Science.gov

Sample records for 449-mhz profiler observations

  1. A 449 MHz modular wind profiler radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindseth, Bradley James

    This thesis presents the design of a 449 MHz radar for wind profiling, with a focus on modularity, antenna sidelobe reduction, and solid-state transmitter design. It is one of the first wind profiler radars to use low-cost LDMOS power amplifiers combined with spaced antennas. The system is portable and designed for 2-3 month deployments. The transmitter power amplifier consists of multiple 1-kW peak power modules which feed 54 antenna elements arranged in a hexagonal array, scalable directly to 126 elements. The power amplifier is operated in pulsed mode with a 10% duty cycle at 63% drain efficiency. The antenna array is designed to have low sidelobes, confirmed by measurements. The radar was operated in Boulder, Colorado and Salt Lake City, Utah. Atmospheric wind vertical and horizontal components at altitudes between 200m and 4km were calculated from the collected atmospheric return signals. Sidelobe reduction of the antenna array pattern is explored to reduce the effects of ground or sea clutter. Simulations are performed for various shapes of compact clutter fences for the 915-MHz beam-steering Doppler radar and the 449-MHz spaced antenna interferometric radar. It is shown that minimal low-cost hardware modifications to existing compact ground planes of 915-MHz beam-steering radar allow for reduction of sidelobes of up to 5dB. The results obtained on a single beam-steering array are extended to the 449 MHz triple hexagonal array spaced antenna interferometric radar. Cross-correlation, transmit beamwidth, and sidelobe levels are evaluated for various clutter fence configurations and array spacings. The resulting sidelobes are as much as 10 dB below those without a clutter fence and can be incorporated into existing and future 915 and 449 MHz wind profiler systems with minimal hardware modifications.

  2. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  3. Installation and Initial Operation of DOE's 449-MHz Wind Profiling Radars on the U.S. West Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, Julia E.; Shaw, William J.; Morris, Victor R.; Wilczak, J. M.; White, A. B.; Ayers, Tom; Jordan, Jim; King, Clark W.

    2015-10-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has recently completed the installation of three new wind profiling radars on the Washington and Oregon coasts. These systems operate at a frequency of 449 MHz and provide mean wind profiles to a height of roughly 8 km, with the maximum measurement height depending on time-varying atmospheric conditions. This is roughly half the depth of the troposphere at these latitudes. Each system is also equipped with a radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), which provides a measure of the temperature profile to heights of approximately 2 km. Other equipment deployed alongside the radar includes a surface meteorological station and GPS for column water vapor. This project began in fiscal year 2014, starting with equipment procurements and site selection. In addition, environmental reviews, equipment assembly and testing, site access agreements, and infrastructure preparations have been performed. Finally, with equipment deployment with data collection and dissemination, the primary tasks of this project have been completed. The three new wind profiling radars have been deployed at airports near Coos Bay, OR, and Astoria, OR, and at an industrial park near Forks, WA. Data are available through the NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory Data Display website, and will soon be made available through the DOE Atmosphere to Electrons data archive and portal as well.

  4. Radar - 449MHz - North Bend, OR (OTH) - Raw Data

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Tim

    2016-10-25

    **Winds.** A radar wind profiler measures the Doppler shift of electromagnetic energy scattered back from atmospheric turbulence and hydrometeors along 3-5 vertical and off-vertical point beam directions. Back-scattered signal strength and radial-component velocities are remotely sensed along all beam directions and are combined to derive the horizontal wind field over the radar. These data typically are sampled and averaged hourly and usually have 6-m and/or 100-m vertical resolutions up to 4 km for the 915 MHz and 8 km for the 449 MHz systems. **Temperature.** To measure atmospheric temperature, a radio acoustic sound system (RASS) is used in conjunction with the wind profile. These data typically are sampled and averaged for five minutes each hour and have a 60-m vertical resolution up to 1.5 km for the 915 MHz and 60-m up to 3.5k m for the 449 MHz. **Spectra.** The daily raw spectra data are available. The files are labeled "header" and "data." These data files are generated by LapXM, binary encoded, and are specific to this application. These datasets contain the raw data from the radar, such as signal-to-noise, signal power, radial velocity, and spectra widths.

  5. Radar - 449MHz - Astoria, OR (AST) - Raw Data

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Tim

    2016-10-25

    **Winds.** A radar wind profiler measures the Doppler shift of electromagnetic energy scattered back from atmospheric turbulence and hydrometeors along 3-5 vertical and off-vertical point beam directions. Back-scattered signal strength and radial-component velocities are remotely sensed along all beam directions and are combined to derive the horizontal wind field over the radar. These data typically are sampled and averaged hourly and usually have 6-m and/or 100-m vertical resolutions up to 4 km for the 915 MHz and 8 km for the 449 MHz systems. **Temperature.** To measure atmospheric temperature, a radio acoustic sound system (RASS) is used in conjunction with the wind profile. These data typically are sampled and averaged for five minutes each hour and have a 60-m vertical resolution up to 1.5 km for the 915 MHz and 60-m up to 3.5k m for the 449 MHz. **Spectra.** The daily raw spectra data are available. The files are labeled "header" and "data." These data files are generated by LapXM, binary encoded, and are specific to this application. These datasets contain the raw data from the radar, such as signal-to-noise, signal power, radial velocity, and spectra widths.

  6. Radar - 449MHz - Forks, WA (FKS) - Raw Data

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Tim

    2016-10-25

    **Winds.** A radar wind profiler measures the Doppler shift of electromagnetic energy scattered back from atmospheric turbulence and hydrometeors along 3-5 vertical and off-vertical point beam directions. Back-scattered signal strength and radial-component velocities are remotely sensed along all beam directions and are combined to derive the horizontal wind field over the radar. These data typically are sampled and averaged hourly and usually have 6-m and/or 100-m vertical resolutions up to 4 km for the 915 MHz and 8 km for the 449 MHz systems. **Temperature.** To measure atmospheric temperature, a radio acoustic sound system (RASS) is used in conjunction with the wind profile. These data typically are sampled and averaged for five minutes each hour and have a 60-m vertical resolution up to 1.5 km for the 915 MHz and 60-m up to 3.5k m for the 449 MHz. **Spectra.** The daily raw spectra data are available. The files are labeled "header" and "data." These data files are generated by LapXM, binary encoded, and are specific to this application. These datasets contain the raw data from the radar, such as signal-to-noise, signal power, radial velocity, and spectra widths.

  7. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  8. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  9. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  10. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christopher

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  11. Radar - ANL Wind Profiler with RASS, Goldendale - Raw Data

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Tim

    2016-10-25

    **Winds.** A radar wind profiler measures the Doppler shift of electromagnetic energy scattered back from atmospheric turbulence and hydrometeors along 3-5 vertical and off-vertical point beam directions. Back-scattered signal strength and radial-component velocities are remotely sensed along all beam directions and are combined to derive the horizontal wind field over the radar. These data typically are sampled and averaged hourly and usually have 6-m and/or 100-m vertical resolutions up to 4 km for the 915 MHz and 8 km for the 449 MHz systems. **Temperature.** To measure atmospheric temperature, a radio acoustic sound system (RASS) is used in conjunction with the wind profile. These data typically are sampled and averaged for five minutes each hour and have a 60-m vertical resolution up to 1.5 km for the 915 MHz and 60-m up to 3.5k m for the 449 MHz.

  12. Radar - ESRL Wind Profiler with RASS, Wasco Airport - Raw Data

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Tim

    2016-10-25

    **Winds.** A radar wind profiler measures the Doppler shift of electromagnetic energy scattered back from atmospheric turbulence and hydrometeors along 3-5 vertical and off-vertical point beam directions. Back-scattered signal strength and radial-component velocities are remotely sensed along all beam directions and are combined to derive the horizontal wind field over the radar. These data typically are sampled and averaged hourly and usually have 6-m and/or 100-m vertical resolutions up to 4 km for the 915 MHz and 8 km for the 449 MHz systems. **Temperature.** To measure atmospheric temperature, a radio acoustic sound system (RASS) is used in conjunction with the wind profile. These data typically are sampled and averaged for five minutes each hour and have a 60-m vertical resolution up to 1.5 km for the 915 MHz and 60-m up to 3.5k m for the 449 MHz.

  13. Radar - ANL Wind Profiler with RASS, Walla Walla - Raw Data

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Tim

    2016-10-25

    **Winds.** A radar wind profiler measures the Doppler shift of electromagnetic energy scattered back from atmospheric turbulence and hydrometeors along 3-5 vertical and off-vertical point beam directions. Back-scattered signal strength and radial-component velocities are remotely sensed along all beam directions and are combined to derive the horizontal wind field over the radar. These data typically are sampled and averaged hourly and usually have 6-m and/or 100-m vertical resolutions up to 4 km for the 915 MHz and 8 km for the 449 MHz systems. **Temperature.** To measure atmospheric temperature, a radio acoustic sound system (RASS) is used in conjunction with the wind profile. These data typically are sampled and averaged for five minutes each hour and have a 60-m vertical resolution up to 1.5 km for the 915 MHz and 60-m up to 3.5k m for the 449 MHz.

  14. Radar - ESRL Wind Profiler with RASS, Troutdale - Raw Data

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Tim

    2016-10-25

    **Winds.** A radar wind profiler measures the Doppler shift of electromagnetic energy scattered back from atmospheric turbulence and hydrometeors along 3-5 vertical and off-vertical point beam directions. Back-scattered signal strength and radial-component velocities are remotely sensed along all beam directions and are combined to derive the horizontal wind field over the radar. These data typically are sampled and averaged hourly and usually have 6-m and/or 100-m vertical resolutions up to 4 km for the 915 MHz and 8 km for the 449 MHz systems. **Temperature.** To measure atmospheric temperature, a radio acoustic sound system (RASS) is used in conjunction with the wind profile. These data typically are sampled and averaged for five minutes each hour and have a 60-m vertical resolution up to 1.5 km for the 915 MHz and 60-m up to 3.5k m for the 449 MHz.

  15. Radar - ANL Wind Profiler with RASS, Yakima - Raw Data

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Tim

    2016-10-25

    **Winds.** A radar wind profiler measures the Doppler shift of electromagnetic energy scattered back from atmospheric turbulence and hydrometeors along 3-5 vertical and off-vertical point beam directions. Back-scattered signal strength and radial-component velocities are remotely sensed along all beam directions and are combined to derive the horizontal wind field over the radar. These data typically are sampled and averaged hourly and usually have 6-m and/or 100-m vertical resolutions up to 4 km for the 915 MHz and 8 km for the 449 MHz systems. **Temperature.** To measure atmospheric temperature, a radio acoustic sound system (RASS) is used in conjunction with the wind profile. These data typically are sampled and averaged for five minutes each hour and have a 60-m vertical resolution up to 1.5 km for the 915 MHz and 60-m up to 3.5k m for the 449 MHz.

  16. Radar - ESRL Wind Profiler with RASS, Condon - Raw Data

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Tim

    2016-10-25

    **Winds.** A radar wind profiler measures the Doppler shift of electromagnetic energy scattered back from atmospheric turbulence and hydrometeors along 3-5 vertical and off-vertical point beam directions. Back-scattered signal strength and radial-component velocities are remotely sensed along all beam directions and are combined to derive the horizontal wind field over the radar. These data typically are sampled and averaged hourly and usually have 6-m and/or 100-m vertical resolutions up to 4 km for the 915 MHz and 8 km for the 449 MHz systems. **Temperature.** To measure atmospheric temperature, a radio acoustic sound system (RASS) is used in conjunction with the wind profile. These data typically are sampled and averaged for five minutes each hour and have a 60-m vertical resolution up to 1.5 km for the 915 MHz and 60-m up to 3.5k m for the 449 MHz.

  17. Radar - ESRL Wind Profiler with RASS, Prineville - Raw Data

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Tim

    2016-10-25

    **Winds.** A radar wind profiler measures the Doppler shift of electromagnetic energy scattered back from atmospheric turbulence and hydrometeors along 3-5 vertical and off-vertical point beam directions. Back-scattered signal strength and radial-component velocities are remotely sensed along all beam directions and are combined to derive the horizontal wind field over the radar. These data typically are sampled and averaged hourly and usually have 6-m and/or 100-m vertical resolutions up to 4 km for the 915 MHz and 8 km for the 449 MHz systems. **Temperature.** To measure atmospheric temperature, a radio acoustic sound system (RASS) is used in conjunction with the wind profile. These data typically are sampled and averaged for five minutes each hour and have a 60-m vertical resolution up to 1.5 km for the 915 MHz and 60-m up to 3.5k m for the 449 MHz.

  18. A comparison of vertical velocity variance measurements from wind profiling radars and sonic anemometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Katherine; Bianco, Laura; Johnston, Paul; Wilczak, James M.

    2017-03-01

    Observations of turbulence in the planetary boundary layer are critical for developing and evaluating boundary layer parameterizations in mesoscale numerical weather prediction models. These observations, however, are expensive and rarely profile the entire boundary layer. Using optimized configurations for 449 and 915 MHz wind profiling radars during the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA), improvements have been made to the historical methods of measuring vertical velocity variance through the time series of vertical velocity, as well as the Doppler spectral width. Using six heights of sonic anemometers mounted on a 300 m tower, correlations of up to R2 = 0. 74 are seen in measurements of the large-scale variances from the radar time series and R2 = 0. 79 in measurements of small-scale variance from radar spectral widths. The total variance, measured as the sum of the small and large scales, agrees well with sonic anemometers, with R2 = 0. 79. Correlation is higher in daytime convective boundary layers than nighttime stable conditions when turbulence levels are smaller. With the good agreement with the in situ measurements, highly resolved profiles up to 2 km can be accurately observed from the 449 MHz radar and 1 km from the 915 MHz radar. This optimized configuration will provide unique observations for the verification and improvement to boundary layer parameterizations in mesoscale models.

  19. Ozone profile observations in Siberia in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorokhov, Valery; Balugin, Nikolay; Yushkov, Vladimir; Makshtas, Alexander; Ivlev, Georgii; Shepelev, Dmitry; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2014-05-01

    The ozonesonde observations of atmospheric ozone profiles at Salekhard aerological station (66.5N, 66.7E) in Western Siberia, Russian Federation are carried out since January 1997. In 1997-2013 we used electrochemical 2Z-ECC ozonesondes for ozone profile observations in the winter-spring period to study the ozone loss in the Arctic regions. The results of ozonesonde observation at Salekhard station are in the NDACC database. In January 2014 we upgraded this ozonesounding station with the new iMet-1 radiosonde and electrochemical 2Z-V7 ozonesonde of Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT), USA. The first results of ozonesonde profile measurements recorded in January-March 2014 at Salekhard aerological station will be presented and discussed.

  20. LOTOS: A Proposed Lower Tropospheric Observing System from the Land Surface through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, S. A.; Lee, W. C.; Carbone, R. E.; Oncley, S.; Brown, W. O. J.; Spuler, S.; Horst, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sensor capabilities, but also in electronics, optics, RF communication, and off-the-grid power are enabling new measurement paradigms. NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) is considering new sensors, new deployment modes, and integrated observing strategies to address challenges in understanding within the atmospheric boundary layer and the underlying coupling to the land surface. Our vision is of a network of deployable observing sites, each with a suite of complementary instruments that measure surface-atmosphere exchange, and the state and evolution of the boundary layer. EOL has made good progress on distributed surface energy balance and flux stations, and on boundary layer remote sensing of wind and water vapor, all suitable for deployments of combined instruments and as network of such sites. We will present the status of the CentNet surface network development, the 449-MHz modular wind profiler, and a water vapor and temperature profiling differential absorption lidar (DIAL) under development. We will further present a concept for a test bed to better understand the value of these and other possible instruments in forming an instrument suite flexible for multiple research purposes.

  1. Wind profiler observations of a sting jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, G.; Parton, G.

    2009-09-01

    Some of the most damaging surface winds experienced in midlatitude cyclonic storms have been attributed to a phenomenon known as a sting jet. Previous studies have deduced how sting jets develop from their mid-tropospheric origin, but there have been no direct observations of these wind features in the mid-troposphere. During windstorm Jeanette on the 27th October 2002, the tip of the storm's cloud head passed over a VHF wind profiler at Aberystwyth, Wales, allowing the structure of a sting jet to be measured with high spatial and temporal resolution. These observations showed a multiple slantwise structure to the sting jet region with two tails of increased winds which persisted after the passing of the cloud head aloft. Simulations by the Met Office Unified Model (UM) showed that the slantwise structure followed ?w surfaces, and that the sting jet descended along ? surfaces as it passed over the UK, accelerating and drying during its descent. The horizontal and vertical scales of the observed structures are compatible with slantwise convection releasing Conditional Symmetric Instability within the cloud head. Further observations of the sting jet were obtained by a UHF wind profiler at Cardington in eastern England, where the sting jet had merged with the cold conveyor belt circulating around the storm. An unstable temperature profile in the lowest kilometre over Cardington enabled damaging gusts of strong winds to be brought to the surface in convective plumes; however, this strong vertical mixing was not represented correctly in the UM.

  2. Ion flux profiles observed at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C. M.; Andersson, L.; Lundin, R. N.; Frahm, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    How Mars lost it's water and atmosphere is still an important question. Many studies have investigated high-energy ion fluxes (>10 eV) surrounding the planet and derived ion outflow rates in order to determine atmospheric loss. These rates suggest that the outflow from high-energy ions is not the dominant escape path for atmospheric loss. Over the years increasing evidence has indicated that the loss of low-energy ions are more important than the high-energy ion loss. In this presentation ion observations (down to the spacecraft potential) from the Mars Express (MEX) mission (2010/11), are used to describe the ion altitude distribution at Mars. The focus of this study is below the altitude of ~1000 km. Within the Mars environment, using the MEX electron observations different plasma regions was identified. Supported by electron identification, different altitude profiles of ion fluxes have been analyzed from the different plasma regions. One of the results from this study is that the altitude profile of the ion flux observed below the photoelectron boundary is different when comparing the northern and the southern hemispheres. The ion distributions, resulting altitude profile, the influence of the crustal magnetic field at Mars, and the implications relating to plasma outflow will be discussed in this presentation.

  3. SAGE II aerosol correlative observations - Profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, M. T.; Rosen, J. M.; Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, Pi-Huan; Livinfston, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of the aerosol extinction measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared with profiles from five correlative experiments between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative profiles were derived from six-channel dustsonde measurements and two-wavelength lidar backscatter data. The correlation between the dustsonde- and lidar-derived measurements and the SAGE II data is good, validating the SAGE II lower stratospheric aerosol extinction measurements.

  4. The Estimation of Hydrometeor Profiles from Wideband Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail M.; Wang, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Profiles of the microphysical properties of clouds and raincells are essential in many areas of atmospheric research and operational meteorology. In order to enhance the understanding of the nonlinear and underconstrained relationships between cloud and hydrometeor microphysical profiles and passive microwave brightness temperatures, estimations of cloud profiles for an anvil, a convective, and an updraft region of an oceanic squall were performed. The estimations relied on comparisons between radiative transfer calculations of incrementally estimated microphysical profiles and concurrent dual-altitude wideband brightness temperatures from the 22 February 1993 flight during TOGA-COARE. The wideband observations (10--220 GHz) are necessary for estimating cloud profiles reaching up to 20 km. The low frequencies enhance the rain and cloud water profiles, while the high frequencies are required to detail the higher altitude ice microphysics. A microphysical profile was estimated for each of the three regions of the storm. Each of the three estimated profiles produced calculated brightness temperatures within approximately 10 K of the observations. A majority, of the total iterative adjustment were to the estimated profile's frozen hydrometeor characteristics and were necessary to match the high frequency calculations with the observations. This indicates a need to validate cloud resolving models using high frequencies. Some difficulties matching the 37 GHz observation channels on the DC-8 and ER-2 aircrafts with the calculations simulated at the two aircraft heights (approximately 11 km and 20 km, respectively) were noted and potential causes presented.

  5. Titan Extinction Profiles Observed by Cassini Radio Occultations and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, Essam; French, Richard; Flasar, F. Michael; Schinder, Paul J.; Rappaport, Nicole J.

    Three monochromatic and phase-coherent radio signals of wavelength = 0.9, 3.6, and 13 cm (Ka-, X-, and S-bands), were propagated by Cassini through the neutral atmosphere of Titan and the refracted signals were observed on the Earth. Abel inversion of observed changes in the signal frequency is used to recover the refractivity profile of the atmosphere, hence estimate the expected loss in signal strength due to defocusing of the radio signal by differential refraction. The refractive defocusing component (wavelength independent, in principle) is then removed from the actual measured signal strength profiles yielding the "true" signal extinction due to absorption and scattering integrated along the propagation path. Abel inversion of the integrated intensity profiles, tempered to combat noise contribution, yields localized estimates of the extinction coefficient (absorbtivity) as a function of altitude, or the extinction profiles. The initial radio measurements are diffraction-limited. We extend Fresnel transform based diffraction reconstruction procedures developed for radio occultation observations of planetary rings to remove diffraction effects from the initial radio measurements. The procedures are tested using idealized models of simple isothermal atmospheric profile extending above a hard-limb (knife-edge) model. Reconstruction of the simulated "observed" diffraction-limited data shows good agreement with the assumed atmospheric profile and the location of the hard-limb for a range of model parameters. We then apply a similar approach to the actual measured data. Strong wavelength-dependent extinction coefficient profile behavior is observed. Its large-scale structure appears well modeled by predictions based on N2-N2 collision-induced gaseous absorption for Titan's physical conditions. Interesting localized features of yet unexplained origin are also observed. Because the spatial scales of the extinction profile features are relatively large compared with

  6. Testing gravity with halo density profiles observed through gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Narikawa, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2012-05-01

    We present a new test of the modified gravity endowed with the Vainshtein mechanism with the density profile of a galaxy cluster halo observed through gravitational lensing. A scalar degree of freedom in the galileon modified gravity is screened by the Vainshtein mechanism to recover Newtonian gravity in high-density regions, however it might not be completely hidden on the outer side of a cluster of galaxies. Then the modified gravity might yield an observational signature in a surface mass density of a cluster of galaxies measured through gravitational lensing, since the scalar field could contribute to the lensing potential. We investigate how the transition in the Vainshtein mechanism affects the surface mass density observed through gravitational lensing, assuming that the density profile of a cluster of galaxies follows the original Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, the generalized NFW profile and the Einasto profile. We compare the theoretical predictions with observational results of the surface mass density reported recently by other researchers. We obtain constraints on the amplitude and the typical scale of the transition in the Vainshtein mechanism in a subclass of the generalized galileon model.

  7. Lidar Observation of Tropopause Ozone Profiles in the Equatorial Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Tropospheric ozone in the tropics zone is significant in terms of the oxidizing efficiency and greenhouse effect. However, in the upper troposphere, the ozone budget in the tropics has not been fully understood yet because of the sparsity of the range-resolved observations of vertical ozone concentration profiles. A DIAL (differential absorption lidar) system for vertical ozone profiles have been installed in the equatorial tropopause region over Kototabang, Indonesia (100.3E, 0.2S). We have observed large ozone enhancement in the upper troposphere, altitude of 13 - 17 km, concurring with a zonal wind oscillation associated with the equatorial Kelvin wave around the tropopause at equatorial region.

  8. TOLNet Data Format for Lidar Ozone Profile & Surface Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Aknan, A. A.; Newchurch, M.; Leblanc, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) is an interagency initiative started by NASA, NOAA, and EPA in 2011. TOLNet currently has six Lidars and one ozonesonde station. TOLNet provides high-resolution spatio-temporal measurements of tropospheric (surface to tropopause) ozone and aerosol vertical profiles to address fundamental air-quality science questions. The TOLNet data format was developed by TOLNet members as a community standard for reporting ozone profile observations. The development of this new format was primarily based on the existing NDAAC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) format and ICARTT (International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation) format. The main goal is to present the Lidar observations in self-describing and easy-to-use data files. The TOLNet format is an ASCII format containing a general file header, individual profile headers, and the profile data. The last two components repeat for all profiles recorded in the file. The TOLNet format is both human and machine readable as it adopts standard metadata entries and fixed variable names. In addition, software has been developed to check for format compliance. To be presented is a detailed description of the TOLNet format protocol and scanning software.

  9. The landfall and inland penetration of a flood-producing atmospheric river in Arizona. Part I: observed synoptic-scale, orographic, and hydrometeorological characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neiman, Paul J.; Ralph, F. Martin; Moore, Benjamin J.; Hughes, Mimi; Mahoney, Kelly M.; Cordeira, Jason M.; Dettinger, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are a dominant mechanism for generating intense wintertime precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. While studies over the past 10 years have explored the impact of ARs in, and west of, California’s Sierra Nevada and the Pacific Northwest’s Cascade Mountains, their influence on the weather across the intermountain west remains an open question. This study utilizes gridded atmospheric datasets, satellite imagery, rawinsonde soundings, a 449-MHz wind profiler and global positioning system (GPS) receiver, and operational hydrometeorological observing networks to explore the dynamics and inland impacts of a landfalling, flood-producing AR across Arizona in January 2010. Plan-view, cross-section, and back-trajectory analyses quantify the synoptic and mesoscale forcing that led to widespread precipitation across the state. The analyses show that a strong AR formed in the lower midlatitudes over the northeastern Pacific Ocean via frontogenetic processes and sea surface latent-heat fluxes but without tapping into the adjacent tropical water vapor reservoir to the south. The wind profiler, GPS, and rawinsonde observations document strong orographic forcing in a moist neutral environment within the AR that led to extreme, orographically enhanced precipitation. The AR was oriented nearly orthogonal to the Mogollon Rim, a major escarpment crossing much of central Arizona, and was positioned between the high mountain ranges of northern Mexico. High melting levels during the heaviest precipitation contributed to region-wide flooding, while the high-altitude snowpack increased substantially. The characteristics of the AR that impacted Arizona in January 2010, and the resulting heavy orographic precipitation, are comparable to those of landfalling ARs and their impacts along the west coasts of midlatitude continents.

  10. Estimating tropical vertical motion profile shapes from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, L. E.; Handlos, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The vertical structure of tropical deep convection strongly influences interactions with larger scale circulations and climate. This research focuses on investigating this vertical structure and its relationship with mesoscale tropical weather states. We test the hypothesis that vertical motion shape varies in association with weather state type. We estimate mean state vertical motion profile shapes for six tropical weather states defined using cloud top pressure and optical depth properties from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. The relationship between vertical motion and the dry static energy budget are utilized to set up a regression analysis that empirically determines two modes of variability in vertical motion from reanalysis data. We use these empirically determined modes, this relationship and surface convergence to estimate vertical motion profile shape from observations of satellite retrievals of rainfall and surface convergence. We find that vertical motion profile shapes vary systematically between different tropical weather states. The "isolated systems" regime exhibits a more ''bottom-heavy'' profile shape compared to the convective/thick cirrus and vigorous deep convective regimes, with maximum upward vertical motion occurring in the lower troposphere rather than the middle to upper troposphere. The variability we observe with our method does not coincide with that expected based on conventional ideas about how stratiform rain fraction and vertical motion are related.

  11. Lyman alpha solar spectral irradiance line profile observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Martin; Machol, Janet; Quemerais, Eric; Curdt, Werner; Kretschmar, Matthieu; Haberreiter, Margit

    2016-04-01

    Solar lyman alpha solar spectral irradiance measurements are available on a daily basis, but only the 1-nm integrated flux is typically published. The International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland has sponsored a team to make higher spectral resolution data available to the community. Using a combination of SORCE/SOLSTICE and SOHO/SUMER observations plus empirical and semi-empirical modeling, we will produce a dataset of the line profile. Our poster will describe progress towards this goal.

  12. Ice-Tethered Profiler Contributions to the Arctic Observing Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toole, J.; Krishfield, R.; Proshutinsky, A.; Timmermans, M.

    2008-12-01

    One of the hoped-for legacies of the International Polar Year is a sustained observational program such as the Arctic Observing Network to document and build understanding of future climate and ecosystem change. In the spirit of the now-operational international Argo float program, investigators from North America, Europe and Japan are collaborating to deploy drifting, ice-based observatory instrument systems on and below floes in the Arctic to sample the polar atmosphere-ice-ocean system and to make the resulting data available to researchers world-wide in real time. One element of these observatories is the WHOI Ice-Tethered Profiler, first deployed in August 2004. The ITP consists of a surface float and electronics package that sits atop an ice floe, a weighted, plastic-jacketed wire-rope tether extending from the surface float through the ice and down to 750-800 m depth, and a profiling vehicle with sensor package that moves up and down the tether. To date, 30 ITP systems (funded by research programs in 5 countries) have been deployed in the Arctic that together have returned more than 10,000 high-vertical-resolution temperature and salinity profiles spanning approximately 7 to 760 m depth over all seasons. Examples of the science being conducted with these data will be presented, along with performance statistics for the ITP instruments and engineering improvements/enhancements that are being implemented. Plans for sustaining the ITP contribution to the Arctic Observing Network will also be reviewed and future international collaborations invited.

  13. Forest Profiling with Multiple Observation Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Chapman, B. D.; Dutra, L. V.; Dos Santos, J. R.; Goncalves, F. G.; Mura, J. C.; Freitas, C. D.; Graca, P. M.; Drake, J.

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of the vertical structure of forest vegetation bear on ecosystem state, such as biodiversity, carbon dynamics, and fire susceptibility, and the estimation of forest biomass. Global monitoring of vertical vegetation structure is one of the most important and as yet unrealized goals of forest remote sensing. The Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) phase and coherence observations are directly sensitive to the vertical distribution of electromagnetic dielectric in the forest medium. This dielectric distribution in turn depends on vegetation density as a function of the vertical coordinate. Multiple InSAR observations--multiple baseline, multiple frequency, and/or multiple polarization--must be used to uniquely estimate vegetation density profiles. This talk explains the need for multiple observation strategies and the benefits of multiple- baseline, multiple-frequency, and multiple-polarization strategies. Multiple baseline tropical forest profiles from C-band (wavelength=0.056 m) InSAR will be shown, as well as results from L-band (0.25 m) few-baseline observations over La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Both surface-deformation measurements and those relevant to vertical-vegetation structure may result from a single InSAR mission design, provided, for example, that multiple nonzero baselines are flown along with the zero-baseline configuration preferred for deformation. The possibility of mutually improving the accuracy of deformation and structure in a simultaneous- measurement scenario will be discussed. There is also potential synergy with other remote sensing missions, such as the Tandem X InSAR mission, for delivering forest structure.

  14. Lidar Observation of Ozone Profiles in the Equatorial Tropopause Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo, M.; Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone in the tropics zone is significant in terms of the oxidizing efficiency and greenhouse effect. However, in the upper troposphere, the ozone budget in the tropics has not been fully understood yet because of the sparsity of the range-resolved observations of vertical ozone concentration profiles. We have constructed the lidar facility for survey of atmospheric structure over troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere and low thermosphere over Kototabang (100.3E, 0.2S), Indonesia in the equatorial region. The lidar system consists of the Mie and Raman lidars for tropospheric aerosol, water vapor and cirrus cloud measurements, the Rayleigh lidar for stratospheric and mesospheric temperature measurements and the Resonance lidar for metallic species such as Na, Fe, Ca ion measurements and temperature measurements in the mesopause region. The lidar observations started from 2004, and routine observations of clouds and aerosol in the troposphere and stratosphere are continued now. We have installed DIAL (differential absorption lidar) system for high-resolution measurements of vertical ozone profiles in the equatorial tropopause region over Kototabang. There were many ozone DIAL systems in the world, but their systems are almost optimized for stratospheric ozone layer measurement or tropospheric ozone measurement. Because of deep ozone absorption in the UV region, the wavelength selection is important. Over the equatorial region, the tropopause height is almost 17km. So we use 305nm for on-line and 355nm for off-line using second harmonics of dye laser and third harmonics of Nd:YAG laser. We have observed large ozone enhancement in the upper troposphere, altitude of 13-17km in June 2014, concurring with a zonal wind oscillation associated with the equatorial Kelvin wave around the tropopause[1] at equatorial region. References Fujiwara, M. et al., JGR, 103, D15, 19,173-19,182, 1998.

  15. Atmospheric Profiling Snthetic observation System(APSOS) - a system for whole atmosphere, purpose and preliminary observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Daren; Pan, Weilin; Wang, Yinan

    2016-07-01

    To understand the vertical coupling processes between the troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere and lower thermosphere with high vertical resolution and temporal resolution, an observation system consisted of multi-lidars, a W-band Doppler radar, and a THz spectrometer has been developing starting from 2012. This system is developed to observer the multiple atmospheric parameters, include high clouds, aerosols, CO2, SO2, NO2, water vapor, ozone, atmospheric temperature and wind, sodium atomic layer, in different height ranges, with vertical resolution of tens to hundreds meters and temporal resolution of several to tens minutes. In addition, the simultaneous observation with high cloud radar will enhance the ability of quantitative retrieval of middle and upper atmospheric observation with combined retrieval of cloud micro-physical characteristics and other atmospheric parameters above the cloud layer. As the cirrus cloud occupied about 50% of earth coverage, this ability will increase the whole atmosphere observation ability obviously. During last 5 years. We have finished each unit of the system and have revealed their targets separately. Temperature profile has been observed from 30 to 110 km, ozone up to 50 km, etc. In spring of 2016, we will have preliminary integrated observation in Eastern China, the Huainan Observatory of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, CAS. In the end of 2016, the system will be implemented at Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Observatory, CAS, near Lasa, Tibetan Plateau. Some preliminary results from Huainan observation will be presented in this presentation. This project is founded by NSFC.

  16. Comparison of climate model simulated and observed borehole temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Rouco, J. F.; Stevens, M. B.; Beltrami, H.; Goosse, H.; Rath, V.; Zorita, E.; Smerdon, J.

    2009-04-01

    Advances in understanding climate variability through the last millennium lean on simulation and reconstruction efforts. Progress in the integration of both approaches can potentially provide new means of assessing confidence on model projections of future climate change, of constraining the range of climate sensitivity and/or attributing past changes found in proxy evidence to external forcing. This work addresses specifically possible strategies for comparison of paleoclimate model simulations and the information recorded in borehole temperature profiles (BTPs). First efforts have allowed to design means of comparison of model simulated and observed BTPs in the context of the climate of the last millennium. This can be done by diffusing the simulated temperatures into the ground in order to produce synthetic BTPs that can be in turn assigned to collocated, real BTPs. Results suggest that there is sensitivity of borehole temperatures at large and regional scales to changes in external forcing over the last centuries. The comparison between borehole climate reconstructions and model simulations may also be subjected to non negligible uncertainties produced by the influence of past glacial and Holocene changes. While the thermal climate influence of the last deglaciation can be found well below 1000 m depth, such type of changes can potentially exert an influence on our understanding of subsurface climate in the top ca. 500 m. This issue is illustrated in control and externally forced climate simulations of the last millennium with the ECHO-G and LOVECLIM models, respectively.

  17. Cohort Profile: HAART Observational Medical Evaluation and Research (HOMER) cohort.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Sophie; Cescon, Angela; Samji, Hasina; Cui, Zishan; Yip, Benita; Lepik, Katherine J; Moore, David; Lima, Viviane D; Nosyk, Bohdan; Harrigan, P Richard; Montaner, Julio S G; Shannon, Kate; Wood, Evan; Hogg, Robert S

    2015-02-01

    Since 1986, antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been available free of charge to individuals living with HIV in British Columbia (BC), Canada, through the BC Centre of Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE) Drug Treatment Program (DTP). The Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) Observational Medical Evaluation and Research (HOMER) cohort was established in 1996 to maintain a prospective record of clinical measurements and medication profiles of a subset of DTP participants initiating HAART in BC. This unique cohort provides a comprehensive data source to investigate mortality, prognostic factors and treatment response among people living with HIV in BC from the inception of HAART. Currently over 5000 individuals are enrolled in the HOMER cohort. Data captured include socio-demographic characteristics (e.g. sex, age, ethnicity, health authority), clinical variables (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma HIV viral load, AIDS-defining illness, hepatitis C co-infection, mortality) and treatment variables (e.g. HAART regimens, date of treatment initiation, treatment interruptions, adherence data, resistance testing). Research findings from the HOMER cohort have featured in numerous high-impact peer-reviewed journals. The HOMER cohort collaborates with other HIV cohorts on both national and international scales to answer complex HIV-specific research questions, and welcomes input from external investigators regarding potential research proposals or future collaborations. For further information please contact the principal investigator, Dr Robert Hogg (robert_hogg@sfu.ca).

  18. Vertical profile of atmospheric conductivity that matches Schumann resonance observations.

    PubMed

    Nickolaenko, Alexander P; Galuk, Yuri P; Hayakawa, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the vertical profile of atmospheric conductivity in the range from 2 to 98 km. The propagation constant of extremely low frequency (ELF) radio waves was computed for this profile by using the full wave solution. A high correspondence is demonstrated of the data thus obtained to the conventional standard heuristic model of ELF propagation constant derived from the Schumann resonance records performed all over the world. We also suggest the conductivity profiles for the ambient day and ambient night conditions. The full wave solution technique was applied for obtaining the corresponding frequency dependence of propagation constant relevant to these profiles. By using these propagation constants, we computed the power spectra of Schumann resonance in the vertical electric field component for the uniform global distribution of thunderstorms and demonstrate their close similarity in all the models. We also demonstrate a strong correspondence between the wave attenuation rate obtained for these conductivity profiles and the measured ones by using the ELF radio transmissions.

  19. Limb profiles of the Moon from grazing occultation observations collected at RGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soma, Mitsuru; Kato, Yuji

    2002-09-01

    From lunar grazing occultation observations it is shown that the present lunar limb profile data have sometimes large errors, and therefore it is apparent that they need to be modified. For that purpose observations of grazing occultations collected at the Royal Greenwich Observatory until 1980 were analyzed and lunar limb profile data were obtained. As a result the number of the luanr limb profile data obtained from grazing occultations was almost doubled. These profile data are being used for the predictions of lunar grazing occultations in order to locate observers at better positions, so that they can also get good grazing occultation data to improve the lunar limb profiles. These profile data will be used in the future analyses of solar eclipse observations and of the possible errors of the Hipparcos proper motion system.

  20. Adaptive super-twisting observer for estimation of random road excitation profile in automotive suspension systems.

    PubMed

    Rath, J J; Veluvolu, K C; Defoort, M

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of road excitation profile is important for evaluation of vehicle stability and vehicle suspension performance for autonomous vehicle control systems. In this work, the nonlinear dynamics of the active automotive system that is excited by the unknown road excitation profile are considered for modeling. To address the issue of estimation of road profile, we develop an adaptive supertwisting observer for state and unknown road profile estimation. Under Lipschitz conditions for the nonlinear functions, the convergence of the estimation error is proven. Simulation results with Ford Fiesta MK2 demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer for state and unknown input estimation for nonlinear active suspension system.

  1. Adaptive Super-Twisting Observer for Estimation of Random Road Excitation Profile in Automotive Suspension Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rath, J. J.; Veluvolu, K. C.; Defoort, M.

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of road excitation profile is important for evaluation of vehicle stability and vehicle suspension performance for autonomous vehicle control systems. In this work, the nonlinear dynamics of the active automotive system that is excited by the unknown road excitation profile are considered for modeling. To address the issue of estimation of road profile, we develop an adaptive supertwisting observer for state and unknown road profile estimation. Under Lipschitz conditions for the nonlinear functions, the convergence of the estimation error is proven. Simulation results with Ford Fiesta MK2 demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer for state and unknown input estimation for nonlinear active suspension system. PMID:24683321

  2. Altitude troposphere ozone profiles over Kyiv-Goloseyev station by simultaneous Umkehr and FTIR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milinevsky, Gennadi; Shavrina, Angelina; Udodov, Evgeny; Liptuga, Anatoly; Kyslyi, Volodymyr; Danylevsky, Vassyl; Kravchenko, Volodymyr; Ivanov, Yuri; Synyavski, Ivan; Romanyuk, Yaroslav; Pavlenko, Yakov; Veles, Oleksandr

    2016-04-01

    Total ozone column and ozone profile data have been obtained from both: (1) standard Dobson measurements and Umkehr method, and (2) using modeling of the ozone absorption spectral band profile near 9.6 microns with the MODTRAN4.3 Atmospheric Radiation Transfer Model based on the HITRAN molecular absorption database from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) observations. The simultaneous ground-based Dobson/Umkehr and FTIR ozone observations have been performed in 2014-2015 at the mid-latitude Kyiv-Goloseyev KGV GAW station for joint altitude troposphere ozone profiles analysis. To retrieve ozone column estimates and ozone profiles from FTIR observations, we used the satellite Aqua-AIRS water vapor, temperature and ozone profiles, and the simultaneous with FTIR observations the Umkehr ozone profiles and surface ozone measurements as input a priori information for the MODTRAN4.3 model. The altitude ozone profiles retrieved from Umkehr method and satellite measurements are in good correspondence in stratosphere layer. However the troposphere part of ozone profiles is uncertain and reproduced with large errors. Therefore we use the MODTRAN4.3 model for interpretation of observed FTIR absorption spectrum to retrieve and improve the troposphere part of ozone altitude distribution. The synergy of Umkehr, satellite and FTIR simultaneous observations including surface ozone measurements allows rendering the ozone profile features in troposphere that indicate the stratosphere-troposphere exchange processes. Season ozone profile variations observed from Umkehr measurements are discussed as well. This work was partly supported by the Polar FORCeS project no. 4012 of the Australian Antarctic Science Program.

  3. An Analysis of Water Line Profiles in Star Formation Regions Observed by SWAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Plume, Rene; Carpenter, John M.; Neufeld, David A.; Chin, Gordon; Erickson, Neal R.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Harwit, Martin; Howe, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    We present spectral line profiles for the 557 GHz 1(sub 1,0) yields 1(sub 0,1) ground-state rotational transition of ortho-H2(16)O for 18 galactic star formation regions observed by SWAS. 2 Water is unambiguously detected in every source. The line profiles exhibit a wide variety of shapes, including single-peaked spectra and self-reversed profiles. We interpret these profiles using a Monte Carlo code to model the radiative transport. The observed variations in the line profiles can be explained by variations in the relative strengths of the bulk flow and small-scale turbulent motions within the clouds. Bulk flow (infall, outflow) must be present in some cloud cores, and in certain cases this bulk flow dominates the turbulent motions.

  4. Retrieval of Hydrometeor Drop Size Distributions from TRMM Field Campaign Profiler Doppler Velocity Spectra Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Christopher R.; Gage, Kenneth S.

    2003-01-01

    Consistent with the original proposal and work plan, this project focused on estimating the raindrop size distributions (DSDs) retrieved from vertically pointing Doppler radar profilers and analyzing the relationship of the retrieved DSDs with the dynamics of the precipitation processes. The first phase of this project focused on developing the model to retrieve the DSD from the observed Doppler velocity spectra. The second phase used this model to perform DSD retrievals from the profiler observations made during the TRMM Ground Validation Field Campaigns of TEFLUN-B, TRMM-LBA, and KWAJEX. The third phase of this project established collaborations with scientists involved with each field campaign in order to validate the profiler DSD estimates and to enable the profiler retrievals to be used in their research. Through these collaborations, the retrieved DSDs were placed into context with the dynamical processes of the observed precipitating cloud systems.

  5. Retrieving Temperature and Moisture Profiles from AERI Radiance Observations. AERIPROF Value-Added Product Technical Description

    SciTech Connect

    Feltz, W. F.; Howell, H. B.; Comstock, J.; Mahon, R.; Turner, D. D.; Smith, W. L.; Woolf, H. M.; Halter, T.

    2007-04-01

    One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to collect a long-term series of radiative and atmospheric state observations to improve the parameterization of these processes in global climate models. The ARM Program intended to move away from the traditional approach of directly measuring profiles of temperature and moisture using radiosondes, which is expensive in terms of expendables and manpower, and develop methods to retrieve these profiles with ground-based remote sensors. The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI), whose radiance data contains information on the vertical distribution of water vapor and temperature, is an integral part of the ARM profiling plan.

  6. Denoising of X-ray pulsar observed profile in the undecimated wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Meng-fan; Li, Xiao-ping; Fu, Ling-zhong; Liu, Xiu-ping; Sun, Hai-feng; Shen, Li-rong

    2016-01-01

    The low intensity of the X-ray pulsar signal and the strong X-ray background radiation lead to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the X-ray pulsar observed profile obtained through epoch folding, especially when the observation time is not long enough. This signifies the necessity of denoising of the observed profile. In this paper, the statistical characteristics of the X-ray pulsar signal are studied, and a signal-dependent noise model is established for the observed profile. Based on this, a profile noise reduction method by performing a local linear minimum mean square error filtering in the un-decimated wavelet domain is developed. The detail wavelet coefficients are rescaled by multiplying their amplitudes by a locally adaptive factor, which is the local variance ratio of the noiseless coefficients to the noisy ones. All the nonstationary statistics needed in the algorithm are calculated from the observed profile, without a priori information. The results of experim! ents, carried out on simulated data obtained by the ground-based simulation system and real data obtained by Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer satellite, indicate that the proposed method is excellent in both noise suppression and preservation of peak sharpness, and it also clearly outperforms four widely accepted and used wavelet denoising methods, in terms of SNR, Pearson correlation coefficient and root mean square error.

  7. Calibration of the total carbon column observing network using aircraft profile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunch, D.; Toon, G. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wofsy, S. C.; Stephens, B. B.; Fischer, M. L.; Uchino, O.; Abshire, J. B.; Bernath, P.; Biraud, S. C.; Blavier, J.-F. L.; Boone, C.; Bowman, K. P.; Browell, E. V.; Campos, T.; Connor, B. J.; Daube, B. C.; Deutscher, N. M.; Diao, M.; Elkins, J. W.; Gerbig, C.; Gottlieb, E.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hurst, D. F.; Jiménez, R.; Keppel-Aleks, G.; Kort, E.; Macatangay, R.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Moore, F.; Morino, I.; Park, S.; Robinson, J.; Roehl, C. M.; Sawa, Y.; Sherlock, V.; Sweeney, C.; Tanaka, T.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2010-06-01

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) produces precise measurements of the column average dry-air mole fractions of CO2, CO, CH4, N2O and H2O at a variety of sites worldwide. These observations rely on spectroscopic parameters that are not known with sufficient accuracy to compute total columns that can be used in combination with in situ measurements. The TCCON must therefore be calibrated to World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in situ trace gas measurement scales. We present a calibration of TCCON data using WMO-scale instrumentation aboard aircraft that measured profiles over four TCCON stations during 2008 and 2009. The aircraft campaigns are the Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport 2008 (START-08), which included a profile over the Park Falls site, the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO-1) campaign, which included profiles over the Lamont and Lauder sites, a series of Learjet profiles over the Lamont site, and a Beechcraft King Air profile over the Tsukuba site. These calibrations are compared with similar observations made during the INTEX-NA (2004), COBRA-ME (2004) and TWP-ICE (2006) campaigns. A single, global calibration factor for each gas accurately captures the TCCON total column data within error.

  8. Calibration of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network using Aircraft Profile Data

    SciTech Connect

    Wunch, Debra; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Stephens, Britton B.; Fischer, Marc L.; Uchino, Osamu; Abshire, James B.; Bernath, Peter; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Blavier, Jean-Francois L.; Boone, Chris; Bowman, Kenneth P.; Browell, Edward V.; Campos, Teresa; Connor, Brian J.; Daube, Bruce C.; Deutscher, Nicholas M.; Diao, Minghui; Elkins, James W.; Gerbig, Christoph; Gottlieb, Elaine; Griffith, David W. T.; Hurst, Dale F.; Jimenez, Rodrigo; Keppel-Aleks, Gretchen; Kort, Eric; Macatangay, Ronald; Machida, Toshinobu; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Moore, Fred; Morino, Isamu; Park, Sunyoung; Robinson, John; Roehl, Coleen M.; Sawa, Yusuke; Sherlock, Vanessa; Sweeney, Colm; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Zondlo, Mark A.

    2010-03-26

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) produces precise measurements of the column average dry-air mole fractions of CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O at a variety of sites worldwide. These observations rely on spectroscopic parameters that are not known with sufficient accuracy to compute total columns that can be used in combination with in situ measure ments. The TCCON must therefore be calibrated to World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in situ trace gas measurement scales. We present a calibration of TCCON data using WMO-scale instrumentation aboard aircraft that measured profiles over four TCCON stations during 2008 and 2009. The aircraft campaigns are the Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport 2008 (START-08), which included a profile over the Park Falls site, the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO-1) campaign, which included profiles over the Lamont and Lauder sites, a series of Learjet profiles over the Lamont site, and a Beechcraft King Air profile over the Tsukuba site. These calibrations are compared with similar observations made during the INTEX-NA (2004), COBRA-ME (2004) and TWP-ICE (2006) campaigns. A single, global calibration factor for each gas accurately captures the TCCON total column data within error.

  9. Observation and interpretation of the asymmetric Stokes Q, U, and V line profiles in sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Lites, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    We present a first approach to systematic characterization and interpretation of observed asymmetries of Stokes profiles as a function of spatial position within sunspots. Spatial maps of the full Stokes profiles of Fe I 6302.5 A gathered in large sunspots using the HAO Stokes II instrument reveal asymmetries that vary systematically across large sunspots observed during 1980. We use the inversion technique by Landolfi to extract the velocity gradients along the line of sight (LOS) which give rise to these asymmetries. The gradients derived from full Stokes profiles are in agreement with previous characterizations of the Evershed flow derived from Stokes I profiles alone (i.e., a flow increasing with depth in the atmosphere). By coupling this semiempirical gradient of velocity with a magnetic field inclination varying along the LOS, the synthesized profiles are able to mimic basic observed features of the broad-band circular polarization present in our data and observed previously by others. This characterization has magnetic field lines which become progressively more horizontal with depth in the penumbra.

  10. Observations of Atmospheric Temperature Structure from an Airborne Microwave Temperature Profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, J. A.; Schick, K. E.; Young, K.; Lim, B.; Ahijevych, D.

    2014-12-01

    A newly-designed Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) was developed at JPL for the NSF-NCAR Gulfstream-V aircraft. The MTP is a scanning microwave radiometer that measures thermal emission in the 50-60 GHz oxygen complex. It scans from near-zenith to near-nadir, measuring brightness temperatures forward, above, and below the aircraft at 17 s intervals. A statistical retrieval method derives temperature profiles from the measurements, using proximate radiosonde profiles as a priori information. MTP data examples from recent experiments, comparisons with simultaneous temperature profiles from the Airborne Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System (AVAPS), and a method for blending MTP and AVAPS temperature profiles will be presented. The Mesoscale Predictability Experiment (MPEX; May-June, 2013) investigated the utility of sub-synoptic observations to extend convective-scale predictability and otherwise enhance skill in regional numerical weather prediction over short forecast periods. This project relied on MTP and AVAPS profiles to characterize atmospheric structure on fine spatial scales. Comparison of MTP profiles with AVAPS profiles confirms uncertainty specifications of MTP. A profile blending process takes advantage of the high resolution of AVAPS profiles below the aircraft while utilizing MTP profiles above the aircraft. Ongoing research with these data sets examines double tropopause structure in association with the sub-tropical jet, mountain lee waves, and fluxes at the tropopause. The attached figure shows a mountain lee wave signature in the MTP-derived isentrope field along the flight track during an east-west segment over the Rocky Mountains. A vertically propagating wave with westward tilt is evident on the leeward side of the mountains at around 38 ksec. The Deep Propagating Gravity Wave Experiment over New Zealand (DEEPWAVE; June-July, 2014) investigated the dynamics of gravity waves from the surface to the lower thermosphere. MTP and AVAPS

  11. Observed changes in the vertical profile of stratopheric nitrous oxide at Thule, Greenland, February - March 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmons, Louisa K.; Reeves, John M.; Shindell, Drew T.; Dezafra, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Using a ground-based mm-wave spectrometer, we have observed stratospheric N2O over Thule, Greenland (76.3 N, 68.4 W) during late February and March, 1992. Vertical profiles of mixing ratio ranging from 16 to 50 km were recovered from molecular emission spectra. The profiles of early March show an abrupt increase in the lower-stratosphere N2O mixing ratio similar to the spring-to-summer change associated with the break up of the Antarctic polar vortex. This increase is correlated with changes in potential vorticity, air temperature, and ozone mixing ratio.

  12. Temperature, N2, and N density profiles of Triton's atmosphere - Observations and model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Sandel, B. R.; Herbert, F.; Vervack, R. J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Improved analysis of the Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrometer observations of the solar occultation by Triton yields the isothermal temperature and N2 number densities in the altitude range 475-675 km. The signature of atomic nitrogen in the occultation spectra is identified, its density profile is derived, and an experimental value of the escape rate of N atoms is given. The one-dimensional thermal conductivity equation for a spherical atmosphere is solved, taking into account CO heating and cooling and heating by precipitating electrons, solar radiation, and chemical effects. Finally, profiles of number densities of N, H2, and H are calculated.

  13. Comparison of MADE3-simulated and observed aerosol distributions with a focus on aerosol vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christopher; Hendricks, Johannes; Righi, Mattia; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of aerosol radiative forcing estimates from climate models depends on the accuracy of simulated global aerosol distribution and composition, as well as on the models' representation of the aerosol-cloud and aerosol-radiation interactions. To help improve on previous modeling studies, we recently developed the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE3 that explicitly tracks particle mixing state in the Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges. We implemented MADE3 into the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC and evaluated it by comparison of simulated aerosol properties to observations. Compared properties include continental near-surface aerosol component concentrations and size distributions, continental and marine aerosol vertical profiles, and nearly global aerosol optical depth. Recent studies have shown the specific importance of aerosol vertical profiles for determination of the aerosol radiative forcing. Therefore, our focus here is on the evaluation of simulated vertical profiles. The observational data is taken from campaigns between 1990 and 2011 over the Pacific Ocean, over North and South America, and over Europe. The datasets include black carbon and total aerosol mass mixing ratios, as well as aerosol particle number concentrations. Compared to other models, EMAC with MADE3 yields good agreement with the observations - despite a general high bias of the simulated mass mixing ratio profiles. However, BC concentrations are generally overestimated by many models in the upper troposphere. With MADE3 in EMAC, we find better agreement of the simulated BC profiles with HIPPO data than the multi-model average of the models that took part in the AeroCom project. There is an interesting difference between the profiles from individual campaigns and more "climatological" datasets. For instance, compared to spatially and temporally localized campaigns, the model simulates a more continuous decline in both total

  14. Observation of speckle pattern and interference fringe forks in stimulated Raman scattering beam profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drampyan, Raphael K.

    2001-05-01

    The circularly distributed speckle pattern, as well as interference fringe structure in profile of the beam of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) I Stokes component, pumped by multimode radiation with nearly four-fold azimuthal symmetry, have been observed. The SRS was excited near the threshold of generation by nanosecond pulses of laser radiation at wavelength 530 nm. The profile of output pump beam had a uniform intensity distribution, whereas the SRS beam profile showed kaleidoscopic change from shot to shot, while the energies of input pulses were kept stable. The interference fringes showed a number of points where the fringes originated or vanished. Such behavior, which is the vortex signature, allows to suppose that SRS waves, generated from quantum noise, carry screw dislocations.

  15. Characteristics of ozone vertical profile observed in the boundary layer around Beijing in autumn.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Xiujuan; Meng, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In the autumn of 2008, the vertical profiles of ozone and meteorological parameters in the low troposphere (0-1000 m) were observed at two sites around Beijing, specifically urban Nanjiao and rural Shangdianzi. At night and early morning, the lower troposphere divided into two stratified layers due to temperature inversion. Ozone in the lower layer showed a large gradient due to the titration of NO. Air flow from the southwest brought ozone-rich air to Beijing, and the ozone profiles were marked by a continuous increase in the residual layer at night. The accumulated ozone in the upper layer played an important role in the next day's surface peak ozone concentration, and caused a rapid increase in surface ozone in the morning. Wind direction shear and wind speed shear exhibited different influences on ozone profiles and resulted in different surface ozone concentrations in Beijing.

  16. A comparison between observed and analytical velocity dispersion profiles of 20 nearby galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammad S.; Abdullah, Mohamed H.; Ali, Gamal B.

    2014-05-01

    We derive analytical expression for the velocity dispersion of galaxy clusters, using the statistical mechanical approach. We compare the observed velocity dispersion profiles for 20 nearby ( z≤0.1) galaxy clusters with the analytical ones. It is interesting to find that the analytical results closely match with the observed velocity dispersion profiles only if the presence of the diffuse matter in clusters is taken into consideration. This takes us to introduce a new approach to detect the ratio of diffuse mass, M diff , within a galaxy cluster. For the present sample, the ratio f= M diff / M, where M the cluster's total mass is found to has an average value of 45±12 %. This leads us to the result that nearly 45 % of the cluster mass is impeded outside the galaxies, while around 55 % of the cluster mass is settled in the galaxies.

  17. Evaluation of radiative heating rate profiles in eight GCMs using A-train satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesana, Gregory; Waliser, D. E.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Jiang, X.; Li, J.-L.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we take advantage of two modeling experiments and A-train satellite observations to characterize the impact of cloud biases in the vertical distribution of radiative heating rates in eight general circulation models General Circulation Models (GCMs). We compare the modeled vertical distribution of clouds against the GCM-Oriented Cloud-Aerosols Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations Cloud Product (CALIPSO-GOCCP) using a simulator approach. Although the overall pattern of modeled zonal cloud frequency profiles is relatively good (r=0.92 for the multi-model mean), we show two main systematic biases in the cloud frequency profiles: a positive bias above 7km (up to 10%), particularly in the tropics; and a negative bias below 3km (up to -10%), which reaches a maximum over the stratocumulus cloud regions. Using radiative heating rate profiles calculated with constraints from CloudSat, CALIPSO and other satellite observations, we show that the excess of clouds in the upper troposphere (>7km) results in excess infrared and solar heating in the vicinity of the clouds as well as more infrared heating for the entire column below the cloud. On the other hand, the lack of clouds in the lower troposphere reduces the infrared cooling near the missing cloud levels and increases the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor below. The global radiative heating rate between 50°S and 50°N is too warm in the models (-0.81K/day vs. -1.01K/day). The representation of clouds in GCMs remains challenging, but reducing the cloud biases would lead to an improvement of the heating rate profiles, which in turn would help in improving other aspects of models' simulations such as the dynamics, cloud feedbacks and surface-atmosphere interactions.

  18. The Temperature Structure of 30 Nearby Clusters Observed with ASCA: Similarity of Temperature Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markevitch, Maxim; Forman, William R.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    1998-08-01

    We present an analysis of ASCA spatially resolved spectroscopic data for a nearly complete sample of bright clusters with redshifts between 0.04 and 0.09. Together with several clusters analyzed elsewhere using the same method, this sample consists of 30 objects with Te >~ 3.5 keV for which we obtained projected temperature profiles and, when possible, crude two-dimensional temperature maps. The clusters are A85, A119, A399, A401, A478, A644, A754, A780, A1650, A1651, A1795, A2029, A2065, A2142, A2256, A2319, A2597, A2657, A3112, A3266, A3376, A3391, A3395, A3558, A3571, A3667, A4059, Cygnus A, MKW 3S, and Triangulum Australis. All clusters, with the possible exception of a few with insufficiently accurate data, are found to be nonisothermal with spatial temperature variations (apart from cooling flows) by a factor of 1.3-2. ASCA temperature maps for many clusters reveal merger shocks. The most notable of these are A754, A2065, A3558, A3667, and Cygnus A; merging can also be inferred with lower confidence from the A85, A119, and A2657 temperature maps and from the A3395 and Triangulum Australis entropy maps. About one-half of the sample show signs of merging; in about 60% of the sample, we detect cooling flows. Nearly all clusters show a significant radial temperature decline at large radii. For a typical 7 keV cluster, the observed temperature decline between 1 and 6 X-ray core radii (0.15 and 0.9 h-1 Mpc) can be approximately quantified by a polytropic index of 1.2-1.3. Assuming such a polytropic temperature profile and hydrostatic equilibrium, the gravitating masses within 1 and within 6 core radii are approximately 1.35 and 0.7 times the isothermal β-model estimates, respectively. Most interestingly, we find that temperature profiles, excluding those for the most asymmetric clusters, appear remarkably similar when the temperature is plotted against the radius in units of the estimated virial radius. We compare the composite temperature profile to a host of

  19. A double peaked pulse profile observed in GX 1+4.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B.; Agrawal, P. C.; Rao, A. R.; Manchanda, R. K.

    1997-03-01

    The hard X-ray pulsar GX 1+4 was observed several times in the last few years with a pair of balloon-borne Xenon filled Multi-cell Proportional Counters (XMPC). In a balloon flight made on 22 March 1995, the source was detected in a bright state, the average observed source count rate being 8.0+/-0.2s^-1^ per detector. X-ray pulsations with a period of 121.9+/-0.1 s were detected in the source with a broad double peak pulse feature. When observed in December 1993 with the same instrument, the pulse profile of GX 1+4 showed a single peak. This change in the pulse profile to a double pulse structure in about 15 months indicates either activation of the opposite pole of the neutron star if the magnetic field is asymmetric or possibly a change in the beam pattern, from a pencil beam to a fan beam. Assuming a fan beam configuration, the pulse profile is used to find the inclinations of the magnetic axis and the viewing axis with the spin axis. The derived angles support the GINGA observations of a dip in the pulse profile which was resolved to have a local maximum in one of the observations and was explained with resonance scattering of cyclotron line energy photons by the accretion column (Makishima et al., 1988Natur.333..746M, Dotani et al., 1989PASJ...41..427D). Compared to our previous observation of the same source with the same telescope (Rao et al., 1994A&A...289L..43R) a period change rate of 0.72 +/-0.40s/yr is obtained which is the lowest rate of change of period for this source since its discovery. Average pulse fraction in the hard X-ray range is low (30%), consistent with its anti correlation with luminosity as reported by us earlier (Rao et al., 1994A&A...289L..43R) and the observed spectrum is very hard (power law photon index 1.67+/-0.12).

  20. A study of the Ionospheric electron density profile with FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Min-Yang; Tsai, Ho-Fang; Lin, Chi-Yen; Lee, I.-Te; Lin, Charles; Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2015-04-01

    The GPS Occultation Experiment payload onboard FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC microsatellite constellation is capable of scanning the ionospheric structure by the radio occultation (RO) technique to retrieve precise electron density profiles since 2006. Due to the success of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC, the follow-on mission, FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2, is to launch 12 microsatellites in 2016 and 2018, respectively, with the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) RO instrument onboard for tracking GPS, Galileo and/or GLONASS satellite signals and to provide more than 8,000 RO soundings per day globally. An overview of the validation of the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC ionospheric profiling is given by means of the traditional Abel transform through bending angle and total electron content (TEC), while the ionospheric data assimilation is also applied, based on the Gauss-Markov Kalman filter with the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI-2007) and global ionosphere map (GIM) as background model, to assimilate TEC observations from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC. The results shows comparison of electron density profiles from Abel inversion and data assimilation. Furthermore, an observing system simulation experiment is also applied to determine the impact of FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 on ionospheric weather monitoring, which reveals an opportunity on advanced study of small spatial and temporal variations in the ionosphere.

  1. Validation of 10 years of SAO OMI Ozone Profiles with Ozonesonde and MLS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and long-term stability of the SAO OMI ozone profile product, we validate ~10 years of ozone profile product (Oct. 2004-Dec. 2014) against collocated ozonesonde and MLS data. Ozone profiles as well stratospheric, tropospheric, lower tropospheric ozone columns are compared with ozonesonde data for different latitude bands, and time periods (e.g., 2004-2008/2009-2014 for without/with row anomaly. The mean biases and their standard deviations are also assessed as a function of time to evaluate the long-term stability and bias trends. In the mid-latitude and tropical regions, OMI generally shows good agreement with ozonesonde observations. The mean ozone profile biases are generally within 6% with up to 30% standard deviations. The biases of stratospheric ozone columns (SOC) and tropospheric ozone columns (TOC) are -0.3%-2.2% and -0.2%-3%, while standard deviations are 3.9%-5.8% and 14.4%-16.0%, respectively. However, the retrievals during 2009-2014 show larger standard deviations and larger temporal variations; the standard deviations increase by ~5% in the troposphere and ~2% in the stratosphere. Retrieval biases at individual levels in the stratosphere and upper troposphere show statistically significant trends and different trends for 2004-2008 and 2009-2014 periods. The trends in integrated ozone partial columns are less significant due to cancellation from various layers, except for significant trend in tropical SOC. These results suggest the need to perform time dependent radiometric calibration to maintain the long-term stability of this product. Similarly, we are comparing the OMI stratospheric ozone profiles and SOC with collocated MLS data, and the results will be reported.

  2. Wind Profiler Observations of the Meiyu/Baiu Precipitation in the downstream of the Yangtze River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K.; Geng, B.; Yamada, H.; Uyeda, H.

    2002-12-01

    Detailed observations of the Baiu/Meiyu frontal precipitation were acquired by several mobile platforms (three Doppler radars, a wind profiler system, three surface automatic weather stations) in the downstream of the Yangtze River for two campaigns of intensive observation (for about 50 days during June and July) period (IOP) in the years 2001 and 2001. For the first time, Frontier Observational Research System for Global Change (FORSGC) deployed a Lower Atmospheric Wind Profiler (LAWP) with Radio acoustic sounding System (RASS) at Dongshan (31°4'47" N; 120°26'3" E) in the Jiangsu province, about 120 km west of Shanghai, PR China. The two IOP data analysis suggested that the most of the time Meiyu/Baiu (heavy) precipitation tended to occur when the southwesterly low-level jet became strong under moist neutral stratification and strong gradient of equivalent potential temperature. During the heavy rainfall the LAWP can be used to provide clues for the forecasting of the maximum strength of winds and the arrival times of strong winds and gales. Observational results also indicate that the LAWP could help to improve the understanding of the atmospheric processes involved in severe weather during typhoon, clod front passage. The results suggest that convective boundary layer (CBL) height at Dongshan varies between 1 and 1.5 km and the CBL evolution depends on variety of factors and is not simply related to any local surface meteorological variables. The low boundary heights at Dongshan during July are probably related to low Bowen ratios (ratio of sensible to latent heat flux at the surface) and very high humidity. The CBL depth also indicates the prevailing synoptic situations during the Meiyu/Baiu season. We developed a simple algorithm to classify each profile into convective, transition (mixed convective-stratiform) and stratiform rain based on the wind profiler observations of the (Reflectivity, Doppler velocity and Spectral width) vertical structure of the

  3. H-alpha profile observations of a limb flare with high temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeter, M.

    1990-12-01

    The impulsive phase of a 1N/M2.0 limb flare on September 8, 1988 was observed in H-alpha with high temporal resolution. With an imaging spectrograph line profiles have been acquired every 2.3 sec. The temporal evolution in the blue and red wing has been correlated with hard X-ray data from HXRBS. It is shown that a prominent spike in the blue wing of H-alpha was delayed with respect to the corresponding hard X-ray burst by 7-8 sec. With the exception of the spike in the blue wing of H-alpha, the temporal development of the line profile is compatible with the predictions for nonthermal electron heating during the impulsive phase.

  4. High-β plasma formation and observation of peaked density profile in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Morikawa, J.; Yano, Y.; Mizushima, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Furukawa, M.; Kawai, Y.; Harima, K.; Kawazura, Y.; Kaneko, Y.; Tadachi, K.; Emoto, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Sugiura, T.; Vogel, G.

    2011-06-01

    High-β ECH plasma is generated and stably sustained in a magnetospheric configuration, the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device, generated by a levitated dipole field magnet. Geomagnetic-field compensation and optimized operation have realized drastic improvements in plasma properties. The maximum local β value has reached 70% and the pressure profiles have a rather steep gradient near the superconducting magnet. Electrons of the high-β plasma typically consist of 70% hot (~50 keV) and the rest of cold populations. Confinement time of the hot component plasma is 0.5 s with the optimized neutral gas pressure. By removing the coil support structure, the peaked density profile is observed in the strong field region.

  5. Observed and Modeled HOCl Profiles in the Midlatitude Stratosphere: Implication for Ozone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalenko, L. J.; Jucks, K. W.; Salawitch, R. J.; Toon, G. C.; Blavier, J. F.; Johnson, D. G.; Kleinbohl, A.; Livesey, N. J .; Margitan, J. J.; Pickett, H. M.; Santee, M. L.; Sen, B.; Stachnik, R. A.; Waters, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    Vertical profiles of stratospheric HOCl calculated with a diurnal steady-state photochemical model that uses currently recommended reaction rates and photolysis cross sections underestimate observed profiles of HOCl obtained by two balloon-borne instruments, FIRS-2 (a far-infrared emission spectrometer) and MkIV (a mid-infrared, solar absorption spectrometer). Considerable uncertainty (a factor of two) persists in laboratory measurements of the rate constant (k(sub 1)) for the reaction ClO + HO2 yields HOCl + O2. Agreement between modeled and measured HOCl can be attained using a value of k(sub 1) from Stimpfle et al. (1979) that is about a factor-of-two faster than the currently recommended rate constant. Comparison of modeled and measured HOCl suggests that models using the currently recommended value for k(sub 1) may underestimate the role of the HOCl catalytic cycle for ozone depletion, important in the midlatitude lower stratosphere.

  6. Sodium D-line emission from Io - Comparison of observed and theoretical line profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Bergstralh, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of the D-line profiles have been obtained for Io's sodium emission cloud. These lines, which are produced through resonance scattering of sunlight, are broad and asymmetric and can be used to infer source and dynamical properties of the sodium cloud. In this paper we compare line profile data with theoretical line shapes computed for several assumed initial velocity distributions corresponding to various source mechanisms. We also examine the consequences of source distributions which are nonuniform over the surface of Io. It is found that the experimental data are compatible with escape of sodium atoms from the leading hemisphere of Io and with velocity distributions characteristic of sputtering processes. Thermal escape and simple models of plasma sweeping are found to be incompatible with the observations.

  7. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency, Active and Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Olson, William S.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated using both simulated and airborne data. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite multi-frequency active and passive observations. These observations are characterized by various spatial and sampling resolutions. This makes the retrieval problem mathematically more difficult and ill-determined because the quality of information decreases with decreasing resolution. A model that, given reflectivity profiles and a small set of parameters (including the cloud water content, the intercept drop size distribution, and a variable describing the frozen hydrometeor properties), simulates high-resolution brightness temperatures is used. The high-resolution simulated brightness temperatures are convolved at the real sensor resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is used to minimize the differences between simulated and observed brightness temperatures. The retrieval technique is investigated using cloud model synthetic and airborne data from the Fourth Convection And Moisture Experiment. Simulated high-resolution brightness temperatures and reflectivities and airborne observation strong are convolved at the resolution of the TRMM instruments and retrievals are performed and analyzed relative to the reference data used in observations synthesis. An illustration of the possible use of the technique in satellite rainfall estimation is presented through an application to TRMM data. The study suggests improvements in combined active and passive retrievals even when the instruments resolutions are significantly different. Future work needs to better quantify the retrievals performance, especially in connection with satellite applications, and the uncertainty of the models used in retrieval.

  8. Observed large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles during TWP-ICE

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; Hume, Timothy; Jakob, Christian; Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Zhang, Minghua

    2010-01-01

    This study documents the characteristics of the large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles observed during the Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which was conducted in January–February 2006 in Darwin during the northern Australian monsoon season. The examined profiles exhibit significant variations between four distinct synoptic regimes that were observed during the experiment. The active monsoon period is characterized by strong upward motion and large advective cooling and moistening throughout the entire troposphere, while the suppressed and clear periods are dominated by moderate midlevel subsidence and significant low- to midlevel drying through horizontal advection. The midlevel subsidence and horizontal dry advection are largely responsible for the dry midtroposphere observed during the suppressed period and limit the growth of clouds to low levels. During the break period, upward motion and advective cooling and moistening located primarily at midlevels dominate together with weak advective warming and drying (mainly from horizontal advection) at low levels. The variations of the diabatic heating and drying profiles with the different regimes are closely associated with differences in the large-scale structures, cloud types, and rainfall rates between the regimes. Strong diabatic heating and drying are seen throughout the troposphere during the active monsoon period while they are moderate and only occur above 700 hPa during the break period. The diabatic heating and drying tend to have their maxima at low levels during the suppressed periods. Furthermore, the diurnal variations of these structures between monsoon systems, continental/coastal, and tropical inland-initiated convective systems are also examined.

  9. Observed large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles during TWP-ICE

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Shaocheng; Hume, Timothy; Jakob, Christian; ...

    2010-01-01

    This study documents the characteristics of the large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles observed during the Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which was conducted in January–February 2006 in Darwin during the northern Australian monsoon season. The examined profiles exhibit significant variations between four distinct synoptic regimes that were observed during the experiment. The active monsoon period is characterized by strong upward motion and large advective cooling and moistening throughout the entire troposphere, while the suppressed and clear periods are dominated by moderate midlevel subsidence and significant low- to midlevel drying through horizontal advection. The midlevel subsidence andmore » horizontal dry advection are largely responsible for the dry midtroposphere observed during the suppressed period and limit the growth of clouds to low levels. During the break period, upward motion and advective cooling and moistening located primarily at midlevels dominate together with weak advective warming and drying (mainly from horizontal advection) at low levels. The variations of the diabatic heating and drying profiles with the different regimes are closely associated with differences in the large-scale structures, cloud types, and rainfall rates between the regimes. Strong diabatic heating and drying are seen throughout the troposphere during the active monsoon period while they are moderate and only occur above 700 hPa during the break period. The diabatic heating and drying tend to have their maxima at low levels during the suppressed periods. Furthermore, the diurnal variations of these structures between monsoon systems, continental/coastal, and tropical inland-initiated convective systems are also examined.« less

  10. Observations of a Downward Mixing of Rainfall with the ASIP Microstructure Profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walesby, Kieran; Ward, Brian; Vialard, Jerome; Minnett, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall can affect air-sea exchanges by stabilizing the upper ocean and inducing a shallow mixed layer. The upper few metres of the ocean can experience significant freshening from a single precipitation event, before it eventually becomes mixed into the bulk waters, typically after a period of hours. However, detailed observations of the downward mixing of rainwater are scarce because of the very shallow vertical scale over which it initially occurs. Here we present observations from the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler (ASIP), an autonomous upwardly-rising microstructure profiler capable of resolving the small-scale variability within centimeters of the air-sea interface. During this Indian Ocean deployment, an intense rainfall event (peak rainfall rate >30 mm/hr) was captured by ASIP, with a corresponding reduction in salinity and temperature in the upper 10 m. This stabilising effect permitted the rainfall to remain for the remainder of the 14-hour deployment. Estimates from SMOS and ARGO observations have suggested a freshening rate on -0.14 psu/mm/hr, but our results indicate that this is much less.

  11. Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Shie, Chung-Lin; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1-QR) in regions of precipitation. The TMI heating algorithm (TRAIN) is calibrated, or "trained" using relatively accurate estimates of heating based upon spaceborne Precipitation Radar (PR) observations collocated with the TMI observations over a one-month period. The heating estimation technique is based upon a previously described Bayesian methodology, but with improvements in supporting cloud-resolving model simulations, an adjustment of precipitation echo tops to compensate for model biases, and a separate scaling of convective and stratiform heating components that leads to an approximate balance between estimated vertically-integrated condensation and surface precipitation. Estimates of Q1-QR from TMI compare favorably with the PR training estimates and show only modest sensitivity to the cloud-resolving model simulations of heating used to construct the training data. Moreover, the net condensation in the corresponding annual mean satellite latent heating profile is within a few percent of the annual mean surface precipitation rate over the tropical and subtropical oceans where the algorithm is applied. Comparisons of Q1 produced by combining TMI Q1-QR with independently derived estimates of QR show reasonable agreement with rawinsonde-based analyses of Q1 from two field campaigns, although the satellite estimates exhibit heating profile structure with sharper and more intense heating peaks than the rawinsonde estimates. 2

  12. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  13. Molecular abundance profiles characterization of Jupiter'satmosphere using ground-based observations at 5 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doriann, Blain; Fouchet, Thierry; Encrenaz, Therese A.; Drossart, Pierre; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, Glenn S.

    2016-10-01

    We report on early results of an observational campaign to support the Juno mission. At the beginning of this year, using TEXES (Texas Echelon cross-dispersed Echelle Spectrograph), mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), we obtained maps of Jupiter in several spectral ranges between 1800 and 2200 cm-1 which probes the atmosphere in the 1-4 bar region, with a spectral resolution of R ≈ 7000 and an angular resolution of ≈ 1.5''. This dataset is analyzed by a code which combines a line-by-line radiative transfer model with a non-linear optimal estimation inversion method. The inversion takes into account the abundance profiles of AsH3 , CO, GeH4 and H2O, as well as clouds contribution, in addtion to the abundance profiles of NH3 and PH3 . We will present the inverted abundance profiles, their significance for the understanding of Jupiter's atmospheric dynamics, and how they will be useful for the determination of water abundance up to 200 bars, which is one of the main objectives of the instrument MWR (MicroWave Radiometer) mounted on the Juno spacecraft. This work will also be useful to prepare the analysis of the JIRAM (Jovian InfraRed Auroral Mapper) 5-microns data aboard Juno.

  14. The daytime mixing layer observed by radiosonde, profiler, and lidar during MILAGRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, W. J.; Pekour, M. S.; Coulter, R. L.; Martin, T. J.; Walters, J. T.

    2007-10-01

    During the MILAGRO campaign centered in the Mexico City area, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) operated atmospheric profiling systems at Veracruz and at two locations on the Central Mexican Plateau in the region around Mexico City. These systems included radiosondes, wind profilers, a sodar, and an aerosol backscatter lidar. An additional wind profiler was operated by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) at the Mexican Petroleum Institue (IMP) near the center of Mexico City. Because of the opportunity afforded by collocation of profilers, radiosondes, and a lidar, and because of the importance of boundary layer depth for aerosol properties, we have carried out a comparison of mixing layer depth as determined independently from these three types of measurement systems during the campaign. We have then used results of this comparison and additional measurements to develop a detailed description of the daily structure and evolution of the boundary layer on the Central Mexican Plateau during MILAGRO. Our analysis indicates that the profilers were more consistently successful in establishing the mixing layer depth during the daytime. The boundary layer growth was similar at the three locations, although the mixing layer tended to be slightly deeper in the afternoon in central Mexico City. The sodar showed that convection began about an hour after sunrise. Maximum daily mixing layer depths always reached 2000 m a.g.l. and frequently extended to 4000 m. The rate and variability of mixing layer growth was essentially the same as that observed during the IMADA-AVER campaign in the same season in 1997. This growth did not seem to be related to whether deep convection was reported on a given day. Wind speeds within the boundary layer exhibited a daily low-altitude maximum in the late afternoon with lighter winds aloft, consistent with previous reports of diurnal regional circulations. Norte events, which produced high

  15. The Daytime Mixed Layer Observed by Radiosonde, Profiler, and LIDAR during MILAGRO

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, William J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Coulter, Richard L.; Martin, Tim J.; Walters, Justin

    2007-10-19

    During the MILAGRO campaign centered in the Mexico City area, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) operated several atmospheric profiling systems at Veracruz and at two locations on the Central Mexican Plateau in the region around Mexico City. These systems included radiosondes, wind profilers, a sodar, and an aerosol backscatter lidar. An additional wind profiler was operated by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) at the Mexican Petroleum Institue (IMP) near the center of Mexico City. Because of the opportunity afforded by collocation of profilers, radiosondes, and a lidar, and because of the importance of boundary layer depth on aerosol properties, we have carried out a comparison of mixed layer depth as determined independently from these three types of measurement systems during the campaign. We have then used results of this comparison and additional measurements to develop a detailed description of the daily structure and evolution of the boundary layer on the Central Mexican Plateau during MILAGRO. Our analysis indicates that the profilers were more consistently successful in establishing the mixing layer depth during the daytime. The boundary layer growth was similar at the three locations, although the mixing layer tended to be slightly deeper in the afternoon in central Mexico City. The sodar showed that convection began about an hour after sunrise. Maximum daily mixed layer depths always reached 2000 m AGL and frequently extended to 4000 m. The rate and variability of mixing layer growth was essentially the same as that observed during the IMADA-AVER campaign in the same season in 1997. This growth did not seem to be related to whether deep convection was reported on a given day. Wind speeds within the boundary layer exhibited a daily low-altitude maximum in the late afternoon with lighter winds aloft, consistent with previous reports of diurnal regional circulations. Norte events, which produced

  16. Geocoronal Balmer α line profile observations and forward-model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Bishop, J.; Roesler, F. L.; Nossal, S. M.

    2006-05-01

    High spectral resolution geocoronal Balmer α line profile observations from Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO) are presented in the context of forward-model analysis. Because Balmer series column emissions depend significantly on multiple scattering, retrieval of hydrogen parameters of general aeronomic interest from these observations (e.g., the hydrogen column abundance) currently requires a forward modeling approach. This capability is provided by the resonance radiative transfer code LYAO_RT. We have recently developed a parametric data-model comparison search procedure employing an extensive grid of radiative transport model input parameters (defining a 6-dimensional parameter space) to map-out bounds for feasible forward model retrieved atomic hydrogen density distributions. We applied this technique to same-night (March, 2000) ground-based Balmer α data from PBO and geocoronal Lyman β measurements from the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta extremo para la Radiación Difusa (EURD) instrument on the Spanish satellite MINISAT-1 (provided by J.F. Gómez and C. Morales of the Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Física Fundamental, INTA, Madrid, Spain) in order to investigate the modeling constraints imposed by two sets of independent geocoronal intensity measurements, both of which rely on astronomical calibration methods. In this poster we explore extending this analysis to the line profile information also contained in the March 2000 PBO Balmer α data set. In general, a decrease in the Doppler width of the Balmer α emission with shadow altitude is a persistent feature in every night of PBO observations in which a wide range of shadow altitudes are observed. Preliminary applications of the LYAO_RT code, which includes the ability to output Doppler line profiles for both the singly and multiply scattered contributions to the Balmer α emission line, displays good qualitative agreement with regard to geocoronal Doppler width trends observed from PBO. Model-data Balmer

  17. ACTRIS aerosol vertical profile data and observations: potentiality and first examples of integrated studies with models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Benedetti, Angela; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Schulz, Michael; Wandinger, Ulla; Laj, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    The ACTRIS-2 project, funded by Horizon 2020, addresses the scope of integrating state-of-the-art European ground-based stations for long term observations of aerosols, clouds and short lived gases, capitalizing on the work of FP7-ACTRIS. It aims at achieving the construction of a user-oriented RI, unique in the EU-RI landscape for providing 4-D integrated high-quality data from near-surface to high altitude (vertical profiles and total-column) which are relevant to climate and air-quality research. ACTRIS-2 develops and implements, in a large network of stations in Europe and beyond, observational protocols that permit the harmonization of collected data and their dissemination. ACTRIS secures provision and dissemination of a unique set of data and data-products that would not otherwise be available with the same level of quality and standardization. This results from a 10-year plus effort in constructing a research infrastructure capable of responding to community needs and requirements, and has been engaged since the start of the FP5 EU commission program. ACTRIS ensures compliance with reporting requirements (timing, format, traceability) defined by the major global observing networks. EARLINET (European Aerosol research Lidar NETwork), the aerosol vertical profiling component of ACTRIS, is providing since May 2000 vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter over Europe. A new structure of the EARLINET database has been designed in a more user oriented approach reporting new data products which are more effective for specific uses of different communities. In particular, a new era is starting with the Copernicus program during which the aerosol vertical profiling capability will be fundamental for assimilation and validation purposes. The new data products have been designed thanks to a strong link with EARLINET data users, first of all modeling and satellite communities, established since the beginning of EARLINET and re-enforced within ACTRIS2

  18. Vertical profiling of methane and carbon dioxide using high resolution near-infrared heterodyne spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Alexander; Klimchuk, Artem; Churbanov, Dmitry; Pereslavtseva, Anastasia; Spiridonov, Maxim; Nadezhdinskyi, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    We present new method of monitoring greenhouse gases using spectroscopic observations of solar radiation passed through the atmosphere with spectral resolution ΛvδΛ up to 108. Such a high resolution is achieved by heterodyne technique and allows to retrieve full information about spectral line shape which, in turn, is used to distinguish contribution of different atmospheric layers to the resulting absorption. Weak absorption line at 6056.5 cm-1 was selected for CO2 measurements and a quartet of lines centered at 6057 cm-1for CH4. The instrument setup includes Sun tracker with a microtelescope and chopper, diode DFB laser used as a local oscillator, a bundle of single mode optical fibers that provides medium for radiation transfer and beam coupling, reference cell with depressurized methane for LO frequency stabilization, and Fabry-Perot etalon for LO frequency calibration. A commercial p-i-n diode with squared detector replaces a mixer and IF spectrometer, providing measurement of heterodyne beating within a bandpass of few MHz, which determines the effective spectral resolution of the instrument. Spectral coverage within narrow range (about 1 cm-1) is provided by ramping the LO frequency based on feedback from the reference channel. Observations of Sun in the Moscow region have resulted for the first time in measurements of the atmospheric transmission near 1.65 μm with sub-Doppler spectral resolution. In order to retrieve vertical profiles of methane and carbon dioxide we developed the inversion algorithm implementing Tikhonov regularization approach. With measured transmission having S/N ratio of 100 or higher, the uncertainty of CH4 profile is about 10 ppb, with the uncertainty of CO2 profile at 1 ppm. This techniques is promising an affordable opportunity or widespread monitoring of greenhouse gases and may be implemented on existing ground-based stations. This work has been supported by the grant of Russian Ministry of education and science #11.G34.31.0074

  19. Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Scott W.; Houze, R.; Kumar, Anil; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2012-09-06

    Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model using six different microphysical schemes. The radar data provide the statistical distribution of the radar reflectivity values as a function of height and anvil thickness. These statistics are compared to the statistics of the modeled anvil cloud reflectivity at all altitudes. Requiring the model to be statistically accurate at all altitudes is a stringent test of the model performance. The typical vertical profile of radiative heating in the anvil clouds is computed from the radar observations. Variability of anvil structures from the different microphysical schemes provides an estimate of the inherent uncertainty in anvil radiative heating profiles. All schemes underestimate the optical thickness of thin anvils and cirrus, resulting in a bias of excessive net anvil heating in all of the simulations.

  20. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE FOR A CORRELATION BETWEEN MACROTURBULENT BROADENING AND LINE-PROFILE VARIATIONS IN OB SUPERGIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Simon-Diaz, S.; Herrero, A.; Castro, N.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Puls, J.

    2010-09-10

    The spectra of O and B supergiants (Sgs) are known to be affected by a significant form of extra line broadening (usually referred to as macroturbulence) in addition to that produced by stellar rotation. Recent analyses of high-resolution spectra have shown that the interpretation of this line broadening as a consequence of large-scale turbulent motions would imply highly supersonic velocity fields in photospheric regions, making this scenario quite improbable. Stellar oscillations have been proposed as a likely alternative explanation. As part of a long-term observational project, we are investigating the macroturbulent broadening in O and B Sgs and its possible connection with spectroscopic variability phenomena and stellar oscillations. In this Letter, we present the first encouraging results of our project, namely, firm observational evidence for a strong correlation between the extra broadening and photospheric line-profile variations in a sample of 13 Sgs with spectral types ranging from O9.5 to B8.

  1. Observations from a 4-year contamination study of a sample depth profile through Martian meteorite Nakhla.

    PubMed

    Toporski, Jan; Steele, Andrew

    2007-04-01

    Morphological, compositional, and biological evidence indicates the presence of numerous well-developed microbial hyphae structures distributed within four different sample splits of the Nakhla meteorite obtained from the British Museum (allocation BM1913,25). By examining depth profiles of the sample splits over time, morphological changes displayed by the structures were documented, as well as changes in their distribution on the samples, observations that indicate growth, decay, and reproduction of individual microorganisms. Biological staining with DNA-specific molecular dyes followed by epifluorescence microscopy showed that the hyphae structures contain DNA. Our observations demonstrate the potential of microbial interaction with extraterrestrial materials, emphasize the need for rapid investigation of Mars return samples as well as any other returned or impactor-delivered extraterrestrial materials, and suggest the identification of appropriate storage conditions that should be followed immediately after samples retrieved from the field are received by a handling/curation facility. The observations are further relevant in planetary protection considerations as they demonstrate that microorganisms may endure and reproduce in extraterrestrial materials over long (at least 4 years) time spans. The combination of microscopy images coupled with compositional and molecular staining techniques is proposed as a valid method for detection of life forms in martian materials as a first-order assessment. Time-resolved in situ observations further allow observation of possible (bio)dynamics within the system.

  2. Profiling float-based observations of net respiration beneath the mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennon, Tyler D.; Riser, Stephen C.; Mecking, Sabine

    2016-06-01

    We employ profiling floats with dissolved oxygen sensors to observe in situ temporal oxygen evolution below the mixed layer, allowing us to characterize net respiration of organic carbon in eight distinct regions over the globe. Export and export efficiency are generally high in locations with strong seasonal variability and low in locations of weak seasonality. Vertically integrated respiration is weakly, yet significantly, correlated with remote observations of chlorophyll, net primary production, and planktonic community size structure. These correlations suggest that regimes of high net primary production and large phytoplankton fuel elevated respiration at depth. Several regions of float-based observations intersect with sites of other detailed observations (e.g., Hawaii and Sargasso Sea), which allows us to compare our results to independent studies. We find that there is good agreement among export production estimates at highly seasonal locations, and that float-based observations may be biased low at weakly seasonal locations. We posit that the reason for the low-latitude discrepancy is the relative steady state of oxygen concentration caused by weak seasonality and shallow wintertime mixed layer depths.

  3. Observational study of lipid profile and LDL particle size in patients with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype is characterized by an increase in plasma triglycerides, a decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc), and the prevalence of small, dense-low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) particles. The aim of this study was to establish the importance of LDL particle size measurement by gender in a group of patients with Metabolic Syndrome (MS) attending at a Cardiovascular Risk Unit in Primary Care and their classification into phenotypes. Subjects and methods One hundred eighty-five patients (93 men and 92 women) from several areas in the South of Spain, for a period of one year in a health centre were studied. Laboratory parameters included plasma lipids, lipoproteins, low-density lipoprotein size and several atherogenic rates were determinated. Results We found differences by gender between anthropometric parameters, blood pressure and glucose measures by MS status. Lipid profile was different in our two study groups, and gender differences in these parameters within each group were also remarkable, in HDLc and Apo A-I values. According to LDL particle size, we found males had smaller size than females, and patients with MS had also smaller than those without MS. We observed inverse relationship between LDL particle size and triglycerides in patients with and without MS, and the same relationship between all atherogenic rates in non-MS patients. When we considered our population in two classes of phenotypes, lipid profile was worse in phenotype B. Conclusion In conclusion, we consider worthy the measurement of LDL particle size due to its relationship with lipid profile and cardiovascular risk. PMID:21936888

  4. Variability of O3 and NO2 profile shapes during DISCOVER-AQ: Implications for satellite observations and comparisons to model-simulated profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Clare Marie; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Crawford, James H.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Diskin, Glenn; Thornhill, K. Lee; Loughner, Christopher; Lee, Pius; Strode, Sarah A.

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the variability of in situ profile shapes under a variety of meteorological and pollution conditions, results are presented of an agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis of the in situ O3 and NO2 profiles for each of the four campaigns of the NASA DISCOVER-AQ mission. Understanding the observed profile variability for these trace gases is useful for understanding the accuracy of the assumed profile shapes used in satellite retrieval algorithms as well as for understanding the correlation between satellite column observations and surface concentrations. The four campaigns of the DISCOVER-AQ mission took place in Maryland during July 2011, the San Joaquin Valley of California during January-February 2013, the Houston, Texas, metropolitan region during September 2013, and the Denver-Front Range region of Colorado during July-August 2014. Several distinct profile clusters emerged for the California, Texas, and Colorado campaigns for O3, indicating significant variability of O3 profile shapes, while the Maryland campaign presented only one distinct O3 cluster. In contrast, very few distinct profile clusters emerged for NO2 during any campaign for this particular clustering technique, indicating the NO2 profile behavior was relatively uniform throughout each campaign. However, changes in NO2 profile shape were evident as the boundary layer evolved through the day, but they were apparently not significant enough to yield more clusters. The degree of vertical mixing (as indicated by temperature lapse rate) associated with each cluster exerted an important influence on the shapes of the median cluster profiles for O3, as well as impacted the correlations between the associated column and surface data for each cluster for O3. The correlation analyses suggest satellites may have the best chance to relate to surface O3 under the conditions encountered during the Maryland campaign Clusters 1 and 2, which include deep, convective boundary layers and few

  5. Improved Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observations of Tropical Cyclones with the Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, D. Esteban; Chang, P.; Carswel, J.; Contreras, R.; Chu, T.; Asuzu, P.; Black, P.; Marks, F.

    2006-01-01

    The Imaging Wind and Rain Arborne Profilers (IWRAP) is a dual-frequency, conically-scanning Doppler radar that measures high-resolution, dual-polarized, multi-beam C- and Ku-band reflectivity and Doppler velocity profiles of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) within the inner core of hurricanes.From the datasets acquired during the 2002 through 20O5 hurricane seasons as part of the ONR Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST) program and the NOAA/NESDIS Ocean Winds and Rain experiments, very high resolution radar observations of hurricanes have been acquired and made available to the CBLAST community. Of particular interest am the ABL wind fields and 3-D structures found within the inner core of hurricanes. As a result of these analysis, a limitation in the ability to retrieve the ABL wind field at very low altitudes was identified. This paper shows how this limitation has been removed and presents initial results demonstrating its new capabilities to derive the ABL wind field within the inner are of hurricanes to much lower altitudes than the ones the original system was capable of.

  6. GSSML: An Observations and Measurements profile for GlobalSoilMap.net (Oceania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Alistair; Simons, Bruce; Wilson, Peter; Cox, Simon

    2013-04-01

    The Oceania node of the GlobalSoilMap.net consortium has defined GSMML, a profile of the Observations and Measurements (O&M) Geography Markup Language (GML) application schema, to support the delivery of project data using Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Feature Services (WFS). This paper describes GSMML, and the results of initial testing, and proposes linkages to other OGC service types and soil data exchange standards. GlobalSoilMap.net will create a global soil dataset providing predictions for twelve agreed soil properties within a three-dimensional grid. The grid consists of 'Spatial Entities' spaced at 3 arc second intervals and extending to a depth of 2 meters with ten physical soil property predictions made at six predefined depth intervals. In addition, two properties predicting the depth of the profile are made for each Spatial Entity. Each prediction must include: an estimate of its uncertainty; its age and that of the source data; and a description of the process used to generate the value. The approach taken in GSMML is to map the GlobalSoilMap.net requirements on to classes within the O&M Observation and Sampling Features packages. The GlobalSoilMap.net Spatial Entities represent a sampling regime across the earth's terrestrial surface and are modelled as nested O&M 'SF_SpatialSamplingFeatures'. The property predictions are related 'OM_Observation' instances that carry the result, age properties, estimation process, and uncertainty. GSMML defines two concrete classes ('GSM_PrimarySpatialEntity' and 'GSM_SecondarySpatialEntity') with no properties of their own that specialize the SF_SpatialSamplingFeature. Uncertainty is encoded by adopting the UncertML profile of O&M. The schema is accompanied by a set of conformance classes to constrain content, and Semantic Web vocabularies that define the observed properties. Test GSMML services show that a WFS can only reliably support the provision of comprehensive data for requests returning a few hundred

  7. Large-scale and Convective-scale Updraft Profiles from Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunaga, H.; Luo, Z. J.

    2015-12-01

    Among the crucial problems involved in the tropical energy budget are the thermodynamic effects of an ensemble of convective clouds on their environment and the large-scale influence imposed back on the convective-scale dynamics. Efforts to seek observational evidence for this problem, however, are challenged by limitations in the capability of measuring vertical motion across different horizontal scales. We have recently been exploring new analysis strategies in hopes to make this seemingly impossible possible, exploiting a suite of satellite instruments including the CloudSat and TRMM radars and Aqua AIRS. Since a complete vertical structure of in-cloud vertical velocity, wc, is unable to be reconstructed from satellite measurements alone, a single-column plume model is run with the environmental soundings from AIRS to obtain a set of synthetic wc profiles under a range of entrainment rates. The solutions are then narrowed down in a Bayesian manner so as to match the cloud-top vertical velocity and buoyancy estimates from A-Train infrared and radar measurements. The vertical profile of large-scale mean vertical motion, ω, is also evaluated from satellite observations in its own approach: ω as a function of pressure is determined so that it satisfies the horizontal divergence terms in the tropospheric water and thermal budget equations in which the remaining terms are constrained by satellite measurements. In this talk, the methodology is briefly outlined and the results are presented and discussed in light of outstanding issues in tropical dynamics. The wc and ω estimates above, although subject to intrinsic uncertainties yet to be verified, do not involve any closure assumption as required for cumulus parameterizations and would offer a useful test bed for climate models and reanalysis data as well as a unique opportunity to study the mechanism of tropical convection.

  8. Radial profile of the inner heliospheric magnetic field as deduced from Faraday rotation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Garzelli, M. V.

    2013-05-01

    Faraday rotation measures (RMs) of the polarized emission from extragalactic radio sources occulted by the coronal plasma were used to infer the radial profile of the inner heliospheric magnetic field near the solar minimum. By inverting LASCO/SOHO polarized brightness (pB) data taken during the observations in May 1997, we retrieved the electron density distribution along the lines of sight to the sources, which allowed us to separate the two plasma properties that contribute to the observed RMs. By comparing the observed RM values with those theoretically predicted by a power law model of the radial component of the coronal magnetic field using a best-fitting procedure, we found that the radial component of the inner heliospheric magnetic field can be nicely approximated by a power law of the form Br = 3.76 r-2.29 G in a range of heights from about 5 to 14 R⊙. Finally, our analysis suggests that the radial computation of the potential field source surface model from the Wilcox Solar Observatory is the preferred choice near solar minimum assuming a radial field in the photosphere and a source surface located at Rss = 2.5 R⊙.

  9. DISTORTED CYCLOTRON LINE PROFILE IN CEP X-4 AS OBSERVED BY NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Fürst, F.; Miyasaka, H.; Harrison, F. A.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Walton, D. J.; Pottschmidt, K.; Bhalerao, V.; Bachetti, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Tomsick, J. A.; Christensen, F. E.; Grinberg, V.; Hailey, C. J.; Kennea, J. A.; Rahoui, F.; Stern, D.; Wilms, J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-06-20

    We present spectral analysis of Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array and Swift observations of Cep X-4 during its outburst in 2014. We observed the source once during the peak of the outburst and once during the decay, finding good agreement in the spectral shape between the observations. We describe the continuum using a power law with a Fermi–Dirac cutoff at high energies. Cep X-4 has a very strong cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) around 30 keV. A simple absorption-like line with a Gaussian optical depth or a pseudo-Lorentzian profile both fail to describe the shape of the CRSF accurately, leaving significant deviations at the red side of the line. We characterize this asymmetry with a second absorption feature around 19 keV. The line energy of the CRSF, which is not influenced by the addition of this feature, shows a small but significant positive luminosity dependence. With luminosities between (1–6) × 10{sup 36} erg s{sup −1}, Cep X-4 is below the theoretical limit where such a correlation is expected. This behavior is similar to Vela X-1 and we discuss parallels between the two systems.

  10. Transitioning Submersible Chemical Analyzer Technologies for Sustained, Autonomous Observations from Profiling Moorings, Gliders and other AUVs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    and deploying them on various autonomous underwater vehicle test platforms, such as the ORCAS IOPC profiler (URI), REMUS AUV, and Slocum coastal...ASA) to develop and demonstrate the technology to autonomously acquire and communicate real-time environmental data from the ORCAS profilers...was designed for deployment on URI’s ORCAS IOPC profiler (Figure 1). It was programmed to collect hourly nutrient profiles for a two week time

  11. Profiles of observed infant anger predict preschool behavior problems: moderation by life stress.

    PubMed

    Brooker, Rebecca J; Buss, Kristin A; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Aksan, Nazan; Davidson, Richard J; Goldsmith, H Hill

    2014-10-01

    Using both traditional composites and novel profiles of anger, we examined associations between infant anger and preschool behavior problems in a large, longitudinal data set (N = 966). We also tested the role of life stress as a moderator of the link between early anger and the development of behavior problems. Although traditional measures of anger were largely unrelated to later behavior problems, profiles of anger that dissociated typical from atypical development predicted behavior problems during preschool. Moreover, the relation between infant anger profiles and preschool behavior problems was moderated such that, when early life stress was low, infants with atypical profiles of early anger showed more preschool behavior problems than did infants with normative anger profiles. However, when early life stress was high, infants with atypical and normative profiles of infant anger did not differ in preschool behavior problems. We conclude that a discrete emotions approach including latent profile analysis is useful for elucidating biological and environmental developmental pathways to early problem behaviors.

  12. The thermal structure of Titan’s upper atmosphere, I: Temperature profiles from Cassini INMS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snowden, D.; Yelle, R. V.; Cui, J.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Ågren, K.

    2013-09-01

    We derive vertical temperature profiles from Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) N2 density measurements from 32 Cassini passes. We find that the average temperature of Titan’s thermosphere varies significantly from pass-to-pass between 112 and 175 K. The temperatures from individual temperature profiles also varies considerably, with many passes exhibiting wave-like temperature perturbations and large temperature gradients. Wave-like temperature perturbations have wavelengths between 150 and 420 km and amplitudes between 3% and 22% and vertical wave power spectra of the INMS data and HASI data have a slope between -2 and -3, which is consistent with vertically propagating atmospheric waves. The lack of a strong correlation between temperature and latitude, longitude, solar zenith angle, or local solar time indicates that the thermal structure of Titan’s thermosphere is not primarily determined by the absorption of solar EUV flux. At N2 densities greater than 108 cm-3, Titan’s thermosphere is colder when Titan is observed in Saturn’s magnetospheric lobes compared to Saturn’s plasma sheet as proposed by Westlake et al. (Westlake, J.H. et al. [2011]. J. Geophys. Res. 116, A03318. http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010JA016251). This apparent correlation suggests that magnetospheric particle precipitation causes the temperature variability in Titan’s thermosphere; however, at densities smaller than 108 cm-3 the lobe passes are hotter than the plasma sheet passes and we find no correlation between the temperature of Titan’s thermosphere and ionospheric signatures of enhanced particle precipitation, which suggests that the correlation is not indicative of a physical connection. The temperature of Titan’s thermosphere also may have decreased by ∼10 K around mid-2007. Finally, we classify the vertical temperature profiles to show which passes are hot and cold and which passes have the largest temperature variations. In a companion paper (Part II), we estimate

  13. Observations of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles Using Simultaneously Measured UV and IR Radiances from OMI and TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Worden, J.; Kulawik, S.; Bowman, K. W.; Sander, S. P.; Liu, X.

    2011-12-01

    Ozone is a radiativelly and chemically important trace gas in the atmosphere. Accurate monitoring of ozone vertical distributions is crucial for a better understanding of air quality and climate change. The Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) mission, an Earth Science Decadal Survey mission that has been recommended for launch in the 2013-2016 time frame by National Research Council, will measure tropospheric ozone and its precursors relating to air quality over the Americas. To improve current capability of tropospheric ozone sounding in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, GEO-CAPE mission calls for an instrument(s) that is sensitive over multiple spectral regions. Prior to the launch of GEO-CAPE satellite, using simultaneous measurements of multiple sensors of an ongoing satellite mission provide an alternative way to improve tropospheric ozone sounding and help in the evaluations of suitable spectral regions for the GEO-CAPE mission. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) are both on the Earth Observing System Aura satellite in orbit. They are providing ozone concentration profiles measurements respectively. OMI is a nadir-viewing pushbroom ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) imaging spectrograph that measures backscattered radiances covering the 270-500 nm wavelength range. TES is a Fourier transform spectrometer that measures the thermal infrared (TIR) light radiances emitted by Earth's surface and by gases and particles in spectral range 650 - 3050 cm-1. We present an approach to combine simultaneously measured OMI UV and TES TIR radiances to improve the tropospheric ozone sounding. The results from combination of these measurements are presented and discussed. The improvements on tropospheric ozone profiles from the UV+TIR joint retrievals, as compared with either spectral region alone, are charterized using the ozonesonde measurements.

  14. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Zhaoxia

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  15. Spring Blooms Observed with Biochemical Profiling Floats from a Chemical and Biological Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, J. N.; Johnson, K. S.; Sakamoto, C.; Jannasch, H. W.; Coletti, L. J.; Elrod, V.

    2015-12-01

    Recently there has been renewed interest in the mechanisms which control the seasonal increases in plankton biomass (spring blooms). Changes in physical and chemical forcing (light, wind, heat and nutrients) may increase the specific growth rate of phytoplankton. These changes may also shift the predator - prey relationships within the food web structure, which can alter the balance between plankton growth and loss rates. Biogeochemical profiling floats provide a means to observe the seasonal evolution of spring blooms from a physical, chemical and biological perspective in near real time. Floats equipped with optical sensors to measure nitrate, oxygen, chlorophyll fluorescence, and optical backscatter now have a presence in many ocean regions including the North Pacific, Subarctic Pacific, North Atlantic, South Atlantic and the Southern Ocean. Data from these regions are used to compare and contrast the evolution of spring blooms. The evolution of the bloom is examined using both chemical (oxygen, nitrate) and biooptical (phytoplankton from chlorophyll fluorescence and particulate organic carbon from optical backscatter) sensors under vastly different environmental conditions.

  16. Profiles of observed infant anger predict preschool behavior problems: Moderation by life stress

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Buss, Kristin A.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Aksan, Nazan; Davidson, Richard J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2014-01-01

    Using both traditional composites and novel profiles of anger, we examined associations between infant anger and preschool behavior problems in a large, longitudinal data set (N = 966). We also tested the role of life stress as a moderator of the link between early anger and the development of behavior problems. Although traditional measures of anger were largely unrelated to later behavior problems, profiles of anger that dissociated typical from atypical development predicted behavior problems during preschool. Moreover, the relation between infant anger profiles and preschool behavior problems was moderated such that, when early life stress was low, infants with atypical profiles of early anger showed more preschool behavior problems than did infants with normative anger profiles. However, when early life stress was high, infants with atypical and normative profiles of infant anger did not differ in preschool behavior problems. We conclude that a discrete emotions approach including latent profile analysis is useful for elucidating biological and environmental developmental pathways to early problem behaviors. PMID:25151247

  17. Mixed layer depth and chlorophyll a: Profiling float observations in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Sachihiko; Yasuda, Ichiro; Saito, Hiroaki; Tsuda, Atsushi; Komatsu, Kosei

    2015-11-01

    Variability in the chlorophyll a concentration (Chl) in relation to fluctuations in the mixed layer (ML) was investigated together with turbidity (Tur) in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension region, using profiling floats. A particular focus was the validity of two hypotheses concerning the spring bloom: the critical depth hypothesis (CDH) and the recently proposed alternative, the disturbance-recovery hypothesis (DRH). During the period from winter to early spring, Chl and Tur integrated over the photosynthetically active layer (PL; defined as the greatest depth of the ML and the euphotic layer) increased with increasing PL depth (PLD), indicating an increase in the phytoplankton biomass. This result is partly consistent with the DRH in that the observed increase in biomass was not explained by an increase in production. Instead, it was more likely attributable to a reduction in the loss rate. However, theoretical analyses revealed that grazer dilution alone could not cause this increase in biomass because such an increase in the ML in the real ocean (as opposed to a dilution experiment within a bottle) would cause a reduction in the mean light intensity. Despite the loss-controlled fluctuation in biomass during the period of low light, a production-driven fluctuation in biomass was also revealed. This occurred when the light intensity was elevated, particularly after late spring, and was consistent with the CDH. Thus, the present study suggests that both the production-driven and loss-driven hypotheses are responsible for the dynamics of the phytoplankton dynamics from winter to spring in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension region.

  18. Seasonal and diurnal variations of aerosol extinction profile and type distribution from CALIPSO 5-year observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Tackett, Jason L.; Su, Hui; Fu, Rong

    2013-05-01

    The new Level 3 aerosol profile data derived from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) provide a multiyear global aerosol distribution with high vertical resolution. We analyzed seasonal and diurnal variations of the vertical distributions of aerosol properties represented by 5-year CALIPSO data. Results show that dust, smoke, and polluted dust are the most frequently detected aerosol types during all seasons. Dust is the dominant type, especially in the middle to upper troposphere, over most areas during boreal spring and summer, while smoke and polluted dust tend to dominate during biomass burning seasons. The seasonal variations of dust layer top height and dust contribution to all-aerosol extinction are positively correlated with the seasonal variation of the dust occurrence frequency. The seasonal cycle of aerosol properties over west Australia is similar to that over biomass burning regime areas, despite its desert regime. In general, smoke is detected more frequently from the lower to middle troposphere; clean marine and polluted continental aerosols are detected more frequently, while polluted dust is detected less frequently, in the lower troposphere during nighttime than daytime. The all-aerosol extinction is generally larger, and the aerosol layer top is detected at high altitudes more frequently during nighttime than daytime. The diurnal changes of aerosol properties are similar within the same aerosol regime. Dust extinction shows little diurnal variation except when dust is the dominant aerosol type. The results contribute to an initial global 3-D aerosol climatology which will likely be extended and improved in the future.

  19. Cloud Effects on Radiative Heating Rate Profiles over Darwin using ARM and A-train Radar/Lidar Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2013-06-11

    Observations of clouds from the ground-based U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) and satellite-based A-train are used to compute cloud radiative forcing profiles over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. Cloud properties are obtained from both radar (the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) and the CloudSat satellite in the A-train) and lidar (the ARM Micropulse lidar (MPL) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite in the A-train) observations. Cloud microphysical properties are taken from combined radar and lidar retrievals for ice clouds and radar only or lidar only retrievals for liquid clouds. Large, statistically significant differences of up to 1.43 K/day exist between the mean ARM and A-train net cloud radiative forcing profiles. The majority of the difference in cloud radiative forcing profiles is shown to be due to a large difference in the cloud fraction above 12 km. Above this altitude the A-train cloud fraction is significantly larger because more clouds are detected by CALIPSO than by the ground-based MPL. It is shown that the MPL is unable to observe as many high clouds as CALIPSO due to being more frequently attenuated and a poorer sensitivity even in otherwise clear-sky conditions. After accounting for cloud fraction differences and instrument sampling differences due to viewing platform we determined that differences in cloud radiative forcing due to the retrieved ice cloud properties is relatively small. This study demonstrates that A-train observations are better suited for the calculation cloud radiative forcing profiles. In addition, we find that it is necessary to supplement CloudSat with CALIPSO observations to obtain accurate cloud radiative forcing profiles since a large portion of clouds at Darwin are detected by CALIPSO only.

  20. Profiles of Anger Control in Second-Grade Children: Examination of Self-Report, Observational, and Physiological Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marissa; Hubbard, Julie A.; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The current study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to examine anger control in 257 second-grade children (approximately 8 years of age). Anger was induced through losing a game and prize to a confederate who cheated. Three components of anger control were assessed: self-report of awareness of anger, observed intensity of angry facial…

  1. Observing System Simulation Experiments to Determine the Potential Impact of Space-Based Lidar Wind Profiles on Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Observing system simulation experiments (OSSE's) provide an effective means to evaluate the potential impact of a proposed observing system, as well as to determine tradeoffs in their design, and to evaluate data assimilation methodology. Great care must be taken to ensure realism of the OSSE's, and in the interpretation of OSSE results. All of the OSSE's that have been conducted to date have demonstrated tremendous potential for space-based wind profile data to improve atmospheric analyses, forecasts, and research. This has been true for differing data assimilation systems, analysis methodology, and model resolutions. OSSE's clearly show much greater potential for observations of the complete wind profile than for single-level wind data or observations of the boundary layer alone.

  2. Observations and Simulations of the Na i D1 Line Profiles in an M-class Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Christian, D. J.; Kowalski, A. F.; Jess, D. B.; Grant, S. D. T.; Kawate, T.; Simões, P. J. A.; Allred, J. C.; Keenan, F. P.

    2016-12-01

    We study the temporal evolution of the Na i D1 line profiles in the M3.9 flare SOL2014-06-11T21:03 UT, using observations at high spectral resolution obtained with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope combined with radiative hydrodynamic simulations. Our results show a significant increase in the intensities of the line core and wings during the flare. The analysis of the line profiles from the flare ribbons reveals that the Na i D1 line has a central reversal with excess emission in the blue wing (blue asymmetry). We combine RADYN and RH simulations to synthesize Na i D1 line profiles of the flaring atmosphere and find good agreement with the observations. Heating with a beam of electrons modifies the radiation field in the flaring atmosphere and excites electrons from the ground state 3s 2S to the first excited state 3p 2P, which in turn modifies the relative population of the two states. The change in temperature and the population density of the energy states make the sodium line profile revert from absorption into emission. Furthermore, the rapid changes in temperature break the pressure balance between the different layers of the lower atmosphere, generating upflow/downflow patterns. Analysis of the simulated spectra reveals that the asymmetries of the Na i D1 flare profile are produced by the velocity gradients in the lower solar atmosphere.

  3. Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment SAMUM 2006: Airborne observations of dust particle properties and vertical dust profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, A.; Weinzierl, B.; Esselborn, M.; Fiebig, M.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.; Wirth, M.; Müller, D.; Wendisch, M.; Schuetz, L.; Kandler, K.; Kahn, R.; Wagner, F.; Pereira, S.; Virkkula, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) is an initiative of several German institutes. Its goal is the characterisation of optical, physical, chemical, and radiative properties of Saharan dust at the source region. SAMUM data may serve as ground truth data to validate satellite products and atmospheric transport models, and to support the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) mission. The first SAMUM intensive field phase was carried out in May/June 2006 in Southern Morocco. Ground sites were Ouarzazate (30.93° N, 6.9° W), Zagora (30.15° N, 5.37°), and Evora (38.53°N, 7.90°E) in Portugal for long- range transport studies. Research aircraft were operating from Ouarzazate (Partenavia, local flights) and Casablanca (DLR Falcon) at the Moroccan west coast As part of SAMUM, airborne measurements of dust particle properties were conducted using the German research aircraft Falcon. The DLR Falcon was equipped with an extensive set of aerosol physico-chemical instruments for size, volatility, and absorption measurements, impactor sampling for chemical analyses and with a nadir-looking high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) for measuring aerosol extinction at 532 nm, and aerosol backscatter and depolarisation at 532 nm and 1064 nm. The field sites were equipped with aerosol sampling devices and instruments for particle size distribution measurements. During the SAMUM core phase, three large-scale dust events were probed which extended from southern Morocco to Portugal. Vertical (0 10 km) and horizontal (Saharan border to southern Portugal) dust plume structures, aerosol optical depth as well as particle microphysical and optical properties were studied for all cases. The upper boundary of the dust layers was found at altitudes between 4 and 6 km above sea level. The internal structure of the dust layers varied from well mixed to stratified. The influence of the Atlas Mountains on the lifting of the dust layers was monitored

  4. Ozone profile intercomparison based on simultaneous observations between 20 and 40 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aimedieu, P.; Krueger, A. J.; Robbins, D. E.; Simon, P. C.

    1983-01-01

    The vertical distribution of stratospheric ozone has been simultaneously measured by means of five different instruments carried on the same balloon payload. The launches were performed from Gap during the intercomparison campaign conducted in June 1981 in southern France. Data obtained between altitudes of 20 and 40 km are compared and discussed. Vertical profiles deduced from Electrochemical Concentration Cell sondes launched from the same location by small balloons and from short Umkehr measurements made at Mt Chiran (France) are also included in this comparison. Systematic differences of the order of 20 percent between ozone profiles deduced from solar u.v. absorption and in situ techniques are found.

  5. Measurements of the vertical profile of water vapor abundance in the Martian atmosphere from Mars Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schofield, J. T.; Mccleese, Daniel J.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the Pressure Modulator Infrared Radiometer (PMIRR) capabilities along with how the vertical profiles of water vapor will be obtained. The PMIRR will employ filter and pressure modulation radiometry using nine spectral channels, in both limb scanning and nadir sounding modes, to obtain daily, global maps of temperature, dust extinction, condensate extinction, and water vapor mixing ratio profiles as a function of pressure to half scale height or 5 km vertical resolution. Surface thermal properties will also be mapped, and the polar radiactive balance will be monitored.

  6. Multilinguals and Their Sociolinguistic Profiles: Observations on Language Use Amongst Three Vintages of Migrants in Melbourne

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlavac, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents profiles of eight multilinguals and examines the circumstances that determine their continued use, in addition to English, of at least two of their "home" languages. I attempt to identify in which domains this occurs, whether there are established patterns of domain-specific language use and whether these patterns are…

  7. Profiles of Observed Infant Anger Predict Preschool Behavior Problems: Moderation by Life Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Buss, Kristin A.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Aksan, Nazan; Davidson, Richard J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2014-01-01

    Using both traditional composites and novel profiles of anger, we examined associations between infant anger and preschool behavior problems in a large, longitudinal data set (N = 966). We also tested the role of life stress as a moderator of the link between early anger and the development of behavior problems. Although traditional measures of…

  8. Observing the Great Plains Low-Level Jet Using the Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS): A Comparison with Boundary Layer Profiler Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, P. S.; Basu, S.

    2009-12-01

    Wind resources derived from the nocturnal low-level jet of the Great Plains of the United States are a driving factor in the proliferation of wind energy facilities across the region. Accurate diagnosis and forecasting of the low-level jet is important to not only assess the wind resource but to estimate the potential for shear-induced stress generation on turbine rotors. This study will examine the utility of Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS) observations in diagnosing low-level jet events across the Texas Panhandle. ACARS observations from Lubbock International Airport (KLBB) will be compared to observations from a 915 MHZ Doppler radar vertical boundary-layer profiler with 60m vertical resolution located at the field experiment site of Texas Tech University. The ability of ACARS data to adequately observe low-level jet events during the spring and summer of 2009 will be assessed and presented.

  9. Retrieval of thermospheric parameters from routinely observed F2-layer Ne(h) profiles at the geomagnetic equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Andrei; Belehaki, Anna; Perrone, Loredana; Zolesi, Bruno; Tsagouri, Ioanna

    2013-04-01

    A principal possibility to retrieve basic thermospheric parameters (neutral temperature Tex, atomic [O] and molecular [O2] oxygen as well as molecular nitrogen [N2] concentrations) from the observed daytime electron density profiles Ne(h) in the equatorial F2-region is demonstrated for the first time. The reduction of a 2D continuity equation for electron concentration in the low-latitude F2-region at the geomagnetic equator (I = 0) results in a simple 1D equation which can be efficiently solved. The method was tested using Jicamarca Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) and Digisonde Ne(h) profiles for the periods when CHAMP and GRACE neutral gas density observations are available in the vicinity of the Jicamarca Observatory. The retrieved from ISR Ne(h) neutral gas densities were shown to be close to the observed ones (MRD < 10%) being within the announced absolute uncertainty (10-15%) of the neutral gas density observations and more successful than the predictions of the empirical models JB-2008 (MRD = 32%) and MSISE-00 (MRD = 27%) for the analyzed cases. The implementation of the method with Jicamarca Digisonde Ne(h) profiles has also shown acceptable results especially for solar minimum conditions (MRD ~ 12%) and higher prediction accuracy than modern empirical models provide. This finding seems to open a way for the practical exploitation of the method for thermospheric monitoring purposes.

  10. The mean ozone profile and its temperature sensitivity in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere - An analysis of LIMS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froidevaux, Lucien; Allen, Mark; Berman, Stanley; Daughton, Alan

    1989-05-01

    Multiple simultaneous LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) observations of both O3 and temperature T in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere are analyzed to derive O3-T correlations for comparisons with model calculations. The zonally averaged O3 profile is compared with results from a simplified photochemical model that assumes O3 to be in a photochemical steady state. The model profile is systematically lower than the observed profile. Key parameters are identified in which changes can systematically increase the O3 profile in both the stratosphere and the mesosphere. The LIMS-derived values for the sensitivity of O3 to changes in T are compared with equilibrium model calculations which include the T-driven opacity feedback effect on photodissociation rate constants. The theoretical O3 response to temperature perturbations is investigated. It is shown how the O3-T sensitivity coefficient is affected by zonal and vertical advection terms as well as by the photochemical coupling between O3 and T.

  11. Diagnostic Power of Broad Emission Line Profiles in Searches for Binary Supermassive Black Holes: Comparison of Models with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Khai; Bogdanovic, Tamara; Eracleous, Michael; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by observational searches for sub-parsec supermassive black hole binaries (SBHBs) we develop a semi-analytic model to describe the spectral emission line signatures of these systems. We are particularly interested in modeling the profiles of the broad emission lines, which have been used as a tool to search for SBHBs. The goal of this work is to test one of the leading models of binary accretion flows in the literature: SBHB in a circumbinary disk. In this context, we model SBHB accretion flows as a set of three accretion disks: two mini-disks that are gravitationally bound to the individual black holes and a circumbinary disk that forms a common envelope about a gravitationally bound binary. Our first generation model shows that emission line profiles tend to have different statistical properties depending on the semi-major axis, mass ratio, eccentricity of the binary, and the alignment of the triple-disk system, and can in principle be used to constrain the statistical distribution of these parameters. We present the results of a second generation model, which improves upon the treatment of radiative transfer by taking into account the effect of line-driven winds on the properties of the model emission line profiles. This improvement allows a preliminary comparison of the model profiles with the observed SBHB candidates and AGN population in general.

  12. Ocean and Atmospheric Profiling Lidar Observations and Its Link to Ocean Carbon Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Yongxiang

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces space-based ocean and atmospheric profiling lidar for improving modeling and understanding of ocean carbon cycle. Unique measurements from space-based profiling lidars include (1) the global ocean surface mean square slope measurements for improving air-sea turbulence exchange estimates; (2) the backscatter and beam attenuation measurements for improving the global estimate of partial pressure of CO2 of the ocean with the reduction of uncertainties in primary productivity estimates. Global statistics of CALIOP integrated ocean subsurface backscatter measurements of coastal waters will be presented. The study will also assess the impact of CALIOP on the uncertainty reduction of primary productivity and the improvement of CO2 partial pressure estimates. Ocean surface roughness statistics, its applications in air-sea interaction and its comparisons with other measurements will also be presented

  13. Statistical temperature profile retrievals in clear-air using passive 118-GHz O2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Johnson, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    The clean-air temperature profile accuracy yielded by a localized linear statistical retrieval operator applied to passive aircraft-based 118-GHz spectra is demonstrated. A comparison of the statistically and physically derived correlation coefficients of antenna temperature and kinetic temperature furnishes a physical justification of the statistical retrieval technique. The atmospheric temperature mean and covariance significantly depend on such geophysical parameters as latitude, longitude, local season, and time, as well as the prevailing meteorological state and orographic effects.

  14. Airborne GPS radio occultation refractivity profiles observed in tropical storm environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. J.; Haase, J. S.; Muradyan, P.; Garrison, J. L.; Wang, K.-N.

    2015-03-01

    Airborne GPS radio occultation (ARO) data have been collected during the 2010 PRE-Depression Investigation of Cloud systems in the Tropics (PREDICT) experiment. GPS signals received by the airborne Global Navigation Satellite System Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS) are used to retrieve vertical profiles of refractivity in the neutral atmosphere. The system includes a conventional geodetic GPS receiver component for straightforward validation of the analysis method in the middle to upper troposphere, and a high-sample rate (10 MHz) GPS recorder for postprocessing complex signals that probe the lower troposphere. The results from the geodetic receivers are presented here. The retrieved ARO profiles consistently agree within ~2% of refractivity profiles calculated from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting model Interim reanalyses as well as from nearby dropsondes and radiosondes. Changes in refractivity obtained from ARO data over the 5 days leading to the genesis of tropical storm Karl are consistent with moistening in the vicinity of the storm center. An open-loop tracking method was implemented in a test case to analyze GPS signals from the GISMOS 10 MHz recording system for comparison with geodetic receiver data. The open-loop mode successfully tracked ~2 km deeper into the troposphere than the conventional receiver and can also track rising occultations, illustrating the benefit from the high-rate recording system. Accurate refractivity retrievals are an important first step toward the future goal of assimilating moisture profiles to improve forecasting of developing storms using this new GPS occultation technique.

  15. Observed damage during Argon gas cluster depth profiles of compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, Anders J. Portoles, Jose F.; Cumpson, Peter J.

    2014-08-07

    Argon Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) sources have become very popular in XPS and SIMS in recent years, due to the minimal chemical damage they introduce in the depth-profiling of polymer and other organic materials. These GCIB sources are therefore particularly useful for depth-profiling polymer and organic materials, but also (though more slowly) the surfaces of inorganic materials such as semiconductors, due to the lower roughness expected in cluster ion sputtering compared to that introduced by monatomic ions. We have examined experimentally a set of five compound semiconductors, cadmium telluride (CdTe), gallium arsenide (GaAs), gallium phosphide (GaP), indium arsenide (InAs), and zinc selenide (ZnSe) and a high-κ dielectric material, hafnium oxide (HfO), in their response to argon cluster profiling. An experimentally determined HfO etch rate of 0.025 nm/min (3.95 × 10{sup −2} amu/atom in ion) for 6 keV Ar gas clusters is used in the depth scale conversion for the profiles of the semiconductor materials. The assumption has been that, since the damage introduced into polymer materials is low, even though sputter yields are high, then there is little likelihood of damaging inorganic materials at all with cluster ions. This seems true in most cases; however, in this work, we report for the first time that this damage can in fact be very significant in the case of InAs, causing the formation of metallic indium that is readily visible even to the naked eye.

  16. Improved Hurricane Boundary Layer Observations with the Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Changy, P.; Carswell, J.; Contreras, R.; Chu, T.

    2006-01-01

    During the NOAA/NESDIS 2005 Hurricane Season (HS2005) and the 2006 Winter Experiment, the University of Massachusetts (UMass) installed two instruments on the NOAA N42RF WP-3D research aircraft: the Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (IWRAP) and the Simultaneous Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR). IWRAP is a dual-band (C- and Ku), dual-polarized pencil-beam airborne radar that profiles the volume backscatter and Doppler velocity from rain and that also measures the ocean backscatter response. It simultaneously profiles along four separate incidence angles while conically scanning at 60 RPM. SFMR is a C-band nadir viewing radiometer that measures the emission from the ocean surface and intervening atmosphere simultaneously at six frequencies. It is designed to obtain the surface wind speed and the column average rain rate. Both instruments have previously been flown during the 2002, 2003 and 2004 hurricane seasons. For the HS2005, the IWRAP system was modified to implement a raw data acquisition system. The importance of the raw data system arises when trying to profile the atmosphere all the way down to the surface with a non-nadir looking radar system. With this particular geometry, problems arise mainly from the fact that both rain and ocean provide a return echo coincident in time through the antenna s main lobe. This paper shows how this limitation has been removed and presents initial results demonstrating its new capabilities to derive the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) wind field within the inner core of hurricanes to much lower altitudes than the ones the original system was capable of, and to analyze the spectral response of the ocean backscatter and the rain under different wind and rain conditions.

  17. Observed stratospheric profiles and stratospheric lifetimes of HCFC-141b and HCFC-142b

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.M.; Sturges, W.T.; Penkett, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    The authors present profile measurements of HCFC-141b and HCFC-142b in the stratosphere. The measurements show that these chemicals are not in equilibrium in the stratosphere at present, and allow inferences of stratospheric lifetimes. The lifetimes are strongly dependent upon the actual N{sub 2}O lifetime, and for an N{sub 2}O lifetime of 110y, are 68 {+-} 11y for HCFC-141b and a minimum of 138y for HCFC-142b.

  18. Observations of Wind Profile of Marine Atmosphere Boundary Layer by Shipborne Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Yin, Jiaping; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao; Zhang, Hongwei; Song, Xiaoquan; Zhang, Kailin

    2016-06-01

    Pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) system is so good as to prove the feasibility of the marine atmosphere boundary layer detection. A ship-mounted Coherent Doppler lidar was used to measure the wind profile and vertical velocity in the boundary layer over the Yellow sea in 2014. Furthermore, for the purpose of reducing the impact of vibration during movement and correcting the LOS velocity, the paper introduces the attitude correction algorithm and comparison results.

  19. Balloon measurements of the vertical ionization profile over southern Israel and comparison to mid-latitude observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaniv, Roy; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin; Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, Giles; Artamonov, Anton; Usoskin, Ilya

    2016-11-01

    Airborne measurements using meteorological balloons were conducted for the first time from southern Israel (geographic 30°35'N, 34°45'E geomagnetic 27°6'N 112°23'E) for measuring the vertical ionization profile during solar cycle 24. The results show the differences (increase of 30%) in count rates as we proceed from solar maximum toward solar minimum. The observed altitude of maximum ionization (the Regener-Pfotzer maximum) was between 17-20 km, and it agrees well with results from other simultaneous measurements conducted at different latitudes (Reading, UK and Zaragoza-Barcelona, Spain). When compared with predictions of an analytical model, we find a highly significant correlation (R2=0.97) between our observations and the computed ionization profiles. The difference in count rates can be attributed to the height of the tropopause due to the model using a US standard atmosphere that differs from the measured atmospheric parameters above Israel.

  20. The Daytime Mixed Layer Observed by Radiosonde, Profiler, and Lidar during MILAGRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, W. J.; Pekour, M. S.; Coulter, R. L.; Martin, T. J.; Walters, J.

    2007-12-01

    During the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign centered in the Mexico City area, scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) operated a variety of atmospheric profiling systems. The systems were located at the Mexican Petroleum Institute (IMP) in central Mexico City, at Tecámac University on the northeastern edge of the Mexico City urban area, and at Rancho la Bisnaga, a privately owned ranch. These sites are referred to as T0, T1, and T2 to reflect the idea of sequential arrival times of air parcels at each site under common transport conditions. T2 was approximately 50 km north of T1. Similar 915 MHz wind profiling radars were operated at all three sites. ANL additionally operated a sodar, a 523-nm micropulse lidar, and a radiosonde system at T1. At T2, PNNL additionally operated a radiosonde system. On aircraft sampling days, five radiosondes were launched at T1 during the daytime, and three were launched at T2. The collocation of profiling systems afforded an opportunity to compare the three primary methods of measuring the depth of deep mixing layers in the Mexico City environment. In this paper we will describe the methods of extracting mixing layer depth from each system as well as the results of the comparison. The results highlight the general agreement among the various methods, but also the ambiguity that results from multiple inversions for radiosondes and from elevated layers with significant particulate matter for lidars. We conclude that the wind profiler is the system of choice for identifying mixing layer depth from the MILAGRO campaign. In addition to the instrument comparison, we also have completed a description of the temporal variability of the mixing layer during the campaign as well as spatial variations among the three sites. We have interpreted our results in the contexts of the widely reported Norte events, of the days with and without

  1. Calculating clear-sky radiative heating rates using the Fu-Liou RTM with inputs from observed and reanalyzed profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinar, E. K.; Dong, X.; Xi, B.

    2015-12-01

    One-dimensional radiative transfer models (RTM) are a common tool used for calculating atmospheric heating rates and radiative fluxes. In the forward sense, RTMs use known (or observed) quantities of the atmospheric state and surface characteristics to determine the appropriate surface and top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes. The NASA CERES science team uses the modified Fu-Liou RTM to calculate atmospheric heating rates and surface and TOA fluxes using the CERES observed TOA shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) fluxes as constraints to derive global surface and TOA radiation budgets using a reanalyzed atmospheric state (e.g. temperature and various greenhouse gases) from the newly developed MERRA-2. However, closure studies have shown that using the reanalyzed state as input to the RTM introduces some disparity between the RTM calculated fluxes and surface observed ones. The purpose of this study is to generate a database of observed atmospheric state profiles, from satellite and ground-based sources, at several permanent Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, including the Southern Great Plains (SGP), Northern Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Tropical Western Pacific Nauru (TWP-C2), and Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) permanent facilities. Since clouds are a major modulator of radiative transfer within the Earth's atmosphere, we will focus on the clear-sky conditions in this study, which will set up the baseline for our cloudy studies in the future. Clear-sky flux profiles are calculated using the Edition 4 NASA LaRC modified Fu-Liou RTM. The aforementioned atmospheric profiles generated in-house are used as input into the RTM, as well as from reanalyses. The calculated surface and TOA fluxes are compared with ARM surface measured and CERES satellite observed SW and LW fluxes, respectively. Clear-sky cases are identified by the ARM radar-lidar observations, as well as satellite observations, at the select ARM sites.

  2. Observing relationships between lightning and cloud profiles by means of a satellite-borne cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiat, Martina; Porcù, Federico; Dietrich, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Cloud electrification and related lightning activity in thunderstorms have their origin in the charge separation and resulting distribution of charged iced particles within the cloud. So far, the ice distribution within convective clouds has been investigated mainly by means of ground-based meteorological radars. In this paper we show how the products from Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on board CloudSat, a polar satellite of NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP), can be used to obtain information from space on the vertical distribution of ice particles and ice content and relate them to the lightning activity. The analysis has been carried out, focusing on 12 convective events over Italy that crossed CloudSat overpasses during significant lightning activity. The CPR products considered here are the vertical profiles of cloud ice water content (IWC) and the effective radius (ER) of ice particles, which are compared with the number of strokes as measured by a ground lightning network (LINET). Results show a strong correlation between the number of strokes and the vertical distribution of ice particles as depicted by the 94 GHz CPR products: in particular, cloud upper and middle levels, high IWC content and relatively high ER seem to be favourable contributory causes for CG (cloud to ground) stroke occurrence.

  3. Constrained profile retrieval applied to the observation mode of the michelson interferometer for passive atmospheric sounding.

    PubMed

    Steck, T; von Clarmann, T

    2001-07-20

    To investigate the atmosphere of Earth and to detect changes in its environment, the Environmental Satellite will be launched by the European Space Agency in a polar orbit in October 2001. One of its payload instruments is a Fourier spectrometer, the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding, designed to measure the spectral thermal emission of molecules in the atmosphere in a limb-viewing mode. The goal of this experiment is to derive operationally vertical profiles of pressure and temperature as well as of trace gases O(3), H(2)O, CH(4), N(2)O, NO(2), and HNO(3) from spectra on a global scale. A major topic in the analysis of the computational methodology for obtaining the profiles is how available a priori knowledge can be used and how this a priori knowledge affects corresponding results. Retrieval methods were compared and it was shown that an optimal estimation formalism can be used in a highly flexible way for this kind of data analysis. Beyond this, diagnostic tools, such as estimated standard deviation, vertical resolution, or degrees of freedom, have been used to characterize the results. Optimized regularization parameters have been determined, and a great effect from the choice of regularization and discretization on the results was demonstrated. In particular, we show that the optimal estimation formalism can be used to emulate purely smoothing constraints.

  4. First retrievals of MLT sodium profiles based on satellite sodium nightglow observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Savigny, Christian; Zilker, Bianca; Langowski, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The Na D lines are a well known feature of the terrestrial airglow and have been identified for the first time in 1929. During the daytime the Na airglow emission is caused by resonance fluorescence, while during the night the excitation occurs by chemiluminescent reactions. Knowledge of Na in the mesopause region is of interest, because the Na layer is thought to be maintained by meteoric ablation and Na measurements allow constraining the meteoric mass influx into the Earth system. In this contribution we employ SCIAMACHY/Envisat nighttime limb measurements of the Na D-line airglow from fall 2002 to spring 2012 - in combination with photochemical models - in order to retrieve Na concentration profiles in the 75 - 100 km altitude range. The Na profiles show realistic peak altitudes, number densities and seasonal variations. The retrieval scheme, sample results and comparisons to ground-based LIDAR measurements of Na as well as SCIAMACHY daytime retrievals will be presented. Moreover, uncertainties in the assumed photochemical scheme and their impact on the Na retrievals will be discussed.

  5. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccia, J.; Guénard, V.; Benech, B.; Campistron, B.; Drobinski, P.

    2004-11-01

    The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program) in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission) in summer 2001. Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events. In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking), which is coherent with non-convective situations. In summer, due to the ground heating and to the interactions with thermal circulation, the vertical motions are

  6. A relative humidity profile retrieval from Megha-Tropiques observations without explicit thermodynamical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivira, R. G.; Brogniez, H.; Mallet, C.; Oussar, Y.

    2014-09-01

    A statistical method trained and optimized to retrieve relative humidity (RH) profiles is presented and evaluated with measurements from radiosoundings. The method makes use of the microwave payload of the Megha-Tropiques plateform, namely the SAPHIR sounder and the MADRAS imager. The approach, based on a Generalized Additive Model (GAM), embeds both the physical and statistical characteritics of the inverse problem in the training phase and no explicit thermodynamical constraint, such as a temperature profile or an integrated water vapor content, is provided to the model at the stage of retrieval. The model is built for cloud-free conditions in order to avoid the cases of scattering of the microwave radiation in the 18.7-183.31 GHz range covered by the payload. Two instrumental configurations are tested: a SAPHIR-MADRAS scheme and a SAPHIR-only scheme, to deal with the stop of data acquisition of MADRAS in January 2013 for technical reasons. A comparison to retrievals based on the Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) technique and on the Least Square-Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM) shows equivalent performance over a large realistic set, promising low errors (bias < 2.2%) and scatters (correlation > 0.8) throughout the troposphere (150-900 hPa). A comparison to radiosounding measurements performed during the international field experiment CINDY/DYNAMO/AMIE of winter 2011-2012 confirms these results for the mid-tropospheric layers (correlation between 0.6 and 0.92), with an expected degradation of the quality of the estimates at the surface and top layers. Finally a rapid insight of the large-scale RH field from Megha-Tropiques is discussed and compared to ERA-Interim.

  7. Assimilation of wind profiler observations and its impact on three-dimensional transport of ozone over the Southeast Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soon-Young; Lee, Soon-Hwan; Lee, Hwa Woon

    2014-12-01

    In order to investigate the impact of data assimilation on the assessment of ozone concentration in inland regions in the eastern area of the Korean Peninsula, several numerical experiments have been carried out using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to estimate atmospheric circulations and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to assess air quality. Observations of wind that are assimilated into the modeling system are obtained from a wind profiler located at Changwon (CW), which is an urbanized coastal region in the Korean Peninsula. The simulated wind and temperature that is related to a well-developed sea breeze circulation are more consistent with observations in the experiment with dada assimilation than that without the assimilation. The ozone concentrations at both the coastal area of CW and the inland region of DG are well reproduced in the simulation with application of profiler data assimilation. Results from experiments without data assimilation are less realistic than that from the experiment with data assimilation. However, the improvement in simulation of meteorological variables and ozone concentration due to data assimilation is greater in the inland area than in the coastal area, where the wind profiler is located. The ozone concentration in CW changes only over a limited area and below the altitude of 1 km with a maximum change of 25 ppb. In contrast, the simulated ozone concentration in DG has been improved from the ground to upper levels of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), despite the fact that the observations are collected and assimilated into the model at the coastal region. Based on the results of process analysis, we find that the horizontal and vertical transportation of ozone related to the sea-breeze is more important than the local contribution of chemical production in determining the ozone concentration over the inland area. Therefore, observations of wind profiles in the coastal area and assimilation

  8. Autonomous profiling float observations of the high-biomass plume downstream of the Kerguelen Plateau in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, M.; Della Penna, A.; Trull, T. W.

    2015-05-01

    Natural iron fertilisation from Southern Ocean islands results in high primary production and phytoplankton biomass accumulations readily visible in satellite ocean colour observations. These images reveal great spatial complexity with highly varying concentrations of chlorophyll, presumably reflecting both variations in iron supply and conditions favouring phytoplankton accumulation. To examine the second aspect, in particular the influences of variations in temperature and mixed layer depth, we deployed four autonomous profiling floats in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current near the Kerguelen Plateau in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. Each "bio-profiler" measured more than 250 profiles of temperature (T), salinity (S), dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence, and particulate backscattering (bbp) in the top 300 m of the water column, sampling up to 5 profiles per day along meandering trajectories extending up to 1000 km. Comparison of surface Chl a estimates (analogous to values from satellite images) with total water column inventories revealed largely linear relationships, suggesting that these images provide credible information on total and not just surface biomass spatial distributions. However, they also showed that physical mixed layer depths are often not a reliable guide to biomass distributions. Regions of very high Chl a accumulation (1.5-10 μg L-1) were associated predominantly with a narrow T-S class of surface waters. In contrast, waters with only moderate Chl a enrichments (0.5-1.5 μg L-1) displayed no clear correlation with specific water properties, including no dependence on mixed layer depth or the intensity of stratification. Geostrophic trajectory analysis suggests that both these observations can be explained if the main determinant of biomass in a given water parcel is the time since leaving the Kerguelen Plateau. One float became trapped in a cyclonic eddy, allowing temporal evaluation of the water column in early

  9. Observations and analysis of O(1D) and NH2 line profiles for the coma of comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.; Combi, Michael R.; Roesler, Fred L.; Scherb, Frank

    1995-01-01

    A set of high-resolution Fabry-Perot measurements of the coma of comet P/Halley was acquired in the (O I) 6300 A and NH2 6298.62 A emission lines. These high-resolution measurements provide the first optical observations capable of studying directly the photochemical kinetics and dynamic outflow of the coma. The observations were analyzed by a Monte Carlo Particle Trajectory Model. The agreement of the model and observed line profiles was excellent and verified the underlying dynamics, exothermic photodissociative chemistry, and collisional thermalization in the coma. The somewhat wider intrinsic line profile width for the O(1D) emission in 1986 January compared to 1986 May, is, for example, produced by the larger outflow speeds and gas temperatures nearer perihelion in January. The January O(1D) profile, which is wider than the January NH2 profile, is indicative of the photochemical kinetics in the dissociation of the parent molecules H2O and OH in the coma. The absolute calibration of the observations in 1986 January allowed the production rates for H2O and the NH2-parent molecules to be determined. The average daily water production rates derived from the O(1D) emission data for January 16 and 17 are presented. These very large water production rates are consistent with the extrapolated (and 7.6 day time variable) water production rates determined from the analysis of lower spectral resolution observations for O(1D) and H-alpha emissions that covered the time period up to January 13. The large production rates on January 16 and 17 establish that the maximum water production rate for comet Halley accurred pre-perihelion in January. Implications drawn from comparison with 18 cm radio emission data in January suggest that the peak water production rate was even larger. The average production rate for NH3 determined from the NH2 emission data for January 17 was (1.48 +/- 0.10) x 10(exp 28) molecules/s, yielding an NH3/H2O production rate ratio of 0.55%.

  10. Aberrant gene expression profile in a mouse model of endometriosis mirrors that observed in women

    PubMed Central

    Pelch, Katherine E.; Schroder, Amy L.; Kimball, Paul A.; Sharpe-Timms, Kathy L.; Davis, J. W.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To define the altered gene expression profile of endometriotic lesions in a mouse model of surgically-induced endometriosis Design Autologous experimental mouse model. Setting Medical school department. Animals Adult C57Bl6 mice. Intervention(s) Endometriosis was surgically-induced by auto-transplantation of uterine tissue to the intestinal mesentery. Endometriotic lesions and eutopic uteri were recovered at 3 or 29 days post-induction. Main Outcome Measure(s) Altered gene expression was measured in the endometriotic lesion relative to the eutopic uterus by genome wide cDNA microarray analysis and was confirmed by real time RT-PCR for six genes. Relevant categories of altered genes were identified using gene ontology analysis to determine groups of genes enriched for altered expression. Result(s) The expression of 479 and 114 genes was altered in the endometriotic lesion compared to the eutopic uterus at 3 or 29 days post-induction, respectively. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that genes associated with the extracellular matrix, cell adhesions, immune function, cell growth, and angiogenesis were altered in the endometriotic lesion compared to the eutopic uterus. Conclusion(s) Based on gene expression analysis, the mouse model of surgically-induced endometriosis appears to be a good model for studying the pathophysiology and treatment of endometriosis. PMID:19473656

  11. Mesoscale current fields observed with a shipboard profiling acoustic current meter

    SciTech Connect

    Regier, L.

    1982-08-01

    Measurements of the near-surface currents obtained with a shipboard acoustic current meter during the POLYMODE Local Dynamics Experiment are discussed. The large-scale spatial structure of the directly measured currents is very similar to that obtained from simultaneous hydrographic observations assuming geostrophic dynamics. The vertical shear of geostrophic currents is half that observed directly, and the two are poorly correlated. Vertical shear is dominated by currents having spatial scales shorter than about 180 km and having no geostrophic signature. Although the shear of the ageostrophic component is clearly evident, estimation of the ageostrophic current is hampered by large experimental uncertainties.

  12. Trend analysis of the 20-year time series of stratospheric ozone profiles observed by the GROMOS microwave radiometer at Bern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, L.; Hocke, K.; Eckert, E.; von Clarmann, T.; Kämpfer, N.

    2015-10-01

    The ozone radiometer GROMOS (GROund-based Millimeter-wave Ozone Spectrometer) has been performing continuous observations of stratospheric ozone profiles since 1994 above Bern, Switzerland (46.95° N, 7.44° E, 577 m). GROMOS is part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). From November 1994 to October 2011, the ozone line spectra were measured by a filter bench (FB). In July 2009, a fast Fourier transform spectrometer (FFTS) was added as a back end to GROMOS. The new FFTS and the original FB measured in parallel for over 2 years. The ozone profiles retrieved separately from the ozone line spectra of FB and FFTS agree within 5 % at pressure levels from 30 to 0.5 hPa, from October 2009 to August 2011. A careful harmonisation of both time series has been carried out by taking the FFTS as the reference instrument for the FB. This enables us to assess the long-term trend derived from stratospheric ozone observations at Bern. The trend analysis was performed by using a robust multilinear parametric trend model which includes a linear term, the solar variability, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index, the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), the annual and semi-annual oscillation and several harmonics with period lengths between 3 and 24 months. Over the last years, some experimental and modelling trend studies have shown that the stratospheric ozone trend is levelling off or even turning positive. With our observed ozone profiles, we are able to support this statement by reporting a statistically significant trend of +3.14 % decade-1 at 4.36 hPa (37.76 km), covering the period from January 1997 to January 2015, above Bern. Additionally, we have estimated a negative trend over this period of -3.94 % decade-1 at 0.2 hPa (59 km).

  13. Trend analysis of the 20 years time series of stratospheric ozone profiles observed by the GROMOS microwave radiometer at Bern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, L.; Hocke, K.; Eckert, E.; von Clarmann, T.; Kämpfer, N.

    2015-06-01

    The ozone radiometer GROMOS (GROund-based Millimeterwave Ozone Spectrometer) performs continuous observations of stratospheric ozone profiles since 1994 above Bern, Switzerland. GROMOS is part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). From November 1994 to October 2011, the ozone line spectra were measured by a filter bench (FB). In July 2009, a Fast-Fourier-Transform spectrometer (FFTS) has been added as backend to GROMOS. The new FFTS and the original FB measured in parallel for over two years. The ozone profiles retrieved separately from the ozone line spectra of FB and FFTS agree within 5 % at pressure levels from 30 to 0.5 hPa, from October 2009 to August 2011. A careful harmonisation of both time series has been carried out by taking the FFTS as the reference instrument for the FB. This enables us to assess the long-term trend derived from more than 20 years of stratospheric ozone observations at Bern. The trend analysis has been performed by using a robust multilinear parametric trend model which includes a linear term, the solar variability, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index, the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), the annual and semi-annual oscillation and several harmonics with period lengths between 3 and 24 months. Over the last years, some experimental and modelling trend studies have shown that the stratospheric ozone trend is levelling off or even turning positive. With our observed ozone profiles, we are able to support this statement by reporting a statistically significant trend of +3.14 % decade-1 at 4.36 hPa, covering the period from January 1997 to January 2015, above Bern. Additionally, we have estimated a negative trend over this period of -3.94 % decade-1 at 0.2 hPa.

  14. Time-series observations of phytoplankton productivity in the western North Pacific by an underwater profiling buoy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, T.; Honda, M. C.; Matsumoto, K.; Kawakami, H.; Wakita, M.; Saino, T.; Marine Biogeochemical Cycle Research Team

    2010-12-01

    An understanding of the variability in phytoplankton primary productivity provides a basic knowledge of the ecosystem structure and carbon cycle in the ocean. Primary productivity in the world’s oceans has been measured mostly by the radiocarbon tracer or oxygen evolution methods. These methods require bottle incubations for periods ranging from hours to 1 day. This methodological limitation makes it difficult to measure primary productivity in situ with high temporal and spatial resolution. In particular, ship-based studies of the open ocean have been limited in their ability to conduct time-series observations for understanding variability in primary productivity. To overcome these problems, we developed an underwater profiling buoy system incorporating a fast repetition rate fluorometer which enables real-time high-frequency measurements of primary productivity, and started time-series observations in the western North Pacific as part of the environmental biogeochemical cycle research program in JAMSTEC. Here, we show the results of observations in the western North Pacific by the underwater profiling buoy system.

  15. Retrieval of vertical profiles of multiple trace gases from MAX-DOAS observations during the MADCAT Campaign in Mainz, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Xie, Pinhua; Wagner, Thomas; Li, Ang; Luo, Yuhan; Remmers, Julia; Horbanski, Martin; Friess, Udo

    2014-05-01

    In order to promote the development of passive DOAS technique and solve some critical problems including e.g. accurate retrievals of trace gas slant column densities (SCD), profile retrievals of trace gases and aerosol, and the effects of cloud, the Multi Axis DOAS-Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) was held at the Max-Planck institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany from June to August 2013. Within this campaign, spectra of scattered sun light were taken by our two-dimensional scanning MAX-DOAS (2D-MAX-DOAS) instrument and a Mini-MAX-DOAS instrument from the Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this presentation, firstly we show the retrieved differential SCDs of O4, NO2, HCHO, HONO and CHOCHO based on the observations of the 2D-MAX-DOAS. Based on these dSCDs we acquired the vertical profiles of these trace gases and aerosol extinction using optimal estimation method. We compare the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MAX-DOAS with simultaneous observations from an AERONET instrument as well as the near surface volume mixing ratio (VMR) of NO2 from MAX-DOAS with those from a CE-DOAS instrument from the IUP Heidelberg group and found in general good agreement. In addition we apply a cloud classification scheme based on our MAX-DOAS observations to identify different kinds of weather during the MAD-CAT campaign.

  16. Pomology observations, morphometric analysis, ultrastructural study and allelic profiles of "olivastra Seggianese" endocarps from ancient olive trees (Olea europaea L.).

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Claudio; Sorbi, Andrea; Paolucci, Elisa; Antonucci, Francesca; Menesatti, Paolo; Costa, Corrado; Pallottino, Federico; Vignani, Rita; Cimato, Antonio; Ciacci, Andrea; Cresti, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary studies of historical sources and remote sensing were used to identify ancient olive trees near archaeological sites and heritage buildings in the Orcia Valley (Siena, Italy). Distinctive characters were assessed by traditional pomological observation. Trees with similar characters were selected on the basis of the features of endocarps, the only structure that survives aerobic deterioration and conserves useful botanical information for centuries. Non-invasive morphometric analysis of endocarp size and shape established morphological variations in individuals of different populations. Plastid organization in the endocarp and location of DNA in the endocarp tegument were detected by morphological and ultrastructural observations using light and electron microscopy. Cytoplasmic markers with high polymorphism were used to test similarity of endocarp and leaf DNA within individuals and to confirm low variability and minimal divergence between individuals. The ancient trees studied showed the same allelic profiles and therefore belonged to a distinct cultivar. The traditional pomological descriptions of the trees, leaves and fruits, morphometric analysis of size, and shape elliptic Fourier analysis of endocarp outline, ultrastructural observations and allelic profiles of endocarp tegument delineated the general species-specific qualities of the cultivar "olivastra Seggianese" of the Orcia Valley.

  17. Lunar limb profile data obtained from a video observation campaign of lunar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soma, Mitsuru; Hayamizu, Tsutomu

    2001-03-01

    Lunar occultations of the 1st magnitude stars Aldebaran and Regulus occurred in 1998 and 1999. In order to obtain precise limb data we had a campaign of the observations of them throughout Japan. This paper presents the results of the campaign.

  18. Describing Profiles of Instructional Practice: A New Approach to Analyzing Classroom Observation Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpin, Peter F.; Kieffer, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors outline the application of latent class analysis (LCA) to classroom observational instruments. LCA offers diagnostic information about teachers' instructional strengths and weaknesses, along with estimates of measurement error for individual teachers, while remaining relatively straightforward to implement and interpret. It is…

  19. Net community production at Ocean Station Papa observed with nitrate and oxygen sensors on profiling floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, Joshua N.; Johnson, Kenneth S.; Sakamoto, Carole M.; Jannasch, Hans W.; Coletti, Luke J.; Riser, Stephen C.; Swift, Dana D.

    2016-06-01

    Six profiling floats equipped with nitrate and oxygen sensors were deployed at Ocean Station P in the Gulf of Alaska. The resulting six calendar years and 10 float years of nitrate and oxygen data were used to determine an average annual cycle for net community production (NCP) in the top 35 m of the water column. NCP became positive in February as soon as the mixing activity in the surface layer began to weaken, but nearly 3 months before the traditionally defined mixed layer began to shoal from its winter time maximum. NCP displayed two maxima, one toward the end of May and another in August with a summertime minimum in June corresponding to the historical peak in mesozooplankton biomass. The average annual NCP was determined to be 1.5 ± 0.6 mol C m-2 yr-1 using nitrate and 1.5 ± 0.7 mol C m-2 yr-1 using oxygen. The results from oxygen data proved to be quite sensitive to the gas exchange model used as well as the accuracy of the oxygen measurement. Gas exchange models optimized for carbon dioxide flux generally ignore transport due to gas exchange through the injection of bubbles, and these models yield NCP values that are two to three time higher than the nitrate-based estimates. If nitrate and oxygen NCP rates are assumed to be related by the Redfield model, we show that the oxygen gas exchange model can be optimized by tuning the exchange terms to reproduce the nitrate NCP annual cycle.

  20. Vertical profiles of atmospheric fluorescent aerosols observed by a mutil-channel lidar spectrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Huang, J.; Zhou, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Bi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Zhongwei Huang1*, Jianping Huang1, Tian Zhou1, Nobuo Sugimoto2, Jianrong Bi1 and Jinsen Shi11Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. 2Atmospheric Environment Division, National Institutes for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan Email: huangzhongwei@lzu.edu.cn Abstract Atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on regional and globe climate. The challenge in quantifying aerosol direct radiative forcing and aerosol-cloud interactions arises from large spatial and temporal heterogeneity of aerosol concentrations, compositions, sizes, shape and optical properties (IPCC, 2007). Lidar offers some remarkable advantages for determining the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols and their related optical properties. To investigate the characterization of atmospheric aerosols (especially bioaerosols) with high spatial and temporal resolution, we developed a Raman/fluorescence/polarization lidar system employed a multi-channel spectrometer, with capabilities of providing measurements of Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence excitation at 355 nm from atmospheric aerosols. Meanwhile, the lidar system operated polarization measurements both at 355nm and 532nm wavelengths, aiming to obtain more information of aerosols. It employs a high power pulsed laser and a received telescope with 350mm diameter. The receiver could simultaneously detect a wide fluorescent spectrum about 178 nm with spectral resolution 5.7 nm, mainly including an F/3.7 Crossed Czerny-Turner spectrograph, a grating (1200 gr/mm) and a PMT array with 32 photocathode elements. Vertical structure of fluorescent aerosols in the atmosphere was observed by the developed lidar system at four sites across northwest China, during 2014 spring field observation that conducted by Lanzhou University. It has been proved that the developed lidar could detect the fluorescent aerosols with high temporal and

  1. Modeling of the spatial profile of neutrals in the plume of Enceladus observed by Cassini INMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Dana; Perry, Mark; Waite, Hunter

    2015-11-01

    Monte Carlo modeling of the vapor erupting from Enceladus’ South polar region is presented to demonstrate the influence of physical characteristics of the emitted vapor on the distribution of particles at altitude. The modeled sources include both localized jets and eruptions distributed along the surface features called “tiger stripes.” The modeling reveals that density enhancements at altitude can be displaced from the source location. The displacement can be produced by the angle of emission. However, in some cases it is caused by superposition of material from adjacent sources. Assuming different molecules are emitted at the same bulk velocity and the same temperature, differences in the amount of spreading for the different species emerges owing to the dependence of thermal velocity on mass. The altitude of the superposition is mass dependent and contributes to differences observed in the mass 28 and mass 44 channels of the Cassini INMS during Enceladus encounters.We present comparisons of INMS data with the model for four Cassini Enceladus flybys. INMS data are modeled using only the tiger stripe sources to reproduce the broad structure of the plume. The difference between the data and the model is attributed to the presence of stronger, more-localized sources, which are identified by their excess. In particular, an additional source is required for mass 44 u on the Saturn-facing hemisphere of Baghdad Sulcus. It is apparent in 3 parallel Cassini flybys. A relative decrease in the source rate is observed for mass 28 u for E14. The lack of small-scale spatial structure of high-density regions in the 28 u INMS observations compared to the more collimated structure of the 44 u INMS observations is consistent with increased thermal spreading for low-mass constituents of the plume. This indicates that even less spatial structure should be expected for the dominant species in the plume--water.

  2. Probabilistic nowcast of PBL profiles with a single column model and ensemble filter assimilation of surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostkier-Edelstein, D.; Hacker, J. P.

    2009-09-01

    A long-term goal of this work is to find an efficient system for probabilistic planetary boundary layer (PBL) nowcasting that can be deployed wherever surface observations are present. One approach showing promise is the use of a single column model (SCM) and ensemble filter (EF) data assimilation techniques. Earlier work showed that surface observations can be an important source of information with an SCM and an EF. Here we extend that work to quantify the deterministic and probabilistic skill of ensemble SCM predictions with added complexity. Although it is appealing to add additional physics and dynamics to the SCM model it is not immediately clear that additional complexity will improve the performance of a PBL nowcasting system based on a simple model. We address this question with regard to treatment of surface assimilation, radiation in the column, and also advection to account for realistic 3D dynamics (a timely WRF prediction). We adopt factor separation analysis to quantify the individual contribution of each model component to the deterministic and probabilistic skill of the system, as well as any beneficial or detrimental interactions between them. Deterministic skill of the system is evaluated through the mean absolute error, and probabilistic skill through the Brier Skill Score (BSS) and the area under the relative operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUR). The BSS is further decomposed into both a reliability and resolution term to understand the trade-offs in different components of probabilistic skill. An alternative system based on climatological covariances and surface observations is used as a reference to assess the real utility of the flow-dependent covariances estimated with the ensemble system. In essence it is a dressing technique, whereby a deterministic 3D mesoscale forecast (e.g. WRF) is corrected with surface forecast errors and covariances computed from a distribution of available historical mesoscale forecasts. The adjusted profile

  3. BLAST OBSERVATIONS OF RESOLVED GALAXIES: TEMPERATURE PROFILES AND THE EFFECT OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI ON FIR TO SUBMILLIMETER EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, Donald V.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume

    2009-12-20

    Over the course of two flights, the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) made resolved maps of seven nearby (<25 Mpc) galaxies at 250, 350, and 500 mum. During its 2005 June flight from Sweden, BLAST observed a single nearby galaxy, NGC 4565. During the 2006 December flight from Antarctica, BLAST observed the nearby galaxies NGC 1097, NGC 1291, NGC 1365, NGC 1512, NGC 1566, and NGC 1808. We fit physical dust models to a combination of BLAST observations and other available data for the galaxies observed by Spitzer. We fit a modified blackbody to the remaining galaxies to obtain total dust mass and mean dust temperature. For the four galaxies with Spitzer data, we also produce maps and radial profiles of dust column density and temperature. We measure the fraction of BLAST detected flux originating from the central cores of these galaxies and use this to calculate a 'core fraction', an upper limit on the 'active galactic nucleus fraction' of these galaxies. We also find our resolved observations of these galaxies give a dust mass estimate 5-19 times larger than an unresolved observation would predict. Finally, we are able to use these data to derive a value for the dust mass absorption coefficient of kappa = 0.29 +- 0.03 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1} at 250 mum. This study is an introduction to future higher-resolution and higher-sensitivity studies to be conducted by Herschel and SCUBA-2.

  4. Evidence for Gently Sloping Plasma Density Profiles in the Deep Corona: Type III Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobzin, V. V.; Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, P. A.; Warmuth, A.; Mann, G.; Gorgutsa, R. V.; Fomichev, V. V.

    2010-12-01

    Type III radio bursts are produced near the local electron plasma frequency fp and near its harmonic 2fp by fast electrons ejected from the solar active regions and moving through the corona and solar wind. The coronal bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency rapidly falling with time, the typical duration being about 1-3 s. In the present paper, 37 well-defined coronal type III radio bursts (25-450 MHz) are analyzed. The results obtained substantiate an earlier statement that the dependence of the central frequency of the emission on time can be fitted to a power-law model, f(t) vprop (t - t 0)-α, where α can be as low as 1. In the case of negligible plasma acceleration and conical flow, it means that the electron number density within about 1 solar radius above the photosphere will decrease as r -2, like in the solar wind. For the data set chosen, the index α varies in the range from 0.2 to 7 or bigger, with mean and median values of 1.2 and 0.5, respectively. A surprisingly large fraction of events, 84%, have α <= 1.2. These results provide strong evidence that in the type III source regions the electron number density scales as n(r) vprop (r - r 0)-β, with minimum, mean, and median β = 2α of 0.4, 2.4, and 1.0, respectively. Hence, the typical density profiles are more gently sloping than those given by existing empirical coronal models. Several events are found with a wind-like dependence of burst frequency on time. Smaller power-law indices could result from the effects of non-conical geometry of the plasma flow tubes, deceleration of coronal plasma, and/or the curvature of the magnetic field lines. The last effect is shown to be too weak to explain such low power-law indices. A strong tendency is found for bursts from the same group to have similar power-law indices, thereby favoring the hypothesis that they are usually produced by the same source region.

  5. Evidence for Gently Sloping Plasma Density Profiles in the Deep Corona: Type III Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Lobzin, V.; Robinson, P. A.; Warmuth, A.; Mann, G. J.; Gorgutsa, R.; Fomichev, V.

    2010-12-01

    Type III radio bursts are produced near the local electron plasma frequency fp and near its harmonic 2fp by fast electrons ejected from the solar active regions and moving through the corona and solar wind. These bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency rapidly falling with time, the typical duration of the coronal burst being about 1--3 seconds. In the present paper, 37 well-defined coronal type III radio bursts (25--450 MHz) are analyzed. It is found that the dependence of the central frequency of the emission on time can be fitted to a power-law model, f(t) ∝ (t-t0)-α . The index α varies in the range 0.2 to ∞ , with mean and median values of 1.2 and 0.5, respectively. A surprisingly large fraction of events, 84%, has α ≤1.2. Assuming a constant speed of the electron beam, these results provide strong evidence that in the type III source regions within about 1 solar radius above the photosphere the electron number density scales as n(r) ∝ (r-r0)-β , with minimum, mean, and median β =2α of 0.4, 2.4, and 1.0, respectively. Hence, the typical density profiles are more gently sloping than could be expected from the existing empirical coronal models. In the case of negligible plasma acceleration and conical flow, from conservation of the number of electrons it follows that the electron number density will decrease as r-2 with α =1, like in the solar wind. Several events are found with such a wind-like dependence of burst frequency on time. Smaller power-law indices could result from the effects of non-conical geometry of the plasma flow tubes, deceleration of coronal plasma, and/or the curvature of the magnetic field lines. The effects of curvature of the magnetic field lines are shown to be too weak to explain such low power-law indices. A strong tendency is found for bursts from the same group to have similar power-law indices, thereby favoring the hypothesis that they are usually produced by the same source region.

  6. An Observational Study of Wind Profiles in the Baroclinic Convective Mixed Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemone, Margaret A.; Zhou, Mingyu; Moeng, Chin-Hoh; Lenschow, Donald H.; Miller, L. Jay; Grossman, Robert L.

    A comprehensive planetary boundary-layer (PBL) and synoptic data set is used to isolate the mechanisms that determine the vertical shear of the horizontal wind in the convective mixed layer. To do this, we compare a fair-weather convective PBL with no vertical shear through the mixed layer (10 March 1992), with a day with substantial vertical shear in the north-south wind component (27 February). The approach involves evaluating the terms of the budget equations for the two components of the vertical shear of the horizontal wind; namely: the time-rate-of-change or time-tendency term, differential advection, the Coriolis terms (a thermal wind term and a shear term), and the second derivative of the vertical transport of horizontal momentum with respect to height (turbulent-transport term). The data, gathered during the 1992 STorm-scale Operational and Research Meteorology (STORM) Fronts Experiments Systems Test (FEST) field experiment, are from gust-probe aircraft horizontal legs and soundings, 915-MHz wind profilers, a 5-cm Doppler radar, radiosondes, and surface Portable Automated Mesonet (PAM) stations in a roughly 50 × 50 km boundary-layer array in north-eastern Kansas, nested in a mesoscale-to-synoptic array of radiosondes and surface data.We present evidence that the shear on 27 February is related to the rapid growth of the convective boundary layer. Computing the shear budget over a fixed depth (the final depth of the mixed layer), we find that the time-tendency term dominates, reflecting entrainment of high-shear air from above the boundary layer. We suggest that shear within the mixed layer occurs when the time-tendency term is sufficiently large that the shear-reduction terms - namely the turbulent-transport term and differential advection terms - cannot compensate. In contrast, the tendency term is small for the slowly-growing PBL of 10 March, resulting in a balance between the Coriolis terms and the turbulent-transport term. Thus, the thermal wind

  7. Autonomous profiling float observations of the high biomass plume downstream of the Kerguelen plateau in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, M.; Della Penna, A.; Trull, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    Natural iron fertilisation from Southern Ocean islands results in high primary production and phytoplankton biomass accumulations readily visible in satellite ocean colour observations. These images reveal great spatial complexity with highly varying concentrations of chlorophyll, presumably reflecting both variations in iron supply and conditions favouring phytoplankton accumulation. To examine the second aspect, in particular the influences of variations in temperature and stratification, we deployed four autonomous profiling floats in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current near the Kerguelen plateau in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. Each "bio-profiler" measured more than 250 profiles of temperature (T), salinity (S), dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll fluorescence (Chl a), and particle backscatter in the top 300 m of the water column, sampling up to 5 profiles per day along meandering trajectories extending up to 1000 km. Comparison of surface Chl a estimates (top 50 m depth; analogous to values from satellite images) with total water column inventories revealed largely linear relationships, suggesting that dilution of chlorophyll by mixed layer depth variations plays only a minor role in the spatial distributions observed by satellite, and correspondingly that these images provide credible information on total and not just surface biomass accumulations. Regions of very high Chl a accumulation (1.5-10 μg L-1) were associated predominantly with a narrow T-S class of surface waters, which appears to derive from the northern Kerguelen plateau. In contrast, waters with only moderate Chl a enrichments (0.5-1.5 μg L-1) displayed no clear correlation with water properties, including no dependence on mixed layer depth, suggesting a diversity of sources of iron and/or its efficient dispersion across filaments of the plume. The lack of dependence on mixed layer depth also indicates a limited influence on production by light limitation. One float became trapped in a

  8. Upper ocean carbon cycling inferred from direct pH observations made by profiling floats and estimated alkalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. S.; Plant, J. N.; Jannasch, H. W.; Coletti, L. J.; Elrod, V.; Sakamoto, C.; Riser, S.

    2015-12-01

    The annual cycle of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is a key tracer of net community production and carbon export in the upper ocean. In particular, the DIC concentration is much less sensitive to air-sea gas exchange, when compared to oxygen, another key tracer of upper ocean metabolism. However, the annual DIC cycle is observed with a seasonal resolution at only a few time-series stations in the open ocean. Here, we consider the annual carbon cycle that has been observed using profiling floats equipped with pH sensors. Deep-Sea DuraFET pH sensors have been deployed on profiling floats for over three years and they can provide temporal and spatial resolution of 5 to 10 days and 5 to 10 m in the upper ocean over multi-year periods. In addition to pH, a second carbon system parameter is required to compute DIC. Total alkalinity can be derived from the float observations of temperature, salinity and oxygen using equations in these variables that are fitted to shipboard observations of alkalinity obtained in the global repeat hydrography programs (e.g., Juranek et al., GRL, doi:10.1029/2011GL048580, 2011), as the relationships should be stable in time in the open ocean. Profiling floats with pH have been deployed from Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) cruises since late 2012 and an array of floats with pH have been deployed since early 2014 in the Southern Ocean as part of the SOCCOM program. The SOCCOM array should grow to nearly 200 floats over the next 5 years. The sensor data was quality controlled and adjusted by comparing observations at 1500 m depth to the deep climatology of pH (derived from DIC and alkalinity) computed with the GLODAP data set. After adjustment, the surface DIC concentrations were calculated from pH and alkalinity. This yields a data set that is used to examine annual net community production in the oligotrophic North Pacific and in the South Pacific near 150 West from 40 South to 65 South.

  9. Iron line profiles and BH spin in deep Suzaku observations of Seyfert 1 AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, A. R.; Reeves, J. N.; Lobban, A. P.; Porquet, D.; Markowitz, A. G.

    2012-03-01

    We present a broad-band analysis of deep Suzaku observations of nearby Seyfert 1 AGN: Fairall 9, MCG-6-30-15, NGC 3516, NGC 3783 and NGC 4051. The use of deep observations (exposures > 200 ks) with high S/N allows the complex spectra of these objects to be examined in full, taking into account features such as the soft excess, reflection continuum and complex absorption components. After a self-consistent modelling of the broad-band data (0.6-100.0 keV, also making use of BAT data from Swift), the subtle curvature which may be introduced as a consequence of warm absorbers has a measured affect upon the spectrum at energies > 3 keV and the FeK region. Forming a model (including absorption) of these AGN allows the true extent to which broadened diskline emission is present to be examined and as a result the measurement of accretion disc and black hole parameters which are consistent over the full 0.6-100.0 keV energy range.

  10. Northern middle-latitude ozone profile features and trends observed by SBUV and Umkehr, 1979-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluisi, J. J.; Mateer, C. L.; Theisen, D.; Bhartia, P. K.; Longenecker, D.; Chu, B.

    1994-01-01

    A comparison of Umkehr ozone profile data with the reprocessed solar backscatter ultraviolet (SBUV) ozone data in the northern middle-latitude region, 30 deg to 50 deg N, is reported. Although significant biases exist between the two types of observations, the long-term variations and least squares linear regression trends agree remarkably well over the comparison period of 1979 to 1990. The ozone trend in the upper stratosphere is of the order of -0.9%/yr. Near 25 km, little if any trend appears, but a larger negative trend is seen in the lower stratosphere near 15 km. Comparisons show that the average annual ozone cycles in the profiles also agree well. The upper stratospheric ozone results are consistent with photochemical model predictions of ozone depletion near 40 km that are due to the release of anthropogenically produced chlorofluorocarbons. The lower stratospheric ozone trend results are in reasonable agreement with published ozonesonde data trends. It is shown that the ozone trends in the lower stratospheric layers impact significantly on the total ozone trend of the order of -0.47%/yr. The good agreement now seen between the two types of observations suggest that the combined ground-based and satellite approach could provide a valuable database for long-term monitoring of stratospheric ozone for trends and extraordinary variations.

  11. Simultaneous fine structure observation of wind and temperature profiles by the Arecibo 430-MHz radar and in situ measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, D.; Bertin, F.; Petitdidier, M.; Teitelbaum, H.; Woodman, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    A simultaneous campaign of balloon and radar measurements took place on March 14 to 16, 1984, above the Arecibo 430-MHz radar. This radar was operating with a vertical resolution of 150 m following two antenna beam directions: 15 deg. from the zenith, respectively, in the N-S and E-W directions. The main results concerning the comparison between the flight and simultaneous radar measurements obtained on March 15, 1984 are analyzed. The radar return power profile (S/N ratio in dB) exhibits maxima which are generally well correlated with step-like structures in the potential temperature profile. These structures are generally considered as the consequence of the mixing processes induced by the turbulence. A good correlation appears in the altitude range 12.5 to 19 km between wind shears induced by a wave structure observed in the meridional wind and the radar echo power maxima. This wave structure is characterized by a vertical wavelength of about 2.5 km, and a period in the range 30 to 40 hours. These characteristics are deduced from the twice daily rawinsonde data launched from the San Juan Airport by the National Weather Service. These results pointed out an example of the interaction between wave and turbulence in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Turbulent layers are observed at locations where wind shears related to an internal inertia-gravity wave are maxima.

  12. Weak, quasiparallel profiles of earth's bow shock - A comparison between numerical simulations and ISEE 3 observations on the far flank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.; Coroniti, F. V.; Moses, S. L.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Omidi, N.; Quest, K. B.; Krauss-Varban, D.

    1991-01-01

    Over 200 crossings of the distant downwind flanks of earth's magnetosonic bow shock by ISEE 3 included many cases of weak, or low Mach number, quasi-parallel shocks. A consistent feature of the magnetic field profiles was the presence of large amplitude, near periodic to irregular transverse oscillations downstream from even the weakest Q-parallel shocks. Large downstream perturbations with whistler-like features similar to those of the observations appear in 1D simulations when the Alfven Mach number M(A) is greater than 2.5 but not when M(A) = 2.1. The observed cases with downstream waves also occurred when M(A) is greater than about 2.5, suggesting the importance of the Alfven as opposed to magnetosonic Mach number in determining the signature of weak, Q-parallel shocks.

  13. Doppler sodar and radar wind-profiler observations of gravity-wave activity associated with a gravity current

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, F.M.; Venkateswaran, S.V. ); Mazaudier, C. ); Crochet, M. )

    1993-02-01

    Observations from two Doppler sodars and a radar wind profiler have been used in conjunction with data from a rawinsonde station and a mesoscale surface observation network to conduct a case study of a gravity current entering into an environment containing a nocturnal inversion and an elevated neutral layer. On the basis of synoptic and mesoscale analyses, it is concluded that the gravity current might have originated either as a scale-contracted cold front or as a gust front resulting from thunderstorm outflows observed very near the leading edge of a cold front. Despite this ambiguity, the detailed vertical structure of the gravity current itself is well resolved from the data. Moreover, the vertical velocity measurements provided by the sodars and the radar wind profiler at high time resolution have given unique information about the height structure of gravity waves excited by the gravity current. Although only wave periods, and not phase speeds or wavelengths, are directly measured, it is possible to make reasonable inferences about wave excitation mechanisms and about the influence and control of ambient stratification on wave-field characteristics. Both Kelvin-Helmholtz waves generated in the regions of high wind shear found in association with the gravity current and lee-type waves forced by the gravity current acting as an obstacle to opposing prefrontal flow are identified. It is also found that the propagation speed of the gravity current and the relative depths of the prefrontal inversion and the postfrontal cold air were not favorable for the formation of either internal bores or solitary waves at the time of day at which the gravity current was being observed. 42 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Can liquid water profiles be retrieved from passive microwave zenith observations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crewell, Susanne; Ebell, Kerstin; Löhnert, Ulrich; Turner, D. D.

    2009-03-01

    The ability to determine the cloud boundaries and vertical distribution of cloud liquid water for single-layer liquid clouds using zenith-pointing microwave radiometers is investigated. Simulations are used to demonstrate that there is little skill in determining either cloud base or cloud thickness, especially when the cloud thickness is less than 500 m. It is also shown that the different distributions of liquid water content within a cloud with known cloud boundaries results in a maximum change in the brightness temperature of less than 1 K at the surface from 20 to 150 GHz, which is on the order of the instrument noise level. Furthermore, it is demonstrated using the averaging kernel that the number of degrees of freedom for signal (i.e., independent pieces of information) is approximately 1, which implies there is no information on vertical distribution of liquid water in the microwave observations.

  15. Velocity Profiles of Galaxies with Claimed Black-Holes - Part Three - Observations and Models for M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Marel, R. P.

    1994-09-01

    We report on high-S/N subarcsec resolution spectra of M87, obtained with the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope in the spectral regions around the blue G-band and the IR Ca II triplet. From the spectra we determine the line strengths, the mean and dispersion of the best-fitting Gaussian velocity profiles (i.e. the line-of-sight velocity distributions) and the Gauss-Hermite moments h_3_,...h_6_ that measure deviations from a Gaussian. We find that the main results derived from the two spectral regions agree, in contradiction to recent measurements by Jarvis & Melnick. The observed line strengths have a central minimum in both spectral regions and are consistent with the central luminosity `spike' of M87 being completely non-thermal. The coefficients h_3_,...h_6_ are close to zero at all radii. The velocity dispersion rises from ~270 km s^-1^ at ~15 arcsec to ~305 km s^-1^ at ~5 arcsec, and then to ~400 km s^-1^ at 0.5 arcsec. We model the observed velocity dispersions by solving the Jeans equation for hydrostatic equilibrium. Radial anisotropy (β ~ 0.5) is required in the outer parts to fit the observed velocity dispersion gradient. Near the centre, the data can still be fitted equally well with radially anisotropic models without a central black hole as they can be with less anisotropic models with a central black hole of mass M_BH_ <~ 5 x 10^9^ M_sun_. However, the radially anisotropic Jeans models without a central black hole need not necessarily correspond to a positive and stable distribution function. We study the central velocity profile of isotropic dynamical models with a central black hole. The wings of the velocity profile are more extended than those of a Gaussian. This is due to the stars that orbit close to the hole at high velocities. The wings contribute significantly to the normalization and the dispersion of the velocity profile. A Gaussian fit to the velocity profile is insensitive to the wings, and thus underestimates both the line strength γ and

  16. Double Bright Band Observations with High-Resolution Vertically Pointing Radar, Lidar, and Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emory, Amber E.; Demoz, Belay; Vermeesch, Kevin; Hicks, Michael

    2014-01-01

    On 11 May 2010, an elevated temperature inversion associated with an approaching warm front produced two melting layers simultaneously, which resulted in two distinct bright bands as viewed from the ER-2 Doppler radar system, a vertically pointing, coherent X band radar located in Greenbelt, MD. Due to the high temporal resolution of this radar system, an increase in altitude of the melting layer of approximately 1.2 km in the time span of 4 min was captured. The double bright band feature remained evident for approximately 17 min, until the lower atmosphere warmed enough to dissipate the lower melting layer. This case shows the relatively rapid evolution of freezing levels in response to an advancing warm front over a 2 h time period and the descent of an elevated warm air mass with time. Although observations of double bright bands are somewhat rare, the ability to identify this phenomenon is important for rainfall estimation from spaceborne sensors because algorithms employing the restriction of a radar bright band to a constant height, especially when sampling across frontal systems, will limit the ability to accurately estimate rainfall.

  17. Systematic observations of long-range transport events and climatological backscatter profiles with the DWD ceilometer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattis, Ina; Müller, Gerhard; Wagner, Frank; Hervo, Maxime

    2015-04-01

    The German Meteorological Service (DWD) operates a network of about 60 CHM15K-Nimbus ceilometers for cloud base height observations. Those very powerful ceilometers allow for the detection and characterization of aerosol layers. Raw data of all network ceilometers are transferred online to DWD's data analysis center at the Hohenpeißenberg Meteorological Observatory. There, the occurrence of aerosol layers from long-range transport events in the free troposphere is systematically monitored on daily basis for each single station. If possible, the origin of the aerosol layers is determined manually from the analysis of the meteorological situation and model output. We use backward trajectories as well as the output of the MACC and DREAM models for the decision, whether the observed layer originated in the Sahara region, from forest fires in North America or from another, unknown source. Further, the magnitude of the observed layers is qualitatively estimated taking into account the geometrical layer depth, signal intensity, model output and nearby sun photometer or lidar observations (where available). All observed layers are attributed to one of the categories 'faint', 'weak', 'medium', 'strong', or 'extreme'. We started this kind of analysis in August 2013 and plan to continue this systematic documentation of long-range transport events of aerosol layers to Germany on long-term base in the framework of our GAW activities. Most of the observed aerosol layers have been advected from the Sahara region to Germany. In the 15 months between August 2013 and November 2014 we observed on average 46 days with Sahara dust layers per station, but only 16 days with aerosol layers from forest fires. The occurrence of Sahara dust layers vary with latitude. We observed only 28 dusty days in the north, close to the coasts of North Sea and Baltic Sea. In contrast, in southern Germany, in Bavarian Pre-Alps and in the Black Forest mountains, we observed up to 59 days with dust. At

  18. Comparison of merged profile ozone satellite observations (1984-2011): Assessment and implications in terms of ozone recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tummon, Fiona; Hassler, Birgit; Harris, Neil, , Dr; Staehelin, Johannes

    The successful implementation of the Montreal Protocol has led to reductions in stratospheric halogen loading, which is expected to result in less chemical depletion of ozone and thus increased stratospheric ozone amounts [WMO, 2011]. To unambiguously identify a positive ozone response directly attributable to declining halogen levels, consistent long-term ozone profile observations are required. Although near-global satellite observations of the ozone profile have been made since 1979, no single instrument has covered this entire period, meaning that merged data series combining several instrument records are required to fully understand long-term ozone changes. As part of the Si2N (Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC), the International Ozone Commission (IOC), the ozone focus area of the Integrated Global Atmospheric Chemistry Observations (IGACO-O3), and the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) - SPARC/IOC/IGACO-O3/NDACC) initiative, all available merged, long-term data sets were compared and assessed. Seven data sets, each based on a varying combination of instruments including SBUV/2, SAGE-2, HALOE, UARS-MLS, OSIRIS, SAGE-3, GOMOS, ACE-FTS, and Aura-MLS, were investigated. The analysis covers the period 1984-2011, for which all data sets were available. The analyses reveal that all data sets represent seasonality and interannual variability well, with those data sets based on the same instrument set tending to be more similar, despite different merging techniques being used. A multiple linear regression analysis reveals that long-term ozone trends are similar in the period prior to 1997, but show more diversity for the period 1998-2011. This is likely a result of the different instruments used to construct each data set, which vary more in the latter period. These results have important implications in terms of the detection of ozone recovery resulting from the reduction in stratospheric halogen

  19. Observations and theory of Mg II lines in early type stars. II - Theory and predicted profiles. III - The observations and a comparison with the predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snijders, M. A. J.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.

    1975-01-01

    Profiles of the UV Mg II lines in the spectra of early type stars are computed in a grid of model atmospheres with effective temperatures between 8000 and 35,000 K and log g values of 2.5 to 4.0 using the LTE and non-LTE theories of line formation. The theoretical results indicate that the line cores are strengthened by non-LTE effects over the entire temperature range, resonance-line wings are weaker in the cooler models than in the LTE case, and very large deviations from LTE occur in the hot low-gravity models. These predictions are compared with the equivalent widths of the UV Mg II lines in 106 stars and of the visual lines in 48 stars (spectral types O4 to A3). The observed equivalent widths of normal stars in luminosity classes II through V are found to agree with the predictions over the entire range from O8 to A2 if a certain Mg/H abundance is adopted. The line intensities observed in supergiants, Be, Bp, and Ap stars are discussed.

  20. Ozone Profiles in the Baltimore-Washington Region (2006-2011): Satellite Comparisons and DISCOVER-AQ Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Stauffer, Ryan M.; Miller, Sonya K.; Martins, Douglas K.; Joseph, Everette; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Diskin, Glenn S.

    2014-01-01

    Much progress has been made in creating satellite products for tracking the pollutants ozone and NO2 in the troposphere. Yet, in mid-latitude regions where meteorological interactions with pollutants are complex, accuracy can be difficult to achieve, largely due to persistent layering of some constituents. We characterize the layering of ozone soundings and related species measured from aircraft over two ground sites in suburban Washington, DC (Beltsville, MD, 39.05N; 76.9W) and Baltimore (Edgewood, MD, 39.4N; 76.3W) during the July 2011 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) experiment. First, we compare column-ozone amounts from the Beltsville and Edgewood sondes with data from overpassing satellites. Second, processes influencing ozone profile structure are analyzed using Laminar Identification and tracers: sonde water vapor, aircraft CO and NOy. Third, Beltsville ozone profiles and meteorological influences in July 2011 are compared to those from the summers of 2006-2010. Sonde-satellite offsets in total ozone during July 2011 at Edgewood and Beltsville, compared to the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), were 3 percent mean absolute error, not statistically significant. The disagreement between an OMIMicrowave Limb Sounder-based tropospheric ozone column and the sonde averaged 10 percent at both sites, with the sonde usually greater than the satellite. Laminar Identification (LID), that distinguishes ozone segments influenced by convective and advective transport, reveals that on days when both stations launched ozonesondes, vertical mixing was stronger at Edgewood. Approximately half the lower free troposphere sonde profiles have very dry laminae, with coincident aircraft spirals displaying low CO (80-110 ppbv), suggesting stratospheric influence. Ozone budgets at Beltsville in July 2011, determined with LID, as well as standard meteorological indicators, resemble those

  1. Profiles of anger control in second-grade children: examination of self-report, observational, and physiological components.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marissa; Hubbard, Julie A; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe

    2011-10-01

    The current study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to examine anger control in 257 second-grade children (∼8 years of age). Anger was induced through losing a game and prize to a confederate who cheated. Three components of anger control were assessed: self-report of awareness of anger, observed intensity of angry facial expressions, and skin conductance reactivity. These components served as indicators in an LPA conducted to determine whether distinct groups of children who differed in anger control profiles would emerge. Five groups were found: (a) Physiology-and-Expression Controllers (high self-report, low expression, low physiological arousal), (b) Expression-Only Controllers (high self-report, low expression, high physiological arousal), (c) Non-controllers (high self-report, high expression, medium physiological arousal), (d) Non-reactive (low self-report, low expression, low physiological arousal), and (e) Non-reporters (low self-report, medium expression, medium physiological arousal). These findings are discussed in terms of implications for the assessment of children's anger control skills and intervention programs for children's anger management.

  2. Insights Into Precipitation Processes As Revealed By Profiling Radar, Disdrometer and Aircraft Observations During The MC3E Campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giangrande, S. E.; Toto, T.; Mishra, S.; Ryzhkov, A.; Bansemer, A.; Kumjian, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) was a collaborative campaign led by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. This campaign was held at the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) in north-central Oklahoma, with the programs joining forces to deploy an extensive array of airborne, radiosonde and ground-based instrumentation towards an unprecedented set of deep convective environment and cloud property observations. An overarching motivation was to capitalize on the wealth of aircraft observations and new multi-frequency dual-polarization radars to provide insights for improving the treatments of cloud processes in convective models. This study considers a coupled aircraft, radar and surface disdrometer approach for identifying key cloud processes and linking those to possible radar-based microphysical fingerprints and/or cloud properties. Our emphasis is on the MC3E observations collected during aircraft spirals over the column of the ARM CF. We focus on those spirals associated with radar 'bright band' signatures and Doppler spectral anomalies observed within trailing stratifrom precipitation. Two cases are highlighted, one following a weaker convective event, and one following a stronger squall line. For each event, we investigate the usefulness of radar to inform on processes including aggregation and riming as viewed by the vertically-pointing ARM wind profiler (915 MHz) and cloud radar Doppler spectral observations (35 GHz). Matching dual-polarization radar signatures from nearby cm-wavelength radar are also consulted for complementary insights. For one event, the successive Citation II aircraft spirals through the melting layer and associated ground observations indicate a fortunate capture of the transition from a region of riming to one favoring aggregation

  3. Convective cloud vertical velocity and mass-flux characteristics from radar wind profiler observations during GoAmazon2014/5

    DOE PAGES

    Giangrande, Scott E.; Toto, Tami; Jensen, Michael P.; ...

    2016-10-21

    A radar wind profiler (RWP) data set collected during the 2 year Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) campaign is used to estimate convective cloud vertical velocity, area fraction, and mass flux profiles. Vertical velocity observations are presented using cumulative frequency histograms and weighted mean profiles to provide insights in a manner suitable for global climate model scale comparisons (spatial domains from 20 km to 60 km). Convective profile sensitivity to changes in environmental conditions and seasonal regime controls is also considered. Aggregate and ensemble average vertical velocity, convective area fraction,more » and mass flux profiles, as well as magnitudes and relative profile behaviors, are found consistent with previous studies. Updrafts and downdrafts increase in magnitude with height to midlevels (6 to 10 km), with updraft area also increasing with height. Updraft mass flux profiles similarly increase with height, showing a peak in magnitude near 8 km. Downdrafts are observed to be most frequent below the freezing level, with downdraft area monotonically decreasing with height. Updraft and downdraft profile behaviors are further stratified according to environmental controls. These results indicate stronger vertical velocity profile behaviors under higher convective available potential energy and lower low-level moisture conditions. Sharp contrasts in convective area fraction and mass flux profiles are most pronounced when retrievals are segregated according to Amazonian wet and dry season conditions. Lastly, during this deployment, wet season regimes favored higher domain mass flux profiles, attributed to more frequent convection that offsets weaker average convective cell vertical velocities.« less

  4. Convective cloud vertical velocity and mass-flux characteristics from radar wind profiler observations during GoAmazon2014/5

    SciTech Connect

    Giangrande, Scott E.; Toto, Tami; Jensen, Michael P.; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Feng, Zhe; Protat, Alain; Williams, Christopher R.; Schumacher, Courtney; Machado, Luiz

    2016-10-21

    A radar wind profiler (RWP) data set collected during the 2 year Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) campaign is used to estimate convective cloud vertical velocity, area fraction, and mass flux profiles. Vertical velocity observations are presented using cumulative frequency histograms and weighted mean profiles to provide insights in a manner suitable for global climate model scale comparisons (spatial domains from 20 km to 60 km). Convective profile sensitivity to changes in environmental conditions and seasonal regime controls is also considered. Aggregate and ensemble average vertical velocity, convective area fraction, and mass flux profiles, as well as magnitudes and relative profile behaviors, are found consistent with previous studies. Updrafts and downdrafts increase in magnitude with height to midlevels (6 to 10 km), with updraft area also increasing with height. Updraft mass flux profiles similarly increase with height, showing a peak in magnitude near 8 km. Downdrafts are observed to be most frequent below the freezing level, with downdraft area monotonically decreasing with height. Updraft and downdraft profile behaviors are further stratified according to environmental controls. These results indicate stronger vertical velocity profile behaviors under higher convective available potential energy and lower low-level moisture conditions. Sharp contrasts in convective area fraction and mass flux profiles are most pronounced when retrievals are segregated according to Amazonian wet and dry season conditions. Lastly, during this deployment, wet season regimes favored higher domain mass flux profiles, attributed to more frequent convection that offsets weaker average convective cell vertical velocities.

  5. Convective cloud vertical velocity and mass-flux characteristics from radar wind profiler observations during GoAmazon2014/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giangrande, Scott E.; Toto, Tami; Jensen, Michael P.; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Feng, Zhe; Protat, Alain; Williams, Christopher R.; Schumacher, Courtney; Machado, Luiz

    2016-11-01

    A radar wind profiler data set collected during the 2 year Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) campaign is used to estimate convective cloud vertical velocity, area fraction, and mass flux profiles. Vertical velocity observations are presented using cumulative frequency histograms and weighted mean profiles to provide insights in a manner suitable for global climate model scale comparisons (spatial domains from 20 km to 60 km). Convective profile sensitivity to changes in environmental conditions and seasonal regime controls is also considered. Aggregate and ensemble average vertical velocity, convective area fraction, and mass flux profiles, as well as magnitudes and relative profile behaviors, are found consistent with previous studies. Updrafts and downdrafts increase in magnitude with height to midlevels (6 to 10 km), with updraft area also increasing with height. Updraft mass flux profiles similarly increase with height, showing a peak in magnitude near 8 km. Downdrafts are observed to be most frequent below the freezing level, with downdraft area monotonically decreasing with height. Updraft and downdraft profile behaviors are further stratified according to environmental controls. These results indicate stronger vertical velocity profile behaviors under higher convective available potential energy and lower low-level moisture conditions. Sharp contrasts in convective area fraction and mass flux profiles are most pronounced when retrievals are segregated according to Amazonian wet and dry season conditions. During this deployment, wet season regimes favored higher domain mass flux profiles, attributed to more frequent convection that offsets weaker average convective cell vertical velocities.

  6. Convective cloud vertical velocity and mass-flux characteristics from radar wind profiler observations during GoAmazon2014/5: VERTICAL VELOCITY GOAMAZON2014/5

    SciTech Connect

    Giangrande, Scott E.; Toto, Tami; Jensen, Michael P.; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Feng, Zhe; Protat, Alain; Williams, Christopher R.; Machado, Luiz

    2016-11-15

    A radar wind profiler data set collected during the 2 year Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) campaign is used to estimate convective cloud vertical velocity, area fraction, and mass flux profiles. Vertical velocity observations are presented using cumulative frequency histograms and weighted mean profiles to provide insights in a manner suitable for global climate model scale comparisons (spatial domains from 20 km to 60 km). Convective profile sensitivity to changes in environmental conditions and seasonal regime controls is also considered. Aggregate and ensemble average vertical velocity, convective area fraction, and mass flux profiles, as well as magnitudes and relative profile behaviors, are found consistent with previous studies. Updrafts and downdrafts increase in magnitude with height to midlevels (6 to 10 km), with updraft area also increasing with height. Updraft mass flux profiles similarly increase with height, showing a peak in magnitude near 8 km. Downdrafts are observed to be most frequent below the freezing level, with downdraft area monotonically decreasing with height. Updraft and downdraft profile behaviors are further stratified according to environmental controls. These results indicate stronger vertical velocity profile behaviors under higher convective available potential energy and lower low-level moisture conditions. Sharp contrasts in convective area fraction and mass flux profiles are most pronounced when retrievals are segregated according to Amazonian wet and dry season conditions. During this deployment, wet season regimes favored higher domain mass flux profiles, attributed to more frequent convection that offsets weaker average convective cell vertical velocities.

  7. Manifestations of personality in Online Social Networks: self-reported Facebook-related behaviors and observable profile information.

    PubMed

    Gosling, Samuel D; Augustine, Adam A; Vazire, Simine; Holtzman, Nicholas; Gaddis, Sam

    2011-09-01

    Despite the enormous popularity of Online Social Networking sites (OSNs; e.g., Facebook and Myspace), little research in psychology has been done on them. Two studies examining how personality is reflected in OSNs revealed several connections between the Big Five personality traits and self-reported Facebook-related behaviors and observable profile information. For example, extraversion predicted not only frequency of Facebook usage (Study 1), but also engagement in the site, with extraverts (vs. introverts) showing traces of higher levels of Facebook activity (Study 2). As in offline contexts, extraverts seek out virtual social engagement, which leaves behind a behavioral residue in the form of friends lists and picture postings. Results suggest that, rather than escaping from or compensating for their offline personality, OSN users appear to extend their offline personalities into the domains of OSNs.

  8. Seasonal variations in Titan's stratosphere observed with Cassini/CIRS: temperature, trace molecular gas and aerosol mixing ratio profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, S.; Bézard, B.; Lebonnois, S.; Teanby, N. A.; Rannou, P.; Anderson, C. M.; Achterberg, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    Titan's northern spring equinox occurred in August 2009. General Circulation Models predict strong modifications of the global circulation in this period, with formation of two circulation cells instead of the pole-to-pole cell that occurred during northern winter. This winter single cell, which had its descending branch at the north pole, was at the origin of the enrichment of molecular abundances and high stratopause temperatures observed by Cassini/CIRS at high northern latitudes. The predicted dynamical seasonal variations after the equinox have strong impact on the spatial distributions of trace gas, temperature and aerosol abundances. We will present here an analysis of CIRS limb-geometry datasets acquired between 2009 and 2013 that we used to monitor the seasonal evolution of the vertical profiles of temperature, molecular (C2H2, C2H6, HCN, ...) and aerosol abundances.

  9. Non-standard Fickian self-diffusion of isotopically pure boron observed by neutron reflectometry and depth profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.M.; Wu, K.; Smith, G.S.; Hubbard, K.M.; Nastasi, M.; Downing, R.G.; Lamaze, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    Neutron reflectometry (NR) studies of thin films of amorphous {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B on silicon indicate that a non-standard form of Fickian diffusion occurs across the boron interface upon annealing. In order to verify this observation, the samples were examined by neutron depth profiling (NDP). Comparison of the results from models of a step function, standard Fickian diffusion and Fickian diffusion with a fixed composition at the interface were made and compared to the previous NR results. The diffusion constant resulting from the non-standard Fickian model for the NDP data differs slightly from that obtained from the commonly used Fickian diffusion model and is not inconsistent with the NR results. This finding suggests that more information regarding diffusion at interfaces can be gained from these higher resolution neutron scattering techniques.

  10. Manifestations of Personality in Online Social Networks: Self-Reported Facebook-Related Behaviors and Observable Profile Information

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Adam A; Vazire, Simine; Holtzman, Nicholas; Gaddis, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Despite the enormous popularity of Online Social Networking sites (OSNs; e.g., Facebook and Myspace), little research in psychology has been done on them. Two studies examining how personality is reflected in OSNs revealed several connections between the Big Five personality traits and self-reported Facebook-related behaviors and observable profile information. For example, extraversion predicted not only frequency of Facebook usage (Study 1), but also engagement in the site, with extraverts (vs. introverts) showing traces of higher levels of Facebook activity (Study 2). As in offline contexts, extraverts seek out virtual social engagement, which leaves behind a behavioral residue in the form of friends lists and picture postings. Results suggest that, rather than escaping from or compensating for their offline personality, OSN users appear to extend their offline personalities into the domains of OSNs. PMID:21254929

  11. Vertical and Spatial Profiling of Arctic Black Carbon on the North Slope of Alaska 2015: Comparison of Model and Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J., III; Feng, Y.; Biraud, S.; Springston, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    One of the major issues confronting aerosol climate simulations of the Arctic and Antarctic Cryospheres is the lack of detailed data on the vertical and spatial distribution of aerosols with which to test these models. This is due, in part, to the inherent difficulty of conducting such measurements in extreme environments. One class of under measured radiative forcing agents in the Polar Region is the absorbing aerosol - black carbon and brown carbon. In particular, vertical profile information of BC is critical in reducing uncertainty in model assessment of aerosol radiative impact at high latitudes. During the summer of 2015, a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) was deployed aboard the Department of Energy (DOE) Gultstream-1 (G-1) aircraft to measure refractory BC (rBC) concentrations as part of the DOE-sponsored ACME-V (ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements) campaign. This campaign was conducted from June through to mid-September along the North Slope of Alaska and was punctuated by vertical profiling over 5 sites (Atquasuk, Barrow, Ivotuk, Oliktok, and Toolik). In addition, measurement of CO, CO2 and CH4were also taken to provide information on the spatial and seasonal differences in GHG sources and how these sources correlate with BC. Lastly, these aerosol and gas measurements provide an important dataset to assess the representativeness of ground sites at regional scales. Comparisons between observations and a global climate model (CAM5) simulations will be agumented with a discussion on the capability of the model to capture observed monthly mean profiles of BC and stratified aerosol layers. Additionally, the ability of the SP2 to partition rBC-containing particles into nascent or aged species allows an evaluation of how well the CAM5 model captures aging of long distant transported carbonaceous aerosols. Finally model sensitivity studies will be aso be presented that investigated the relative importance of the different emission sectors to the summer Arctic

  12. Comparison of stratospheric NO2 profiles above Kiruna, Sweden retrieved from ground-based zenith sky DOAS measurements, SAOZ balloon measurements and SCIAMACHY limb observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Myojeong; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Hendrick, François; Pukite, Janis; Van Roozendael, Michel; Platt, Ulrich; Raffalski, Uwe; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Stratospheric NO2 not only destroys ozone but acts as a buffer against halogen catalyzed ozone loss by converting halogen species into stable nitrates. These two roles of stratospheric NO2 depend on the altitude. Hence, the objective of this study is to investigate the vertical distribution of stratospheric NO2. We compare the NO2 profiles derived from the zenith sky DOAS with those obtained from, SAOZ balloon measurements and satellite limb observations. Vertical profiles of stratospheric NO2 are retrieved from ground-based zenith sky DOAS observations operated at Kiruna, Sweden (68.84°N, 20.41°E) since 1996. To determine the profile of stratospheric NO2 measured from ground-based zenith sky DOAS, we apply the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM) to retrieval of vertical profiles of stratospheric NO2 which has been developed by IASB-BIRA. The basic principle behind this profiling approach is the dependence of the mean scattering height on solar zenith angle (SZA). We compare the retrieved profiles to two additional datasets of stratospheric NO2 profile. The first one is derived from satellite limb observations by SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY) on EnviSAT. The second is derived from the SAOZ balloon measurements (using a UV/Visible spectrometer) performed at Kiruna in Sweden.

  13. Ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington region (2006-2011): satellite comparisons and DISCOVER-AQ observations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Anne M; Stauffer, Ryan M; Miller, Sonya K; Martins, Douglas K; Joseph, Everette; Weinheimer, Andrew J; Diskin, Glenn S

    Much progress has been made in creating satellite products for tracking the pollutants ozone and NO2 in the troposphere. Yet, in mid-latitude regions where meteorological interactions with pollutants are complex, accuracy can be difficult to achieve, largely due to persistent layering of some constituents. We characterize the layering of ozone soundings and related species measured from aircraft over two ground sites in suburban Washington, DC (Beltsville, MD, 39.05 N; 76.9 W) and Baltimore (Edgewood, MD, 39.4 N; 76.3 W) during the July 2011 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) experiment. First, we compare column-ozone amounts from the Beltsville and Edgewood sondes with data from overpassing satellites. Second, processes influencing ozone profile structure are analyzed using Laminar Identification and tracers: sonde water vapor, aircraft CO and NOy. Third, Beltsville ozone profiles and meteorological influences in July 2011 are compared to those from the summers of 2006-2010. Sonde-satellite offsets in total ozone during July 2011 at Edgewood and Beltsville, compared to the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), were 3 % mean absolute error, not statistically significant. The disagreement between an OMI/Microwave Limb Sounder-based tropospheric ozone column and the sonde averaged 10 % at both sites, with the sonde usually greater than the satellite. Laminar Identification (LID), that distinguishes ozone segments influenced by convective and advective transport, reveals that on days when both stations launched ozonesondes, vertical mixing was stronger at Edgewood. Approximately half the lower free troposphere sonde profiles have very dry laminae, with coincident aircraft spirals displaying low CO (80-110 ppbv), suggesting stratospheric influence. Ozone budgets at Beltsville in July 2011, determined with LID, as well as standard meteorological indicators, resemble those

  14. Middle and upper atmosphere pressure-temperature profiles and the abundances of CO2 and CO in the upper atmosphere from ATMOS/Spacelab 3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Zander, R.; Lopez-Puertas, M.

    1992-01-01

    An improved method for retrieving pressure-temperature profiles is described and is used to retrieve profiles of the kinetic-temperature and atmospheric-pressure profiles between 20 and 116 km altitudes and the CO2 and CO volume-mixing ratios between 70 and 116 km, using the IR occultation spectra recorded by the Spacelab 3 atmospheric trace molecular spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer between April 29 and May 6, 1985. Profiles are derived for six ATMOS occultations. The CO2 and CO volume-mixing profiles are compared with previous observations and model predictions. Evidence is found for vibrational non-LTE by analyzing the lines of the (nu-2 + nu-3 - nu-2) (C-12)(O-16) band. Results are used for deriving (C-12)(O-16) (010) vibrational temperatures, which are compared with the retrieved kinetic temperatures and the predictions of non-LTE effects by recent models.

  15. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfrich, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Helfrich addresses two perspectives from which to think about observation in the classroom: that of the teacher observing her classroom, her group, and its needs, and that of the outside observer coming into the classroom. Offering advice from her own experience, she encourages and defends both. Do not be afraid of the disruption of outside…

  16. Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joosten, Albert Max

    2016-01-01

    Joosten begins his article by telling us that love and knowledge together are the foundation for our work with children. This combination is at the heart of our observation. With this as the foundation, he goes on to offer practical advice to aid our practice of observation. He offers a "List of Objects of Observation" to help guide our…

  17. Integrating Wind Profiling Radars and Radiosonde Observations with Model Point Data to Develop a Decision Support Tool to Assess Upper-Level Winds for Space Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III; Flinn, Clay

    2013-01-01

    On the day of launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds for their launch customers. During launch operations, the payload/launch team sometimes asks the LWOs if they expect the upper-level winds to change during the countdown. The LWOs used numerical weather prediction model point forecasts to provide the information, but did not have the capability to quickly retrieve or adequately display the upper-level observations and compare them directly in the same display to the model point forecasts to help them determine which model performed the best. The LWOs requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a graphical user interface (GUI) that will plot upper-level wind speed and direction observations from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Automated Meteorological Profiling System (AMPS) rawinsondes with point forecast wind profiles from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) North American Mesoscale (NAM), Rapid Refresh (RAP) and Global Forecast System (GFS) models to assess the performance of these models. The AMU suggested adding observations from the NASA 50 MHz wind profiler and one of the US Air Force 915 MHz wind profilers, both located near the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility, to supplement the AMPS observations with more frequent upper-level profiles. Figure 1 shows a map of KSC/CCAFS with the locations of the observation sites and the model point forecasts.

  18. Non-invasive observation of the shallow soil profile stratification and its effect on soil water regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeřábek, Jakub; Zumr, David

    2016-04-01

    Arable soils are exhibited to many stresses resulting in changes of the soil structure and properties at various scales. The most affected layer is the topsoil, which is periodically disrupted and consolidated due to tillage, rapid crop growth and changing weather conditions. The compacted layer often forms below the topsoil as a result of the pressure induced by the agriculture machinery and because of the finest particles caught on the divide between the tilled soil and untreated subsoil. The compacted layer is rather homogeneous, but there are features of different sizes, such as wheel tracks, till drainage shafts, local depressions, wormholes or cracks which redirect the water flow pathways or allow water to percolate into deeper horizon. The data acquisition targeting the spatial evaluation of the soil structure is, however, complicated. In this study, we utilize electrical resistance tomography in combination with penetration resistance tests and compare the results with complementary measured soil characteristics. Soil profile samples were taken to gain more complex information of soil physical characteristics possibly influencing the soil resistivity. We tried to relate the observed features to previous management activities at the field. Results showed, that the proposed technique can be used to compacted layer identification, but the information about its macroscopic heterogeneities is only in qualitative manner. The research was performed within the framework of a postdoctoral project granted by Czech Science Foundation No. 13-20388P and internal CTU project.

  19. Detailed Comparison of Observed Dose-Time Profile of October 19-20, 1989 SPE on Mir with Model Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Atwell, William

    1999-01-01

    The dose rate dynamics of the October 19-20,1989 solar energetic particle (SPE) event as observed by the Liulin instrument onboard the Mir orbital station was analyzed in light of new calculations of the geomagnetic cutoff and improved estimates of the less than 100 MeV energy spectra from the GOES satellite instrument. The new calculations were performed using the as-flown Mir orbital trajectory and includes time variations of the cutoff rigidity due to changes in the kappa (sub p) index. Although the agreement of total event integrated calculated dose to the measured dose is good, it results from some measured dose-time profile been higher and some lower than model calculations. They point to the need to include the diurnal variation of the geomagnetic cutoff and modifications of the cutoffs to variations in kappa (sub p) in model calculations. Understanding of such events in light of the upcoming construction of the International Space Station during the period of maximum solar activity needs to be vigorously pursued.

  20. Seasonal Variations in Titan's Stratosphere Observed with Cassini/CIRS: Temperature, Trace Molecular Gas and Aerosol Mixing Ratio Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinatier, S.; Bezard, B.; Anderson, C. M.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N.

    2012-01-01

    Titan's northern spring equinox occurred in August 2009. General Circulation Models (e.g. Lebonnois et al., 2012) predict strong modifications of the global circulation in this period, with formation of two circulation cells instead of the pole-to-pole cell that occurred during northern winter. This winter single cell, which had its descending branch at the north pole, was at the origin of the enrichment of molecular abundances and high stratopause temperatures observed by Cassini/CIRS at high northern latitudes (e.g. Achterberg et al., 2011, Coustenis et al., 2010, Teanby et al., 2008, Vinatier et al., 2010). The predicted dynamical seasonal variations after the equinox have strong impact on the spatial distributions of trace gas, temperature and aerosol abundances. We will present here an analysis of CIRS limb-geometry datasets acquired in 2010 and 2011 that we used to monitor the seasonal evolution of the vertical profiles of temperature, molecular (C2H2, C2H6, HCN, ..) and aerosol abundances.

  1. Validation of Satellite-Based Objective Overshooting Cloud-Top Detection Methods Using CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedka, Kristopher M.; Dworak, Richard; Brunner, Jason; Feltz, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Two satellite infrared-based overshooting convective cloud-top (OT) detection methods have recently been described in the literature: 1) the 11-mm infrared window channel texture (IRW texture) method, which uses IRW channel brightness temperature (BT) spatial gradients and thresholds, and 2) the water vapor minus IRW BT difference (WV-IRW BTD). While both methods show good performance in published case study examples, it is important to quantitatively validate these methods relative to overshooting top events across the globe. Unfortunately, no overshooting top database currently exists that could be used in such study. This study examines National Aeronautics and Space Administration CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar data to develop an OT detection validation database that is used to evaluate the IRW-texture and WV-IRW BTD OT detection methods. CloudSat data were manually examined over a 1.5-yr period to identify cases in which the cloud top penetrates above the tropopause height defined by a numerical weather prediction model and the surrounding cirrus anvil cloud top, producing 111 confirmed overshooting top events. When applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R Series (GOES-R) Advanced Baseline Imager proxy data, the IRW-texture (WV-IRW BTD) method offered a 76% (96%) probability of OT detection (POD) and 16% (81%) false-alarm ratio. Case study examples show that WV-IRW BTD.0 K identifies much of the deep convective cloud top, while the IRW-texture method focuses only on regions with a spatial scale near that of commonly observed OTs. The POD decreases by 20% when IRW-texture is applied to current geostationary imager data, highlighting the importance of imager spatial resolution for observing and detecting OT regions.

  2. Tropical-Extratropical Exchange Based on Argo Profiles and Ship-Based Observations Near the Western Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, D.; Li, B.; Yang, L.

    2014-12-01

    The tropical-extratropical exchange in the northwestern Pacific Ocean is studied using the absolute geostrophic currents based on Argo Profiles and the observations of the western boundary currents (WBCs) during two cruises in the winters of 2010 and 2012. The absolute geostrophic currents are calculated using the P-vector method for the period of 2004 through 2011. The transport of the geostrophic currents is compared with the Sverdrup theory and found to differ significantly in several locations. Analyses have shown that errors of wind stress estimation cannot account for all of the differences. The largest differences are found in the area, where nonlinear activities are vigorous. It is, therefore, suggested that the linear dynamics of the Sverdrup theory is deficient in explaining the geostrophic transport of the tropical northwestern Pacific Ocean. Previous studies suggest recharge and discharge of the tropical Pacific Ocean heat content through the interior circulation of the North Pacific Ocean, based on the Sverdrup theory, and that the WBCs play the role opposite to the interior ocean recharge and discharge anomalies. Using ocean observations from two cruises in a La Niña winter and a normal winter, it is suggested that the Kuroshio transport decreases significantly and the Mindanao Current transport increases significantly at the peak of 2010 La Niña, opposite to the prediction of existing theory. The anomalies of the western boundary current transport are found much larger than those of the meridional circulation in the entire interior of the North Pacific Ocean, the dynamics of which are suggested to be associated with the Kelvin wave propagation around the Philippine islands. The results suggest that the WBCs dominate the interannual recharge and discharge of the western Pacific warm pool during the 2010 La Niña.

  3. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  4. Ultraviolet observations of cool stars. VI - L alpha and Mg II emission line profiles /and a search for flux variability/ in Arcturus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclintock, W.; Moos, H. W.; Henry, R. C.; Linsky, J. L.; Barker, E. S.

    1978-01-01

    High-precision, high-resolution profiles of the L alpha and Mg II k chromospheric emission lines from Arcturus (alpha Boo) obtained with the Princeton Experimental Package aboard the Copernicus satellite are presented. Asymmetries seen in the profiles of these lines are probably intrinsic to the star, rather than the result of interstellar absorption. In contrast to previous observations of the Ca II K emission line, no evidence is found during a three-year period for variability in the profiles or in the total fluxes from these lines on time scales ranging from hours to months. Also presented is a flux profile of the O I 1302 line and flux upper limits for L beta, O VI 1032, Si III 1206, and O V 1218.

  5. Vertical profiling using a complementary kite and tethered balloon platform at Ferryland Downs, Newfoundland, Canada: Observation of a dry, ozone-rich plume in the free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, K. G.; Jensen, M. L.; Balsley, B. B.; Bognar, J. A.; Oltmans, S. J.; Smith, T. W.; Birks, J. W.

    1998-06-01

    Vertical profiles of ozone mixing ratio, water vapor mixing ratio, and temperature obtained during August 3-13, 1995, at Ferryland Downs, Newfoundland, Canada, as part of the North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE) demonstrate the use of high-altitude tethered balloons and kites as measurement platforms. In combination with a novel, fast winching system, previously developed for use with kites, tethered balloons were used for profiling chemical species and meteorological parameters to altitudes as high as 7.6 km. Tethered balloon profiling complements profiling with kite systems by expanding the range of wind conditions over which data can be obtained. A total of 65 profiles were collected using these platforms. Elevated ozone mixing ratios highly anticorrelated with water vapor mixing ratios observed during August 4-7 suggest an upper atmospheric source for ozone-rich air during summertime in the Maritime Provinces of Canada. Ozone mixing ratios reaching 100 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) in this air mass were associated with water vapor mixing ratios as low as 0.1 g kg-1. Profiles collected during August 11-13 demonstrate the use of kite and balloon systems to obtain vertical profiles over a wide range of wind conditions. Ozone mixing ratios of 65 ppbv were observed at 1 km altitude on August 12, while profiles collected on August 13 exhibit no evidence of elevated ozone. These results document the rapid transport of an air mass containing elevated ozone levels over the sampling site that would not have been possible with either system alone.

  6. First Global Observations of HCHO from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Joiner, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dunlap, L.

    2014-12-01

    Global retrievals of formaldehyde (HCHO) from satellite UV instruments such as the Aura/Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and MetOp/Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) have provided important constraints on the emissions of biogenic isoprene. Here we present the first results of HCHO retrievals from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS). We apply an innovative principal component analysis (PCA) retrieval algorithm to extract a set of principal components (PCs) from OMPS-measured radiances between 325.0 and 356.5 nm over presumably clean oceanic regions. Since the background loading of HCHO due to methane oxidation is very small over these areas, the leading PCs (that explain the most variation in radiances) represent spectral features associated with various physical processes (e.g., ozone absorption, rotational Raman scattering) and measurement details (e.g., wavelength shift) other than those related to HCHO absorption. The vertical column density of HCHO is then derived by fitting the PCs and HCHO Jacobians calculated with a radiative transfer model to OMPS-measured radiance spectra. Our retrievals highlight the diverse nature of HCHO sources. Summertime maxima in HCHO detected over the eastern U.S. are likely due to biogenic emissions, while seasonal hot spots observed over West and Central Africa and Russia are mainly attributed to biomass burning emissions. Efforts have also been made to distinguish between anthropogenic and biogenic precursors of HCHO. Finally, the OMPS PCA HCHO retrievals are compared to OMI HCHO data produced with different Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithms, in an effort to understand and reconcile the differences between various satellite HCHO datasets.

  7. Inferring ice formation processes from global-scale black carbon profiles observed in the remote atmosphere and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, S.-M.; Schwarz, J. P.; Liu, J.; Fahey, D. W.; Ginoux, P.; Horowitz, L. W.; Levy, H., II; Ming, Y.; Spackman, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol absorbs solar radiation and can act as cloud condensation nucleus and ice formation nucleus. The current generation of climate models have difficulty in accurately predicting global-scale BC concentrations. Previously, an ensemble of such models was compared to measurements, revealing model biases in the tropical troposphere and in the polar troposphere. Here global aerosol distributions are simulated using different parameterizations of wet removal, and model results are compared to BC profiles observed in the remote atmosphere to explore the possible sources of these biases. The model-data comparison suggests a slow removal of BC aerosol during transport to the Arctic in winter and spring, because ice crystal growth causes evaporation of liquid cloud via the Bergeron process and, hence, release of BC aerosol back to ambient air. By contrast, more efficient model wet removal is needed in the cold upper troposphere over the tropical Pacific. Parcel model simulations with detailed droplet and ice nucleation and growth processes suggest that ice formation in this region may be suppressed due to a lack of ice nuclei (mainly insoluble dust particles) in the remote atmosphere, allowing liquid and mixed-phase clouds to persist under freezing temperatures, and forming liquid precipitation capable of removing aerosol incorporated in cloud water. Falling ice crystals can scavenge droplets in lower clouds, which also results in efficient removal of cloud condensation nuclei. The combination of models with global-scale BC measurements in this study has provided new, latitude-dependent information on ice formation processes in the atmosphere, and highlights the importance of a consistent treatment of aerosol and moist physics in climate models.

  8. Temperature profiling of the atmospheric boundary layer with rotational Raman lidar during the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammann, E.; Behrendt, A.; Le Mounier, F.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2015-03-01

    The temperature measurements of the rotational Raman lidar of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH RRL) during the High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observation Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in April and May 2013 are discussed. The lidar consists of a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm with 10 W average power at 50 Hz, a two-mirror scanner, a 40 cm receiving telescope, and a highly efficient polychromator with cascading interference filters for separating four signals: the elastic backscatter signal, two rotational Raman signals with different temperature dependence, and the vibrational Raman signal of water vapor. The main measurement variable of the UHOH RRL is temperature. For the HOPE campaign, the lidar receiver was optimized for high and low background levels, with a novel switch for the passband of the second rotational Raman channel. The instrument delivers atmospheric profiles of water vapor mixing ratio as well as particle backscatter coefficient and particle extinction coefficient as further products. As examples for the measurement performance, measurements of the temperature gradient and water vapor mixing ratio revealing the development of the atmospheric boundary layer within 25 h are presented. As expected from simulations, a reduction of the measurement uncertainty of 70% during nighttime was achieved with the new low-background setting. A two-mirror scanner allows for measurements in different directions. When pointing the scanner to low elevation, measurements close to the ground become possible which are otherwise impossible due to the non-total overlap of laser beam and receiving telescope field of view in the near range. An example of a low-level temperature measurement is presented which resolves the temperature gradient at the top of the stable nighttime boundary layer 100 m above the ground.

  9. Galaxy Cluster Pressure Profiles as Determined by Sunyaev Zel’dovich Effect Observations with MUSTANG and Bolocam. II. Joint Analysis of 14 Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Charles E.; Mason, Brian S.; Sayers, Jack; Mroczkowski, Tony; Sarazin, Craig; Donahue, Megan; Baldi, Alessandro; Clarke, Tracy E.; Young, Alexander H.; Sievers, Jonathan; Dicker, Simon R.; Reese, Erik D.; Czakon, Nicole; Devlin, Mark; Korngut, Phillip M.; Golwala, Sunil

    2017-04-01

    We present pressure profiles of galaxy clusters determined from high-resolution Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (SZ) effect observations of 14 clusters, which span the redshift range of 0.25< z< 0.89. The procedure simultaneously fits spherical cluster models to MUSTANG and Bolocam data. In this analysis, we adopt the generalized NFW parameterization of pressure profiles to produce our models. Our constraints on ensemble-average pressure profile parameters, in this study γ, C 500, and P 0, are consistent with those in previous studies, but for individual clusters we find discrepancies with the X-ray derived pressure profiles from the ACCEPT2 database. We investigate potential sources of these discrepancies, especially cluster geometry, electron temperature of the intracluster medium, and substructure. We find that the ensemble mean profile for all clusters in our sample is described by the parameters [γ ,{C}500,{P}0]=[{0.3}-0.1+0.1,{1.3}-0.1+0.1,{8.6}-2.4+2.4], cool core clusters are described by [γ ,{C}500,{P}0] =[{0.6}-0.1+0.1,{0.9}-0.1+0.1,{3.6}-1.5+1.5], and disturbed clusters are described by [γ ,{C}500,{P}0]=[{0.0}-0.0+0.1,{1.5}-0.2+0.1,{13.8}-1.6+1.6]. Of the 14 clusters, 4 have clear substructure in our SZ observations, while an additional 2 clusters exhibit potential substructure.

  10. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration from satellite observation taking into account the aerosol vertical profiles and hygroscopicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanchul; Lee, Kwon H; Kim, Ji I; Noh, Youngmin; Shin, Dong H; Shin, Sung K; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young J; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Surface-level PM10 distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of vertical profiles and hygroscopicity of aerosols over Jeju, Korea during March 2008 and October 2009. In this study, MODIS AOD data from the Terra and Aqua satellites were corrected with aerosol extinction profiles and relative humidity data. PBLH (Planetary Boundary Layer Height) was determined from MPLNET lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficient profiles. Through statistical analysis, better agreement in correlation (R = 0.82) between the hourly PM10 concentration and hourly average Sunphotometer AOD was the obtained when vertical fraction method (VFM) considering Haze Layer Height (HLH) and hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) was used. The validity of the derived relationship between satellite AOD and surface PM10 concentration clearly demonstrates that satellite AOD data can be utilized for remote sensing of spatial distribution of regional PM10 concentration.

  11. Integrating Wind Profiling Radars and Radiosonde Observations with Model Point Data to Develop a Decision Support Tool to Assess Upper-Level Winds for Space Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III; Flinn, Clay

    2013-01-01

    On the day-of-launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds for their launch customers to include NASA's Launch Services Program and NASA's Ground Systems Development and Operations Program. They currently do not have the capability to display and overlay profiles of upper-level observations and numerical weather prediction model forecasts. The LWOs requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool in the form of a graphical user interface (GUI) that will allow them to plot upper-level wind speed and direction observations from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50 MHz tropospheric wind profiling radar, KSC Shuttle Landing Facility 915 MHz boundary layer wind profiling radar and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Automated Meteorological Processing System (AMPS) radiosondes, and then overlay forecast wind profiles from the model point data including the North American Mesoscale (NAM) model, Rapid Refresh (RAP) model and Global Forecast System (GFS) model to assess the performance of these models. The AMU developed an Excel-based tool that provides an objective method for the LWOs to compare the model-forecast upper-level winds to the KSC wind profiling radars and CCAFS AMPS observations to assess the model potential to accurately forecast changes in the upperlevel profile through the launch count. The AMU wrote Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) scripts to automatically retrieve model point data for CCAFS (XMR) from the Iowa State University Archive Data Server (http://mtarchive.qeol.iastate.edu) and the 50 MHz, 915 MHz and AMPS observations from the NASA/KSC Spaceport Weather Data Archive web site (http://trmm.ksc.nasa.gov). The AMU then developed code in Excel VBA to automatically ingest and format the observations and model point data in Excel to ready the data for generating Excel charts for the LWO's. The resulting charts allow the LWOs to independently initialize the three models 0

  12. Sensitivity of Temperature Profiles Retrieved from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS/TES) Observations to the GSFC Synthetic Mars Model Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maguire, William C.; Pearl, J. C.; Smith, M. D.; Thompson, R. F.; Conrath, B. J.; Dason, S.; Kaelberer, M. S.; Christensen, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    Part of the task of interpreting IR spectral features observed by MGS/TES due to surface minerals requires distinguishing those IR signatures from atmospheric signatures of gas and dust. Surface-atmosphere separation for MGS/TES depends on knowledge of the retrieved temperature profile. In turn, the temperature retrieval Erom the observed data depends on molecular parameters including 15 micron CO2 line shape or line intensities which contribute to defining the Mars synthetic radiative transfer model. Using a simple isothermal, homogeneous single layer model of Pinnock and Shine, we find the ratio of (the error in degrees Kelvin of the retrieved temperature profile) to (the percentage error in the absorption coefficient) (deg K/percent) to be 0.4 at 200K. This ratio at 150K and 250K is 0.2 and 0.6, respectively. A more refined model, incorporating observed MGS/TES retrieved temperature profiles, the TES instrumental resolution and the most recent molecular modelling, will yield an improved knowledge of this error sensitivity. We present results of such a sensitivity study to determine the dependence of temperature profiles inverted from MGS/TES on these and other molecular parameters. This work was supported in part by NASA's Mars Data Analysis Program.

  13. Estimate of a D region ionospheric electron density profile from MF radio wave observations by the S-310-37 rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashihara, Y.; Ishisaka, K.; Miyake, T.

    2016-01-01

    The S-310-37 rocket, launched at 11:20 (JST) on 16 January 2007, was equipped with a radio receiver to observe the medium-frequency (MF) radio wave propagation characteristics in the ionosphere. The radio receiver measured the intensity and the waveform of the radio wave at 873 kHz from the NHK Kumamoto broadcasting station. The polarized mode waves' intensity characteristics were obtained by analyzing the observed waveform. In this study, the S-310-37 rocket-observed polarized mode waves' propagation characteristics are analyzed in order to estimate the electron density profile in the ionospheric D region. These observations become better measurement approach because the electron density profile in the ionospheric D region is difficult to be observed by other equipment such as a Langmuir probe. A Langmuir probe can measure in the ionospheric D region; however, the absolute values may be off by the influence of wake effects around the sounding rocket. It is demonstrated that the propagation characteristics of the polarized mode waves can be successfully used to derive the electron density profile in the ionospheric D region.

  14. A study of polarized spectra of magnetic CP stars: Predicted š. observed Stokes IQUV profiles for beta CrB and 53 Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnulo, S.; Wade, G. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Landstreet, J. D.; Leone, F.; Monin, D. N.; Stift, M. J.

    2001-04-01

    We present a comparison of observed and calculated Stokes IQUV spectra of two well-known magnetic chemically peculiar stars, beta Coronae Borealis and 53 Camelopardalis. The observed Stokes spectra were recently described by Wade et al. (\\cite{wad00a}), and have been complemented with additional circularly polarized spectra obtained at the Special Astrophysical Observatory. The calculated spectra represent the predictions of new and previously published magnetic field models derived from the analysis of some surface averaged field estimates (e.g., longitudinal field, magnetic field modulus, etc.). We find that these magnetic models are not sufficient to account fully for the observed Stokes profiles - particularly remarkable is the disagreement between the predicted and observed Stokes Q and U profiles of 53 Cam. We suggest that this should be interpreted in terms of magnetic morphologies which are significantly more complex than the second-order multipolar expansions assumed in the models. However, it is clear that some of our inability to reproduce the detailed shapes of the Stokes IQUV profiles is unrelated to the magnetic models. For many metallic ions, for both stars, we found it impossible to account for the strengths and shapes of the observed spectral line profiles when we adopted a unique value for the individual ion abundance. We suggest that this results from strongly non-uniform distributions of these ions as a function of optical depth (i.e., chemical stratification), a hypothesis that is supported by comparison with simple chemically stratified models. Based on observations obtained with the 2 m Bernard Lyot telescope of the Pic-du-Midi Observatory, the 1 m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory, and the 0.9 m telescope of the Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania.

  15. Observation of diffusive and dispersive profiles of the nonequilibrium polariton-condensate dispersion relation in a CuBr microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Masaaki; Ueda, Masafumi

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the dispersion relation of polariton condensates in a CuBr microcavity with the use of angle-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy at 77 K. The polariton condensation was clearly confirmed by the thresholdlike changes in the PL intensity, energy, and bandwidth of the lower polariton at a zero in-plane wave-vector k∥= 0 as a function of excitation power density. A blueshifted flat dispersion of the PL energy suddenly appeared at the condensation threshold in a small k∥ region accompanied by the dispersion of the noncondensate PL as a background. With increasing excitation power density from the threshold, the intensity of the noncondensate PL became negligible. As a result, we found a dispersive profile of the dispersion relation of the condensate in a large k∥ region in addition to the flat dispersion corresponding to the diffusive profile. The total dispersion relation of the condensate was explained quantitatively by a theoretical model for nonequilibrium condensation.

  16. Observed L-alpha profiles for two solar flares - 14:12 UT 15 June, 1973 and 23:16 UT 21 January, 1974

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, R. C.; van Hoosier, M. E.

    1980-09-01

    Photographic observations of the time development of the profile of the L-alpha line of hydrogen during flares were obtained with the NRL spectrograph on ATM. The profiles for the June 15, 1973 and Jan. 21, 1974 flares cover both core and wings of the line. The time sequences begin before flare maximum, and continue well into the decay phase. Careful attention has been given to photometry and absolute calibration. In the case of the June 15 flare, data are presented both first-order corrected and uncorrected for incomplete filling of the spectrograph slit by flaring material. Correction of the January 21 flare was not possible. Core symmetry and shift are discussed, and it is shown that the observations imply integrated flare L-alpha/H-alpha intensity ratios within a factor of two of unity for these two flares.

  17. The Effect of Wind-Turbine Wakes on Summertime US Midwest Atmospheric Wind Profiles as Observed with Ground-Based Doppler Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Michael E.; Lundquist, Julie K.

    2013-07-01

    We examine the influence of a modern multi-megawatt wind turbine on wind and turbulence profiles three rotor diameters (D) downwind of the turbine. Light detection and ranging (lidar) wind-profile observations were collected during summer 2011 in an operating wind farm in central Iowa at 20-m vertical intervals from 40 to 220 m above the surface. After a calibration period during which two lidars were operated next to each other, one lidar was located approximately 2D directly south of a wind turbine; the other lidar was moved approximately 3D north of the same wind turbine. Data from the two lidars during southerly flow conditions enabled the simultaneous capture of inflow and wake conditions. The inflow wind and turbulence profiles exhibit strong variability with atmospheric stability: daytime profiles are well-mixed with little shear and strong turbulence, while nighttime profiles exhibit minimal turbulence and considerable shear across the rotor disk region and above. Consistent with the observations available from other studies and with wind-tunnel and large-eddy simulation studies, measurable reductions in wake wind-speeds occur at heights spanning the wind turbine rotor (43-117 m), and turbulent quantities increase in the wake. In generalizing these results as a function of inflow wind speed, we find the wind-speed deficit in the wake is largest at hub height or just above, and the maximum deficit occurs when wind speeds are below the rated speed for the turbine. Similarly, the maximum enhancement of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity occurs at hub height, although observations at the top of the rotor disk do not allow assessment of turbulence in that region. The wind shear below turbine hub height (quantified here with the power-law coefficient) is found to be a useful parameter to identify whether a downwind lidar observes turbine wake or free-flow conditions. These field observations provide data for validating turbine-wake models and wind

  18. Observing Magnetic and Current Profiles of the Night side and Terminator of Mars through the Mars Global Surveyor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, N.; Fillingim, M. O.; Fogle, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    Mars has no global magnetic field. Changes in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field can impact the upper atmosphere and induce currents in the ionosphere of Mars. During aerobraking maneuvers, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) made over 1000 passes through Mars's ionosphere. During these passes, MGS measured the local magnetic field. From these measurements, we can determine the ionospheric currents. We restrict our analysis to passes where the radial component of the magnetic field is nearly zero. This restriction, along with some assumptions about the gradients in the magnetic field, allows us to estimate the horizontal ionospheric currents. Additionally, we focus on the magnetic field data acquired over regions above negligible crustal magnetic fields in order to simplify the analysis. At a maximum altitude of 250 km, the Mars map was segmented to 30 by 30 degrees east longitude and latitude for analysis. We find that on the night side, where the solar zenith angle (SZA) lies between 130 to 180 degrees, only 4% of the data (out of a total of 52 profiles) is usable for computing currents, that is the radial component of the magnetic field is nearly zero. We also find that near the terminator, where the SZA lies between 50 to 130 degrees, an average of 2% of the magnetic field profiles (out of 1905) are usable to compute currents. This implies that currents are rarely horizontal (as required by our assumptions) in these regions. The currents computed from these profiles can give us insights into how the changing solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field can affect the upper atmosphere of Mars. For example, induced currents can lead to Joule heating of the atmosphere potentially modifying the neutral dynamics.

  19. Retrieving Temperature and Moisture Profiles from AERI Radiance Observations: AERIPROF Value-Added Product Technical Description Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    WF Feltz; HB Howell; RO Knuteson; JM Comstock; R Mahon; DD Turner; WL Smith; HM Woolf; C Sivaraman; TD Halter

    2007-04-30

    This document explains the procedure to retrieve temperature and moisture profiles from high-spectral resolution infrared radiance data measured by the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation (ARM) Program’s atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) instrument. The technique has been named the AERIPROF thermodynamic retrieval algorithm. The software has been developed over the last decade at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has matured into an ARM Value-Added Procedure. This document will describe the AERIPROF retrieval procedure, outline the algorithm routines, discuss the software heritage, and, finally, provide references with further documentation.

  20. Seasonal variability of aerosol vertical profiles over east US and west Europe: GEOS-Chem/APM simulation and comparison with CALIPSO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Yu, Fangqun

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we employed 5 years (2007-2011) of the CALIPSO level-3 monthly aerosol extinction product to compare with the GEOS-Chem/APM simulations for the same time period over two major industrial regions (east US and west Europe). The objective is to understand which aerosol types or species significantly determine the vertical profiles by comparing the seasonal variability between the simulations and observations. Our study shows that the model successfully produces the magnitude of aerosol extinction, profile shape, and their seasonal variability observed by CALIPSO over both east US (EUS) and west Europe (WEU). The extinctions below 1 km make up 44-79% to the total, from either the model simulations or satellite retrievals, with larger percentages in winter seasons (62-79%) and smaller percentages in summer seasons (44-57%) associated with the strength of vertical transport. The shape of the vertical profiles has, therefore, a distinct seasonal variability, with a more like quasi-exponential shape in DJF (December, January, and February) and SON (September, October, and November) than in MAM (March, April, and May) and JJA (June, July, and August), which have been discerned from both measurements and simulations. Analysis of modeled aerosol species indicates that secondary particles (SP), containing sulfate, ammonia, nitrate, and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs), predominantly determine the total aerosol vertical profiles while black carbon (BC), primary organic carbon (OC), and sea salt (SS), only account for a small fraction and are also limited near the surface. Mineral dust (DS) contributes more to the total extinction over WEU than over EUS, particularly in MAM, a result of being adjacent to the North Africa desert. Secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA, i.e. sulfate, ammonia, and nitrate) contributes most of the total SP mass in DJF and SON while SOA is particularly important in MAM and JJA when the emissions from leafed plants are active. Our study also

  1. Observations of the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray brightness profiles of Fe, Ni, and Ge in magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    May, M J; Finkenthal, M; Moos, H W; Fournier, K B; Goldstein, W H; Mattioli, M; Pacella, D; Mazzitelli, G; Leigheb, M; Gabellieri, L

    2001-09-01

    The spatial brightness profiles of emission lines for the K-like through He-like ionization states of Fe, Ge, and Ni have been measured during a set of experiments in which Fe and Ge were introduced into FTU tokamak plasmas by using the laser blowoff technique. Nickel was an intrinsic impurity observed during these experiments that was sputtered from the inconel limiter. The brightness profiles were measured by spatially scanable, photometrically calibrated vaccum ultraviolet and x-ray spectrometers that covered the 1 to 1700 A region. Simulations of these profiles and the time evolution of the laser blowoffs were performed with the MIST transport code using several sets of atomic physics compilations [ADPAK (originally in MIST), Arnaud and Raymond (AR92), Arnaud and Rothenflug (AR85), Mazzotta et al., and Mattioli (an extension to Mazzotta)]. The goal was to determine which set of available rates could best simulate the measured spatial brightness profiles and the charge state balance in the plasma. The Mazzotta et al. (for Fe and Ni), the Mattioli (for Ge), and the AR92 (for Fe only) rates adequately simulated the He-, Li-, Be-, Na-, Mg-like ionization states. The F- to B-like charge states could not be simulated by these compilations unless the relevant dielectronic rates were multiplied by a factor of 2. The ADPAK rates could not adequately predict any of the charge states of Fe, Ge, or Ni.

  2. Observation of vertcal CO2 concentration profiles in the lower-atmosphere using a compact direct detection 1.6 μm DIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, C.; Shibata, Y.; Abo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of present carbon sources and sinks including their spatial profile and their variation in time is one of the essential informations for predicting future CO2 atmospheric concentration levels. Moewover, for the detailed analysis of forest carbon dynamics and CO2 fluxes of urban area, the CO2 concentration measurement techniques with high spatial and temporal resolution are required in the lower atmosphere. A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is expected to measure atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer from a ground platform. We have succeeded to develop a compact direct detection 1.6 μm DIAL system for measuring CO2 concentration profiles in the lower atmosphere. This DIAL system consists of the optical parametric generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd:YAG laser with high repetition rate and the receiving optics that included the near-infrared photomultiplier tube operating at the analog mode and the 25 cm telescope. We have succeeded in observing the daytime temporal change of vertical CO2 concentration profiles for the range from 0.25 to 2.5 km with integration time of 30 minutes and range resolution of 300 m. This compact direct detection CO2 DIAL is usefull for the estimation of CO2 flux. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  3. Vertical air motions over the Tropical Western Pacific for validating cloud resolving and regional models

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christopher R.

    2015-03-16

    The objective of this project was to estimate the vertical air motion using Doppler velocity spectra from two side-by-side vertically pointing radars. The retrieval technique was applied to two different sets of radars. This first set was 50- and 920-MHz vertically pointing radars near Darwin, Australia. The second set was 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz vertically pointing radars deployed at SGP for MC3E. The retrieval technique uses the longer wavelength radar (50 or 449 MHz) to observe both the vertical air motion and precipitation motion while the shorter wavelength radar (920 MHz or 2.8 GHz) observes just the precipitation motion. By analyzing their Doppler velocity spectra, the precipitation signal in the 920 MHz or 2.8 GHz radar is used to mask-out the precipitation signal in the 50 or 449 MHz radar spectra, leaving just the vertical air motion signal.

  4. In situ vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, mass, and composition over the southeast United States during SENEX and SEAC4RS: observations of a modest aerosol enhancement aloft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, N. L.; Brock, C. A.; Angevine, W. M.; Beyersdorf, A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; de Gouw, J. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Graus, M. G.; Huey, G.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D. A.; Liao, J.; Liu, X.; Markovic, M. Z.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Mikoviny, T.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2015-02-01

    Vertical profiles of submicron aerosol over the southeastern United States (SEUS) during the summertime from in situ aircraft-based measurements were used to construct aggregate profiles of chemical, microphysical, and optical properties. Shallow cumulus convection was observed during many profiles. These conditions enhance vertical transport of trace gases and aerosol and create a cloudy transition layer on top of the sub-cloud mixed layer. The trace gas and aerosol concentrations in the transition layer were modeled as a mixture with contributions from the mixed layer below and the free troposphere above. The amount of vertical mixing, or entrainment of air from the free troposphere, was quantified using the observed mixing ratio of carbon monoxide (CO). Although the median aerosol mass, extinction, and volume decreased with altitude in the transition layer, they were ~10% larger than expected from vertical mixing alone. This enhancement was likely due to secondary aerosol formation in the transition layer. Although the transition layer enhancements of the particulate sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) were both similar in magnitude, only the enhancement of sulfate was statistically significant. The column integrated extinction, or aerosol optical depth (AOD), was calculated for each individual profile, and the transition layer enhancement of extinction typically contributed less than 10% to the total AOD. Our measurements and analysis were motivated by two recent studies that have hypothesized an enhanced layer of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) aloft to explain the summertime enhancement of AOD (2-3 times greater than winter) over the southeastern United States. In contrast to this hypothesis, the modest enhancement we observed in the transition layer was not dominated by OA and was not a large fraction of the summertime AOD.

  5. Long-term ferry-based observations of the suspended sediment fluxes through the Marsdiep inlet using acoustic Doppler current profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauw, J. J.; Merckelbach, L. M.; Ridderinkhof, H.; van Aken, H. M.

    2014-03-01

    Long-term measurements with a hull mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) under the ferry, crossing the Marsdiep inlet between the mainland and the island of Texel (the Netherlands), were used to determine the volume flux and the flux of suspended particulate matter (SPM) through this inlet for the period 2003-2005. Profiles of the SPM concentration were estimated from profiles of the acoustic backscatter intensity in which the shift between the low and the high turbulent regime is taken into account. Calibration constants and tuning parameters were estimated by using data collected during 7 different 13 hour anchor stations. The residual (water) volume flux through the inlet appears to vary strongly on a variety of time scales from daily to inter-annual. A regression analysis indicates that the daily residual volume transport correlates well with the daily mean wind component from the south; the latter likely drives the residual flow along the coast of Holland. The observed residual SPM transport of 7 to 11 Mton/yr is dominated by the correlation between tidal velocity and SPM concentration variations. This leads to an import as currents and SPM concentrations during flood were higher than those during ebb, a process generally known as tidal asymmetry. Our analysis has shown that regular observations with a ferry mounted ADCP is an effective method to monitor the volume and SPM transport processes in an estuary.

  6. Experimental observation of the influence of furnace temperature profile on convection and segregation in the vertical Bridgman crystal growth technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G. T.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Azulene-doped naphtalene was directionally solidified using the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. Doping homogeneity and convection are determined as a function of the temperature profile in the furnace and the freezing rate. Convective velocities are two orders of magnitude lower when the temperature increases with height. The cross sectional variation in azulene concentration tends to be asymmetric. Neither rotation of the ampoule nor deliberate introduction of thermal asymmetries during solidification had a significant influence on cross sectional variations in doping. It is predicted that slow directional solidification under microgravity conditions can produce greater inhomogeneities than on earth. Thus when low freezing rates are necessary in order to avoid constitutional supercooling, it may be necessary to combine microgravity and magnetic fields in order to achieve homogeneous crystals.

  7. A layer-averaged relative humidity profile retrieval for microwave observations: design and results for the Megha-Tropiques payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivira, R. G.; Brogniez, H.; Mallet, C.; Oussar, Y.

    2015-03-01

    A statistical method trained and optimized to retrieve seven-layer relative humidity (RH) profiles is presented and evaluated with measurements from radiosondes. The method makes use of the microwave payload of the Megha-Tropiques platform, namely the SAPHIR sounder and the MADRAS imager. The approach, based on a generalized additive model (GAM), embeds both the physical and statistical characteristics of the inverse problem in the training phase, and no explicit thermodynamical constraint - such as a temperature profile or an integrated water vapor content - is provided to the model at the stage of retrieval. The model is built for cloud-free conditions in order to avoid the cases of scattering of the microwave radiation in the 18.7-183.31 GHz range covered by the payload. Two instrumental configurations are tested: a SAPHIR-MADRAS scheme and a SAPHIR-only scheme to deal with the stop of data acquisition of MADRAS in January 2013 for technical reasons. A comparison to learning machine algorithms (artificial neural network and support-vector machine) shows equivalent performance over a large realistic set, promising low errors (biases < 2.2%RH) and scatters (correlations > 0.8) throughout the troposphere (150-900 hPa). A comparison to radiosonde measurements performed during the international field experiment CINDY/DYNAMO/AMIE (winter 2011-2012) confirms these results for the mid-tropospheric layers (correlations between 0.6 and 0.92), with an expected degradation of the quality of the estimates at the surface and top layers. Finally a rapid insight of the estimated large-scale RH field from Megha-Tropiques is presented and compared to ERA-Interim.

  8. The GAW Aerosol Lidar Observation Network (GALION) as a source of near-real time aerosol profile data for model evaluation and assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, R. M.; Pappalardo, G.

    2010-12-01

    In 2007, the WMO Global Atmospheric Watch’s Science Advisory Group on Aerosols described a global network of lidar networks called GAW Aerosol Lidar Observation Network (GALION). GALION has a purpose of providing expanded coverage of aerosol observations for climate and air quality use. Comprised of networks in Asia (AD-NET), Europe (EARLINET and CIS-LINET), North America (CREST and CORALNET), South America (ALINE) and with contribution from global networks such as MPLNET and NDACC, the collaboration provides a unique capability to define aerosol profiles in the vertical. GALION is designed to supplement existing ground-based and column profiling (AERONET, PHOTONS, SKYNET, GAWPFR) stations. In September 2010, GALION held its second workshop and one component of discussion focussed how the network would integrate into model needs. GALION partners have contributed to the Sand and Dust Storm Warning and Analysis System (SDS-WAS) and to assimilation in models such as DREAM. This paper will present the conclusions of those discussions and how these observations can fit into a global model analysis framework. Questions of availability, latency, and aerosol parameters that might be ingested into models will be discussed. An example of where EARLINET and GALION have contributed in near-real time observations was the suite of measurements during the Eyjafjallajokull eruption in Iceland and its impact on European air travel. Lessons learned from this experience will be discussed.

  9. Bio-optical profiling floats as new observational tools for biogeochemical and ecosystem studies: Potential synergies with ocean color remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Claustre, H.; Bishop, J.; Boss, E.; Bernard, S.; Berthon, J.-F.; Coatanoan, C.; Johnson, K.; Lotiker, A.; Ulloa, O.; Perry, M.J.; D'Ortenzio, F.; D'andon, O.H.F.; Uitz, J.

    2009-10-01

    Profiling floats now represent a mature technology. In parallel with their emergence, the field of miniature, low power bio-optical and biogeochemical sensors is rapidly evolving. Over recent years, the bio-geochemical and bio-optical community has begun to benefit from the increase in observational capacities by developing profiling floats that allow the measurement of key biooptical variables and subsequent products of biogeochemical and ecosystem relevance like Chlorophyll a (Chla), optical backscattering or attenuation coefficients which are proxies of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC), Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM). Thanks to recent algorithmic improvements, new bio-optical variables such as backscattering coefficient or absorption by CDOM, at present can also be extracted from space observations of ocean color. In the future, an intensification of in situ measurements by bio-optical profiling floats would permit the elaboration of unique 3D/4D bio-optical climatologies, linking surface (remotely detected) properties to their vertical distribution (measured by autonomous platforms), with which key questions in the role of the ocean in climate could be addressed. In this context, the objective of the IOCCG (International Ocean Color Coordinating Group) BIO-Argo working group is to elaborate recommendations in view of a future use of bio-optical profiling floats as part of a network that would include a global array that could be 'Argo-relevant', and specific arrays that would have more focused objectives or regional targets. The overall network, realizing true multi-scale sustained observations of global marine biogeochemistry and biooptics, should satisfy the requirements for validation of ocean color remote sensing as well as the needs of a wider community investigating the impact of global change on biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems. Regarding the global profiling float array, the recommendation is that Chla as well as POC should be the key

  10. In situ vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, mass, and composition over the southeast United States during SENEX and SEAC4RS: observations of a modest aerosol enhancement aloft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, N. L.; Brock, C. A.; Angevine, W. M.; Beyersdorf, A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D.; de Gouw, J. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Graus, M. G.; Holloway, J. S.; Huey, G.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D. A.; Liao, J.; Liu, X.; Markovic, M. Z.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Mikoviny, T.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2015-06-01

    Vertical profiles of submicron aerosol from in situ aircraft-based measurements were used to construct aggregate profiles of chemical, microphysical, and optical properties. These vertical profiles were collected over the southeastern United States (SEUS) during the summer of 2013 as part of two separate field studies: the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study and the Study of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS). Shallow cumulus convection was observed during many profiles. These conditions enhance vertical transport of trace gases and aerosol and create a cloudy transition layer on top of the sub-cloud mixed layer. The trace gas and aerosol concentrations in the transition layer were modeled as a mixture with contributions from the mixed layer below and the free troposphere above. The amount of vertical mixing, or entrainment of air from the free troposphere, was quantified using the observed mixing ratio of carbon monoxide (CO). Although the median aerosol mass, extinction, and volume decreased with altitude in the transition layer, they were ~10 % larger than expected from vertical mixing alone. This enhancement was likely due to secondary aerosol formation in the transition layer. Although the transition layer enhancements of the particulate sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) were both similar in magnitude, only the enhancement of sulfate was statistically significant. The column integrated extinction, or aerosol optical depth (AOD), was calculated for each individual profile, and the transition layer enhancement of extinction typically contributed less than 10 % to the total AOD. Our measurements and analysis were motivated by two recent studies that have hypothesized an enhanced layer of secondary aerosol aloft to explain the summertime enhancement of AOD (2-3 times greater than winter) over the southeastern United States. The first study attributes the layer aloft to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) while

  11. Using a coherent hydrophone array for observing sperm whale range, classification, and shallow-water dive profiles.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duong D; Huang, Wei; Bohn, Alexander C; Wang, Delin; Gong, Zheng; Makris, Nicholas C; Ratilal, Purnima

    2014-06-01

    Sperm whales in the New England continental shelf and slope were passively localized, in both range and bearing, and classified using a single low-frequency (<2500 Hz), densely sampled, towed horizontal coherent hydrophone array system. Whale bearings were estimated using time-domain beamforming that provided high coherent array gain in sperm whale click signal-to-noise ratio. Whale ranges from the receiver array center were estimated using the moving array triangulation technique from a sequence of whale bearing measurements. Multiple concurrently vocalizing sperm whales, in the far-field of the horizontal receiver array, were distinguished and classified based on their horizontal spatial locations and the inter-pulse intervals of their vocalized click signals. The dive profile was estimated for a sperm whale in the shallow waters of the Gulf of Maine with 160 m water-column depth located close to the array's near-field where depth estimation was feasible by employing time difference of arrival of the direct and multiply reflected click signals received on the horizontal array. By accounting for transmission loss modeled using an ocean waveguide-acoustic propagation model, the sperm whale detection range was found to exceed 60 km in low to moderate sea state conditions after coherent array processing.

  12. Experimental observation of the influence of furnace temperature profile on convection and segregation in the vertical Bridgman crystal growth technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G. T.; Wilcox, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Azulene-doped naphthalene was directionally solidified during the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. Doping homogeneity and convection were determined as a function of the temperature profile in the furnace and the freezing rate. Convection velocities were two orders of magnitude lower when the temperature increased with height. Rarely was the convection pattern axisymmetric, even though the temperature varied less than 0.1 K around the circumference of the growth ampoule. Correspondingly the cross sectional variation in azulene concentration tended to be asymmetric, especially when the temperature increased with height. This cross sectional variation changed dramatically along the ingot, reflecting changes in convection presumably due to the decreasing height of the melt. Although there was large scatter and irreproducibility in the cross sectional variation in doping, this variation tended to be least when the growth rate was low and the convection was vigorous. It is expected that compositional variations would also be small at high growth rates with weak convection and flat interfaces, although this was not investigated in the present experiments. Neither rotation of the ampoule nor deliberate introduction of thermal asymmetries during solidification had a significant influence on cross sectional variations in doping. It is predicted that slow directional solidification under microgravity conditions could produce greater inhomogeneities than on Earth. Combined use of microgravity and magnetic fields would be required to achieve homogeneity when it is necessary to freeze slowly in order to avoid constitutional supercooling.

  13. Clinical Profile and Comorbidity of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder among Children and Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional Observation in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Md. Hafizur Rahman; Mullick, Mohammad S. I.

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common disorder characterised by persistent and unwanted intrusive thoughts, images, and urges and repetitive behaviours or mental acts and can cause pervasive impairments. In Bangladesh, the prevalence of OCD among children is 2% which is higher than in previous reporting. This study was aimed at looking into the type, frequency, and severity of symptoms of OCD and comorbidity among children and adolescents. A consecutive 60 OCD cases from a child mental health service with age range of 5–18 years were recruited and divided into below and above 12 years of age group. The assessment was carried out using standardized Bangla version of Development and Wellbeing Assessment and Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale was administered. Of the obsession, contamination was the highest followed by doubt, and of the compulsion, washing/cleaning was the highest followed by checking, repeating, and ordering rituals. More than half of the subjects had severe OCD and comorbidity was present in 58% subjects. Specific phobia, social phobia, major depressive disorder, and tic disorder were more prevalent. These symptoms and comorbidity profile can serve the baseline data for a country like Bangladesh and further large scale study would better generalize the study results. PMID:28070501

  14. Observing Physical and Biological Drivers of pH and O2 in a Seasonal Ice Zone in the Ross Sea Using Profiling Float Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, E.; Martz, T. R.; Talley, L. D.; Mazloff, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Ice cover has strong influence over gas exchange, vertical stability, and biological production which are critical to understanding the Southern Ocean's central role in oceanic biogeochemical cycling and heat and carbon uptake under a changing climate. However the relative influence of physical versus biological processes in this hard-to-study region is poorly understood due to limited observations. Here we present new findings from a profiling float equipped with biogeochemical sensors in the seasonal ice zone of the Ross Sea capturing, for the first time, under-ice pH profile data over a two year timespan from 2014 to the present. The relative influence of physical (e.g. vertical mixing and air-sea gas exchange) and biological (e.g. production and respiration) drivers of pH and O2 within the mixed layer are explored during the phases of ice formation, ice cover, and ice melt over the two seasonal cycles. During the austral fall just prior to and during ice formation, O2 increases as expected due to surface-layer undersaturation and enhanced gas exchange. A small increase in pH is also observed during this phase, but without a biological signal in accompanying profiling float chlorophyll data, which goes against common reasoning from both a biological and physical standpoint. During the phase of ice cover, gas exchange is inhibited and a clear respiration signal is observed in pH and O2 data from which respiration rates are calculated. In the austral spring, ice melt gives rise to substantial ice edge phytoplankton blooms indicated by O2 supersaturation and corresponding increase in pH and large chlorophyll signal. The influence of the duration of ice cover and mixed layer depth on the magnitude of the ice edge blooms is explored between the two seasonal cycles.

  15. Temperature profiling of the atmospheric boundary layer with rotational Raman lidar during the HD(CP)2 observational prototype experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammann, E.; Behrendt, A.; Le Mounier, F.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2014-11-01

    The temperature measurements of the Rotational Raman Lidar of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH RRL) during the High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2 Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in April and May 2013 are discussed. The lidar consists of a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm with 10 W average power at 50 Hz, a two-mirror scanner, a 40 cm receiving telescope and a highly efficient polychromator with cascading interference filters for separating four signals: the elastic backscatter signal, two rotational Raman signals with different temperature dependence, and the vibrational Raman signal of water vapor. The main measurement variable of the UHOH RRL is temperature. For the HOPE campaign, the lidar receiver was optimized for high and low background levels, respectively, with a novel switch for the passband of the second rotational Raman channel. The instrument delivers atmospheric profiles of water vapor mixing ratio as well as particle backscatter coefficient and particle extinction coefficient as further products. As examples for the measurement performance, measurements of the temperature gradient and water vapor mixing ratio revealing the development of the atmospheric boundary layer within 25 h are presented. As expected from simulations, a significant advance during nighttime was achieved with the new low-background setting. A two-mirror scanner allows for measurements in different directions. When pointing the scanner to low elevation, measurements close to the ground become possible which are otherwise impossible due to the non-total overlap of laser beam and receiving telescope field-of-view in the near range. We present an example of a low-level temperature measurement which resolves the temperature gradient at the top of the stable nighttime boundary layer a hundred meters above the ground.

  16. Wnt5a participates in hepatic stellate cell activation observed by gene expression profile and functional assays

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wu-Jun; Hu, Li-Juan; Jian, Yi-Cheng; Wang, Li-Jing; Jiang, Ming; Li, Wei; He, Yi

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify differentially expressed genes in quiescent and activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and explore their functions. METHODS: HSCs were isolated from the normal Sprague Dawley rats by in suit perfusion of collagenase and pronase and density Nycodenz gradient centrifugation. Total RNA and mRNA of quiescent HSCs, and culture-activated HSCs were extracted, quantified and reversely transcripted into cDNA. The global gene expression profile was analyzed by microarray with Affymetrix rat genechip. Differentially expressed genes were annotated with Gene Ontology (GO) and analyzed with Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Microarray data were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The function of Wnt5a on human HSCs line LX-2 was assessed with lentivirus-mediated Wnt5a RNAi. The expression of Wnt5a in fibrotic liver of a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced fibrosis rat model was also analyzed with Western blotting. RESULTS: Of the 28 700 genes represented on this chip, 2566 genes displayed at least a 2-fold increase or decrease in expression at a P < 0.01 level with a false discovery rate. Of these, 1396 genes were upregulated, while 1170 genes were downregulated in culture-activated HSCs. These differentially expressed transcripts were grouped into 545 GO based on biological process GO terms. The most enriched GO terms included response to wounding, wound healing, regulation of cell growth, vasculature development and actin cytoskeleton organization. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that Wnt5a signaling pathway participated in the activation of HSCs. Wnt5a was significantly increased in culture-activated HSCs as compared with quiescent HSCs. qRT-PCR validated the microarray data. Lentivirus-mediated suppression of Wnt5a expression in activated LX-2 resulted in significantly impaired proliferation, downregulated expressions of

  17. A New Ionosphere Tomography Algorithm with Two-Grids Virtual Observations Constraints and 3D Velocity Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jian; Yao, Yibin; Shum, Che-Kwan

    2014-05-01

    Due to the sparsity of world's GNSS stations and limitations of projection angles, GNSS-based ionosphere tomography is a typical ill-posed problem. There are two main ways to solve this problem. Firstly the joint inversion method combining multi-source data is one of the effective ways. Secondly using a priori or reference ionosphere models, e.g., IRI or GIM models, as the constraints to improve the state of normal equation is another effective approach. The traditional way for adding constraints with virtual observations can only solve the problem of sparse stations but the virtual observations still lack horizontal grid constraints therefore unable to fundamentally improve the near-singularity characteristic of the normal equation. In this paper, we impose a priori constraints by increasing the virtual observations in n-dimensional space, which can greatly reduce the condition number of the normal equation. Then after the inversion region is gridded, we can form a stable structure among the grids with loose constraints. We then further consider that the ionosphere indeed changes within certain temporal scale, e.g., two hours. In order to establish a more sophisticated and realistic ionosphere model and obtain the real time ionosphere electron density velocity (IEDV) information, we introduce the grid electron density velocity parameters, which can be estimated with electron density parameters simultaneously. The velocity parameters not only can enhance the temporal resolution of the ionosphere model thereby reflecting more elaborate structure (short-term disturbances) under ionosphere disturbances status, but also provide a new way for the real-time detection and prediction of ionosphere 3D changes. We applied the new algorithm to the GNSS data collected in Europe for tomography inversion for ionosphere electron density and velocity at 2-hour resolutions, which are consistent throughout the whole day variation. We then validate the resulting tomography model

  18. Extensive MRO CRISM Observations of 1.27 micron O2 Airglow in Mars Polar Night and Their Comparison to MRO MCS Temperature Profiles and LMD GCM Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, R. Todd; Sandor, Brad J.; Wolff, Michael J.; Smith, Michael Doyle; Lefevre, Franck; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Forget, Francois; Murchie, Scott L.; Seelos, Frank P.; Seelos, Kim D.; Nair, Hari A.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Humm, David; Kass, David M.; Kleinbahl, Armin; Heavens, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The Martian polar night distribution of 1.27 micron (0-0) band emission from O2 singlet delta [O2(1Delta(sub g))] is determined from an extensive set of Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectral Mapping (CRISM) limb scans observed over a wide range of Mars seasons, high latitudes, local times, and longitudes between 2009 and 2011. This polar nightglow reflects meridional transport and winter polar descent of atomic oxygen produced from CO2 photodissociation. A distinct peak in 1.27 micron nightglow appears prominently over 70-90NS latitudes at 40-60 km altitudes, as retrieved for over 100 vertical profiles of O2(1Delta(sub g)) 1.27 micron volume emission rates (VER). We also present the first detection of much (x80+/-20) weaker 1.58 micron (0-1) band emission from Mars O2(1Delta(sub g)). Co-located polar night CRISM O2(1Delta(sub g)) and Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) (McCleese et al., 2008) temperature profiles are compared to the same profiles as simulated by the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) general circulation/photochemical model (e.g., Lefèvre et al., 2004). Both standard and interactive aerosol LMD simulations (Madeleine et al., 2011a) underproduce CRISM O2(1Delta(sub g)) total emission rates by 40%, due to inadequate transport of atomic oxygen to the winter polar emission regions. Incorporation of interactive cloud radiative forcing on the global circulation leads to distinct but insufficient improvements in modeled polar O2(1Delta(sub g)) and temperatures. The observed and modeled anti-correlations between temperatures and 1.27 mm band VER reflect the temperature dependence of the rate coefficient for O2(1Delta(sub g)) formation, as provided in Roble (1995).

  19. Rain cell-based identification of the vertical profile of reflectivity as observed by weather radar and its use for precipitation uncertainty estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, P.; Torfs, P. J. J. F.; Leijnse, H.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2012-04-01

    The wide scale implementation of weather radar systems over the last couple of decades has increased our understanding concerning spatio-temporal precipitation dynamics. However, the quantitative estimation of precipitation by these devices is affected by many sources of error. A very dominant source of error results from vertical variations in the hydrometeor size distribution known as the vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR). Since the height of the measurement as well as the beam volume increases with distance from the radar, for stratiform precipitation this results in a serious underestimation (overestimation) of the surface reflectivity while sampling within the snow (bright band) region. This research presents a precipitation cell-based implementation to correct volumetric weather radar measurements for VPR effects. Using the properties of a flipping carpenter square, a contour-based identification technique was developed, which is able to identify and track precipitation cells in real time, distinguishing between convective, stratiform and undefined precipitation. For the latter two types of systems, for each individual cell, a physically plausible vertical profile of reflectivity is estimated using a Monte Carlo optimization method. Since it can be expected that the VPR will vary within a given precipitation cell, a method was developed to take the uncertainty of the VPR estimate into account. As a result, we are able to estimate the amount of precipitation uncertainty as observed by weather radar due to VPR for a given precipitation type and storm cell. We demonstrate the possibilities of this technique for a number of winter precipitation systems observed within the Belgian Ardennes. For these systems, in general, the precipitation uncertainty estimate due to vertical reflectivity profile variations varies between 10-40%.

  20. Homeostasis and Cancer Symptom in Elemental Concentration Profiles of Hair Observed by Fluorescent X-ray Analysis with Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikawa, Jun-ichi

    2004-08-01

    Hair samples of 37 donors including 12 patients of hepatocelluar carcinoma have been examined by fluorescent X-ray analysis using the SPring-8, which detected many kinds of trace elements in a single hair root. Homeostasis in concentrations of Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Sr was found to be in consistency with their concentrations measured for the serum in a healthy case. Unusual increases of [Cu] and/or [Fe] were observed for hair of the patients by disorder of the liver function to excrete these elements due to cancer. The unique behavior observed for [Ca] is discussed in relation to the "Calcium paradox", a phenomenon of increasing from the regulated Ca ion concentration in cytosol, which is caused by parathyroid hormone in the case of Ca deficiency due to many kinds of disease as well as insufficient intake and absorption of Ca. It is concluded that the analysis of hair is useful for screening serious diseases such as the cancer and osteoporosis.

  1. Interpreting seasonal convective mixing in Devils Hole, Death Valley National Park, from temperature profiles observed by fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausner, Mark B.; Wilson, Kevin P.; Gaines, D. Bailey; Tyler, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    Devils Hole, a groundwater-filled fracture in the carbonate aquifer of the southern Nevada Mojave Desert, represents a unique ecohydrological setting, as home to the only extant population of Cyprinodon diabolis, the endangered Devils Hole pupfish. Using water column temperatures collected with a fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS) during four field campaigns in 2009, evidence of deep circulation and nutrient export are, for the first time, documented. The DTS was deployed to measure vertical temperature profiles in the system, and the raw data returned were postprocessed to refine the calibration beyond the precision of the instrument's native calibration routines. Calibrated temperature data serve as a tracer for water movement and reveal a seasonal pattern of convective mixing that is supported by numerical simulations of the system. The periodic presence of divers in the water is considered, and their impacts on the temperature profiles are examined and found to be minimal. The seasonal mixing cycle may deplete the pupfish's food supplies when nutrients are at their scarcest. The spatial and temporal scales of the DTS observations make it possible to observe temperature gradients on the order of 0.001°C m-1, revealing phenomena that would have been lost in instrument noise and uncertainty.

  2. Mechanism enabling the observation of the formally optically-forbidden 2Ag- and 1Bu- states in resonance-Raman excitation profiles of spheroidene in KBr disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagae, Hiroyoshi; Koyama, Yasushi

    2010-07-01

    An expression for the Albrecht A-term resonance-Raman excitation profiles (RREP) of a pigment dispersed in a KBr disc, in such a way that the pigment molecules aggregate in a microcrystal and the microcrystals are dispersed in the KBr disc, is formulated by taking into account the self-absorption of incident and scattered light and the distribution of microcrystals properly. Based on the resultant formula, simulations for the RREPs of spheroidene dispersed in KBr disc were carried out in the spectral region from 12,000 to 24,000 cm -1. Fairly good agreement between the simulations and the observed RREPs was obtained for different concentrations of spheroidene. Mechanisms have been investigated which enable the observation of the formally optically-forbidden (very weakly allowed) 2Ag- and 1Bu- states of spheroidne in RREPs free from the contribution of the optically-allowed 1Bu+ state, and a two-step self-absorption mechanism is proposed.

  3. Cohort profile for the Nurture Observational Study examining associations of multiple caregivers on infant growth in the Southeastern USA

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin Neelon, Sara E; Østbye, Truls; Bennett, Gary G; Kravitz, Richard M; Clancy, Shayna M; Stroo, Marissa; Iversen, Edwin; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Childcare has been associated with obesity in children in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, although some observed no association. Few studies have focused on care during infancy, a period when children may be especially vulnerable. Participants The Nurture Study is an observational birth cohort designed to assess longitudinal associations of childcare and the presence of multiple caregivers on infant adiposity and weight trajectories throughout the first year of life. We examine as potential mediators feeding, physical activity, sleep and stress. We completed recruitment in 2015. Of the 860 women who enrolled during pregnancy, 799 delivered a single live infant who met our inclusion criteria. Of those, 666 mothers (77.4%) agreed to participate in the study for themselves and their infants. Findings to date Among the 666 women in the study, 472 (71%) identified as black, 127 (19%) as white, 7 (1%) as Asian or Asian American, 6 (1%) as Native American and 49 (7%) as other race or more than one race; 43 (7%) identified as Hispanic/Latina. Just under half (48%) had a high school diploma or less, 61% had household incomes <$20 000/year and 59% were married or living with a partner. The mean (SD) infant gestational age was 41.28 weeks (2.29) and birth weight for gestational age z-score was −0.31 (0.93). Just under half (49%) of infants were females, 69% received some human milk and 40% were exclusively breast fed at hospital discharge. Data collection began in 2013, is currently underway, and is scheduled to conclude in late 2016. Future plans Results will help assess the magnitude of associations between childcare in infancy and subsequent obesity. Findings will also inform intervention and policy efforts to improve childcare environments and help prevent obesity in settings where many infants spend time. Trial registration number Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01788644. PMID:28179416

  4. Vertically-resolved profiles of mass concentrations and particle backscatter coefficients of Asian dust plumes derived from lidar observations of silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Noh, Youngmin; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Young J

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a method to retrieve vertically-resolved profiles of dust mass concentrations by analyzing Raman lidar signals of silicon dioxide (quartz) at 546nm. The observed particle plumes consisted of mixtures of East Asian dust with anthropogenic pollution. Our method for the first time allows for extracting the contribution of the aerosol component "pure dust" contained in the aerosol type "polluted dust". We also propose a method that uses OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) and the mass concentrations profiles of dust in order to derive profiles of backscatter coefficients of pure dust in mixed dust/pollution plumes. The mass concentration of silicon dioxide (quartz) in the atmosphere can be estimated from the backscatter coefficient of quartz. The mass concentration of dust is estimated by the weight percentage (38-77%) of mineral quartz in Asian dust. The retrieved dust mass concentrations are classified into water soluble, nucleation, accumulation, mineral-transported and coarse mode according to OPAC. The mass mixing ratio of 0.018, 0.033, 0.747, 0.130 and 0.072, respectively, is used. Dust extinction coefficients at 550nm were calculated by using OPAC and prescribed number concentrations for each of the 5 components. Dust backscatter coefficients were calculated from the dust extinction coefficients on the basis of a lidar ratio of 45±3sr at 532nm. We present results of quartz-Raman measurements carried out on the campus of the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (35.10°N, 126.53°E) on 15, 16, and 21 March 2010.

  5. Blood Pressure Profile in School Children (6–16 Years) of Southern India: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Sayeemuddin, Mohammad; Sharma, Deepak; Pandita, Aakash; Sultana, Tabassum; Shastri, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objective: To determine normal blood pressure (BP) in apparently healthy, asymptomatic school children in the age group of 6–16 years and to determine the correlation of BP values with different sex, weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) and also to find out prevalence of hypertension in school going population. Materials and methods: This prospective, observational study enrolled 3,302 urban children (1,658 boys and 1,644 girls) in the age group of 6–16 years. These were analyzed to study the distribution pattern of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at different ages, sex, weight, height, and BMI. The SBP and DBP were noted as per age and sex. The association was seen between mean SBP and mean DBP with weight, height, and BMI. Information was collected about the family history of hypertension and was correlated with the obtained SBP and DBP readings. Results: The mean SBP in males at 6 years was 99.69 ± 3.62 mm of Hg, at 10 years was 102.20 ± 2.16 mm of Hg, and at 16 years was 115.33 ± 1.26 mm of Hg. The mean SBP in females at 6 years was 96.55 ± 2.86 mm of Hg, at 10 years was 101.16 ± 2.12 mm of Hg, and at 16 years was 112.41 ± 1.06 mm of Hg. The correlation coefficient for relationship between age and SBP in males and females was 0.89 and 0.91, respectively, and for DBP was 0.92 and 0.90, respectively. The correlation coefficient for relationship between height and SBP in males and females was 0.91 and 0.93, respectively, and for DBP was 0.92 and 0.88, respectively. The correlation coefficient for relationship between weight and SBP in males and females was 0.92 and 0.92, respectively, and for DBP was 0.94 and 0.91, respectively. In the nomogram obtained in the study, 95% of study population fall between mean +2SD and −2SD. Conclusion: The blood pressure (BP) (SBP and DBP) tends to increase with age, weight, height, and BMI. The BP values (SBP and DBP

  6. Observation of dopant-profile independent electron transport in sub-monolayer TiO{sub x} stacked ZnO thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, D. E-mail: pmisra@rrcat.gov.in; Misra, P. E-mail: pmisra@rrcat.gov.in; Joshi, M. P.; Kukreja, L. M.; Das, Gangadhar

    2016-01-18

    Dopant-profile independent electron transport has been observed through a combined study of temperature dependent electrical resistivity and magnetoresistance measurements on a series of Ti incorporated ZnO thin films with varying degree of static-disorder. These films were grown by atomic layer deposition through in-situ vertical stacking of multiple sub-monolayers of TiO{sub x} in ZnO. Upon decreasing ZnO spacer layer thickness, electron transport smoothly evolved from a good metallic to an incipient non-metallic regime due to the intricate interplay of screening of spatial potential fluctuations and strength of static-disorder in the films. Temperature dependent phase-coherence length as extracted from the magnetotransport measurement revealed insignificant role of inter sub-monolayer scattering as an additional channel for electron dephasing, indicating that films were homogeneously disordered three-dimensional electronic systems irrespective of their dopant-profiles. Results of this study are worthy enough for both fundamental physics perspective and efficient applications of multi-stacked ZnO/TiO{sub x} structures in the emerging field of transparent oxide electronics.

  7. Assessing the Role of Vegetation Fires in CO Vertical Profile Anomalies in 2002-2012 with MOZAIC-IAGOS Airborne Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petetin, H.

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation fires represent a major source of pollution throughout the troposphere, with strong impacts on the atmospheric composition, air quality and radiative balance. Among the myriad of compounds emitted by these fires, carbon monoxide represents one of the dominant species, and due to its long lifetime, can be transported over very large distances. In the framework of the MOZAIC-IAGOS program, carbon monoxide is routinely measured since 2002 by several commercial aircraft, which provides a unique dataset of CO vertical profiles throughout troposphere. In this study, we investigate the role of vegetation fires in the strong CO anomalies observed in troposphere during the 2002-2012 period. FLEXPART backward simulations coupled with anthropogenic and biomass burning emission inventories are used to trace the geographical origin of these anomalies, which provides valuable informations on the long-range transport of vegetation fire plumes and their subsequent impact on downwind regions.

  8. Development of balloon-borne CO2 sonde: CO2 vertical profile (0-10km) observations and comparison with the air craft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, M.; Matsumi, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.

    2012-12-01

    The atmospheric CO2 concentration has drastically increased since the Industrial Revolution due to the mass consumption of fossil fuels and natural gas by human activities. CO2 is considered to be a major factor of global warming; therefore it is important to measure CO2 correctly. CO2 vertical profile measurement is the key to estimate CO2 sources and sinks in high precision. However, current CO2 monitoring sites are limited and there are few CO2 vertical profile measurements. We have been developing a balloon-borne instrument that can measure the vertical distribution of CO2 in any place in the world under any kind of weather conditions (CO2 sonde). The target specifications of altitude range is from surface to 10 km. Time resolution is 1min. The CO2 sensor, originally developed for upper air sounding by our team, is based on the non-dispersed infrared absorption spectroscopy technique (NDIR) at the wavelengths of 4.0 and 4.3 micrometer. The data of the optical infrared absorption are transmitted through a GPS sonde with temperature, humidity and GPS data every second. In this study, we will show simultaneous measurement campaigns of the balloon-borne instruments and in-situ aircraft measurements in January and February 2011 in the Tokyo metropolitan area in Japan. We will present the comparisons between the results of CO2 sonde (5 flights) and two types of aircraft measurements. One is observed by the CONTRAIL (Comprehensive Observation Network for TRace gases by AIrLiner) and the other is chartered flight measurements operated by NIES/JAXA.

  9. Risk-Benefit Profile of Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants in Established Therapeutic Indications: An Overview of Systematic Reviews and Observational Studies.

    PubMed

    Raschi, Emanuel; Bianchin, Matteo; Ageno, Walter; De Ponti, Roberto; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2016-12-01

    Since 2008, the direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have expanded the therapeutic options of cardiovascular diseases with recognized clinical and epidemiological impact, such as non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and venous thromboembolism (VTE), and also in the preventive setting of orthopedic surgical patients. The large body of evidence, not only from pivotal clinical trials but also from 'real-world' postmarketing observational findings (e.g. analytical epidemiological studies and registry data) gathered to date allow for a first attempt at verifying a posteriori whether or not the pharmacological advantages of the DOACs actually translate into therapeutic innovation, with relevant implications for clinicians, regulators and patients. This review aims to synthesize the risk-benefit profile of DOACs in the aforementioned consolidated indications through an 'evidence summary' approach gathering the existent evidence-based data, particularly systematic reviews with meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, as well as observational studies, comparing DOACs with vitamin K antagonists. Clinical evidence will be discussed and compared with major international guidelines to identify whether an update is needed. Controversial clinically relevant safety issues will be also examined in order to highlight current challenges and unsettled questions (e.g. actual bleeding risk in susceptible populations). It is anticipated that the large number of publications on NVAF or VTE (44 systematic reviews with meta-analyses and 12 observational studies retained in our analysis) suggests the potential existence of overlapping studies and calls for common criteria to qualitatively and quantitatively assess discordances, thus guiding future research.

  10. Peak position differences observed during XPS sputter depth profiling of the SEI on lithiated and delithiated carbon-based anode material for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, S.; Hoffmann, M.; Zier, M.

    2017-04-01

    The ability of delivering chemical information from peak shift phenomena has ever since made X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) an ideal tool for material characterization in Li-ion batteries (LIB). Upon investigation, charging is inevitable as most of the chemical species involved are non-conducting. Thus, the binding energy (BE) scale must be corrected to allow an accurate interpretation of the results. This is usually done using the peak position of the ubiquitous surface carbon contamination detectable for all Li-ion battery relevant materials. We herein report on the occurrence of peak shift phenomena that can be observed when investigating surface layers on graphite anodes using sputter depth-profiling. These shifts, however, are not related to classical static electric charging, but are depending on the state of charge (lithiation) of the anode material. The observations presented are in agreement with previous findings on other Li-containing materials and are obviously caused by the presence of Li in its elemental state. As aging and failure mechanisms in LIBs are closely linked to electrolyte reaction products on electrode surfaces it is of high importance to draw the correct conclusions on their chemical origin from XP spectra. In order to avoid misinterpretation of the BE positions, implanted Ar can be used for identification of relevant peak positions and species involved in the phenomena observed.

  11. Kalman filters for assimilating near-surface observations into the Richards equation - Part 1: Retrieving state profiles with linear and nonlinear numerical schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, G. B.; Medina, H.; Romano, N.

    2014-07-01

    This paper examines the potential of different algorithms, based on the Kalman filtering approach, for assimilating near-surface observations into a one-dimensional Richards equation governing soil water flow in soil. Our specific objectives are: (i) to compare the efficiency of different Kalman filter algorithms in retrieving matric pressure head profiles when they are implemented with different numerical schemes of the Richards equation; (ii) to evaluate the performance of these algorithms when nonlinearities arise from the nonlinearity of the observation equation, i.e. when surface soil water content observations are assimilated to retrieve matric pressure head values. The study is based on a synthetic simulation of an evaporation process from a homogeneous soil column. Our first objective is achieved by implementing a Standard Kalman Filter (SKF) algorithm with both an explicit finite difference scheme (EX) and a Crank-Nicolson (CN) linear finite difference scheme of the Richards equation. The Unscented (UKF) and Ensemble Kalman Filters (EnKF) are applied to handle the nonlinearity of a backward Euler finite difference scheme. To accomplish the second objective, an analogous framework is applied, with the exception of replacing SKF with the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) in combination with a CN numerical scheme, so as to handle the nonlinearity of the observation equation. While the EX scheme is computationally too inefficient to be implemented in an operational assimilation scheme, the retrieval algorithm implemented with a CN scheme is found to be computationally more feasible and accurate than those implemented with the backward Euler scheme, at least for the examined one-dimensional problem. The UKF appears to be as feasible as the EnKF when one has to handle nonlinear numerical schemes or additional nonlinearities arising from the observation equation, at least for systems of small dimensionality as the one examined in this study.

  12. Boundary Layer Observations of Water Vapor and Aerosol Profiles with an Eye-Safe Micro-Pulse Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.; Ismail, S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of real-time high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of combined water vapor and aerosols in the boundary layer have been a long standing observational challenge to the meteorological, weather forecasting, and climate science communities. To overcome the high reoccurring costs associated with radiosondes as well as the lack of sufficient water vapor measurements over the continental united states, a compact and low cost eye-safe all semiconductor-based micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been developed for water vapor and aerosol profiling in the lower troposphere. The laser transmitter utilizes two continuous wave external cavity diode lasers operating in the 830 nm absorption band as the online and offline seed laser sources. An optical switch is used to sequentially injection seed a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA) with the two seed laser sources in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The TSOA is actively current pulsed to produce up to 7 μJ of output energy over a 1 μs pulse duration (150 m vertical resolution) at a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. The measured laser transmitter spectral linewidth is less than 500 kHz while the long term frequency stability of the stabilized on-line wavelength is ± 55 MHz. The laser transmitter spectral purity was measured to be greater than 0.9996, allowing for simultaneous measurements of water vapor in the lower and upper troposphere. The DIAL receiver utilizes a commercially available full sky-scanning capable 35 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect the scattered light from the laser transmitter. Light collected by the telescope is spectrally filtered to suppress background noise and is coupled into a fiber optic cable which acts as the system field stop and limits the full angle field of view to 140 μrad. The light is sampled by a fiber coupled APD operated in a Geiger mode. The DIAL instrument is operated autonomously where water vapor and

  13. New Perspectives from Satellite and Profile Observations on Tropospheric Ozone over Africa and the Adjacent Oceans: An Indian-Atlantic Ocean Link to tbe "Ozone Paradox"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Diab, Roseanne D.; Thouret, Valerie; Sauvage, Bastien; Chatfield, B.; Guan, Hong

    2004-01-01

    In the past few years, tropospheric ozone observations of Africa and its adjacent ocenas have been greatly enhanced by high resolution (spatial and temporal) satellite measurements and profile data from aircraft (MOZAIC) and balloon-borne (SHADOZ) soundings. These views have demonstrated for the first time the complexity of chemical-dynamical interactions over the African continent and the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. The tropical Atlantic "ozone paradax" refers to the observation that during the season of maximum biomass burning in west Africa north of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), the highest tropospheric ozone total column occurs south of the ITCZ over the tropical Atlantic. The longitudinal view of tropospheric ozone in the southern tropics from SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) soundings shown the persistence of a "zonal-wave one" pattern that reinforces the "ozone paradox". These ozone features interact with dynamics over southern and northern Africa where anthropogenic sources include the industrial regions of the South African Highveld and Mideastern-Mediterranean influences, respectively. Our newest studies with satellites and soundings show that up to half the ozone pollution over the Atlantic in the January-March "paradox" period may originate from south Asian pollution. Individual patches of pollurion over the Indian Ocean are transported upward by convective mixing and are enriched by pyrogenic, biogenic sources and lightning as they cross Africa and descend over the Atlantic. In summary, local sources, intercontinental import and export and unique regional transport patterns put Africa at a crossroads of troposheric ozone influences.

  14. Ash and fine-mode particle mass profiles from EARLINET-AERONET observations over central Europe after the eruptions of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansmann, A.; Tesche, M.; Seifert, P.; Groß, S.; Freudenthaler, V.; Apituley, A.; Wilson, K. M.; Serikov, I.; Linné, H.; Heinold, B.; Hiebsch, A.; Schnell, F.; Schmidt, J.; Mattis, I.; Wandinger, U.; Wiegner, M.

    2011-10-01

    A combined lidar-photometer method that permits the retrieval of vertical profiles of ash and non-ash (fine-mode) particle mass concentrations is presented. By using a polarization lidar, the contributions of non-ash and ash particles to total particle backscattering and extinction are separated. Sun photometer measurements of the ratio of particle volume concentration to particle optical thickness (AOT) for fine and coarse mode are then used to convert the non-ash and ash extinction coefficients into respective fine-mode and ash particle mass concentrations. The method is applied to European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun photometer observations of volcanic aerosol layers at Cabauw, Netherlands, and Hamburg, Munich, and Leipzig, Germany, after the strong eruptions of the Icelandic Eyjafjallajökull volcano in April and May 2010. A consistent picture in terms of photometer-derived fine- and coarse-mode AOTs and lidar-derived non-ash and ash extinction profiles is found. The good agreement between the fine- to coarse-mode AOT ratio and non-ash to ash AOT ratio (<10% difference) in several cases corroborates the usefulness of the new retrieval technique. The main phases of the evolution of the volcanic aerosol layers over central Europe from 16 April to 17 May 2010 are characterized in terms of optical properties and mass concentrations of fine fraction and ash particles. Maximum coarse-mode 500 nm AOTs were of the order of 1.0-1.2. Ash concentrations and column mass loads reached maximum values around 1500 μg/m3 and 1750 mg/m2, respectively, on 16-17 April 2010. In May 2010, the maximum ash loads were lower by at least 50%. A critical aspect of the entire retrieval scheme is the high uncertainty in the mass-to-extinction conversion for fresh volcanic plumes with an unknown concentration of particles with radii >15 μm.

  15. Evaluation of Backscatter in the northeastern Red Sea using a Lowered Acoustic Doppler Profiler, Simrad EK60 Echosounder and in situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. J.; Klevjer, T. A.; Solberg, I.; Bower, A. S.; Kaartvedt, S.

    2010-12-01

    An oceanographic research cruise aboard the R/V Aegaeo was conducted in the Red Sea from 16-29 March 2010. The primary objective of the cruise was to undertake the first large-scale physical oceanographic survey of the northeastern quadrant of the Red Sea, including observations of top-to-bottom ocean currents and water properties such as temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity and fluorescence. Additional objectives were to take seawater samples throughout the water column for carbonate chemistry and microbial studies, and to survey the distribution of pelagic fishes using acoustic methods. A total of 111 casts were made during the cruise which covered nine transects ranging from 22°-28°N. A modified SeaBird 9/11+ rosette/CTD system equipped with a pair of upward and downward facing 300 kHz Lowered Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (LADCP) from Teledyne RD Instruments was used for station sampling. The LADCP system is primarily used for measuring full water column absolute velocity profiles. However, this study focuses on using the LADCP echo intensity data to measure ocean backscatter. Complex methods are usually required for calibration of acoustic instruments to measure backscatter due to attenuation and absorption of sound in water. Here we present a method for data processing which eliminates the need for calibration by using a single bin at a fixed distance from the ADCP transducers. We also present data from a Simrad EK60 echosounder which collected underway acoustic data throughout the cruise. Diurnal migration patterns of mesopelagic fish (an abundant and important part of the Red Sea ecosystem) are clearly evident in both data sets. Although the LADCP (due to bin size settings optimized for water velocity measurements) cannot resolve the thinner layers of acoustic scatterers compared to the 38 kHz EK60 data, it can be a very useful tool for measuring fish and zooplankton distribution from ships not equipped with high end acoustic

  16. Lower Vitamin D Level and Distinct Tear Cytokine Profile Were Observed in Patients with Mild Dry Eye Signs but Exaggerated Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Rohit; Sethu, Swaminathan; Chevour, Priyanka; Deshpande, Kalyani; Pahuja, Natasha; Nagaraja, Harsha; Pindipapanahalli, Narendra; Ghosh, Arkasubhra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dry eye is associated with inflammation, pain, and discomfort. Vitamin D is known to modulate immune responses and pain. This study investigates the level of serum vitamin D and tear-inflammatory proteins with relation to exaggerated symptoms in patients with mild dry eye. Methods Patients with mild dry eye signs (Dry Eye Workshop [DEWS] severity grade 1) but with exaggerated symptoms and healthy controls (n = 19, each) were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Schirmer's Test I (mm), tear film break-up time (TBUT; secs), and ocular surface disease index (OSDI) score were recorded. Serum vitamin D level and tear cytokine levels were measured. Results The mean OSDI score in the patient cohort (46 ± 3) was significantly higher than controls (8.4 ± 1.6). TBUT was lower (7.6 ± 0.3 secs) in patients compared with controls (11.0 ± 0.9 secs). Mean Schirmer's Test I value in patients (19.3 ± 1.4 mm) was lower than in controls (30.6 ± 1.9 mm). An inverse correlation was observed between serum vitamin D levels and OSDI score (r = −0.569; P = 0.01). Significantly higher levels of interleukin (IL)-17A/F, interferon (IFN)-γ, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, IL-4, IL-10, and decreased IL-2 concentrations was observed in the tears of patients compared with controls (P < 0.05). Conclusion Decreased serum vitamin D was associated with exaggerated symptoms in dry eye patients with mild dry eye signs. In addition, altered tear cytokine profile was also observed in these patients. Translational Relevance Vitamin D measurements would aid in the diagnosis and management of dry eye. PMID:27980879

  17. Considering the radiative effects of snow on tropical Pacific Ocean radiative heating profiles in contemporary GCMs using A-Train observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-L. F.; Lee, Wei-Liang; Waliser, Duane; Wang, Yi-Hui; Yu, Jia-Yuh; Jiang, Xianan; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; Chen, Yi-Chun; Kubar, Terry; Fetzer, Eric; Mahakur, M.

    2016-02-01

    This study characterizes biases in water vapor, dynamics, shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative properties in contemporary global climate models (GCMs) against observations over tropical Pacific Ocean. The observations are based on Atmospheric Infrared Sounder for water vapor, CloudSat 2B-FLXHR-LIDAR for LW and SW radiative heating profiles, and radiative flux from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System products. The model radiative heating profiles are adopted from the coupled and uncoupled National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1) and joint Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC)/Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) Task Force-Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric System Studies (GASS) Multi-Model Physical Processes Experiment (YOTC-GASS). The results from the model evaluation for YOTC-GASS and NCAR CESM1 demonstrate a number of systematic radiative biases. These biases include excessive outgoing LW radiation and excessive SW surface radiative fluxes, in conjunction with a radiatively unstable atmosphere with excessive LW cooling in the upper troposphere over convectively active areas, such as the Intertropical Convergence Zone/South Pacific Convergence Zone (ITCZ/SPCZ) and warm pool. Using sensitivity experiments with the NCAR-uncoupled/NCAR-coupled CESM1, we infer that these biases partly result from the interactions between falling snow and radiation that are missing in most contemporary GCMs (e.g., YOTC-GASS, Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 (CMIP)3, and Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project 5 (AMIP5)/CMIP5). A number of biases in the YOTC-GASS model simulations are consistent with model biases in CMIP3, AMIP5/CMIP5, and NCAR-uncoupled/NCAR-coupled model simulation without snow-radiation interactions. These include excessive upper level convection and low level downward motion with outflow from ITCZ/SPCZ. This generates weaker low-level trade winds and excessive precipitation in

  18. Convective and large-scale mass flux profiles over tropical oceans determined from synergistic analysis of a suite of satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunaga, Hirohiko; Luo, Zhengzhao Johnny

    2016-07-01

    A new, satellite-based methodology is developed to evaluate convective mass flux and large-scale total mass flux. To derive the convective mass flux, candidate profiles of in-cloud vertical velocity are first constructed with a simple plume model under the constraint of ambient sounding and then narrowed down to the solution that matches satellite-derived cloud top buoyancy. Meanwhile, the large-scale total mass flux is provided separately from satellite soundings by a method developed previously. All satellite snapshots are sorted into a composite time series that delineates the evolution of a vigorous and organized convective system. Principal findings are the following. First, convective mass flux is modulated primarily by convective cloud cover, with the intensity of individual convection being less variable over time. Second, convective mass flux dominates the total mass flux only during the early hours of the convective evolution; as convective system matures, a residual mass flux builds up in the mass flux balance that is reminiscent of stratiform dynamics. The method developed in this study is expected to be of unique utility for future observational diagnosis of tropical convective dynamics and for evaluation of global climate model cumulus parameterizations in a global sense.

  19. Convective and large-scale mass flux profiles over tropical oceans determined from synergistic analysis of a suite of satellite observations.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Hirohiko; Luo, Zhengzhao Johnny

    2016-07-16

    A new, satellite-based methodology is developed to evaluate convective mass flux and large-scale total mass flux. To derive the convective mass flux, candidate profiles of in-cloud vertical velocity are first constructed with a simple plume model under the constraint of ambient sounding and then narrowed down to the solution that matches satellite-derived cloud top buoyancy. Meanwhile, the large-scale total mass flux is provided separately from satellite soundings by a method developed previously. All satellite snapshots are sorted into a composite time series that delineates the evolution of a vigorous and organized convective system. Principal findings are the following. First, convective mass flux is modulated primarily by convective cloud cover, with the intensity of individual convection being less variable over time. Second, convective mass flux dominates the total mass flux only during the early hours of the convective evolution; as convective system matures, a residual mass flux builds up in the mass flux balance that is reminiscent of stratiform dynamics. The method developed in this study is expected to be of unique utility for future observational diagnosis of tropical convective dynamics and for evaluation of global climate model cumulus parameterizations in a global sense.

  20. Ultrastructural observation of mesophyll cells and temporal expression profiles of the genes involved in transitory starch metabolism in flag leaves of wheat after anthesis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guozhang; Peng, Xiaoqi; Wang, Lina; Yang, Yingying; Shao, Ruixin; Xie, Yingxin; Ma, Dongyun; Wang, Chenyang; Guo, Tiancai; Zhu, Yunji

    2015-01-01

    Transitory starch in cereal plant leaves is synthesized during the day and remobilized at night to provide a carbon source for growth and grain filling, but its mechanistic basis is still poorly understood. The objective of this study is to explore the regulatory mechanism for starch biosynthesis and degradation in plant source organs. Using transmission electron microscopy, we observed that during the day after anthesis, starch granules in mesophyll cells of wheat flag leaves accumulated in chloroplasts and the number of starch granules gradually decreased with wheat leaf growth. During the night, starch granules synthesized in chloroplasts during the day were completely or partially degraded. The transcript levels of 26 starch synthesis-related genes and 16 starch breakdown-related genes were further measured using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Expression profile analysis revealed that starch metabolism genes were clustered into two groups based on their temporal expression patterns. The genes in the first group were highly expressed and presumed to play crucial roles in starch metabolism. The genes in the other group were not highly expressed in flag leaves and may have minor functions in starch metabolism in leaf tissue. The functions of most of these genes in leaves were further discussed. The starch metabolism-related genes that are predominantly expressed in wheat flag leaves differ from those expressed in wheat grain, indicating that two different pathways for starch metabolism operate in these tissues. This provides specific information on the molecular mechanisms of transitory starch metabolism in higher plants.

  1. Observation of a tropopause fold by MARA VHF wind-profiler radar and ozonesonde at Wasa, Antarctica: comparison with ECMWF analysis and a WRF model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalikova, M.; Kirkwood, S.; Arnault, J.; Mikhaylova, D.

    2012-09-01

    Tropopause folds are one of the mechanisms of stratosphere-troposphere exchange, which can bring ozone rich stratospheric air to low altitudes in the extra-tropical regions. They have been widely studied at northern mid- or high latitudes, but so far almost no studies have been made at mid- or high southern latitudes. The Moveable Atmospheric Radar for Antarctica (MARA), a 54.5 MHz wind-profiler radar, has operated at the Swedish summer station Wasa, Antarctica (73° S, 13.5° W) during austral summer seasons from 2007 to 2011 and has observed on several occasions signatures similar to those caused by tropopause folds at comparable Arctic latitudes. Here a case study is presented of one of these events when an ozonesonde successfully sampled the fold. Analysis from European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) is used to study the circumstances surrounding the event, and as boundary conditions for a mesoscale simulation using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The fold is well resolved by the WRF simulation, and occurs on the poleward side of the polar jet stream. However, MARA resolves fine-scale layering associated with the fold better than the WRF simulation.

  2. Effects and safety profile of betahistine in patients in the Russian contingent of OSVaLD, an open-label observational study in vestibular vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Morozova, Svetlana Vyacheslavovna; Alekseeva, Natalia Stepanovna; Lilenko, Sergey Vasilyevich; Matsnev, Eduard Ivanovich; Melnikov, Oleg Anatol’evich

    2015-01-01

    Background We report here data from the >200 patients recruited in Russia to take part in OSVaLD, a 12-week, open-label, post-marketing surveillance study of the response to betahistine 48 mg/day in vertigo of peripheral vestibular origin carried out in a total of 13 countries. Methods The primary efficacy endpoint was change in the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI; 100-point scale). Changes in Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36, version 2 (SF-36v2®) scores were a priori secondary Outcomes. Results Total DHI score improved by 43 points during betahistine treatment. This aggregate improvement was equally distributed across the three domains of the DHI (physical, emotional, and functional; P<0.0001 for main and subscore changes from baseline). Statistically significant improvements versus baseline were also observed in mean HADS scores for anxiety and depression (both P<0.0001), and in the Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary scores of the SF-36v2 (both P<0.0001 versus baseline). Only one suspected adverse drug reaction was recorded in the Russian safety population (n=204), indicating that betahistine was well tolerated in those patients. Conclusion Betahistine 48 mg/day was associated with clear improvements in well-configured and widely validated measures of health-related quality of life and an encouraging tolerability profile in patients in Russia who took part in OSVaLD. PMID:25653552

  3. Assessing representation errors of IAGOS CO2, CO and CH4 profile observations: the impact of spatial variations in near-field emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschetti, Fabio; Thouret, Valerie; Nedelec, Philippe; Chen, Huilin; Gerbig, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Airborne platforms have their main strength in the ability of collecting mixing ratio and meteorological data at different heights across a vertical profile, allowing an insight in the internal structure of the atmosphere. However, rental airborne platforms are usually expensive, limiting the number of flights that can be afforded and hence on the amount of data that can be collected. To avoid this disadvantage, the MOZAIC/IAGOS (Measurements of Ozone and water vapor by Airbus In-service airCraft/In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) program makes use of commercial airliners, providing data on a regular basis. It is therefore considered an important tool in atmospheric investigations. However, due to the nature of said platforms, MOZAIC/IAGOS's profiles are located near international airports, which are usually significant emission sources, and are in most cases close to major urban settlements, characterized by higher anthropogenic emissions compared to rural areas. When running transport models at finite resolution, these local emissions can heavily affect measurements resulting in biases in model/observation mismatch. Model/observation mismatch can include different aspects in both horizontal and vertical direction, for example spatial and temporal resolution of the modeled fluxes, or poorly represented convective transport or turbulent mixing in the boundary layer. In the framework of the IGAS (IAGOS for GMES Atmospheric Service) project, whose aim is to improve connections between data collected by MOZAIC/IAGOS and Copernicus Atmospheric Service, the present study is focused on the effect of the spatial resolution of emission fluxes, referred to here as representation error. To investigate this, the Lagrangian transport model STILT (Stochastic Time Inverted Lagrangian Transport) was coupled with EDGAR (Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research) version-4.3 emission inventory at European regional scale. EDGAR's simulated fluxes for CO, CO2

  4. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Robert A. Houze, Jr.

    2013-11-13

    We examined cloud radar data in monsoon climates, using cloud radars at Darwin in the Australian monsoon, on a ship in the Bay of Bengal in the South Asian monsoon, and at Niamey in the West African monsoon. We followed on with a more in-depth study of the continental MCSs over West Africa. We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the observed anvil clouds to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model at high resolution using six different ice-phase microphysical schemes. We carried out further simulations with a cloud-resolving model forced by sounding network budgets over the Niamey region and over the northern Australian region. We have devoted some of the effort of this project to examining how well satellite data can determine the global breadth of the anvil cloud measurements obtained at the ARM ground sites. We next considered whether satellite data could be objectively analyzed to so that their large global measurement sets can be systematically related to the ARM measurements. Further differences were detailed between the land and ocean MCS anvil clouds by examining the interior structure of the anvils with the satellite-detected the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The satellite survey of anvil clouds in the Indo-Pacific region was continued to determine the role of MCSs in producing the cloud pattern associated with the MJO.

  5. Integrating Wind Profiling Radars and Radiosonde Observations with Model Point Data to Develop a Decision Support Tool to Assess Upper-level Winds For Space Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III; Flinn, Clay

    2012-01-01

    Launch directors need to know upper-level wind forecasts. We developed an Excel-based GUI to display upper-level winds: (1) Rawinsonde at CCAFS, (2) Wind profilers at KSC, (3) Model point data at CCAFS.

  6. Cassini-VIMS observations of Saturn's main rings: I. Spectral properties and temperature radial profiles variability with phase angle and elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M. M.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Brown, R. H.; Cerroni, P.; Altobelli, N.; Spilker, L. J.

    2014-10-01

    . Greater pollution caused by meteoritic material is seen in the C ring and Cassini division while the low levels of aliphatic material observed by VIMS in the A and B rings particles are an evidence that they are pristine. Thermal properties: the ring-particles' temperature is retrieved by fitting the spectral position of the 3.6 μm continuum peak observed on reflectance spectra: in case of pure water ice the position of the peak, as measured in laboratory, shifts towards shorter wavelengths when temperature decreases, moving from about 3.65 μm at 123 K to about 3.55 μm at 88 K. When applied to VIMS rings observations, this method allows us to infer the average temperature across ring regions sampled through 400 km-wide radial bins. Comparing VIMS temperature radial profiles with similar CIRS measurements acquired at the same time we have found a substantial agreement between the two instruments' results across the A and B rings. In general VIMS measures higher temperatures than CIRS across C ring and Cassini division as a consequence of the lower optical depth and the resulting pollution that creates a deviation from pure water ice composition of these regions. VIMS results point out that across C ring and CD the 3.6 μm peak wavelength is always higher than across B and A rings and therefore C ring and CD are warmer than A and B rings. VIMS observations allow us to investigate also diurnal and seasonal effects: comparing antisolar and subsolar ansae observations we have measured higher temperature on the latter. As the solar elevation angle decreases to 0° (equinox), the peak's position shifts at shorter wavelengths because ring's particles becomes colder. Merging multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models, combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith composition, grain size and thermal properties with the ring structures.

  7. Global distribution of vertical wavenumber spectra in the lower stratosphere observed using high-vertical-resolution temperature profiles from COSMIC GPS radio occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noersomadi; Tsuda, T.

    2016-02-01

    We retrieved temperature (T) profiles with a high vertical resolution using the full spectrum inversion (FSI) method from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO) data from January 2007 to December 2009. We studied the characteristics of temperature perturbations in the stratosphere at 20-27 km altitude. This height range does not include a sharp jump in the background Brunt-Väisälä frequency squared (N2) near the tropopause, and it was reasonably stable regardless of season and latitude. We analyzed the vertical wavenumber spectra of gravity waves (GWs) with vertical wavelengths ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 km, and we integrated the (total) potential energy EpT. Another integration of the spectra from 0.5 to 1.75 km was defined as EpS for short vertical wavelength GWs, which was not studied with the conventional geometrical optics (GO) retrievals. We also estimated the logarithmic spectral slope (p) for the saturated portion of spectra with a linear regression fitting from 0.5 to 1.75 km.Latitude and time variations in the spectral parameters were investigated in two longitudinal regions: (a) 90-150° E, where the topography was more complicated, and (b) 170-230° E, which is dominated by oceans. We compared EpT, EpS, and p, with the mean zonal winds (U) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). We also show a ratio of EpS to EpT and discuss the generation source of EpS. EpT and p clearly showed an annual cycle, with their maximum values in winter at 30-50° N in region (a), and 50-70° N in region (b), which was related to the topography. At 30-50° N in region (b), EpT and p exhibited some irregular variations in addition to an annual cycle. In the Southern Hemisphere, we also found an annual oscillation in EpT and p, but it showed a time lag of about 2 months relative to U. Characteristics of EpTand p in the tropical region seem to be related to convective activity. The ratio of EpT to the

  8. Comparison of GPS/SAC-C and MIPAS/ENVISAT temperature profiles and its implementation for EOS AURA-MLS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Wang, Ding-Yi; Romans, Larry J.; Ao, Chi O.; Schwartz, Michael J.; Stiller, Gabriele P.; von Clarmann, Thomas; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Funke, Bernd; Gil-Lopez, Sergio; Glatthor, Norbert; Grabowski, Udo; Hopfner, Michael; Kellmann, Sylvia; Kiefer, Michael; Linden, Andrea; Tsidu, Glzaw Mengitsu; Milz, Mathias; Steck, Tilman; Fischer, Herbert

    2003-01-01

    A new generation GPS flight receiver was launched on the Argentinian satellite SAC-C in 2001. It has demonstrated the potential applicability for the continuous monitoring of the earth's atmosphere with radio occultation technology, and providing high vertical resolution profiles of temperature and water vapour data complementary to other sounding techniques.

  9. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    2013-03-14

    submitted in September 2012. The major highlights are as follows: a. The results indicate that NU-WRF model could capture observed diurnal variation of rainfall (composite not individual); b. NU-WRF model could simulate two different types (propagating and local type) of the diurnal variation of rainfall; c. NU-WRF model simulation show very good agreement with observation in terms of precipitation pattern (linear MCS), radar reflectivity (a second low peak shallow convection); d. NU-WRF model simulation indicates that the cool-pool dynamic is the main physical process for MCS propagation speed; e. Surface heat fluxes (including land surface model and initial surface condition) do not play a major role in phase of diurnal variation (change rainfall amount slightly); f. Terrain effect is important for initial stage of MCS (rainfall is increased and close to observation by increasing the terrain height that is also close to observed); g. Diurnal variation of radiation is not important for the simulated variation of rainfall. Publications: Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Powell, R. Houze, Jr., P. Ciesielski, N. Guy, H. Pierce and T. Matsui, 2012: A comparison of the water budgets between clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE. J. Atmos. Sci., 70, 487-503. Powell, S. W., R. A. Houze, Jr., A. Kumar, and S. A. McFarlane, 2012: Comparison of simulated and observed continental tropical anvil clouds and their radiative heating profiles. J. Atmos. Sci., 69, 2662-2681. Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, T. Matsui, S. Xie, S. Lang, M. Zhang, D. Starr, and X. Li, 2011: Estimating the Ice Crystal Enhancement Factor in the Tropics. J. Atmos. Sci., 68, 1424-1434. Conferences: Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Powell, R. Houze, Jr., P. Ciesielski, N. Guy, H. Pierce and T. Matsui, 2012: Comparison of water budget between AMMA and TWP-ICE clouds. The 3rd Annual ASR Science Team Meeting. Arlington, Virginia, Mar. 12-16, 2012. Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Powell, R. A. Houze Jr., and P. Ciesielski, 2011: Comparing the water budgets between

  10. Simulation study for measurement of horizontal wind profiles in the polar stratosphere and mesosphere using ground-based observations of ozone and carbon monoxide lines in the 230-250 GHz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnham, David A.; Ford, George P.; Moffat-Griffin, Tracy; Pumphrey, Hugh C.

    2016-07-01

    Meteorological and atmospheric models are being extended up to 80 km altitude but there are very few observing techniques that can measure stratospheric-mesospheric winds at altitudes between 20 and 80 km to verify model datasets. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of horizontal wind profile measurements using ground-based passive millimetre-wave spectroradiometric observations of ozone lines centred at 231.28, 249.79, and 249.96 GHz. Vertical profiles of horizontal winds are retrieved from forward and inverse modelling simulations of the line-of-sight Doppler-shifted atmospheric emission lines above Halley station (75°37' S, 26°14' W), Antarctica. For a radiometer with a system temperature of 1400 K and 30 kHz spectral resolution observing the ozone 231.28 GHz line we estimate that 12 h zonal and meridional wind profiles could be determined over the altitude range 25-74 km in winter, and 28-66 km in summer. Height-dependent measurement uncertainties are in the range 3-8 m s-1 and vertical resolution ˜ 8-16 km. Under optimum observing conditions at Halley a temporal resolution of 1.5 h for measuring either zonal or meridional winds is possible, reducing to 0.5 h for a radiometer with a 700 K system temperature. Combining observations of the 231.28 GHz ozone line and the 230.54 GHz carbon monoxide line gives additional altitude coverage at 85 ± 12 km. The effects of clear-sky seasonal mean winter/summer conditions, zenith angle of the received atmospheric emission, and spectrometer frequency resolution on the altitude coverage, measurement uncertainty, and height and time resolution of the retrieved wind profiles have been determined.

  11. Parent PDD behavior inventory profiles of young children classified according to autism diagnostic observation schedule-generic and autism diagnostic interview-revised criteria.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ira L; Gomez, Tina Rovito; Gonzalez, Maripaz G; Lennon, Elizabeth M; Karmel, Bernard Z; Gardner, Judith M

    2010-02-01

    Quantitative variations in score profiles from the parent version of the PDD Behavior Inventory (PDDBI) were examined in young Autism and PDD-NOS groups defined by ADOS-G and ADI-R criteria, relative to a not spectrum (NS) group of similar age. Both the Autism and the PDD-NOS group profiles markedly differed from the NS group. The most sensitive measures of group differences were those domain and composite scores that assessed social communication competence, as well as the overall Autism Composite score. Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictability measures were quite good for these measures. It was concluded that the PDDBI is useful in assisting in the differential diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder.

  12. (1)JCH NMR Profile: Identification of Key Structural Features and Functionalities by Visual Observation and Direct Measurement of One-Bond Proton-Carbon Coupling Constants.

    PubMed

    Marcó, Núria; Souza, Alexandre A; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Gil, Roberto R; Parella, Teodor

    2017-02-17

    A user-friendly NMR interface for the visual and accurate determination of experimental one-bond proton-carbon coupling constants ((1)JCH) in small molecules is presented. This intuitive (1)JCH profile correlates directly to δ((1)H), and (1)JCH facilitates the rapid identification and assignment of (1)H signals belonging to key structural elements and functional groups. Illustrative examples are provided for some target molecules, including terminal alkynes, strained rings, electronegative substituents, or lone-pair-bearing heteronuclei.

  13. Raindrop size distribution and vertical velocity characteristics in the rainband of Hurricane Bolaven (2012) observed by a 1290 MHz wind profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Kyun; Lee, Dong-In

    2017-03-01

    Microphysics and vertical velocity characteristics between weak and strong rainband regions of Hurricane Bolaven were investigated primarily from 1290 MHz (UHF) wind profiler measurements on 27-28 August 2012. With a focus on regions with radar reflectivities greater than 30 dBZ below a melting level, raindrop size distributions (DSDs) and related rain parameters retrieved from profiler Doppler spectra were examined. Temporal variations in vertical structure and bright band from a widespread stratiform to a relatively narrow, intense rainband were examined as the rainbands move over the land in the southern coast of Korea. Based on vertical characteristics in radar reflectivity, Doppler velocity, and vertical air motion (w) profiles, the rainbands were classified into a stratiform (S) region with a strong bright band and mixed stratiform-convective (S-C) region with a weak or non-existent bright band. The retrieved w fields showed that updrafts were dominant in the mixed S-C region and downdrafts in the S region. More broad histograms in both radar reflectivity (Z) and mass-weighted mean diameter (Dm) were found in the S period. Compared to the Z distribution, rain rate (R) was more widely distributed in the mixed S-C region than in the S region. This is largely because R values were more variable in association with stronger updrafts in this region since they depend on fall velocities of raindrops. Higher R and smaller Dm mean values were analyzed within relatively strong updrafts in the mixed S-C period compared to those in the S period. Even when the w correction is applied, the mean Dm was still slightly smaller in the mixed S-C region, indicating that there is a relatively larger number of small drops than those in the S region.

  14. Changes in the MicroRNA Profile Observed in the Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue of Obese Patients after Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding

    PubMed Central

    Iaffaldano, Laura; Pilone, Vincenzo; Dodaro, Concetta Anna; Forestieri, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Background. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) results in significant lasting weight loss and improved metabolism in obese patients. To evaluate whether epigenetic factors could concur to these benefits, we investigated the subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) microRNA (miRNA) profile before (T0) and three years (T1) after LAGB in three morbidly obese women. Case Reports. SAT miRNA profiling, evaluated by TaqMan Array, showed four downexpressed (miR-519d, miR-299-5p, miR-212, and miR-671-3p) and two upexpressed (miR-370 and miR-487a) miRNAs at T1 versus T0. Bioinformatics predicted that these miRNAs regulate genes belonging to pathways associated with the cytoskeleton, inflammation, and metabolism. Western blot analysis showed that PPAR-alpha, which is the target gene of miR-519d, increased after LAGB, thereby suggesting an improvement in SAT lipid metabolism. Accordingly, the number and diameter of adipocytes were significantly higher and lower, respectively, at T1 versus T0. Bioinformatics predicted that the decreased levels of miR-212, miR-299-5p, and miR-671-3p at T1 concur in reducing SAT inflammation. Conclusion. We show that the miRNA profile changes after LAGB. This finding, although obtained in only three cases, suggests that this epigenetic mechanism, by regulating the expression of genes involved in inflammation and lipid metabolism, could concur to improve SAT functionality in postoperative obese patients. PMID:28386478

  15. Estimating Cognitive Profiles Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS).

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kang; Frisby, Craig L; Davison, Mark L

    2004-10-01

    Two of the most popular methods of profile analysis, cluster analysis and modal profile analysis, have limitations. First, neither technique is adequate when the sample size is large. Second, neither method will necessarily provide profile information in terms of both level and pattern. A new method of profile analysis, called Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS; Davison, 1996), is introduced to meet the challenge. PAMS extends the use of simple multidimensional scaling methods to identify latent profiles in a multi-test battery. Application of PAMS to profile analysis is described. The PAMS model is then used to identify latent profiles from a subgroup (N = 357) within the sample of the Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery-Revised (WJ-R; McGrew, Werder, & Woodcock, 1991; Woodcock & Johnson, 1989), followed by a discussion of procedures for interpreting participants' observed score profiles from the latent PAMS profiles. Finally, advantages and limitations of the PAMS technique are discussed.

  16. Radar - ARL Wind Profilerwith RASS, Boardman - Raw Data

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Tim

    2016-10-25

    **Winds.** A radar wind profiler measures the Doppler shift of electromagnetic energy scattered back from atmospheric turbulence and hydrometeors along 3-5 vertical and off-vertical point beam directions. Back-scattered signal strength and radial-component velocities are remotely sensed along all beam directions and are combined to derive the horizontal wind field over the radar. These data typically are sampled and averaged hourly and usually have 6-m and/or 100-m vertical resolutions up to 4 km for the 915 MHz and 8 km for the 449 MHz systems. **Temperature.** To measure atmospheric temperature, a radio acoustic sound system (RASS) is used in conjunction with the wind profile. These data typically are sampled and averaged for five minutes each hour and have a 60-m vertical resolution up to 1.5 km for the 915 MHz and 60-m up to 3.5k m for the 449 MHz.

  17. State Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State-Federal Information Clearinghouse for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA.

    State-by-state public policy profiles are provided by the Council for Exceptional Children's State-Federal Information Clearinghouse. These profiles summarize the present legal base for the delivery of educational services to handicapped children in the United States. Included in each profile is information from various avenues used to establish…

  18. Chronic wound healing by fetal cell therapy may be explained by differential gene profiling observed in fetal versus old skin cells.

    PubMed

    Ramelet, Albert-Adrien; Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Raffoul, Wassim; Scaletta, Corinne; Pioletti, Dominique P; Offord, Elizabeth; Mansourian, Robert; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2009-03-01

    Engineering of fetal tissue has a high potential for the treatment of acute and chronic wounds of the skin in humans as these cells have high expansion capacity under simple culture conditions and one organ donation can produce Master Cell Banks which can fabricate over 900 million biological bandages (9 x 12cm). In a Phase 1 clinical safety study, cases are presented for the treatment of therapy resistant leg ulcers. All eight patients, representing 13 ulcers, tolerated multiple treatments with fetal biological bandages showing no negative secondary effects and repair processes similar to that seen in 3rd degree burns. Differential gene profiling using Affymetrix gene chips (analyzing 12,500 genes) were accomplished on these banked fetal dermal skin cells compared to banked dermal skin cells of an aged donor in order to point to potential indicators of wound healing. Families of genes involved in cell adhesion and extracellular matrix, cell cycle, cellular signaling, development and immune response show significant differences in regulation between banked fetal and those from banked old skin cells: with approximately 47.0% of genes over-expressed in fetal fibroblasts. It is perhaps these differences which contribute to efficient tissue repair seen in the clinic with fetal cell therapy.

  19. Protein expression guided chemical profiling of living cells by the simultaneous observation of Raman scattering and anti-Stokes fluorescence emission

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Liang-da; Ichimura, Taro; Sekiya, Takumasa; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Tomonobu; Fujita, Hideaki; Ozawa, Takeaki; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of molecular biology provides a clear picture of how the genome, transcriptome and proteome regulate each other, but how the chemical environment of the cell plays a role in cellular regulation remains much to be studied. Here we show an imaging method using hybrid fluorescence-Raman microscopy that measures the chemical micro-environment associated with protein expression patterns in a living cell. Simultaneous detection of fluorescence and Raman signals, realised by spectrally separating the two modes through the single photon anti-Stokes fluorescence emission of fluorescent proteins, enables the accurate correlation of the chemical fingerprint of a specimen to its physiological state. Subsequent experiments revealed the slight chemical differences that enabled the chemical profiling of mouse embryonic stem cells with and without Oct4 expression. Furthermore, using the fluorescent probe as localisation guide, we successfully analysed the detailed chemical content of cell nucleus and Golgi body. The technique can be further applied to a wide range of biomedical studies for the better understanding of chemical events during biological processes. PMID:28272392

  20. Field observations of wind profiles and sand fluxes above the windward slope of a sand dune before and after the establishment of semi-buried straw checkerboard barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunlai; Li, Qing; Zhou, Na; Zhang, Jiaqiong; Kang, Liqiang; Shen, Yaping; Jia, Wenru

    2016-03-01

    Straw checkerboard barriers are effective and widely used measures to control near-surface sand flow. The present study measured the wind profiles and sand mass flux above the windward slope of a transverse dune before and after the establishment of semi-buried straw checkerboards. The 0.2 m high checkerboards enhanced the aerodynamic roughness length to larger than 0.02 m, which was two to three orders of magnitude higher than that of the bare sand. The modified Charnock model predicted the roughness length of the sand bed during saltation well, with Cm = 0.138 ± 0.003. For the checkerboards, z0 increased slowly to a level around 0.037 m with increasing wind velocity and the rate of increase tended to slow down in strong wind. The barriers reduced sand flux and altered its vertical distribution. The total height-integrated dimensionless mass flux of saltating particles (q0) above bare sand followed the relationship ln q0 = a + b(u∗t/u∗) + c(u∗t/u∗)2, with a peak at u∗/u∗t ≈ 2, whereas a possible peak appeared at u∗/u∗t ≈ 1.5 above 1 m × 1 m straw checkerboards. The vertical distribution of mass flux above these barriers resembled an "elephant trunk", with maximum mass flux at 0.05-0.2 m above the bed, in contrast with the continuously and rapidly decreasing mass flux with increasing height above the bare sand. The influences of the barriers on the wind and sand flow prevent dune movement and alter the evolution of dune morphology.

  1. Association of trace elements with lipid profiles and glycaemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus in northern Sardinia, Italy: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Peruzzu, Angela; Solinas, Giuliana; Asara, Yolande; Forte, Giovanni; Bocca, Beatrice; Tolu, Francesco; Malaguarnera, Lucia; Montella, Andrea; Madeddu, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Sardinia is an Italian region with a high incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to determine the associations of trace elements with lipid profiles and glycaemic control in patients with T1DM. A total of 192 patients with T1DM who attended the Unit of Diabetology and Metabolic Diseases in Sassari, Italy, were enrolled. Trace elements zinc, copper, selenium, chromium, and iron were measured in whole blood by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The correlations between metabolic variables and the levels of trace elements were determined. Zinc was positively correlated with total cholesterol (P=0.023), low-density lipoprotein (P=0.0015), and triglycerides (P=0.027). Iron as significantly correlated with TC (P=0.0189), LDL (P=0.0121), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (P=0.0466). In males, Cr was positively correlated with HDL (P=0.0079) and Se, in females was correlated with TG (P=0.0113). The mean fasting plasma glucose was166.2mgdL(-1). Chromium was correlated with fasting plasma glucose (P=0.0149), particularly in males (P=0.0038). Overall, 63.5% of the patients had moderate HbA1c (7-9%). Copper was significantly correlated with HbA1c% in males (P=0.0155). In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that trace elements show different associations with lipid levels and glycaemic control in T1DM. Zinc, Fe, and Se were associated with lipid levels whereas Cu and Cr were associated with HbA1c%.

  2. Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters and ROSAT Observations of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results on the elliptical galaxy NGC 1407 were published in the proceedings of the first ROSAT symposium. NGC 1407 is embedded in diffuse X-ray-emitting gas which is extensive enough that it is likely to be related to the surrounding group of galaxies, rather than just NGC 1407. Spectral data for NGC 1407 (AO2) and IC 1459 (AO3) are also included in a complete sample of elliptical galaxies I compiled in collaboration with David Davis. This allowed us to construct the first complete X-ray sample of optically-selected elliptical galaxies. The complete sample allows us to apply Malmquist bias corrections to the observed correlation between X-ray and optical luminosities. I continue to work on the implications of this first complete X-ray sample of elliptical galaxies. Paul Eskridge Dave Davis and I also analyzed three long ROSAT PSPC observations of the small (but not dwarf) elliptical galaxy M32. We found the X-ray spectra and variability to be consistent with either a Low Mass X-Ray Binary (LMXRB) or a putative 'micro"-AGN.

  3. Three-dimensional optical high-resolution profiler with a large observation field: foot arch behavior under low static charge studies.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Jaime; Gharbi, Tijani; Cornu, Jean Yves

    2002-09-01

    Our aim is to describe a method for detecting small deformations from a three-dimensional (3D) shape of large lateral dimensions. For this purpose the measurement method is based on the simultaneous utilization of several 3D optical systems and the phase-shifting technique. In this way, the following problems appear: optical distortion due to the large field observed, nonlinear phase-to-height conversion, conversion of image coordinates into object coordinates for each 3D optical system, and coordinate unification of all optical systems. The resolution is 50 microm with a field of view of 320 mm x 150 mm. We used this system to study the 3D human foot arch deformation under low loads in vivo. First results indicate the hysteresis behavior of the human foot under a low load (50 to 450 N).

  4. MonitorNet: the Italian multi-centre observational study aimed at estimating the risk/benefit profile of biologic agents in real-world rheumatology practice.

    PubMed

    Sfriso, P; Salaffi, F; Montecucco, C M; Bombardieri, S; Todesco, S

    2009-01-01

    MonitorNet is a database established by the Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR) in January 2007 and funded by the Italian Medicines Agency (AIFA), for the active long-term follow-up of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis treated with biologic agents. All hospital Rheumatology Units in Italy were invited to participate in a non-interventional, observational, epidemiological study. The study is conducted in a routine clinical setting (real-world practice) where biologics are prescribed on the basis of current recommendations. In this report we describe the design, methodology, and present preliminary data of the study. At the time of the analysis (April 2009) the database included 3510 patients: 2469 (70.3%) with established RA, 675 (19.2%) with PsA and 366 (10.4%) with AS. The cumulative follow up period was 8,787 patient-years (RA: 8,388, PsA: 157; AS: 242). There were 1,538 adverse events in 938 (26.7%) patients. Infections were recorded in 630 patients, skin-related adverse events in 142 and post-infusion reactions in 90. A total of 30 malignancies were reported. An interim analysis of efficacy was conducted on 2,148 RA patients. Seven hundred and thirty-one patients (35.8%) achieved EULAR remission (defined as DAS28<2.4). When assessed with the more restrictive CDAI and SDAI criteria, the frequency of remission was lower (17.9% and 14.7% respectively). Availability of funding for this study provided an opportunity to organize a collaborative national network of rheumatology clinics to develop a large multicentre observational study.

  5. P Cygni type profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraiah, A.; Srinivasa Rao, M.

    The authors present a series of P Cygni type profiles of spectral lines computed by employing different velocity laws of expansion in a spherically symmetric atmosphere. A comparison has been made with those of Beals classification. They have employed the line transfer equation in comoving frame in certain test cases, to obtain the source function which is being used to calculate the profiles observed at infinity.

  6. Horizontal evolution of tidally modulated buoyant plumes and the subsequent genesis of non linear internal waves as observed with an AUV based microstructure profiler.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    toberman, matthew; Inall, Mark; Boyd, Tim

    2013-04-01

    The tidally modulated outflow of brackish water from a sea loch forms a thin stable surface layer that propagates into the coastal ocean as a buoyant gravity current, transporting nutrients and sediments, as well as fresh water, heat and momentum. The fresh intrusion propagates as an undular bore, and the introduced stratification supports trains of non-linear internal waves (NLIWs). In February 2011 an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was used on repeated reciprocal transects to make simultaneous CTD, ADCP and shear microstructure measurements of the evolution of these phenomena in conjunction with conventional mooring measurements. AUV-based temperature and salinity signals of NLIWs of depression were observed together with increased turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates of over two orders of magnitude within and in the wake of the NLIWs. Repeated measurements over several tidal cycles allow a unique opportunity to investigate the horizontal structure of these phenomena, the interaction of each tidally driven pulse with ambient stratification and the remnants of previous plumes, as well as the genesis of and subsequent mixing induced by the NLIWs.

  7. Initial daytime and nighttime SOFDI observations of thermospheric winds from Fabry-Perot Doppler shift measurements of the 630-nm OI line-shape profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrard, A. J.; Meriwether, J. W.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we present both night and day thermospheric wind observations made with the Second-generation, Optimized, Fabry-Perot Doppler Imager (SOFDI), a novel triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) designed to make 24-h measurements of thermospheric winds from OI 630-nm emission. These results were obtained from the northeastern United States and from under the magnetic equator at Huancayo, Peru and demonstrate the current instrument capability for measurements of Doppler shifts for either night or day. We found the uncertainties in the measurements agree with expected values based upon forward modeling calculations; nighttime wind components having an uncertainty of ~20-m s-1 at 30-min resolution and daytime wind components having an uncertainty of ~70-m s-1 at 20-min resolution. The nighttime uncertainties are typically larger than those seen with traditional single-etalon FPIs, which occur at the cost of being able to achieve daytime measurements. The thermospheric wind measurements from Huancayo replicate recently reported CHAMP zonal winds and are in disagreement with current empirical wind climatologies. In addition, we discuss the incorporation of how multiple point heads in the SOFDI instrument will allow for unique studies of gravity wave activity in future measurements.

  8. Ion density and temperature profiles along (XGSM) and across (ZGSM) the magnetotail as observed by THEMIS, Geotail, and ARTEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Hietala, H.; Runov, A.; Shinohara, I.

    2017-02-01

    Characteristics of the two-dimensional configuration of the magnetotail current sheet are important for modeling magnetotail motion/evolution and charged particle energization. Because of the magnetotail current sheet's dynamical nature, however, simultaneous plasma and magnetic field measurements at different radial distances are required to reveal this configuration. Simultaneous observations of the magnetotail current sheet from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) D (around 10RE downtail), Geotail (around 30RE downtail), and Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moons Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) P1 (around 55RE downtail) are used to study distributions of plasma (ion) density and temperature along (Earth-Sun direction) and across (north-south direction) the magnetotail. Fourteen events (each including several current sheet crossings at different downtail distances) are studied. We demonstrate that the plasma temperature along and across the magnetotail varies more significantly than plasma density does. The temperature decrease from equatorial plane to current sheet boundaries is a major contributor to the cross-tail pressure balance. The Alfven velocity VA,B calculated at the current sheet boundaries increases significantly toward the Earth from 700 km/s at lunar orbit ˜55RE to 2200 km/s around ˜10RE downtail. The corresponding energy EA=mpVA,B2 (mp is the proton mass) is 4 times larger than the plasma temperature T0 in the magnetotail's equatorial plane, whereas the ratio EA/T0 is constant along the magnetotail. The plasma temperature T0 measured around lunar orbit in the magnetotail agrees well with the simultaneously measured energy of solar wind protons mpVSW2/2 (VSW is the solar wind speed).

  9. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teach, Beverly; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents profiles of two leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Carolyn Guss and Mendel Sherman, both retired professors from Indiana University's program in Information Systems Technology. (KRN)

  10. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Robert M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents profiles of three leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Robert Mills Gagne, Florida State University; Robert Heinich, Indiana University; and Charles Francis Schuller, University of Georgia. (SLW)

  11. Biophysical Profile

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Rh positive Worrisome results from other prenatal tests Your health care provider might also recommend a biophysical profile if ... the test and at regular intervals during the test. Your health care provider or a member of your health care ...

  12. Large-scale vertical velocity, diabatic heating and drying profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed in the GoAmazon2014/5 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shuaiqi; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Yunyan; Zhang, Minghua; Schumacher, Courtney; Upton, Hannah; Jensen, Michael P.; Johnson, Karen L.; Wang, Meng; Ahlgrimm, Maike; Feng, Zhe; Minnis, Patrick; Thieman, Mandana

    2016-11-01

    This study describes the characteristics of large-scale vertical velocity, apparent heating source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2) profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed during the two intensive operational periods (IOPs) that were conducted from 15 February to 26 March 2014 (wet season) and from 1 September to 10 October 2014 (dry season) near Manaus, Brazil, during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) experiment. The derived large-scale fields have large diurnal variations according to convective activity in the GoAmazon region and the morning profiles show distinct differences between the dry and wet seasons. In the wet season, propagating convective systems originating far from the GoAmazon region are often seen in the early morning, while in the dry season they are rarely observed. Afternoon convective systems due to solar heating are frequently seen in both seasons. Accordingly, in the morning, there is strong upward motion and associated heating and drying throughout the entire troposphere in the wet season, which is limited to lower levels in the dry season. In the afternoon, both seasons exhibit weak heating and strong moistening in the boundary layer related to the vertical convergence of eddy fluxes. A set of case studies of three typical types of convective systems occurring in Amazonia - i.e., locally occurring systems, coastal-occurring systems and basin-occurring systems - is also conducted to investigate the variability of the large-scale environment with different types of convective systems.

  13. Large-scale vertical velocity, diabatic heating and drying profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed in the GoAmazon2014/5 experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Shuaiqi; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Yunyan; ...

    2016-11-16

    This study describes the characteristics of large-scale vertical velocity, apparent heating source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2) profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed during the two intensive operational periods (IOPs) that were conducted from 15 February to 26 March 2014 (wet season) and from 1 September to 10 October 2014 (dry season) near Manaus, Brazil, during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) experiment. The derived large-scale fields have large diurnal variations according to convective activity in the GoAmazon region and the morning profiles show distinct differences between the dry and wet seasons. In the wetmore » season, propagating convective systems originating far from the GoAmazon region are often seen in the early morning, while in the dry season they are rarely observed. Afternoon convective systems due to solar heating are frequently seen in both seasons. Accordingly, in the morning, there is strong upward motion and associated heating and drying throughout the entire troposphere in the wet season, which is limited to lower levels in the dry season. In the afternoon, both seasons exhibit weak heating and strong moistening in the boundary layer related to the vertical convergence of eddy fluxes. A set of case studies of three typical types of convective systems occurring in Amazonia – i.e., locally occurring systems, coastal-occurring systems and basin-occurring systems – is also conducted to investigate the variability of the large-scale environment with different types of convective systems.« less

  14. Balloon-borne radiometer profiler: Field observations

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D.; Anderson, G.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Hubbe, J.M.; Scott, K.A.

    1995-03-01

    This project involves the development of the capability of making routine soundings of broadband radiative fluxes and radiative flux divergences to heights of 1500m AGL. Described in this document are radiometers carried on a stabilized platform in a harness inserted in the tetherline of a tethered balloon meteriological sounding system. Field test results are given.

  15. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orey, Michael; Moore, David M.; Reeves, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Contains the following two leadership profiles of individuals who have made significant contributions to the field of instructional technology: "Francis M. Dwyer: Visual Researcher Extraordinaire" (David M. Moore); and "Tribute to John G. Hedberg: Professor of Education, University of Wollongong" (Thomas Reeves). (MES)

  16. The line profile variable B stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    The observational status of the line profile variable B stars is summarized. The following areas are discussed: recent history; evolutionary status; line profile variations; line strength variations; and photometric variations.

  17. Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) to Identify Core Profiles from the WMS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisby, Craig L.; Kim, Se-Kang

    2008-01-01

    Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is a procedure for extracting latent core profiles in a multitest data set. The PAMS procedure offers several advantages compared with other profile analysis procedures. Most notably, PAMS estimates individual profile weights that reflect the degree to which an individual's observed profile…

  18. Symptom burden, Metabolic profile, Ultrasound findings, Rhythm, neurohormonal activation, haemodynamics and health-related quality of life in patients with atrial Fibrillation (SMURF): a protocol for an observational study with a randomised interventional component

    PubMed Central

    Charitakis, Emmanouil; Walfridsson, Ulla; Nyström, Fredrik; Nylander, Eva; Strömberg, Anna; Alehagen, Urban; Walfridsson, Håkan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, with an estimated prevalence of 1.5–2%. It is an independent risk factor for ischaemic stroke and is estimated to cause about 20–25% of all stroke cases. AF has a great impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL); however, one unresolved issue related to AF is the wide variation in its symptoms. Methods and analysis The symptom burden, metabolic profile, ultrasound findings, rhythm, neurohormonal activation, haemodynamics and HRQoL in patients with AF (Symptom burden, Metabolic profile, Ultrasound findings, Rhythm, neurohormonal activation, haemodynamics and health-related quality of life in patients with atrial Fibrillation, SMURF) study is a prospective observational, cohort study, with a randomised interventional part. The aim of the study is to investigate, in patients with AF, the relationship between symptom burden and metabolic aspects, atrial function and different neurohormones, and the effect of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The interventional part of the study will give an insight into the neurohormonal and intracardiac pressure changes directly after initiation of AF. Consecutive patients with symptomatic AF accepted for treatment with RFA for the first time at Linköping University Hospital are eligible for participation. The enrolment started in January 2012, and a total of 200 patients are to be included into the study, with 45 of them being enrolled into the interventional study with initiation of AF. The sample size of the interventional study is based on a small pilot study with 5 patients induced to AF while 2 served as controls. The results indicated that, in order to find a statistically significant difference, there was a need to include 28 patients; for safety reasons, 45 patients will be included. Ethics and dissemination The SMURF study is approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden. The results will

  19. MPI Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Han, D K; Jones, T R

    2005-02-11

    The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is the de facto message-passing standard for massively parallel programs. It is often the case that application performance is a crucial factor, especially for solving grand challenge problems. While there have been many studies on the scalability of applications, there have not been many focusing on the specific types of MPI calls being made and their impact on application performance. Using a profiling tool called mpiP, a large spectrum of parallel scientific applications were surveyed and their performance results analyzed.

  20. Atmospheric Profiles, Clouds, and the Evolution of Sea Ice Cover in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas: Atmospheric Observations and Modeling as Part of the Seasonal Ice Zone Reconnaissance Surveys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    retreat of the SIZ. As sea ice retreats further, changes in lower atmospheric temperature, humidity, winds , and clouds are likely to result from changed...obtain atmospheric profiles of temperature, humidity, and winds from the time of ice edge retreat in spring to advance in fall. Transects following...aerial vehicles (Glidersonde, SmartSonde) designed to obtain detailed high-vertical-resolution temperature, humidity and wind profiles and cloud

  1. Advanced Multiple Aperture Seeing Profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Deqing; Zhao, Gang

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the seeing profile of the atmospheric turbulence as a function of altitude are crucial for solar astronomical site characterization, as well as the optimized design and performance estimation of solar Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO). Knowledge of the seeing distribution, up to 30 km, with a potential new solar observation site, is required for future solar MCAO developments. Current optical seeing profile measurement techniques are limited by the need to use a large facility solar telescope for such seeing profile measurements, which is a serious limitation on characterizing a site's seeing conditions in terms of the seeing profile. Based on our previous work, we propose a compact solar seeing profiler called the Advanced Multiple Aperture Seeing Profile (A-MASP). A-MASP consists of two small telescopes, each with a 100 mm aperture. The two small telescopes can be installed on a commercial computerized tripod to track solar granule structures for seeing profile measurement. A-MASP is extreme simple and portable, which makes it an ideal system to bring to a potential new site for seeing profile measurements.

  2. Profiling users in the UNIX os environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, V N P; Vemuri, R; Templeton, S J

    2000-09-29

    This paper presents results obtained by using a method of profiling a user based on the login host, the login time, the command set, and the command set execution time of the profiled user. It is assumed that the user is logging onto a UNIX host on a computer network. The paper concentrates on two areas: short-term and long-term profiling. In short-term profiling the focus is on profiling the user at a given session where user characteristics do not change much. In long-term profiling, the duration of observation is over a much longer period of time. The latter is more challenging because of a phenomenon called concept or profile drift. Profile drift occurs when a user logs onto a host for an extended period of time (over several sessions).

  3. Profiling and Racial Profiling: An Interactive Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semple, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Racial Profiling has been recognized as a serious problem that affects many segments of our society and is especially notable in law enforcement. Governments and police services have pronounced that racial profiling is not acceptable and will not be tolerated. They have gone to great lengths in trying to eradicate racial profiling through…

  4. Atmospheric Profiles, Clouds, and the Evolution of Sea Ice Cover in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas Atmospheric Observations and Modeling as Part of the Seasonal Ice Zone Reconnaissance Surveys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Atmospheric Profiles, Clouds , and the Evolution of Sea Ice...sea ice retreats further, changes in lower atmospheric temperature, humidity, winds, and clouds are likely to result from changed sea ice...how changes in sea ice and sea surface conditions in the SIZ affect changes in cloud properties and cover. • Determine the role additional atmospheric

  5. Time Series of Trace Gas Profiles of O3, N2o, Ch4, Hf, Hcl, and Hno3 As Retrieved From Ground Based Ftir Observations In Winter 2000/2001 and 2001/2002 At Kiruna (sweden)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesfeller, A.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.; Höpfner, M.; Ruhnke, R.; Arvelius, J.; Raffalski, U.; Kondo, Y.

    Atmospheric absorption spectra using the sun as the source of radiation were recorded by ground based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) spectrometers at Kiruna (Swe- den, 68N, 20E) during winter and early spring since winter 1990. Since March 1996 a Bruker 120 HR is in operation at the IRF (Swedish Institute of Space Physics). It is operated permanently and it is part of the NDSC (Network for the Detection of Strato- spheric Change). The FTIR spectra have been analyzed with the radiative transfer code KOPRA (Karlsruhe Optimized and Precise Radiative transfer Algorithm) and the re- trieval code PROFFIT (Profile Fit) using Tikhonov-Phillips approach. Zenith column amounts (ZCA) of several trace gases like O3, N2O, CH4, HF, HCl, ClONO2, NO, NO2, and HNO3 have been derived from these spectra. In case of some important species as O3, N2O, CH4, HF, HCl, and HNO3 also reasonable information on the vertical concentration profiles can be derived. Since winter 1999/2000 data analysis is performed in near real time during the campaigns. These time series of ZCA and profiles will be presented for the winters of 2000/2001 and 2001/2002 and discussed in terms of chlorine activation and deactivation, ozone loss, and sequestration of ni- tric acid in PSCs in the polar vortex. Winter 2000/2001 is of interest due to a long lasting break-up of the polar vortex. Therefore a great variability in many gases is ob- served and will be discussed. In addition the results will be compared to results from KASIMA (Karlsruhe Simulation Model of the Middle Atmosphere).

  6. Profiling Instructional Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gephart, William J.; Bartos, Bruce B.

    The necessity of evaluating research methodology is discussed, and a profiling approach is proposed. Explanatory statements about the research process, directions for doing the actual profiling of the research report, a research profiling flow chart, a research profile sheet, and two additional graphic aids to understanding are included. The…

  7. Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) to identify core profiles from the WMS-III.

    PubMed

    Frisby, Craig L; Kim, Se-Kang

    2008-03-01

    Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is a procedure for extracting latent core profiles in a multitest data set. The PAMS procedure offers several advantages compared with other profile analysis procedures. Most notably, PAMS estimates individual profile weights that reflect the degree to which an individual's observed profile approximates the shape and scatter of latent core profiles. The PAMS procedure was applied to index scores of nonreplicated participants from the standardization sample (N = 1,033) for the Wechsler Memory Scale--Third Edition (D. Tulsky, J. Zhu, & M. F. Ledbetter, 2002). PAMS extracted discrepant visual memory and auditory memory versus working memory core profiles for the complete 16- to 89-year-old sample and discrepant working memory and auditory memory versus working memory core profiles for the 75- to 89-year-old cohort. Implications for use of PAMS in future research are discussed.

  8. Autonomous Observations of the Upper Ocean Stratification and Velocity Fields About the Seasonally-Retreating Marginal Ice Zone. Acquisition of Ice-Tethered Profilers with Velocity (ITP-V) Instruments as a Contribution to the Marginal Ice Zone DRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    ice -ocean interactions in the polar oceans ( Arctic and Southern Ocean). Particular areas of focus include ice -ocean exchanges of momentum, heat and...the manuscript of Cole et al., 2012 (Ekman veering, internal waves, and turbulent fluxes observed under Arctic sea- ice , J. Phys. Oceanogr., in...Observed ocean velocity was primarily directed to the right of ice velocity and spiraled clockwise while decaying with depth through the surface mixed

  9. Diagnose Test-Taker's Profile in Terms of Core Profile Patterns: Principal Component (PC) vs. Profile Analysis via MDS (PAMS) Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L.

    A study was conducted to examine how principal components analysis (PCA) and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) can be used to diagnose individuals observed score profiles in terms of core profile patterns identified by each method. The standardization sample from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Third Edition…

  10. DNA profiles from fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Criminal investigations would be considerably improved if DNA profiles could be routinely generated from single fingermarks. Here we report a direct DNA profiling method that was able to generate interpretable profiles from 71% of 170 fingermarks. The data are based on fingermarks from all 5 digits of 34 individuals. DNA was obtained from the fingermarks using a swab moistened with Triton-X, and the fibers were added directly to one of two commercial DNA profiling kits. All profiles were obtained without increasing the number of amplification cycles; therefore, our method is ideally suited for adoption by the forensic science community. We indicate the use of the technique in a criminal case in which a DNA profile was generated from a fingermark on tape that was wrapped around a drug seizure. Our direct DNA profiling approach is rapid and able to generate profiles from touched items when current forensic practices have little chance of success.

  11. Profile and Remote Sensing Observation Datasets (Trace Gases and Aerosols) for Regional- Scale Model Evaluation under the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII)- North American and European Perspectives

    EPA Science Inventory

    While the vast majority of operational air-pollution networks across the world are designed to measure relevant metrics at the surface, the air pollution problem is a three-dimensional phenomenon. The lack of adequate observations aloft to routinely characterize the nature of ai...

  12. Polar mesosphere summer echoes observed with the EISCAT 933-MHz radar and the CUPRI 46.9-MHz radar, their similarity to 224-MHz radar echoes, and their relation to turbulence and electron density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettger, J.; Rietveld, M. T.; La Hoz, C.; Hall, T.; Kelley, M. C.

    1990-08-01

    The relation of the coherent echoes from the mesosphere detected by an incoherent scatter UHF radar to the echoes registered simultaneously with a portable radar interferometer is analyzed. It is demonstrated that these 933-MHz echoes are of the same character as the VHF radar polar mesosphere summer echoes. It is also noted that a narrow electron density observed in the incoherent scatter UHF radar data occurs at the comparable altitude as the portable radar interferometer polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). Potential origins of the scattering process of the PMSEs observed in VHF and UHF are discussed, with focus placed on enhanced electron density fluctuations as well as steep electron density gradients in the presence of cluster ions in the cold polar mesosphere.

  13. Atmospheric Profiles, Clouds, and the Evolution of Sea Ice Cover in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas Atmospheric Observations and Modeling as Part of the Seasonal Ice Zone Reconnaissance Surveys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Meric Srokosz, Alex West, Richard Wood, Axel Schweiger (2012), Assessment of Possibility and Impact of Rapid Climate Change in the Arctic Rep., 62 pp, UK MetOffice, Hadley Centre ...Ice Cover in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas Atmospheric Observations and Modeling as Part of the Seasonal Ice Zone Reconnaissance Surveys Axel ...email: axel @apl.washington.edu Ron Lindsay Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington Jinlun Zhang Applied Physics Laboratory

  14. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1979-01-01

    Work towards establishing a vector wind profile gust model for the Space Transportation System flight operations and trade studies is reported. To date, all the statistical and computational techniques required were established and partially implemented. An analysis of wind profile gust at Cape Kennedy within the theoretical framework is presented. The variability of theoretical and observed gust magnitude with filter type, altitude, and season is described. Various examples are presented which illustrate agreement between theoretical and observed gust percentiles. The preliminary analysis of the gust data indicates a strong variability with altitude, season, and wavelength regime. An extension of the analyses to include conditional distributions of gust magnitude given gust length, distributions of gust modulus, and phase differences between gust components has begun.

  15. Laquinimod Safety Profile

    PubMed Central

    Comi, Giancarlo; Vollmer, Timothy L.; Montalban, Xavier; Kappos, Ludwig; Dadon, Yuval; Gorfine, Tali; Margalit, Maya; Sasson, Nissim; Rubinchick, Svetlana; Knappertz, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Background: Laquinimod 0.6 mg is a once-daily, oral, disease-modifying therapy in development for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) that was investigated in two double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials: ALLEGRO and BRAVO. Methods: Data from these studies were pooled to assess the safety profile of laquinimod versus placebo. Adverse events (AEs), laboratory value changes, and potential risks identified in preclinical studies were evaluated in participants in ALLEGRO and BRAVO treated with at least one dose of laquinimod or matching placebo (1:1 random assignment). Results: In total, 1988 patients received at least one dose of study drug (laquinimod: n = 983 [mean ± SD duration, 639 ± 190 days]; placebo: n = 1005 [mean ± SD duration, 627 ± 198 days]). Early terminations due to AEs were infrequent (laquinimod: 6.4%; placebo: 4.7%). Death was reported in four patients (laquinimod: n = 1; placebo: n = 3). Rates of serious AEs (including malignancies, infections, and cardiovascular AEs) were similar between groups. The most common AEs identified with laquinimod use were back and neck pain and appendicitis. Laquinimod was also associated with asymptomatic changes in liver enzyme levels, fibrinogen levels, and hematologic parameters that followed a consistent temporal pattern: mild, nonprogressive, and occurring within 90 days of treatment initiation, then stabilizing or reverting to baseline levels during continued treatment. Conclusions: Data from these pivotal laquinimod studies demonstrate a safety profile comprising benign or manageable AEs and asymptomatic laboratory findings with a clear temporal pattern. Potential risks noted in preclinical studies were not observed. PMID:28243182

  16. Atmospheric Profiles, Clouds, and the Evolution of Sea Ice Cover in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas: Atmospheric Observations and Modeling as Part of the SeasonalIce Zone Reconnaissance Surveys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    quality of sea ice drift forecasts from 6 hours to 9 days. We examined the role of wind forcing. Advanced Observation Platforms (IR Dropsonde...the continental origin of the air mass in the BCSIZ domain and the downslope warming and drying over the Brooks Range. Both S01 and S04 have much...forecast model increases the probability of tracking a target drifting in sea ice with a 10x10 km image from 60% to 95% for a 24-hr forecast and from

  17. MODELING OF CHANGING ELECTRODE PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Prentice, Geoffrey Allen

    1980-12-01

    A model for simulating the transient behavior of solid electrodes undergoing deposition or dissolution has been developed. The model accounts for ohmic drop, charge transfer overpotential, and mass transport limitations. The finite difference method, coupled with successive overrelaxation, was used as the basis of the solution technique. An algorithm was devised to overcome the computational instabilities associated with the calculations of the secondary and tertiary current distributions. Simulations were performed on several model electrode profiles: the sinusoid, the rounded corner, and the notch. Quantitative copper deposition data were obtained in a contoured rotating cylinder system, Sinusoidal cross-sections, machined on stainless steel cylinders, were used as model geometries, Kinetic parameters for use in the simulation were determined from polarization curves obtained on copper rotating cylinders, These parameters, along with other physical property and geometric data, were incorporated in simulations of growing sinusoidal profiles. The copper distributions on the sinusoidal cross-sections were measured and found to compare favorably with the simulated results. At low Wagner numbers the formation of a slight depression at the profile peak was predicted by the simulation and observed on the profile. At higher Wagner numbers, the simulated and experimental results showed that the formation of a depression was suppressed. This phenomenon was shown to result from the competition between ohmic drop and electrode curvature.

  18. Deprojecting the nasal profile.

    PubMed

    Papel, I D; Mabrie, D C

    1999-02-01

    The nose is the most prominent aesthetic feature of the facial profile. Nasal length, tip rotation, and tip projection are integral aspects in analysis of the nasal profile. In most rhinoplasties the surgeon has the difficult task of increasing or maintaining tip projection of an underprojected or normally projected nasal tip. Less commonly, the rhinoplastic surgeon is presented with an overprojected nasal tip, and efforts are focused on deprojecting the nasal profile. In this article, the authors present a discussion of the overprojected tip, elucidating strategies of analysis, etiologies, and management of the nasal profile and give clinical examples.

  19. An Airborne and Ground-based Study of a Long-lived and Intense Atmospheric River Impacting California during the CalWater-2014 Early-Start Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiman, P. J.; Benjamin, M.; White, A. B.; Wick, G. A.; Aikins, J.; Jackson, D. L.; Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    During the CalWater-2014 Early Start winter field campaign, the wettest period occurred with a long-lived, intense atmospheric river (AR) impacting California on 7-10 February. SSMIS satellite imagery of integrated water vapor (see figure) provides a large-scale overview of the event. Based on Lagrangian trajectories, the AR tapped into the tropical water-vapor reservoir, and the water vapor subsequently advected to California. Widespread heavy precipitation (200-400 mm) fell across the coastal mountain ranges northwest of San Francisco and across the northern Sierra Nevada, although only modest flooding ensued due to anomalously dry antecedent conditions. The NOAA G-IV aircraft - which represents the cornerstone observing platform for this study - flew through two mesoscale frontal waves in the AR environment offshore in a ~24-h period. Parallel dropsonde curtains documented key three-dimensional thermodynamic and kinematic characteristics across the AR and frontal waves prior to landfall. Different AR characteristics were evident, depending on the location of the cross section through the frontal waves. A newly-implemented tail-mounted Doppler radar on the G-IV simultaneously captured coherent precipitation features. Along the coast, a 449-MHz wind profiler and collocated global positioning system (GPS) receiver monitored tropospheric winds and water vapor during the AR landfall. These instruments also observed the transient frontal waves - which prolonged AR conditions and heavy precipitation - and highlighted the orographic character of the rainfall in the coastal mountains. A vertically pointing S-PROF radar in the coastal mountains provided detailed information on the bulk microphysical characteristics of the rainfall. Farther inland, a pair of 915-MHz wind profilers and GPS receivers quantified the orographic precipitation forcing as the AR ascended the Sierra Nevada, and as the terrain-induced Sierra barrier jet ascended the northern terminus of California

  20. Gender differences in the adverse events’ profile registered in seven observational studies of a wide gender-medicine (MetaGeM) project: the MetaGeM safety analysis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Delia; Zagni, Emanuela; Nica, Mihaela; Rizzoli, Sara; Ori, Alessandra; Bellia, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Background MetaGeM is a wide gender-medicine project comprising post hoc and meta-analyses by gender of clinical outcomes, therapeutic approaches, and safety data from previously conducted observational studies to explore possible gender differences in real-life clinical settings. We report the results of the safety meta-analysis of seven MetaGeM studies, evaluating gender differences in adverse event (AE) incidence and severity. Methods Data were collected between February 2002 and July 2013. Male and female patients were compared for the main safety variables, using Student’s t-test, χ2 test, or Fisher’s exact test as appropriate. As supportive analysis, a logistic regression model was estimated to evaluate associations between gender and outcome. Results In total, 4,870 patients (46% females, 54% males) were included in the analysis; age was higher for females (mean ± standard deviation 61.2±18.3 years) than males (56.3±16.6 years). Overall, 264 AEs were reported (59.1% in males). There were no significant gender differences in the percentage of patients with at least one AE: 3.0% for females versus 3.9% for males, χ2 test P>0.05. According to the logistic regression model results, no association between gender and AEs occurrence seems to exist. A statistically significant gender difference in the percentage of drug-related AEs emerged (37.6% in females vs 20.8% in males, χ2 P=0.0039). Slightly significantly more AEs in females were addressed with treatment compared with males (78.1% vs 66.7%, χ2 P=0.0485). Total serious AEs (SAEs) were 47 (72% in males). The frequency of patients with ≥1 SAE was 0.6% in females versus 1.2% in males (χ2 test P=0.0246). Conclusion This safety analysis on a large sample of almost 5,000 patients with different diseases and treated with a wide range of different drugs provides a useful overview on possible gender differences in drug tolerability, which may be helpful in more accurately designing future clinical trials

  1. Profiling atmospheric water vapor by microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Wilheit, T. T.; Szejwach, G.; Gesell, L. H.; Nieman, R. A.; Niver, D. S.; Krupp, B. M.; Gagliano, J. A.; King, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    High-altitude microwave radiometric observations at frequencies near 92 and 183.3 GHz were used to study the potential of retrieving atmospheric water vapor profiles over both land and water. An algorithm based on an extended kalman-Bucy filter was implemented and applied for the water vapor retrieval. The results show great promise in atmospheric water vapor profiling by microwave radiometry heretofore not attainable at lower frequencies.

  2. Campus Profile 98.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glendale Community Coll., CA. Planning and Research Office.

    Glendale Community College's Campus Profile is designed to assist faculty, staff, and students in understanding the college's diverse operations. Organized around an outline from the state accountability model, this statistical report focuses on the academic years 1995-1997. "Campus Profile '98" includes more accountability performance…

  3. Estimating Cognitive Profiles Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang; Frisby, Craig L.; Davison, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    Two of the most popular methods of profile analysis, cluster analysis and modal profile analysis, have limitations. First, neither technique is adequate when the sample size is large. Second, neither method will necessarily provide profile information in terms of both level and pattern. A new method of profile analysis, called Profile Analysis via…

  4. Wind profiler-related research in the tropical Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, K. S.; Balsley, B. B.; Ecklund, W. L.; Carter, D. A.; McAfee, J. R.

    This paper is concerned with the application of wind-profiling Doppler radar technology to tropical atmospheric research. Examples of the use of wind profilers in the tropics are drawn from the Aeronomy Laboratory's wind profilers located on Pohnpei, Micronesia (7°N, 158°E), and Christmas Island (2°N, 157°W). The Pohnpei wind profiler was constructed in 1984 and has been used exclusively to observe vertical motions. The Christmas Island wind profiler has observed horizontal and vertical velocities routinely since 1986. These two wind profilers form part of a planned trans-Pacific network of wind-profiling radars that will eventually span the tropical Pacific.

  5. Comparison of theoretical and observed pressure profiles in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Marquez M, R.

    1981-01-01

    Two-phase water-steam flow conditions in geothermal wells are studied aimed at predicting pressure drops in these wells. Five prediction methods were selected to be analyzed and compared with each other and with actual pressure measurements. These five correlations were tested on five wells: three in New Zealand, one in Mexico, and one in the Philippines.

  6. Interior Cornice Profile, Interior Pilaster Profile, Lions Head Roof Scupper, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior Cornice Profile, Interior Pilaster Profile, Lions Head Roof Scupper, and Interior Panel Moulding - Flanders Field American Cemetery & Memorial, Chapel, Wortegemseweg 117, Waregem, West Flanders (Belgium)

  7. Variations in a Universal Dark Matter Profile for Dwarf Spheroidals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardel, John R.; Gebhardt, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Using a newly developed modeling technique, we present orbit-based dynamical models of the Carina, Draco, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. These models calculate the dark matter profiles non-parametrically without requiring any assumptions to be made about their profile shapes. By lifting this restriction, we discover a host of dark matter profiles in the dSphs that are different from the typical profiles suggested by both theorists and observers. However, when we scale these profiles appropriately and plot them on a common axis, they appear to follow an approximate r -1 power law with considerable scatter.

  8. Expedition 29 Crew Profile

    NASA Video Gallery

    The six members of Expedition 29 are profiled and interviewed. NASA astronauts Mike Fossum and Dan Burbank; JAXA astronaut Satoshi Furukawa; and cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov and Anatoly Ivanishin di...

  9. Profile of Older Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Administration on Aging Administration on Disabilities Center for Integrated Programs Center for Performance and Evaluation National Institute ... Project Aging Statistics Profile of Older Americans AGing Integrated Database (AGID) Census Data & Population Estimates Projected Future ...

  10. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  11. Attitude profile design program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Attitude Profile Design (APD) Program was designed to be used as a stand-alone addition to the Simplex Computation of Optimum Orbital Trajectories (SCOOT). The program uses information from a SCOOT output file and the user defined attitude profile to produce time histories of attitude, angular body rates, and accelerations. The APD program is written in standard FORTRAN77 and should be portable to any machine that has an appropriate compiler. The input and output are through formatted files. The program reads the basic flight data, such as the states of the vehicles, acceleration profiles, and burn information, from the SCOOT output file. The user inputs information about the desired attitude profile during coasts in a high level manner. The program then takes these high level commands and executes the maneuvers, outputting the desired information.

  12. Profiles in Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    These articles put a face to some of the thousands of individuals who contribute to NCI’s cancer research efforts. The profiles highlight the work of scientists and clinicians and describe the circumstances and motivation behind their work.

  13. Whipple Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trangsrud, A.

    2015-12-01

    The solar system that we know today was shaped dramatically by events in its dynamic formative years. These events left their signatures at the distant frontier of the solar system, in the small planetesimal relics that populate the vast Oort Cloud, the Scattered Disk, and the Kuiper Belt. To peer in to the history and evolution of our solar system, the Whipple mission will survey small bodies in the large volume that begins beyond the orbit of Neptune and extends out to thousands of AU. Whipple detects these objects when they occult distant stars. The distance and size of the occulting object is reconstructed from well-understood diffraction effects in the object's shadow. Whipple will observe tens of thousands of stars simultaneously with high observing efficiency, accumulating roughly a billion "star-hours" of observations over its mission life. Here we describe the Whipple observing strategy, including target selection and scheduling.

  14. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    J. Huffer

    2004-09-28

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I.

  15. Accelerated Profile HMM Searches.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Sean R

    2011-10-01

    Profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs) and probabilistic inference methods have made important contributions to the theory of sequence database homology search. However, practical use of profile HMM methods has been hindered by the computational expense of existing software implementations. Here I describe an acceleration heuristic for profile HMMs, the "multiple segment Viterbi" (MSV) algorithm. The MSV algorithm computes an optimal sum of multiple ungapped local alignment segments using a striped vector-parallel approach previously described for fast Smith/Waterman alignment. MSV scores follow the same statistical distribution as gapped optimal local alignment scores, allowing rapid evaluation of significance of an MSV score and thus facilitating its use as a heuristic filter. I also describe a 20-fold acceleration of the standard profile HMM Forward/Backward algorithms using a method I call "sparse rescaling". These methods are assembled in a pipeline in which high-scoring MSV hits are passed on for reanalysis with the full HMM Forward/Backward algorithm. This accelerated pipeline is implemented in the freely available HMMER3 software package. Performance benchmarks show that the use of the heuristic MSV filter sacrifices negligible sensitivity compared to unaccelerated profile HMM searches. HMMER3 is substantially more sensitive and 100- to 1000-fold faster than HMMER2. HMMER3 is now about as fast as BLAST for protein searches.

  16. Doppler wind profile experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The data collection phase of a Doppler wind measurement experiment supported by high-resolution Jimsphere/FPS-16 wind data and Windsonde data was carried out at the Kennedy Space Center in February, March and early April of 1985. The Doppler wind measurements were made using a hybrid doppler profiler put in place by the Johnson Space Center and a SOUSY profiler operated by Radian Corporation. Both systems operated at 50 Mhz. Although the doppler profiler systems were located 10 km apart to enable concurrent operation of the systems for data comparison, little concurrent data were obtained due to set-up delays with the SOUSY system, and system problems with the WPL system during the last month of the test. During the test period, special serial Jimsphere soundings were taken at two-hour intervals on six days in March and April in addition to balloon soundings taken in support of the Shuttle launch operations. In addition, there is temperature, moisture and wind information available from the daily morning Radiosonde sounding taken at the Kennedy site. The balloon release point was at the same location as the SOUSY profiler. Vertical resolution of the SOUSY profiler was 150 M to approximately 20 km. The vertical resolution of the WPL profiler was 290 M to 10 km and 870 M to 17 km. Winds determined form the Jimsphere balloon have a vertical resolution of 30 M.

  17. Tuning ferromagnetism by varying ion beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariwal, Rajesh V.; Malik, Hitendra K.; Asokan, K.

    2017-02-01

    Present study demonstrates a novel technique to tune the ferromagnetism at room temperature by varying the ion beam profiles from 3 to 7 mm during Carbon ion implantation in ZnO matrix and keeping other beam parameters constant. The interaction of implanted C ions with host ZnO matrix at different profiles result in variable ferromagnetism from 0.75 to 3.0  ×  10‑4 emu gm‑1 due to difference in the induced radiation pressure. Similar variation is also observed in the optical bandgap from 3.35 to 3.24 eV for different beam profiles. This study shows that the material properties can be tuned and controlled by the variation of beam profiles during the ion implantation.

  18. Laser profile reshaping in a Fabry-Perot thin film.

    PubMed

    Simon, H J; Andaloro, R V; Deck, R T

    2012-01-15

    We report the observation of non-Gaussian reflected and transmitted laser spatial profiles resulting from the excitation of resonant modes below the critical angle for total reflection in a Fabry-Perot cavity formed by a thin ~7 um air film between two glass prisms. The observations of an interference minimum in the reflected profile and exponential decay in the transmitted profile are new and in excellent agreement with a complex pole theory. Extension of the theory to a larger ~0.7 m cavity at normal incidence predicts similar reshaped profiles.

  19. Effective resist profile control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen-Yu; Wang, Chien-Wei; Huang, Chun-Ching; Chang, Ching-Yu; Ku, Yao-Ching

    2014-03-01

    To meet Moore's law, resist resolution improvement has become more and more important. However, it is difficult to improve resist resolution and keep vertical sidewall profile. For example, a high contrast hole resist may cause trench scum, due to very T-top profile. This paper reports several concepts for resist profile tuning without losing performance for lithographic factor , including mask error enhancement factor (MEEF), depth of focus (DOF), and critical dimension uniformity (CDU). To quantitative analysis the resist profile improvement, we define a new factor, Scum fail ratio (F/R%) for new techniques evaluation. The new techniques, including floatable additive, floatable PAG, and new monomer, are discussed. From X-SEM and CD-SEM data, former three concepts could improve resist sidewall profile quantitatively evaluated by Scum fail F/R% and keep lithographic factors. In addition, another key factor, resist residue defect, is also discussed. The high contrast resist with higher receding contact angle (RCA) easily generates more residue defect after development. With the new monomer composition, RCA of Resist E is decreased from 54 to 48 degree after development. Therefore, the residue defect is improved one order.

  20. Flare Observations.

    PubMed

    Benz, Arnold O

    Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s) of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth's lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  1. Muon Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duldig, Marc L.

    2000-07-01

    Muon observations are complementary to neutron monitor observations but there are some important differences in the two techniques. Unlike neutron monitors, muon telescope systems use coincidence techniques to obtain directional information about the arriving particle. Neutron monitor observations require simple corrections for pressure variations to compensate for the varying mass of atmospheric absorber over a site. In contrast, muon observations require additional corrections for the positive and negative temperature effects. Muon observations commenced many years before neutron monitors were constructed. Thus, muon data over a larger number of solar cycles is available to study solar modulation on anisotropies and other cosmic ray variations. The solar diurnal and semi-diurnal variations have been studied for many years. Using the techniques of Bieber and Chen it has been possible to derive the radial gradient, parallel mean-free path and symmetric latitude gradient of cosmic rays for rigidities <200 GV. The radial gradient varies with the 11-year solar activity cycle whereas the parallel mean-free path appears to vary with the 22-year solar magnetic cycle. The symmetric latitudinal gradient reverses at each solar polarity reversal. These results are in general agreement with predictions from modulation models. In undertaking these analyses the ratio of the parallel to perpendicular mean-free path must be assumed. There is strong contention in the literature about the correct value to employ but the results are sufficiently robust for this to be, at most, a minor problem. An asymmetric latitude gradient of highly variable nature has been found. These observations do not support current modulation models. Our view of the sidereal variation has undergone a revolution in recent times. Nagashima, Fujimoto and Jacklyn proposed a narrow Tail-In source anisotropy and separate Loss-Cone anisotropy as being responsible for the observed variations. A new analysis

  2. Practical Differential Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, M; De Supinski, B R

    2007-02-04

    Comparing performance profiles from two runs is an essential performance analysis step that users routinely perform. In this work we present eGprof, a tool that facilitates these comparisons through differential profiling inside gprof. We chose this approach, rather than designing a new tool, since gprof is one of the few performance analysis tools accepted and used by a large community of users. eGprof allows users to 'subtract' two performance profiles directly. It also includes callgraph visualization to highlight the differences in graphical form. Along with the design of this tool, we present several case studies that show how eGprof can be used to find and to study the differences of two application executions quickly and hence can aid the user in this most common step in performance analysis. We do this without requiring major changes on the side of the user, the most important factor in guaranteeing the adoption of our tool by code teams.

  3. Country profile: Hungary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Country Profile: Hungary has been prepared as a background document for use by US Government agencies and US businesses interested in becoming involved with the new democracies of Eastern Europe as they pursue sustainable economic development. The focus of the Profile is on energy and highlights information on Hungary's energy supply, demand, and utilization. It identifies patterns of energy usage in the important economic sectors, especially industry, and provides a preliminary assessment for opportunities to improve efficiencies in energy production, distribution and use by introducing more efficient technologies. The use of more efficient technologies would have the added benefit of reducing the environmental impact which, although is not the focus of the report, is an issue that effects energy choices. The Profile also presents considerable economic information, primarily in the context of how economic restructuring may affect energy supply, demand, and the introduction of more efficient technologies.

  4. Country profile: Hungary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Country Profile: Hungary has been prepared as a background document for use by US Government agencies and US businesses interested in becoming involved with the new democracies of Eastern Europe as they pursue sustainable economic development. The focus of the Profile is on energy and highlights information on Hungary`s energy supply, demand, and utilization. It identifies patterns of energy usage in the important economic sectors, especially industry, and provides a preliminary assessment for opportunities to improve efficiencies in energy production, distribution and use by introducing more efficient technologies. The use of more efficient technologies would have the added benefit of reducing the environmental impact which, although is not the focus of the report, is an issue that effects energy choices. The Profile also presents considerable economic information, primarily in the context of how economic restructuring may affect energy supply, demand, and the introduction of more efficient technologies.

  5. Detonation Wave Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  6. Temperamental Profiles of Dysregulated Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Althoff, Robert R.; Ayer, Lynsay A.; Crehan, Eileen T.; Rettew, David C.; Baer, Julie R.; Hudziak, James J.

    2012-01-01

    It is crucial to characterize self-regulation in children. We compared the temperamental profiles of children with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) Dysregulation Profile (CBCL-DP) to profiles associated with other CBCL-derived syndromes. 382 children (204 boys; aged 5-18) from a large family study were examined. Temperamental profiles were…

  7. Generation of geographical profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Yuan-Biao; Liang, Kai-Fa; Lu, Zhen-Xing

    2010-08-01

    To provide help for the police's investigation on serial criminals, we develop a mathematical model in the paper. First, we use Inherently Continuous Model and Improved Kinetic Model to generate the offender's geographical profile. However, there is a difference in two models' results. For better synthesizing the difference, we develop a Combination Model and generate a new geographical profile. As a result, we estimate the offender's location and carry on a series of analysis. What's more, the models created can be applied in other fields, such as market's investigation, military operations and so on.

  8. Profile characteristics of excimer laser micromachined features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabat, Martin D.; O'Keeffe, Terence R.; Ho, Wen

    1993-04-01

    In our work with excimer lasers, we observe a complex depth profile in processed blind holes that is energy, material, and process independent. This feature occurs when processing ceramics, polyimide, semiconductors, and metals. Further it occurs under different optical configurations. An understanding of this phenomena is essential when micron-precision features are required. We present our findings and explore explanations.

  9. First Test of a Shipboard Wind Profiler.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, D. A.; Ecklund, W. L.; Gage, K. S.; Spowart, M.; Cole, H. L.; Chamberlain, E. F.; Dabberdt, W. F.; Wilson, J.

    1992-10-01

    The Aeronomy Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Atmospheric Technology Division of the National Center for Atmospheric Research are jointly developing Integrated Sounding Systems (ISS) for use in support of TOGA (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere) and TOGA COARE (Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment). Some of the ISS units will have to be operated on research ships during TOGA COARE's intensive observing period in late 1992 and early 1993. The greatest technical challenge in adapting the ISS to shipboard use is to stabilize the UHF wind profiler that is an integral part of the ISS. In June 1991 a UHF wind-profiling Doppler radar was installed on a stabilized platform aboard the NOAA research vessel Malcolm Baldrige on an eight-day cruise in the Atlantic Ocean. The wind profiler was gyrostabilized and profiler winds were corrected for ship motion utilizing the Global Positioning System. During the eight days at sea, CLASS (Cross-Chain LORAN Atmospheric Sounding System) and OMEGA Sounding System balloons were launched on-board ship for wind profile comparisons. Results of the comparisons show excellent agreement between wind profiles, with an rms difference of about 1 m s1 in wind speed.

  10. Transform analysis of the resonance Raman excitation profile of lycopene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1992-10-01

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles (RREPs) of the ν 1, ν 2 and ν 3 vibrations of lycopene in acetone, ethyl alcohol, toluene and carbon disulphide solvents have been analyzed using the transform method for calculating resonance Raman excitation profiles. The tests show excellent agreement between the calculated and observed profiles for the ν 2 and ν 3 RREPs, but greater difference between experiment and theory occurs for the ν 1 RREP, especially in carbon disulphide solvent.

  11. Profiler Support for Operations at Space Launch Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis; Wilfong, Timothy; Lambert, Winifred; Short, David; Decker, Ryan; Ward, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Accurate vertical wind profiles are essential to successful launch or landing. Wind changes can make it impossible to fly a desired trajectory or avoid dangerous vehicle loads, possibly resulting in loss of mission. Balloons take an hour to generate a profile up to 20 km, but major wind changes can occur in 20 minutes. Wind profilers have the temporal response to detect such last minute hazards. They also measure the winds directly overhead while balloons blow downwind. At the Eastern Range (ER), altitudes from 2 to 20 km are sampled by a 50-MHz profiler every 4 minutes. The surface to 3 km is sampled by five 915-MHz profilers every 15 minutes. The Range Safety office assesses the risk of potential toxic chemical dispersion. They use observational data and model output to estimate the spatial extent and concentration of substances dispersed within the boundary layer. The ER uses 915-MHz profilers as both a real time observation system and as input to dispersion models. The WR has similar plans. Wind profilers support engineering analyses for the Space Shuttle. The 50-IVl11z profiler was used recently to analyze changes in the low frequency wind and low vertical wavenumber content of wind profiles in the 3 to 15 km region of the atmosphere. The 915-MHz profiler network was used to study temporal wind change within the boundary layer.

  12. Gaussian Random Field: Physical Origin of Sersic Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-08-01

    While the Sersic profile family provides adequate fits for the surface brightness profiles of observed galaxies, its physical origin is unknown. We show that if the cosmological density field is seeded by random Gaussian fluctuations, as in the standard cold dark matter model, galaxies with steep central profiles have simultaneously extended envelopes of shallow profiles in the outskirts, whereas galaxies with shallow central profiles are accompanied by steep density profiles in the outskirts. These properties are in accord with those of the Sersic profile family. Moreover, galaxies with steep central profiles form their central regions in smaller denser subunits that possibly merge subsequently, which naturally leads to the formation of bulges. In contrast, galaxies with shallow central profiles form their central regions in a coherent fashion without significant substructure, a necessary condition for disk galaxy formation. Thus, the scenario is self-consistent with respect to the correlation between observed galaxy morphology and the Sersic index. We further predict that clusters of galaxies should display a similar trend, which should be verifiable observationally.

  13. GAUSSIAN RANDOM FIELD: PHYSICAL ORIGIN OF SERSIC PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-08-01

    While the Sersic profile family provides adequate fits for the surface brightness profiles of observed galaxies, its physical origin is unknown. We show that if the cosmological density field is seeded by random Gaussian fluctuations, as in the standard cold dark matter model, galaxies with steep central profiles have simultaneously extended envelopes of shallow profiles in the outskirts, whereas galaxies with shallow central profiles are accompanied by steep density profiles in the outskirts. These properties are in accord with those of the Sersic profile family. Moreover, galaxies with steep central profiles form their central regions in smaller denser subunits that possibly merge subsequently, which naturally leads to the formation of bulges. In contrast, galaxies with shallow central profiles form their central regions in a coherent fashion without significant substructure, a necessary condition for disk galaxy formation. Thus, the scenario is self-consistent with respect to the correlation between observed galaxy morphology and the Sersic index. We further predict that clusters of galaxies should display a similar trend, which should be verifiable observationally.

  14. Teaching with Stratigraphic Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefanich, Greg P.

    1974-01-01

    Presents two exercises modeled after the ice age puzzle described in the ESCP textbook, including formation of terminal moraines and kettle lakes and intersection of normal faults with gold-quartz veins. Indicates that the stratigraphic profiles are usable in teaching earth science, geography, general science, and topographic problems. (CC)

  15. Profiling Bad Apples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFee, Scott

    2000-01-01

    Many school administrators want to develop profiling procedures to identify violence-prone students before bullets start flying. Warning signs (chronic depression, anger, abusive home conditions, violent history) are a staring point. Two FBI agents recommend visiting classrooms, identifying troubled kids, and ensuring that they get help. (MLH)

  16. Profiles of Algebraic Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humberstone, J.; Reeve, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The algebraic competence of 72 12-year-old female students was examined to identify profiles of understanding reflecting different algebraic knowledge states. Beginning algebraic competence (mapping abilities: word-to-symbol and vice versa, classifying, and solving equations) was assessed. One week later, the nature of assistance required to map…

  17. Country Profiles, Iran.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, John K.; Moore, Richard V.

    A profile of Iran is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population--size, number of households, women of reproductive age, growth patterns, role of women, urban/rural distribution,…

  18. Cinnarizine: Comprehensive Profile.

    PubMed

    Haress, Nadia G

    2015-01-01

    Cinnarizine is a piperazine derivative with antihistaminic, antiserotonergic, antidopaminergic, and calcium channel-blocking activities. A comprehensive profile was performed on cinnarizine including its description and the different methods of analysis. The 1H NMR and 13C one- and two-dimensional NMR methods were used. In addition, infrared and mass spectral analyses were performed which all confirmed the structure of cinnarizine.

  19. Low profile thermite igniter

    DOEpatents

    Halcomb, Danny L.; Mohler, Jonathan H.

    1991-03-05

    A thermite igniter/heat source comprising a housing, high-density thermite, and low-density thermite. The housing has a relatively low profile and can focus energy by means of a torch-like ejection of hot reaction products and is externally ignitable.

  20. Rural Incubator Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Mark L.

    This profile summarizes the responses of 20 managers of rural business incubators, reporting on their operations, entry and exit policies, facility promotion, service arrangements and economic development outcomes. Incubators assist small businesses in the early stages of growth by providing them with rental space, shared services, management and…

  1. Culinary Arts Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This chart is intended for use in documenting the fact that a student participating in a culinary arts program has achieved the performance standards specified in the Missouri Competency Profile for culinary arts. The chart includes space for recording basic student and instructor information and the student's on-the-job training and work…

  2. Profile of a Dropout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammontree, Tom

    1978-01-01

    At Coral Gables Senior High, Dade County, Florida, a profile of the average student dropout was composed on the basis of school records to serve as a guide to identifying potential dropouts, who are given special remedial and counseling attention. Dropout rates have decreased from 10 percent to 4.4 over three years. (DTT)

  3. English Teaching Profile: Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.

    This profile of the English language teaching situation in Mexico examines the role of English in society and in the educational system. It is noted that the extent to which English is used in Mexico is affected by the country's proximity to the United States. The educational system is described, with emphasis on English instruction which begins…

  4. Country Profiles, Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzuki, Ariffin Bin; Peng, J. Y.

    A profile of Malaysia is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, migration,…

  5. PROFILE user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, L.; Saunders, D.

    1986-01-01

    User information for program PROFILE, an aerodynamics design utility for refining, plotting, and tabulating airfoil profiles is provided. The theory and implementation details for two of the more complex options are also presented. These are the REFINE option, for smoothing curvature in selected regions while retaining or seeking some specified thickness ratio, and the OPTIMIZE option, which seeks a specified curvature distribution. REFINE uses linear techniques to manipulate ordinates via the central difference approximation to second derivatives, while OPTIMIZE works directly with curvature using nonlinear least squares techniques. Use of programs QPLOT and BPLOT is also described, since all of the plots provided by PROFILE (airfoil coordinates, curvature distributions) are achieved via the general purpose QPLOT utility. BPLOT illustrates (again, via QPLOT) the shape functions used by two of PROFILE's options. The programs were designed and implemented for the Applied Aerodynamics Branch at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, and written in FORTRAN and run on a VAX-11/780 under VMS.

  6. Poverty Profile USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Procopio, Mariellen; Perella, Frederick J., Jr.

    This second edition of "Poverty Profile", published by the Missionary Society of St. Paul the Apostle as part of their Campaign for Human Development, updates the data examined in the earlier (1972) edition and examines some of the current social welfare programs designed to alleviate the affects of poverty. The extent to which poverty…

  7. English Teaching Profile: Senegal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.

    This profile of the English language teaching situation in Senegal examines the role of English in society and in the educational system. It is noted that English is the principal foreign language studied, but that it is used very little as a means of communication. The English curriculum is described, especially the secondary school examinations,…

  8. The autonomous ocean profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Echert, D.C.; White, G.B.; Geller, E.W.; Morison, J.H.

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes the development and initial field test results of the Autonomous Ocean Profiler (AOP). The AOP is an oceanographic instrument platform for measuring profiles of physical, thermodynamic, and biological properties in the ocean. The profiler employs a hydrodynamic lift device to ''fly'' the instrument package up and down the water column along a taut vertical cable. Because the local currents drive the platform's vertical motion, power requirements are low, and therefore long, unattended deployments are possible. By using ARGOS or GOES satellite retrieval networks, the system can supply near real-time data. The system provides profile data at very high vertical resolution in contrast to conventional buoys, which gather data at only fixed sensor depths. Because only a single set of sensors is required to cover the vertical range desired, the system is low cost and, for many applications, expendable. The initial deployment configuration is as an Arctic drifting buoy. A satellite retransmission buoy is placed on the sea-ice surface with the cable suspended below the ice. Conductivity, temperature, and depth information are gathered over a depth range of 0 to 300 m. Data are internally recorded and relayed to the surface buoy through an inductive communications link for transmission via satellite.

  9. Adult Competency Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of abstracts of 120 current Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) federally supported projects being conducted in 34 States and the District of Columbia, this project profile was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are currently…

  10. Profiles of Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Library, Springfield.

    Since January 1986, when the Illinois Secretary of State Literacy Grant Program began funding a wide variety of adult literacy programs, more than 30,000 students have sought help with reading. They have been matched with 25,000 tutors who have provided more than 2 million hours of volunteer instruction. The profiles in this booklet are stories of…

  11. English Teaching Profile: Bahrain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.

    A profile of the state of English and English instruction in Bahrain covers the following topics: description of the role and status of English language use in industry and commerce, government, and education; the role of English at all levels of the educational system; the availability, characteristics, and qualifications of teachers of English;…

  12. PSI Member Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Secretaries International, Kansas City, MO.

    A survey of 2,700 of the 27,000 members of Professional Secretaries International received 755 responses yielding the following profile of secretarial workers: (1) the average member is female, about 45 years old, married with no dependents living at home, and owns a single-family home in the suburbs; (2) most respondents have worked in office or…

  13. Country Profiles, Pakistan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardee, J. Gilbert; Satterthwaite, Adaline P.

    A profile of Pakistan is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, migration,…

  14. Profiles in Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, Larry H.; Wright, Benjamin Drake; Linacre, John Michael; Webster, Linda; Andrich, David

    1998-01-01

    Four of the articles in this section profile major figures in measurement: (1) Sir Francis Galton (Larry Ludlow); (2) Georg Rasch (Benjamin Wright); (3) Benjamin Wright (John Michael Linacre); and (4) David Andrich (Linda Webster). The fifth article, by David Andrich, presents insights gained into the Rasch model. (SLD)

  15. Observational astrophysics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léna, P.; Lebrun, F.; Mignard, F.

    This book is the 2nd edition of an English translation published in 1988 (45.003.105) of the French original "Astrophysique: Méthodes physiques de l'observation" published in 1986 (42.003.048). Written specifically for physicists and graduate students in astronomy, this textbook focuses on astronomical observation and on the basic physical principles that astronomers use to conceive, build and exploit their instruments at their ultimate limits in sensitivity or resolution. This second edition has been entirely restructured and almost doubled in size, in order to improve its clarity and to account for the great progress achieved in the last 15 years. It deals with ground-based and space-based astronomy and their respective fields. It presents the new generation of giant ground-based telescopes, with the new methods of optical interferometry and adaptive optics, and also the ambitious concepts behind planned space missions for the next decades. Avoiding particulars, it covers the whole of the electromagnetic spectrum and touches upon the "new astronomies" becoming possible with gravitational waves and neutrinos.

  16. Profile Likelihood and Incomplete Data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiwei

    2010-04-01

    According to the law of likelihood, statistical evidence is represented by likelihood functions and its strength measured by likelihood ratios. This point of view has led to a likelihood paradigm for interpreting statistical evidence, which carefully distinguishes evidence about a parameter from error probabilities and personal belief. Like other paradigms of statistics, the likelihood paradigm faces challenges when data are observed incompletely, due to non-response or censoring, for instance. Standard methods to generate likelihood functions in such circumstances generally require assumptions about the mechanism that governs the incomplete observation of data, assumptions that usually rely on external information and cannot be validated with the observed data. Without reliable external information, the use of untestable assumptions driven by convenience could potentially compromise the interpretability of the resulting likelihood as an objective representation of the observed evidence. This paper proposes a profile likelihood approach for representing and interpreting statistical evidence with incomplete data without imposing untestable assumptions. The proposed approach is based on partial identification and is illustrated with several statistical problems involving missing data or censored data. Numerical examples based on real data are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach.

  17. Polyphenol profiles of apple juices.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Kathrin; Kraus, Michael; Richling, Elke

    2005-08-01

    Focusing on 17 constituents, the polyphenol profiles of juices freshly made from various dessert (n = 4) and cider apple cultivars (n = 7) as well as commercially available apple juices (n = 24) were investigated using high-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and (HPLC)-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI(neg)-MS/MS) analyses. Significant differences in the total polyphenol content as well as the profiles of the apple cultivars under study were observed. For dessert apples the total polyphenol content ranged from 154 to 178 mg/L, whereas for 'old' German cider apple cultivars 261-970 mg/L were determined. Boskoop showed the highest (970 mg/L) and Granny Smith the lowest (154 mg/L) polyphenol content of the freshly prepared samples under study. Hydroxycinnamic acids, with chlorogenic acid as dominating constituent, ranged from 57 to 68 mg/L as well as from 134-593 mg/L in juices made from dessert apples and that from cider apples, respectively. Dessert apple juices showed lower contents of dihydrochalcones (10-35 mg/L) and flavan-3-ols (50-95 mg/L) compared to that of cider apples (34-171 mg/L and 70-393 mg/L, respectively). Quercetin and its derivatives were found from 0.4-4 mg/L and 0.4-27 mg/L in juices made from dessert apples and that of cider apples, respectively. Compared with freshly made juices, lower contents of polyphenols were determined in the commercial samples under study. Amounts ranging from 110-459 mg/L, dominated by chlorogenic acid with concentrations from 53-217 mg/L, were determined. Information about cultivar-typical apple polyphenol content and profile is important for bioactivity studies and, consequently, essential for the development of consumer-relevant products with particular nutritional functionalities.

  18. Approximate Stokes Drift Profiles and their use in Ocean Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, Oyvind; Bidlot, Jea-Raymond; Janssen, Peter A. E. M.; Mogensen, Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Deep-water approximations to the Stokes drift velocity profile are explored as alternatives to the monochromatic profile. The alternative profiles investigated rely on the same two quantities required for the monochromatic profile, viz the Stokes transport and the surface Stokes drift velocity. Comparisons against parametric spectra and profiles under wave spectra from the ERA-Interim reanalysis and buoy observations reveal much better agreement than the monochromatic profile even for complex sea states. That the profiles give a closer match and a more correct shear has implications for ocean circulation models since the Coriolis-Stokes force depends on the magnitude and direction of the Stokes drift profile and Langmuir turbulence parameterizations depend sensitively on the shear of the profile. Of the two Stokes drift profiles explored here, the profile based on the Phillips spectrum is by far the best. In particular, the shear near the surface is almost identical to that influenced by the f-5 tail of spectral wave models. The NEMO general circulation ocean model was recently extended to incorporate the Stokes-Coriolis force along with two other wave-related effects. The ECWMF coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean ensemble forecast system now includes these wave effects in the ocean model component (NEMO).

  19. [Safety profile of dolutegravir].

    PubMed

    Rivero, Antonio; Domingo, Pere

    2015-03-01

    Integrase inhibitors are the latest drug family to be added to the therapeutic arsenal against human immunodeficiency virus infection. Drugs in this family that do not require pharmacological boosting are characterized by a very good safety profile. The latest integrase inhibitor to be approved for use is dolutegravir. In clinical trials, dolutegravir has shown an excellent tolerability profile, both in antiretroviral-naïve and previously treated patients. Discontinuation rates due to adverse effects were 2% and 3%, respectively. The most frequent adverse effects were nausea, headache, diarrhea and sleep disturbance. A severe hypersensitivity reaction has been reported in only one patient. In patients coinfected with hepatropic viruses, the safety profile is similar to that in patients without coinfection. The lipid profile of dolutegravir is similar to that of raltegravir and superior to those of Atripla® and darunavir/ritonavir. Dolutegravir induces an early, predictable and non-progressive increase in serum creatinine of around 10% of baseline values in treatment-naïve patients and of 14% in treatment-experienced patients. This increase is due to inhibition of tubular creatinine secretion through the OCT2 receptor and does not lead to a real decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate with algorithms that include serum creatinine. The effect of the combination of dolutegravir plus Kivexa(®) on biomarkers of bone remodeling is lower than that of Atripla(®). Dolutegravir has an excellent tolerability profile with no current evidence of long-term adverse effects. Its use is accompanied by an early and non-progressive increase in serum creatinine due to OCT2 receptor inhibition. In combination with abacavir/lamivudine, dolutegravir has a lower impact than enofovir/emtricitabine/efavirenz on bone remodelling markers.

  20. ASCA Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1998-01-01

    This recently expired grant has supported the work of the PI, his students, and his collaborators on a variety of ASCA projects over the past four years. Annual reports have summarized much of the work accomplished; here we provide a brief review of the work resulting from this effort, and a summary of the personnel who have benefited from the grant's support. Starburst Galaxies with Extreme X-ray Luminosities This project began as a careful examination of the claims of Boller et al. (1992) that there were dozens of "normal" galaxies in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey that had X-ray luminosities in excess of 1042 erg sec, higher than that seen in the hundreds of non-AGN galaxies observed with Einstein. If true, this suggested that X-ray emission associated with star formation activity might have a significant contribution to make to the still unexplained cosmic X-ray background (XRB). Since some of our earlier work with the Einstein Observatory Deep Surveys had suggested a similar possibility and several sets of authors over the years had modelled the starburst XRB contribution, these claims were worth pursuing. Our work expanded the examination beyond the RASS to include earlier claims of high-luminosity galaxies powered by starburst emission (selected in this case on the basis of the far-IR luminosities). The result of extensive followup observations under several programs using ROSAT, ASCA, and ground-based facilities was to show that nearly all of these objects in fact have hidden AGN at their cores, and that their luminosities are not in any way extraordinary.

  1. Infragravity waves over a natural barred profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H.; Holman, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of cross-shore flow were made across the surf zone during a storm as a nearshore bar became better developed and migrated offshore. Measured infragravity band spectra were compared to synthetic spectra calculated numerically over the natural barred profile assuming a white run-up spectrum of leaky mode or high-mode edge waves. The dominant wave observed early in the storm was consistent with Symond and Bowen's (1984) theoretical prediction of resonant amplification of discrete frequencies over a barred profile. -from Authors

  2. The resonance Raman excitation profile of lutein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles for the ν 1, ν 2 and ν 3 vibrations of lutein in acetone, toluene and carbon disulfide solvents have been measured. The results are interpreted in terms of a three-mode vibrational theory which includes both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening effects. Excellent agreement between calculated and observed excitation profiles and visible spectra was found in acetone and toluene, but the results in carbon disulfide indicate a possible breakdown in the three-mode model. The major broadening mechanism is homogeneous, with about a 25% contribution from inhomogeneous broadening.

  3. The resonance Raman excitation profile of fucoxanthin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, L. J.; Glasgow, L. A.; Hoskins, L. C.; Krohe, T.

    1989-01-01

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles (RREPs) of the ν 1 and ν 2 vibrations of fucoxanthin in acetone and toluene solvents have been studied. Fucoxanthin, which is a predominant pigment in marine seaweed and phytoplankton, has several structural differences from carotenoids for which excitation profiles have been determined. The RREPs for fucoxanthin are interpreted in terms of a two-mode model and show a B2 value which is approximately 20% lower than for carotenoids like β-carotene and lutein which occur in higher plants. Excellent fits between experimental data and the theoretical model were observed in both solvents.

  4. Transom Profile; Door Elevation; Entrance Hall Ceiling Profile National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Transom Profile; Door Elevation; Entrance Hall Ceiling Profile - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers - Battle Mountain Sanitarium, Administration Building, 500 North Fifth Street, Hot Springs, Fall River County, SD

  5. Observational exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Earth's atmosphere absorbs partially or completely many ultraviolet, infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Atmospheric seeing distorts small images, imposing a limit on the achievable angular resolution at optical and infrared wavelengths that is much poorer than the intrinsic capability of telescope optics. The atomic and molecular species of the atmosphere confuse or prevent the spectral studies of similar compounds outside of the terrestrial environment. Telescopes placed in orbit above the atmosphere avoid these problems and enjoy a unique view of the universe. There are many complex questions pertaining to the origin and evolution of the biogenic elements and compounds and the existence of terrestrial types of planets elsewhere that can be only tackled from orbiting facilities. The detailed nature of the spacecraft, platforms and instrumentation most likely to be launched by the United States and Europe in the near future in an attempt to determine what observational programs would be tractable and which areas of interest to exobiology required hardware capabilities beyond those currently envisioned are considered.

  6. Profile machining apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A. J.

    1985-02-26

    The disclosure relates to a profile forming apparatus and in particular a cam grinding machine in which a cam to be ground is mounted for rotation about the axis of the cam shaft in a work-table and a drive motor rotates the cam about its axis at a speed controlled by a predetermined programme. The work-table is mounted for rocking movement about an axis parallel to the cam shaft axis to move towards and away from the rotating grinding wheel which grinds cam surfaces spaced apart along the camshaft. The work-table is driven positively about its axis by a reversible drive motor in accordance with a further programme to rock the camshaft towards and away from the axis of the grinding wheel as the camshaft rotates and thereby determine the shape and dimensions of the profile to which the cam is ground.

  7. Temperature profile detector

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1983-10-11

    Disclosed is a temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles. 8 figs.

  8. Temperature profile detector

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles.

  9. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  10. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  11. ROSAT observation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    In this annual progress report (November 1, 1993 to October 31, 1994), the geminga pulsar was observed by the ROSAT PSPC for 37,000 s in September 1993, in order to make a more detailed study than was previously possible of the pulse profile and two-component spectrum, and to do phase-resolved spectroscopy. This exposure was 2.5 times longer than the original discovery observation. In addition, a shorter 4,000 s exposure was made in October 1992, simultaneously with a GRO observation of Geminga, in order to verify the absolute phasing of the X-ray and gamma-ray peaks. We verified that the spectrum can be described as the sum of two black bodies, whose temperatures are 6 x 10(exp 5) K and 3 - 4 x 10(exp 6) K, with the latter covering 3 x 10(exp -5) the area of the former. The pulse profiles indicate that the intensity of the two emitting regions peak is approximately 90 deg out of phase in rotation, but that the temperatures are otherwise independent of phase. An improved estimate of the distance can be made from the cooler (larger) blackbody component, yielding d = 440 +/- 120 pc. Another program of this report was to obtain PSPC spectra of an important class of Seyfert galaxies which have narrow lines and stron permitted Fe II emission. Sometines called I Zw 1 objects, or narrow-line Seyfert 1s, they are crucial to our understanding of Seyfert classification and models of Seyfert unification. We observed four new objects and, in addition, obtained data on 17 more from the ROSAT archive. A third program combined PSPC and HRI observations of selected Seyfert galaxies which have unusual and variable spectra. The purpose was to disentangle diffuse X-ray emission from the nuclear source, in order to properly interpret the soft X-ray spectral shapes in terms of partial covering and/or warm-absorber models. The targets of the program are NGC 3516, NGC 3227, and NGC 7314. So far, we have only performed a dtailed analysis on NGC 3516. The fourth program of this report is

  12. Temperature-profile detector

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

  13. Temperature profile detector

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors, creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

  14. Compare Gene Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linux environment in serial or parallel mode.

  15. Surface profiling interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Takacs, Peter Z.; Qian, Shi-Nan

    1989-01-01

    The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

  16. T-ray profile synthesis using photoconductive emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Toshiaki; Masuda, Masayoshi; Sakamoto, Masaya; Egawa, Kazuhiro; Itatani, Taro; Ohi, Akihiko

    2007-09-01

    We have observed coherent synthesis of spatial profiles of THz radiation emitted from a photoconductive antenna array. The antenna array is composed of seven independently addressable photoconductive antenna units having interdigitated electrodes. The antennas were pumped by amplified 800 nm femtosecond optical pulses. Emitted THz radiation was focused, and the time-resolved spatial profile of the THz radiation on the focal plane was observed using a newly developed real-time imaging apparatus, which can correct the terahertz field images for nonuniformity in birefringence of the EO crystal. By scanning the delay time, frequency-resolved images were also obtained, which exhibit frequency-dependent field profiles. Field profiles observed were coherent superpositions of terahertz waves emitted from the antenna units constituting the array. By inverting the bias voltage to the central unit of the emitter array, we observed super-resolution beam size of terahertz waves, which are smaller than the diffraction limit.

  17. GHGRP Chemicals Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Chemicals industry.

  18. GHGRP Minerals Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Minerals industry.

  19. GHGRP Metals Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Metals industry.

  20. GHGRP Refineries Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Refineries industry.

  1. Serum Protein Profile Alterations in Hemodialysis Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G A; Davies, R W; Choi, M W; Perkins, J; Turteltaub, K W; McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Langlois, R G; Curzi, M P; Trebes, J E; Fitch, J P; Dalmasso, E A; Colston, B W; Ying, Y; Chromy, B A

    2003-11-18

    Background: Serum protein profiling patterns can reflect the pathological state of a patient and therefore may be useful for clinical diagnostics. Here, we present results from a pilot study of proteomic expression patterns in hemodialysis patients designed to evaluate the range of serum proteomic alterations in this population. Methods: Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-TOFMS) was used to analyze serum obtained from patients on periodic hemodialysis treatment and healthy controls. Serum samples from patients and controls were first fractionated into six eluants on a strong anion exchange column, followed by application to four array chemistries representing cation exchange, anion exchange, metal affinity and hydrophobic surfaces. A total of 144 SELDI-TOF-MS spectra were obtained from each serum sample. Results: The overall profiles of the patient and control samples were consistent and reproducible. However, 30 well-defined protein differences were observed; 15 proteins were elevated and 15 were decreased in patients compared to controls. Serum from one patient exhibited novel protein peaks suggesting possible additional changes due to a secondary disease process. Conclusion: SELDI-TOF-MS demonstrated dramatic serum protein profile differences between patients and controls. Similarity in protein profiles among dialysis patients suggests that patient physiological responses to end-stage renal disease and/or dialysis therapy have a major effect on serum protein profiles.

  2. Beach profile variation on Hawaiian carbonate beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, A.E.; Richmond, B.M.; Fletcher, C.H.; ,

    2000-01-01

    Beach profiles from selected Oahu and Maui beaches quantitatively document beach volume variation and change between 1994 and 1999. Along exposed, high-energy beaches, large fluctuations in beach volume, characterized primarily by the formation and erosion of extensive berms, dominate the seasonal changes. Beaches along more protected stretches of coastline show much less variation in profile morphology. Beaches on the west (leeward) coast of Oahu experienced the most seasonal variation in profile volume, followed by the north shore, east (windward) shore, and south shore. Similar to Oahu, beaches along the west coast of Maui showed the greatest overall profile variation. However, the mean variation for profiles along a single coastal reach showed little difference compared to other coastal segments. Although some beaches showed net gain or loss during the study period, most beaches remained relatively stable with change limited to a finite envelope. No island-wide trends in beach erosion or accretion were observed during the study period. However, no extreme events, such as tropical storms or hurricanes, directly influenced the Hawaiian Islands during the study period. This data set should therefore be considered as representative of typical annual beach activity. Greater variation and possible long-term change would be expected during extreme events.

  3. Modeling detector response for neutron depth profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coakley, K. J.; Downing, R. G.; Lamaze, G. P.; Hofsäss, H. C.; Biegel, J.; Ronning, C.

    1995-02-01

    In Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP), inferences about the concentration profile of an element in a material are based on the energy spectrum of charged particles emitted due to specific nuclear reactions. The detector response function relates the depth of emission to the expected energy spectrum of the emitted particles. Here, the detector response function is modeled for arbitrary source and detector geometries based on a model for the stopping power of the material, energy straggling, multiple scattering and random detector measurement error. At the NIST Cold Neutron Research Facility, a NDP spectrum was collected for a diamond-like carbon (DLC) sample doped with boron. A vertical slit was placed in front of the detector for collimation. Based on the computed detector response function, a model for the depth profile of boron is fit to the observed NDP spectrum. The contribution of straggling to overall variability was increased by multiplying the Bohr Model prediction by a ramp factor. The adjustable parameter in the ramp was selected to give the best agreement between the fitted profile and the expected shape of the profile. The expected shape is determined from experimental process control measurements.

  4. Laser range profile of cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenzhen; Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-10-01

    technology. Laser one-dimensional range profile can reflect the characteristics of the target shape and surface material. These techniques were motivated by applications of laser radar to target discrimination in ballistic missile defense. The radar equation of pulse laser about cone is given in this paper. This paper demonstrates the analytical model of laser one-dimensional range profile of cone based on the radar equation of the pulse laser. Simulations results of laser one-dimensional range profiles of some cones are given. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retroreflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of different pulse width of cone is given in this paper. The influences of surface material, pulse width, attitude on the one-dimensional range are analyzed. The laser two-dimensional range profile is two-dimensional scattering imaging of pulse laser of target. The two-dimensional range profile of roughness target can provide range resolved information. An analytical model of two-dimensional laser range profile of cone is proposed. The simulations of two-dimensional laser range profiles of some cones are given. Laser two-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser two-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retroreflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. The influence of pulse width, surface material on laser two-dimensional range profile is analyzed. Laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile are called as laser

  5. Competitive Cooperation: The Iceberg Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Jerry L.

    Competitive athletes' scores on the Profile of Mood States (POMS) test create an iceberg-like pattern known as the "Iceberg Profile." Their scores for tension, depression, anger, fatigue, and confusion are low while their scores on vigor juts upward creating the "Iceberg Profile." Persons in a cooperative relationship are often…

  6. Hanford Site Ecological Quality Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Bilyard, Gordon R.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Tzemos, Spyridon

    2002-02-17

    This report reviews the ecological quality profile methodology and results for the Hanford Site. It covers critical ecological assets and terrestrial resources, those in Columbia River corridor and those threatened and engdangered, as well as hazards and risks to terrestrial resources. The features of a base habitat value profile are explained, as are hazard and ecological quality profiles.

  7. Profile Analysis: Multidimensional Scaling Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Cody S.

    2001-01-01

    Outlines an exploratory multidimensional scaling-based approach to profile analysis called Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) (M. Davison, 1994). The PAMS model has the advantages of being applied to samples of any size easily, classifying persons on a continuum, and using person profile index for further hypothesis studies, but…

  8. Profile Interface Generator

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-09

    The Profile Interface Generator (PIG) is a tool for loosely coupling applications and performance tools. It enables applications to write code that looks like standard C and Fortran functions calls, without requiring that applications link to specific implementations of those function calls. Performance tools can register with PIG in order to listen to only the calls that give information they care about. This interface reduces the build and configuration burden on application developers and allows semantic instrumentation to live in production codes without interfering with production runs.

  9. Laser range profile of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Profile information about a three-dimensional target can be obtained by laser range profile (LRP). A mathematical LRP model from rough sphere is presented. LRP includes laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile. A target coordinate system and an imaging coordinate system are established, the mathematical model of the range profile is derived in the imaging coordinate system. The mathematical model obtained has nothing to do with the incidence direction of laser. It is shown that the laser range profile of the sphere is independent of the incidence direction of laser. This is determined by the symmetry of the sphere. The laser range profile can reflect the shape and material properties of the target. Simulations results of LRP about some spheres are given. Laser range profile of sphere, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profile of sphere, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retro-reflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. Laser range profiles of different pulse width of sphere are given in this paper. The influences of geometric parameters, pulse width on the range profiles are analyzed.

  10. Metabolic profiling of praziquantel enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haina; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Zheng, Yang; Zhou, Kun; Hu, Changyan; Krausz, Kristopher W; Sun, Dequn; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2014-07-15

    Praziquantel (PZQ), prescribed as a racemic mixture, is the most readily available drug to treat schistosomiasis. In the present study, ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-QTOFMS) based metabolomics was employed to decipher the metabolic pathways and enantioselective metabolic differences of PZQ. Many phase I and four new phase II metabolites were found in urine and feces samples of mice 24h after dosing, indicating that the major metabolic reactions encompassed oxidation, dehydrogenation, and glucuronidation. Differences in the formation of all these metabolites were observed between (R)-PZQ and (S)-PZQ. In an in vitro phase I incubation system, the major involvement of CYP3A, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 in the metabolism of PZQ, and CYP3A, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 exhibited different catalytic activity toward the PZQ enantiomers. Apparent Km and Vmax differences were observed in the catalytic formation of three mono-oxidized metabolites by CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 further supporting the metabolic differences for PZQ enantiomers. Molecular docking showed that chirality resulted in differences in substrate location and conformation, which likely accounts for the metabolic differences. In conclusion, in silico, in vitro, and in vivo methods revealed the enantioselective metabolic profile of praziquantel.

  11. Safety profile of levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Santiago; Crawford, Pamela

    2003-05-01

    A good balance between safety and tolerability is necessary for an antiepileptic drug (AED) to be successful in the management of patients with epilepsy. Levetiracetam is one of the new generation of AEDs licensed as an add-on therapy for the treatment of patients with partial-onset seizures. Leveti-racetam's mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Controlled clinical trials, open-label studies, and postmarketing surveillance indicate that leveti-racetam has a favorable safety profile characterized by little effect on vital signs or clinical laboratory values, reported adverse events that are mild to moderate, and no known drug-drug interactions. The tolerability of levetiracetam may extend to both pediatric and elderly patients based on analyses of small numbers of patients. Tolerability is maintained over the long term. Levetirac-etam does not appear to have a different safety profile in learning-disabled patients. Levetiracetam appears to have a good balance between tolerability and efficacy in the treatment of a wide variety of patients with partial epilepsy.

  12. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  13. Determination of precipitation profiles from airborne passive microwave radiometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Hakkarinen, Ida M.; Pierce, Harold F.; Weinman, James A.

    1991-01-01

    This study presents the first quantitative retrievals of vertical profiles of precipitation derived from multispectral passive microwave radiometry. Measurements of microwave brightness temperature (Tb) obtained by a NASA high-altitude research aircraft are related to profiles of rainfall rate through a multichannel piecewise-linear statistical regression procedure. Statistics for Tb are obtained from a set of cloud radiative models representing a wide variety of convective, stratiform, and anvil structures. The retrieval scheme itself determines which cloud model best fits the observed meteorological conditions. Retrieved rainfall rate profiles are converted to equivalent radar reflectivity for comparison with observed reflectivities from a ground-based research radar. Results for two case studies, a stratiform rain situation and an intense convective thunderstorm, show that the radiometrically derived profiles capture the major features of the observed vertical structure of hydrometer density.

  14. Raster profile development for the spatial data transfer standard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szemraj, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The Spatial Data Transfer Standard (SDTS), recently approved as Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) Publication 173, is designed to transfer various types of spatial data. Implementing all of the standard's options at one time is impractical. Profiles, or limited subsets of the SDTS, are the mechanisms by which the standards will be implemented. The development of a raster profile is being coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) SDTS Task Force. This raster profile is intended to accommodate digital georeferenced image data and regularly spaces, georeferenced gridded data. The USGS's digital elevation models (DEMs) and digital orthophoto quadrangles (DOQs), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) advanced very huh resolution radiometer (AVHRR) and Landsat data, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth observing system (EOS) data are among the candidate data sets for this profile. Other raster profiles, designed to support nongeoreferenced and other types of "raw" sensor data will be consider in the future. As with the Topological Vector Profile (TVP) for the SDTS, development of the raster profile includes designing a prototype profile, testing the prototype profile using sample data sets, and finally, requesting and receiving FIPS approval.

  15. Sensitivity Studies for Assimilated Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Winslow, Nathan; Wargan, Krzysztof; Rood, Richard; Pawson, Steven

    2002-01-01

    An ozone data assimilation system at the NASA/Goddard Data Assimilation Office (DAO) produces three-dimensional global ozone fields. They are obtained by assimilating ozone retrieved from the Solar Backscatter UltraViolet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument and the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP TOMS) measurements into an off-line parameterized chemistry and transport model. In this talk we focus on the quality of lower stratospheric assimilated ozone profiles. Ozone in the lower stratosphere plays a key role in the forcing of climate. A biased ozone field in this region will adversely impact calculations of the stratosphere-troposphere exchange and, when used as a first guess in retrievals, the values determined from satellite observations. The SBUV/2 ozone data have a coarse vertical resolution with increased uncertainty below the ozone maximum, and TOMS provides only total ozone columns. Thus, the assimilated ozone profiles in the lower stratosphere are only weakly constrained by the incoming SBUV and TOMS data. Consequently, the assimilated ozone distribution should be sensitive to changes in inputs to the statistical analysis scheme. We investigate the sensitivity of assimilated ozone profiles to changes in a variety of system inputs: TOMS and SBUV/2 data selection, forecast and observations error covariance models, inclusion or omission of a parameterized chemistry model, and different versions of DAO assimilated wind fields used to drive the transport model. Comparisons of assimilated ozone fields with independent observations, primarily ozone sondes, are used to determine the impact of each of these changes.

  16. Data Quality Control for Vessel Mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler. Application for the Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Gorriz, E.; Front, J.; Candela, J.

    1997-01-01

    A systematic Data Quality Checking Protocol for vessel Mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler observations is proposed. Previous-to-acquisition conditions are considered along with simultaneous ones.

  17. Profiling phylogenetic informativeness.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2007-04-01

    The resolution of four controversial topics in phylogenetic experimental design hinges upon the informativeness of characters about the historical relationships among taxa. These controversies regard the power of different classes of phylogenetic character, the relative utility of increased taxonomic versus character sampling, the differentiation between lack of phylogenetic signal and a historical rapid radiation, and the design of taxonomically broad phylogenetic studies optimized by taxonomically sparse genome-scale data. Quantification of the informativeness of characters for resolution of phylogenetic hypotheses during specified historical epochs is key to the resolution of these controversies. Here, such a measure of phylogenetic informativeness is formulated. The optimal rate of evolution of a character to resolve a dated four-taxon polytomy is derived. By scaling the asymptotic informativeness of a character evolving at a nonoptimal rate by the derived asymptotic optimum, and by normalizing so that net phylogenetic informativeness is equivalent for all rates when integrated across all of history, an informativeness profile across history is derived. Calculation of the informativeness per base pair allows estimation of the cost-effectiveness of character sampling. Calculation of the informativeness per million years allows comparison across historical radiations of the utility of a gene for the inference of rapid adaptive radiation. The theory is applied to profile the phylogenetic informativeness of the genes BRCA1, RAG1, GHR, and c-myc from a muroid rodent sequence data set. Bounded integrations of the phylogenetic profile of these genes over four epochs comprising the diversifications of the muroid rodents, the mammals, the lobe-limbed vertebrates, and the early metazoans demonstrate the differential power of these genes to resolve the branching order among ancestral lineages. This measure of phylogenetic informativeness yields a new kind of information

  18. Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles

    DOEpatents

    Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-26

    A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

  19. Losartan: Comprehensive Profile.

    PubMed

    Al-Majed, Abdul-Rahman A; Assiri, Ebrahim; Khalil, Nasr Y; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A

    2015-01-01

    Losartan (Cozaar™) is an angiotensin II receptor antagonist with antihypertensive activity. It is used in the management of hypertension and heart failure. Nomenclature, formulae, elemental analysis, and appearance of the drug are included in this review. The uses, applications, and the variety of synthetic pathways of this drug are outlined. Physical characteristics including: ionization constant, solubility, X-ray powder diffraction pattern, thermal methods of analysis, UV spectrum, IR spectrum, mass spectrum with fragmentation patterns, and NMR (1H and 13C) spectra of losartan together with the corresponding figures and/or tables are all produced. This profile also includes the monograph of British Pharmacopoeia, together with several reported analytical methods including: spectrophotometric, electrochemical, chromatographic, and capillary electrophoretic methods. The stability, the pharmacokinetic behavior and the pharmacology of the drug are also provided.

  20. Metabolic Profiling of Alpine and Ecuadorian Lichens.

    PubMed

    Mittermeier, Verena K; Schmitt, Nicola; Volk, Lukas P M; Suárez, Juan Pablo; Beck, Andreas; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Non-targeted ¹H-NMR methods were used to determine metabolite profiles from crude extracts of Alpine and Ecuadorian lichens collected from their natural habitats. In control experiments, the robustness of metabolite detection and quantification was estimated using replicate measurements of Stereocaulon alpinum extracts. The deviations in the overall metabolite fingerprints were low when analyzing S. alpinum collections from different locations or during different annual and seasonal periods. In contrast, metabolite profiles observed from extracts of different Alpine and Ecuadorian lichens clearly revealed genus- and species-specific profiles. The discriminating functions determining cluster formation in principle component analysis (PCA) were due to differences in the amounts of genus-specific compounds such as sticticin from the Sticta species, but also in the amounts of ubiquitous metabolites, such as sugar alcohols or trehalose. However, varying concentrations of these metabolites from the same lichen species e.g., due to different environmental conditions appeared of minor relevance for the overall cluster formation in PCA. The metabolic clusters matched phylogenetic analyses using nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of lichen mycobionts, as exemplified for the genus Sticta. It can be concluded that NMR-based non-targeted metabolic profiling is a useful tool in the chemo-taxonomy of lichens. The same approach could also facilitate the discovery of novel lichen metabolites on a rapid and systematical basis.

  1. Confinement and the safety factor profile

    SciTech Connect

    Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; Scott, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    The conjecture that the safety factor profile, q(r), controls the improvement in tokamak plasmas from poor confinement in the Low (L-) mode regime to improved confinement in the supershot regime has been tested in two experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First, helium was puffed into the beam-heated phase of a supershot discharge which induced a degradation from supershot to L-mode confinement in about 100 msec, far less than the current relaxation time. The q and shear profiles measured by a motional Stark effect polarimeter showed little change during the confinement degradation. Second, rapid current ramps in supershot plasmas altered the q profile, but were observed not to change significantly the energy confinement. Thus, enhanced confinement in supershot plasmas is not due to a particular q profile which has enhanced stability or transport properties. The discharges making a continuous transition between supershot and L-mode confinement were also used to test the critical-electron-temperature-gradient transport model. It was found that this model could not reproduce the large changes in electron and ion temperature caused by the change in confinement.

  2. [Legal implication of DNA profiling].

    PubMed

    Doutremepuich, Christian

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, DNA profiling has been used regularly by the justice system, and has seen a number of improvements, with the need for fewer cells, more efficient DNA extraction and purification, and more rapid genotyping. These methods can now identify an individual more rapidly, from a corpse, blood stain, sperm or epithelial cells, by comparison with familial profiles. In France, DNA profiling can only be ordered by a judge.

  3. Pressure-time profile of multiply shocked carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, G. T.; Gupta, Y. M.; Bellamy, P. M.

    1986-02-01

    An experimental method was developed to measure the pressure-time profile of a liquid in a reverberation of multiple-shock experiment. Profiles, with peak pressures to 30 kbars, were measured for carbon disulfide using shorted quartz gauges (25.4 mm diameter by 3.15 mm thick); these gauges formed the back surfaces of cells which contained the carbon disulfide. Sapphire plates were used both as impactors and as the front surfaces of the cell. Up to six pressure steps were clearly observed in the quartz-gauge output. Measured pressure-time profiles were compared to profiles calculated with available equations of state. The experiments agreed well with profiles predicted with an equation of state proposed by Sheffield (1983). Calibration experiments were performed to characterize both the initial current response and the subsequent current ramping of the shorted quartz gauges used in this study.

  4. A Bayesian approach to microwave precipitation profile retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, K. Franklin; Turk, Joseph; Wong, Takmeng; Stephens, Graeme L.

    1995-01-01

    A multichannel passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithm is developed. Bayes theorem is used to combine statistical information from numerical cloud models with forward radiative transfer modeling. A multivariate lognormal prior probability distribution contains the covariance information about hydrometeor distribution that resolves the nonuniqueness inherent in the inversion process. Hydrometeor profiles are retrieved by maximizing the posterior probability density for each vector of observations. The hydrometeor profile retrieval method is tested with data from the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (10, 19, 37, and 85 GHz) of convection over ocean and land in Florida. The CP-2 multiparameter radar data are used to verify the retrieved profiles. The results show that the method can retrieve approximate hydrometeor profiles, with larger errors over land than water. There is considerably greater accuracy in the retrieval of integrated hydrometeor contents than of profiles. Many of the retrieval errors are traced to problems with the cloud model microphysical information, and future improvements to the algorithm are suggested.

  5. Infrared Astronomy. [observations of extragalactic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Matthews, K.

    1981-01-01

    Several observational programs in infrared astronomy are described and significant findings are briefly discussed. The near infrared work concentrates largely on the use of the 5 m Hale telescope in spectroscopic and photometric studies of extragalactic sources. Observations of the P alpha line profile in a low redshift quasar, X-ray bursters, reflection nebula, and cataclysmic variables are included. Millimeter continuum observations of dust emission from quasars and galactic molecular clouds are also discussed. Finally, improvements to instrumentation are reported.

  6. Analysis of Mass Profiles and Cooling Flows of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies AO2, AO3 and Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters AO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1998-01-01

    This final report uses ROSAT observations to analyze two different studies. These studies are: Analysis of Mass Profiles and Cooling Flows of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies; and Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters.

  7. USGIN ISO metadata profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    The USGIN project has drafted and is using a specification for use of ISO 19115/19/39 metadata, recommendations for simple metadata content, and a proposal for a URI scheme to identify resources using resolvable http URI's(see http://lab.usgin.org/usgin-profiles). The principal target use case is a catalog in which resources can be registered and described by data providers for discovery by users. We are currently using the ESRI Geoportal (Open Source), with configuration files for the USGIN profile. The metadata offered by the catalog must provide sufficient content to guide search engines to locate requested resources, to describe the resource content, provenance, and quality so users can determine if the resource will serve for intended usage, and finally to enable human users and sofware clients to obtain or access the resource. In order to achieve an operational federated catalog system, provisions in the ISO specification must be restricted and usage clarified to reduce the heterogeneity of 'standard' metadata and service implementations such that a single client can search against different catalogs, and the metadata returned by catalogs can be parsed reliably to locate required information. Usage of the complex ISO 19139 XML schema allows for a great deal of structured metadata content, but the heterogenity in approaches to content encoding has hampered development of sophisticated client software that can take advantage of the rich metadata; the lack of such clients in turn reduces motivation for metadata producers to produce content-rich metadata. If the only significant use of the detailed, structured metadata is to format into text for people to read, then the detailed information could be put in free text elements and be just as useful. In order for complex metadata encoding and content to be useful, there must be clear and unambiguous conventions on the encoding that are utilized by the community that wishes to take advantage of advanced metadata

  8. Construction and Identification of Profiles of Curvature Radiation of Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdyushev, V. A.; Bordovitsyn, V. A.; Grokhovskaya, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Parameters of the observed radiation of pulsars are identified with the help of numerical simulation within the framework of the nonlinear least squares problem. With the help of the obtained parameter values, we have constructed profiles of radiation and indicatrices of the angular distribution of the instantaneous radiated power for experimentally observed pulsars.

  9. Coronal magnetic field profiles from shock-CME standoff distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.

    2016-10-01

    Coronagraphs observe coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and driven shocks in white light images. From these observations the shock's speed and the shock's standoff distance from the CME's leading edge can be derived. Using these quantities, theoretical relationships between the shock's Alfvénic Mach number MA and standoff distance, and empirical radial profiles for the solar wind velocity and number density, the radial magnetic field profile upstream of the shock can be calculated. These profiles cannot be measured directly. We test the accuracy of this method for estimating the radial magnetic field profile upstream of the shock by simulating a sample CME that occurred on 29 November 2013 using the three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic Block-Adaptive-Tree-Solarwind-Roe-Upwind-Scheme code, retrieving shock-CME standoff distances from the simulation, and comparing the estimated and simulated radial magnetic field profiles. We find good agreement between the two profiles (within ±30%) between 1.8 and 10 R⊙. Our simulations confirm that a linear relationship exists between the standoff distance and the inverse compression ratio at the shock. We also find very good agreement between the empirical and simulated radial profiles of the number density and speed of the solar wind and inner corona.

  10. Bronchiectasis: a bacteriological profile

    PubMed Central

    Bopaka, Régis Gothard; El Khattabi, Wiam; Janah, Hind; Jabri, Hasna; Afif, Hicham

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of bronchiectasis can involve a combination of many environmental factors, including infection. The aim of our work is to determine the bacteriological profile of bronchiectasis. This is a retrospective study of 100 patients hospitalized in between January 2010 and July 2013. The average age was 48 years with a 58% female predominance. Symptomatology was by a bronchial syndrome in 90% of cases. Bacteriological examination was able to isolate the microbe in 35% of cases. In our study it was through the examination of sputum cytology in 27% of cases, through the examination of liquid bronchial aspiration in 5% of cases, and through direct examination of sputum in search of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 3% of cases. Microbes isolated were: Streptococcus pneumonia in 11 cases; Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 10 cases, Klebsiella pneumonia and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 3 cases each; Moraxella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Citrobacter spp, Serratia marcescens, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus in one case each. Through this work, the authors highlight that Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most commonly- identified microbes in their patients. It is necessary to have a full bacterial examination and to repeat it regularly over the course of the bronchiectasis. PMID:27047618

  11. Tritium profiles in snowpacks.

    PubMed

    Galeriu, D; Davis, P; Workman, W

    2010-10-01

    The release of tritiated water (HTO) to the atmosphere during the winter can contribute significantly to snow contamination and to water-soil-plant contamination after the spring thaw. The dose significance of such a release depends on the persistence of tritiated water in the snowpack, which is primarily controlled by the HTO diffusion process in snow and the rate of re-emission into the atmosphere from the snowpack surface. Monitoring data collected after an acute winter release at Chalk River Laboratories and data obtained in winter over a chronically contaminated area were analyzed to estimate the diffusion coefficient of HTO in the snowpack. Under conditions of cold and dry snow, the diffusion coefficient lay in the range 1-2x10(-10)m(2)s(-1), an order of magnitude lower than diffusion in water but an order of magnitude higher than self-diffusion in ice. These results confirm the theoretical predictions (Bales, 1991). Values up to six times higher were found for warmer periods and just before spring melt, when other processes contribute to profile evolution. The low diffusion rate of tritium in cold, dry snow means that tritium remains in the snowpack throughout the winter, to be released during spring thaw to potentially contaminate surface water, soil and crops.

  12. CO2 profile retrievals from TCCON spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohe, Susanne; Hase, Frank; Sepúlveda, Eliezer; García, Omaira; Wunch, Debra; Wennberg, Paul; Gómez-Peláez, Angel; Abshire, James B.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Schneider, Matthias; Blumenstock, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) is a global network of ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometers recording direct solar spectra in the near-infrared spectral region. With stringent requirements on the instrumentation, data processing and calibration, accurate and precise column-averaged abundances of CO2, CH4, N2O, HF, CO, H2O, and HDO are retrieved being an essential contribution for the validation of satellite data (e.g. GOSAT, OCO-2) and carbon cycle research (Olsen and Randerson, 2004). However, the determined column-averaged dry air mole fraction (DMF) contains no information about the vertical CO2 profile, due to the use of a simple scaling retrieval within the common TCCON analysis, where the fitting algorithm GFIT (e.g. Yang et al., 2005) is used. In this presentation we will apply a different procedure for calculating trace gas abundances from the measured spectra, the fitting algorithm PROFFIT (Hase et. al., 2004) which has been shown to be in very good accordance with GFIT. PROFFIT additionally offers the ability to perform profile retrievals in which the pressure broadening effect of absorption lines is used to retrieve vertical gas profiles, being of great interest especially for the CO2 modelling community. A new analyzing procedure will be shown and retrieved vertical CO2 profiles of the TCCON sites Izaña (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain) and Lamont (Oklahoma, USA) will be presented and compared with simultaneously performed surface in-situ measurements and CO2 profiles from different aircraft campaigns. References: - Hase, F. et al., J.Q.S.R.T. 87, 25-52, 2004. - Olsen, S.C. and Randerson, J.T., J.G.Res., 109, D023012, 2004. - Yang, Z. et al., J.Q.S.R.T., 90, 309-321, 2005.

  13. Rain Profiling Algorithm for the TRMM Precipitation Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iguchi, Toshio; Kozu, Toshiaki; Meneghini, Robert; Okamoto, Kenichi

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an outline of the algorithm that estimates the instantaneous profiles of the true radar reflectivity factor and rainfall rate from the radar reflectivity profiles observed by the Precipitation Radar (PR) onboard the TRMM satellite. The major challenge of the algorithm lies in the correction of rain attenuation with the non-uniform beam filling effect. The algorithm was tested with synthetic data and the result is shown.

  14. Individual Profiling Using Text Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-15

    for author profiling techniques, many of which give rise to deep ethical considerations. A company or organisation could use an author profiling tool...fourth ACM international conference on Web search and data mining - WSDM ’11, pages 365–374, 2011. [19] F Pedregosa, G Varoquaux, A Gramfort, V Michel

  15. Steel Energy and Environmental Profile

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2000-08-01

    Major steelmaking processes (from ironmaking through fabrication and forming) and their associated energy requirements have been profiled in this 2001 report (PDF 582 KB). This profile by Energetics, Inc. also describes the waste streams generated by each process and estimates annual emissions of CO2 and criteria pollutants.

  16. Commitment Profiles and Employee Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Laura; Vandenberghe, Christian; Vandenberg, Robert; Bentein, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    We examined how affective (AC), normative (NC), perceived sacrifice (PS), and few alternatives (FA) commitments combine to form profiles and determine turnover intention and turnover. We theorized that three mechanisms account for how profiles operate, i.e., the degree to which membership is internally regulated, the perceived desirability and…

  17. English Language Teaching Profile: India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    This profile in outline form examines the English language teaching situation and the role of English in India. The profile considers these issues by region, that is, the eastern, southern and northern regions of the country. For each region, the following topics are covered: the role of English; English within the educational system, including a…

  18. User Profiles in Organizational Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Claudio; Pinto, Joaquim Sousa; Martins, Joaquim Arnaldo

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to describe a project to provide an online web portal that can be used as a front-end for all university users--students, teachers, staff--and services, library, administration, e-learning, and e-mail. Design/methodology/approach: The profile model proposed is mainly inheritable, defined by profile components with…

  19. Resonance Raman excitation profiles of lycopene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of lycopene has been examined in acetone solvent and excitation profiles of the three fundamentals ν1, ν2, and ν3 have been determined. The excitation data and the visible spectrum have been analyzed using two-mode and three-mode vibrational models, with the two-mode model involving virtual states of ν1 and ν2 giving the best fit to the data. This mode mixing or Duskinsky effect was not observed for β-carotene. The single-mode and three-mode theories which have been used to explain the corresponding data for β-carotene are shown to be inconsistent with the experimental data of lycopene. Equations for calculating excitation profiles and visible spectra are given.

  20. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mather, James

    2008-01-15

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  1. Transmission profile of the Dutch Open Telescope Hα Lyot filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koza, J.; Hammerschlag, R. H.; Rybák, J.; Gömöry, P.; Kučera, A.; Schwartz, P.

    Context Accurate knowledge of the spectral transmission profile of a Lyot filter is important, in particular in comparing observations with simulated data. The paper summarizes available facts about the transmission profile of the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) Hα Lyot filter pointing to a discrepancy between sidelobe-free Gaussian-like profile measured spectroscopically and signatures of possible leakage of parasitic continuum light in DOT Hα images. We compute wing-to-center intensity ratios resulting from convolutions of Gaussian and square of the sinc function with the Hα atlas profile and compare them with the ratios derived from observations of the quiet Sun chromosphere at disk center. We interpret discrepancies between the anticipated and observed ratios and the sharp limb visible in the DOT Hα image as an indication of possible leakage of parasitic continuum light. A method suggested here can be applied also to indirect testing of transmission profiles of other Lyot filters. We suggest two theoretical transmission profiles of the DOT Hα Lyot filter which should be considered as the best available approximations. Conclusive answer can only be given by spectroscopic re-measurement of the filter.

  2. Optimal Linear Fitting for Objective Determination of Ocean Mixed Layer Depth from Glider Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-06

    profile is around 1 m . All the profiles are deeper than 700 m and clearly show the existence of layered structure: mixed layer, thermocline, and deep...controlled profiles observed by the two Seagliders. With high vertical resolution (1 m ), we chose n 5 4. The value of Hmix was calculated for each...compared to the fluctuations in the mixed layer depth observed after this date. The mixed layer depth oscillates between 50 and 90 m before 25 November 2007

  3. Laser heterodyne surface profiler

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1980-06-16

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for testing the deviation of the face of an object from a flat smooth surface using a beam of coherent light of two plane-polarized components, one of a frequency constantly greater than the other by a fixed amount to produce a difference frequency with a constant phase to be used as a reference, and splitting the beam into its two components. The separate components are directed onto spaced apart points on the face of the object to be tested for smoothness while the face of the object is rotated on an axis normal to one point, thereby passing the other component over a circular track on the face of the object. The two components are recombined after reflection to produce a reflected frequency difference of a phase proportional to the difference in path length of one component reflected from one point to the other component reflected from the other point. The phase of the reflected frequency difference is compared with the reference phase to produce a signal proportional to the deviation of the height of the surface along the circular track with respect to the fixed point at the center, thereby to produce a signal that is plotted as a profile of the surface along the circular track. The phase detector includes a quarter-wave plate to convert the components of the reference beam into circularly polarized components, a half-wave plate to shift the phase of the circularly polarized components, and a polarizer to produce a signal of a shifted phase for comparison with the phase of the frequency difference of the reflected components detected through a second polarizer. Rotation of the half-wave plate can be used for phase adjustment over a full 360/sup 0/ range.

  4. Algeria: country profile.

    PubMed

    Harding, J

    1987-12-01

    Data are presented on the economy, the people, the population's health, and the culture in this country profile of Algeria. The population numbers 21.7 million. The infant mortality rate, used as a health indicator, is 81/1000 live births. Algeria's gross national product per capita is $2410 (US$15,390). Its main imports are machinery, transport equipment, food, tobacco, and consumer goods. The primary exports include oil, petroleum products, liquified natural gas, wine, and tobacco. Algeria's traditional Berber culture has survived occupation by Phoenicians, Romans, Arabs, and Europeans. The country is made up of an assortment of different social groups and ethnicities, and modern Algeria realized its unitary identity from the anti-colonial struggle. Recent laws allow freedom of association, an indication of growing pluralism in a state where opposition traditionally has been proscribed. 1987 marks the 25th anniversary of Algeria's independence, obtained after a long and bitter war with France. The victory of the Front de Liberation Nationale (FLN) was a signal for French settlers to leave in droves, and much of the country's managerial and technical expertise left with them. Yet, the FLN inherited a sound infrastructure on which to build a modern post-colonial society. Additionally, the country also was to benefit from plentiful hydrocarbon reserves, which guaranteed good foreign exchange earnings. One of the country's goals is to feed itself by investing in a long-neglected agricultural sector, yet presently oil and gas revenues continue to be the driving force behind development. The plans for increasing food production include greater scope for private farmers. A widening gap exists between those who espouse the old values forged by the liberation struggle and a younger generation, for whom the FLN's founding precepts and the leadership's old authoritarian style mean considerably less.

  5. Assimilation of Satellite Ozone Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Winslow, N.; Wargan, K.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Rood, R.

    2003-01-01

    This talk will discuss assimilation of ozone data from satellite-borne instruments. Satellite observations of ozone total columns and profiles have been measured by a series of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) instruments, and more recently by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment. Additional profile data are provided by instruments on NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and by occultation instruments on other platforms. Instruments on Envisat' and future EOS Aura satellite will supply even more comprehensive data about the ozone distribution. Satellite data contain a wealth of information, but they do not provide synoptic global maps of ozone fields. These maps can be obtained through assimilation of satellite data into global chemistry and transport models. In the ozone system at NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO) any combination of TOMS, SBUV, and Microwave Limb sounder (MLS) data can be assimilated. We found that the addition of MLS to SBUV and TOMS data in the system helps to constrain the ozone distribution, especially in the polar night region and in the tropics. The assimilated ozone distribution in the troposphere and lower stratosphere is sensitive also to finer changes in the SBUV and TOMS data selection and to changes in error covariance models. All results are established by comparisons of assimilated ozone with independent profiles from ozone sondes and occultation instruments.

  6. A new method for comparing and matching snow profiles, application for profiles measured by penetrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenmuller, Pascal; Pilloix, Thibault

    2016-05-01

    Hardness has long been recognized as a good predictor of snow mechanical properties and therefore as an indicator of snowpack stability at the measured point. Portable digital penetrometers enable the amassing of a large number of snow stratigraphic hardness profiles. Numerous probings can be performed to assess the snowpack spatial variability and to compensate for measurement errors. On a decameter scale, continuous internal layers are typically present in the snowpack. The variability in stratigraphic features observed in the measurement set mainly originates from the measured variations in internal layer thickness due to either a real heterogeneity in the snowpack or to errors in depth measurement. For the purpose of real time analysis of snowpack stability, a great amount of data collected by digital penetrometers must be quickly synthesized into a characterization representative of the test site. This paper presents a method with which to match and combine several hardness profiles by automatically adjusting their layer thicknesses. The objectives are to synthesize the information collected by several profiles into one representative profile of the measurement set, disentangle information about hardness and depth variabilities, and quantitatively compare hardness profiles measured by different penetrometers. The method was tested by using co-located hardness profiles measured with three different penetrometers --- the snow micropenetrometer (SMP), the Avatech SP1 and the ramsonde --- during the winter 2014-2015 at two sites in the French Alps. When applied to the SMP profiles of both sites, the method reveals a low spatial variability of hardness properties, which is usually masked by depth variations. The developed algorithm is further used to evaluate the new portable penetrometer SP1. The hardness measured with this instrument is shown to be in good agreement with the SMP measurements, but errors in the recovered depth are notable, with a standard

  7. Profile: Brian Schmidt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhathal, Ragbir

    2012-02-01

    Brian Schmidt was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2011 along with Saul Perlmutter and Adam Riess. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science and of the US National Academy of Sciences. Schmidt has made significant contributions in observational cosmology, supernovae, gamma-ray bursts and all-sky surveys. Ragbir Bhathal interviewed him in 2006 for the National Oral History Project on significant Australian Astronomers sponsored by the National Library of Australia. (Photos: Belinda Pratten)

  8. Effects of gender and physical attractiveness on visual attention to Facebook profiles.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Gwendolyn; Miller, Olivia S

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined viewers' gaze while observing Facebook profiles of strangers varying in gender and physical attractiveness. Fifty-one participants viewed four Facebook profiles, a physically attractive and unattractive individual of each gender. Participants' eye movements were tracked as they viewed each profile for 60 seconds. Results showed that participants paid more attention to the physical appearance (main profile photograph) of female than of male profile owners and to the personal information (likes and interests) of male than to female profile owners. Participants spent more time focusing on information that was irrelevant to forming an impression of the profile owner (advertisements) when viewing the profiles of unattractive than attractive individuals, suggesting that they made a greater effort to learn about these individuals.

  9. SURFACE BRIGHTNESS PROFILES OF DWARF GALAXIES. I. PROFILES AND STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Hunter, Deidre A.; Elmegreen, Bruce G. E-mail: dah@lowell.edu

    2013-11-01

    Radial surface brightness profiles of spiral galaxies are classified into three types: (I) single exponential, or the light falls off with one exponential to a break before falling off (II) more steeply, or (III) less steeply. Profile breaks are also found in dwarf disks, but some dwarf Type IIs are flat or increasing out to a break before falling off. Here we re-examine the stellar disk profiles of 141 dwarfs: 96 dwarf irregulars (dIms), 26 Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCDs), and 19 Magellanic-type spirals (Sms). We fit single, double, or even triple exponential profiles in up to 11 passbands: GALEX FUV and NUV, ground-based UBVJHK and Hα, and Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 μm. We find that more luminous galaxies have brighter centers, larger inner and outer scale lengths, and breaks at larger radii; dwarf trends with M{sub B} extend to spirals. However, the V-band break surface brightness is independent of break type, M{sub B} , and Hubble type. Dwarf Type II and III profiles fall off similarly beyond the breaks but have different interiors and IIs break ∼twice as far as IIIs. Outer Type II and III scale lengths may have weak trends with wavelength, but pure Type II inner scale lengths clearly decrease from the FUV to visible bands whereas Type III inner scale lengths increase with redder bands. This suggests the influence of different star formation histories on profile type, but nonetheless the break location is approximately the same in all passbands. Dwarfs continue trends between profile and Hubble types such that later-type galaxies have more Type II but fewer Type I and III profiles than early-type spirals. BCDs and Sms are over-represented as Types III and II, respectively, compared to dIms.

  10. Wind profiler dedicated in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, Ken

    A dedication ceremony was recently held in Biak, Indonesia, to commemorate the opening of the Biak VHF wind profiler. The wind profiler, which operates at 50 MHz, was constructed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Aeronomy Laboratory in cooperation with the Indonesian National Institute of Aeronautics and Space (LAPAN). The Biak facility completes the NOAA'Colorado University trans-Pacific wind-profiler network. Other stations in the network, which is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, are Piura, Peru; Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia; and Christmas Island in Kirabati. The Christmas Island facility is supported by NOAA's Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Program Project Office.

  11. Comparing mixing-length models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2010-05-01

    Models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain for the entire atmospheric boundary layer are developed using mixing-length theory and are compared to wind speed observations up to 300 m at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The measurements are performed within a wide range of atmospheric stability conditions, which allows a comparison of the models with the average wind profile computed in seven stability classes, showing a better agreement than compared to the traditional surface-layer wind profile. The wind profile is measured by combining cup anemometer and lidar observations, showing good agreement at the overlapping heights. The height of the boundary layer, a parameter required for the wind profile models, is estimated under neutral and stable conditions using surface-layer turbulence measurements, and under unstable conditions based on the aerosol backscatter profile from ceilometer observations.

  12. Facial profile parameters and their relative influence on bilabial prominence and the perceptions of facial profile attractiveness: A novel approach

    PubMed Central

    Denize, Erin Stewart; McDonald, Fraser; Sherriff, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relative importance of bilabial prominence in relation to other facial profile parameters in a normal population. Methods Profile stimulus images of 38 individuals (28 female and 10 male; ages 19-25 years) were shown to an unrelated group of first-year students (n = 42; ages 18-24 years). The images were individually viewed on a 17-inch monitor. The observers received standardized instructions before viewing. A six-question questionnaire was completed using a Likert-type scale. The responses were analyzed by ordered logistic regression to identify associations between profile characteristics and observer preferences. The Bayesian Information Criterion was used to select variables that explained observer preferences most accurately. Results Nasal, bilabial, and chin prominences; the nasofrontal angle; and lip curls had the greatest effect on overall profile attractiveness perceptions. The lip-chin-throat angle and upper lip curl had the greatest effect on forehead prominence perceptions. The bilabial prominence, nasolabial angle (particularly the lower component), and mentolabial angle had the greatest effect on nasal prominence perceptions. The bilabial prominence, nasolabial angle, chin prominence, and submental length had the greatest effect on lip prominence perceptions. The bilabial prominence, nasolabial angle, mentolabial angle, and submental length had the greatest effect on chin prominence perceptions. Conclusions More prominent lips, within normal limits, may be considered more attractive in the profile view. Profile parameters have a greater influence on their neighboring aesthetic units but indirectly influence related profile parameters, endorsing the importance of achieving an aesthetic balance between relative prominences of all aesthetic units of the facial profile. PMID:25133133

  13. Profile detection by projection of coloured patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontani, Daniela; Francini, Franco; Sansoni, Paola; Jafrancesco, David; Mercatelli, Luca

    2007-06-01

    The paper presents a study to detect the three-dimensional profile of an object using a technique based on the projection of colour-coded lines. The accessibility at low-cost of projectors and digital photographic cameras has approved the employment and the development of these techniques. They provide information concerning the profile through the acquisition of a couple of images. The first one concerns a reference plane and it is captured only once, while the second one refers to the object image. The proposed methodology simplifies the individuation of homologous lines within the two images, when grating projection techniques are employed. Even though these methods are conceptually very simple, they are rarely applied because of this difficulty in stating the correspondence between observed deformation and projected line. The attribution of a different colour to every single line, or to a set of them, introduces an element useful for their selection. After the image acquisition, the data pertaining to the profile are extracted examining the image by means of an algorithm developed in Matlab language for this application. The research work is in progress beyond the results presented in this paper, which already represent a excellent starting point for further studies and evolutions of the technique.

  14. Non-LTE Inversion of Line Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socas-Navarro, H.; Ruiz Cobo, B.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    1998-11-01

    In this paper we address the problem of the non-LTE (NLTE) inversion of line profiles by means of a nonlinear least-squares minimization procedure combined with very efficient multilevel transfer methods. Our approach is based on the concept of response functions, which measure the first-order response of the emergent profiles to changes in the atmospheric conditions. We introduce the fixed departure coefficients (FDC) approximation in order to compute these response functions in a fast and straightforward manner. The accuracy of this approximation is checked comparing FDC response functions with those obtained from full NLTE computations. An NLTE inversion code based on these response functions has been developed and extensively tested. Reference synthetic profiles, similar to those expected from real observations, are given as input to the inversion algorithm and the recovered models are shown to be compatible with the reference models within the error bars. Our NLTE inversion code thus provides a new tool for the investigation of the chromospheres of the Sun and other stars.

  15. Frequency dependence of pulsar integrated profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsett, S.E. )

    1991-08-01

    The dependence of component separation on observing frequency has been studied for seven pulsars that exhibit double- or multiple-component average profiles. In each case, a review of all available data shows a smooth variation of given form. No evidence is found for a 'break frequency' at which the separation behavior discretely changes. It is argued that previous reports of such a discontinuity are due to insufficiently sampled data together with a prejudice toward pure power-law functional behaviors. The absence of such a break has implications for theories of the pulsar emission mechanism and of the propagation of radio waves in the pulsar magnetosphere. 44 refs.

  16. Recent advances in topside profile modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, S. A.; Depuev, V. H.; Karpachev, A. T.; Radicella, S. M.; Danilkin, N. P.

    A parameterized model for topside profile was developed based on the Epstein function approximation. Using the Intercosmos-19 database, model parameters were obtained for different geophysical conditions, including strong-magnetic storms. In some specific conditions the F3 layer was observed on topside ionograms. A physical explanation is proposed as well as results based on modeling approach. Topside ionograms from the sounder on MIR Space Station were studied. Some exotic cases are presented including oblique propagation, station position under the peak height etc. Peak height global distribution is described as well as neutral wind parameters derived from the topside peak height values.

  17. A study of multifrequency polarization pulse profiles of millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, S.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.; Kerr, M.; Shannon, R. M.; van Straten, W.; Mata, A.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Coles, W. A.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M. J.; Levin, Y.; Osłowski, S.; Reardon, D.; Ravi, V.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Tiburzi, C.; Toomey, L.; Wang, H. G.; Wang, J.-B.; Wen, L.; Xu, R. X.; Yan, W. M.; Zhu, X.-J.

    2015-05-01

    We present high signal-to-noise ratio, multifrequency polarization pulse profiles for 24 millisecond pulsars that are being observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project. The pulsars are observed in three bands, centred close to 730, 1400 and 3100 MHz, using a dual-band 10 cm/50 cm receiver and the central beam of the 20-cm multibeam receiver. Observations spanning approximately six years have been carefully calibrated and summed to produce high S/N profiles. This allows us to study the individual profile components and in particular how they evolve with frequency. We also identify previously undetected profile features. For many pulsars we show that pulsed emission extends across almost the entire pulse profile. The pulse component widths and component separations follow a complex evolution with frequency; in some cases these parameters increase and in other cases they decrease with increasing frequency. The evolution with frequency of the polarization properties of the profile is also non-trivial. We provide evidence that the pre- and post-cursors generally have higher fractional linear polarization than the main pulse. We have obtained the spectral index and rotation measure for each pulsar by fitting across all three observing bands. For the majority of pulsars, the spectra follow a single power-law and the position angles follow a λ2 relation, as expected. However, clear deviations are seen for some pulsars. We also present phase-resolved measurements of the spectral index, fractional linear polarization and rotation measure. All these properties are shown to vary systematically over the pulse profile.

  18. Modified power law equations for vertical wind profiles. [in investigation of windpower plant siting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.; Richards, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    In an investigation of windpower plant siting, equations are presented and evaluated for a wind profile model which incorporates both roughness and wind speed effects, while retaining the basic simplicity of the Hellman power law. These equations recognize the statistical nature of wind profiles and are compatible with existing analytical models and recent wind profile data. Predictions of energy output based on the proposed profile equations are 10% to 20% higher than those made with the 1/7 power law. In addition, correlation between calculated and observed blade loads is significantly better at higher wind speeds when the proposed wind profile model is used than when a constant power model is used.

  19. SPLC Sustainable Purchasing Guidance Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To help you find the resource that is right for your organization, EPA conducted a scan of the landscape and developed summary profiles of some of the leading sources of sustainable purchasing guidance around the globe.

  20. User profiling in WWW network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekez, Michal; Gluszek, Adam; Rudzinski, Filip

    2005-02-01

    In this paper we present application of several theoretical tools to a problem of generation of WWW user pofile. First, we present the idea of user profiling and the problem of classification using decision rules. The user profile consists of rules concerning time of day, amount of pages that were browsed and presumable time spent on browsing pages in one WWW host. This profile can be used for planning of advertisement on WWW sites. In the next section, we shortly describe selected tools for generation of decision rules that were used to create user profile. We have chosen two tools -- CART and C4.5 that are examples of decision tree algorithms. We also present the process of data mining. The following section of this paper presents the discussion of results.

  1. Automotive Refinishing Industry: Isocyanates Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The isocyanates profile document is part of the DfE Auto Refinishing Shop Project and is intended to provide information on refinishing, control technologies, and regulatory status regarding isocyanate compounds

  2. Planetary Scientist Profile: Noah Petro

    NASA Video Gallery

    Noah Petro is a NASA planetary geologist who studies the surface of airless bodies in space, primarily focusing on the moon. In this video profile, Noah talks about how he was inspired to become a ...

  3. Geographic Profiling: Knowledge Through Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    CRUSH Crime Reduction Utilizing Statistical History CTM Communist terrorist movements DNA deoxyribonucleic acid FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation... PROFILING : KNOWLEDGE THROUGH PREDICTION by Tiffany D. Crosby June 2014 Thesis Advisor: William Fox Second Reader: Michael Freeman THIS PAGE...

  4. Grinding Wheel Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graphic dubbed by engineers as the 'Grinding Wheel Profile' is the detective's tool used by the Opportunity team to help them understand one of the processes that formed the interior of a rock called 'McKittrick.' Scientists are looking for clues as to how layers, grains and minerals helped create this rock, and the engineers who built the rock abrasion tool (RAT) wanted to ensure that their instrument's handiwork did not get confused with natural processes.

    In the original microscopic image underlaying the graphics, engineers and scientists noticed 'layers' or 'scratches' on the spherical object nicknamed 'blueberry' in the lower right part of the image. The designers of the rock abrasion tool noticed that the arc length and width of the scratches were similar to the shape and size of the rock abrasion tool's grinding wheel, which is made out of a pad of diamond teeth.

    The scrapes on the bottom right blueberry appear to be caused by the fact that the berry got dislodged slightly and its surface was scraped with the grinding pad. In this image, the largest yellow circle is the overall diameter of the hole ground by the rock abrasion tool and the largest yellow rectangular shape is the area of the grinding wheel bit. The smaller yellow semi-circle is the path that the center of the grinding tool follows. The orange arrow arcing around the solid yellow circle (center of grinding tool) indicates the direction that the grinding tool spins around its own center at 3,000 revolutions per minute. The tool simultaneously spins in an orbit around the center of the hole, indicated by the larger orange arrow to the left.

    The grinding tool is 22 millimeters (0.9 inches) in length and the actual grinding surface, which consists of the diamond pad, is 1.5 millimeters (0.06 inches) in length, indicated by the two smaller rectangles. You can see that the smaller bottom rectangle fits exactly the width of the scrape marks.

    The grooves on the blueberry are also the

  5. Use of two profilers during MCTEX for unambiguous identification of Bragg scattering and Rayleigh scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gage, K.S.; Williams, C.R.; Ecklund, W.L.; Johnston, P.E.

    1999-11-01

    A 2835-MHz (10.6-cm wavelength) profiler and a 920-MHz (32.6-cm wavelength) profiler were collocated by the NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory at Garden Point, Australia, in the Tiwi Islands during the Maritime Continent Thunderstorm Experiment (MCTEX) field campaign in November and December 1995. The two profilers were directed vertically and observed vertical velocities in the clear atmosphere and hydrometeor fall velocities in deep precipitating cloud systems. In the absence of Rayleigh scatterers, the profilers obtain backscattering from the refractive index irregularities created from atmospheric turbulence acting upon refractive index gradients. This kind of scattering is commonly referred to as Bragg scattering and is only weakly dependent on the radar wavelength provided the radar half-wavelength lies within the inertial subrange of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. In the presence of hydrometeors the profilers observe Rayleigh backscattering from hydrometeors much as weather radars do and this backscatter is very dependent upon radar wavelength, strongly favoring the shorter wavelength profiler resulting in a 20-dB enhancement of the ability of the 2835-MHz profiler to observe hydrometeors. This paper presents observations of equivalent reflectivity, Doppler velocity, and spectral width made by collocated profilers during MCTEX. Differential reflectivity is used to diagnose the type of echo observed by the profilers in the spectral moment data.

  6. Anomalous polarization profiles in sunspots: possible origin of umbral flashes

    PubMed

    Socas-Navarro; Trujillo Bueno J; Ruiz Cobo B

    2000-05-26

    We present time-series spectropolarimetric observations of sunspots in the Ca II infrared triplet lines, which show a periodic occurrence of anomalous, asymmetric, circular polarization profiles in the umbral chromosphere. The profiles may be caused by the periodic development of an unresolved atmospheric component in a downward flowing magnetized environment. This active component with upward directed velocities as high as 10 kilometers per second is connected to the umbral flash (UF) phenomenon. We can explain the observations with a semiempirical model of the chromospheric oscillation and of the sunspot magnetized atmospheric plasma during a UF event.

  7. What Disc Brightness Profiles Can Tell us about Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckman, John; Erwin, Peter; Gutiérrez, Leonel

    2015-03-01

    Azimuthally averaged surface brightness profiles of disc galaxies provide a most useful practical classification scheme which gives insights into their evolution. Freeman (1970) first classified disc profiles into Type I, with a single exponential decline in surface brightness, and Type II, having a split exponential profile, whose inner radial portion is shallower than its outer section. Van der Kruit & and Searle, (1981) drew attention to sharply truncated profiles of outer discs observed edge-on, but more recently Pohlen et al. (2004) showed that if these same galaxies were observed face-on their profiles would be of Type II. Finally in Erwin, Beckman and Pohlen (2005) we found a significant fraction of profiles with inner portion steeper than the outer portion, which we termed ``antitruncations`` or Type III profiles. In Erwin, Pohlen and Beckman (2008), we produced a refined classification, taking into account those Type II's produced by dynamical effects at the outer Lindblad resonance, and those Type III's caused by the presence of an outer stellar halo. In Gutiérrez et al. (2011) we showed the distribution of the three main profile types along the Hubble sequence. In early type discs Types I and III predominate, while in late types, Sc and later, Type II predominates. The evolution of Type II's over cosmic time was studied by Azzollini et al. (2008a, 2008b) who obtained four key results: (a) between z = 1 and z = 0 the break radius between the inner (shallower) and outer (steeper) profile has increased systematically, by a factor 1.3; (b) the inner profile has steepened while the outer profile is shallower at lower z; (c) the extrapolated central surface brightness has fallen by over two magnitudes; (d) the discs in the full redshift interval are always bluest at the break radius. While this behaviour can be qualitatively explained via evolutionary models including stellar migration plus gas infall, such as that by Roskar et al. (2008), and while Type III

  8. Characteristics of He II Proximity Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Syphers, David; Meiksin, Avery; Kriss, Gerard A.; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.; Anderson, Scott F.

    2015-06-01

    The proximity profile in the spectra of z≈ 3 quasars, where fluxes extend blueward of the He ii Lyα wavelength 304 (1+z) Å, is one of the most important spectral features in the study of the intergalactic medium (IGM). Based on the Hubble Space Telescope spectra of 24 He ii quasars, we find that the majority of them display a proximity profile, corresponding to an ionization radius as large as 20 Mpc in the source's rest frame. In comparison with those in the H i spectra of the quasars at z ≈ 6, the He ii proximity effect is more prominent and is observed over a considerably longer period of reionization. The He ii proximity zone sizes decrease at higher redshifts, particularly at z\\gt 3.3. This trend is similar to that for H i, signaling an onset of He ii reionization at z≳ 4. For quasar SDSS1253+6817 (z = 3.48), the He ii absorption trough displays a gradual decline and serves as a good case for modeling the He ii reionization. To model such a broad profile requires a quasar radiation field whose energy distribution between 4 and 1 Rydberg is considerably harder than normally assumed. The UV continuum of this quasar is indeed exceptionally steep, and the He ii ionization level in the quasar vicinity is higher than the average level in the IGM. These results are evidence that a very hard EUV continuum from this quasar produces a large ionized zone around it. Distinct exceptions are the two brightest He ii quasars at z ≈ 2.8, for which no significant proximity profile is present, probably implying that they are very young.

  9. Interpretation of sputter depth profiles by mixing simulations.

    PubMed

    Kupris, G; Rössler, H; Ecke, G; Hofmann, S

    1995-10-01

    The interpretation of sputter depth profiles can be simplified by use of computer simulations. Distortions caused by mixing effects and distortions caused by the information depth of the analytical method have to be distinguished. Atomic mixing and the information depth distort the depth profile simultaneously. Therefore, it is necessary to take into consideration a superposition of both distortion effects. The sputtering of a GaAs/A1As multilayer has been calculated on a personal computer with the binary collision approximation code T-DYN by Biersack and with an own layer model. A new computer code LAMBDA has been used for the investigation of the influence of the AES information depth in addition to atomic mixing and preferential sputtering. A comparison of the calculated and the measured depth profile explains the observed effects. Therefore conclusions can be drawn about the original elemental distribution in the sample from the measured depth profile.

  10. Vortex structure in stimulated Raman scattering beam profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drampyan, Raphael K.

    2000-02-01

    The beam profile of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a Kerr medium pumped by multimode radiation with regular structure having nearly four-fold azimuthal symmetry was studied. The SRS was excited near the threshold of generation by nanosecond pulses of laser radiation at wavelength 530 nm. The profile of output pump beam had a uniform intensity distribution, whereas the SRS beam profile showed kaleidoscopic change from shot to shot, while the energies of input pulses were kept stable. The circularly distributed speckle pattern, as well as interference fringe structure in the profile of the beam of SRS I Stokes components was observed. The interference fringes showed the number of points with origination and vanishing of fringes. Such behavior, which is the vortex signature, allows to suppose that SRS waves, generated from quantum noise, carry the screw dislocations. The origin of dislocations is analogous to one described for a speckle field and discussed for SRS.

  11. Temperature and velocity profiles in sooting free boundary layer flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ang, J. A.; Pagni, P. J.; Mataga, T. G.; Margle, J. M.; Lyons, V. J.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature and velocity profiles are presented for cyclohexane, n-heptane, and iso-octane free, laminar, boundary layer, sooting, diffusion flames. Temperatures are measured with 3 mil Pt/Pt-13 percent Rh thermocouples. Corrected gas temperatures are derived by performing an energy balance of convection to and radiation from the thermocouple bead incorporating the variation of air conductivity and platinum emissivity with temperature. Velocities are measured using laser doppler velocimetry techniques. Profiles are compared with previously reported analytic temperature and velocity fields. Comparison of theoretical and experimental temperature profiles suggests improvement in the analytical treatment is needed, which accounts more accurately for the local soot radiation. The velocity profiles are in good agreement, with the departure of the theory from observation partially due to the small fluctuations inherent in these free flows.

  12. Personality profile of patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Karachristianou, Styliani; Katsarou, Zoe; Bostantjopoulou, Sevasti; Economou, Andri; Garyfallos, George; Delinikopoulou, Eleni

    2008-11-01

    In the study described here we attempted to evaluate the personality profiles of 25 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) at the time of diagnosis, before treatment, and to explore a potential relationship between behavioral aspects and clinical outcome. For this purpose we employed a standardized and objective instrument, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), and found that patients with JME have a personality profile similar to that of the control group, which corresponds to the 3,1 code type MMPI profile. We also noted that the characteristics of this personality type include those described in patients with long-duration JME by previous researchers. Consequently, we conclude that personality aberrations are not a feature of this syndrome. Furthermore, we observed that under treatment, EEGs normalized in patients who had exhibited "psychotic tendencies" pretreatment. The credibility of our results is supported by the fact that assessment of the personality profile was not confounded by medication or the longitudinal burden of epileptic seizures.

  13. Identifying Neighborhoods of Coordinated Gene Expression and Metabolite Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Timothy; Wicker, Nicolas; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate how metabolic network structure affects any coordination between transcript and metabolite profiles. To achieve this goal we conduct two complementary analyses focused on the metabolic response to stress. First, we investigate the general size of any relationship between metabolic network gene expression and metabolite profiles. We find that strongly correlated transcript-metabolite profiles are sustained over surprisingly long network distances away from any target metabolite. Secondly, we employ a novel pathway mining method to investigate the structure of this transcript-metabolite relationship. The objective of this method is to identify a minimum set of metabolites which are the target of significantly correlated gene expression pathways. The results reveal that in general, a global regulation signature targeting a small number of metabolites is responsible for a large scale metabolic response. However, our method also reveals pathway specific effects that can degrade this global regulation signature and complicates the observed coordination between transcript-metabolite profiles. PMID:22355360

  14. New fast beam profile monitor for electron-positron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Bogomyagkov, A. V.; Gurko, V. F.; Zhuravlev, A. N.; Zubarev, P. V.; Kiselev, V. A.; Meshkov, O. I.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Selivanov, A. N.; Smaluk, V. V.; Khilchenko, A. D.

    2007-04-15

    A new fast beam profile monitor has been developed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. This monitor is based on the Hamamatsu multianode photomultiplier with 16 anode strips and provides turn-by-turn measurement of the transverse beam profile. The device is equipped with an internal memory, which has enough capacity to store 131 072 samples of the beam profile. The dynamic range of the beam profile monitor allows us to study turn-by-turn beam dynamics within the bunch charge range from 1 pC up to 10 nC. Using this instrument, we have investigated at the VEPP-4M electron-positron collider a number of beam dynamics effects which cannot be observed by other beam diagnostics tools.

  15. Non-LTE profiles of the Al I autoionization lines. [for solar model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, G. D.; Jefferies, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    A non-LTE formulation is given for the transfer of radiation in the autoionizing lines of neutral aluminum at 1932 and 1936 A through both the Bilderberg and Harvard-Smithsonian model atmospheres. Numerical solutions for the common source function of these lines and their theoretical line profiles are calculated and compared with the corresponding LTE profiles. The results show that the non-LTE profiles provide a better match with the observations. They also indicate that the continuous opacity of the standard solar models should be increased in this wavelength region if the center-limb variations of observed and theoretical profiles of these lines are to be in reasonable agreement.

  16. The Diversity of Dark Matter Profiles in the Milky Way's Dwarf Spheroidals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardel, John; Gebhardt, K.

    2013-07-01

    Studies of the Milky Way's dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies can be divided into two types: ones that find dark matter (DM) profiles that are cuspy, and ones that find cores. Every dynamical study to date has focused on comparing these two types of profiles and ruling out one in favor of the other. I present results from a very different modeling approach that, instead of comparing between profile parameterizations, calculates the DM profile non-parametrically. This generalized analysis allows me to detect other profile types not predicted from theory or otherwise observed. For the five bright dSphs studied, I find some have DM profiles consistent with the cusps predicted from theory, some have profiles that may be cored, and others show hints of an up-bending in density at smaller radii---a result that has not been predicted nor observed previously. The diversity of profile types observed demonstrates the universal density profile hypothesis, a generic prediction of most galaxy formation theories, is not applicable to the Milky Way's dSph population at z=0. I speculate on the ways feedback from baryons may account for profile differences.

  17. Observations of Three Dimensional Surfzone Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, J. L.; Henderson, S. M.; Solovitz, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present measurements of the vertical structure of surfzone eddies (frequencies 0.0005-0.01 Hz). From 16 Oct to 07 Nov 2011, an array of 12 Acoustic Doppler Profilers (ADPs) measured velocity profiles in 0-6 m water depth on a natural beach near Duck, North Carolina. We will analyze and describe vertical variations in eddy velocity. Vertical variability of eddy magnitude will be presented, as well as coherence and phase between near-surface and near-bed velocities. We aim to shed light on the causes and consequences of vertical eddy variability, which has recently been recognized in observations, but is not yet well understood.

  18. Modelling chemical depletion profiles in regolith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brantley, S.L.; Bandstra, J.; Moore, J.; White, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical or mineralogical profiles in regolith display reaction fronts that document depletion of leachable elements or minerals. A generalized equation employing lumped parameters was derived to model such ubiquitously observed patterns:C = frac(C0, frac(C0 - Cx = 0, Cx = 0) exp (??ini ?? over(k, ??) ?? x) + 1)Here C, Cx = 0, and Co are the concentrations of an element at a given depth x, at the top of the reaction front, or in parent respectively. ??ini is the roughness of the dissolving mineral in the parent and k???? is a lumped kinetic parameter. This kinetic parameter is an inverse function of the porefluid advective velocity and a direct function of the dissolution rate constant times mineral surface area per unit volume regolith. This model equation fits profiles of concentration versus depth for albite in seven weathering systems and is consistent with the interpretation that the surface area (m2 mineral m- 3 bulk regolith) varies linearly with the concentration of the dissolving mineral across the front. Dissolution rate constants can be calculated from the lumped fit parameters for these profiles using observed values of weathering advance rate, the proton driving force, the geometric surface area per unit volume regolith and parent concentration of albite. These calculated values of the dissolution rate constant compare favorably to literature values. The model equation, useful for reaction fronts in both steady-state erosional and quasi-stationary non-erosional systems, incorporates the variation of reaction affinity using pH as a master variable. Use of this model equation to fit depletion fronts for soils highlights the importance of buffering of pH in the soil system. Furthermore, the equation should allow better understanding of the effects of important environmental variables on weathering rates. ?? 2008.

  19. Electron density profiles from ionograms - Comparisons with rocket profiles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, J. W.; Paul, A. K.

    1973-01-01

    From a series of ten rocket flights at Wallops Island conducted by the University of Illinois, detailed electron density profiles are available in the altitude range 60-120 km. Concurrent ionograms from a nearby conventional ionosonde of good sensitivity and precision, have been reduced to N(h) profiles by the NOAA methods. Special attention is given to the needs for accurate ionosonde calibration, proper ionogram interpretation, and corrections for underlying ionization, 'valley' ionization, and effects of lateral-gradients. Proper corrections in the present cases yield profiles by ionogram inversion which agree to within a few percent in density, and a few hundred meters or less in height, with the rocket results.

  20. Ranking of facial profiles among Asians.

    PubMed

    Lew, K K; Soh, G; Loh, E

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the facial profile preferences in a sample of 1,189 Asian teenagers (aged 15.3 +/- 3.2 years). Five facial profile types were computer-generated by trained personnel (orthodontists and oral maxillofacial surgeons) to represent distinct facial types. Subjects were asked to rank the profiles in descending order of attractiveness. The ranking was as follows: orthognathic profile, bimaxillary retrusive profile, bimaxillary protrusive profile, mandibular retrognathic profile, and mandibular prognathic profile. The differences in rank scores between all the profile types were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Assessment of profile types among lay personnel could provide clinicians an indication into the relative attractiveness among profile types and health care workers in treatment prioritization among dysmorphic facial types.

  1. Earth Observing System: Global Observations to Study the Earth's Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by which scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During the last couple of years, four EOS science missions were launched, representing observations of (i) total solar irradiance, (ii) Earth radiation budget, (iii) land cover & land use change, (iv) ocean processes (vector wind, sea surface temperature, and ocean color), (v) atmospheric processes (aerosol and cloud properties, water vapor, and temperature and moisture profiles), and (vi) tropospheric chemistry. In succeeding years many more satellites will be launched that will contribute immeasurably to our understanding of the Earth's environment. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using NASA's Earth science data to examine land use and natural hazards, environmental air quality, including: dust storms over the worlds deserts, cloud and radiation properties, sea surface temperature, and winds over the ocean, with a special emphasis on satellite observations available for studying the southern African environment.

  2. Subtropical Productivity from Profiling Floats and Gliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, D. P.; Johnson, K. S.; Karl, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2007 profiling floats equipped with dissolved oxygen and nitrate sensors have been released from the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) and Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) sites and can be calibrated using time-series observations. More recent deployments have also included bio-optical and pH sensors. Gliders with oxygen sensors and bio-optics have been intermittently deployed near HOT Station ALOHA since 2008 and at BATS since 2014. While gliders maintain a restricted survey region near the time-series stations, profiling floats drifted widely across the subtropical gyres. Multiple floats and gliders enables a cotemporaneous comparison of biogeochemical processes across gyres. These platforms enable observations on spatial scales from submesoscale to basin scale and on temporal scales from diel to interannual. Here, I focus on the spatiotemporal variability of nitrate and oxygen mass balances in the North Pacific and North Atlantic subtropical gyres using a data-assimilating and float-tracking 1D upper ocean model.

  3. Preclinical toxicity profile of oral bilastine.

    PubMed

    Lucero, María Luisa; Arteche, Joseba K; Sommer, E W; Casadesus, Agustín

    2012-06-01

    As part of the bilastine development program, and as mandated by regulatory authorities, several studies were performed with oral bilastine in different animal species to evaluate its toxicity profile. Toxicokinetic analyses conducted in tandem to evaluate systemic exposure, gender differences, and dose proportionality in the different animal species indicated that animals were systemically exposed to bilastine during treatment. Repeated-dose toxicity studies in beagle dogs (52 weeks) and in rats and mice (13 weeks) showed that bilastine at doses up to 2,000 mg/kg/day was not associated with any mortality, ocular effects, or nodules/masses. Likewise, no bilastine-associated neoplastic lesions were observed in rats and mice after 104 weeks of treatment with bilastine at doses up to 2,000 mg/kg/day. In general, bilastine-related clinical signs, body-weight changes, food consumption, clinical chemistry, haematology, and macro- and microscopic findings were of low order and reversible, with effects present only at the highest doses administered. Bilastine (up to 1,000 mg/kg/day) was well tolerated in pregnant/lactating rats and in their offspring and subsequent generations. With respect to effects on embryofoetal development in rabbits, bilastine at 400 mg/kg/day (the highest dose evaluated) was assessed to be the no observed adverse effects level. Overall, bilastine demonstrated a favorable toxicity profile in all animal models investigated and at higher doses than the corresponding recommended daily human dosage.

  4. Uncertainties in derived temperature-height profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzner, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Nomographs were developed for relating uncertainty in temperature T to uncertainty in the observed height profiles of both pressure p and density rho. The relative uncertainty delta T/T is seen to depend not only upon the relative uncertainties delta P/P or delta rho/rho, and to a small extent upon the value of T or H, but primarily upon the sampling-height increment Delta h, the height increment between successive observations of p or delta. For a fixed value of delta p/p, the value of delta T/T varies inversely with Delta h. No limit exists in the fineness of usable height resolution of T which may be derived from densities, while a fine height resolution in pressure-height data leads to temperatures with unacceptably large uncertainties.

  5. Profiling the orphan enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sorokina, Maria; Stam, Mark; Médigue, Claudine; Lespinet, Olivier; Vallenet, David

    2014-06-06

    The emergence of Next Generation Sequencing generates an incredible amount of sequence and great potential for new enzyme discovery. Despite this huge amount of data and the profusion of bioinformatic methods for function prediction, a large part of known enzyme activities is still lacking an associated protein sequence. These particular activities are called "orphan enzymes". The present review proposes an update of previous surveys on orphan enzymes by mining the current content of public databases. While the percentage of orphan enzyme activities has decreased from 38% to 22% in ten years, there are still more than 1,000 orphans among the 5,000 entries of the Enzyme Commission (EC) classification. Taking into account all the reactions present in metabolic databases, this proportion dramatically increases to reach nearly 50% of orphans and many of them are not associated to a known pathway. We extended our survey to "local orphan enzymes" that are activities which have no representative sequence in a given clade, but have at least one in organisms belonging to other clades. We observe an important bias in Archaea and find that in general more than 30% of the EC activities have incomplete sequence information in at least one superkingdom. To estimate if candidate proteins for local orphans could be retrieved by homology search, we applied a simple strategy based on the PRIAM software and noticed that candidates may be proposed for an important fraction of local orphan enzymes. Finally, by studying relation between protein domains and catalyzed activities, it appears that newly discovered enzymes are mostly associated with already known enzyme domains. Thus, the exploration of the promiscuity and the multifunctional aspect of known enzyme families may solve part of the orphan enzyme issue. We conclude this review with a presentation of recent initiatives in finding proteins for orphan enzymes and in extending the enzyme world by the discovery of new activities.

  6. STEREO Observations of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonRosenvinge, Tycho; Christian, Eric; Cohen, Christina; Leske, Richard; Mewaldt, Richard; Stone, Edward; Wiedenbeck, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We report on observations of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events as observed by instruments on the STEREO Ahead and Behind spacecraft and on the ACE spacecraft. We will show observations of an electron event observed by the STEREO Ahead spacecraft on June 12, 2010 located at W74 essentially simultaneously with electrons seen at STEREO Behind at E70. Some similar events observed by Helios were ascribed to fast electron propagation in longitude close to the sun. We will look for independent verification of this possibility. We will also show observations of what appears to be a single proton event with very similar time-history profiles at both of the STEREO spacecraft at a similar wide separation. This is unexpected. We will attempt to understand all of these events in terms of corresponding CME and radio burst observations.

  7. Balmer line profiles for infalling T Tauri envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee

    1992-01-01

    The possibility that the Balmer emission lines of T Tauri stars arise in infalling envelopes rather than winds is considered. Line profiles for the upper Balmer lines are presented for models with cone geometry, intended to simulate the basic features of magnetospheric accretion from a circumstellar disk. An escape probability treatment is used to determine line source functions in nonspherically symmetric geometry. Thermalization effects are found to produce nearly symmetric H-alpha line profiles at the same time the higher Balmer series lines exhibit inverse P Cygni profiles. The infall models produce centrally peaked emission line wings, in good agreement with observations of many T Tauri stars. It is suggested that the Balmer emission of many T Tauri stars may be produced in an infalling envelope, with blue shifted absorption contributed by an overlying wind. Some of the observed narrow absorption components with small blueshifts may also arise in the accretion column.

  8. Expected Performance of Ozone Climate Data Records from Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite Limb Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, P. Q.; Rault, D. F.; Pawson, S.; Wargan, K.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite Limb Profiler (OMPS/LP) was launched on board of the Soumi NPP space platform in late October 2011. It provides ozone-profiling capability with high-vertical resolution from 60 Ian to cloud top. In this study, an end-to-end Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) of OMPS/LP ozone is discussed. The OSSE was developed at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) using the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) data assimilation system. The "truth" for this OSSE is built by assimilating MLS profiles and OMI ozone columns, which is known to produce realistic three-dimensional ozone fields in the stratosphere and upper troposphere. OMPS/LP radiances were computed at tangent points computed by an appropriate orbital model. The OMPS/LP forward RT model, Instrument Models (IMs) and EDR retrieval model were introduced and pseudo-observations derived. The resultant synthetic OMPS/LP observations were evaluated against the "truth" and subsequently these observations were assimilated into GEOS-5. Comparison of this assimilated dataset with the "truth" enables comparisons of the likely uncertainties in 3-D analyses of OMPS/LP data. This study demonstrated the assimilation capabilities of OMPS/LP ozone in GEOS-5, with the monthly, zonal mean (O-A) smaller than 0.02ppmv at all levels, the nns(O-A) close to O.lppmv from 100hPa to 0.2hPa; and the mean(O-B) around the 0.02ppmv for all levels. The monthly zonal mean analysis generally agrees to within 2% of the truth, with larger differences of 2-4% (0.1-0.2ppmv) around 10hPa close to North Pole and in the tropical tropopause region, where the difference is above 20% due to the very low ozone concentrations. These OSSEs demonstrated that, within a single data assimilation system and the assumption that assimilated MLS observations provide a true rendition of the stratosphere, the OMPS/LP ozone data are likely to produce accurate analyses through much of the stratosphere

  9. Classification of road surface profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Rouillard, V.; Bruscella, B.; Sek, M.

    2000-02-01

    This paper introduces a universal classification methodology for discretely sampled sealed bituminous road profile data for the study of shock and vibrations related to the road transportation process. Data representative of a wide variety of Victorian (Australia) road profiles were used to develop a universal classification methodology with special attention to their non-Gaussian and nonstationary properties. This resulted in the design of computer software to automatically detect and extract transient events from the road spatial acceleration data as well as to identify segments of the constant RMS level enabling transients to be analyzed separately from the underlying road process. Nine universal classification parameters are introduced to describe road profile spatial acceleration based on the statistical characteristics of the transient amplitude and stationary RMS segments. Results from this study are aimed at the areas of road transport simulation as well as road surface characterization.

  10. Waste product profile: Glass containers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.

    1995-09-01

    In 1992, Waste Age initiated the Waste Product Profile series -- brief, factual listings of the solid waste management characteristics of materials in the solid waste stream. This popular series of profiles high-lighted a product, explained how it fit into integrated waste management systems, and provided current data on recycling and markets for the product. Glass containers are made from sand, limestone, soda ash, cullet (crushed bottles), and various additives, including those used to produce green, brown, and blue glass. Other glass products include flat glass, such as windows, and fiberglass products, such as insulation and glassware. These products are manufactured using different processes and different additives than container glass. This profile covers only glass containers.

  11. Chemogenomic profiling predicts antifungal synergies

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Gregor; Lee, Anna Y; Epp, Elias; Fredette, Amélie; Surprenant, Jamie; Harcus, Doreen; Scott, Michelle; Tan, Elaine; Nishimura, Tamiko; Whiteway, Malcolm; Hallett, Michael; Thomas, David Y

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapies, HIV infections, and treatments to block organ transplant rejection are creating a population of immunocompromised individuals at serious risk of systemic fungal infections. Since single-agent therapies are susceptible to failure due to either inherent or acquired resistance, alternative therapeutic approaches such as multi-agent therapies are needed. We have developed a bioinformatics-driven approach that efficiently predicts compound synergy for such combinatorial therapies. The approach uses chemogenomic profiles in order to identify compound profiles that have a statistically significant degree of similarity to a fluconazole profile. The compounds identified were then experimentally verified to be synergistic with fluconazole and with each other, in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Our method is therefore capable of accurately predicting compound synergy to aid the development of combinatorial antifungal therapies. PMID:20029371

  12. School Health Profiles 2014: West Virginia Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia Department of Education Office of Research, Accountability, and Data Governance, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The School Health Profiles (Profiles) is a system of surveys assessing school health policies and practices in states, large urban school districts, and territories. Profiles surveys are conducted biennially by education and health agencies among middle and high school principals and lead health education teachers. Profiles monitors the current…

  13. Theoretical solution of profile drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pretsch, J

    1942-01-01

    After a survey of the customary procedures for appraising the profile drag in which pressure drag was discounted and the methods for computing the laminar and turbulent friction flow, the author proposes a method by which the pressure drag can be computed with the aid of the displacement thickness of the frictional layer. The method is restricted to the case where the effects, caused by separation of frictional layer, are small. Then the total profile drag can be expressed solely by quantities derived from the velocity distribution in the frictional layer immediately at the trailing edge.

  14. Measurement of whole tire profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongyue; Jiao, Wenguang

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, a precision measuring device is developed for obtaining characteristic curve of tire profile and its geometric parameters. It consists of a laser displacement measurement unit, a closed-loop precision two-dimensional coordinate table, a step motor control system and a fast data acquisition and analysis system. Based on the laser trigonometry, a data map of tire profile and coordinate values of all points can be obtained through corresponding data transformation. This device has a compact structure, a convenient control, a simple hardware circuit design and a high measurement precision. Experimental results indicate that measurement precision can meet the customer accuracy requirement of +/-0.02 mm.

  15. Microbial profile modification with spores

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, J.H.; Chambers, K.T.; Lee, H.O.

    1996-08-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of conventional, near-wellbore profile modification methods, a microbial profile modification (MPM) method with spores was investigated. A halotolerant, spore-forming mesophile was isolated and characterized. These biopolymer-producing spores propagate easily in Berea cores with permeabilities more than about 500 md. With a specifically formulated nutrient package, they are readily germinated and produce biofilm, which reduces the permeability of the rock. The depth of penetration and the degree of permeability reduction can be controlled by varying injection schemes.

  16. Method to determine thermal profiles of nanoscale circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K; Begtrup, Gavi E

    2013-04-30

    A platform that can measure the thermal profiles of devices with nanoscale resolution has been developed. The system measures the local temperature by using an array of nanoscale thermometers. This process can be observed in real time using a high resolution imagining technique such as electron microscopy. The platform can operate at extremely high temperatures.

  17. Hα LINE PROFILE ASYMMETRIES AND THE CHROMOSPHERIC FLARE VELOCITY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Kennedy, M.; Keenan, F. P.; Simões, P. J. A.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der; Fletcher, L.; Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F.; Graham, D.

    2015-11-10

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  18. Non-LTE profiles of strong solar lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneeberger, T. J.; Beebe, H. A.

    1976-01-01

    The complete linearization method is applied to the formation of strong lines in the solar atmosphere. Transitions in Na(I), Mg(I), Ca(I), Mg(II), and Ca(II) are computed with a standard atmosphere and microturbulent velocity model. The computed profiles are compared to observations at disk center.

  19. Cognitive Profile of Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Rethinking Nonverbal Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Laurie E.; Clements, Amy M.; Lightman, Andrea D.; Yerby-Hammack, Pamula D.; Denckla, Martha Bridge

    2004-01-01

    The cognitive profiles of children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF-1) have many similarities to those observed in learning disabilities in the general school population, as well as some distinct features. Approximately 30-65 percent of children with NF-1 have learning disabilities; most commonly, they have language and reading disabilities,…

  20. Observer's Interface for JWST Observation Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Miranda; Douglas, Robert; Moriarty, Christopher; Roman, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    In support of the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, various teams at STScI (the Space Telescope Science Institute) have collaborated on how to re-structure the view of a an observing program within the Astronomer's Proposal Tool (APT) to accommodate for the differences between HST and JWST. For HST APT programs, the structure is visit-dominant, and there is one generic form for entering observing information that spans all instruments with their required fields and options. This can result in sometimes showing irrelevant fields to the user for a given observing goal. Also, the generation of mosaicked observations in HST requires the user to manually calculate the position of each tile within the mosaic, accounting for positional offsets and the roll of the telescope, which is a time consuming process. Now, for JWST programs in APT, the description of the observations has been segregated by instrument and mode into discrete observing templates. Each template's form allows instrument specific choices and displays of relevant information. APT will manually manage the number of visits needed to perform the observation. This is particularly useful for mosaics and dithering with JWST. For example, users will select how they would like a mosaic to be tiled at the observation level, and the visits are automatically created. In this, visits have been re-structured to be purely informational; all editing is done at the observation level. These options and concepts are illustrated to future users via the corresponding poster.

  1. Variation of the pulse profile of Hercules X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohashi, T.; Inoue, H.; Kawai, N.; Koyama, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Mitani, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Nagase, F.; Nakagawa, M.; Kondo, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The X-ray pulsar Her X-1 was observed in an on-state during its 35th cycle of activity in May, 1983 using the gas scintillation proportional counter (GSPC) array of the Tenma X-ray astronomy satellite. The outstanding features observed during the declining phase of the on-state included: a sharp decrease in the main X-ray pulse amplitude; and a steady increase in the column density of cool matter. On the basis of the spectral shape of the pulses, it is suggested that the main phase was attenuated due to electron scattering of the X-ray beam in a highly ionized medium located 3 x 10 to the 8th cm from the neutron star. Near the end of the on-state, the main pulse totally disappeared and a plain sinusoidal profile was observed. The observed pulse profiles are reproduced in graphic form.

  2. Simulation of Wind Profile Perturbations for Launch Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    2004-01-01

    Ideally, a statistically representative sample of measured high-resolution wind profiles with wavelengths as small as tens of meters is required in design studies to establish aerodynamic load indicator dispersions and vehicle control system capability. At most potential launch sites, high- resolution wind profiles may not exist. Representative samples of Rawinsonde wind profiles to altitudes of 30 km are more likely to be available from the extensive network of measurement sites established for routine sampling in support of weather observing and forecasting activity. Such a sample, large enough to be statistically representative of relatively large wavelength perturbations, would be inadequate for launch vehicle design assessments because the Rawinsonde system accurately measures wind perturbations with wavelengths no smaller than 2000 m (1000 m altitude increment). The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Jimsphere wind profiles (150/month and seasonal 2 and 3.5-hr pairs) are the only adequate samples of high resolution profiles approx. 150 to 300 m effective resolution, but over-sampled at 25 m intervals) that have been used extensively for launch vehicle design assessments. Therefore, a simulation process has been developed for enhancement of measured low-resolution Rawinsonde profiles that would be applicable in preliminary launch vehicle design studies at launch sites other than KSC.

  3. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L; Frisby, Craig L

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) parameterization of the Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) model to demonstrate validation of profile pattern hypotheses derived from multidimensional scaling (MDS). Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is an exploratory method for identifying major profiles in a multi-subtest test battery. Major profile patterns are represented as dimensions extracted from a MDS analysis. PAMS represents an individual observed score as a linear combination of dimensions where the dimensions are the most typical profile patterns present in a population. While the PAMS approach was initially developed for exploratory purposes, its results can later be confirmed in a different sample by CFA. Since CFA is often used to verify results from an exploratory factor analysis, the present paper makes the connection between a factor model and the PAMS model, and then illustrates CFA with a simulated example (that was generated by the PAMS model) and at the same time with a real example. The real example demonstrates confirmation of PAMS exploratory results by using a different sample. Fit indexes can be used to indicate whether the CFA reparameterization as a confirmatory approach works for the PAMS exploratory results.

  4. ANALYTICAL CALCULATION OF STOKES PROFILES OF ROTATING STELLAR MAGNETIC DIPOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez Gonzalez, M. J.

    2012-08-20

    The observation of the polarization emerging from a rotating star at different phases opens up the possibility to map the magnetic field in the stellar surface thanks to the well-known Zeeman-Doppler imaging. When the magnetic field is sufficiently weak, the circular and linear polarization profiles locally in each point of the star are proportional to the first and second derivatives of the unperturbed intensity profile, respectively. We show that the weak-field approximation (for weak lines in the case of linear polarization) can be generalized to the case of a rotating star including the Doppler effect and taking into account the integration on the stellar surface. The Stokes profiles are written as a linear combination of wavelength-dependent terms expressed as series expansions in terms of Hermite polynomials. These terms contain the surface-integrated magnetic field and velocity components. The direct numerical evaluation of these quantities is limited to rotation velocities not larger than eight times the Doppler width of the local absorption profiles. Additionally, we demonstrate that in a rotating star, the circular polarization flux depends on the derivative of the intensity flux with respect to the wavelength and also on the profile itself. Likewise, the linear polarization depends on the profile and on its first and second derivatives with respect to the wavelength. We particularize the general expressions to a rotating dipole.

  5. Frequent Rain Observation From Geostationary Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzarri, B.; Gomas Science Team

    The target 3-h observing cycle of GPM will meet requirements from Global NWP and, to a large extent, Regional NWP; and be supportive of VIS/IR-derived rain estimates from geostationary satellites for the purpose of Nowcasting. MW rain observation from geostationary orbit at, say, 15 min intervals, would fully meet Regional NWP requirements and have greatest impact on Nowcasting: but this implies either unprac- tically large antennas or unacceptably coarse resolution. Concepts to overcome this problem have been developed in the US within the study called GEM (Geostationary Microwave Observatory), and now there is in Europe a proposal for a demonstration satellite submitted to ESA as GOMAS (Geostationary Observatory for Microwave Atmospheric Sounding). To overcome the problem of resolution, use of Sub-mm fre- quencies is envisaged: e.g., at 425 GHz, a 10-km resolution at nadir would require a 3-m antenna. The observing principle is based on the use of absorption bands of oxygen (54, 118 and 425 GHz) and of water vapour (183 and 380 GHz). Narrow- bandwidths channels are implemented (for a total of about 40 in the five bands) so as to observe the full profile of temperature and water vapour. Profiles from different bands are differently affected by liquid and ice water of different drop size, and fi- nally by precipitation. Simultaneous retrieval of temperature/humidity profiles, cloud liquid/ice water (total-columns and gross profile) and precipitation rate is in principle possible, and partially demonstrated by several airborne MW/Sub-mm instruments. To transfer this demonstrations in the geostationary orbit, the problem of radiometric sensitivity (additional to that one of the antenna size) has to be solved. With current technology, it is feasible to get sufficient accuracy if scan is limited to about 1/12 of the Earth disk, which is sufficient to abundantly cover Europe, the Mediterranean and Eastern Atlantic. The imaged area can be moved everywhere within the disk

  6. Ultrasoft X-ray Measurements of Impurity Profiles in NSTX*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Vero, R.; Fournier, K.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Menard, J.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Efthimion, P.; Kaye, S.; Leblanc, B.; Mueller, P.; Synakowski, E.; Maingi, R.; Houlberg, W.

    2001-10-01

    Three arrays of absolute photodiodes and several calibrated spectrometers measure the emission profiles and impurity spectra in the ultrasoft and soft X-ray range in NSTX. A multilayer mirror array for C VI Ly-alpha was also recently installed. Impurity density profiles are estimated by modeling these data with an atomic physics and impurity transport computational package. Many ohmic discharges show evidence for strong impurity peaking, which is reduced by either sawtooth crashes or early Reconnection Events. The peaking is associated with strong 1/1 activity. Peripheral impurity accumulation and cold island formation are observed in ELM-free H-modes.The profiles in center-stack -limited NBI discharges on the other hand, exhibit a pronounced 'well' at r/a <0.5-0.6. Modeling this profile requires a discontinuity in the core particle transport, suggesting the existence of a 'natural' internal barrier. Sheared MHD rotation is often observed at the radius of this discontinuity. Neon injection experiments were performed for a preliminary quantitative estimate of the impurity transport. The time-dependent simulation of the Ne profiles seems to support a large decrease in particle diffusion at about mid-radius. Comparison with neo-classical predictions will be discussed. *Work supported by DoE grant No. DE-FG02-99ER54523

  7. Offshore wind profile measurements using a Doppler LIDAR at the Hazaki Oceanographical Research Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Susumu; Ohsawa, Teruo; Ohgishi, Tatsuya; Kikushima, Yoshihiro; Kogaki, Testuya; Kawaguchi, Koji; Nakamura, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    Vertical wind speed profiles near the coast were observed using a Doppler Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system at the Hazaki Oceanographical Research Station (HORS) from September 17 to 26, 2013. The accuracies of the theoretical wind profile models of the log profile model and the Monin-Obukov similarity (MOS) theory were examined by comparing them to those of the observed wind profiles. As a result, MOS, which takes into account the stability effects during wind profile calculations, successfully estimated the wind profile more accurately than the log profile model when the wind was from a sea sector (from sea to land). Conversely, both models did not estimate the profile adequately when the wind was from a land sector (from land to sea). Moreover, the wind profile for the land sector was found to include an obvious diurnal cycle, which is relevant to the stability change over land. Consequently, it is found that the atmospheric stability plays an important roll to determine the offshore wind speed profiles near the coast for not only the sea sector but also the land sector.

  8. Oral Reading Observation System Observer's Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Mary Ella; And Others

    A self-instructional program for use by teachers of the handicapped, this training manual was developed to teach accurate coding with the Oral Reading Observation System (OROS)an observation system designed to code teacher-pupil verbal interaction during oral reading instruction. The body of the manual is organized to correspond to the nine…

  9. Learning to Observe--Observing to Learn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Dorothy H.

    In this address, Dorothy H. Cohen admonishes teachers to remain aware that in the classroom they are both teachers and observers trying to find clues to understanding and interaction. Because teachers are human beings with attitudes and beliefs of their own, it is difficult to be objective in making observations of children. An open mind ready to…

  10. Observing the magnetosphere through global auroral imaging: 1. Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mende, Stephen B.

    2016-10-01

    Over the years, it has become clear that there are fundamental limitations in observing magnetospheric processes through their auroral footprints. Most electron auroras are formed in the auroral acceleration region relatively close to the Earth at altitudes (<2 RE). There are four distinct auroral types: (1) downward field-aligned current (FAC) regions where ion precipitation is dominant, (2) pitch angle diffusion aurora (or briefly "diffusion aurora") region without significant FAC, (3) upward FAC regions of precipitating electrons and monoenergetic auroral arc formations, and (4) Alfvénic auroral regions, where low-energy electrons from the ionosphere are accelerated by incoming Alfvén waves. Alfvénic auroras are the footprints of magnetospheric regions where waves are produced by dynamic events such as reconnection, substorm onset initiation, and magnetic field dipolarization. Based on the mean energy and density of the precipitating electrons, ground-based and spacecraft-based optical observations can be used to distinguish between auroras where the source is the plasma sheet (types 1, 2, and 3) and Alfvénic auroras, where the source is the ionosphere (type 4). Imaging of the Alfvénic auroral region could be used to map the dynamically active regions of the magnetosphere. The energy distribution of the most significant precipitating ions, protons, can be measured from the Doppler profile of the hydrogen emission lines. Mapping of the time dependent global energy distribution of proton precipitation would allow the observation of the associated magnetospheric boundaries.

  11. Earth Observing System: Global Observations to Study the Earth's Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by which scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During the last couple of years, four EOS science missions were launched, representing observations of (1) total solar irradiance, (2) Earth radiation budget, (3) land cover & land use change, (4) ocean processes (vector wind, sea surface temperature, and ocean color), (5) atmospheric processes (aerosol and cloud properties, water vapor, and temperature and moisture profiles), and (6) tropospheric chemistry. In succeeding years many more satellites will be launched that will contribute immeasurably to our understanding of the Earth's environment. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using NASA's Earth science data to examine land use and natural hazards, environmental air quality, including dust storms over the world's deserts, cloud and radiation properties, sea surface temperature, and winds over the ocean.

  12. Profiled spectral lines generated in the field of Kerr superspinars

    SciTech Connect

    Schee, Jan; Stuchlík, Zdenek E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@fpf.slu.cz

    2013-04-01

    String Theory suggests existence of primordial Kerr superspinars, extremely compact objects with external spacetime described by the Kerr naked singularity geometry. The primordial Kerr superspinars have to be converted to a near-extreme black hole due to accretion, but they could survive to the era of highly redshifted quasars. We study the shape of the profiled spectral lines generated by radiating rings or the innermost parts of Keplerian discs orbiting the Kerr superspinars. Influence of the superspinar surface location on the profiled lines is also considered. We demonstrate strong difference of the character of the profiled lines generated by radiating rings for all values of the superspinar spin and all values of the inclination angles of the observer when compared to those generated in the field of Kerr black holes. For small and mediate inclination angles there are large quantitative differences in the extension and position of the lines. For large inclination angles even strong qualitative difference appears as the profiled lines have a clear doubled character. The smaller, redshifted region of the profiled line is related to the photons reaching the regions near the superspinar surface. Strong differences are obtained also for profiled lines generated by the innermost parts of Keplerian discs especially in the shape of the line. The influence of the superspinar surface location is reflected in the intermediate parts of the the profiled lines. The line profiles can give a clear signature of the presence of a Kerr superspinar and in principle enable estimates of its surface location since the signatures of the superspinar surface location are of different character as those corresponding to the presence of the black hole horizon.

  13. Cognitive Profile of Turner Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, David; Kent, Jamie Scaletta; Kesler, Shelli

    2009-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a relatively common neurogenetic disorder characterized by complete or partial monosomy-X in a phenotypic female. TS is associated with a cognitive profile that typically includes intact intellectual function and verbal abilities with relative weaknesses in visual-spatial, executive, and social cognitive domains. In this…

  14. Country Energy Profile, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This country energy profile provides energy and economic information about South Africa. Areas covered include: Economics, demographics, and environment; Energy situation; Energy structure; Energy investment opportunities; Department of Energy (DOE) programs in South Africa; and a listing of International aid to South Africa.

  15. Teachers' Entrepreneurial Profile: Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stettiner, Caio Flavio; Formigoni, Alexandre; Filho, Mário Pereira Roque; de Camargo, Mauricio Ortiz; Moia, Roberto Padilha

    2015-01-01

    This article was prepared in order to investigate whether the teachers working in a Business Administration BA degree have an entrepreneurial profile, with the aim of finding whether such teachers are able to support the Pedagogical Proposal of the Institution to which they belong to in what concerns the requirement of the course and also the…

  16. Grandparents today: a demographic profile.

    PubMed

    Szinovacz, M E

    1998-02-01

    This article presents a demographic profile of grandparents, using the National Survey of Families and Households. Specific dimensions of grandparenthood addressed include grandparents' survival, the timing of grandparenthood, grandparents' involvement in other roles, surrogate parenting, and stepgrandparents. The data indicate considerable heterogeneity among grandparents of different genders and races or ethnicities. They also suggest modifications in previous descriptions of modern grandparenthood.

  17. Grandparents Today: A Demographic Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szinovacz, Maximiliane E.

    1998-01-01

    Utilizes the National Survey of Families and Households to present a demographic profile of grandparents. Examines grandparents' survival, timing of grandparenthood, grandparents' involvement in other roles, surrogate parenting, and stepgrandparents. Data indicate considerable heterogeneity among grandparents of different genders and ethnicities.…

  18. Electronics. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability skills (competencies)…

  19. Motivational Profiles of Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothes, Ana; Lemos, Marina S.; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated profiles of autonomous and controlled motivation and their effects in a sample of 188 adult learners from two Portuguese urban areas. Using a person-centered approach, results of cluster analysis and multivariate analysis of covariance revealed four motivational groups with different effects in self-efficacy, engagement,…

  20. Humidity profiles over the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Tang, Wenqing; Niiler, Pearn P.

    1991-01-01

    The variabilities of atmospheric humidity profile over oceans from daily to interannual time scales were examined using 9 years of daily and semidaily radiosonde soundings at island stations extending from the Arctic to the South Pacific. The relative humidity profiles were found to have considerable temporal and geographic variabilities, contrary to the prevalent assumption. Principal component analysis on the profiles of specific humidity were used to examine the applicability of a relation between the surface-level humidity and the integrated water vapor; this relation has been used to estimate large-scale evaporation from satellite data. The first principal component was found to correlate almost perfectly with the integrated water vapor. The fractional variance represented by this mode increases with increasing period. It reaches approximately 90 percent at two weeks and decreases sharply, below one week, down to approximately 60 percent at the daily period. At low frequencies, the integrated water vapor appeared to be an adequate estimator of the humidity profile and the surface-level humidity. At periods shorter than a week, more than one independent estimator is needed.