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Sample records for 4355a peruvian soil-1

  1. Ultra-Low Level Plutonium Isotopes in the NIST SRM 4355A (Peruvian Soil-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Inn, Kenneth G.; LaRosa, Jerome; Nour, Svetlana; Brooks, George; LaMont, Steve; Steiner, Rob; Williams, Ross; Patton, Brad; Bostick, Debra A.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Petersen, Steven L.; Douglas, Matthew; Beals, Donna; Cadieux, James; Hall, Greg; Goldberg, Steve; Vogt, Stephan

    2009-05-31

    For more than 20 years, countries and their agencies which monitor discharge sites and storage facilities have relied on the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material (SRM) 4355 Peruvian Soil reference material. Its low fallout contamination makes it an ideal soil blank for measurements associated with terrestrial pathway to man studies. Presently, SRM 4355 is out of stock, and a new batch of the Peruvian soil is currently under development as future NIST SRM 4355A. Both environmental radioanalytical laboratories and mass spectrometry communities will benefit from this SRM. The former must assess their laboratory contamination and measurement detection limits by measurement of blank sample material. The Peruvian Soil is so low in anthropogenic radionuclides that it is a suitable virtual blank. On the other hand, mass spectrometric laboratories have high sensitivity instruments that are capable of quantitative isotopic measurements at low plutonium levels of the SRM 4355 (first Peruvian Soil SRM) that provided the mass spectrometric community with the calibration, quality control, and testing material needed for methods development, and legal defensibility. The quantification of the ultra-low plutonium content in the SRM 4355A was a considerable challenge for the mass spectrometric laboratories. Careful blank control and correction, isobaric interferences, instrument stability, peak assessment, and detection assessment were necessary. Furthermore, a systematic statistical evaluation of the measurement results and considerable discussions with the mass spectroscopy metrologists were needed to derive the certified values and uncertainties. SRM 4355A will provide the mass spectrometric community with the quality control and testing material needed for higher sensitivity methods development, and legal defensibility.

  2. Peruvian Moche Jewelry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Berniece

    1998-01-01

    Surveys the history of the pre-Columbian, Peruvian Moche art, particularly the ornamental jewelry found in Moche burial sites. Outlines a procedure for creating pins reminiscent of Moche jewelry out of paper and other inexpensive materials. Points to ways that the lesson can be combined with lessons in history and science. (DSK)

  3. Peruvian villages go solar

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, J.

    1999-12-01

    Students and faculty from an American University work with indigenous Peruvians to electrify their village and improve their quality of life. The remote village of Malvas in the Andes seems typical of many in Peru. The 500 Inca descendants have no electricity, no running water, one telephone and mud adobe houses. At a 10,000-foot (3,048 m) altitude, residents survive through subsistence farming. And this project might sound like a typical solar system installation--a system is donated, consultants install it, no one owns it and if something goes wrong, no one fixes it. The equipment ultimately helps no one and few learn from the experience. But two aspects of this project make it unique - the unusual level of communal sharing in the town and the design and installation of the solar system by students.

  4. Intestinal helminths in wild Peruvian red uakari monkeys (Cacajao calvus ucayalii) in the northeastern Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Conga, David F; Bowler, Mark; Tantalean, Manuel; Montes, Daniel; Serra-Freire, Nicolau Maués; Mayor, Pedro

    2014-04-01

    Parasites are important in the management of the health of primate populations. We examined 36 fecal samples from Peruvian red uakari monkeys (Cacajao calvus ucayalii) collected from wild animals in the northeastern Peruvian Amazon. Samples were positive for helminth infection. Nematodes egg: Strongyloididae, Trypanoxyuris sp., Spirurid, and a cestode egg were identified.

  5. Bilingual Education: An Experience in Peruvian Amazonia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Mildred L., Ed.; Davis, Patricia M., Ed.

    This book reports on an experimental bilingual education program conducted in Peru by Peruvian educators and Summer Institute of Linguistics (SIL) linguists. Sections of the book discuss: (1) the historical perspective of the program; (2) program aspects such as teacher training, goals, and curriculum; (3) what this program may contribute to the…

  6. Peruvian Rural School Construction System. SERP 71: Sierra Type.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cangiano, Miguel

    Based on cooperative action of the government and local communities, the Peruvian Rural School System (SERP 71) evolved from the necessity to reconstruct Peruvian schools of the Sierra region after the earthquake of 1970, and from Peru's new educational reform law (1970) which called for an active-dynamic pupil attitude, continuous updating of…

  7. Repeated Plasmodium vivax malaria relapses in a Peruvian sailor.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Adam P; Sanchez, Juan F; Mercado, Alejandro; Ventocilla, Julio A; Cavalcanti, Sofia; Gonzalez, Sofia; Lescano, Andres G

    2015-01-01

    Two Plasmodium vivax recurrences in a Peruvian sailor with weight above the 60 kg (cap for primaquine dosage) highlight the importance of adequate radical cure weight dosage for patient treatment and control efforts, particularly within the military. PMID:26620122

  8. Repeated Plasmodium vivax malaria relapses in a Peruvian sailor.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Adam P; Sanchez, Juan F; Mercado, Alejandro; Ventocilla, Julio A; Cavalcanti, Sofia; Gonzalez, Sofia; Lescano, Andres G

    2015-12-01

    Two Plasmodium vivax recurrences in a Peruvian sailor with weight above the 60 kg (cap for primaquine dosage) highlight the importance of adequate radical cure weight dosage for patient treatment and control efforts, particularly within the military.

  9. Series of disasters strikes Peruvian Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Jim

    A midday blaze severely damaged the Geophysical Observatory at Huancayo, Peru, high in the Andes above Lima on August 28, 1996. The fire, which started accidentally, was one of a series of misfortunes suffered by the Peruvian Geophysical Institute (IGP) in recent years.The observatory, which was built in 1919 by the Carnegie Institution of Washington, is a 4-hour drive by bus from the Pacific coast between cosmopolitan Lima and the Amazonian lowlands. From the late 1980s until 1992, the observatory was isolated from the international community due to political developments in Peru, namely the Maoist Communist insurrection known as Sendero Luminoso. The turmoil resulted in the loss of nearly all cooperative contracts with American universities for research at Huancayo. IGP did maintain a few contracts, such as one with Cornell for the Radio Observatory at Jicamarca in the northern part of the country.

  10. Geochemistry of Peruvian near-surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böning, Philipp; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen; Böttcher, Michael E.; Schnetger, Bernhard; Kriete, Cornelia; Kallmeyer, Jens; Borchers, Sven Lars

    2004-11-01

    Sixteen short sediment cores were recovered from the upper edge (UEO), within (WO) and below (BO) the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off Peru during cruise 147 of R/V Sonne. Solids were analyzed for major/trace elements, total organic carbon, total inorganic carbon, total sulfur, the stable sulfur isotope composition (δ 34S) of pyrite, and sulfate reduction rates (SRR). Pore waters were analyzed for dissolved sulfate/sulfide and δ 34S of sulfate. In all cores highest SRR were observed in the top 5 cm where pore water sulfate concentrations varied little due to resupply of sulfate by sulfide oxidation and/or diffusion of sulfate from bottom water. δ 34S of dissolved sulfate showed only minor downcore increases. Strong 32S enrichments in sedimentary pyrite (to -48‰ vs. V-CDT) are due to processes in the oxidative part of the sulfur cycle in addition to sulfate reduction. Manganese and Co are significantly depleted in Peruvian upwelling sediments most likely due to mobilization from particles settling through the OMZ, whereas release of both elements from reducing sediments only seems to occur in near-coastal sites. Cadmium, Mo and Re are exceptionally enriched in WO sediments (<600 m water depth). High Re and moderate Cd and Mo enrichments are seen in BO sediments (>600 m water depth). Re/Mo ratios indicate anoxic and suboxic conditions for WO and BO sediments, respectively. Cadmium and Mo downcore profiles suggest considerable contribution to UEO/WO sediments by a biodetrital phase, whereas Re presumably accumulates via diffusion across the sediment-water interface to precipitation depth. Uranium is distinctly enriched in WO sediments (due to sulfidic conditions) and in some BO sediments (due to phosphorites). Silver transfer to suboxic BO sediments is likely governed by diatomaceous matter input, whereas in anoxic WO sediments Ag is presumably trapped due to sulfide precipitation. Cadmium, Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Ag, and T1 predominantly accumulate via biogenic pre

  11. Rickettsial Disease in the Peruvian Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Kocher, Claudine; Morrison, Amy C; Leguia, Mariana; Loyola, Steev; Castillo, Roger M; Galvez, Hugo A; Astete, Helvio; Flores-Mendoza, Carmen; Ampuero, Julia S; Bausch, Daniel G; Halsey, Eric S; Cespedes, Manuel; Zevallos, Karine; Jiang, Ju; Richards, Allen L

    2016-07-01

    Using a large, passive, clinic-based surveillance program in Iquitos, Peru, we characterized the prevalence of rickettsial infections among undifferentiated febrile cases and obtained evidence of pathogen transmission in potential domestic reservoir contacts and their ectoparasites. Blood specimens from humans and animals were assayed for spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) and typhus group rickettsiae (TGR) by ELISA and/or PCR; ectoparasites were screened by PCR. Logistic regression was used to determine associations between patient history, demographic characteristics of participants and symptoms, clinical findings and outcome of rickettsial infection. Of the 2,054 enrolled participants, almost 2% showed evidence of seroconversion or a 4-fold rise in antibody titers specific for rickettsiae between acute and convalescent blood samples. Of 190 fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) and 60 ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) tested, 185 (97.4%) and 3 (5%), respectively, were positive for Rickettsia spp. Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis was identified in 100% and 33% of the fleas and ticks tested, respectively. Collectively, our serologic data indicates that human pathogenic SFGR are present in the Peruvian Amazon and pose a significant risk of infection to individuals exposed to wild, domestic and peri-domestic animals and their ectoparasites.

  12. Transboundary air Pollution in Peruvian Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luis, S.; Luis, C.

    2007-05-01

    Biomass burning in the tropics is an important source of pollution to the atmosphere with different and not well understood consequences to the climate and the atmospheric chemistry. Burning over Amazonia is related mainly to land use cover change. During the dry season (May to November) high amount of fires are produced in Amazonia. The resulting pollutants under some conditions could produce tropospheric ozone, which reaches long distances far from the sources, the same occurs with aerosols, both could be detected by ground and satellite measurements. The work focused on the transboundary air pollution between Brazil and Peru during the last years. In this sense, this research determines the seasonal variations and the spatial coverage of this pollution in Peruvian Amazonia. We used satellite data and ground measurements to make a detailed evaluation of the transport and production of pollutants (tropospheric ozone and aerosols) related to biomass burning in order to quantify the levels of pollution based on tropospheric ozone and aerosol index and optical depth. Also, we evaluate the climatology of fires detected by satellites. It is expected that the results will provide basic information to policy makers about possible effects of this pollution in the natural resources of Peru. Also, we will provide the scientific basis for the National Program for Prevention of Forest Fires.

  13. Pharmacogenomic assessment of Mexican and Peruvian populations

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Sharon; King, Cristi R; Van Booven, Derek J; Revollo, Jane Y; Gilman, Robert H; McLeod, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinically relevant polymorphisms often demonstrate population-specific allele frequencies. Central and South America remain largely uncategorized in the context of pharmacogenomics. Materials & methods We assessed 15 polymorphisms from 12 genes (ABCB1 3435C>T, ABCG2 Q141K, CYP1B1*3, CYP2C19*2, CYP3A4*1B, CYP3A5*3C, ERCC1 N118N, ERCC2 K751Q, GSTP1 I105V, TPMT 238G>C, TPMT 460G>A, TPMT 719A>G, TYMS TSER, UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A1 −3156G>A) in 81 Peruvian and 95 Mexican individuals. Results Six polymorphism frequencies differed significantly between the two populations: ABCB1 3435C>T, CYP1B1*3, GSTP1 I105V, TPMT 460G>A, UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A1 −3156G>A. The pattern of observed allele frequencies for all polymorphisms could not be accurately estimated from any single previously studied population. Conclusion This highlights the need to expand the scope of geographic data for use in pharmacogenomics studies. PMID:25916516

  14. Rickettsial Disease in the Peruvian Amazon Basin

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, Claudine; Morrison, Amy C.; Leguia, Mariana; Loyola, Steev; Castillo, Roger M.; Galvez, Hugo A.; Astete, Helvio; Flores-Mendoza, Carmen; Ampuero, Julia S.; Bausch, Daniel G.; Halsey, Eric S.; Cespedes, Manuel; Zevallos, Karine; Jiang, Ju; Richards, Allen L.

    2016-01-01

    Using a large, passive, clinic-based surveillance program in Iquitos, Peru, we characterized the prevalence of rickettsial infections among undifferentiated febrile cases and obtained evidence of pathogen transmission in potential domestic reservoir contacts and their ectoparasites. Blood specimens from humans and animals were assayed for spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) and typhus group rickettsiae (TGR) by ELISA and/or PCR; ectoparasites were screened by PCR. Logistic regression was used to determine associations between patient history, demographic characteristics of participants and symptoms, clinical findings and outcome of rickettsial infection. Of the 2,054 enrolled participants, almost 2% showed evidence of seroconversion or a 4-fold rise in antibody titers specific for rickettsiae between acute and convalescent blood samples. Of 190 fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) and 60 ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) tested, 185 (97.4%) and 3 (5%), respectively, were positive for Rickettsia spp. Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis was identified in 100% and 33% of the fleas and ticks tested, respectively. Collectively, our serologic data indicates that human pathogenic SFGR are present in the Peruvian Amazon and pose a significant risk of infection to individuals exposed to wild, domestic and peri-domestic animals and their ectoparasites. PMID:27416029

  15. Diagnosis of Cystic Echinococcosis, Central Peruvian Highlands

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Armando E.; Zhang, Wenbao; McManus, Donald P.; Lopera, Luis; Ninaquispe, Berenice; Garcia, Hector H.; Rodríguez, Silvia; Verastegui, Manuela; Calderon, Carmen; Pan, William K.Y.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated prevalence of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in a central Peruvian Highland district by using 4 diagnostic methods: ultrasonography for 949 persons, radiography for 829, and 2 serologic tests for 929 (2 immunoblot formats using bovine hydatid cyst fluid [IBCF] and recombinant EpC1 glutathione S-transferase [rEpC1-GST] antigens). For the IBCF and rEpC1-GST testing, prevalence of liver and pulmonary CE was 4.7% and 1.1% and seropositivity was 8.9% and 19.7%, respectively. Frequency of seropositive results for IBCF and rEpC1-GST testing was 35.7% and 16.7% (all hepatic cysts), 47.1% and 29.4% (hepatic calcifications excluded), and 22.2% and 33.3% (lung cysts), respectively. Weak immune response against lung cysts, calcified cysts, small cysts, and cysts in sites other than lung and liver might explain the poor performance of the serodiagnostic tests. We confirm that CE is highly endemic to Peru and emphasize the limited performance of available serologic assays in the field. PMID:18258119

  16. SEROEPIDEMIOLOGY OF STRONGYLOIDIASIS IN THE PERUVIAN AMAZON

    PubMed Central

    YORI, PABLO P.; KOSEK, MARGARET; GILMAN, ROBERT H.; CORDOVA, JULIANNA; BERN, CARYN; CHAVEZ, CESAR BANDA; OLORTEGUI, MARIBEL PAREDES; MONTALVAN, CARMEN; SANCHEZ, GRACIELA MEZA; WORTHEN, BEVELLE; WORTHEN, JAMES; LEUNG, FAY; ORÉ, CARLOS VIDAL

    2006-01-01

    A stool and serosurvey for Strongyloides stercoralis was conducted in a community in the Peruvian Amazon region. Strongyloidiasis stercoralis was identified in the stool of 69 (8.7%) of 792 participants. Six hundred nine sera were tested using by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 94%; 442 (72%) were positive. In multivariable logistic regression models, having S. stercoralis in stool was associated with hookworm in the same specimen (odds ratio [OR] = 4.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.02-9.79), occasionally or never wearing shoes (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.10-3.27), and increasing age (OR = 1.012 for each one-year increase, 95% CI = 1.00-1.03). Similarly, occasionally or never wearing shoes (OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.01-2.37) and increasing age (OR = 1.04 for each one-year increase, 95% CI = 1.02-1.06) were associated with an increased risk of a positive S. stercoralis ELISA result. The ELISA had a negative predictive value of 98% and is an excellent screening test for strongyloidiasis. PMID:16407351

  17. Rickettsial Disease in the Peruvian Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Kocher, Claudine; Morrison, Amy C; Leguia, Mariana; Loyola, Steev; Castillo, Roger M; Galvez, Hugo A; Astete, Helvio; Flores-Mendoza, Carmen; Ampuero, Julia S; Bausch, Daniel G; Halsey, Eric S; Cespedes, Manuel; Zevallos, Karine; Jiang, Ju; Richards, Allen L

    2016-07-01

    Using a large, passive, clinic-based surveillance program in Iquitos, Peru, we characterized the prevalence of rickettsial infections among undifferentiated febrile cases and obtained evidence of pathogen transmission in potential domestic reservoir contacts and their ectoparasites. Blood specimens from humans and animals were assayed for spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) and typhus group rickettsiae (TGR) by ELISA and/or PCR; ectoparasites were screened by PCR. Logistic regression was used to determine associations between patient history, demographic characteristics of participants and symptoms, clinical findings and outcome of rickettsial infection. Of the 2,054 enrolled participants, almost 2% showed evidence of seroconversion or a 4-fold rise in antibody titers specific for rickettsiae between acute and convalescent blood samples. Of 190 fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) and 60 ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) tested, 185 (97.4%) and 3 (5%), respectively, were positive for Rickettsia spp. Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis was identified in 100% and 33% of the fleas and ticks tested, respectively. Collectively, our serologic data indicates that human pathogenic SFGR are present in the Peruvian Amazon and pose a significant risk of infection to individuals exposed to wild, domestic and peri-domestic animals and their ectoparasites. PMID:27416029

  18. Sexual education / AIDS prevention. Peruvian schools.

    PubMed

    Caceres, C F

    1993-01-01

    An evaluation of AIDS prevention and sex education program during a 3-month period in 190 in Peruvian schools (7 controls and 7 with the program) found that the intervention, based on behavioral change models, influenced knowledge and attitudes. Knowledge of sexuality and AIDS was greater among study participants than among controls. Attitudes toward erotophobia, condoms, contraception, and people with AIDS were also different among participants. Intentions to adopt prevention-oriented behaviors were also greater among study participants. A follow-up of 250 students was conducted in order to assess actual behavior change; analysis is pending. The curriculum is easy to implement and low-cost. The intervention and evaluation were developed by researchers and planners at the Cayetano Heredia University in Lima. The curriculum emphasized empowerment, self-esteem, information, attitude change, skill development, and a supportive environment. The 14-hour program covered the following topics: 1) puberty and adolescence, 2) sexual anatomy and physiology and human sexual responses, 3) conception and pregnancy (delivery, breast feeding, and unwanted pregnancy), 4) planned parenthood and contraceptive technologies including abortion, 5) sex and gender (social and cultural aspects and sexual orientation), 6) AIDS/STDs and condom skills, and 7) personal decision making about sexual issues (assertive communication skills and self-determination). Two hours of instruction were provided for each of the 7 units. Support materials included teacher and student training manuals, charts, a sample contraceptive kit, and condoms. Teaching techniques ranged from role playing and brainstorming to collaborative study with friends, family, and community heath institutions. Teachers received special training prior to the intervention. PMID:12286360

  19. Education, work and earnings of Peruvian women.

    PubMed

    King, E M

    1996-01-01

    This study describes trends in educational attainment among women in Peru, and examines the determinants of educational attainment, labor force participation and employment, and earnings. Data were obtained from the Peruvian Living Standards Survey among a sample of 5644 women aged 20-59 years. Findings indicate that parents' educational variables had a positive and statistically significant relationship with the educational attainment of their daughters. The impact declined over time from older to younger cohorts. School reforms improved women's access to education. Education became more universal and compulsory over time. Daughters of mothers with white collar occupations had higher levels of schooling than farmers' daughters. The effects of fathers' education was larger. There was a wider gap between farmers and nonfarmers. Textbooks, teachers, and number of grades offered were the only primary school inputs that showed any clear cohort trend in their effect on years of schooling. As primary schools became more available, textbooks had a greater impact on school attainment. The impact of textbooks was larger for women than for men. The number of grades offered had a large positive effect which increased across cohorts from older to younger. Findings suggest weak effects of school reforms on women's likelihood of participating in the paid or unpaid labor force. Years of schooling had a very small and negative effect on total labor force participation. Woman's paid employment was influenced by age, education and training, household characteristics, and family's unearned income. Educational attainment had a small positive effect on participation in paid employment for younger women and no effect for older women. The average rate of return in paid employment to primary education was about 12%. Primary education had the highest rate of return. The return to job tenure was higher for younger women. PMID:12348507

  20. Layout as Political Expression: Visual Literacy and the Peruvian Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhurst, Kevin G.

    Newspaper layout and design studies ignore politics, and most studies of newspaper politics ignore visual design. News layout is generally thought to be a set of neutral, efficient practices. This study suggests that the political position of Peruvian newspapers parallels their visual presentation of terrorism. The liberal "La Republica" covered…

  1. Moral Education and Post-War Societies: The Peruvian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisancho, Susana; Reategui, Felix

    2009-01-01

    This article analyses the unique challenges and needs of moral and citizenship education in post-war Peruvian society. It assumes the explanation of the roots, the facts and the enduring negative consequences of violence as described in the final report of the Comision de la Verdad y Reconciliacion (CVR) [Truth and Reconciliation Commission]…

  2. Bioactive Compounds from Plants Used in Peruvian Traditional Medicine.

    PubMed

    Lock, Olga; Perez, Eleucy; Villar, Martha; Flores, Diana; Rojas, Rosario

    2016-03-01

    It is estimated that there are as many as 1400 plant species currently used in traditional Peruvian medicine; however, only a few have undergone scientific investigation. In this paper, we make a review of the botanical, chemical, pharmacological and clinical propierties of the most investigated Peruvian medicinal plants. The plant species selected for this review are: Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon), Croton lechleri (sangre de grado), Uncaria tomentosa/U. guianensis (uña de gato), Lepidium meyenii (maca), Physalis peruviana (aguaymanto), Minthostachys mollis (muña), Notholaena nivea (cuti-cuti), Maytenus macrocarpa (chuchuhuasi), Dracontium loretense (jergon sacha), Gentianella nitida (hercampuri), Plukenetia volubilis (sacha inchi) and Zea mays (maiz morado). For each of these plants, information about their traditional uses and current commercialization is also included. PMID:27169179

  3. Bioactive Compounds from Plants Used in Peruvian Traditional Medicine.

    PubMed

    Lock, Olga; Perez, Eleucy; Villar, Martha; Flores, Diana; Rojas, Rosario

    2016-03-01

    It is estimated that there are as many as 1400 plant species currently used in traditional Peruvian medicine; however, only a few have undergone scientific investigation. In this paper, we make a review of the botanical, chemical, pharmacological and clinical propierties of the most investigated Peruvian medicinal plants. The plant species selected for this review are: Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon), Croton lechleri (sangre de grado), Uncaria tomentosa/U. guianensis (uña de gato), Lepidium meyenii (maca), Physalis peruviana (aguaymanto), Minthostachys mollis (muña), Notholaena nivea (cuti-cuti), Maytenus macrocarpa (chuchuhuasi), Dracontium loretense (jergon sacha), Gentianella nitida (hercampuri), Plukenetia volubilis (sacha inchi) and Zea mays (maiz morado). For each of these plants, information about their traditional uses and current commercialization is also included.

  4. Clinical research training of Peruvian neurologists: a baseline assessment

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Chumbes, Gian Carlos; Montano-Torres, Silvia Margarita; Díaz-Vásquez, Alberto; Zunt, Joseph Raymond

    2010-01-01

    In Peru, despite a strong clinical research infrastructure in Lima, and Masters degree programs in epidemiology at three universities, few neurologists participate in clinical research. It was our objective to identify perceived needs and opportunities for increasing clinical research capacity and training opportunities for Peruvian neurologists. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional survey of Peruvian neurologists in Lima and Arequipa, Peru. Forty-eight neurologists completed written surveys and oral interviews. All neurologists reported interest in clinical research, but noted that lack of time and financial resources limited their ability to participate. Although most neurologists had received some training in epidemiology and research design as medical students or residents, the majority felt these topics were not adequately covered. Neurologists in Arequipa noted international funding for clinical research was uncommon outside the capital city of Lima. We concluded that clinical research is important to Peruvian neurologists. The three main barriers to increased participation in clinical research identified by neurologists were insufficient training in clinical research methodology, meager funding opportunities, and lack of dedicated time to participate in clinical research. Distance learning holds promise as a method for providing additional training in clinical research methodology, especially for neurologists who may have difficulty traveling to larger cities for additional training. PMID:21577342

  5. A preliminary study of a Peruvian diet using dietary analysis and hair mineral content as indicators.

    PubMed

    Tueller, Daniel J; Eggett, Dennis L; Parker, Tory L

    2013-11-01

    Observations among former American residents living long-term in Peru suggested that hair health improved while in Peru. To determine if a Peruvian diet correlates with hair composition, dietary intake of nutrients and mineral content of hair were measured among Peruvian and matched US residents. Selected foods from Peru were also analyzed for mineral and antioxidant content and compared with equivalent foods available in the USA. Statistically significant differences between Peruvian and US residents' hair were found for sodium (decreased in Peru, p = 0.007) and vanadium (decreased in Peru, p = 0.03). Differences in hair composition between residencies may be explained by lower dietary sodium and vanadium intake among Peruvian residents or by lower concentrations of these minerals in Peruvian drinking water. Many significant mineral differences were also identified between Peruvian foods and their US equivalents. Although no statistically significant correlations between dietary intake and hair mineral content were found, results indicate that a Peruvian diet contributes differently to hair composition than a US diet. More research is needed to elucidate the link between a Peruvian diet and specific aspects of hair health.

  6. Interculturality for Afro-Peruvians: Towards a Racially Inclusive Education in Peru

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdiviezo, Laura Alicia

    2006-01-01

    Intercultural education policy and programs in Peru emerged as a response to the right of education for marginalised indigenous populations. Under the influence of international dialogue regarding education for all, Peruvian policy has recently proposed interculturality as a guiding principle of education for all Peruvians. In this context,…

  7. Gallstone disease in Peruvian coastal natives and highland migrants

    PubMed Central

    Moro, P; Checkley, W; Gilman, R; Cabrera, L; Lescano, A; Bonilla, J; Silva, B

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—In a previous study, we found that gallstones were a common occurrence in the high altitude villages of the Peruvian Andes.
AIMS—To determine if high altitude (⩾ 1500 m) is a contributing risk factor for gallstone disease.
METHODS—We conducted a cross sectional study in a periurban community in Lima, Peru, and compared the prevalence of gallstone disease between coastal natives, highland (Sierra) natives and Sierra natives who had migrated to the coast. We also compared the prevalence rates from this study with those from a previous study conducted at high altitude. We examined 1534 subjects >15 years of age for gallstone disease. Subjects were interviewed for the presence or absence of risk factors.
RESULTS—Gallstone disease was more common in females (16.1 cases per 100, 95% CI 13.8-18.2) than in males (10.7 per 100, 95% CI 8.0-13.4). Females had a greater risk of gallstone disease, especially if they had used oral contraception and/or had four or more children. The age adjusted prevalence was not significantly different between coastal natives, Sierra migrants, and Andean villagers. The prevalence of gallstone disease was not associated with time since migration or with having native Sierra parents. After adjusting for other risk factors, Sierra natives who migrated to the coast had a lower prevalence of gallstone disease than coastal natives (odds ratio 0.74, 95% CI 0.58-0.94).
CONCLUSIONS—This study indicates that high altitude is not a positive risk factor for gallstone disease and confirms that this disease is common in Peruvians, which may be attributable to Peruvian-Indian ethnicity.


Keywords: gallstone disease; cholelithiasis; high altitude; risk factors; epidemiology; Peru PMID:10716689

  8. Seasonality in marine ecosystems: Peruvian seabirds, anchovy, and oceanographic conditions.

    PubMed

    Passuni, Giannina; Barbraud, Christophe; Chaigneau, Alexis; Demarcq, Hervé; Ledesma, Jesus; Bertrand, Arnaud; Castillo, Ramiro; Perea, Angel; Mori, Julio; Viblanc, Vincent A; Torres-MaitaA, Jose; Bertrand, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    In fluctuating environments, matching breeding timing to periods of high resource availability is crucial for the fitness of many vertebrate species, and may have major consequences on population health. Yet, our understanding of the proximate environmental cues driving seasonal breeding is limited. This is particularly the case in marine ecosystems, where key environmental factors and prey abundance and availability are seldom quantified. The Northern Humboldt Current System (NHCS) is a highly productive, low-latitude ecosystem of moderate seasonality. In this ecosystem, three tropical seabird species (the Guanay Cormorant Phalacrocorax bougainvillii, the Peruvian Booby Sula variegata, and the Peruvian Pelican Pelecanus thagus) live in sympatry and prey almost exclusively on anchovy, Engraulis ringens. From January 2003 to December 2012, we monitored 31 breeding sites along the Peruvian coast to investigate the breeding cycle of these species. We tested for relationships between breeding timing, oceanographic conditions, and prey availability using occupancy models. We found that all three seabird species exhibited seasonal breeding patterns, with marked interspecific differences. Whereas breeding mainly started during the austral winter/early spring and ended in summer/early fall, this pattern was stronger in boobies and pelicans than in cormorants. Breeding onset mainly occurred when upwelling was intense but ecosystem productivity was below its annual maxima, and when anchovy were less available and in poor physiological condition. Conversely, the abundance and availability of anchovy improved during chick rearing and peaked around the time of fledging. These results suggest that breeding timing is adjusted so that fledging may occur under optimal environmental conditions, rather than being constrained by nutritional requirements during egg laying. Adjusting breeding time so that fledglings meet optimal conditions at independence is unique compared with other

  9. Immune response to measles vaccine in Peruvian children.

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-López, N. L.; Vaisberg, A.; Kanashiro, R.; Hernández, H.; Ward, B. J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the immune response in Peruvian children following measles vaccination. METHODS: Fifty-five Peruvian children received Schwarz measles vaccine (about 10(3) plaque forming units) at about 9 months of age. Blood samples were taken before vaccination, then twice after vaccination: one sample at between 1 and 4 weeks after vaccination and the final sample 3 months post vaccination for evaluation of immune cell phenotype and lymphoproliferative responses to measles and non-measles antigens. Measles-specific antibodies were measured by plaque reduction neutralization. FINDINGS: The humoral response developed rapidly after vaccination; only 4 of the 55 children (7%) had plaque reduction neutralization titres <200 mlU/ml 3 months after vaccination. However, only 8 out of 35 children tested (23%) had lymphoproliferative responses to measles antigens 3-4 weeks after vaccination. Children with poor lymphoproliferative responses to measles antigens had readily detectable lymphoproliferative responses to other antigens. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed diffuse immune system activation at the time of vaccination in most children. The capacity to mount a lymphoproliferative response to measles antigens was associated with expression of CD45RO on CD4+ T-cells. CONCLUSION: The 55 Peruvian children had excellent antibody responses after measles vaccination, but only 23% (8 out of 35) generated detectable lymphoproliferative responses to measles antigens (compared with 55-67% in children in the industrialized world). This difference may contribute to the less than uniform success of measles vaccination programmes in the developing world. PMID:11731811

  10. Seasonality in marine ecosystems: Peruvian seabirds, anchovy, and oceanographic conditions.

    PubMed

    Passuni, Giannina; Barbraud, Christophe; Chaigneau, Alexis; Demarcq, Hervé; Ledesma, Jesus; Bertrand, Arnaud; Castillo, Ramiro; Perea, Angel; Mori, Julio; Viblanc, Vincent A; Torres-MaitaA, Jose; Bertrand, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    In fluctuating environments, matching breeding timing to periods of high resource availability is crucial for the fitness of many vertebrate species, and may have major consequences on population health. Yet, our understanding of the proximate environmental cues driving seasonal breeding is limited. This is particularly the case in marine ecosystems, where key environmental factors and prey abundance and availability are seldom quantified. The Northern Humboldt Current System (NHCS) is a highly productive, low-latitude ecosystem of moderate seasonality. In this ecosystem, three tropical seabird species (the Guanay Cormorant Phalacrocorax bougainvillii, the Peruvian Booby Sula variegata, and the Peruvian Pelican Pelecanus thagus) live in sympatry and prey almost exclusively on anchovy, Engraulis ringens. From January 2003 to December 2012, we monitored 31 breeding sites along the Peruvian coast to investigate the breeding cycle of these species. We tested for relationships between breeding timing, oceanographic conditions, and prey availability using occupancy models. We found that all three seabird species exhibited seasonal breeding patterns, with marked interspecific differences. Whereas breeding mainly started during the austral winter/early spring and ended in summer/early fall, this pattern was stronger in boobies and pelicans than in cormorants. Breeding onset mainly occurred when upwelling was intense but ecosystem productivity was below its annual maxima, and when anchovy were less available and in poor physiological condition. Conversely, the abundance and availability of anchovy improved during chick rearing and peaked around the time of fledging. These results suggest that breeding timing is adjusted so that fledging may occur under optimal environmental conditions, rather than being constrained by nutritional requirements during egg laying. Adjusting breeding time so that fledglings meet optimal conditions at independence is unique compared with other

  11. Mitochondrial genome of the Peruvian scallop Argopecten purpuratus (Bivalvia: Pectinidae).

    PubMed

    Marín, Alan; Alfaro, Rubén; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome of the Peruvian scallop Argopecten purpuratus was determined. The length of the mitochondrial coding region is 15,608 bp. A typical bivalve mitochondrial composition was detected with 12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 21 transfer RNA genes, with the absence of the atp8 gene. Fifty percent of the protein-coding genes use typical ATG start codon, whereas five genes utilize ATA as their start codon. Only one gene was found to utilize TTG as its start codon. The A. purpuratus mitogenome shows a significant similarity to that of A. irradians irradians, in length as well as in gene composition.

  12. First documented outbreak of dengue in the Peruvian Amazon region.

    PubMed

    Phillips, I; Need, J; Escamilla, J; Colán, E; Sánchez, S; Rodríguez, M; Vásquez, L; Seminario, J; Betz, T; da Rosa, A T

    1992-01-01

    This article describes a classical dengue outbreak caused by dengue serotypes 1 and 4 that occurred from March to July 1990 in the city of Iquitos and surrounding areas of Loreto Department in the Peruvian Amazon. Epidemiologic data indicate that more than 150,000 persons may have been affected in Iquitos alone. Another dengue outbreak occurred in Tarapoto, a city in the neighboring department of San Martín. Laboratory data indicate that the same dengue serotypes were involved in both outbreaks. No cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever/shock syndrome appear to have occurred. Prior to this outbreak, no indigenous dengue cases had been documented in Peru.

  13. Language, Culture, and Power: Intercultural Bilingual Education among the Urarina of Peruvian Amazonia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Bartholomew

    1999-01-01

    The Peruvian national indigenous federation established a bilingual, intercultural teachers' training program to counter stereotypes of indigenous people portrayed in the authoritarian, monolingual Spanish national curriculum, and to enhance language preservation, ethnic mobilization, and cultural survival. A complementary transitional bilingual…

  14. Two Words of Chinese Origin in Present-Day Peruvian Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, James F.

    1977-01-01

    The origin, etymology and phonology of two words of Chinese origin found in Peruvian Spanish are outlined. The words, "chifa" and "chaufa," derive from Cantonese words for "rice" and have been adapted into Spanish. (CHK)

  15. [Blood lead in the inhabitants of 4 Peruvian localities].

    PubMed

    Ramírez, A V; Paucar, J C; Medina, J M

    1997-05-01

    During 1994 and 1995, a cross-sectional study was carried out to investigate the concentrations of lead in the blood of inhabitants of four Peruvian cities (Lima, Huancayo, La Oroya, and Yaupi) with different population densities and degrees of industrial development. In a random sample of 180 men and 180 women without occupational exposure to lead, blood lead levels were measured by the atomic absorption method with a Perkin Elmer 603 spectrophotometer without a graphite oven. The results revealed blood lead concentrations of 269 +/- 63 micrograms per liter (micrograms/L) in Lima, 224 +/- 47 micrograms/L in Huancayo; 348 +/- 40 micrograms/L in La Oroya, and 140 +/- 27 micrograms/L in Yaupi. It was concluded that blood lead levels in the inhabitants of these cities were related to the degree of industrialization and the population density of each locality. PMID:9377649

  16. Paleozoic diamictites in the Peruvian Altiplano: evidence and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Martínez, Enrique; Acosta, Harmuth; Cardenas, José; Carlotto, Víctor; Rodríguez, Rildo

    2001-11-01

    Striated and faceted clasts found within the diamictites of the San Gabán Formation immediately north of Ayaviri (southeast Peru) are interpreted as evidence for the late Ashgill-Llandovery glaciations in the Peruvian Altiplano, an area where this unit was previously considered not to be deposited. The Lower Paleozoic stratigraphic sequence cropping out in the area includes the Sandia, San Gabán, and Ananea Formations, and thus belongs to the Eastern Cordillera tectonostratigraphic domain, but within the Altiplano morphotectonic region. The marked difference between the Lower Paleozoic sequences of the Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera tectonostratigraphic domains suggests important tectonic shortening along the boundary fault zone during Andean Cenozoic deformation.

  17. Elevated atmospheric sulfur levels off the Peruvian coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltzman, E. S.; Savoie, D. L.; Prospero, J. M.; Zika, R. G.; Mosher, B.

    1986-06-01

    Elevated levels of non-sea-salt sulfate and SO2 in samples collected off the west coast of South America indicate that there is a major source of atmospheric sulfur in the region of southern Peru and northern Chile. During a 1983 cruise, observed concentrations of non-sea-salt sulfur, SO2, selenium, arsenic, and antimony were comparable to levels reported for moderately polluted urban air. In contrast, methanesulfonic acid levels were typical of coastal marine air. Clearly, the elevated atmospheric sulfur levels in this region cannot be ascribed to oceanic organosulfur emissions. The major inputs are tentatively attributed to the smelting of sulfide ores which is a major industry in this region. The transport of smelter derived aerosols to this region may have a number of consequences for the atmospheric and oceanic chemistry of the Peruvian upwelling area.

  18. Compositional characterization of native Peruvian chili peppers (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Meckelmann, Sven W; Riegel, Dieter W; van Zonneveld, Maarten J; Ríos, Llermé; Peña, Karla; Ugas, Roberto; Quinonez, Lourdes; Mueller-Seitz, Erika; Petz, Michael

    2013-03-13

    The national Capsicum germplasm bank of Peru at INIA holds a unique collection of more than 700 Capsicum accessions, including many landraces. These conserved accessions have never been thoroughly characterized or evaluated. Another smaller collection exists at UNALM, and CIDRA provided taxonomically characterized fruits from the Amazon region of Ucayali. Of these collections, 147 accessions have been selected to represent the biodiversity of Peruvian Capsicum annuum , Capsicum baccatum , Capsicum chinense , and Capsicum frutescens by morphological traits as well as by agronomic characteristics and regional origin. All fruits from the selected accessions have been oven-dried and ground in Peru and analyzed in Germany. Results are reported for each accession by total capsaicinoids and capsaicinoid pattern, total polyphenol content, antioxidant capacity, specific flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol, luteolin, apigenin), fat content, vitamin C, surface color, and extractable color. A wide variability in phytochemical composition and concentration levels was found.

  19. The Peruvian diaspora: portrait of a migratory process.

    PubMed

    Durand, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1980s and especially the 1990s, Peru has become a nation of emigrants. Emigration has become massive over the past two decades, and the Peruvian populations of the United States, Japan, and Spain have tripled in less than a decade. A survey of households in five localities, three urban and two rural, in and around Lima helps to reveal the special character of this emigration. It tends to involve older and better-educated individuals than are typical of international migration and to target a wider variety of destinations. Moreover, it is a multiclass phenomenon. The economic, political, and social crisis brought about by a change in the economic model, two decades of terrorism, and a succession of failed democratic administrations has affected the society as a whole, and international migration seems to operate as an escape valve.

  20. Paleoindian settlement of the high-altitude Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Rademaker, Kurt; Hodgins, Gregory; Moore, Katherine; Zarrillo, Sonia; Miller, Christopher; Bromley, Gordon R M; Leach, Peter; Reid, David A; Álvarez, Willy Yépez; Sandweiss, Daniel H

    2014-10-24

    Study of human adaptation to extreme environments is important for understanding our cultural and genetic capacity for survival. The Pucuncho Basin in the southern Peruvian Andes contains the highest-altitude Pleistocene archaeological sites yet identified in the world, about 900 meters above confidently dated contemporary sites. The Pucuncho workshop site [4355 meters above sea level (masl)] includes two fishtail projectile points, which date to about 12.8 to 11.5 thousand years ago (ka). Cuncaicha rock shelter (4480 masl) has a robust, well-preserved, and well-dated occupation sequence spanning the past 12.4 thousand years (ky), with 21 dates older than 11.5 ka. Our results demonstrate that despite cold temperatures and low-oxygen conditions, hunter-gatherers colonized extreme high-altitude Andean environments in the Terminal Pleistocene, within about 2 ky of the initial entry of humans to South America. PMID:25342802

  1. Compositional characterization of native Peruvian chili peppers (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Meckelmann, Sven W; Riegel, Dieter W; van Zonneveld, Maarten J; Ríos, Llermé; Peña, Karla; Ugas, Roberto; Quinonez, Lourdes; Mueller-Seitz, Erika; Petz, Michael

    2013-03-13

    The national Capsicum germplasm bank of Peru at INIA holds a unique collection of more than 700 Capsicum accessions, including many landraces. These conserved accessions have never been thoroughly characterized or evaluated. Another smaller collection exists at UNALM, and CIDRA provided taxonomically characterized fruits from the Amazon region of Ucayali. Of these collections, 147 accessions have been selected to represent the biodiversity of Peruvian Capsicum annuum , Capsicum baccatum , Capsicum chinense , and Capsicum frutescens by morphological traits as well as by agronomic characteristics and regional origin. All fruits from the selected accessions have been oven-dried and ground in Peru and analyzed in Germany. Results are reported for each accession by total capsaicinoids and capsaicinoid pattern, total polyphenol content, antioxidant capacity, specific flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol, luteolin, apigenin), fat content, vitamin C, surface color, and extractable color. A wide variability in phytochemical composition and concentration levels was found. PMID:23410113

  2. Logging Concessions Enable Illegal Logging Crisis in the Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N.; Sky, Melissa A. Blue; Pine, Justin

    2014-04-01

    The Peruvian Amazon is an important arena in global efforts to promote sustainable logging in the tropics. Despite recent efforts to achieve sustainability, such as provisions in the US-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement, illegal logging continues to plague the region. We present evidence that Peru's legal logging concession system is enabling the widespread illegal logging via the regulatory documents designed to ensure sustainable logging. Analyzing official government data, we found that 68.3% of all concessions supervised by authorities were suspected of major violations. Of the 609 total concessions, nearly 30% have been cancelled for violations and we expect this percentage to increase as investigations continue. Moreover, the nature of the violations indicate that the permits associated with legal concessions are used to harvest trees in unauthorized areas, thus threatening all forested areas. Many of the violations pertain to the illegal extraction of CITES-listed timber species outside authorized areas. These findings highlight the need for additional reforms.

  3. Developmental Effects Determine Submaximal Arterial Oxygen Saturation in Peruvian Quechua

    PubMed Central

    León-Velarde, Fabiola; Rivera-Chira, María; Elías, Gianpietro; Brutsaert, Tom D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Kiyamu, Melisa, Fabiola León-Velarde, María Rivera-Chira, Gianpietro Elías, and Tom D. Brutsaert. Developmental effects determine submaximal arterial oxygen saturation in Peruvian Quechua. High Alt Med Biol 16, 138–146, 2015.—Andean high altitude natives show higher arterial oxygen saturation (Sao2) during exercise in hypoxia, compared to acclimatized sojourners. In order to evaluate the effects of life-long exposure to high altitude on Sao2, we studied two groups of well-matched, self-identified Peruvian Quechua natives who differed in their developmental exposure to hypoxia before and after a 2-month training period. Male and female volunteers (18–35 years) were recruited in Lima, Peru (150 m). The two groups were: a) Individuals who were born and raised at sea-level (BSL, n=34) and b) Individuals who were born and raised at high altitude (BHA, n=32), but who migrated to sea-level as adults (>16 years old). Exercise testing was conducted using a submaximal exercise protocol in normobaric hypoxia in Lima (BP=750 mmHg, Fio2=0.12), in order to measure Sao2 (%), ventilation (VE L/min) and oxygen consumption (Vo2, L/min). Repeated-measures ANOVA, controlling for VE/VO2 (L/min) and sex during the submaximal protocol showed that BHA maintained higher Sao2 (%) compared to BSL at all workloads before (p=0.005) and after training (p=0.017). As expected, both groups showed a decrease in Sao2 (%) (p<0.001), as workload increased. Resting Sao2 levels were not found to be different between groups. The results suggest that developmental exposure to altitude contributes to the maintenance of higher Sao2 levels during submaximal exercise at hypoxia. PMID:25977978

  4. Benthic phosphorus cycling in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomnitz, U.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Löscher, C. R.; Noffke, A.; Wallmann, K.; Hensen, C.

    2015-10-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) that impinge on continental margins favor the release of phosphorus (P) from the sediments to the water column, enhancing primary productivity and the maintenance or expansion of low-oxygen waters. A comprehensive field program in the Peruvian OMZ was undertaken to identify the sources of benthic P, including the analysis of particles from the water column, surface sediments and pore fluids as well as in situ benthic flux measurements. A major fraction of solid phase P was bound as particulate inorganic P (PIP) both in the water column and in sediments. Sedimentary PIP increased with depth in the sediment at the expense of particulate organic P (POP). The ratio of particulate organic carbon (POC) to POP exceeded the Redfield Ratio both in the water column (202 ± 29) and in surface sediments (303 ± 77). However, the POC to total particulate P (TPP = POP + PIP) ratio was close to Redfield in the water column (103 ± 9) and in sediment samples (102 ± 15) taken from the core of the OMZ. This observation suggests that the burial efficiencies of POC and TPP are similar under the low oxygen conditions prevailing in the Peruvian OMZ. Benthic fluxes of dissolved P were extremely high (up to 1.04 ± 0.31 mmol m-2 d-1) and exceeded the fluxes resulting from the degradation of particulate organic matter raining to the seabed. Most of the excess P may have been released by bacterial mats that had stored P during previous periods when bottom waters were less reducing. At one station located at the lower rim of the OMZ, dissolved P was taken up by the sediments indicating recent phosphorite formation.

  5. Developmental Effects Determine Submaximal Arterial Oxygen Saturation in Peruvian Quechua.

    PubMed

    Kiyamu, Melisa; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Rivera-Chira, María; Elías, Gianpietro; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2015-06-01

    Kiyamu, Melisa, Fabiola León-Velarde, María Rivera-Chira, Gianpietro Elías, and Tom D. Brutsaert. Developmental effects determine submaximal arterial oxygen saturation in Peruvian Quechua. High Alt Med Biol 16, 138-146, 2015.--Andean high altitude natives show higher arterial oxygen saturation (Sao(2)) during exercise in hypoxia, compared to acclimatized sojourners. In order to evaluate the effects of life-long exposure to high altitude on Sao(2), we studied two groups of well-matched, self-identified Peruvian Quechua natives who differed in their developmental exposure to hypoxia before and after a 2-month training period. Male and female volunteers (18-35 years) were recruited in Lima, Peru (150 m). The two groups were: a) Individuals who were born and raised at sea-level (BSL, n=34) and b) Individuals who were born and raised at high altitude (BHA, n=32), but who migrated to sea-level as adults (>16 years old). Exercise testing was conducted using a submaximal exercise protocol in normobaric hypoxia in Lima (BP=750 mmHg, Fio(2)=0.12), in order to measure Sao(2) (%), ventilation (VE L/min) and oxygen consumption (Vo(2), L/min). Repeated-measures ANOVA, controlling for VE/VO(2) (L/min) and sex during the submaximal protocol showed that BHA maintained higher Sao(2) (%) compared to BSL at all workloads before (p=0.005) and after training (p=0.017). As expected, both groups showed a decrease in Sao(2) (%) (p<0.001), as workload increased. Resting Sao(2) levels were not found to be different between groups. The results suggest that developmental exposure to altitude contributes to the maintenance of higher Sao(2) levels during submaximal exercise at hypoxia. PMID:25977978

  6. Education and the community in the Peruvian educational reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malpica, Carlos

    1980-09-01

    The reform of Peruvian education initiated in 1972 was based on new concepts, postulated new policies and proposed to convert the old school system into a new educational system in accordance with the revolutionary process begun in 1968. The principles of permanent education, education in the community and the educating community inspired an ambitious educational model on a national scale, to organise community education nuclei (NECs) of a local dimension, in which a dynamic social education of a participatory and self-managerial character could be created. This process of nuclearisation, which has historical antecedents going back to the social, economic and political organisation of the Incan Empire, and was revived in the twentieth century by the creation of the famous Warisata School in Bolivia, has now undergone nine years of valuable experience in Peru, attempting to develop an efficient alternative to the old school model which originated before the Christian era. The community/education dialectic has suffered a profound change in Peru in the last ten years and the experience, whether of obstacles and limitations, appears to be valuable and irreversible. The non-statist, non-bureaucratic, non-party and non-private solution that was pursued by the Peruvian Revolution in the field of education is very attractive and could interest other countries of the region which, during the last 30 years have applied the nuclearisation model, as well as other countries in Latin America or other regions who have recently either initiated or considered it. This article presents the experience, relates it to its historical antecedents, gives some information on evaluation studies in progress and traces some perspectives or projections for educational nuclearisation.

  7. Antileishmanial, antitrypanosomal, and cytotoxic screening of ethnopharmacologically selected Peruvian plants.

    PubMed

    González-Coloma, Azucena; Reina, Matías; Sáenz, Claudia; Lacret, Rodney; Ruiz-Mesia, Lastenia; Arán, Vicente J; Sanz, Jesús; Martínez-Díaz, Rafael A

    2012-04-01

    Extracts (34) from eight plant species of the Peruvian Amazonia currently used in traditional Peruvian medicine, mostly as antileishmanial remedies and also as painkiller, antiseptic, antipyretic, anti-inflamatory, antiflu, astringent, diuretic, antipoison, anticancerous, antiparasitic, insecticidal, or healing agents, have been tested for their antileishmanial, antitrypanosomal, and cytotoxic activity. Plant species were selected based on interviews conducted with residents of rural areas. The different plant parts were dried, powdered, and extracted by maceration with different solvents (hexane, chloroform, and 70% ethanol-water). These extracts were tested on promastigote forms of Leishmania infantum strain PB75, epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi strain Y, and the mammalian CHO cell line. Parasite viability and nonspecific cytotoxicity were analyzed by a modified MTT colorimetric assay method. The isolation and identification of pure compounds from selected extracts were performed by column chromatography, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS; mixtures), spectroscopic techniques [MS, infrared (IR), ultraviolet (UV)], and mono and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR; COSY, HSQC, NOESY) experiments. Chondodendron tomentosum bark and Cedrela odorata were the most active extracts against Leishmania, while C. odorata and Aristoloquia pilosa were the most active against Trypanosoma, followed by Tabebuia serratifolia, Tradescantia zebrina, and Zamia ulei. Six compounds and two mixtures were isolated from Z. ulei [cycasin (1)], T. serratifolia {mixtures 1-2, and naphthoquinones 2-acetyl-4H,9H-naphtho[2,3-b]furan-4,9-dione (2) and 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)-4H,9H-naphtho[2,3-b]furan-4,9-dione (3)}, and C. tomentosum [chondrocurine (4); (S,S')-12-O-methyl(+)-curine (5); and cycleanine (6)]. Four compounds and the two mixtures exhibited significant activity.

  8. Peruvian Maca (Lepidium peruvianum): (I) Phytochemical and Genetic Differences in Three Maca Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Henry O; Mscisz, Alina; Mrozikiewicz, Mieczyslaw; Baraniak, Marek; Mielcarek, Sebastian; Kedzia, Bogdan; Piatkowska, Ewa; Jólkowska, Justyna; Pisulewski, Pawel

    2015-09-01

    Glucosinolates were previously reported as physiologically-important constituents present in Peruvian Maca (Lepidium peruvianum Chacon) and linked to various therapeutic functions of differently-colored Peruvian Maca hypocotyls. In two separate Trials, three colours of Maca hypocotyls "Black", "Red" and "Yellow" (termed "Maca phenotypes"), were selected from mixed crops of Peruvian Maca for laboratory studies as fresh and after being dried. Individual Maca phenotypes were cultivated in the highlands of the Peruvian Andes at 4,200m a.s.l. (Junin and Ninacaca). Glucosinolate levels, chromatographic HPLC profiles and DNA variability in the investigated Maca phenotypes are presented. Genotypic profiles were determined by the ISSR-PCR and RAPD techniques. Compared to the Black and Red phenotypes, the Yellow phenotype contained much lower Glucosinolate levels measured against Glucotropaeolin and m-methoxy-glucotropaeolin standards, and exhibited different RAPD and ISSR-PCR reactions. The Red Maca phenotype showed the highest concentrations of Glucosinolates as compared to the Black and Yellow Maca. It appears that the traditional system used by natives of the Peruvian Andean highlands in preparing Maca as a vegetable dish (boiling dried Maca after soaking in water), to supplement their daily meals, is as effective as laboratory methods - for extracting Glucosinolates, which are considered to be one of the key bioactive constituents responsible for therapeutic functions of Peruvian Maca phenotypes. It is reasonable to assume that the HPLC and DNA techniques combined, or separately, may assist in determining ID and "Fingerprints" identifying individual Peruvian Maca phenotypes, hence confirming the authenticity of marketable Maca products. The above assumptions warrant further laboratory testing. PMID:26508907

  9. Peruvian Maca (Lepidium peruvianum): (I) Phytochemical and Genetic Differences in Three Maca Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Henry O.; Mscisz, Alina; Mrozikiewicz, Mieczyslaw; Baraniak, Marek; Mielcarek, Sebastian; Kedzia, Bogdan; Piatkowska, Ewa; Jólkowska, Justyna; Pisulewski, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Glucosinolates were previously reported as physiologically-important constituents present in Peruvian Maca (Lepidium peruvianum Chacon) and linked to various therapeutic functions of differently-colored Peruvian Maca hypocotyls. In two separate Trials, three colours of Maca hypocotyls “Black”, “Red” and “Yellow” (termed “Maca phenotypes”), were selected from mixed crops of Peruvian Maca for laboratory studies as fresh and after being dried. Individual Maca phenotypes were cultivated in the highlands of the Peruvian Andes at 4,200m a.s.l. (Junin and Ninacaca). Glucosinolate levels, chromatographic HPLC profiles and DNA variability in the investigated Maca phenotypes are presented. Genotypic profiles were determined by the ISSR-PCR and RAPD techniques. Compared to the Black and Red phenotypes, the Yellow phenotype contained much lower Glucosinolate levels measured against Glucotropaeolin and m-methoxy-glucotropaeolin standards, and exhibited different RAPD and ISSR-PCR reactions. The Red Maca phenotype showed the highest concentrations of Glucosinolates as compared to the Black and Yellow Maca. It appears that the traditional system used by natives of the Peruvian Andean highlands in preparing Maca as a vegetable dish (boiling dried Maca after soaking in water), to supplement their daily meals, is as effective as laboratory methods - for extracting Glucosinolates, which are considered to be one of the key bioactive constituents responsible for therapeutic functions of Peruvian Maca phenotypes. It is reasonable to assume that the HPLC and DNA techniques combined, or separately, may assist in determining ID and “Fingerprints” identifying individual Peruvian Maca phenotypes, hence confirming the authenticity of marketable Maca products. The above assumptions warrant further laboratory testing. PMID:26508907

  10. Late Cenozoic Exhumation in the Northern Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, M.; Hall, S. R.; Farber, D.; Hourigan, J. K.

    2011-12-01

    Orogens represent first-order morphological manifestations of the dynamical forces that drive plate tectonics. Despite advances in techniques that quantify geologic processes, understanding these processes at a continental scale remains challenging. The South American Andes are an example of a long-lived, morphologically and tectonically segmented orogen. The Northern Peruvian Andes are characterized by flat slab subduction and a relatively narrow section of high topography, in contrast to the central Andes, which contain the broad Altiplano-Puna plateau and normal-angle subduction. Current models of Andean orogenesis suggest that most of the high topography evolved recently beginning about 10-20Ma. Recent data from the Central Andes further suggest that this uplift occurred rapidly from ~6-10Ma. However, as many of these data are from the central Andean region, they may not be directly applicable to the entire Andean chain. Therefore, it is critical to investigate areas outside of the central Andean region using similar techniques to test the applicability of these models elsewhere in the Andes. Here, we use low-temperature thermochronology to characterize the shallow crustal cooling history from four sites in the northern Peruvian Andes, across three degrees of latitude (5°S to 8°S). By using both apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometers we are able to record rates of crustal exhumation as well as temporal and spatial accelerations and decelerations of exhumation. In contrast to previous studies based on stratigraphical, structural and sedimentological relationships, our preliminary results show no significant exhumation until the Miocene in the Eastern Cordillera of Northern Peru. In general, our results indicate slow exhumation (<0.01 mm/yr) during the Mesozoic and early Cenozoic and record an acceleration of exhumation in the late Miocene to the present, to rates of 0.2-0.5 mm/yr. This regional acceleration signal occurs in field sites in the north (5

  11. Epidemiology of Echinococcus granulosus infection in the central Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed Central

    Moro, P. L.; McDonald, J.; Gilman, R. H.; Silva, B.; Verastegui, M.; Malqui, V.; Lescano, G.; Falcon, N.; Montes, G.; Bazalar, H.

    1997-01-01

    The prevalence of human, canine, and ovine echinococcosis was determined in an endemic area of the Peruvian Andes where control programmes have not been operational since 1980. Prevalence of infection in humans was determined using portable ultrasound, chest X-rays, and an enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) assay. Canine and ovine echinococcal prevalence was determined by microscopic stool examinations following arecoline purging for tapeworm detection and by examination of the viscera from slaughtered livestock animals, respectively. The prevalence among 407 humans surveyed was 9.1%. The frequency of disease in the liver, lung, and in both organs was 3.4%, 2.0%, and 0.2%, respectively. Portable ultrasound or portable chest X-ray has shown that, compared to adults, children under 11 years had significantly higher seropositive rates without evidence of hydatid disease (P < 0.05). Among the 104 dogs inspected for echinococcus after arecoline purging, 33 (32%) were positive for adult tapeworms. Among the 117 sheep slaughtered at the local abattoir, 102 (87%) had hydatid cysts. The prevalence of human hydatidosis in this endemic area of Peru is one of the highest in the world and nearly five times higher than previously reported in 1980. An increase in echinococcosis prevalence may result after premature cessation of control programmes. PMID:9509628

  12. Poverty, health infrastructure and the nutrition of Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, Martín

    2004-12-01

    This paper offers empirical evidence on the impact of the expansion in health infrastructure of the 1990s upon child nutrition in Peru, as measured by the height for age z-score. Using a pooled sample of three rounds of the Peruvian DHS, I have controlled for biases in the allocation of public investments by using a district fixed effects model. The econometric analysis shows a positive effect of the expansion of the last decade in urban areas, but not in rural areas. Furthermore, the effect for urban children is highly non-linear and has a pro-poor bias, in the sense that the estimated effect is larger for children of less educated mothers. These findings support the idea that reducing distance and waiting time barriers is necessary to improve child health and nutrition in developing countries, but that we need more explicitly inclusive policies to improve the health of the rural poor, especially indigenous groups, that are caught in this type of poverty trap. PMID:15576249

  13. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB) control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Methods Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Results Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. Conclusions The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings. PMID:20875140

  14. Epidemiology of Taeniasis and Cysticercosis in a Peruvian Village

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, F.; Garcia, H. H.; Gilman, R. H.; Gonzales, A. E.; Castro, M.; Tsang, V. C. W.; Pilcher, J. B.; Vasquez, L. E.; Lescano, M.; Carcamo, C.; Madico, G.; Miranda, E.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of cysticercosis in a rural area where the disease is endemic, the authors studied the seroepidemiology of human and porcine cysticercosis in a Peruvian jungle community (Maceda, Peru) in 1988 using an enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) assay. Of the 371 sampled inhabitants, 30 (8%) were seropositive, most of whom were asymptomatic. After niclosamide therapy, four Taenia species worms were identified in the seropositive group, compared with one in the control group (p = 0.06). Pigs were frequently infected: 44 of 133 (33%) were found positive for Taenia by tongue examination and 57 of 133 (43%) were positive by EITB. In 69% of the sampled households that had pigs, there was at least one seropositive pig. The number of pigs diagnosed positive by the tongue examination was significantly greater in households that had latrines than in those that did not. Cysticercosis is a common but usually asymptomatic infection that affects both humans and pigs in the high jungle areas of Peru. PMID:1585900

  15. Meteorological constraints on oceanic halocarbons above the Peruvian Upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhlbrügge, S.; Quack, B.; Atlas, E.; Fiehn, A.; Hepach, H.; Krüger, K.

    2015-07-01

    Halogenated very short lived substances (VSLS) are naturally produced in the ocean and emitted to the atmosphere. Recently, oceanic upwelling regions in the tropical East Atlantic were identified as strong sources of brominated halocarbons to the atmosphere. During a cruise of R/V METEOR in December 2012 the oceanic sources and emissions of various halogenated trace gases and their mixing ratios in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) were investigated above the Peruvian Upwelling for the first time. This study presents novel observations of the three VSLS bromoform, dibromomethane and methyl iodide together with high resolution meteorological measurements and Lagrangian transport modelling. Although relatively low oceanic emissions were observed, except for methyl iodide, surface atmospheric abundances were elevated. Radiosonde launches during the cruise revealed a low, stable MABL and a distinct trade inversion above acting both as strong barriers for convection and trace gas transport in this region. Significant correlations between observed atmospheric VSLS abundances, sea surface temperature, relative humidity and MABL height were found. We used a simple source-loss estimate to identify the contribution of oceanic emissions to observed atmospheric concentrations which revealed that the observed marine VSLS abundances were dominated by horizontal advection below the trade inversion. The observed VSLS variations can be explained by the low emissions and their accumulation under different MABL and trade inversion conditions. This study confirms the importance of oceanic upwelling and trade wind systems on creating effective transport barriers in the lower atmosphere controlling the distribution of VSLS abundances above ocean upwelling regions.

  16. Dermatoglyphics of a high altitude Peruvian population and interpopulation comparisons.

    PubMed

    Baca, O R; Del Valle Mendoza, L; Guerrero, N A

    2001-01-01

    Studies of genetic structures of Andean human populations have not been numerous, even though these studies could be used to answer questions concerning migration routes of the indigenous peoples who populated America. Such studies could provide basic genetic information and clarify uncertainties surrounding genetic relatedness of South American indigenous peoples. This present work describes, quantifies, and analyzes the digital and palmar dermatoglyphics of 120 people in the community of San Pedro de Casta, Perú. The results were then compared using distance analysis to all other Peruvian population values studied to date and other South American populations. The dermatoglyphic indicators studied were the distribution of digital pattern frequencies, the total ridge counts (TRC), the pattern intensity index (PII), the atd angle, and the a-b ridge counts. The results did not show statistically significant differences for digital patterns between hands, neither within a sex nor between sexes. The means and standard deviations of PII and TRC were 12.32 +/- 3.97 and 112.18 +/- 45.09, respectively. The means and standard deviations for the other two indicators were the following: atd angle, 94.85 degrees +/- 12.33; and a-b ridge counts, 81.57 +/- 9.06. The distance analyses results suggest the existence of two different genetic lines among high altitude populations, as well as the need for further research.

  17. Helminthiasis and cultural change in the Peruvian rainforest.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, A; Schulz, S; Witte, B; Skewes-Ramm, R; Etzler, A

    1992-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the impact of cultural and ecological change on intestinal helminth infections in traditional indigenous communities in the Peruvian rainforest and to identify the ways of transmission of helminth eggs. A remote indigenous settlement was compared with a more developed mestizo town. Stool specimens as well as soil, dust, air and water were examined for Ascaris and Trichuris eggs. A significantly lower infection intensity of Ascaris and Trichuris could be demonstrated for the traditional Indian community. Here the hygienic conditions were found to be better than in the town. The mestizo teacher and his family, who had come from the town to the Indian settlement, showed poorer hygienic standards and higher levels of Ascaris and Trichuris egg excretion than the Indian dwellers. The distribution of Ascaris and Trichuris eggs in the soil, house dust and in the air suggests that the contaminated dust from defaecation sites was distributed through the whole community by feet, animals (chickens) and wind. It was observed that many traditional habits that contributed to the good hygiene of the native population were being abandoned in the process of cultural change.

  18. Structural characterization of Peruvian carrot (Arracacia xanthorrhiza) starch and the effect of annealing on its semicrystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Thais S; Cunha, Verena A G; Jane, Jay-Lin; Franco, Celia M L

    2011-04-27

    Structural characteristics of native and annealed Peruvian carrot (Arracacia xanthorrhiza) starches were determined and compared to those of cassava and potato starches. Peruvian carrot starch presented round and irregular shaped granules, low amylose content and B-type X-ray pattern. Amylopectin of this starch contained a large proportion of long (DP > 37) and short (DP 6-12) branched chains. These last ones may contribute to its low gelatinization temperature. After annealing, the gelatinization temperatures of all starches increased, but the ΔH and the crystallinity increased only in Peruvian carrot and potato starches. The annealing process promoted a higher exposure of Peruvian carrot amylose molecules, which were more quickly attacked by enzymes, whereas amylopectin molecules became more resistant to hydrolysis. Peruvian carrot starch had structural characteristics that differed from those of cassava and potato starches. Annealing affected the semicrystalline structure of this starch, enhancing its crystallinity, mainly due to a better interaction between amylopectin chains.

  19. Reproduction and population levels of Peruvian Guano Birds, 1980 to 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovar, H.; GuilléN, V.; Cabrera, D.

    1987-12-01

    The three species of guano birds, guanay cormorant (Phalacrocorax bougainvillii), Peruvian booby (Sula variegate), and Peruvian pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis thagus), depend mainly on the Peruvian anchovy (Engraulis ringens) for sustenance. A naturally occurring limitation on the population size of these birds is the oceanographic phenomenon known as "El Niño". The industrialization of the anchovy fishery during the 1960s and 1970s has also affected seabird populations: The annual extraction of huge volumes offish has decreased the availability of food for the guano birds, causing large population fluctuations and considerable changes in the relative abundance of the birds. Because of its great intensity and duration, the 1982-1983 El Niño caused high avian mortality, depressing populations to levels from which they have not yet recovered.

  20. High prevalence of clustered tuberculosis cases in peruvian migrants in florence, Italy.

    PubMed

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Tortoli, Enrico; Borroni, Emanuele; Bartalesi, Filippo; Strohmeyer, Marianne; Baretti, Simonetta; Simonetti, Maria Tullia; Liendo, Carola; Santini, Maria Grazia; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2014-11-19

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of morbidity for Peruvian migrants in Florence, Italy, where they account for about 20% of yearly diagnosed cases. A retrospective study on cases notified in Peruvian residents in Florence in the period 2001-2010 was carried out and available Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were genotyped (MIRU-VNTR-24 and Spoligotyping). One hundred thirty eight cases were retrieved. Genotyping performed in 87 strains revealed that 39 (44.8%) belonged to 12 clusters. Assuming that in each cluster the transmission of tuberculosis from the index case took place in Florence, a large proportion of cases could be preventable by improving early diagnosis of contagious cases and contact tracing.

  1. Description of Lutzomyia (Trichophoromyia) nautaensis n. sp. (Diptera: Psychodidae) from the Peruvian Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Roberto; Lopez, Victor; Cardenas, Roldan; Requena, Edwin

    2015-07-01

    A new species of sand fly, which we describe as Lutzomyia (Trichophoromyia) nautaensis n. sp., was collected in the northern Peruvian Amazon Basin. In this region of Peru, cutaneous leishmaniasis is transmitted primarily by anthropophilic sand flies; however, zoophilic sand flies of the subgenus Trichophoromyia may also be incriminated in disease transmission. Detection of Leishmania spp. in Lutzomyia auraensis Mangabeira captured in the southern Peruvian Amazon indicates the potential of this and other zoophilic sand flies for human disease transmission, particularly in areas undergoing urban development. Herein, we describe Lutzomyia (Trichophoromyia) nautaensis n. sp., and report new records of sand flies in Peru.

  2. Description of Lutzomyia (Trichophoromyia) nautaensis n. sp. (Diptera: Psychodidae) from the Peruvian Amazon Basin

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Roberto; Lopez, Victor; Cardenas, Roldan; Requena, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    A new species of sand fly, which we describe as Lutzomyia (Trichophoromyia) nautaensis n. sp., was collected in the northern Peruvian Amazon Basin. In this region of Peru, cutaneous leishmaniasis is transmitted primarily by anthropophilic sand flies; however, zoophilic sand flies of the subgenus Trichophoromyia may also be incriminated in disease transmission. Detection of Leishmania spp. in Lutzomyia auraensis Mangabeira captured in the southern Peruvian Amazon indicates the potential of this and other zoophilic sand flies for human disease transmission, particularly in areas undergoing urban development. Herein, we describe Lutzomyia (Trichophoromyia) nautaensis n. sp., and report new records of sand flies in Peru. PMID:26335468

  3. Deglaciation and Holocene climate change in the western Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Chengyu; Bush, Mark B.; Curtis, Jason H.; Kolata, Alan L.; Dillehay, Tom D.; Binford, Michael W.

    2006-07-01

    Pollen, charcoal, magnetic susceptibility, and bulk density data provide the first paleoecological record spanning the last 33,000 years from the western cordillera of the Peruvian Andes. Sparse super-puna vegetation existed before 30,000 cal yr B.P. around Lake Compuerta (3950 m elevation), prior to a sedimentary hiatus that lasted until c. 16,200 cal yr B.P. When sedimentation resumed, a glacial foreland or super-puna flora is represented in which Polylepis was a significant element. Glacial outwash, marked by high sedimentary magnetic susceptibility, increased from c.16,200 cal yr B.P. and reached a peak at c. 13,200 cal yr B.P. Between c. 12,500 cal yr B.P. and 10,000 cal yr B.P., magnetic susceptibility was reduced. Vegetation shifts suggest a cool dry time, consistent with regional descriptions of the Younger Dryas event. Deglaciation resumes by 10,000 cal yr B.P. and the last ice is lost from the catchment at ˜7500 cal yr B.P. During the early Holocene warm and dry period between 10,000 and 5500 cal yr B.P., Alnus expanded in downslope forests. Alnus declined in abundance at 5500 cal yr B.P. when wetter and cooler conditions returned and human activity intensified. Maize ( Zea mays) pollen first occurred in the core at ˜2600 cal yr B.P., indicating a minimum age for local agriculture. An increase in Alnus pollen abundance at ˜1000 cal yr B.P. could be due to human activity or perhaps due to a regional climate change associated with cultural turnover elsewhere in the Andes at this time.

  4. Meteorological constraints on oceanic halocarbons above the Peruvian upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhlbrügge, Steffen; Quack, Birgit; Atlas, Elliot; Fiehn, Alina; Hepach, Helmke; Krüger, Kirstin

    2016-09-01

    During a cruise of R/V METEOR in December 2012 the oceanic sources and emissions of various halogenated trace gases and their mixing ratios in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) were investigated above the Peruvian upwelling. This study presents novel observations of the three very short lived substances (VSLSs) - bromoform, dibromomethane and methyl iodide - together with high-resolution meteorological measurements, Lagrangian transport and source-loss calculations. Oceanic emissions of bromoform and dibromomethane were relatively low compared to other upwelling regions, while those for methyl iodide were very high. Radiosonde launches during the cruise revealed a low, stable MABL and a distinct trade inversion above acting as strong barriers for convection and vertical transport of trace gases in this region. Observed atmospheric VSLS abundances, sea surface temperature, relative humidity and MABL height correlated well during the cruise. We used a simple source-loss estimate to quantify the contribution of oceanic emissions along the cruise track to the observed atmospheric concentrations. This analysis showed that averaged, instantaneous emissions could not support the observed atmospheric mixing ratios of VSLSs and that the marine background abundances below the trade inversion were significantly influenced by advection of regional sources. Adding to this background, the observed maximum emissions of halocarbons in the coastal upwelling could explain the high atmospheric VSLS concentrations in combination with their accumulation under the distinct MABL and trade inversions. Stronger emissions along the nearshore coastline likely added to the elevated abundances under the steady atmospheric conditions. This study underscores the importance of oceanic upwelling and trade wind systems on the atmospheric distribution of marine VSLS emissions.

  5. Climate change and potato cropping in the Peruvian Altiplano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanabria, J.; Lhomme, J. P.

    2013-05-01

    The potential impacts of climate change on potatoes cropping in the Peruvian highlands (Altiplano) is assessed using climate projections for 2071-2100, obtained from the HadRM3P regional atmospheric model of the Hadley Centre. The atmospheric model is run under two different special report on emission scenarios: high CO2 concentration (A2) and moderate CO2 concentration (B2) for four locations situated in the surroundings of Lake Titicaca. The two main varieties of potato cultivated in the area are studied: the Andean potato ( Solanum tuberosum) and the bitter potato ( Solanum juzepczukii). A simple process-oriented model is used to quantify the climatic impacts on crops cycles and yields by combining the effects of temperature on phenology, of radiation and CO2 on maximum yield and of water balance on yield deficit. In future climates, air temperature systematically increases, precipitation tends to increase at the beginning of the rainy season and slightly decreases during the rest of the season. The direct effects of these climatic changes are earlier planting dates, less planting failures and shorter crop cycles in all the four locations and for both scenarios. Consequently, the harvesting dates occur systematically earlier: roughly in January for the Andean potato instead of March in the current situation and in February for the bitter potato instead of April. Overall, yield deficits will be higher under climate change than in the current climate. There will be a strong negative impact on yields for S. tuberosum (stronger under A2 scenario than under B2); the impact on S. juzepczukii yields, however, appears to be relatively mixed and not so negative.

  6. Land Use Change Driven by Gold Mining; Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, J. J.; Carter, C. E.; domec, J.; Delgado, C. I.

    2011-12-01

    Many factors such as poverty, ineffective institutions and environmental regulations may prevent developing countries from managing how natural resources are extracted to meet a strong market demand. Extraction for some resources has reached such proportions that evidence is measurable from space. We present recent evidence of the global demand for a single commodity and the ecosystem destruction resulting from commodity extraction, recorded by satellites for one of the most biodiverse areas of the world. We find that since 2003, recent mining deforestation in Madre de Dios, Peru is increasing nonlinearly alongside a constant annual rate of increase in international gold price (~18%/yr). We detect that the new pattern of mining deforestation (1915 ha/year, 2006-2009) is outpacing that of nearby settlement deforestation. We show that gold price is linked with exponential increases in Peruvian national mercury imports over time (R2 = 0.93, p = 0.04, 2003- 2009). Given the past rates of increase we predict that mercury imports may more than double for 2011 (~500 t/year). Virtually all of Peru's mercury imports are used in artisanal gold mining. Much of the mining increase is unregulated/ artisanal in nature, lacking environmental impact analysis or miner education. As a result, large quantities of mercury are being released into the atmosphere, sediments and waterways. Other developing countries endowed with gold deposits are likely experiencing similar environmental destruction in response to recent record high gold prices. The increasing availability of satellite imagery ought to evoke further studies linking economic variables with land use and cover changes on the ground.

  7. Trading forests for yields in the Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Holly

    2012-03-01

    Our knowledge of how agriculture expands, and the types of land it replaces, is remarkably limited across the tropics. Most remote-sensing studies focus on the net gains and losses in forests and agricultural land rather than the land-use transition pathways (Gibbs et al 2010). Only a handful of studies identify land sources for new croplands or plantations, and then only for farming systems aggregated together (e.g., Koh and Wilcove 2008, Morton et al 2006, Gibbs et al 2010). Gutiérrez-Vélez et al (2011), however, have taken a leap forward by tracking the different expansion pathways for smallholder and industrial oil palm plantations. Using a combination of Landsat, MODIS and field surveys, they investigate whether higher yields in new agricultural lands spare forests in the Peruvian Amazon and in a smaller focus area in the Ucayali region. Across the Peruvian Amazon, they show that between 2000 and 2010, new high-yield oil palm plantations replaced forests 72% of the time and accounted for 1.3% of total deforestation, with most expansion occurring after 2006. Gutiérrez-Vélez et al went further in the Ucayali region and compared land sources for new high-yield and low-yield plantations. Expansion of higher-yield agricultural lands should logically reduce the total area needed for production, thus potentially sparing forests. In the Ucayali focus area, expansion of high-yield oil palm did convert less total land area but more forest was cleared than with low-yield expansion. Smaller-scale plantations tended to expand into already cleared areas while industrial-scale plantations traded their greater yields for forests, leading to higher land-clearing carbon emissions per production unit (Gibbs et al 2008). Gutiérrez-Vélez et al show that higher yields may require less land for production but more forest may be lost in the process, and they emphasize the need for stronger incentives for land sparing. The potential land-saving nature of these high

  8. Two new nor-triterpene glycosides from peruvian "Uña de Gato" (Uncaria tomentosa).

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Mariko; Hashimoto, Ken-Ichiro; Yokoya, Masashi; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Sandoval, Manuel; Aimi, Norio

    2003-02-01

    Two new 27-nor-triterpene glycosides, tomentosides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from Peruvian "Uña de Gato" (cat's claw, plant of origin: Uncaria tomentosa), a traditional herbal medicine in Peru. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis and chemical interconversions. This is the first report of naturally occurring pyroquinovic acid glycosides.

  9. Icon and Idea: A Symbolic Reading of Pictures in a Peruvian Indian Chronicle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adorno, Rolena

    1979-01-01

    An examination and categorization of over 400 full-page drawings in the 1615 "Nueva coronica y bien gobierno" of Felipe Guaman Poma de Alaya, which details life in the Peruvian Viceroyalty. Explains the function of the illustrations in the text and that of five "signifying attributes" of spatial configuration. (SB)

  10. Two new nor-triterpene glycosides from peruvian "Uña de Gato" (Uncaria tomentosa).

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Mariko; Hashimoto, Ken-Ichiro; Yokoya, Masashi; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Sandoval, Manuel; Aimi, Norio

    2003-02-01

    Two new 27-nor-triterpene glycosides, tomentosides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from Peruvian "Uña de Gato" (cat's claw, plant of origin: Uncaria tomentosa), a traditional herbal medicine in Peru. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis and chemical interconversions. This is the first report of naturally occurring pyroquinovic acid glycosides. PMID:12608878

  11. Ascaridole as a pharmacologically active principle of "Paico," a medicinal Peruvian plant.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, E; Umeyama, K; Saito, Y; Yamazaki, M; Satake, M

    1993-07-01

    "Paico," Chenopodium ambrosioides L., is a traditional Peruvian medicine which is considered to be nervine, antirheumatic, anthelmintic, etc. An attempt was made to isolate the component having sedative and/or analgesic properties from "Paico" and "Aritasou" (the Japanese name for C. ambrosioides). Ascaridole was identified as the active principle in both materials.

  12. Molecular characterization of Peruvian Citrus tristeza virus isolates based on 3’UTR sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus in Peru was decimated by quick decline and stem pitting strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). Commercial citrus production in Peru is being restored by use of CTV cross-protection. To characterize the predominant CTV strains involved, Peruvian CTV isolates from “protected” and “non-protecti...

  13. "Una Nacion Acorralada": Southern Peruvian Quechua Language Planning and Politics in Historical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannheim, Bruce

    1984-01-01

    Outlines history of Spanish colonial policies toward Southern Peruvian Quechua and points out those issues under debate concerning the indigenous languages. The central issue of the "Andean language debate" continues to be whether or not the Quechua have a right to exist as a separate community. (SL)

  14. Ascaridole as a pharmacologically active principle of "Paico," a medicinal Peruvian plant.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, E; Umeyama, K; Saito, Y; Yamazaki, M; Satake, M

    1993-07-01

    "Paico," Chenopodium ambrosioides L., is a traditional Peruvian medicine which is considered to be nervine, antirheumatic, anthelmintic, etc. An attempt was made to isolate the component having sedative and/or analgesic properties from "Paico" and "Aritasou" (the Japanese name for C. ambrosioides). Ascaridole was identified as the active principle in both materials. PMID:8374999

  15. Bilingual Education and Language Use among the Shipibo of the Peruvian Amazon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tacelosky, Kathleen

    2001-01-01

    Investigates how language choice for education contributes to changes in the way a society views and uses language in the context of the Peruvian Amazon. Oral surveys were administered to Shipibo people in 13 communities along the Ucayali River of eastern Peru where a transition type bilingual education program was introduced several decades ago.…

  16. Benthic phosphorus cycling in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomnitz, Ulrike; Sommer, Stefan; Dale, Andrew W.; Löscher, Carolin R.; Noffke, Anna; Wallmann, Klaus; Hensen, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) that impinge on continental margins favor the release of phosphorus (P) from the sediments to the water column, enhancing primary productivity and the maintenance or expansion of low-oxygen waters. A comprehensive field program in the Peruvian OMZ was undertaken to identify the sources of benthic P at six stations, including the analysis of particles from the water column, surface sediments, and pore fluids, as well as in situ benthic flux measurements. A major fraction of solid-phase P was bound as particulate inorganic P (PIP) both in the water column and in sediments. Sedimentary PIP increased with depth in the sediment at the expense of particulate organic P (POP). The ratio of particulate organic carbon (POC) to POP exceeded the Redfield ratio both in the water column (202 ± 29) and in surface sediments (303 ± 77). However, the POC to total particulate P (TPP = POP + PIP) ratio was close to Redfield in the water column (103 ± 9) and in sediment samples (102 ± 15). This suggests that the relative burial efficiencies of POC and TPP are similar under low-oxygen conditions and that the sediments underlying the anoxic waters on the Peru margin are not depleted in P compared to Redfield. Benthic fluxes of dissolved P were extremely high (up to 1.04 ± 0.31 mmol m-2 d-1), however, showing that a lack of oxygen promotes the intensified release of dissolved P from sediments, whilst preserving the POC / TPP burial ratio. Benthic dissolved P fluxes were always higher than the TPP rain rate to the seabed, which is proposed to be caused by transient P release by bacterial mats that had stored P during previous periods when bottom waters were less reducing. At one station located at the lower rim of the OMZ, dissolved P was taken up by the sediments, indicating ongoing phosphorite formation. This is further supported by decreasing porewater phosphate concentrations with sediment depth, whereas solid-phase P concentrations were comparatively

  17. Benthic nitrogen cycling traversing the capitalize peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, L.; Dale, A. W.; Sommer, S.; Mosch, T.; Hensen, C.; Noffke, A.; Scholz, F.; Wallmann, K.

    2011-10-01

    Benthic nitrogen (N) cycling was investigated at six stations along a transect traversing the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) at 11°S. An extensive dataset including porewater concentration profiles and in situ benthic fluxes of nitrate (NO 3-), nitrite (NO 2-) and ammonium (NH 4+) was used to constrain a 1-D reaction-transport model designed to simulate and interpret the measured data at each station. Simulated rates of nitrification, denitrification, anammox and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) by filamentous large sulfur bacteria (e.g. Beggiatoa and Thioploca) were highly variable throughout the OMZ yet clear trends were discernible. On the shelf and upper slope (80-260 m water depth) where extensive areas of bacterial mats were present, DNRA dominated total N turnover (⩽2.9 mmol N m -2 d -1) and accounted for ⩾65% of NO 3- + NO 2- uptake by the sediments from the bottom water. Nonetheless, these sediments did not represent a major sink for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = NO 3- + NO 2- + NH 4+) since DNRA reduces NO 3- and, potentially NO 2-, to NH 4+. Consequently, the shelf and upper slope sediments were recycling sites for DIN due to relatively low rates of denitrification and high rates of ammonium release from DNRA and ammonification of organic matter. This finding contrasts with the current opinion that sediments underlying OMZs are a strong sink for DIN. Only at greater water depths (300-1000 m) did the sediments become a net sink for DIN. Here, denitrification was the major process (⩽2 mmol N m -2 d -1) and removed 55-73% of NO 3- and NO 2- taken up by the sediments, with DNRA and anammox accounting for the remaining fraction. Anammox was of minor importance on the shelf and upper slope yet contributed up to 62% to total N 2 production at the 1000 m station. The results indicate that the partitioning of oxidized N (NO 3-, NO 2-) into DNRA or denitrification is a key factor determining the role of marine sediments as DIN

  18. Sources and fate of amino sugars in coastal Peruvian sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggemann, Jutta; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2006-05-01

    Amino sugars are involved in the marine carbon and nitrogen cycles and comprise a geochemically significant fraction of marine organic material (OM). However, information on abundance and distribution of these compounds in marine sediments is scarce. Three sediment cores (<50 cm) from the coastal region off Peru were investigated for concentrations of glucosamine (GlcN), galactosamine (GalN), mannosamine (ManN), and muramic acid (Mur). The sum of the four amino sugars accounted for 1.0-2.4% of organic carbon and 1.9-3.8% of nitrogen in the sediments. At the shallowest (102 m) and the deepest site (1278 m), carbon-normalized concentrations decreased down-core, suggesting preferential degradation of amino sugars compared to bulk sedimentary OM. At the site from the center of the oxygen minimum zone (238 m), amino sugar concentrations were high throughout the core, pointing to enhanced preservation of amino sugars under anoxic conditions. GlcN (44-56 mol%) and GalN (33-42 mol%) were the dominant amino sugars in all investigated samples, while ManN (6-14 mol%) and Mur (1-4 mol%) were significantly less abundant. Mur was predominantly associated with cell wall remains rather than with living bacteria, since bacterial abundances estimated based on Mur concentrations were up to 500 times higher than cell counts reported for sediments from this area. GlcN/GalN-ratios (1.1-1.7) indicated that chitin, a polymer of GlcN, was not a major contributor to the amino sugar pool of the investigated sediments. Furthermore, GlcN/Mur-ratios (13-68) are inconsistent with a predominant contribution of intact peptidoglycan, which exhibits a 1:1-ratio. The present study includes a compilation of previously published information on distribution and abundance of amino sugars in the marine environment. Both concentrations and ratios observed in the Peruvian sediments fall in the range of values reported for OM in water column and sediments from different oceanic regions and water depths

  19. Population Genetics of Plasmodium vivax in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Ratto, Christopher; Gamboa, Dionicia; Soto-Calle, Veronica E.; Van den Eede, Peter; Torres, Eliana; Sánchez-Martínez, Luis; Contreras-Mancilla, Juan; Rosanas-Urgell, Anna; Rodriguez Ferrucci, Hugo; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Erhart, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterizing the parasite dynamics and population structure provides useful information to understand the dynamic of transmission and to better target control interventions. Despite considerable efforts for its control, vivax malaria remains a major health problem in Peru. In this study, we have explored the population genetics of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Iquitos, the main city in the Peruvian Amazon, and 25 neighbouring peri-urban as well as rural villages along the Iquitos-Nauta Road. Methodology/ Results From April to December 2008, 292 P. vivax isolates were collected and successfully genotyped using 14 neutral microsatellites. Analysis of the molecular data revealed a similar proportion of monoclonal and polyclonal infections in urban areas, while in rural areas monoclonal infections were predominant (p = 0.002). Multiplicity of infection was higher in urban (MOI = 1.5–2) compared to rural areas (MOI = 1) (p = 0.003). The level of genetic diversity was similar in all areas (He = 0.66–0.76, p = 0.32) though genetic differentiation between areas was substantial (PHIPT = 0.17, p<0.0001). Principal coordinate analysis showed a marked differentiation between parasites from urban and rural areas. Linkage disequilibrium was detected in all the areas (IAs = 0.08–0.49, for all p<0.0001). Gene flow among the areas was stablished through Bayesian analysis of migration models. Recent bottleneck events were detected in 4 areas and a recent parasite expansion in one of the isolated areas. In total, 87 unique haplotypes grouped in 2 or 3 genetic clusters described a sub-structured parasite population. Conclusion/Significance Our study shows a sub-structured parasite population with clonal propagation, with most of its components recently affected by bottleneck events. Iquitos city is the main source of parasite spreading for all the peripheral study areas. The routes of transmission and gene flow and the reduction of the parasite population described

  20. New oleanan-type triterpene and cincholic acid glycosides from Peruvian "Uña de Gato" (Uncaria tomentosa).

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Mariko; Hashimoto, Ken-Ichiro; Sandoval, Manuel; Aimi, Norio; Takayama, Hiromitsu

    2004-10-01

    A new oleanan-type triterpene and three new cincholic acid glycosides were isolated from Peruvian "Una de Gato" (Cat's claw, plant of origin: Uncaria tomentosa), a traditional herbal medicine in Peru. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis.

  1. Partial in vitro analysis of toxic and antigenic activities of eleven Peruvian pitviper snake venoms.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Duarte, C; Lopes-Peixoto, J; Fonseca-de-Souza, B R; Stransky, S; Oliveira, D; Schneider, F S; Lopes-de-Souza, L; Bonilla, C; Silva, W; Tintaya, B; Yarleque, A; Chávez-Olórtegui, C

    2015-12-15

    This work used eleven Peruvian snake venoms (Bothrops andianus, Bothrops atrox, Bothrops barnetti, Bothrops castelnaudi, Bothriopsis chloromelas, Bothrocophias microphthalmus, Bothrops neuwiedi, Bothriopsis oligolepis, Bothriopsis peruviana, Bothrops pictus and Bothriopsis taeniata) to perform in vitro experimentation and determine its main characteristics. Hyaluronidase (HYAL), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), snake venom metalloproteinase (SVMP), snake venom serine protease (SVSP) and L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) activities; toxicity by cell viability assays using MGSO3, VERO and HeLa cell lineages; and crossed immunoreactivity with Peruvian (PAV) and Brazilian (BAV) antibothropic polyvalent antivenoms, through ELISA and Western Blotting assays, were determined. Results show that the activities tested in this study were not similar amongst the venoms and each species present their own peculiarities, highlighting the diversity within Bothrops complex. All venoms were capable of reducing cell viability of all tested lineages. It was also demonstrated the crossed recognition of all tested venoms by both antivenoms. PMID:26365916

  2. High Prevalence of Clustered Tuberculosis Cases in Peruvian Migrants in Florence, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Tortoli, Enrico; Borroni, Emanuele; Bartalesi, Filippo; Strohmeyer, Marianne; Baretti, Simonetta; Simonetti, Maria Tullia; Liendo, Carola; Santini, Maria Grazia; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of morbidity for Peruvian migrants in Florence, Italy, where they account for about 20% of yearly diagnosed cases. A retrospective study on cases notified in Peruvian residents in Florence in the period 2001-2010 was carried out and available Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were genotyped (MIRU-VNTR-24 and Spoligotyping). One hundred thirty eight cases were retrieved. Genotyping performed in 87 strains revealed that 39 (44.8%) belonged to 12 clusters. Assuming that in each cluster the transmission of tuberculosis from the index case took place in Florence, a large proportion of cases could be preventable by improving early diagnosis of contagious cases and contact tracing. PMID:25568758

  3. Kinship Paths To and From the New Europe: A Unified Analysis of Peruvian Adoption and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Leinaweaver, Jessaca B.

    2013-01-01

    This article compares migrants and adoptees of Peruvian origin residing in Europe by focusing on their respective movements out of and return to the sending country of Peru. First, it analyzes family-based reunifications by drawing on a framework from studies of adoption and kinship. Juxtaposing the experiences of adoptees with those of migrants reveals how migration, too, may be steeped in concerns about kin ties. Next, it analyzes returns of adult adoptees using a template modeled on migrant returns, focusing on the centrality of the notion of contribution. The article shows how migrants and adoptees contest the constraints of European nation-state definitions of kinship intended to limit migration. It is based on recent research with Peruvian migrants and adoptees in Spain, as well as longer-term research in Peru on migration and adoption. PMID:24443664

  4. Two-billion-year granulites in the late precambrian metamorphic basement along the southern peruvian coast.

    PubMed

    Dalmayrac, B; Lancelot, J R; Leyreloup, A

    1977-10-01

    Uranium-lead data indicate that the high-pressure granulitic and charnockitic nuclei within the medium-grade metamorphic complex of the Peruvian coastal area must be related to an orogenic event 2 x 10(9) years ago. As in western Africa and Brazil, this old granulitic basement is reworked by Late Precambrian orogeny. Its presence along the Peru-Chile Trench must be taken into account in interpreting the anomalously high strontium isotopic ratios of recent calc-alkaline volcanism.

  5. Peruvian Stratus Clouds and the Tropical Pacific Circulation: A Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere GCM Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chung-Chun; Mechoso, Carlos R.; Robertson, Andrew W.; Arakawa, Akio

    1996-07-01

    Extensive and persistent stratus cloud decks are prominent climatic features off the Peruvian coast. They are believed to play a key role in the coupled atmosphere-ocean processes that determine the sea surface temperature (SST) throughout the eastern tropical Pacific. This notion is examined and further developed using a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (GCM): a control simulation, in which the simulated amount of Peruvian stratus clouds is unrealistically low, is compared with an experiment in which a stratus cloud deck is prescribed to persistently cover the ocean off the Peruvian coast.Beneath the prescribed cloud deck SSTs are reduced by up to 5 K, as expected from decreased solar radiation reaching the surface. In addition, there is significant cooling over much of the eastern tropical Pacific south of the equator, and even along the equator well into the central Pacific. The prescribed stratus deck largely alleviates the coupled GCM's warm bias in SST in the southeastern Pacific, which is common to most contemporary coupled GCMS, and produces a distribution of SST with more realistic interhemispheric asymmetries.Examination of differences between SST evolutions in the enhanced stratus experiment and the control circulation reveals that the remote ocean cooling is not due to a single mechanism. The cooling immediately to the west and north of the region with the prescribed stratus deck is primarily associated with increased evaporation as the southeast trades strengthen. The cooling along the equator in the central Pacific is mainly due to increased oceanic cold advection.The results of this study suggest that the Peruvian stratus clouds are important in modulating the circulation of the tropical Pacific. The `double ITCZ' syndrome of the coupled GCM, however, does not appear to be solely due to underpredicted stratus cloud cover and requires consideration of other processes in the coupled GCM.

  6. Fasciola hepatica Infection in an Indigenous Community of the Peruvian Jungle.

    PubMed

    Cabada, Miguel M; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Lopez, Martha; Caravedo, María Alejandra; Arque, Eulogia; White, Arthur Clinton

    2016-06-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a zoonotic infection with a worldwide distribution. Autochthonous cases have not been reported in the Amazon region of Peru. Operculated eggs resembling F. hepatica were identified in the stools of five out of 215 subjects in a remote indigenous community of the Peruvian jungle. Polymerase chain reaction targeting Fasciola hepatica cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene and sequencing of the products confirmed Fasciola infection.

  7. Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Peruvian Children with Bloody Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Alejandro; Lee, Jorge; López, Francisco; Contreras, Carmen; Barletta, Francesca; Chea-Woo, Elsa; Ugarte, Claudia; Cleary, Thomas G.; Ochoa, Theresa J.

    2012-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are not routinely sought in clinical laboratories in developing counties. Among 131 bloody diarrhea samples in Peruvian children <5y of age, STEC was found in 9.2% and was associated with absence of fever, an observation that may increase suspicion of these pathogens. Because of the significant prevalence of STEC locally, proper diagnostics methods should be implemented in the region. PMID:22315000

  8. Patterns of GPS Tracks Suggest Nocturnal Foraging by Incubating Peruvian Pelicans (Pelecanus thagus)

    PubMed Central

    Zavalaga, Carlos B.; Dell'Omo, Giacomo; Becciu, Paolo; Yoda, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Most seabirds are diurnal foragers, but some species may also feed at night. In Peruvian pelicans (Pelecanus thagus), the evidence for nocturnal foraging is sparse and anecdotal. We used GPS-dataloggers on five incubating Peruvian pelicans from Isla Lobos de Tierra, Perú, to examine their nocturnality, foraging movements and activities patterns at sea. All instrumented pelicans undertook nocturnal trips during a 5–7 day tracking period. Eighty-seven percent of these trips (n = 13) were strictly nocturnal, whereas the remaining occurred during the day and night. Most birds departed from the island after sunset and returned a few hours after sunrise. Birds traveled south of the island for single-day trips at a maximum range of 82.8 km. Overall, 22% of the tracking period was spent at sea, whereas the remaining time was spent on the island. In the intermediate section of the trip (between inbound and outbound commutes), birds spent 77% of the trip time in floating bouts interspersed by short flying bouts, the former being on average three times longer than the latter. Taken together, the high sinuosity of the bird's tracks during floating bouts, the exclusively nocturnal trips of most individuals, and the fact that all birds returned to the island within a few hours after sunrise suggest that pelicans were actively feeding at night. The nocturnal foraging strategy of Peruvian pelicans may reduce food competition with the sympatric and strictly diurnal Guanay cormorants (Phalacrocorax bougainvillii), Peruvian boobies (Sula variegata) and Blue-footed boobies (S. nebouxii), which were present on the island in large numbers. Likewise, plankton bioluminescence might be used by pelicans as indirect cues to locate anchovies during their upward migration at night. The foraging success of pelicans at night may be enhanced by seizing prey close to the sea surface using a sit-and-wait strategy. PMID:21647444

  9. Substance use and sexual risk behaviors among Peruvian MSM social media users.

    PubMed

    Young, Sean D; Nianogo, Roch A; Chiu, ChingChe J; Menacho, Lucho; Galea, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Peru is experiencing a concentrated HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM). Substance use (alcohol and drug use) has been found to be associated with HIV-related sexual risk behaviors. A recent surge in the number of social media users in Peru has enabled these technologies to be potential tools for reaching HIV at-risk individuals. This study sought to assess the relationship between substance use and sexual risk behaviors among Peruvian MSM who use social media. A total of 556 Peruvian MSM Facebook users (ages 18-59) were recruited to complete a 92-item survey on demographics, sexual risk behaviors, and substance use. We performed a logistic regression of various sexual risk behaviors (e.g., unprotected sex, casual sex) on substance abuse, including alcohol, adjusting for potential covariates. Drinking more than five alcoholic drinks a day in the past three months was associated with an increased odds of having unprotected sex (vaginal and anal) (aOR: 1.52; 95% CL: 1.01, 2.28), casual sex (1.75; 1.17, 2.62), and sex with unknown persons (1.82; 1.23, 2.71). Drug use was not significantly associated with sexual risk behaviors. Among Peruvian MSM social media users, findings suggest that alcohol use was associated with increased HIV-related sexual risk behaviors. PMID:26324405

  10. [Evaluation of peruvian money test in screening of cognitive impairment among older adults].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa, Teodoro J; Cieza, Edwin; Parodi, José F; Paredes, Napoleón

    2016-03-01

    Objectives To evaluate the Peruvian adaptation of the money test (Eurotest) for identifying cognitive impairment among >60-year-old adults. Materials and methods This is a phase I study of diagnostic test, with a convenience sampling and calculation of the test´s sensitivity and specificity, based on a pretest prevalence of 50%. The criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV) and Global Deterioration Scale (GDS) were used for the operational definition of patients with cognitive impairment. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to identify the optimal cut-off value. Results The study evaluated 42 cases and 42 controls; there was no significant difference between age (77.88 ± 6.01 years vs. 6.49 76.14 ± years) and years of education (13.69 ± 3.70 years vs. 8.17 ± 4.71 years). The Peruvian version of the Eurotest has a sensitivity of 90.5% and specificity of 83.3% with cut-off value of 24. Conclusions The Peruvian adapted version of the Eurotest, called prueba de la moneda peruana could be useful in screening for cognitive impairment among older adults.

  11. A millennium of metallurgy recorded by lake sediments from Morococha, Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B; Wolfe, Alexander P; Kittleson, John L

    2007-05-15

    To date, information concerning pre-Colonial metallurgy in South America has largely been limited to the archaeological record of artifacts. Here, we reconstruct a millennium of smelting activity in the Peruvian Andes using the lake-sediment stratigraphy of atmospherically derived metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Sb, Bi, and Ti) and lead isotopic ratios (206Pb/ 207Pb) associated with smelting from the Morococha mining region in the central Peruvian Andes. The earliest evidence for metallurgy occurs ca. 1000 A.D., coinciding with the fall of the Wari Empire and decentralization of local populations. Smelting during this interval appears to have been aimed at copper and copper alloys, because of large increases in Zn and Cu relative to Pb. A subsequent switch to silver metallurgy under Inca control (ca. 1450 to conquest, 1533 A.D.) is indicated by increases in Pb, Sb, and Bi, a conclusion supported by further increases of these metals during Colonial mining, which targeted silver extraction. Rapid development of the central Andes during the 20th century raised metal burdens by an order of magnitude above previous levels. Our results represent the first evidence for pre-Colonial smelting in the central Peruvian Andes, and corroborate the sensitivity of lake sediments to pre-Colonial metallurgical activity suggested by earlier findings from Bolivia. PMID:17547165

  12. Homogeneous temperature and precipitation series for a Peruvian High Andes regions from 1965 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acuña, D.; Serpa Lopez, B.; Silvestre, E.; Konzelmann, Th.; Rohrer, M.; Schwarb, M.; Salzmann, N.

    2010-09-01

    As a basis of a joint Swiss-Peruvian effort focused on water resources, food security and disaster preparedness (Peruvian Climate Adaptation Project, PACC) clean and homogenized meteorological datasets have been elaborated for the Cusco and Apurimac Regions in the Central Andes. Operational and historical data series of more than 100 stations of the Peruvian Meteorological and Hydrological Service (SENAMHI) were available as a data base. Additionally, meteorological data provided by the National Climatic Data Centre (NCDC) or the Meteorological Aerodrome Records (METAR), have been considered. In contrast to many European countries, where most conventional sensors have been replaced by automated sensors during the last decades, instrumentation of climatological stations remained unchanged in Peru. Station records and station history of the Cusco-Apurimac-region are partially fragmentary or lost, mainly because of armed conflicts, particularly in the 1980ies. Moreover, many stations do observe precipitation as only variable. As a consequence, it was only possible so far to elaborate four complete homogenized air temperature series (Curahuasi 2763m a.s.l., Granja Kcayra-Cusco 3219m, Sicuani, 3574m and La Angostura, 4150m) since 1965. For precipitation a larger number of stations was available for elaboration, which is important because of the small scaled characteristics of the mostly convective type precipitation events in these regions. Based on these homogenized series, linear and gaussian low pass filtered trends have been calculated for all series of precipitation and air temperature records.

  13. A millennium of metallurgy recorded by lake sediments from Morococha, Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B; Wolfe, Alexander P; Kittleson, John L

    2007-05-15

    To date, information concerning pre-Colonial metallurgy in South America has largely been limited to the archaeological record of artifacts. Here, we reconstruct a millennium of smelting activity in the Peruvian Andes using the lake-sediment stratigraphy of atmospherically derived metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Sb, Bi, and Ti) and lead isotopic ratios (206Pb/ 207Pb) associated with smelting from the Morococha mining region in the central Peruvian Andes. The earliest evidence for metallurgy occurs ca. 1000 A.D., coinciding with the fall of the Wari Empire and decentralization of local populations. Smelting during this interval appears to have been aimed at copper and copper alloys, because of large increases in Zn and Cu relative to Pb. A subsequent switch to silver metallurgy under Inca control (ca. 1450 to conquest, 1533 A.D.) is indicated by increases in Pb, Sb, and Bi, a conclusion supported by further increases of these metals during Colonial mining, which targeted silver extraction. Rapid development of the central Andes during the 20th century raised metal burdens by an order of magnitude above previous levels. Our results represent the first evidence for pre-Colonial smelting in the central Peruvian Andes, and corroborate the sensitivity of lake sediments to pre-Colonial metallurgical activity suggested by earlier findings from Bolivia.

  14. Nitrogen fixation in sediments along a depth transect through the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gier, Jessica; Sommer, Stefan; Löscher, Carolin R.; Dale, Andrew W.; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Treude, Tina

    2016-07-01

    The potential coupling of nitrogen (N2) fixation and sulfate reduction (SR) was explored in sediments of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Sediment samples were retrieved by a multiple corer at six stations along a depth transect (70-1025 m water depth) at 12° S, covering anoxic and hypoxic bottom water conditions. Benthic N2 fixation, determined by the acetylene reduction assay, was detected at all sites, with highest rates between 70 and 253 m and lower rates at greater depth. SR rates decreased with increasing water depth. N2 fixation and SR overlapped in sediments, suggesting a potential coupling of both processes. However, a weak positive correlation of their activity distribution was detected by principle component analysis. A potential link between N2 fixation and sulfate-reducing bacteria was indicated by the molecular analysis of nifH genes. Detected nifH sequences clustered with the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfonema limicola at the 253 m station. However, nifH sequences of other stations clustered with uncultured organisms, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes (Clostridia) rather than with known sulfate reducers. The principle component analysis revealed that benthic N2 fixation in the Peruvian OMZ is controlled by organic matter (positive) and free sulfide (negative). No correlation was found between N2 fixation and ammonium concentrations (even at levels > 2022 µM). N2 fixation rates in the Peruvian OMZ sediments were in the same range as those measured in other organic-rich sediments.

  15. Substance use and sexual risk behaviors among Peruvian MSM social media users.

    PubMed

    Young, Sean D; Nianogo, Roch A; Chiu, ChingChe J; Menacho, Lucho; Galea, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Peru is experiencing a concentrated HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM). Substance use (alcohol and drug use) has been found to be associated with HIV-related sexual risk behaviors. A recent surge in the number of social media users in Peru has enabled these technologies to be potential tools for reaching HIV at-risk individuals. This study sought to assess the relationship between substance use and sexual risk behaviors among Peruvian MSM who use social media. A total of 556 Peruvian MSM Facebook users (ages 18-59) were recruited to complete a 92-item survey on demographics, sexual risk behaviors, and substance use. We performed a logistic regression of various sexual risk behaviors (e.g., unprotected sex, casual sex) on substance abuse, including alcohol, adjusting for potential covariates. Drinking more than five alcoholic drinks a day in the past three months was associated with an increased odds of having unprotected sex (vaginal and anal) (aOR: 1.52; 95% CL: 1.01, 2.28), casual sex (1.75; 1.17, 2.62), and sex with unknown persons (1.82; 1.23, 2.71). Drug use was not significantly associated with sexual risk behaviors. Among Peruvian MSM social media users, findings suggest that alcohol use was associated with increased HIV-related sexual risk behaviors.

  16. [Evaluation of peruvian money test in screening of cognitive impairment among older adults].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa, Teodoro J; Cieza, Edwin; Parodi, José F; Paredes, Napoleón

    2016-03-01

    Objectives To evaluate the Peruvian adaptation of the money test (Eurotest) for identifying cognitive impairment among >60-year-old adults. Materials and methods This is a phase I study of diagnostic test, with a convenience sampling and calculation of the test´s sensitivity and specificity, based on a pretest prevalence of 50%. The criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV) and Global Deterioration Scale (GDS) were used for the operational definition of patients with cognitive impairment. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to identify the optimal cut-off value. Results The study evaluated 42 cases and 42 controls; there was no significant difference between age (77.88 ± 6.01 years vs. 6.49 76.14 ± years) and years of education (13.69 ± 3.70 years vs. 8.17 ± 4.71 years). The Peruvian version of the Eurotest has a sensitivity of 90.5% and specificity of 83.3% with cut-off value of 24. Conclusions The Peruvian adapted version of the Eurotest, called prueba de la moneda peruana could be useful in screening for cognitive impairment among older adults. PMID:27384624

  17. Centile Curves and Reference Values for Height, Body Mass, Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference of Peruvian Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Alcibíades; Freitas, Duarte; Pan, Huiqi; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Maia, José

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to provide height, body mass, BMI and waist circumference (WC) growth centile charts for school-children, aged 4–17 years, from central Peru, and to compare Peruvian data with North-American and Argentinean references. The sample consisted of 8753 children and adolescents (4130 boys and 4623 girls) aged 4 to 17 years, from four Peruvian cities: Barranco, La Merced, San Ramón and Junín. Height, body mass and WC were measured according to standardized techniques. Centile curves for height, body mass, BMI and WC were obtained separately for boys and girls using the LMS method. Student t-tests were used to compare mean values. Overall boys have higher median heights than girls, and the 50th percentile for body mass increases curvilinearly from 4 years of age onwards. In boys, the BMI and WC 50th percentiles increase linearly and in girls, the increase presents a curvilinear pattern. Peruvian children are shorter, lighter and have higher BMI than their counterparts in the U.S. and Argentina; in contrast, age and sex-specific WC values are lower. Height, body mass and WC of Peruvian children increased with age and variability was higher at older ages. The growth patterns for height, body mass, BMI and WC among Peruvian children were similar to those observed in North-American and Argentinean peers. PMID:25761169

  18. Some Key Issues in Intercultural Bilingual Education Teacher Training Programmes--as Seen from a Teacher Training Programme in the Peruvian Amazon Basin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trapnell, Lucy A.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a critical reflection of the author's 14-year experience in the Teacher Training Program for Intercultural Bilingual Education in the Peruvian Amazon Basin, developed by a national Peruvian indigenous confederation and the Loreto state teacher training college. Focuses on ethical, political, and pedagogical challenges that intercultural…

  19. An Analysis of and Recommendations for the Peruvian Blood Collection and Transfusion System

    PubMed Central

    George, Paul E; Vidal, Julio; Garcia, Patricia J

    2016-01-01

    Background Peru experienced a crisis in its blood collection and supply system in the mid-2000s, as contaminated blood led to several transfusion-transmitted infections (TTI), occurring in the backdrop of extremely low voluntary donation rates and a national blood supply shortage. Thus, the Peruvian Ministry of Health (MINSA) implemented a national investigation on the safety and quality of the Peruvian blood collection/transfusion network. Methods Every Peruvian blood bank was evaluated by MINSA from 2007–2008. These evaluations consisted of an update of the national registry of blood banks and visits to each blood bank from MINSA oversight teams. Information was collected on the condition of the blood bank personnel, equipment, supplies, and practices. Further, previously-collected blood at each blood bank was randomly selected and screened for TTI-causing pathogens. Results Uncovered in this investigation was a fragmented, under-equipped, and poorly-staffed blood collection and transfusion network, consisting of 241 independent blood banks and resulting in suboptimal allocation of resources. Further, blood with evidence of TTI-causing pathogens (including Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and syphilis) and set for transfusion was discovered at three separate blood banks as part of the random screening process. Conclusion Using the successful reorganizations of national blood supply systems in other Latin American countries as examples, Peru would be well-served to form large, high-volume, regional blood collection and transfusion centers, responsible for blood collection and screening for the entire country. The small, separate blood banks would then be transformed into a network of blood transfusion centers, not responsible for blood collection. This reorganization would allow Peru to better utilize its resources, standardize the blood collection and transfusion process, and increase voluntary donation, resulting in a safer, more abundant national blood product. PMID

  20. New species and geographical records of dactylogyrids (Monogenea) of catfish (Siluriformes) from the Peruvian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Palmero, Carlos A; Scholz, Tomáš; Mendoza-Franco, Edgar F; Kuchta, Roman

    2012-06-01

    Three new species of gill monogeneans (Dactylogyridae: Ancyrocephalinae) are described from siluriform catfish from Iquitos, Peru: Demidospermus mortenthaleri n. sp. from Brachyplatystoma juruense (Boulenger), Demidospermus brevicirrus n. sp. from Pimelodus sp., and Aphanoblastella aurorae n. sp. from Goeldiella eques (Müller & Troschel). Demidospermus mortenthaleri is characterized by a male copulatory organ (MCO) with a small loop at its middle portion; 2 types of hooks, of which pairs 5 and 6 are longer than the remaining hooks; a proximal subunit round and highly depressed thumb; and a sclerotized vagina with a round pad at the vaginal aperture. Demidospermus brevicirrus is distinguished from other congeners by the presence of a short, straight, and robust MCO and boot-shaped accessory piece with a hooked projection directed posteriorly. Aphanoblastella aurorae is the only species of the genus that possesses an arrow-shaped sclerotized vagina and a medial process on the dorsal bar. Another 6 dactylogyrids described previously are recorded for the first time from the Peruvian Amazonia: Cosmetocleithrum bulbocirrus Kritsky, Thatcher and Boeger, 1986 ; Vancleaveus fungulus Kritsky, Thatcher and Boeger, 1986 ; V. janauacaensis Kritsky, Thatcher and Boeger, 1986 ; V. platyrhynchi Kritsky, Thatcher and Boeger, 1986 ; Unilatus unilatus Mizelle and Kritsky, 1967 ; and U. brittani Mizelle, Kritsky and Crane, 1968 . Based on observations of specimens collected in the Peruvian Amazonia, new morphological data for these species are provided. Comparison of new specimens of U. unilatus and U. brittani with those of Unilatus brevispinus Suriano, 1985 and Unilatus longispinus Suriano, 1985 , both originally described from Brazil, has shown that they are conspecific. Therefore, the latter species were synonymized with U. unilatus and U. brittani , respectively. In addition, 56 undescribed monogeneans found in catfish from the Peruvian Amazonia, some of them probably belonging

  1. New species and geographical records of dactylogyrids (Monogenea) of catfish (Siluriformes) from the Peruvian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Palmero, Carlos A; Scholz, Tomáš; Mendoza-Franco, Edgar F; Kuchta, Roman

    2012-06-01

    Three new species of gill monogeneans (Dactylogyridae: Ancyrocephalinae) are described from siluriform catfish from Iquitos, Peru: Demidospermus mortenthaleri n. sp. from Brachyplatystoma juruense (Boulenger), Demidospermus brevicirrus n. sp. from Pimelodus sp., and Aphanoblastella aurorae n. sp. from Goeldiella eques (Müller & Troschel). Demidospermus mortenthaleri is characterized by a male copulatory organ (MCO) with a small loop at its middle portion; 2 types of hooks, of which pairs 5 and 6 are longer than the remaining hooks; a proximal subunit round and highly depressed thumb; and a sclerotized vagina with a round pad at the vaginal aperture. Demidospermus brevicirrus is distinguished from other congeners by the presence of a short, straight, and robust MCO and boot-shaped accessory piece with a hooked projection directed posteriorly. Aphanoblastella aurorae is the only species of the genus that possesses an arrow-shaped sclerotized vagina and a medial process on the dorsal bar. Another 6 dactylogyrids described previously are recorded for the first time from the Peruvian Amazonia: Cosmetocleithrum bulbocirrus Kritsky, Thatcher and Boeger, 1986 ; Vancleaveus fungulus Kritsky, Thatcher and Boeger, 1986 ; V. janauacaensis Kritsky, Thatcher and Boeger, 1986 ; V. platyrhynchi Kritsky, Thatcher and Boeger, 1986 ; Unilatus unilatus Mizelle and Kritsky, 1967 ; and U. brittani Mizelle, Kritsky and Crane, 1968 . Based on observations of specimens collected in the Peruvian Amazonia, new morphological data for these species are provided. Comparison of new specimens of U. unilatus and U. brittani with those of Unilatus brevispinus Suriano, 1985 and Unilatus longispinus Suriano, 1985 , both originally described from Brazil, has shown that they are conspecific. Therefore, the latter species were synonymized with U. unilatus and U. brittani , respectively. In addition, 56 undescribed monogeneans found in catfish from the Peruvian Amazonia, some of them probably belonging

  2. Psychometric Properties of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in a Cohort of Peruvian Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qiu-Yue; Gelaye, Bizu; Sánchez, Sixto E.; Williams, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: We sought to evaluate the construct validity and factor structure of the Spanish-language version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) among pregnant Peruvian women. Methods: A cohort of 642 women were interviewed at ≤ 16 weeks of gestation. During interview, we ascertained information about lifestyles, demographics, sleep characteristics, and mood symptoms. Stress induced sleep disturbance, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms were evaluated using the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) assessment scales, respectively. Consistency indices, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, correlations, and logistic regressions were used. Results: Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated a three-factor solution: sleep quality, sleep efficiency, and sleep medication. We observed significantly positive correlations of the PSQI with the FIRST (0.42), the PHQ-9 (0.49), and the GAD-7 (0.46). Poor sleepers (PSQI global score > 5) had significantly increased odds of experiencing stress-induced sleep disturbance (odds ratio, OR = 3.57; 95% CI: 2.40, 5.31), depression (OR = 5.48; 95% CI: 3.58, 8.37), and generalized anxiety disorder (OR = 4.57; 95% CI: 3.08, 6.76). Conclusions: The Spanish-language version of the PSQI instrument was found to have good construct validity among pregnant Peruvian women. Consistent with some other studies, the PSQI was found to have a three-factor structure. Further assessment and validation studies are needed to determine whether the three, factor-specific scoring of the PSQI is favored over the PSQI global score in diverse populations. Citation: Zhong QY, Gelaye B, Sánchez SE, Williams MA. Psychometric properties of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in a cohort of Peruvian pregnant women. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(8):869–877. PMID:25845902

  3. Precipitation variability in the Peruvian Andes under future climatic conditions - Assessment and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukom, Raphael; Rohrer, Mario; Salzmann, Nadine; Calanca, Pierluigi; Huggel, Christian; Acuña, Delia

    2014-05-01

    The Peruvian Andes are characterized by pronounced dry and wet seasons. Agriculture but also other economic sectors such as hydropower production strongly depend on water availability, and are therefore sensitive to changes in precipitation regime at the local and regional scale. Future changes in rainfall amounts and variability may have severe consequences for society and need to be assessed in order to develop adequate strategies for adaptation. The precipitation regime of the high Peruvian Andes is characterized by a complex interplay of local orographic effects with large-scale circulation. A main moisture source for the region is the Amazon Basin and the amount of moisture received in the Central Andes is influenced by the strength of zonal winds in the upper troposphere. As a result, variations in seasonal precipitation amounts can be associated to the South American Monsoon and large-scale teleconnections with the oceans surrounding the South American continent. Notably, however, direct correlations of local precipitation with ENSO, the main driver of tropical Pacific variability, are mostly weak and unstable over the short instrumental period. In this contribution we provide an assessment of future changes in precipitation amounts and variability of the southern Peruvian Andes in relation to changes in the large-scale atmospheric circulation, quantify the associated uncertainties and discuss some of the implications for society. The analysis relies on climate change projections from the CMIP5 initiative. We show that owing to the complex dynamic influence on local climate and the distinct, small-scaled topographic features of the Andes, Global Climate Models (GCMs) have limited ability to adequately simulate precipitation variability at the local scale. Accordingly, uncertainties in simulated precipitation patterns are considerable. More reliable is the simulation of the mid and upper tropospheric flow, as shown by comparing the model output with global re

  4. Social and economic causes of deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon basin: Natives and colonists. Working paper

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, E.B.

    1991-03-01

    The people in the Peruvian Amazon directly engaged in agriculture are the leading cause of deforestation; and can be divided into two groups, colonists and indigenous groups. The factors affecting the rate at which each group causes deforestation differ. The paper explores these differences in Peru's Upper Huallaga Valley (the principal coca producing region in the world), focusing on the interrelationships between land availability, land tenure laws, and market forces on one hand, and agricultural intensification and deforestation on the other. The study concludes that the technological decisions of the two groups are guided by diverse sets of socioeconomic factors.

  5. Chemical, physical and morphometric properties of Peruvian carrot (Arracacia xanthorrhiza B.) starch.

    PubMed

    Pérez, E E; Borneo, R; Melito, C G; Tovar, J

    1999-01-01

    Starch was isolated from Peruvian carrot (PC)--or arracacha--(Arraccacia xanthorrhiza B.) roots. Its chemical, physical, physicochemical and granular structural properties were compared to those of commercial cassava starch. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a granular size for PC starch ranging between 4 and 26 microns in diameter, with spherical and truncated-egg shapes. PC and cassava starches were similar regarding gross chemical composition and basic physical characteristics but differed in pasting properties, with PC starch showing lower breakdown and consistency indices. The two starches also showed different water absorption and solubility patterns.

  6. Native dialect influences second-language vowel perception: Peruvian versus Iberian Spanish learners of Dutch.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Paola; Williams, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Peruvian Spanish (PS) and Iberian Spanish (IS) learners were tested on their ability to categorically discriminate and identify Dutch vowels. It was predicted that the acoustic differences between the vowel productions of the two dialects, which compare differently to Dutch vowels, would manifest in differential L2 perception for listeners of these two dialects. The results show that although PS learners had higher general L2 proficiency, IS learners were more accurate at discriminating all five contrasts and at identifying six of the L2 Dutch vowels. These findings confirm that acoustic differences in native vowel production lead to differential L2 vowel perception.

  7. Forming of plankton luminescence field by factors of aqueous medium in the water of Peruvian upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavoruev, Valerii

    2004-12-01

    In a period of El Nino the intensity of plankton luminescence and physicochemical water parameters in the water area of the Peruvian upwelling were measured. It is shown that the correlation (R2 = 0.81-0.95) exists between the location of bioluminescence extremes, the salinity gradient, and the oxygen concentration. The distribution of chlorophyll fluorescence maximum coincided with the location of pycnocline (R2 = 0.85). The spatial distribution of intensities of bioluminescence and fluorescence in the region of research was different. It is assumed that this is due to the properties of plankton forming the light fields in the ocean.

  8. Evaluation of antihyperglycemia and antihypertension potential of native Peruvian fruits using in vitro models.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Marcia Da Silva; Ranilla, Lena Galvez; Apostolidis, Emmanouil; Lajolo, Franco Maria; Genovese, Maria Inés; Shetty, Kalidas

    2009-04-01

    Local food diversity and traditional crops are essential for cost-effective management of the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes and associated complications of hypertension. Water and 12% ethanol extracts of native Peruvian fruits such as Lucuma (Pouteria lucuma), Pacae (Inga feuille), Papayita arequipeña (Carica pubescens), Capuli (Prunus capuli), Aguaymanto (Physalis peruviana), and Algarrobo (Prosopis pallida) were evaluated for total phenolics, antioxidant activity based on 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay, and functionality such as in vitro inhibition of alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) relevant for potential management of hyperglycemia and hypertension linked to type 2 diabetes. The total phenolic content ranged from 3.2 (Aguaymanto) to 11.4 (Lucuma fruit) mg/g of sample dry weight. A significant positive correlation was found between total phenolic content and antioxidant activity for the ethanolic extracts. No phenolic compound was detected in Lucuma (fruit and powder) and Pacae. Aqueous extracts from Lucuma and Algarrobo had the highest alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities. Papayita arequipeña and Algarrobo had significant ACE inhibitory activities reflecting antihypertensive potential. These in vitro results point to the excellent potential of Peruvian fruits for food-based strategies for complementing effective antidiabetes and antihypertension solutions based on further animal and clinical studies.

  9. Bender-gradual scoring system: performance of Brazilian and Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Acácia Aparecida Angeli; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto; Rueda, Fabián Javier Marín; Segovia, José Livia

    2014-06-01

    This is a transcultural study of a sample of Peruvian and Brazilian children using the Bender-Gradual Scoring System (B-SPG), which considers shape distortion as the only aspect to be analyzed, assuming that perceptual-motor maturity is independent of cultural context. The study verified that the scoring system has psychometric qualities such that it may be applied in another country. The sample consisted of 231 children, ages 6 to 10 yr., 108 from different districts of the province Lima in Peru, and 123 children from three states in Brazil. During test application, the figures were projected to children in groups. Scoring the protocols for errors was conducted by psychologists experienced in interpreting and correcting the Bender-SPG, who rigorously followed instructions in Portuguese and Spanish. The results obtained with Differential Item Functioning (DIF) analysis indicated that Figures 1 and 4 presented DIF, one favoring Brazilian children and the other Peruvian children. Thus, it was concluded that the overall scores did not favor either population and the Bender-SPG could be used to evaluate perceptual-motor maturity in both countries.

  10. Developing integrated approaches to climate change adaptation in rural communities of the Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggel, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Over centuries, Andean communities have developed strategies to cope with climate variability and extremes, such as cold waves or droughts, which can have severe impacts on their welfare. Nevertheless, the rural population, living at altitudes of 3000 to 4000 m asl or even higher, remains highly vulnerable to external stresses, partly because of the extreme living conditions, partly as a consequence of high poverty. Moreover, recent studies indicate that climatic extreme events have increased in frequency in the past years. A Peruvian-Swiss Climate Change Adaptation Programme in Peru (PACC) is currently undertaking strong efforts to understand the links between climatic conditions and local livelihood assets. The goal is to propose viable strategies for adaptation in collaboration with the local population and governments. The program considers three main areas of action, i.e. (i) water resource management; (ii) disaster risk reduction; and (iii) food security. The scientific studies carried out within the programme follow a highly transdisciplinary approach, spanning the whole range from natural and social sciences. Moreover, the scientific Peruvian-Swiss collaboration is closely connected to people and institutions operating at the implementation and political level. In this contribution we report on first results of thematic studies, address critical questions, and outline the potential of integrative research for climate change adaptation in mountain regions in the context of a developing country.

  11. A phytosociological analysis and synopsis of the dry woodlands and succulent vegetation of the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Galán-DE-Mera, Antonio; Sánchez-Vega, Isidoro; Linares-Perea, Eliana; Campos, José; Montoya, Juan; Vicente-Orellana, José A

    2016-01-01

    A phytosociological approach to dry forest and cactus communities on the occidental slopes of the Peruvian Andes is presented in base of 164 plots carried out following the Braun-Blanquet method. From them, 52 have been made recently, and the other 112 were taken from the literature. After a multivariate analysis, using a hierarchical clustering and a detendred correspondence analysis, the Acacio-Prosopidetea class (dry forest and cactus communities, developed on soils with some edaphic humidity or precipitations derived from El Niño Current), the Opuntietea sphaericae class (cactus communities of central and southern Peru, on few stabilized rocky or sandy soils) and the Carico-Caesalpinietea class (dry forests of the Peruvian coastal desert, influenced by the maritime humidity of the cold Humboldt Current), are differentiated. Within the Acacio-Prosopidetea class, two alliances are commented: the Bursero-Prosopidion pallidae (with two new associations Loxopterygio huasanginis-Neoraimondietum arequipensis and Crotono ruiziani-Acacietum macracanthae), and the new alliance Baccharido-Jacarandion acutifoliae (with the new associations Armatocereo balsasensis-Cercidietum praecocis and Diplopterydo leiocarpae-Acacietum macracanthae). For the Opuntietea sphaericae class, the association Haageocereo versicoloris-Armatocereetum proceri (Espostoo-Neoraimondion) is described on the basis of plots from hyperarid localities of central Peru. Finally, a typological classification of the studied plant communities is given. PMID:27142545

  12. Growth of children in two economically diverse Peruvian high-altitude communities.

    PubMed

    Pawson, I G; Huicho, L; Muro, M; Pacheco, A

    2001-01-01

    The growth of children living in two high-altitude communities associated with an active copper mine in southern Peru was examined. In the community directly associated with mining operations, nutritional and health conditions were believed to be relatively favorable as a result of the substantial mine-related infrastructure that had developed over the previous 12 years. In contrast, few such benefits were available in the other community, which provides limited part-time labor at the mine. Anthropometric data, including measurements of height, weight, skinfold thicknesses, upper arm circumference, and chest dimensions, and determination of bone age, were collected from a total of 880 children between the ages of 4 and 18 years. There were significant differences between the two communities, with those in the mining community exhibiting significantly greater height and weight, a higher level of body fat, and more rapid skeletal development. Among children over the age of 12 years, a plateau in height was seen, suggesting that the benefits to growth resulting from mining-related development were more noticeable in younger children. Compared with Peruvian high-altitude populations examined during the 1960s, both samples from the present study were substantially taller and heavier, suggesting that despite local differences in socioeconomic conditions between the communities studied, overall conditions for growth are generally more favorable than those that existed among Peruvian high-altitude populations surveyed in the 1960s. PMID:11460898

  13. Mesozoic arc magmatism along the southern Peruvian margin during Gondwana breakup and dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekhout, Flora; Spikings, Richard; Sempere, Thierry; Chiaradia, Massimo; Ulianov, Alexey; Schaltegger, Urs

    2012-08-01

    A high-resolution U-Pb zircon geochronological study of plutonic units along the south Peruvian margin between 17° and 18°S allows the integration of the geochemical, geodynamic and tectonic evolution of this part of the Andean margin. This study focuses on the composite Jurassic-early Cretaceous Ilo Batholith that was emplaced along the southern Peruvian coast during two episodes of intrusive magmatism; a first period between 173 and 152 Ma (with a peak in magmatic activity between roughly 168 and 162 Ma) and a second period between 110 and 106 Ma. Emplacement of the Jurassic part of the composite Ilo Batholith shortly post-dated the accumulation of the volcanosedimentary succession it intruded (Chocolate formation), which allows to estimate a subsidence rate for this unit of ~ 3.5 km/Ma. The emplacement of the main peak of Jurassic plutonism of the Ilo Batholith was also closely coeval with widespread and repeated slumping (during deposition of the Cachíos Formation) in the back-arc region, suggesting a common causal link between these phenomena, which is discussed in the context of an observed 100 km trenchward arc migration at ~ 175 Ma, and the relation with extensional tectonics that prevailed along the Central Andean margin during Pangaea break-up.

  14. Boundaries of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone shaped by coherent mesoscale dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettencourt, João H.; López, Cristóbal; Hernández-García, Emilio; Montes, Ivonne; Sudre, Joël; Dewitte, Boris; Paulmier, Aurélien; Garçon, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved oxygen in sea water affects marine habitats and biogeochemical cycles. Oceanic zones with oxygen deficits represent 7% of the volume and 8% of the area of the oceans, and are thought to be expanding. One of the most pronounced lies in the region off Peru, where mesoscale activity in the form of fronts and eddies is strong. Here, we study the dynamics of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone in a Lagrangian framework, using a coupled physical-biogeochemical numerical model and finite-size Lyapunov exponent fields, to evaluate the role of mesoscale activity. We find that, at depths between 380 and 600 m, mesoscale structures have two distinct roles. First, their mean positions and paths delimit and maintain the oxygen minimum zone boundaries. Second, their high-frequency fluctuations inject oxygen across the oxygen minimum zone boundaries and eddy fluxes are one order of magnitude higher than mean oxygen fluxes. We conclude that these eddy fluxes contribute to the ventilation of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone.

  15. Scenes from the past: MR imaging versus CT of ancient Peruvian and Egyptian mummified tissues.

    PubMed

    Ohrström, Lena Maria; von Waldburg, Hendrik; Speier, Peter; Bock, Michael; Suri, Roland Erwin; Rühli, Frank Jakobus

    2013-01-01

    Ancient Egyptian and Peruvian mummies are extremely valuable historical remains, and noninvasive methods for their examination are desirable. The current standard of reference for radiologic imaging of mummies is computed tomography (CT), with tissue having a homogeneous appearance on all CT images. It was long believed that ancient mummified tissue could not be studied with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging because of the low water content in mummies. Recently, however, the usefulness of MR imaging in the evaluation of mummified tissue was demonstrated for the first time, with use of a special ultrashort echo time technique. The authors of the present study acquired and analyzed MR imaging and CT data from the left hands of two ancient Egyptian mummies and the head of a third Egyptian mummy (ca 1500-1100 bce), as well as data from an ancient Peruvian mummy (ca 1100 ce). CT was found to provide superior detail of the anatomic structures, mainly because of its higher spatial resolution. The signal intensity of mummified tissue varied greatly on MR images; thus, the quality of these images is not yet comparable to that of clinical MR images, and further research will be needed to determine the full capacity of MR imaging in this setting. Nevertheless, additional information may theoretically be obtained with MR imaging, which should be viewed as complementary to, rather than a replacement for, CT.

  16. A phytosociological analysis and synopsis of the dry woodlands and succulent vegetation of the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Galán-DE-Mera, Antonio; Sánchez-Vega, Isidoro; Linares-Perea, Eliana; Campos, José; Montoya, Juan; Vicente-Orellana, José A

    2016-01-01

    A phytosociological approach to dry forest and cactus communities on the occidental slopes of the Peruvian Andes is presented in base of 164 plots carried out following the Braun-Blanquet method. From them, 52 have been made recently, and the other 112 were taken from the literature. After a multivariate analysis, using a hierarchical clustering and a detendred correspondence analysis, the Acacio-Prosopidetea class (dry forest and cactus communities, developed on soils with some edaphic humidity or precipitations derived from El Niño Current), the Opuntietea sphaericae class (cactus communities of central and southern Peru, on few stabilized rocky or sandy soils) and the Carico-Caesalpinietea class (dry forests of the Peruvian coastal desert, influenced by the maritime humidity of the cold Humboldt Current), are differentiated. Within the Acacio-Prosopidetea class, two alliances are commented: the Bursero-Prosopidion pallidae (with two new associations Loxopterygio huasanginis-Neoraimondietum arequipensis and Crotono ruiziani-Acacietum macracanthae), and the new alliance Baccharido-Jacarandion acutifoliae (with the new associations Armatocereo balsasensis-Cercidietum praecocis and Diplopterydo leiocarpae-Acacietum macracanthae). For the Opuntietea sphaericae class, the association Haageocereo versicoloris-Armatocereetum proceri (Espostoo-Neoraimondion) is described on the basis of plots from hyperarid localities of central Peru. Finally, a typological classification of the studied plant communities is given.

  17. New oleanan-type triterpene and cincholic acid glycosides from Peruvian "Uña de Gato" (Uncaria tomentosa).

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Mariko; Hashimoto, Ken-Ichiro; Sandoval, Manuel; Aimi, Norio; Takayama, Hiromitsu

    2004-10-01

    A new oleanan-type triterpene and three new cincholic acid glycosides were isolated from Peruvian "Una de Gato" (Cat's claw, plant of origin: Uncaria tomentosa), a traditional herbal medicine in Peru. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis. PMID:15467250

  18. An Ancestral Language to Speak with the "Other": Closing down Ideological Spaces of a Language Policy in the Peruvian Andes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavala, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Using a multilayered, ethnographic and critical approach to language policy and planning, this article examines a language policy favoring Quechua in Apurímac in the Southern Peruvian Andes, which is being imagined as an integrated community unified by the local language. This study presents a case in which top-down policies open up ideological…

  19. Massive parasitism by Gussevia tucunarense (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) in fingerlings of bujurqui-tucunare cultured in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Patrick D; Mertins, Omar; Mathews, John P D; Orbe, Rosa I

    2013-06-01

    A high infestation of the monogenean Gussevia tucunarense in a cultivation of bujurqui-tucunare was reported. The prevalence was 100%. The mean intensity and abundance of the parasite was 164.4 of parasites per individual. This is the first report of a high infestation by G. tucunarense in C. semifasciatus cultured from the Peruvian Amazon. PMID:23666660

  20. [Balancing risks and benefits of mammography screening for breast cancer: would you support its recommendation in Peruvian women?].

    PubMed

    Posso, Margarita; Puig, Teresa; Bonfill, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the balance between benefits and risks of population-based mammography screening programs in Peruvian women. We followed the criteria proposed by the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) working group. A generic search strategy for published studies was performed using Medline and other sources of national data (gray literature). The evidence of benefits, risks, costs and preferences of the population was used in order to state a recommendation in favour, or against, screening. We found five systematic reviews (SR) that evaluated the balance between benefit and risks, two economic evaluations based on Peruvian data, and one study that reported the preferences of Peruvian women. The quality of evidence of the SR was moderate in favour of screening in women aged 50-69 years. The balance of risks and benefits showed a higher probability of overdiagnosis compared with the reduction in mortality. The most cost-effective strategy was the triennial mammography. Perceived barriers could seriously compromise the participation of women. In conclusion, the recommendation of mammography screening for Peruvian women is weak, even more if we take into account other health necessities of the population. However, if implemented, triennial mammography in women aged 50-69 years could be the more suitable screening strategy.

  1. Development of Teleological Explanations in Peruvian Quechua-Speaking and U.S. English-Speaking Preschoolers and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez Tapia, Ingrid; Gelman, Susan A.; Hollander, Michelle A.; Manczak, Erika M.; Mannheim, Bruce; Escalante, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Teleological reasoning involves the assumption that entities exist for a purpose (giraffes have long necks for reaching leaves). This study examines how teleological reasoning relates to cultural context, by studying teleological reasoning in 61 Quechua-speaking Peruvian preschoolers (M[subscript age] = 5.3 years) and adults in an indigenous…

  2. Massive parasitism by Gussevia tucunarense (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) in fingerlings of bujurqui-tucunare cultured in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Patrick D; Mertins, Omar; Mathews, John P D; Orbe, Rosa I

    2013-06-01

    A high infestation of the monogenean Gussevia tucunarense in a cultivation of bujurqui-tucunare was reported. The prevalence was 100%. The mean intensity and abundance of the parasite was 164.4 of parasites per individual. This is the first report of a high infestation by G. tucunarense in C. semifasciatus cultured from the Peruvian Amazon.

  3. Morphotectonic, Morphometric, and Critical Taper Analysis of the Offshore Peruvian Continental Slope - Implications for Wedge Mechanics and Submarine Landscape Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukowski, N.; Hampel, A.; Hoth, S.; Norabuena, E. O.; Bialas, J.

    2004-12-01

    We use new swath bathymetry data acquired during the RV Sonne cruise GEOPECO and complement them with swath data from adjacent regions to analyse the morphotectonics of the Peruvian convergent margin. The Nazca plate is not covered with sediments and therefore has a rough surface along the entire Peruvian trench. The styles of roughness differ significantly along the margin with linear morphological features trending in various directions, most of them oblique to the trench and roughness magnitudes of a few to several hundred meters. Oblique convergence and resulting strain partitioning cause a transtensional stress regime in the outer fore-arc. The lower slope is locally very rough and at the verge of failure throughout the entire Peruvian margin, as a result of subduction erosion causing the lower slope to oversteepen. Critical taper analysis is applied to the forearc wedge along several transects. Using curvature attributes to quantitatively examine the morphology in the Yaquina and Mendaña areas revealed that the latter shows a larger local roughness both seaward and landward of the trench however, the amplitude of morphological roughness is larger in the Yaquina area. We identified a 250 km2 large slump on the Lima middle slope. Morphometric dating suggests an age of 74,500 years within 50% error and incision rates on the upper slope are between 0.1 and 0.3 mm per year suggesting that landscape evolution on the Peruvian submarine continental slope is similarly slow than that in the Atacama desert.

  4. Morphotectonic, Morphometric, and Critical Taper Analysis of the Offshore Peruvian Continental Slope - Implications for Wedge Mechanics and Submarine Landscape Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukowski, N.; Hampel, A.; Hoth, S.; Norabuena, E. O.; Bialas, J.

    2007-12-01

    We use new swath bathymetry data acquired during the RV Sonne cruise GEOPECO and complement them with swath data from adjacent regions to analyse the morphotectonics of the Peruvian convergent margin. The Nazca plate is not covered with sediments and therefore has a rough surface along the entire Peruvian trench. The styles of roughness differ significantly along the margin with linear morphological features trending in various directions, most of them oblique to the trench and roughness magnitudes of a few to several hundred meters. Oblique convergence and resulting strain partitioning cause a transtensional stress regime in the outer fore-arc. The lower slope is locally very rough and at the verge of failure throughout the entire Peruvian margin, as a result of subduction erosion causing the lower slope to oversteepen. Critical taper analysis is applied to the forearc wedge along several transects. Using curvature attributes to quantitatively examine the morphology in the Yaquina and Mendaña areas revealed that the latter shows a larger local roughness both seaward and landward of the trench however, the amplitude of morphological roughness is larger in the Yaquina area. We identified a 250 km2 large slump on the Lima middle slope. Morphometric dating suggests an age of 74,500 years within 50% error and incision rates on the upper slope are between 0.1 and 0.3 mm per year suggesting that landscape evolution on the Peruvian submarine continental slope is similarly slow than that in the Atacama desert.

  5. Three-Dimensional Gravity and Magnetic Modelling Along the Peruvian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, A.; Sabetian, R.

    2015-12-01

    The gravity and magnetic models are constructed for three areas along the Peruvian margin between 7.25°S and 16.75°S and are based on the all available wide-angle seismic velocity models. The gravity and magnetic models image nearly the whole margin which has been only partly resolved with geophysical methods up to now. The continental margin is characterized by positive free-air anomalies of varying amplitudes, indicating that the margin has been shaped by the subduction of different features on the Nazca Plate. In the Yaquina Area (7.25°S to 11°S) gravity anomalies caused by the Trujillo Trough and the Mendaña Fracture Zone are successfully modelled with remarkable undulations in the layer geometry of the oceanic crust. Along the continental margin, especially in the Lima Area (10.50°S to 14.40°S), strong undulations of the lower continental crust influence the upper sedimentary layers and support the development of basins along the Peruvian margin. The theory stating that the Peruvian margin is uplifted by the subducting Nazca Ridge is supported by gravity modelling. Consequently the buoyant Nazca Ridge is, at least partly, responsible for the extended region of flat subduction. The thickened and slightly asymmetrical crust of the Nazca Ridge is envisaged in gravity modelling. In the Nazca Ridge Area (14.25°S to 16.75°S) no accretionary prism is modelled. We conclude that the ridge is eroding the continental margin; furthermore the subduction of eroded sediments is probable. Gravity modelling suggests that the Nazca Ridge has fractured the continental margin. North of the ridge, in the Lima Area, a rather uniform accretionary complex is observed. This indicates that, after the margin was eroded by the southwards moving Nazca Ridge, the prism rapidly reached its stable size. In the Yaquina Area an accretionary prism is modelled in the whole research area but local variations of its location and structure indicate the former erosive influence on the

  6. [A phytosociological interpretation of vegetation from sandy hills of the Peruvian desert].

    PubMed

    Galán de Mera, Antonio; Linares Perea, Eliana; Campos de la Cruz, José; Vicente Orellana, José Alfredo

    2011-06-01

    The vegetation of the sandy hills ("lomas") constitutes the main originality of the Peruvian and Chilean desert with a high number of endemics that shapes the vicarious associations. In this work, a phytosociological view of sandy environments of the Peruvian coastal desert is presented. According to the Braun-Blanquet method, we have made up 32 phytosociological inventories and added 138 ones from others authors. In each inventory, we have analyzed its floristic composition and ecological parameters, as altitude, soil and geomorphology. All releves were synthesized in a table to deduce the different associations, higher phytosociological units, and the distribu tion of its flora along the Peruvian coast and the Andean Cordillera. Using the Shannon-Wiener diversity index, the diversity of this flora is discussed making a comparison with historical data about the use of the territory with livestock during pre-Inca and Inca cultures, and Spanish invasion. As a result, two associations from Southern Peru -Nolanetum scaposo-spathulatae and Palauetum camanensis-weberbaueri-, two alliances -Nolanion humifusae from central Peru, and Nolanion spathulatae from the Southern Peru- and a new order -Tetragonio crystallinae-Plantaginetalia limensis- are described. In Nolanetum scaposo-spathulatae, Dictyophragnus englerianus, Leptoglossis lomana, Nolana scaposa, N. spathulata, Palaua velutina and Tetragonia vestita are the main characteristics, while in Palauetum camanensis-weberbaueri association N. scaposa and P. velutina are replaced by Palaua camanensis and P. weberbaueri. Nolanion humifusae alliance integrates species as Geranium limae, Hymenocallis amancaes, Nolana humifusa, N. latipes, Palaua rhombifolia or Villanova oppositifolia. Likewise, Cistanthe weberbaueri, Cryptantha parviflora, Hoffmannseggia miranda, Lupinus mollendoensis, Nolana confinis, N. pallidula, N. scaposa, N. spathulata, Palaua camanensis, P. velutina, P. weberbaueri, Tetragonia vestita and

  7. [A phytosociological interpretation of vegetation from sandy hills of the Peruvian desert].

    PubMed

    Galán de Mera, Antonio; Linares Perea, Eliana; Campos de la Cruz, José; Vicente Orellana, José Alfredo

    2011-06-01

    The vegetation of the sandy hills ("lomas") constitutes the main originality of the Peruvian and Chilean desert with a high number of endemics that shapes the vicarious associations. In this work, a phytosociological view of sandy environments of the Peruvian coastal desert is presented. According to the Braun-Blanquet method, we have made up 32 phytosociological inventories and added 138 ones from others authors. In each inventory, we have analyzed its floristic composition and ecological parameters, as altitude, soil and geomorphology. All releves were synthesized in a table to deduce the different associations, higher phytosociological units, and the distribu tion of its flora along the Peruvian coast and the Andean Cordillera. Using the Shannon-Wiener diversity index, the diversity of this flora is discussed making a comparison with historical data about the use of the territory with livestock during pre-Inca and Inca cultures, and Spanish invasion. As a result, two associations from Southern Peru -Nolanetum scaposo-spathulatae and Palauetum camanensis-weberbaueri-, two alliances -Nolanion humifusae from central Peru, and Nolanion spathulatae from the Southern Peru- and a new order -Tetragonio crystallinae-Plantaginetalia limensis- are described. In Nolanetum scaposo-spathulatae, Dictyophragnus englerianus, Leptoglossis lomana, Nolana scaposa, N. spathulata, Palaua velutina and Tetragonia vestita are the main characteristics, while in Palauetum camanensis-weberbaueri association N. scaposa and P. velutina are replaced by Palaua camanensis and P. weberbaueri. Nolanion humifusae alliance integrates species as Geranium limae, Hymenocallis amancaes, Nolana humifusa, N. latipes, Palaua rhombifolia or Villanova oppositifolia. Likewise, Cistanthe weberbaueri, Cryptantha parviflora, Hoffmannseggia miranda, Lupinus mollendoensis, Nolana confinis, N. pallidula, N. scaposa, N. spathulata, Palaua camanensis, P. velutina, P. weberbaueri, Tetragonia vestita and

  8. Peruvian sediments as recorders of an evolving hiatus for the last 22 thousand years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Zeynep; Schönfeld, Joachim; Glock, Nicolaas; Dengler, Marcus; Mosch, Thomas; Sommer, Stefan; Elger, Judith; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2016-04-01

    The Peruvian continental margin is characterized by the presence of one of the strongest and most distinct Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) in today's oceans. Therefore, it has long been in the focus of oceanographic and geological investigations. Observations indicate that OMZs are expanding in relation with currently changing climate. To advance understanding of the temporal evolution of OMZs and climate change, complete paleoceanographic and palaeoclimatological reconstructions are needed. However, the development of paleoenvironmental scenarios for the period since the Last Glacial Maximum at this region was hampered by a ubiquitous hiatus and short-term interruptions of the stratigraphical record. In the present study, we combined the stratigraphical information from 31 sediment cores from the Peruvian margin located between 3 and 18°S and water depths of 90 to 1300 m within and below today's OMZ, in order to determine the extent of the hiatus and assess the responsible mechanisms. A widespread unconformity and related erosional features, omission surfaces and phosphorites, were observed in sediment cores from the area south of 7°S, depicting a prograding feature on the continental slope from south to north during the deglaciation. Combining recent oceanographic and sedimentological observations, it is inferred that, tide-topography interaction and resulting non-linear internal waves (NLIWs) shape the slope by erosion, carry sediments upslope or downslope and leave widespread phosphoritic lag sediments, while the Peru Chile Undercurrent (PCUC) transports the resuspended sediments southward causing non-deposition. This exceptional sedimentary regime makes the Peruvian margin a modern analogue for such environments. Overall, our compilation of downcore records showed that enhanced bottom currents due to tide-topography interaction were progressively evolving and affected a wider area with the onset of the last deglaciation. Elevated tidal amplitudes and variability

  9. Wind Disturbance Produced Changes in Tree Species Assemblage in the Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rifai, S. W.; Chambers, J. Q.; Negron Juarez, R. I.; Ramirez, F.; Tello, R.; Alegria Muñoz, W.

    2010-12-01

    Wind disturbance has been a frequently overlooked abiotic cause of mass tree mortality in the Amazon basin. In the Peruvian Amazon these wind disturbances are produced by meteorological events such as convective systems. Downbursts for example produce short term descendent wind speeds that can be in excess of 30 m s-1. These are capable of producing tree blowdowns which have been reported to be as large as 33 km2 in the Amazon basin. We used the chronosequence of Landsat Satellite imagery to find and locate where these blowdowns have occurred in the Loreto region of the Peruvian Amazon. Spectral Mixture Analysis was used to estimate the proportion landcover of green vegetation, non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV), soil and shade in each pixel. The change in NPV was calculated by subtracting the NPV signal in the Landsat image prior to the blowdown occurrence, from the image following the disturbance. Our prior research has established a linear relationship between tree mortality and change in NPV. It is hypothesized that these mass tree mortality events result in changes in the tree species assemblage of affected forests. Here we present preliminary tree species assemblage data from two sites in the Peruvian Amazon near Iquitos, Peru. The site (ALP) at the Allpahuayo Mishana reserve (3.945 S, 73.455 W) is 30 km south of Iquitos, Peru, and hosts the remnants of a 50 ha blowdown that occurred in either 1992 or 1993. Another site (NAPO) on the Napo river about 60 km north of Iquitos, is the location of an approximately 300 ha blowdown that occurred in 1998. At each site, a 3000 m x 10 m transect encompassing non disturbed and disturbed areas was installed, and trees greater than 10 cm diameter at breast height were measured for diameter, height and were identified to the species. Stem density of trees with diameter at breast height > 10 cm, and tree height appear to be similar both inside and outside the blowdown affected areas of the forests at both sites. At the ALP

  10. Structural factors that increase HIV/STI vulnerability among indigenous people in the Peruvian amazon.

    PubMed

    Orellana, E Roberto; Alva, Isaac E; Cárcamo, Cesar P; García, Patricia J

    2013-09-01

    We examined structural factors-social, political, economic, and environmental-that increase vulnerability to HIV among indigenous people in the Peruvian Amazon. Indigenous adults belonging to 12 different ethnic groups were purposively recruited in four Amazonian river ports and 16 indigenous villages. Qualitative data revealed a complex set of structural factors that give rise to environments of risk where health is constantly challenged. Ferryboats that cross Amazonian rivers are settings where unprotected sex-including transactional sex between passengers and boat crew and commercial sex work-often take place. Population mobility and mixing also occurs in settings like the river docks, mining sites, and other resource extraction camps, where heavy drinking and unprotected sex work are common. Multilevel, combination prevention strategies that integrate empirically based interventions with indigenous knowledge are urgently needed, not only to reduce vulnerability to HIV transmission, but also to eliminate the structural determinants of indigenous people's health.

  11. Accelerating to Zero: Strategies to Eliminate Malaria in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Quispe, Antonio M.; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Rodriguez, Hugo; Clendenes, Martin; Cabezas, Cesar; Leon, Luis M.; Chuquiyauri, Raul; Moreno, Marta; Kaslow, David C.; Grogl, Max; Herrera, Sócrates; Magill, Alan J.; Kosek, Margaret; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Lescano, Andres G.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    In February 2014, the Malaria Elimination Working Group, in partnership with the Peruvian Ministry of Health (MoH), hosted its first international conference on malaria elimination in Iquitos, Peru. The 2-day meeting gathered 85 malaria experts, including 18 international panelists, 23 stakeholders from different malaria-endemic regions of Peru, and 11 MoH authorities. The main outcome was consensus that implementing a malaria elimination project in the Amazon region is achievable, but would require: 1) a comprehensive strategic plan, 2) the altering of current programmatic guidelines from control toward elimination by including symptomatic as well as asymptomatic individuals for antimalarial therapy and transmission-blocking interventions, and 3) the prioritization of community-based active case detection with proper rapid diagnostic tests to interrupt transmission. Elimination efforts must involve key stakeholders and experts at every level of government and include integrated research activities to evaluate, implement, and tailor sustainable interventions appropriate to the region.

  12. Iron sufficiency with prolonged exclusive breast-feeding in Peruvian infants.

    PubMed

    Pastel, R A; Howanitz, P J; Oski, F A

    1981-10-01

    Serum ferritin and erythrocyte porphyrin concentrations were measured in seven Peruvian infants, who ranged in age from 7.5-12.0 months (mean: 9.3 months), who had been exclusively breast-fed all their lives. No infant had evidence of iron deficiency as reflected by a reduced serum ferritin, or an increased erythrocyte porphyrin. Mean serum ferritin and erythrocyte porphyrin values in these seven infants were similar to those of 40 nonanemic, noniron-deficient U.S. infants who ranged in age from 9 to 12 months, on a mixed diet. These findings illustrate that exclusively breast-feeding an infant for at least 9 months of life meets the iron requirements of the full-term infant.

  13. Nine genera of Eucnemidae (Coleoptera) new to Peru, with a key to Peruvian genera

    PubMed Central

    Muona, Jyrki; Linna, Ari; Sääksjärvi, Ilari E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thirteen genera of Eucnemidae containing forty species were collected from the Iquitos region in Peru. Nine of the genera are new to the country: Rhagomicrus Fleutiaux, 1902, Adelorhagus Horn, 1890, Adelothyreus Chevrolat, 1867, Microrhagus Dejean, 1833, Dyscharachthis Blackburn, 1900, Heterotaxis Bonvouloir, 1871, Spinifornax Fleutiaux, 1926, Serrifornax Fleutiaux, 1926 and Maelodrus Fleutiaux, 1928. The previous eucnemid record from Peru contained eleven species in ten genera. Only one of the forty species caught, Entomophthalmus americanus Bonvouloir, was previously known and described from the country. Dyscharachthis, Maelodrus and Adelorhagus are recorded from South America for the first time. Many of the collected species seem to favor white-sand forest as their habitat. Possible reasons for this are discussed. A list of eucnemids from Peru is included, containing taxa already recorded from the country and also taxa that are likely to occur there. A key to the Peruvian genera is included. PMID:25834475

  14. Preferences for intervention among Peruvian women in intimate partner violence relationships.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Swee May; Espinoza, Damarys; Rondon, Marta B; Jimenez, Maria Luisa; Sanchez, Elena; Ojeda, Nely; Sanchez, Sixto; Williams, Michelle A

    2015-01-01

    We sought to identify what abused Peruvian women want or need as intervention strategies. We conducted five focus groups with 30 women with prior or current experience with intimate partner violence. Participants noted that abused women need compassionate support, professional counseling, and informational and practical (e.g., work skills training, employment, shelter, financial support) interventions. We propose a 2-tiered intervention strategy that includes community support groups and individual professional counseling. This strategy is intended to offer broad coverage, meeting the needs of large groups of women who experience abuse, whereas providing specialized counseling for those requiring intensive support. Respect for each woman's autonomy in the decision-making process is a priority. Interventions targeted toward women and men should address structural factors that contribute to violence against women.

  15. Paleoseismicity and neotectonics of the Cordillera Blanca fault zone, Northern Peruvian Andes.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, D.P.

    1988-01-01

    The Cordillera Blanca fault zone is a major W dipping normal fault that bounds the W side of a 120- 170-km wide zone of active extension along the crest of the N Peruvian Andes. The fault is approximately 210 km long and exhibits continuous geomorphic evidence of repeated late Pleistocene and Holocene displacements but has not been the source of historical or teleseismically recorded earthquakes. Trenching and mapping of fault scarps provide new information on earthquake recurrence, slip rate, timing of the most recent events and Andean neotectonics. At Quebrada Queroccocha, 55 km from valley fill lacustrine and fluvial deposits are displaced 7.5-8 m. Scarp profiles, tectonic terraces, and trench exposures indicate 5 to 7 scarp-forming earthquakes of 2-3 m per event during the past 11 000-14 000 yrs at this location.-from Author

  16. The microeconomics of sexual exploitation of girls and young women in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Mujica, Jaris

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the sexual exploitation of girls and young women as an increasing phenomenon within the extractive industries of wood, oil, minerals and gas in Peruvian Amazonia. The analysis focuses on the city of Pucallpa and the northern part of the Ucayali River and aims to identify the social and economic dynamics underpinning the commercial sexual exploitation of female children and teenagers around the main river port. The study describes the local operating mechanisms of bars and restaurants in the port, the demand for and perceptions of the sexual exploitation of children and teenagers, and the economic logic that it entails. Using a discourse analytic approach, it is argued that this is a business whose profitability is tied to the trade in alcoholic beverages and foods and which responds to a set of family connections and networks.

  17. Structural Factors That Increase HIV/STI Vulnerability Among Indigenous People in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, E. Roberto; Alva, Isaac E.; Cárcamo, Cesar P.; García, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    We examined structural factors—social, political, economic, and environmental—that increase vulnerability to HIV among indigenous people in the Peruvian Amazon. Indigenous adults belonging to 12 different ethnic groups were purposively recruited in four Amazonian river ports and 16 indigenous villages. Qualitative data revealed a complex set of structural factors that give rise to environments of risk where health is constantly challenged. Ferryboats that cross Amazonian rivers are settings where unprotected sex—including transactional sex between passengers and boat crew and commercial sex work—often take place. Population mobility and mixing also occurs in settings like the river docks, mining sites, and other resource extraction camps, where heavy drinking and unprotected sex work are common. Multilevel, combination prevention strategies that integrate empirically based interventions with indigenous knowledge are urgently needed, not only to reduce vulnerability to HIV transmission, but also to eliminate the structural determinants of indigenous people’s health. PMID:23925407

  18. Structural factors that increase HIV/STI vulnerability among indigenous people in the Peruvian amazon.

    PubMed

    Orellana, E Roberto; Alva, Isaac E; Cárcamo, Cesar P; García, Patricia J

    2013-09-01

    We examined structural factors-social, political, economic, and environmental-that increase vulnerability to HIV among indigenous people in the Peruvian Amazon. Indigenous adults belonging to 12 different ethnic groups were purposively recruited in four Amazonian river ports and 16 indigenous villages. Qualitative data revealed a complex set of structural factors that give rise to environments of risk where health is constantly challenged. Ferryboats that cross Amazonian rivers are settings where unprotected sex-including transactional sex between passengers and boat crew and commercial sex work-often take place. Population mobility and mixing also occurs in settings like the river docks, mining sites, and other resource extraction camps, where heavy drinking and unprotected sex work are common. Multilevel, combination prevention strategies that integrate empirically based interventions with indigenous knowledge are urgently needed, not only to reduce vulnerability to HIV transmission, but also to eliminate the structural determinants of indigenous people's health. PMID:23925407

  19. Preferences for Intervention Among Peruvian Women in Intimate Partner Violence Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Cripe, Swee May; Espinoza, Damarys; Rondon, Marta B.; Jimenez, Maria Luisa; Sanchez, Elena; Ojeda, Nely; Sanchez, Sixto; Williams, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to identify what abused Peruvian women want or need as intervention strategies. We conducted five focus groups with thirty women with prior or current experience with intimate partner violence. Participants noted that abused women need compassionate support, professional counseling, informational and practical (e.g., work skills training, employment, shelter, financial support) interventions. We propose a two-tiered intervention strategy that includes community support groups and individual professional counseling. This strategy is intended to offer broad coverage, meeting the needs of large groups of women who experience abuse, while providing specialized counseling for those requiring intensive support. Respect for each woman’s autonomy in the decision-making process is a priority. Interventions targeted towards women and men should address structural factors that contribute to violence against women. PMID:25741931

  20. Climate change in Peruvian newspapers: The role of foreign voices in a context of vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Bruno; Meisner, Mark

    2013-05-01

    Media coverage of climate change has been an area of continued research during the last years, mostly with a focus on developed countries. This study attempts to contribute to this body of work by analyzing the coverage in a developing country. The study presents a content analysis of newspaper coverage of climate change in Peru through the study of frames, geographical focus, and climate change strategies (mitigation/adaptation). Additionally, the role of foreign voices is assessed by comparing the coverage by Peruvian reporters with the coverage by wire services, and by determining the types of sources present in the articles. Results show a prevalence of an effects frame, followed by a politics frame. Also, the study found a significant amount of stories originating from wire services. In general, coverage prioritizes mitigation strategies and policies while providing limited attention to adaptation, which can be insufficient for a highly vulnerable country. PMID:23833108

  1. Molecular and morphological evidence of Taenia omissa in pumas (Puma concolor) in the Peruvian Highlands.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Puerta, Luis Antonio; Alarcon, Virgilio; Pacheco, Joel; Franco, Francisco; Lopez-Urbina, Maria Teresa; Gonzalez, Armando Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    A total of 41 cestodes were collected during necropsy examination on 2 pumas (Puma concolor) that were found in 2 communities in Canchis province, Cuzco region, Peru, at 4500 meters above sea level (Peruvian Andes). The cestodes were evaluated morphologically and molecularly. A fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1) was used as a genetic marker. All the cestodes were identified as Taenia omissa. In the present report, we give a brief description by molecular and morphological diagnosis of the cestodes and compare nucleotide sequences with previous isolates from GenBank. Upon comparison, the sequences showed a difference in the cox1 gene of 5.1 to 5.3% with other teniids sequences. This finding constitutes the first report of T. omissa in Peru and expands the geographic distribution of this parasite.

  2. Traditional use of the Andean flicker (Colaptes rupicola) as a galactagogue in the Peruvian Andes

    PubMed Central

    Froemming, Steve

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the use of the dried meat and feathers of the Andean Flicker (Colaptes rupicola) to increase the milk supply of nursing women and domestic animals in the Andes. The treatment is of preColumbian origin, but continues to be used in some areas, including the village in the southern Peruvian highlands where I do ethnographic research. I explore the factors giving rise to and sustaining the practice, relate it to other galactagogues used in the Andes and to the use of birds in ethnomedical and ethnoveterinary treatments in general, and situate it within the general tendency in the Andes and elsewhere to replicate human relations in the treatment of valuable livestock. The bird's use as a galactagogue appears to be motivated by both metaphorical associations and its perceived efficacy, and conceptually blends human and animal healthcare domains. PMID:16677398

  3. The microeconomics of sexual exploitation of girls and young women in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Mujica, Jaris

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the sexual exploitation of girls and young women as an increasing phenomenon within the extractive industries of wood, oil, minerals and gas in Peruvian Amazonia. The analysis focuses on the city of Pucallpa and the northern part of the Ucayali River and aims to identify the social and economic dynamics underpinning the commercial sexual exploitation of female children and teenagers around the main river port. The study describes the local operating mechanisms of bars and restaurants in the port, the demand for and perceptions of the sexual exploitation of children and teenagers, and the economic logic that it entails. Using a discourse analytic approach, it is argued that this is a business whose profitability is tied to the trade in alcoholic beverages and foods and which responds to a set of family connections and networks. PMID:23713475

  4. Needs, acceptability, and value of humanitarian medical assistance in remote Peruvian Amazon riverine communities.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Juan F; Halsey, Eric S; Bayer, Angela M; Beltran, Martin; Razuri, Hugo R; Velasquez, Daniel E; Cama, Vitaliano A; Graf, Paul C F; Quispe, Antonio M; Maves, Ryan C; Montgomery, Joel M; Sanders, John W; Lescano, Andres G

    2015-06-01

    Much debate exists regarding the need, acceptability, and value of humanitarian medical assistance. We conducted a cross-sectional study on 457 children under 5 years from four remote riverine communities in the Peruvian Amazon and collected anthropometric measures, blood samples (1-4 years), and stool samples. Focus groups and key informant interviews assessed perspectives regarding medical aid delivered by foreigners. The prevalence of stunting, anemia, and intestinal parasites was 20%, 37%, and 62%, respectively. Infection with multiple parasites, usually geohelminths, was detected in 41% of children. The prevalence of intestinal parasites both individual and polyparasitism increased with age. Participants from smaller communities less exposed to foreigners expressed lack of trust and fear of them. However, participants from all communities were positive about foreigners visiting to provide health support. Prevalent health needs such as parasitic infections and anemia may be addressed by short-term medical interventions. There is a perceived openness to and acceptability of medical assistance delivered by foreign personnel.

  5. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its relationship with leisure time physical activity among Peruvian adults

    PubMed Central

    Gelaye, Bizu; Tafur, Luis Revilla; Lopez, Tania; Sanchez, Sixto; Williams, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an important risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Previous studies have suggested an inverse relationship between physical activity and MetS. However, these findings were inconsistent; and few investigators have examined these associations among South Americans. We estimated the prevalence of MetS and its association with leisure time physical activity (LTPA) among Peruvian adults. Materials and methods This cross-sectional study of 1,675 individuals (619 men and 1056 women) was conducted among residents in Lima and Callao, Peru. Information about LTPA, socio-demographic, and other lifestyle characteristics were collected by interview. The presence of MetS was defined using the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria. Results Overall, the prevalence of MetS was 26.9% and was more common among women (29.9%) than men (21.6%). Habitual participation in LTPA was associated with a 23% reduced risk of MetS (OR=0.77; 95% CI: 0.60–1.03). There was an inverse trend of MetS risk with amount of LTPA (p=0.016). Compared with non-exercisers, those who exercised < 150 minutes/week had a 21% reduced risk of MetS (AOR= 0.79; 95% CI 0.60–1.04). Individuals who exercised ≥ 150 minutes/week, compared with non-exercisers, had a 42% reduced risk of MetS (AOR=0.58; 95% CI: 0.36–0.93). Associations of similar magnitudes were observed when men and women were studied separately. Conclusion These data document a high prevalence of MetS and suggest an association with LTPA among urban dwelling Peruvians. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these observations and to examine interventions that may promote increased physical activity in this population. PMID:19563445

  6. Insight on the Peruvian Amazon River: A Planform Metric Characterization of its Morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A. M. P.; Ortals, C.; Frias, C. E.; Abad, J. D.; Vizcarra, J.

    2014-12-01

    Starting in Peru, the Amazon River flows through Colombia and Brazil; additionally, tributaries from Bolivia, Venezuela, and Ecuador contribute to the massive river and its unique geomorphic features. Accordingly, the Amazon Basin has become an important aspect of South America; it is an area of extraordinary biodiversity, rich resources, and unique cultures. However, due to the sheer magnitude and exceptionality of the Amazon River, research regarding the morphodynamic processes that shape and define the river has been difficult. Consequently, current research has not completely understood the planform dynamics of some portions of this river that present a main channel and secondary channels known as "anabranching structures". The purpose of this research was to gain an understanding of the geomorphology of the upper Amazon, the Peruvian section, by obtaining migration rates and planform metrics, including channel count, length, width, and sinuosity, as well as island count, area, and shape. With this data, the morphodynamics of the Peruvian Amazon, especially the relationship between the main channel and its secondary channels in each "anabranching structure" along the river, could be analyzed according to correlations found between various metrics. This analysis was carried out for 5-year time spans over a period of 25 years. Preliminary results showed that the average migration rate versus channel bend radius envelope peak is lower for the secondary channels than for the main channel. However, the maximum migration rate was not always found in the main channel; for several structures, the most dynamic channels were the secondary ones. This implies a certain periodicity to the river's migratory patterns that could be related to the valley boundaries, the local channel sinuosity or geological formations in the study area.

  7. Biogenic halocarbons from the Peruvian upwelling region as tropospheric halogen source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepach, Helmke; Quack, Birgit; Tegtmeier, Susann; Engel, Anja; Bracher, Astrid; Fuhlbrügge, Steffen; Galgani, Luisa; Atlas, Elliot L.; Lampel, Johannes; Frieß, Udo; Krüger, Kirstin

    2016-09-01

    Halocarbons are produced naturally in the oceans by biological and chemical processes. They are emitted from surface seawater into the atmosphere, where they take part in numerous chemical processes such as ozone destruction and the oxidation of mercury and dimethyl sulfide. Here we present oceanic and atmospheric halocarbon data for the Peruvian upwelling zone obtained during the M91 cruise onboard the research vessel METEOR in December 2012. Surface waters during the cruise were characterized by moderate concentrations of bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2) correlating with diatom biomass derived from marker pigment concentrations, which suggests this phytoplankton group is a likely source. Concentrations measured for the iodinated compounds methyl iodide (CH3I) of up to 35.4 pmol L-1, chloroiodomethane (CH2ClI) of up to 58.1 pmol L-1 and diiodomethane (CH2I2) of up to 32.4 pmol L-1 in water samples were much higher than previously reported for the tropical Atlantic upwelling systems. Iodocarbons also correlated with the diatom biomass and even more significantly with dissolved organic matter (DOM) components measured in the surface water. Our results suggest a biological source of these compounds as a significant driving factor for the observed large iodocarbon concentrations. Elevated atmospheric mixing ratios of CH3I (up to 3.2 ppt), CH2ClI (up to 2.5 ppt) and CH2I2 (3.3 ppt) above the upwelling were correlated with seawater concentrations and high sea-to-air fluxes. During the first part of the cruise, the enhanced iodocarbon production in the Peruvian upwelling contributed significantly to tropospheric iodine levels, while this contribution was considerably smaller during the second part.

  8. Distribution of Short-Term and Lifetime Predicted Risks of Cardiovascular Diseases in Peruvian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Quispe, Renato; Bazo-Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Burroughs Peña, Melissa S; Poterico, Julio A; Gilman, Robert H; Checkley, William; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Huffman, Mark D; Miranda, J Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Background Short-term risk assessment tools for prediction of cardiovascular disease events are widely recommended in clinical practice and are used largely for single time-point estimations; however, persons with low predicted short-term risk may have higher risks across longer time horizons. Methods and Results We estimated short-term and lifetime cardiovascular disease risk in a pooled population from 2 studies of Peruvian populations. Short-term risk was estimated using the atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease Pooled Cohort Risk Equations. Lifetime risk was evaluated using the algorithm derived from the Framingham Heart Study cohort. Using previously published thresholds, participants were classified into 3 categories: low short-term and low lifetime risk, low short-term and high lifetime risk, and high short-term predicted risk. We also compared the distribution of these risk profiles across educational level, wealth index, and place of residence. We included 2844 participants (50% men, mean age 55.9 years [SD 10.2 years]) in the analysis. Approximately 1 of every 3 participants (34% [95% CI 33 to 36]) had a high short-term estimated cardiovascular disease risk. Among those with a low short-term predicted risk, more than half (54% [95% CI 52 to 56]) had a high lifetime predicted risk. Short-term and lifetime predicted risks were higher for participants with lower versus higher wealth indexes and educational levels and for those living in urban versus rural areas (P<0.01). These results were consistent by sex. Conclusions These findings highlight potential shortcomings of using short-term risk tools for primary prevention strategies because a substantial proportion of Peruvian adults were classified as low short-term risk but high lifetime risk. Vulnerable adults, such as those from low socioeconomic status and those living in urban areas, may need greater attention regarding cardiovascular preventive strategies. PMID:26254303

  9. Eveningness Chronotype, Daytime Sleepiness, Caffeine Consumption, and Use of Other Stimulants Among Peruvian University Students

    PubMed Central

    Whittier, Anjalene; Sanchez, Sixto; Castañeda, Benjamín; Sanchez, Elena; Yanez, David; Williams, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to evaluate patterns of circadian preferences and daytime sleepiness, and to examine the extent to which the consumption of stimulant beverages is associated with daytime sleepiness and evening chronotype among Peruvian college-age students. Methods: A total of 2,581 undergraduate students completed a self-administered comprehensive questionnaire that gathered information about sleep habits, sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics, and the use of caffeinated beverages. The Morningness–Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were used to assess chronotype and daytime sleepiness. We used multivariable linear and logistic regression procedures to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the associations of sleep disorders with sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Results: The prevalence of daytime sleepiness was 35% [95% CI 32.7–36.4] and eveningness chronotype was 10% [95% CI 8.8–11.1%]. Age, sex, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption were significantly associated with an evening chronotype. After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, body mass index, and physical activity, students who reported consumption of any stimulant beverages had 1.25 increased odds of excessive daytime sleepiness (OR=1.25 [95% CI 1.03–1.53]) compared with students who did not consume stimulant beverages. Consumption of any stimulant beverages was not statistically significantly associated with being an evening chronotype (OR=1.30 [95% CI 0.86–1.96]). Conclusions: Excessive daytime sleepiness and eveningness chronotype are common among Peruvian college students. MEQ scores were associated with age, sex, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Regular stimulant beverage consumption tended to be positively associated with excessive daytime sleepiness. PMID:24868492

  10. Family Impact Scale (FIS): Cross-cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties for the Peruvian Spanish Language.

    PubMed

    Abanto, Jenny; Albites, Ursula; Bönecker, Marcelo; Paiva, Saul M; Castillo, Jorge L; Aguilar-Gálvez, Denisse

    2015-12-01

    The lack of a Family Impact Scale (FIS) in Spanish language limits its use as an indicator in Spanish-speaking countries and precludes comparisons with data from other cultural and ethnic groups. The purpose of this study was therefore to adapt the FIS cross-culturally to the Peruvian Spanish language and assess its reliability and validity. In order to translate and adapt the FIS cross-culturally, it was answered by 60 parents in two pilot tests, after which it was tested on 200 parents of children aged 11 to 14 years who were clinically examined for dental caries experience and malocclusions. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha coefficient while repeat administration of the FIS on the same 200 parents enabled the test-retest reliability to be assessed via intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Construct and discriminant validity were based on associations of the FIS with global ratings of oral health and clinical groups, respectively. Mean (standard deviation) FIS total score was 5.20 (5.86). Internal consistency was confirmed by Cronbach's alpha 0.84. Test-retest reliability revealed excellent reproducibility (ICC = 0.96). Construct validity was good, demonstrating statistically significant associations between total FIS score and global ratings of oral health (p=0.007) and overall wellbeing (p=0.002), as well as for the subscale scores (p<0.05) with exception of the financial burden subscale. The FIS was also able to discriminate between children with and without dental caries experience and malocclusions (p<0.05). Satisfactory psychometric results for the Peruvian Spanish FIS confirm it as a reliable, valid instrument for assessing the impact on the family caused by children's oral conditions.

  11. Patterns of Geographic Expansion of Aedes aegypti in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Guagliardo, Sarah Anne; Barboza, José Luis; Morrison, Amy C.; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo; Kitron, Uriel

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives In the Peruvian Amazon, the dengue vector Aedes aegypti is abundant in large urban centers such as Iquitos. In recent years, it has also been found in a number of neighboring rural communities with similar climatic and socioeconomic conditions. To better understand Ae. aegypti spread, we compared characteristics of communities, houses, and containers in infested and uninfested communities. Methods We conducted pupal-demographic surveys and deployed ovitraps in 34 communities surrounding the city of Iquitos. Communities surveyed were located along two transects: the Amazon River and a 95km highway. We calculated entomological indices, mapped Ae. aegypti presence, and developed univariable and multivariable logistic regression models to predict Ae. aegypti presence at the community, household, or container level. Results Large communities closer to Iquitos were more likely to be infested with Ae. aegypti. Within infested communities, houses with Ae. aegypti had more passively-filled containers and were more often infested with other mosquito genera than houses without Ae. aegypti. For containers, large water tanks/drums and containers with solar exposure were more likely to be infested with Ae. aegypti. Maps of Ae. aegypti presence revealed a linear pattern of infestation along the highway, and a scattered pattern along the Amazon River. We also identified the geographical limit of Ae. aegypti expansion along the highway at 19.3 km south of Iquitos. Conclusion In the Peruvian Amazon, Ae. aegypti geographic spread is driven by human transportation networks along rivers and highways. Our results suggest that urban development and oviposition site availability drive Ae. aegypti colonization along roads. Along rivers, boat traffic is likely to drive long-distance dispersal via unintentional transport of mosquitoes on boats. PMID:25101786

  12. Nitrogen fixation in sediments along a depth transect through the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gier, J.; Sommer, S.; Löscher, C. R.; Dale, A. W.; Schmitz, R. A.; Treude, T.

    2015-09-01

    Benthic nitrogen (N2) fixation and sulfate reduction (SR) were investigated in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Sediment samples, retrieved by a multiple corer were taken at six stations (70-1025 m) along a depth transect at 12° S, covering anoxic and hypoxic bottom water conditions. Benthic N2 fixation was detected at all sites, with high rates measured in OMZ mid-waters between the 70 and 253 m and lowest N2 fixation rates below 253 m down to 1025 m water depth. SR rates were decreasing with increasing water depth, with highest rates at the shallow site. Benthic N2 fixation depth profiles largely overlapped with SR depth profiles, suggesting that both processes are coupled. The potential of N2 fixation by SR bacteria was verified by the molecular analysis of nifH genes. Detected nifH sequences clustered with SR bacteria that have been demonstrated to fix N2 in other benthic environments. Depth-integrated rates of N2 fixation and SR showed no direct correlation along the 12° S transect, suggesting that the benthic diazotrophs in the Peruvian OMZ are being controlled by additional various environmental factors. The organic matter availability and the presence of sulfide appear to be major drivers for benthic diazotrophy. It was further found that N2 fixation was not inhibited by high ammonium concentrations. N2 fixation rates in OMZ sediments were similar to rates measured in other organic-rich sediments. Overall, this work improves our knowledge on N sources in marine sediments and contributes to a better understanding of N cycling in OMZ sediments.

  13. [The voluntary health auxiliary. Application to the Peruvian Altiplano of new concepts of primary health care in disadvantaged communities].

    PubMed

    Gachoud, P

    1979-05-01

    A group a Swiss physicians, who have been working for about eight years in rural health posts of the Peruvian highlands (Altiplano), engaged in training voluntary health auxiliaries, chosen by the indigenous communities. Experience has shown that, as in other countries, it is thus possible to markedly improve the health of populations which badly lack resources. The efficacy of using such auxiliaries was recognized by the Peruvian Ministry of Health, which has now set up a programme for their training and supervision. Within the concept of primary health care, based on the participation of people to the management of their health, the voluntary health auxiliary is placed in a strategic and decisive position for the success of an enterprise which is now spreading to many countries of the Third World.

  14. A 22,000 year record of changing redox conditions from the Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ): benthic foraminifera approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Z.; Schönfeld, J.; Glock, N.

    2015-12-01

    Benthic foraminifera have been used as proxies for the prevailing conditions at the sediment-water interface. Their distribution patterns are thought to facilitate reconstruction of past environmental conditions. Variations of bottom water oxygenation can be traced by the downcore distribution of benthic foraminifera and some of their morphological characters. Being one of the strongest and most pronounced OMZs in today's world oceans, the Peruvian OMZ is a key area to study such variations in relation with changing climate. Spatial changes or an extension of the OMZ through time and space are investigated using sediment cores from the lower OMZ boundary. We focus on time intervals Late Holocene, Early Holocene, Bølling Allerød, Heinrich-Stadial 1 and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to investigate changes in bottom-water oxygen and redox conditions. The recent distributions of benthic foraminiferal assemblages provide background data for an interpretation of the past conditions. Living benthic foraminiferal faunas from the Peruvian margin are structured with the prevailing bottom-water oxygen concentrations today (Mallon et al., 2012). Downcore distribution of benthic foraminiferal assemblages showed fluctuations in the abundance of the indicator species depicting variations and a decreasing trend in bottom water oxygen conditions since the LGM. In addition, changes in bottom-water oxygen and nitrate concentrations are reconstructed for the same time intervals by the pore density in tests of Planulina limbata and Bolivina spissa (Glock et al., 2011), respectively. The pore densities also indicate a trend of higher oxygen and nitrate concentrations in the LGM compared to the Holocene. Combination of both proxies provide information on past bottom-water conditions and changes of oxygen concentrations for the Peruvian margin. Glock et al., 2011: Environmental influences on the pore density of Bolivina spissa (Cushman), Journal of Foraminiferal Research, v. 41, no. 1, p

  15. Peruvian Maca: Two Scientific Names Lepidium Meyenii Walpers and Lepidium Peruvianum Chacon – Are They Phytochemically-Synonymous?

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Henry O.; Mscisz, Alina; Kedzia, Bogdan; Pisulewski, Pawel; Piatkowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LCMS) , profiles of the two isotypes labelled under the same common name Maca deposited in the Medicinal Plant Herbarium, in Australia and Poland, but identified under two different scientific names Lepidium meyenii Walpers (L. meyenii) and Lepidium peruvianum Chacon (L. peruvianum) are presented. The two isotypes correspond to two holotypes of Peruvian medicinal herb known under the same common name “Maca”, as originally deposited in the Herbarium of San Marcos University in Lima, Peru dated back to 1843 and 1990 respectively. The results demonstrate distinct differences in taxonomy, visual appearance, phytochemical profiles and DNA sequences of the two researched Maca isotypes, suggesting that the two Maca specimens are dissimilar and formal use of the term “synonymous” to L. meyenii and L. peruvianum may be misleading. On the basis of presented results the scientific name L. meyenii, used since 1843 up-today for cultivated Peruvian Maca by numerous reference sources worldwide, including Regulatory Bodies in the USA, EU, Australia and most lately in China, appears to be used in error and should be formally revised. It is concluded, that the isotype of cultivated Peruvian Maca labelled under its scientific name Lepidium peruvianum Chacon, provides all the characteristics peculiar to this historically-documented herb grown in Andean highlands, which may be linked to its traditional use and accepted functionality, confirmed in recent clinical study to be relevant to its present day use for expected dietary, therapeutic and health benefits.

  16. Modelling multiple threats to water security in the Peruvian Amazon using the WaterWorld Policy Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soesbergen, A. J. J.; Mulligan, M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper explores a multitude of threats to water security in the Peruvian Amazon using the WaterWorld policy support system. WaterWorld is a spatially explicit, physically-based globally-applicable model for baseline and scenario water balance that is particularly well suited to heterogeneous environments with little locally available data (e.g. ungauged basins) and which is delivered through a simple web interface, requiring little local capacity for use. The model is capable of producing a hydrological baseline representing the mean water balance for 1950-2000 and allows for examining impacts of population, climate and land use change as well as land and water management interventions on hydrology. This paper describes the application of WaterWorld to the Peruvian Amazon, an area that is increasingly under pressure from deforestation and water pollution as a result of population growth, rural to urban migration and oil and gas extraction, potentially impacting both water quantity and water quality. By applying single and combined scenarios of: climate change, deforestation around existing and planned roads, population growth and rural-urban migration, mining and oil and gas exploitation, we explore the potential combined impacts of these multiple changes on water resources in the Peruvian Amazon and discuss the likely pathways for adaptation to and mitigation against their worst effects. See Mulligan et al. (2013) for a similar analysis for the entire Amazon Basin.

  17. Coupled ecosystem/supply chain modelling of fish products from sea to shelf: the Peruvian anchoveta case.

    PubMed

    Avadí, Angel; Fréon, Pierre; Tam, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Sustainability assessment of food supply chains is relevant for global sustainable development. A framework is proposed for analysing fishfood (fish products for direct human consumption) supply chains with local or international scopes. It combines a material flow model (including an ecosystem dimension) of the supply chains, calculation of sustainability indicators (environmental, socio-economic, nutritional), and finally multi-criteria comparison of alternative supply chains (e.g. fates of landed fish) and future exploitation scenarios. The Peruvian anchoveta fishery is the starting point for various local and global supply chains, especially via reduction of anchoveta into fishmeal and oil, used worldwide as a key input in livestock and fish feeds. The Peruvian anchoveta supply chains are described, and the proposed methodology is used to model them. Three scenarios were explored: status quo of fish exploitation (Scenario 1), increase in anchoveta landings for food (Scenario 2), and radical decrease in total anchoveta landings to allow other fish stocks to prosper (Scenario 3). It was found that Scenario 2 provided the best balance of sustainability improvements among the three scenarios, but further refinement of the assessment is recommended. In the long term, the best opportunities for improving the environmental and socio-economic performance of Peruvian fisheries are related to sustainability-improving management and policy changes affecting the reduction industry. Our approach provides the tools and quantitative results to identify these best improvement opportunities.

  18. HIV testing among social media-using Peruvian men who have sex with men: correlates and social context.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Evan A; Chiu, ChingChe J; Menacho, Luis A; Young, Sean D

    2016-10-01

    HIV remains concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Peru, and homophobia and AIDS-related stigmas have kept the epidemic difficult to address. Gay self-identity has been associated with increased HIV testing, though this relationship has not been examined extensively. Social media use has been rapidly increasing in Peru, yet little is known about MSM social media users in Peru. This study sought to investigate the demographic, behavioral, and stigma-related factors associated with HIV testing among social media-using Peruvian MSM. Five hundred and fifty-six MSM from Lima and surrounding areas were recruited from social networking websites to complete a survey on their sexual risk behaviors. We examined the demographic and social correlates of HIV testing behavior among this sample. Younger age and non-gay identity were significantly associated with lower likelihood of getting tested in univariate analysis. After controlling for key behaviors and AIDS-related stigma, younger age remained significantly associated with decreased testing. Participants who engaged in discussions online about HIV testing were more likely to get tested, while AIDS-related stigma presented a significant barrier to testing. Stigma severity also varied significantly by sexual identity. Youth appear to be significantly less likely than older individuals to test for HIV. Among Peruvian MSM, AIDS-related stigma remains a strong predictor of willingness to get tested. Social media-based intervention work targeting Peruvian youth should encourage discussion around HIV testing, and must also address AIDS-related stigma.

  19. Coupled Ecosystem/Supply Chain Modelling of Fish Products from Sea to Shelf: The Peruvian Anchoveta Case

    PubMed Central

    Avadí, Angel; Fréon, Pierre; Tam, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Sustainability assessment of food supply chains is relevant for global sustainable development. A framework is proposed for analysing fishfood (fish products for direct human consumption) supply chains with local or international scopes. It combines a material flow model (including an ecosystem dimension) of the supply chains, calculation of sustainability indicators (environmental, socio-economic, nutritional), and finally multi-criteria comparison of alternative supply chains (e.g. fates of landed fish) and future exploitation scenarios. The Peruvian anchoveta fishery is the starting point for various local and global supply chains, especially via reduction of anchoveta into fishmeal and oil, used worldwide as a key input in livestock and fish feeds. The Peruvian anchoveta supply chains are described, and the proposed methodology is used to model them. Three scenarios were explored: status quo of fish exploitation (Scenario 1), increase in anchoveta landings for food (Scenario 2), and radical decrease in total anchoveta landings to allow other fish stocks to prosper (Scenario 3). It was found that Scenario 2 provided the best balance of sustainability improvements among the three scenarios, but further refinement of the assessment is recommended. In the long term, the best opportunities for improving the environmental and socio-economic performance of Peruvian fisheries are related to sustainability-improving management and policy changes affecting the reduction industry. Our approach provides the tools and quantitative results to identify these best improvement opportunities. PMID:25003196

  20. Coupled ecosystem/supply chain modelling of fish products from sea to shelf: the Peruvian anchoveta case.

    PubMed

    Avadí, Angel; Fréon, Pierre; Tam, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Sustainability assessment of food supply chains is relevant for global sustainable development. A framework is proposed for analysing fishfood (fish products for direct human consumption) supply chains with local or international scopes. It combines a material flow model (including an ecosystem dimension) of the supply chains, calculation of sustainability indicators (environmental, socio-economic, nutritional), and finally multi-criteria comparison of alternative supply chains (e.g. fates of landed fish) and future exploitation scenarios. The Peruvian anchoveta fishery is the starting point for various local and global supply chains, especially via reduction of anchoveta into fishmeal and oil, used worldwide as a key input in livestock and fish feeds. The Peruvian anchoveta supply chains are described, and the proposed methodology is used to model them. Three scenarios were explored: status quo of fish exploitation (Scenario 1), increase in anchoveta landings for food (Scenario 2), and radical decrease in total anchoveta landings to allow other fish stocks to prosper (Scenario 3). It was found that Scenario 2 provided the best balance of sustainability improvements among the three scenarios, but further refinement of the assessment is recommended. In the long term, the best opportunities for improving the environmental and socio-economic performance of Peruvian fisheries are related to sustainability-improving management and policy changes affecting the reduction industry. Our approach provides the tools and quantitative results to identify these best improvement opportunities. PMID:25003196

  1. Age, maturation, and population structure of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas off the Peruvian Exclusive Economic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bilin; Chen, Xinjun; Chen, Yong; Tian, Siquan; Li, Jianhua; Fang, Zhou; Yang, Mingxia

    2013-01-01

    Age, maturation and population structure of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas were studied based on random sampling of the Chinese jigging fishery off the Peruvian Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) during 2008-2010. Estimated ages ranged from 144 to 633 days, confirming that the squid is a short-lived species with longevity no longer than 2 years. Occurrence of mature females and hatching in each month indicated that Humboldt squid spawned year-round. Back-calculated hatching dates for the samples were from January 22nd, 2008 to April 22nd, 2010 with a peak between January and March. Two size-based and two hatching date-based populations could be defined from mantle length (ML) at maturity and back-calculated hatching dates, respectively. Females matured at a larger size than males, and there was a significant difference in ML at maturity between the two hatching groups ( P <0.05). The waters adjacent to 11°S off the Peruvian EEZ may be a potential spawning ground. This study shows the complexity of the population structure and large variability in key life history parameters in the Humboldt squid off the Peruvian EEZ, which should be considered in the assessment and management of this important resource.

  2. Population genetic structure of traditional populations in the Peruvian Central Andes and implications for South American population history.

    PubMed

    Cabana, Graciela S; Lewis, Cecil M; Tito, Raúl Y; Covey, R Alan; Cáceres, Angela M; Cruz, Augusto F De La; Durand, Diana; Housman, Genevieve; Hulsey, Brannon I; Iannacone, Gian Carlo; López, Paul W; Martínez, Rolando; Medina, Ángel; Dávila, Olimpio Ortega; Pinto, Karla Paloma Osorio; Santillán, Susan I Polo; Domínguez, Percy Rojas; Rubel, Meagan; Smith, Heather F; Smith, Silvia E; Massa, Verónica Rubín de Celis; Lizárraga, Beatriz; Stone, Anne C

    2014-01-01

    Molecular-based characterizations of Andean peoples are traditionally conducted in the service of elucidating continent-level evolutionary processes in South America. Consequently, genetic variation among "western" Andean populations is often represented in relation to variation among "eastern" Amazon and Orinoco River Basin populations. This west-east contrast in patterns of population genetic variation is typically attributed to large-scale phenomena, such as dual founder colonization events or differing long-term microevolutionary histories. However, alternative explanations that consider the nature and causes of population genetic diversity within the Andean region remain underexplored. Here we examine population genetic diversity in the Peruvian Central Andes using data from the mtDNA first hypervariable region and Y-chromosome short tandem repeats among 17 newly sampled populations and 15 published samples. Using this geographically comprehensive data set, we first reassessed the currently accepted pattern of western versus eastern population genetic structure, which our results ultimately reject: mtDNA population diversities were lower, rather than higher, within Andean versus eastern populations, and only highland Y-chromosomes exhibited significantly higher within-population diversities compared with eastern groups. Multiple populations, including several highland samples, exhibited low genetic diversities for both genetic systems. Second, we explored whether the implementation of Inca state and Spanish colonial policies starting at about ad 1400 could have substantially restructured population genetic variation and consequently constitute a primary explanation for the extant pattern of population diversity in the Peruvian Central Andes. Our results suggest that Peruvian Central Andean population structure cannot be parsimoniously explained as the sole outcome of combined Inca and Spanish policies on the region's population demography: highland populations

  3. Lichenometric Dating of Little Ice Age Moraines in the Cordillera Vilcabamba, Southern Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taggart, J. R.; Licciardi, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    Lateral and end moraines deposited by two valley glaciers were mapped on the south side of Nevado Tucarhuay (5910 m asl) and on the east side of Nevado Salcantay (6271 m asl) in the Cordillera Vilcabamba in the southern Peruvian Andes (~13°S latitude). The geomorphic expression of outer and inner moraine sequences in these two drainages mimics that of a previously studied pair of moraines in the upper Rio Blanco valley on the south side of Nevado Salcantay. Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating has yielded ages of 9.0 ± 0.3 ka and 195 ± 24 years, respectively, for these outer and inner Rio Blanco moraines. In all three valleys, prominent outer moraines occur ~3-5 km from headwalls and inner moraine ridges are found ~2.5-3 km from headwalls. Recessional moraines found exclusively on the east side of Salcantay indicate multiple early- to late-Holocene glacier pauses, rather than continuous retreat, prior to the latest Holocene glacier readvance. Diameters of the lichen Rhizocarpon subgenus Rhizocarpon were measured on moraine boulders from the inner moraines in all three valleys. Lichen diameters on the two undated inner moraines are consistent with diameters on the inner 10Be-dated Rio Blanco moraine, which signifies similar lichenometric ages and supports synchronous glacier culminations in all three drainages during the Little Ice Age. The new lichen measurements and age estimates provide a critical link between previous lichen studies in the Cordillera Blanca to the north and in the Cordillera Real to the south, thereby increasing spatial coverage of terrestrial paleoclimate information. Moreover, the extensive lichen measurements gathered on the inner 10Be-dated Rio Blanco moraine define a new control point for the Rhizocarpon subgenus Rhizocarpon growth curve in the tropical Peruvian- Bolivian Andes, which will increase the accuracy of lichenometric age estimates in this region. 10Be exposure dating of the inner moraines in adjacent valleys is underway

  4. Cold Episodes, Their Precursors and Teleconnections in the Central Peruvian Andes (1958-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulca, J. C.; Vuille, M. F.; Trasmonte, G.; Silva, Y.; Takahashi, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Mantaro valley (MV) is located in the central Peruvian Andes. Occasionally, cold episodes are observed during the austral summer (January-March), which strongly damage crops. However, little is known about the causes and impacts of such cold episodes in the MV. The main goal of this study is thus to characterize cold episodes in the MV and assess their large-scale circulation and teleconnections over South America (SA) during austral summer. To identify cold events in the MV daily minimum temperature for the period 1958-2009 from Huayao station, located within the MV was used. We defined a cold episode as the period when daily minimum temperature drops below the 10-percentile for at least one day. Several gridded reanalysis and satellite products were used to characterize the large-scale circulation, cloud cover and rainfall over SA associated with these events for same period. Cold episodes in the MV are associated with positive OLR anomalies, which extend over much of the central Andes, indicating reduced convective cloud cover during these extremes, but also affirm the large-scale nature of these events. At the same time, northeastern Brazil (NEB) registers negative OLR anomalies, strong convective activity and enhanced cloud cover because displacement of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) toward the northeast of its climatologic position. Further, it is associated with a weakening of the Bolivian High - Nordeste Low (BH-NL) system at upper levels, but also influenced by a low-level migratory high-pressure center develops at 30°S, 50°W; propagating from mid- to low latitudes as part of an extratropical Rossby wave train. In conclusion, cold episodes in the MV appear to be caused by radiative cooling associated with reduced cloudiness, rather than cold air advection. The reduced cloud cover in turn results from a robust large-scale pattern of westerly wind anomalies over central Peruvian Andes, inhibiting moisture influx, convective activity and

  5. Dynamics and fishery of the Peruvian hake: Between nature and man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-Carrasco, Renato; Lleonart, Jordi

    Mean length in the catch of Peruvian hake ( Merluccius gayi peruanus) declined drastically by 8 cm in a few months in 1992. The 1991-93 El Niño event marked the beginning of changes in bottom environmental conditions, that along with other changes in the ecosystem, were the cause of the disappearance of large sized old hake from the traditional fishing grounds and the invasion of these areas by high concentrations of small sized young hake, traditionally distributed in the southern areas. A misinterpretation of this change gave an optimistic perception of the state of the stock, leading to a large increase of the fishing fleet and therefore to an increase of the fishing pressure on this resource. Catch increased quickly to very high levels in 1996, the fishery indicators of relative abundance remained stable, while global abundance of hake was diminishing. The resource responded to these natural variations of environment and to the intense fishing pressure with changes in some aspects of its biology and ecology. The most remarkable was the decrease of the length and age at first maturity that led to spawning by 1 year old (19 cm) individuals in a species whose observed longevity was 14 years. In 2002 a total and indefinite fishery closure was established by the Peruvian government and a technical commission for the hake recovery was created, which carried out continuous monitoring of the stock. After a closure of 20 months the indicators showed signs of recovery and the fishery was reopened in 2004. However, after an encouraging beginning during 2004 and the first quarter of 2005, neither abundance nor age structure had improved by the end of 2005, and in fact were deteriorating by the start of 2006. The survival of the age 2 and 3 groups was very low and few 4+ years old individuals were observed. Several factors working at different time scales have been proposed to explain the status of hake. The impact of the fishery, variations in the abiotic environment

  6. Late Pleistocene equilibrium-line reconstructions in the northern Peruvian Andes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodbell, D.T.

    1992-01-01

    ELA reconstructions using the toe-to-headwall-altitude ratio method for paleoglaciers in the Cordilleras Blanca and Oriental, northern Peruvian Andes indicate that ELAs during the last glacial maximum (LGM; marine isotope stage 2)) were c.4300 m in the Cordillera Blanca, c.3900-3600 m on the west side of the Cordillera Oriental, and c.3200 m on the east (Amazon Basin) side of the Cordillera Oriental. Comparison with estimated modern ELAs and glaciation thresholds indicate that ELA depression ranged from c.700 m in the Cordillera Blanca to c.1200 m on the east side of the Cordillera Oriental. Palynological evidence for drier conditions during the LGM in the tropical Andes suggests that ELA depression of this amount involved a temperature reduction (>5-6??C) that greatly exceeded the tropical sea-surface temperature depression estimates of CLIMAP (<2??C). The west to east increase in ELA depression during the LGM indicates that the steep modern precipitation gradients may have been even steeper during the LGM. -from Author

  7. The drugs industry and peasant self-defence in a Peruvian cocaine enclave.

    PubMed

    van Dun, Mirella

    2012-11-01

    This article gives a detailed account of the cocaine industry and the related violence in the Peruvian Upper Huallaga. It is argued that in this cocaine producing region violence increased during state-led forced eradication operations of the coca plants. Most of the violent incidents were closely related to the diminishing cocaine industry, but they were also related to the actions of the state security forces. Instead of receiving support from the state's security apparatus, the population mobilized its own forces to fight the violence. As will be argued, the causes of violence in this cocaine enclave are part of a dynamic interaction amongst many factors - an interaction that is influenced by the local context, a partial state vacuum, and the social utility and the economic advantages of violence. One needs to be aware that motivations of those who engage in the violent behaviour can change over time, as underlying power structures are influenced by changes in local conditions. The study covers an in-depth account of events taking place in the Upper Huallaga during the years 2003-2007. The research material was collected by several ethnographical fieldwork methods. PMID:22386071

  8. Sulfur dioxide emissions from Peruvian copper smelters detected by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carn, S. A.; Krueger, A. J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Yang, K.; Levelt, P. F.

    2007-05-01

    We report the first daily observations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from copper smelters by a satellite-borne sensor - the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA's EOS/Aura spacecraft. Emissions from two Peruvian smelters (La Oroya and Ilo) were detected in up to 80% of OMI overpasses between September 2004 and June 2005. SO2 production by each smelter in this period is assessed and compared with contemporaneous emissions from active volcanoes in Ecuador and southern Colombia. Annual SO2 discharge from the Ilo smelter, La Oroya smelter, and volcanoes in 2004-2005 is estimated and amounts to 0.3-0.1 +0.2, 0.07 +/- 0.03, and 1.2 +/- 0.5 Tg, respectively. This study confirms OMI's potential as an effective tool for evaluation of anthropogenic and natural SO2 emissions. Smelter plumes transport an array of toxic metals in addition to SO2 and continued monitoring to mitigate health and environmental impacts is recommended.

  9. We need to "ikarar the kutipados": intercultural understanding and health care in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Yajahuanca, Rosário Avellaneda; Diniz, Carmen Simone Grilo; Cabral, Cristiane da Silva

    2015-09-01

    The scope of this qualitative research was to describe and analyze how the Kukamas Kukamirias indigenous population from the Peruvian Amazon perceives and evaluates the healthcare offered by health workers at the local San Regis health post. An ethnographic-based study was conducted among the San Regis community on the Marañon River in the Loreto district of Peru, including interviews and participative observations with female and male patients as well as with traditional healers and professional health workers. An intercultural perspective is adopted to discuss the evaluations made by the Kukamas Kukamirias about the healthcare offered by professionals at their local health post. Issues examined include the intercultural matches and mismatches that affect vulnerable groups of the population in their interactions with the health services. The frequent preference shown for traditional treatment implies a close relationship between the healer and the person who is sick. This means that conventional forms of healthcare should be seen from an intercultural perspective and taken into account when organizing and articulating health services. PMID:26331515

  10. Evidence for Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Oviposition on Boats in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Guagliardo, Sarah Anne; Morrison, Amy C; Luis Barboza, Jose; Wesson, Dawn M; Ponnusamy, Loganathan; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo; Kitron, Uriel

    2015-07-01

    Dengue vector Aedes aegypti L. is invading peri-urban and rural areas throughout Latin America. Our previous research in the Peruvian Amazon has shown that river boats are heavily infested with immature and adult Ae. aegypti mosquitoes, likely playing a major role in their long-distance dispersal and successful invasion. However, the presence of immature mosquitoes provides no information about the timing of oviposition, and whether it took place in the boats. Here, we used baited ovitraps deployed on river boats to test the hypothesis that Ae. aegypti oviposition occurs during boat travel. We deployed 360 ovitraps on 60 different barges during August and October of 2013, and February 2014 (with 20 barges sampled during each month). We found that Ae. aegypti mosquitoes in 22 individual ovitraps from 15 of the 60 barges (premise index 25%) across all sampling dates. Further, the distribution of Ae. aegypti egg abundance was highly aggregated: 2.6% of traps (N=7) were responsible for 71.8% of eggs found, and 1.5% of traps (N=4) were responsible for all (100%) of the larvae found. Similarly, 5% of boats were responsible for the 71.47% of eggs. Our results provide strong evidence that Ae. aegypti oviposition commonly occurs during boat travel. Baited ovitraps could represent a cost-effective means of monitoring and controlling mosquito populations on boats. PMID:26335482

  11. Diversity of commercial sex among men and male-born trans people in three Peruvian cities.

    PubMed

    Nureña, César R; Zúñiga, Mario; Zunt, Joseph; Mejía, Carolina; Montano, Silvia; Sánchez, Jorge L

    2011-11-01

    In Peru, commercial sex involving men and male-born travestis, transgenders and transsexuals (CSMT) is usually represented as a dangerous practice carried out on the streets by people experiencing economic hardship and social exclusion. However, in reality little is known about the complexities of this practice in Peru. This paper presents findings from an ethnographic study of the characteristics, patterns and sociocultural aspects of CSMT in three Peruvian cities. The study included participant observation in sex work venues and interviews with 42 sex workers and 25 key informants. We found that CSMT in Peru takes many forms (some not previously described in the country) and is practised in different places by people from various socioeconomic levels. In many cases, the practice appears linked to ideals of social mobility, migratory experiences and other economic activities. In addition, the increasing use of the Internet and mobile phones has changed patterns of sex work in Peru. We review the implications of these findings for future research and public health interventions.

  12. Carabidae diversity along an altitudinal gradient in a Peruvian cloud forest (Coleoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Maveety, Sarah A.; Browne, Robert A.; Erwin, Terry L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Carabid beetles were sampled at five sites, ranging from 1500 m to 3400 m, along a 15 km transect in the cloud forest of Manu National Park, Perú. Seasonal collections during a one year period yielded 77 morphospecies, of which 60% are projected to be undescribed species. There was a significant negative correlation between species richness and altitude, with the number of carabid species declining at the rate of one species for each 100 m increase in altitude. The majority of species (70.1 %) were restricted to only one altitudinal site and no species was found at more than three of the five altitudinal sites. Only one genus, Pelmatellus (Tribe Harpalini), was found at all five sites. Active (hand) collections yielded approximately twice as many species per individuals collected than passive (pitfall trap) collections. This study is the first systematic sampling ofcarabid beetles of a high altitude gradient in the cloud forests of southeastern Perú and supports the need to conserve the zone of extremely high biodiversity present on the eastern slopes of the Peruvian Andes. PMID:22371680

  13. Planform evolution of two anabranching structures in the Upper Peruvian Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frias, C. E.; Abad, J. D.; Mendoza, A.; Paredes, J.; Ortals, C.; Montoro, H.

    2015-04-01

    We present a study to relate the sinuosity of the main channel and its effect on the dynamics of the secondary channels of anabranching structures. For this purpose, two locations of the Peruvian Amazon River were selected: (1) a site with a medium to high-sinuosity main channel (MS site: Muyuy, Peru) and (2) a site with a low-sinuosity main channel (LS site: at the triple boundary between Brazil, Colombia, and Peru). The main channels for both the MS and LS anabranching structures have freedom to migrate in the lateral direction, while at least one of their secondary channels is adjacent to the geological valley. For MS and LS sites, temporal analysis of planform evolution was carried out using 30 years of satellite imagery from which metrics such as width, sinuosity, and annual maximum migration rates of main and secondary channels were calculated. Additionally, detailed hydrodynamic and bed morphology field measurements were carried out, and a two-dimensional shallow water numerical model was developed. For a medium to high-sinuosity main channel anabranching structure, the secondary channels present a dominant mechanism for reworking the floodplain, while for the low-sinuosity anabranching structure, the main channel planform dynamics is dominant. Flow velocities along the main and secondary channels for low, transition, and high-flow discharges describe that for MS (LS) site, the velocities are much higher along the secondary (main) channels.

  14. A new species of Phrynopus (Anura: Craugastoridae) from the central Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Mamani, Luis; Malqui, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new species of Phrynopus from the humid grassland of Distrito de Comas, Provincia Concepcion, Department of Junin. The new species is diagnosed by the lack of dentigerous processes of vomers, tympanic annulus and membrane imperceptible through the skin, males with nuptial pads and vocal slits, warty dorsal skin, and aerolate throat, belly and ventral surfaces of thighs, by possessing pronounced subconical tubercles in the post-tympanic area, by having rounded finger and toe tips with no disc structure, and by its overall dark brown to black coloration with few white and yellow spots in the dorsum and a dark-brown belly with white to gray blotches. Specimens were found under stones at a single area of the central Peruvian Andes at elevations between 4205-4490 m.a.s.l. The eggs had an average diameter of 4.3 mm. With the description and naming of the new species, the genus Phrynopus now contains 26 species, all of them endemic to Peru, and five of which are restricted to Departamento Junin. PMID:25081770

  15. Single cell genomic study of Dehalococcoidetes species from deep-sea sediments of the Peruvian Margin

    PubMed Central

    Kaster, Anne-Kristin; Mayer-Blackwell, Koshlan; Pasarelli, Ben; Spormann, Alfred M

    2014-01-01

    The phylum Chloroflexi is one of the most frequently detected phyla in the subseafloor of the Pacific Ocean margins. Dehalogenating Chloroflexi (Dehalococcoidetes) was originally discovered as the key microorganisms mediating reductive dehalogenation via their key enzymes reductive dehalogenases (Rdh) as sole mode of energy conservation in terrestrial environments. The frequent detection of Dehalococcoidetes-related 16S rRNA and rdh genes in the marine subsurface implies a role for dissimilatory dehalorespiration in this environment; however, the two genes have never been linked to each other. To provide fundamental insights into the metabolism, genomic population structure and evolution of marine subsurface Dehalococcoidetes sp., we analyzed a non-contaminated deep-sea sediment core sample from the Peruvian Margin Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) site 1230, collected 7.3 m below the seafloor by a single cell genomic approach. We present for the first time single cell genomic data on three deep-sea Chloroflexi (Dsc) single cells from a marine subsurface environment. Two of the single cells were considered to be part of a local Dehalococcoidetes population and assembled together into a 1.38-Mb genome, which appears to be at least 85% complete. Despite a high degree of sequence-level similarity between the shared proteins in the Dsc and terrestrial Dehalococcoidetes, no evidence for catabolic reductive dehalogenation was found in Dsc. The genome content is however consistent with a strictly anaerobic organotrophic or lithotrophic lifestyle. PMID:24599070

  16. Needs, Acceptability, and Value of Humanitarian Medical Assistance in Remote Peruvian Amazon Riverine Communities

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Juan F.; Halsey, Eric S.; Bayer, Angela M.; Beltran, Martin; Razuri, Hugo R.; Velasquez, Daniel E.; Cama, Vitaliano A.; Graf, Paul C. F.; Quispe, Antonio M.; Maves, Ryan C.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Sanders, John W.; Lescano, Andres G.

    2015-01-01

    Much debate exists regarding the need, acceptability, and value of humanitarian medical assistance. We conducted a cross-sectional study on 457 children under 5 years from four remote riverine communities in the Peruvian Amazon and collected anthropometric measures, blood samples (1–4 years), and stool samples. Focus groups and key informant interviews assessed perspectives regarding medical aid delivered by foreigners. The prevalence of stunting, anemia, and intestinal parasites was 20%, 37%, and 62%, respectively. Infection with multiple parasites, usually geohelminths, was detected in 41% of children. The prevalence of intestinal parasites both individual and polyparasitism increased with age. Participants from smaller communities less exposed to foreigners expressed lack of trust and fear of them. However, participants from all communities were positive about foreigners visiting to provide health support. Prevalent health needs such as parasitic infections and anemia may be addressed by short-term medical interventions. There is a perceived openness to and acceptability of medical assistance delivered by foreign personnel. PMID:25846293

  17. [Incorporation of an intercultural approach in the Peruvian health care system: the vertical birth method].

    PubMed

    Nureña, César R

    2009-10-01

    Peru has a large indigenous population (40% of the total), made of 72 distinct groups. These peoples are at a great disadvantage compared to the mestizos and other groups that are more closely connected with the dominant culture. The political and economic inequality and inequities are particularly stark with regard to health conditions. National policy and plans have not considered the indigenous peoples' values and identity, nor their right to self-determination and control of their land and resources, and even less so, their health knowledge and practices, inasmuch western 'modern medicine' has been imposed upon them by the dominant culture. Since 1992, as a result of international forums and academia, as well as a growing movement in Peru to acknowledge the value of cultural diversity and the rights of indigenous peoples, Government proposals, initiatives, and programs were undertaken to incorporate and empower cultural contributions and traditional practices in a way that would not only benefit the indigenous, but also enrich, through various intercultural venues, the stock of cultural traditions and ethnic roots of the greater Peruvian society. This article explores specifically how these intercultural strategies have been rolled out in health care to institutionalize the vertical birth method in rural, predominantly indigenous, communities, and endeavors to assess the decrease in maternal mortality, as well as the difficulties encountered, and mostly overcome, by expressing multiculturalism in the health field. PMID:20107687

  18. Diversity of commercial sex among men and male-born trans people in three Peruvian cities

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga, Mario; Zunt, Joseph; Mejía, Carolina; Montano, Silvia; Sánchez, Jorge L.

    2011-01-01

    In Peru, commercial sex involving men and male-born travestis, transgenders and transsexuals (CSMT) is usually represented as a dangerous practice carried out on the streets by people experiencing economic hardship and social exclusion. However, in reality little is known about the complexities of this practice in Peru. This paper presents findings from an ethnographic study of the characteristics, patterns and socio-cultural aspects of CSMT in three Peruvian cities. The study included participant observation in sex work venues and interviews with 42 sex workers and 25 key informants. We found that CSMT in Peru takes many forms (some not previously described in the country) and is practised in different places by people from various socioeconomic levels. In many cases, the practice appears linked to ideals of social mobility, migratory experiences and other economic activities. In addition, the increasing use of the internet and mobile phones has changed patterns of sex work in Peru. We review the implications of these findings for future research and public health interventions. PMID:21936651

  19. Developmental and physical-fitness associations with gross motor coordination problems in Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    de Chaves, Raquel Nichele; Bustamante Valdívia, Alcibíades; Nevill, Alan; Freitas, Duarte; Tani, Go; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Maia, José António Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this cross-sectional study were to examine the developmental characteristics (biological maturation and body size) associated with gross motor coordination problems in 5193 Peruvian children (2787 girls) aged 6-14 years from different geographical locations, and to investigate how the probability that children suffer with gross motor coordination problems varies with physical fitness. Children with gross motor coordination problems were more likely to have lower flexibility and explosive strength levels, having adjusted for age, sex, maturation and study site. Older children were more likely to suffer from gross motor coordination problems, as were those with greater body mass index. However, more mature children were less likely to have gross motor coordination problems, although children who live at sea level or at high altitude were more likely to suffer from gross motor coordination problems than children living in the jungle. Our results provide evidence that children and adolescents with lower physical fitness are more likely to have gross motor coordination difficulties. The identification of youths with gross motor coordination problems and providing them with effective intervention programs is an important priority in order to overcome such developmental problems, and help to improve their general health status.

  20. Modeling River Hydrologic Regime and Spawning of Migratory Catfishes in Southeastern Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canas, C. M.; Waylen, P. R.

    2008-05-01

    Seasonal hydrologic conditions and catfish larvae production were evaluated in the Madre de Dios River in order to determine whether environmental conditions influence the reproductive activity of a group of large, commercially important catfishes, in the Southeastern Peruvian Amazon. A simple stochastic model of floods is presented to describe the influence of the natural high flow regime on observed patterns of catfish larvae release and drifting. Daily river stage records at Puerto Maldonado are related to weekly larval catches to determine the association between flood and spawning events. On the basis of hydroclimatologic characteristics of Andean- Amazon regions, available long-term historical rainfall records are employed to approximate the likely inter- annual variability of floods within this Amazon headwater basin. Major larval drift appeared associated with stages of over the 5 m, or "Biologic Hydrologic Significant Events" (BSE), which act as triggers, or a reasonable surrogates, for spawning responses of these species. The timing of BSEs, estimated from the historical rainfall records, appear to be uniformly distributed during the rain season and their inter-arrival times exponential. These observations provided the basis of the stochastic model describing the likelihood of volumes of larvae releases from the headwater region to lowland Amazon. The ecologically significant role of the hydroclimatology of this region in the complete life cycle of this important Amazon fish resource is illustrated.

  1. A Peruvian family with a novel PARK2 mutation: Clinical and Pathological Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo-Olivas, Mario; Torres, Luis; Mata, Ignacio F; Mazzetti, Pilar; Rivas, Diana; Cosentino, Carlos; Inca-Martinez, Miguel; Cuba, Juan M; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Leverenz, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in PARK2 result in autosomal recessive young onset Parkinson’s disease (YOPD). Although there have been a number of reports on the clinical characteristics of PARK2-related PD, there is limited information available on the associated neuropathologic changes. Design We describe the clinical and pathological characteristics of a Peruvian family with YOPD. The proband and one unaffected sibling were screened for PARK2 dosage and point mutations. One affected sibling had detailed neuropathologic examination. Setting Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurologicas (INCN) in Lima, Peru Results The proband and two of her four siblings developed YOPD and both parents were unaffected. The clinical course has been characterized by akinetic-rigid parkinsonism predominantly affecting the lower limbs and dyskinesias. Analysis of PARK2 showed that the proband is compound heterozygous for a novel acceptor splice site mutation in intron 5 (IVS5-1G>A) and an exon 7 deletion. Neuropathologic assessment of an affected sibling revealed severe neuronal loss in the substantia nigra (SN) and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunopositive fibers in the striatum. No Lewy body pathology was observed using standard histology or immunohistochemistry for α-synuclein. Conclusions Consistent with most neuropathologic reports of patients with PARK2 mutations, we did not observe Lewy body inclusions, despite marked SN degeneration and severe dopaminergic denervation of the striatum. These data describe a novel splice site mutation and further extend the clinicopathological characterization of PARK2-associated PD. PMID:25817512

  2. Evidence for Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Oviposition on Boats in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Guagliardo, Sarah Anne; Morrison, Amy C; Luis Barboza, Jose; Wesson, Dawn M; Ponnusamy, Loganathan; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo; Kitron, Uriel

    2015-07-01

    Dengue vector Aedes aegypti L. is invading peri-urban and rural areas throughout Latin America. Our previous research in the Peruvian Amazon has shown that river boats are heavily infested with immature and adult Ae. aegypti mosquitoes, likely playing a major role in their long-distance dispersal and successful invasion. However, the presence of immature mosquitoes provides no information about the timing of oviposition, and whether it took place in the boats. Here, we used baited ovitraps deployed on river boats to test the hypothesis that Ae. aegypti oviposition occurs during boat travel. We deployed 360 ovitraps on 60 different barges during August and October of 2013, and February 2014 (with 20 barges sampled during each month). We found that Ae. aegypti mosquitoes in 22 individual ovitraps from 15 of the 60 barges (premise index 25%) across all sampling dates. Further, the distribution of Ae. aegypti egg abundance was highly aggregated: 2.6% of traps (N=7) were responsible for 71.8% of eggs found, and 1.5% of traps (N=4) were responsible for all (100%) of the larvae found. Similarly, 5% of boats were responsible for the 71.47% of eggs. Our results provide strong evidence that Ae. aegypti oviposition commonly occurs during boat travel. Baited ovitraps could represent a cost-effective means of monitoring and controlling mosquito populations on boats.

  3. Time and mode of exhumation of the Cordillera Blanca batholith (Peruvian Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margirier, Audrey; Audin, Laurence; Robert, Xavier; Herman, Frédéric; Ganne, Jérôme; Schwartz, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    The Cordillera Blanca batholith (12-5 Myr) forms the highest Peruvian summits and builds the footwall of the Cordillera Blanca normal fault (CBNF). Even if several models have been proposed, the processes driving both the exhumation of the Cordillera Blanca and extensional deformation along the CBNF are still debated. Here we quantify the emplacement depth and exhumation of the batholith of the northern Peru arc from the late Miocene to present. Based on a compilation of crystallization ages and new thermobarometry data in the Cordillera Blanca batholith, we propose that the batholith was emplaced at a depth of ~3 km in successive sills from 14 to 5 Ma. By contrast, the younger rocks exposed at the surface were emplaced the deepest (i.e., ~6 km) and are located close to the CBNF, suggesting post 5 Ma tilting. Furthermore, a formal inversion of the thermochronologic data indicates an increase of the exhumation rates in the Cordillera Blanca during the Quaternary. The higher predicted exhumation rates correlate with areas of high relief, both in the northern and central part of the Cordillera Blanca, suggesting that Quaternary valley carving by glaciations have a significant impact on the latest stage of the Cordillera Blanca exhumation (2-0 Ma).

  4. Outbreak of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Peruvian Military Personnel Undertaking Training Activities in the Amazon Basin, 2010.

    PubMed

    Oré, Marianela; Sáenz, Eliana; Cabrera, Rufino; Sanchez, Juan F; De Los Santos, Maxy B; Lucas, Carmen M; Núñez, Jorge H; Edgel, Kimberly A; Sopan, Justino; Fernández, Jorge; Carnero, Andres M; Baldeviano, G Christian; Arrasco, Juan C; Graf, Paul C F; Lescano, Andres G

    2015-08-01

    Military personnel deployed to the Amazon Basin are at high risk for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). We responded to an outbreak among Peruvian Army personnel returning from short-term training in the Amazon, conducting active case detection, lesion sample collection, and risk factor assessment. The attack rate was 25% (76/303); the incubation period was 2-36 weeks (median = 8). Most cases had one lesion (66%), primarily ulcerative (49%), and in the legs (57%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identified Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (59/61 = 97%) and L. (V.) guyanensis (2/61 = 3%). Being male (risk ratio [RR] = 4.01; P = 0.034), not wearing long-sleeve clothes (RR = 1.71; P = 0.005), and sleeping in open rooms (RR = 1.80; P = 0.009) were associated with CL. Sodium stibogluconate therapy had a 41% cure rate, less than previously reported in Peru (~70%; P < 0.001). After emphasizing pre-deployment education and other basic prevention measures, trainees in the following year had lower incidence (1/278 = 0.4%; P < 0.001). Basic prevention can reduce CL risk in deployed militaries.

  5. Outbreak of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Peruvian Military Personnel Undertaking Training Activities in the Amazon Basin, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Oré, Marianela; Sáenz, Eliana; Cabrera, Rufino; Sanchez, Juan F.; De Los Santos, Maxy B.; Lucas, Carmen M.; Núñez, Jorge H.; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Sopan, Justino; Fernández, Jorge; Carnero, Andres M.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Arrasco, Juan C.; Graf, Paul C. F.; Lescano, Andres G.

    2015-01-01

    Military personnel deployed to the Amazon Basin are at high risk for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). We responded to an outbreak among Peruvian Army personnel returning from short-term training in the Amazon, conducting active case detection, lesion sample collection, and risk factor assessment. The attack rate was 25% (76/303); the incubation period was 2–36 weeks (median = 8). Most cases had one lesion (66%), primarily ulcerative (49%), and in the legs (57%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identified Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (59/61 = 97%) and L. (V.) guyanensis (2/61 = 3%). Being male (risk ratio [RR] = 4.01; P = 0.034), not wearing long-sleeve clothes (RR = 1.71; P = 0.005), and sleeping in open rooms (RR = 1.80; P = 0.009) were associated with CL. Sodium stibogluconate therapy had a 41% cure rate, less than previously reported in Peru (∼ 70%; P < 0.001). After emphasizing pre-deployment education and other basic prevention measures, trainees in the following year had lower incidence (1/278 = 0.4%; P < 0.001). Basic prevention can reduce CL risk in deployed militaries. PMID:26078320

  6. Ethnobiology and Ethnopharmacology of Lepidium meyenii (Maca), a Plant from the Peruvian Highlands

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Gustavo F.

    2012-01-01

    Lepidium meyenii (maca) is a Peruvian plant of the Brassicaceae family cultivated for more than 2000 years, which grows exclusively in the central Andes between 4000 and 4500 m altitude. Maca is used as a food supplement and also for its medicinal properties described traditionally. Since the 90s of the XX century, an increasing interest in products from maca has been observed in many parts of the world. In the last decade, exportation of maca from Peru has increased from 1,415,000 USD in 2001 to USD 6,170,000 USD in 2010. Experimental scientific evidence showed that maca has nutritional, energizer, and fertility-enhancer properties, and it acts on sexual dysfunctions, osteoporosis, benign prostatic hyperplasia, memory and learning, and protects skin against ultraviolet radiation. Clinical trials showed efficacy of maca on sexual dysfunctions as well as increasing sperm count and motility. Maca is a plant with great potential as an adaptogen and appears to be promising as a nutraceutical in the prevention of several diseases. PMID:21977053

  7. Late Holocene Regression of the Northern Peruvian Coast Near Rio Chicama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, M. T.; Goodbred, S. L.; Dillehay, T. D.; Quivira, M. P.

    2008-12-01

    Many Peruvian archaeological sites lie at the interface between an arid coastal desert, a rich marine ecosystem, and some of the tallest mountains in the Western Hemisphere, providing several unique environments within a small geographic area. While the region has supported civilizations since at least 6000BP, it has also been subject to a complex history of environmental impacts evident in the stratigraphy of the surrounding coastal environment. Most notable in the stratigraphy are El Nino flood events, providing the majority of sediment input to the coast, and tsunami events that are occasionally marked in the stratigraphic record. Such evidence for a paleotsunami appears to exist within a sequence of regressive Holocene shoreline deposits. This possible event is characterized by a planar erosional surface, dipping shallowly seaward, truncating the entire sequence of Holocene shorelines. The surface also consists of a lag of gravel that has been subsequently weathered by subaerial exposure to salt and sun. In addition there appears to be residual evidence of a similar, earlier event, most of which has been eroded from the record by the younger event. This entire sequence of shoreface deposits is situated approximately 2m above present mean sea level, and is suspected to be younger than 3000 years (pending radiocarbon dates), suggesting a rapid, recent Holocene regression in this region.

  8. pic gene of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and its association with diarrhea in Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    Durand, David; Contreras, Carmen A; Mosquito, Susan; Ruíz, Joaquim; Cleary, Thomas G; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2016-08-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) causes acute and persistent diarrhea among children, HIV-infected patients, and travelers to developing countries. We have searched for 18 genes-encoding virulence factors associated with aggregative adherence, dispersion, biofilm, toxins, serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) and siderophores, analyzed in 172 well-characterized EAEC strains (aggR(+)) isolated from stool samples of 97 children with diarrhea and 75 healthy controls from a passive surveillance diarrhea cohort study in Peru. Eighty-one different genetic profiles were identified, 37 were found only associated with diarrhea and 25 with control samples. The most frequent genetic profile was aggC(+)aatA(+)aap(+)shf(+)fyuA(+), present in 19 strains, including diarrhea and controls. The profile set1A(+)set1B(+)pic(+) was associated with diarrhea (P < 0.05). Of all genes evaluated, the most frequent were aatA (CVD 342) present in 159 strains (92.4%) and fyuA in 157 (91.3%). When EAEC strains were analyzed as a single pathogen (excluding co-infections), only pic was associated with diarrhea (P < 0.05) and with prolonged diarrhea (diarrhea ≥ 7 days) (P < 0.05). In summary, this is the first report on the prevalence of a large set of EAEC virulence genes and its association with diarrhea in Peruvian children. More studies are needed to elucidate the exact role of each virulence factor.

  9. Evidence for Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Oviposition on Boats in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Guagliardo, Sarah Anne; Morrison, Amy C.; Luis Barboza, Jose; Wesson, Dawn M.; Ponnusamy, Loganathan; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo; Kitron, Uriel

    2015-01-01

    Dengue vector Aedes aegypti L. is invading peri-urban and rural areas throughout Latin America. Our previous research in the Peruvian Amazon has shown that river boats are heavily infested with immature and adult Ae. aegypti mosquitoes, likely playing a major role in their long-distance dispersal and successful invasion. However, the presence of immature mosquitoes provides no information about the timing of oviposition, and whether it took place in the boats. Here, we used baited ovitraps deployed on river boats to test the hypothesis that Ae. aegypti oviposition occurs during boat travel. We deployed 360 ovitraps on 60 different barges during August and October of 2013, and February 2014 (with 20 barges sampled during each month). We found that Ae. aegypti mosquitoes in 22 individual ovitraps from 15 of the 60 barges (premise index 25%) across all sampling dates. Further, the distribution of Ae. aegypti egg abundance was highly aggregated: 2.6% of traps (N = 7) were responsible for 71.8% of eggs found, and 1.5% of traps (N = 4) were responsible for all (100%) of the larvae found. Similarly, 5% of boats were responsible for the 71.47% of eggs. Our results provide strong evidence that Ae. aegypti oviposition commonly occurs during boat travel. Baited ovitraps could represent a cost-effective means of monitoring and controlling mosquito populations on boats. PMID:26335482

  10. Persistent strongyloidiasis complicated by recurrent meningitis in an HTLV seropositive Peruvian migrant resettled in Italy.

    PubMed

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Montagnani, Francesca; Tordini, Giacinta; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Bisoffi, Zeno; Bartoloni, Alessandro; De Luca, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    We describe a case of persistent strongyloidiasis complicated by recurrent meningitis, in a human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) seropositive Peruvian migrant adult resettled in Italy. He was admitted with signs and symptoms of acute bacterial meningitis, reporting four other meningitis episodes in the past 6 years, with an etiological diagnosis of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium in two cases. He had been previously treated with several antihelmintic regimens not including ivermectin, without eradication of strongyloidiasis, and he had never been tested for HTLV before. During the described episode, the patient was treated for meningitis with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and 200 μg/kg/dose oral ivermectin once daily on day 1, 2, 15 and 16 with full recovery and no further episodes of meningitis. The presented case underlines several critical points concerning the management of poorly known neglected diseases such as strongyloidiasis and HTLV infection in low-endemic areas. Despite several admissions for meningitis and strongyloidiasis, the parasitic infection was not adequately treated and the patient was not previously tested for HTLV. The supply of ivermectin and the choice of treatment scheme was challenging since ivermectin is not approved in Italy and there are no standardized guidelines for the treatment of severe strongyloidiasis in HTLV seropositive subjects.

  11. [Environmental pollution, climate variability and climate change: a review of health impacts on the Peruvian population].

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Zevallos, Alisson; Gonzales-Castañeda, Cynthia; Nuñez, Denisse; Gastañaga, Carmen; Cabezas, César; Naeher, Luke; Levy, Karen; Steenland, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    This article is a review of the pollution of water, air and the effect of climate change on the health of the Peruvian population. A major air pollutant is particulate matter less than 2.5 μ (PM 2.5). In Lima, 2,300 premature deaths annually are attributable to this pollutant. Another problem is household air pollution by using stoves burning biomass fuels, where excessive indoor exposure to PM 2.5 inside the household is responsible for approximately 3,000 annual premature deaths among adults, with another unknown number of deaths among children due to respiratory infections. Water pollution is caused by sewage discharges into rivers, minerals (arsenic) from various sources, and failure of water treatment plants. In Peru, climate change may impact the frequency and severity of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which has been associated with an increase in cases of diseases such as cholera, malaria and dengue. Climate change increases the temperature and can extend the areas affected by vector-borne diseases, have impact on the availability of water and contamination of the air. In conclusion, Peru is going through a transition of environmental risk factors, where traditional and modern risks coexist and infectious and chronic problems remain, some of which are associated with problems of pollution of water and air. PMID:25418656

  12. Association between Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Control in Peruvian School Children: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Uceda, Mónica; Ziegler, Otto; Lindo, Felipe; Herrera-Pérez, Eder

    2013-01-01

    Background. Asthma and allergic rhinitis are highly prevalent conditions that cause major illness worldwide. This study aimed to assess the association between allergic rhinitis and asthma control in Peruvian school children. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 256 children with asthma recruited in 5 schools from Lima and Callao cities. The outcome was asthma control assessed by the asthma control test. A score test for trend of odds was used to evaluate the association between allergic rhinitis severity and the prevalence of inadequate asthma control. A generalized linear regression model was used to estimate the adjusted prevalence ratios of inadequate asthma control. Results. Allergic rhinitis was present in 66.4% of the population with asthma. The trend analysis showed a positive association between allergic rhinitis and the probability of inadequate asthma control (P < 0.001). It was associated with an increased prevalence of inadequate asthma control, with adjusted prevalence ratios of 1.53 (95% confidence interval: 1.19−1.98). Conclusion. This study indicates that allergic rhinitis is associated with an inadequate level of asthma control, giving support to the recommendation of evaluating rhinitis to improve asthma control in children. PMID:23984414

  13. Results of monitoring of Equatorial Front at the northern Peruvian coastal site since December 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, C. W.; Gutiérrez, D.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature, salinity and currents have been observed by mooring oceanographic instruments at an oil platform (4º26.863'S, 81º 20.148'W) to monitor movement of the Equatorial Front along the northern Peruvian coastal region since December 6, 2014. Temperature was increased from December 2014 to May 2015 both near surface (10 m) and near bottom (54 m). Bottom temperature became warm abruptly from 16ºC to 22 ºC from mid-March to early-May; however, surface temperature was undulated with a period of 36.6 days. In overall, temperature and salinity was an inverse proportional relation at surface with a steep decline of salinity (from 34.92 to 33.23 psu) for 3 days from 13 to 16 February. This salinity decline suggests southward displacement of the Equatorial Front. The depth mean current which flowed toward south-southwest with 12.4 cm/s supports this. Bottom temperature increased after the Equatorial Front moved to southward. This is important to forecast El Niño.

  14. Persistent Strongyloidiasis Complicated by Recurrent Meningitis in an HTLV Seropositive Peruvian Migrant Resettled in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Montagnani, Francesca; Tordini, Giacinta; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Bisoffi, Zeno; Bartoloni, Alessandro; De Luca, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of persistent strongyloidiasis complicated by recurrent meningitis, in a human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) seropositive Peruvian migrant adult resettled in Italy. He was admitted with signs and symptoms of acute bacterial meningitis, reporting four other meningitis episodes in the past 6 years, with an etiological diagnosis of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium in two cases. He had been previously treated with several antihelmintic regimens not including ivermectin, without eradication of strongyloidiasis, and he had never been tested for HTLV before. During the described episode, the patient was treated for meningitis with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and 200 μg/kg/dose oral ivermectin once daily on day 1, 2, 15 and 16 with full recovery and no further episodes of meningitis. The presented case underlines several critical points concerning the management of poorly known neglected diseases such as strongyloidiasis and HTLV infection in low-endemic areas. Despite several admissions for meningitis and strongyloidiasis, the parasitic infection was not adequately treated and the patient was not previously tested for HTLV. The supply of ivermectin and the choice of treatment scheme was challenging since ivermectin is not approved in Italy and there are no standardized guidelines for the treatment of severe strongyloidiasis in HTLV seropositive subjects. PMID:25846292

  15. Revisiting Peruvian anchovy ( Engraulis ringens) trophodynamics provides a new vision of the Humboldt Current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, Pepe; Bertrand, Arnaud

    2008-10-01

    The Peruvian anchovy or anchoveta ( Engraulis ringens) forages on plankton and is a main prey for marine mammals, seabirds, fish, and fishers, and is therefore a key element of the food web in the Humboldt Current system (HCS). Here, we present results from the analysis of 21,203 anchoveta stomach contents sampled during 23 acoustic surveys over the period 1996-2003. Prey items were identified to the genus level, and the relative dietary importance of different prey was assessed by determination of their carbon content. Variability in stomach fullness was examined relative to the diel cycle, the distance from the coast, sea surface temperature, and latitude, using generalized additive models (GAMs). Whereas phytoplankton largely dominated anchoveta diets in terms of numerical abundance and comprised >99% of ingested prey items, the carbon content of prey items indicated that zooplankton was by far the most important dietary component, with euphausiids contributing 67.5% of dietary carbon followed by copepods (26.3%). Stomach fullness data showed that anchoveta feed mainly during daytime between 07h00 and 18h00, although night-time feeding also made a substantial contribution to total food consumption. Stomach fullness also varied with latitude, distance from the coast, and temperature, but with substantial variability indicating a high degree of plasticity in anchoveta feeding behaviour. The results suggest an ecological role for anchoveta that challenges current understanding of its position in the foodweb, the functioning of the HCS, and trophic models of the HCS.

  16. Evidence for Holocene stability of steep slopes, northern Peruvian Andes, based on soils and radiocarbon dates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, D.C.; Birkeland, P.W.; Rodbell, D.T.

    1993-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating and soil relationships indicate that landscapes in highaltitude glaciated valleys of the northern Peruvian Andes have been remarkably stable during the Holocene. Radiocarbon dates show that deglaciation was underway by 12 ka, and that slopes and alluvial fans at the bases of slopes were essentially stabilized by at least 8 ka. The soils consist of fine-grained loessial A horizons overlying Bw horizons in gravelly till or alluvial-fan gravel. Following deglaciation, widespread gullying took place in till on the steep (maximum angle: 37??) sideslopes of most valleys; the eroded material was deposited as fans at the bases of the slopes. Loess was then deposited as a fairly uniform blanket across most elements of the landscape. Soil formation began during or following loess deposition, and because soil-profile morphology is sufficiently similar at most sites, soil formation has been a dominant process during much of the Holocene. This remarkable stability, especially for such steep slopes, is attributed to a combination of tight packing of the till, permeability of the capping loess, rapid revegetation following ice retreat, and roots from the present grassland vegetation and possibly former forests. ?? 1993.

  17. Outbreak of Group A beta hemolytic Streptococcus pharyngitis in a Peruvian military facility, April 2012.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Mariana; Valle, Ruben; Reaves, Eric J; Loayza, Luis; Gonzalez, Sofia; Bernal, Maria; Soto, Giselle; Hawksworth, Anthony W; Kasper, Matthew R; Tilley, Drake H; De Mattos, Carlos A; Brown, Jason R; Bausch, David G

    2013-06-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS), or Streptococcus pyogenes, is a common cause of acute pharyngitis as well as other diseases. Closed populations such as those living on military bases, nursing homes, and prisons are particularly vulnerable to GAS outbreaks due to crowding that facilitates person-to-person transmission. This report details a large outbreak of GAS pharyngitis at a Peruvian military training facility near Lima, Peru, in April 2012. Initial findings showed 145 cases. However, as the investigation continued it was revealed that some trainees may have concealed their illness to avoid real or perceived negative consequences of seeking medical care. A subsequent anonymous survey of all trainees revealed at least 383 cases of pharyngitis among the facility's 1,549 trainees and an attack rate of 34 percent among the 1,137 respondents. The epidemic curve revealed a pattern consistent with routine person-to-person transmission, although a point-source initiating event could not be excluded. Laboratory results showed GAS emm type 80.1 to be the culprit pathogen, an organism not commonly implicated in outbreaks of GAS in the Americas. Barious unique and illustrative features of outbreak investigation in military facilities and populations are discussed.

  18. HIV testing among social media-using Peruvian men who have sex with men: correlates and social context.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Evan A; Chiu, ChingChe J; Menacho, Luis A; Young, Sean D

    2016-10-01

    HIV remains concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Peru, and homophobia and AIDS-related stigmas have kept the epidemic difficult to address. Gay self-identity has been associated with increased HIV testing, though this relationship has not been examined extensively. Social media use has been rapidly increasing in Peru, yet little is known about MSM social media users in Peru. This study sought to investigate the demographic, behavioral, and stigma-related factors associated with HIV testing among social media-using Peruvian MSM. Five hundred and fifty-six MSM from Lima and surrounding areas were recruited from social networking websites to complete a survey on their sexual risk behaviors. We examined the demographic and social correlates of HIV testing behavior among this sample. Younger age and non-gay identity were significantly associated with lower likelihood of getting tested in univariate analysis. After controlling for key behaviors and AIDS-related stigma, younger age remained significantly associated with decreased testing. Participants who engaged in discussions online about HIV testing were more likely to get tested, while AIDS-related stigma presented a significant barrier to testing. Stigma severity also varied significantly by sexual identity. Youth appear to be significantly less likely than older individuals to test for HIV. Among Peruvian MSM, AIDS-related stigma remains a strong predictor of willingness to get tested. Social media-based intervention work targeting Peruvian youth should encourage discussion around HIV testing, and must also address AIDS-related stigma. PMID:27140820

  19. Peruvian Maca (Lepidium peruvianum): (II) Phytochemical Profiles of Four Prime Maca Phenotypes Grown in Two Geographically-Distant Locations.

    PubMed

    O Meissner, Henry; Mscisz, Alina; Piatkowska, Ewa; Baraniak, Marek; Mielcarek, Sebastian; Kedzia, Bogdan; Holderna-Kedzia, Elzbieta; Pisulewski, Pawel

    2016-03-01

    Peruvian Maca crops (Lepidium peruvianum), grown in two geographically-distant cultivation sites located at similar altitudes in the highlands of the Peruvian Andes (Junin at 4,200 m a.s.l. and Ancash 4,150 m a.s.l.), were used in the study. Four prime Maca phenotypes, distinguished by hypocotyl colours labelled as "Yellow", "Purple", "Red" and "Black" were selected to determine distribution in levels and corresponding ratios between individual Glucosinolates (Glucotropaeolin and m-methylglucotropaeolin) in an attempt to identify four Peruvian Maca phenotypes from analyses of powdered hypocotyls. There were highly significant differences (P<0.01) in hypocotyl weight/size of four Maca phenotypes harvested in two locations. The Junin crop represented a mostly "large" class (13.3 g) with "small" size hypocotyls (7.2 g), while a "small" class was predominant in Ancash (3.5 g). Powdered Yellow Maca showed significantly higher (P<0.001) microbial contamination than the other three, with Black Maca being the least infected. Only minor, statistically-confirmed differences were detected in nutritive characteristics between the four Maca phenotypes grown in Junin, however highly significant differences (P<0.01) in Glucosinolates existed between the Red and Black Maca grown in Junin and Ancash. Irrespective of the cultivation location, Red phenotypes showed the highest content of Total Glucosinolates, followed by Black and Purple, with the Yellow phenotype showing consistently lower levels. Highly significant P<0.01) differences determined in ratios of individual Glucosinolates between four Maca phenotypes grown in two locations, confirms an earlier assumption that sums of individual Glucosinolates, their ratios and profiles, may be feasible to explore in analytically identifying individual Maca phenotypes in pulverised marketed Maca products. PMID:27127450

  20. Peruvian Maca (Lepidium peruvianum): (II) Phytochemical Profiles of Four Prime Maca Phenotypes Grown in Two Geographically-Distant Locations

    PubMed Central

    O. Meissner, Henry; Mscisz, Alina; Piatkowska, Ewa; Baraniak, Marek; Mielcarek, Sebastian; Kedzia, Bogdan; Holderna-Kedzia, Elzbieta; Pisulewski, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Peruvian Maca crops (Lepidium peruvianum), grown in two geographically-distant cultivation sites located at similar altitudes in the highlands of the Peruvian Andes (Junin at 4,200 m a.s.l. and Ancash 4,150 m a.s.l.), were used in the study. Four prime Maca phenotypes, distinguished by hypocotyl colours labelled as “Yellow”, “Purple”, “Red” and “Black” were selected to determine distribution in levels and corresponding ratios between individual Glucosinolates (Glucotropaeolin and m-methylglucotropaeolin) in an attempt to identify four Peruvian Maca phenotypes from analyses of powdered hypocotyls. There were highly significant differences (P<0.01) in hypocotyl weight/size of four Maca phenotypes harvested in two locations. The Junin crop represented a mostly “large” class (13.3 g) with “small” size hypocotyls (7.2 g), while a “small” class was predominant in Ancash (3.5 g). Powdered Yellow Maca showed significantly higher (P<0.001) microbial contamination than the other three, with Black Maca being the least infected. Only minor, statistically-confirmed differences were detected in nutritive characteristics between the four Maca phenotypes grown in Junin, however highly significant differences (P<0.01) in Glucosinolates existed between the Red and Black Maca grown in Junin and Ancash. Irrespective of the cultivation location, Red phenotypes showed the highest content of Total Glucosinolates, followed by Black and Purple, with the Yellow phenotype showing consistently lower levels. Highly significant P<0.01) differences determined in ratios of individual Glucosinolates between four Maca phenotypes grown in two locations, confirms an earlier assumption that sums of individual Glucosinolates, their ratios and profiles, may be feasible to explore in analytically identifying individual Maca phenotypes in pulverised marketed Maca products. PMID:27127450

  1. A genetic response to high altitude hypoxia: high hemoglobin-oxygen affinity in chicken (Gallus gallus) from the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Velarde, F L; Espinoza, D; Monge, C; de Muizon, C

    1991-01-01

    A population of chicken (Gallus gallus) from the Peruvian Andes (4,000 m) carrying a high hemoglobin-oxygen affinity has been identified. This property remained stable after over 1 year residence at sea level and was transmitted to the descendants born at sea level. Chicken were introduced in South America during the Spanish conquest and therefore their adaptation time to high altitude is less than 500 years. This finding shows that a genotypic change in hemoglobin function can occur in an extremely short evolutionary time and leads to some reflections on the high altitude adaptation of the mammals that migrated to South America during the great Plio-Pleistocene interchange.

  2. Direction and timing of uplift propagation in the Peruvian Andes deduced from molecular phylogenetics of highland biotaxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Damien; Sempere, Thierry; Plantard, Olivier

    2008-07-01

    Physical paleoaltimetric methods are increasingly used to estimate the amount and timing of surface uplift in orogens. Because the rise of mountains creates new ecosystems and triggers evolutionary changes, biological data may also be used to assess the development and timing of regional surface uplift. Here we apply this idea to the Peruvian Andes through a molecular phylogeographic and phylochronologic analysis of Globodera pallida, a potato parasite nematode that requires cool temperatures and thus thrives above 2.0-2.5 km in these tropical highlands. The Peruvian populations of this species exhibit a clear evolutionary pattern with deeper, more ancient lineages occurring in Andean southern Peru and shallower, younger lineages occurring progressively northwards. Genetically diverging G. pallida populations thus progressively colonized highland areas as these were expanding northwards, demonstrating that altitude in the Peruvian Andes was acquired longitudinally from south to north, i.e. in the direction of decreasing orogenic volume. This phylogeographic structure is recognized in other, independent highland biotaxa, and point to the Central Andean Orocline (CAO) as the region where high altitudes first emerged. Moreover, molecular clocks relative to Andean taxa, including the potato-tomato group, consistently estimate that altitudes high enough to induce biotic radiation were first acquired in the Early Miocene. After calibration by geological and biological tie-points and intervals, the phylogeny of G. pallida is used as a molecular clock, which estimates that the 2.0-2.5 km threshold elevation range was reached in the Early Miocene in southernmost Peru, in the Middle and Late Miocene in the Abancay segment (NW southern Peru), and from the latest Miocene in central and northern Peru. Although uncertainties attached to phylochronologic ages are significantly larger than those derived from geochronological methods, these results are fairly consistent with coeval

  3. Receiver Function Study of the Peruvian Flat-Slab Region: Initial Results from PULSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, B.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Kumar, A.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.; Tavera, H.

    2013-12-01

    The largest segment of flat slab subduction in the world occurs beneath Peru where the distribution of slab earthquakes indicates the Nazca plate subducts nearly horizontally below the Andes. The presumably buoyant Nazca Ridge subducts at the southern end of this shallow subduction segment which has been linked to the cessation of active arc volcanism within the segment of the Andes between 3°S and 15°S. We deployed 40 broadband seismic stations as part of the PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment (PULSE) to investigate the flat slab subduction processes beneath the Peruvian Andes between 10.5°S and 15°S. As one component of a multi-technique seismological study, we have calculated Receiver Functions from PULSE seismic data to create Common Conversion Point stacks utilizing a 1-D velocity structure with Vp of 6.2 km/s to 60 km depth, 8.1 km/s from 60 to 200 km depth, and a Vp/Vs ratio of 1.8 to provide preliminary constraints on crustal-scale structures near the subducting Nazca Ridge. Forward modeling of results from individual stations was carried out to provide additional constraints on more localized crustal variations. These results provide estimates for the thickness of the continental crust of the overriding South American Plate as well as the first regional images of a discontinuous oceanic Moho of the subducted Nazca Plate. Receiver function results show a strong P-to-S conversion from the continental Moho indicating the presence of significantly thickened crust within the central Peruvian Andes, reaching thicknesses of 50 to more than 60 kilometers and extending eastward into the Subandean region. A significant change in crustal thickness is present in the Eastern Cordillera northeast of Cuzco, stepping from approximately 62 km to 55 km, which matches prior crustal models based on gravity data. A number of high amplitude arrivals indicate the top of a low velocity layer at approximately 12-15 km depth throughout the PULSE study region, roughly

  4. Characterizing Seismic Anisotropy across the Peruvian Flat-Slab Subduction Zone: Shear Wave Splitting from PULSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, C. M.; Long, M. D.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.; Tavera, H.

    2013-12-01

    Although 10% of subduction zones worldwide today exhibit shallow or flat subduction, we are yet to fully understand how and why these slabs go flat. An excellent study location for such a problem is in Peru, where the largest region of flat-subduction currently exists, extending ~1500 km in length (from 3 °S to 15 °S) and ~300 km in width. Across this region we investigate the pattern of seismic anisotropy, an indicator for past and/or ongoing deformation in the upper mantle. To achieve this we conduct shear wave splitting analyzes at 40 broadband stations from the PULSE project (PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment). These stations were deployed for 2+ years across the southern half of the Peruvian flat-slab region. We present detailed shear wave splitting results for deep and teleseismic events, making use of a wide variety of available phases that sample the upper mantle directly beneath the stations (such as SKS, SKKS, PKS, sSKS, SKiKS, ScS and local/direct S). We analyze the variability of our results with respect to initial polarizations and ray paths, as well as spatial variability between stations as the underlying slab morphology changes. Preliminary results show predominately NW-SE fast polarizations (trench oblique to sub-parallel) over the flat-slab region east of Lima. These results are consistent with observations of more complex multi-layered anisotropy beneath a nearby permanent station (NNA). Further south, towards the transition to steeper subduction, the splitting pattern becomes increasingly dominated by null measurements. Over to the east however, beyond Cuzco, where the mantle wedge might begin to play a role, we record fast polarizations quasi-parallel to the local slab contours. We carefully evaluate the different possible source locations within the subduction zone for this seismic anisotropy and observe increasing evidence for distinct anisotropy within the slab as well as the sub-slab mantle.

  5. Gold Mining in the Peruvian Amazon: Global Prices, Deforestation, and Mercury Imports

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Jennifer J.; Carter, Catherine E.; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Delgado, Cesar I.

    2011-01-01

    Many factors such as poverty, ineffective institutions and environmental regulations may prevent developing countries from managing how natural resources are extracted to meet a strong market demand. Extraction for some resources has reached such proportions that evidence is measurable from space. We present recent evidence of the global demand for a single commodity and the ecosystem destruction resulting from commodity extraction, recorded by satellites for one of the most biodiverse areas of the world. We find that since 2003, recent mining deforestation in Madre de Dios, Peru is increasing nonlinearly alongside a constant annual rate of increase in international gold price (∼18%/yr). We detect that the new pattern of mining deforestation (1915 ha/year, 2006–2009) is outpacing that of nearby settlement deforestation. We show that gold price is linked with exponential increases in Peruvian national mercury imports over time (R2 = 0.93, p = 0.04, 2003–2009). Given the past rates of increase we predict that mercury imports may more than double for 2011 (∼500 t/year). Virtually all of Peru's mercury imports are used in artisanal gold mining. Much of the mining increase is unregulated/artisanal in nature, lacking environmental impact analysis or miner education. As a result, large quantities of mercury are being released into the atmosphere, sediments and waterways. Other developing countries endowed with gold deposits are likely experiencing similar environmental destruction in response to recent record high gold prices. The increasing availability of satellite imagery ought to evoke further studies linking economic variables with land use and cover changes on the ground. PMID:21526143

  6. Big catch, little sharks: Insight into Peruvian small-scale longline fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Philip D; Alfaro-Shigueto, Joanna; Hodgson, David J; Mangel, Jeffrey C; Witt, Matthew J; Godley, Brendan J

    2014-01-01

    Shark take, driven by vast demand for meat and fins, is increasing. We set out to gain insights into the impact of small-scale longline fisheries in Peru. Onboard observers were used to document catch from 145 longline fishing trips (1668 fishing days) originating from Ilo, southern Peru. Fishing effort is divided into two seasons: targeting dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus; December to February) and sharks (March to November). A total of 16,610 sharks were observed caught, with 11,166 identified to species level. Of these, 70.6% were blue sharks (Prionace glauca), 28.4% short-fin mako sharks (Isurus oxyrinchus), and 1% were other species (including thresher (Alopias vulpinus), hammerhead (Sphyrna zygaena), porbeagle (Lamnus nasus), and other Carcharhinidae species (Carcharhinus brachyurus, Carcharhinus falciformis, Galeorhinus galeus). Mean ± SD catch per unit effort of 33.6 ± 10.9 sharks per 1000 hooks was calculated for the shark season and 1.9 ± 3.1 sharks per 1000 hooks were caught in the dolphinfish season. An average of 83.7% of sharks caught (74.7% blue sharks; 93.3% mako sharks) were deemed sexually immature and under the legal minimum landing size, which for species exhibiting k-selected life history traits can result in susceptibility to over exploitation. As these growing fisheries operate along the entire Peruvian coast and may catch millions of sharks per annum, we conclude that their continued expansion, along with ineffective legislative approaches resulting in removal of immature individuals, has the potential to threaten the sustainability of the fishery, its target species, and ecosystem. There is a need for additional monitoring and research to inform novel management strategies for sharks while maintaining fisher livelihoods. PMID:25360274

  7. Seismic properties of the Nazca oceanic crust in southern Peruvian subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Clayton, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    The horizontal Nazca slab, extending over a distance of ~800 km along the trench is one of enigmatic features in Peruvian subduction zone. Increased buoyancy of the oceanic lithosphere alone due to the subduction of Nazca Ridge is insufficient to fully explain such a lengthy segment. We use data from the recent seismic experiment in southern Peru to find that the subduction-related hydration plays a major role in controlling shear wave velocities within the upper part of the oceanic crust and overlying materials. We observe substantial velocity reductions of ~20-40% near the top plate interface along- and perpendicular-to the trench from ~40-120 km depths. In particular, significant shear wave velocity reductions and subsequently higher P-to-S velocity ratio (exceeding 2.0) at the flat slab region suggest that the seismically probed layer is fluid-rich and mechanically weak. The dominant source of fluid comes from metasediments and subducted crust (Nazca Ridge). Long-term supply of fluid from the southward migrating Nazca Ridge provides additional buoyancy of the subducting oceanic lithosphere and also lowers the viscosity of the overlying mantle wedge to drive and sustain the flat plate segment of ~800 km along the trench. Also, by comparing calculated seismic velocities with experimentally derived mineral physics data, we additionally provide mechanical constraints on the possible changes in frictional behavior across the subduction zone plate interface. Observed low seismic velocities in the seismogenic zone suggest a presence of low strength materials that may be explained by overpressured pore fluids (i.e., accreted sediment included in the subduction channel).

  8. Seismic properties of the Nazca oceanic crust in southern Peruvian subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, YoungHee; Clayton, Robert W.

    2015-11-01

    The horizontal Nazca slab, extending over a distance of ∼800 km along the trench is one of enigmatic features in Peruvian subduction zone. Increased buoyancy of the oceanic lithosphere alone due to the subduction of Nazca Ridge is insufficient to fully explain such a lengthy segment. We use data from the recent seismic experiment in southern Peru to find that the subduction-related hydration plays a major role in controlling shear wave velocities within the upper part of the oceanic crust and overlying materials. We observe substantial velocity reductions of ∼20-40% near the top plate interface along- and perpendicular-to the trench from ∼40-120 km depths. In particular, significant shear wave velocity reductions and subsequently higher P-to-S velocity ratio (exceeding 2.0) at the flat slab region suggest that the seismically probed layer is fluid-rich and mechanically weak. The dominant source of fluid comes from metasediments and subducted crust (Nazca Ridge). Long-term supply of fluid from the southward migrating Nazca Ridge provides additional buoyancy of the subducting oceanic lithosphere and also lowers the viscosity of the overlying mantle wedge to drive and sustain the flat plate segment of ∼800 km along the trench. Also, by comparing calculated seismic velocities with experimentally derived mineral physics data, we additionally provide mechanical constraints on the possible changes in frictional behavior across the subduction zone plate interface. Observed low seismic velocities in the seismogenic zone suggest a presence of low strength materials that may be explained by overpressured pore fluids (i.e., accreted sediment included in the subduction channel).

  9. Sleepiness and nocturnal hypoxemia in Peruvian men with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Jorge Rey; Mezones-Holguín, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the intensity of nocturnal hypoxemia associated with sleepiness in Peruvian men with a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods We carried out a secondary data analysis based on a study which includes patients with OSA who were seen in a private hospital in Lima, Peru from 2006 to 2012. We included male adults who had polysomnographic recordings and who answered the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESE). The intensity of nocturnal hypoxemia (oxygen saturation ≤90 %) was classified in four new categories: 0, <1, 1 to 10 and >10 % total sleep time with nocturnal hypoxemia (NH). When the ESE score was higher than 10, we used the definitions presence or absence of sleepiness. We used Poisson regression models with robust variance to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) for association between sleepiness and NH. Results 518 male patients with OSA were evaluated. Four hundred and fifty-two (87 %) patients had NH and 262 (51 %) had sleepiness. Of the 142 (27.4 %) patients who had >10 % total sleep time with NH, 98 (69.0 %) showed sleepiness and had a greater probability of sleepiness prevalence, with a crude PR of 1.82 (95 % CI 1.31–2.53). This association persisted in the multivariate models. Conclusions We found an association between NH and sleepiness. Only patients with the major intensity of NH (over 10 % of the total sleep time) had a greater probability of sleepiness. This suggests that sleepiness probably occurs after a chronic process and after overwhelming compensatory mechanisms. PMID:24249663

  10. Influence of Peruvian flat-subduction dynamics on the evolution of western Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, Caroline M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina; Dávila, Federico M.

    2014-10-01

    Convection in the Earth's mantle is mainly driven by cold, dense subducting slabs, but relatively little is known about how 3D variations in slab morphology and buoyancy affect mantle flow or how the surface above deforms in response (i.e. dynamic topography). We investigate this problem by studying the dynamics of an active region of flat-slab subduction located in Peru in South America. Here the slab geometry is well known, based on the regional seismicity, and we have observations from the local geological record to validate our models. Of particular interest is the widespread subsidence and deposition of the Solimões Formation across western Amazonia that coincided with the development of the Peruvian flat-slab during the Mid-Late Miocene. This formation covers an extensive area from the foredeep to the Purus Arch located ∼2000 km away from the trench. Close to the Andes the preservation of several kilometers of sedimentary thicknesses can be easily accounted for by flexure. Based on an estimate of the Andean loading we predict 2.8 to 3.6 km of accommodation space that spans 100 km. The spatial and temporal history of the Solimões Formation however, particularly the thick distal foreland accumulations up to 1.2 km deep, can only be matched with the addition of a longer-wavelength dynamic source of topography. Following the transition from normal to flat subduction, we predict over 1 km of dynamic subsidence (∼1500 km wide) that propagates over 1000 km away from the trench, tracking the subduction leading edge. This is followed by a pulse of dynamic uplift over the flat segment behind it. We therefore propose that a combination of uplift, flexure and dynamic topography during slab flattening in Peru is responsible for the sedimentation history and landscape evolution of western Amazonia that eventually led to the configuration of the Amazon Drainage Basin we know today.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a serine protease, Ba III-4, from Peruvian Bothrops atrox venom.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Soto, L A; Bonfim, V L; Novello, J C; Navarro Oviedo, R; Yarlequé Chocas, A; Marangoni, S

    2007-09-01

    A serine protease from Bothrops atrox (Peruvian specimen's venom) was isolated in two chromatographic steps in LC molecular exclusion and reverse phase-HPLC. This protein was denominated Ba III-4 (33,080.265 Da determinated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry) and showed pI of 5.06, Km 0.2 x 10(-1 ) M and the V (máx) 4.1 x 10(-1 )nmoles p-NA/lt/min on the synthetic substrate BapNA. Ba III-4 also showed ability to coagulate bovine fibrinogen. The serine protease was inhibited by soyben trypsin inhibitor and DA2II, which is an anti-hemorrhagic factor isolated from the opossum specie Didelphis albiventris. The primary structure of Ba III-4 showed the presence of His(44), Asp(94) and Ser(193) residues in the corresponding positions to the catalytic triad established in the serine proteases and Ser(193) are inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride (PMSF). Amino acid analysis showed a high content of Asp, Glu, Gly, Ser, Ala and Pro, as well as 12 half-cysteine residues. Ba III-4 contained 293 amino acid residues and the primary structure of VIGGDECDIN EHPFLAFMYY SPRYFCGMTL INQEWVLTAA HCRYFCGMTL IHLGVHRESE KANYDEVRRF PKEKYFIFCD NNFTDDEVDK DIMLIRLDKP VSNSEHIAPL SLPSNPPSVG SVCRIMGWGQ TTTSPIDVLS PDEPHCANIN LFDNTVCHTA HPQVANTRTS TDTLCAGDLQ GGRDTCNGDS GGPLICNEQL HGILSWGGDP CAQPNKPAFY TKVYYFDHPW IKSIIAGNKK TVNFTCPPLR SDAKDDSTTY INQEWDWVLT AEHCDRTHMR NSFYDYSSIN SDS. Titration experiments did not show the presence of free sulfhydryl groups after 4 h incubation, nor were differences found in relation to titration kinetics in the presence of nondenaturating buffer. The isolation of this protein, Ba III-4, is of potential interest for the understanding of the pathomechanism of the snake venom action and for the identification of new blood coagulation enzymes of natural sources. PMID:17522968

  12. Gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon: global prices, deforestation, and mercury imports.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Jennifer J; Carter, Catherine E; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Delgado, Cesar I

    2011-04-19

    Many factors such as poverty, ineffective institutions and environmental regulations may prevent developing countries from managing how natural resources are extracted to meet a strong market demand. Extraction for some resources has reached such proportions that evidence is measurable from space. We present recent evidence of the global demand for a single commodity and the ecosystem destruction resulting from commodity extraction, recorded by satellites for one of the most biodiverse areas of the world. We find that since 2003, recent mining deforestation in Madre de Dios, Peru is increasing nonlinearly alongside a constant annual rate of increase in international gold price (∼18%/yr). We detect that the new pattern of mining deforestation (1915 ha/year, 2006-2009) is outpacing that of nearby settlement deforestation. We show that gold price is linked with exponential increases in Peruvian national mercury imports over time (R(2) = 0.93, p = 0.04, 2003-2009). Given the past rates of increase we predict that mercury imports may more than double for 2011 (∼500 t/year). Virtually all of Peru's mercury imports are used in artisanal gold mining. Much of the mining increase is unregulated/artisanal in nature, lacking environmental impact analysis or miner education. As a result, large quantities of mercury are being released into the atmosphere, sediments and waterways. Other developing countries endowed with gold deposits are likely experiencing similar environmental destruction in response to recent record high gold prices. The increasing availability of satellite imagery ought to evoke further studies linking economic variables with land use and cover changes on the ground.

  13. Arc Interrupted: The birth, life, and death of the Peruvian flat slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Lara; Knezevic Antonijevic, Sanja; Kumar, Abhash; Beck, Susan; Long, Maureen; Zandt, George; Tavera, Hernando; Minaya, Estela

    2016-04-01

    The Peruvian flat slab is a unique natural laboratory for investigating the temporal evolution of flat slab subduction and its associated thermal, tectonic, and seismic implications. This is because the flat slab has been hypothesized to have first formed further north (at approximately the latitude of Lima, Peru), but broadened to the south over the past 11 Ma. This means that areas further to the north represent an older, more evolved flat slab setting, whereas the southernmost edge of the modern flat slab reflects conditions experienced by a newly formed flat slab. Here we present findings from a suite of recent temporary broadband seismic deployments that spanned this entire region. Results from intermediate depth earthquake locations, surface wave tomography (ballistic and ambient Rayleigh wave), and Rayleigh wave anisotropy all indicate that the flat slab did indeed first form further to the north and broadened to the south, along with the southward migration of the Nazca ridge. Subsequently, a trench-parallel tear developed in the older portions of the flat slab north of the ridge, resulting in a resumption of normal subduction geometry where once a flat slab had existed. This tear allows for an interchange of mantle material from beneath the slab to the south to above the slab to the north. This mantle flow has significant thermal implications, both beneath the flat slab and in the lower continental crust located above the relatively newly formed tear. Our results provide unique constraints on the thermal and tectonic evolution of this unusual subduction geometry that may help us to understand better subduction zone processes everywhere.

  14. Effects of birthplace and individual genetic admixture on lung volume and exercise phenotypes of Peruvian Quechua.

    PubMed

    Brutsaert, Tom D; Parra, Esteban; Shriver, Mark; Gamboa, Alfredo; Palacios, Jose-Antonio; Rivera, Maria; Rodriguez, Ivette; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2004-04-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC) and maximal exercise response were measured in two populations of Peruvian males (age, 18-35 years) at 4,338 m who differed by the environment in which they were born and raised, i.e., high altitude (Cerro de Pasco, Peru, BHA, n = 39) and sea level (Lima, Peru, BSL, n = 32). BSL subjects were transported from sea level to 4,338 m, and were evaluated within 24 hr of exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Individual admixture level (ADMIX, % Spanish ancestry) was estimated for each subject, using 22 ancestry-informative genetic markers and also by skin reflectance measurement (MEL). Birthplace accounted for the approximately 10% larger FVC (P < 0.001), approximately 15% higher maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2)max, ml.min(-1).kg(-1)) (P < 0.001), and approximately 5% higher arterial oxygen saturation during exercise (SpO(2)) (P < 0.001) of BHA subjects. ADMIX was low in both study groups, averaging 9.5 +/- 2.6% and 2.1 +/- 0.3% in BSL and BHA subjects, respectively. Mean underarm MEL was significantly higher in the BSL group (P < 0.001), despite higher ADMIX. ADMIX was not associated with any study phenotype, but study power was not sufficient to evaluate hypotheses of genetic adaptation via the ADMIX variable. MEL and FVC were positively correlated in the BHA (P = 0.035) but not BSL (P = 0.335) subjects. However, MEL and ADMIX were not correlated across the entire study sample (P = 0.282). In summary, results from this study emphasize the importance of developmental adaptation to high altitude. While the MEL-FVC correlation may reflect genetic adaptation to high altitude, study results suggest that alternate (environmental) explanations be considered.

  15. Lead exposure from soil in Peruvian mining towns: a national assessment supported by two contrasting examples

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Carolina; Gil, Vladimir; Sherpa, Shaky; Jack, Darby

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the population of Peru living in the vicinity of active or former mining operations that could be exposed to lead from contaminated soil. Methods Geographic coordinates were compiled for 113 active mines, 138 ore processing plants and 3 smelters, as well as 7743 former mining sites. The population living within 5 km of these sites was calculated from census data for 2000. In addition, the lead content of soil in the historic mining town of Cerro de Pasco and around a recent mine and ore processing plant near the city of Huaral was mapped in 2009 using a hand-held X-ray fluorescence analyser. Findings Spatial analysis indicated that 1.6 million people in Peru could be living within 5 km of an active or former mining operation. Two thirds of the population potentially exposed was accounted for by 29 clusters of mining operations, each with a population of over 10 000 each. These clusters included 112 active and 3438 former mining operations. Soil lead levels exceeded 1200 mg/kg, a reference standard for residential soil, in 35 of 74 sites tested in Cerro de Pasco but in only 4 of 47 sites tested around the newer operations near Huaral. Conclusion Soil contamination with lead is likely to be extensive in Peruvian mining towns but the level of contamination is spatially far from uniform. Childhood exposure by soil ingestion could be substantially reduced by mapping soil lead levels, making this information public and encouraging local communities to isolate contaminated areas from children. PMID:23284193

  16. Developmental and genetic components explain enhanced pulmonary volumes of female Peruvian Quechua.

    PubMed

    Kiyamu, Melisa; Bigham, Abigail; Parra, Esteban; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Rivera-Chira, María; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2012-08-01

    High altitude natives have enlarged vital capacities and residual volumes (RV). Because pulmonary volumes are an indication of functionally relevant traits, such as diffusion capacity, the understanding of the factors (genetic/developmental) that influence lung volumes provides insight into the adaptive responses of highlanders. In order to test for the effect of growth and development at high altitude on lung volumes, we obtained forced vital capacities (FVC), RV, and total lung capacities (TLC) for a sample of 65 Peruvian females of mostly Quechua origins (18-34 years) who were sub-divided into two well-matched groups: 1) sea-level born and raised females (BSL, n = 34) from Lima, Peru (150 m), and 2) high-altitude born and raised females (BHA, n = 31) from Cerro de Pasco, Peru (4,338 m). To determine Quechua origins, Native American ancestry proportion (NAAP) for each individual was assessed using a panel of 70 ancestry informative markers. NAAP was similar between groups (BSL = 91.71%; BHA = 89.93%; P = 0.240), and the analysis confirmed predominantly Quechua origins. After adjusting for body size and NAAP, BHA females had significantly higher FVC (3.79 ± 0.06 l; P < 0.001), RV (0.98 ± 0.03 l; P < 0.001) and TLC (4.80 ± 0.07 l; P < 0.001) compared to BSL females (FVC = 3.33 ± 0.05 l; RV = 0.69 ± 0.03 l; TLC = 4.02 ± 0.06 l). NAAP was not associated with FVC (P = 0.352) or TLC (P = 0.506). However, NAAP was positively associated with RV (P = 0.004). In summary, results indicate that developmental exposure to high altitude in females constitutes an important factor for all lung volumes, whereas both genetic and developmental factors seem to be important for RV.

  17. Tropical timber rush in Peruvian Amazonia: spatial allocation of forest concessions in an uninventoried frontier.

    PubMed

    Salo, Matti; Toivonen, Tuuli

    2009-10-01

    Land-use allocation has important implications for the conservation and management of tropical forests. Peru's forestry regime has recently been reformed and more than 7 million ha has been assigned as forest concessions. This potentially has a drastic impact on the land-use practices and species composition of the assigned areas. Nevertheless, the environmental variation found within the concessions and the process applied to delimit them are poorly studied and documented. Thus, it is difficult to estimate the biological impacts of forestry activities in concessions or plan them sustainably. This paper reveals the characteristics of the current concession allocation in Loreto, Peruvian Amazonia, using environmental and access-related variables and compares the concessions to other major land-use assignments. The work draws on a number of data sets describing land-use, ecosystem diversity, and fluvial network in the region. According to our data, certain environment types such as relatively fertile Pebas soils are overrepresented in the concessions, while others, like floodplain forests, are underrepresented in comparison to other land-use assignments. Concessions also have less anthropogenic disturbance than other areas. Furthermore, concessions are located on average further from the river network than the other land-use assignments studied. We claim that forest classification based on productivity, soil fertility, accessibility, and biodiversity patterns is an achievable long-term goal for forest authorities in Peru, and in many other tropical countries. We present a rough design of a geographic information system incorporating environmental, logging, and access-related data that could be applied to approach this goal in Peru. PMID:19669830

  18. [Prevalence of burnout syndrome in peruvian physicians and nurses, ENSUSALUD 2014].

    PubMed

    Maticorena-Quevedo, Jesús; Beas, Renato; Anduaga-Beramendi, Alexander; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2016-06-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of burnout syndrome (BOS) in Peruvian physicians and nurses in 2014 according to different cutoff points established in the literature. Materials and methods This was a cross-sectional and descriptive study based on the National Survey on User Satisfaction of Health Services for 2014 (ENSUSALUD-2014), which features two-stage probability sampling. BOS was identified by the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) using different cutoff points to establish prevalence, including default values, terciles, and quartiles. Results Of the 5062 health professionals, 62.3% were women, 44.0% were physicians, 46.0% belonged to the MINSA, and 23.1% worked in Lima. The overall BOS prevalence was 2.8% (95% CI, 2.4-3.2), when default values were used; the prevalence was 7.9% (95% CI, 7.3-8.6) when quartiles were used as cutoff points and 12.5% (95% CI, 11.4-13.6) when terciles were used as cutoff points. The prevalence was higher in doctors than in nurses, regardless of the cutoff point used (3.7% vs. 2.1% using default values, 10.2 vs. 6.1% using quartiles, and 16.2 vs. 9.5% using terciles). Conclusions The prevalence of BOS in health workers differs within the same population when different cutoff points are used. The use of default values is recommended by the instrument author until specific cut-points for our country are obtained. PMID:27656922

  19. Gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon: global prices, deforestation, and mercury imports.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Jennifer J; Carter, Catherine E; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Delgado, Cesar I

    2011-01-01

    Many factors such as poverty, ineffective institutions and environmental regulations may prevent developing countries from managing how natural resources are extracted to meet a strong market demand. Extraction for some resources has reached such proportions that evidence is measurable from space. We present recent evidence of the global demand for a single commodity and the ecosystem destruction resulting from commodity extraction, recorded by satellites for one of the most biodiverse areas of the world. We find that since 2003, recent mining deforestation in Madre de Dios, Peru is increasing nonlinearly alongside a constant annual rate of increase in international gold price (∼18%/yr). We detect that the new pattern of mining deforestation (1915 ha/year, 2006-2009) is outpacing that of nearby settlement deforestation. We show that gold price is linked with exponential increases in Peruvian national mercury imports over time (R(2) = 0.93, p = 0.04, 2003-2009). Given the past rates of increase we predict that mercury imports may more than double for 2011 (∼500 t/year). Virtually all of Peru's mercury imports are used in artisanal gold mining. Much of the mining increase is unregulated/artisanal in nature, lacking environmental impact analysis or miner education. As a result, large quantities of mercury are being released into the atmosphere, sediments and waterways. Other developing countries endowed with gold deposits are likely experiencing similar environmental destruction in response to recent record high gold prices. The increasing availability of satellite imagery ought to evoke further studies linking economic variables with land use and cover changes on the ground. PMID:21526143

  20. Cyclic 100-ka (glacial-interglacial) migration of subseafloor redox zonation on the Peruvian shelf

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Sergio; Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Prieto-Mollar, Xavier; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Khalili, Arzhang; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of subseafloor microbial life to oceanographic and atmospheric conditions is poorly understood. We examined diagenetic imprints and lipid biomarkers of past subseafloor microbial activity to evaluate its response to glacial-interglacial cycles in a sedimentary section drilled on the Peruvian shelf (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201, Site 1229). Multiple and distinct layers of diagenetic barite and dolomite, i.e., minerals that typically form at the sulfate−methane transition (SMT), occur at much shallower burial depth than the present SMT around 30 meters below seafloor. These shallow layers co-occur with peaks of 13C-depleted archaeol, a molecular fossil of anaerobic methane-oxidizing Archaea. Present-day, non-steady state distributions of dissolved sulfate also suggest that the SMT is highly sensitive to variations in organic carbon flux to the surface shelf sediments that may lead to shoaling of the SMT. Reaction-transport modeling substantiates our hypothesis that shallow SMTs occur in response to cyclic sediment deposition with a high organic carbon flux during interglacials and a low organic carbon flux during glacial stages. Long diffusion distances expectedly dampen the response of deeply buried microbial communities to changes in sediment deposition and other oceanographic drivers over relatively short geological time scales, e.g., glacial-interglacial periods. However, our study demonstrates how dynamically sediment biogeochemistry of the Peru Margin has responded to glacial-interglacial change and how these changes are now preserved in the geological record. Such changes in subsurface biogeochemical zonation need to be taken into account to assess the role of the subseafloor biosphere in global element and redox cycling. PMID:24145422

  1. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli: Prevalence and Pathotype Distribution in Children from Peruvian Rural Communities.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Gonzalo J; Vigo, Natalia I; Durand, David; Riveros, Maribel; Arango, Sara; Zambruni, Mara; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2016-09-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) are common pathogens of childhood gastrointestinal infections worldwide. To date, research tracking DEC has mainly been completed in urban areas. This study aims to determine the prevalence and pathotype distribution of DEC strains in children from rural Peruvian communities and to establish their association with malnutrition. In this prospective cohort, 93 children aged 6-13 months from rural communities of Urubamba (Andes) and Moyobamba (jungle) were followed for 6 months. Diarrheal and control stool samples were analyzed using multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction to identify the presence of virulence genes of DEC strains. The overall isolation rate of DEC was 43.0% (352/820). Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC, 20.4%), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, 14.2%), and diffusely aggregative E. coli (DAEC, 11.0%) were the most prevalent pathotypes. EAEC was more frequently found in Moyobamba samples (P < 0.01). EPEC was the only strain significantly more frequent in diarrheal than asymptomatic control samples (P < 0.01). DEC strains were more prevalent among younger children (aged 6-12 months, P < 0.05). A decline in height-for-age Z-score (HAZ) was observed in 75.7% of children overall. EAEC was more frequently isolated among children who had a greater HAZ decline (P < 0.05). In conclusion, DEC strains were frequently found in stool samples from children in rural communities of the highlands and jungle of Peru. In addition, children with a greater decline in their growth rate had higher EAEC isolation rates, highlighting the importance of this pathogen in child malnutrition.

  2. Allocating Logging Rights in Peruvian Amazonia—Does It Matter to Be Local?

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Matti; Helle, Samuli; Toivonen, Tuuli

    2011-01-01

    Background The fate of tropical forests is a global concern, yet many far-reaching decisions affecting forest resources are made locally. We explore allocation of logging rights using a case study from Loreto, Peruvian Amazonia, where millions of hectares of tropical rainforest were offered for concession in a competitive tendering process that addressed issues related to locality. Methodology/Principal Findings After briefly presenting the study area and the tendering process, we identify and define local and non-local actors taking part in the concession process. We then analyse their tenders, results of the tendering, and attributes of the concession areas. Our results show that there was more offer than demand for concession land in the tendering. The number of tenders the concession areas received was related to their size and geographic location in relation to the major cities, but not to their estimated timber volumes or median distances from transport routes. Small and Loreto-based actors offered lower yearly area-based fees compared to larger ones, but the offers did not significantly affect the results of the tenders. Local experience in the form of logging history or residence near the solicited concession areas, as well as being registered in the region of Loreto, improved the success of the tenders. Conclusions/Significance The allocation process left a considerable number of forest areas under the management of small and local actors, and if Peru is to reach its goal of zero deforestation rate by safeguarding 75 per cent of its forests by 2020, the small and the local actors need to be integrated to the forest regime as important constituents of its legitimacy. PMID:21589922

  3. Multiple Norovirus Infections in a Birth Cohort in a Peruvian Periurban Community

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mayuko; Goel-Apaza, Sonia; Espetia, Susan; Velasquez, Daniel; Cabrera, Lilia; Loli, Sebastian; Crabtree, Jean E.; Black, Robert E.; Kosek, Margaret; Checkley, William; Zimic, Mirko; Bern, Caryn; Cama, Vitaliano; Gilman, Robert H.; Xiao, L.; Kelleher, D.; Windle, H. J.; van Doorn, L. J.; Varela, M.; Verastegui, M.; Calderon, M.; Alva, A.; Roman, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Human noroviruses are among the most common enteropathogens globally, and are a leading cause of infant diarrhea in developing countries. However, data measuring the impact of norovirus at the community level are sparse. Methods. We followed a birth cohort of children to estimate norovirus infection and diarrhea incidence in a Peruvian community. Stool samples from diarrheal episodes and randomly selected nondiarrheal samples were tested by polymerase chain reaction for norovirus genogroup and genotype. Excretion duration and rotavirus coinfection were evaluated in a subset of episodes. Results. Two hundred twenty and 189 children were followed to 1 and 2 years of age, respectively. By 1 year, 80% (95% confidence interval [CI], 75%–85%) experienced at least 1 norovirus infection and by 2 years, 71% (95% CI, 65%–77%) had at least 1 episode of norovirus-associated diarrhea. Genogroup II (GII) infections were 3 times more frequent than genogroup 1 (GI) infections. Eighteen genotypes were found; GII genotype 4 accounted for 41%. Median excretion duration was 34.5 days for GII vs 8.5 days for GI infection (P = .0006). Repeat infections by the same genogroup were common, but repeat infections by the same genotype were rare. Mean length-for-age z score at 12 months was lower among children with prior norovirus infection compared to uninfected children (coefficient: −0.33 [95% CI, −.65 to −.01]; P = .04); the effect persisted at 24 months. Conclusions. Norovirus infection occurs early in life and children experience serial infections with multiple genotypes, suggesting genotype-specific immunity. An effective vaccine would have a substantial impact on morbidity, but may need to target multiple genotypes. PMID:24300042

  4. Big catch, little sharks: Insight into Peruvian small-scale longline fisheries.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Philip D; Alfaro-Shigueto, Joanna; Hodgson, David J; Mangel, Jeffrey C; Witt, Matthew J; Godley, Brendan J

    2014-06-01

    Shark take, driven by vast demand for meat and fins, is increasing. We set out to gain insights into the impact of small-scale longline fisheries in Peru. Onboard observers were used to document catch from 145 longline fishing trips (1668 fishing days) originating from Ilo, southern Peru. Fishing effort is divided into two seasons: targeting dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus; December to February) and sharks (March to November). A total of 16,610 sharks were observed caught, with 11,166 identified to species level. Of these, 70.6% were blue sharks (Prionace glauca), 28.4% short-fin mako sharks (Isurus oxyrinchus), and 1% were other species (including thresher (Alopias vulpinus), hammerhead (Sphyrna zygaena), porbeagle (Lamnus nasus), and other Carcharhinidae species (Carcharhinus brachyurus, Carcharhinus falciformis, Galeorhinus galeus). Mean ± SD catch per unit effort of 33.6 ± 10.9 sharks per 1000 hooks was calculated for the shark season and 1.9 ± 3.1 sharks per 1000 hooks were caught in the dolphinfish season. An average of 83.7% of sharks caught (74.7% blue sharks; 93.3% mako sharks) were deemed sexually immature and under the legal minimum landing size, which for species exhibiting k-selected life history traits can result in susceptibility to over exploitation. As these growing fisheries operate along the entire Peruvian coast and may catch millions of sharks per annum, we conclude that their continued expansion, along with ineffective legislative approaches resulting in removal of immature individuals, has the potential to threaten the sustainability of the fishery, its target species, and ecosystem. There is a need for additional monitoring and research to inform novel management strategies for sharks while maintaining fisher livelihoods. PMID:25360274

  5. Glacial-interglacial Variations of Molybdenum Isotopes in the Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, C.; Frank, M.; Scholz, F.

    2015-12-01

    Mo isotopes have been widely used as a tool to constrain redox-conditions during major global events such as the oxygenation of the oceans in the Precambrian and Cretaceous Ocean Anoxic Events. In addition, Mo isotopes have considerable, yet underexplored potential to quantitatively track local redox-variation at high resolution on shorter timescales. Here we present data from piston core M77/2-024-5 that was retrieved in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone in the context of Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 754 of the Deutsche Forschungs Gemeinschaft (DFG). The age model for this core is well constrained and the core covers the last 140 ka with a hiatus between 20 and 50 ky BP. The oxygen minimum zone along the Peru continental margin is thought to have been better ventilated and therefore less pronounced during glacial periods compared to interglacials. Concentrations of redox-sensitive trace elements show high-amplitude changes and indicate periods of strongly sulphidic conditions with high Mo fixation rate and oxygenated periods with limited Mo fixation (Scholz et al 2014). Mo isotopes do not show straightforward correlations with elemental redox tracers and are only weakly correlated with Mo/U and total organic carbon (TOC). However, Mo isotopes become significantly heavier around the last glacial maximum (Δ98Mo of 0.4 permil). The observed signatures indicate that the Mo isotope composition is dominated by changes in the operating Mo delivery mechanism, i.e. particulate transport versus molecular diffusion. Our results suggest that Mo isotopes can track local redox variation therefore adding to our understanding of this complex indicator for marine environmental change. Scholz et al., (2014), Nature Geosciences, Vol. 7, Pages 433-437

  6. Big catch, little sharks: Insight into Peruvian small-scale longline fisheries.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Philip D; Alfaro-Shigueto, Joanna; Hodgson, David J; Mangel, Jeffrey C; Witt, Matthew J; Godley, Brendan J

    2014-06-01

    Shark take, driven by vast demand for meat and fins, is increasing. We set out to gain insights into the impact of small-scale longline fisheries in Peru. Onboard observers were used to document catch from 145 longline fishing trips (1668 fishing days) originating from Ilo, southern Peru. Fishing effort is divided into two seasons: targeting dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus; December to February) and sharks (March to November). A total of 16,610 sharks were observed caught, with 11,166 identified to species level. Of these, 70.6% were blue sharks (Prionace glauca), 28.4% short-fin mako sharks (Isurus oxyrinchus), and 1% were other species (including thresher (Alopias vulpinus), hammerhead (Sphyrna zygaena), porbeagle (Lamnus nasus), and other Carcharhinidae species (Carcharhinus brachyurus, Carcharhinus falciformis, Galeorhinus galeus). Mean ± SD catch per unit effort of 33.6 ± 10.9 sharks per 1000 hooks was calculated for the shark season and 1.9 ± 3.1 sharks per 1000 hooks were caught in the dolphinfish season. An average of 83.7% of sharks caught (74.7% blue sharks; 93.3% mako sharks) were deemed sexually immature and under the legal minimum landing size, which for species exhibiting k-selected life history traits can result in susceptibility to over exploitation. As these growing fisheries operate along the entire Peruvian coast and may catch millions of sharks per annum, we conclude that their continued expansion, along with ineffective legislative approaches resulting in removal of immature individuals, has the potential to threaten the sustainability of the fishery, its target species, and ecosystem. There is a need for additional monitoring and research to inform novel management strategies for sharks while maintaining fisher livelihoods.

  7. Use of filter papers to determine seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii among hunted ungulates in remote Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Aston, Emily J; Mayor, Pedro; Bowman, Dwight D; Mohammed, Hussni O; Liotta, Janice L; Kwok, Oliver; Dubey, J P

    2014-04-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a zoonosis caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, and it is found worldwide. To determine whether ungulates are reservoirs of T. gondii in an isolated and remote region of the northeastern Peruvian Amazon, antibodies to T. gondii were determined in 5 species of ungulates by the modified agglutination test (MAT). These animals were hunted by subsistence hunters along the Yavarí-Mirín River, in the northeastern Peruvian Amazon. Blood samples were collected by hunters on filter papers. For determination of T. gondii antibodies, blood was eluted from filter papers, and a titer of 1:25 was considered indicative of exposure to T. gondii. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 26 (31.0%) peccaries (Pecari tajacu, Tayassu pecari), six (17.1%) brocket deer (Mazama americana, Mazama gouazoubira), and four (40.0%) lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris). We also introduced a modification to the MAT protocol that allows the extraction of fluid samples from several types of laboratory-grade filter paper, thus enabling researchers to easily adapt their approaches to the materials presented to them. PMID:24918073

  8. Morningness/eveningness chronotype, poor sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness in relation to common mental disorders among Peruvian college students.

    PubMed

    Rose, Deborah; Gelaye, Bizu; Sanchez, Sixto; Castañeda, Benjamín; Sanchez, Elena; Yanez, N David; Williams, Michelle A

    2015-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate the association between sleep disturbances and common mental disorders (CMDs) among Peruvian college students. A total of 2538 undergraduate students completed a self-administered questionnaire to gather information about sleep characteristics, sociodemographic, and lifestyle data. Evening chronotype, sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness were assessed using the Horne and Ostberg morningness-eveningness questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale, respectivelty. Presence of CMDs was evaluated using the General Health Questionnaire. Logistic regression procedures were used to examine the associations of sleep disturbances with CMDs while accounting for possible confounding factors. Overall, 32.9% of the participants had prevalent CMDs (39.3% among females and 24.4% among males). In multivariable-adjusted logistic models, those with evening chronotype (odds ratios (OR) = 1.43; 95% CI 1.00-2.05), poor sleep quality (OR = 4.50; 95% CI 3.69-5.49), and excessive daytime sleepiness (OR = 1.68; 95% CI 1.41-2.01) were at a relative increased odds of CMDs compared with those without sleep disturbances. In conclusion, we found strong associations between sleep disturbances and CMDs among Peruvian college students. Early education and preventative interventions designed to improve sleep habits may effectively alter the possibility of developing CMDs among young adults.

  9. Use of filter papers to determine seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii among hunted ungulates in remote Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Aston, Emily J; Mayor, Pedro; Bowman, Dwight D; Mohammed, Hussni O; Liotta, Janice L; Kwok, Oliver; Dubey, J P

    2014-04-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a zoonosis caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, and it is found worldwide. To determine whether ungulates are reservoirs of T. gondii in an isolated and remote region of the northeastern Peruvian Amazon, antibodies to T. gondii were determined in 5 species of ungulates by the modified agglutination test (MAT). These animals were hunted by subsistence hunters along the Yavarí-Mirín River, in the northeastern Peruvian Amazon. Blood samples were collected by hunters on filter papers. For determination of T. gondii antibodies, blood was eluted from filter papers, and a titer of 1:25 was considered indicative of exposure to T. gondii. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 26 (31.0%) peccaries (Pecari tajacu, Tayassu pecari), six (17.1%) brocket deer (Mazama americana, Mazama gouazoubira), and four (40.0%) lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris). We also introduced a modification to the MAT protocol that allows the extraction of fluid samples from several types of laboratory-grade filter paper, thus enabling researchers to easily adapt their approaches to the materials presented to them.

  10. Use of filter papers to determine seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii among hunted ungulates in remote Peruvian Amazon☆

    PubMed Central

    Aston, Emily J.; Mayor, Pedro; Bowman, Dwight D.; Mohammed, Hussni O.; Liotta, Janice L.; Kwok, Oliver; Dubey, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a zoonosis caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, and it is found worldwide. To determine whether ungulates are reservoirs of T. gondii in an isolated and remote region of the northeastern Peruvian Amazon, antibodies to T. gondii were determined in 5 species of ungulates by the modified agglutination test (MAT). These animals were hunted by subsistence hunters along the Yavarí-Mirín River, in the northeastern Peruvian Amazon. Blood samples were collected by hunters on filter papers. For determination of T. gondii antibodies, blood was eluted from filter papers, and a titer of 1:25 was considered indicative of exposure to T. gondii. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 26 (31.0%) peccaries (Pecari tajacu, Tayassu pecari), six (17.1%) brocket deer (Mazama americana, Mazama gouazoubira), and four (40.0%) lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris). We also introduced a modification to the MAT protocol that allows the extraction of fluid samples from several types of laboratory-grade filter paper, thus enabling researchers to easily adapt their approaches to the materials presented to them. PMID:24918073

  11. Efficacy and effectiveness of mefloquine and artesunate combination therapy for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Alexandre Macedo; Chavez, Jorge; de Leon, Gabriel Ponce; Durand, Salomon; Arrospide, Nancy; Roberts, Jacquelin; Cabezas, Cesar; Marquiño, Wilmer

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and effectiveness of mefloquine (MQ) plus artesunate (AS) to treat patients with uncomplicated malaria in the Peruvian Amazon Basin in April 2005-March 2006. Patients ≥ 1 year of age with fever (axillary temperature ≥ 37.5°C) or history of fever and Plasmodium falciparum monoinfection were included. Patients received antimalarial treatment with MQ (12.5 mg/kg/day for two days) and AS (4.0 mg/kg/day for three days) either by directly observed therapy or without directly observed therapy. After a 28-day follow-up, treatment efficacy and effectiveness were assessed on the basis of clinical and parasitologic outcomes. Ninety-six patients were enrolled in each study group; nine patients were lost to follow-up. All patients, except for one in the observed group, demonstrated adequate clinical and parasitologic response; none had detectable parasitemia on day 3. The efficacy of MQ + AS efficacy was 98.9% (95% confidence interval = 94.1-100.0%) and the effectiveness was 100.0% (95% confidence interval = 95.9-100.0%). Our study shows that MQ + AS is highly efficacious in the Peruvian Amazon.

  12. Changes in soil physical and chemical properties in long term improved natural and traditional agroforestry management systems of cacao genotypes in Peruvian Amazon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional slash and burn agriculture practiced in the Peruvian Amazon region is leading to soil degradation and deforestation of native forest flora. The only way to stop such destructive processes is through the adoptation of sustainable alternatives such as growing crops in agroforestry systems....

  13. Curriculum Reform and the Displacement of Knowledge in Peruvian Rural Secondary Schools: Exploring the Unintended Local Consequences of Global Education Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balarin, Maria; Benavides, Martin

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws attention to processes of policy implementation in developing contexts, and to the unintended consequences of education policies that follow international policy scripts without enough consideration of local histories and cultures. Drawing on a study of teaching practices in Peruvian rural secondary schools after a period of…

  14. Intercultural Education and Literacy: An Ethnographic Study of Indigenous Knowledge and Learning in the Peruvian Amazon. Studies in Written Language and Literacy, Volume 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aikman, Sheila

    This book examines indigenous education in South America, focusing on the development of intercultural education and on an ethnographic study of educational processes and change among the Arakmbut people of the Peruvian Amazon. The Arakmbut are one of seven Harakmbut-speaking peoples who live in the Department of Madre de Dios in southeastern…

  15. Delivery by caesarean section and risk of childhood obesity: analysis of a Peruvian prospective cohort

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, J. Jaime; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We aimed to assess if Caesarean section is a risk factor for overnutrition in early- and late-childhood, and to assess the magnitude of the effect of child- versus family-related variables in these risk estimates. Methods. Longitudinal data from Peruvian children from the Young Lives Study was used. Outcomes assessed were overweight, obesity, overnutrition (overweight plus obesity), and central obesity (waist circumference) at the age 5 (first follow-up) and 7 (second follow-up) years. The exposure of interests was delivery by Caesarean section. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using multivariable models adjusted for child-related (e.g., birth weight) and family-related (e.g., maternal nutritional status) variables. Results. At baseline, mean age was 11.7 (± 3.5) months and 50.1% were boys. Children born by Caesarean section were 15.6%. The 10.5% of the children were overweight and 2.4% were obese. For the obesity outcome, data from 6,038 and 9,625 children-years was included from baseline to the first and second follow-up, respectively. Compared to those who did not experience Caesarean delivery, the risk of having obesity was higher in the group born by Caesarean: RRs were higher at early-childhood (first follow-up: 2.25; 95% CI [1.36–3.74]) than later in life (second follow-up: 1.57; 95% CI [1.02–2.41]). Family-related variables had a greater effect in attenuating the risk estimates for obesity at the first, than at the second follow-up. Conclusion. Our results suggest a higher probability of developing obesity, but not overweight, among children born by Caesarean section delivery. The magnitude of risk estimates decreased over time, and family-related variables had a stronger effect on the risk estimates at early-childhood. PMID:26137427

  16. Risk Factors Associated with Malnutrition in One-Year-Old Children Living in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Serene A.; Casapía, Martín; Blouin, Brittany; Maheu-Giroux, Mathieu; Rahme, Elham; Gyorkos, Theresa W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children under two years of age are in the most critical window for growth and development. As mobility increases, this time period also coincides with first exposure to soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections in tropical and sub-tropical environments. The association between malnutrition and STH infection, however, has been understudied in this vulnerable age group. Methodology/Principal Findings A nested cross-sectional survey was conducted in 12 and 13-month old children participating in a deworming trial in Iquitos, an STH-endemic area of the Peruvian Amazon. An extensive socio-demo-epi questionnaire was administered to the child's parent. Length and weight were measured, and the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development were administered to measure cognition, language, and fine motor development. Stool specimens were collected to determine the presence of STH. The association between malnutrition (i.e. stunting and underweight) and STH infection, and other child, maternal, and household characteristics, was analyzed using multivariable Poisson regression. A total of 1760 children were recruited between September 2011 and June 2012. Baseline data showed a prevalence of stunting and underweight of 24.2% and 8.6%, respectively. In a subgroup of 880 randomly-allocated children whose specimens were analyzed by the Kato-Katz method, the prevalence of any STH infection was 14.5%. Risk factors for stunting in these 880 children included infection with at least one STH species (aRR = 1.37; 95% CI 1.01, 1.86) and a lower development score (aRR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95, 0.99). A lower development score was also a significant risk factor for underweight (aRR = 0.92; 95% CI: 0.89, 0.95). Conclusions The high prevalence of malnutrition, particularly stunting, and its association with STH infection and lower developmental attainment in early preschool-age children is of concern. Emphasis should be placed on determining the most cost

  17. The first report of Pb and Zn accumulation in some native plants from the Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Jaume; Duran, Paola; Poma, Wilfredo; Sánchez, Isidoro; Barceló, Juan; Roca, Núria; Boluda, Rafael; Roca-Pérez, Luís.; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2010-05-01

    Until recent decades little has been known about the remediation of mining sites using metalophytes in Latin America. Metal mining has helped to create severe and diverse environmental problems. The present study proposed to identify and characterize spontaneously growing heavy metal tolerant plant species in the area around the polimetalic mine in Hualgayoc (Cajamarca, Peru). These species are potentially useful for phytorremediation. Plant and soils from their rhizosphere were sampled and analized for concentration of As, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn. Translocation Factor (TF) defined the metals concentrations ratio between shoots and root biomass and Shoot Accumulation Factor (SAF) the metal concentration ratio between shoot and soil concentration were determined and used to measure the effectiveness of a plant in concentrating metals into its biomass. The soils were neutral pH (7,4±0,5) with variable content of organic carbon (2,4±1,1) and loam texture: sand (42,9±10,8) and clay (16,7±4,6). According to the total metals, all samples exceeded toxicity thresholds, high Pb (20016 ± 32559 mg•kg-1) and Zn (22512 ± 13056 mg•kg-1) concentrations were detected. High shoot Pb and Zn concentrations were found in Plantaginaceae Plantago orbignyana (6998 and 9617 μg/g); Brassicaceae Lepidium bipinnatifidum (6886 and 5034 mg•kg-1) and Asteraceae Senecio sp (4253 and 3870 mg•kg-1) and Baccharis latifolia (2554 and 1284 mg•kg-1 respectively). The high values of TFs indicates that the plants effectively traslocated metales. Lepidium bipinnatifidum shows the highest TFs values (143 in Pb and 21,5 in Zn). The SAF values were much lower than those reported for other species such as Paspalum sp in the Peruvian copper mine, which may be due to a high top soil Pb and Zn concentrations. These species can surely be considered as interesting for phytoextraction, due not only to its accumulative capacity but also since they showed an elevated transfer factor and grew in the

  18. Patterns of commercial fish landings in the Loreto region (Peruvian Amazon) between 1984 and 2006.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Aurea; Tello, Salvador; Vargas, Gladis; Duponchelle, Fabrice

    2009-03-01

    Patterns of commercial fish catches over the period from 1984 to 2006 were studied in the Loreto region and in Iquitos, which is the most important town of the region and the principal fish marketplace of the Peruvian Amazon. Despite important inter-annual variations, the overall fish landings have significantly increased in the region during this period. The same three species dominated the catches during the whole period (Prochilodus nigricans, Potamorhina altamazonica and Psectrogaster amazonica), making up about 62% of the catches. However, the number of species exploited by commercial fisheries increased considerably during the 22 years of this study (from about 21 species in 1984 to over 65 in 2006), although part of the difference may be accounted for by a better identification of individual species nowadays. At the same time, the large high-valued species, such as Arapaima gigas, Colossoma macropomum and Brachyplatystoma rousseauxii, declined significantly and were replaced by smaller, short-lived and lower-valued species. Catches of the silver Arahuana (Osteoglossum bicirrhosum) also declined significantly during the studied period, strengthening recent warnings about the species' conservation status (Moreau and Coomes, Oryx 40:152-160, 2006). The relative proportions of the trophic groups (detritivores, omnivores and piscivores) remained relatively constant over the study period, but there were significant changes in the relative abundances of the species groups. The proportion of the dominant group, the Characiformes, which averaged about 81% of the catches, increased between 1984 and 2006, whereas the proportion of the Siluriformes and Perciformes remained constant. On the other hand, the proportion of Osteoglossiformes, represented only by two well known species (Arapaima gigas and Osteoglossum bicirrhosum), declined sharply during the same period. Important differences were observed between the landings of Iquitos and the landing of the whole Loreto

  19. Effects of Dosage, Comorbidities, and Food on Isoniazid Pharmacokinetics in Peruvian Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Geraint; Waterhouse, David; Ardrey, Alison; Jave, Oswaldo; López-Romero, Sonia Llanet; Ward, Stephen A.; Moore, David A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Poor response to tuberculosis (TB) therapy might be attributable to subtherapeutic levels in drug-compliant patients. Pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters can be affected by several factors, such as comorbidities or the interaction of TB drugs with food. This study aimed to determine the PK of isoniazid (INH) in a Peruvian TB population under observed daily and twice-weekly (i.e., biweekly) therapy. Isoniazid levels were analyzed at 2 and 6 h after drug intake using liquid chromatography mass spectrometric methods. A total of 107 recruited patients had available PK data; of these 107 patients, 42.1% received biweekly isoniazid. The mean biweekly dose (12.8 mg/kg of body weight/day) was significantly lower than the nominal dose of 15 mg/kg/day (P < 0.001), and this effect was particularly marked in patients with concurrent diabetes and in males. The median maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 6 h (AUC0–6) were 2.77 mg/liter and 9.71 mg·h/liter, respectively, for daily administration and 8.74 mg/liter and 37.8 mg·h/liter, respectively, for biweekly administration. There were no differences in the Cmax with respect to gender, diabetes mellitus (DM) status, or HIV status. Food was weakly associated with lower levels of isoniazid during the continuation phase. Overall, 34% of patients during the intensive phase and 33.3% during the continuation phase did not reach the Cmax reference value. However, low levels of INH were not associated with poorer clinical outcomes. In our population, INH exposure was affected by weight-adjusted dose and by food, but comorbidities did not indicate any effect on PK. We were unable to demonstrate a clear relationship between the Cmax and treatment outcome in this data set. Twice-weekly weight-adjusted dosing of INH appears to be quite robust with respect to important potentially influential patient factors under program conditions. PMID:25224007

  20. Leaf Wax δ13C Varies with Elevation in the Peruvian Andes and Western Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. S.; Feakins, S. J.; Ponton, C.; Peters, T.; West, A. J.; Galy, V.; Bentley, L. P.; Salinas, N.; Shenkin, A.; Martin, R.; Asner, G. P.; Malhi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Plant leaf wax carbon isotopic composition (δ13Cwax) reflects the net isotopic effects associated with diffusion into the leaf, fixation of carbon by Rubisco and biosynthesis of individual leaf wax biochemicals. As declining pCO2 with elevation affects the first two fractionations, we expect to find an isotopic gradient in δ13Cwax, if the fractionation of leaf wax biosynthesis is constant. To test this, we report δ13Cwax values from 500 samples of leaves collected by tree-climbers from the upper canopy from 9 forest-inventory plots spanning a 3.5km elevation transect in the Peruvian Andes and western Amazonia during the CHAMBASA field campaign. These samples provide a unique opportunity to study the relationship between δ13Cwax and pCO2 in diverse species across this remote tropical montane forest and lowland rainforest. The very wet climate throughout (2-5 m rainfall per year) minimizes fractionation effects due to stomatal restrictions (i.e. water use efficiency) that may be an important factor elsewhere. Preliminary results show δ13Cwax values on average increase with elevation by ~1.5‰/km, a trend consistent with bulk plant δ13C in previous studies. The mean epsilon between bulk and C29 n-alkane is -7.3±2.2‰. Inter-sample differences are large on the order of 10‰. Shaded leaves and understory leaves are found to be depleted relative to sunlit leaves, presumably due to a lower photosynthetic rate and use of respired CO2 in the understory. C29 n-alkanes are on average ~2.5‰ more depleted than C30 n-alkanoic acids, indicating fractionation during selective decarboxylation. We further compare results from plants with soil and river sediments to provide insights into how leaf wax signals are archived in soils and exported from the landscape. We find a ~1.4‰/km gradient in forest soils similar to plants. We observe a ~2‰ offset between C29 n-alkane in plant leaves and in soils across the elevation profile, which is likely a signal of degradation

  1. Hotspots of Malaria Transmission in the Peruvian Amazon: Rapid Assessment through a Parasitological and Serological Survey

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Aguirre, Angel; Speybroeck, Niko; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Rosanas-Urgell, Anna; Carrasco-Escobar, Gabriel; Rodriguez, Hugo; Gamboa, Dionicia; Contreras-Mancilla, Juan; Alava, Freddy; Soares, Irene S.; Remarque, Edmond; D´Alessandro, Umberto; Erhart, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Background With low and markedly seasonal malaria transmission, increasingly sensitive tools for better stratifying the risk of infection and targeting control interventions are needed. A cross-sectional survey to characterize the current malaria transmission patterns, identify hotspots, and detect recent changes using parasitological and serological measures was conducted in three sites of the Peruvian Amazon. Material and Methods After full census of the study population, 651 participants were interviewed, clinically examined and had a blood sample taken for the detection of malaria parasites (microscopy and PCR) and antibodies against P. vivax (PvMSP119, PvAMA1) and P. falciparum (PfGLURP, PfAMA1) antigens by ELISA. Risk factors for malaria infection (positive PCR) and malaria exposure (seropositivity) were assessed by multivariate survey logistic regression models. Age-specific seroprevalence was analyzed using a reversible catalytic conversion model based on maximum likelihood for generating seroconversion rates (SCR, λ). SaTScan was used to detect spatial clusters of serology-positive individuals within each site. Results The overall parasite prevalence by PCR was low, i.e. 3.9% for P. vivax and 6.7% for P. falciparum, while the seroprevalence was substantially higher, 33.6% for P. vivax and 22.0% for P. falciparum, with major differences between study sites. Age and location (site) were significantly associated with P. vivax exposure; while location, age and outdoor occupation were associated with P. falciparum exposure. P. falciparum seroprevalence curves showed a stable transmission throughout time, while for P. vivax transmission was better described by a model with two SCRs. The spatial analysis identified well-defined clusters of P. falciparum seropositive individuals in two sites, while it detected only a very small cluster of P. vivax exposure. Conclusion The use of a single parasitological and serological malaria survey has proven to be an efficient

  2. High Prevalence of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Infection in Indigenous Women from the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    García, Patricia J.; Cárcamo, Cesar; Montano, Silvia M.; Mori, Nicanor; Muñante, Ricardo; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    Background In an earlier study, we detected an association between human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infection and cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) in indigenous Amazonian Peruvian women of the Shipibo-Konibo ethnic group. As both HTLV and HPV can be transmitted sexually, we now report a population-based study examining the prevalence and risk factors for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infection in this population. Methods Between July and December 2010, we conducted a comprehensive screening for HTLV among Shipibo-Konibo women 15 to 39 years of age living in two communities located in Lima and in 17 communities located within four hours by car or boat from the Amazonian city of Pucallpa in Peru. Results We screened 1,253 Shipibo-Konibo women for HTLV infection 74 (5.9%) tested positive for HTLV-1, 47 (3.8%) for HTLV-2 infection, and 4 (0.3%) had indeterminate results. In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with HTLV-1 infection included: older age (Prevalence Ratio (PR): 1.04, 95% CI 1.00–1.08), primary education or less (PR: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.25–3.24), younger or same age most recent sex partner (PR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.00–2.74), and having a most recent sex partner who worked at a logging camp (PR: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.09–2.75). The only factor associated with HTLV-2 infection was older age (PR: 1.08, 95% CI: 1.03–1.12). Conclusion HTLV infection is endemic among Shipibo-Konibo women. Two characteristics of the sexual partner (younger age and labor history) were associated with infection in women. These results suggest the need for implementation of both HTLV screening during the antenatal healthcare visits of Shipibo-Konibo women, and counseling about the risk of HTLV transmission through prolonged breastfeeding in infected women. We also recommend the implementation of prevention programs to reduce sexual transmission of these viruses. PMID:24040133

  3. Asymptomatic Renal Colonization of Humans in the Peruvian Amazon by Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Ganoza, Christian A.; Matthias, Michael A.; Saito, Mayuko; Cespedes, Manuel; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal carriage and shedding of leptospires is characteristic of carrier or maintenance animal hosts. Sporadic reports indicate that after infection, humans may excrete leptospires for extended periods. We hypothesized that, like mammalian reservoir hosts, humans develop asymptomatic leptospiruria in settings of high disease transmission such as the Peruvian Amazon. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a cross-sectional study design, we used a combination of epidemiological data, serology and molecular detection of the leptospiral 16S rRNA gene to identify asymptomatic urinary shedders of Leptospira. Approximately one-third of the 314 asymptomatic participants had circulating anti-leptospiral antibodies. Among enrolled participants, 189/314 (59%) had evidence of recent infection (microscopic agglutination test (MAT0 ≥1∶800 or ELISA IgM-positive or both). The proportion of MAT-positive and high MAT-titer (≥1∶800) persons was higher in men than women (p = 0.006). Among these people, 13/314 (4.1%) had Leptospira DNA-positive urine samples. Of these, the 16S rRNA gene from 10 samples was able to be sequenced. The urine-derived species clustered within both pathogenic (n = 6) and intermediate clades of Leptospira (n = 4). All of the thirteen participants with leptospiral DNA in urine were women. The median age of the DNA-positive group was older compared to the negative group (p≤0.05). A group of asymptomatic participants (“long-term asymptomatic individuals,” 102/341 (32.5%) of enrolled individuals) without serological evidence of recent infection was identified; within this group, 6/102 (5.9%) excreted pathogenic and intermediate-pathogenic Leptospira (75–229 bacteria/mL of urine). Conclusions/Significance Asymptomatic renal colonization of leptospires in a region of high disease transmission is common, including among people without serological or clinical evidence of recent infection. Both pathogenic and intermediate Leptospira

  4. Patterns of commercial fish landings in the Loreto region (Peruvian Amazon) between 1984 and 2006.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Aurea; Tello, Salvador; Vargas, Gladis; Duponchelle, Fabrice

    2009-03-01

    Patterns of commercial fish catches over the period from 1984 to 2006 were studied in the Loreto region and in Iquitos, which is the most important town of the region and the principal fish marketplace of the Peruvian Amazon. Despite important inter-annual variations, the overall fish landings have significantly increased in the region during this period. The same three species dominated the catches during the whole period (Prochilodus nigricans, Potamorhina altamazonica and Psectrogaster amazonica), making up about 62% of the catches. However, the number of species exploited by commercial fisheries increased considerably during the 22 years of this study (from about 21 species in 1984 to over 65 in 2006), although part of the difference may be accounted for by a better identification of individual species nowadays. At the same time, the large high-valued species, such as Arapaima gigas, Colossoma macropomum and Brachyplatystoma rousseauxii, declined significantly and were replaced by smaller, short-lived and lower-valued species. Catches of the silver Arahuana (Osteoglossum bicirrhosum) also declined significantly during the studied period, strengthening recent warnings about the species' conservation status (Moreau and Coomes, Oryx 40:152-160, 2006). The relative proportions of the trophic groups (detritivores, omnivores and piscivores) remained relatively constant over the study period, but there were significant changes in the relative abundances of the species groups. The proportion of the dominant group, the Characiformes, which averaged about 81% of the catches, increased between 1984 and 2006, whereas the proportion of the Siluriformes and Perciformes remained constant. On the other hand, the proportion of Osteoglossiformes, represented only by two well known species (Arapaima gigas and Osteoglossum bicirrhosum), declined sharply during the same period. Important differences were observed between the landings of Iquitos and the landing of the whole Loreto

  5. Microbial Diversity in Maras Salterns, a Hypersaline Environment in the Peruvian Andes

    PubMed Central

    Maturrano, Lenin; Santos, Fernando; Rosselló-Mora, Ramon; Antón, Josefa

    2006-01-01

    Maras salterns are located 3,380 m above sea level in the Peruvian Andes. These salterns consist of more than 3,000 little ponds which are not interconnected and act as crystallizers where salt precipitates. These ponds are fed by hypersaline spring water rich in sodium and chloride. The microbiota inhabiting these salterns was examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis, and cultivation techniques. The total counts per milliliter in the ponds were around 2 × 106 to 3 × 106 cells/ml, while the spring water contained less than 100 cells/ml and did not yield any detectable FISH signal. The microbiota inhabiting the ponds was dominated (80 to 86% of the total counts) by Archaea, while Bacteria accounted for 10 to 13% of the 4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) counts. A total of 239 16S rRNA gene clones were analyzed (132 Archaea clones and 107 Bacteria clones). According to the clone libraries, the archaeal assemblage was dominated by microorganisms related to the cosmopolitan square archaeon “Haloquadra walsbyi,” although a substantial number of the sequences in the libraries (31% of the 16S rRNA gene archaeal clones) were related to Halobacterium sp., which is not normally found in clone libraries from solar salterns. All the bacterial clones were closely related to each other and to the γ-proteobacterium “Pseudomonas halophila” DSM 3050. FISH analysis with a probe specific for this bacterial assemblage revealed that it accounted for 69 to 76% of the total bacterial counts detected with a Bacteria-specific probe. When pond water was used to inoculate solid media containing 25% total salts, both extremely halophilic Archaea and Bacteria were isolated. Archaeal isolates were not related to the isolates in clone libraries, although several bacterial isolates were very closely related to the “P. halophila” cluster found in the libraries. As observed for other hypersaline environments, extremely

  6. Cold episodes in the Peruvian Central Andes: Composites, Types, and their Impacts over South America (1958-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulca, J. C.; Vuille, M. F.; Roundy, P. E.; Trasmonte, G.; Silva, Y.; Takahashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Mantaro basin (MB) is located in the central Peruvian Andes. Occasionally, cold episodes are observed during austral summer (January-March), that strongly damage crops. However, little is known about the causes and impacts of such cold episodes. The main goal of this study is thus to characterize cold episodes in the MB and assess their large-scale circulation and teleconnections over South America (SA) during austral summer. To identify cold events in the MB daily minimum temperature (Tmin) for the period 1958-2014 from Huayao station, located within the MB was used. A cold episode is defined when daily minimum temperature drops below its 10-percentile for at least one day. Additionally, to study the sensitivity between physical mechanisms associated with cold episodes and temperature, cold episodes are classified in three groups: Weak cold episodes (7.5 ≤ Tmin ≤ 10 percentile), strong cold episodes (Tmin ≤ 2.5 percentile), but excluding the 9 coldest events (Tmin ≤ 0 ͦ C), henceforth referred to as extraordinary cold episodes. Several gridded reanalysis were used to characterize the large-scale circulation, cloud cover and rainfall over SA associated with these events. Weak and strong cold episodes in the MB are mainly associated with a weakening of the Bolivian High-Nordeste Low system by tropical-extratropical interactions. Both types of cold episodes are associated with westerly wind anomalies at mid- and upper-tropospheric levels aloft the Peruvian Central Andes, which inhibit the influx of humid air masses from the lowlands to the east and hence limit the development of cloud cover (e.g., positive OLR anomalies over MB). The resulting clear sky conditions cause nighttime temperatures to drop, leading to cold extremes below 10-percentile. Simultaneously, northeastern Brazil (NEB) registers negative OLR anomalies, strong convection and enhanced cloud cover because displacement of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) toward the northeast of

  7. Neotropics provide insights into the emergence of New World monkeys: New dental evidence from the late Oligocene of Peruvian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Marivaux, Laurent; Adnet, Sylvain; Altamirano-Sierra, Ali J; Boivin, Myriam; Pujos, François; Ramdarshan, Anusha; Salas-Gismondi, Rodolfo; Tejada-Lara, Julia V; Antoine, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Recent field efforts in Peruvian Amazonia (Contamana area, Loreto Department) have resulted in the discovery of a late Oligocene (ca. 26.5 Ma; Chambira Formation) fossil primate-bearing locality (CTA-61). In this paper, we analyze the primate material consisting of two isolated upper molars, the peculiar morphology of which allows us to describe a new medium-sized platyrrhine monkey: Canaanimico amazonensis gen. et sp. nov. In addition to the recent discovery of Perupithecus ucayaliensis, a primitive anthropoid taxon of African affinities from the alleged latest Eocene Santa Rosa locality (Peruvian Amazonia), the discovery of Canaanimico adds to the evidence that primates were well-established in the Amazonian Basin during the Paleogene. Our phylogenetic results based on dental evidence show that none of the early Miocene Patagonian taxa (Homunculus, Carlocebus, Soriacebus, Mazzonicebus, Dolichocebus, Tremacebus, and Chilecebus), the late Oligocene Bolivian Branisella, or the Peruvian Canaanimico, is nested within a crown platyrrhine clade. All these early taxa are closely related and considered here as stem Platyrrhini. Canaanimico is nested within the Patagonian Soriacebinae, and closely related to Soriacebus, thereby extending back the soriacebine lineage to 26.5 Ma. Given the limited dental evidence, it is difficult to assess if Canaanimico was engaged in a form of pitheciine-like seed predation as is observed in Soriacebus and Mazzonicebus, but dental microwear patterns recorded on one upper molar indicate that Canaanimico was possibly a fruit and hard-object eater. If Panamacebus, a recently discovered stem cebine from the early Miocene of Panama, indicates that the crown platyrrhine radiation was already well underway by the earliest Miocene, Canaanimico indicates in turn that the "homunculid" radiation (as a part of the stem radiation) was well underway by the late Oligocene. These new data suggest that the stem radiation likely occurred in the Neotropics

  8. Neotropics provide insights into the emergence of New World monkeys: New dental evidence from the late Oligocene of Peruvian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Marivaux, Laurent; Adnet, Sylvain; Altamirano-Sierra, Ali J; Boivin, Myriam; Pujos, François; Ramdarshan, Anusha; Salas-Gismondi, Rodolfo; Tejada-Lara, Julia V; Antoine, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Recent field efforts in Peruvian Amazonia (Contamana area, Loreto Department) have resulted in the discovery of a late Oligocene (ca. 26.5 Ma; Chambira Formation) fossil primate-bearing locality (CTA-61). In this paper, we analyze the primate material consisting of two isolated upper molars, the peculiar morphology of which allows us to describe a new medium-sized platyrrhine monkey: Canaanimico amazonensis gen. et sp. nov. In addition to the recent discovery of Perupithecus ucayaliensis, a primitive anthropoid taxon of African affinities from the alleged latest Eocene Santa Rosa locality (Peruvian Amazonia), the discovery of Canaanimico adds to the evidence that primates were well-established in the Amazonian Basin during the Paleogene. Our phylogenetic results based on dental evidence show that none of the early Miocene Patagonian taxa (Homunculus, Carlocebus, Soriacebus, Mazzonicebus, Dolichocebus, Tremacebus, and Chilecebus), the late Oligocene Bolivian Branisella, or the Peruvian Canaanimico, is nested within a crown platyrrhine clade. All these early taxa are closely related and considered here as stem Platyrrhini. Canaanimico is nested within the Patagonian Soriacebinae, and closely related to Soriacebus, thereby extending back the soriacebine lineage to 26.5 Ma. Given the limited dental evidence, it is difficult to assess if Canaanimico was engaged in a form of pitheciine-like seed predation as is observed in Soriacebus and Mazzonicebus, but dental microwear patterns recorded on one upper molar indicate that Canaanimico was possibly a fruit and hard-object eater. If Panamacebus, a recently discovered stem cebine from the early Miocene of Panama, indicates that the crown platyrrhine radiation was already well underway by the earliest Miocene, Canaanimico indicates in turn that the "homunculid" radiation (as a part of the stem radiation) was well underway by the late Oligocene. These new data suggest that the stem radiation likely occurred in the Neotropics

  9. Recording Earthen Architecture at the Peruvian Andes: the Case of KUÑO Tambo CHURCH'S Historic Wall Paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, K.; Hanley, C.; Santana Quintero, M.; Fai, S.; Ouimet, C.; Cancino, C.; Rainer, L.; Villacorta-Santamato, L.

    2013-07-01

    According to UNESCO "Earthen architecture is one of the most original and powerful expressions of our ability to create a built environment with readily available resources. It includes a great variety of structures, ranging from mosques, palaces and granaries, to historic city centres, cultural landscapes and archaeological sites" (WHEAP, 2007). This contribution looks at developing effective methods for recording earthen historic structures for their rehabilitation and preservation using the Kuño Tambo church in Peru, which is a Peruvian national historic site that requires serious rehabilitation work, as a case study. This project describes the compilation of an effective metric record of the "state-of-conservation" - "as found" of wall paintings in this important and remote building using a toolbox of different "off-the-shelf" heritage recording techniques. This approach was applied by Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS), as part of the Earthen Architecture Initiative of the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI).

  10. Different selection pressures give rise to distinct ethnic phenomena : a functionalist framework with illustrations from the Peruvian Altiplano.

    PubMed

    Moya, Cristina; Boyd, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Many accounts of ethnic phenomena imply that processes such as stereotyping, essentialism, ethnocentrism, and intergroup hostility stem from a unitary adaptation for reasoning about groups. This is partly justified by the phenomena's co-occurrence in correlational studies. Here we argue that these behaviors are better modeled as functionally independent adaptations that arose in response to different selection pressures throughout human evolution. As such, different mechanisms may be triggered by different group boundaries within a single society. We illustrate this functionalist framework using ethnographic work from the Quechua-Aymara language boundary in the Peruvian Altiplano. We show that different group boundaries motivate different ethnic phenomena. For example, people have strong stereotypes about socioeconomic categories, which are not cooperative units, whereas they hold fewer stereotypes about communities, which are the primary focus of cooperative activity. We also show that, despite the cross-cultural importance of ethnolinguistic boundaries, the Quechua-Aymara linguistic distinction does not strongly motivate any of these intergroup processes.

  11. [Letters to the editor published in Peruvian biomedical journals indexed in SciELO-Peru 2006-2013].

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Idrogo, Juan José; Mejía-Dolores, Jhon William; Chalco-Huamán, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    This bibliometric study describes the characteristics of letters to the editor published between 2006-2013 in biomedical journals indexed in SciELO-Peru.253 letters (10.3% of total publications) were collected. Most letters (139) were in the Peruvian Journal of Experimental Medicine and Public Health, with marked increase throughout those years. 25% of letters submitted included medical student participation. 14% of authors presented with international affiliations and 27% with endogenous affiliation - common in university journals (Anales de la Facultad de Medicina, Revista Médica Herediana).The usual criteria justifying the publication of letters were: opinion of medical fact or public domain (35.6%) and discussion of results, methodological flaws or interpretation (22.9%). In biomedical journals indexed in SciELO Peru the letters to the editor comprise a percentage of publications that has increased in recent years, with low publication of letters of findings or primary data, compared with opinion or criticism.

  12. Adherence to 7-Day Primaquine Treatment for the Radical Cure of P. vivax in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Grietens, Koen Peeters; Soto, Veronica; Erhart, Annette; Ribera, Joan Muela; Toomer, Elizabeth; Tenorio, Alex; Montalvo, Tanilu Grande; Rodriguez, Hugo; Cuentas, Alejandro Llanos; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Gamboa, Dionicia

    2010-01-01

    Despite being free of charge, treatment adherence to 7-day primaquine for the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax was estimated at 62.2% among patients along the Iquitos-Nauta road in the Peruvian Amazon. The principal reason for non-adherence was the perceived adverse effects related to local humoral illness conceptions that hold that malaria produces a hot state of body, which is further aggravated by the characteristically hot medical treatment. Notably, patients were willing to adhere to the first 3 days of treatment during which symptoms are most apparent and include the characteristic chills. Nevertheless, as symptoms abate, the perceived aggravating characteristics of the medication outweigh the perceived advantages of treatment adherence. Improving community awareness about the role of primaquine to prevent further malaria transmission and fostering a realistic system of direct observed treatment intake, organized at community level, can be expected to improve adherence to the radical cure of P. vivax in this area. PMID:20519594

  13. Divergence in parental care, habitat selection and larval life history between two species of Peruvian poison frogs: an experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, J L; Morales, V; Summers, K

    2008-11-01

    Changes in the nature of the ecological resources exploited by a species can lead to the evolution of novel suites of behaviours. We identified a case in which the transition from large pool use to the use of very small breeding pools in neotropical poison frogs (family Dendrobatidae) is associated with the evolution of a suite of behaviours, including biparental care (from uniparental care) and social monogamy (from promiscuity). We manipulated breeding pool size in order to demonstrate experimentally that breeding habitat selection strategy has evolved in concert with changes in parental care and mating system. We also manipulated intra- and interspecific larval interactions to demonstrate that larval adaptation to the use of very small pools for breeding affected the evolution of larval competition and cannibalism. Our results illustrate the intimate connection between breeding pool ecology, parental care and mating strategies in Peruvian poison frogs. PMID:18811668

  14. The tragedy of Tauccamarca: a human rights perspective on the pesticide poisoning deaths of 4 children in the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Erika

    2003-01-01

    The pesticide poisoning deaths of 24 children in an isolated Peruvian village make a compelling case that corporate accountability for pesticide poisonings in the developing south should be examined from a human rights perspective. Highly toxic pesticides cannot be used safely under prevailing socioeconomic conditions. The industry asserts that the deaths of these children were accidental, blaming misuse. Tragedies such as these poisonings are not accidents, but foreseeable, and therefore preventable. Sales of highly toxic pesticides that cause repeated and predictable poisonings violate the fundamental human rights to life, health, and security of person. The Tauccamarca tragedy is a clear example of the urgency of applying a precautionary, human rights approach to pesticide issues in the developing south.

  15. Sustaining a hygiene education intervention to prevent and control geohelminth infections at schools in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Thériault, François L; Blouin, Brittany; Casapía, Martín; Gyorkos, Theresa W

    2015-10-01

    The World Health Organization currently recommends that school-based deworming programs include health hygiene education as a complementary measure. However, the sustainability and long-term impact of such hygiene education had yet to be assessed. In July 2012, this cross-sectional study was conducted in 18 primary schools in the Peruvian Amazon to gauge continuing adherence to a health hygiene education intervention introduced 2 years earlier to reduce soil-transmitted helminth infections. Due in large part to high teacher turn-over, only 9 of 47 (19.1%) teachers were still implementing the intervention. Health hygiene education interventions must, therefore, be designed to ensure sustainability in order to contribute to the overall effectiveness of school-based deworming programs.

  16. Sustaining a hygiene education intervention to prevent and control geohelminth infections at schools in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Thériault, François L; Blouin, Brittany; Casapía, Martín; Gyorkos, Theresa W

    2015-10-01

    The World Health Organization currently recommends that school-based deworming programs include health hygiene education as a complementary measure. However, the sustainability and long-term impact of such hygiene education had yet to be assessed. In July 2012, this cross-sectional study was conducted in 18 primary schools in the Peruvian Amazon to gauge continuing adherence to a health hygiene education intervention introduced 2 years earlier to reduce soil-transmitted helminth infections. Due in large part to high teacher turn-over, only 9 of 47 (19.1%) teachers were still implementing the intervention. Health hygiene education interventions must, therefore, be designed to ensure sustainability in order to contribute to the overall effectiveness of school-based deworming programs. PMID:26758227

  17. Spatial patterns of avian malaria prevalence in Zonotrichia capensis on the western slope of the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Jones, M R; Cheviron, Z A; Carling, M D

    2013-10-01

    Environmental heterogeneity largely dictates the spatial distributions of parasites and therefore the susceptibility to infection of host populations. We surveyed avian malaria infections in Rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis) across replicated altitudinal and latitudinal transects along the western slope of the Peruvian Andes to assess geographic patterns of prevalence. We found malaria infection prevalence peaked at midelevations along all 3 altitudinal transects (x ≈ 2,733 m), with highest overall prevalence observed in the northern transect. We observed low levels of malarial parasite diversity, with 94% of infected birds carrying a single Haemoproteus (subgenus Parahaemoproteus) strain. The remaining infected birds harbored either a single alternate Haemoproteus or 1 of 2 Plasmodium strains. Our data suggest that temperature and precipitation are the primary drivers of the spatial patterns in avian malaria prevalence along the western slope of the Andes.

  18. Quaternary marine terraces and maximum tectonic uplift rate of the Peruvian coast at 15. 5/sup 0/S latitude

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.T.; Bloom, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    Numerous and well preserved marine terraces near San Juan de Marcona, Peru are a result of tectonic uplift related to subduction of the Nazca Plate, combined with Quaternary sea level fluctuations. A flight of 10 terraces from modern sea level up to 310 m has been sampled and surveyed along two transects. The lowest terrace surface is covered with cobble beach ridges and is truncated by a modern sea cliff 29 m above sea level. It may be the continuation of an abrasion platform with a well developed shoreline angle at 41 m. The extreme aridity of the Peruvian coastal desert is responsible for the preservation and lack of alteration of the terrace deposits. All landforms and sedimentary facies of the modern surf zone are still recognizable on the terraces. Abundant and well preserved mollusk shells, all of which are nearshore or surf zone species, can be found on most of the terraces. Uncorrected radiocarbon ages of pelecypods in growth position on the lowest terrace were >40,000 year B.P. If this lowest terrace is older than 40,000 yr. B.P. then its next most likely time of formation was during the 62,000 year B.P. interstadial event. By this hypothesis, a wide and well developed terrace at 148 m would have been formed during the 125,000 year B.P. interglacial high sea level, and the average uplift rate would have been 1.2 m/1000 year. This uplift rate is the maximum that can be assumed for this section of the Peruvian coast, because if the terraces are even older, the uplift rate must have been less.

  19. Outbreak of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) on a Peruvian Navy ship - June-July 2009.

    PubMed

    2010-02-19

    On June 25, 2009, a naval cadet reported to the infirmary of a 355-crewman Peruvian Navy ship with a febrile acute respiratory infection (FARI) 5 days after the ship docked in San Francisco, California. Pandemic 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus was suspected as the cause because it was circulating in the city at that time. A test for pandemic H1N1 by real-time reverse transcription--polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) was positive. During the subsequent 3 weeks, as the ship continued its cruise, 77 additional crew members developed confirmed pandemic H1N1 influenza. The U.S. Naval Medical Research Center Detachment (NMRCD), in collaboration with the Peruvian Navy, conducted an investigation to describe the outbreak and determine the attack rate for pandemic H1N1 influenza on the ship. This report summarizes the results of that investigation, which indicated that, of the 85 patients with FARI, 78 (92%) tested positive for pandemic H1N1 by rRT-PCR. The attack rate for confirmed pandemic H1N1 influenza was 22.0%. The most frequent symptoms, other than fever, were cough, headache, nasal congestion, and malaise. No complications or deaths occurred. Patients were treated according to World Health Organization (WHO) influenza treatment guidelines; six patients received antiviral medication because of preexisting comorbidities. A shipboard respiratory surveillance program, which had been implemented aboard the ship before its departure from Peru, permitted the early detection of the outbreak. Subsequent implementation of control measures might have slowed the outbreak. Laboratory disease surveillance and adequate outbreak control procedures might reduce transmission of pandemic H1N1 influenza aboard ships.

  20. In vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Traditional Plant Used in Mestizo Shamanism from the Peruvian Amazon in Case of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Roumy, Vincent; Gutierrez-Choquevilca, Andréa-Luz; Lopez Mesia, Jean Pierre; Ruiz, Lastenia; Ruiz Macedo, Juan Celidonio; Abedini, Amin; Landoulsi, Ameni; Samaillie, Jennifer; Hennebelle, Thierry; Rivière, Céline; Neut, Christel

    2015-01-01

    Context: Our survey was performed near Iquitos (Peruvian Amazon) and its surroundings and leads us to consider Mestizo ethnomedical practices. The plant species reported here are traditionally used for ailments related to microbial infections. Inhabitants of various ethnic origins were interviewed, and 52 selected plants extracts were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties against a panel of 36 sensitive and multi-resistant bacteria or yeast. The study aimed at providing information on antimicrobial plant extract activities and the ethnomedical context of Mestizo riverine populations from Loreto (Peru). Material and Method: The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the plant crude extracts were carried out using the agar dilution method and ranged between 0.075 and 5.0 mg/ml. Results: Of the 40 plants analyzed, 9 species showed MIC ≤0.3 mg/ml (Anacardium occidentale, Couroupita guianensis, Croton lechleri, Davilla rugosa, Erythrina amazonica, Jacaranda copaia subsp. Spectabilis, Oenocarpus bataua, Peperomia macrostachya, and Phyllanthus urinaria) for one or several of the 36 microorganisms and only 6 drug extracts were inactive. Among the 40 plants, 13 were evaluated for the first time for an antibacterial activity. Conclusion: This evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of 40 plants using an approved standard methodology allowed comparing those activities against various microbes to establish antimicrobial spectra of standardized plant extracts, and give support to the traditional use of these plants. It may also help discovering new chemical classes of antimicrobial agents that could serve against multi-resistant bacteria. SUMMARY This study leads us to consider Mestizo ethnomedical practices near Iquitos (Peruvian Amazon) and its surroundings. The plant species reported here are traditionally used for ailments related to microbial infections. 52 selected plants extracts were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties against a panel of 36

  1. Depletion of oxygen, nitrate and nitrite in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone cause an imbalance of benthic nitrogen fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, S.; Gier, J.; Treude, T.; Lomnitz, U.; Dengler, M.; Cardich, J.; Dale, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are key regions for fixed nitrogen loss in both the sediments and the water column. During this study, the benthic contribution to N cycling was investigated at ten sites along a depth transect (74-989 m) across the Peruvian OMZ at 12°S. O2 levels were below detection limit down to ~500 m. Benthic fluxes of N2, NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, H2S and O2 were measured using benthic landers. Flux measurements on the shelf were made under extreme geochemical conditions consisting of a lack of O2, NO3- and NO2- in the bottom water and elevated seafloor sulphide release. These particular conditions were associated with a large imbalance in the benthic nitrogen cycle. The sediments on the shelf were densely covered by filamentous sulphur bacteria Thioploca, and were identified as major recycling sites for DIN releasing high amounts of NH4+up to 21.2 mmol m-2 d-1 that were far in excess of NH4+ release by ammonification. This difference was attributed to dissimilatory nitrate (or nitrite) reduction to ammonium (DNRA) that was partly being sustained by NO3- stored within the sulphur oxidizing bacteria. Sediments within the core of the OMZ (ca. 200-400 m) also displayed an excess flux of N of 3.5 mmol m-2 d-1 mainly as N2. Benthic nitrogen and sulphur cycling in the Peruvian OMZ appears to be particularly susceptible to bottom water fluctuations in O2, NO3- and NO2-, and may accelerate the onset of pelagic euxinia when NO3- and NO2- become depleted.

  2. Human Leptospirosis Caused by a New, Antigenically Unique Leptospira Associated with a Rattus Species Reservoir in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Cespedes, Manuel; Diaz, M. Monica; Galloway, Renee L.; Saito, Mayuko; Steigerwalt, Arnold G.; Patra, Kailash P.; Ore, Carlos Vidal; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H.; Levett, Paul N.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    As part of a prospective study of leptospirosis and biodiversity of Leptospira in the Peruvian Amazon, a new Leptospira species was isolated from humans with acute febrile illness. Field trapping identified this leptospire in peridomestic rats (Rattus norvegicus, six isolates; R. rattus, two isolates) obtained in urban, peri-urban, and rural areas of the Iquitos region. Novelty of this species was proven by serological typing, 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and DNA-DNA hybridization analysis. We have named this species “Leptospira licerasiae” serovar Varillal, and have determined that it is phylogenetically related to, but genetically distinct from, other intermediate Leptospira such as L. fainei and L. inadai. The type strain is serovar Varillal strain VAR 010T, which has been deposited into internationally accessible culture collections. By microscopic agglutination test, “Leptospira licerasiae” serovar Varillal was antigenically distinct from all known serogroups of Leptospira except for low level cross-reaction with rabbit anti–L. fainei serovar Hurstbridge at a titer of 1∶100. LipL32, although not detectable by PCR, was detectable in “Leptospira licerasiae” serovar Varillal by both Southern blot hybridization and Western immunoblot, although on immunoblot, the predicted protein was significantly smaller (27 kDa) than that of L. interrogans and L. kirschneri (32 kDa). Isolation was rare from humans (2/45 Leptospira isolates from 881 febrile patients sampled), but high titers of MAT antibodies against “Leptospira licerasiae” serovar Varillal were common (30%) among patients fulfilling serological criteria for acute leptospirosis in the Iquitos region, and uncommon (7%) elsewhere in Peru. This new leptospiral species reflects Amazonian biodiversity and has evolved to become an important cause of leptospirosis in the Peruvian Amazon. PMID:18382606

  3. Methane and nitrous oxide fluxes across an elevation gradient in the tropical Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Y. A.; Diem, T.; Jones, S.; Huaraca Quispe, L. P.; Baggs, E.; Morley, N.; Richards, M.; Smith, P.; Meir, P.

    2014-04-01

    Remote sensing and inverse modelling studies indicate that the tropics emit more CH4 and N2O than predicted by bottom-up emissions inventories, suggesting that terrestrial sources are stronger or more numerous than previously thought. Tropical uplands are a potentially large and important source of CH4 and N2O often overlooked by past empirical and modelling studies. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated spatial, temporal and environmental trends in soil CH4 and N2O fluxes across a long elevation gradient (600-3700 m a.s.l.) in the Kosñipata Valley, in the southern Peruvian Andes, that experiences seasonal fluctuations in rainfall. The aim of this work was to produce preliminary estimates of soil CH4 and N2O fluxes from representative habitats within this region, and to identify the proximate controls on soil CH4 and N2O dynamics. Area-weighted flux calculations indicated that ecosystems across this altitudinal gradient were both atmospheric sources and sinks of CH4 on an annual basis. Montane grasslands (3200-3700 m a.s.l.) were strong atmospheric sources, emitting 56.94 ± 7.81 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1. Upper montane forest (2200-3200 m a.s.l.) and lower montane forest (1200-2200 m a.s.l.) were net atmospheric sinks (-2.99 ± 0.29 and -2.34 ± 0.29 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1, respectively); while premontane forests (600-1200 m a.s.l.) fluctuated between source or sink depending on the season (wet season: 1.86 ± 1.50 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1; dry season: -1.17 ± 0.40 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1). Analysis of spatial, temporal and environmental trends in soil CH4 flux across the study site suggest that soil redox was a dominant control on net soil CH4 flux. Soil CH4 emissions were greatest from habitats, landforms and during times of year when soils were suboxic, and soil CH4 efflux was inversely correlated with soil O2 concentration (Spearman's ρ = -0.45, P < 0.0001) and positively correlated with water-filled pore space (Spearman's ρ = 0.63, P <0.0001). Ecosystems across the

  4. Redox sensitive elements in foraminifera from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glock, N.; Eisenhauer, A.; Liebetrau, V.; Wiedenbeck, M.; Hensen, C.; Nehrke, G.

    2011-08-01

    Testing order to assess their potential as a proxy for redox conditions the element/Ca ratios of the redox sensitive elements Mn and Fe were determined in tests of benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Prior to the determination of the element/Ca ratios the distributions of Ca, Mn, Fe, Mg, Ba, Al, Si, P and S in tests of the shallow infaunal species Uvigerina peregrina and Bolivina spissa were mapped with an electron microprobe (EMP). An Fe rich phase which is also enriched in Al, Si, P and S was found on the inner test surface of U. peregrina. The element distributions of a specimen treated with an oxidative cleaning procedure show the absence of this phase. EMP maps of B. spissa also identified a similar phase which too could be removed with oxidative cleaning. Neither in B. spissa nor in U. peregrina were any hints for diagenetic (oxyhydr)oxide or carbonate coatings found. Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca ratios of single specimens of B. spissa from different locations have been determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Bulk analyses using solution ICP-MS of several samples were compared to the SIMS data. The difference between SIMS analyses on single specimens and ICP-MS bulk analyses from the same sampling sites was 14.0-134.8 μmol mol-1 for the Fe/Ca and 1.68 μmol mol-1 for the Mn/Ca ratios. This amounts to 3-29 % for the Fe/Ca and 21.5 % for the Mn/Ca ratios of the overall variability between the samples of the different sampling sites. The Mn/Ca ratios in the calcite were generally relatively low (2.21-9.93 μmol mol-1) but of the same magnitude as in the pore waters (1.37-6.67 μmol mol-1). Comparison with sediment pore water data showed that Mn/Ca in the foraminiferal calcite is proportional to the Mn/Ca ratio in the top cm of the pore water. The lowest Fe/Ca ratio in tests of B. spissa (87.0 μmol mol-1) has been found at a sampling site which was strongly depleted in oxygen and showed a high, sharp iron peak in the top interval

  5. Evidence of Teleconnections between the Peruvian central Andes and Northeast Brazil during extreme rainfall events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulca, J. C.; Vuille, M. F.; Silva, F. Y.; Takahashi, K.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge about changes in regional circulation and physical processes associated with extreme rainfall events in South America is limited. Here we investigate such events over the Mantaro basin (MB) located at (10°S-13°S; 73°W-76°W) in the central Peruvian Andes and Northeastern Brazil (NEB), located at (9°S-15°S; 39°W-46°W). Occasional dry and wet spells can be observed in both areas during the austral summer season. The main goal of this study is to investigate potential teleconnections between extreme rainfall events in MB and NEB during austral summer. We define wet (dry) spells as periods that last for at least 3 (5) consecutive days with rainfall above (below) the 70 (30) percentile. To identify the dates of ocurrence of these events, we used daily accumulated rainfall data from 14 climate stations located in the Mantaro basin for the period 1965 to 2002. In NEB we defined a rainfall index which is based on average daily gridded rainfall data within the region for the same period. Dry (wet spells) in the MB are associated with positive (negative) OLR anomalies which extend over much of the tropical Andes, indicating the large-scale nature of these events. At 200 hPa anomalous easterly (westerly) zonal winds aloft accompany wet (dry) spells. Composite anomalies of dry spells in MB reveal significant contemporaneous precipitation anomalies of the opposite sign over NEB, which suggest that intraseasonal precipitation variability over the two regions may be dynamically linked. Indeed upper-tropospheric circulation anomalies over the central Andes extend across South America and appear to be tied to an adjustment in the Bolivian High-Nordeste Low system. Dry (wet) spells in NEB are equally associated with a large-scale pattern of positive (negative) OLR anomalies; however, there are no related significant OLR anomalies over the MB during these events. Dry (wet) spells are associated with robust patterns of anomalous wind fields at both low and upper

  6. Microbial methanogenesis in the sulfate-reducing zone of surface sediments traversing the Peruvian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltby, J.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Treude, T.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the concurrence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in surface sediments (0-25 cm below sea floor) at six stations (70, 145, 253, 407, 990 and 1024 m) along the Peruvian margin (12° S). This oceanographic region is characterized by high carbon export to the seafloor creating an extensive oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the shelf, both factors that could favor surface methanogenesis. Sediments sampled along the depth transect traversed areas of anoxic and oxic conditions in the bottom-near water. Net methane production (batch incubations) and sulfate reduction (35S-sulfate radiotracer incubation) were determined in the upper 0-25 cm b.s.f. of multiple cores from all stations, while deep hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (> 30 cm b.s.f., 14C-bicarbonate radiotracer incubation) was determined in two gravity cores at selected sites (78 and 407 m). Furthermore, stimulation (methanol addition) and inhibition (molybdate addition) experiments were carried out to investigate the relationship between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis.

    Highest rates of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in the surface sediments, integrated over 0-25 cm b.s.f., were observed on the shelf (70-253 m, 0.06-0.1 and 0.5-4.7 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively), while lowest rates were discovered at the deepest site (1024 m, 0.03 and 0.2 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively). The addition of methanol resulted in significantly higher surface methanogenesis activity, suggesting that the process was mostly based on non-competitive substrates - i.e., substrates not used by sulfate reducers. In the deeper sediment horizons, where competition was probably relieved due to the decrease of sulfate, the usage of competitive substrates was confirmed by the detection of hydrogenotrophic activity in the sulfate-depleted zone at the shallow shelf station (70 m).

    Surface methanogenesis appeared to be correlated to the availability of labile organic matter (C / N ratio) and organic carbon

  7. Microbial methanogenesis in the sulfate-reducing zone of surface sediments traversing the Peruvian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltby, J.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Treude, T.

    2015-09-01

    We studied the concurrence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in surface sediments (0-25 cm below sea floor, cmbsf) at six stations (70, 145, 253, 407, 770 and 1024 m) along the Peruvian margin (12° S). This oceanographic region is characterized by high carbon export to the seafloor, creating an extensive oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the shelf, both factors that could favor surface methanogenesis. Sediments sampled along the depth transect traversed areas of anoxic and oxic conditions in the bottom-near water. Net methane production (batch incubations) and sulfate reduction (35S-sulfate radiotracer incubation) were determined in the upper 0-25 cmbsf of multicorer cores from all stations, while deep hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (> 30 cmbsf, 14C-bicarbonate radiotracer incubation) was determined in two gravity cores at selected sites (78 and 407 m). Furthermore, stimulation (methanol addition) and inhibition (molybdate addition) experiments were carried out to investigate the relationship between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Highest rates of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in the surface sediments, integrated over 0-25 cmbsf, were observed on the shelf (70-253 m, 0.06-0.1 and 0.5-4.7 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively), while lowest rates were discovered at the deepest site (1024 m, 0.03 and 0.2 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively). The addition of methanol resulted in significantly higher surface methanogenesis activity, suggesting that the process was mostly based on non-competitive substrates, i.e., substrates not used by sulfate reducers. In the deeper sediment horizons, where competition was probably relieved due to the decline of sulfate, the usage of competitive substrates was confirmed by the detection of hydrogenotrophic activity in the sulfate-depleted zone at the shallow shelf station (70 m). Surface methanogenesis appeared to be correlated to the availability of labile organic matter (C / N ratio) and organic carbon degradation (DIC production

  8. Effects of different land-uses on soil organic carbon pools in the Peruvian tropical forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, V.; Kala, J.; Lever, R.; Teh, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical soils are a large carbon reservoir, acting as both a source and a sink of CO2. Changes to these soil environments have major implications for long term carbon storage and rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Enhanced CO2 emissions originate, in large part, from the decomposition and loss of soil organic matter (SOM) following anthropogenic disturbances such as deforestation or agricultural conversion. Therefore, quantitative knowledge of the stabilisation and decomposition of SOM is necessary in order to understand, assess and predict the impact of land use change in the tropics. In particular, labile SOM is an early and sensitive indicator of how SOM responds to changes in land use and management practices. The main focus of this study is to explore the relationship between soil respiration, decomposition and soil C pools in order to estimate the turnover times of soil C on a suite of different land uses in the Peruvian tropical forests. Three major C pools (light fractions, occluded light fractions and heavy fractions) were separated using sodium polytungstate in a density fraction technique, soil CO2 flux was measured bimonthly over a year using a closed-chamber technique and decomposition rates were estimated using buried birch wood sticks acting as a common substrate across the sites. Our results showed that CO2 flux ranged from 0.237-7.676 μmol m-2s-1 for the banana plantation, 2.773-11.1 μmol m-2s-1 for the mature forest, 1.718-17.005 μmol m-2s-1 for pasture and 2.931-5.216 μmol m-2s-1 for the secondary forest. On an annual basis, the soil CO2 flux was highest in the pasture ecosystem with an estimated production of 2.3 kg C m-2yr-1 followed by the banana plantation with 1.3 kg C m-2yr-1 and the mature forest site with 1.0 kg C m-2yr-1. Land use affected soil temperature and bulk density, which also showed positive correlations with CO2 flux. The stick decomposition rate was significantly faster on the pasture site in comparison to the forest

  9. Neutralization of four Peruvian Bothrops sp. snake venoms by polyvalent antivenoms produced in Perú and Costa Rica: preclinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Ermila; Quesada, Lil; Arce, Viviana; Lomonte, Bruno; Rojas, Gustavo; Gutiérrez, José María

    2005-01-01

    Envenomations after bites inflicted by snakes of the genus Bothrops constitute a public health hazard in Perú, and the intravenous administration of equine-derived antivenoms represents the only scientifically validated treatment. This study presents a preclinical assessment of the efficacy of two whole IgG antivenoms, prepared in Perú and Costa Rica, to neutralize the most relevant toxic effects induced by the venoms of Bothrops atrox, B. brazili, B. barnetti and B. pictus from Perú. Peruvian antivenom is produced by immunizing horses with Bothrops sp. venoms from this country, whereas the production of Costa Rican antivenom involves immunization with venoms from Central American snakes. The neutralization of lethal, hemorrhagic, edema-forming, myotoxic, coagulant and defibrinating activities was evaluated in assays involving incubation of venom and antivenom prior to testing. Both antivenoms were effective in the neutralization of these effects, with quantitative variations in the values of effective dose 50% depending on the effects being studied. Peruvian antivenom was more effective in the neutralization of lethality induced by B. atrox and B. barnetti venoms. However, Peruvian antivenom failed to neutralize coagulant activity of B. barnetti venom and edema-forming activity of B. brazili venom, whereas neutralization was achieved by Costa Rican antivenom. It is concluded that an extensive immunological cross-reactivity exists between Bothrops sp. venoms from Perú and Costa Rica, and that both antivenoms are effective in the neutralization of these four venoms in a rodent model of envenoming. PMID:15589801

  10. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Genotype and Arterial Oxygen Saturation at High Altitude in Peruvian Quechua

    PubMed Central

    Bigham, Abigail W.; Kiyamu, Melisa; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Parra, Esteban J.; Rivera-Ch, Maria; Shriver, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Bigham, Abigail W., Melisa Kiyamu, Fabiola León-Verlarde, Esteban J. Parra, Maria Rivera-Ch, Mark D. Shriver, and Tom D. Brutsaert. Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotype and arterial oxygen saturation at high altitude in Peruvian Quechua. High Alt. Med. Biol. 9:167–178, 2008.—The I-allele of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism has been associated with performance benefits at high altitude (HA). In n = 142 young males and females of largely Quechua origins in Peru, we evaluated 3 specific hypotheses with regard to the HA benefits of the I-allele: (1) the I-allele is associated with higher arterial oxygen saturation (\\documentclass{aastex}\\usepackage{amsbsy}\\usepackage{amsfonts}\\usepackage{amssymb}\\usepackage{bm}\\usepackage{mathrsfs}\\usepackage{pifont}\\usepackage{stmaryrd}\\usepackage{textcomp}\\usepackage{portland,xspace}\\usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra}\\pagestyle{empty}\\DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6}\\begin{document}$${\\rm Sa}_{\\rm O_2}$$\\end{document}) at HA, (2) the I-allele effect depends on the acclimatization state of the subjects, and (3) the putative I-allele effect on \\documentclass{aastex}\\usepackage{amsbsy}\\usepackage{amsfonts}\\usepackage{amssymb}\\usepackage{bm}\\usepackage{mathrsfs}\\usepackage{pifont}\\usepackage{stmaryrd}\\usepackage{textcomp}\\usepackage{portland,xspace}\\usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra}\\pagestyle{empty}\\DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6}\\begin{document}$${\\rm Sa}_{\\rm O_2}$$\\end{document} is mediated by the isocapnic hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR, \\documentclass{aastex}\\usepackage{amsbsy}\\usepackage{amsfonts}\\usepackage{amssymb}\\usepackage{bm}\\usepackage{mathrsfs}\\usepackage{pifont}\\usepackage{stmaryrd}\\usepackage{textcomp}\\usepackage{portland,xspace}\\usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra}\\pagestyle{empty}\\DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6}\\begin{document}$$1 / {\\rm min}^{- 1} / \\%{\\rm Sa}_{\\rm O_2}{- 1}$$\\end{document}). The subject participants

  11. Cooling and Exhumation of the Coastal Batholith in the Peruvian Andes (5-12°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, M.; Hall, S. R.; Farber, D.; Hourigan, J. K.; Audin, L.

    2014-12-01

    The South American Andes exhibit strong morphological differences along strike, shaped by a combination of tectonic forces and surface processes. In the central Peruvian Andes (~12°S) a major morphological transition occurs; to the north, the spines of the Western and Eastern Cordilleras come together into a relatively narrow configuration of high topography. In Southern Peru, the region of high topography widens, where the Western and Eastern Cordilleras flank the broad, Altiplano plateau. Despite this morphological change, the Mesozoic-early Cenozoic Coastal Batholith outcrops continuously from 0°-18°S along the western margin of the Peruvian Andes, emplaced along a trench-parallel marginal basin in the Mesozoic. The Coastal Batholith is an ideal geologic setting to investigate potential differences in rock exhumation and cooling histories along the western margin of Peru. While the cooling history of the southern Coastal Batholith has been previously used to estimate timing and magnitude of rock exhumation in Southern Peru, north of 12°S it is poorly constrained. We present 16 zircon and 7 apatite (U-Th)/He mean-ages from three sites, across seven degrees of latitude (5°S to 12°S). In general, ZHe and AHe ages capture two stages of cooling, Oligocene-to-mid-Miocene and mid-to-late Miocene, respectively. We model time-temperature histories of samples with paired AHe and ZHe ages using a Monte-Carlo inversion of HeFTy® (Ketcham, 2005); best fit time-temperature pathways show cooling rates ranging from ~2-24°C/my, where fastest cooling rates are generally observed in the mid-Miocene. To estimate exhumation rates, we apply a simple thermal model to account for nonuniform geothermal gradients expected in a trench-arc setting. Exhumation rates range from ~0.2mm/yr in the north, to 0.4-0.7mm/yr in the south, and rates increase orogenward, where mean elevation is highest. These results, particularly the predominance of Miocene ZHe and AHe data, and the younging

  12. Epidemiology and Genetic Characterization of Noroviruses among Adults in an Endemic Setting, Peruvian Amazon Basin, 2004–2011

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Sarah-Blythe; Reaves, Erik J.; Luna, C. Giannina; Silva, Maria E.; Rocha, Claudio; Heitzinger, Kristen; Saito, Mayuko; Apaza, Sonia; Espetia, Susan; Blazes, David L.; Tilley, Drake H.; Guzmán Aguilar, Rene C.; Gilman, Robert H.; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Successful vaccination strategies against norovirus will require understanding the burden of disease and relevant genotypes in populations. However, few data are available from cohort studies of adults living in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Materials and Methods We conducted a nested case-control study within a Peruvian military cohort to characterize the burden of norovirus infection, predominant genotypes, and associated symptoms from 2004 through 2011. Randomly selected case and control stools were tested for norovirus, bacteria, and parasites. The odds ratio of the association between norovirus infection and diarrhea was estimated using multiple logistic regression and co-infection adjusted attributable fractions were calculated. Results Of the 3,818 cohort study participants, 624 developed diarrhea. Overall and norovirus-associated diarrhea incidence rates were 42.3 and 6.0 per 100 person-years, respectively. The most prevalent norovirus genogroup was GII (72.5%, 29/40), which was associated with diarrhea (AOR 3.4, 95% CI: 1.3–8.7, P = 0.012). The co-infection adjusted GII attributable fraction was 6.4%. Discussion Norovirus was a frequent cause of diarrhea in an adult population followed longitudinally in an LMIC setting. Vaccine strategies should consider targeting adults in endemic settings and special populations that could serve as community transmission sources. PMID:26161556

  13. Physical features, phenolic compounds, betalains and total antioxidant capacity of coloured quinoa seeds (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) from Peruvian Altiplano.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Fatima; Huanatico, Elizabeth; Segura, Roger; Arribas, Silvia; Gonzalez, M Carmen; Condezo-Hoyos, Luis

    2015-09-15

    Physical features, bioactive compounds and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of coloured quinoa varieties (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) from Peruvian Altiplano were studied. Quinoa seeds did not show a pure red colour, but a mixture which corresponded to different fractal colour values (51.0-71.8), and they varied from small to large size. Regarding bioactive compounds, total phenolic (1.23-3.24mg gallic acid equivalents/g) and flavonol contents (0.47-2.55mg quercetin equivalents/g) were highly correlated (r=0.910). Betalains content (0.15-6.10mg/100g) was correlated with L colour parameter (r=-0.569), total phenolics (r=0.703) and flavonols content (r=0.718). Ratio of betaxanthins to betacyanins (0.0-1.41) was negatively correlated with L value (r=-0.744). Whereas, high TAC values (119.8-335.9mmol Trolox equivalents/kg) were negatively correlated with L value (r=-0.779), but positively with betalains (r=0.730), as well as with free (r=0.639), bound (r=0.558) and total phenolic compounds (r=0.676). Unexploited coloured quinoa seeds are proposed as a valuable natural source of phenolics and betalains with high antioxidant capacity.

  14. Characteristics and speculations on the uses of Strombus trumpets found at the ancient Peruvian center Chavin de Huantar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rick, John; Lubman, David

    2002-11-01

    A cache of 20 Strombus shell trumpets was excavated in 2001 from an underground gallery at Chavin de Huantar, the type site of the Peruvian Early Horizon period (ca. 1200 to 400 B.C.). Strombus shell usage stretches from antiquity to present day Peru, with the trumpet function showing remarkable continuity. Soon after their discovery, a dozen of the ancient shells were played to an enthusiastic audience at Lima's National Museum of Archaeology, Anthropology and History. Evidence suggests that Strombus trumpets are, and were, used as ritual instruments for the legitimization of political and religious power. Those uses may have developed from earlier practical uses for ritual and communication. This paper describes measured acoustical properties of a Strombus horn. Strombus blasts are rich in overtones. Source strengths as high as 111 dBA @ 1 M were observed. These high source levels support speculation that shell trumpets could have been used for signaling over great distances. The trumpets can produce strong combination tones, which, accompanied by likely ingestion of local hallucinogenic substances, the use of reflected light, and other sound manipulation, suggests that early leaders in Chavin were using a range of methods to help establish early religious and political authority.

  15. Vivid valleys, pallid peaks? Hypsometric variations and rural–urban land change in the Central Peruvian Andes

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    What happens to the land cover within the hinterland's altitudinal belts while Central Andean cities are undergoing globalization and urban restructuring? What conclusions can be drawn about changes in human land use? By incorporating a regional altitudinal zonation model, direct field observations and GIS analyses of remotely sensed long term data, the present study examines these questions using the example of Huancayo Metropolitano – an emerging Peruvian mountain city of 420,000 inhabitants, situated at 3260 m asl in the Mantaro Valley. The study's results indicate that rapid urban growth during the late 1980s and early 1990s was followed by the agricultural intensification and peri-urban condominization at the valley floor (quechua) – since the beginning of Peru's neoliberal era. Moreover, regarding the adjoining steep slopes (suni) and subsequent grassland ecosystems (puna), the research output presents land cover change trajectories that clearly show an expansion of human land use, such as reforestation for wood production and range burning for livestock grazing, even at high altitudes – despite rural–urban migration trends and contrary to several results of extra-Andean studies. Consequently, rural–urban planners and policy makers are challenged to focus on the manifold impacts of globalization on human land use – at all altitudinal belts of the Andean city's hinterland: toward sustainable mountain development that bridges the social and physical gaps – from the bottom up. PMID:23564987

  16. Biochemical and immunological characteristics of Peruvian Loxosceles laeta spider venom: neutralization of its toxic effects by anti-loxoscelic antivenoms.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, G; Dias-Lopes, C; Duarte, C G; Felicori, L; Machado de Avila, R A; Figueiredo, L F M; de Moura, J; Faleiro, B T; Barro, J; Flores, K; Silva, W; Tintaya, B; Yarleque, A; Bonilla, C; Kalapothakis, E; Salas, C E; Chávez-Olortegui, C

    2013-08-01

    This manuscript describes the general biochemical properties and immunological characteristics of Peruvian spider Loxosceles laeta venom (PLlv), which is responsible for the largest number of accidents involving venomous animals in Peru. In this work, we observed that the venom of this spider is more lethal to mice when compared with L. laeta venom from Brazil (BLlv). The LD₅₀ of PLlv was 1.213 mg/kg when the venom was intradermally injected. The venom displayed sphingomyelinase activity and produced dermonecrotic, hemorrhagic and edema effects in rabbits. 2-D SDS-PAGE separation of the soluble venoms resulted in a protein profile ranging from 20 to 205 kDa. Anti-PLlv and anti-BLlv sera produced in rabbits and assayed by ELISA showed that rabbit antibodies cross-reacted with PLlv and BLlv and also with other Brazilian Loxosceles venoms. Western blotting analysis showed that bands corresponding to 25-35 kDa are the proteins best recognized in every Loxosceles spp venoms analyzed. The immunized rabbits displayed protective effect after challenge with PLlv and BLlv. In vitro assays with horse anti-loxoscelic antivenoms produced in Brazil and Peru demonstrated that these commercial antivenoms were efficient to inhibit the sphingomyelinase activity of PLlv and BLlv.

  17. Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Peruvian Amazon, a region of low transmission, is associated with immunologic memory.

    PubMed

    Clark, Eva H; Silva, Claudia J; Weiss, Greta E; Li, Shanping; Padilla, Carlos; Crompton, Peter D; Hernandez, Jean N; Branch, OraLee H

    2012-04-01

    The development of clinical immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria is thought to require years of parasite exposure, a delay often attributed to difficulties in developing protective antibody levels. In this study, we evaluated several P. falciparum vaccine candidate antigens, including apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1), circumsporozoite protein (CSP), erythrocyte binding antigen 175 (EBA-175), and the 19-kDa region of merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1(19)). After observing a more robust antibody response to MSP1(19), we evaluated the magnitude and longevity of IgG responses specific to this antigen in Peruvian adults and children before, during, and after P. falciparum infection. In this low-transmission region, even one reported prior infection was sufficient to produce a positive anti-MSP1(19) IgG response for >5 months in the absence of reinfection. We also observed an expansion of the total plasmablast (CD19(+) CD27(+) CD38(high)) population in the majority of individuals shortly after infection and detected MSP1-specific memory B cells in a subset of individuals at various postinfection time points. This evidence supports our hypothesis that effective antimalaria humoral immunity can develop in low-transmission regions.

  18. The Genetic History of Peruvian Quechua-Lamistas and Chankas: Uniparental DNA Patterns among Autochthonous Amazonian and Andean Populations.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, José R; Lacerda, Daniela R; Acosta, Oscar; Jota, Marilza S; Robles-Ruiz, Paulo; Salazar-Granara, Alberto; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R; Paz-Y-Miño, César; Fujita, Ricardo; Santos, Fabricio R

    2016-03-01

    This study focuses on the genetic history of the Quechua-Lamistas, inhabitants of the Lamas Province in the San Martin Department, Peru, who speak their own distinct variety of the Quechua family of languages. It has been suggested that different pre-Columbian ethnic groups from the Peruvian Amazonia, like the Motilones or "shaven heads", assimilated the Quechua language and then formed the current native population of Lamas. However, many Quechua-Lamistas claim to be direct descendants of the Chankas, a famous pre-Columbian indigenous group that escaped from Inca rule in the Andes. To investigate the Quechua-Lamistas and Chankas' ancestries, we compared uniparental genetic profiles (17 STRs of Q-M3 Y-chromosome and mtDNA complete control region haplotypes) among autochthonous Amazonian and Andean populations from Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador. The phylogeographic and population genetic analyses indicate a fairly heterogeneous ancestry for the Quechua-Lamistas, while they are closely related to their neighbours who speak Amazonian languages, presenting no direct relationships with populations from the region where the ancient Chankas lived. On the other hand, the genetic profiles of self-identified Chanka descendants living in Andahuaylas (located in the Apurimac Department, Peru, in the Central Andes) were closely related to those living in Huancavelica and the assumed Chanka Confederation area before the Inca expansion. PMID:26879156

  19. Applicability of the Ricketts’ posteroanterior cephalometry for sex determination using logistic regression analysis in Hispano American Peruvians

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Ivan; Chavez, Allison K.; Ponce, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Ricketts' posteroanterior (PA) cephalometry seems to be the most widely used and it has not been tested by multivariate statistics for sex determination. Objective: The objective was to determine the applicability of Ricketts' PA cephalometry for sex determination using the logistic regression analysis. Materials and Methods: The logistic models were estimated at distinct age cutoffs (all ages, 11 years, 13 years, and 15 years) in a database from 1,296 Hispano American Peruvians between 5 years and 44 years of age. Results: The logistic models were composed by six cephalometric measurements; the accuracy achieved by resubstitution varied between 60% and 70% and all the variables, with one exception, exhibited a direct relationship with the probability of being classified as male; the nasal width exhibited an indirect relationship. Conclusion: The maxillary and facial widths were present in all models and may represent a sexual dimorphism indicator. The accuracy found was lower than the literature and the Ricketts' PA cephalometry may not be adequate for sex determination. The indirect relationship of the nasal width in models with data from patients of 12 years of age or less may be a trait related to age or a characteristic in the studied population, which could be better studied and confirmed. PMID:27555732

  20. The Genetic History of Peruvian Quechua-Lamistas and Chankas: Uniparental DNA Patterns among Autochthonous Amazonian and Andean Populations.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, José R; Lacerda, Daniela R; Acosta, Oscar; Jota, Marilza S; Robles-Ruiz, Paulo; Salazar-Granara, Alberto; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R; Paz-Y-Miño, César; Fujita, Ricardo; Santos, Fabricio R

    2016-03-01

    This study focuses on the genetic history of the Quechua-Lamistas, inhabitants of the Lamas Province in the San Martin Department, Peru, who speak their own distinct variety of the Quechua family of languages. It has been suggested that different pre-Columbian ethnic groups from the Peruvian Amazonia, like the Motilones or "shaven heads", assimilated the Quechua language and then formed the current native population of Lamas. However, many Quechua-Lamistas claim to be direct descendants of the Chankas, a famous pre-Columbian indigenous group that escaped from Inca rule in the Andes. To investigate the Quechua-Lamistas and Chankas' ancestries, we compared uniparental genetic profiles (17 STRs of Q-M3 Y-chromosome and mtDNA complete control region haplotypes) among autochthonous Amazonian and Andean populations from Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador. The phylogeographic and population genetic analyses indicate a fairly heterogeneous ancestry for the Quechua-Lamistas, while they are closely related to their neighbours who speak Amazonian languages, presenting no direct relationships with populations from the region where the ancient Chankas lived. On the other hand, the genetic profiles of self-identified Chanka descendants living in Andahuaylas (located in the Apurimac Department, Peru, in the Central Andes) were closely related to those living in Huancavelica and the assumed Chanka Confederation area before the Inca expansion.

  1. Waist Circumference, Body Mass Index, and Other Measures of Adiposity in Predicting Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Peruvian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, K. M.; Paiva, L. L.; Sanchez, S. E.; Revilla, L.; Lopez, T.; Yasuda, M. B.; Yanez, N. D.; Gelaye, B.; Williams, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the extent to which measures of adiposity can be used to predict selected components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP). Methods. A total of 1,518 Peruvian adults were included in this study. Waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), waist-height ratio (WHtR), and visceral adiposity index (VAI) were examined. The prevalence of each MetS component was determined according to tertiles of each anthropometric measure. ROC curves were used to evaluate the extent to which measures of adiposity can predict cardiovascular risk. Results. All measures of adiposity had the strongest correlation with triglyceride concentrations (TG). For both genders, as adiposity increased, the prevalence of Mets components increased. Compared to individuals with low-BMI and low-WC, men and women with high-BMI and high- WC had higher odds of elevated fasting glucose, blood pressure, TG, and reduced HDL, while only men in this category had higher odds of elevated CRP. Overall, the ROCs showed VAI, WC, and WHtR to be the best predictors for individual MetS components. Conclusions. The results of our study showed that measures of adiposity are correlated with cardiovascular risk although no single adiposity measure was identified as the best predictor for MetS. PMID:21331161

  2. High-yield oil palm expansion spares land at the expense of forests in the Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Vélez, Víctor H.; DeFries, Ruth; Pinedo-Vásquez, Miguel; Uriarte, María; Padoch, Christine; Baethgen, Walter; Fernandes, Katia; Lim, Yili

    2011-01-01

    High-yield agriculture potentially reduces pressure on forests by requiring less land to increase production. Using satellite and field data, we assessed the area deforested by industrial-scale high-yield oil palm expansion in the Peruvian Amazon from 2000 to 2010, finding that 72% of new plantations expanded into forested areas. In a focus area in the Ucayali region, we assessed deforestation for high- and smallholder low-yield oil palm plantations. Low-yield plantations accounted for most expansion overall (80%), but only 30% of their expansion involved forest conversion, contrasting with 75% for high-yield expansion. High-yield expansion minimized the total area required to achieve production but counter-intuitively at higher expense to forests than low-yield plantations. The results show that high-yield agriculture is an important but insufficient strategy to reduce pressure on forests. We suggest that high-yield agriculture can be effective in sparing forests only if coupled with incentives for agricultural expansion into already cleared lands.

  3. Association of vectors and environmental conditions during the emergence of Peruvian horse sickness orbivirus and Yunnan orbivirus in northern Peru.

    PubMed

    Méndez-López, María R; Attoui, Houssam; Florin, David; Calisher, Charles H; Florian-Carrillo, J Christian; Montero, Stephanie

    2015-12-01

    Since 1983, cases of diseased donkeys and horses with symptoms similar to those produced by alphaviruses were identified in two departments in northern Peru; however serological testing ruled out the presence of those viruses and attempts to isolate an agent were also unproductive. In 1997, also in northern Peru, two new orbiviruses were discovered, each recognized as a causative agent of neurological diseases in livestock and domestic animals and, at the same time, mosquitoes were found to be infected with these viruses. Peruvian horse sickness virus (PHSV) was isolated from pools of culicid mosquitoes, Aedes serratus and Psorophora ferox, and Yunnan virus (YUOV) was isolated from Aedes scapularis in the subtropical jungle (upper jungle) located on the slope between the east side of the Andes and the Amazonian basin in the Department of San Martín. Both viruses later were recovered from mosquitoes collected above the slope between the west side of the Andes and the coast (Department of Piura) in humid subtropical areas associated with the Piura River basin. In this region, PHSV was isolated from Anopheles albimanus and YUOV was isolated from Ae. scapularis. We discuss the ecology of vector mosquitoes during the outbreaks in the areas where these mosquitoes were found.

  4. Spatial and temporal trace metal distribution of a Peruvian basin: recognizing trace metal sources and assessing the potential risk.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, C; Blazquez, N; Pérez-Foguet, A; Miralles, N

    2013-10-01

    Recent efforts have been made to determine the environmental impact of mining over the past 11 years in the Jequetepeque River basin, in northern Peru. We have now analyzed data from two studies to elucidate the spatial and temporal trace metal distributions and to assess the sources of contamination. These two studies were carried out from 2003 to 2008 by a Peruvian government administration and from 2008 to 2010 by us. We analyzed 249 samples by principal component analysis, measuring: pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, total suspended solids, chloride, weak-acid-dissociable cyanide, total cyanide, nitrite and nitrate, ammonium, sulfate, and trace metals and metalloids (Al, As, Ca, Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn). Within the spatial distribution of the basin, the highest Al, As, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Pb concentrations were found at the closest point to the mine sites for both periods of time, with the higher peaks measured during the first years of the sampling data. Temporal trends showed higher concentrations of Cu and Fe in samples taken before 2005, at which point the two mines were closed. Risk assessment was quantified by the hazard quotient as related to water ingestion. The risk for human health posed by the concentrations of several trace metals and metalloids was found to be highly adverse (As and Cr), significant (Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, and Pb), or minimal (Ni and Zn). PMID:23479118

  5. Physical features, phenolic compounds, betalains and total antioxidant capacity of coloured quinoa seeds (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) from Peruvian Altiplano.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Fatima; Huanatico, Elizabeth; Segura, Roger; Arribas, Silvia; Gonzalez, M Carmen; Condezo-Hoyos, Luis

    2015-09-15

    Physical features, bioactive compounds and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of coloured quinoa varieties (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) from Peruvian Altiplano were studied. Quinoa seeds did not show a pure red colour, but a mixture which corresponded to different fractal colour values (51.0-71.8), and they varied from small to large size. Regarding bioactive compounds, total phenolic (1.23-3.24mg gallic acid equivalents/g) and flavonol contents (0.47-2.55mg quercetin equivalents/g) were highly correlated (r=0.910). Betalains content (0.15-6.10mg/100g) was correlated with L colour parameter (r=-0.569), total phenolics (r=0.703) and flavonols content (r=0.718). Ratio of betaxanthins to betacyanins (0.0-1.41) was negatively correlated with L value (r=-0.744). Whereas, high TAC values (119.8-335.9mmol Trolox equivalents/kg) were negatively correlated with L value (r=-0.779), but positively with betalains (r=0.730), as well as with free (r=0.639), bound (r=0.558) and total phenolic compounds (r=0.676). Unexploited coloured quinoa seeds are proposed as a valuable natural source of phenolics and betalains with high antioxidant capacity. PMID:25863614

  6. Climate Warming and Soil Carbon in Tropical Forests: Insights from an Elevation Gradient in the Peruvian Andes

    PubMed Central

    Nottingham, Andrew T.; Whitaker, Jeanette; Turner, Benjamin L.; Salinas, Norma; Zimmermann, Michael; Malhi, Yadvinder; Meir, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition in tropical forests will influence future climate. Studies of a 3.5-kilometer elevation gradient in the Peruvian Andes, including short-term translocation experiments and the examination of the long-term adaptation of biota to local thermal and edaphic conditions, have revealed several factors that may regulate this sensitivity. Collectively this work suggests that, in the absence of a moisture constraint, the temperature sensitivity of decomposition is regulated by the chemical composition of plant debris (litter) and both the physical and chemical composition of preexisting SOM: higher temperature sensitivities are found in litter or SOM that is more chemically complex and in SOM that is less occluded within aggregates. In addition, the temperature sensitivity of SOM in tropical montane forests may be larger than previously recognized because of the presence of “cold-adapted” and nitrogen-limited microbial decomposers and the possible future alterations in plant and microbial communities associated with warming. Studies along elevation transects, such as those reviewed here, can reveal factors that will regulate the temperature sensitivity of SOM. They can also complement and guide in situ soil-warming experiments, which will be needed to understand how this vulnerability to temperature may be mediated by altered plant productivity under future climatic change. PMID:26955086

  7. Evolved priors for ethnolinguistic categorization: A case study from the Quechua-Aymara boundary in the Peruvian Altiplano.

    PubMed

    Moya, Cristina

    2013-07-01

    Ethnic categories uniquely structure human social worlds. People readily form stereotypes about these, and other social categories, but it is unclear whether certain dimensions are privileged for making predictions about strangers when information is limited. If humans have been living in culturally-structured groups for much of their evolutionary history, we might expect them to have adaptations for prioritizing ethno-linguistic cues as a basis for making predictions about others. We provide a strong test of this possibility through a series of studies in a field context along the Quechua-Aymara linguistic boundary in the Peruvian Altiplano where the language boundary is not particularly socially meaningful. We find evidence of such psychological priors among children and adults at this site by showing that their age, and the social categories' novelty affect participants' reliance on ethno-linguistic inductive inferences (i.e. one-to-many predictions). Studies 1-3 show that participants make more ethno-linguistic inferences when the social categories are more removed from their real-world context. Additionally, in Study 4 when the category is marked with acoustic cues of language use, young children rely heavily on ethno-linguistic predictions, even though adults do not.

  8. A Phase One Safety Study of Lactobacillus reuteri Conducted in the Peruvian Amazon: Observations from the Field

    PubMed Central

    Oberhelman, Richard A.; Kosek, Margaret N.; Peñataro-Yori, Pablo; Paredes-Olórtegui, Maribel; Connolly, Eamonn

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research on probiotics presents challenging issues for researchers, regulators, and funding agencies, and these issues become more complex when United States federally funded research is conducted outside the United States. Here, we describe the design and results of a Phase I safety study of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 conducted as a community-based trial under the Food and Drug Administration Investigative New Drug (FDA IND) program in a small town in the Peruvian Amazon. Forty-five healthy adults 18 to 65 years of age were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive either Lactobacillus reuteri 108 organisms once daily for 5 days or an identical appearing placebo. Results showed no evidence of invasive infection resulting from probiotic administration and no differences between groups. Although we encountered several challenges in conducting an FDA-approved safety trial in this setting, the rigorously collected contextually relevant data will be very valuable to support later Phase II/III studies of L. reuteri for use in similar settings. PMID:24515943

  9. HPV and Genital Warts among Peruvian Men Who Have Sex with Men and Transgender People: Knowledge, Attitudes and Treatment Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Nureña, César R.; Brown, Brandon; Galea, Jerome T.; Sánchez, Hugo; Blas, Magaly M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have assessed the epidemiology of HPV infection among MSM, but no qualitative studies have specifically assessed how HPV and genital warts (GW) affect South American men who have sex with men (MSM) and male-to-female transgendered women (TG). This study explored the knowledge, attitudes and experiences of Peruvian MSM and TG regarding HPV and GW. Methods We performed a qualitative study consisting of fifteen in-depth interviews and three focus groups carried out in Lima, Peru with diverse MSM and TG groups, including sex workers. Resulting data were analyzed by applying a systematic comparative and descriptive content analysis. Results While knowledge of HPV was limited, awareness of GW was common, particularly among TG persons and sex workers. Still, few participants recognized that GW are sexually transmitted, and many had problems differentiating between GW and other STI/anogenital conditions. Stigmatizing experiences were common during sexual encounters with people who had visible GW. Shame, emotional and physical troubles, and embarrassing sexual experiences were reported by individuals with GW. Search for treatment was mediated by peers, but stigma and apparent health services’ inability to deal with GW limited the access to effective medical care. Conclusions In Peru, public health interventions should strengthen services for HPV/GW management and increase accurate knowledge of the transmission, treatment, and sequelae of HPV/GW in MSM and TG populations. PMID:23516536

  10. Phylogeny of Nolana (Solanaceae) of the Atacama and Peruvian deserts inferred from sequences of four plastid markers and the nuclear LEAFY second intron.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tieyao; Dillon, Michael O; Sun, Hang; Wen, Jun

    2008-11-01

    The phylogeny of Nolana (Solanaceae), a genus primarily distributed in the coastal Atacama and Peruvian deserts with a few species in the Andes and one species endemic to the Galápagos Islands, was reconstructed using sequences of four plastid regions (ndhF, psbA-trnH, rps16-trnK and trnC-psbM) and the nuclear LEAFY second intron. The monophyly of Nolana was strongly supported by all molecular data. The LEAFY data suggested that the Chilean species, including Nolana sessiliflora, the N. acuminata group and at least some members of the Alona group, are basally diverged, supporting the Chilean origin of the genus. Three well-supported clades in the LEAFY tree were corroborated by the SINE (short interspersed elements) or SINE-like insertions. Taxa from Peru are grouped roughly into two clades. Nolana galapagensis from the Galápagos Island is most likely to have derived from a Peruvian ancestor. The monophyly of the morphologically well-diagnosed Nolana acuminata group (N. acuminata, N. baccata, N. paradoxa, N. parviflora, N. pterocarpa, N. rupicola and N. elegans) was supported by both plastid and LEAFY data. Incongruence between the plastid and the LEAFY data was detected concerning primarily the positions of N. sessiliflora, N. galapagensis, taxa of the Alona group and the two Peruvian clades. Such incongruence may be due to reticulate evolution or in some cases lineage sorting of plastid DNA. Incongruence between our previous GBSSI trees and the plastid-LEAFY trees was also detected concerning two well-supported major clades in the GBSSI tree. Duplication of the GBSSI gene may have contributed to this incongruence.

  11. Pedological and mineralogical investigations on a soil-paleosoil sequence within Andosols in the Western Cordillera of the Peruvian Andes (region Laramate, 14.5S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leceta Gobitz, Fernando; Mächtle, Bertil; Schukraft, Gerd; Meyer, Hans-Peter; Eitel, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    An integrated research project of environmental sciences focuses on a group of four Andosol profiles in Western flank of the Peruvian southern Andes. Aim of this study is to contribute to the reconstruction of the paleo environmental conditions in the Western Cordillera of the Peruvian Andes. Standard pedological and sedimentological analysis has been conducted in order to identify morphological and geochemical features generated by climatic variations during the middle and late Holocene. Though a provenance analysis of sediments, all potential lithological sources around the town of Laramate are being examined under the scanning electron microscope, in order to find significant mineralogical associations downward the soil-profile. Preliminary results reveal two edaphic cycles within a soil-paleo soil-sequence: a relative poor developed "Ah" topsoil, mostly composed by fine grain sediments, is underlain by a well preserved "2Ah" paleo soil; a "2Bwt" subsoil exhibits signs of alteration and clay translocation; parent material in slight weathered statement at "2C" culminates the sequence. Mineralogical analytical data supports the premise, that materials in the uppermost horizons are relatable to distal geological units of the Western and Eastern Cordillera, therefore also related to other described aeolian archives from the region: "Desert Margin Loess" at the Andean foot-zone and "Mixed Loess" in the Puna grassland. The amphibole varieties Actinolite, Mg-Hornblende and Edenite could be only distinguished within the soil sediments. The fluvial transport to its current position is excluded, insofar mentioned varieties stem from the granodiorites of Coastal Batholite (downstream the study area), and the vulcanites of the Anta und Andahuaylas Formation (eastward the continental divide). References: Eitel, B., et al. (2005). "Geoarchaeological evidence from desert loess in the Nazca-Palpa region, southern Peru : Palaeoenvironmental changes and their impact on Pre

  12. Characterizing Seismic Anisotropy across the Peruvian Flat-Slab Subduction Zone: Implications for the Dynamics of Flat-Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, Caroline; Long, Maureen; Beck, Susan; Wagner, Lara; Tavera, Hernando

    2014-05-01

    Although 10% of subduction zones worldwide today exhibit shallow or flat subduction, we are yet to fully understand how and why these slabs go flat. An excellent study location for such a problem is in Peru, where the largest region of flat-subduction currently exists, extending ~1500 km in length (from 3 °S to 15 °S) and ~300 km in width. Across this region we investigate the pattern of seismic anisotropy, an indicator for past and/or ongoing deformation in the upper mantle. To achieve this we conduct shear wave splitting analyzes at 40 broadband stations from the PULSE project (PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment). These stations were deployed for 2+ years across the southern half of the Peruvian flat-slab region. We present detailed shear wave splitting results for both teleseismic events (such as SKS, SKKS, PKS, sSKS) that sample the upper mantle column beneath the stations as well as direct S from local events that constrain anisotropy in the upper portion of the subduction zone. We analyze the variability of our results with respect to initial polarizations, ray paths, and frequency content as well as spatial variability between stations as the underlying slab morphology changes. Teleseismic results show predominately NW-SE fast polarizations (trench oblique to sub-parallel) over the flat-slab region east of Lima. These results are consistent with observations of more complex multi-layered anisotropy beneath a nearby permanent station (NNA) that suggests a trench-perpendicular fast direction in the lowest layer in the sub-slab mantle. Further south, towards the transition to steeper subduction, the splitting pattern becomes increasingly dominated by null measurements. Over to the east however, beyond Cuzco, where the mantle wedge might begin to play a role, we record fast polarizations quasi-parallel to the local slab contours. Local S results indicate the presence of weak (delay times typically less than 0.5 seconds) and heterogeneous supra

  13. The Role of Subducting Ridges in the Formation of Flat Slabs: Insights from the Peruvian Flat Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, Sanja; Wagner, Lara; Kumar, Abhash; Beck, Susan; Long, Maureen; Zandt, George; Eakin, Caroline M.

    2015-04-01

    Flattening of the subducting plate is often used to explain various geological features removed far from the subducting margins, including basement-cored uplifts, the cessation of arc volcanism, ignimbrite flare-ups, and the formation of high plateaus and ore deposits [Humphreys et al., 2003; Gutscher et al., 2000; Rosenbaum et al., 2005, Kay and Mpodozis, 2001]. Today, flat slab subduction is observed in central Chile and Peru, representing the modern analogues to the immense paleo-flat slab that subducted beneath the North American continent during the Laramide orogeny (80-55 Ma) [English et al., 2003]. However, how flat slabs form and what controls their inboard and along-strike extent is still poorly understood. To better understand modern and paleo-flat slabs, we focus on the Peruvian flat slab, where the Nazca plate starts to bend at ~90 km depth and travels horizontally for several hundred kilometers beneath the South American plate. Earlier studies propose a correlation between the flat slab and the subducting Nazca Ridge that has been migrating to the south over the past 11 ~Ma [Hampel et al., 2004, Gutscher et al., 2003]. Combining 3D shear wave velocity structure and Rayleigh wave phase anisotropy between ~10° and 18° S, we find that the flat slab has the greatest inboard extent along the track of the subducting Nazca Ridge. North of the ridge track, where the flat slab was initially formed, the flat slab starts to sag, tear and re-initiate steep slab subduction, allowing inflow of warm asthenosphere. Based on our new constraints on the geometry of the subducted plate, we find that the subduction of buoyant oceanic features with overthickened oceanic crust plays a vital role in the formation of flat slabs. We further develop a model of temporal evolution of the Peruvian flab slab that forms as a result of the combined effects of the subducting ridge, trench retreat, and suction forces. Once the buoyant ridge subducts to ~90 km depth, it will fail to

  14. Conservation Beyond Park Boundaries: The Impact of Buffer Zones on Deforestation and Mining Concessions in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Weisse, Mikaela J; Naughton-Treves, Lisa C

    2016-08-01

    Many researchers have tested whether protected areas save tropical forest, but generally focus on parks and reserves, management units that have internationally recognized standing and clear objectives. Buffer zones have received considerably less attention because of their ambiguous rules and often informal status. Although buffer zones are frequently dismissed as ineffective, they warrant attention given the need for landscape-level approaches to conservation and their prevalence around the world-in Peru, buffer zones cover >10 % of the country. This study examines the effectiveness of buffer zones in the Peruvian Amazon to (a) prevent deforestation and (b) limit the extent of mining concessions. We employ covariate matching to determine the impact of 13 buffer zones on deforestation and mining concessions from 2007 to 2012. Despite variation between sites, these 13 buffer zones have prevented ~320 km(2) of forest loss within their borders during the study period and ~1739 km(2) of mining concessions, an outcome associated with the special approval process for granting formal concessions in these areas. However, a closer look at the buffer zone around the Tambopata National Reserve reveals the difficulties of controlling illegal and informal activities. According to interviews with NGO employees, government officials, and community leaders, enforcement of conservation is limited by uncertain institutional responsibilities, inadequate budgets, and corruption, although formal and community-based efforts to block illicit mining are on the rise. Landscape-level conservation not only requires clear legal protocol for addressing large-scale, formal extractive activities, but there must also be strategies and coordination to combat illegal activities. PMID:27179802

  15. Complex anisotropy beneath the Peruvian flat slab from frequency-dependent, multiple-phase shear wave splitting analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, Caroline M.; Long, Maureen D.

    2013-09-01

    Flat or shallow subduction is a relatively widespread global occurrence, but the dynamics remain poorly understood. In particular, the interaction between flat slabs and the surrounding mantle flow has yet to be studied in detail. Here we present measurements of seismic anisotropy to investigate mantle flow beneath the Peruvian flat-slab segment, the largest present-day region of flat subduction. We conduct a detailed shear wave splitting analysis at a long-running seismic station (NNA) located near Lima, Peru. We present measurements of apparent splitting parameters (fast direction φ and delay time δt) for SKS, ScS, and local S phases from 80 events. We observe well-defined frequency dependence and backazimuthal variability, indicating the likely presence of complex anisotropy. Forward modeling the observations with two or three layers of anisotropy reveals a likely layer with a trench-normal fast direction underlying a layer with a more trench-oblique (to trench-subparallel) fast direction. In order to further constrain the anisotropic geometry, we analyzed the source-side splitting from events originating within the slab measured at distant stations. Beneath the flat-slab segment, we found trench-normal fast splitting directions in the subslab mantle, while within the dipping portion of the slab further to the east, likely trench-subparallel anisotropy within the slab itself. This subslab pattern contradicts observations from elsewhere in South America for "normal" (i.e., more steeply dipping) slab conditions. It is similar, however, to inferences from other shallowly dipping subduction zones around the world. While there is an apparent link between slab dip and the surrounding mantle flow, at least beneath Peru, the precise nature of the relationship remains to be clarified.

  16. Complex anisotropy beneath the Peruvian flat-slab from frequency-dependent, multiple-phase shear wave splitting analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, C. M.; Long, M. D.

    2013-05-01

    Flat or shallow subduction is a relatively widespread global occurrence but the dynamics remain poorly understood. In particular, the interaction between flat-slabs and the surrounding mantle flow has yet to be studied in detail. In this study measurements of seismic anisotropy are utilized to investigate mantle flow beneath the Peruvian flat-slab segment, the largest present-day region of flat-subduction. A detailed shear wave splitting analysis is conducted at a long-running seismic station (NNA) located near Lima, Peru. Measurements of apparent splitting parameters (fast direction φ and delay time δt) for SKS, ScS and local S phases from 86 events were obtained. Well defined frequency dependence and back-azimuthal variability is observed, indicating the likely presence of complex anisotropy. Forward modeling the observations with two or three layers of anisotropy reveals a likely layer with a trench-parallel fast axis overlying a layer(s) with a more trench-normal fast geometry. In order to further constrain the anisotropic geometry, source-side splitting from events originating within the slab measured at distant stations have been analyzed. Beneath the flat-slab segment, trench-normal fast splitting directions in the sub-slab mantle were found and likely trench-parallel anisotropy within the slab itself. This sub-slab pattern contradicts observations from elsewhere in South America for 'normal' (i.e. more steeply dipping) slab conditions. It is similar, however, to inferences from other shallowly dipping subduction zones around the world. While there is an apparent link between slab dip and the surrounding mantle flow, at least beneath Peru, the precise nature of the relationship requires further investigation.

  17. River Boats Contribute to the Regional Spread of the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Guagliardo, Sarah Anne; Morrison, Amy C.; Barboza, Jose Luis; Requena, Edwin; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo; Kitron, Uriel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives The dramatic range expansion of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti is associated with various anthropogenic transport activities, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms driving this geographic expansion. We longitudinally characterized infestation of different vehicle types (cars, boats, etc.) to estimate the frequency and intensity of mosquito introductions into novel locations (propagule pressure). Methods Exhaustive adult and immature Ae. aegypti collections were performed on six different vehicle types at five ports and two bus/ taxi departure points in the Amazonian city of Iquitos, Peru during 2013. Aquatic vehicles included 32 large and 33 medium-sized barges, 53 water taxis, and 41 speed boats. Terrestrial vehicles sampled included 40 buses and 30 taxis traveling on the only highway in the region. Ae. aegypti adult infestation rates and immature indices were analyzed by vehicle type, location within vehicles, and sampling date. Results Large barges (71.9% infested) and medium barges (39.4% infested) accounted for most of the infestations. Notably, buses had an overall infestation rate of 12.5%. On large barges, the greatest number of Ae. aegypti adults were found in October, whereas most immatures were found in February followed by October. The vast majority of larvae (85.9%) and pupae (76.7%) collected in large barges were produced in puddles formed in cargo holds. Conclusions Because larges barges provide suitable mosquito habitats (due to dark, damp cargo storage spaces and ample oviposition sites), we conclude that they likely serve as significant contributors to mosquitoes’ propagule pressure across long distances throughout the Peruvian Amazon. This information can help anticipate vector population mixing and future range expansions of dengue and other viruses transmitted by Ae. aegypti. PMID:25860352

  18. Birds of Two Oceans? Trans-Andean and Divergent Migration of Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger cinerascens) from the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Lisa C.

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal flooding compels some birds that breed in aquatic habitats in Amazonia to undertake annual migrations, yet we know little about how the complex landscape of the Amazon region is used seasonally by these species. The possibility of trans-Andes migration for Amazonian breeding birds has largely been discounted given the high geographic barrier posed by the Andean Cordillera and the desert habitat along much of the Pacific Coast. Here we demonstrate a trans-Andes route for Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger cinerascens) breeding on the Manu River (in the lowlands of Manu National Park, Perú), as well as divergent movement patterns both regionally and across the continent. Of eight skimmers tracked with satellite telemetry, three provided data on their outbound migrations, with two crossing the high Peruvian Andes to the Pacific. A third traveled over 1800 km to the southeast before transmissions ended in eastern Paraguay. One of the two trans-Andean migrants demonstrated a full round-trip migration back to its tagging location after traveling down the Pacific Coast from latitude 9° South to latitude 37° S, spending the austral summer in the Gulf of Arauco, Chile. This is the first documentation of a trans-Andes migration observed for any bird breeding in lowland Amazonia. To our knowledge, this research also documents the first example of a tropical-breeding waterbird migrating out of the tropics to spend the non-breeding season in the temperate summer, this being the reverse pattern with respect to seasonality for austral migrants in general. PMID:26760301

  19. Stunting, adiposity, and the individual-level “dual burden” among urban lowland and rural highland peruvian children

    PubMed Central

    Pomeroy, Emma; Stock, Jay T; Stanojevic, Sanja; Miranda, J Jaime; Cole, Tim J; Wells, Jonathan CK

    2014-01-01

    Background The causes of the “dual burden” of stunting and obesity remain unclear, and its existence at the individual level varies between populations. We investigate whether the individual dual burden differentially affects low socioeconomic status Peruvian children from contrasting environments (urban lowlands and rural highlands), and whether tibia length can discount the possible autocorrelation between adiposity proxies and height due to height measurement error. Methods Stature, tibia length, weight, and waist circumference were measured in children aged 3–8.5 years (n = 201). Height and body mass index (BMI) z scores were calculated using international reference data. Age-sex-specific centile curves were also calculated for height, BMI, and tibia length. Adiposity proxies (BMI z score, waist circumference-height ratio (WCHtR)) were regressed on height and also on tibia length z scores. Results Regression model interaction terms between site (highland vs. lowland) and height indicate that relationships between adiposity and linear growth measures differed significantly between samples (P < 0.001). Height was positively associated with BMI among urban lowland children, and more weakly with WCHtR. Among rural highland children, height was negatively associated with WCHtR but unrelated to BMI. Similar results using tibia length rather than stature indicate that stature measurement error was not a major concern. Conclusions Lowland and rural highland children differ in their patterns of stunting, BMI, and WCHtR. These contrasts likely reflect environmental differences and overall environmental stress exposure. Tibia length or knee height can be used to assess the influence of measurement error in height on the relationship between stature and BMI or WCHtR. PMID:24706334

  20. Human dimension in scientific models in high-mountain climate change and risk projects: Peruvian-Swiss experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicuña, Luis; Jurt, Christine; Minan, Fiorella; Huggel, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Models in a range of scientific disciplines are increasingly seen as indispensable for successful adaptation. Governments as well as international organizations and cooperations put their efforts in basing their adaptation projects on scientific results. Thereby, it is critical that scientific models are first put into the particular context in which they will be applied. This paper addresses the experience of the project 'Glaciers 513- Climate change adaptation and disaster risk management for glacier retreat in the Andes' conducted in the districts of Carhuaz (Ancash region) and Santa Teresa (Cusco region) in Peru. The Peruvian and the Swiss governments put their joint efforts in an adaptation project in the context of climate change and the retreat of the glaciers. The project is led by a consortium of Care Peru and the University of Zurich with additional Swiss partners and its principal aim is to improve the capacity for integral adaptation and reduce the risk of disasters from glaciers and high-mountain areas, and effects of climate change, particularly in the regions of Cusco and Ancash. The paper shows how the so called "human dimension" on the one hand, and models from a range of disciplines, including climatology, glaciology, and hydrology on the other hand, were conceptualized and perceived by the different actors involved in the project. Important aspects have been, among others, the role of local knowledge including ancestral knowledge, demographic information, socio-economic indicators as well as the social, political and cultural framework and the historical background. Here we analyze the role and context of local knowledge and the historical background. The analysis of the implications of the differences and similarities of the perceptions of a range of actors contributes to the discussion about how, and to what extent scientific models can be contextualized, what kind of information can be helpful for the contextualization and how it can be

  1. Conservation Beyond Park Boundaries: The Impact of Buffer Zones on Deforestation and Mining Concessions in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Weisse, Mikaela J; Naughton-Treves, Lisa C

    2016-08-01

    Many researchers have tested whether protected areas save tropical forest, but generally focus on parks and reserves, management units that have internationally recognized standing and clear objectives. Buffer zones have received considerably less attention because of their ambiguous rules and often informal status. Although buffer zones are frequently dismissed as ineffective, they warrant attention given the need for landscape-level approaches to conservation and their prevalence around the world-in Peru, buffer zones cover >10 % of the country. This study examines the effectiveness of buffer zones in the Peruvian Amazon to (a) prevent deforestation and (b) limit the extent of mining concessions. We employ covariate matching to determine the impact of 13 buffer zones on deforestation and mining concessions from 2007 to 2012. Despite variation between sites, these 13 buffer zones have prevented ~320 km(2) of forest loss within their borders during the study period and ~1739 km(2) of mining concessions, an outcome associated with the special approval process for granting formal concessions in these areas. However, a closer look at the buffer zone around the Tambopata National Reserve reveals the difficulties of controlling illegal and informal activities. According to interviews with NGO employees, government officials, and community leaders, enforcement of conservation is limited by uncertain institutional responsibilities, inadequate budgets, and corruption, although formal and community-based efforts to block illicit mining are on the rise. Landscape-level conservation not only requires clear legal protocol for addressing large-scale, formal extractive activities, but there must also be strategies and coordination to combat illegal activities.

  2. Conservation Beyond Park Boundaries: The Impact of Buffer Zones on Deforestation and Mining Concessions in the Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisse, Mikaela J.; Naughton-Treves, Lisa C.

    2016-08-01

    Many researchers have tested whether protected areas save tropical forest, but generally focus on parks and reserves, management units that have internationally recognized standing and clear objectives. Buffer zones have received considerably less attention because of their ambiguous rules and often informal status. Although buffer zones are frequently dismissed as ineffective, they warrant attention given the need for landscape-level approaches to conservation and their prevalence around the world—in Peru, buffer zones cover >10 % of the country. This study examines the effectiveness of buffer zones in the Peruvian Amazon to (a) prevent deforestation and (b) limit the extent of mining concessions. We employ covariate matching to determine the impact of 13 buffer zones on deforestation and mining concessions from 2007 to 2012. Despite variation between sites, these 13 buffer zones have prevented ~320 km2 of forest loss within their borders during the study period and ~1739 km2 of mining concessions, an outcome associated with the special approval process for granting formal concessions in these areas. However, a closer look at the buffer zone around the Tambopata National Reserve reveals the difficulties of controlling illegal and informal activities. According to interviews with NGO employees, government officials, and community leaders, enforcement of conservation is limited by uncertain institutional responsibilities, inadequate budgets, and corruption, although formal and community-based efforts to block illicit mining are on the rise. Landscape-level conservation not only requires clear legal protocol for addressing large-scale, formal extractive activities, but there must also be strategies and coordination to combat illegal activities.

  3. Research and in situ conservation of owl monkeys enhances environmental law enforcement at the Colombian-Peruvian border.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Angela M; Peck, Mika R

    2014-07-01

    This study reports on impacts of illegal trade in owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae, A. vociferans) for the biomedical research market in the Colombian-Peruvian Amazonian border. Through freedom of information requests and interviews with hunters we found that 912 owl monkeys, including A. nancymaae captured in Peru, were trapped over a 3-month period in 2012 to supply a malaria research facility based in Leticia, Colombia, which had trapping permits for the use of only 800 A. vociferans annually yet experimentation took place using A. nancymaae. High levels of extraction in Peru have had population-level impacts with significantly lower densities of Aotus spp. (3-24 individuals/km(2)) compared to Colombian sites with low hunting pressure (26-44 individuals/km(2)). Post-experimental release of this species in Colombian territory has created a new distribution whose status and impacts on resident populations of A. vociferans remain unknown. The trapping method has also had environmental impact, with loss of over 65,000 trees (including sleeping sites), annually. As Aotus species are registered under the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Appendix II, international trade requires official permission and evidence that extraction does not impact wild populations. However, no official records exist and CITES legislation has failed, due principally to a lack of appropriate monitoring by national authorities responsible for compliance. Of further concern is that we had previously documented and reported the illegal trade to the appropriate governmental authorities yet still no action was taken-as demonstrated by the continuing trade in 2013. Enforcement eventually occurred when a non-governmental organization initiated legal action against organizations responsible. A successful second instance ruling by the Colombian State's Council in 2013 revoked trapping permits. Using the trade in owl monkeys as a case study we consider

  4. Trade-Offs in Relative Limb Length among Peruvian Children: Extending the Thrifty Phenotype Hypothesis to Limb Proportions

    PubMed Central

    Pomeroy, Emma; Stock, Jay T.; Stanojevic, Sanja; Miranda, J. Jaime; Cole, Tim J.; Wells, Jonathan C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Methods Both the concept of ‘brain-sparing’ growth and associations between relative lower limb length, childhood environment and adult disease risk are well established. Furthermore, tibia length is suggested to be particularly plastic under conditions of environmental stress. The mechanisms responsible are uncertain, but three hypotheses may be relevant. The ‘thrifty phenotype’ assumes that some components of growth are selectively sacrificed to preserve more critical outcomes, like the brain. The ‘distal blood flow’ hypothesis assumes that blood nutrients decline with distance from the heart, and hence may affect limbs in relation to basic body geometry. Temperature adaptation predicts a gradient of decreased size along the limbs reflecting decreasing tissue temperature/blood flow. We examined these questions by comparing the size of body segments among Peruvian children born and raised in differentially stressful environments. In a cross-sectional sample of children aged 6 months to 14 years (n = 447) we measured head circumference, head-trunk height, total upper and lower limb lengths, and zeugopod (ulna and tibia) and autopod (hand and foot) lengths. Results Highland children (exposed to greater stress) had significantly shorter limbs and zeugopod and autopod elements than lowland children, while differences in head-trunk height were smaller. Zeugopod elements appeared most sensitive to environmental conditions, as they were relatively shorter among highland children than their respective autopod elements. Discussion The results suggest that functional traits (hand, foot, and head) may be partially protected at the expense of the tibia and ulna. The results do not fit the predictions of the distal blood flow and temperature adaptation models as explanations for relative limb segment growth under stress conditions. Rather, our data support the extension of the thrifty phenotype hypothesis to limb growth, and suggest that certain

  5. A 2,300-year-long annually resolved record of the South American summer monsoon from the Peruvian Andes

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Broxton W.; Abbott, Mark B.; Vuille, Mathias; Rodbell, Donald T.; Stansell, Nathan D.; Rosenmeier, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Decadal and centennial mean state changes in South American summer monsoon (SASM) precipitation during the last 2,300 years are detailed using an annually resolved authigenic calcite record of precipitation δ18O from a varved lake in the Central Peruvian Andes. This unique sediment record shows that δ18O peaked during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) from A.D. 900 to 1100, providing evidence that the SASM weakened considerably during this period. Minimum δ18O values occurred during the Little Ice Age (LIA) between A.D. 1400 and 1820, reflecting a prolonged intensification of the SASM that was regionally synchronous. After the LIA, δ18O increased rapidly, particularly during the current warm period (CWP; A.D. 1900 to present), indicating a return to reduced SASM precipitation that was more abrupt and sustained than the onset of the MCA. Diminished SASM precipitation during the MCA and CWP tracks reconstructed Northern Hemisphere and North Atlantic warming and a northward displacement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) over the Atlantic, and likely the Pacific. Intensified SASM precipitation during the LIA follows reconstructed Northern Hemisphere and North Atlantic cooling, El Niño-like warming in the Pacific, and a southward displacement of the ITCZ over both oceans. These results suggest that SASM mean state changes are sensitive to ITCZ variability as mediated by Western Hemisphere tropical sea surface temperatures, particularly in the Atlantic. Continued Northern Hemisphere and North Atlantic warming may therefore help perpetuate the recent reductions in SASM precipitation that characterize the last 100 years, which would negatively impact Andean water resources. PMID:21555548

  6. High diversity of tropical peatland ecosystem types in the Pastaza-Marañón basin, Peruvian Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LäHteenoja, Outi; Page, Susan

    2011-06-01

    Very little information exists on Amazonian peatlands with most studies on tropical peatlands concentrating on Southeast Asia. Here we describe diversity of Amazonian peatland ecosystems and consider its implications for the global diversity of tropical peatland ecosystems. Nine study sites were selected from within the most extensive wetland area of Peruvian Amazonia: the 120,000 km2 Pastaza-Marañón basin. Peat thickness was determined every 500 m from the edge toward the center of each site, and peat samples were collected from two cores per site. Samples from the entire central core and surface samples from the other core were analyzed for nutrient content. Topography of four peat deposits was measured. In order to study differences in vegetation, pixel values were extracted from a satellite image. The surface peat nutrient content of the peatlands varied from very nutrient-rich to nutrient-poor. Two of the peatlands measured for their topography were domed (5.4 and 5.8 m above the stream), one was gently sloping (1.4 m above the stream), and one was flat and occurred behind a 7 m high levee. Five different peatland vegetation types were detected on the basis of pixel values derived from the satellite image. The peat cores had considerable variation in nutrient content and showed different developmental pathways. In summary, the Pastaza-Marañón basin harbors a considerable diversity of previously undescribed peatland ecosystems, representing a gradient from atmosphere-influenced, nutrient-poor ombrotrophic bogs through to river-influenced, nutrient-rich swamps. Their existence affects the habitat diversity, carbon dynamics, and hydrology of the Amazonian lowlands, and they also provide an undisturbed analog for the heavily disturbed peatlands of Southeast Asia. Considering the factors threatening the Amazonian lowlands, there is an urgent need to investigate and conserve these peatland ecosystems, which may in the near future be among the very few

  7. Birds of Two Oceans? Trans-Andean and Divergent Migration of Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger cinerascens) from the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Lisa C; Goodenough, Katharine S; Haugaasen, Torbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal flooding compels some birds that breed in aquatic habitats in Amazonia to undertake annual migrations, yet we know little about how the complex landscape of the Amazon region is used seasonally by these species. The possibility of trans-Andes migration for Amazonian breeding birds has largely been discounted given the high geographic barrier posed by the Andean Cordillera and the desert habitat along much of the Pacific Coast. Here we demonstrate a trans-Andes route for Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger cinerascens) breeding on the Manu River (in the lowlands of Manu National Park, Perú), as well as divergent movement patterns both regionally and across the continent. Of eight skimmers tracked with satellite telemetry, three provided data on their outbound migrations, with two crossing the high Peruvian Andes to the Pacific. A third traveled over 1800 km to the southeast before transmissions ended in eastern Paraguay. One of the two trans-Andean migrants demonstrated a full round-trip migration back to its tagging location after traveling down the Pacific Coast from latitude 9° South to latitude 37° S, spending the austral summer in the Gulf of Arauco, Chile. This is the first documentation of a trans-Andes migration observed for any bird breeding in lowland Amazonia. To our knowledge, this research also documents the first example of a tropical-breeding waterbird migrating out of the tropics to spend the non-breeding season in the temperate summer, this being the reverse pattern with respect to seasonality for austral migrants in general.

  8. Contribution of modifiable risk factors for hypertension and type-2 diabetes in Peruvian resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M; Gilman, Robert H; Checkley, William; Smeeth, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Background It is important to understand the local burden of non-communicable diseases including within-country heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to characterise hypertension and type-2 diabetes profiles across different Peruvian geographical settings emphasising the assessment of modifiable risk factors. Methods Analysis of the CRONICAS Cohort Study baseline assessment was conducted. Cardiometabolic outcomes were blood pressure categories (hypertension, prehypertension, normal) and glucose metabolism disorder status (diabetes, prediabetes, normal). Exposures were study setting and six modifiable factors (smoking, alcohol drinking, leisure time and transport-related physical activity levels, TV watching, fruit/vegetables intake and obesity). Poisson regression models were used to report prevalence ratios (PR). Population attributable risks (PAR) were also estimated. Results Data from 3238 participants, 48.3% male, mean age 45.3 years, were analysed. Age-standardised (WHO population) prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension was 24% and 16%, whereas for prediabetes and type-2 diabetes it was 18% and 6%, respectively. Outcomes varied according to study setting (p<0.001). In multivariable model, hypertension was higher among daily smokers (PR 1.76), heavy alcohol drinkers (PR 1.61) and the obese (PR 2.06); whereas only obesity (PR 2.26) increased the prevalence of diabetes. PAR showed that obesity was an important determinant for hypertension (15.7%) and type-2 diabetes (23.9%). Conclusions There is an evident heterogeneity in the prevalence of and risk factors for hypertension and diabetes within Peru. Prehypertension and prediabetes are highly prevalent across settings. Our results emphasise the need of understanding the epidemiology of cardiometabolic conditions to appropriately implement interventions to tackle the burden of non-communicable diseases. PMID:26248550

  9. Evaluation of indigenous grains from the Peruvian Andean region for antidiabetes and antihypertension potential using in vitro methods.

    PubMed

    Ranilla, Lena Galvez; Apostolidis, Emmanouil; Genovese, Maria Ines; Lajolo, Franco Maria; Shetty, Kalidas

    2009-08-01

    The health-relevant functionality of 10 thermally processed Peruvian Andean grains (five cereals, three pseudocereals, and two legumes) was evaluated for potential type 2 diabetes-relevant antihyperglycemia and antihypertension activity using in vitro enzyme assays. Inhibition of enzymes relevant for managing early stages of type 2 diabetes such as hyperglycemia-relevant alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase and hypertension-relevant angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) were assayed along with the total phenolic content, phenolic profiles, and antioxidant activity based on the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical assay. Purple corn (Zea mays L.) (cereal) exhibited high free radical scavenging-linked antioxidant activity (77%) and had the highest total phenolic content (8 +/- 1 mg of gallic acid equivalents/g of sample weight) and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity (51% at 5 mg of sample weight). The major phenolic compound in this cereal was protocatechuic acid (287 +/- 15 microg/g of sample weight). Pseudocereals such as Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) and Kañiwa (Chenopodium pallidicaule Aellen) were rich in quercetin derivatives (1,131 +/- 56 and 943 +/- 35 microg [expressed as quercetin aglycone]/g of sample weight, respectively) and had the highest antioxidant activity (86% and 75%, respectively). Andean legumes (Lupinus mutabilis cultivars SLP-1 and H-6) inhibited significantly the hypertension-relevant ACE (52% at 5 mg of sample weight). No alpha-amylase inhibitory activity was found in any of the evaluated Andean grains. This in vitro study indicates the potential of combination of Andean whole grain cereals, pseudocereals, and legumes to develop effective dietary strategies for managing type 2 diabetes and associated hypertension and provides the rationale for animal and clinical studies. PMID:19735168

  10. Self-esteem in adolescents with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion in a Peruvian sample

    PubMed Central

    Florián-Vargas, Karla; Honores, Marcos J. Carruitero; Bernabé, Eduardo; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare self-esteem scores in 12 to 16-year-old adolescents with different Angle malocclusion types in a Peruvian sample. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 276 adolescents (159, 52 and 65 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusions, respectively) from Trujillo, Peru. Participants were asked to complete the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and were also clinically examined, so as to have Angle malocclusion classification determined. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare RSES scores among adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions, with participants' demographic factors being controlled. Results: Mean RSES scores for adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions were 20.47 ± 3.96, 21.96 ± 3.27 and 21.26 ± 4.81, respectively. The ANCOVA test showed that adolescents with Class II malocclusion had a significantly higher RSES score than those with Class I malocclusion, but there were no differences between other malocclusion groups. Supplemental analysis suggested that only those with Class II, Division 2 malocclusion might have greater self-esteem when compared to adolescents with Class I malocclusion. Conclusion: This study shows that, in general, self-esteem did not vary according to adolescents' malocclusion in the sample studied. Surprisingly, only adolescents with Class II malocclusion, particularly Class II, Division 2, reported better self-esteem than those with Class I malocclusion. A more detailed analysis assessing the impact of anterior occlusal features should be conducted. PMID:27275616

  11. Households across All Income Quintiles, Especially the Poorest, Increased Animal Source Food Expenditures Substantially during Recent Peruvian Economic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Debbie L.; Behrman, Jere R.; Crookston, Benjamin T.; Dearden, Kirk A.; Schott, Whitney; Penny, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Relative to plant-based foods, animal source foods (ASFs) are richer in accessible protein, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin B-12 and other nutrients. Because of their nutritional value, particularly for childhood growth and nutrition, it is important to identify factors influencing ASF consumption, especially for poorer households that generally consume less ASFs. Objective To estimate differential responsiveness of ASF consumption to changes in total household expenditures for households with different expenditures in a middle-income country with substantial recent income increases. Methods The Peruvian Young Lives household panel (n = 1750) from 2002, 2006 and 2009 was used to characterize patterns of ASF expenditures. Multivariate models with controls for unobserved household fixed effects and common secular trends were used to examine nonlinear relationships between changes in household expenditures and in ASF expenditures. Results Households with lower total expenditures dedicated greater percentages of expenditures to food (58.4% vs.17.9% in 2002 and 24.2% vs. 21.5% in 2009 for lowest and highest quintiles respectively) and lower percentages of food expenditures to ASF (22.8% vs. 33.9% in 2002 and 30.3% vs. 37.6% in 2009 for lowest and highest quintiles respectively). Average percentages of overall expenditures spent on food dropped from 47% to 23.2% between 2002 and 2009. Households in the lowest quintiles of expenditures showed greater increases in ASF expenditures relative to total consumption than households in the highest quintiles. Among ASF components, meat and poultry expenditures increased more than proportionately for households in the lowest quintiles, and eggs and fish expenditures increased less than proportionately for all households. Conclusions Increases in household expenditures were associated with substantial increases in consumption of ASFs for households, particularly households with lower total expenditures. Increases in ASF

  12. Vulnerability assessment in a participatory approach to design and implement community based adaptation to drought in the Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasage, Ralph; Muis, Sanne; Sardella, Carolina; van Drunen, Michiel; Verburg, Peter; Aerts, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    The livelihoods of people in the Andes are expected to be affected by climate change due to their dependence on glacier meltwater during the growing season. The observed decrease in glacier volume over the last few decades is likely to accelerate during the current century, which will affect water availability in the region. This paper presents the implementation of an approach for the participatory development of community-based adaptation measures to cope with the projected impacts of climate change, which was implemented jointly by the local community and by a team consisting of an NGO, Peruvian ministry of environment, research organisations and a private sector organisation. It bases participatory design on physical measurements, modelling and a vulnerability analysis. Vulnerability to drought is made operational for households in a catchment of the Ocoña river basin in Peru. On the basis of a household survey we explore how a vulnerability index (impacts divided by the households' perceived adaptive capacity) can be used to assess the distribution of vulnerability over households in a sub catchment. The socio-economic factors water entitlement, area of irrigated land, income and education are all significantly correlate with this vulnerability to drought. The index proved to be appropriate for communicating about vulnerability to climate change and its determining factors with different stakeholders. The water system research showed that the main source of spring water is local rainwater, and that water use efficiency in farming is low. The adaptation measures that were jointly selected by the communities and the project team aimed to increase water availability close to farmland, and increase water use efficiency, and these will help to reduce the communities vulnerability to drought.

  13. Terrigenous material supply to the Peruvian central continental shelf (Pisco, 14° S) during the last 1000 years: paleoclimatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño-Zuluaga, Francisco Javier; Sifeddine, Abdelfettah; Caquineau, Sandrine; Cardich, Jorge; Salvatteci, Renato; Gutierrez, Dimitri; Ortlieb, Luc; Velazco, Federico; Boucher, Hugues; Machado, Carine

    2016-03-01

    In the eastern Pacific, lithogenic input to the ocean responds to variations in the atmospheric and oceanic system and their teleconnections over different timescales. Atmospheric (e.g., wind fields), hydrological (e.g., fresh water plumes) and oceanic (e.g., currents) conditions determine the transport mode and the amount of lithogenic material transported from the continent to the continental shelf. Here, we present the grain size distribution of a composite record of two laminated sediment cores retrieved from the Peruvian continental shelf that record the last ˜ 1000 years at a sub-decadal to centennial time-series resolution. We propose novel grain size indicators of wind intensity and fluvial input that allow reconstructing the oceanic-atmospheric variability modulated by sub-decadal to centennial changes in climatic conditions. Four grain size modes were identified. Two are linked to aeolian inputs (M3: ˜ 54; M4: ˜ 91 µm on average), the third is interpreted as a marker of sediment discharge (M2: ˜ 10 µm on average), and the last is without an associated origin (M1: ˜ 3 µm). The coarsest components (M3 and M4) dominated during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the Current Warm Period (CWP) periods, suggesting that aeolian transport increased as a consequence of surface wind stress intensification. In contrast, M2 displays an opposite behavior, exhibiting an increase in fluvial terrigenous input during the Little Ice Age (LIA) in response to more humid conditions associated with El Niño-like conditions. Comparison with other South American paleoclimate records indicates that the observed changes are driven by interactions between meridional displacement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), the South Pacific Subtropical High (SPSH) and Walker circulation at decadal and centennial timescales.

  14. Terrigeneous material supply to the Peruvian central continental shelf (Pisco 14° S) during the last 1100 yr: paleoclimatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño Zuluaga, F.; Sifeddine, A.; Caquineau, S.; Cardich, J.; Salvatteci, R.; Gutierrez, D.; Ortlieb, L.; Velazco, F.; Boucher, H.; Machado, C.

    2015-07-01

    In the Eastern Pacific, lithogenic input to the ocean is a response of the atmospheric and ocean system variability and their teleconnections over different timescales. Atmospheric (e.g., wind fields, precipitation), hydrological (e.g., fresh water plumes) and oceanic (e.g., currents) conditions determine the transport mode and the amount of lithogenic material transported from the continent to the continental shelf. Here, we present the grain size distribution of a composite record of two laminated sediment cores retrieved in the Peruvian continental shelf, covering the last ~1100 yr at sub-decadal to centennial time-series resolution. We then discuss the paleo-environmental significance and the climatic mechanisms involved. Four grain size modes were identified. Two are linked to aeolian inputs (M3: 53.0 μm and M4: 90.8 μm on average), the third is interpreted as a marker of sediment discharge (M2: 9.4 μm on average), and the last is without an associated origin (M1: ~3 μm). The coarsest components (M3 and M4) dominated during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and Current Warm Period (CWP) periods, suggesting that aeolian transport increased as consequence of wind stress intensification. In contrast, M2 displays an opposite behavior, exhibiting an increase in fluvial terrigenous input during the Little Ice Age (LIA), in response to more humid conditions. Comparison with other South American paleoclimate records indicates that the observed changes are driven by interactions between meridional displacement of the Intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and of the South Pacific Sub-tropical High (SPSH) at decadal and centennial time scales.

  15. Sleep Quality, Sleep Patterns and Consumption of Energy Drinks and Other Caffeinated Beverages among Peruvian College Students

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Sixto E.; Martinez, Claudia; Oriol, Raphaelle A.; Yanez, David; Castañeda, Benjamín; Sanchez, Elena; Gelaye, Bizu; Williams, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate sleep quality in relation to lifestyle characteristics including consumption of energy drinks and other caffeinated beverages among Peruvian college students. Methods A total of 2,458 college students were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire that collected information about a variety of behaviors including consumption of energy drinks, caffeinated and alcoholic beverages. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to assess sleep quality. Logistic regression procedures were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for poor sleep quality in relation to lifestyle characteristics. Results A total of 965 males and 1,493 female students were enrolled in the study. 52.0% of males and 58.4% of females experienced poor sleep quality (p=0.002). Females (OR=1.28; 95% CI 1.08–1.51) and those who reported consuming ≥ 3 stimulant beverages per week (OR=1.88; 95% CI 1.42–2.50) had higher odds of poor sleep quality. Students who consumed 1–19 alcoholic beverages monthly (OR=1.90; 95% CI 1.46–2.49) had a higher odds of long sleep latency. Consumption of ≥ 3 stimulant beverages per week was associated with daytime dysfunction due to sleep loss (OR=1.45; 95% CI 1.10–1.90), short sleep duration (OR= 1.49; 95% CI 1.14–1.94), and use of sleep medication (OR= 2.10; 95% CI 1.35–3.28). Conclusions Consumption of energy drinks, other caffeinated beverages and alcoholic beverages are risk factors of poor sleep quality. Increased awareness of these associations should promote interventions to improve students’ lifestyle habits, including consumption of alcoholic and caffeinated beverages, and overall health. PMID:25243056

  16. Peruvian Tropical Glacier May Survive Longer Than Previously Thought: Landsat Image Analysis of Nevado Coropuna Ice Cap, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochtitzky, W. H.; Edwards, B. R.; Marino, J.; Manrique, N.

    2015-12-01

    Nevado Coropuna is a large volcanic complex in southern Peru (15.56°S, 72.62°N; 6,425 m). The complex is approximately 12 km east-west and 8 km north-south with elevation from ~4,500 m at the base to over 6,000 m at the highest points. This ice cap is the largest hosted by a volcano in the tropics, and one of the ten biggest ice masses in the tropics. Previous workers have predicted that the Coropuna ice cap will completely melt by 2050. We present a new analysis of historic satellite imagery to test this hypothesis. In this study, ice and snow are classified based on unique spectral signatures including spectral band thresholds, Normalized Difference Snow Index, and Band 4/5 ratio. Landsat scenes (L2, 4, 5, 7, and 8) from 1975 to present in addition to one SPOT scene (2013) are used. Previous workers used images from June and July, which are peak snow periods in southern Peru, leading to overestimates of ice area. This study uses November and December images when snow is at an annual minimum. Annual equilibrium line altitudes are calculated for each end of year image (November/December). The glaciers of Nevado Coropuna were found to be shrinking at ~0.5 km2/yr, which is ~1/3 the rate previously published. In this study, SPOT (1.5 m resolution) and Landsat 7 ETM scenes from November 23 and 26, 2013 respectively were used to calibrate the spectral band threshold classification. While this study suggests that the ice cap of Coropuna will persist until 2100 given current rates, water quantity and security remains a concern for Peruvian agriculture. Coropuna is an active volcano, so it poses great risk to surrounding inhabitants from lahars, flooding, and debris avalanches. Our new data suggest that these will continue to be risks late into this century.

  17. Endemic pemphigus in the Peruvian Amazon: epidemiology and risk factors for the development of complications during treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Willy; Chacon, Gina Rocio; Galarza, Carlos; Gutierrez, Ericson Leonardo; Smith, Maria Eugenia; Ortega-Loayza, Alex Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pemphigus is an autoimmune blistering disease. According to a report, in areas of endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF) in Peru there are cases of pemphigus vulgaris with epidemiologic, clinical and histopathologic characteristics similar to those of "endemic pemphigus vulgaris" (EPV) in Brazil. OBJECTIVES To determine the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of endemic pemphigus and the risk factors of patients for developing complications during treatment. METHODS A study was carried out from July 2003 to March 2008. The study population was 60 patients with EPF and 7 patients with EPV evaluated in hospitals and clinics in the Peruvian Amazon and Lima. A multivariate analysis was carried out using binary logistic regression. RESULTS The average age of EPF patients was 31.4 years; 55% were men; 60% presented the generalized clinical variant. Non-compliance with the treatment was seen in 57.1% of the patients. Thirty-five percent presented complications (e.g. pyodermitis and pyelonephritis) during treatment. The risk factors for developing complications during treatment were non-compliance with the treatment and having the generalized clinical form. In the EPV group, the average age was 21.7 years; 71.4% were men. All patients presented with the mucocutaneous clinical variant and the initial presentation consisted of oral mucosa lesions; 71.4% presented complications during treatment, pyodermitis being the most frequent. CONCLUSIONS Non-compliance with the treatment and the generalized clinical form are risk factors for the development of complications during treatment of patients with EPF. Peru indeed has EPV cases with epidemiologic characteristics similar to EPF. Living in a rural area may represent a risk factor for the development of complications during treatment of patients with EPV. PMID:23197201

  18. Socioeconomic status and chronic child malnutrition: Wealth and maternal education matter more in the Peruvian Andes than nationally.

    PubMed

    Urke, Helga B; Bull, Torill; Mittelmark, Maurice B

    2011-10-01

    This study investigated the association of parents' socioeconomic status (SES) with child stunting in the Peruvian Andes and in Peru nationally. It was hypothesized that the relationship of SES to child stunting would be weaker in the Andean compared with the national sample. This is consistent with earlier research indicating that the relationship of SES to health may be weak in poor regions. The data were from the Demographic and Health Survey 2004 to 2006. Two samples of children 3 to 60 months old were compared: a national sample (n = 1426) and an Andean sample (n = 543). Malnutrition was measured using the indicator "stunting," which is small stature for age. Socioeconomic status was measured using parental education, occupation, and household wealth index (WI). In both samples, SES was significantly related to stunting. The odds of stunting in the poorest WI quintile were significantly higher than in the richest quintile. The same pattern was observed in children of mothers having incomplete primary education compared with children of mothers having complete secondary or higher education. The odds of stunting were significantly lower in children of mothers working at home compared with mothers in professional occupations. The associations of WI and maternal education with stunting were significantly stronger in the Andean compared with the national sample; the study did not find support for the hypothesis. Even in very poor regions such as the Andes, SES may be associated with child health, suggesting the importance of public health measures to overcome the health disadvantages experienced by children living in low SES households.

  19. Birds of Two Oceans? Trans-Andean and Divergent Migration of Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger cinerascens) from the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Lisa C; Goodenough, Katharine S; Haugaasen, Torbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal flooding compels some birds that breed in aquatic habitats in Amazonia to undertake annual migrations, yet we know little about how the complex landscape of the Amazon region is used seasonally by these species. The possibility of trans-Andes migration for Amazonian breeding birds has largely been discounted given the high geographic barrier posed by the Andean Cordillera and the desert habitat along much of the Pacific Coast. Here we demonstrate a trans-Andes route for Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger cinerascens) breeding on the Manu River (in the lowlands of Manu National Park, Perú), as well as divergent movement patterns both regionally and across the continent. Of eight skimmers tracked with satellite telemetry, three provided data on their outbound migrations, with two crossing the high Peruvian Andes to the Pacific. A third traveled over 1800 km to the southeast before transmissions ended in eastern Paraguay. One of the two trans-Andean migrants demonstrated a full round-trip migration back to its tagging location after traveling down the Pacific Coast from latitude 9° South to latitude 37° S, spending the austral summer in the Gulf of Arauco, Chile. This is the first documentation of a trans-Andes migration observed for any bird breeding in lowland Amazonia. To our knowledge, this research also documents the first example of a tropical-breeding waterbird migrating out of the tropics to spend the non-breeding season in the temperate summer, this being the reverse pattern with respect to seasonality for austral migrants in general. PMID:26760301

  20. Does spatial variation in environmental conditions affect recruitment? A study using a 3-D model of Peruvian anchovy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yi; Rose, Kenneth A.; Chai, Fei; Chavez, Francisco P.; Ayón, Patricia

    2015-11-01

    We used a 3-dimensional individual-based model (3-D IBM) of Peruvian anchovy to examine how spatial variation in environmental conditions affects larval and juvenile growth and survival, and recruitment. Temperature, velocity, and phytoplankton and zooplankton concentrations generated from a coupled hydrodynamic Nutrients-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) model, mapped to a three dimensional rectangular grid, were used to simulate anchovy populations. The IBM simulated individuals as they progressed from eggs to recruitment at 10 cm. Eggs and yolk-sac larvae were followed hourly through the processes of development, mortality, and movement (advection), and larvae and juveniles were followed daily through the processes of growth, mortality, and movement (advection plus behavior). A bioenergetics model was used to grow larvae and juveniles. The NPZD model provided prey fields which influence both food consumption rate as well as behavior mediated movement with individuals going to grids cells having optimal growth conditions. We compared predicted recruitment for monthly cohorts for 1990 through 2004 between the full 3-D IBM and a point (0-D) model that used spatially-averaged environmental conditions. The 3-D and 0-D versions generated similar interannual patterns in monthly recruitment for 1991-2004, with the 3-D results yielding consistently higher survivorship. Both versions successfully captured the very poor recruitment during the 1997-1998 El Niño event. Higher recruitment in the 3-D simulations was due to higher survival during the larval stage resulting from individuals searching for more favorable temperatures that lead to faster growth rates. The strong effect of temperature was because both model versions provided saturating food conditions for larval and juvenile anchovies. We conclude with a discussion of how explicit treatment of spatial variation affected simulated recruitment, other examples of fisheries modeling analyses that have used a

  1. Nutrient limitation in rainforests and cloud forests along a 3,000-m elevation gradient in the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Joshua B; Malhi, Yadvinder; Torres, Israel Cuba; Metcalfe, Daniel B; van de Weg, Martine J; Meir, Patrick; Silva-Espejo, Javier E; Huasco, Walter Huaraca

    2013-07-01

    We report results from a large-scale nutrient fertilization experiment along a "megadiverse" (154 unique species were included in the study) 3,000-m elevation transect in the Peruvian Andes and adjacent lowland Amazonia. Our objectives were to test if nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) limitation shift along this elevation gradient, and to determine how an alleviation of nutrient limitation would manifest in ecosystem changes. Tree height decreased with increasing elevation, but leaf area index (LAI) and diameter at breast height (DBH) did not vary with elevation. Leaf N:P decreased with increasing elevation (from 24 at 200 m to 11 at 3,000 m), suggesting increased N limitation and decreased P limitation with increasing elevation. After 4 years of fertilization (N, P, N + P), plots at the lowland site (200 m) fertilized with N + P showed greater relative growth rates in DBH than did the control plots; no significant differences were evident at the 1,000 m site, and plots fertilized with N at the highest elevation sites (1,500, 3,000 m) showed greater relative growth rates in DBH than did the control plots, again suggesting increased N constraint with elevation. Across elevations in general N fertilization led to an increase in microbial respiration, while P and N + P addition led to an increase in root respiration and corresponding decrease in hyphal respiration. There was no significant canopy response (LAI, leaf nutrients) to fertilization, suggesting that photosynthetic capacity was not N or P limited in these ecosystems. In sum, our study significantly advances ecological understanding of nutrient cycling and ecosystem response in a region where our collective knowledge and data are sparse: we demonstrate N limitation in high elevation tropical montane forests, N and P co-limitation in lowland Amazonia, and a nutrient limitation response manifested not in canopy changes, but rather in stem and belowground changes. PMID:23180422

  2. Health, healthcare access, and use of traditional versus modern medicine in remote Peruvian Amazon communities: a descriptive study of knowledge, attitudes, and practices.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Jonathan; Ramirez, Ronald; Wingfield, Tom

    2015-04-01

    There is an urgent need for healthcare research, funding, and infrastructure in the Peruvian Amazon. We performed a descriptive study of health, health knowledge and practice, and healthcare access of 13 remote communities of the Manatí and Amazon Rivers in northeastern Peru. Eighty-five adults attending a medical boat service were interviewed to collect data on socioeconomic position, health, diagnosed illnesses, pain, healthcare access, and traditional versus modern medicine use. In this setting, poverty and gender inequality were prevalent, and healthcare access was limited by long distances to the health post and long waiting times. There was a high burden of reported pain (mainly head and musculoskeletal) and chronic non-communicable diseases, such as hypertension (19%). Nearly all participants felt that they did not completely understand their diagnosed illnesses and wanted to know more. Participants preferred modern over traditional medicine, predominantly because of mistrust or lack of belief in traditional medicine. Our findings provide novel evidence concerning transitional health beliefs, hidden pain, and chronic non-communicable disease prevalence in marginalized communities of the Peruvian Amazon. Healthcare provision was limited by a breach between health education, knowledge, and access. Additional participatory research with similar rural populations is required to inform regional healthcare policy and decision-making.

  3. A ~13,000 year history of glacial variability in the tropical Andes recorded in lake sediments from the Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stansell, N. D.; Rodbell, D. T.; Mark, B. G.; Sedlak, C. M.

    2012-04-01

    Pro-glacial lake sediments from Peru contain continuous records of climatic variability spanning the Holocene. Here we present results from multiple alpine lake basins along an east-west transect through the Peruvian Andes that contain high-resolution records of clastic sediment variability for the last ~13,000 years. Radiocarbon-dated sediment cores were measured by scanning X-ray Fluorescence, and for magnetic susceptibility, carbon content, biogenic silica and calcium carbonate concentrations. Samples of bedrock and sediments from glacial moraines in the watersheds were analyzed using ICP-MS in order to fingerprint and trace the source of glacial sediments deposited in the lakes. Preliminary results indicate that glaciers retreated after after ~13,000 cal yr BP and remained less extensive during the remaining late Glacial Stage and early Holocene. Gradually increasing clastic sediments through most of the remaining Holocene indicate that glaciers became progressively larger, or more erosive, during the last ~10,000 years. This overall Holocene trend of increasing glacier extent was interrupted by a pronounced decrease in clastic sediments from ~2500 to 550 cal yr BP, and glaciers then advanced again during the Little Ice Age (~550 to 70 cal yr BP). Periods of ice advance in the Peruvian Andes generally correspond to times of increased moisture-balance and lower temperatures that are recorded in other regional, terrestrial proxy records.

  4. Peruvian and globally reported amino acid substitutions on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrazinamidase suggest a conserved pattern of mutations associated to pyrazinamide resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zimic, Mirko; Sheen, Patricia; Quiliano, Miguel; Gutierrez, Andrés; Gilman, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to pyrazinamide in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is usually associated with a reduction of pyrazinamidase activity caused by mutations in pncA, the pyrazinamidase coding gene. Pyrazinamidase is a hydrolase that converts pyrazinamide, the antituberculous drug against the latent stage, to the active compound, pyrazinoic acid. To better understand the relationship between pncA mutations and pyrazinamide-resistance, it is necessary to analyze the distribution of pncA mutations from pyrazinamide resistant strains. We determined the distribution of Peruvian and globally reported pncA missense mutations from M. tuberculosis clinical isolates resistant to pyrazinamide. The distributions of the single amino acid substitutions were compared at the secondary-structure-domains level. The distribution of the Peruvian mutations followed a similar pattern as the mutations reported globally. A consensus clustering of mutations was observed in hot-spot regions located in the metal coordination site and to a lesser extent in the active site of the enzyme. The data was not able to reject the null hypothesis that both distributions are similar, suggesting that pncA mutations associated to pyrazinamide resistance in M. tuberculosis, follow a conserved pattern responsible to impair the pyrazinamidase activity. PMID:19963078

  5. Health, Healthcare Access, and Use of Traditional Versus Modern Medicine in Remote Peruvian Amazon Communities: A Descriptive Study of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Jonathan; Ramirez, Ronald; Wingfield, Tom

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for healthcare research, funding, and infrastructure in the Peruvian Amazon. We performed a descriptive study of health, health knowledge and practice, and healthcare access of 13 remote communities of the Manatí and Amazon Rivers in northeastern Peru. Eighty-five adults attending a medical boat service were interviewed to collect data on socioeconomic position, health, diagnosed illnesses, pain, healthcare access, and traditional versus modern medicine use. In this setting, poverty and gender inequality were prevalent, and healthcare access was limited by long distances to the health post and long waiting times. There was a high burden of reported pain (mainly head and musculoskeletal) and chronic non-communicable diseases, such as hypertension (19%). Nearly all participants felt that they did not completely understand their diagnosed illnesses and wanted to know more. Participants preferred modern over traditional medicine, predominantly because of mistrust or lack of belief in traditional medicine. Our findings provide novel evidence concerning transitional health beliefs, hidden pain, and chronic non-communicable disease prevalence in marginalized communities of the Peruvian Amazon. Healthcare provision was limited by a breach between health education, knowledge, and access. Additional participatory research with similar rural populations is required to inform regional healthcare policy and decision-making. PMID:25688165

  6. A combined XRF/Monte Carlo simulation study of multilayered Peruvian metal artifacts from the tomb of the Priestess of Chornancap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, Antonio; Fabian, Julio; La Torre, Carlos Wester; Schiavon, Nick

    2016-06-01

    An innovative methodological approach based on XRF measurements using a polychromatic X-ray beam combined with simulation tests based on an ultra-fast custom-made Monte Carlo code has been used to characterize the bulk chemical composition of restored (i.e., cleaned) and unrestored multilayered Peruvian metallic artifacts belonging to the twelfth- and thirteenth-century AD funerary complex of Chornancap-Chotuna in northern Peru. The multilayered structure was represented by a metal substrate covered by surface corrosion patinas and/or a layer from past protective treatments. The aim of the study was to assess whether this new approach could be used to overcome some of the limitations highlighted in previous research performed using monochromatic X-ray beam on patina-free and protective treatment-free metal artifacts in obtaining reliable data both on the composition on the bulk metals and on surface layers thickness. Results from the analytical campaign have led to a reformulation of previous hypotheses about the structure and composition of the metal used to create the Peruvian artifacts under investigation.

  7. Assessing the impact of public health interventions on the transmission of pandemic H1N1 influenza a virus aboard a Peruvian navy ship

    PubMed Central

    Vera, Delphis M; Hora, Ricardo A; Murillo, Anarina; Wong, Juan F; Torre, Armando J; Wang, David; Boulay, Darbi; Hancock, Kathy; Katz, Jacqueline M; Ramos, Mariana; Loayza, Luis; Quispe, Jose; Reaves, Erik J; Bausch, Daniel G; Chowell, Gerardo; Montgomery, Joel M

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited data exist on transmission dynamics and effectiveness of control measures for influenza in confined settings. Objectives To investigate the transmission dynamics of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A outbreak aboard a Peruvian Navy ship and quantify the effectiveness of the implemented control measures. Methods We used surveillance data and a simple stochastic epidemic model to characterize and evaluate the effectiveness of control interventions implemented during an outbreak of 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A aboard a Peruvian Navy ship. Results The serological attack rate for the outbreak was 49·1%, with younger cadets and low-ranking officers at greater risk of infection than older, higher-ranking officers. Our transmission model yielded a good fit to the daily time series of new influenza cases by date of symptom onset. We estimated a reduction of 54·4% in the reproduction number during the period of intense control interventions. Conclusion Our results indicate that the patient isolation strategy and other control measures put in place during the outbreak reduced the infectiousness of isolated individuals by 86·7%. Our findings support that early implementation of control interventions can limit the spread of influenza epidemics in confined settings. PMID:24506160

  8. Synthesis and absolute configuration of a new 3,4-dihydro-beta-carboline-type alkaloid, 3,4-dehydro-5(S)-5-carboxystrictosidine, isolated from Peruvian Uña de Gato (Uncaria tomentosa).

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Mariko; Yokoya, Masashi; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Aimi, Norio

    2002-10-01

    The structure including the absolute configuration of a new glucoalkaloid, 3,4-dehydro-5(S)-5-carboxystrictosidine, isolated from Peruvian Uña de Gato (Cat's Claw, original plant: Uncaria tomentosa), was confirmed by synthesis starting from secologanin and L-tryptophan.

  9. Snow and glaciers in the tropics: the importance of snowfall level and snow line altitude in the Peruvian Cordilleras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauwecker, Simone; Rohrer, Mario; Huggel, Christian; Salzmann, Nadine; Montoya, Nilton; Endries, Jason; Perry, Baker

    2016-04-01

    The snow line altitude, defined as the line separating snow from ice or firn surfaces, is among the most important parameters in the glacier mass and energy balance of tropical glaciers, since it determines net shortwave radiation via surface albedo. Therefore, hydroglaciological models require estimations of the melting layer during precipitation events, as well as parameterisations of the transient snow line. Typically, the height of the melting layer is implemented by simple air temperature extrapolation techniques, using data from nearby meteorological stations and constant lapse rates. Nonetheless, in the Peruvian mountain ranges, stations at the height of glacier tongues (>5000 m asl.) are scarce and the extrapolation techniques must use data from distant and much lower elevated stations, which need prior careful validation. Thus, reliable snowfall level and snow line altitude estimates from multiple data sets are necessary. Here, we assemble and analyse data from multiple sources (remote sensing, in-situ station data, reanalysis data) in order to assess their applicability in estimating both, the melting layer and snow line altitude. We especially focus on the potential of radar bright band data from TRMM and CloudSat satellite data for its use as a proxy for the snow/rain transition height. As expected for tropical regions, the seasonal and regional variability in the snow line altitude is comparatively low. During the course of the dry season, Landsat satellite as well as webcam images show that the transient snow line is generally increasing, interrupted by light snowfall or graupel events with low precipitation amounts and fast decay rates. We show limitations and possibilities of different data sources as well as their applicability to validate temperature extrapolation methods. Further on, we analyse the implications of the relatively low variability in seasonal snow line altitude on local glacier mass balance gradients. We show that the snow line

  10. Changes in N:P stoichiometry influence taxonomic composition and nutritional quality of phytoplankton in the Peruvian upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauss, Helena; Franz, Jasmin M. S.; Sommer, Ulrich

    2012-10-01

    Inorganic dissolved macronutrient (nitrogen, N, and phosphorus, P) supply to surface waters in the eastern tropical South Pacific is influenced by expanding oxygen minimum zones, since N loss occurs due to microbial processes under anoxic conditions while P is increasingly released from the shelf sediments. To investigate the impact of decreasing N:P supply ratios in the Peruvian Upwelling, we conducted nutrient manipulation experiments using a shipboard mesocosm setup with a natural phytoplankton community. In a first experiment, either N or P or no nutrients were added with mesozooplankton present or absent. In a second experiment, initial nutrient concentrations were adjusted to four N:P ratios ranging from 2.5 to 16 using two "high N" and two "high P" levels in combination (i.e., + N, + P, + N and P, no addition). Over six and seven days, respectively, microalgal biomass development as well as nutrient uptake was monitored. Phytoplankton biomass strongly responded to N addition, in both mesozooplankton-grazed and not grazed treatments. The developing diatom bloom in the "high N" exceeded that in the "low N" treatments by a factor of two. No modulation of the total biomass by P-addition was observed, however, species-specific responses were more variable. Notably, some organisms were able to benefit from low N:P fertilization ratios, especially Heterosigma sp. and Phaeocystis globosa which are notorious for forming blooms that are toxic or inadequate for mesozooplankton nutrition. After the decline of the diatom bloom, the relative contribution of unsaturated fatty acid to the lipid content of seston was positively correlated to diatom biomass in the peak bloom, indicating that positive effects of diatom blooms on food quality of the protist community to higher trophic levels remain even after the phytoplankton biomass was incorporated by grazers. Our results indicate an overall N-limitation of the system, especially in the case of dominating diatoms, which were

  11. Reactive Halogen Species in the Marine Boundary Layer: A Comparision of the Mauretanian and the Peruvian upwelling regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, Johannes; Tschritter, Jens; Pöhler, Denis; Großmann, Katja; Horbanski, Martin; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS) such as bromine oxide (BrO) or iodine oxide (IO) play a major role in the chemistry of ozone in both, the troposphere, and the stratosphere and possibly influence the ozone budget on a global scale. In order to estimate the amount of RHS release from marine sources DOAS measurements in three different upwelling regions (Mauritanian, African equatorial and Peruvian) as well as long-term-observations at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO) were performed within the SOPRAN Project (BMBF Förderkennzeichen 03F0611F). In 2010 the HaloCaVe campaign with a set of DOAS instruments on the CVAO and RV Poseidon allowed for an intercomparision of Long-Path-DOAS (LP), Multi-Axis-DOAS (MAX) and Cavity-Enhanced-DOAS (CE) measurements on shore as well as for extending these observations to a larger area with the simultaneous ship-borne MAX-DOAS measurements during the DRIVE campaign from Gran Canaria to Cape Verde and back along the mauretanian coast. A re-evaluation of the entire data set is presented. LP- and MAX-DOAS observations show significant BrO concentrations of several ppt with strong variations from day to day and a diurnal cycle with a maximum at sunrise and sunset and a minimum during noon. In opposite to previous measurements, IO was below the detection limit of 0.5 ppt for the LP-DOAS and CE-DOAS instrument. From the ship (DRIVE campaign) locally restricted BrO hotspots with mixing ratios of up to 10ppt were observed in the Mauritanian costal upwelling. These findings allow new conclusions on the relevance of halogens on this marine environment which will be presented. Within the SOPRAN cruise M91 on RV Meteor the upwelling region along the coast of Peru has been investigated in December 2012. First results from MAX-DOAS and CE-DOAS measurements will be presented and compared to those from the Atlantic. Both instruments measured NO2, IO and glyoxal mixing ratios, the MAX-DOAS additionally BrO and formaldehyde. We observed

  12. Association between Human Papillomavirus and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus in Indigenous Women from the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Patricia J.; Carcamo, Cesar; Montano, Silvia M.; Muñante, Ricardo; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Background No association between the Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV), an oncogenic virus that alters host immunity, and the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has previously been reported. Examining the association between these two viruses may permit the identification of a population at increased risk for developing cervical cancer. Methods and Findings Between July 2010 and February 2011, we conducted a cross-sectional study among indigenous Amazonian Peruvian women from the Shipibo-Konibo ethnic group, a group with endemic HTLV infection. We recruited women between 15 and 39 years of age who were living in the cities of Lima and Ucayali. Our objectives were to determine the association between HTLV and: (i) HPV infection of any type, and (ii) high-risk HPV type infection. Sexually active Shipibo-Konibo women were screened for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infections. All HTLV-1 or -2 positive women, along with two community-matched HTLV negative sexually active Shipibo-Konibo controls were later tested for the presence of HPV DNA, conventional cytology, and HIV. We screened 1,253 Shipibo-Konibo women, observing a prevalence of 5.9% (n = 74) for HTLV-1 and 3.8% (n = 47) for HTLV-2 infections. We enrolled 62 (60.8%) HTLV-1 positive women, 40 (39.2%) HTLV-2 positive women, and 205 community-matched HTLV negative controls. HTLV-1 infection was strongly associated with HPV infection of any type (43.6% vs. 29.3%; Prevalence Ratio (PR): 2.10, 95% CI: 1.53–2.87), and with high-risk HPV infection (32.3% vs. 22.4%; PR: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.04–3.59). HTLV-2 was not significantly associated with either of these HPV infections. Conclusions HTLV-1 infection was associated with HPV infection of any type and with high-risk HPV infection. Future longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate the incidence of high-risk HPV infection as well as the incidence of cervical neoplasia among HTLV-1 positive women. PMID:22952937

  13. Tomographic imaging of the effects of Peruvian flat slab subduction on the Nazca slab and surrounding mantle under central and southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scire, A. C.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Bishop, B.; Biryol, C. B.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    The modern central Peruvian Andes are dominated by a laterally extensive region of flat slab subduction. The Peruvian flat slab extends for ~1500 km along the strike of the Andes, correlating with the subduction of the Nazca Ridge in the south and the theorized Inca Plateau in the north. We have used data from the CAUGHT and PULSE experiments for finite frequency teleseismic P- and S-wave tomography to image the Nazca slab in the upper mantle below 95 km depth under central Peru between 10°S and 18°S as well as the surrounding mantle. Since the slab inboard of the subducting Nazca Ridge is mostly aseismic, our results provide important constraints on the geometry of the subducting Nazca slab in this region. Our images of the Nazca slab suggest that steepening of the slab inboard of the subducting Nazca Ridge locally occurs ~100 km further inland than was indicated in previous studies. The region where we have imaged the steepening of the Nazca slab inboard of the Nazca Ridge correlates with the location of the Fitzcarrald Arch, a long wavelength upper plate topographic feature which has been suggested to be a consequence of ridge subduction. When the slab steepens inboard of the flat slab region, it does so at a very steep (~70°) angle. The transition from the Peruvian flat slab to the more normally dipping slab south of 16°S below Bolivia is characterized by an abrupt bending of the slab anomaly in the mantle in response to the shift from flat to normal subduction. The slab anomaly appears to be intact south of the Nazca Ridge with no evidence for tearing of the slab in response to the abrupt change in slab dip. A potential tear in the slab is inferred from an observed offset in the slab anomaly north of the Nazca Ridge extending subparallel to the ridge axis between 130 and 300 km depth. A high amplitude (-5-6%) slow S-wave velocity anomaly is observed below the projection of the Nazca Ridge. This anomaly appears to be laterally confined to the mantle

  14. Late Quaternary Glaciations in the Central Peruvian Andes (10°-11°S) and Evidence for a Link to Heinrich Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Farber, D. L.; Finkel, R. C.; Rodbell, D. T.; Seltzer, G. O.

    2009-05-01

    Seven cosmogenic 10Be ages from a moraine in the Santuario Nacional Bosque de Piedras de Huayllay (BP) in the Western Cordillera of the central Peruvian Andes (10°59'S, 76°20'W, 4180-4200 masl) are consistent with 10Be ages on moraines in both the Eastern Cordillera (40-45 km to the east) and Nevado Jeulla Rajo (NJR) massif (10°00'S, 77°16'W) at the southern end of the Cordillera Blanca (150 km to the northwest). In the BP, 10Be ages are ~14-15 ka on four ignimbrite boulders, ~26 and ~20 ka on two quartz boulders, and ~45 ka on ignimbrite bedrock below the trimline in the valley wall. In the Eastern Cordillera bordering Lake Junin, the most extensive glaciations are >150 ka, but end moraines farther upvalley date to the local last glacial maximum (LLGM; 25-30 ka) and a late-glacial stillstand or readvance (14-18 ka). In NJR, 10Be ages indicate that the largest lateral moraines were deposited during similar intervals (27-32 ka and 14-18 ka). Avulsion of a glacial valley preserved an older, smaller pair of lateral moraines (56-65 ka) in NJR; correlative moraines were apparently not preserved in the Junin valleys. We have found no moraines in NJR that date to the global LGM (ca. 19-24 ka), but see some evidence for an advance ca. 40-48 ka. Outwash deposits (ca. 43-50 ka) located beyond the termini of NJR moraines are underlain by lodgement till that extends ca. 6 km across the Conococha Plain, suggesting that at least one older glaciation was far more extensive than any of the late Quaternary NJR advances dated by 10Be (ages calculated using CRONUS-Earth Online Calculator v. 2.2, Lal/Stone time-dependent scaling, and zero erosion). The timing of glacial advances in the central Peruvian Andes since 70 ka suggests a correlation to Heinrich events and associated southward shifts of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the Atlantic Ocean. We propose that Peruvian glaciers typically expanded when southward migration of the ITCZ resulted in increased

  15. Review of antiviral and immunomodulating properties of plants of the Peruvian rainforest with a particular emphasis on Una de Gato and Sangre de Grado.

    PubMed

    Williams, J E

    2001-12-01

    Viral diseases, including emerging and chronic viruses, are an increasing worldwide health concern. As a consequence, the discovery of new antiviral agents from plants has assumed more urgency than in the past. A number of native Amazonian medicines of plant origin are known to have antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity, although only a few have been studied for their antiviral properties and immunomodulating effects. Those most studied include: Sangre de Grado (drago) (Croton lechleri) in the Euphorbiaceae family and Una de Gato (Uncaria tomentosa) in the Rubiaceae family. This article reviews the chemical composition, pharmacological properties, state of current research, clinical use, and potential antiviral and immunomodulating activity of these and other plants from the Peruvian Amazon.

  16. A cosmogenic 10Be chronology for the local last glacial maximum and termination in the Cordillera Oriental, southern Peruvian Andes: Implications for the tropical role in global climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Hall, Brenda L.; Rademaker, Kurt M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Todd, Claire E.; Hegland, Matthew; Winckler, Gisela; Jackson, Margaret S.; Strand, Peter D.

    2016-09-01

    Resolving patterns of tropical climate variability during and since the last glacial maximum (LGM) is fundamental to assessing the role of the tropics in global change, both on ice-age and sub-millennial timescales. Here, we present a10Be moraine chronology from the Cordillera Carabaya (14.3°S), a sub-range of the Cordillera Oriental in southern Peru, covering the LGM and the first half of the last glacial termination. Additionally, we recalculate existing 10Be ages using a new tropical high-altitude production rate in order to put our record into broader spatial context. Our results indicate that glaciers deposited a series of moraines during marine isotope stage 2, broadly synchronous with global glacier maxima, but that maximum glacier extent may have occurred prior to stage 2. Thereafter, atmospheric warming drove widespread deglaciation of the Cordillera Carabaya. A subsequent glacier resurgence culminated at ∼16,100 yrs, followed by a second period of glacier recession. Together, the observed deglaciation corresponds to Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1: ∼18,000-14,600 yrs), during which pluvial lakes on the adjacent Peruvian-Bolivian altiplano rose to their highest levels of the late Pleistocene as a consequence of southward displacement of the inter-tropical convergence zone and intensification of the South American summer monsoon. Deglaciation in the Cordillera Carabaya also coincided with the retreat of higher-latitude mountain glaciers in the Southern Hemisphere. Our findings suggest that HS1 was characterised by atmospheric warming and indicate that deglaciation of the southern Peruvian Andes was driven by rising temperatures, despite increased precipitation. Recalculated 10Be data from other tropical Andean sites support this model. Finally, we suggest that the broadly uniform response during the LGM and termination of the glaciers examined here involved equatorial Pacific sea-surface temperature anomalies and propose a framework for testing the viability

  17. Biological nitrate transport in sediments on the Peruvian margin mitigates benthic sulfide emissions and drives pelagic N loss during stagnation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, A. W.; Sommer, S.; Lomnitz, U.; Bourbonnais, A.; Wallmann, K.

    2016-06-01

    Benthic N cycling in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) was investigated at ten stations along 12 °S from the middle shelf (74 m) to the upper slope (1024 m) using in situ flux measurements, sediment biogeochemistry and modeling. Middle shelf sediments were covered by mats of the filamentous bacteria Thioploca spp. and contained a large 'hidden' pool of nitrate that was not detectable in the porewater. This was attributed to a biological nitrate reservoir stored within the bacteria to oxidize sulfide during 'dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium' (DNRA). The extremely high rates of DNRA on the shelf (15.6 mmol m-2 d-1 of N), determined using an empirical steady-state model, could easily supply all the ammonium requirements for anammox in the water column. The model further showed that denitrification by foraminifera may account for 90% of N2 production at the lower edge of the OMZ. At the time of sampling, dissolved oxygen was below detection limit down to 400 m and the water body overlying the shelf had stagnated, resulting in complete depletion of nitrate and nitrite. A decrease in the biological nitrate pool was observed on the shelf during fieldwork concomitant with a rise in porewater sulfide levels in surface sediments to 2 mM. Using a non-steady state model to simulate this natural anoxia experiment, these observations were shown to be consistent with Thioploca surviving on a dwindling intracellular nitrate reservoir to survive the stagnation period. The model shows that sediments hosting Thioploca are able to maintain high ammonium fluxes for many weeks following stagnation, potentially sustaining pelagic N loss by anammox. In contrast, sulfide emissions remain low, reducing the economic risk to the Peruvian fishery by toxic sulfide plume development.

  18. An Allometric Modelling Approach to Identify the Optimal Body Shape Associated with, and Differences between Brazilian and Peruvian Youth Motor Performance

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Simonete; Bustamante, Alcibíades; Nevill, Alan; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Freitas, Duarte; Prista, António; Maia, José

    2016-01-01

    Children from developed and developing countries differ in their body size and shape due to marked differences across their life history caused by social, economic and cultural differences which are also linked to their motor performance (MP). We used allometric models to identify size/shape characteristics associated with MP tests between Brazilian and Peruvian schoolchildren. A total of 4,560 subjects, 2,385 girls and 2,175 boys aged 9–15 years were studied. Height and weight were measured; biological maturation was estimated with the maturity offset technique; MP measures included the 12 minute run (12MR), handgrip strength (HG), standing long jump (SLJ) and the shuttle run speed (SR) tests; physical activity (PA) was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. A multiplicative allometric model was adopted to adjust for body size differences across countries. Reciprocal ponderal index (RPI) was found to be the most suitable body shape indicator associated with the 12MR, SLJ, HG and SR performance. A positive maturation offset parameter was also associated with a better performance in SLJ, HG and SR tests. Sex differences were found in all motor tests. Brazilian youth showed better scores in MP than their Peruvian peers, even when controlling for their body size differences The current study identified the key body size associated with four body mass-dependent MP tests. Biological maturation and PA were associated with strength and motor performance. Sex differences were found in all motor tests, as well as across countries favoring Brazilian children even when accounting for their body size/shape differences. PMID:26939118

  19. An Allometric Modelling Approach to Identify the Optimal Body Shape Associated with, and Differences between Brazilian and Peruvian Youth Motor Performance.

    PubMed

    Silva, Simonete; Bustamante, Alcibíades; Nevill, Alan; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Freitas, Duarte; Prista, António; Maia, José

    2016-01-01

    Children from developed and developing countries differ in their body size and shape due to marked differences across their life history caused by social, economic and cultural differences which are also linked to their motor performance (MP). We used allometric models to identify size/shape characteristics associated with MP tests between Brazilian and Peruvian schoolchildren. A total of 4,560 subjects, 2,385 girls and 2,175 boys aged 9-15 years were studied. Height and weight were measured; biological maturation was estimated with the maturity offset technique; MP measures included the 12 minute run (12MR), handgrip strength (HG), standing long jump (SLJ) and the shuttle run speed (SR) tests; physical activity (PA) was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. A multiplicative allometric model was adopted to adjust for body size differences across countries. Reciprocal ponderal index (RPI) was found to be the most suitable body shape indicator associated with the 12MR, SLJ, HG and SR performance. A positive maturation offset parameter was also associated with a better performance in SLJ, HG and SR tests. Sex differences were found in all motor tests. Brazilian youth showed better scores in MP than their Peruvian peers, even when controlling for their body size differences The current study identified the key body size associated with four body mass-dependent MP tests. Biological maturation and PA were associated with strength and motor performance. Sex differences were found in all motor tests, as well as across countries favoring Brazilian children even when accounting for their body size/shape differences. PMID:26939118

  20. Turnover and storage of soil organic carbon from different land uses on an elevation gradient in the Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Viktoria; Kala, Jose; Lever, Rebecca; Oliveras, Imma; Arn Teh, Yit

    2015-04-01

    Tropical soils account for a third of global soil C and play a critical role in regulating atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The continuing fast rates of deforestation in the tropics for agricultural expansion and subsequent abandonment of new land uses are of particular interest to the science of soil C because of the associated C losses and potential for C sequestration. This study seeks to improve understanding of soil C stock changes within managed land in different ecosystems over a 2600 m gradient in the south-eastern Peruvian Andes. Using a density fractionation technique and natural abundance isotopes, the effects of the diverse range of local land use changes on 23 sites were investigated: grazing and burning on high altitude montane grasslands; burning in montane cloud forests; agricultural practices (cultivated and abandoned banana plantations, pastures of different grazing intensity), selective logging and secondary forest succession in the premontane forests. Overall, the montane grasslands and montane cloud forest had very similar soil C stocks down to 30 cm (167 ± 12 and 162 ± 36 Mg C ha-1), with the premontane forest containing approximately 35 % less soil C (61 ± 2.5 Mg C ha-1). The majority of the soil C pool (75 %) was recovered in the mineral - associated density fraction, with the montane grasslands containing on average ~ 10 % less C in this fraction than the premontane soils. Burning and grazing in the montane grasslands had no significant influence on the total C stocks but the distribution of physical density fractions were altered, with significantly lower labile fractions and burning alone causing higher occluded LFs. Burning in the upper montane forest had no significant effect on soil C stocks, except on one of the sites, which may have been a result of burning intensity or site-specific micro climate differences. Agricultural practices in the premontane elevation showed variable results in both total soil C and its distribution within

  1. The time-space distribution of Eocene to Miocene magmatism in the central Peruvian polymetallic province and its metallogenetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissig, Thomas; Ullrich, Thomas D.; Tosdal, Richard M.; Friedman, Richard; Ebert, Shane

    2008-07-01

    Eocene to late Miocene magmatism in the central Peruvian high-plain (approx. between Cerro de Pasco and Huancayo; Lats. ˜10.2-12°S) and east of the Cordillera Occidental is represented by scattered shallow-level intrusions as well as subaerial domes and volcanic deposits. These igneous rocks are calc-alkalic and range from basalt to rhyolite in composition, and many of them are spatially, temporally and, by inference, genetically associated with varied styles of major polymetallic mineralization. Forty-four new 40Ar- 39Ar and three U/Pb zircon dates are presented, many for previously undated intrusions. Our new time constraints together with data from the literature now cover most of the Cenozoic igneous rocks of this Andean segment and provide foundation for geodynamic and metallogenetic research. The oldest Cenozoic bodies are of Eocene age and include dacitic domes to the west of Cerro de Pasco with ages ranging from 38.5 to 33.5 Ma. South of the Domo de Yauli structural dome, Eocene igneous rocks occur some 15 km east of the Cordillera Occidental and include a 39.34 ± 0.28 Ma granodioritic intrusion and a 40.14 ± 0.61 Ma rhyolite sill, whereas several diorite stocks were emplaced between 36 and 33 Ma. Eocene mineralization is restricted to the Quicay high-sulfidation epithermal deposit some 10 km to the west of Cerro de Pasco. Igneous activity in the earliest Oligocene was concentrated up to 70 km east of the Cordillera Occidental and is represented by a number of granodioritic intrusions in the Milpo-Atacocha area. Relatively voluminous early Oligocene dacitic to andesitic volcanism gave rise to the Astabamba Formation to the southeast of Domo de Yauli. Some stocks at Milpo and Atacocha generated important Zn-Pb (-Ag) skarn mineralization. After about 29.3 Ma, magmatism ceased throughout the study region. Late Oligocene igneous activity was restricted to andesitic and dacitic volcanic deposits and intrusions around Uchucchacua (approx. 25 Ma) and felsic

  2. Child Health in the Peruvian Amazon: Prevalence and Factors Associated with Referred Morbidity and Health Care Access in the City of Iñapari

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Maria Gabriela Silva; Braña, Athos Muniz; Oliart-Guzmán, Humberto; Branco, Fernando Luiz Cunha Castelo; Delfino, Breno Matos; Pereira, Thasciany Moraes; Mantovani, Saulo Augusto Silva; Martins, Antonio Camargo; Santos, Ana Paula; Filgueira-Júnior, José Alcântara; Ramalho, Alanderson Alves; Guimarães, Andreia da Silva; Oliveira, Cristieli Sérgio de Menezes; de Araújo, Thiago Santos; Estrada, Carlos Hermógenes Manrique de Lara; Arróspide, Nancy; da Silva-Nunes, Mônica

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Children under 5 years of age are more susceptible to developing morbidities such as diarrhea, respiratory infections, anemia, and malnutrition. The objective of the study is to evaluate the prevalence of reported morbidities in this age group in the city of Iñapari (Peru) and the access to health services in this municipality. Methods. Data collection using interviews that assessed socioeconomic and demographic conditions, child morbidity, and access to health services was performed in 2011. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0. Results. Regarding morbidities that occurred during lifetime, 39.8% reported previous anemia and intestinal parasite infection. About 53.7% of the children reported any type of morbidities in the last 15 days before interview, being most frequent respiratory symptoms (38.9%), diarrhea (23,4%), and fever (23,1%). Only 63.1% of those reporting recent morbidities sought health care. These morbidities were associated with precarious sanitation and lack of infrastructure, the presence of other comorbidities, and poor access to health services. Conclusion. The main referred morbidities in Amazonian Peruvian children were diarrhea, respiratory symptoms, anemia, and vomiting. Incentives and improvements in the health and sanitation conditions would be important measures to improve the quality of life of the Amazonian child population. PMID:26640493

  3. Surnames and genetic structure of a high-altitude Quechua community from the Ichu River Valley, Peruvian Central Andes, 1825-1914.

    PubMed

    Pettener, D; Pastor, S; Tarazona-Santos, E

    1998-10-01

    Changes in isolation, inbreeding, population subdivision, and isonymous relationships are examined in six Quechua communities from the upper valley of the Ichu River in the Peruvian Central Andes (3700 m). All marriages registered between 1825 and 1914 in the Parish of Santa Ana were analyzed. The data (1680 marriages) were divided into 2 periods (1825-1870 and 1871-1914) and into the 6 villages that constitute the parish. Endogamy rates are between 81% and 100%, indicating high levels of reproductive isolation. The inbreeding indicated by isonymy (Ft, Fr, and Fn) is lower than in other mountain populations studied. Isonymy values, calculated from the different surname combinations made possible by the Ibero-American Surnames System, indicate a strong rejection of consanguineous marriages, particularly between patrilineal relatives, in agreement with the parental structure typical of Andean populations. The comparison between observed and expected repeated-pair values reveals a moderate level of subdivision within populations, which could be related to cultural and socioeconomic factors. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling was used to investigate temporal changes in the isonymous relationships among the communities. The results reveal a decrease in the interpopulational variability measured by surnames, in agreement with an increase in exogamy. Surnames and data contained in historical and demographic records yield reliable information, and they can be used to reconstruct the biological history of Amerindian populations over the last few centuries.

  4. An evaluation study of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using recombinant protein Pap31 for detection of antibody against Bartonella bacilliformis infection among the Peruvian population.

    PubMed

    Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Atkins, Erin H; Romero, Sofia; Grieco, John; Chao, Chien Chung; Ching, Wei Mei

    2014-04-01

    Reliable laboratory testing is of great importance to detect Bartonella bacilliformis infection. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using recombinant protein Pap31 (rPap31) for the detection of antibodies against B. bacilliformis as compared with immunofluorescent assay (IFA). Of the 302 sera collected between 1997 and 2000 among an at-risk Peruvian population, 103 and 34 samples tested positive for IFA-immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IFA-IgM, respectively. By using Youden's index, the cutoff values of ELISA-IgG at 0.915 gave a sensitivity of 84.5% and specificity of 94%. The cutoff values of ELISA-IgM at 0.634 gave a sensitivity of 88.2% and specificity of 85.1%. Using latent class analysis, estimates of sensitivity and specificity of almost all the assays were slightly higher than those of a conventional method of calculation. The test is proved beneficial for discriminating between infected and non-infected individuals with the advantage of low-cost and high-throughput capability.

  5. When "health" is not enough: societal, individual and biomedical assessments of well-being among the Matsigenka of the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Carolina

    2005-08-01

    Although biomedical indicators of health status show that physical health for the Matsigenka of the Peruvian Amazon has significantly improved over the past 20-30 years, the Matsigenka perceive their health and well-being to have severely declined during this period. This discrepancy between empirical measures and local perceptions of health and well-being points to the central tension inherent in measuring and defining "health." While biomedical parameters of health are generally linked to notions of the body free of illness, measurable by physiological means, the Matsigenka define physical health as only one component of what it means to be healthy and to experience well-being. For the Matsigenka, notions of health and well-being are linked fundamentally to ideals about happiness, productivity and goodness, in addition to biomedical health. The Matsigenka attribute the decrease in their well-being to newly instigated sorcery and stressors resulting from outside influences and morality institutionalized by cultural "outsiders", such as missionaries, school teachers, health personnel, oil company employees and government officials. This article explores the relationships between biomedical, societal and personal assessments of health and well-being among the Matsigenka as they seek to preserve their sense of wellness in spite of their rapidly changing social and economic environment. By using longitudinal qualitative and quantitative ethnographic and health data, this paper shows that, for the Matsigenka, increases in acculturation and permanent settlement result in an alarming decrease in their health and well-being.

  6. The novel metalloproteinase atroxlysin-I from Peruvian Bothrops atrox (Jergón) snake venom acts both on blood vessel ECM and platelets.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Eladio F; Schneider, Francisco S; Yarleque, Armando; Borges, Marcia H; Richardson, Michael; Figueiredo, Suely G; Evangelista, Karla S; Eble, Johannes A

    2010-04-01

    We report the isolation and structure-function relationship of a 23kDa metalloproteinase named atroxlysin-I from the venom of the Peruvian Bothrops atrox (Jergón). Atroxlysin is a P-I metalloproteinase and contains 204 residues. Its proteolytic activity towards dimethylcasein is enhanced by Ca2+ but inhibited by EDTA, dithiothreitol, excessive Zn2+ and alpha2-macroglobulin. Unlike other structurally homologous P-I metalloproteinases, atroxlysin-I causes hemorrhages. To examine its hemorrhagic activity mechanistically, we studied its function in vitro and in vivo. It cleaved the Ala14-Leu15 and Tyr16-Leu17 bonds in oxidized insulin B-chain and specifically hydrolyzed the alpha-chains of fibrin(ogen) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Atroxlysin-I cleaved plasma fibronectin and other extracellular matrix proteins (collagens I and IV) and the triple-helical fragment CB3 of collagen IV, but did not degrade laminin-111. Complementarily, the laminin and collagen binding integrins alpha7beta1 and alpha1beta1 were cleaved by atroxlysin. Even without catalytic activity atroxlysin-I inhibited collagen- and ADP-triggered platelet aggregation. PMID:20102699

  7. Child Health in the Peruvian Amazon: Prevalence and Factors Associated with Referred Morbidity and Health Care Access in the City of Iñapari.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Maria Gabriela Silva; Braña, Athos Muniz; Oliart-Guzmán, Humberto; Branco, Fernando Luiz Cunha Castelo; Delfino, Breno Matos; Pereira, Thasciany Moraes; Mantovani, Saulo Augusto Silva; Martins, Antonio Camargo; Santos, Ana Paula; Filgueira-Júnior, José Alcântara; Ramalho, Alanderson Alves; Guimarães, Andreia da Silva; Oliveira, Cristieli Sérgio de Menezes; de Araújo, Thiago Santos; Estrada, Carlos Hermógenes Manrique de Lara; Arróspide, Nancy; da Silva-Nunes, Mônica

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Children under 5 years of age are more susceptible to developing morbidities such as diarrhea, respiratory infections, anemia, and malnutrition. The objective of the study is to evaluate the prevalence of reported morbidities in this age group in the city of Iñapari (Peru) and the access to health services in this municipality. Methods. Data collection using interviews that assessed socioeconomic and demographic conditions, child morbidity, and access to health services was performed in 2011. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0. Results. Regarding morbidities that occurred during lifetime, 39.8% reported previous anemia and intestinal parasite infection. About 53.7% of the children reported any type of morbidities in the last 15 days before interview, being most frequent respiratory symptoms (38.9%), diarrhea (23,4%), and fever (23,1%). Only 63.1% of those reporting recent morbidities sought health care. These morbidities were associated with precarious sanitation and lack of infrastructure, the presence of other comorbidities, and poor access to health services. Conclusion. The main referred morbidities in Amazonian Peruvian children were diarrhea, respiratory symptoms, anemia, and vomiting. Incentives and improvements in the health and sanitation conditions would be important measures to improve the quality of life of the Amazonian child population.

  8. Determinants of Caregivers' Use and Adoption of Household Water Chlorination: A Qualitative Study with Peri-urban Communities in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Jessica D.; Leontsini, Elli; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Surkan, Pamela J.; Kosek, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The gap between the efficacy and the effectiveness of household water treatment in reducing diarrhea-related morbidity indicates the need for a better understanding of the determinants of long-term behavior change. To explore the barriers to drinking water chlorination in the Peruvian Amazon, where diarrhea is endemic among under-5 children, we conducted qualitative research with 23 caregivers from peri-urban communities of Iquitos, Peru. Our inquiry drew on the Transtheoretical Model of behavior change and the Integrated Behavioral Model for Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene to identify the most relevant contextual, psychosocial, and technological determinants of initial action and long-term adoption of chlorination. Our findings suggest that the decision to try out this practice resulted from the combined effect of knowledge of chlorination benefits and product availability and affordability. Progress from action to adoption was influenced by caretakers' understanding of dosage, the packaging of chlorine products, knowledge and skills for multipurpose laundry bleach, the taste of treated water, and reinforcement. This analysis suggests that a focus on these determinants and the household domain may help to improve the sustainability of future intervention efforts. PMID:26175028

  9. Child Health in the Peruvian Amazon: Prevalence and Factors Associated with Referred Morbidity and Health Care Access in the City of Iñapari.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Maria Gabriela Silva; Braña, Athos Muniz; Oliart-Guzmán, Humberto; Branco, Fernando Luiz Cunha Castelo; Delfino, Breno Matos; Pereira, Thasciany Moraes; Mantovani, Saulo Augusto Silva; Martins, Antonio Camargo; Santos, Ana Paula; Filgueira-Júnior, José Alcântara; Ramalho, Alanderson Alves; Guimarães, Andreia da Silva; Oliveira, Cristieli Sérgio de Menezes; de Araújo, Thiago Santos; Estrada, Carlos Hermógenes Manrique de Lara; Arróspide, Nancy; da Silva-Nunes, Mônica

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Children under 5 years of age are more susceptible to developing morbidities such as diarrhea, respiratory infections, anemia, and malnutrition. The objective of the study is to evaluate the prevalence of reported morbidities in this age group in the city of Iñapari (Peru) and the access to health services in this municipality. Methods. Data collection using interviews that assessed socioeconomic and demographic conditions, child morbidity, and access to health services was performed in 2011. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0. Results. Regarding morbidities that occurred during lifetime, 39.8% reported previous anemia and intestinal parasite infection. About 53.7% of the children reported any type of morbidities in the last 15 days before interview, being most frequent respiratory symptoms (38.9%), diarrhea (23,4%), and fever (23,1%). Only 63.1% of those reporting recent morbidities sought health care. These morbidities were associated with precarious sanitation and lack of infrastructure, the presence of other comorbidities, and poor access to health services. Conclusion. The main referred morbidities in Amazonian Peruvian children were diarrhea, respiratory symptoms, anemia, and vomiting. Incentives and improvements in the health and sanitation conditions would be important measures to improve the quality of life of the Amazonian child population. PMID:26640493

  10. Exploration of Vanilla pompona from the Peruvian Amazon as a potential source of vanilla essence: quantification of phenolics by HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Maruenda, Helena; Vico, Maria del Lujan; Householder, J Ethan; Janovec, John P; Cañari, Cristhian; Naka, Angelica; Gonzalez, Ana E

    2013-05-01

    This study provides the first chemical investigation of wild-harvested fruits of Vanilla pompona ssp. grandiflora (Lindl.) Soto-Arenas developed in their natural habitat in the Peruvian Amazon. Flowers were hand-pollinated and the resulting fruits were analysed at different developmental stages using an HPLC-DAD method validated for the quantification of glucovanillin and seven other compounds. The method showed satisfactory linearity (r(2)>0.9969), precision (coefficient of variation <2%), recoveries (70-100%), limit of detection (0.008-0.212 μg/ml), and limit of quantification (0.027-0.707 μg/ml). The evaluation of crude and enzyme-hydrolyzed Soxhlet-extracted samples confirmed the leading role of glucosides in fruit development. LC-ESI-MS studies corroborated the identities of four glucosides and seven aglycones, among them vanillin (5.7/100 g), 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (3.6/100 g), and anisyl alcohol (7.1/100 g) were found in high concentrations. The attractive flavor/aroma profile exhibited by wild V. pompona fruits supports studies focused on the development of this species as a specialty crop.

  11. The sensitivity of tropical leaf litter decomposition to temperature: results from a large-scale leaf translocation experiment along an elevation gradient in Peruvian forests.

    PubMed

    Salinas, N; Malhi, Y; Meir, P; Silman, M; Roman Cuesta, R; Huaman, J; Salinas, D; Huaman, V; Gibaja, A; Mamani, M; Farfan, F

    2011-03-01

    • We present the results from a litter translocation experiment along a 2800-m elevation gradient in Peruvian tropical forests. The understanding of the environmental factors controlling litter decomposition is important in the description of the carbon and nutrient cycles of tropical ecosystems, and in predicting their response to long-term increases in temperature. • Samples of litter from 15 species were transplanted across all five sites in the study, and decomposition was tracked over 448 d. • Species' type had a large influence on the decomposition rate (k), most probably through its influence on leaf quality and morphology. When samples were pooled across species and elevations, soil temperature explained 95% of the variation in the decomposition rate, but no direct relationship was observed with either soil moisture or rainfall. The sensitivity of the decay rate to temperature (κ(T)) varied seven-fold across species, between 0.024 and 0.169 °C⁻¹, with a mean value of 0.118 ± 0.009 °C⁻¹ (SE). This is equivalent to a temperature sensitivity parameter (Q₁₀) for litter decay of 3.06 ± 0.28, higher than that frequently assumed for heterotrophic processes. • Our results suggest that the warming of approx. 0.9 °C experienced in the region in recent decades may have increased decomposition and nutrient mineralization rates by c. 10%. PMID:21077887

  12. Genetic diversity of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in Lutzomyia spp., with special reference to Lutzomyia peruensis, a main vector of Leishmania (Viannia) peruviana in the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kento; Cáceres, Abraham G; Gomez, Eduardo A; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Hiroyuki; Korenaga, Masataka; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Katakura, Ken; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa; Kato, Hirotomo

    2013-05-01

    The genetic divergence caused by genetic drift and/or selection is suggested to affect the vectorial capacity and insecticide susceptibility of sand flies, as well as other arthropods. In the present study, cytochrome b (cyt b) gene sequences were determined in 13 species circulating in Peru to establish a basis for analysis of the genetic structure, and the intraspecific genetic diversity was assessed in the Lutzomyia (Lu.) peruensis, a main vector species of Leishmania (Viannia) peruviana in Peruvian Andes. Analysis of intraspecific genetic diversity in the cyt b gene sequences from 36 Lu. peruensis identified 3 highly polymorphic sites in the middle region of the gene. Haplotype and gene network analyses were performed on the cyt b gene sequences of 130 Lu. peruensis in 9 Andean areas from 3 Departments (Ancash, Lima and La Libertad). The results showed that the populations of La Libertad were highly polymorphic and that their haplotypes were distinct from those of Ancash and Lima, where dominant haplotypes were observed, suggesting that a population bottleneck may have occurred in Ancash and Lima, but not in La Libertad. The present study indicated that the middle region of the cyt b gene is useful for the analysis of genetic structure in sand fly populations.

  13. Ancient DNA reveals selection acting on genes associated with hypoxia response in pre-Columbian Peruvian Highlanders in the last 8500 years

    PubMed Central

    Fehren-Schmitz, Lars; Georges, Lea

    2016-01-01

    Archaeological evidence shows that humans began living in the high altitude Andes approximately 12,000 years ago. Andean highlanders are known to have developed the most complex societies of pre-Columbian South America despite challenges to their health and reproductive success resulting from chronic exposure to hypoxia. While the physiological adaptations to this environmental stressor are well studied in contemporary Andean highlanders, the molecular evolutionary processes associated with such adaptations remain unclear. We aim to better understand how humans managed to demographically establish in this harsh environment by addressing a central question: did exposure to hypoxia drive adaptation via natural selection within Andean populations or did an existing phenotype –characterized by reduced susceptibility to hypoxic stress–enable human settlement of the Andes? We genotyped three variable loci within the NOS3 and EGLN1 genes previously associated with adaptation to high altitude in 150 ancient human DNA samples from Peruvian high altitude and coastal low altitude sites in a time frame between ~8500–560 BP. We compare the data of 109 successful samples to forward simulations of genetic drift with natural selection and find that selection, rather than drift, explains the gradual frequency changes observed in the highland populations for two of the three SNPs. PMID:26996763

  14. Understanding mechanisms that control fish spawning and larval recruitment: Parameter optimization of an Eulerian model (SEAPODYM-SP) with Peruvian anchovy and sardine eggs and larvae data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Olga; Lehodey, Patrick; Senina, Inna; Echevin, Vincent; Ayón, Patricia; Bertrand, Arnaud; Gaspar, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    The Spatial Ecosystem And Populations Dynamics Model "SEAPODYM", based on a system of Eulerian equations and initially developed for large pelagic fish (e.g., tuna), was modified to describe spawning habitat and eggs and larvae dynamics of small pelagic fish. The spawning habitat is critical since it controls the initial recruitment of larvae and the subsequent spatio-temporal variability of natural mortality during their drift with currents. A robust statistical approach based on Maximum Likelihood Estimation is presented to optimize the model parameters defining the spawning habitat and the eggs and larvae dynamics. To improve parameterization, eggs and larvae density observations are assimilated in the model. The model and its associated optimization approach allow investigating the significance of the mechanisms proposed to control fish spawning habitat and larval recruitment: temperature, prey abundance, trade-off between prey and predators, and retention and dispersion processes. An application to the Peruvian anchovy (Engraulis ringens) and sardine (Sardinops sagax) illustrates the ability of the model to simulate the main features of spatial dynamics of these two species in the Humboldt Current System.

  15. Determinants of Caregivers' Use and Adoption of Household Water Chlorination: A Qualitative Study with Peri-Urban Communities in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Jessica D; Leontsini, Elli; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Surkan, Pamela J; Kosek, Margaret

    2015-09-01

    The gap between the efficacy and the effectiveness of household water treatment in reducing diarrhea-related morbidity indicates the need for a better understanding of the determinants of long-term behavior change. To explore the barriers to drinking water chlorination in the Peruvian Amazon, where diarrhea is endemic among under-5 children, we conducted qualitative research with 23 caregivers from peri-urban communities of Iquitos, Peru. Our inquiry drew on the Transtheoretical Model of behavior change and the Integrated Behavioral Model for Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene to identify the most relevant contextual, psychosocial, and technological determinants of initial action and long-term adoption of chlorination. Our findings suggest that the decision to try out this practice resulted from the combined effect of knowledge of chlorination benefits and product availability and affordability. Progress from action to adoption was influenced by caretakers' understanding of dosage, the packaging of chlorine products, knowledge and skills for multipurpose laundry bleach, the taste of treated water, and reinforcement. This analysis suggests that a focus on these determinants and the household domain may help to improve the sustainability of future intervention efforts. PMID:26175028

  16. Peruvian contributions to the study on human reproduction at high altitude: from the chronicles of the Spanish conquest to the present.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2007-09-30

    Humans have lived in the Peruvian Andes for about 12,000 years providing adequate time for adaptation to high altitude to have occurred. The arrival of the Spanish conquistadors in the 16th century potentially altered this process through genetic admixture. Early records revealed a potential for reduced fertility and a high perinatal and neonatal mortality amongst the early Spanish inhabitants who settled at high altitude when compared to the native Inca population. It appears that fertility is reduced during acute exposure at high altitude but is normal in populations born and living at high altitude. On the other hand, perinatal and neonatal mortality is presently still high at elevated altitudes, even after taking into account socio-economic status. The rates of perinatal and neonatal mortality are, however, lower in populations that have resided at high altitude for longer; populations inhabiting the southern Andes have a longer antiquity at high altitude and lower rates of fetal and neonatal deaths than those in the central Andes with a shorter residence at high altitude. Clearly, antiquity and genetics are important components in determining survival and quality of life at high altitude.

  17. Formation of intra-arc volcanosedimentary basins in the western flank of the central Peruvian Andes during Late Cretaceous oblique subduction: field evidence and constraints from U-Pb ages and Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polliand, Marc; Schaltegger, Urs; Frank, Martin; Fontboté, Lluis

    2005-04-01

    During late Early to Late Cretaceous, the Peruvian coastal margin underwent fast and oblique subduction and was characterized by important arc plutonism (the Peruvian Coastal Batholith) and formation of volcanosedimentary basins known as the Western Peruvian Trough (WPT). We present high-precision U-Pb ages and initial Hf isotopic compositions of zircon from conformable volcanic and crosscutting intrusive rocks within submarine volcanosedimentary strata of the WPT hosting the Perubar massive sulfide deposit. Zircons extracted from both the volcanic and intrusive rocks yield concordant U-Pb ages ranging from 67.89±0.18 Ma to 69.71±0.18 Ma, indicating that basin subsidence, submarine volcanism and plutonic activity occurred in close spatial and temporal relationship within the Andean magmatic arc during the Late Cretaceous. Field observations, satellite image interpretation, and plate reconstructions, suggest that dextral wrenching movements along crustal lineaments were related to oblique subduction. Wrench tectonics is therefore considered to be the trigger for the formation of the WPT as a series of pull-apart basins and for the emplacement of the Coastal Batholith. The zircon initial ɛHf values of the dated magmatic rocks fall between 5.5 and 7.4, and indicate only very subordinate influence of a sedimentary or continental component. The absence of inherited cores in the zircons suggest a complete lack of old basement below the WPT, in agreement with previous U-Pb and Sr isotopic data for batholithic rocks emplaced in the WPT area. This is supported by the presence of a most likely continuous block of dense (~3.0 g/cm3) material observed beneath the WPT area on gravimetric crustal cross sections. We suggest that this gravimetric anomaly may correspond to a piece of lithospheric mantle and/or oceanic crust inherited from a possible Late Permian-Triassic rifting. Such young and mafic crust was the most probable source for arc magmatism in the WPT area.

  18. Multiproxy Holocene paleoclimate records from the southern Peruvian Andes - what new can we learn from the stable carbon isotope composition of high altitude organic matter deposits?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Engel, Zbyněk

    2015-04-01

    Interpretation of the Central Andean paleoclimate over the last millennia still represents a research challenge demanding deeper studies [1,2]. Several high-resolution paleoclimate proxies for the last 10,000 years have been developed for the northern hemisphere. However, similar proxies are very limited for South America, particularly for high altitudes where, for example, tree-ring chronologies are not available and instrumental records are very limited. Consequently, our knowledge of high altitude climate changes in arid regions of the Peruvian Andes mainly relies on ice-core and lake deposit studies. In our study, we used a new alternative proxy for interpretation of palaeoclimate conditions based on a peat core taken from the Carhuasanta Valley at the foot of Nevado Mismi in the southern Peruvian Andes (15° 30'S, 71° 43'W, 4809m a.s.l.). The stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of Distichia peat reflects mainly the relative variation of the mean air temperature during subsequent growing seasons [3], and allows reconstructions of palaeotemperature changes. In contrast, peat organic carbon concentration (C % wt) records mainly wetness in the valley, directly corresponding to the changes in runoff in the upper part of the catchment. The most prominent climate changes recorded in the peat over last 4ka occurred between 3040 and 2750 cal. yrs BP. The initial warming turned to a very rapid cooling to temperatures at least 2° C lower than the mean for the Late Holocene. Initially drier conditions within this event turned to a short wet phase after 2780 cal. yrs BP, when the temperature increased again. This event coincides with significant changes in peat and ice core records in the Central Andes that match the timing of the global climate event around 2.8 cal. ka BP. Climatic conditions in the study area became relatively dry and stable after the event for about 800 years. Highly variable temperatures and humidity prevailed during the last 2000 years, when

  19. The Peru Cervical Cancer Screening Study (PERCAPS): the design and implementation of a mother/daughter screen, treat, and vaccinate program in the Peruvian jungle.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, Carolina E; Levinson, Kimberly L; Salmeron, Jorge; Sologuren, Carlos Vallejos; Fernandez, Maria Jose Vallejos; Belinson, Jerome L

    2014-06-01

    Peru struggles to prevent cervical cancer (CC). In the jungle, prevention programs suffer from significant barriers although technology exists to detect CC precursors. This study used community based participatory research (CBPR) methods to overcome barriers. The objective was to evaluate the utility of CBPR techniques in a mother-child screen/treat and vaccinate program for CC prevention in the Peruvian jungle. The CC prevention program used self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV) for screening, cryotherapy for treatment and the HPV vaccine Gardasil for vaccination. Community health leaders (HL) from around Iquitos participated in a two half day educational course. The HLs then decided how to implement interventions in their villages or urban sectors. The success of the program was measured by: (1) ability of the HLs to determine an implementation plan, (2) proper use of research forms, (3) participation and retention rates, and (4) participants' satisfaction. HLs successfully registered 320 women at soup kitchens, schools, and health posts. Screening, treatment, and vaccination were successfully carried out using forms for registration, consent, and results with minimum error. In the screen/treat intervention 100% of participants gave an HPV sample and 99.7% reported high satisfaction; 81% of HPV + women were treated, and 57% returned for 6-month followup. Vaccine intervention: 98% of girls received the 1st vaccine, 88% of those received the 2nd, and 65% the 3rd. CBPR techniques successfully helped implement a screen/treat and vaccinate CC prevention program around Iquitos, Peru. These techniques may be appropriate for large-scale preventive health-care interventions.

  20. The Peru Cervical Cancer Screening Study (PERCAPS): The Design and Implementation of a Mother/Daughter Screen, Treat, and Vaccinate Program in the Peruvian Jungle

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Kimberly L.; Salmeron, Jorge; Sologuren, Carlos Vallejos; Fernandez, Maria Jose Vallejos; Belinson, Jerome L.

    2014-01-01

    Peru struggles to prevent cervical cancer (CC). In the jungle, prevention programs suffer from significant barriers although technology exists to detect CC precursors. This study used community based participatory research (CBPR) methods to overcome barriers. The objective was to evaluate the utility of CBPR techniques in a mother–child screen/treat and vaccinate program for CC prevention in the Peruvian jungle. The CC prevention program used self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV) for screening, cryotherapy for treatment and the HPV vaccine Gardasil for vaccination. Community health leaders (HL) from around Iquitos participated in a two half day educational course. The HLs then decided how to implement interventions in their villages or urban sectors. The success of the program was measured by: (1) ability of the HLs to determine an implementation plan, (2) proper use of research forms, (3) participation and retention rates, and (4) participants’ satisfaction. HLs successfully registered 320 women at soup kitchens, schools, and health posts. Screening, treatment, and vaccination were successfully carried out using forms for registration, consent, and results with minimum error. In the screen/treat intervention 100 % of participants gave an HPV sample and 99.7 % reported high satisfaction; 81 % of HPV + women were treated, and 57 % returned for 6-month followup. Vaccine intervention: 98 % of girls received the 1st vaccine, 88 % of those received the 2nd, and 65 % the 3rd. CBPR techniques successfully helped implement a screen/treat and vaccinate CC prevention program around Iquitos, Peru. These techniques may be appropriate for large-scale preventive health-care interventions. PMID:24276617

  1. Helicobacter pylori from Peruvian Amerindians: Traces of Human Migrations in Strains from Remote Amazon, and Genome Sequence of an Amerind Strain

    PubMed Central

    Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Kalia, Awdhesh; Gilman, Robert H.; Mendez, Melissa; Herrera, Phabiola; Cabrera, Lilia; Velapatiño, Billie; Balqui, Jacqueline; Paredes Puente de la Vega, Freddy; Rodriguez Ulloa, Carlos A.; Cok, Jaime; Hooper, Catherine C.; Dailide, Giedrius; Tamma, Sravya; Berg, Douglas E.

    2010-01-01

    Background The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is extraordinary in its genetic diversity, the differences between strains from well-separated human populations, and the range of diseases that infection promotes. Principal Findings Housekeeping gene sequences from H. pylori from residents of an Amerindian village in the Peruvian Amazon, Shimaa, were related to, but not intermingled with, those from Asia. This suggests descent of Shimaa strains from H. pylori that had infected the people who migrated from Asia into The Americas some 15,000+ years ago. In contrast, European type sequences predominated in strains from Amerindian Lima shantytown residents, but with some 12% Amerindian or East Asian-like admixture, which indicates displacement of ancestral purely Amerindian strains by those of hybrid or European ancestry. The genome of one Shimaa village strain, Shi470, was sequenced completely. Its SNP pattern was more Asian- than European-like genome-wide, indicating a purely Amerind ancestry. Among its unusual features were two cagA virulence genes, each distinct from those known from elsewhere; and a novel allele of gene hp0519, whose encoded protein is postulated to interact with host tissue. More generally, however, the Shi470 genome is similar in gene content and organization to those of strains from industrialized countries. Conclusions Our data indicate that Shimaa village H. pylori descend from Asian strains brought to The Americas many millennia ago; and that Amerind strains are less fit than, and were substantially displaced by, hybrid or European strains in less isolated communities. Genome comparisons of H. pylori from Amerindian and other communities should help elucidate evolutionary forces that have shaped pathogen populations in The Americas and worldwide. PMID:21124785

  2. The “sowing of concrete”: Peri-urban smallholder perceptions of rural–urban land change in the Central Peruvian Andes☆

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Policy makers concerned with the peri-urban interface find their greatest challenges in the rapid urban growth of developing mountain regions, since limitations caused by relief and altitude often lead to an increased competition between rural and urban land use at the valley floors. In this context, little attention has been paid to the affected agriculturalists’ perceptions of peri-urban growth—important information required for the realization of sustainable land use planning. How is the process of rural–urban land change perceived and assessed by peri-urban smallholder communities? Which are the major difficulties to be overcome? By what means are the affected people reacting and how are these adaptation strategies linked with the ongoing landscape transformations of the hinterland? By using the example of Huancayo Metropolitano, an emerging Peruvian mountain city, it is shown that rural–urban land change is intensively discussed within peri-urban smallholder groups. Although urbanization also leads to infrastructure investments by public institutions—an advantage perceived throughout the study area—the negative impacts of rural–urban land use change prevail. The perceptions’ analysis reveals that the decrease of fertile and irrigated agricultural land at the quechua valley floor is especially considered to threaten subsistence, food and income security. In order to compensate the loss of production capacities, many smallholders try to expand or intensify their land use at the suni altitudinal belt: an agro-ecological zone characterized by steep and nonirrigated slopes that can actually not be used for the year-round production of crops previously cultivated at the quechua zone. PMID:25844006

  3. The Peru Cervical Cancer Screening Study (PERCAPS): the design and implementation of a mother/daughter screen, treat, and vaccinate program in the Peruvian jungle.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, Carolina E; Levinson, Kimberly L; Salmeron, Jorge; Sologuren, Carlos Vallejos; Fernandez, Maria Jose Vallejos; Belinson, Jerome L

    2014-06-01

    Peru struggles to prevent cervical cancer (CC). In the jungle, prevention programs suffer from significant barriers although technology exists to detect CC precursors. This study used community based participatory research (CBPR) methods to overcome barriers. The objective was to evaluate the utility of CBPR techniques in a mother-child screen/treat and vaccinate program for CC prevention in the Peruvian jungle. The CC prevention program used self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV) for screening, cryotherapy for treatment and the HPV vaccine Gardasil for vaccination. Community health leaders (HL) from around Iquitos participated in a two half day educational course. The HLs then decided how to implement interventions in their villages or urban sectors. The success of the program was measured by: (1) ability of the HLs to determine an implementation plan, (2) proper use of research forms, (3) participation and retention rates, and (4) participants' satisfaction. HLs successfully registered 320 women at soup kitchens, schools, and health posts. Screening, treatment, and vaccination were successfully carried out using forms for registration, consent, and results with minimum error. In the screen/treat intervention 100% of participants gave an HPV sample and 99.7% reported high satisfaction; 81% of HPV + women were treated, and 57% returned for 6-month followup. Vaccine intervention: 98% of girls received the 1st vaccine, 88% of those received the 2nd, and 65% the 3rd. CBPR techniques successfully helped implement a screen/treat and vaccinate CC prevention program around Iquitos, Peru. These techniques may be appropriate for large-scale preventive health-care interventions. PMID:24276617

  4. Effects of a Post-Deworming Health Hygiene Education Intervention on Absenteeism in School-Age Children of the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Thériault, François L.; Maheu-Giroux, Mathieu; Blouin, Brittany; Casapía, Martin; Gyorkos, Theresa W.

    2014-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections are a leading cause of disability and disease burden in school-age children of worm-endemic regions. Their effect on school absenteeism, however, remains unclear. The World Health Organization currently recommends delivering mass deworming and health hygiene education through school-based programs, in an effort to control STH-related morbidity. In this cluster-RCT, the impact of a health hygiene education intervention on absenteeism was measured. From April to June 2010, all Grade 5 students at 18 schools in a worm-endemic region of the Peruvian Amazon were dewormed. Immediately following deworming, nine schools were randomly assigned to the intervention arm of the trial using a matched-pair design. The Grade 5 students attending intervention schools (N = 517) received four months of health hygiene education aimed at increasing knowledge of STH prevention. Grade 5 students from the other nine schools (N = 571) served as controls. Absenteeism was measured daily through teachers' attendance logs. After four months of follow-up, overall absenteeism rates at intervention and control schools were not statistically significantly different. However, post-trial non-randomized analyses have shown that students with moderate-to-heavy Ascaris infections and light hookworm infections four months after deworming had, respectively, missed 2.4% (95% CI: 0.1%, 4.7%) and 4.6% (95% CI: 1.9%, 7.4%) more schooldays during the follow-up period than their uninfected counterparts. These results provide empirical evidence of a direct effect of STH infections on absenteeism in school-age children. PMID:25122469

  5. An Overlap of Breastfeeding during Late Pregnancy Is Associated with Subsequent Changes in Colostrum Composition and Morbidity Rates among Peruvian Infants and Their Mothers1,2

    PubMed Central

    Marquis, Grace S.; Penny, Mary E.; Zimmer, J. Paul; Díaz, Judith M.; Marín, R. Margot

    2009-01-01

    An overlap of breast-feeding and late pregnancy is associated with decreased intake of human milk and reduced infant growth. We evaluated the association of an overlap with macronutrient and immunological components of milk, infant urinary IgA, and infant and maternal morbidity. On d 2 and 1 mo postpartum, staff measured 24-h intake of breast milk and collected samples from 133 Peruvian women; 68 had breast-fed during the last trimester of pregnancy (BFP) and 65 had not breast-fed during pregnancy (NBFP). Data on maternal and infant anthropometry and health were collected for 1 mo. On d 2, lactose and lysozyme concentrations were higher, total lysozyme intake was higher and concentration and total intake of lactoferrin were lower in the BFP than the NBFP group (P < 0.05). The total 1-mo IgA intake was lower among BFP than NBFP infants (P = 0.01). Urinary IgA concentration was correlated with breast milk IgA concentration (r = 0.29; P = 0.01) but not with breast-feeding during pregnancy. An overlap was not associated with diarrhea but BFP infants were 5 times as likely to have a cough for at least 7 d than NBFP infants (P < 0.05). Reported mastitis was rare and occurred only in the NBFP group (P = 0.05). An overlap of breast-feeding and late pregnancy was associated with changes in milk composition, an increased frequency in symptoms of infant respiratory illness but decreased reported mastitis. Further in-depth studies are warranted to determine the cumulative effects associated with a breast-feeding/pregnancy overlap on infant and maternal outcomes. PMID:12888642

  6. Cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric properties of the child perceptions questionnaire 11-14 (CPQ11-14) for the peruvian spanish language

    PubMed Central

    Albites, Ursula; Bönecker, Marcelo; Martins-Paiva, Saul; Castillo, Jorge L.; Aguilar-Gálvez, Denisse

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Oral-Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) instruments, such as the Child Perceptions Questionnaire 11-14 (CPQ11-14), are broadly used in oral health surveys around the world. However, there is a lack of these instruments in Spanish language limiting the comparison of OHRQoL outcomes among countries, cultures and ethnic groups. The aim of the present study was to cross-culturally adapt the CPQ11-14 to the Peruvian Spanish language and assess its reliability and validity. Material and Methods: To test the translation and cross-cultural adaptation, 60 children aged 11-to-14-years answered the CPQ11-14 in two pilot tests. After that, the questionnaire was tested on 200 children of the same age, who were clinically examined for dental caries. The internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach’s alpha coefficient while repeat administration of the CPQ11-14 on the same 200 children facilitated the test-retest reliability via intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Construct and discriminant validity were based on associations of the CPQ11-14 with global ratings of oral health and clinical groups respectively. Results: The mean (standard deviation) CPQ11-14 score was 20.18(13.07). Internal consistency was confirmed by a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.81. Test-retest reliability revealed excellent reproducibility (ICC= 0.92). Construct validity was confirmed demonstrating statistically significant associations between total CPQ11-14 score and global ratings of oral health (p=0.035) and overall well-being (p<0.001). The measure was also able to discriminate between children with dental caries experience and those without (mean scores: 26.32 and 12.96 respectively; p<0.001). Conclusions: The Spanish CPQ11-14 has satisfactory psychometric properties and is applicable to children in Peru. Key words:Oral health, quality of life, children, adolescent, validity, reliability. PMID:23722140

  7. Multidisciplinary and participatory workshops with stakeholders in a community of extreme poverty in the Peruvian Amazon: Development of priority concerns and potential health, nutrition and education interventions

    PubMed Central

    Casapia, Martin; Joseph, Serene A; Gyorkos, Theresa W

    2007-01-01

    Background Communities of extreme poverty suffer disproportionately from a wide range of adverse outcomes, but are often neglected or underserved by organized services and research attention. In order to target the first Millennium Development Goal of eradicating extreme poverty, thereby reducing health inequalities, participatory research in these communities is needed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the priority problems and respective potential cost-effective interventions in Belen, a community of extreme poverty in the Peruvian Amazon, using a multidisciplinary and participatory focus. Methods Two multidisciplinary and participatory workshops were conducted with important stakeholders from government, non-government and community organizations, national institutes and academic institutions. In Workshop 1, participants prioritized the main health and health-related problems in the community of Belen. Problem trees were developed to show perceived causes and effects for the top six problems. In Workshop 2, following presentations describing data from recently completed field research in school and household populations of Belen, participants listed potential interventions for the priority problems, including associated barriers, enabling factors, costs and benefits. Results The top ten priority problems in Belen were identified as: 1) infant malnutrition; 2) adolescent pregnancy; 3) diarrhoea; 4) anaemia; 5) parasites; 6) lack of basic sanitation; 7) low level of education; 8) sexually transmitted diseases; 9) domestic violence; and 10) delayed school entry. Causes and effects for the top six problems, proposed interventions, and factors relating to the implementation of interventions were multidisciplinary in nature and included health, nutrition, education, social and environmental issues. Conclusion The two workshops provided valuable insight into the main health and health-related problems facing the community of Belen. The

  8. Population structure and spatio-temporal transmission dynamics of Plasmodium vivax after radical cure treatment in a rural village of the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the large burden of Plasmodium vivax, little is known about its transmission dynamics. This study explored the population structure and spatio-temporal dynamics of P. vivax recurrent infections after radical cure in a two-year cohort study carried out in a rural community of the Peruvian Amazon. Methods A total of 37 P. vivax participants recruited in San Carlos community (Peru) between April and December 2008 were treated radically with chloroquine and primaquine and followed up monthly for two years with systematic blood sampling. All samples were screened for malaria parasites and subsequently all P. vivax infections genotyped using 15 microsatellites. Parasite population structure and dynamics were determined by computing different genetic indices and using spatio-temporal statistics. Results After radical cure, 76% of the study participants experienced one or more recurrent P. vivax infections, most of them sub-patent and asymptomatic. The parasite population displayed limited genetic diversity (He = 0.49) and clonal structure, with most infections (84%) being monoclonal. Spatio-temporal clusters of specific haplotypes were found throughout the study and persistence of highly frequent haplotypes were observed over several months within the same participants/households. Conclusions In San Carlos community, P. vivax recurrences were commonly observed after radical treatment, and characterized by asymptomatic, sub-patent and clustered infections (within and between individuals from a few neighbouring households). Moreover low genetic diversity as well as parasite inbreeding are likely to define a clonal parasite population which has important implications on the malaria epidemiology of the study area. PMID:24393454

  9. The impact of overfishing and El Niño on the condition factor and reproductive success of Peruvian hake, Merluccius gayi peruanus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballón, Michael; Wosnitza-Mendo, Claudia; Guevara-Carrasco, Renato; Bertrand, Arnaud

    2008-10-01

    In this study we examine physiological responses of Peruvian hake ( Merluccius gayi peruanus) to changes in their population structure and physical environment during the period 1971-2004. In particular, we assess the relative investment of energy in growth and/or reproduction of small (20-35 cm) and large (35-50 cm) hake. We calculated the (i) condition (Fulton’s K), (ii) gonad and (iii) gut fullness indices for 42,761 female hakes sampled from commercial landings; these indices indicate fish somatic, reproductive and feeding condition, respectively. Using Generalized Additive Models we then examined potential relationships between these indices and sea surface temperature anomalies and date. Drastic energy exhaustion and a decrease in female hake fecundity were observed during El Niño events. The long-term trend showed a general increase in condition factor and a decrease in gonad index for large hake between 1971 and 2004. Small hake exhibited a different trend with an increase in reproductive activity, which was accompanied by an earlier maturation. We hypothesise that the observed low investment of energy in reproduction by large female hake might be related to the lack of large males, due to a sex-selective fishery and the impact of El Niño. We suggest that fishing diminished hake reproductive capacity, modified the sex ratio in favour of females and increased population vulnerability to environmental stress, in particular to the El Niño. The impact of multidecadal variability and predators like the squid, Dosidicus gigas, remain unresolved until longer time series become available.

  10. Role of maca (Lepidium meyenii) consumption on serum interleukin-6 levels and health status in populations living in the Peruvian Central Andes over 4000 m of altitude.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Gasco, Manuel; Lozada-Requena, Ivan

    2013-12-01

    Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a plant that grows at over 4,000 m above sea level in the central Peruvian Andes. The hypocotyls of this plant are traditionally consumed for their nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to determine the health status based on a health related quality of life (HRQL) questionnaire (SF-20) and serum levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) in subjects that are maca consumers. For this, a cross-sectional study was designed to be performed in 50 subjects from Junin (4,100 m): 27 subjects were maca consumers and 23 were non-consumers. The SF-20 survey is used to obtain a summary measure of health status. The stand up from a chair and sit down (SUCSD) test (to assess lower-extremity function), hemoglobin measurement, blood pressure, sexual hormone levels, serum IL-6 levels and the score of chronic mountain sickness (CMS) were evaluated. Testosterone/estradiol ratio (P <0.05), IL-6 (P < 0.05) and CMS score were lower, whereas the health status score was higher, in maca consumers when compared to non-consumers (P < 0.01). A greater proportion of maca consumers successfully completed the SUCSD test compared to non-consumers (P < 0.01), showing a significant association with lower values of serum IL-6 (P < 0.05). In conclusion, consumption of maca was associated with low serum IL-6 levels and in turn with better health status scores in the SF-20 survey and low chronic mountain sickness scores. PMID:23934543

  11. A mixture of extracts from Peruvian plants (black maca and yacon) improves sperm count and reduced glycemia in mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Gonzales-Castañeda, Cynthia; Gasco, Manuel

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effect of two extracts from Peruvian plants given alone or in a mixture on sperm count and glycemia in streptozotocin-diabetic mice. Normal or diabetic mice were divided in groups receiving vehicle, black maca (Lepidium meyenii), yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) or three mixtures of extracts black maca/yacon (90/10, 50/50 and 10/90%). Normal or diabetic mice were treated for 7 d with each extract, mixture or vehicle. Glycemia, daily sperm production (DSP), epididymal and vas deferens sperm counts in mice and polyphenol content, and antioxidant activity in each extract were assessed. Black maca (BM), yacon and the mixture of extracts reduced glucose levels in diabetic mice. Non-diabetic mice treated with BM and yacon showed higher DSP than those treated with vehicle (p < 0.05). Diabetic mice treated with BM, yacon and the mixture maca/yacon increased DSP, and sperm count in vas deferens and epididymis with respect to non-diabetic and diabetic mice treated with vehicle (p < 0.05). Yacon has 3.05 times higher polyphenol content than in maca, and this was associated with higher antioxidant activity. The combination of two extracts improved glycemic levels and male reproductive function in diabetic mice. Streptozotocin increased 1.43 times the liver weight that was reversed with the assessed plants extracts. In summary, streptozotocin-induced diabetes resulted in reduction in sperm counts and liver damage. These effects could be reduced with BM, yacon and the BM+yacon mixture. PMID:23489070

  12. Dynamics of Malaria Drug Resistance Patterns in the Amazon Basin Region following Changes in Peruvian National Treatment Policy for Uncomplicated Malaria▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, David J.; McCollum, Andrea M.; Griffing, Sean M.; Salas, Carola; Soberon, Valeria; Santolalla, Meddly; Haley, Ryan; Tsukayama, Pablo; Lucas, Carmen; Escalante, Ananias A.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring changes in the frequencies of drug-resistant and -sensitive genotypes can facilitate in vivo clinical trials to assess the efficacy of drugs before complete failure occurs. Peru changed its national treatment policy for uncomplicated malaria to artesunate (ART)-plus-mefloquine (MQ) combination therapy in the Amazon basin in 2001. We genotyped isolates collected in 1999 and isolates collected in 2006 to 2007 for mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) genes, multidrug resistance gene 1 (Pfmdr-1), the chloroquine (CQ) resistance transporter gene (Pfcrt), and the Ca2+ ATPase gene (PfATP6); these have been shown to be involved in resistance to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), MQ, CQ, and possibly ART, respectively. Microsatellite haplotypes around the Pfdhfr, Pfdhps, Pfcrt, and Pfmdr-1 loci were also determined. There was a significant decline in the highly SP resistant Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genotypes from 1999 to 2006. In contrast, a CQ-resistant Pfcrt genotype increased in frequency during the same period. Among five different Pfmdr-1 allelic forms noted in 1999, two genotypes increased in frequency while one genotype decreased by 2006. We also noted previously undescribed polymorphisms in the PfATP6 gene as well as an increase in the frequency of a deletion mutant during this period. In addition, microsatellite analysis revealed that the resistant Pfdhfr, Pfdhps, and Pfcrt genotypes have each evolved from a single founder haplotype, while Pfmdr-1 genotypes have evolved from at least two independent haplotypes. Importantly, this study demonstrates that the Peruvian triple mutant Pfdhps genotypes are very similar to those found in other parts of South America. PMID:19258269

  13. An overlap of breastfeeding during late pregnancy is associated with subsequent changes in colostrum composition and morbidity rates among Peruvian infants and their mothers.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Grace S; Penny, Mary E; Zimmer, J Paul; Díaz, Judith M; Marín, R Margot

    2003-08-01

    An overlap of breast-feeding and late pregnancy is associated with decreased intake of human milk and reduced infant growth. We evaluated the association of an overlap with macronutrient and immunological components of milk, infant urinary IgA, and infant and maternal morbidity. On d 2 and 1 mo postpartum, staff measured 24-h intake of breast milk and collected samples from 133 Peruvian women; 68 had breast-fed during the last trimester of pregnancy (BFP) and 65 had not breast-fed during pregnancy (NBFP). Data on maternal and infant anthropometry and health were collected for 1 mo. On d 2, lactose and lysozyme concentrations were higher, total lysozyme intake was higher and concentration and total intake of lactoferrin were lower in the BFP than the NBFP group (P < 0.05). The total 1-mo IgA intake was lower among BFP than NBFP infants (P = 0.01). Urinary IgA concentration was correlated with breast milk IgA concentration (r = 0.29; P = 0.01) but not with breast-feeding during pregnancy. An overlap was not associated with diarrhea but BFP infants were 5 times as likely to have a cough for at least 7 d than NBFP infants (P < 0.05). Reported mastitis was rare and occurred only in the NBFP group (P = 0.05). An overlap of breast-feeding and late pregnancy was associated with changes in milk composition, an increased frequency in symptoms of infant respiratory illness but decreased reported mastitis. Further in-depth studies are warranted to determine the cumulative effects associated with a breast-feeding/pregnancy overlap on infant and maternal outcomes. PMID:12888642

  14. Role of maca (Lepidium meyenii) consumption on serum interleukin-6 levels and health status in populations living in the Peruvian central Andes over 4000 m of altitude

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Gustavo F.; Gasco, Manuel; Lozada, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a plant that grows at over 4000 meters above sea level in the central Peruvian Andes. The hypocotyls of this plant are traditionally consumed for their nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to determine the health status based on a health related quality of life (HRQL) questionnaire (SF-20) and serum levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) in subjects that are maca consumers. For this, a cross-sectional study was designed to be performed in 50 subjects from Junin (4100 m): 27 subjects were maca consumers and 23 were non-consumers. The SF-20 survey is used to obtain a summary measure of health status. The stand up from a chair and sit down (SUCSD) test (to assess lower-extremity function), hemoglobin measurement, blood pressure, sexual hormone levels, serum IL-6 levels and the score of chronic mountain sickness (CMS) were evaluated. Testosterone/estradiol ratio (P≪0.05), IL-6 (P<0.05) and CMS score were lower, whereas the health status score was higher, in maca consumers when compared to non-consumers (P<0.01). A greater proportion of maca consumers successfully completed the SUCSD test compared to non-consumers (P<0.01), showing a significant association with lower values of serum IL-6 (P<0.05). In conclusion, consumption of maca was associated with low serum IL-6 levels and in turn with better health status scores in the SF-20 survey and low chronic mountain sickness scores. PMID:23934543

  15. Role of maca (Lepidium meyenii) consumption on serum interleukin-6 levels and health status in populations living in the Peruvian Central Andes over 4000 m of altitude.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Gasco, Manuel; Lozada-Requena, Ivan

    2013-12-01

    Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a plant that grows at over 4,000 m above sea level in the central Peruvian Andes. The hypocotyls of this plant are traditionally consumed for their nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to determine the health status based on a health related quality of life (HRQL) questionnaire (SF-20) and serum levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) in subjects that are maca consumers. For this, a cross-sectional study was designed to be performed in 50 subjects from Junin (4,100 m): 27 subjects were maca consumers and 23 were non-consumers. The SF-20 survey is used to obtain a summary measure of health status. The stand up from a chair and sit down (SUCSD) test (to assess lower-extremity function), hemoglobin measurement, blood pressure, sexual hormone levels, serum IL-6 levels and the score of chronic mountain sickness (CMS) were evaluated. Testosterone/estradiol ratio (P <0.05), IL-6 (P < 0.05) and CMS score were lower, whereas the health status score was higher, in maca consumers when compared to non-consumers (P < 0.01). A greater proportion of maca consumers successfully completed the SUCSD test compared to non-consumers (P < 0.01), showing a significant association with lower values of serum IL-6 (P < 0.05). In conclusion, consumption of maca was associated with low serum IL-6 levels and in turn with better health status scores in the SF-20 survey and low chronic mountain sickness scores.

  16. Anemia and malnutrition in indigenous children and adolescents of the Peruvian Amazon in a context of lead exposure: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Anticona, Cynthia; San Sebastian, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Background Indigenous children and adolescents of the Peruvian Amazon live in precarious conditions that could increase the risk of malnutrition. A particular problem in the Corrientes river communities is the high exposure to lead among children and adolescents. Objective This study aimed to determine the nutritional status of children and adolescents in indigenous communities in the Corrientes river basin and examine risk factors for anemia, stunting, underweight, and wasting. Design This was a cross-sectional assessment in children and adolescents aged 0–17 years from six communities (n=330). Data collection included measurement of hemoglobin levels, anthropometrics, blood lead levels (BLLs); a parental questionnaire including demographic and dwelling information; parents’ occupation; and the child's duration of breastfeeding and food consumption. Analysis included univariate, bivariate, and logistic regression. Results Overall, anemia prevalence was 51.0%, stunting (proxy for chronic malnutrition) 50.0%, and underweight 20.0%. Bivariate analysis showed that anemia and underweight prevalence was higher in the 0–4 years group (p<0.05). No association was found between anemia, stunting, or underweight with gender, community exposure to oil activity, or consumption of river water. Stunting prevalence was higher in the group whose BLLs were >5 µg/dL (p<0.05). In the logistic regression analysis, no variable was associated with anemia or underweight. The group 5–11 years and >12 years had 1.9 and 3.1 times higher risk of stunting than the group under five years, respectively. Children and adolescents with BLLs >5 µg/dL had twice the risk of stunting compared to those with lower BLLs. Conclusions Half of the study population was found with anemia and stunting. Anemia was more prevalent in the 0- to 5-year age group and stunting in the 12- to 17-year group. The association between stunting and BLLs might be attributed to a direct effect of lead on human

  17. Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Values for Unaltered and Hydrothermally Altered Samples from the Cretaceous Linga Plutonic Complex of the Peruvian Coastal Batholith near Ica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, L. U.; Holk, G. J.; Clausen, B. L.; Poma Porras, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    A portion of the Peruvian Coastal Batholith near Ica, Peru is being studied using stable isotopes to determine the source of hydrothermal fluids that caused propylitic, phyllic, and potassic alteration in the mineralized Linga plutonic complex. Sources of hydrothermal fluids and water/rock ratios are estimated to understand the role of such fluids in alteration during cooling. A set of 64 mineral analysis from 18 igneous samples, 7 unaltered and 11 altered, were analyzed for D/H and 18O/16O isotopes. The δ18O values for whole rocks with no apparent alteration vary from +6.8‰ to +7.9‰, with sets of δ18O mineral values indicating isotopic equilibrium at closure temperatures from 571°C to 651°C, and no interaction with meteoric water. This conclusion is bolstered by hornblende (-87‰ to -64‰) and biotite (-81‰ to -74‰) δD values Most δ18O values for samples with hydrothermal alteration suggest that alteration results from magmatic fluids; however, several analyses indicate interaction with other fluids. The high δ18O values for plagioclase (+9.3‰) and hornblende (+6.3‰) from a metamorphic aureole in volcanic host rock near a plutonic intrusion may be due to interaction with metamorphic or low temperature magmatic fluids. Plagioclase (+2.6‰) and biotite (+0.1‰) δ18O values in a sample from the Jurassic volcanic envelope indicate a significant effect from meteoric-hydrothermal fluids. An altered monzonite yielded δ18O values for quartz (+5.5‰), K-spar (+5.6‰), and magnetite (+0.4‰), also suggesting interaction with meteoric fluids. A diorite from an area with strong epidotization produced an epidote δD value of -25.8‰ and a monzonite from a highly veined area has an epidote δD value of -36.1‰ suggesting interaction with sea water. This new data indicate that the Linga complex was primarily influenced by magmatic hydrothermal fluids, but metamorphic, meteoric, and sea water may have had some influence in producing alteration

  18. Lateral Variations of Fission-Track Cooling Ages along the Southern Peruvian Coast Reveal Coast-Parallel Extension during the Eocene and Oligocene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noury, M.; Bernet, M.; Jaillard, E.; Sempere, T.

    2014-12-01

    Proterozoic metamorphic rocks largely crop out between ~14 and ~17°S along the coast of southern Peru. Previous thermochronological studies in this belt focused on the Late Neogene cooling history and yielded Late Paleozoic to mid-Cretaceous zircon U-Th/He and fission-track ages, and Late Cretaceous to Early Paleocene apatite fission-track ages. Our study aims at extending the fission-track database in the ~300 km-long, high-grade metamorphic Atico-Mollendo Block (AMB; 15.8-17.1°S), in order to understand the lateral variations of thermochronologic ages along the Pacific coast of southern Peru. We present new apatite and zircon fission-track ages from the AMB and interpret them along with the previously published dates from this block and its surrounding areas. The apatite fission-track data show a longitudinal variation pattern with two localized shifts from younger (60 Ma) to older (~90 Ma) dates, corresponding to the northwestern and southeastern borders of the AMB. These shifts coincide in the field with two major normal fault zones that strike perpendicular to the coast and bound the AMB, and had been understated until now. Given the offsetted ages, the faults were active after 60 Ma, and tilted the AMB down to the NW. This interpretation is consistent with the fact that the metamorphic grade of the basement increases towards the SE, and with the deposition between ~55 and 30 Ma of forearc continental deposits (Lower Moquegua Group) that exhibit numerous synsedimentary extensional features. The zircon fission-track age pattern is more complicated but can be interpreted either as (i) reflecting a partial reset of the whole area due to burial during the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, or (ii) as the reactivation of an important Carboniferous detachment fault during the ~100-80 Ma interval. We suggest that this coast-parallel Eocene-Oligocene extension accommodated the counterclockwise block rotation of the southern Peruvian forearc that accompanied the

  19. Change in dust and fluvial deposition variability in the Peruvian central continental coast during the last millennium: Response of the ocean atmospheric systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifeddine, A.; Briceño, F. J., Sr.; Caquineau, S.; Velazco, F.; Salvatecci, R.; Ortlieb, L.; Gutierrez, D.; Cardich, J.; Almeida, C.

    2014-12-01

    factors indicate an unambiguous change in the atmospheric regime in relationship with climate changes in the last millennium over the Peruvian continental shelf.

  20. Impact of Health Education on Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections in Schoolchildren of the Peruvian Amazon: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gyorkos, Theresa W.; Maheu-Giroux, Mathieu; Blouin, Brittany; Casapia, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background To control soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections, the World Health Organization recommends school-based deworming programs with a health hygiene education component. The effect of such health hygiene interventions, however, has not been adequately studied. The objective of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of a health hygiene education intervention on the occurrence of STH re-infection four months post-de-worming. Methodology/Principal Findings An open-label pair-matched cluster-randomized trial was conducted in Grade 5 schoolchildren of 18 primary schools (9 intervention and 9 control) in the Peruvian Amazon. Baseline assessment included interview with a pre-tested questionnaire and collection of single stool specimens that were examined using the single Kato-Katz thick smear. All schoolchildren were then treated with single-dose albendazole (400 mg). Schoolchildren in intervention schools then received 1) an initial one hour in-class activity on health hygiene and sanitation and 30-minute refresher activities every two weeks over four months; and 2) a half-day workshop for teachers and principals, while children in control schools did not. Four months later, STH infection was re-assessed in all schools by laboratory technologists blinded to intervention status. From April 21–October 20, 2010, a total of 1,089 schoolchildren (518 and 571 from intervention and control schools, respectively) participated in this study. Intervention children scored significantly higher on all aspects of a test of STH-related knowledge compared with control children (aOR = 18·4; 95% CI: 12·7 to 26·6). The intensity of Ascaris lumbricoides infection at follow-up was statistically significantly lower (by 58%) in children in intervention schools compared with children in control schools (aIRR = 0·42; 95% CI = 0·21 to 0·85). No significant changes in hookworm or Trichuris trichiura intensity were observed. Conclusions/Significance A

  1. Evaluation of I/Ca ratios in benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone as proxy for redox conditions in the ambient water masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glock, N.; Liebetrau, V.; Eisenhauer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are most important areas of oxygen depletion in today´s oceans and nutrient cycling in these regions has a large socio-economic impact because they account for about 17% of the global commercial fish catches(1). Possibly increasing magnitude and area of oxygen depletion in these regions, might endanger rich pelagic fish habitats in the future threatening the global marine food supply. By the use of a quantitative redox proxy in OMZs, reconstruction of the temporal variation in OMZ extension eventually providing information about past and future changes in oxygenation and the anthropogenic role in the recent trend of expanding OMZs(2). Recent work has shown that iodine/calcium (I/Ca) ratios in marine carbonates are a promising proxy for ambient oxygen concentration(3). Our study explores the correlation of I/Ca ratios in four benthic foraminiferal species (three calcitic, one aragonitic) from the Peruvian OMZ to bottom water oxygen concentrations ([O2]BW) and evaluates foraminiferal I/Ca ratios as a possible redox proxy for the ambient water masses. Our results show that all species have a positive trend in the I/Ca ratios as a function of [O2]BW. Only for the aragonitic species Hoeglundina elegans this trend is not significant. The highest significance has been found for Uvigerina striata (I/Ca = 0.032(±0.004).[O2]BW + 0.29(±0.03), R² = 0.61, F = 75, P < 0.0001). Although I/Ca ratios in benthic foraminifera appear to be a robust redox proxy there are some methodical issues which have to be considered. These "pitfalls" include: (i) the volatility of iodine in acidic solutions, (ii) a species dependency of the I/Ca-[O2]BW relationship which is either related to a strong vital effect or toa species dependency on the calcification depth within sediment, and (iii) the inter-test variability of I/Ca between different specimens from the same species and habitat. (1): FAO FishStat: Fisheries and aquaculture software. In: FAO

  2. The socio-cultural importance of Mauritia flexuosa palm swamps (aguajales) and implications for multi-use management in two Maijuna communities of the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fruit from the palm Mauritia flexuosa (aguaje) is harvested throughout the Peruvian Amazon for subsistence and commercial purposes. Recent estimates suggest that residents of Iquitos, the largest city in the region, consume approximately 148.8 metric tons of aguaje fruit per month, the vast majority of which is harvested by felling and killing adult female trees. In this study, we sought to better understand and document the importance of M. flexuosa palm swamps (aguajales) in two Maijuna indigenous communities to inform the sustainable management of this habitat and species. Methods Semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and household surveys were carried out to assess the significance of aguajales and their associated plant and animal resources as well as to determine how the relationship that the Maijuna have with aguajales has changed over time. Results Aguajales and their associated resources are culturally significant and useful to the Maijuna in a wide variety of ways. In addition to M. flexuosa, the Maijuna use over 60 different species of plants from aguajales. When M. flexuosa is in fruit, aguajales are important hunting areas with a total of 20 different animal species hunted. The Maijuna also have traditional beliefs about aguajales, believing that malevolent supernatural beings reside in them. Notably, the relationship that the Maijuna have with aguajales has changed considerably over the years as aguaje fruit went from a subsistence item collected opportunistically from the ground to a market good destructively harvested beginning in the early 1990s. The Maijuna are concerned not only about how this has affected the future commercial harvest of aguaje but also about its effects on game animals given the importance of hunting to Maijuna cultural identity, subsistence, and income generation. Conclusions In order to meet the multiple socio-cultural and economic needs of the Maijuna, sustainable management efforts must be expanded to not

  3. The effect of pre-Hispanic agriculture practices on soils in the Western Cordillera of the Peruvian Andes (region Laramate, 14.5°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leceta, Fernando; Mächtle, Bertil; Schukraft, Gerd; Eitel, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    ) could be also attested in the Laramate area. Retention of eroded loessic material transported against the terrace walls could be associated to periods of increased geomorphodynamics founded in the surroundings by 600 AD (Forbriger & Schittek 2011, unpublished raw data). References Branch, N., Kemp, R., Silva, B., Meddens F., Williams, A., Kendall, A., Vivanco Pomacanchari, C. (2007): Testing the sustainability and sensitivity to climatic change of terrace agricultural systems in the Peruvian Andes: a pilot study. Journal of Archaeological Science 34 (2007) 1-9. Eitel, B., Hecht, S., Mächtle, B., Schukraft, G., Kadereit, A., Wagner, G. A., Kromer, B., Unkel, I., Reindel, M. (2005): Geoarchaeological evidence from desert loess in the Nasca-Palpa region, southern Peru: Palaeoenvironmental changes and their impact on Pre-Columbian cultures. Archaeometry 47, 137-185. Mächtle, B. (2007): Geomorphologisch-bodenkundliche Untersuchungen zur Rekonstruktion der holozänen Umweltgeschichte in der nördlichen Atacama im Raum Palpa/Südperu. Dissertation, Heidelberger Geographische Arbeiten 123.- 227 S.

  4. Geoglyphs of the Peruvian Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    "Geoglyphs" in the form of lines, geometric designs, and zoomorphic figures were laid out across wide expanses of arid coastal desert ("pampa") near Nazca, in southern Peru. They represent an extraordinary cultural phenomenon but are also notorious for some of the outlandish theories purporting to explain them. Geoglyphs are also found in adjacent pampas as well as being scattered up and down coastal areas of Peru and northern Chile. The idea that they represented a vast "astronomy book", although continuing to be propagated to tourists, is long discredited. However, astronomical considerations may still help to explain a complex phenomenon that clearly stretched over a considerable geographical area and a significant time period. The broader context suggests that astronomy, and particularly observations of sunrise and sunset, may well have played a significant role in regulating a ritual calendar, but the archaeoastronomical evidence to connect this to geoglyph orientations is weak.

  5. The Astronomy of Peruvian Huacas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullberg, Steven; Malville, J. McKim

    The Incas honored and venerated many features of both natural and ­man-made landscapes that they felt to be endowed with superhuman powers. In Quechua these shrines were known as huacas, and at the time of the Spanish ­conquest there were thousands of them. Soon after invading the Incan homeland the Spaniards began a campaign against the indigenous religion that included a systematic eradication of huacas. Shrines that were large carved stones and outcroppings survived, ­however, and form part of our study. A number of these were found to have astronomical meaning, marking events such as solstices and equinoxes. Water channels are associated with the majority of astronomical huacas. Ritual stairways are also common features, symbolizing shamanic movement between the three worlds of Incan cosmology.

  6. Quantification of Plasmodium falciparum malaria from complex infections in the Peruvian Amazon using quantitative PCR of the merozoite surface protein 1, block 2 (PfMSP1-B2): in vitro dynamics reveal density-dependent interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zervos, Thomas M.; Hernandez, Jean N.; Sutton, Patrick L.; Branch, Oralee H.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The majority of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates are defined as complex infections because they contain multiple genetically distinct clones. Studying interactions between clones in complex infections in vivo and in vitro could elucidate important phenomena in malaria infection, transmission and treatment. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) of the P. falciparum merozoite surface protein 1, block 2 (PfMSP1-B2), we provide a sensitive and efficient genotyping method. This is important for epidemiological studies because it makes it possible to study genotype-specific growth dynamics. We compared 3 PfMSP1-B2 genotyping methods by analysing 79 field isolates from the Peruvian Amazon. In vivo observations from other studies using these techniques led to the hypothesis that clones within complex infections interact. By co-culturing clones with different PfMSP1-B2 genotypes, and measuring parasitaemia using qPCR, we found that suppression of clonal expansion was a factor of the collective density of all clones present in a culture. PfMSP1-B2 qPCR enabled us to find in vitro evidence for parasite-parasite interactions and could facilitate future investigations of growth trends in naturally occurring complex infections. PMID:22339946

  7. Quantification of Plasmodium falciparum malaria from complex infections in the Peruvian Amazon using quantitative PCR of the merozoite surface protein 1, block 2 (PfMSP1-B2): in vitro dynamics reveal density-dependent interactions.

    PubMed

    Zervos, Thomas M; Hernandez, Jean N; Sutton, Patrick L; Branch, Oralee H

    2012-05-01

    The majority of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates are defined as complex infections because they contain multiple genetically distinct clones. Studying interactions between clones in complex infections in vivo and in vitro could elucidate important phenomena in malaria infection, transmission and treatment. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) of the P. falciparum merozoite surface protein 1, block 2 (PfMSP1-B2), we provide a sensitive and efficient genotyping method. This is important for epidemiological studies because it makes it possible to study genotype-specific growth dynamics. We compared 3 PfMSP1-B2 genotyping methods by analysing 79 field isolates from the Peruvian Amazon. In vivo observations from other studies using these techniques led to the hypothesis that clones within complex infections interact. By co-culturing clones with different PfMSP1-B2 genotypes, and measuring parasitaemia using qPCR, we found that suppression of clonal expansion was a factor of the collective density of all clones present in a culture. PfMSP1-B2 qPCR enabled us to find in vitro evidence for parasite-parasite interactions and could facilitate future investigations of growth trends in naturally occurring complex infections.

  8. Additional zinc delivered in a liquid supplement, but not in a fortified porridge, increased fat-free mass accrual among young Peruvian children with mild-to-moderate stunting.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Joanne E; López de Romaña, Daniel; Penny, Mary E; Van Loan, Marta D; Brown, Kenneth H

    2008-01-01

    The exact mechanism whereby zinc influences growth is unknown, although it has been postulated that zinc may stimulate appetite and energy intake or enhance fat-free mass (FFM) accrual directly. We compared energy intake, reported appetite, and body composition of 6- to 8-mo-old Peruvian children with initial length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) < -0.5 SD who were randomly assigned to receive daily for 6 mo: 1) 3 mg/d zinc in a liquid supplement; 2) 3 mg/d zinc in a fortified porridge; or 3) no extra zinc in either the supplement or porridge. There were no group-wise differences in changes in dietary energy intakes or body composition or in the prevalence of reported poor appetite. However, among children with an initial LAZ less than the median (-1.1 SD), those who received zinc as a liquid supplement had a 0.41 kg greater increase in FFM than those who did not receive zinc (P < 0.05). We concluded that daily provision of 3 mg of supplemental zinc did not affect energy intake or reported appetite. Among children with initial mild-to-moderate stunting, those who received the zinc supplement had a greater increase in FFM than those who did not receive additional zinc. It is possible that the growth-restricted children were more likely to be zinc deficient and that FFM accrual may be an early growth response to supplemental zinc. Zinc supplements may be more efficacious than the same dose of zinc provided in fortified food; therefore, further research is needed on the optimal level of zinc fortification that will result in improved health outcomes in populations with high rates of zinc deficiency.

  9. Reconstructing the Life of an Unknown (ca. 500 Years-Old South American Inca) Mummy – Multidisciplinary Study of a Peruvian Inca Mummy Suggests Severe Chagas Disease and Ritual Homicide

    PubMed Central

    Panzer, Stephanie; Peschel, Oliver; Haas-Gebhard, Brigitte; Bachmeier, Beatrice E.; Pusch, Carsten M.; Nerlich, Andreas G.

    2014-01-01

    The paleopathological, paleoradiological, histological, molecular and forensic investigation of a female mummy (radiocarbon dated 1451–1642 AD) provides circumstantial evidence for massive skull trauma affecting a young adult female individual shortly before death along with chronic infection by Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease). The mummy (initially assumed to be a German bog body) was localized by stable isotope analysis to South America at/near the Peruvian/Northern Chilean coast line. This is further supported by New World camelid fibers attached to her plaits, typical Inca-type skull deformation and the type of Wormian bone at her occiput. Despite an only small transverse wound of the supraorbital region computed tomography scans show an almost complete destruction of face and frontal skull bones with terrace-like margins, but without evidence for tissue reaction. The type of destruction indicates massive blunt force applied to the center of the face. Stable isotope analysis indicates South American origin: Nitrogen and hydrogen isotope patterns indicate an extraordinarily high marine diet along with C4-plant alimentation which fits best to the coastal area of Pacific South America. A hair strand over the last ten months of her life indicates a shift to a more “terrestric” nutrition pattern suggesting either a move from the coast or a change in her nutrition. Paleoradiology further shows extensive hypertrophy of the heart muscle and a distended large bowel/rectum. Histologically, in the rectum wall massive fibrosis alternates with residual smooth muscle. The latter contains multiple inclusions of small intracellular parasites as confirmed by immunohistochemical and molecular ancient DNA analysis to represent a chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection. This case shows a unique paleopathological setting with massive blunt force trauma to the skull nurturing the hypothesis of a ritual homicide as previously described in South American mummies in an individual

  10. Additional zinc delivered in a liquid supplement, but not in a fortified porridge, increased fat-free mass accrual among young Peruvian children with mild-to-moderate stunting.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Joanne E; López de Romaña, Daniel; Penny, Mary E; Van Loan, Marta D; Brown, Kenneth H

    2008-01-01

    The exact mechanism whereby zinc influences growth is unknown, although it has been postulated that zinc may stimulate appetite and energy intake or enhance fat-free mass (FFM) accrual directly. We compared energy intake, reported appetite, and body composition of 6- to 8-mo-old Peruvian children with initial length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) < -0.5 SD who were randomly assigned to receive daily for 6 mo: 1) 3 mg/d zinc in a liquid supplement; 2) 3 mg/d zinc in a fortified porridge; or 3) no extra zinc in either the supplement or porridge. There were no group-wise differences in changes in dietary energy intakes or body composition or in the prevalence of reported poor appetite. However, among children with an initial LAZ less than the median (-1.1 SD), those who received zinc as a liquid supplement had a 0.41 kg greater increase in FFM than those who did not receive zinc (P < 0.05). We concluded that daily provision of 3 mg of supplemental zinc did not affect energy intake or reported appetite. Among children with initial mild-to-moderate stunting, those who received the zinc supplement had a greater increase in FFM than those who did not receive additional zinc. It is possible that the growth-restricted children were more likely to be zinc deficient and that FFM accrual may be an early growth response to supplemental zinc. Zinc supplements may be more efficacious than the same dose of zinc provided in fortified food; therefore, further research is needed on the optimal level of zinc fortification that will result in improved health outcomes in populations with high rates of zinc deficiency. PMID:18156412

  11. Antibody response dynamics to the Plasmodium falciparum conserved vaccine candidate antigen, merozoite surface protein-1 C-terminal 19kD (MSP1-19kD), in Peruvians exposed to hypoendemic malaria transmission

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Katherine J; Clark, Eva H; Hernandez, Jean N; Soto-Cornejo, Katherine E; Gamboa, Dionicia; Branch, OraLee H

    2008-01-01

    to the frequent asymptomatic P. falciparum infections in this Peruvian population. PMID:18782451

  12. Plant Water Uptake in Drying Soils1

    PubMed Central

    Lobet, Guillaume; Couvreur, Valentin; Meunier, Félicien; Javaux, Mathieu; Draye, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, investigations on root water uptake have evolved toward a deeper integration of the soil and roots compartment properties, with the goal of improving our understanding of water acquisition from drying soils. This evolution parallels the increasing attention of agronomists to suboptimal crop production environments. Recent results have led to the description of root system architectures that might contribute to deep-water extraction or to water-saving strategies. In addition, the manipulation of root hydraulic properties would provide further opportunities to improve water uptake. However, modeling studies highlight the role of soil hydraulics in the control of water uptake in drying soil and call for integrative soil-plant system approaches. PMID:24515834

  13. EMP and SIMS studies on Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca systematics in benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian OMZ: a contribution to the identification of potential redox proxies and the impact of cleaning protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glock, N.; Eisenhauer, A.; Liebetrau, V.; Wiedenbeck, M.; Hensen, C.; Nehrke, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we present an initial dataset of Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca ratios in tests of benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) determined with SIMS. These results are a contribution to a better understanding of the proxy potential of these elemental ratios for ambient redox conditions. Foraminiferal tests are often contaminated by diagenetic coatings, like Mn rich carbonate- or Fe and Mn rich (oxyhydr)oxide coatings. Thus, it is substantial to assure that the cleaning protocols are efficient or that spots chosen for microanalyses are free of contaminants. Prior to the determination of the element/Ca ratios, the distributions of several elements (Ca, Mn, Fe, Mg, Ba, Al, Si, P and S) in tests of the shallow infaunal species Uvigerina peregrina and Bolivina spissa were mapped with an electron microprobe (EMP). To visualize the effects of cleaning protocols uncleaned and cleaned specimens were compared. The cleaning protocol included an oxidative cleaning step. An Fe rich phase was found on the inner test surface of uncleaned U. peregrina specimens. This phase was also enriched in Al, Si, P and S. A similar Fe rich phase was found at the inner test surface of B. spissa. Specimens of both species treated with oxidative cleaning show the absence of this phase. Neither in B. spissa nor in U. peregrina were any hints found for diagenetic (oxyhydr)oxide or carbonate coatings. Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca ratios of single specimens of B. spissa from different locations have been determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Bulk analyses using solution ICP-MS of several samples were compared to the SIMS data. The difference between SIMS analyses and ICP-MS bulk analyses from the same sampling sites was 14.0-134.8 μmol mol-1 for the Fe/Ca and 1.68(±0.41) μmol mol-1 for the Mn/Ca ratios. This is in the same order of magnitude as the variability inside single specimens determined with SIMS at these sampling sites (1σ[Mn/Ca] = 0.35-2.07 μmol mol-1; 1

  14. Peruvian Arid Coast and Agriculture, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The coast of Peru, between the Pacific Ocean and the Andes Mountains is very arid (16.5S, 72.5W). For several thousand years, water from numerous small streams has been used for traditional flood and canal irrigation agriculture. However, during the past decade innovative techniques have tapped new water sources for increased agricultural production. Ground water in the porous sedimentary rock formations has been tapped for well irrigation agriculture.

  15. [Emergency oral contraception policy: the Peruvian experience].

    PubMed

    Pretell-Zárate, Eduardo A

    2013-07-01

    Emergency oral contraception is part of the sexual and reproductive rights of women. In 2001, this health policy was incorporated into the Rules of the National Family Planning Program of the Ministry of Health, primarily to prevent unwanted pregnancy and its serious consequences, induced abortion and the high associated maternal mortality rate, which are major public health problems. Scientific research has confirmed that the main mechanism of action of levonorgestrel, component of emergency oral contraception (EOC) is to inhibit or delay ovulation, preventing fertilization of the egg; additionally, it increases the thickening of the cervical mucus, making the sperm migration more difficult. No study has found endometrial abnormalities that may interfere with the implantation of the fertilized egg or embryo development of an implanted egg. However, despite the support of medical science and legal backing, the EOC is available only to users with economic resources, but its use has not been fully implemented in public sector services, due to obstacles created by groups opposed to contraception under claim of an alleged abortive effect that has already been ruled out scientifically. This article describes the administrative experience and legal confrontations between groups of power that prevent the proper implementation of an emergency contraception policy in Peru.

  16. Preceramic irrigation canals in the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Dillehay, Tom D; Eling, Herbert H; Rossen, Jack

    2005-11-22

    One of the most important developments in the existence of human society was the successful shift from a subsistence economy based on foraging to one primarily based on food production derived from cultivated plants and domesticated animals. The shift to plant food production occurred in only a few independent centers around the world and involved a commitment to increased sedentism and social interaction and to permanent agricultural fields and canals. One center was Peru, where early civilization and food production were beginning to develop by at least 4,500 years ago. New archeological evidence points to 5,400- and possible 6,700-year-old small-scale gravity canals in a circumscribed valley of the western Andean foothills in northern Peru that are associated with farming on low terrace benches at the foot of alluvial fans in areas where the canals are drawn from hydraulically manageable small lateral streams. This evidence reveals early environmental manipulation and incipient food production in an artificially created wet agroecosystem rather than simply the intensive harvesting or gardening of plants in moist natural areas. This finding is different from previously conceived notions, which expected early canals in lower-elevated, broad coastal valleys. The evidence also points to communal organization of labor to construct and maintain the canals and to the scheduling of daily activities beyond individual households. The development of early organized irrigation farming was combined with a hunting and gathering economy to support an increase in the local population size. PMID:16284247

  17. Preceramic irrigation canals in the Peruvian Andes

    PubMed Central

    Dillehay, Tom D.; Eling, Herbert H.; Rossen, Jack

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important developments in the existence of human society was the successful shift from a subsistence economy based on foraging to one primarily based on food production derived from cultivated plants and domesticated animals. The shift to plant food production occurred in only a few independent centers around the world and involved a commitment to increased sedentism and social interaction and to permanent agricultural fields and canals. One center was Peru, where early civilization and food production were beginning to develop by at least 4,500 years ago. New archeological evidence points to 5,400- and possible 6,700-year-old small-scale gravity canals in a circumscribed valley of the western Andean foothills in northern Peru that are associated with farming on low terrace benches at the foot of alluvial fans in areas where the canals are drawn from hydraulically manageable small lateral streams. This evidence reveals early environmental manipulation and incipient food production in an artificially created wet agroecosystem rather than simply the intensive harvesting or gardening of plants in moist natural areas. This finding is different from previously conceived notions, which expected early canals in lower-elevated, broad coastal valleys. The evidence also points to communal organization of labor to construct and maintain the canals and to the scheduling of daily activities beyond individual households. The development of early organized irrigation farming was combined with a hunting and gathering economy to support an increase in the local population size. PMID:16284247

  18. Preceramic irrigation canals in the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Dillehay, Tom D; Eling, Herbert H; Rossen, Jack

    2005-11-22

    One of the most important developments in the existence of human society was the successful shift from a subsistence economy based on foraging to one primarily based on food production derived from cultivated plants and domesticated animals. The shift to plant food production occurred in only a few independent centers around the world and involved a commitment to increased sedentism and social interaction and to permanent agricultural fields and canals. One center was Peru, where early civilization and food production were beginning to develop by at least 4,500 years ago. New archeological evidence points to 5,400- and possible 6,700-year-old small-scale gravity canals in a circumscribed valley of the western Andean foothills in northern Peru that are associated with farming on low terrace benches at the foot of alluvial fans in areas where the canals are drawn from hydraulically manageable small lateral streams. This evidence reveals early environmental manipulation and incipient food production in an artificially created wet agroecosystem rather than simply the intensive harvesting or gardening of plants in moist natural areas. This finding is different from previously conceived notions, which expected early canals in lower-elevated, broad coastal valleys. The evidence also points to communal organization of labor to construct and maintain the canals and to the scheduling of daily activities beyond individual households. The development of early organized irrigation farming was combined with a hunting and gathering economy to support an increase in the local population size.

  19. The healing practices of a Peruvian shaman.

    PubMed

    Luna, L E

    1984-07-01

    The use of psychotropic plants among the mestizo population of the northwestern Amazon has already been the subject of some research. However, the field is far from fully investigated. Practitioners locally known by the name of "vegetalistas" or simply "maestros" have preserved considerable knowledge of plant lore, and still today contribute substantially to the health care of both rural and urban population. The present paper is based on field work with one particular such practitioner, Don Emilio Andrade Gómez, a 65-year-old shaman who lives in the vicinity of Iquitos (3 degrees 50S 73 degrees 15W), northeastern Peru. Some of the basic ideas of his cosmovision are presented. Special attention is given to the concept of "doctor" or "plant teacher", applied to certain plants which are supposed to "teach medicine", if the appropriate conditions of isolation and diet are observed. Some of these plants are added to the hallucinogenic beverage known in the region by the Quéchua name ayahuasca, made from the stem of Banisteriopsis species, and one or several additives. During the period of isolation the spirits of these plants teach the initiate certain melodies or "icaros" that he will later use when practising his shamanistic activities. During field work in 1981 and 1982 the author collected various specimens of "plant teachers", part of which have now been identified, and are also presented. PMID:6387284

  20. Child Health and NGOs in Peruvian Provinces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Frank W.; Merschrod, Kris

    2010-01-01

    Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are widely accepted in developing countries as a crucial organizational asset. They combine entrepreneurship, provision of quasi-government services and donor financing, but their conceptual status is unclear. Are they the organizational embodiments of social capital, generating cohesion and superior…

  1. Revising the nitrogen cycle in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Lam, Phyllis; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; van de Vossenberg, Jack; Schmid, Markus; Woebken, Dagmar; Gutiérrez, Dimitri; Amann, Rudolf; Jetten, Mike S M; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2009-03-24

    The oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) is 1 of the 3 major regions in the world where oceanic nitrogen is lost in the pelagic realm. The recent identification of anammox, instead of denitrification, as the likely prevalent pathway for nitrogen loss in this OMZ raises strong questions about our understanding of nitrogen cycling and organic matter remineralization in these waters. Without detectable denitrification, it is unclear how NH(4)(+) is remineralized from organic matter and sustains anammox or how secondary NO(2)(-) maxima arise within the OMZ. Here we show that in the ETSP-OMZ, anammox obtains 67% or more of NO(2)(-) from nitrate reduction, and 33% or less from aerobic ammonia oxidation, based on stable-isotope pairing experiments corroborated by functional gene expression analyses. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was detected in an open-ocean setting. It occurred throughout the OMZ and could satisfy a substantial part of the NH(4)(+) requirement for anammox. The remaining NH(4)(+) came from remineralization via nitrate reduction and probably from microaerobic respiration. Altogether, deep-sea NO(3)(-) accounted for only approximately 50% of the nitrogen loss in the ETSP, rather than 100% as commonly assumed. Because oceanic OMZs seem to be expanding because of global climate change, it is increasingly imperative to incorporate the correct nitrogen-loss pathways in global biogeochemical models to predict more accurately how the nitrogen cycle in our future ocean may respond.

  2. Peruvian FSWs: understanding HPV and barriers to vaccination.

    PubMed

    Brown, Brandon; Carcamo, Cesar; Blas, Magaly M; Valderrama, Maria; Halsey, Neal

    2010-11-16

    Vaccine acceptability and vaccine-related knowledge data were collected from female sex workers (FSWs) in Lima, Peru to determine their awareness of HPV and barriers to the potential acceptability of HPV vaccine. FSWs were found to have low knowledge of HPV, HPV vaccine, and cervical cancer. Due to high reported sexual exposure, FSWs are likely at increased risk of cervical cancer, and should have access to HPV vaccine. FSWs should be targeted for HPV education campaigns and barriers to vaccination should be addressed. Future studies should assess HPV prevalence in this population and examine retention issues for vaccine dose completion. PMID:20932498

  3. Glacier loss and emerging hydrologic vulnerabilities in the Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, B. G.; McKenzie, J. M.; Baraer, M.; Lagos, P.; Lautz, L.; Carey, M.; Bury, J.; Crumley, R.; Wigmore, O.; Somers, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Accelerating glacier recession in the tropical Andes is transforming downstream hydrology, while increasing demands for water by end-users (even beyond the watershed limits) is complicating the assessment of vulnerability. Future scenarios of hydro-climatic vulnerability require a better understanding of coupled hydrologic and human systems, involving both multiscale process studies and more robust models of glacier-climate interactions. We synthesize research in two proglacial valleys of glacierized mountain ranges in different regions of Peru that are both in proximity to growing water usage from urban sectors, agriculture, hydroelectric generation, and mining. In both the Santa River watershed draining the Cordillera Blanca and the Shullcas River watershed below Hyuatapallana Mountain in Junin, glaciers have receded over 25% since the 1980s. Historical runoff and glacier data, combined with glacier-climate modeling, show a long-term decrease in discharge resulting from a net loss of stored water. We find evidence that this altered hydrology is transforming proglacial wetland ecology and water quality, even while water resource use has intensified. Beyond glaciers, our results show that over 60% of the dry season base flow in each watershed is groundwater sourced from heterogeneous aquifers. Municipal water supply in Huancayo already relies on 18 groundwater wells. Perceptions of water availability and actual water use practices remain relatively divorced from the actual water resources provided from each mountain range. Critical changes in glacier volume and water supply are not perceived or acknowledged consistently amongst different water users, nor reflected in water management decisions. In order to identify, understand, model, and adapt to climate-glacier-water changes, it is vital to integrate the analysis of water availability and groundwater processes (the domain of hydrologists) with that of water use (the focus for social scientists). Attention must be drawn to evaluating risks and adaptation options with rigorous, data-based scenario evaluations of how management decisions impact all end users.

  4. Factor Structure of Child Behavior Scale Scores in Peruvian Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Erin L.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Soto, Cesar Merino; Simmons, Crystal S.; Anguiano, Rebecca; Brett, Jeremy; Holman, Alea; Martin, Justin F.; Hata, Heidi K.; Roberts, Kimberly J.; Mello, Zena R.; Worrell, Frank C.

    2011-01-01

    Behavior rating scales aid in the identification of problem behaviors, as well as the development of interventions to reduce such behavior. Although scores on many behavior rating scales have been validated in the United States, there have been few such studies in other cultural contexts. In this study, the structural validity of scores on a…

  5. Birth weight and altitude: a study in Peruvian communities.

    PubMed

    Mortola, J P; Frappell, P B; Aguero, L; Armstrong, K

    2000-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that at high altitude birth weight decreases once a critical barometric pressure (Pb) is reached. Birth weight data covering the 1-year period from November 1997 to October 1998 were collected in Peru from the data files of 15 community and mining centers between sea level and 4575 m altitude. These centers are scattered along the main road that joins Lima (on the Pacific shore) to Cerro de Pasco (4330 m) and surroundings. Above approximately 2000 m (ie, at Pb below approximately 590 mm Hg, inspired O(2) partial pressure of approximately 114 mm Hg) and up to approximately 4500 m altitude birth weight declined at an average of 65 g for every additional 500 m altitude (or 105 g for every additional 50 mm Hg drop in Pb). This pattern did not differ between sexes. Averages and modal distributions of the birth weight from 2 hospitals in Cerro de Pasco (4330 m) serving different social groups were similar. Body length at birth was similar at various altitudes, with the exception of the 2 highest locations above 4500 m, where it was slightly reduced. From these data, together with additional data collected in the North of Peru (Chacas, 3360 m) and with results from other ethnic groups previously published, we conclude that the drop in birth weight at altitude is (1) apparent once the critical Pb of approximately 590 mm Hg is reached, corresponding to an altitude of approximately 2000 m, (2) proportional to the increase in altitude between approximately 2000 m and 4500 m, and (3) independent from socioeconomic factors.

  6. A Sociolinguistic Profile of the Peruvian Deaf Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Elizabeth; Parks, Jason

    2010-01-01

    A sociolinguistic survey of the sign language used by the deaf communities of Peru was conducted in November and December of 2007. For eight weeks, our survey team visited six deaf communities in the cities of Lima, Arequipa, Cusco, Trujillo, Chiclayo, and Iquitos. Using sociolinguistic questionnaires and recorded text testing (RTT) tools, we…

  7. Presence of Porocephalus clavatus (Arthropoda: Porocephalidae) in Peruvian Boidae snakes.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Puerta, Luis A; Lopez-Urbina, María T; Gonzalez, Armando E

    2011-09-27

    The pentastome species, Porocephalus clavatus, has been found to infect the lungs of two species of snakes in the family Boidae family (Boa constrictor and Epicrates cenchria). The individual of B. constrictor was collected in the Amazonian rainforest of Departamento Loreto, Peru. The E. cenchria was recovered from the pet trade in Lima, Peru's capital city. A total of 22 P. clavatus were collected and examined from these two snakes. This is the first report of P. clavatus in Peru. The morphology of the parasites and the possible importance in public and animal health are discussed.

  8. Primers of glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis from Peruvian rain forest plants.

    PubMed

    Taylor, W H; Sinha, A; Khan, I A; McDaniel, S T; Esko, J D

    1998-08-28

    We have developed a rapid, high throughput screening assay for compounds that alter the assembly of glycosaminoglycan chains in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The assay uses autoradiography to measure the binding of newly synthesized [35S]proteoglycans and [35S]glycosaminoglycans to a positively charged membrane. Screening over 1000 extracts from a random plant collection obtained from the Amazon rain forest yielded five plants that stimulated glycosaminoglycan assembly in both wild-type cells and a mutant cell line defective in xylosyltransferase (the first committed enzyme involved in glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis). Fractionation of an extract of Maieta guianensis by silica gel and reverse-phase chromatography yielded two pure compounds with stimulatory activity. Spectroscopic analysis by NMR and mass spectrometry revealed that the active principles were xylosides of dimethylated ellagic acid. One of the compounds also contained a galloyl group at C-3 of the xylose moiety. These findings suggest that plants and other natural products may be a source of agents that can potentially alter glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan formation in animal cells.

  9. Over three millennia of mercury pollution in the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Colin A; Balcom, Prentiss H; Biester, Harald; Wolfe, Alexander P

    2009-06-01

    We present unambiguous records of preindustrial atmospheric mercury (Hg) pollution, derived from lake-sediment cores collected near Huancavelica, Peru, the largest Hg deposit in the New World. Intensive Hg mining first began ca. 1400 BC, predating the emergence of complex Andean societies, and signifying that the region served as a locus for early Hg extraction. The earliest mining targeted cinnabar (HgS) for the production of vermillion. Pre-Colonial Hg burdens peak ca. 500 BC and ca. 1450 AD, corresponding to the heights of the Chavín and Inca states, respectively. During the Inca, Colonial, and industrial intervals, Hg pollution became regional, as evidenced by a third lake record approximately 225 km distant from Huancavelica. Measurements of sediment-Hg speciation reveal that cinnabar dust was initially the dominant Hg species deposited, and significant increases in deposition were limited to the local environment. After conquest by the Inca (ca. 1450 AD), smelting was adopted at the mine and Hg pollution became more widely circulated, with the deposition of matrix-bound phases of Hg predominating over cinnabar dust. Our results demonstrate the existence of a major Hg mining industry at Huancavelica spanning the past 3,500 years, and place recent Hg enrichment in the Andes in a broader historical context. PMID:19451629

  10. Birth weight and altitude: a study in Peruvian communities.

    PubMed

    Mortola, J P; Frappell, P B; Aguero, L; Armstrong, K

    2000-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that at high altitude birth weight decreases once a critical barometric pressure (Pb) is reached. Birth weight data covering the 1-year period from November 1997 to October 1998 were collected in Peru from the data files of 15 community and mining centers between sea level and 4575 m altitude. These centers are scattered along the main road that joins Lima (on the Pacific shore) to Cerro de Pasco (4330 m) and surroundings. Above approximately 2000 m (ie, at Pb below approximately 590 mm Hg, inspired O(2) partial pressure of approximately 114 mm Hg) and up to approximately 4500 m altitude birth weight declined at an average of 65 g for every additional 500 m altitude (or 105 g for every additional 50 mm Hg drop in Pb). This pattern did not differ between sexes. Averages and modal distributions of the birth weight from 2 hospitals in Cerro de Pasco (4330 m) serving different social groups were similar. Body length at birth was similar at various altitudes, with the exception of the 2 highest locations above 4500 m, where it was slightly reduced. From these data, together with additional data collected in the North of Peru (Chacas, 3360 m) and with results from other ethnic groups previously published, we conclude that the drop in birth weight at altitude is (1) apparent once the critical Pb of approximately 590 mm Hg is reached, corresponding to an altitude of approximately 2000 m, (2) proportional to the increase in altitude between approximately 2000 m and 4500 m, and (3) independent from socioeconomic factors. PMID:10700688

  11. Childhood Abuse and Early Menarche among Peruvian Women

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Yasmin V.; Sanchez, Sixto E.; Nicolaidis, Christina; Garcia, Pedro J.; Gelaye, Bizu; Zhong, Qiuyue; Williams, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Childhood abuse has been associated with age of menarche in some studies, but not all, and few have assessed the independent associations of sexual and physical abuse with early menarche. We examined the association between childhood abuse and early menarche among pregnant women in Lima, Peru. Methods Multinomial logistic regression procedures were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for early menarche (≤11 years) in relation to any physical or sexual childhood abuse, physical abuse only, sexual abuse only and both physical and sexual abuse in a cohort of 1,499 pregnant (first trimester) women. Results Approximately 69% of participants reported experiencing physical or sexual abuse in childhood. The frequencies of physical abuse only, sexual abuse only and both physical and sexual abuse were 37.4%, 7.7% and 24.5%, respectively. Compared with women who reported no childhood abuse, those who reported any childhood abuse had a 1.38-fold increased odds of early menarche (95% CI: 1.01–1.87). Compared to no abuse, the odds of early menarche was 1.60-fold among women with childhood sexual abuse only (OR=1.60; 95% CI 0.93–2.74) and 1.56-fold for those with both physical and sexual abuse (OR=1.56; 95% CI 1.07–2.25) during childhood. Isolated physical abuse was weakly associated with early menarche (OR=1.23; 95% CI 0.87–1.74). There was no clear evidence of association of childhood abuse with late menarche (≥15 years). Conclusion Childhood abuse, particularly joint physical and sexual abuse, is associated with early menarche. Our findings add to an expanding body of studies documenting the enduring adverse health consequences of childhood abuse. PMID:25620302

  12. Forest canopy gap distributions in the southern Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Kellner, James R; Kennedy-Bowdoin, Ty; Knapp, David E; Anderson, Christopher; Martin, Roberta E

    2013-01-01

    Canopy gaps express the time-integrated effects of tree failure and mortality as well as regrowth and succession in tropical forests. Quantifying the size and spatial distribution of canopy gaps is requisite to modeling forest functional processes ranging from carbon fluxes to species interactions and biological diversity. Using high-resolution airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), we mapped and analyzed 5,877,937 static canopy gaps throughout 125,581 ha of lowland Amazonian forest in Peru. Our LiDAR sampling covered a wide range of forest physiognomies across contrasting geologic and topographic conditions, and on depositional floodplain and erosional terra firme substrates. We used the scaling exponent of the Zeta distribution (λ) as a metric to quantify and compare the negative relationship between canopy gap frequency and size across sites. Despite variable canopy height and forest type, values of λ were highly conservative (λ mean  = 1.83, s  = 0.09), and little variation was observed regionally among geologic substrates and forest types, or at the landscape level comparing depositional-floodplain and erosional terra firme landscapes. λ-values less than 2.0 indicate that these forests are subjected to large gaps that reset carbon stocks when they occur. Consistency of λ-values strongly suggests similarity in the mechanisms of canopy failure across a diverse array of lowland forests in southwestern Amazonia. PMID:23613748

  13. Brucellar arthritis: a study of 39 Peruvian families.

    PubMed Central

    Gotuzzo, E; Seas, C; Guerra, J G; Carrillo, C; Bocanegra, T S; Calvo, A; Castañeda, O; Alarcón, G S

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to characterise the articular manifestation of Brucella melitensis within a family in Peru. From January 1981 to June 1986, 39 families with 232 individuals were evaluated. Brucellosis was diagnosed in 118 family members (attack rate of 50.9%). A lower attack rate was observed in children less than 10 years' old compared with other age groups (p less than 0.02). Complete clinical data were available in 92 of the 118 affected members. Moderate and severe forms of the diseases were more prevalent in women than in men (41.8% v 13.5%; p less than 0.001). Twenty eight of the 92 patients developed some brucellar complications; the articular involvement was the most prevalent (23.9%). Arthritis was also more common in women than in men (34.5% v 8.1%; p less than 0.01). Children appeared to have less articular involvement. Overall, the following pattern was observed: peripheral arthritis (54.5%); unilateral sacroiliitis (23.0%); mixed arthritis (4.5%), and spondylitis (9.1%). Spondylitis was seen only in the elderly with chronic brucellosis. Four patients developed extra-articular rheumatism. Within members of family groups, brucellar arthritis occurred less frequently than in individual patients from the same hospital. This suggests that many family cases were diagnosed in the early stages. PMID:3662637

  14. Susceptibility of Peruvian mosquitoes to eastern equine encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Turell, M J; O'Guinn, M L; Dohm, D; Zyzak, M; Watts, D; Fernandez, R; Calampa, C; Klein, T A; Jones, J W

    2008-07-01

    Mosquitoes were collected in the Amazon Basin, near Iquitos, Peru, and used in experimental studies to evaluate their susceptibility to strains of eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) that were isolated from mosquitoes captured within 20 km of Iquitos. When fed on hamsters or chickens with a viremia of 4105 plaque-forming units (PFU) of EEEV/ml, Culex pedroi Sirivanakarn and Belkin, Aedesfulvus (Wiedemann), Psorophora albigenu (Peryassu), and Psorophoraferox (Von Humboldt) were susceptible to infection, whereas none of the Aedes serratus (Theobald), Culex vomerifer Komp, Culex gnomatos Sallum, Huchings, and Ferreira, Culex portesi Senevet and Abonnenc, or Culex coronator Dyar and Knab became infected, even though they fed on the same viremic blood sources. When these mosquito species fed on animals with viremias of approximately 10(8) PFU/ml, Cx. pedroi, Ae.II (Brazil-Peru) and a lineage III (Argentina-Panama) isolate of EEEV. This study, combined with the repeated isolation of strains of EEEV from Cx. pedroi captured in the Amazon Basin region of Peru, suggests that Cx. pedroi may be the primary enzootic vector of EEEV in this region.

  15. Revising the nitrogen cycle in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Lam, Phyllis; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; van de Vossenberg, Jack; Schmid, Markus; Woebken, Dagmar; Gutiérrez, Dimitri; Amann, Rudolf; Jetten, Mike S M; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2009-03-24

    The oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) is 1 of the 3 major regions in the world where oceanic nitrogen is lost in the pelagic realm. The recent identification of anammox, instead of denitrification, as the likely prevalent pathway for nitrogen loss in this OMZ raises strong questions about our understanding of nitrogen cycling and organic matter remineralization in these waters. Without detectable denitrification, it is unclear how NH(4)(+) is remineralized from organic matter and sustains anammox or how secondary NO(2)(-) maxima arise within the OMZ. Here we show that in the ETSP-OMZ, anammox obtains 67% or more of NO(2)(-) from nitrate reduction, and 33% or less from aerobic ammonia oxidation, based on stable-isotope pairing experiments corroborated by functional gene expression analyses. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was detected in an open-ocean setting. It occurred throughout the OMZ and could satisfy a substantial part of the NH(4)(+) requirement for anammox. The remaining NH(4)(+) came from remineralization via nitrate reduction and probably from microaerobic respiration. Altogether, deep-sea NO(3)(-) accounted for only approximately 50% of the nitrogen loss in the ETSP, rather than 100% as commonly assumed. Because oceanic OMZs seem to be expanding because of global climate change, it is increasingly imperative to incorporate the correct nitrogen-loss pathways in global biogeochemical models to predict more accurately how the nitrogen cycle in our future ocean may respond. PMID:19255441

  16. Outbreak of human rabies in the Peruvian jungle.

    PubMed

    Lopez, A; Miranda, P; Tejada, E; Fishbein, D B

    1992-02-15

    Transmission of rabies to man by vampire bats has been known for 60 years but there have been few reports of the features of rabies transmitted in this way. These aspects of the disease were investigated during an outbreak in Peru in early 1990. Between Jan 1 and April 30, 1990, 29 (5%) of 636 residents of the two rural communities in the Amazon Jungle in Peru acquired an illness characterised by hydrophobia, fever, and headache and died shortly thereafter. A census in one of the two towns revealed that the proportion affected was significantly higher for 5-14 year olds (17%) than for other age-groups (p less than 10(-5). Interviews conducted with 23 of the patients or their families revealed that 22 (96%) had a history of bat bite, compared with 66 (22%) of 301 community members who remained healthy (p less than 10(-6). A rabies virus strain identical to those isolated from vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) was isolated from the brain of the only person on whom necropsy could be done. Because of the extreme isolation of this and other communities affected by bat-transmitted rabies, preventive measures should be directed at decreasing the risk of nocturnal exposure to bats by bat proofing dwellings or use of mosquito nets and at prompt wound care. Rabies pre-exposure or postexposure vaccination is clearly indicated, but may not be feasible in these isolated populations. PMID:1346669

  17. Forest Canopy Gap Distributions in the Southern Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Gregory P.; Kellner, James R.; Kennedy-Bowdoin, Ty; Knapp, David E.; Anderson, Christopher; Martin, Roberta E.

    2013-01-01

    Canopy gaps express the time-integrated effects of tree failure and mortality as well as regrowth and succession in tropical forests. Quantifying the size and spatial distribution of canopy gaps is requisite to modeling forest functional processes ranging from carbon fluxes to species interactions and biological diversity. Using high-resolution airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), we mapped and analyzed 5,877,937 static canopy gaps throughout 125,581 ha of lowland Amazonian forest in Peru. Our LiDAR sampling covered a wide range of forest physiognomies across contrasting geologic and topographic conditions, and on depositional floodplain and erosional terra firme substrates. We used the scaling exponent of the Zeta distribution (λ) as a metric to quantify and compare the negative relationship between canopy gap frequency and size across sites. Despite variable canopy height and forest type, values of λ were highly conservative (λ mean  = 1.83, s  = 0.09), and little variation was observed regionally among geologic substrates and forest types, or at the landscape level comparing depositional-floodplain and erosional terra firme landscapes. λ-values less than 2.0 indicate that these forests are subjected to large gaps that reset carbon stocks when they occur. Consistency of λ-values strongly suggests similarity in the mechanisms of canopy failure across a diverse array of lowland forests in southwestern Amazonia. PMID:23613748

  18. Parasitic infections in ornamental cichlid fish in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Aguinaga, Jefferson Yunis; Marcusso, Paulo Fernandes; Claudiano, Gustavo da Silva; Lima, Bruno Tadeu Marotta; Marotta, Bruno L; Sebastião, Fernanda de Alexandre; Fernandes, João Batista Kochenborger; de Moraes, Flávio Ruas; de Moraes, Julieta Rodini Engracia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and seasonal distribution of the main parasite species in Amazonian ornamental cichlids that affect their trade. The study was conducted from August 2007 to September 2009. We sampled 3042 specimens from 9 different species, of which 9.47% had at least one type of external parasite. 81.25% of the cases occurred in the dry season. Crenicichla anthurus (28.57%) was the most parasitized, followed by Aequidens diadema (26.32%), Pterophyllum scalare (22.69%), Cichlasoma sp. (9.52%), Apistogramma sp. (3.88%) and Symphysodon aequifasciatus (3.66%). Monogenea was the most abundant group of parasites, occurring in 66.67% of the cases, of which 96.88% occurred in the dry season. This parasite infested 95.68% of Pterophyllum scalare, 76.67% of Apistogramma sp, 33.33% of Cichlasoma sp. and 23.81% of Symphysodon aequifasciatus cases. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis infested 100% of Aequidens diadema, 76.19% of Symphysodon aequifasciatus, 66.67% of Cichlasoma sp, 41.67% of Crenicichla anthurus and 23.33% of Apistogramma sp cases. Myxosporidia infested 58.33% of Crenicichla anthurus. Trichodina infested 4.32% of Pterophyllum scalare. The prevalence of these parasites is related to the season, preferred habitat, fish behavior, individual susceptibility and handling of animals during transportation by fishermen. PMID:25909258

  19. Landscape-scale forest disturbance regimes in southern Peruvian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Doreen S; Hill, Ross A; Hopkinson, Chris; Baker, Timothy R

    2013-10-01

    Landscape-scale gap-size frequency distributions in tropical forests are a poorly studied but key ecological variable. Currently, a scale gap currently exists between local-scale field-based studies and those employing regional-scale medium-resolution satellite data. Data at landscape scales but of fine resolution would, however, facilitate investigation into a range of ecological questions relating to gap dynamics. These include whether canopy disturbances captured in permanent sample plots (PSPs) are representative of those in their surrounding landscape, and whether disturbance regimes vary with forest type. Here, therefore, we employ airborne LiDAR data captured over 142.5 km2 of mature, swamp, and regenerating forests in southeast Peru to assess the landscape-scale disturbance at a sampling resolution of up to 2 m. We find that this landscape is characterized by large numbers of small gaps; large disturbance events are insignificant and infrequent. Of the total number of gaps that are 2 m2 or larger in area, just 0.45% were larger than 100 m2, with a power-law exponent (alpha) value of the gap-size frequency distribution of 2.22. However, differences in disturbance regimes are seen among different forest types, with a significant difference in the alpha value of the gap-size frequency distribution observed for the swamp/regenerating forests compared with the mature forests at higher elevations. Although a relatively small area of the total forest of this region was investigated here, this study presents an unprecedented assessment of this landscape with respect to its gap dynamics. This is particularly pertinent given the range of forest types present in the landscape and the differences observed. The coupling of detailed insights into forest properties and growth provided by PSPs with the broader statistics of disturbance events using remote sensing is recommended as a strong basis for scaling-up estimates of landscape and regional-scale carbon balance.

  20. [Epidemiologic survey of intestinal parasitoses in Peruvian Amazonia].

    PubMed

    Bourée, P; David, P; Basset, D; Coco, O; Beauvais, B; David-Julien, M C; Pougnet, A

    1984-01-01

    An epidemiological survey was carried out in 4 native villages from tribe Cashibo, in Amazonia (Peru). Among 165 stools examination, 92% were positives for helminthic (hookworms: 72%, roundworms and whipworms: 55% each, strongyloides: 5%) and protozoan infections (Entamoeba coli and Endolimax nana: 50% each, Entamoeba histolytica 24%, Giardia intestinalis 17%). Balantidium coli is not seldom (6%). Polyparasitism, very frequent, is reported with a maximum of 10 species. The most important villages are the most infested. Several factors can explain these results: lack of hygien and treatment, and no sanitary education. These rates are among the highest recorded for the South-American Indian people. PMID:6525727

  1. New leishmanicidal stilbenes from a Peruvian folk medicine, Lonchocarpus nicou.

    PubMed

    Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kiuchi, Fumiyuki; Yamanaka, Azusa; Obu, Akihiro; Wada, Hiroshi; Mori-Yasumoto, Kanami; Kawahara, Nobuo; Flores, Diana; Palacios, Olga; Sekita, Setsuko; Satake, Motoyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Two new stilbenes, 1 and 2, were isolated as leishmanicidal constituents from the methanolic extract of Lonchocarpus nicou leaves and stem, together with five known stilbenes and rotenoids. Their chemical structures were determined by spectral methods. Among them, the cis stilbene-type compounds 1 and 4 showed potent leishmanicidal activity (IC50: 5.5, 3.9 µg/mL), while the trans stilbene-type compounds 2 and 5, and rotenoids 6 and 7, showed moderate activities (IC50: 9.9, 12.8, 22.6, 19.6 µg/mL, respectively).

  2. Corpus Planning for the Southern Peruvian Quechua Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coronel-Molina, Serafin M.

    1997-01-01

    The discussion of corpus planning for the Southern Quechua language variety of Peru examines issues of graphization, standardization, modernization, and renovation of Quechua in the face of increasing domination by the Spanish language. The efforts of three major groups of linguists and other scholars working on language planning in Peru, and the…

  3. Over three millennia of mercury pollution in the Peruvian Andes

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Colin A.; Balcom, Prentiss H.; Biester, Harald; Wolfe, Alexander P.

    2009-01-01

    We present unambiguous records of preindustrial atmospheric mercury (Hg) pollution, derived from lake-sediment cores collected near Huancavelica, Peru, the largest Hg deposit in the New World. Intensive Hg mining first began ca. 1400 BC, predating the emergence of complex Andean societies, and signifying that the region served as a locus for early Hg extraction. The earliest mining targeted cinnabar (HgS) for the production of vermillion. Pre-Colonial Hg burdens peak ca. 500 BC and ca. 1450 AD, corresponding to the heights of the Chavín and Inca states, respectively. During the Inca, Colonial, and industrial intervals, Hg pollution became regional, as evidenced by a third lake record ≈225 km distant from Huancavelica. Measurements of sediment-Hg speciation reveal that cinnabar dust was initially the dominant Hg species deposited, and significant increases in deposition were limited to the local environment. After conquest by the Inca (ca. 1450 AD), smelting was adopted at the mine and Hg pollution became more widely circulated, with the deposition of matrix-bound phases of Hg predominating over cinnabar dust. Our results demonstrate the existence of a major Hg mining industry at Huancavelica spanning the past 3,500 years, and place recent Hg enrichment in the Andes in a broader historical context. PMID:19451629

  4. Optimal birthweights in Peruvian populations at high and low altitudes.

    PubMed

    Beall, C M

    1981-11-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that optimum birthweight for survival is lower among hospital-born infants in Puno, Peru (altitude 3860 m) than that among their counterparts at low altitude in Tacna, Peru (altitude 600 m). The data are derived from hospital birth records for 1971 and 1972 and municipal death records for 1971 through 1973. Linking these records permits analysis of the patterns of mortality in relation to birthweight. Stabilizing selection upon birthweight is operating in both populations. The high altitude population has a lower mean birthweight and a lower optimal birthweight. The Puno population is closer to its optimal birthweight distribution and, as a result of mortality during infancy, is approaching its optimum birthweight distribution for survival more rapidly than the Tacna population. It appears that the high altitude Puno population may well be adapted to its environment in the sense that there is less selective mortality on birthweight phenotypes.

  5. Infrared measurements of pristine and disturbed soils 1. Spectral contrast differences between field and laboratory data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Lucey, P.G.; Horton, K.A.; Winter, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of emissivity spectra (8-13 ??m) of pristine soils in the field with laboratory reflectance spectra of the same soils showed that laboratory spectra tend to have less spectral contrast than field spectra (see following article). We investigated this the phenomenon by measuring emission spectra of both undisturbed (in situ) and disturbed soils (prepared as if for transport to the laboratory). The disturbed soils had much less spectral contrast than the undisturbed soils in the reststrahlen region near 9 ??m. While the increased porosity of a disturbed soil can decrease spectral contrast due to multiple scattering, we hypothesize that the effect is dominantly the result of a difference in grain-size distribution of the optically active layer (i.e., fine particle coatings). This concept was proposed by Salisbury et al. (1994) to explain their observations that soils washed free of small particles adhering the larger grains exhibited greater spectral contrast than unwashed soils. Our laboratory reflectance spectra of wet- and dry-sieved soils returned from field sites also show greater spectral contrast for wet-sieved (washed) soils. We therefore propose that undisturbed soils in the field can be characterized as 'clean' soils (washed free of fine particles at the surface due to rain and wind action) and that disturbed soils represent 'dirty' soils (contaminated with fine particle coatings). The effect of packing soils in the field and laboratory also increases spectral contrast but not to the magnitude of that observed for undisturbed and wet-sieved soils. Since it is a common practice to use laboratory spectra of field samples to interpret spectra obtained remotely, we suggest that the influence of fine particle coatings on disturbed soils, if unrecognized, could influence interpretations of remote sensing data.Comparison of emissivity spectra (8-13 ??m) of pristine soils in the field with laboratory reflectance spectra of the same soils showed that laboratory spectra tend to have less spectral contrast than field spectra (see following article). We investigated this phenomenon by measuring emission spectra of both undisturbed (in situ) and disturbed soils (prepared as if for transport to the laboratory). The disturbed soils had much less spectral contrast than the undisturbed soils in the reststrahlen region near 9 ??m. While the increased porosity of a disturbed soil can decrease spectral contrast due to multiple scattering, we hypothesize that the effect is dominantly the result of a difference in grain-size distribution of the optically active layer (i.e., fine particle coatings). This concept was proposed by Salisbury et al. (1994) to explain their observations that soils washed free of small particles adhering to larger grains exhibited greater spectral contrast than unwashed soils. Our laboratory reflectance spectra of wet- and dry-sieved soils returned from field sites also show greater spectral contrast for wet-sieved (washed) soils. We therefore propose that undisturbed soils in the field can be characterized as `clean' soils (washed free of fine particles at the surface due to rain and wind action) and that disturbed soils represent `dirty' soils (contaminated with fine particle coatings). The effect of packing soils in the field and laboratory also increases spectral contrast but not to the magnitude of that observed for undisturbed and wet-sieved soils. Since it is a common practice to use laboratory spectra of field samples to interpret spectra obtained remotely, we suggest that the influence of fine particle coatings on disturbed soils, if unrecognized, could influence interpretations of remote sensing data.

  6. A model of thermal conductivity for planetary soils: 1. Theory for unconsolidated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-09-01

    We present a model of heat conduction for mono-sized spherical particulate media under stagnant gases based on the kinetic theory of gases, numerical modeling of Fourier's law of heat conduction, theoretical constraints on the gas thermal conductivity at various Knudsen regimes, and laboratory measurements. Incorporating the effect of the temperature allows for the derivation of the pore-filling gas conductivity and bulk thermal conductivity of samples using additional parameters (pressure, gas composition, grain size, and porosity). The radiative and solid-to-solid conductivities are also accounted for. Our thermal model reproduces the well-established bulk thermal conductivity dependency of a sample with the grain size and pressure and also confirms laboratory measurements finding that higher porosities generally lead to lower conductivities. It predicts the existence of the plateau conductivity at high pressure, where the bulk conductivity does not depend on the grain size. The good agreement between the model predictions and published laboratory measurements under a variety of pressures, temperatures, gas compositions, and grain sizes provides additional confidence in our results. On Venus, Earth, and Titan, the pressure and temperature combinations are too high to observe a soil thermal conductivity dependency on the grain size, but each planet has a unique thermal inertia due to their different surface temperatures. On Mars, the temperature and pressure combination is ideal to observe the soil thermal conductivity dependency on the average grain size. Thermal conductivity models that do not take the temperature and the pore-filling gas composition into account may yield significant errors.

  7. Water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a drained heavy clay soil: 1. Preferential flow processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haria, A. H.; Johnson, A. C.; Bell, J. P.; Batchelor, C. H.

    1994-12-01

    The processes and mechanisms that control pesticide transport from drained heavy clay catchments are being studied at Wytham Farm (Oxford University) in southern England. In the first field season field-drain water contained high concentrations of pesticide. Soil studies demonstrated that the main mechanism for pesticide translocation was by preferential flow processes, both over the soil surface and through the soil profile via a macropore system that effectively by-passed the soil matrix. This macropore system included worm holes, shrinkage cracks and cracks resulting from ploughing. Rainfall events in early winter rapidly created a layer of saturation in the A horizon perched above a B horizon of very low hydraulic conductivity. Drain flow was initiated when the saturated layer in the A horizon extended into the upper 0.06m of the soil profile; thereafter water moved down slope via horizontal macropores possibly through a band of incorporated straw residues. These horizontal pathways for water movement connected with the fracture system of the mole drains, thus feeding the drains. Overland flow occurred infrequently during the season.

  8. A Model of Thermal Conductivity for Planetary Soils: 1. Theory for Unconsolidated Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a model of heat conduction for mono-sized spherical particulate media under stagnant gases based on the kinetic theory of gases, numerical modeling of Fourier s law of heat conduction, theoretical constraints on the gas thermal conductivity at various Knudsen regimes, and laboratory measurements. Incorporating the effect of the temperature allows for the derivation of the pore-filling gas conductivity and bulk thermal conductivity of samples using additional parameters (pressure, gas composition, grain size, and porosity). The radiative and solid-to-solid conductivities are also accounted for. Our thermal model reproduces the well-established bulk thermal conductivity dependency of a sample with the grain size and pressure and also confirms laboratory measurements finding that higher porosities generally lead to lower conductivities. It predicts the existence of the plateau conductivity at high pressure, where the bulk conductivity does not depend on the grain size. The good agreement between the model predictions and published laboratory measurements under a variety of pressures, temperatures, gas compositions, and grain sizes provides additional confidence in our results. On Venus, Earth, and Titan, the pressure and temperature combinations are too high to observe a soil thermal conductivity dependency on the grain size, but each planet has a unique thermal inertia due to their different surface temperatures. On Mars, the temperature and pressure combination is ideal to observe the soil thermal conductivity dependency on the average grain size. Thermal conductivity models that do not take the temperature and the pore-filling gas composition into account may yield significant errors.

  9. Comparative Denitrification of Selected Microorganisms in a Culture Medium and in Autoclaved Soil1

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Cheryl L.; Bollag, Jean-Marc

    1974-01-01

    The denitrifying behavior of selected soil bacteria was compared in a culture solution and in soil that was sterilized by autoclaving. The essential characteristics concerning nitrate reduction and the formation of nitrogenous gases did not change significantly for most bacteria in the two environments. Bacteria whose denitrification product was nitrous oxide evolved the same gas both in soil and in a liquid system, whereas other bacteria formed only nitrogen gas. The validity of laboratory observations in relation to field studies in the domain of denitrification is discussed and evaluated. PMID:4207762

  10. Language and the Formation of Masculine Potency in Peruvian Aymara Boyhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    The dissertation project is a study of how childrens' increasingly skillful use of certain language forms ("stance forms") help them to more effectively perform culturally salient social identities in discourse. Although scholars have long claimed that language use helps to position speakers in terms of socially recognizable identities, very…

  11. Ovarian features of the wild collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu) from the northeastern Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Pedro; Fenech, Mar; Bodmer, Richard E; Lopez-Bejar, Manel

    2006-07-01

    In this study, the ovaries of 27 wild collared peccaries (Tayassu tajacu) from the Amazonian region of northeastern Peru were examined macroscopically and microscopically, and expression of major steroidogenic enzymes was detected by immunohistochemistry. Our observations suggest a mean ovulation rate of 2.3 +/- 0.6 follicles and a low rate of reproductive wastage (0.4 +/- 0.6 oocytes or embryos per pregnancy). The collared peccary seems to exhibit follicular waves involving the synchronous growth of a cohort of follicles, several of which seem to attain selection. The presence of antral follicles in pregnant females suggests that follicular turnover continues during pregnancy. In cyclic animals, corpora lutea were characterised by the presence of distinct large and small luteal cell populations. The luteal volume in pregnant females was larger than that recorded for non-pregnant females. Through immunohistochemistry, it was observed that luteal cells from active corpora lutea exhibit intensive 3beta-HSD expression in advanced stages of pregnancy. This suggests that the corpora lutea seems to remain steroidogenically active throughout pregnancy and likely contribute to progesterone production during pregnancy.

  12. ‘Mystery big cats’ in the Peruvian Amazon: morphometrics solve a cryptozoological mystery

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Manabu; Hocking, Peter; Sanchez, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Two big cat skulls procured from hunters of Yanachaga National Park, Peru, were reported as those of cats informally dubbed the ‘striped tiger’ and ‘anomalous jaguar’. Observations suggested that both skulls were distinct from those of jaguars, associated descriptions of integument did not conform to this species, and it has been implied that both represent members of one or two novel species. We sought to resolve the identity of the skulls using morphometrics. DNA could not be retrieved since both had been boiled as part of the defleshing process. We took 36 cranial and 13 mandibular measurements and added them to a database incorporating nearly 300 specimens of over 30 felid species. Linear discriminant analysis resolved both specimens as part of Panthera onca with high probabilities for cranial and mandibular datasets. Furthermore, the specimens exhibit characters typical of jaguars. If the descriptions of their patterning and pigmentation are accurate, we assume that both individuals were aberrant. PMID:24688867

  13. [Complicated chickenpox in a national pediatric Peruvian hospital, 2001-2011].

    PubMed

    Miranda-Choque, Edwin; Candela-Herrera, Jorge; Díaz-Pera, Javier; Farfán-Ramos, Sonia; Muñoz-Junes, Edith María; Escalante-Santivañez, Imelda Rita

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of complicated chickenpox cases seen at the National Institute of Children's Health (INSN, Spanish acronym) of Peru from 2001 to 2011. A case series was collected, including a total of 1,073 children with complicated chickenpox. The median age was 2.5 years (IQR 1.1-4.8 years), of which 578 (54%) were male. The most frequent complications were secondary skin and soft tissue infections with 768 cases (72%). 13 deaths (1.4%) were recorded. In conclusion, the hospitalizations due to complicated chickenpox in the INSN included mostly children under five, with a short stay and a low proportion of deaths most complications being related to secondary skin and soft tissue infections.

  14. [Geographic Altitude of Residence and Alcohol Dependence in a Peruvian Population].

    PubMed

    Quiñones-Laveriano, Dante Manuel; Espinoza-Chiong, César; Scarsi-Mejia, Ottavia; Rojas-Camayo, José; Mejia, Christian Richard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between alcohol dependence and altitude of residence in 11 villages in two high altitude areas of Peru. An analytical cross-sectional study was performed using a survey conducted by physicians in primary health care in 11 villages until 2013, that were divided into low altitude (≤2500m asl (above sea level)), and high altitude (>2500m asl) areas. The CAGE test for alcoholism (cut point, ≥2) was applied to those who responded positively when asked if they consumed alcohol. Statistical associations were obtained with generalised linear models Of the 737 participants, 51% were women and the median age was 36 years [interquartile range, 25-50], 334 (45%) lived at low altitude, and 113 (15%) had alcohol dependence. The highest frequency of alcoholism was positively associated with being a village considered extremely poor (Likelihood Ratio (LP)=2.42; 95%CI, 1.40-4.19), while being female (LP=0.44; 95%CI, 0.23-0.89) and residing at high altitude (LP=0.15; 95%CI, 0.07-0.31) were negatively associated. These were adjusted for nine socio-occupational and pathological variables. According to these data, there is a higher frequency of alcohol dependence in being, male, extremely poor, and residing at low altitude. These results should be taken into account by professionals who work in primary care and those involved in mental health care, because of their implications in society. PMID:27569012

  15. Birth in the Peruvian Andes: Physical and Behavioral Consequences in the Neonate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saco-Pollitt, Carmen

    1981-01-01

    Neonates born without complications to healthy mothers at 14,000 feet or at 490 feet above sea level were evaluated at 24-36- and 48-60-hours-of-life. In comparison with low-altitude infants, high-altitude infants were significantly lighter, shorter, had a smaller arm circumference, and presented more signs of behavioral immaturity in interactive…

  16. Peptoniphilus catoniae sp. nov., isolated from a human faecal sample from a traditional Peruvian coastal community.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nisha B; Tito, Raul Y; Obregón-Tito, Alexandra J; O'Neal, Lindsey; Trujillo-Villaroel, Omar; Marin-Reyes, Luis; Troncoso-Corzo, Luzmila; Guija-Poma, Emilio; Lewis, Cecil M; Lawson, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, coccus-shaped, obligately anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a faecal sample obtained from an individual in a traditional community located off the southern coast of Peru. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed the novel bacterium belonged to the genus Peptoniphilus but showed no particular relationship with any species, demonstrating less than 91 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with all members of the genus. The major cellular fatty acids of the novel isolate were determined to be C10 : 0, C14 : 0, C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω9c and C18 : 2ω6,9c/anteiso-C18 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 34.4 mol%. End-products of metabolism from peptone-yeast-glucose broth (PYG) were determined to be acetate and butyrate. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic results, the organism represents a novel species of the genus Peptoniphilus, for which the name Peptoniphilus catoniae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is M6.X2DT ( = DSM 29874T = CCUG 66798T). PMID:26907921

  17. Storm-triggered landslides in the Peruvian Andes and implications for topography, carbon cycles, and biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, K. E.; West, A. J.; Hilton, R. G.; Asner, G. P.; Quesada, C. A.; Silman, M. R.; Saatchi, S. S.; Farfan-Rios, W.; Martin, R. E.; Horwath, A. B.; Halladay, K.; New, M.; Malhi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we assess the geomorphic role of a rare, large-magnitude landslide event and consider the effect of this event on mountain forest ecosystems and the erosion of organic carbon in an Andean river catchment. Proximal triggers such as large rain storms are known to cause large numbers of landslides, but the relative effects of such low-frequency, high-magnitude events are not well known in the context of more regular, smaller events. We develop a 25 year duration, annual-resolution landslide inventory by mapping landslide occurrence in the Kosñipata Valley, Peru, from 1988 to 2012 using Landsat, Quickbird and Worldview satellite images. Catchment-wide landslide rates were high, at 0.076 % yr-1 by area, indicating landslides may completely turn over hillslopes every ~ 1320 years and strip 28 tC km-2 yr-1 of soil (73 %) and vegetation (27 %). A single rain storm in March 2010 accounted for 27 % of all landslide area observed during the 25 year study and removed 26 % of the organic carbon that was stripped from hillslopes by all landslides during the study. An approximately linear magnitude-frequency relationship for annual landslide areas suggests that large storms contribute an equivalent landslide failure area to the sum of smaller frequency landslides events occurring over the same period. However, the spatial distribution of landslides associated with the 2010 storm is distinct. On the basis of precipitation statistics and landscape morphology, we hypothesize that spatial focusing of storm-triggered landslide erosion at lower elevations in the Kosñipata catchment may be characteristic of longer-term patterns. These patterns may have implications for the source and composition of sediments and organic material supplied to river systems of the Amazon basin, and, through focusing of regular ecological disturbance, for the species composition of forested ecosystems in the region.

  18. On the mutual relationship of the equatorial electrojet, TEC and scintillation in the Peruvian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadka, Sovit M.; Valladares, Cesar; Pradipta, Rezy; Pacheco, Edgardo; Condor, Percy

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the interrelationship between the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) strength, Global Positioning System (GPS)-derived total electron content (TEC), and postsunset scintillation from ground observations with the aim of finding reliable precursors of the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities. Mutual relationship studies provide a possible route to predict the occurrence of TEC fluctuation and scintillation in the ionosphere during the late afternoon and night respectively based on daytime measurement of the equatorial ionosphere. Data from ground based observations in the low latitudes of the west American longitude sector were examined during the 2008 solar minimum. We find a strong relationship exists between the noontime equatorial electrojet and GPS-derived TEC distributions during the afternoon mediated by vertical E × B drift via the fountain effect, but there is little or no relationship with postsunset ionospheric scintillation.

  19. Description of the female of the Peruvian sand fly Lutzomyia reclusa (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae).

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Bernal, Sergio; Cáceres, Abraham G

    2011-03-01

    The female of the phlebotomine sand fly Lutzomyia reclusa Fernández & Rogers 1991 [= Pintomyia (Pifanomyia) reclusa (Fernández & Rogers) sensu Galati], is described for the first time, based on specimens collected in the Department of Cajamarca, in northern Peru. The female can be recognized from other species of the series pia, species group Verrucarum, by wing venation with beta shorter than half of alpha, labrum just shorter than head width but longer than flagellomere 1, palpomere 5 much longer than palpomere 3, arrangement of cibarial armature, and form of spermathecae and relative size of spermathecal ducts. Diagnostic characters and measurements of the male of Lu. reclusa are provided as well.

  20. Validation of the Alcohol Expectancy Questionnaire (AEQ-A) for Peruvian University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Aranibar, Cecilia Chau; Van den Broucke, Stephan; Fontaine, Johnny

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the adaptation of the Adolescent version of the Alcohol Expectancy Questionnaire (AEQ-A) for university students in Peru. 672 male and female university students enrolled in the first years at a private university in Peru completed the AEQ-A translated into Spanish. All 90 items were scored on 5-point rating scales. A principal…

  1. Cultural Differences in Early Math Skills among U.S., Taiwanese, Dutch, and Peruvian Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paik, Jae H.; van Gelderen, Loes; Gonzales, Manuel; de Jong, Peter F.; Hayes, Michael

    2011-01-01

    East Asian children have consistently outperformed children from other nations on mathematical tests. However, most previous cross-cultural studies mainly compared East Asian countries and the United States and have largely ignored cultures from other parts of the world. The present study explored cultural differences in young children's early…

  2. Ophioderma peruana, a new species of brittlestar (Echinodermata, Ophiuroidea, Ophiodermatidae) from the Peruvian coast.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Enríquez, Tania; Solís-Marín, Francisco A; Hooker, Yuri; Alfredo Laguarda-Figueras

    2013-01-01

    Ophioderma peruana sp. n. is a new species of Ophiodermatidae, extending the distribution of the genus Ophioderma to Lobos de Afuera Island, Peru, easily distinguishable from its congeners by its peculiarly fragmented dorsal arm plates. Dense granules, rounded or polygonal cover the disc, the radial shields may be naked or completely covered by granules. A good character for recognizing this species in the field is the dorsal side of the disc which is brown with disc granules lighter cream and brown, the arms are mottled with whitish spots and the ventral part of the disc on the interradial part is brown and the radial part bright yellow. PMID:24363579

  3. Ophioderma peruana, a new species of brittlestar (Echinodermata, Ophiuroidea, Ophiodermatidae) from the Peruvian coast

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Enríquez, Tania; Solís-Marín, Francisco A.; Hooker, Yuri; Alfredo Laguarda-Figueras

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Ophioderma peruana sp. n. is a new species of Ophiodermatidae, extending the distribution of the genus Ophioderma to Lobos de Afuera Island, Peru, easily distinguishable from its congeners by its peculiarly fragmented dorsal arm plates. Dense granules, rounded or polygonal cover the disc, the radial shields may be naked or completely covered by granules. A good character for recognizing this species in the field is the dorsal side of the disc which is brown with disc granules lighter cream and brown, the arms are mottled with whitish spots and the ventral part of the disc on the interradial part is brown and the radial part bright yellow. PMID:24363579

  4. Adapting to Uncertain Futures: Glacier Recession and Livelihood Vulnerability in the Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, J.

    2008-12-01

    With a large portion of the world's population dependent on hydrologic resources linked to tropical glaciers, the decline of these natural "water towers" has important repercussions for the social and ecological systems that depend on these vital reservoirs of freshwater. In Peru's Cordillera Blanca (the highest and most extensively glaciated range in the tropics) glacial melt water makes up a critical percentage of the discharge of a wide array of water courses, ranging from first-order, highland streams to the Rio Santa, one of the largest and most economically important rivers on Peru's Pacific slope. Climate change-induced warming is occurring rapidly in this region and glaciers have lost a significant percentage of their mass in the past 50 years. While there have been indications that significant and temporary increases in glacial meltwater discharge flows will take place, predictions for the coming decades suggest that these flows will decrease and be more variable across seasons in even the most glaciated catchments of the range. Current population levels and patterns of water use in the Central Andes suggest that many human communities are highly vulnerable to decreasing or variable quantities of water and other changes associated with climate change. Here will be presented the first results from two years of field work assessing human vulnerability to increasing hydrological variability due to glacier-recession and evaluating how changing access to water resources is contributing to livelihood adaptation and potential conflicts over resources in the Cordillera Blanca region of Peru. The findings are drawn from stratified case-study research in two communities and are comprised of an extensive set of key interviews with national, regional and local key informants and semi-structured household surveys that were sampled utilizing stratified systematic unaligned techniques. The results provide insights into key elements of household vulnerability, how households perceive climate-change related glacier recession in the region and the ways in which household livelihoods are already being significantly impacted by these changes. The findings demonstrate that there is significant and very compelling evidence that human vulnerability has been increasing rapidly in the region and serve as an important foundation for the identification of key vectors of social and economic change for future research.

  5. Sporangium Exposure and Spore Release in the Peruvian Maidenhair Fern (Adiantum peruvianum, Pteridaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Poppinga, Simon; Haushahn, Tobias; Warnke, Markus; Masselter, Tom; Speck, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the different processes involved in spore liberation in the polypod fern Adiantum peruvianum (Pteridaceae). Sporangia are being produced on the undersides of so-called false indusia, which are situated at the abaxial surface of the pinnule margins, and become exposed by a desiccation-induced movement of these pinnule flaps. The complex folding kinematics and functional morphology of false indusia are being described, and we discuss scenarios of movement initiation and passive hydraulic actuation of these structures. High-speed cinematography allowed for analyses of fast sporangium motion and for tracking ejected spores. Separation and liberation of spores from the sporangia are induced by relaxation of the annulus (the ‘throwing arm’ of the sporangium catapult) and conservation of momentum generated during this process, which leads to sporangium bouncing. The ultra-lightweight spores travel through air with a maximum velocity of ~5 m s-1, and a launch acceleration of ~6300g is measured. In some cases, the whole sporangium, or parts of it, together with contained spores break away from the false indusium and are shed as a whole. Also, spores can stick together and form spore clumps. Both findings are discussed in the context of wind dispersal. PMID:26444002

  6. High frequency of coinfecting enteropathogens in Aeromonas-associated diarrhea of hospitalized Peruvian infants.

    PubMed

    Pazzaglia, G; Sack, R B; Salazar, E; Yi, A; Chea, E; Leon-Barua, R; Guerrero, C E; Palomino, J

    1991-06-01

    Rectal swabs from 391 infants less than 18 months of age who were hospitalized with acute diarrhea and from 138 similarly aged healthy infants were examined for the etiologic agents of diarrhea. Aeromonas spp. were recovered from 205 of 391 (52.4%) diarrheic patients, whereas they were recovered from 12 of 138 (8.7%) controls (P less than 10(-11). Among the 205 Aeromonas-positive diarrheic patients, 118 (57.6%) were found to be coinfected with other common enteropathogens. Of the 164 Aeromonas-positive initial diarrheic specimens, 82 (50.0%) had one or more other enteropathogens present; 30 patients were coinfected with rotavirus, 20 with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, 16 with Campylobacter spp., 14 with Shigella spp., 13 with enteropathogenic E. coli, 4 with Vibrio spp., 1 with Salmonella spp., and 1 with Plesiomonas spp. of Aeromonas strains from cases compared with that from controls supports an etiologic role for this organism. However, frequent concomitant infections with other well-recognized enteropathogens and a lack of disease correlation with common Aeromonas phenotypes suggest that only a subset of Aeromonas strains may be diarrhea causing and that such strains may be common to several of the existing species.

  7. Clinical Presentation and Microarray Analysis of Peruvian Children with Atypical Development and/or Aberrant Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G.; Usrey, Kelly; Roberts, Jennifer L.; Schroeder, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    We report our experience with high resolution microarray analysis in infants and young children with developmental disability and/or aberrant behavior enrolled at the Centro Ann Sullivan del Peru in Lima, Peru, a low income country. Buccal cells were collected with cotton swabs from 233 participants for later DNA isolation and identification of copy number variation (deletions/duplications) and regions of homozygosity (ROH) for estimating consanguinity status in 15 infants and young children (12 males, 3 females; mean age ± SD = 28.1 m ±  7.9 m; age range 14 m–41 m) randomly selected for microarray analysis. An adequate DNA yield was found in about one-half of the enrolled participants. Ten participants showed deletions or duplications containing candidate genes reported to impact behavior or cognitive development. Five children had ROHs which could have harbored recessive gene alleles contributing to their clinical presentation. The coefficient of inbreeding was calculated and three participants showed first-second cousin relationships, indicating consanguinity. Our preliminary study showed that DNA isolated from buccal cells using cotton swabs was suboptimal, but yet in a subset of participants the yield was adequate for high resolution microarray analysis and several genes were found that impact development and behavior and ROHs identified to determine consanguinity status. PMID:25400949

  8. [Demographic characteristics of human papillomavirus detected by PCR-RFLP in peruvian women].

    PubMed

    Sullcahuaman-Allende, Yasser; Castro-Mujica, María Del Carmen; Mejía Farro, Roberto; Castaneda, Carlos A; Castillo, Miluska; Dolores-Cerna, Ketty; Poquioma, Ebert

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the sociodemographic characteristics of human papillomavirus (HPV) in patients referred to the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases (INEN) between 2012-2014, the detection of HPV in cervical cells was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In 465 cervical samples, 151 (32.5%) cases were HPV positive. The most common genotypes were HPV-16 (23.8%) and HPV-6 (11.9%). The presence of HPV was higher in women aged 17-29 years (OR = 2.64, 95% CI 1.14 to 6.13) and single women (OR = 2.31, 95% CI 1.37 to 3.91). The presence of genotypes of high-risk HPV was higher in single women (OR = 2.19, 95% CI 1.04 to 4.62). In conclusion, young and single women had a higher frequency of HPV-positive cases. Therefore participation by these groups should be emphasized in screening programs with combined molecular and cytological methods in order to detect the risk of developing cervical cancer in a timely manner. PMID:26580934

  9. Influence of Peruvian Flat-Subduction Dynamics on the Evolution of Western Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, Caroline; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina; Dávila, Federico

    2014-05-01

    Subducting slabs are the primary buoyancy force in the Earth's mantle and provide a critical source of surface deformation via their coupling to the upper plate. The impact of variations in slab morphology on this process however remains to be fully investigated. This is of particular importance for episodes of "flat" or "shallow" subduction that are often associated with slabs that have thickened oceanic crust. The shape and buoyancy content of these flat-slabs is therefore quite different to "normal" subduction scenarios. The consequences for dynamics of the mantle and how the upper plate deforms in response are not well understood. One way we can constrain this better is to study dynamic topography produced by active flat-slab systems, such as in Peru in South America, and compare them against observations from the geological record. Flat-subduction beneath Peru is thought to have begun during the Mid-Late Miocene. At the same time widespread subsidence occurred across western Amazonia resulting in the deposition of the Solimões Formation from the foredeep all the way up to the Purus Arch, 2000 km from the modern trench. We investigate how both long-wavelength changes of dynamic topography from the arrival of the flat-slab, as well as shorter wavelength flexure from Andean loading interacted to shape the modern day Amazonian landscape. We calculate dynamic topography of a slab model derived from the regional seismicity to provide a realistic flat-slab geometry that best defines the leading edge of subduction and therefore constrains the loci of dynamic subsidence. We find that >1 km of dynamic subsidence (~1500 km wide) is expected over 1000 km away from the trench. In contrast our flexural calculations predict 2.8 to 3.6 km of accommodation space that spans only 100 km across. We show that thick distal foreland accumulations of the Solimões Formation (up to 1.2 km deep), are beyond the influence of the narrow flexural subsidence but are well matched by our predicted dynamic topography. We therefore propose that a combination of uplift, flexure and dynamic topography during slab flattening in Peru is responsible for the sedimentation history of western Amazonia and the eventual configuration of the Amazon drainage basin we know today.

  10. Distribution models and species discovery: the story of a new Solanum species from the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Särkinen, Tiina; Gonzáles, Paúl; Knapp, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    A new species of Solanum sect. Solanum from Peru is described here. Solanum pseudoamericanum Särkinen, Gonzáles & S.Knapp sp. nov. is a member of the Morelloid clade of Solanum, and is characterized by the combination of mostly forked inflorescences, flowers with small stamens 2.5 mm long including the filament, and strongly exerted styles with capitate stigmas. The species was first thought to be restricted to the seasonally dry tropical forests of southern Peru along the dry valleys of Río Pampas and Río Apurímac. Results from species distribution modelling (SDM) analysis with climatic predictors identified further potential suitable habitat areas in northern and central Peru. These areas were visited during field work in 2013. A total of 17 new populations across the predicted distribution were discovered using the model-based sampling method, and five further collections were identified amongst herbarium loans. Although still endemic to Peru, Solanum pseudoamericanum is now known from across northern, central and southern Peru. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of SDM for predicting new occurrences of rare plants, especially in the Andes where collection densities are still low in many areas and where many new species remain to be discovered. PMID:24399901

  11. The Factor Structure of Preschool Learning Behaviors Scale Scores in Peruvian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Kathryn R.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Merino, Cesar; Worrell, Frank C.

    2009-01-01

    The factor structure of the Escala de Conductas de Aprendizaje Preescolar (ECAP), a Spanish translation of the Preschool Learning Behaviors Scale (PLBS), was examined in this study. Children aged 2 to 6 years (N = 328) enrolled in public and private preschools in the Republic of Peru were rated by classroom teachers on the frequency of observable,…

  12. Determinants of School Performance Among Quechua Children in the Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Enrique; Cueto, Santiago; Pollitt, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    In the rural Andes of Peru, primary school inefficiency ranks higher than in the rest of the country, with a nearly 50 per cent rate of first grade repetition. In 1993 the investigators administered a battery of four psycho-educational tests to 360 schoolchildren in the fourth and fifth grades at ten primary schools in the Andean region of Huaraz. They also recorded the children's individual characteristics, i.e. family background, nutritional status, and educational attainment, and rated the schools according to educational features such as classroom size, time devoted to learning, and student-teacher ratio. A year later, in 1994, children were re-examined in the schools using the same test battery. All subjects were small for their age, had poor diets, spoke mostly Quechua at home (Spanish in school), lived in a rural environment, and walked considerable distances to school. Regression analyses of the 1993 data indicated that the performance of Quechua children on verbal tests was heavily influenced by family background, while their mathematical competence was related to school experience. On the other hand, improvement in test scores from one year to the next appeared to be strongly related to test performance in 1993 and less clearly to the other recorded variables. Finally, the schools' promotion rates were clearly associated with test scores from the previous year but less clearly with grade repetition rates.

  13. Fish and mammals in the economy of an ancient Peruvian kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Joyce; Sommer, Jeffrey D.; Glew, Christopher P.

    1999-01-01

    Fish and mammal bones from the coastal site of Cerro Azul, Peru shed light on economic specialization just before the Inca conquest of A.D. 1470. The site devoted itself to procuring anchovies and sardines in quantity for shipment to agricultural communities. These small fish were dried, stored, and eventually transported inland via caravans of pack llamas. Cerro Azul itself did not raise llamas but obtained charqui (or dried meat) as well as occasional whole adult animals from the caravans. Guinea pigs were locally raised. Some 20 species of larger fish were caught by using nets; the more prestigious varieties of these show up mainly in residential compounds occupied by elite families. PMID:10339628

  14. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Peruvian Andes: an epidemiological study of infection and immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, C. R.; Llanos-Cuentas, E. A.; Pyke, S. D.; Dye, C.

    1995-01-01

    A prospective longitudinal survey of cutaneous leishmaniasis (Leishmania peruviana) was carried out in Peru on a study population of 4716 persons living in 38 villages (Departments of Lima, Ancash and Piura). Demographic and clinical data were collected from all individuals, and a Montenegro skin test (MST) was carried out on 72% (3418) of the study population. Each household was revisited at 3-monthly intervals for up to 2 years to detect new leishmaniasis cases; 497 people received a second MST at the end of the study. Analysis of the epidemiological data indicated that (i) 17% (16/94) of all infections were subclinical, (ii) this percentage increased significantly with age, (iii) clinical infections led to 73.9% protective immunity (95% C.I. 53.0-85.5%) and relatively permanent MST responsiveness (recovery rate = 0.0098/year; 95% C.I. 0.000-0.020/year), (iv) sub-clinical infections led to protective immunity, which was positively correlated with their MST induration size (increasing by 17.9% per mm; P < 0.0001), and a mean MST recovery rate of 0.114/year (4/421 man-months), and (v) recurrent leishmaniasis was dominated by reactivations, not by reinfections. PMID:7705493

  15. Political Goals of Peruvian Students: The Foundations of Legitimacy in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, David

    1988-01-01

    Explores several factors that led students in Peru's highland region to see revolt, as opposed to educational expansion, as the most desirable solution to their nation's problems. Examines Marxist functionalism, rational-action theory, and Weberian perspectives to illuminate the reasons behind the Sendero Luminoso ("shining path") insurrection.…

  16. Impact of El Niño events on pelagic fisheries in Peruvian waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ñiquen, Miguel; Bouchon, Marilú

    2004-03-01

    Using data from stock assesment surveys on pelagic resources during El Niño events of 1972/73, 1982/83, 1997/98, we analyze biological changes on pelagic ecosystems and pelagic fisheries during different stages of development of El Niño phenomenon: emergence, full, final and post-Niño. Results indicate changes in spatial distribution of resources, their concentration and size structure. In anchovy (Engraulis ringens) a decrease in biomass was observed, which was estimated at 1.2 million tons in September 1998, the lowest throughout the 1990s. This resource showed an asymmetric distribution towards the south of Peru. Other pelagic resources increased their biomass during or after Niño events, primarily sardine (Sardinops sagax), jack mackerel (Trachurus murphyi), pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), and longnose anchovy (Anchoa nasus). At the end of the El Niño phenomenon we found less productivity but more diversity in the pelagic ecosystem. During the 1997/98 El Niño, the diversity index (Manual de Ecologia, 1a Edition, Editorial Trillas, Mexico, 267pp) increased from 0.87 to 1.23-1.70. In both the emergence stage and fully developed stages of El Niño we found large numbers of sardine and longnose anchovy present simultaneously. Size structure of sardine, jack mackerel, and pacific mackerel showed an increase in juveniles. Anchovy during El Niño showed a single modal group composed of adults, but the post-Niño phase indicated an increase in juveniles with an average length of 6-7 cm. In El Niño conditions spawning among anchovy was low, but among sardine and pacific mackerel it was high. We observed, for the first time during full spawning, juvenile sardines with a total length of 18-20 cm. The anchovy spawning season during the post-Niño phase was considerably lengthened, from April to December 1998. Drastic change occurred in fisheries when monospecific fisheries, based on anchovy before El Niño, became multispecific fisheries based on sardine, jack mackerel, pacific mackerel, longnose anchovy and other species typical of tropical and warm oceans. Landings of anchovy decreased substantially, but those of longnose anchovy, jack mackerel, pacific mackerel, and sardine increased.

  17. [High frequency of plagiarism in medical thesis from a Peruvian public university].

    PubMed

    Saldaña-Gastulo, J Jhan C; Quezada-Osoria, C Claudia; Peña-Oscuvilca, Américo; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2010-03-01

    An observational study was conducted to describe the presence of plagiarism in medical thesis in 2008 performed at a public university in Peru. Search for plagiarism in 33 thesis introductions using a Google search algorithm, characterizes of the study type and we search in electronic form if the thesis mentor have published articles in scientific journals. We found evidence of plagiarism in 27/33 introductions, 37.3% (171/479) of all the paragraphs analyzed had some degree of plagiarism, literal plagiarism was the most frequent (20/27) and journals were the most common sources of plagiarism (19/27). The characteristics of the studies were observational (32/33), cross-sectional (30/33), descriptive (25/33) and retrospective (19/33). None of the authors had published in a scientific journal, and only nine of his tutors of them had at least one publication. No association was found between the characteristics of the thesis and the presence of plagiarism. In conclusion, we found a high frequency of plagiarism in theses analyzed. Is responsibility of medical schools take the necessary actions to detect and avoid plagiarism among their students.

  18. Middle Eocene rodents from Peruvian Amazonia reveal the pattern and timing of caviomorph origins and biogeography

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Marivaux, Laurent; Croft, Darin A.; Billet, Guillaume; Ganerød, Morgan; Jaramillo, Carlos; Martin, Thomas; Orliac, Maëva J.; Tejada, Julia; Altamirano, Ali J.; Duranthon, Francis; Fanjat, Grégory; Rousse, Sonia; Gismondi, Rodolfo Salas

    2012-01-01

    The long-term isolation of South America during most of the Cenozoic produced a highly peculiar terrestrial vertebrate biota, with a wide array of mammal groups, among which caviomorph rodents and platyrrhine primates are Mid-Cenozoic immigrants. In the absence of indisputable pre-Oligocene South American rodents or primates, the mode, timing and biogeography of these extraordinary dispersals remained debated. Here, we describe South America's oldest known rodents, based on a new diverse caviomorph assemblage from the late Middle Eocene (approx. 41 Ma) of Peru, including five small rodents with three stem caviomorphs. Instead of being tied to the Eocene/Oligocene global cooling and drying episode (approx. 34 Ma), as previously considered, the arrival of caviomorphs and their initial radiation in South America probably occurred under much warmer and wetter conditions, around the Mid-Eocene Climatic Optimum. Our phylogenetic results reaffirm the African origin of South American rodents and support a trans-Atlantic dispersal of these mammals during Middle Eocene times. This discovery further extends the gap (approx. 15 Myr) between first appearances of rodents and primates in South America. PMID:21993503

  19. Effect of Dental Education on Peruvian Dental Students' Oral Health-Related Attitudes and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Manuel; Camino, Javier; Oyakawa, Harumi Rodriguez; Rodriguez, Lyly; Tong, Liyue; Ahn, Chul; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dental education on oral health-related attitudes and behavior of students in a five-year dental program in Peru. A survey using the Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI), which consists of twenty dichotomous responses (agree-disagree) regarding oral health behavior and attitudes, was completed by Year 1 and Year 5 dental students at the Universidad Inca Garcilaso de la Vega in Lima, Peru. A total of 153 Year 1 students and 120 Year 5 students responded to the Spanish version of the HU-DBI questionnaire. The data were analyzed using chi-square tests and logistic regression analyses. Compared to the Year 1 students, the Year 5 dental students were more likely to agree with questions such as “I think I can clean my teeth well without using toothpaste” (OR=0.24, 95% CI: 0.10-0.58); “I have used a dye to see how clean my teeth are” (OR=0.19, 95% CI: 0.10-0.36); and “I have had my dentist tell me that I brush very well” (OR=0.34, 95% CI: 0.17-0.69). Overall, the data showed that the curriculum in this dental school in Peru resulted in more positive oral health-related attitudes and behavior among Year 5 dental students compared to those of Year 1 dental students. PMID:24002856

  20. Lake sediment record of neo-glacial advances in the southwestern Cordillera Raura, Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stansell, N. D.; Abbott, M. B.

    2006-12-01

    Radiocarbon dated lake sediments are used to identify the timing of middle and late Holocene glacial advances in the southwestern Cordillera Raura of central Peru. Elemental iron, titanium and calcium data, obtained using scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), record relative changes in the rate of deposition of titanium/iron-rich versus calcium-rich sediments. Magnetic susceptibility, coulometry and digital color analyses of high- resolution core-scan images complement the XRF data. Combined, the data indicate that glacial advances in the watershed took place from 3320 to 2490 cal. yr BP, 2400 to 2190 cal. yr BP, 1780 to 1385 cal. yr BP and 790 to 270 cal. yr BP. Independent ice core data and lake level records suggest that the advances from 3320 to 2490 and from 2400 to 2190 cal. yr BP took place during colder and drier periods. The advance from 1780 to 1385 cal. yr BP was initially during a cold and drier period from 1780 to 1615 cal. yr BP, followed by a warmer and wetter period from 1615 to 1385 cal. yr BP. Likewise, the advance from 790 to 270 cal. yr BP initially took place during a cold and drier period followed by a cold and wetter period from 620 to 270 cal. yr BP.

  1. A multistatic HF beacon network for ionospheric specification in the Peruvian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D. L.; Milla, M. A.; Vierinen, J.

    2016-05-01

    A small network of HF beacon transmitters and receivers has been deployed in Peru for specifying the F region ionosphere in the sector. The effort is motivated by ionospheric disturbances associated with equatorial spread F (ESF) and specifically disturbances arising under inauspicious conditions for ESF as determined by numerical simulations. The beacons operate at dual frequencies (2.72 and 3.64 MHz). They are CW but incorporate pseudorandom noise (PRN) coding so that the group delays of the links can be measured. Other observables are power, Doppler shift, bearing, and polarization. A transmitter is currently deployed at Ancon (11°46'37''S, 77°09'1''W, 51 m above sea level (asl)), while receivers are at Jicamarca (11°57'5.8''S, 76°52'27''W, 510 m asl) and Huancayo (12°02'30''S, 75°19'15''W, 3315 m asl). An algorithm for inverting the beacon data combined with electron density profiles from Jicamarca is described. Data and representative solutions from an experimental campaign held in August 2015 are presented and evaluated.

  2. The impact of indoor residual spraying of deltamethrin on dengue vector populations in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Esquivel, Claudia; Lenhart, Audrey; del Río, Ricardo; Leza, M M; Estrugo, M; Chalco, Enrique; Casanova, Wilma; Miranda, Miguel Ángel

    2016-02-01

    Dengue is an important public health problem in the Amazon area of Peru, resulting in significant morbidity each year. As in other areas of the world, ultra-low volume (ULV) application of insecticides is the main strategy to reduce adult populations of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti, despite growing evidence of its limitations as a single control method. This study investigated the efficacy of deltamethrin S.C. applied through indoor residual spraying (IRS) of dwellings in reducing A. aegypti populations. The residual effect of the insecticide was tested by monthly bioassays on the three most common indoor surfaces found in the Amazon area: painted wood, unpainted wood and brick. The results showed that in an area with moderate levels of A. aegypti infestation, IRS dramatically reduced all immature indices the first week after deltamethrin IRS application and the adult index from 18.5 to 3.1, four weeks after intervention (p<0.05). Even though housing conditions facilitated reinfestation with A. aegypti (100% of the houses have open roof eaves, 31.5% lack sewage systems, and 60.4% collected rain in open containers), indices remained low compared to baseline 16 weeks after insecticide application. Bioassays showed that deltamethrin S.C. caused mortalities >80% 8 weeks after application on all types of surfaces. The residual effect of the insecticide was greater on brick than on wooden walls (p<0.05). Our results demonstrate that IRS can have both an immediate and sustained effect on reducing adult and immature A. aegypti populations and should be considered as an adult mosquito control strategy by dengue vector control programs.

  3. An Entrepreneurial Learning Exercise as a Pedagogical Tool for Teaching CSR: A Peruvian Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farber, Vanina A.; Prialé, María Angela; Fuchs, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory cross-sectional study of the value of an entrepreneurial learning exercise as a tool for examining the entrepreneurship dimension of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The study used grounded theory to analyse diaries kept by graduate (MBA) students during the "20 Nuevos Soles Project". From the…

  4. Peruvian Female Sex Workers’ Ethical Perspectives on Their Participation in an HPV Vaccine Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Brandon; Davtyan, Mariam; Fisher, Celia B.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined female sex workers’ evaluation of ethically relevant experiences of participating in an HPV4 vaccine clinical trial conducted in Lima, Peru (the Sunflower Study). The Sunflower Study provided all participants with HPV testing, treatment for those testing positive, and access to the vaccine for all testing negative. Themes that emerged from content analysis of interviews with 16 former participants included the importance of respectful treatment and access to healthcare not otherwise available and concerns about privacy protections, the potential for HIV stigma, and poststudy abandonment. PMID:27789934

  5. Deforestation alters phytotelm habitat availability and mosquito production in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Yanoviak, Stephen P; Paredes, J E Ramírez; Lounibos, L Philip; Weaver, Scott C

    2006-10-01

    We quantified the effects of deforestation, and subsequent cultivation and forest regeneration, on the abundance and composition of mosquito larval habitats, specifically phytotelmata (plant-held waters), in the western Amazon basin. Recently deforested sites were characterized by increased phytotelm density (1.6 phytotelmata/m2) and greater relative abundance of fallen-plant-part phytotelmata (76%) compared to intact forests (0.9 phytotelmata/m2 and 25% fallen plant parts). As a result, the total volume of colonizable phytotelm water was significantly larger in new clearings. Subsequent cultivation of cleared land with mixed crops including pineapple and plantain had similar consequences: phytotelm density (2.2 units/m2) was significantly larger in plantations than in forests due to greater relative abundance of water-filled plant axils (71% vs. 39% in forest). Such axils are the preferred larval habitats for Wyeomyia spp. mosquitoes, which showed a similarly significant increase in production in plantations (0.25 larvae/m2) vs. forests (0.04 larvae/m2). Likewise, Limatus spp. mosquitoes were an order of magnitude more abundant in altered landscapes (especially in recently deforested and cultivated areas) than in mature forest, due to increased abundance of fallen-plant-part phytotelmata, in which they are typically the most common colonists. Because they are potential vectors of pathogens in a region of high endemic and emergent virus activity, increases in local abundance of Limatus spp. and Wyeomyia spp. due to large-scale deforestation and agriculture may influence rates of disease transmission.

  6. Distribution models and species discovery: the story of a new Solanum species from the Peruvian Andes

    PubMed Central

    Särkinen, Tiina; Gonzáles, Paúl; Knapp, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Solanum sect. Solanum from Peru is described here. Solanum pseudoamericanum Särkinen, Gonzáles & S.Knapp sp. nov. is a member of the Morelloid clade of Solanum, and is characterized by the combination of mostly forked inflorescences, flowers with small stamens 2.5 mm long including the filament, and strongly exerted styles with capitate stigmas. The species was first thought to be restricted to the seasonally dry tropical forests of southern Peru along the dry valleys of Río Pampas and Río Apurímac. Results from species distribution modelling (SDM) analysis with climatic predictors identified further potential suitable habitat areas in northern and central Peru. These areas were visited during field work in 2013. A total of 17 new populations across the predicted distribution were discovered using the model-based sampling method, and five further collections were identified amongst herbarium loans. Although still endemic to Peru, Solanum pseudoamericanum is now known from across northern, central and southern Peru. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of SDM for predicting new occurrences of rare plants, especially in the Andes where collection densities are still low in many areas and where many new species remain to be discovered. PMID:24399901

  7. Two New Genera of Fish Blood Flukes (Digenea: Aporocotylidae) from Catfishes in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Orélis-Ribeiro, Raphael; Bullard, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    Cladocaecum tomasscholzi n. gen., n. sp. infects the heart (lumen of ventricle) of driftwood catfish, Ageneiosus inermis Linnaeus, 1766 (Siluriformes: Auchenipteridae) from the Nanay River (Amazon River Basin, near Iquitos, Peru). It differs from all other aporocotylid genera by having a highly branched intestine comprising a central cecum that terminates immediately anterior to the ovary and that has numerous laterally directed diverticula. Kritsky platyrhynchi ( Guidelli, Isaac, and Pavanelli, 2002 ) n. gen., n. comb. (= Plehniella p.) is redescribed based on paratypes plus new specimens collected from the body cavity of the type host (porthole shovelnose catfish, Hemisorubim platyrhynchos Valenciennes, 1840) (Pimelodidae) from the nearby Itaya River. Kritsky differs from Sanguinicola Plehn, 1905 , Plehniella Szidat, 1951 , Nomasanguinicola Truong and Bullard, 2013 , and Cladocaecum by the combination of having a spinous anterior sucker, an intestine comprising 6 asymmetrical ceca, a lanceolate body, a straight vas deferens, an ovary with finger-like lateral projections, a small and spheroid oötype, numerous, minute, spheroid uterine eggs, and separate genital pores. An updated list of hosts, tissues infected, and geographic localities for the catfish blood flukes (9 spp.; 5 genera) is provided. This is the first report of a fish blood fluke infecting a member of Auchenipteridae and first proposal of a new genus of blood fluke (Schistosomatoidea) from South America in 64 yr. It brings the total number of Amazonian fish blood flukes to a mere 4 species.

  8. Religious and Self-Generated Quechua Literacy Practices in the Peruvian Andes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Quechua speakers' religious literacy practices in the native language in a rural community located in the department of Cuzco (Peru). I argue that in a situation where the school did not play the role of developing or maintaining the written vernacular, a group of community members found specific situations where they felt…

  9. Why Are Teachers Absent? Probing Service Delivery in Peruvian Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcazar, Lorena; Rogers, F. Halsey; Chaudhury, Nazmul; Hammer, Jeffrey; Kremer, Michael; Muralidharan, Karthik

    2006-01-01

    A high rate of absence of teachers from their posts is a serious obstacle to delivery of education in many developing countries, but hard evidence on the problem has been scarce. This study, carried out as part of a new multi-country survey project, is the first systematic investigation in Peru into the extent and causes of teachers' absence from…

  10. Victimization among Peruvian Adolescents: Insights into Mental/Emotional Health from the Young Lives Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lister, Cameron E.; Merrill, Ray M.; Vance, David L.; West, Joshua H.; Hall, Parley C.; Crookston, Benjamin T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bullying is a global problem among children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to explore bully victimization in Peru and to identify potential adverse mental health and social outcomes resulting from bully victimization. Methods: This study analyzed data from an ongoing prospective cohort of children taking part in the…

  11. Seismicity and state of stress in the central and southern Peruvian flat slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Abhash; Wagner, Lara S.; Beck, Susan L.; Long, Maureen D.; Zandt, George; Young, Bissett; Tavera, Hernando; Minaya, Estella

    2016-05-01

    We have determined the Wadati-Benioff Zone seismicity and state of stress of the subducting Nazca slab beneath central and southern Peru using data from three recently deployed local seismic networks. Our relocated hypocenters are consistent with a flat slab geometry that is shallowest near the Nazca Ridge, and changes from steep to normal without tearing to the south. These locations also indicate numerous abrupt along-strike changes in seismicity, most notably an absence of seismicity along the projected location of subducting Nazca Ridge. This stands in stark contrast to the very high seismicity observed along the Juan Fernandez ridge beneath central Chile where, a similar flat slab geometry is observed. We interpret this as indicative of an absence of water in the mantle beneath the overthickened crust of the Nazca Ridge. This may provide important new constraints on the conditions required to produce intermediate depth seismicity. Our focal mechanisms and stress tensor inversions indicate dominantly down-dip extension, consistent with slab pull, with minor variations that are likely due to the variable slab geometry and stress from adjacent regions. We observe significantly greater variability in the P-axis orientations and maximum compressive stress directions. The along strike change in the orientation of maximum compressive stress is likely related to slab bending and unbending south of the Nazca Ridge.

  12. Short term effects of fire on soil respiration in Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, L. F.; Kruijt, B.

    2008-05-01

    Severe changes are affecting the role of Amazon in the Earth system. One of these possible effects could be the modification of the role of soils in the carbon cycle due to land use and land cover change activities mainly involving the change of forest by crops. In this sense, fire is the main tool used by farmers for land use and also is an important factor for mobilizing C from the soil to the atmosphere, mainly as CO2. This could have an important effect in the global warming. This proposal will evaluate the variation of the soil respiration related to the seasonality and the fire effects on soils in the Amazon of Peru and Brazil. In experimental locations of Peru with different vegetation cover (forest and pasture), we measured soil respiration along with the organic carbon and the microbial biomass of soils during campaigns covering wet and dry seasons. Complementary measurements of soil temperature, water and nutrient content were performed. Also, we reproduced a fire experiment simulating agricultural local activity by the technique of "slash and burn" to evaluate fire effects on soil respiration. Measurements were taken after the soil cooled and at least 3 days after the fire. Additionally, the carbon stocks of the subplots were evaluated. Evaluation of the variations of CO2 fluxes and the capacity of adaptation to fire and water content are discussed through the comparisons of the different locations, type of soils and concentration of available N (nitrate and ammonium) as an indicator of nutrient content.

  13. Cover crops alter phosphorus soil fractions and organic matter accumulation in a Peruvian cacao agroforestry system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many tropical soils, excessive weathering of primary minerals confounded by intense agricultural production has resulted in the depletion of organic matter and plant available forms of phosphorus (P). Long-term growth of cover crops in tropical agroforestry systems have been shown to influence nu...

  14. Virulence factors profiles and ESBL production in Escherichia coli causing bacteremia in Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    Palma, Noemí; Gomes, Cláudia; Riveros, Maribel; García, Wilfredo; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Mateu, Judit; García, Coralith; Jacobs, Jan; Ochoa, Theresa J; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-09-01

    The presence of 25 virulence genes (VGs), genetic phylogroups, quinolone-resistance and Extended Spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-production was assessed in 65 Escherichia coli isolates from blood cultures in children <5 years in Peru. The most frequent VGs were fimA (89.2%), iutA (83.1%), agn43 (72.3%), iucA (67.7%), and fyuA (49.2%). The isolates belonged to D (47.7%), A (26.1%), B1 (21.5%), and B2 (4.6%) phylogroups. D + B2 isolates presented a high number of fimA, hly, papC, sat, and fyuA genes. Quinolone-susceptible (22 isolates - 33.8%) and ESBL-negative (31 isolates - 47.7%) isolates carried more VGs that their respective counterparts (5.7 vs. 4.7 and 5.3 vs. 4.4 respectively); the frequency of the fyuA, aat, aap, and hly genes significantly differed between quinolone-resistant and quinolone-susceptible isolates. Neonatal sepsis isolates tended to be more quinolone-resistant (P = 0.0697) and ESBL-producers (P = 0.0776). Early-onset neonatal sepsis isolates possessed a high number of VGs (5.2 VGs), especially in neonates of ≤1 day (5.9 VGs). PMID:27345125

  15. Prevalence of gonococcal and chlamydial infections in commercial sex workers in a Peruvian Amazon city.

    PubMed

    Paris, M; Gotuzzo, E; Goyzueta, G; Aramburu, J; Caceres, C F; Castellano, T; Jordan, N N; Vermund, S H; Hook, E W

    1999-02-01

    This study aims to characterize the prevalence of gonococcal and chlamydial infections among commercial sex workers (CSWs) in Iquitos, Peru, which provides a thriving market for CSWs and, consequently, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and to correlate those findings with social/behavioral characteristics. About 100 CSWs, recruited through street (n = 37) and brothel outreach (n = 67), were interviewed through questionnaires. Urine specimens were collected for gonorrhea and chlamydial testing. Findings revealed that registered CSWs were significantly more likely to have worked in the sex trade for more than 5 years, report 10 or more sex partners per week, and to work in brothels. Nonetheless, there were no significant differences in age, average charge for sex, or STD prevalence between registered and unregistered CSWs. Overall, 28% of CSWs were positive for chlamydia (22%) and gonorrhea (14%). Furthermore, a number of CSWs stated that they did not know whether they were at risk or assessed their risk as being low for contracting gonorrhea or AIDS. There was no significant association between self-perception of STD risk and STD prevalence. High infection rates, lack of knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS and STD risk assessment, and other high-risk behaviors prevalent among this population stress the need for STD intervention programs and risk reduction behavior.

  16. Glacier Retreat in the Southern Peruvian Andes: Climate Change, Environmental Impacts, Human Perception and Social Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlove, B.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents results from recent environmental and anthropological research near glacierized areas in the department of Cusco, Peru, home to the well-known Quelccaya Ice Cap and to the peak of Ausangate (6384 m). Glaciers in the region are in negative mass balance, losing volume and area, with upslope movement of the glacier fronts. Somewhat paradoxically, flows in many streams close to the glaciers are reduced, particularly in the dry season, due to a shift in the seasonal distribution of melting, to increased evaporation and to increased percolation into newly-exposed sands and gravels. Associated with this reduction in flow is a desiccation of some anthropogenic and natural wetlands, reducing the availability of dry season forage to wild (vicuna) and domesticated (alpaca, llama) ruminants. Interviews and ethnographic observations with local populations of Quechua-speaking herders at elevations of 4500-5200 meters provide detailed comments on these changes. They have an extensive vocabulary of terms for glacial features associated with retreat. They link this treat with environmental factors (higher temperatures, greater winds that deposit dust on lower portions of glaciers) and with religious factors (divine punishment for human wrong-doing, failure of humans to respect mountain spirits). They describe a variety of economic and extra-economic impacts of this retreat on different spatial, social and temporal scales. Though they face other issues as well (threats of pollution from new mining projects, inadequacy of government services), glacier retreat is their principal concern. Many herders express extreme distress over this unprecedented threat to their livelihoods and communities, though a few propose responses - out-migration, the formation of an association of neighboring communities, development of irrigation works - that could serve as adaptations.

  17. Evoking the essence of caring: experiences from a Peruvian adventure relevant for leaders in healthcare today.

    PubMed

    Shiparski, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    There are times when an experience is so powerful that it evokes caring in its purest form. This is what happened when a group of healthcare providers traveled together on a trip to Peru. This article recounts a harrowing experience that called each person to give caring and receive learning regarding his or her own journey. It is about how caring can simply happen with ease and purpose. Communication and collaboration occurred effortlessly. In this experience, there was a remembering of the passion and purpose that exists when we are called to serve in healthcare settings. The learning gained included 4 key elements of caring: intent, presence, action, and surrender. This learning offers insight, direction for healthcare environments today. Healthcare leaders must be responsive to creating cultures and providing opportunities to support those serving patients to intentionally think about their caring approaches. It is possible to evoke caring through providing opportunities that help healthcare providers transcend the daily barriers to being present and be more effective in their caring. It is imperative that they experience ways to examine their ability to care for themselves and others and to reconnect to the passion of choosing the healthcare profession. PMID:18160865

  18. Methane fluxes from a wet puna ecosystem in the Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Diem, Torsten; Priscila Huaraca Quispe, Lidia; Quispe Ccahuana, Adan Julian; Meir, Patrick; Arn Teh, Yit

    2014-05-01

    Discrepancies exist between top-down and bottom-up estimates of the tropical South American atmospheric methane budget. This suggests that current source-sink inventories fail to adequately characterise the landscapes of the region. This may be particularly true of Andean environments where very few field observations have been made. The high tropical Andes, between tree and permanent snow-lines, is home to diverse grass, shrub and giant rosette dominated ecosystems known variously from Venezuela to northern Chile and Argentina as paramo, jalca and puna. In humid regions these are characterised by wet, organic-rich mineral soils, peat-forming wetlands and shallow lakes. Such conditions are likely to promote methane production and potentially represent a regionally significant source to the atmosphere that should be considered. We report on methane fluxes from a bunch-grass dominated puna habitat at 3500 m above sea level in south-eastern Peru. Mean annual temperature and precipitation are 11 °C and 2500 mm, respectively. Temperature is aseasonal but experiences considerable diurnal variations with overnight frosting common-place. In contrast, rainfall is intensely episodic and has a pronounced wet season between September and March. Sampling encompassed a range of topographic features, such as grassland on freely draining, gently inclined or steep slopes and depressions containing bogs, over a 3 ha ridge to basin transition. Monthly sampling was carried out between January 2011 and June 2013 to investigate seasonal variability in methane fluxes. Intensive sampling campaigns were conducted to investigate spatial and short-term variations on a daily basis in two nine-day campaigns during wet and dry season. The site was a net source of methane to the atmosphere during the period of study. Methane fluxes were dominated by emissions from bogs, whereas, freely draining grassland exhibited weak source or marginal sink activity. Temporal variations were most notable at the seasonal scale with fluxes during the wet season almost an order of magnitude greater than those of the dry season. Mean emissions from bogs during wet and dry season were 85.0 (15.0) and 10.0 (2.0) mg C-CH4 m-2 d-1, respectively. Similarly, mean fluxes in the grassland were 0.4 (0.7) and -0.05 (0.6) mg C-CH4 m-2 d-1. These data highlight the importance of considering such Andean highlands in landscape scale source-sink inventories. In this respect, understanding the influence of differences in climatic regime found across the Andes and determining the areal extent of topographic hotspots driving methane emissions within these environments are key challenges.

  19. Evidence of rabies virus exposure among humans in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Amy T; Petersen, Brett W; Recuenco, Sergio; Niezgoda, Michael; Gómez, Jorge; Laguna-Torres, V Alberto; Rupprecht, Charles

    2012-08-01

    In May of 2010, two communities (Truenococha and Santa Marta) reported to be at risk of vampire bat depredation were surveyed in the Province Datem del Marañón in the Loreto Department of Perú. Risk factors for bat exposure included age less than or equal to 25 years and owning animals that had been bitten by bats. Rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (rVNAs) were detected in 11% (7 of 63) of human sera tested. Rabies virus ribonucleoprotein (RNP) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were detected in the sera of three individuals, two of whom were also seropositive for rVNA. Rabies virus RNP IgM antibodies were detected in one respondent with no evidence of rVNA or RNP IgG antibodies. Because one respondent with positive rVNA results reported prior vaccination and 86% (six of seven) of rVNA-positive respondents reported being bitten by bats, these data suggest nonfatal exposure of persons to rabies virus, which is likely associated with vampire bat depredation. PMID:22855749

  20. 'Mystery big cats' in the Peruvian Amazon: morphometrics solve a cryptozoological mystery.

    PubMed

    Naish, Darren; Sakamoto, Manabu; Hocking, Peter; Sanchez, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Two big cat skulls procured from hunters of Yanachaga National Park, Peru, were reported as those of cats informally dubbed the 'striped tiger' and 'anomalous jaguar'. Observations suggested that both skulls were distinct from those of jaguars, associated descriptions of integument did not conform to this species, and it has been implied that both represent members of one or two novel species. We sought to resolve the identity of the skulls using morphometrics. DNA could not be retrieved since both had been boiled as part of the defleshing process. We took 36 cranial and 13 mandibular measurements and added them to a database incorporating nearly 300 specimens of over 30 felid species. Linear discriminant analysis resolved both specimens as part of Panthera onca with high probabilities for cranial and mandibular datasets. Furthermore, the specimens exhibit characters typical of jaguars. If the descriptions of their patterning and pigmentation are accurate, we assume that both individuals were aberrant. PMID:24688867

  1. Thermo-hydraulics of the Peruvian accretionary complex at 12°S

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kukowski, Nina; Pecher, Ingo

    1999-01-01

    The models were constrained by the thermal gradient obtained from the depth of bottomsimulating reflectors (BSRs) at the lower slope and some conventional measurements. We foundthat significant frictional heating is required to explain the observed strong landward increase ofheat flux. This is consistent with results from sandbox modelling which predict strong basalfriction at this margin. A significantly higher heat source is needed to match the observed thermalgradient in the southern line.

  2. Two New Genera of Fish Blood Flukes (Digenea: Aporocotylidae) from Catfishes in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Orélis-Ribeiro, Raphael; Bullard, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    Cladocaecum tomasscholzi n. gen., n. sp. infects the heart (lumen of ventricle) of driftwood catfish, Ageneiosus inermis Linnaeus, 1766 (Siluriformes: Auchenipteridae) from the Nanay River (Amazon River Basin, near Iquitos, Peru). It differs from all other aporocotylid genera by having a highly branched intestine comprising a central cecum that terminates immediately anterior to the ovary and that has numerous laterally directed diverticula. Kritsky platyrhynchi ( Guidelli, Isaac, and Pavanelli, 2002 ) n. gen., n. comb. (= Plehniella p.) is redescribed based on paratypes plus new specimens collected from the body cavity of the type host (porthole shovelnose catfish, Hemisorubim platyrhynchos Valenciennes, 1840) (Pimelodidae) from the nearby Itaya River. Kritsky differs from Sanguinicola Plehn, 1905 , Plehniella Szidat, 1951 , Nomasanguinicola Truong and Bullard, 2013 , and Cladocaecum by the combination of having a spinous anterior sucker, an intestine comprising 6 asymmetrical ceca, a lanceolate body, a straight vas deferens, an ovary with finger-like lateral projections, a small and spheroid oötype, numerous, minute, spheroid uterine eggs, and separate genital pores. An updated list of hosts, tissues infected, and geographic localities for the catfish blood flukes (9 spp.; 5 genera) is provided. This is the first report of a fish blood fluke infecting a member of Auchenipteridae and first proposal of a new genus of blood fluke (Schistosomatoidea) from South America in 64 yr. It brings the total number of Amazonian fish blood flukes to a mere 4 species. PMID:26859799

  3. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Survey of Northern Peruvian Plants: Baselines for Paleodietary and Paleoecological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Szpak, Paul; White, Christine D.; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Millaire, Jean-François; Vásquez Sánchez, Víctor F.

    2013-01-01

    The development of isotopic baselines for comparison with paleodietary data is crucial, but often overlooked. We review the factors affecting the carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopic compositions of plants, with a special focus on the carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of twelve different species of cultivated plants (n = 91) and 139 wild plant species collected in northern Peru. The cultivated plants were collected from nineteen local markets. The mean δ13C value for maize (grain) was −11.8±0.4 ‰ (n = 27). Leguminous cultigens (beans, Andean lupin) were characterized by significantly lower δ15N values and significantly higher %N than non-leguminous cultigens. Wild plants from thirteen sites were collected in the Moche River Valley area between sea level and ∼4,000 meters above sea level (masl). These sites were associated with mean annual precipitation ranging from 0 to 710 mm. Plants growing at low altitude sites receiving low amounts of precipitation were characterized by higher δ15N values than plants growing at higher altitudes and receiving higher amounts of precipitation, although this trend dissipated when altitude was >2,000 masl and MAP was >400 mm. For C3 plants, foliar δ13C was positively correlated with altitude and precipitation. This suggests that the influence of altitude may overshadow the influence of water availability on foliar δ13C values at this scale. PMID:23341996

  4. Hyperaccumulator of Pb in native plants growing on Peruvian mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Jaume; Roca, Nuria; Boluda, Rafael; Tume, Pedro; Duran, Paola; Poma, Wilfredo; Sanchez, Isidoro

    2014-05-01

    Tailings usually provide an unfavourable substrate for plant growth because of their extreme pH, low organic matter and nutrients, high concentrations of trace elements and physical disturbance, such as bad soil structure, and low water availability. Heavy metal contamination has also been one serious problem in the vicinity of mine sites due to the discharge and dispersion of mine-waste materials into the ecosystem. Moreover, Pb is considered a target metal when undertaking soil remediation, because it is usually quite immobile and not readily accumulated in upper plant parts. The presence of vegetation reduces water and wind erosion, which may decrease the downward migration of contaminants into the groundwater and improve aesthetical aspects. Plants growing on naturally metal-enriched soils are of particular interest in this perspective, since they are genetically tolerant to high metal concentrations, have an excellent adaptation to this multi-stress environment. Efficient phytoextraction requires plant species combining both high metal tolerance and elevated capacity for metal uptake and metal translocation to easily harvestable plant organs (e.g. shoots). Soil and plant samples were taken in Peru, at a polymetallic mine (mainly Ag, Pb and Cu) in Cajamarca Province, Hualgayoc district. Top soils (0-20 cm) were analysed for physical and chemical properties by standard methods. Total Pb concentrations in top soils were determined by ICP-OES. Pb content in plants were analysed separately (aerial and root system) by ICP-MS. Ti content was used as an indicator for contamination of plant samples with soil particles. Translocation Factor (TF) and Shoot Accumulation Factor (SAF) were determined to assess the tolerance strategies developed by these species and to evaluate their potential for phytoremediation purposes. The non-polluted soils had near neutral pH (6.8±0.1), a great content of organic carbon (42 ± 4.0 g•kg-1) and a silt loamy texture. Soil and plant samples were taken at four locations (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4) with different levels of Pb. The Pb soil content (mean ± standard deviation) in mg•kg-1 is as follows: CA1 3992 ± 301; CA2 10128 ± 2247, CA3 14197 ± 895, CA4 16060 ± 810. The non-polluted value around the mine was Pb 124 mg•kg-1. Unusual elevated concentrations of Pb (over 1000 mg kg-1) and TF greater than one were detected in shoots of 6 different plants species (Ageratina sp., Achirodine alata, Cortaderia apalothica, Epilobium denticulatum, Taraxacum officinalis and Trifolium repens). The location CA4 has the maximum content of Pb in the shoots of Ageratina sp. (5045±77 mg•kg-1), C. apalothica (3367±188 mg•kg-1), E. denticulatum (13599±848 mg•kg-1), T. officinalis (2533±47 mg•kg-1) and T. repens (2839±231 mg•kg-1). However, the BF (Bioaccumulation Factor) was smaller than one. Despite the low BF index, the great TFs for Pb indicate that these plant species effectively translocate this metal (i.e., 2.4 for Ageratina sp., 2.3 for C. apalothica, 1.6 for T. repens, 1.5 for A. alata, 1.3 for T. officinalis and 1.2 for E. denticulatum). It seems that the BF is not a reliable index when the metal soil concentration is extremely large. Controlled-environment studies must be performed to definitively confirm the Pb hyperaccumulation character of cited plant species.

  5. The Influence of Differential "Power" and "Solidarity" upon the Predictability of Behavior: A Peruvian Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moles, Jerry A.

    1978-01-01

    The usage of Spanish address terms is investigated to explore the predictability and variability in the behavior of non-Indians and Quechua Indians in Peru. The behavior variations are related to differential "power" and "solidarity" between the two ethnic groups and differential "solidarity" within the Quecha group. (Author/SW)

  6. [Historical review of the distribution of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Peruvian Amazon].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Roberto; Vera, Hubert; Calderón, Guillermo

    2014-04-01

    Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) darlingi has been reported since 1931 in border areas of the department of Loreto, mainly along the borders with Brazil and Colombia. In 1994, during an outbreak of malaria, An. darlingi was found in neighboring towns to Iquitos. At present, its distribution has expanded considerably in Loreto. Thi