload canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers inside the payload canister watch the S1 Integrated Truss Structure as it is lowered toward them. The canister will transport the truss to Atlantis. The first starboard truss segment, the S1 will be attached to the Central truss segment, the S0 Truss, on the International Space Station during mission STS-112. Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2.

  20. STS-113 P1 Truss payload in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians use an overhead crane to lower the P1 Truss Segment into the payload canister. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  1. STS-113 P1 Truss payload in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, the P1 Truss Segment is lowered into the payload canister. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  2. STS-113 P1 Truss payload in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians prepare the P1 Truss Segment to be hooked to the overhead crane and moved toward the payload canister. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station's central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  3. STS-113 P1 Truss payload in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, the P1 Truss Segment is moved by overhead crane through the highbay toward the payload canister. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  4. P-1 truss arrival at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved from the Shuttle Landing Facility toward the newly constructed RLV hangar (viewed here from inside the hangar) as precaution against bad weather approaching the Center (background). The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. In the background is the Super Guppy transport that brought it to KSC. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P- 1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  5. P-1 truss arrival at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, arrives inside the RLV hangar, located near the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC. Approaching bad weather caused the detour as a precaution. The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by- 15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  6. P-1 truss arrival at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers oversee the placement of the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, onto a flatbed truck that will move it to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P- 1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  7. P-1 truss moves into O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, sits inside the Operations and Checkout Building where it will undergo processing. The truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  8. STS-112 S1 truss in Payload Changeout Room at Launch Pad 39-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The payload canister is ready to be opened in the Payload Changeout Room at the pad. Inside is the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, primary payload on mission STS-112 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. The first starboard truss segment, the S1 will be attached to the Central truss segment, the S0 Truss, on the International Space Station during the mission. Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2.

  9. STS-112 S1 Truss is transported to the payload canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An overhead crane lifts the S1 Integrated Truss Structure from its workstand. The S1 will be placed in the payload canister for transport it to Atlantis. The first starboard truss segment, the S1 will be attached to the Central truss segment, the S0 Truss, on the International Space Station during mission STS-112. Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2.

  10. STS-112 S1 Truss is transported to the payload canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An overhead crane moves the S1 Integrated Truss Structure above over other equipment to get to the payload canister for transport to Atlantis. The first starboard truss segment, the S1 will be attached to the Central truss segment, the S0 Truss, on the International Space Station during mission STS-112. Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2.

  11. Synchronously deployable truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G. (Inventor); Mikulas, M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A collapsible-expandable truss structure, including first and second spaced surface truss layers having an attached core layer is described. The surface truss layers are composed of a plurality of linear struts arranged in multiple triangular configurations. Each linear strut is hinged at the center and hinge connected at each end to a nodular joint. A passive spring serves as the expansion force to move the folded struts from a stowed collapsed position to a deployed operative final truss configuration. A damper controls the rate of spring expansion for the synchronized deployment of the truss as the folded configuration is released for deployment by the restrain belts. The truss is synchronously extended under the control of motor driven spools.

  12. STS-113 P1 Truss payload arrives at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Complex 39A, the P1 Truss Segment arrives at the pad for transfer into the Payload Changeout Room. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113 to the International Space Station. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  13. STS-113 P1 Truss payload arrives at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Complex 39A, the P1 Truss Segment is lifted to the level of the Payload Changeout Room. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113 to the International Space Station. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  14. STS-113 Mission Specialists review data on the P1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-113 Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria (left) and John Herrington (center) review data on the P1 Integrated Truss Structure with a technician in the Space Station Processing Facility. During the mission, the P1 truss will be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, during spacewalks. The payload also includes the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002.

  15. Prestressed rock truss

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.F.

    1981-06-23

    A roof support system for mines in which prestressed rock trusses are bolted to the roof of the mine with roof bolts which each extend beyond the width of the mine gallery and the method of installing said trusses into position.

  16. P-1 truss moved to O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Cranes place the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, on a transport vehicle that will move it to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The truss had been temporarily stored in the RLV hangar in the background as a precaution against approaching bad weather. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by- 15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  17. 16. Pony trusses pier between the 64 foot truss ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Pony trusses - pier between the 64 foot truss and the first 80 foot truss. View of the lower chord pin connection at the juncture of the two pony trusses as they sit on the replacement pier added, circa 1966. Shows the floor beam, chord eye bars. There are 10 of these similar connections for the six pony trusses. A 1 1/2 conduit is also shown. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  18. The P-1 truss in the O&C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the foreground is the P-1 truss, resting in a blue workstand in the long, crowded Operations and Checkout Building. Scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, the P-1 is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14- by 15-foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the International Space Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  19. STS-113 P1 Truss paylad in Payload Changeout Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From the Payload Changeout Room on Launch Pad 39A, the P1 truss payload, plus the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart B, are moved into the payload bay of Space Shuttle Endeavour. Scheduled to launch Nov. 10 on mission STS-113, Endeavour will make the 16th assembly flight to the International Space Station. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1 in 2003 when it will be attached to the central truss segment, S0, on the Space Station. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth.

  20. Deployable geodesic truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Simonton, J. Wayne (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A deployable geodesic truss structure which can be deployed from a stowed state to an erected state is described. The truss structure includes a series of bays, each bay having sets of battens connected by longitudinal cross members which give the bay its axial and torsional stiffness. The cross members are hinged at their mid point by a joint so that the cross members are foldable for deployment or collapsing. The bays are deployed and stabilized by actuator means connected between the mid point joints of the cross members. Hinged longerons may be provided to also connect the sets of battens and to collapse for stowing with the rest of the truss structure.

  1. Probabilistic progressive buckling of trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    A three-bay, space, cantilever truss is probabilistically evaluated to describe progressive buckling and truss collapse in view of the numerous uncertainties associated with the structural, material, and load variables (primitive variables) that describe the truss. Initially, the truss is deterministically analyzed for member forces, and member(s) in which the axial force exceeds the Euler buckling load are identified. These member(s) are then discretized with several intermediate nodes and a probabilistic buckling analysis is performed on the truss to obtain its probabilistic buckling loads and respective mode shapes. Furthermore, sensitivities associated with the uncertainties in the primitive variables are investigated, margin of safety values for the truss are determined, and truss end node displacements are noted. These steps are repeated by sequentially removing the buckled member(s) until onset of truss collapse is reached. Results show that this procedure yields an optimum truss configuration for a given loading and for a specified reliability.

  2. P-1 truss arrives at O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, arrives in the parking lot outside the Operations and Checkout Building where it will undergo processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Space Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  3. P-1 truss moved to O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers oversee the placement of the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, onto the bed of a transport vehicle that will move it to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  4. Structural Truss Elements and Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troyer, Steve; Griffis, Kurt; Shackelford, Ray

    2005-01-01

    In the field of construction, most structures are supported by several groups of truss systems working together synergistically. A "truss" is a group of centered and balanced elements combined to carry a common load (Warner, 2003). Trusses provide strength against loads and forces within a structure. Though a complex field of study, structural…

  5. STS-112 S1 truss in Payload Changeout Room at Launch Pad 39-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Payload Changeout Room at the pad, the payload is moved out of the payload canister for transfer to Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay for mission STS-112. The primary payload on the mission is the S1 Integrated Truss Structure. The first starboard truss segment, the S1 will be attached to the Central truss segment, the S0 Truss, on the International Space Station during the mission. Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2.

  6. Wedge Joints for Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Kenneth E.

    1987-01-01

    Structure assembled rapidly with simple hand tools. Proposed locking wedge joints enable rapid assembly of lightweight beams, towers, scaffolds, and other truss-type structures. Lightweight structure assembled from tubular struts joined at nodes by wedge pins fitting into mating slots. Joint assembled rapidly by seating wedge pin in V-shaped slots and deforming end of strut until primary pawl engages it.

  7. 48. REMOVAL OF FIRST TRUSS. The first truss removed here ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. REMOVAL OF FIRST TRUSS. The first truss removed here rests on ground plates and awaits the similar placement of all the trusses for temporary storage. In the foreground are cut out sections of roofing also removed by crane. Note the 1873-74 standing seam sheet metal roof above the 1851 shingling. The roof pole gutters were in part made up of bench back rails. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. Deployment of a Curved Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Knarr, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Structures capable of deployment into complex, three-dimensional trusses have well known space technology applications such as the support of spacecraft payloads, communications antennas, radar reflectors, and solar concentrators. Such deployable trusses could also be useful in terrestrial applications such as the rapid establishment of structures in military and emergency service situations, in particular with regard to the deployment of enclosures for habitat or storage. To minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a single arch-shaped truss is preferable to multiple straight trusses arranged vertically and horizontally. To further minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a synchronous deployment with a single degree of freedom is also preferable. One method of synchronizing deployment of a truss is the use of a series of gears; this makes the deployment sequence predictable and testable, allows the truss to have a minimal stowage volume, and the deployed structure exhibits the excellent stiffness-to-mass and strength-to-mass ratios characteristic of a truss. A concept for using gears with varying ratios to deploy a truss into a curved shape has been developed and appears to be compatible with both space technology applications as well as potential use in terrestrial applications such as enclosure deployment. As is the case with other deployable trusses, this truss is formed using rigid elements (e.g., composite tubes) along the edges, one set of diagonal elements composed of either cables or folding/hinged rigid members, and the other set of diagonal elements formed by a continuous cable that is tightened by a motor or hand crank in order to deploy the truss. Gears of varying ratios are used to constrain the deployment to a single degree of freedom, making the deployment synchronous, predictable, and repeatable. The relative sizes of the gears and the relative dimensions of the diagonal elements determine the deployed geometry (e

  9. Truss structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daily, Carl S. (Inventor); Lees, Daniel A. (Inventor); McKitterick, Dennis Donald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An integrally formed three-dimensional truss structure, including molds and methods for production of same, containing outer top and bottom plane surfaces thereof comprising interconnected rod segments integrally formed at their points of intersection on the outer top and bottom surfaces, the top and bottom surfaces also integrally joined together through additional interconnected rod segments passing through an integrally formed intersection, wherein the additional interconnected rod segments passing through the integrally formed intersection form a three-dimensional continuous array of triangles.

  10. 7. DETAIL OF DECK TRUSS SPANNING CANAL. THIS DECK TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF DECK TRUSS SPANNING CANAL. THIS DECK TRUSS WA ALSO ERECTED IN 1893 AS PART OF AN EXTENSIVE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE BRIDGE. LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTH SIDE OF CANAL. - Illinois Central Railroad, Illinois River Bridge, Spanning Illinois River, La Salle, La Salle County, IL

  11. 63. DETAIL OF TRAVELING CRANE TRUSS FROM NORTHEAST. TRUSS IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. DETAIL OF TRAVELING CRANE TRUSS FROM NORTHEAST. TRUSS IS IN FRONT OF CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN. THE BARREN SOLUTION TANK IS JUST VISIBLE IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  12. STS-113 P1 Truss paylad in Payload Changeout Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A worker in the Payload Changeout Room on Launch Pad 39A watches as the P1 truss payload, plus the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart B, move into the payload bay of Space Shuttle Endeavour. Scheduled to launch Nov. 10 on mission STS-113, Endeavour will make the 16th assembly flight to the International Space Station. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1 in 2003 when it will be attached to the central truss segment, S0, on the Space Station. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth.

  13. STS-113 P1 Truss payload arrives at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Complex 39A, the payload canister doors are open to reveal the P1 truss before transfer to the Payload Changeout Room. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113 to the International Space Station. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  14. STS-113 P1 Truss payload arrives at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Complex 39A, technicians prepare to move the P1 truss segment from the payload canister into the Payload Changeout Room. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113 to the International Space Station. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  15. STS-113 P1 Truss payload arrives at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Complex 39A, technicians in the Payload Changout Room supervise the opening of the payload canister doors for transfer of the P1 truss. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113 to the International Space Station. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  16. STS-113 P1 Truss payload arrives at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Complex 39A, the P1 Truss Segment arrives at the Payload Changeout Room in preparation for installation into Endeavour's payload bay. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113 to the International Space Station. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  17. Zenith 1 truss transfer ceremony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Zenith-1 (Z-1) Truss, the cornerstone truss of the Space Station, is shown on the floor of the Space Station Processing Facility. The Z-1 Truss was officially turned over to NASA from The Boeing Co. on July 31. It is scheduled to fly in Space Shuttle Discovery's payload pay on STS-92 targeted for launch Oct. 5, 2000. The Z-1 is considered a cornerstone truss because it carries critical components of the Station's attitude, communications, thermal and power control systems as well as four control moment gyros, high and low gain antenna systems, and two plasma contactor units used to disperse electrical charge build- ups. The Z-1 truss and a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3), also flying to the Station on the same mission, will be the first major U.S. elements flown to the ISS aboard the Shuttle since the launch of the Unity element in December 1998.

  18. Installation of the S1 Truss to the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts Piers J. Sellers (left ) and David A. Wolf work on the newly installed Starboard One (S1) truss to the International Space Station (ISS) during the STS-112 mission. The primary payloads of this mission, ISS Assembly Mission 9A, were the Integrated Truss Assembly S1 (S One), the starboard side thermal radiator truss, and the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart to the ISS. The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. The S1 truss was attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss, which was launched on April 8, 2002 aboard the STS-110, and flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat-rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA cart was attached to the Mobil Transporter and will be used by assembly crews on later missions. Manufactured by the Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, California, the truss primary structure was transferred to the Marshall Space Flight Center in February 1999 for hardware installations and manufacturing acceptance testing. The launch of the STS-112 mission occurred on October 7, 2002, and its 11-day mission ended on October 18, 2002.

  19. Telerobotic truss assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Philip L.

    1987-01-01

    The ACCESS truss was telerobotically assembled in order to gain experience with robotic assembly of hardware designed for astronaut extravehicular (EVA) assembly. Tight alignment constraints of the ACCESS hardware made telerobotic assembly difficult. A wider alignment envelope and a compliant end effector would have reduced the problem. The manipulator had no linear motion capability, but many of the assembly operations required straight line motion. The manipulator was attached to a motion table in order to provide the X, Y, and Z translations needed. A programmable robot with linear translation capability would have eliminated the need for the motion table and streamlined the assembly. Poor depth perception was a major problem. Shaded paint schemes and alignment lines were helpful in reducing this problem. The four cameras used worked well for only some operations. It was not possible to identify camera locations that worked well for all assembly steps. More cameras or movable cameras would have simplified some operations. The audio feedback system was useful.

  20. Two Concepts for Deployable Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renfro, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Two concepts that could be applied separately or together have been suggested to enhance the utility of deployable truss structures. The concepts were intended originally for application to a truss structure to be folded for compact stowage during transport and subsequently deployed in outer space. The concepts may also be applicable, with some limitations, to deployable truss structures designed to be used on Earth. The first concept involves a combination of features that would help to maximize reliability of a structure while minimizing its overall mass, the complexity of its deployment system, and the expenditure of energy for deployment. The deployment system would be integrated into the truss: some of the truss members would contain folding/unfolding-detent mechanisms similar to those in umbrellas; other truss members would contain shape-memory-alloy (SMA) coil actuators (see Figure 1). Upon exposure to sunlight, the SMA actuators would be heated above their transition temperature, causing them to extend to their deployment lengths. The extension of the actuators would cause the structure to unfold and, upon completion of unfolding, the umbrellalike mechanisms would lock the unfolded truss in the fully deployed configuration. The use of solar heating to drive deployment would eliminate the need to carry a deployment power source. The actuation scheme would offer high reliability in that the truss geometry would be such that deployment could be completed even if all actuators were not functioning. Of course, in designing for operation in normal Earth gravitation, it would be necessary to ensure that the SMA actuators could apply forces large enough to overcome the deploymentresisting forces attributable to the weights of the members. The second concept is that of an improved design for the joints in folding members. Before describing this design,

  1. Zenith 1 truss transfer ceremony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Zenith-1 (Z-1) Truss is officially presented to NASA by The Boeing Co. on the Space Station Processing Facility floor on July 31. STS-92 Commander Col. Brian Duffy discusses the significance of the Z-1 Truss during a press conference after the presentation. The Z-1 Truss is the cornerstone truss of the International Space Station and is scheduled to fly in Space Shuttle Discovery's payload pay on STS-92 targeted for launch Oct. 5, 2000. The Z-1 is considered a cornerstone truss because it carries critical components of the Station's attitude, communications, thermal and power control systems as well as four control moment gyros, high and low gain antenna systems, and two plasma contactor units used to disperse electrical charge build- ups. The Z-1 truss and a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3), also flying to the Station on the same mission, will be the first major U.S. elements flown to the ISS aboard the Shuttle since the launch of the Unity element in December 1998.

  2. Zenith 1 truss transfer ceremony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The STS-92 astronaut team study the the Zenith-1 (Z-1) Truss during the Crew Equipment Interface Test. The Z-1 Truss was officially presented to NASA by The Boeing Co. on the Space Station Processing Facility floor on July 31. The truss is the cornerstone truss of the International Space Station and is scheduled to fly in Space Shuttle Discovery's payload pay on STS- 92 targeted for launch Oct. 5, 2000. The Z-1 is considered a cornerstone truss because it carries critical components of the Station's attitude, communications, thermal and power control systems as well as four control moment gyros, high and low gain antenna systems, and two plasma contactor units used to disperse electrical charge build-ups. The Z-1 truss and a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3), also flying to the Station on the same mission, will be the first major U.S. elements flown to the ISS aboard the Shuttle since the launch of the Unity element in December 1998.

  3. Zenith 1 truss transfer ceremony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Zenith-1 (Z-1) Truss is officially presented to NASA by The Boeing Co. on the Space Station Processing Facility floor on July 31. STS-92 Commander Col. Brian Duffy, comments on the presentation. At his side is Tip Talone, NASA director of International Space Station and Payload Processing at KSC. Talone and Col. Duffy received a symbolic key for the truss from John Elbon, Boeing director of ISS ground operations. The Z-1 Truss is the cornerstone truss of the International Space Station and is scheduled to fly in Space Shuttle Discovery's payload pay on STS- 92 targeted for launch Oct. 5, 2000. The Z-1 is considered a cornerstone truss because it carries critical components of the Station's attitude, communications, thermal and power control systems as well as four control moment gyros, high and low gain antenna systems, and two plasma contactor units used to disperse electrical charge build-ups. The Z-1 truss and a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3), also flying to the Station on the same mission, will be the first major U.S. elements flown to the ISS aboard the Shuttle since the launch of the Unity element in December 1998.

  4. Zenith 1 truss transfer ceremony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A wide-angle view of the floor of the Space Station Processing Facility. The floor is filled with racks and hardware for processing and testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). At the bottom left is the Zenith-1 (Z-1) Truss, the cornerstone truss of the Space Station. The Z-1 Truss was officially turned over to NASA from The Boeing Co. on July 31. The truss is scheduled to fly in Space Shuttle Discovery's payload pay on STS-92 targeted for launch Oct. 5, 2000. The Z-1 is considered a cornerstone truss because it carries critical components of the Station's attitude, communications, thermal and power control systems as well as four control moment gyros, high and low gain antenna systems, and two plasma contactor units used to disperse electrical charge build- ups. The Z-1 truss and a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3), also flying to the Station on the same mission, will be the first major U.S. elements flown to the ISS aboard the Shuttle since the launch of the Unity element in December 1998. The large module in the center of the floor is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. Expected to be a major feature in future research, Destiny will provide facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS- 98 (no date determined yet for launch).

  5. The S1 Truss Prior to Installation on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Being attached to the Canadarm2 on the International Space Station (ISS), the Remote Manipulator System arm built by the Canadian Space Agency, the Integrated Truss Assembly (S1) Truss is suspended over the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis' cargo bay. Astronauts Sandra H. Magnus, STS-112 mission specialist, and Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition Five flight engineer, used the Canadarm2 from inside the Destiny laboratory on the ISS to lift the S1 truss out of the orbiter's cargo bay and move it into position prior to its installation on the ISS. The primary payloads of this mission, ISS Assembly Mission 9A, were the Integrated Truss Assembly S1 (S One), the starboard side thermal radiator truss, and the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart to the ISS. The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. The S1 truss was attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss, which was launched on April 8, 2002 aboard the STS-110, and flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat-rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA cart was attached to the Mobil Transporter and will be used by assembly crews on later missions. Manufactured by the Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, California, the truss primary structure was transferred to the Marshall Space Flight Center in February 1999 for hardware installations and manufacturing acceptance testing. The launch of the STS-112 mission occurred on October 7, 2002, and its 11-day mission ended on October 18, 2002.

  6. Rod shop, roof and truss detail showing older pink roof ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rod shop, roof and truss detail showing older pink roof truss, newer pratt truss, and longitudinal, truss for overhead traveling crane - Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, Roundhouse & Shops, Broadway & Spring Streets, Aurora, Kane County, IL

  7. Experiments for locating damaged truss members in a truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, Paul E.; Smith, Suzanne W.; Javeed, Mehzad

    1991-01-01

    Locating damaged truss members in large space structures will involve a combination of sensing and diagnostic techniques. Methods developed for damage location require experimental verification prior to on-orbit applications. To this end, a series of experiments for locating damaged members using a generic, ten bay truss structure were conducted. A 'damaged' member is a member which has been removed entirely. Previously developed identification methods are used in conjunction with the experimental data to locate damage. Preliminary results to date are included, and indicate that mode selection and sensor location are important issues for location performance. A number of experimental data sets representing various damage configurations were compiled using the ten bay truss. The experimental data and the corresponding finite element analysis models are available to researchers for verification of various methods of structure identification and damage location.

  8. Lightweight structural columns. [space erectable trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Lightweight half-lengths of columns for truss structures are described. The columns are adapted for nestable storage and transport to facilitate fabrication of large area truss structures at a remote site and particularly adaptable for space applications.

  9. Zenith 1 truss transfer ceremony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A wide-angle view of the floor of the Space Station Processing Facility. The floor is filled with racks and hardware for processing and testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). At center left is the Zenith-1 (Z-1) Truss, the cornerstone truss of the Space Station. The Z-1 Truss was officially turned over to NASA from The Boeing Co. on July 31. It is scheduled to fly in Space Shuttle Discovery's payload pay on STS-92 targeted for launch Oct. 5, 2000. The Z-1 is considered a cornerstone truss because it carries critical components of the Station's attitude, communications, thermal and power control systems as well as four control moment gyros, high and low gain antenna systems, and two plasma contactor units used to disperse electrical charge build-ups. The Z-1 truss and a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3), also flying to the Station on the same mission, will be the first major U.S. elements flown to the ISS aboard the Shuttle since the launch of the Unity element in December 1998. The large module in the upper right hand corner of the floor is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. Expected to be a major feature in future research, Destiny will provide facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch).

  10. Zenith 1 truss transfer ceremony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Zenith-1 (Z-1) Truss is officially presented to NASA by The Boeing Co. on the Space Station Processing Facility floor on July 31. Astronauts from the STS-92 crew look on while their commander, Col. Brian Duffy, and Tip Talone, NASA director of International Space Station and Payload Processing at KSC, receive a symbolic key from John Elbon, Boeing director of ISS ground operations. The Z-1 Truss is the cornerstone truss of the International Space Station and is scheduled to fly in Space Shuttle Discovery's payload pay on STS-92 targeted for launch Oct. 5, 2000. The Z-1 is considered a cornerstone truss because it carries critical components of the Station's attitude, communications, thermal and power control systems as well as four control moment gyros, high and low gain antenna systems, and two plasma contactor units used to disperse electrical charge build- ups. The Z-1 truss and a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3), also flying to the Station on the same mission, will be the first major U.S. elements flown to the ISS aboard the Shuttle since the launch of the Unity element in December 1998.

  11. P-1 truss moved to work stand in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, an overhead crane lifts the top of the canister containing the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station. The truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by- 15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  12. Flexible beam control using an adaptive truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warrington, Thomas J.; Horner, C. Garnett

    1990-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of adaptive trusses for vibration suppression, a 12-ft-long beam is attached to a single cell of an adaptive truss which has three active battens. With the base of the adaptive truss attached to the laboratory frame, the measured strain of the vibrating beam shows the adaptive truss to be very effective in suppressing vibration when subjected to initial conditions. Control is accomplished by a PC/XT computer that implements an LQR-designed control law.

  13. Space truss zero gravity dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Andy

    1989-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics Branch of the Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory in cooperation with the Reduced Gravity Office of the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) plans to perform zero-gravity dynamic tests of a 12-meter truss structure. This presentation describes the program and presents all results obtained to date.

  14. 13. 64 foot truss oblique view of the 64 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. 64 foot truss - oblique view of the 64 foot pony truss showing its general configuration. The 80 foot pony trusses are similar. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  15. 308. Dennis Hill, Photographer April 1998 VIEW OF DECK TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    308. Dennis Hill, Photographer April 1998 VIEW OF DECK TRUSS SPANS WITH THROUGH TRUSS SPANS AND CANTILEVER TRUSS IN BACKGROUND, SOUTH SIDE, FACING WEST. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. 2. VIEW NORTHWEST, GENERAL VIEW SHOWING RAILWAY CANAL TRUSS IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTHWEST, GENERAL VIEW SHOWING RAILWAY CANAL TRUSS IN CENTER, RAILWAY RIVER TRUSS ON LEFT, HIGHWAY TRUSSES IN BACKGROUND - White Rock Bridge, Spanning Pawcatuck River & White Rock Canal, Westerly, Washington County, RI

  17. Deployable M-Braced Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr.; Rhodes, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Tension/compression and shear separated structurally in deployable beam. M-Braced Sections Packaged using combination of hinges and telescoping sections. When upper sections telescope into base, diagonals hinge, telescope, and rotate along batten. Components of M-braced truss fabricated from conventional metallic materials or nonmetallic materials such as graphite/epoxy. Applications include masts for antenna feed horns and ribs for solar array blankets.

  18. Box truss development and its application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1977, Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace has aggressively pursued development of deployable structural systems applicable to a wide variety of Shuttle-transportable large space system requirements. This effort has focused on the deployable box truss, mechanisms and materials development, mesh reflector design and fabrication, gate frame truss design and fabrication, and offset-fed antenna design and analysis. The activities discussed are: box truss design; metal matrix composites; precision joints; enhanced passive damping design; mesh reflector development; gate frame truss for solar arrays; 15-meter spinning radio meter; and 60 x 120 meter push broom antenna.

  19. Geometry control in prestressed adaptive space trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sener, Murat; Utku, Senol; Wada, Ben K.

    1993-01-01

    In this work the actuator placement problem for the precision control in prestressed adaptive space trusses is studied. These structures cannot be statically determinate, implying that the length-adjusting actuators have to work against the existing prestressing forces, and also against the stresses caused by the actuation. This type of difficulties does not exist in statically determinate adaptive trusses where, except for overcoming the friction, the actuators operate under zero axial force, and require almost no energy. The actuator placement problem in statically inderterminate trusses is, therefore, governed seriously by the energy and the strength requirements. The paper provides various methodologies for the actuator placement problem in prestressed space trusses.

  20. [Trusses in the current management of hernia].

    PubMed

    Gianom, D; Schubiger, C; Decurtins, M

    2002-11-01

    To assess the frequency and reasons for truss prescription, we surveyed 437 general practitioners collaborating with the surgical department of the Kantonsspital Winterthur and all members of the Swiss Association of Orthotists. 59% of the general practitioners answered. For 85% of them trusses are obsolete. Based on the data of the orthotists, an estimated 1740 trusses are issued in Switzerland annually (250 per million population). In Switzerland approximately 16,000 hernia operations are performed annually. Therefore, 11% of hernia patients are supplied with a truss rather than referred for a consultant surgical opinion. Patients can be divided into groups, one that wears the truss only for a short time in order to delay surgery for medical or occupational reasons and another group, especially elderly patients, that wears the truss permanently. Poor hernia control and pain, hernia incarceration, or dissatisfaction with the uncomfortable truss are reasons for referral to a surgeon. In our personal experience with 14 patients, all judged their situation after the operation better than with the truss. Our study confirms that despite advances in hernia surgery and in the use of regional and local anesthesia trusses are often prescribed. PMID:12430061

  1. P-1 truss moved to work stand in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved the length of the Operations and Checkout Building to its work stand where it will undergo processing. Scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, the P-1 is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  2. P-1 truss moved to work stand in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is lowered into a work stand in the Operations and Checkout Building where it will undergo processing. Scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, the P-1 is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  3. P-1 truss moved to work stand in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss (top of photo), a component of the International Space Station, nears its work stand in the Operations and Checkout Building where it will undergo processing. Scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, the P-1 is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by- 15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  4. P-1 truss moved to work stand in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is lifted out of its canister to move to a work stand where it will undergo processing. Scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, the P-1 is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000- pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  5. Truss Structure Could Be Folded For Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theer, Douglas S.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed truss structure comprises cubical bays and folded for compactness during transport. When folded, truss 1/25.6 as long as when fully extended. Conceived for transport and deployment in outerspace, suitable for terrestrial structures that must be transported compactly and erected quickly.

  6. Truss Performance and Packaging Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M.; Collins, Timothy J.; Doggett, William; Dorsey, John; Watson, Judith

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper a set of performance metrics are derived from first principals to assess the efficiency of competing space truss structural concepts in terms of mass, stiffness, and strength, for designs that are constrained by packaging. The use of these performance metrics provides unique insight into the primary drivers for lowering structural mass and packaging volume as well as enabling quantitative concept performance evaluation and comparison. To demonstrate the use of these performance metrics, data for existing structural concepts are plotted and discussed. Structural performance data is presented for various mechanical deployable concepts, for erectable structures, and for rigidizable structures.

  7. 24 CFR 3280.402 - Test procedures for roof trusses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... read and recorded to the nearest 1/32-inch. Dead load must be applied to the top and bottom chord, and... truss design evaluated by this procedure. (i) Dead load. Measure and record initial elevation of the truss or trusses in the test position at no load. Apply to the top and bottom chords of the truss...

  8. STS-110 Crew Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This is the official STS-110 crew portrait. In front, from the left, are astronauts Stephen N. Frick, pilot; Ellen Ochoa, flight engineer; and Michael J. Bloomfield, mission commander; In the back, from left, are astronauts Steven L. Smith, Rex J. Walheim, Jerry L. Ross and Lee M.E. Morin, all mission specialists. Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis on April 8, 2002, the STS-110 mission crew prepared the International Space Station (ISS) for future space walks by installing and outfitting a 43-foot-long Starboard side S0 truss and preparing the Mobile Transporter. The mission served as the 8th ISS assembly flight.

  9. 20. 80 foot pony truss an upper chord pin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. 80 foot pony truss - an upper chord pin connection at a vertical post other than at the end post. Common to the five 80 foot trusses and similar to the 64 foot truss, there are two pairs per 80 foot truss and one pair on the 64 foot truss for a total of 22. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  10. Trusses in the management of hernia today.

    PubMed

    Cheek, C M; Williams, M H; Farndon, J R

    1995-12-01

    In the UK an estimated 40,000 trusses are issued annually. The rate of 700 per million is higher than that presently found in other countries and may be because of reduced access to surgery. Despite the high use of trusses little has been published on their effectiveness, complication rates and value. This review summarizes current knowledge, and concludes that further studies on the benefits and effectiveness of trusses need to be performed to enable patients to receive appropriate advice and guidance. PMID:8548220

  11. Assembling Precise Truss Structures With Minimal Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sword, Lee F.

    1996-01-01

    Improved method of assembling precise truss structures involves use of simple devices. Tapered pins that fit in tapered holes indicate deviations from prescribed lengths. Method both helps to ensure precision of finished structures and minimizes residual stresses within structures.

  12. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2015-10-20

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  13. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-06-28

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  14. Optimization of space trusses on vector multiprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Adeli, H.; Hsu, H.L.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical optimization of space trusses in a vector/parallel processing environment is the subject of this paper. Parallel processing is achieved through microtasking and the use of the CRAY CFT77 compiler directives. Speed-up results are presented for four space-truss examples. It is concluded that the speedup due to microtasking is improved substantially with an increase in the size of the problem.

  15. Design and operation of a deployable truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, K.

    1984-01-01

    A concept for the one dimensional deployable truss structure is presented. The deployed configuration of the structure consists of the repetition of a longitudinal octahedral truss module. The principal mechanical feature of the truss is that the lateral members comprising the lateral triangular truss are telescoping beams. Contracting of the lateral members results in the deployment of the truss structure. The geometric transformation of this truss of variable geometry is presented. Both simultaneous and sequential modes of transformation are possible. The validity of the transformation applied to the deployment is verified through design of a conceptual model.

  16. Offset truss hex solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John E. (Inventor); Sturgis, James D. (Inventor); Erikson, Raymond J. (Inventor); Waligroski, Gregg A. (Inventor); Scott, Michael A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A solar energy concentrator system comprises an offset reflector structure made up of a plurality of solar energy reflector panel sections interconnected with one another to form a piecewise approximation of a portion of a (parabolic) surface of revolution rotated about a prescribed focal axis. Each panel section is comprised of a plurality of reflector facets whose reflective surfaces effectively focus reflected light to preselected surface portions of the interior sidewall of a cylindrically shaped solar energy receiver. The longitudinal axis of the receiver is tilted at an acute angle with respect to the optical axis such that the distribution of focussed solar energy over the interior surface of the solar engine is optimized for dynamic solar energy conversion. Each reflector panel section comprises a flat, hexagonally shaped truss support framework and a plurality of beam members interconnecting diametrically opposed corners of the hexagonal framework recessed within which a plurality of (spherically) contoured reflector facets is disposed. The depth of the framework and the beam members is greater than the thickness of a reflector facet such that a reflector facet may be tilted (for controlling the effective focus of its reflected light through the receiver aperture) without protruding from the panel section.

  17. [Truss-induced macular amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Abels, C; Karrer, S; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R M

    2001-10-01

    A 80-year-old male presented with a long time history of a localized red-brown macule with superficial lichenification and slight scaling in the right groin. An earlier skin biopsy revealed the presence of amyloid deposits. The patient therefore had a complete internal checkup including a rectal biopsy for exclusion of systemic amyloidosis. However, the laboratory data did not reveal any specific abnormalities including immunoglobulins and Bence-Jones protein. The rectal biopsy was also nonspecific. After skin examination, a rebiopsy was performed at our department showing acanthosis and spongiosis of the epidermis with parakeratosis. A homogenous eosinophilic deposit was present in the upper dermis and stained positive with thioflavine. At the second visit the patient wore a truss for a right inguinal hernia, perfectly matching the area of the skin lesion. Thus, the diagnosis of a localized macular amyloidosis was confirmed very likely due to permanent local friction. The classification of localized cutaneous amyloidoses should include local trauma as a cause to avoid unnecessary and exhausting internal checkups to exclude systemic involvement. PMID:11715396

  18. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF TWO PANEL POINTS OF TRUSS, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF TWO PANEL POINTS OF TRUSS, SHOWING OVAL, TUBULAR UPPER CHORD MEMBER, VERTICALS, DIAGONALS, AND LOWER CHORD. - White Bowstring Arch Truss Bridge, Spanning Yellow Creek at Cemetery Drive (Riverside Drive), Poland, Mahoning County, OH

  19. 21. DETAIL OF SPRING BLOCK AND BASE OF ROOF TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL OF SPRING BLOCK AND BASE OF ROOF TRUSS ON WEST WALL OF NORTHEAST TRANSEPT. NOTE REINFORCING ADDED TO TRUSS IN DISTANCE. - Cornell University, Sage Chapel, Central Avenue, Ithaca, Tompkins County, NY

  20. 9. 64 foot pony truss south west bearing abutment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. 64 foot pony truss - south west bearing abutment of the first pony, truss, showing the sheet piling and the added 'I' beam support. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  1. 12. 80 foot pony truss looking east from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. 80 foot pony truss - looking east from the upstream side, view of a single pony truss showing its general arrangement on replacement piers, circa 1966. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  2. 23. 100 foot through truss looking west from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. 100 foot through truss - looking west from the downstream side, view of a single through truss showing its general arrangement on extended column piers. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  3. 5. DETAIL OF OTHER END OF TRUSS WITH PLATE IDENTIFYING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF OTHER END OF TRUSS WITH PLATE IDENTIFYING 'COMMISSIONERS J. C. ROBINSON, PETER KNITTLE, DAVID H. EDWARDS.' - Town Creek Truss-leg Bedstead Bridge, Spanning Town Creek at County Route 82, Van Wert, Van Wert County, OH

  4. 4. DETAIL OF TRUSS END AND MAKER'S PLATE WHICH STATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL OF TRUSS END AND MAKER'S PLATE WHICH STATES 'BRACKETT BRIDGE CO., BUILDERS, CINCINNATI, O. 1894.' - Town Creek Truss-leg Bedstead Bridge, Spanning Town Creek at County Route 82, Van Wert, Van Wert County, OH

  5. Detail One Half of Wood Truss, Detail One Quarter Plan ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail One Half of Wood Truss, Detail One Quarter Plan of Floor Beams & Bottom Truss Cord, Detail at A Plan, Detail at B Plan - Covered Bridge, Spanning Darby Creek, North Lewisburg, Champaign County, OH

  6. 2. GENERAL VIEW OF BRIDGE SHOWING PARKER THROUGH TRUSS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW OF BRIDGE SHOWING PARKER THROUGH TRUSS CENTER SPAN AND DECK TRUSS SPANS AT EITHER SIDE OF CENTER SPAN, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Ouachita River Bridge, Spanning Ouachita River at U.S. Highway 167, Calion, Union County, AR

  7. 24. Moody Bridge truss repair plans showing existing area of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Moody Bridge truss repair plans showing existing area of damage along with repair procedures for correcting damage and returning truss to structural integrity. - Moody Bridge, Spanning South Fork Eel River, Garberville, Humboldt County, CA

  8. 2. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING ENTIRE STRUCTURE: PENNSYLVANIA TRUSS MAIN SPANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING ENTIRE STRUCTURE: PENNSYLVANIA TRUSS MAIN SPANS AND PONY TRUSS APPROACH SPANS - Coraopolis Bridge, Spanning Ohio River back channel at Ferree Street & Grand Avenue, Coraopolis, Allegheny County, PA

  9. Experimental characterization of deployable trusses and joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikegami, R.; Church, S. M.; Keinholz, D. A.; Fowler, B. L.

    1987-01-01

    The structural dynamic properties of trusses are strongly affected by the characteristics of joints connecting the individual beam elements. Joints are particularly significant in that they are often the source of nonlinearities and energy dissipation. While the joints themselves may be physically simple, direct measurement is often necessary to obtain a mathematical description suitable for inclusion in a system model. Force state mapping is a flexible, practical test method for obtaining such a description, particularly when significant nonlinear effects are present. It involves measurement of the relationship, nonlinear or linear, between force transmitted through a joint and the relative displacement and velocity across it. An apparatus and procedure for force state mapping are described. Results are presented from tests of joints used in a lightweight, composite, deployable truss built by the Boeing Aerospace Company. The results from the joint tests are used to develop a model of a full 4-bay truss segment. The truss segment was statically and dynamically tested. The results of the truss tests are presented and compared with the analytical predictions from the model.

  10. Closeup view showing portion of continuous bottom chord of truss ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view showing portion of continuous bottom chord of truss with other web members and posts of the truss connected thereto at a joint by the use of a large steel pin. Note: The timber ties supporting the track (not shown but above) span transversely from truss to truss which are on 16' -0 centers. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  11. 30. 100 foot through truss detail of an upper, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. 100 foot through truss - detail of an upper, inside, corner of a through truss. Shows the upper chord pin connection, end post, lateral lace strut and sway bracing. There are four of these per through truss, for a total of eight. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  12. 28. 100 foot through truss a typical lower chord ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. 100 foot through truss - a typical lower chord pin connection, located below each vertical lace post on the through trusses. Each truss has four of these for a total of eight. Shown is the floor beam below the pin connection, and the four inch conduit. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  13. 31. 100 foot through truss view is the outside ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. 100 foot through truss - view is the outside of an upper chord pin connection at the end post of a through truss. Shown also, is the ornamental urn treatment, one placed at each of the upper end post junctions of the truss. Only seven of the original eight remain today. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  14. Bridge Types: Suspension Bridge Spans, Section AA; Cantilever Truss Spans, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bridge Types: Suspension Bridge Spans, Section A-A; Cantilever Truss Spans, Section B-B; Through Truss Spans, Section C-C; Deck Truss Spans, Section D-D - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. 13. View of Truss tower and pivot pier locking east. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of Truss tower and pivot pier locking east. When the draw is open, the two arms of the truss act as cantilevers supported by the truss tower. A counterweight in the shorter of the bridge keeps the span in proper balance. - Center Street Swing Bridge, Southwest of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. 40. GARRET TRUSS DETAIL. The south queen post (called 'king ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. GARRET TRUSS DETAIL. The south queen post (called 'king post' in the 1755 account for scantling for the Greater Meeting House) of the third truss from the east end. Note the numerals for assembling the truss members and the plaster marks from the 1755 Monthly Meeting Room. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. 9. GENERAL VIEW OF THE CAST IRON TRUSS SYSTEM IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. GENERAL VIEW OF THE CAST IRON TRUSS SYSTEM IN THE ATTIC OF UNIT 2, SHOWING THE JUNCTION OF THE TRUSSES ABOVE THE MAIN ENTRY GABLE WITH THE TYPICAL TRUSS SYSTEM FOR THE WING; LOOKING SSW. (Ryan and Ceronie) - Watervliet Arsenal, Building No. 40, Broadway between Dalliba & Watervliet Avenues, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  18. UNIDENTIFIED CATENARY SUSPENSION BRIDGE WITH TRUSSED OBELISK TOWERS ON STONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UNIDENTIFIED CATENARY SUSPENSION BRIDGE WITH TRUSSED OBELISK TOWERS ON STONE PIERS, SHOWING HOWE PIPE TRUSS RAILING AND TRUSSED DECK BEAMS TYPICAL TO BRIDGES BUILT BY FLINN-MOYER COMPANY. 3/4 VIEW FROM BELOW. - Clear Fork of Brazos River Suspension Bridge, Spanning Clear Fork of Brazos River at County Route 179, Albany, Shackelford County, TX

  19. Passive damping for space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Wada, Ben K.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of passive damping techniques in truss-type structures are presented, with emphasis on the use of viscoelastic damping in the parallel load path. The constraining member length is shown to be a convenient design variable for enhancing damping performance. Results are presented for integral damping members made of thin-wall aluminum tubes, concentric constraining members, and viscoelastic materials in a six-bay truss structure at low frequency and low dynamic strain conditions. Integral members with graphite/epoxy constraining members exhibited relatively low damping values due to the possible polymer interaction during the cocure stage.

  20. 25. 'HANGAR SHEDS TRUSSES DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. 'HANGAR SHEDS - TRUSSES - DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS - PLANT AREA; MODIFICATION CENTER NO. 1, DAGGETT, CALIFORNIA.' Sections and details of trusses, ironwork, and joints, as modified to show ridge joint detail. As built. This blueline also shows the fire suppression system, added in orange pencil for 'Project 13: Bldgs. T-30, T-50, T-70, T-90' at a later, unspecified date. Contract no. W509 Eng. 2743; File no. 555/84, revision B, dated August 24, 1942. No sheet number. - Barstow-Daggett Airport, Hangar Shed No. 4, 39500 National Trails Highway, Daggett, San Bernardino County, CA

  1. 18. 80 foot pony truss detail of the lower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. 80 foot pony truss - detail of the lower cord pin connection, typical of the 80 foot trusses and similar to the 64 foot truss, where the vertical lace post joins the upper and lower chords. There are two pair of each 80 foot truss and a single pair on the 64 foot truss for a total of 22. The view also shows the chord eye bar and eye rod along with the diagonal bar and rod members. The rod hanging diagonally to the left is a broken lateral member. A four inch conduit is also in view. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  2. Quasi-static shape estimation and control of adaptive truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwao, Fumihiro; Chen, Gun-Shing; Wada, Ben K.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for estimating the deformation of adaptive truss structures are proposed which employ internal displacement sensors to measure changes in the length of selected truss members. Based on the measured data from the instrumented truss member, the total truss deformation pattern can be estimated through direct interpolation. To verify the validity of the methods presented here, numerical simulations are carried out for simple plane trusses, a beam truss, and a tetrahedral truss.

  3. Self-Deploying Trusses Containing Shape-Memory Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schueler, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Composite truss structures are being developed that can be compacted for stowage and later deploy themselves to full size and shape. In the target applications, these smart structures will precisely self-deploy and support a large, lightweight space-based antenna. Self-deploying trusses offer a simple, light, and affordable alternative to articulated mechanisms or inflatable structures. The trusses may also be useful in such terrestrial applications as variable-geometry aircraft components or shelters that can be compacted, transported, and deployed quickly in hostile environments. The truss technology uses high-performance shape-memory-polymer (SMP) thermoset resin reinforced with fibers to form a helical composite structure. At normal operating temperatures, the truss material has the structural properties of a conventional composite. This enables truss designs with required torsion, bending, and compression stiffness. However, when heated to its designed glass transition temperature (Tg), the SMP matrix acquires the flexibility of an elastomer. In this state, the truss can be compressed telescopically to a configuration encompassing a fraction of its original volume. When cooled below Tg, the SMP reverts to a rigid state and holds the truss in the stowed configuration without external constraint. Heating the materials above Tg activates truss deployment as the composite material releases strain energy, driving the truss to its original memorized configuration without the need for further actuation. Laboratory prototype trusses have demonstrated repeatable self-deployment cycles following linear compaction exceeding an 11:1 ratio (see figure).

  4. Deployable Carbon Tape Truss for Gossamer Space Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrandt, Martin; Straubel, Marco; Huhne, Christian; Wiedemann, Martin

    2012-07-01

    DLR has developed a high performance deployable truss concept for very large Gossamer Space Structures such as solar sails with side length up to a few hundred meters. The truss concept is based on foldable longerons made of thin-walled carbon tapes. In comparison to longerons of solid rods - the most frequently used type for deployable trusses - they show much higher compression strength when going to high element length. This enables increasing truss bay length and radius without increase in mass. As strength and stiffness of a truss depend strongly on its radius, highly mass-efficient trusses can be realized. A small packaging ratio is gained using a two path folding pattern. Therefore, the triangular truss is flattened first in cross direction enabled by hinges added to one row of battens. In the second step the flattened truss is reeled up on a central hub taking advantage from the high deformation capability of thin-walled carbon tapes. Extensive finite-element analysis has been done as well as hardware testing of longeron specimens and a truss prototype was manufactured. Measured and calculated performance values gained by this analysis show the superiority of this new truss-concept towards established deployable mast concepts in regard to bending stiffness, bending strength and specific truss mass.

  5. SpRoUTS (Space Robot Universal Truss System): Reversible Robotic Assembly of Deployable Truss Structures of Reconfigurable Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel; Cheung, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Automatic deployment of structures has been a focus of much academic and industrial work on infrastructure applications and robotics in general. This paper presents a robotic truss assembler designed for space applications - the Space Robot Universal Truss System (SpRoUTS) - that reversibly assembles a truss from a feedstock of hinged andflat-packed components, by folding the sides of each component up and locking onto the assembled structure. We describe the design and implementation of the robot and show that the assembled truss compares favorably with prior truss deployment systems.

  6. Onsite Fabrication of Trusses and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodle, J. G.; Browning, D. L.; Fisher, J. G.; Hujsak, E. J.; Kleidon, E. H.; Siden, L. E.; Tremblay, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    Tribeam truss that is strong and light made at site where used. Reinforced plastic members are fabricated by beam-making machine and assembled by assembly and welding machines. Although proposed for space-platform assembly, concept may be useful in terrestrial applications in remote or inaccessible places.

  7. A Teaching Model for Truss Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigoni, Davide; Dal Corso, Francesco; Misseroni, Diego; Tommasini, Mirko

    2012-01-01

    A classroom demonstration model has been designed, machined and successfully tested in different learning environments to facilitate understanding of the mechanics of truss structures, in which struts are subject to purely axial load and deformation. Gaining confidence with these structures is crucial for the development of lattice models, which…

  8. A continuum model for interconnected lattice trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    A continuum model for interconnected lattice trusses based on the 1D Timoshenko beam approximation is developed using the NASA-LRC Phase Zero Evolutionary Model. The continuum model dynamics is presented in the canonical wave-equation form in a Hilbert space.

  9. Natural frequency of uniform and optimized tetrahedral truss platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Lake, Mark S.

    1994-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative estimates for the fundamental frequency of uniform and optimized tetrahedral truss platforms are determined. A semiempirical equation is developed for the frequency of free-free uniform trusses as a function of member material properties, truss dimensions, and parasitic (nonstructural) mass fraction Mp/Mt. Optimized trusses with frequencies approximately two times those of uniform trusses are determined by varying the cross-sectional areas of member groups. Trusses with 3 to 8 rings, no parasitic mass, and member areas up to 25 times the minimum area are optimized. Frequencies computed for ranges of both Mp/Mt and the ratio of maximum area to minimum area are normalized to the frequency of a uniform truss with no parasitic mass. The normalized frequency increases with the number of rings, and both frequency and the ratio of maximum area to minimum area decrease with increasing Mp/Mt. Frequency improvements that are achievable with a limited number of member areas are estimated for a 3-ring truss by using Taguchi methods. Joint stiffness knockdown effects are also considered. Comparison of optimized and baseline uniform truss frequencies indicates that tailoring can significantly increase structural frequency; maximum gains occur for trusses with low values of Mp/Mt. This study examines frequency trends for ranges of structural parameters and may be used as a preliminary design guide.

  10. Multi-Criterion Preliminary Design of a Tetrahedral Truss Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey

    1995-01-01

    An efficient method is presented for multi-criterion preliminary design and demonstrated for a tetrahedral truss platform. The present method requires minimal analysis effort and permits rapid estimation of optimized truss behavior for preliminary design. A 14-m-diameter, 3-ring truss platform represents a candidate reflector support structure for space-based science spacecraft. The truss members are divided into 9 groups by truss ring and position. Design variables are the cross-sectional area of all members in a group, and are either 1, 3 or 5 times the minimum member area. Non-structural mass represents the node and joint hardware used to assemble the truss structure. Taguchi methods are used to efficiently identify key points in the set of Pareto-optimal truss designs. Key points identified using Taguchi methods are the maximum frequency, minimum mass, and maximum frequency-to-mass ratio truss designs. Low-order polynomial curve fits through these points are used to approximate the behavior of the full set of Pareto-optimal designs. The resulting Pareto-optimal design curve is used to predict frequency and mass for optimized trusses. Performance improvements are plotted in frequency-mass (criterion) space and compared to results for uniform trusses. Application of constraints to frequency and mass and sensitivity to constraint variation are demonstrated.

  11. 33. 100 foot through truss view is a detail ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. 100 foot through truss - view is a detail of the underside of the north west corner of the second through truss. Shows the upper chord pin connection, end post, lateral lace strut and sway bracing. This is typical of all four corners of each through truss for this bridge for a total of eight. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  12. 21. 80 foot pony truss view is from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. 80 foot pony truss - view is from the deck, looking down to the junction of the two pony trusses, showing the top of the lower chord pin connection on top of the replacement pier. Also shown is some deck surface and an electrical conduit. This is typical of the junction of all the pony trusses. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  13. 19. 80 foot pony truss view of upper chord ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. 80 foot pony truss - view of upper chord pin connection at the end post, typical of the five 80 foot trusses and similar to the 64 foot tress. There are two pair per pony truss for a total of 24. Shown are the vertical lace post, end post, top chord member, and a diagonal member. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  14. 35. SECOND FLOOR WEST ROOM LOOKING NORTH. The two trusses ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. SECOND FLOOR WEST ROOM LOOKING NORTH. The two trusses above this room date from 1812. They differ from the 1755 salvaged trusses in that they are made of pine rather than poplar, their numbering system differs, and they do not have pockets for joists. These two trusses were added to extend the plan of the building when it was re-erected in 1812. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. Robot-friendly connector. [space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parma, George F. (Inventor); Vandeberghe, Mark H. (Inventor); Ruiz, Steve C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Robot friendly connectors, which, in one aspect, are truss joints with two parts, a receptacle and a joint, are presented. The joints have a head which is loosely inserted into the receptacle and is then tightened and aligned. In one aspect, the head is a rounded hammerhead which initially is enclosed in the receptacle with sloppy fit provided by the shape, size, and configuration of surfaces on the head and on the receptacle.

  16. Hybrid deployable support truss designs for LDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J.

    1988-01-01

    Concepts for a 20-meter diameter Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) deployable truss backup structure, and analytical predictions of its structural characteristics are discussed. The concept shown is referred to as the SIXPAC; It is a combination of the PACTRUSS concept and a single-fold beam, which would make up the desired backup structure. One advantage of retaining the PACTRUSS concept is its packaging density and its capability for synchronous deployment. Various 2-meter hexagonal panel arrangements are possible for this Hybrid PACTRUSS structure depending on the panel-to-structure attachment strategies used. Static analyses of the SIXPAC using various assumptions for truss designs and panel masses of 10 kg sq meters were performed to predict the tip displacement of the structure when supported at the center. The tip displacement ranged from 0.20 to 0.44 mm without the panel mass, and from 0.9 to 3.9 mm with the panel mass (in a 1-g field). The data indicate that the structure can be adequately ground tested to validate its required performance in space, assuming the required performance in space is approximately 100 microns. The static displacement at the tip of the structure when subjected to an angular acceleration of 0.001 rad/sec squared were estimated to range from 0.8 to 7.5 microns, depending on the type of truss elements.

  17. An articulated-truss space crane concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, Thomas R.; Bush, Harold G.; Wallsom, Richard E.

    1990-01-01

    An articulated-truss space-crane concept is described, and four articulating-joint (AJ) concepts are evaluated. The space-crane concept uses the same truss structure hardware as Space Station Freedom. The joint concepts are compared according to their actuator stroke ratio, actuator authority, and part count. One AJ concept is selected as a candidate space-crane joint because of its better performance and lower part count. The space-crane reach envelope is determined as a function of the number of AJs and the number of fixed-length booms. A space crane with three booms, three AJs, and one rotary joint provides an adequate reach envelope for an expected work area. The space-crane tip velocity, because of an allowable truss strut compressive load, is limited to approximately 1.0 in./sec for a 300,000-lbm payload. The displacement response is also shown for an emergency stop scenario as a function of the payload mass. The space-crane tip deflection is on the order of 12 in. for a 300,000-lbm payload.

  18. roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail Chopawamsic Recreational ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Main Arts and Crafts Lodge, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  19. Deployable-erectable trade study for space station truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr.; Wright, A. S., Jr.; Bush, H. G.; Watson, J. J.; Dean, E. B.; Twigg, L. T.; Rhodes, M. D.; Cooper, P. A.; Dorsey, J. T.; Lake, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a trade study on truss structures for constructing the space station are presented. Although this study was conducted for the reference gravity gradient space station, the results are generally applicable to other configurations. The four truss approaches for constructing the space station considered in this paper were the 9 foot single fold deployable, the 15 foot erectable, the 10 foot double fold tetrahedral, and the 15 foot PACTRUSS. The primary rational for considering a 9 foot single-fold deployable truss (9 foot is the largest uncollapsed cross-section that will fit in the Shuttle cargo bay) is that of ease of initial on-orbit construction and preintegration of utility lines and subsystems. The primary rational for considering the 15 foot erectable truss is that the truss bay size will accommodate Shuttle size payloads and growth of the initial station in any dimension is a simple extension of the initial construction process. The primary rational for considering the double-fold 10 foot tetrahedral truss is that a relatively large amount of truss structure can be deployed from a single Shuttle flight to provide a large number of nodal attachments which present a pegboard for attaching a wide variety of payloads. The 15 foot double-fold PACTRUSS was developed to incorporate the best features of the erectable truss and the tetrahedral truss.

  20. 9. OBLIQUE VIEW, PARTIAL WEST SPAN, FROM SOUTHWEST, SHOWING TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. OBLIQUE VIEW, PARTIAL WEST SPAN, FROM SOUTHWEST, SHOWING TRUSS PANELS AND SOLID CONFIGURATION OF TRUSS MEMBERS, INCLUDING POLYGONAL TOP CHORD, VERTICAL AND DIAGONAL MEMBERS, AND CROSS-STRUTS - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  1. 24. 100 foot through truss view is from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. 100 foot through truss - view is from the deck, looking down to the junction of the two through trusses where they are attached to pier #7. There are only two of these, located on each end of pier #7. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  2. 36. 100 foot through truss view is the outside ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. 100 foot through truss - view is the outside of an upper chord pin connection showing the vertical post and a diagonal member. There are four of these for each of two through trusses for a total of eight. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  3. 27. 100 foot through truss a typical lower chord ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. 100 foot through truss - a typical lower chord pin connection, located below the vertical member junction with the end post and upper chord. View shows one diagonal member. There are four of these per through truss for a total of 8, also shows the four inch conduit. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  4. 29. 100 foot through truss looking north from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. 100 foot through truss - looking north from the deck through the south portal of the first through truss, to show the general configuration of the upper part of the structure. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  5. 7. 80 foot pony truss underside of bridge, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. 80 foot pony truss - underside of bridge, looking north, showing the original pier and the outrigger type extension to raise and level the present-day support for the pony trusses. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  6. 14. 64 foot pony truss view of a lower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. 64 foot pony truss - view of a lower cord pin connection at the first vertical post, this truss has two pair of this connection for a total of four. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  7. 32. 100 foot through truss looking north from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. 100 foot through truss - looking north from the deck through the exit portal of the second through truss, showing the general arrangement of the underside of the upper part of the structure. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  8. VIEW OF CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS BRIDGE PORTALS AT JUNCTION BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS BRIDGE PORTALS AT JUNCTION BETWEEN SIMPLE THROUGH TRUSS SPAN LOOKING SOUTHEAST TOWARD WEST BANK. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  9. 11. 100 foot through truss north east bearing abutment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 100 foot through truss - north east bearing abutment of the second through truss, showing that the bearing point is to the backmost position of the concrete pier. This bearing point is on a concrete extension of the original bearing point now covered by rock and soil. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  10. 24 CFR 3280.402 - Test procedure for roof trusses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the design. The top and bottom chords shall be braced and covered with the material, with connections... procedure, the top chord may be sheathed with 1/4 inch by 12 inch plywood strips. The plywood strips shall be at least long enough to cover the top chords of the trusses at the designated design truss...

  11. 13. ONE OF TWO LATERAL ROOF TRUSSES AND ROOF SUPPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. ONE OF TWO LATERAL ROOF TRUSSES AND ROOF SUPPORT BEAMS OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY GASHOLDER NO. 2 HOUSE LOOKING WEST. THE WIRES AND BEAM AT RIGHT CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH HAVE BEEN ADDED TO STABILIZE TRUSS SYSTEM - Saratoga Gas Light Company, Gasholder No. 2, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation Substation Facility, intersection of Excelsior & East Avenues, Saratoga Springs, NY

  12. 12. CENTRAL ROOF TRUSS AND ROOF SUPPORT BEAMS OF SARATOGA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. CENTRAL ROOF TRUSS AND ROOF SUPPORT BEAMS OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY GASHOLDER NO. 2 HOUSE, LOOKING WEST. THE WIRES AND BEAM AT RIGHT OF PHOTOGRAPH HAVE BEEN ADDED TO STABILIZE TRUSS SYSTEM. - Saratoga Gas Light Company, Gasholder No. 2, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation Substation Facility, intersection of Excelsior & East Avenues, Saratoga Springs, NY

  13. 8. 100 foot through truss underside of bridge, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. 100 foot through truss - underside of bridge, looking north, showing the original concrete-filled cylinder pier, as well as the concrete, (extension), and 'I' beam additions used to raise the bridge level. This pier is the mid support for the two through trusses. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  14. DETAIL OF "FEET" OF MAIN TRUSS NORTH END. NOTE PLATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF "FEET" OF MAIN TRUSS NORTH END. NOTE PLATES ON WHICH FEET REST ALLOWING EXPANSION OF TRUSS AS IT EXPANDS AND SHRINKS UNDER THE SUN - Missouri & North Arkansas Railroad Bridge, Spanning Middle Fork Little Red River, Shirley, Van Buren County, AR

  15. 17. 80 foot pony truss detail of the lower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. 80 foot pony truss - detail of the lower pin connection located where an end post joins the first and the last vertical post. There are two pair on each of the five 80 foot trusses for a total of 20. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  16. 33 CFR 147.831 - Holstein Truss Spar safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Holstein Truss Spar safety zone. 147.831 Section 147.831 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.831 Holstein Truss Spar safety zone....

  17. 33 CFR 147.831 - Holstein Truss Spar safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Holstein Truss Spar safety zone. 147.831 Section 147.831 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.831 Holstein Truss Spar safety zone....

  18. 33 CFR 147.831 - Holstein Truss Spar safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Holstein Truss Spar safety zone. 147.831 Section 147.831 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.831 Holstein Truss Spar safety zone....

  19. 33 CFR 147.831 - Holstein Truss Spar safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Holstein Truss Spar safety zone. 147.831 Section 147.831 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.831 Holstein Truss Spar safety zone....

  20. 33 CFR 147.831 - Holstein Truss Spar safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Holstein Truss Spar safety zone. 147.831 Section 147.831 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.831 Holstein Truss Spar safety zone....

  1. Detail of tension bars at end posts western truss. Shows ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of tension bars at end posts western truss. Shows adjustable bars at top of structure; diagonal and vertical members on truss are not adjustable. Looking north from civilian land. - Naval Supply Annex Stockton, Rough & Ready Island, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  2. Detail of tension bars at end posts western truss. Shows ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of tension bars at end posts western truss. Shows adjustable bars at top of structure; diagonal and vertical members on truss are not adjustable. Looking north from civilian land. - Naval Supply Annex Stockton, Daggett Road Bridge, Daggett Road traversing Burns Cut Off, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  3. Actuator placement in prestressed adaptive trusses for vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalihal, P.; Utku, Senol; Wada, Ben K.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the optimal location selection of actuators for vibration control in prestressed adaptive trusses. Since prestressed adaptive trusses are statically indeterminate, the actuators to be used for vibration control purposes must work against (1) existing static axial prestressing forces, (2) static axial forces caused by the actuation, and (3) dynamic axial forces caused by the motion of the mass. In statically determinate adaptive trusses (1) and (2) are non - existing. The actuator placement problem in statically indeterminate trusses is therefore governed by the actuation energy and the actuator strength requirements. Assuming output feedback type control of selected vibration modes in autonomous systems, a procedure is given for the placement of vibration controlling actuators in prestressed adaptive trusses.

  4. Analysis of Brace Stiffness Influence on Stability of the Truss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewski, M.; Iwicki, P.

    2015-02-01

    The paper is devoted to the numerical and experimental research of stability of a truss with side elastic supports at the top chord. The structure is a model of a real roof truss scaled by factor 1/4. The linear buckling analysis and non-linear static analysis were carried out. The buckling length factor for the compressed top chord was calculated and the limit load for the imperfect truss shell model with respect to brace stiffness was obtained. The relation between brace normal force and loading of the truss is presented. The threshold stiffness of braces necessary to obtain the maximum buckling load was found. The truss load bearing capacity obtained from numerical analysis was compared with Eurocode 3 requirements.

  5. Modal identification of a deployable space truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Axel; Pappa, Richard S.

    1990-01-01

    Work performed under a collaborative research effort between NASA and the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) is summarized. The objective is to develop and demonstrate advanced technology for system identification of future large space structures. Recent experiences using the eigensystem realization algorithm (ERA) for modal identification of Mini-Mast are reported. Mini-Mast is a 20-meter-long deployable space truss used for structural dynamics and active-vibration control research at the NASA Langley Research Center. Due to nonlinearities and numerous local modes, modal identification of Mini-Mast proved to be surprisingly difficult. Methods available with ERA for obtaining detailed, high-confidence results are illustrated.

  6. Deployable M-braced truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr. (Inventor); Rhodes, M. D. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A deployable M-braced truss structure, efficiently packaged into a compact stowed position and expandable to an operative position at the use site is described. The M-braced configuration effectively separates tension compression and shear in the structure and permits efficient structural design. Both diagonals and longerons telescope from an M-braced base unit and deploy either pneumatically, mechanically by springs or cables, or by powered reciprocating mechanisms. Upon full deployment, the diagonals and longerons lock into place with a simple latch mechanism.

  7. Component count and preliminary assembly considerations for large space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, W. Scott; Rhodes, Marvin D.; Fichter, W. B.

    1990-01-01

    Expressions for the number of truss components per truss division are presented along with expressions for the area and dimensions of mosaic hexagonal panel arrangements. The expressions were developed by substituting the number of truss components in specific truss divisions into associated polynomial equations and solving for the coefficients of the polynomials. To assist in automated or astronaut truss/panel assembly operations, a concept for assembling a tetrahedral truss with hexagonal panels is presented. The assembly concept minimizes the exchange of truss assembly devices and panel attachment devices, assuming that the number of exchanges is a driving assembly concern.

  8. STS-110 Crew Photographs Soyuz and Atlantis Docked to International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Docked to the International Space Station (ISS), a Soyuz vehicle (foreground) and the Space Shuttle Atlantis were photographed by a crew member in the Pirs docking compartment on the orbital outpost. Atlantis launched on April 8, 2002, carrying the the STS-110 mission which prepared the ISS for future space walks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long Starboard side S0 (S-zero) truss and preparing the first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver space walkers around the Station and was the first time all of a shuttle crew's scapulas were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock.

  9. Destiny's Earth Observation Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronaut Michael J. Bloomfield, STS-110 mission commander, looks through the Earth observation window in the Destiny laboratory aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The STS-110 mission prepared the ISS for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-zero) truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 Truss, weighing in at 27,000 pounds, was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the STS-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and marked the first time all spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  10. The P4 truss is moved to a workstand in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers get ready to lower the International Space Station's P4 truss onto a workstand. Part of the 10-truss, girder-like structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field, the P4 is the second port truss segment that will attach to the first port truss segment (P1 truss). The P4 is scheduled for mission 12A in September 2002.

  11. The P4 truss is moved to a workstand in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers oversee the removal of the P4 truss from the truck that transported it from Tulsa, Okla. Part of the 10-truss, girder-like structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field on the International Space Station, the P4 is the second port truss segment that will attach to the first port truss segment (P1 truss). The P4 is scheduled for mission 12A in September 2002.

  12. The P4 truss is moved to a workstand in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane moves the P4 truss to a workstand. Part of the 10-truss, girder-like structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field on the International Space Station, the P4 is the second port truss segment that will attach to the first port truss segment (P1 truss). The P4 is scheduled for mission 12A in September 2002.

  13. The P4 truss is moved to a workstand in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    After its move across the Space Station Processing Facility, the International Space Station's P4 truss rests in its workstand. Part of the 10-truss, girder-like structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field, the P4 is the second port truss segment that will attach to the first port truss segment (P1 truss). The P4 is scheduled for mission 12A in September 2002.

  14. 3. Photographic copy of roof truss construction details for Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photographic copy of roof truss construction details for Building 4505, Taylor & Barnes, Architects & Engineers, 803 W. Third Street, Los Angeles California, O.C.E. Office of Civil Engineer Job No. A(9-10), Military Construction: Materiel Command Flight Test Base, Muroc, California, Hangar and Auxiliary Buildings: Hangar Type P-A, Detail of Trusses T-2, T-3, T-4, T-5 & T6, Sheet No. 9, March 1944. A similar drawing for truss T-l is included in project field notes. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Hangar, End of North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. Heavily loaded joints for assembling aerobrake support trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandel, Hannskarl; Olsson, Nils; Levintov, Boris

    1990-01-01

    The major emphasis was to develop erectable joints for large aerobrake support trusses. The truss joints must be able to withstand the large forces experienced by the truss during the aero-pass, as well as be easily assembled and disassembled on orbit by astronauts or robots. Other important design considerations include; strength, stiffness, and allowable error in strut length. Six mechanical joint designs, as well as a seventh joint design, where a high strength epoxy is injected to make the connection rigid, are presented.

  16. Closeup view of portion of swingspan truss showing members and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of portion of swing-span truss showing members and their pin connections at joints. The vertical member (hanger) shown is a portion of a small secondary truss added in each subdivided panel to help support the bottom chord. The track timber ties span the distance (16'-0') center to center of trusses, rest on the bottom chord and support the track. Note: Several of the members shown are eyebars. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  17. Section NN, showing steel roof trusses, mezzanine iron railing, first ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section NN, showing steel roof trusses, mezzanine iron railing, first floor doors, etc. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Library Building. Also includes steel truss roof plan and a small stress diagram of the truss. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 8, job no. 315. Scales 1/2 inch to the foot (section), and 1/8 and 1/16 inch to the foot. No date given on sheet (probably March or April, 1927). - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  18. Observation of B_{s}^{0}→D[over ¯]^{0}K_{S}^{0} and Evidence for B_{s}^{0}→D[over ¯]^{*}^{0}K_{S}^{0} Decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusardi, N; Lusiani, A; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F

    2016-04-22

    The first observation of the B_{s}^{0}→D[over ¯]^{0}K_{S}^{0} decay mode and evidence for the B_{s}^{0}→D[over ¯]^{*0}K_{S}^{0} decay mode are reported. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb^{-1} collected in pp collisions by LHCb at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The branching fractions are measured to be B(B_{s}^{0}→D[over ¯]^{0}K[over ¯]^{0})=[4.3±0.5(stat)±0.3(syst)±0.3(frag)±0.6(norm)]×10^{-4},B(B_{s}^{0}→D[over ¯]^{*0}K[over ¯]^{0})=[2.8±1.0(stat)±0.3(syst)±0.2(frag)±0.4(norm)]×10^{-4},where the uncertainties are due to contributions coming from statistical precision, systematic effects, and the precision of two external inputs, the ratio f_{s}/f_{d} and the branching fraction of B^{0}→D[over ¯]^{0}K_{S}^{0}, which is used as a calibration channel. PMID:27152791

  19. 10. Detail of truss located on top the northeast pier, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail of truss located on top the northeast pier, looking southwest. - Bridge No. 4800, Spanning Minnesota River on Trunk Highway 4 between Brown & Nicollet Counties, Sleepy Eye, Brown County, MN

  20. 9. Detail of truss work on southwesternmost span, looking northnortheast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail of truss work on southwesternmost span, looking north-northeast - Bridge No. 4800, Spanning Minnesota River on Trunk Highway 4 between Brown & Nicollet Counties, Sleepy Eye, Brown County, MN

  1. Interior view of north wall showing roof trusses & monitor; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of north wall showing roof trusses & monitor; camera facing northeast. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Smithery, California Avenue, west side at California Avenue & Eighth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  2. Facility No. 175, interior detail showing rolling doors, trusses, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. 175, interior detail showing rolling doors, trusses, and angled monitor roof - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Landplane Hangar Type, Wasp Boulevard and Gambier Bay Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. 42. DETAIL VIEW OF TRIPLED, HEAVY TIMBER TRUSSES IN FOUNDRY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. DETAIL VIEW OF TRIPLED, HEAVY TIMBER TRUSSES IN FOUNDRY. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Shops, South side of Pratt Street between Carey & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  4. 41. DETAIL VIEW OF TRIPLED, HEAVY TIMBER TRUSSES IN FOUNDRY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. DETAIL VIEW OF TRIPLED, HEAVY TIMBER TRUSSES IN FOUNDRY. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Shops, South side of Pratt Street between Carey & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  5. 43. DETAIL VIEW OF TRIPLED, HEAVY TIMBER TRUSSES IN FOUNDRY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. DETAIL VIEW OF TRIPLED, HEAVY TIMBER TRUSSES IN FOUNDRY. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Shops, South side of Pratt Street between Carey & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  6. 14. BRIDGE ABUTMENT AND ARCH TRUSS MOUNTING PLATE SHOWING EYEBAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. BRIDGE ABUTMENT AND ARCH TRUSS MOUNTING PLATE SHOWING EYE-BAR CONNECTION AND EYE-BAR PIN LOCATION - Spruce Street Bridge, East Spruce Street, 500 Block, spanning Power Canal, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  7. DETAIL VIEW OF END OF TRUSS SHOWING CONNECTION OF DECORATIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF END OF TRUSS SHOWING CONNECTION OF DECORATIVE "KNEE", RAILING ENDPOST AND UPPER AND LOWER CHORDS - Scarlets Mill Bridge, Spanning former Reading Railroad, Scarlets Mill, Berks County, PA

  8. 7. DETAIL VIEW SHOWING CONNECTION OF BRIDGE COLUMN, TRUSS, TOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW SHOWING CONNECTION OF BRIDGE COLUMN, TRUSS, TOP BEAM, AND ARCHED CROSS MEMBER. NOTE KNEE BRACE FOR CROSS MEMBER AND DIAGONAL TENSION BAR - Heber Creeper Railroad Line, Olmstead Bridge, Spanning Provo River, Provo, Utah County, UT

  9. 14. View of swing truss apex with major sway bracing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View of swing truss apex with major sway bracing and bottom latticed strut members, with knee braces below. (Nov. 25, 1988) - University Heights Bridge, Spanning Harlem River at 207th Street & West Harlem Road, New York County, NY

  10. 11. OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAST TRUSS AND EAST SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAST TRUSS AND EAST SIDE OF SOUTH ABUTMENT, SEEN FROM SOUTH BANK OF WINTER'S RUN. - Mitchell's Mill Bridge, Spanning Winter's Run on Carrs Mill Road, west of Bel Air, Bel Air, Harford County, MD

  11. 7. CLOSER OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST TRUSS AND WEST SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. CLOSER OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST TRUSS AND WEST SIDE OF SOUTH ABUTMENT; VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Mitchell's Mill Bridge, Spanning Winter's Run on Carrs Mill Road, west of Bel Air, Bel Air, Harford County, MD

  12. 15. SOUTH WEB AND WEST PORTAL OF MIDDLE THROUGH TRUSS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. SOUTH WEB AND WEST PORTAL OF MIDDLE THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  13. 31. LOWER CHORD / FLOOR STRUCTURE DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. LOWER CHORD / FLOOR STRUCTURE DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTH. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  14. 32. LOWER CHORD / FLOOR STRUCTURE DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. LOWER CHORD / FLOOR STRUCTURE DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTH. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  15. 72. VIEW SHOWING THE ERECTION OF A TAINTER GATE TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. VIEW SHOWING THE ERECTION OF A TAINTER GATE TRUSS ON TRUNNION PIN ON WEST SIDE OF BAY 9, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Taken on August 17, 1935. - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  16. 8. General view of truss geometry at center of span ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. General view of truss geometry at center of span from lower parking lot, looking northwest - Lower Rollstone Street Bridge, Spanning Nashua River on Rollstone Street, Fitchburg, Worcester County, MA

  17. 27. VIEW SOUTH; DETAIL OF TRUSSES IN AUDITORIUM. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW SOUTH; DETAIL OF TRUSSES IN AUDITORIUM. - Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Bowditch Hall, 600 feet east of Smith Street & 350 feet south of Columbia Cove, West bank of Thames River, New London, New London County, CT

  18. 6. OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM SOUTHWEST, SHOWING WEST PORTAL, THROUGH TRUSSES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM SOUTHWEST, SHOWING WEST PORTAL, THROUGH TRUSSES OF WEST SPAN, AND PORTION OF WEST APPROACH - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  19. 6. West side, details of west truss web and floorbeam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. West side, details of west truss web and floor-beam bracing by steel plates and steel rod; looking northeast - Bridge No. 92101, Spanning Pike River at County Highway 373, Embarrass, St. Louis County, MN

  20. View of movable span and point truss (to right), from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of movable span and point truss (to right), from navy land, looking west, showing bridge in context of navigational channel. - Naval Supply Annex Stockton, Daggett Road Bridge, Daggett Road traversing Burns Cut Off, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  1. View of movable span and point truss (to right), from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of movable span and point truss (to right), from navy land, looking west, showing bridge in context of navigational channel. - Naval Supply Annex Stockton, Rough & Ready Island, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  2. 19. DETAIL OF FLOORBEAM CONNECTION AT TRUSS PANEL POINT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAIL OF FLOORBEAM CONNECTION AT TRUSS PANEL POINT AND FLOOR STRINGER SUPPORT AT FLOORBEAMS - Wabash River Bridge, Spanning Wabash River over Salamonie Road (County Road 200 West), Huntington, Huntington County, IN

  3. 34. 100 foot through truss looking north from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. 100 foot through truss - looking north from the deck up to an internal top strut, showing the general configuration. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  4. 38. 100 foot through truss bridge original identification plaque ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. 100 foot through truss - bridge original identification plaque located on the top of the north portal entrance. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  5. 19. WEST ANCHOR SPAN OF THROUGH TRUSS AND PIERS NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. WEST ANCHOR SPAN OF THROUGH TRUSS AND PIERS NO. 2 AND 3, FROM WEST RIVERBANK. VIEW TO NORTH. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  6. 12. DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS SPANS AND PIERS NO. 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS SPANS AND PIERS NO. 3, 4 AND 5, FROM WEST RIVERBANK. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  7. 14. DETAIL OF ROOF TRUSS STRUCTURE AND HAY HOOK CABLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF ROOF TRUSS STRUCTURE AND HAY HOOK CABLE AND PULLEY SYSTEM LOCATED ON WEST END OF BARN. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - James H. Lane Ranch, Barn, One Mile South of Richfield on Highway 26, Richfield, Lincoln County, ID

  8. 22. DOWNSTREAM DETAIL OF PIER NO. 3, TRUSS TOWER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DOWNSTREAM DETAIL OF PIER NO. 3, TRUSS TOWER AND CANTILEVER ARMS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  9. 18. WEST DECK TRUSS APPROACH SPAN AND PIERS NO. 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. WEST DECK TRUSS APPROACH SPAN AND PIERS NO. 1 AND 2, FROM WEST RIVERBANK. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  10. Application of the ADAMS program to deployable space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calleson, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The need for a computer program to perform kinematic and dynamic analyses of large truss structures while deploying from a packaged configuration in space led to the evaluation of several existing programs. ADAMS (automatic dynamic analysis of mechanical systems), a generalized program from performing the dynamic simulation of mechanical systems undergoing large displacements, is applied to two concepts of deployable space antenna units. One concept is a one cube folding unit of Martin Marietta's Box Truss Antenna and the other is a tetrahedral truss unit of a Tetrahedral Truss Antenna. Adequate evaluation of dynamic forces during member latch-up into the deployed configuration is not yet available from the present version of ADAMS since it is limited to the assembly of rigid bodies. Included is a method for estimating the maximum bending stress in a surface member at latch-up. Results include member displacement and velocity responses during extension and an example of member bending stresses at latch-up.

  11. Detail east panel of east truss showing rollling panels and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail east panel of east truss showing rollling panels and counter weights. View south - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  12. Detail showing connection of trusses to counter weights. View northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail showing connection of trusses to counter weights. View northeast - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  13. Safety factor maximization for trusses subjected to fatigue stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedaya, Mohammed Mohammed; Moneeb Elsabbagh, Adel; Hussein, Ahmed Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    This article presents a mathematical model for sizing optimization of undamped trusses subjected to dynamic loading leading to fatigue. The combined effect of static and dynamic loading, at steady state, is considered. An optimization model, whose objective is the maximization of the safety factor of these trusses, is developed. A new quantity (equivalent fatigue strain energy) combining the effects of static and dynamic stresses is presented. This quantity is used as a global measure of the proximity of fatigue failure. Therefore, the equivalent fatigue strain energy is minimized, and this seems to give a good value for the maximal equivalent static stress. This assumption is verified through two simple examples. The method of moving asymptotes is used in the optimization of trusses. The applicability of the proposed approach is demonstrated through two numerical examples; a 10-bar truss with different loading cases and a helicopter tail subjected to dynamic loading.

  14. 3. View of reinforced concrete and through truss eleveated rightofway, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of reinforced concrete and through truss eleveated right-of-way, Shaker Rapid Transit, at E. 80th St in Cleveland. Constructed ca. 1920. - Shaker Heights Rapid Transit Line, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. 28. Rear lot of the Adelman Block. The collapsed truss ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Rear lot of the Adelman Block. The collapsed truss roof (ca. 1932) originally sheltered an automobile sales garage - Lockport Historic District, Bounded by Eighth, Hamilton & Eleventh Streets & Illinois & Michigan Canal, Lockport, Will County, IL

  16. VIEW OF BRIDGE CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS CANTILEVER SECTION, LOOKING WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BRIDGE CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS CANTILEVER SECTION, LOOKING WEST. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  17. 13. VIEW OF CANTILEVERED NORTHERN TRUSS SECTION (LOWER CENTER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF CANTILEVERED NORTHERN TRUSS SECTION (LOWER CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH), SHOWING LINKAGES TO THE CENTRAL BRIDGE SUPERSTRUCTURE. FACING NORTHEAST. - Coverts Crossing Bridge, Spanning Mahoning River along Township Route 372 (Covert Road), New Castle, Lawrence County, PA

  18. Detail, pier and underside of deck at truss span 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, pier and underside of deck at truss span 2 from below and north, showing floor system configuration, lower chords and cantilevered sidewalk - Breslau Bridge, Spanning North Branch of Susquehanna River at Hannover Street, Plymouth, Luzerne County, PA

  19. 14. VIEW OF CANTILEVERED SOUTHERN TRUSS SECTION AND WOOD DECK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF CANTILEVERED SOUTHERN TRUSS SECTION AND WOOD DECK FROM THE CENTRAL BRIDGE SUPERSTRUCTURE SHOWN IN PA-474-13. - Coverts Crossing Bridge, Spanning Mahoning River along Township Route 372 (Covert Road), New Castle, Lawrence County, PA

  20. VIEW OF BRIDGE CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS CANTILEVER PORTAL ON WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BRIDGE CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS CANTILEVER PORTAL ON WEST BANK SIDE LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  1. Wave propagation in equivalent continuums representing truss lattice materials

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, Mark C.; Barham, Matthew I.; Kumar, Mukul; Barton, Nathan R.

    2015-07-29

    Stiffness scales linearly with density in stretch-dominated lattice meta-materials offering the possibility of very light yet very stiff structures. Current additive manufacturing techniques can assemble structures consisting of these lattice materials, but the design of such structures will require accurate, efficient simulation techniques. Equivalent continuum models have several advantages over discrete truss models of stretch dominated lattices, including computational efficiency and ease of model construction. However, the development an equivalent model suitable for representing the dynamic response of a periodic truss is complicated by microinertial effects. This paper derives a dynamic equivalent continuum model for periodic truss structures and verifies it against detailed finite element simulations. The model must incorporate microinertial effects to accurately reproduce long-wavelength characteristics of the response such as anisotropic elastic soundspeeds. The formulation presented here also improves upon previous work by preserving equilibrium at truss joints for affine lattice deformation and by improving numerical stability by eliminating vertices in the effective yield surface.

  2. 5. DETAIL OF NORTHWEST END OF TRUSS, SHOWING INCLINED POST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF NORTHWEST END OF TRUSS, SHOWING INCLINED POST, TOP CHORD AND DIAGONAL BRACING. - North Branch Quantico Creek Bridge, Prince William Forest Park, on NPS Route 406 spanning north branch of Quantico Creek, Dumfries, Prince William County, VA

  3. 8. Detail of interior roof showing truss bracing and roof ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail of interior roof showing truss bracing and roof plank decking; view to east from approximately the center of the shelter. - Warm River Shelter, Warm River Campground, Ashton, Fremont County, ID

  4. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER CHORD OF 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER CHORD OF 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING FLOOR BEAM (WITH CANTILEVERED SIDEWALK EXTENSION), STRINGERS AND LATERAL BRACING, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Sixth Street Viaduct, Spanning Burlington Northern Railroad & Valley Street, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  5. VIEW OF THE ROOF TRUSSES NEAR THE ENTRY TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE ROOF TRUSSES NEAR THE ENTRY TO THE GYMNASIUM. VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Gymnasium Building, North Waterfront & Pierce Street near Berth S-13, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. 51. TRUSS A AND PROSCENIUM WALL IN TREATER ATTIC, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. TRUSS A AND PROSCENIUM WALL IN TREATER ATTIC, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NOTE TERRA COTTA FIREPROOFING OF ROOF DECK; HEAVY PLASTER CEILING PROVIDED FIRE SEPARATION FROM THEATER BELOW. - Auditorium Building, 430 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  7. 7. DETAIL OF LATERAL BRACING OF THROUGH TRUSS SPAN (THIS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF LATERAL BRACING OF THROUGH TRUSS SPAN (THIS SPAN IS IMMEDIATELY SOUTH OF THE VERTICAL LIFT SPAN). - Shippingsport Bridge, Spanning Illinois River at State Route 51, La Salle, La Salle County, IL

  8. 4. DETAIL VIEW FIXED SPAN INCLUDING TRUSS, MOVEABLE SPAN WHICH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW FIXED SPAN INCLUDING TRUSS, MOVEABLE SPAN WHICH THE NEXT UNIT TO THE RIGHT, AND FIRST UNIT OF PONTOON FLOATING SPAN. - Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Floating Bridge, Spanning Lake Washington at I-90, Seattle, King County, WA

  9. 13. OBLIQUE OF UNDERSIDE OF SOUTH TRUSS SPAN, SOUTH APPROACH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. OBLIQUE OF UNDERSIDE OF SOUTH TRUSS SPAN, SOUTH APPROACH SPAN, AND SOUTH PIER, SHOWING FLOOR SYSTEM AND BEARINGS. LOOKING NORTH. - Flintville Bridge, Spanning Broad Creek at Flintville Road (Maryland Route 623), Castleton, Harford County, MD

  10. 5. SOUTHWEST PORTAL AND SOUTHWEST WEB OT THROUGH TRUSSES, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SOUTHWEST PORTAL AND SOUTHWEST WEB OT THROUGH TRUSSES, SHOWING TOP CHORD DETAILS; VIEW TO NORTHEAST - Nebraska City Bridge, Spanning Missouri River near Highway 2 between Nebraska & Iowa, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  11. 20. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF NORTH PONY TRUSS; SHOWING INCLINED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF NORTH PONY TRUSS; SHOWING INCLINED END POST, HIP VERTICAL, VERTICAL POSTS, DIAGONALS, AND COUNTER BRACING - Boyleston Bridge, Spanning Skunk River, Lowell, Henry County, IA

  12. Changing Stiffnesses Of Truss Members For Vibration Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.

    1994-01-01

    Extension of active-member method of vibration testing of trusses and similar structures proposed to obtain additional data for refinement of finite-element mathematical models of vibrational properties of structures. Active truss members not only used in vibration tests to excite and measure vibrations of structures, but also made to have different effective stiffnesses in some tests, enabling excitation of different vibrational modes yielding additional data. Aspects of active-member method of vibration testing described previously in articles in NASA Tech Briefs including "Two Techniques for Suppressing Vibrations in Structures" (NPO-17889), "Active Suppression of Vibrations in a Truss" (NPO-18305), and "Active Members Excite and Measure Vibrations in Trusses" (NPO-18353).

  13. View of West end of central lift span truss web ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of West end of central lift span truss web of Tensaw River Bridge, showing web brace of lift girder superstructure, looking west - Tensaw River Lift Bridge, Spanning Tensaw River at U.S. Highway 90, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  14. 37. GARRET, SOUTH HALF, LOOKING WEST. The trusses and joists ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. GARRET, SOUTH HALF, LOOKING WEST. The trusses and joists date from the 1755 Greater Meeting House. When this building was being torn down in 1812, these trusses were incorporated into the new Twelfth Street Meeting House. The trusses and joists were all pit sawn. The lower strut of the truss center posts were added in 1812 with iron strapping tieing them into the older members. Many of the joist tenons broke off in the transfer for reuse, so ledgers were provided to support the joists in 1812. At the Greater Meeting House the space between the queen posts was the Monthly Meeting Room. Evidence still exists for its plaster walls and ceiling. The suspended wood air duct dates from 1852. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. 2. EAST ABUTMENT RIVER PIER LOOKING AT BASCULE TRUSS LIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAST ABUTMENT RIVER PIER LOOKING AT BASCULE TRUSS LIVE LOAD SUPPORT COLUMN. - Chicago River Bascule Bridge, Monroe Street, Spanning South Branch of Chicago River at Monroe Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  16. 1. FIRST FLOOR INTERIOR OF BUILDING No. 1 TRUSSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. FIRST FLOOR INTERIOR OF BUILDING No. 1 - TRUSSED WOOD GIRDERS WITH TWO STRUTS AND TENSION ROD FITTINGS AT BEAM ENDS - Whiting-Plover Paper Mill, Building No. 1, 3243 Whiting Road, Whiting, Portage County, WI

  17. 10. TRUSS DETAILS, BRIDGE OVER SCOTT SWAMP (Shop Drawing, Berlin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. TRUSS DETAILS, BRIDGE OVER SCOTT SWAMP (Shop Drawing, Berlin Construction Company) Sheet 1 of 2, July 5, 1927 - Bridge No. 475, Spanning Pequabuck River on U.S. Route 6, Farmington, Hartford County, CT

  18. Interior view of fixed end of northernmost truss span, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of fixed end of northernmost truss span, looking due south. - Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway, Beaver River Bridge, Spanning Beaver River along line of Second Avenue, New Brighton, Beaver County, PA

  19. Detail view of fixed end of northernmost truss span. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of fixed end of northernmost truss span. - Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway, Beaver River Bridge, Spanning Beaver River along line of Second Avenue, New Brighton, Beaver County, PA

  20. Interior wall, truss, and roof detail. View to northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior wall, truss, and roof detail. View to northeast - Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road Company Shops, Foundry, Southwest of downtown Two Harbors, northwest of Agate Bay, Two Harbors, Lake County, MN

  1. 11. DETAIL SHOWING ROLLING ENGINE DECK AND NORTHEAST TRUSS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL SHOWING ROLLING ENGINE DECK AND NORTHEAST TRUSS OF SUPERSTRUCTURE. Looking northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. 18. DETAIL VIEW OF FIRE CURTAIN CONSTRUCTION IN TRUSS, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL VIEW OF FIRE CURTAIN CONSTRUCTION IN TRUSS, LOOKING NORTHEAST November 22, 1950. (Original negative GT-914) - New York Barge Canal, Gowanus Bay Terminal Pier, East of bulkhead supporting Columbia Street, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  3. 13. Interior, Hangar 1301, showing bottom of a truss, steel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Interior, Hangar 1301, showing bottom of a truss, steel hinge point and expansion joint, and concrete buttress, looking north northwest - Dover Air Force Base, Hangar No. 1301, Dover, Kent County, DE

  4. Detail of corner where trusses of main and secondary wings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of corner where trusses of main and secondary wings meet, view from mezzanine - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Air Base Temporary Storehouse, Avoget Street and Ranger Loop, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Detail, east truss of south span, showing railing, vertical UL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, east truss of south span, showing railing, vertical U-L, diagonal eyebar U-L with turnbuckle - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  6. CLOSEUP VIEW OF PORTION OF SIMPLE THROUGH TRUSS SPAN LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CLOSE-UP VIEW OF PORTION OF SIMPLE THROUGH TRUSS SPAN LOOKING UP AND NORTHEAST. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  7. 51. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING, AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT ROOF TRUSS DETAILS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING, AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT ROOF TRUSS DETAILS, SACKING SHED-FLOTATION UNIT - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  8. 52. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT ROOF TRUSS DETAILS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT ROOF TRUSS DETAILS, SACKING SHED-FLOTATION UNIT - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  9. 19. VERTICAL VIEW, FROM DECK, SHOWING CONNECTION OF CENTER TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VERTICAL VIEW, FROM DECK, SHOWING CONNECTION OF CENTER TRUSS TENSION BARS, DIAGONAL TENSION RODS, AND LATTICE-JOINED VERTICAL CHANNELS - Lenox Bridge, Spanning Obion River, Rural Road S8025, Lenox, Dyer County, TN

  10. Detail view of truss end bearings, with students from Susquehanna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of truss end bearings, with students from Susquehanna College seated on concrete base for stringers. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Selinsgrove Bridge, Spanning Susquehanna River, south of Cherry Island, Selinsgrove, Snyder County, PA

  11. Elevation of deck truss span over creek, looking NW along ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation of deck truss span over creek, looking NW along U.S. route 322. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Brandywine Valley Viaduct, Spanning Brandywine Creek & U.S. Route 322, Downingtown, Chester County, PA

  12. Design and Synthesis of Triangulated DNA Origami Trusses.

    PubMed

    Matthies, Michael; Agarwal, Nayan P; Schmidt, Thorsten L

    2016-03-01

    DNA nanotechnology offers unique control over matter on the nanoscale. Here, we extend the DNA origami method to cover a range of wireframe truss structures composed of equilateral triangles, which use less material per volume than standard multiple-helix bundles. From a flat truss design, we folded tetrahedral, octahedral, or irregular dodecahedral trusses by exchanging few connector strands. Other than standard origami designs, the trusses can be folded in low-salt buffers that make them compatible with cell culture buffers. The structures also have defined cavities that may in the future be used to precisely position functional elements such as metallic nanoparticles or enzymes. Our graph routing program and a simple design pipeline will enable other laboratories to make use of this valuable and potent new construction principle for DNA-based nanoengineering. PMID:26883285

  13. Interior detail of trusses and high windows in north wing; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior detail of trusses and high windows in north wing; camera facing southwest. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Defense Electronics Equipment Operating Center, I Street, terminus west of Cedar Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  14. Detail of three trusses resting on one column at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of three trusses resting on one column at the junction of the roundhouse and care repair shop looking south. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Auxiliary Buildings, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  15. 13. TOP OF STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW OF STEEL TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. TOP OF STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW OF STEEL TRUSS STRUCTURE AND OVERHEAD CRANE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  16. 11. DETAIL VIEW OF TRUSS, 1917 SPAN, SOUTHWEST ELEVATION, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL VIEW OF TRUSS, 1917 SPAN, SOUTHWEST ELEVATION, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Mystic River Drawbridge No. 7, Spanning Mystic River at Boston & Maine Railroad Eastern Route, Somerville, Middlesex County, MA

  17. 15. Stress Sheet, Truss number 2, span number 6, Superior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Stress Sheet, Truss number 2, span number 6, Superior Avenue viaduct. Drawing courtesy Engineering Dept., City of Cleveland. - Superior Avenue Viaduct, Cleveland East & West side, Cuyahoga Valley Vicinity, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  18. 15. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER CHORD ON 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER CHORD ON 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING ENDPOST, PORTAL STRUT, LATERAL BRACING, HIP VERTICAL AND DIAGONAL, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Sixth Street Viaduct, Spanning Burlington Northern Railroad & Valley Street, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  19. 16. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER CHORD ON 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER CHORD ON 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING TYPICAL VERTICAL, STRUT, LATERAL BRACING AND DIAGONAL, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Sixth Street Viaduct, Spanning Burlington Northern Railroad & Valley Street, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  20. 13. DETAIL VIEW OF DECK OF 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING HIP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL VIEW OF DECK OF 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING HIP VERTICAL, SIDEWALK AND GUARDRAIL, LOOKING EAST - Sixth Street Viaduct, Spanning Burlington Northern Railroad & Valley Street, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  1. 14. DETAIL VIEW OF DECK OF 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING TYPICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW OF DECK OF 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING TYPICAL VERTICAL AND DIAGONALS, SIDEWALK AND GUARDRAIL, LOOKING EAST - Sixth Street Viaduct, Spanning Burlington Northern Railroad & Valley Street, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  2. 12. VIEW OF DECK OF 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING ROADWAY, SIDEWALKS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF DECK OF 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING ROADWAY, SIDEWALKS AND WEB MEMBERS, LOOKING SOUTH - Sixth Street Viaduct, Spanning Burlington Northern Railroad & Valley Street, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  3. OBLIQUE INTERIOR VIEW. NOTE THE FLAT TRUSS AT THE CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE INTERIOR VIEW. NOTE THE FLAT TRUSS AT THE CENTER OF THE HANGAR. VIEW FACING EAST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Seaplane Hangar, Lexington Boulevard, south of Enterprise Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. INTERIOR ELEVATION SHOWING THE SLIDING DOORS AND ROOF TRUSSES. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR ELEVATION SHOWING THE SLIDING DOORS AND ROOF TRUSSES. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Seaplane Hangar, Lexington Boulevard, south of Enterprise Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Interior, building 1205, view to west showing roof truss system, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, building 1205, view to west showing roof truss system, 90 mm lens plus electronic flash fill lighting. - Travis Air Force Base, Readiness Maintenance Hangar, W Street, Air Defense Command Readiness Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  6. Interior, middle wing, medical records storage. Notice roof trusses. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, middle wing, medical records storage. Notice roof trusses. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Detail of pumps in troughs, detail of truss attachment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of pumps in troughs, detail of truss - attachment to the wall - as well as the troughs themselves. Interior of the main hatchery building, view to the east. - Prairie Creek Fish Hatchery, Hwy. 101, Orick, Humboldt County, CA

  8. View southwest showing main truss and understructure as well as ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southwest showing main truss and understructure as well as concrete piers, timber supported approach span in right center background - William B. Crumpton Bridge, Spanning Tombigbee River on Alabama State Highway 10, Nanafalia, Marengo County, AL

  9. Interior view of second floor space showing roof trusses; camera ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of second floor space showing roof trusses; camera facing northeast. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Rubber Shop, California Avenue, west side across from Dry Dock 1 near Ninth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  10. 258. Dennis Hill, Photographer April 1998 VIEW OF CANTILEVER TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    258. Dennis Hill, Photographer April 1998 VIEW OF CANTILEVER TRUSS ANCHOR ARM AT PIERS E- AND E-2, SOUTH SIDE, FACING NORTH. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  11. THE TRUSS BRIDGE SEGMENT OF THE TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE IN FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THE TRUSS BRIDGE SEGMENT OF THE TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE IN FOREGROUND AND THE HELL GATE BRIDGE IN THE BACKGROUND ADJACENT TO THE SUSPENSION SEGMENT OF THE TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE. - Triborough Bridge, Passing through Queens, Manhattan & the Bronx, Queens (subdivision), Queens County, NY

  12. Interior view of skewed Baltimore truss and curved deck of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of skewed Baltimore truss and curved deck of Bridge No. 1363, First B&O Crossing, looking west. - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  13. Interior view of skewed Baltimore truss of Bridge No. 1363, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of skewed Baltimore truss of Bridge No. 1363, First B&O Crossing, looking west. - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  14. STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED BY ARCHITECTURAL FINISH. TENSION RING ROLLER SUPPORT AT COLUMN OBSCURED BY COLUMN COVERINGS. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  15. 4. Main span (parker through truss), south end, detail of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Main span (parker through truss), south end, detail of web members and sway bracing; looking west. - Bridge 4666, Minnesota Trunk Highway 19 spanning Minnesota River, North Redwood, Redwood County, MN

  16. 6. Main span (parker through truss, detail of floor system ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Main span (parker through truss, detail of floor system and bottom lateral bracing; looking northwest. - Bridge 4666, Minnesota Trunk Highway 19 spanning Minnesota River, North Redwood, Redwood County, MN

  17. 8. Approach spans (two warren pony trusses), west side, detail ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Approach spans (two warren pony trusses), west side, detail of lower chords and pier no. 2 (west pier); looking south. - Bridge 4666, Minnesota Trunk Highway 19 spanning Minnesota River, North Redwood, Redwood County, MN

  18. View of central lift span truss web of Tensaw River ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of central lift span truss web of Tensaw River Bridge, showing support girders for life house, looking east - Tensaw River Lift Bridge, Spanning Tensaw River at U.S. Highway 90, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  19. East Elevation, Bridge Plan & Truss Details Chickamauga National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East Elevation, Bridge Plan & Truss Details - Chickamauga National Military Park Tour Roads, Alexander's Bridge, At the confluence of West Chickamauga Creek and Gordon's Slough, Fort Oglethorpe, Catoosa County, GA

  20. 9. VIEW SHOWING TRUSSES FROM DECK WITH 4' RANGE POLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW SHOWING TRUSSES FROM DECK WITH 4' RANGE POLE AT SECOND VERTICAL POST ON SOUTH SIDE, LOOKING WEST - White River Bridge, Spanning White River at U.S. Highway 70, De Valls Bluff, Prairie County, AR

  1. 31. DETAIL VIEW OF MOVABLE SPAN, UPPER TRUSS GUSSET PLATE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. DETAIL VIEW OF MOVABLE SPAN, UPPER TRUSS GUSSET PLATE, CONNECTION OF VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL MEMBERS AT BRIDGE TENDER'S MOUSE (taken in December 1983) - Sharptown Bridge, Spanning Nanticoke River, State Route 313, Sharptown, Wicomico County, MD

  2. 19. COPY OF ENGRAVING OF 'WROUGHT IRON ARCH TRUSS BRIDGE,' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. COPY OF ENGRAVING OF 'WROUGHT IRON ARCH TRUSS BRIDGE,' PAT. DEC. 10, 1867 BY OHIO BRIDGE COMPANY, CLEVELAND, OHIO. (COURTESY OF OHIO HISTORICAL SOCIETY ARCHIVES, COLUMBUS, OHIO) - Tioronda Bridge, South Avenue spanning Fishkill Creek, Beacon, Dutchess County, NY

  3. 25. VIEW OF EARTHQUAKEDAMAGED TRUSS MEMBER AT #070, SUPPORTED BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF EARTHQUAKE-DAMAGED TRUSS MEMBER AT #070, SUPPORTED BY TEMPORARY BRACING, LOOKING NORTHEAST TO SOUTHWEST - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  4. 8. VIEW OF WEST WEB OF 1886 TRUSS, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF WEST WEB OF 1886 TRUSS, LOOKING EAST FROM BURLINGTON NORTHERN RAILROAD TRACKS - Sixth Street Viaduct, Spanning Burlington Northern Railroad & Valley Street, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  5. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE STEEL BRIDGE TRUSS AND ROADWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE STEEL BRIDGE TRUSS AND ROADWAY AT PIER 3, EAST SIDE, FROM RIVER, FACING WEST - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  6. Detail elevation of truss from southeast. Waterville Bridge, Spanning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail elevation of truss from southeast. - Waterville Bridge, Spanning Swatara Creek at Appalachian Trail (moved from Little Pine Creek at State Route 44, Waterville, Lycoming County), Green Point, Lebanon County, PA

  7. Details of roof truss, building for drawing room and laying ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Details of roof truss, building for drawing room and laying out floor, Johnson Company, Johnstown,m Pa. Jan 19th 1893, H.E.F., scale 3/4 = 1 ft, (photograph of architect's drawing of roof truss detail, company drawing no. 14767, held at the Johnstown Corporation General Office, Johnstown, Pennsylvania) - Johnson Steel Street Rail Company, Drawing Room & Laying-Out Floor Building, 525 Central Avenue, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  8. 10. 100 foot through truss north west bearing abutment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 100 foot through truss - north west bearing abutment of the second through truss, showing the diagonal sway bracing to its alternate pier. This bearing point is on a concrete extension of the original bearing point now covered by rock and soil. Note that the bearing point is to the backmost position on the concrete pier. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  9. 39. GARRET TRUSS DETAIL. Connection of a queen post (called ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. GARRET TRUSS DETAIL. Connection of a queen post (called 'king post' in the 1755 account for scantling for the Greater Meeting House) and the bottom chord at the south side of the second truss from the east end. Note the rose head nails and plaster stains from the walls of the 1755 Monthly Meeting Room. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. Structural design feasibility study of Space Station long spacer truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, Sasan C.; Funk, Gregory P.; Dohogne, Caroline A.

    1994-01-01

    The structural design and configuration feasibility of the long spacer truss assembly that will be used as part of the Space Station Freedom is the focus of this study. The structural analysis discussed herein is derived from the transient loading events presented in the Space Transportation System Interface Control Document (STS ICD). The transient loading events are liftoff, landing, and emergency landing loads. Quasi-static loading events were neglected in this study since the magnitude of the quasi-static acceleration factors is lower than that of the transient acceleration factors. Structural analysis of the proposed configuration of the long spacer truss with four longerons indicated that negative safety margins are possible. As a result, configuration changes were proposed. The primary configuration change suggested was to increase the number of truss longerons to six. The six-longeron truss appears to be a more promising structure than the four-longeron truss because it offers a positive margin of safety and more volume in its second bay (BAY2). This additional volume can be used for resupply of some of the orbital replacement units (such as a battery box). Note that the design effort on the long spacer truss has not fully begun and that calculations and reports of the negative safety margins are, to date, based on concept only.

  11. Fatigue analysis of mini-mast space truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Shoi Y.

    1989-01-01

    The functional, structural adequacy of a 20 meter long generic space truss (Mini-Mast), subjected to fatigue loading, was examined with respect to the failure modes which are most likely to occur during services. The space truss is made of thin-walled tubes having unidirectional, zero degree layups of Celanese G50 graphite fibers/Narmco 5217 epoxy composites. The approach used to investigate the most probable failure mode of the truss under fatigue loading is to determine the stress level, including the types of stress, in the member first, then followed by failure mode analysis based on the stress level just determined. To begin, an approximate beam-parameter truss (BPT) model is analyzed first, followed by a detailed analysis of the truss using a finite element model (FEM) run with NASTRAN code. The response results of the BPT model are used to compare FEM results and to check any major deviation of trend derived from the FEM. The purpose of the work was to search available fatigue data of the tube material, to conduct approximate dynamical stress analysis of the BPT model, to run detailed dynamical stress analysis of the FEM model using NASTRAN code, and to predict the fatigue life of the truss member based on limited fatigue data.

  12. Structural design feasibility study of Space Station long spacer truss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armand, Sasan C.; Funk, Gregory P.; Dohogne, Caroline A.

    1994-02-01

    The structural design and configuration feasibility of the long spacer truss assembly that will be used as part of the Space Station Freedom is the focus of this study. The structural analysis discussed herein is derived from the transient loading events presented in the Space Transportation System Interface Control Document (STS ICD). The transient loading events are liftoff, landing, and emergency landing loads. Quasi-static loading events were neglected in this study since the magnitude of the quasi-static acceleration factors is lower than that of the transient acceleration factors. Structural analysis of the proposed configuration of the long spacer truss with four longerons indicated that negative safety margins are possible. As a result, configuration changes were proposed. The primary configuration change suggested was to increase the number of truss longerons to six. The six-longeron truss appears to be a more promising structure than the four-longeron truss because it offers a positive margin of safety and more volume in its second bay (BAY2). This additional volume can be used for resupply of some of the orbital replacement units (such as a battery box). Note that the design effort on the long spacer truss has not fully begun and that calculations and reports of the negative safety margins are, to date, based on concept only.

  13. First observation of the decay B s 0 → K S 0 K ∗(892)0 at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthieu, K.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2016-01-01

    A search for B ( s) 0 → K S 0 K ∗(892)0 decays is performed using pp collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 .0 fb-1, collected with the LHCb detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The B s 0 → K S 0 K ∗(892)0 decay is observed for the first time, with a significance of 7.1 standard deviations. The branching fraction is measured to be B({B}_s^0to {overline{K}}^0{K}^{ast }{(892)}^0)+B({B}_s^0to {K}^0{overline{K}}^{ast }{(892)}^0)=(16.4± 3.4± 2.3)× 1{0}^{-6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. No evidence is found for the decay B 0 → K S 0 K ∗(892)0 and an upper limit is set on the branching fraction, B({B}^0to {overline{K}}^0{K}^{ast }{(892)}^0)+B({B}^0to {K}^0{overline{K}}^{ast }{(892)}^0)<0.96× 1{0}^{-6} , at 90 % confidence level. All results are consistent with Standard Model predictions. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. THE ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE EVOLVING S0 FRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Just, Dennis W.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Sand, David J.; Desai, Vandana; Rudnick, Gregory

    2010-03-01

    We re-investigate the dramatic rise in the S0 fraction, f{sub S0}, within clusters since z {approx} 0.5. In particular, we focus on the role of the global galaxy environment on f{sub S0} by compiling, either from our own observations or the literature, robust line-of-sight velocity dispersions, sigma's, for a sample of galaxy groups and clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.8 that have uniformly determined, published morphological fractions. We find that the trend of f{sub S0} with redshift is twice as strong for sigma < 750 km s{sup -1} groups/poor clusters than for higher-sigma, rich clusters. From this result, we infer that over this redshift range galaxy-galaxy interactions, which are more effective in lower-sigma environments, are more responsible for transforming spiral galaxies into S0's than galaxy-environment processes, which are more effective in higher-sigma environments. The rapid, recent growth of the S0 population in groups and poor clusters implies that large numbers of progenitors exist in low-sigma systems at modest redshifts ({approx}0.5), where morphologies and internal kinematics are within the measurement range of current technology.

  15. STS-110 Astronaut Jerry Ross Performs Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis on April 8, 2002, the STS-110 mission prepared the International Space Station (ISS) for future space walks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long Starboard side S0 (S-zero) truss and preparing the first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver space walkers around the Station and was the first time all of a shuttle crew's space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. In this photograph, Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, mission specialist, anchored on the end of the Canadarm2, moves near the newly installed S0 truss. Astronaut Lee M. E. Morin, mission specialist, (out of frame), worked in tandem with Ross during this fourth and final scheduled session of EVA for the STS-110 mission. The final major task of the space walk was the installation of a beam, the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0. The spur will be used by space walkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss.

  16. Measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetries in B {s/0} → J/ ψK {S/0}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-06-01

    The first measurement of decay-time-dependent CP asymmetries in the decay B {s/0} → J/ ψK {S/0} and an updated measurement of the ratio of branching fractions are presented. The results are obtained using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions recorded with the LHCb detector at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The results on the CP asymmetries are

  17. Planetary Nebula Spectrograph survey of S0 galaxy kinematics - II. Clues to the origins of S0 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, A.; Merrifield, M. R.; Coccato, L.; Arnaboldi, M.; Gerhard, O.; Bamford, S.; Napolitano, N. R.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Douglas, N. G.; Kuijken, K.; Capaccioli, M.; Freeman, K. C.; Saha, K.; Chies-Santos, A. L.

    2013-06-01

    The stellar kinematics of the spheroids and discs of S0 galaxies contain clues to their formation histories. Unfortunately, it is difficult to disentangle the two components and to recover their stellar kinematics in the faint outer parts of the galaxies using conventional absorption line spectroscopy. This paper therefore presents the stellar kinematics of six S0 galaxies derived from observations of planetary nebulae, obtained using the Planetary Nebula Spectrograph. To separate the kinematics of the two components, we use a maximum-likelihood method that combines the discrete kinematic data with a photometric component decomposition. The results of this analysis reveal that: the discs of S0 galaxies are rotationally supported; however, the amount of random motion in these discs is systematically higher than in comparable spiral galaxies; and the S0s lie around one magnitude below the Tully-Fisher relation for spiral galaxies, while their spheroids lie nearly one magnitude above the Faber-Jackson relation for ellipticals. All of these findings are consistent with a scenario in which spirals are converted into S0s through a process of mild harassment or `pestering,' with their discs somewhat heated and their spheroid somewhat enhanced by the conversion process. In such a scenario, one might expect the properties of S0s to depend on environment. We do not see such an effect in this fairly small sample, although any differences would be diluted by the fact that the current location does not necessarily reflect the environment in which the transformation occurred. Similar observations of larger samples probing a broader range of environments, coupled with more detailed modelling of the transformation process to match the wide range of parameters that we have shown can now be measured, should take us from these first steps to the definitive answer as to how S0 galaxies form.

  18. Effects of joints in truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikegami, R.

    1988-01-01

    The response of truss-type structures for future space applications, such as Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), will be directly affected by joint performance. Some of the objectives of research at BAC were to characterize structural joints, establish analytical approaches that incorporate joint characteristics, and experimentally establish the validity of the analytical approaches. The test approach to characterize joints for both erectable and deployable-type structures was based upon a Force State Mapping Technique. The approach pictorially shows how the nonlinear joint results can be used for equivalent linear analysis. Testing of the Space Station joints developed at LaRC (a hinged joint at 2 Hz and a clevis joint at 2 Hz) successfully revealed the nonlinear characteristics of the joints. The Space Station joints were effectively linear when loaded to plus or minus 500 pounds with a corresponding displacement of about plus or minus 0.0015 inch. It was indicated that good linear joints exist which are compatible with errected structures, but that difficulty may be encountered if nonlinear-type joints are incorporated in the structure.

  19. Laser Truss Sensor for Segmented Telescope Phasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Duncan T.; Lay, Oliver P.; Azizi, Alireza; Erlig, Herman; Dorsky, Leonard I.; Asbury, Cheryl G.; Zhao, Feng

    2011-01-01

    A paper describes the laser truss sensor (LTS) for detecting piston motion between two adjacent telescope segment edges. LTS is formed by two point-to-point laser metrology gauges in a crossed geometry. A high-resolution (<30 nm) LTS can be implemented with existing laser metrology gauges. The distance change between the reference plane and the target plane is measured as a function of the phase change between the reference and target beams. To ease the bandwidth requirements for phase detection electronics (or phase meter), homodyne or heterodyne detection techniques have been used. The phase of the target beam also changes with the refractive index of air, which changes with the air pressure, temperature, and humidity. This error can be minimized by enclosing the metrology beams in baffles. For longer-term (weeks) tracking at the micron level accuracy, the same gauge can be operated in the absolute metrology mode with an accuracy of microns; to implement absolute metrology, two laser frequencies will be used on the same gauge. Absolute metrology using heterodyne laser gauges is a demonstrated technology. Complexity of laser source fiber distribution can be optimized using the range-gated metrology (RGM) approach.

  20. Evolutionary Optimization of a Geometrically Refined Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, P. V.; Tinker, M. L.; Dozier, G. V.

    2007-01-01

    Structural optimization is a field of research that has experienced noteworthy growth for many years. Researchers in this area have developed optimization tools to successfully design and model structures, typically minimizing mass while maintaining certain deflection and stress constraints. Numerous optimization studies have been performed to minimize mass, deflection, and stress on a benchmark cantilever truss problem. Predominantly traditional optimization theory is applied to this problem. The cross-sectional area of each member is optimized to minimize the aforementioned objectives. This Technical Publication (TP) presents a structural optimization technique that has been previously applied to compliant mechanism design. This technique demonstrates a method that combines topology optimization, geometric refinement, finite element analysis, and two forms of evolutionary computation: genetic algorithms and differential evolution to successfully optimize a benchmark structural optimization problem. A nontraditional solution to the benchmark problem is presented in this TP, specifically a geometrically refined topological solution. The design process begins with an alternate control mesh formulation, multilevel geometric smoothing operation, and an elastostatic structural analysis. The design process is wrapped in an evolutionary computing optimization toolset.

  1. Evolutionary optimization of a Genetically Refined Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Patrick V.; Tinker, Michael L.; Dozier, Gerry

    2005-01-01

    Structural optimization is a field of research that has experienced noteworthy growth for many years. Researchers in this area have developed optimization tools to successfully design and model structures, typically minimizing mass while maintaining certain deflection and stress constraints. Numerous optimization studies have been performed to minimize mass, deflection and stress on a benchmark cantilever truss problem. Predominantly traditional optimization theory is applied to this problem. The cross-sectional area of each member is optimized to minimize the aforementioned objectives. This paper will present a structural optimization technique that has been previously applied to compliant mechanism design. This technique demonstrates a method that combines topology optimization, geometric refinement, finite element analysis, and two forms of evolutionary computation: Genetic Algorithms and Differential Evolution to successfully optimize a benchmark structural optimization problem. An non-traditional solution to the benchmark problem is presented in this paper, specifically a geometrically refined topological solution. The design process begins with an alternate control mesh formulation, multilevel geometric smoothing operation, and an elastostatic structural analysis. The design process is wrapped in an evolutionary computing optimization toolset.

  2. Measurement of the CP Asymmetry in B_{s}^{0}-B[over ¯]_{s}^{0} Mixing.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Déléage, N; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozachuk, A; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Mussini, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhokhov, A; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2016-08-01

    The CP asymmetry in the mixing of B_{s}^{0} and B[over ¯]_{s}^{0} mesons is measured in proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb^{-1}, recorded by the LHCb experiment at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. Semileptonic B_{s}^{0} and B[over ¯]_{s}^{0} decays are studied in the inclusive mode D_{s}^{∓}μ^{±}ν[over (-)]_{μ}X with the D_{s}^{∓} mesons reconstructed in the K^{+}K^{-}π^{∓} final state. Correcting the observed charge asymmetry for detection and background effects, the CP asymmetry is found to be a_{sl}^{s}=(0.39±0.26±0.20)%, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This is the most precise measurement of a_{sl}^{s} to date. It is consistent with the prediction from the standard model and will constrain new models of particle physics. PMID:27541460

  3. A structural design methodology for large angle articulated trusses considering realistic joint modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorwald, Gregory; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A structural design methodology is developed by quantifying the magnitude that large angle articulations and realistic modeling considerations adversely affect a truss's structural stiffness. Batten actuators provide the ability for the truss both to deploy and articulate. Such an articulated truss can be used in space crane applications. With geometry and modeling considerations identified and examined, strategies to alleviate the truss's stiffness reduction are developed and evaluated. Using these strategies, an improved articulated truss is then demonstrated. Observing that the design strategies are effective for the planar truss models similar 3-D truss models are then analyzed. The results show that the improvement strategies benefit both the 2-D and 3-D truss models.

  4. STS-110 and Expedition Four Crews Pose for Onboard Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Posed inside the Destiny Laboratory aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are the STS-110 and Expedition Four crews for a traditional onboard portrait From the left, bottom row, are astronauts Ellen Ochoa, STS mission specialist, Michael J. Bloomfield, STS mission commander, and Yury I Onufrienko, Expedition Four mission commander. From the left, middle row, are astronauts Daniel W. Bursch, Expedition Four flight engineer, Rex J. Walheim, STS mission specialist, and Carl E. Walz, Expedition Four flight engineer. From the left, top row, are astronauts Stephen N. Frick, STS pilot; Jerry L. Ross, Lee M.E. Morin, and Steven L. Smith, all mission specialists. Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis on April 8, 2002, the STS-110 mission crew prepared the ISS for future space walks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long Starboard side S0 truss and preparing the Mobile Transporter. The mission served as the 8th ISS assembly flight.

  5. Nonlinear damage identification of breathing cracks in Truss system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; DeSmidt, Hans

    2014-03-01

    The breathing cracks in truss system are detected by Frequency Response Function (FRF) based damage identification method. This method utilizes damage-induced changes of frequency response functions to estimate the severity and location of structural damage. This approach enables the possibility of arbitrary interrogation frequency and multiple inputs/outputs which greatly enrich the dataset for damage identification. The dynamical model of truss system is built using the finite element method and the crack model is based on fracture mechanics. Since the crack is driven by tensional and compressive forces of truss member, only one damage parameter is needed to represent the stiffness reduction of each truss member. Assuming that the crack constantly breathes with the exciting frequency, the linear damage detection algorithm is developed in frequency/time domain using Least Square and Newton Raphson methods. Then, the dynamic response of the truss system with breathing cracks is simulated in the time domain and meanwhile the crack breathing status for each member is determined by the feedback from real-time displacements of member's nodes. Harmonic Fourier Coefficients (HFCs) of dynamical response are computed by processing the data through convolution and moving average filters. Finally, the results show the effectiveness of linear damage detection algorithm in identifying the nonlinear breathing cracks using different combinations of HFCs and sensors.

  6. 33 CFR 147.839 - Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.839 Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform safety zone. (a) Description. Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform, Green Canyon 782 (GC 782), located at...

  7. 33 CFR 147.839 - Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.839 Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform safety zone. (a) Description. Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform, Green Canyon 782 (GC 782), located at...

  8. 33 CFR 147.839 - Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.839 Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform safety zone. (a) Description. Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform, Green Canyon 782 (GC 782), located at...

  9. 33 CFR 147.839 - Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.839 Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform safety zone. (a) Description. Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform, Green Canyon 782 (GC 782), located at...

  10. 33 CFR 147.839 - Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.839 Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform safety zone. (a) Description. Mad Dog Truss Spar Platform, Green Canyon 782 (GC 782), located at...

  11. Study on light weight design of truss structures of spacecrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fuming; Yang, Jianzhong; Wang, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Truss structure is usually adopted as the main structure form for spacecrafts due to its high efficiency in supporting concentrated loads. Light-weight design is now becoming the primary concern during conceptual design of spacecrafts. Implementation of light-weight design on truss structure always goes through three processes: topology optimization, size optimization and composites optimization. During each optimization process, appropriate algorithm such as the traditional optimality criterion method, mathematical programming method and the intelligent algorithms which simulate the growth and evolution processes in nature will be selected. According to the practical processes and algorithms, combined with engineering practice and commercial software, summary is made for the implementation of light-weight design on truss structure for spacecrafts.

  12. Hybrid deployable/erectable solar dynamic box truss system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V., Jr.; Irvine, T. B.

    1986-01-01

    The design of a hybrid deployable/erectable solar dynamic box truss power generation system for the initial operation capability (IOC) of the Space Shuttle is examined. An organic Rankine cycle heat engine for IOC solar power generation is studied. The design configuration is a simple parabolic concentration where the receiver is located in the focal plane with its aperture at the focal point. The relationship between concentrator size and collection efficiency is analyzed. The geometry of the deployable graphite/epoxy box truss ring and the reflective panels of the system are described. Mass properties and dynamic analyses are performed to evaluate the center of gravity location and moments of inertia characteristics of the energy conversion subsystem (ECS). The deployable/erectable truss is applicable for large IR space telescopes and center and offset fed ECSs.

  13. Microdynamic modelling of joint-dominated truss-based structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. K. C.; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology for the mathematical modeling of preloaded joint-dominated truss-based space structures applicable in the microdynamic regime is presented. First, various factors which could affect the microdynamic behavior of joint-dominated truss structures are examined. Then, mathematical models for various types of joints involving contact deformations are derived from Hertzian contact theory. Their dynamic behavior is studied analytically and numerically by means of computer simulation. It was found that both synchronous and asynchronous oscillations having the same orders of magnitude are excited by sinusoidal load perturbations in the microdynamic regime. These oscillations persist even in the presence of light linear damping. The integration of the derived joint models with those for the elastic links of preloaded planar truss structures is discussed.

  14. Mobile remote manipulator system for a tetrahedral truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor); Schneider, William C. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The mobile remote manipulator system (MRMS) was initially developed for transit about the trusses of the delta space station; however, it can be utilized just as easily for transit about the trusses of the dual keel station. The MRMS is comprised of a mobile platform having a rail system formed of transversely disposed T-shaped tracks, which engage with guide pins located at the nodes of the trusses. The guide pins form a grid and the tracks are so designed as to permit travel in either of two orthogonal directions. The present invention provides a near-uniform traversing velocity with minimal dynamic loading on the system. Pivoting changers move the platform from one face to another.

  15. Novel Control Effectors for Truss Braced Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Edward V.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Joshi, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    At cruise flight conditions very high aspect ratio/low sweep truss braced wings (TBW) may be subject to design requirements that distinguish them from more highly swept cantilevered wings. High aspect ratio, short chord length and relative thinness of the airfoil sections all contribute to relatively low wing torsional stiffness. This may lead to aeroelastic issues such as aileron reversal and low flutter margins. In order to counteract these issues, high aspect ratio/low sweep wings may need to carry additional high speed control effectors to operate when outboard ailerons are in reversal and/or must carry additional structural weight to enhance torsional stiffness. The novel control effector evaluated in this study is a variable sweep raked wing tip with an aileron control surface. Forward sweep of the tip allows the aileron to align closely with the torsional axis of the wing and operate in a conventional fashion. Aft sweep of the tip creates a large moment arm from the aileron to the wing torsional axis greatly enhancing aileron reversal. The novelty comes from using this enhanced and controllable aileron reversal effect to provide roll control authority by acting as a servo tab and providing roll control through intentional twist of the wing. In this case the reduced torsional stiffness of the wing becomes an advantage to be exploited. The study results show that the novel control effector concept does provide roll control as described, but only for a restricted class of TBW aircraft configurations. For the configuration studied (long range, dual aisle, Mach 0.85 cruise) the novel control effector provides significant benefits including up to 12% reduction in fuel burn.

  16. Minimizing distortion in truss structures via Tabu search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1990-01-01

    The shape control of large flexible space structures is of great interest to structural designers. A related problem is to seek ways to minimize the need for active controls by careful design and construction of the space structure. A tetrahedral truss structure that is used to support a precision segmented reflector or antenna surface is considered. The structure has a hexagonal platform and is characterized by the number of rings of members in the truss. For simplicity it is assumed that a flat truss geometry exists. Hence, all structural members and ball joints are required to have the same nominal length and diameter, respectively. Inaccuracies in the length of member or diameters of joints may produce unacceptable levels of surface distortion and internal forces. In the case of a truss structure supporting an antenna, surface distortions may cause unacceptable gain loss or pointing errors. The focus is solely on surface distortion, however, internal forces may be treated in a similar manner. To test the Tabu search code for DSQRMS the appropriate influence matrices are used for a flat, two-ring tetrahedral reflector truss generated by Green and Haftka (1989). In this example there are 102 members (NMEMB) and 31 ball joints (NJOINT) of the same nominal length, respectively. Hence, all the members may be interchanged and all the joints may be interchanged. In addition, 19 positions on the surface of the truss (NNODES) were used to measure error influences. After a variety of experiments a set of good parameters was choosen for Tabu search. The sample size at each iteration is 10*NMEMB and the short term memory size is 40. In addition four pruning rules were used to accelerate the search..

  17. S=0 pseudoscalar meson photoproduction from the proton

    SciTech Connect

    M. Dugger for the CLAS Collaboration

    2005-10-10

    Many measurements of pseudoscalar mesons with S = 0 photoproduced on the proton have been made recently. These new data are particularly useful in theoretical investigations of nucleon resonances. How the new data from various labs complement each other and help fill in the gaps in the world data set is disscussed, with a glance at measurements to be made in the near future. Some theoretical techniques used to explain the data are briefly described.

  18. Observation of Bs0-B¯s0 Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Azzurri, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Baroiant, S.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Belloni, A.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Berry, T.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bolshov, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Budroni, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carrillo, S.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, I.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciljak, M.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Coca, M.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooper, B.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Cyr, D.; Daronco, S.; D'Auria, S.; Davies, T.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dagenhart, D.; de Barbaro, P.; Cecco, S. De; Deisher, A.; Lentdecker, G. De; Dell'Orso, M.; Paoli, F. Delli; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Pedis, D. De; Derwent, P. F.; Giovanni, G. P. Di; Dionisi, C.; Ruzza, B. Di; Dittmann, J. R.; Dituro, P.; Dörr, C.; Donati, S.; Donega, M.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, I.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Foland, A.; Forrester, S.; Foster, G. W.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H. J.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garberson, F.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gay, C.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Goldstein, J.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Griffiths, M.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamilton, A.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Holloway, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ishizawa, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Iyutin, B.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeans, D.; Jensen, H.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kemp, Y.; Kephart, R.; Kerzel, U.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Klute, M.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kovalev, A.; Kraan, A. C.; Kraus, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuhr, T.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lai, S.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, S. W.; Lefèvre, R.; Leonardo, N.; Leone, S.; Levy, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.; Lin, C. S.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Liss, T. M.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Loverre, P.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Margaroli, F.; Marginean, R.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, M.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Matsunaga, H.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazini, R.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzemer, S.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Messina, A.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miles, J.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyamoto, A.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mohr, B.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Nachtman, J.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nahn, S.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Oldeman, R.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Piedra, J.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Portell, X.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptochos, F.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ranjan, N.; Rappoccio, S.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Sabik, S.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Salamanna, G.; Saltó, O.; Saltzberg, D.; Sánchez, C.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savard, P.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Sjolin, J.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soderberg, M.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spinella, F.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Staveris-Polykalas, A.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, H.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Takikawa, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Tourneur, S.; Trischuk, W.; Tsuchiya, R.; Tsuno, S.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Unverhau, T.; Uozumi, S.; Usynin, D.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Veramendi, G.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vollrath, I.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, W.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waschke, S.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, T.; Yang, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, J.; Zucchelli, S.

    2006-12-01

    We report the observation of Bs0-B¯s0 oscillations from a time-dependent measurement of the Bs0-B¯s0 oscillation frequency Δms. Using a data sample of 1fb-1 of pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, we find signals of 5600 fully reconstructed hadronic Bs decays, 3100 partially reconstructed hadronic Bs decays, and 61 500 partially reconstructed semileptonic Bs decays. We measure the probability as a function of proper decay time that the Bs decays with the same, or opposite, flavor as the flavor at production, and we find a signal for Bs0-B¯s0 oscillations. The probability that random fluctuations could produce a comparable signal is 8×10-8, which exceeds 5σ significance. We measure Δms=17.77±0.10(stat)±0.07(syst)ps-1 and extract |Vtd/Vts|=0.2060±0.0007(Δms)-0.0060+0.0081(Δmd+theor).

  19. Truss Assembly and Welding by Intelligent Precision Jigging Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an Intelligent Precision Jigging Robot (IPJR) prototype that enables the precise alignment and welding of titanium space telescope optical benches. The IPJR, equipped with micron accuracy sensors and actuators, worked in tandem with a lower precision remote controlled manipulator. The combined system assembled and welded a 2 m truss from stock titanium components. The calibration of the IPJR, and the difference between the predicted and the truss dimensions as-built, identified additional sources of error that should be addressed in the next generation of IPJRs in 2D and 3D.

  20. Snap-Through Instability Patterns in Truss Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrinda, Glenn A.

    2010-01-01

    Geometrically nonlinear truss structures with snap-through behavior are demonstrated by using an arc length approach within a finite element analysis. The instability patterns are equilibrium paths that are plotted throughout the snap-through event. Careful observation of these patterns helps to identify weak designs in large space structures, as well as identify desirable snap-through behavior in the miniaturization of electronic devices known as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Examples of highly nonlinear trusses that show snap-through behavior are examined by tracing their equilibrium paths.

  1. Optimization of NTP System Truss to Reduce Radiation Shield Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharber, Luke L.; Kharofa, Adam; Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of nuclear thermal propulsion are numerous and relevant to the current NASA mission goals involving but not limited to the crewed missions to mars and the moon. They do however also present new and unique challenges to the design and logistics of launching/operating spacecraft. One of these challenges, relevant to this discussion, is the significant mass of the shielding which is required to ensure an acceptable radiation environment for the spacecraft and crew. Efforts to reduce shielding mass are difficult to accomplish from material and geometric design points of the shield itself, however by increasing the distance between the nuclear engines and the main body of the spacecraft the required mass of the shielding is lessened considerably. The mass can be reduced significantly per unit length, though any additional mass added by the structure to create this distance serves to offset those savings, thus the design of a lightweight structure is ideal. The challenges of designing the truss are bounded by several limiting factors including; the loading conditions, the capabilities of the launch vehicle, and achieving the ideal truss length when factoring for the overall mass reduced. Determining the overall set of mass values for a truss of varying length is difficult since to maintain an optimally designed truss the geometry of the truss or its members must change. Thus the relation between truss mass and length for these loading scenarios is not linear, and instead has relation determined by the truss design. In order to establish a mass versus length trend for various truss designs to compare with the mass saved from the shield versus length, optimization software was used to find optimal geometric properties that still met the design requirements at established lengths. By solving for optimal designs at various lengths, mass trends could be determined. The initial design findings show a clear benefit to extending the engines as far from the main

  2. Probabilistic structural analysis of a truss typical for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.

    1990-01-01

    A three-bay, space, cantilever truss is probabilistically evaluated using the computer code NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) to identify and quantify the uncertainties and respective sensitivities associated with corresponding uncertainties in the primitive variables (structural, material, and loads parameters) that defines the truss. The distribution of each of these primitive variables is described in terms of one of several available distributions such as the Weibull, exponential, normal, log-normal, etc. The cumulative distribution function (CDF's) for the response functions considered and sensitivities associated with the primitive variables for given response are investigated. These sensitivities help in determining the dominating primitive variables for that response.

  3. Adaptive Control of Truss Structures for Gossamer Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang Bong-Jun; Calise, anthony J.; Craig, James I.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Neural network-based adaptive control is considered for active control of a highly flexible truss structure which may be used to support solar sail membranes. The objective is to suppress unwanted vibrations in SAFE (Solar Array Flight Experiment) boom, a test-bed located at NASA. Compared to previous tests that restrained truss structures in planar motion, full three dimensional motions are tested. Experimental results illustrate the potential of adaptive control in compensating for nonlinear actuation and modeling error, and in rejecting external disturbances.

  4. The P4 truss is moved to a workstand in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Suspended by an overhead crane in the Space Station Processing Facility, the International Space Station's P4 truss moves toward a workstand. Below and behind it on the floor is the Multi- Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, another segment of the Space Station. Part of the 10-truss, girder-like structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field, the P4 is the second port truss segment that will attach to the first port truss segment (P1 truss). The P4 is scheduled for mission 12A in September 2002.

  5. Measurement of the time-integrated CP asymmetry in D 0 → K {S/0} K {S/0} decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2015-10-01

    The time-integrated CP asymmetry in the decay D 0 → K S 0 K S 0 is measured using 3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The flavour of the D 0 meson is determined by use of the decay D *+ → D 0 π + and its charge conjugate mode. The result is {A}_{CP}=-0.029± 0.052± 0.022, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The result is consistent with Standard Model expectations and improves the uncertainty with respect to the only previous measurement of this quantity by more than a factor of three. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Research on the support truss structure of foreign space remote sensor with large-scale and flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Mingxin; Dong, Jihong; Li, Wei; Guo, Quanfeng; Li, Yan-chun; Zhao, Weiguo; Wang, Haiping

    2014-09-01

    The truss structure had the merits of simple configuration, reliable, flexible assembly, specific stiffness and strong design ability. It was widely used in the support structure of Space camera and large telescope at home and abroad. The article described and analyzed truss structures of ground-based telescopes, space-based telescopes and Space camera. Conclusions that some reference should be followed in the truss design process were given. Simultaneously it also introduced the basic knowledge of truss design optimization, including the optimization ideas of truss structure and optimization algorithm of truss structure, which laid a good foundation for optimal design of truss in future.

  7. Comparative morphology of configurations with reduced part count derived from the octahedral-tetrahedral truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalvani, Haresh; Collins, Timothy J.

    1991-01-01

    Morphology (the study of structure and form) of the octahedral-tetrahedral (octet) truss is described. Both the geometry and symmetry of the octet truss are considered. Morphological techniques based on symmetry operations are presented which enable the derivation of reduced-part-count truss configurations from the octet truss by removing struts and nodes. These techniques are unique because their Morphological origination and they allow for the systematic generation and analysis of a large variety of structures. Methods for easily determining the part count and redundancy of infinite truss configurations are presented. Nine examples of truss configurations obtained by applying the derivation techniques are considered. These configurations are structurally stable while at the same time exhibiting significant reductions in part count. Some practical and analytical considerations, such as structural performance, regarding the example reduced-part-count truss geometries are briefly discussed.

  8. Searching for Young S0 Galaxies in Abell 2052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, D. H.; Rix, H.-W.; Caldwell, N.

    1999-12-01

    Numerous studies have established strong observational evidence for evolution in cluster member color and morphology. Such evolution is predicted by hierarchical structure formation scenarios where galaxy clusters evolve via accretion of mass from the field. It has been hypothesized that recently accreted large surface brightness spirals will rapidly evolve via some star formation (SF) truncation mechanism into smooth disk galaxies with little or no current SF, but relatively young stellar populations. These younger S0's (hereafter bluer S0's = BS0's) would have bluer colors than the older early-types (E/S0) that define the mean cluster color-magnitude relation (CMR). The existence of such galaxies provides explanations for the disappearance of the blue, star-forming disk galaxies that were common in clusters at z 0.5 (the Butcher-Oemler effect), and the increased fraction of S0's in present-day clusters. To date a significant population of BS0's in nearby clusters has not been found. Therefore, we have obtained wide field (R > 0.6 Mpc), high precision UVI photometry for a sample of 14 local (z < 0.06) Abell clusters, most with over <100 spectroscopically confirmed members. We present photometric results for our first completely reduced cluster, Abell 2052. We have selected candidate BS0's as those early-type members that deviate blueward from the CMR by more than the intrinsic CMR scatter. We used 2-D bulge/disk (B/D) decomposition as an indicator of morphology to refine our sample. This spring, we will obtain spectroscopy of this sample to confirm the relative youth of the stellar populations. In addition, we will use the B/D decompositions of these candidate BS0's to address the following questions: (1) do BS0's make up a significant fraction of the early-type members that deviated from the cluster mean CMR; (2) do BS0's avoid the inner cluster; (3) are BS0's bluer in their disks or bulges; (4) do BS0's exhibit a range of B/D ratios similar to that found in

  9. 19. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL PENNSYLVANIA PETIT TRUSS WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL PENNSYLVANIA PETIT TRUSS WITH CASTLE ROCK IN BACKGROUND. JUNCTION OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL AND TOP CHORD WITH STABILIZING LATERAL STRUT ABOVE AND SWAY STRUT BELOW. ORIGINAL PAIRED DIAGONAL EYE BARS LATER REINFORCED WITH TIE ROD - New River Bridge, Spanning New River at State Route 623, Pembroke, Giles County, VA

  10. 22. Detail of interior corner showing truss system, dock no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Detail of interior corner showing truss system, dock no. 492. View to south. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Nose Docks, On either side of Hangar Access Apron at Northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  11. 10. DETAILS OF STEEL FLUME, TYPICAL BENTS AND TRUSSES. EXHIBIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAILS OF STEEL FLUME, TYPICAL BENTS AND TRUSSES. EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 1 PROJECT, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523196 (sheet no. 6; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Flumes & Tunnels below Sandbox, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  12. 47. DISMANTLING OF ROOF. Removal of the first truss with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. DISMANTLING OF ROOF. Removal of the first truss with crane and cradle. Note the reinforcing plates at the panel points. The rear of the PSFS building is beyond. Note that the face bricks of the entire Meeting House have been stripped off for reuse at the new George School site. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. 12. Photocopy of photograph. TRIPLE TRUSS BRIDGE OVER LITTLE SHENANGO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph. TRIPLE TRUSS BRIDGE OVER LITTLE SHENANGO RIVER ON COLLEGE (THEN PRAIRIE) AVENUE, CA. 1874. (Original in Greenville Area Historical Society) - College Avenue Bridge, Pennsylvania Route 58/ Legislative Route 82 spanning Little Shenango River, Greenville, Mercer County, PA

  14. Detail of brick fire wall and steel trusses, note the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of brick fire wall and steel trusses, note the gable roof with saw tooth monitors in the background, view facing north - Kahului Cannery, Plant No. 28, Cannery Building and Dryer House/Feed Storage Building, 120 Kane Street, Kahului, Maui County, HI

  15. 18. Photocopy of drawing, Erection Plan, North Truss, Bridge at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of drawing, Erection Plan, North Truss, Bridge at Main and Washington Sts., Norwalk, Ct., Contract No. 3000, Berlin Iron Bridge Company, dated July 12, 1895. Original on file with Metro North Commuter Railroad. - South Norwalk Railroad Bridge, South Main & Washington Streets, Norwalk, Fairfield County, CT

  16. 8. DETAIL OF NORTH END OF EAST TRUSS, SHOWING END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF NORTH END OF EAST TRUSS, SHOWING END POST, TOP AND LOWER CHORDS, AND DIAGONAL EYE BARS, SEEN FROM NORTHEAST. - Mitchell's Mill Bridge, Spanning Winter's Run on Carrs Mill Road, west of Bel Air, Bel Air, Harford County, MD

  17. View of pony truss approach span, showing metal caissons and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of pony truss approach span, showing metal caissons and deck system, including metal floor beams and timber stringers. The same decking system was used on movable span. Looking north from civilian land. - Naval Supply Annex Stockton, Daggett Road Bridge, Daggett Road traversing Burns Cut Off, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  18. View of pony truss approach span, showing metal caissons and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of pony truss approach span, showing metal caissons and deck system, including metal floor beams and timber stringers. The same decking system was used on movable span. Looking north from civilian land. - Naval Supply Annex Stockton, Rough & Ready Island, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  19. 10. OVERALL VIEW OF BRIDGE, WITH WEST DECK TRUSS APPROACH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. OVERALL VIEW OF BRIDGE, WITH WEST DECK TRUSS APPROACH SPAN AND PIER NO. 1 IN FOREGROUND, FROM WEST RIVERBANK. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  20. View of horizontal truss supports showing hoisting engines and motors ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of horizontal truss supports showing hoisting engines and motors used for raising and lowering hooks. Taken June 11, 1940. Fourteenth Naval District Photo Collection Item No. 13775 - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Bridge Gantry Crane No. 1, Welding slab along Third Street, near intersection with Avenue G, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. 20. Detail of sandstone pier under north line of trusses ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Detail of sandstone pier under north line of trusses showing granite pier cap (darker stone) which supports the vertical strut. View to east. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  2. 11. View showing detail of truss tower. The vertical, or ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View showing detail of truss tower. The vertical, or compression, members of the bridge are formed from two channel beams riveted together with lacing bars. The diagonal or tension members, are die-forged eyebars. - Center Street Swing Bridge, Southwest of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. CLOSEUP VIEW OF BOTTOM OF MAIN BRIDGE CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CLOSE-UP VIEW OF BOTTOM OF MAIN BRIDGE CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS SPAN SHOWING CANTILEVERED HIGHWAY FLOOR BRACKET LOOKING NORTHWEST AT PIER “II”. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  4. Automated assembly of a tetrahedral truss structure using machine vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.

    1992-01-01

    The Automated Structures Assembly Laboratory is a unique facility at NASA Langley Research Center used to investigate the robotic assembly of truss structures. Two special-purpose end-effectors have been used to assemble 102 truss members and 12 panels into an 8-meter diameter structure. One end-effector is dedicated to truss member insertion, while a second end-effector is used to install panels. Until recently, the robot motions required to construct the structure were developed iteratively using the facility hardware. Recent work at Langley has resulted in a compact machine vision system capable of providing position information relative to targets on the structure. Use of the vision system to guide the robot from an approach point 10 to 18 inches from the structure, offsetting model inaccuracies, permits robot motion based on calculated points as a first step toward use of preplanned paths from an automated path planner. This paper presents recent work at Langley highlighting the application of the machine vision system during truss member insertion.

  5. Wave propagation in equivalent continuums representing truss lattice materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Messner, Mark C.; Barham, Matthew I.; Kumar, Mukul; Barton, Nathan R.

    2015-07-29

    Stiffness scales linearly with density in stretch-dominated lattice meta-materials offering the possibility of very light yet very stiff structures. Current additive manufacturing techniques can assemble structures consisting of these lattice materials, but the design of such structures will require accurate, efficient simulation techniques. Equivalent continuum models have several advantages over discrete truss models of stretch dominated lattices, including computational efficiency and ease of model construction. However, the development an equivalent model suitable for representing the dynamic response of a periodic truss is complicated by microinertial effects. This paper derives a dynamic equivalent continuum model for periodic truss structures and verifiesmore » it against detailed finite element simulations. The model must incorporate microinertial effects to accurately reproduce long-wavelength characteristics of the response such as anisotropic elastic soundspeeds. The formulation presented here also improves upon previous work by preserving equilibrium at truss joints for affine lattice deformation and by improving numerical stability by eliminating vertices in the effective yield surface.« less

  6. Oblique view, west elevation, from northwest, showing Pratt truss configuration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view, west elevation, from northwest, showing Pratt truss configuration of north and south spans, including verticals with lacing bars, endposts, diagonals, and north portal - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  7. Detail U, connection of south span (west truss), from southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail U, connection of south span (west truss), from southwest and below, showing pin connection of U-L vertical, upper chord, lateral bracing, overhead strut, and diagonal eyebars - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  8. Detail, typical vertical member UL of south span, east truss, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, typical vertical member U-L of south span, east truss, showing riveted lacing bars and channels, and "Cambria" imprint, indicating Cambria Iron Company fabrication of member - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  9. CLOSEUP VIEW OF BOTTOM OF MAIN BRIDGE CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CLOSE-UP VIEW OF BOTTOM OF MAIN BRIDGE CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS SPAN SHOWING RAILROAD PORTION OF FLOOR BEAMS AND OTHER STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS AND LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  10. Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing truss ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing truss type B at wall post. New aluminum roofing seen in comparison with older galvanized steel siding. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  11. Dynamic testing of a two-dimensional box truss beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Charles W.

    1987-01-01

    Testing to determine the effects of joint freeplay and pretensioning of diagonal members on the dynamic characteristics of a two-dimensional box truss beam was conducted. The test article was ten bays of planar truss suspended by long wires at each joint. Each bay measured 2 meters per side. Pins of varying size were used to simulate various joint freeplay conditions. Single-point random excitation was the primary method of test. The rational fraction polynomial method was used to extract modal characteristics from test data. A finite element model of the test article was generated from which modal characteristics were predicted. These were compared with those obtained from tests. With the exception of the fundamental mode, correlation of theoretical and experimental results was poor, caused by the resonant coupling of local truss member bending modes with global truss beam modes. This coupling introduced many modes in the frequency range of interest whose frequencies were sensitive to joint boundary conditions. It was concluded that local/global coupling must be avoided in the frequency range where accurate modal characteristics are required.

  12. 28. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. VIEW OVER TOP OF TRUSS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. VIEW OVER TOP OF TRUSS FROM CONTROL CABIN DECK. Photographer unknown, August 1947 (Note that frame for electrical power cables is still in place, though the bridge was converted to hand operation almost ten years earlier.) - Gianella Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at State Highway 32, Hamilton City, Glenn County, CA

  13. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF UNDERSTRUCTURE, SHOWING TIMBER TRUSS END POSTS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF UNDERSTRUCTURE, SHOWING TIMBER TRUSS END POSTS, TOP CHORD, GUSSET PLATES, TENSION RODS, TRANSVERSE BEAM, AND FLOOR BEAM, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Middle Fork Stanislaus River Bridge, Spans Middle Fork Stanislaus River at State Highway 108, Dardanelle, Tuolumne County, CA

  14. 15. 64 foot pony truss detail of the lower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. 64 foot pony truss - detail of the lower pin connection shown in CA-14 showing 'I' beam bracket, diagonal support bar, floor beam and lower chord eye bars. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  15. Hinge specification for a square-faceted tetrahedral truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    A square-faceted tetrahedral truss is geometrically analyzed. Expressions are developed for single degree of freedom hinges which allow packaging of the structure into a configuration in which all members are parallel and closely packed in a square pattern. Deployment is sequential, thus providing control over the structure during deployment.

  16. Alignment Jigs For Bonding End Fittings To Truss Members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sword, Lee F.

    1996-01-01

    Set of alignment jigs hold fittings during adhesive bonding of fittings to ends of truss members. For each member, jigs hold two end fittings collinear while member allowed to move slightly, within dimensional tolerances, during injection and curing of adhesive. Once adhesive cured, fittings remain collinear even though member not necessarily perfectly straight between them.

  17. Detail, L, connection of west truss (north span) from northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, L, connection of west truss (north span) from northwest and below, showing pin connection at L, bottom chord, floor beam, stringers, and portion of lateral bracing and concrete deck - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  18. Detail, U, connection of south span (west truss), from southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, U, connection of south span (west truss), from southeast and below, showing pin connection at vertical member U-L top chord, inclined endpoint U-L diagonal eyebars, and lateral bracing including portion of portal strut with lattice bars and brace - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  19. CLOSEUP VIEW OF PORTION OF MAIN BRIDGE CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CLOSE-UP VIEW OF PORTION OF MAIN BRIDGE CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS SPAN LOOKING UP AND NORTHEAST. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  20. CLOSEUP OF TYPICAL BUILTUP, RIVETED AND PIN CONNECTED DECK TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CLOSE-UP OF TYPICAL BUILT-UP, RIVETED AND PIN CONNECTED DECK TRUSS LOOKING UP AND NORTHEAST. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  1. Detail of south granite pier revealing riveted truss ends and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of south granite pier revealing riveted truss ends and iron footing plates on top of granite cap stones. View north - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  2. Woodwork and trusses, looking East into the office on the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Woodwork and trusses, looking East into the office on the upper level near the worker's break room, Southwest corner of the building - Bureau of Mines Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Original Building, Date Street north of U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  3. 41. GARRET TRUSS DETAIL. This view was taken to show ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. GARRET TRUSS DETAIL. This view was taken to show that the 'Rafters' (as called in the 1755 account for scantling for the Greater Meeting House) were first hewn with a broad axe and them sawn to size. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. Interior, building 1205, view to southeast showing roof truss system, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, building 1205, view to southeast showing roof truss system, sliding main doors, and roll up door at center to allow clearance for aircraft tail assembly, 90 mm lens plus electronic flash fill lighting. - Travis Air Force Base, Readiness Maintenance Hangar, W Street, Air Defense Command Readiness Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  5. VIEW OF SOUTHWEST FACE OF SIMPLE BRIDGE THROUGH TRUSS SPAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTHWEST FACE OF SIMPLE BRIDGE THROUGH TRUSS SPAN BETWEEN CONCRETE PIERS “III” AND “IV”, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  6. VIEW OF BRIDGE SIMPLE THROUGH TRUSS SPAN ON EAST BANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BRIDGE SIMPLE THROUGH TRUSS SPAN ON EAST BANK END BETWEEN CONCRETE PIERS “III” AND “IV” AND PORTION OF CANTILEVER SECTION BETWEEN CONCRETE PIERS “II” AND “III”, LOOKING WEST. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  7. 10. Credit JTL: Oblique view, two panels of truss showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Credit JTL: Oblique view, two panels of truss showing wrought iron bottom chord, cast iron joint blocks, and cast iron diagonal members - Reading-Halls Station Bridge, U.S. Route 220, spanning railroad near Halls Station, Muncy, Lycoming County, PA

  8. 24 CFR 3280.402 - Test procedure for roof trusses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Test procedure for roof trusses. 3280.402 Section 3280.402 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT...

  9. 24 CFR 3280.402 - Test procedure for roof trusses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Nondestructive test procedure—(1) Dead load plus live load. (i) Noting figure A-1, measure and record initial... the truss equal to the full dead load of roof and ceiling. Measure and record deflections. (iii) Maintaining the dead load, add live load in approximate 1/4 design live load increments. Measure...

  10. 24 CFR 3280.402 - Test procedure for roof trusses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... inches on center so as to simulate uniform loading. (c) Nondestructive test procedure—(1) Dead load plus... no load. EC17OC91.008 (ii) Apply load units to the top chord of the truss equal to the full dead load of roof and ceiling. Measure and record deflections. (iii) Maintaining the dead load, add live...

  11. Detail of deck plate girder and 150' Warren deck truss ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of deck plate girder and 150' Warren deck truss skewed connection atop skewed concrete pier, Bridge No. 1348, Second Potomac and C&O Canal Crossing, looking northwest. - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  12. 9. Detail of pin truss and floor board system, from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail of pin truss and floor board system, from Minnesota end of the bridge, looking at the bridge's southwest side - Enloe Bridge No. 90021, Spanning Red River of North between Minnesota & North Dakota on County State Aid Highway 28, Wolverton, Wilkin County, MN

  13. VIEW OF ROOF FRAMING SHOWING DETAIL OF TIMBER HOWE TRUSS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ROOF FRAMING SHOWING DETAIL OF TIMBER HOWE TRUSS. 2,000-POUND MOTOR-DRIVEN HAMMER, 1940, BY CHAMBERSBURG ENGINEERING COMPANY, CHAMBERSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA, VISIBLE TO LEFT ON FLOOR. - Cambria Iron Company, Blacksmith Shop, Lower Works, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  14. 6. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST ALONG CENTRAL BAY. NOTE TRUSSED SUPPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST ALONG CENTRAL BAY. NOTE TRUSSED SUPPORT FOR CRANEWAY TRACKS WITH OVERHEAD BRIDGE CRANES IN BACKGROUND. NOTE ALSO SWINGING BOOM CRANES ATTACHED TO COLUMNS. - Rosie the Riveter National Historical Park, Auxiliary Plate Shop, 912 Harbour Way, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  15. 14. DETAIL OF ONE OF THROUGH PARKER TRUSSES SHOWING LACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF ONE OF THROUGH PARKER TRUSSES SHOWING LACED VERTIALS AND SWAY FRAME AND WHEEL-TYPE, TENSION ADJUSTMENT DEVICES ON DIAGONAL MEMBERS - Twenty-first Street Bridge, Spanning Railroad tracks at Twenty-first Street, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  16. 31. Interior of fabrication buildingnote pipe truss and timber framing. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Interior of fabrication building-note pipe truss and timber framing. Railway to move vessels in and out of structure. Flying bridge roof of barbour-built vessel Stardust (#1) to right. - Barbour Boat Works, Tryon Palace Drive, New Bern, Craven County, NC

  17. TRUSS DETAILS. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. Includes crane ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRUSS DETAILS. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. Includes crane girder section. No architect noted. Drawn by Penney. Plan no. 2-N-7. March 10, 1942, no revisions. U.S. Navy, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Contract no. bs 76, item no. 22A. Approved for construction October 9, 1943. blueprint - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Warehouse, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  18. Analyzing Tensile and Compressive Forces in Planar Trusses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Jeremiah V.

    1995-01-01

    Tensile and compressive forces in planar trusses can be analyzed using either the method of sections or the method of joints. This article summarizes and extends a project accomplished by a high school student using the method of joints and graphing calculators, spreadsheets, and matrix-manipulation software. (MKR)

  19. Development of a verification program for deployable truss advanced technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Jack E.

    1988-01-01

    Use of large deployable space structures to satisfy the growth demands of space systems is contingent upon reducing the associated risks that pervade many related technical disciplines. The overall objectives of this program was to develop a detailed plan to verify deployable truss advanced technology applicable to future large space structures and to develop a preliminary design of a deployable truss reflector/beam structure for use a a technology demonstration test article. The planning is based on a Shuttle flight experiment program using deployable 5 and 15 meter aperture tetrahedral truss reflections and a 20 m long deployable truss beam structure. The plan addresses validation of analytical methods, the degree to which ground testing adequately simulates flight and in-space testing requirements for large precision antenna designs. Based on an assessment of future NASA and DOD space system requirements, the program was developed to verify four critical technology areas: deployment, shape accuracy and control, pointing and alignment, and articulation and maneuvers. The flight experiment technology verification objectives can be met using two shuttle flights with the total experiment integrated on a single Shuttle Test Experiment Platform (STEP) and a Mission Peculiar Experiment Support Structure (MPESS). First flight of the experiment can be achieved 60 months after go-ahead with a total program duration of 90 months.

  20. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and Lee M.E. Morin work in tandem on the fourth scheduled EVA session for the STS-110 mission aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis. Ross is anchored on the mobile foot restraint on the International Space Station's (ISS) Canadarm2, while Morin works inside the S0 (S-zero) truss. The STS-110 mission prepared the Station for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting a 43-foot-long S0 truss and preparing the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 Truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and marked the first time all spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  1. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 mission specialist Lee M.E. Morin carries an affixed 35 mm camera to record work which is being performed on the International Space Station (ISS). Working with astronaut Jerry L. Ross (out of frame), the duo completed the structural attachment of the S0 (s-zero) truss, mating two large tripod legs of the 13 1/2 ton structure to the station's main laboratory during a 7-hour, 30-minute space walk. The STS-110 mission prepared the Station for future space walks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long S0 truss and preparing the Mobile Transporter. The S0 Truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver space walkers around the Station and marked the first time all space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  2. Expandable panel and truss system/antenna/solar panel

    SciTech Connect

    Slysh, P.

    1983-04-12

    Disclosed is an expandable panel and truss structure capable of being stowed in a storage container (canister) for transportation into space and deployed to form structures such as antennas, solar panels or similar space or terrestial structures. The antenna formed comprises the panels stored as hinged pairs (sets) folded in accordian-like fashion together with the expandable trusses and other devices necessary for antenna space operation, such as attitude control and antenna feed. The panel sets are deployed from the canister to form a toroidal ring, circular in cross-section when deployed, for supporting the antenna lens and to form a feed support boom utilizing the canister as part of the antenna structure. The canister is connected to the ring and support boom in the deployed state by the expandable trusses. A fully automatic system is included for deploying the antenna and for holding the antenna structure in its deployed state. By adding a second (back) boom and reflector screen, a paraboloidal antenna is formed. In a second embodiment, utilizing the same storage and deployment principle but with panel sets which are triangular in cross-section, when deployed, either an offset (asymmetrical) paraboloidal or a feed horn type antenna structure is formed. In another embodiment of the invention, utilizing the same principle and with panel sets which are triangular in crosssection, when deployed, a solar panel array is formed. Also disclosed is a foldable truss geostationary platform and package for transfer into a geostationary orbit. Finally, an alternate mechanism is disclosed in the form of a pantograph for deploying panel sets to form a truss.

  3. S0 Tight Loop Studies on ICHIRO 9-Cell Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Fumio; Konomi, T.; Saito, Kenji; Bice, Damon; Crawford, Anthony C.; Geng, Rongli

    2009-11-01

    We have continued high gradient R&D of ICHIRO 9-cell cavities at KEK. ICHIRO 9-cell cavity #5 (I9#5) that has no end groups on beam tube to focus on high gradient sent to Jlab as S0 tight loop study. Surface treatments and vertical test were repeated 3 times at Jlab, and then I9#5 sent back to KEK. We also repeated surface treatments and test at KEK. Maximum gradients were 36.5MV/m at Jlab, and 33.7MV/m at KEK so far. Now we are struggling with the puzzle why the results of singles do not work well on 9-cell cavities.

  4. KINEMATIC ANALYSIS OF MODULAR, TRUSS-BASED MANIPULATOR UNITS

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, R. J.

    1994-06-01

    Decontamination and Dismantling (D&D) activities within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) require a long reach manipulator with a large load capacity. Variable Geometry Trusses (VGTs) are a unique class of mechanical structures which allow the advantages of truss structures for large scale applications to be applied to large robotic manipulators. Individual VGT units may be assembled to create a modular, long-reach, truss-type manipulator. Each module of such a manipulator system is either a static truss section or one of several possible VGT geometries. While many potential applications exist for this technology, the present work is largely motivated by the need for generic robotic systems for remote manipulation. A manipulator system based on VGT modules provides several advantages. The reconfigurable nature of the manipulator system allows it to be adapted on site to unforeseen conditions. The kinematic redundancy of the manipulator enables it to work effectively even in a highly obstructed workspace. The parallel structure of the truss modules enables the manipulator to be withdrawn in the event of a structural failure. Finally, the open framework of the modules provides a clear, protected passageway for control and power cabling, waste conveyance, or other services required at the end effector. As is implied in a truss structure, all primary members of a VGT are ideally loaded in pure tension or compression. This results in an extremely stiff and strong manipulator system with minimal overall weight. Careful design of the joints of a VGT is very important to the overall stiffness and accuracy of the structure, as several links (as many as six) are joined together at each joint. The greatest disadvantage to this approach to manipulator design has traditionally been that the kinematics of VGT structures are complex and poorly understood. This report specifically addresses the kinematics of several possible geometries for the individual VGT units. Equations and

  5. Structural stiffness, strength and dynamic characteristics of large tetrahedral space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr.; Bush, H. G.; Card, M. F.

    1977-01-01

    Physical characteristics of large skeletal frameworks for space applications are investigated by analyzing one concept: the tetrahedral truss, which is idealized as a sandwich plate with isotropic faces. Appropriate analytical relations are presented in terms of the truss column element properties which for calculations were taken as slender graphite/epoxy tubes. Column loads, resulting from gravity gradient control and orbital transfer, are found to be small for the class structure investigated. Fundamental frequencies of large truss structures are shown to be an order of magnitude lower than large earth based structures. Permissible loads are shown to result in small lateral deflections of the truss due to low-strain at Euler buckling of the slender graphite/epoxy truss column elements. Lateral thermal deflections are found to be a fraction of the truss depth using graphite/epoxy columns.

  6. Wing spar stress charts and wing truss proportions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1926-01-01

    In order to simplify the calculation of beams continuous over three supports, a series of charts have been calculated giving the bending moments at all the critical points and the reactions at all supports for such members. Using these charts as a basis, calculations of equivalent bending moments, representing the total stresses acting in two bay-wing trusses of proportions varying over a wide range, have been determined, both with and without allowance for column effect. This leads finally to the determination of the best proportions for any particular truss or the best strut locations in any particular airplane. The ideal proportions are found to vary with the thickness of the wing section used, the aspect ratio, and the ratio of gap to chord.

  7. Conceptual design for scaled truss antenna flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    The conceptual design for a scaled truss antenna structures experiment program (STASEP) is presented. The hardware analysis of the scaled truss antenna structure (STAS) was performed by interactive design and evaluation of advanced spacecraft (IDEAS) computer aided, interactive, design and analysis program. Four STAS's were designed to be launched by the Shuttle, tested by using the space technology experiments platform (STEP) and space transportation system (STS), and then free flown in short lifetime orbits. Data were gathered on deployment, structural characteristics, geometric accuracies, thermal performance, and drag and lifetime as an orbiting spacecraft. Structural and thermal properties were determined for the STAS, including mass properties, thermal loading, structural natural frequencies, and mode shapes. The necessary analysis, scaling, and ground testing are discussed.

  8. Truss topology optimization with simultaneous analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaranarayanan, S.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    1992-01-01

    Strategies for topology optimization of trusses for minimum weight subject to stress and displacement constraints by Simultaneous Analysis and Design (SAND) are considered. The ground structure approach is used. A penalty function formulation of SAND is compared with an augmented Lagrangian formulation. The efficiency of SAND in handling combinations of general constraints is tested. A strategy for obtaining an optimal topology by minimizing the compliance of the truss is compared with a direct weight minimization solution to satisfy stress and displacement constraints. It is shown that for some problems, starting from the ground structure and using SAND is better than starting from a minimum compliance topology design and optimizing only the cross sections for minimum weight under stress and displacement constraints. A member elimination strategy to save CPU time is discussed.

  9. Control of a flexible planar truss using proof mass actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minas, Constantinos; Garcia, Ephrahim; Inman, Daniel J.

    1989-01-01

    A flexible structure was modeled and actively controlled by using a single space realizable linear proof mass actuator. The NASA/UVA/UB actuator was attached to a flexible planar truss structure at an optimal location and it was considered as both passive and active device. The placement of the actuator was specified by examining the eigenvalues of the modified model that included the actuator dynamics, and the frequency response functions of the modified system. The electronic stiffness of the actuator was specified, such that the proof mass actuator system was tuned to the fourth structural mode of the truss by using traditional vibration absorber design. The active control law was limited to velocity feedback by integrating of the signals of two accelerometers attached to the structure. The two lower modes of the closed-loop structure were placed further in the LHS of the complex plane. The theoretically predicted passive and active control law was experimentally verified.

  10. Modeling of joints for the dynamic analysis of truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    1987-01-01

    An experimentally-based method for determining the stiffness and damping of truss joints is described. The analytical models use springs and both viscous and friction dampers to simulate joint load-deflection behavior. A least-squares algorithm is developed to identify the stiffness and damping coefficients of the analytical joint models from test data. The effects of nonlinear joint stiffness such as joint dead band are also studied. Equations for predicting the sensitivity of beam deformations to changes in joint stiffness are derived and used to show the level of joint stiffness required for nearly rigid joint behavior. Finally, the global frequency sensitivity of a truss structure to random perturbations in joint stiffness is discussed.

  11. Minimizing distortion in truss structures - A Hopfield network solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, B.; Hajela, P.

    1992-01-01

    Distortions in truss structures can result from random errors in element lengths that are typical of a manufacturing process. These distortions may be minimized by an optimal selection of elements from those available for placement between the prescribed nodes - a combinatorial optimization problem requiring significant investment of computational resource for all but the smallest problems. The present paper describes a formulation in which near-optimal element assignments are obtained as minimum-energy stable states, of an analogous Hopfield neural network. This requires mapping of the optimization problem into an energy function of the appropriate Liapunov form. The computational architecture is ideally suited to a parallel processor implementation and offers significant savings in computational effort. A numerical implementation of the approach is discussed with reference to planar truss problems.

  12. Minimizing distortion in truss structures -- a Hopfield network solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, B.; Hajela, P.

    1993-01-01

    Distortions in truss structures can result from random errors in elemental lengths that are typical of a manufacturing process. These distortions may be minimized by an optimal selection of elements from those available for placement between the prescribed nodes -- a combinatorial optimization problem requiring significant investment of computational resource for all but the smallest problems. The present paper describes a formulation in which near-optimal element assignments are obtained as minimum energy, stable states, of an analogous Hopfield neural network. This requires mapping of the optimization problem into an energy function of the appropriate Lyapunov form. The computational architecture is ideally suited to a parallel processor implementation and offers significant savings in computational effort. A numerical implementation of the approach is discussed with reference to planar truss problems.

  13. Spin-dependent parameters P/sub n/000, D/sub n/0n0, K/sub n/00n, D/sub s/0s0, D/sub s/0k0, M/sub s/0sn, and M/sub s/0kn in pp elastic scattering at 579 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aprile, E.; Hausammann, R.; Heer, E.; Hess, R.; Lechanoine-Leluc, C.; Leo, W.R.; Morenzoni, S.; Onel, Y.; Rapin, D.; Mango, S.

    1983-06-01

    The polarization parameter P/sub n/000, the two-spin parameters D/sub n/0n0, K/sub n/00n, D/sub s/0s0, and D/sub s/0k0, and the three-spin parameters M/sub s/0sn and M/sub s/0kn have been measured for pp elastic scattering at 579 MeV between 34/sup 0/ and 118/sup 0/ center-of-mass scattering angle. The experiment was performed at SIN using a polarized proton beam, a polarized butanol target, and a polarimeter for the measurement of the polarization of the scattered proton. These data form the basis for a complete experimental determination of the scattering amplitudes.

  14. Preliminary analysis and design optimization of the short spacer truss of Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendy, A. S.; Patnaik, S. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Berke, L.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis, dynamic simulation, and design optimization of the short spacer truss of the Space Station Freedom are presented in this report. The short spacer truss will be positioned between the integrated equipment assembly (IEA) and another truss, called the long spacer truss, in the Space Station Freedom. During its launch in the Space Shuttle, the truss will be subjected to considerable in-span distributed inertia loads due to shuttle accelerations. The short spacer truss, therefore, has been modeled as a space frame to account for flexural response. Several parameters have been assumed, since the design specifications are in the process of development; hence the results presented should be considered preliminary. However, the automated analysis and design capabilities that have been developed can readily be used to generate an optimum design of the short spacer truss once the actual specifications have been determined. This report includes static and dynamic analyses of the short spacer truss, which have been obtained with the linear elastic code LE-HOST (in these analyses, LE-HOST data files have been automated to facilitate their future use for different design specifications of the short spacer truss); the dynamic animation of the short spacer truss, which has been carried out by using the results of the dynamic analysis and a post-processing feature of the modeling code PATRAN; and the optimum-weight design of the spacer truss, which was obtained under prescribed stress, displacement, and frequency constraints by using the design code COMETBOARDS. Examination of the analysis and design results revealed that the design could be improved if the configuration of the short spacer truss were modified to a certain extent. A modified configuration, which may simplify fabrication, has been suggested. The performance of this configuration has been evaluated and was found to be satisfactory under both static and dynamic conditions.

  15. 29. Attic interior showing roof truss system over waiting room; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Attic interior showing roof truss system over waiting room; note knob-and-tube wiring system; brick section at far left is rear of tower, which of brick masonry construction above the first story level, joined to the exterior walls of stone masonry; view to southeast along axis of building, 90mm lens and electronic flash illumination. - Southern Pacific Depot, 559 El Camino Real, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  16. Theoretical and experimental studies of a truss incorporating active members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, D. L.; Bicos, A. S.; Fuller, C. M.; Tracy, J. J.; Fechter, J. S.

    1992-04-01

    To model the behavior of the piezoelectric elements, a unique finite-element formulation of the piezoelectric struts has been developed which is based on the MSC/NASTRAN CQUAD4 element. The formulation uses the element's Poisson expansion under in-plane loading to make its behavior simulate a piezoelectric member. It is shown that the active members in the MDSSC CSI truss are useful in the investigation of a variety of vibration dissipitation and damage detection techniques.

  17. Planning Assembly Of Large Truss Structures In Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Mello, Luiz S. Homem; Desai, Rajiv S.

    1992-01-01

    Report dicusses developmental algorithm used in systematic planning of sequences of operations in which large truss structures assembled in outer space. Assembly sequence represented by directed graph called "assembly graph", in which each arc represents joining of two parts or subassemblies. Algorithm generates assembly graph, working backward from state of complete assembly to initial state, in which all parts disassembled. Working backward more efficient than working forward because it avoids intermediate dead ends.

  18. TWIN SKEWED TRUSS RAILROAD BRIDGES NEAR BRIDGE STREET AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TWIN SKEWED TRUSS RAILROAD BRIDGES NEAR BRIDGE STREET AT THE WEST END OF THE PLANT. THIS VIEW PROBABLY LOOKING NORTHWEST. BRIDGES BUILT OVER ERIE CANAL (WHICH FLOWED RIGHT THROUGH THE MIDDLE OF THE PLANT) BY AMERICAN BRIDGE COMPANY IN 1902. SINCE THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN, NEAR BRIDGE HAS BEEN DEMOLISHED; FAR BRIDGE IS STILL IN SERVICE. - Solvay Process Company, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  19. Verification Test of Automated Robotic Assembly of Space Truss Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Quach, Cuong C.

    1995-01-01

    A multidisciplinary program has been conducted at the Langley Research Center to develop operational procedures for supervised autonomous assembly of truss structures suitable for large-aperture antennas. The hardware and operations required to assemble a 102-member tetrahedral truss and attach 12 hexagonal panels were developed and evaluated. A brute-force automation approach was used to develop baseline assembly hardware and software techniques. However, as the system matured and operations were proven, upgrades were incorporated and assessed against the baseline test results. These upgrades included the use of distributed microprocessors to control dedicated end-effector operations, machine vision guidance for strut installation, and the use of an expert system-based executive-control program. This paper summarizes the developmental phases of the program, the results of several assembly tests, and a series of proposed enhancements. No problems that would preclude automated in-space assembly or truss structures have been encountered. The test system was developed at a breadboard level and continued development at an enhanced level is warranted.

  20. Beam and Truss Finite Element Verification for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, H J

    2007-07-16

    The explicit finite element (FE) software program DYNA3D has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to simulate the dynamic behavior of structures, systems, and components. This report focuses on verification of beam and truss element formulations in DYNA3D. An efficient protocol has been developed to verify the accuracy of these structural elements by generating a set of representative problems for which closed-form quasi-static steady-state analytical reference solutions exist. To provide as complete coverage as practically achievable, problem sets are developed for each beam and truss element formulation (and their variants) in all modes of loading and physical orientation. Analyses with loading in the elastic and elastic-plastic regimes are performed. For elastic loading, the FE results are within 1% of the reference solutions for all cases. For beam element bending and torsion loading in the plastic regime, the response is heavily dependent on the numerical integration rule chosen, with higher refinement yielding greater accuracy (agreement to within 1%). Axial loading in the plastic regime produces accurate results (agreement to within 0.01%) for all integration rules and element formulations. Truss elements are also verified to provide accurate results (within 0.01%) for elastic and elastic-plastic loading. A sample problem to verify beam element response in ParaDyn, the parallel version DYNA3D, is also presented.

  1. The Research of Historical Trusses in Northern Regions of Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenková, Renáta; Krušinský, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The blanket research of historical trusses in the territory of Slovakia has been running at our department since 2008. This research is done as teamwork in cooperation with experts from the field of conservation, and it is mainly focused on typology, construction, and the current technical and constructional state of investigated trusses. The long-time support of the grant scheme from the Ministry of Culture allows to get a fair amount of different data related to individual buildings and structures, which enables to carry out the in-depth research. In terms of their conservation and maintenance with an effort to extend their lifetime (the oldest known historical trusses in Slovakia are those of the 13th century), it is necessary to look into the microclimate impact of the under-roof space on wooden roof structures as well as to monitor the contemporary constructional and technical condition of a roof structure itself. The suitable microclimate in the under-roof space is influenced by a number of marginal conditions, constructional solutions of roof details, proper space ventilation etc

  2. Structural characterization of a first-generation articulated-truss joint for space crane application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, Thomas R.; Wu, K. Chauncey; Riutort, Kevin T.; Laufer, Joseph B.; Phelps, James E.

    1992-01-01

    A first-generation space crane articulated-truss joint was statically and dynamically characterized in a configuration that approximated an operational environment. The articulated-truss joint was integrated into a test-bed for structural characterization. Static characterization was performed by applying known loads and measuring the corresponding deflections to obtain load-deflection curves. Dynamic characterization was performed using modal testing to experimentally determine the first six mode shapes, frequencies, and modal damping values. Static and dynamic characteristics were also determined for a reference truss that served as a characterization baseline. Load-deflection curves and experimental frequency response functions are presented for the reference truss and the articulated-truss joint mounted in the test-bed. The static and dynamic experimental results are compared with analytical predictions obtained from finite element analyses. Load-deflection response is also presented for one of the linear actuators used in the articulated-truss joint. Finally, an assessment is presented for the predictability of the truss hardware used in the reference truss and articulated-truss joint based upon hardware stiffness properties that were previously obtained during the Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) Technology Development Program.

  3. Spectroscopy for E and S0 galaxies in nine clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Inger; Franx, Marijn; Kjaergaard, Per

    1995-10-01

    Central velocity dispersions, Mg_2 line indices and radial velocities for 220 E and S0 galaxies are derived on the basis of intermediate resolution spectroscopy. Galaxies in the following clusters have been observed: Abell 194, Abell 539, Abell 3381, Abell 3574, S639, S753, Doradus, HydraI (Abell 1060) and Grm 15. For 151 of the galaxies, the velocity dispersion has not previously been measured. 134 of the Mg_2 determinations are for galaxies with no previous measurement. The spectra cover either 500 or 1000A, centred on the magnesium triplet at 5177A. The observations were obtained with the Boller & Chivens spectrograph at the ESO 1.5-m telescope and with the OPTOPUS, a multi-object fibre-fed B&C spectrograph, at the ESO 3.6-m telescope. The data are part of our ongoing study of the large-scale motions in the Universe and the physical background for the Fundamental Plane. The Fourier fitting method was used to derive the velocity dispersions and radial velocities. The velocity dispersions have been corrected for the effect of the size of the aperture. The correction was established on the basis of velocity dispersion profiles available in the literature. A comparison with results from Davies et al. shows that the derived central velocity dispersions have an rms error of 0.036 in logsigma. There is no offset relative to the velocity dispersions from Davies et al. The offset relative to data from Lucey & Carter is -0.017+/-0.011 in logsigma, with our velocity dispersions being the smallest. The velocity dispersions derived from the B&C and the OPTOPUS observations, as well as the velocity dispersions published by Davies et al., Dressler, Lucey & Carter and Lucey et al., can be brought on a system consistent within 3 per cent. The Mg_2 line indices have been corrected for the size of the apertures, transformed to the Lick system, and corrected for the effect of the velocity dispersion. From comparison with data from Davies et al. and from Faber, we find that the rms

  4. First observation of B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) and measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+)/B(B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+)pi(-)).

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-11-01

    A combined mass and particle identification fit is used to make the first observation of the decay B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) and measure the branching fraction of B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) relative to B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+)pi(-). This analysis uses 1.2 fb(-1) integrated luminosity of pp collisions at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We observe a B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) signal with a statistical significance of 8.1 sigma and measure B(B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) /B(B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+)pi(-) 0.097+/-0.018(stat) +/- 0.009(syst). PMID:20365917

  5. The integration of a mesh reflector to a 15-foot box truss structure. Task 3: Box truss analysis and technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachtell, E. E.; Thiemet, W. F.; Morosow, G.

    1987-01-01

    To demonstrate the design and integration of a reflective mesh surface to a deployable truss structure, a mesh reflector was installed on a 15 foot box truss cube. The specific features demonstrated include: (1) sewing seams in reflective mesh; (2) mesh stretching to desired preload; (3) installation of surface tie cords; (4) installation of reflective surface on truss; (5) setting of reflective surface; (6) verification of surface shape/accuracy; (7) storage and deployment; (8) repeatability of reflector surface; and (9) comparison of surface with predicted shape using analytical methods developed under a previous task.

  6. In the O&C Building, the P3 truss, an ISS segment, is revealed inside its shipping container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, cranes lift the top of the shipping container containing the port-side P3 truss, a segment of the International Space Station (ISS). The truss is scheduled to be added to the ISS on mission STS-115 in 2002 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. The second port truss segment, P3 will be attached to the first port truss segment (P1).

  7. Nonlinear and distributed parameter models of the mini-mast truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Large spacecraft such as Space Station Freedom employ large trusses in their construction. The structural dynamics of such trusses often exhibit nonlinear behavior and little damping which can impact significantly the performance of control systems. The Mini-MAST truss was constructed to research such structural dynamics and control systems. The Mini-MAST truss is an object of study for the guest investigator program as part of NASA's controls-structures interaction program. The Mini-MAST truss is deployable and about 65 ft long. Although the bending characteristics of the Mini-MAST truss are essentially linear, the angular deflection under torsional loading has exhibited significant hysteresis and nonlinear stiffness. It is the purpose to develop nonlinear and distributed parameter models of the truss and to compare the model dynamics with actual measurements. Distributed parameter models have the advantage of requiring fewer model parameters. A tangent function is used to describe the nonlinear stiffness in torsion, partly because of the convenience of its easily expressed inverse. Hysteretic slip elements are introduced and extended to a continuum to account for the observed hysteresis in torsion. The contribution of slipping to the structural damping is analyzed and found to be strongly dependent on the applied loads. Because of the many factors which affect the damping and stiffness in a truss, it is risky to assume linearity.

  8. EVALUATION OF THE TEMPORARY TENT COVER TRUSS SYSTEM AP PRIMARY VENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    HAQ MA

    2009-12-31

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate a temporary ten cover truss system. This system will be used to provide weather protection to the workers during replacement of the filter for the Primary Ventilation System in AP Tank Farm. The truss system has been fabricated utilizing tubes and couplers, which are normally used for scaffoldings.

  9. Stiffness and strength tailoring in uniform space-filling truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.

    1992-01-01

    A deterministic procedure for tailoring the continuum stiffness and strength of uniform space-filling truss structures, through the appropriate selection of truss geometry and member sizes (flexural stiffness, axial stiffness, and length), is presented. The trusses considered herein are generated by uniform replication of a characteristic truss cell. The repeating cells are categorized by one of a set of possible geometric symmetry groups derived using crystallographic techniques. The elastic symmetry associated with each geometric symmetry group is identified to help select an appropriate truss geometry for a given application. Stiffness and strength tailoring of a given truss geometry is enabled through explicit expressions relating the continuum stiffnesses and failure stresses of the truss to the stiffnesses and failure loads of its members. These expressions are derived using an existing equivalent continuum analysis technique and a newly developed analytical failure theory for trusses. Several examples are presented to illustrate the application of these techniques and to demonstrate the usefulness of the information gained from this analysis.

  10. Stiffness and strength tailoring in uniform space-filling truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a deterministic procedure for tailoring the continuum stiffness and strength of uniform space-filling truss structures through the appropriate selection of truss geometry and member sizes (i.e., flexural and axial stiffnesses and length). The trusses considered herein are generated by replication of a characteristic truss cell uniformly through space. The repeating cells are categorized by one of a set of possible geometric symmetry groups derived using the techniques of crystallography. The elastic symmetry associated with each geometric symmetry group is identified to aid in the selection of an appropriate truss geometry for a given application. Stiffness and strength tailoring of a given truss geometry is enabled through explicit expressions relating the continuum stiffnesses and failure stresses of the truss to the stiffnesses and failure loads of its members. These expressions are derived using an existing equivalent continuum analysis technique and a newly developed analytical failure theory for trusses. Several examples are presented to illustrate the application of these techniques, and to demonstrate the usefulness of the information gained from this analysis.

  11. Use of a truss to maintain inguinal hernia reduction in a very low birth weight infant.

    PubMed

    Ruderman, J W; Schick, J B; Sherman, M; Reagan, Y; Hanks, G; Weitzman, J J

    1995-01-01

    Trusses are not usually used in management of inguinal hernia of the very low birth weight infant. A potential benefit of this therapy is maintenance of hernia reduction, thus delaying operative repair until the infant is larger and healthier. We designed a safe and effective truss with supplies found in most neonatal intensive care units. PMID:7595774

  12. The design and development of a two-dimensional adaptive truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwao, Fumihiro; Motohashi, Shoichi; Yoshihara, Makoto; Takahara, Kenichi; Natori, Michihiro

    1987-01-01

    The functional model of a two dimensional adaptive truss structure which can purposefully change its geometrical configuration is introduced. The details of design and fabrication such as kinematic analysis, dynamic characteristics analysis and some test results are presented for the demonstration of this two dimensional truss concept.

  13. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission astronauts Steven L. Smith (right) and Rex J. Walheim work in tandem on the third scheduled EVA session in which they released the locking bolts on the Mobile Transporter and rewired the Station's robotic arm (out of frame). Part of the Destiny laboratory and a glimpse of the Earth's horizon are seen in the lower portion of this digital image. The STS-110 mission prepared the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-zero) Truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 truss weighing in at 27,000 pounds was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and marked the first time all spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  14. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission astronaut Rex J. Walheim, accompanied by astronaut Steven L. Smith (out of frame) translates along the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS) during the third scheduled EVA session. The duo released the locking bolts on the Mobile Transporter and rewired the Station's robotic arm. The STS-110 mission prepared the ISS for future space walks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-Zero) Truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 truss weighing in at 27,000 pounds was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver space walkers around the Station and marked the first time all space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  15. Application of artificial neural networks in nonlinear analysis of trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alam, J.; Berke, L.

    1991-01-01

    A method is developed to incorporate neural network model based upon the Backpropagation algorithm for material response into nonlinear elastic truss analysis using the initial stiffness method. Different network configurations are developed to assess the accuracy of neural network modeling of nonlinear material response. In addition to this, a scheme based upon linear interpolation for material data, is also implemented for comparison purposes. It is found that neural network approach can yield very accurate results if used with care. For the type of problems under consideration, it offers a viable alternative to other material modeling methods.

  16. Devices prevent ice damage to trusses of semi

    SciTech Connect

    Marthinsen, A.

    1985-04-01

    Much exploration drilling is done in subarctic waters around the world, and this will be important in the future. Special demands will be made on the drilling structures to enable them to withstand collisions with drifting ice. A Newfoundland Certificate of Fitness, for example, says a vessel must be able to tolerate collision with the largest iceberg that can be undetectable by radar, with out the danger of platform collapse. The iceberg in this case is defined as having a weight of 5000 tons and a drifting velocity of 2 meters/second. Devices to prevent ice damage to the trusses of semisubmersibles are discussed.

  17. Search for CP violation in D ± → K {S/0} K ± and D {/s ±} → K {S/0} π ± decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-10-01

    A search for CP violation in Cabibbo-suppressed D ± → K {S/0} K ± and D {/s ±} → K {S/0} π ± decays is performed using pp collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb, recorded by the LHCb experiment. The individual CP-violating asymmetries are measured to be

  18. Combined structures-controls optimization of lattice trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    The role that distributed parameter model can play in CSI is demonstrated, in particular in combined structures controls optimization problems of importance in preliminary design. Closed form solutions can be obtained for performance criteria such as rms attitude error, making possible analytical solutions of the optimization problem. This is in contrast to the need for numerical computer solution involving the inversion of large matrices in traditional finite element model (FEM) use. Another advantage of the analytic solution is that it can provide much needed insight into phenomena that can otherwise be obscured or difficult to discern from numerical computer results. As a compromise in level of complexity between a toy lab model and a real space structure, the lattice truss used in the EPS (Earth Pointing Satellite) was chosen. The optimization problem chosen is a generic one: of minimizing the structure mass subject to a specified stability margin and to a specified upper bond on the rms attitude error, using a co-located controller and sensors. Standard FEM treating each bar as a truss element is used, while the continuum model is anisotropic Timoshenko beam model. Performance criteria are derived for each model, except that for the distributed parameter model, explicit closed form solutions was obtained. Numerical results obtained by the two model show complete agreement.

  19. Optical truss and retroreflector modeling for picometer laser metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Braden E.

    1993-09-01

    Space-based astrometric interferometer concepts typically have a requirement for the measurement of the internal dimensions of the instrument to accuracies in the picometer range. While this level of resolution has already been achieved for certain special types of laser gauges, techniques for picometer-level accuracy need to be developed to enable all the various kinds of laser gauges needed for space-based interferometers. Systematic errors due to retroreflector imperfections become important as soon as the retroreflector is allowed to either translate in position or articulate in angle away from its nominal zero-point. Also, when combining several laser interferometers to form a three-dimensional laser gauge (a laser optical truss), systematic errors due to imperfect knowledge of the truss geometry are important as the retroreflector translates away from its nominal zero-point. In order to assess the astrometric performance of a proposed instrument, it is necessary to determine how the effects of an imperfect laser metrology system impact the astrometric accuracy. This paper show the development of an error propagation model from errors in the 1-D metrology measurements through the impact on the overall astrometric accuracy for OSI. Simulations are then presented based on this development which were used to define a multiplier which determines the 1-D metrology accuracy required to produce a given amount of fringe position error.

  20. The P6 truss moves to a payload transport canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, the P6 integrated truss segment is placed in the payload transport canister while workers watch its progress. After being secured in the canister, the truss will be transported to Launch Pad 39B and the payload changeout room. Then it will be moved into Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay for mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station's electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a '''blanket''' that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST.

  1. Plastic Hinging Collapse of Periodic Cellular Truss Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwhuis, B. A.; Bele, E.; Hibbard, G. D.

    2008-10-01

    Periodic cellular metals (PCMs) have considerable potential as a new type of hybrid material for sandwich panel cores, due to their high architectural efficiency and load-bearing capability at relatively low mass. The mechanical performance of these materials is controlled by both architectural and microstructural parameters. In the case of PCM struts that have intermediate slenderness ratios, the peak load capacity is determined by the inelastic buckling stress, in which the rotation of the strut ends is opposed by their plastic hinging resistance. Strut rotation is, therefore, a key component of the overall PCM failure mechanism. In the present study, a method is developed for measuring the plastic hinging strength by allowing the truss core nodes to spread radially outward during collapse. Both finite element (FE) and experimental methods were used to study this behavior in AA3003 truss cores; the effect of work hardening, interfacial friction, and specimen size was examined. Direct measures for the plastic hinging resistance can be obtained and it was possible to demonstrate that while work hardening during PCM stretch-forming fabrication introduces significant work hardening in the near-hinge region, not all of the strengthening is available to resist plastic hinging collapse by virtue of the Bauschinger effect.

  2. Effect of Nonlinear Joints on Space Deployable Truss Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongwei; Deng, Zhongquan; Wu, Xiang; Liu, Rongqiang

    2012-07-01

    Joints nonlinearities with characteristics of freeplay and hysteresis are analyzed by describing joint nonlinear force-displacement based on describing function method. The nonlinear dynamic responses of the one- DOF system with joints under different exciting force levels are presented in the charts. The influence of the characterizing parameters, e.g., gaps, slipping forces of the joints on nonlinearities is analyzed. The nonlinear effects of freeplay and hysteresis present that the dynamic responses switch from one resonance frequency to another frequency when amplitude exceed the demarcation values. The hysteresis nonlinearity contributes nonlinear damping to the system. Dynamic responses of the modular beam-like deployable joint- dominated truss structure are tested under different sinusoidal exciting force levels which show obvious nonlinear behaviors. The nonlinear dynamic behaviors of the truss structure contributed by the joints shows a shift to lower resonance frequency and higher amplitude with the exciting force increases. The nonlinearity of the joints in the tested structure is identified to meet with the hysteresis nonlinearity. The experiment validates that describing method is an effective tool to model the joint nonlinearities.

  3. Design of deployable-truss masts for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, Mary; Benton, Max

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of three deployable-truss designs that were considered for use on Space Station Freedom to deploy the solar array wings. The first design chosen early in the program was a nut-deployed coilable longeron mast which has the advantage of being lightweight and reliable, with considerable flight history. Subsequently, because of the restructure of Space Station, a second design was chosen: a lanyard-deployed FASTMast (Folding Articulated Square Truss Mast), which has improved strength and redundancy characteristics for a given stowed volume. After further definition of the load requirements during deployment, however, it became necessary to modify the deployment system, resulting in the third mast design for space station solar arrays: a nut-deployed FASTMast, which was ultimately selected to provide increased stiffness and strength during deployment. This paper presents a brief review of these mast designs and their associated deployment systems, emphasizing the trade-offs involved in selecting between them. In addition, some innovative features of the FASTMast design as it stands currently for Space Station are described, and a brief review of the test program that is underway to qualify this design for flight is included.

  4. Development of Bonded Joint Technology for a Rigidizable-Inflatable Deployable Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2006-01-01

    Microwave and Synthetic Aperture Radar antenna systems have been developed as instrument systems using truss structures as their primary support and deployment mechanism for over a decade. NASA Langley Research Center has been investigating fabrication, modular assembly, and deployment methods of lightweight rigidizable/inflatable linear truss structures during that time for large spacecraft systems. The primary goal of the research at Langley Research Center is to advance these existing state-of-the-art joining and deployment concepts to achieve prototype system performance in a relevant space environment. During 2005, the development, fabrication, and testing of a 6.7 meter multi-bay, deployable linear truss was conducted at Langley Research Center to demonstrate functional and precision metrics of a rigidizable/inflatable truss structure. The present paper is intended to summarize aspects of bonded joint technology developed for the 6.7 meter deployable linear truss structure while providing a brief overview of the entire truss fabrication, assembly, and deployment methodology. A description of the basic joint design, surface preparation investigations, and experimental joint testing of component joint test articles will be described. Specifically, the performance of two room temperature adhesives were investigated to obtain qualitative data related to tube folding testing and quantitative data related to tensile shear strength testing. It was determined from the testing that a polyurethane-based adhesive best met the rigidizable/inflatable truss project requirements.

  5. TEST AND ANALYSIS ON THE PROGRESSIVE COLLAPSE OF STEEL TRUSSES UNDER CYCLIC LOADING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imase, Fumiaki; Usami, Tsutomu; Funayama, Jyunki; Wang, Chun-Lin

    The objective of this study is to examine experimentally and analytically the damage progress of steel truss structures in cyclic loadings. The adequacy of a numerical model developed in the past study for analyzing truss structures under cyclic or dynamic loadings is examined in view of the test results of model truss structures. Seven steel truss specimens whose panel points are rigidly connected through gusset plates by high-tension bolts were tested under constant vertical loads and cyclically increasing horizontal loads. Two truss models equipped with buckling restrained braces as diagonal members were tested. Moreover, elastic-plastic large displacement analysis is executed with appropriate modeling of test truss structures and with initial lateral loads simulating initial imperfections. In many cases, good correlation between test and analysis is observed up to the points where local bolt hole damages appear near the lower panel points of test truss structures. In addition an analytical model that can examine the up-lift effect of a base plate on the hinge-support has been proposed to improve the analytical modeling.

  6. Search for the decays B_{(s)};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-} and B_{(s)};{0} --> e;{+} e;{-} in CDF run II.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-05-22

    We report results from a search for the lepton flavor violating decays B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-} and B;{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}, and the flavor-changing neutral-current decays B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} e;{-} and B;{0} --> e;{+} e;{-}. The analysis uses data corresponding to 2 fb;{-1} of integrated luminosity of pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV collected with the upgraded Collider Detector (CDF II) at the Fermilab Tevatron. The observed number of B0 and B_{s};{0} candidates is consistent with background expectations. The resulting Bayesian upper limits on the branching ratios at 90% credibility level are B(B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}) < 2.0 x 10;{-7}, B(B;{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}) < 6.4 x 10;{-8}, B(B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} e;{-}) < 2.8 x 10;{-7}, and B(B;{0} --> e;{+} e;{-}) < 8.3 x 10;{-8}. From the limits on B(B_{(s)};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}), the following lower bounds on the Pati-Salam leptoquark masses are also derived: M_{LQ}(B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}) > 47.8 TeV/c;{2}, and M_{LQ}(B;{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}) > 59.3 TeV / c;{2}, at 90% credibility level. PMID:19519018

  7. Performance effects of tie-truss modifications for a 70-meter centerline beam waveguide antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucchissi, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The elevation-axis tie truss of the 70-m antennas would have to be modified to accommodate a centerline beam waveguide. To accomplish this, the center section of the tie truss has to be altered, causing a change in the tie-truss compliance and affecting structural performance. Even with the center section completely removed, the worst-case rms pathlength error due to gravity load is increased from 0.025 to only 0.030 inches. Using a simple postprocessor technique, the effects of modifying the compliance can be predicted without resorting to multiple and costly re-analyses of large finite-element models on a mainframe computer.

  8. The Z1 truss begins its ride up the RSS on Launch Pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    With the onset of dawn, the payload canister (left) with the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 inside begins its journey up the side of the Rotating Service Structure to the Payload Changeout Room. There the Z1 truss will be removed and later transferred to Space Shuttle Discovery's payload bay. The Z1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the International Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. Along with its companion payload, the third Pressurized Mating Adapter, the Z1 is scheduled to be launched aboard Discovery Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT.

  9. The Z1 truss is lifted up the RSS on Launch Pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    With its umbilical hoses stretched out, the payload canister (left) with the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 inside nears the top of the passage to the Payload Changeout Room. There the Z1 truss will be removed and later transferred to Space Shuttle Discovery's payload bay. The Z1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the International Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. Along with its companion payload, the third Pressurized Mating Adapter, the Z1 is scheduled to be launched aboard Discovery Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT.

  10. The Z1 truss begins its ride up the RSS on Launch Pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    As the sky grows lighter, , the payload canister (left) with the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 inside is slowly lifted up the side of the Rotating Service Structure to the Payload Changeout Room. There the Z1 truss will be removed and later transferred to Space Shuttle Discovery's payload bay. The Z1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the International Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. Along with its companion payload, the third Pressurized Mating Adapter, the Z1 is scheduled to be launched aboard Discovery Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT.

  11. A variable geometry truss manipulator for positioning large payloads

    SciTech Connect

    Stoughton, R.S.; Tucker, J.C.; Horner, C.G.

    1995-02-01

    A major thrust within the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Decontamination and Dismantling (D&D) Robotics program is the development of a Selective Equipment Removal System (SERS). SERS will consist of a mobile vehicle, a Dual-Arm Work Module (DAWM), and a deployment manipulator capable of extending the DAWM up to 6.096m (20) from the vehicle. The DAWM, built by RedZone Robotics, includes two Schilling Titan II manipulators, a unique five degree-of-freedom (DOF) module for positioning/orienting the two Schilling arms, and a massive steel backplane to maintain structural rigidity. Together with its payload, the DAWM weighs about 975 kg (2150 pounds). In order to accurately position the DAWM, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) together with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s Langley Research Center (NASA LARC) are developing a deployment manipulator, which includes two double-octahedral Variable Geometry Truss (VGT) modules connected with a static truss section. The entire SERS system (Figure 1) will include the mobile vehicle, a 2-DOF base actuation system (waist rotate and pitch) with an output link approximately 2.134m (7) in length, the VGT system and the DAWM. The VGT system (Figure 2) consists of a 1.067m (42) diameter ({approximately}1.346m (53) long) base VGT, which mounts to the end of the output link of the base actuation system, a 1.524m (60) long static truss section which tapers from 1.067m (42) diameter at its base to 0.8128m (32) diameter at the end, and a 0.8128m (32) diameter ({approximately}1.0922m (43) long) tip VGT to which the DAWM is mounted. The stiffness of the VGT system is such that with the base VGT mounted to a rigid base and the VGT system oriented horizontally (worst case), the static deflection of the DAWM together with full payload will be less than 0.0254m.

  12. Experimental Dynamic Characterization of a Reconfigurable Adaptive Precision Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkle, J. D.; Peterson, L. D.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a reconfigurable adaptive truss structure with non-linear joints is investigated. The objective is to experimentally examine the effects of the local non-linearities on the global dynamics of the structure. Amplitude changes in the frequency response functions are measured at micron levels of motion. The amplitude and frequency variations of a number of modes indicate a non-linear Coulomb friction response. Hysteretic bifurcation behavior is also measured at an amplitude approximately equal to the specified free-play in the joint. Under the 1 g pre-load, however, the non-linearity was dominantly characteristic of Coulomb friction with little evidence of free-play stiffening.

  13. New displacement-based methods for optimal truss topology design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendsoe, Martin P.; Ben-Tal, Aharon; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1991-01-01

    Two alternate methods for maximum stiffness truss topology design are presented. The ground structure approach is used, and the problem is formulated in terms of displacements and bar areas. This large, nonconvex optimization problem can be solved by a simultaneous analysis and design approach. Alternatively, an equivalent, unconstrained, and convex problem in the displacements only can be formulated, and this problem can be solved by a nonsmooth, steepest descent algorithm. In both methods, the explicit solving of the equilibrium equations and the assembly of the global stiffness matrix are circumvented. A large number of examples have been studied, showing the attractive features of topology design as well as exposing interesting features of optimal topologies.

  14. On an adaptive truss manipulator space crane concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Wada, Ben K.

    The paper describes an adaptive truss manipulator (ATM) space crane concept for in-space assembly and construction. The underlying mechanism of an ATM is that the batten members of the constituent octahedral modules are controllable in length. Through geometric transformations of the constituent modules, the basic manipulator functions such as articulation can be performed by the ATM. The mechanism can also provide deployment/retraction, high dexterity motion, and bracing operation. The advantages of an ATM over the conventional multijoint-multilink anthropomorphic manipulator are its compact stowage volume for in-space storage and mobility, deployment as needed, high dexterity in complex workspace, and high redundancy of the actuator function. The kinematic description of an ATM is formulated in the global cartesian coordinate system.

  15. On an adaptive truss manipulator space crane concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Wada, Ben K.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes an adaptive truss manipulator (ATM) space crane concept for in-space assembly and construction. The underlying mechanism of an ATM is that the batten members of the constituent octahedral modules are controllable in length. Through geometric transformations of the constituent modules, the basic manipulator functions such as articulation can be performed by the ATM. The mechanism can also provide deployment/retraction, high dexterity motion, and bracing operation. The advantages of an ATM over the conventional multijoint-multilink anthropomorphic manipulator are its compact stowage volume for in-space storage and mobility, deployment as needed, high dexterity in complex workspace, and high redundancy of the actuator function. The kinematic description of an ATM is formulated in the global cartesian coordinate system.

  16. International Space Station Configuration After P6 Truss Installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Photographed from the Space Shuttle Discovery upon its separation from the orbital outpost, the International Space Station (ISS) is shown sporting its new additions. A fly-around gave the crew a look at their handiwork, a new P5 spacer truss segment and a fully retracted P6 solar array wing. Earlier, the STS-116 and Expedition 14 crews concluded eight days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and station where they accomplished the installation of the newest piece of the station and completely rewired the power grid over the course of four space walks. The station is currently the size of a typical three-bedroom house, with a surface area large enough to cover four basketball courts. The image reflects the latest configuration of the ISS as of December 19, 2006.

  17. A three dimensional heart model based on anatomically aligned trusses.

    PubMed

    Witman, S; Gefen, A; Barnea, O

    2007-01-01

    A new approach for modeling and simulating the contraction of the heart is presented. The model is based on anatomical images and accounts for cardiac muscle fibers and their orientation. The heart is modeled as a structure built of trusses, each representing a group of myofibers with calculated deformations using matrix structural analysis. Three elements are represented; these are the contractile cardiac muscle, the elastic passive collagen, and intracardiac blood interacting with the heart's preload and afterload. Incompressibility of each element is preserved. The conduction system is simulated in the model by transferring the activating signal from one element to another or by Purkinje fibers activation. The method was demonstrated using a three-dimensional one-layer geometrical ventricle with orthogonal fibers and with anatomically oriented fibers. PMID:18002551

  18. Robot path planning for space-truss assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muenger, Rolf; Sanderson, Arthur C.

    1992-01-01

    Construction, repair, and maintenance of space-based structures will require extensive planning of operations in order to effectively carry out these tasks. The path planning algorithm described here is a general approach to generating paths that guarantee collision avoidance for a single chain nonredundant or redundant robot. The algorithm uses a graph search of feasible points in position space, followed by a local potential field method that guarantees collision avoidance among objects, structures, and the robot arm as well as conformance to joint limit constraints. This algorithm is novel in its computation of goal attractive potential fields in Cartesian space, and computation of obstacle repulsive fields in robot joint space. These effects are combined to generate robot motion. Computation is efficiently implemented through the computation of the robot arm Jacobian and not the full inverse arm kinematics. These planning algorithms have been implemented and evaluated using existing space-truss designs, and are being integrated into the RPI-CIRSSE Testbed environment.

  19. Tubular space truss structure for SKITTER 2 robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beecham, Richard; Dejulio, Linda; Delorme, Paul; Eck, Eric; Levy, Avi; Lowery, Joel; Radack, Joe; Sheffield, Randy; Stevens, Scott

    1988-01-01

    The Skitter 2 is a three legged transport vehicle designed to demonstrate the principle of a tripod walker in a multitude of environments. The tubular truss model of Skitter 2 is a proof of principal design. The model will replicate the operational capabilities of Skitter 2 including its ability to self-right itself. The project's focus was on the use of light weight tubular members in the final structural design. A strong design for the body was required as it will undergo the most intense loading. Triangular geometry was used extensively in the body, providing the required structural integrity and eliminating the need for cumbersome shear panels. Both the basic femur and tibia designs also relied on the strong geometry of the triangle. An intense literature search aided in the development of the most suitable weld techniques, joints, linkages, and materials required for a durable design. The hinge design features the use of spherical rod end bearings. In order to obtain a greater range of mobility in the tibia, a four-bar linkage was designed which attaches both to the femur and the tibia. All component designs, specifically the body, femur, and the tibia were optimized using the software package IDEAS 3.8A Supertab. The package provided essential deformation and stress analysis information on each component's design. The final structure incurred only a 0.0544 inch deflection in a maximum (worst case) loading situation. The highest stress experienced by any AL6061-T6 tubular member was 1920 psi. The structural integrity of the final design facilitated the use of Aluminum 6061-T6 tubing. The tubular truss structure of Skitter 2 is an effective and highly durable design. All facets of the design are structurally sound and cost effective.

  20. Tubular space truss structure for SKITTER 2 robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beecham, Richard; Dejulio, Linda; Delorme, Paul; Eck, Eric; Levy, Avi; Lowery, Joel; Radack, Joe; Sheffield, Randy; Stevens, Scott

    1988-05-01

    The Skitter 2 is a three legged transport vehicle designed to demonstrate the principle of a tripod walker in a multitude of environments. The tubular truss model of Skitter 2 is a proof of principal design. The model will replicate the operational capabilities of Skitter 2 including its ability to self-right itself. The project's focus was on the use of light weight tubular members in the final structural design. A strong design for the body was required as it will undergo the most intense loading. Triangular geometry was used extensively in the body, providing the required structural integrity and eliminating the need for cumbersome shear panels. Both the basic femur and tibia designs also relied on the strong geometry of the triangle. An intense literature search aided in the development of the most suitable weld techniques, joints, linkages, and materials required for a durable design. The hinge design features the use of spherical rod end bearings. In order to obtain a greater range of mobility in the tibia, a four-bar linkage was designed which attaches both to the femur and the tibia. All component designs, specifically the body, femur, and the tibia were optimized using the software package IDEAS 3.8A Supertab. The package provided essential deformation and stress analysis information on each component's design. The final structure incurred only a 0.0544 inch deflection in a maximum (worst case) loading situation. The highest stress experienced by any AL6061-T6 tubular member was 1920 psi. The structural integrity of the final design facilitated the use of Aluminum 6061-T6 tubing. The tubular truss structure of Skitter 2 is an effective and highly durable design. All facets of the design are structurally sound and cost effective.

  1. Error Modeling of Multi-baseline Optical Truss. Part II; Application to SIM Metrology Truss Field Dependent Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Liwei Dennis; Milman, Mark; Korechoff, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The current design of the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) employs a 19 laser-metrology-beam system (also called L19 external metrology truss) to monitor changes of distances between the fiducials of the flight system's multiple baselines. The function of the external metrology truss is to aid in the determination of the time-variations of the interferometer baseline. The largest contributor to truss error occurs in SIM wide-angle observations when the articulation of the siderostat mirrors (in order to gather starlight from different sky coordinates) brings to light systematic errors due to offsets at levels of instrument components (which include comer cube retro-reflectors, etc.). This error is labeled external metrology wide-angle field-dependent error. Physics-based model of field-dependent error at single metrology gauge level is developed and linearly propagated to errors in interferometer delay. In this manner delay error sensitivity to various error parameters or their combination can be studied using eigenvalue/eigenvector analysis. Also validation of physics-based field-dependent model on SIM testbed lends support to the present approach. As a first example, dihedral error model is developed for the comer cubes (CC) attached to the siderostat mirrors. Then the delay errors due to this effect can be characterized using the eigenvectors of composite CC dihedral error. The essence of the linear error model is contained in an error-mapping matrix. A corresponding Zernike component matrix approach is developed in parallel, first for convenience of describing the RMS of errors across the field-of-regard (FOR), and second for convenience of combining with additional models. Average and worst case residual errors are computed when various orders of field-dependent terms are removed from the delay error. Results of the residual errors are important in arriving at external metrology system component requirements. Double CCs with ideally co-incident vertices

  2. Testing and application of a viscous passive damper for use in precision truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trubert, M.; Fanson, J.; Davis, P.; Anderson, E.

    1991-01-01

    A passive damping device intended to replace individual struts in precision truss structures for space applications is described. The theory of operation of the D-Strut device is detailed, and simple five- and three-parameter models are derived. Results from tests conducted to characterize the D-Strut at submicron displacement levels are reporeted. The incorporation of a strut in a precision truss testbed is described. Parameters determined from the component-level tests are used in a finite element model of the truss, and damping augmentation is predicted. Using the simple three-parameter model, a damper is selected for multiple placement in a separate optical interferometer truss testbed. The effect of the addition of the damper struts is illustrated analytically in a model of the structure. Finally, an improved Arched Flexure D-Strut that is expected to provide higher loss factors, and is currently under development, is described.

  3. Preliminary design of a large tetrahedral truss/hexagonal heatshield panel aerobrake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    An aerobrake structural concept is introduced which consists of two primary components: (1) a lightweight erectable tetrahedral support truss; and (2) sandwich hexagonal heatshield panels which, when attached to the truss, form a continuous impermeable aerobraking surface. Generic finite element models and a general analysis procedure to design tetrahedral truss/hexagonal heatshield panel aerobrakes is developed, and values of the aerobrake design parameters which minimize mass and packaging volume for a 120-foot-diameter aerobrake are determined. Sensitivity of the aerobrake design to variations in design parameters is also assessed. The results show that a 120-foot-diameter aerobrake is viable using the concept presented (i.e., the aerobrake mass is less than or equal to 15 percent of the payload spacecraft mass). Minimizing the aerobrake mass (by increasing the number of rings in the support truss) however, leads to aerobrakes with the highest part count.

  4. Design of a welded joint for robotic, on-orbit assembly of space trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, W. K.; Thomas, F. P.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary design for a weldable truss joint for on-orbit assembly of large space structures is described. The joint was designed for ease of assembly, for structural efficiency, and to allow passage of fluid (for active cooling or other purposes) along the member through the joint. The truss members were assumed to consist of graphite/epoxy tubes to which were bonded 2219-T87 aluminum alloy end fittings for welding on-orbit to truss nodes of the same alloy. A modified form of gas tungsten arc welding was assumed to be the welding process. The joint was designed to withstand the thermal and structural loading associated with a 120-ft diameter tetrahedral truss intended as an aerobrake for a mission to Mars.

  5. Static task of von Mises planar truss analyzed using the potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalina, Martin

    2013-10-01

    A Von Mises planar truss subjected to vertical static load at its top joint is studied. The mathematical concept of large displacement elastic analysis of the von Mises truss targeted for computers is described. The model geometry is described using finite mass points. Formulae for the evaluation of displacements of mass points and rotation of segments were derived with the help of geometrical and physical conditions. Formulae for the determination of potential energy of the system are listed. Deformation of the structure is evaluated by seeking the minimal potential energy. The step-by-step increment method combined with Newton-Raphson method is used. The mathematical solution described in the article enables the modelling of Mises truss using a finite amount of segments. The described solution is suitable for load-deflection curve computation of a limit load model. The equilibrium stability problem of von Mises truss is discussed in connection with the random effects of imperfections.

  6. Design of a welded joint for robotic, on-orbit assembly of space trusses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rule, W. K.; Thomas, F. P.

    1992-10-01

    A preliminary design for a weldable truss joint for on-orbit assembly of large space structures is described. The joint was designed for ease of assembly, for structural efficiency, and to allow passage of fluid (for active cooling or other purposes) along the member through the joint. The truss members were assumed to consist of graphite/epoxy tubes to which were bonded 2219-T87 aluminum alloy end fittings for welding on-orbit to truss nodes of the same alloy. A modified form of gas tungsten arc welding was assumed to be the welding process. The joint was designed to withstand the thermal and structural loading associated with a 120-ft diameter tetrahedral truss intended as an aerobrake for a mission to Mars.

  7. Control of flexible beams using a free-free active truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. W.; Kimiavi, B.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study involving controlling flexible beams using a free-free active truss is presented. This work extends previous work in controlling flexible continua with active trusses which were configured with fixed-free boundary conditions. The following describes the Lagrangian approach used to derive the equations of motion for the active truss and the beams attached to it. A partial-state feedback control law is derived for this system based on a full-state feedback Linear Quadratic Regulator method. The analytical model is examined via numerical simulations and the results are compared to a similar experimental apparatus described herein. The results show that control of a flexible continua is possible with a free-free active truss.

  8. Locating damaged members in a truss structure using modal test data - A demonstration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Suzanne Weaver; Mcgowan, Paul E.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment is designed to demonstrate and verify the performance of the on-orbit assessment approach for large flexible space truss structures. The on-orbit assessment approach can be accomplished, in principle, with dynamic response information, structural identification methods, and model correlation techniques which produce an adjusted mathematical model. An optimal update of the structure model is formed using the response data, then examined to locate damaged members. The experiment uses a laboratory scale model truss structure which exhibits characteristics expected for large space truss structures. Vibration experiments are performed to generate response data for the damaged truss. The damage location approach is described, as well as analytical work performed in support of the vibration tests, the measured response of the test article, and some preliminary results.

  9. Locating Damaged Members in a Truss Structure Using Modal Test Data: a Demonstration Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Suzanne Weaver; Mcgowan, Paul E.

    1989-01-01

    On-orbit assessment of large flexible space truss structures can be accomplished, in principle, with dynamic response information, structural identification methods, and model correlation techniques which produce an adjusted mathematical model. In a previously developed approach for damage location, an optimal update of the structure model is formed using the response data, then examined to locate damaged members. An experiment designed to demonstrate and verify the performance of the on-orbit assessment approach uses a laboratory scale model truss structure which exhibits characteristics expected for large space truss structures. Vibration experiments were performed to generate response data for the damaged truss. The damage location approach, analytical work performed in support of the vibration tests, the measured response of the test article, and some preliminary results are described.

  10. Graphite composite truss welding and cap section forming subsystems. Volume 2: Program results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The technology required to develop a beam builder which automatically fabricates long, continuous, lightweight, triangular truss members in space from graphite/thermoplastics composite materials is described. Objectives are: (1) continue the development of forming and welding methods for graphite/thermoplastic (GR/TP) composite material; (2) continue GR/TP materials technology development; and (3) fabricate and structurally test a lightweight truss segment.

  11. Strip antenna figure errors due to support truss member length imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greschik, Gyula; Mikular, Martin M.; Helms, Richard G.; Freeland, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    The dependence of strip antenna steadyy state geometric errors on member length uncertainties in the supporting truss beam is studied with the Monte carlo analysis of a representative truss design. The results, presented in a format streamlined for practical use, can guide the specification for hardware fabrication of required error tolerances (for structural properties as well as member lengths), or they can aid the prediction of antenna performance if component statistics are available.

  12. Loading mode dependent effective properties of octet-truss lattice structures using 3D-printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challapalli, Adithya

    Cellular materials, often called lattice materials, are increasingly receiving attention for their ultralight structures with high specific strength, excellent impact absorption, acoustic insulation, heat dissipation media and compact heat exchangers. In alignment with emerging additive manufacturing (AM) technology, realization of the structural applications of the lattice materials appears to be becoming faster. Considering the direction dependent material properties of the products with AM, by directionally dependent printing resolution, effective moduli of lattice structures appear to be directionally dependent. In this paper, a constitutive model of a lattice structure, which is an octet-truss with a base material having an orthotropic material property considering AM is developed. In a case study, polyjet based 3D printing material having an orthotropic property with a 9% difference in the principal direction provides difference in the axial and shear moduli in the octet-truss by 2.3 and 4.6%. Experimental validation for the effective properties of a 3D printed octet-truss is done for uniaxial tension and compression test. The theoretical value based on the micro-buckling of truss member are used to estimate the failure strength. Modulus value appears a little overestimate compared with the experiment. Finite element (FE) simulations for uniaxial compression and tension of octettruss lattice materials are conducted. New effective properties for the octet-truss lattice structure are developed considering the observed behavior of the octet-truss structure under macroscopic compression and tension trough simulations.

  13. Efficient development and processing of thermal math models of very large space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Andrew H.; Arelt, Joseph E.; Lalicata, Anthony L.

    1993-01-01

    As the spacecraft moves along the orbit, the truss members are subjected to direct and reflected solar, albedo and planetary infra-red (IR) heating rates, as well as IR heating and shadowing from other spacecraft components. This is a transient process with continuously changing heating loads and the shadowing effects. The resulting nonuniform temperature distribution may cause nonuniform thermal expansion, deflection and stress in the truss elements, truss warping and thermal distortions. There are three challenges in the thermal-structural analysis of the large truss structures. The first is the development of the thermal and structural math models, the second - model processing, and the third - the data transfer between the models. All three tasks require considerable time and computer resources to be done because of a very large number of components involved. To address these challenges a series of techniques of automated thermal math modeling and efficient processing of very large space truss structures were developed. In the process the finite element and finite difference methods are interfaced. A very substantial reduction of the quantity of computations was achieved while assuring a desired accuracy of the results. The techniques are illustrated on the thermal analysis of a segment of the Space Station main truss.

  14. Design, fabrication, and test of a graphite/epoxy metering truss. [as applied to the LST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oken, S.; Skoumal, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A graphite/epoxy metering truss as applied to the large space telescope was investigated. A full-scale truss was designed, fabricated and tested. Tests included static limit loadings, a modal survey and thermal-vacuum distortion evaluation. The most critical requirement was the demonstration of the dimensional stability provided by the graphite/epoxy truss concept. Crucial to the attainment of this objective was the ability to make very sophisticated thermal growth measurements which was provided by a seven beam laser interferometer. The design of the basic truss elements were tuned to provide the high degree of dimensional stability and stiffness required by the truss. The struts and spider assembly were fabricated with Fiberite's AS/934 and HMS/934 broadgoods. The rings utilized T300 graphite fabricate with the same materials. The predicted performance of the truss was developed using the NASTRAN program. These results showed conformance with the critical stiffness and thermal distortion requirements and correlated well with the test results.

  15. Structural Analyses of the Support Trusses for the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engines and Drop Tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.

    2006-01-01

    Finite element structural analyses were performed on the support trusses of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) engines and drop tanks to verify that the proper amount of mass was allocated for these components in the vehicle sizing model. The verification included a static stress analysis, a modal analysis, and a buckling analysis using the MSC/NASTRAN™ structural analysis software package. In addition, a crippling stress analysis was performed on the truss beams using a handbook equation. Two truss configurations were examined as possible candidates for the drop tanks truss while a baseline was examined for the engine support thrust structure. For the drop tanks trusses, results showed that both truss configurations produced similar results although one performed slightly better in buckling. In addition, it was shown that the mass allocated in the vehicle sizing model was adequate although the engine thrust structure may need to be modified slightly to increase its lateral natural frequency above the minimum requirement of 8 Hz that is specified in the Delta IV Payload Planners Guide.

  16. Implementation of local feedback controllers for vibration supression of a truss using active struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, Robert; Lim, Tae W.; Bosse, Albert; Fisher, Shalom

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of local feedback controllers for active vibration suppression of a laboratory truss referred to as the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) space truss. The NRL space truss is a 3.7 meter, 12-bay aluminum laboratory truss used as a testbed to explore smart structures technologies for future Navy spacecraft missions. To conduct real-time control and data acquisition for the implementation of controllers, a digital signal processor based system is used. Two piezoceramic active struts are employed in this experimental study. Each strut is instrumented with a force transducer and a displacement sensor. Modal strain energy computed using a refined finite element model was used to select the optimum locations of the two actuators to ensure controllability of the first two structural modes. Two local feedback controllers were designed and implemented, an integral force feedback and an integral plus double-integral force feedback. The controllers were designed independently for each active strut using classical control design techniques applied to an identified model of the system dynamics. System identification results and controller design procedure are described along with closed loop test results. The test results show up to a factor of 1/110 attenuation of the truss tip motion due to sinusoidal resonant input disturbances and up to 100 times increase in damping of the lower frequency modes of the truss.

  17. Measurement of the B(s)(0) lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B(s)(0)→D(s)(-)μ(+)νX.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Borysova, M; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Gogota, O; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kaur, M; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Savitskyi, M; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2015-02-13

    We present an updated measurement of the B(s)(0) lifetime using the semileptonic decays B(s)(0)→D(s)(-)μ(+)νX, with D(s)(-)→ϕπ(-) and ϕ→K(+)K(-) (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at √[s]=1.96  TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4  fb(-1). We find a flavor-specific lifetime τ(fs)(B(s)(0))=1.479±0.010(stat)±0.021(syst)  ps. This technique is also used to determine the B(0) lifetime using the analogous B(0)→D(-)μ(+)νX decay with D(-)→ϕπ(-) and ϕ→K(+)K(-), yielding τ(B(0))=1.534±0.019(stat)±0.021(syst)  ps. Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B(s)(0) lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio τ(fs)(B(s)(0))/τ(B(0))=0.964±0.013(stat)±0.007(syst). PMID:25723207

  18. A Revised Parallel-Sequence Galaxy Classification: Structure and Formation of S0 and Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John; Bender, R.

    2012-01-01

    We update van den Bergh's (1976, ApJ, 206, 883) parallel sequence galaxy classification in which S0 galaxies form a sequence S0a-S0b-S0c that parallels the sequence Sa-Sb-Sc of spiral galaxies. The ratio B/T of bulge to total light defines the position of a galaxy in this tuning fork diagram. Our classification makes one main improvement. We extend the S0a-S0b-S0c sequence to spheroidal (Sph) galaxies that are positioned in parallel to irregular galaxies in a similarly extended Sa-Sb-Sc-Im sequence. This provides a natural home for spheroidals, which previously were thought to be low-surface-brightness ellipticals. To motivate our juxtaposition of spheroidals and irregulars, we present photometry and bulge-disk decompositions of late-type S0s that bridge the gap between the more common S0b and Sph galaxies. We find several S0s in the Virgo cluster that have B/T <= 0.1. They are the S0cs that were missing from van den Bergh's paper. We update the structural parameter correlations of Sph, spiral and irregular, and elliptical galaxies. We show that spheroidals of increasing luminosity form a continuous sequence with the disks (but not bulges) of S0c-S0b-S0a galaxies. Remarkably, this Sph-S0-disk sequence is almost identical to that of irregular and spiral galaxies. We suggest that spheroidal galaxies are transformed, "red and dead" Scd-Im galaxies in the same way that many S0 galaxies are transformed, red and dead Sa-Sc spiral galaxies. Plausible transformation processes include ram-pressure gas stripping, gravitational harassment, and starvation by cutting off the late infall of cold gas. We suggest that many different processes act together to engineer S0 and Sph galaxies. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-0607490.

  19. Secular evolution along the sequence of S0 Hubble types through minor mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamorano, J.; Eliche-Moral, M. C.; González-García, A. C.; Gallego, J.; Balcells, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Prieto, M.

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies have argued that galaxy mergers are not important drivers for the evolution of S0's, on the basis that mergers cannot preserve the coupling between the bulge and disk scale-lengths observed in these galaxies and the lack of correlation of their ratio with the S0 Hubble type. We investigate whether the remnants resulting from collision-less N-body simulations of intermediate and minor mergers onto S0 galaxies evolve fulfilling global structural relations observed in these galaxies, or not. We show that all remnants present undisturbed S0 morphologies according to the prescriptions of specialized surveys. The dry intermediate and minor mergers induce noticeable bulge growth (S0clongrightarrowS0b and S0blongrightarrowS0a), but affect negligibly to the bulge and disk scale-lengths. Therefore, if a coupling between these two components exists prior to the merger, the encounter does not break this coupling. This fact provides a simple explanation for the observed lack of correlation between the bulge-to-disk scale-lengths ratio and the S0 Hubble type. These models prove that dry intermediate and minor mergers can induce global structural evolution within the sequence of S0 Hubble types compatible with observations, meaning that these processes should not be discarded from the evolutionary scenarios of S0's just on the basis of the strong bulge-disk coupling observed in these galaxies. This study is published in Eliche-Moral et al. (2012, A&A, in press, arXiv:1209.0782).

  20. Decreased Frequency of Strong Bars in S0 Galaxies: Evidence for Secular Evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buta, R.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Knapen, J. H.

    2010-09-01

    Using data from the Near-Infrared S0 Survey of nearby, early-type galaxies, we examine the distribution of bar strengths in S0 galaxies as compared to S0/a and Sa galaxies, and as compared to previously published bar strength data for Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey spiral galaxies. Bar strengths based on the gravitational torque method are derived from 2.2 μm Ks -band images for a statistical sample of 138 (98 S0, 40 S0/a,Sa) galaxies having a mean total blue magnitude lang BT rang <= 12.5 and generally inclined less than 65°. We find that S0 galaxies have weaker bars on average than spiral galaxies in general, even compared to their closest spiral counterparts, S0/a and Sa galaxies. The differences are significant and cannot be entirely due to uncertainties in the assumed vertical scale heights or in the assumption of constant mass-to-light ratios. Part of the difference is likely simply due to the dilution of the bar torques by the higher mass bulges seen in S0s. If spiral galaxies accrete external gas, as advocated by Bournaud & Combes, then the fewer strong bars found among S0s imply a lack of gas accretion according to this theory. If S0s are stripped former spirals, or else are evolved from former spirals due to internal secular dynamical processes which deplete the gas as well as grow the bulges, then the weaker bars and the prevalence of lenses in S0 galaxies could further indicate that bar evolution continues to proceed during and even after gas depletion.

  1. On the Sensitivity of Piezoceramics and Piezopolymers in Structural Integrity Monitoring of Large Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abatan, A. O.; Lin, M. W.; Mintz, E.

    1996-01-01

    An analytical assessment has been made of the reliability of using integrated microactuators and sensors in the form of piezoceramics and piezopolymers as joint integrity monitors in trussed systems. The concept is first implemented for a simple structure which consists of two truss members with a 45 deg lift angle joined at the apex. A piezoceramic patch (or piezopolymer film) bonded on the surface of one of the members at a location near the joint is used as a collocated actuator/sensor. The overall structural dynamic response under an excitation was modeled by finite element method. Different degrees of nodal constraints at the joints representing various degrees of joint integrity are employed. The resulting dynamic response showed distinct responses for varying joint stiffnesses. Parallel experimental work on a truss model using a multichannel data acquisition system and a digital signal analyzer confirms the results from analysis. We further studied the sensitivity of the micro-sensors to the behavior of joints of large arch truss structure. Results obtained for large trusses with many degrees of freedom indicate optimum locations of sensors for which the dynamic response signatures are distinct and distinguishable for relatively small changes in joint integrity and/or structural geometry. Computations based on finite element modeling show that locating the single actuator/sensor at the joint corresponding to the first loss of static stability appear optimal. Hence, static stability analysis of complex trusses can give us a good indication of the optimum placement of sensors for maximum response. This observation is important if few distributed sensors and actuators are available for placement in constructed facilities made from large trusses with many degrees of freedom. As an extension of this work a dynamic response signature identification technique to monitor in-service degradation of joints is under development for application to the monitoring of the

  2. Precise Truss Assembly using Commodity Parts and Low Precision Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Reishus, Dustin; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    We describe an Intelligent Precision Jigging Robot (IPJR), which allows high precision assembly of commodity parts with low-precision bonding. We present preliminary experiments in 2D that are motivated by the problem of assembling a space telescope optical bench on orbit using inexpensive, stock hardware and low-precision welding. An IPJR is a robot that acts as the precise "jigging", holding parts of a local assembly site in place while an external low precision assembly agent cuts and welds members. The prototype presented in this paper allows an assembly agent (in this case, a human using only low precision tools), to assemble a 2D truss made of wooden dowels to a precision on the order of millimeters over a span on the order of meters. We report the challenges of designing the IPJR hardware and software, analyze the error in assembly, document the test results over several experiments including a large-scale ring structure, and describe future work to implement the IPJR in 3D and with micron precision.

  3. Analysis of wing truss stresses including the effect of redundancies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, E P; Miller, R G

    1921-01-01

    Airplane wing trusses are generally designed to contain redundant members (stagger wires and external drag wires) which, according to common practice, are not taken into account in calculations, so as to simplify the stress analysis by rendering the structure statically determinate. A more accurate method, in which the redundancies are included, involves a solution by means of Castigliano's method of least work. For the purpose of demonstrating the practical application of the method of least work this report presents examples for stresses of several cases of loading worked out for a structure similar to that of the Curtiss JN-4h. Case 1 was taken as the condition of velocity of 100 miles per hour combined with the angle of attack of maximum lift. Case 1a assumed the same loading but neglected the distortion of wooden members in the least-work analysis. So little error was involved in case 1a that this simplified method was employed for each succeeding case. Case 2 assumed a diving speed of 120 miles per hour and an angle of attack of no lift. Case 3 was worked out for the conditions imposed by the sand load recommended in NACA technical note no. 6.

  4. Vertical load capacities of roof truss cross members

    PubMed Central

    Gearhart, David F.; Morsy, Mohamed Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Trusses used for roof support in coal mines are constructed of two grouted bolts installed at opposing forty-five degree angles into the roof and a cross member that ties the angled bolts together. The load on the cross member is vertical, which is transverse to the longitudinal axis, and therefore the cross member is loaded in the weakest direction. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the vertical load capacity and deflection of three different types of cross members. Single-point load tests, with the load applied in the center of the specimen and double-point load tests, with a span of 2.4 m, were conducted. For the single-point load configuration, the yield of the 25 mm solid bar cross member was nominally 98 kN of vertical load, achieved at 42 cm of deflection. For cable cross members, yield was not achieved even after 45 cm of deflection. Peak vertical loads were about 89 kN for 17 mm cables and 67 kN for the 15 mm cables. For the double-point load configurations, the 25 mm solid bar cross members yielded at 150 kN of vertical load and 25 cm of deflection. At 25 cm of deflection individual cable strands started breaking at 133 and 111 kN of vertical load for the 17 and 15 mm cable cross members respectively. PMID:27547484

  5. Precise Truss Assembly Using Commodity Parts and Low Precision Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Reishus, Dustin; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, W. R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Hardware and software design and system integration for an intelligent precision jigging robot (IPJR), which allows high precision assembly using commodity parts and low-precision bonding, is described. Preliminary 2D experiments that are motivated by the problem of assembling space telescope optical benches and very large manipulators on orbit using inexpensive, stock hardware and low-precision welding are also described. An IPJR is a robot that acts as the precise "jigging", holding parts of a local structure assembly site in place, while an external low precision assembly agent cuts and welds members. The prototype presented in this paper allows an assembly agent (for this prototype, a human using only low precision tools), to assemble a 2D truss made of wooden dowels to a precision on the order of millimeters over a span on the order of meters. The analysis of the assembly error and the results of building a square structure and a ring structure are discussed. Options for future work, to extend the IPJR paradigm to building in 3D structures at micron precision are also summarized.

  6. Modes of interconnected lattice trusses using continuum models, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    This represents a continuing systematic attempt to explore the use of continuum models--in contrast to the Finite Element Models currently universally in use--to develop feedback control laws for stability enhancement of structures, particularly large structures, for deployment in space. We shall show that for the control objective, continuum models do offer unique advantages. It must be admitted of course that developing continuum models for arbitrary structures is no easy task. In this paper we take advantage of the special nature of current Large Space Structures--typified by the NASA-LaRC Evolutionary Model which will be our main concern--which consists of interconnected orthogonal lattice trusses each with identical bays. Using an equivalent one-dimensional Timoshenko beam model, we develop an almost complete continuum model for the evolutionary structure. We do this in stages, beginning only with the main bus as flexible and then going on to make all the appendages also flexible-except for the antenna structure. Based on these models we proceed to develop formulas for mode frequencies and shapes. These are shown to be the roots of the determinant of a matrix of small dimension compared with mode calculations using Finite Element Models, even though the matrix involves transcendental functions. The formulas allow us to study asymptotic properties of the modes and how they evolve as we increase the number of bodies which are treated as flexible. The asymptotics, in fact, become simpler.

  7. Auxeticity in truss networks and the role of bending versus stretching deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmoulins, Albert; Zelhofer, Alex J.; Kochmann, Dennis M.

    2016-05-01

    Auxetic behavior (i.e., a negative value of Poisson’s ratio) has been reported for a variety of cellular networks including truss structures. Commonly, this implies that the geometric arrangement of truss members within a periodic unit cell is designed to achieve the negative Poisson effect, e.g., in the reentrant honeycomb configuration. Here, we show that elastic periodic truss lattices can be tuned to display auxeticity by controlling the ratio of bending to stretching stiffness. If the nodal stiffness (or the bending stiffness) is low compared to the stretching stiffness of individual truss members, then the lattice is expected to exhibit a positive Poisson’s ratio, showing lateral expansion upon uniaxial compression. In contrast, if the nodal or bending stiffness is high (and buckling is prevented), the lattice may reveal auxetic behavior, contracting laterally under uniaxial compression. This effect is demonstrated in two dimensions for the examples of square and triangular lattices, and it is confirmed both analytically in the limit of small strains as well as numerically for finite elastic deformation. Under large deformation, instability additionally gives rise to auxetic behavior due to truss buckling.

  8. Structural design and static analysis of a double-ring deployable truss for mesh antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Guan, Fuling; Chen, Jianjun; Zheng, Yao

    2012-12-01

    This paper addresses the structural design, the deployment control design, the static analysis and the model testing of a new double-ring deployable truss that is intended for large mesh antennas. This deployable truss is a multi-DOF (degree-of-freedom), over-constrained mechanism. Two kinds of deployable basic elements were introduced, as well as a process to synthesise the structure of the deployable truss. The geometric equations were formulated to determine the length of each strut, including the effects of the joint size. A DOF evaluation showed that the mechanism requires two active cables and requires deployment control. An open-loop control system was designed to control the rotational velocities of two motors. The structural stiffness of the truss was assessed by static analysis that considered the effects of the constraint condition and the pre-stress of the passive cables. A 4.2-metre demonstration model of an antenna was designed and fabricated. The geometry and the deployment behaviour of the double-ring truss were validated by the experiments using this model.

  9. Research on the mechanical properties of a glass fiber reinforced polymer-steel combined truss structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhao, Qilin; Li, Fei; Liu, Jinchun; Chen, Haosen

    2014-01-01

    An assembled plane truss structure used for vehicle loading is designed and manufactured. In the truss, the glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) tube and the steel joint are connected by a new technology featuring a pretightened tooth connection. The detailed description for the rod and node design is introduced in this paper, and a typical truss panel is fabricated. Under natural conditions, the short-term load test and long-term mechanical performance test for one year are performed to analyze its performance and conduct a comparative analysis for a reasonable FEM model. The study shows that the design and fabrication for the node of an assembled truss panel are convenient, safe, and reliable; because of the creep control design of the rods, not only does the short-term structural stiffness meet the design requirement but also the long-term creep deformation tends towards stability. In addition, no significant change is found in the elastic modules, so this structure can be applied in actual engineering. Although the safety factor for the strength of the composite rods is very large, it has a lightweight advantage over the steel truss for the low density of GFRP. In the FEM model, simplifying the node as a hinge connection relatively conforms to the actual status. PMID:25247203

  10. Research on the Mechanical Properties of a Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Steel Combined Truss Structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhao, Qilin; Li, Fei; Liu, Jinchun; Chen, Haosen

    2014-01-01

    An assembled plane truss structure used for vehicle loading is designed and manufactured. In the truss, the glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) tube and the steel joint are connected by a new technology featuring a pretightened tooth connection. The detailed description for the rod and node design is introduced in this paper, and a typical truss panel is fabricated. Under natural conditions, the short-term load test and long-term mechanical performance test for one year are performed to analyze its performance and conduct a comparative analysis for a reasonable FEM model. The study shows that the design and fabrication for the node of an assembled truss panel are convenient, safe, and reliable; because of the creep control design of the rods, not only does the short-term structural stiffness meet the design requirement but also the long-term creep deformation tends towards stability. In addition, no significant change is found in the elastic modules, so this structure can be applied in actual engineering. Although the safety factor for the strength of the composite rods is very large, it has a lightweight advantage over the steel truss for the low density of GFRP. In the FEM model, simplifying the node as a hinge connection relatively conforms to the actual status. PMID:25247203

  11. PaR Tensile Truss for Nuclear Decontamination and Decommissioning - 12467

    SciTech Connect

    Doebler, Gary R.

    2012-07-01

    Remote robotics and manipulators are commonly used in nuclear decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) processes. D and D robots are often deployed using rigid telescoping masts in order to apply and counteract side loads. However, for very long vertical reaches (15 meters or longer) and high lift capacities, a telescopic is usually not practical due to the large cross section and weight required to make the mast stiff and resist seismic forces. For those long vertical travel applications, PaR Systems has recently developed the Tensile Truss, a rigid, hoist-driven 'structure' that employs six independent wire rope hoists to achieve long vertical reaches. Like a mast, the Tensile Truss is typically attached to a bridge-mounted trolley and is used as a platform for robotic manipulators and other remotely operated tools. For suspended, rigid deployment of D and D tools with very long vertical reaches, the Tensile Truss can be a better alternative than a telescoping mast. Masts have length limitations that can make them impractical or unworkable as lengths increase. The Tensile Truss also has the added benefits of increased safety, ease of decontamination, superior stiffness and ability to withstand excessive side loading. A Tensile Truss system is currently being considered for D and D operations and spent fuel recovery at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. This system will deploy interchangeable tools such as underwater hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic shears and crushers, grippers and fuel grapples. (authors)

  12. Design, analysis, and testing of the Phase 1 CSI Evolutionary Model erectable truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronet, M. J.; Davis, D. A.; Kintis, D. H.; Brillhart, R. D.; Atkins, E. M.

    1992-01-01

    This report addressed the design, analysis, and testing of the erectable truss structure for the Phase 1 CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) testbed. The Phase 1 CEM testbed is the second testbed to form part of an ongoing program of focused research at NASA/LaRC in the development of Controls-Structures Integration (CSI) technology. The Phase 1 CEM contains the same overall geometry, weight, and sensor locations as the Phase 0 CEM, but is based in an integrated controller and structure design, whereby both structure and controller design variables are sized simultaneously. The Phase 1 CEM design features seven truss sections composed of struts with tailored mass and stiffness properties. A common erectable joint is used and the strut stiffness is tailored by varying the cross-sectional area. To characterize the structure, static tests were conducted on individual struts and 10-bay truss assemblies. Dynamic tests were conducted on 10-bay truss assemblies as well as the fully-assembled CEM truss. The results indicate that the static and dynamic properties of the structure are predictable, well-characterized, and within the performance requirements established during the Phase 1 CEM integrated controller/structure design analysis.

  13. Truss beam having convex-curved rods, shear web panels, and self-aligning adapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Ian M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A truss beam comprised of a plurality of joined convex-curved rods with self-aligning adapters (SAA) adhesively attached at each end of the truss beam is disclosed. Shear web panels are attached to adjacent pairs of rods, providing buckling resistance for the truss beam. The rods are disposed adjacent to each other, centered around a common longitudinal axis, and oriented so that adjacent rod ends converge to at least one virtual convergence point on the common longitudinal axis, with the rods' curvature designed to increase prevent buckling for the truss beam. Each SAA has longitudinal bores that provide self-aligning of the rods in the SAA, the self-aligning feature enabling creation of strong adhesive bonds between each SAA and the rods. In certain embodiments of the present invention, pultruded unidirectional carbon fiber rods are coupled with carbon fiber shear web panels and metal SAA(s), resulting in a lightweight, low-cost but strong truss beam that is highly resistant to buckling.

  14. Molecular gas, the interstellar medium, and star formation in S0 and Sa galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Tacconi, Linda; Kenney, Jeffrey; Margulis, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The results are presented of a survey for CO J = 1 - 0 emission from S0 and S0/a galaxies. The results show that molecular gas is abundant within some early-type disk galaxies, and that the range in the ratio of molecular gas to atomic gas mass is similar to those in other disk galaxies. In the S0 and S0/a galaxies studied, estimated rates of star formation are substantially smaller than, but efficiencies of star formation are roughly the same as, those in Sb or Sc galaxies. Although the rate of cooling of the hot, X-ray emitting gas may be close to the estimated stellar mass return rate in the sample, the star formation rate probably exceeds both by a significant factor.

  15. Formation of S0 galaxies through mergers. Bulge-disc structural coupling resulting from major mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querejeta, M.; Eliche-Moral, M. C.; Tapia, T.; Borlaff, A.; Rodríguez-Pérez, C.; Zamorano, J.; Gallego, J.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Observations reveal a strong structural coupling between bulge and disc in S0 galaxies, which seems difficult to explain if they have formed from supposedly catastrophic events such as major mergers. Aims: We face this question by quantifying the bulge-disc coupling in dissipative simulations of major and minor mergers that result in realistic S0s. Methods: We have studied the dissipative N-body binary merger simulations from the GalMer database that give rise to realistic, relaxed E/S0 and S0 remnants (67 major and 29 minor mergers). We simulate surface brightness profiles of these S0-like remnants in the K band, mimicking typical observational conditions, to perform bulge-disc decompositions analogous to those carried out in real S0s. Additional components have been included when needed. The global bulge-disc structure of these remnants has been compared with real data. Results: The S0-like remnants distribute in the B/T - re - hd parameter space consistently with real bright S0s, where B/T is the bulge-to-total luminosity ratio, re is the bulge effective radius, and hd is the disc scalelength. Major mergers can rebuild a bulge-disc coupling in the remnants after having destroyed the structures of the progenitors, whereas minor mergers directly preserve them. Remnants exhibit B/T and re/hd spanning a wide range of values, and their distribution is consistent with observations. Many remnants have bulge Sérsic indices ranging 1 S0s. Conclusions: Contrary to the popular view, mergers (and in particular, major events) can result in S0 remnants with realistically coupled bulge-disc structures in less than ~3 Gyr. The bulge-disc coupling and the presence of pseudobulges in real S0s cannot be used as an argument against the possible major-merger origin of these galaxies. Table 3 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Distributed parameter estimation for NASA Mini-Mast truss through displacement measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Shen, Ji-Yao; Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Most methods of system identification of large flexible structures by far are based on the lumped parameter approach. Because of the considerable computational burden due to the large number of unknown parameters, distributed parameter approach, which greatly decreases the number of unknowns, has being investigated. In this paper a distributed parameter model for the estimation of modal characteristics of NASA Mini-Mast truss has been formulated. Both Bernoulli-Euler beam and Timoshenko beam equations are used to characterize the lateral bending vibrations of the truss. The measurement of the lateral displacement at the tip of the truss is provided to the maximum likelihood estimator. Closed-form solutions of the partial differential equations and closed-form expressions of the sensitivity functions are derived so that the estimation algorithm is highly efficient. The resulting estimates from test data by using Timoshenko beam model are found to be comparable to those derived from finite element analysis.

  17. Structural optimization and model fabrication of a double-ring deployable antenna truss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lu; Guan, Fuling; Guest, James K.

    2014-02-01

    This paper explores the design of a new type of deployable antenna system composed of a double-ring deployable truss, prestressed cable nets, and a metallic reflector mesh. The primary novelty is the double-ring deployable truss, which is found to significantly enhance the stiffness of the entire antenna over single-ring systems with relatively low mass gain. Structural optimization was used to minimize the system mass subject to constraints on system stiffness and member section availability. Both genetic algorithms (GA) and gradient-based optimizers are employed. The optimized system results were obtained and incorporated into a 4.2-m scaled system prototype, which was then experimentally tested for dynamic properties. Practical considerations such as the maximum number of truss sides and their effects on system performances were also discussed.

  18. Design, development and mechanization of a precision deployable truss with optimized structural efficiency for spaceborne applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craighead, N. D.; Hult, T. D.; Preliasco, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A deployable mast concept which meets the weight, size and stability requirements for a feed support structure for offset antennas up to 100 meters in diameter is discussed. A triangulated truss configuration, the use of tapered tubes which exhibit a high strength-to-weight ratio, and low CTE graphite-epoxy material are seen to provide an efficient, lightweight and stable truss suitable for an antenna feed support. A low stowage ratio of 30:1 is achieved through a unique preloaded hinge located at the center of each longeron and an autonomous deployment cage with a drive mechanism. Initial analysis and proof of concept hardware validated the basic mechanism and design assumptions and provided a basis for further investigation. The concept can readily accept variations in member size and thus lends itself to optimization for other potential uses where a stiff, lightweight deployable truss is needed.

  19. A unified stochastic framework for robust topology optimization of continuum and truss-like structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. N.; Filomeno Coelho, R.; Adriaenssens, S.

    2016-02-01

    In this article, a unified framework is introduced for robust structural topology optimization for 2D and 3D continuum and truss problems. The uncertain material parameters are modelled using a spatially correlated random field which is discretized using the Karhunen-Loève expansion. The spectral stochastic finite element method is used, with a polynomial chaos expansion to propagate uncertainties in the material characteristics to the response quantities. In continuum structures, either 2D or 3D random fields are modelled across the structural domain, while representation of the material uncertainties in linear truss elements is achieved by expanding 1D random fields along the length of the elements. Several examples demonstrate the method on both 2D and 3D continuum and truss structures, showing that this common framework provides an interesting insight into robustness versus optimality for the test problems considered.

  20. Harmonic finite-element thermoelastic analysis of space frames and trusses

    SciTech Connect

    Givoli, D.; Rand, O. )

    1993-09-01

    A numerical procedure is devised for the thermoelastic analysis of three-dimensional frame- or truss-type space structures exposed to solar radiation. Thin-walled frame or truss members with cross sections of arbitrary shape are considered. Tension-compression, bending, shear, and torsional effects due to the temperature distribution induced by the solar radiation are all taken into account. The procedure proposed involves finite element discretization in the axial direction and a harmonic analysts in the circumferential direction of each member. This procedure is an extension of the one employed previously to obtain the temperature field in trusses. A multibay frame structure serves as a model to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method. The temperature, displacement, and stress fields in the frame are found in various cases. 23 refs.