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Sample records for 45-m radio telescope

  1. Wind induced surface deformation of the Nobeyama 45-m radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukita, N.

    2008-07-01

    Reflector surface deformation due to wind loading on the Nobeyama 45-m antenna has been measured with four LED lamps on the surface at r = 20 m and two CCD cameras on the central hub as it rotates in azimuth with elevation angles of 90 and 11 degrees. The side-wind loading of 8.4 m s-1 caused a tilt of 12 arcseconds and an astigmatic deformation of 0.8 mm. The front- and back-wind loading of 9.9 m s-1 induced a vertical displacement variation of 2.3 mm. These largescale surface deformation profiles have been compared with those of finite element calculations and coefficients of axial force and yaw moment predicted by a JPL wind tunnel data excerpt.

  2. Z45: A new 45-GHz band dual-polarization HEMT receiver for the NRO 45-m radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Ogawa, Hideo; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Kimura, Kimihiko; Okada, Nozomi; Kozu, Minato; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Tokuda, Kazuki; Ochiai, Tetsu; Mizuno, Izumi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Kameno, Seiji; Taniguchi, Kotomi; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Takano, Shuro; Kawabe, Ryohei; Nakajima, Taku; Iono, Daisuke; Kuno, Nario; Onishi, Toshikazu; Momose, Munetake; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    We developed a dual-linear-polarization HEMT (High Electron Mobility Transistor) amplifier receiver system of the 45-GHz band (hereafter Z45), and installed it in the Nobeyama 45-m radio telescope. The receiver system is designed to conduct polarization observations by taking the cross-correlation of two linearly polarized components, from which we process full Stokes spectroscopy. We aim to measure the magnetic field strength through the Zeeman effect of the emission line of CCS (JN = 43-32) toward pre-protostellar cores. A linear-polarization receiver system has a smaller contribution of instrumental polarization components to the Stokes V spectra than that of the circular polarization system, so that it is easier to obtain the Stokes V spectra. The receiver has an RF frequency of 42-46 GHz and an intermediate frequency (IF) band of 4-8 GHz. The typical noise temperature is about 50 K, and the system noise temperature ranges from 100 to 150 K over the frequency of 42-46 GHz. The receiver system is connected to two spectrometers, SAM45 and PolariS. SAM45 is a highly flexible FX-type digital spectrometer with a finest frequency resolution of 3.81 kHz. PolariS is a newly developed digital spectrometer with a finest frequency resolution of 60 Hz, and which has a capability to process the full-Stokes spectroscopy. The half-power beam width (HPBW) was measured to be 37″ at 43 GHz. The main beam efficiency of the Gaussian main beam was derived to be 0.72 at 43 GHz. The SiO maser observations show that the beam pattern is reasonably round at about 10% of the peak intensity and the side-lobe level was less than 3% of the peak intensity. Finally, we present some examples of astronomical observations using Z45.

  3. A New 100-GHz Band Two-Beam Sideband-Separating SIS Receiver for Z-Machine on the NRO 45-m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, T.; Kimura, K.; Nishimura, A.; Iwashita, H.; Miyazawa, C.; Sakai, T.; Iono, D.; Kohno, K.; Kawabe, R.; Kuno, N.; Ogawa, H.; Asayama, S.; Tamura, T.; Noguchi, T.

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a two-beam waveguide-type dual-polarization sideband-separating SIS receiver system in the 100-GHz band for z-machine on the 45-m radio telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. The receiver is intended for astronomical use in searching for highly redshifted spectral lines from galaxies of unknown redshift. This receiver has two beams, which have 45'' of beam separation and allow for observation with the switch in the on-on position. The receiver of each beam is composed of an ortho-mode transducer and two sideband-separating SIS mixers, which are both based on a waveguide technique, and the receiver has four intermediate frequency bands of 4.0-8.0 GHz. Over the radio frequency range of 80-116 GHz, the single-sideband receiver noise temperature is lower than about 50 K, and the image rejection ratios are greater than 10 dB in most of the same frequency range. The new receiver system has been installed in the telescope, and we successfully observed a 12CO (J = 3-2) emission line toward a cloverleaf quasar at z = 2.56, which validates the performance of the receiver system. The SSB noise temperature of the system, including the atmosphere, is typically 150-300 K at a radio frequency of 97 GHz. We have begun a blind search of high-J CO toward high-z submillimeter galaxies.

  4. Nobeyama CO Galactic Plane Survey: New Chapter of the Nobeyama 45-m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamidani, T.; Umemoto, T.; Nishimura, A.; Matsuo, M.; Fujita, S.; Tsuda, Y.; Ohashi, S.; Tosaki, T.; Kuno, N.

    2016-05-01

    Nobeyama CO Galactic Plane Survey (FOREST Ultra-wide Galactic plane survey In Nobeyama: FUGIN) project is one of the legacy projects of Nobeyama Radio Observatory using the 45-m Telescope and the new four-beam 100 GHz-Band receiver FOREST. This project aims to investigate the fundamental nature of molecular gas in the Galaxy and star formation in them. We, therefore, are carrying out the survey observation along the Galactic plane by the J = 1-0 transitions of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O simultaneously at the highest angular resolution (˜18'') to date. This survey is providing invaluable data set for investigating the physical process and the evolution of ISM from large galactic scale to small filament/clump/core scales.

  5. Line Survey Project of External Galaxies with NRO 45-m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, T.; Takano, S.; Kohno, K.; Inoue, H.

    2011-05-01

    Molecular line observations of different galaxies allow us to study the effects of these different properties/activities on the molecular medium. In fact, some groups have suggested that it is possible to diagnose power sources in dusty galaxies using molecular line ratios. The observation of the molecular gas chemistry of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) toward NGC 1068, one of the nearest galaxies with an AGN, has already been reported. However, further systematic observations of molecular lines are indispensable to study the impact of AGN on the interstellar medium. Therefore, we started a project to conduct a line survey in the 3-mm band of NGC 1068 using the new receiver in the 45-m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory. The beam size of this telescope (18'' at 86 GHz) is smaller than the size of the circumnuclear starburst ring in NGC 1068 (d ˜ 30''), and it is therefore essential to study the impact of the AGN on the surrounding molecules; this will enable us to mitigate the contamination of the molecular lines from the circumnuclear starburst region in NGC 1068. We conduct a spectral line survey in the 3-mm band (85.1--98.4 GHz) toward NGC 1068 and the prototypical starburst galaxy NGC 253. We detected rotational transitions of C2H, cyclic-C3H2 and H13CN in NGC 1068. In addition, the C2H N = 1--0 lines were detected in NGC 253 [10]. We calculated the abundances of these molecules relative to CS for both NGC 1068 and NGC 253, and found that there were no significant differences in the abundances between the two galaxies. This result suggests that the basic carbon-containing molecules are either insusceptible to AGN, or are tracing cold (Trot ˜ 10 K) molecular gas rather than X-ray irradiated hot gas.

  6. The Smiley Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R. M.; Castelaz, M. W.; Daugherty, J.; Owen, L.

    2004-12-01

    More than ever modern astronomy is based upon a multi-wavelength approach combining data-sets from optical, infrared, radio, X-ray and gamma ray observatories to provide improved understanding of astrophysical phenomena. In the field of astronomy education however, until recently most teaching resources available to high schools have been limited to small optical telescopes, with little coverage of other branches of observational astronomy. To fill in this resource gap, PARI has developed the School of Galactic Radio Astronomy and the Smiley 4.6 m Radio Telescope to provide high schools access to a state-of-the-art, internet accessable radio observatory for class projects and activities. We describe here the development of the Smiley radio telescope, its control systems and give examples of several class activities which have been developed for use by high school students. We describe the future development of Smiley and plans to upgrade its performance. The SGRA has been supported by grants from Progress Energy, Z. Smith Reynolds, STScI IDEAS, and the AAS Small Research Grant Program which is supported by NASA.

  7. Prism beamswitch for radio telescopes.

    PubMed

    Payne, J M; Ulich, B L

    1978-12-01

    A dielectric prism and switching mechanism have been constructed for beamswitching a Cassegrain radio telescope. Spatially extended radio sources may be mapped without significant confusion utilizing the sensitivity and stability inherent in the conventional Dicke radiometer. PMID:18699031

  8. Soviet radio telescopes and solar radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. A.; Gel'Freikh, Georgii B.; Zaitsev, Valerii V.; Iliasov, Iurii P.; Kaidanovskii, N. L.

    Soviet radio telescopes of different type and purpose are described, with particular emphasis on very long baseline interferometry. Soviet radio-astronomy studies of solar radio emission and the interplanetary medium are also discussed, with particular attention given to the investigation of the sun's supercorona and the interplanetary plasma.

  9. Radio Telescope Gets Star Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-11-01

    Actress Jodie Foster, who played a scientist in search of extraterrestrial life in the 1997 film Contact, narrates a new promotional film to reintroduce the public to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) renovated Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. The 24-minute film, Beyond the Visible, which will air in the VLA Visitor Center, focuses on the operation of the telescope and scientific achievements associated with it.

  10. Kashima 34-m Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekido, Mamoru; Kawai, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    The Kashima 34-m radio telescope has been continuously operated and maintained by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) as a facility of the Kashima Space Technology Center (KSTC) in Japan. This brief report summarizes the status of this telescope, the staff, and activities during 2012.

  11. The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nityananda, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) of the National Centre of Radio Astrophysics (NCRA) of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) at Khodad, India, has been operational in the band 0.2 to 2 metres for the last two and a half years. The system characteristics and performance and recent results from the group will be presented. Details of use over the last six months by scientists from other observatories under the GMRT Time Allocation Committee (GTAC) and future plans will be also be reviewed in this paper. Areas which have been studied include observations made in the GMRT band of neutral hydrogen, nearby galaxies, supernova remnants, the Galactic Centre, pulsars, the Sun and others.

  12. Proposed Integrated Radio-Telescope Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M. H.; Ewing, M. S.; Levy, G. S.; Mallis, R. K.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Smith, J. R.; Backer, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed network of radio telescopes, controlled by a central computer and managed by a single organization, offer potential for research on a scale that could not be matched by present privately and publicly-owned radio telescopes. With 10 antenna sites, network would establish base lines thousands of miles long. Antennas will be linked to computer center by telephone circuits.

  13. Geodetic Observatory Wettzell - 20-m Radio Telescope and Twin Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neidhardt, Alexander; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Schatz, Raimund

    2013-01-01

    In the year 2012, the 20-m radio telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany again contributed very successfully to the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry observing program. Technical changes, developments, improvements, and upgrades were made to increase the reliability of the entire VLBI observing system. In parallel, the new Twin radio telescope Wettzell (TTW) got the first feedhorn, while the construction of the HF-receiving and the controlling system was continued.

  14. Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibe, Mary; MacLaren, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) project as a way of teaching astronomy concepts to middle school students. The project provides students opportunities to work with professional scientists. (SOE)

  15. The radio telescope RATAN 600

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R.

    1978-01-01

    A six-meter radio antenna having 900 reflector elements arranged on a 579 -meter diameter circle and located in the northern part of the Caucasian Mountains is described. The elements are about 7.4 m by 2 m resulting in a total reflector surface of about 10,000 sq m. Individual elements can be adjusted by changing 260 screws and can be rotated both horizontally and vertically as well as being moved translationally in the radial direction. The circular area is equipped with a grid of tracks where four asymmetric cylindrical paraboloids serving as subreflectors are located. The directional profile or observational direction of the antenna is achieved by shifting the subreflectors and changing the position of the reflecting elements with respect to the subreflectors. Different radio sources can be observed at the same time by using different subreflectors and their associated reflector sectors. Each subreflector is connected to a receiving station. Capabilities for spectroscopic observation are discussed.

  16. Teaching radio astronomy with Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    A simple, easy to build and portable radio telescope, called Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT), has been developed by the Radio Physics Laboratory (RPL), a radio astronomy teaching unit associated with the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (TIFR) and Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), which are two premier astronomy institutes in India. ASRT consists of off-the-shelf available Direct to Home television dishes and is easy to assemble. Our design is scalable from simple very low cost telescope to more complex yet moderately costing instrument. ASRT provides a platform for demonstrating radio physics concepts through simple hands-on experiment as well as for carrying out solar monitoring by college/University students. The presentation will highlight the concept of ASRT and the different experiments that can be carried out using it. The solar monitoring observations will be discussed along-with details of methods for calibrating these measurements. The pedagogical usefulness of ASRT in introducing undergraduatephysics students to astrophysics, measurements and analysis methods used in radio astronomy will also be discussed. Use of ASRT in the last three years in the programs of RPL, namely the annual Radio Astronomy Winter School for College students (RAWSC) and Pulsar Observing for Students (POS) is also presented. This year a new program was initiated to form a virtual group of an ASRT community, which will not only share their measurements, but also think of improving the pedagogical usefulness of ASRT by innovative experiments. This initiative is presented with the best practices drawn from our experience in using ASRT as a tool for student training in space sciences. The talk will also point out future ideas in involving a larger body of students in simple radio astronomy experiments with the ASRT, which RPL is likely to nucleate as part of its mandate.

  17. Design of a Wideband Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Weinreb, Sander; Mani, Handi

    2007-01-01

    A wideband Radio Telescope is being designed for use in the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope program. It uses an existing 34-meter antenna retrofitted with a tertiary offset mirror placed at the apex of the main reflector. It can be rotated to use two feeds that cover the 1.2 to 14 GHz band. The feed for 4.0 to 14.0 GHz is a cryogenically cooled commercially available open boundary quadridge horn from ETS-Lindgren. Coverage from 1.2 to 4.0 GHz is provided by an un-cooled scaled version of the same feed. The performance is greater than 40% over most of the band and greater than 55%from 6 to 13.5 GHz.

  18. IAA RAS Radio Telescope Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A.; Lavrov, A.

    2007-07-01

    Institute of Applied Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IAA RAS) has three identical radio telescopes, the receiving complex of which consists of five two-channel receivers of different bands, six cryogen systems, and additional devices: four local oscillators, phase calibration generators and IF commutator. The design, hardware and data communication protocol are described. The most convenient way to join the devices of the receiving complex into the common monitoring system is to use the interface which allows to connect numerous devices to the data bus. For the purpose of data communication regulation and to exclude conflicts, a data communication protocol has been designed, which operates with complex formatted data sequences. Formation of such sequences requires considerable data processing capability. That is provided by a microcontroller chip in each slave device. The test version of the software for the central computer has been developed in IAA RAS. We are developing the Mark IV FS software extension modules, which will allow us to control the receiving complex of the radio telescope by special SNAP commands from both operator input and schedule files. We are also developing procedures of automatic measurements of SEFD, system noise temperature and other parameters, available both in VLBI and single-dish modes of operation. The system described has been installed on all IAA RAS radio telescopes at "Svetloe", "Zelenchukskaya" and "Badary" observatories. It has proved to be working quite reliably and to show the perfonmance expected.

  19. Pulsar Observations with Radio Telescope FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Ren-Dong; Wang, Qi-Ming; Zhu, Li-Chun; Zhu, Wen-Bai; Jin, Cheng-Jin; Gan, Heng-Qian

    2006-12-01

    FAST, Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, is the Chinese effort for the international project SKA, Square Kilometer Array. An innovative engineering concept and design pave a new road to realizing huge single dish in the most effective way. Three outstanding features of the telescope are the unique karst depressions as the sites, the active main reflector which corrects spherical aberration on the ground to achieve full polarization and wide band without involving complex feed system, and the light focus cabin driven by cables and servomechanism plus a parallel robot as secondary adjustable system to carry the most precise parts of the receivers. Besides a general coverage of those critical technologies involved in FAST concept, the progresses in demonstrating model being constructed at the Miyun Radio Observatory of the NAOC is introduced. Being the most sensitive radio telescope, FAST will enable astronomers to jumpstart many of science goals, for example, the natural hydrogen line surveying in distant galaxies, looking for the first generation of shining objects, hearing the possible signal from other civilizations, etc. Among these subjects, the most striking one could be pulsar study. Large scale survey by FAST will not only improve the statistics of the pulsar population, but also may offer us a good fortune to pick up more of the most exotic, even unknown types like a sub-millisecond pulsar or a neutron star -- black hole binary as the telescope is put into operation.

  20. A Small Radio Telescope for Instructional Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, S. R.; Wurster, J. E.; Nellermoe, B. L.

    1996-12-01

    Radio astronomers nowadays have a number of excellent instruments to choose from for their research projects, such as the VLA, VLBA, Arecibo,etc. However, these instruments do not readily furnish the opportunity for student instruction in the technical aspects of radio astronomy that was available twenty five years ago or more. Such experience can in part be provided by small dedicated telescopes at universities. Such a radiotelescope has been installed at the University of Iowa. A commercial 4.5 meter satellite TV antenna has been modified to work as a radiotelescope. The radio telescope operates as a transit instrument, with computer control of elevation pointing. Working receivers exist at 5.0 and 1.4 GHz. Components exist for construction of receivers at 610 MHz and 15.0 GHz. Observations to date have been made of the Sun, Moon, Crab Nebula, and galactic HI. We have recently installed a mechanical switch in the 5 GHz front end, built switching electronics, and written a Labview virtual instrument to provide a Dicke radiometer. In the immediate future we plan to use this instrument to repeat the determination of the 5.0 GHz radio phase function of the Moon. Our presentation will include information on commercial sources of critical components for the system, such as low loss RF cables, low insertion loss mechanical switches, low noise amplifiers, etc.

  1. New Radio Telescope Makes First Scientific Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    The world's two largest radio telescopes have combined to make detailed radar images of the cloud-shrouded surface of Venus and of a tiny asteroid that passed near the Earth. The images mark the first scientific contributions from the National Science Foundation's (NSF) new Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia, which worked with the NSF's recently-upgraded Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico. The project used the radar transmitter on the Arecibo telescope and the huge collecting areas of both telescopes to receive the echoes. GBT-Arecibo Radar Image of Maxwell Montes on Venus "These images are the first of many scientific contributions to come from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, and a great way for it to begin its scientific career," said Paul Vanden Bout, director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "Our congratulations go to the scientists involved in this project as well as to the hard-working staffs at Green Bank and Arecibo who made this accomplishment possible," Vanden Bout added. To the eye, Venus hides behind a veil of brilliant white clouds, but these clouds can be penetrated by radar waves, revealing the planet's surface. The combination of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), the world's largest fully-steerable radio telescope, and the Arecibo telescope, the world's most powerful radar, makes an unmatched tool for studying Venus and other solar-system bodies. "Having a really big telescope like the new Green Bank Telescope to receive the radar echoes from small asteroids that are really close to the Earth and from very distant objects like Titan, the large moon of Saturn, will be a real boon to radar studies of the solar system." said Cornell University professor Donald Campbell, leader of the research team. Ten years ago, the radar system on NASA's Magellan spacecraft probed though the clouds of Venus to reveal in amazing detail the surface of the Earth's twin planet. These new studies using the GBT and Arecibo, the

  2. Classroom Experience with the Small Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W.; Pratap, P.

    2005-12-01

    The Small Radio Telescope (SRT) was designed by MIT Haystack Observatory for use in science classrooms at the secondary and undergraduate level. The system consists of a 7-ft antenna with a receiver capable of observing the 1420 MHz radio astronomy band. A portable version of the telescope is available for teachers in the eastern Massachusetts and southern New Hampshire area. The SRT has been used at Haystack Observatory by teachers participating in an NSF Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program. High school lesson plans for the SRT were developed as part of this program and are available on the Haystack Observatory web site at http://web.haystack.mit.edu/pcr/precollegeindex.htm. Last spring, some of these lesson plans were tested at Nashua High School South in Nashua, NH. The presentation will discuss the experience of teaching observational radio astronomy in a high school physics classroom. Specific information will be given on the SRT and available lesson plans. Effects on student achievement and attitude will also be discussed. These experiences were made possible through an NSF/RET grant.

  3. Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope System Theory of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, George R.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this learning module is to enable learners to describe how the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) system functions in support of Apple Valley Science and Technology Center's (AVSTC) client schools' radio astronomy activities.

  4. Beam Calibration of Radio Telescopes with Drones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chihway; Monstein, Christian; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Glauser, Adrian; Casura, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    We present a multifrequency far-field beam map for the 5-m dish telescope at the Bleien Observatory measured using a commercially available drone. We describe the hexacopter drone used in this experiment, the design of the flight pattern, and the data analysis scheme. This is the first application of this calibration method to a single-dish radio telescope in the far-field. The high signal-to-noise ratio data allows us to characterize the beam pattern with high accuracy out to at least the fourth side-lobe. The resulting two-dimensional beam pattern is compared with that derived from a more traditional calibration approach using an astronomical calibration source. We discuss the advantages of this method compared to other beam calibration methods. Our results show that this drone-based technique is very promising for ongoing and future radio experiments, where the knowledge of the beam pattern is key to obtaining high-accuracy cosmological and astronomical measurements.

  5. Radio Telescopes Reveal Youngest Stellar Corpse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    Astronomers using a global combination of radio telescopes to study a stellar explosion some 30 million light-years from Earth have likely discovered either the youngest black hole or the youngest neutron star known in the Universe. Their discovery also marks the first time that a black hole or neutron star has been found associated with a supernova that has been seen to explode since the invention of the telescope nearly 400 years ago. M51 An artist's impression of Supernova 1986J. The newly discovered nebula around the black hole or neutron star in the center is shown in blue, and is in the center of the expanding, fragmented shell of material thrown off in the supernova explosion, which is shown in red. CREDIT: Norbert Bartel and Michael F. Bietenholz, York University; Artist: G. Arguner (Click on image for larger version) Image Files Artist's Conception (above image, 836K) Galaxy and Supernova (47K) A VLA image (left) of the galaxy NGC 891, showing the bright supernova explosion below the galaxy's center. At right, a closer view of the supernova, made with a global array of radio telescopes. CREDIT: Miguel A. Perez-Torres, Antxon Alberdi and Lucas Lara, Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia - CSIC, Spain, Jon Marcaide and Jose C. Guirado, Universidad de Valencia, Spain Franco Mantovani, IRA-CNR, Italy, Eduardo Ros, MPIfR, Germany, and Kurt W. Weiler, Naval Research Laboratory, USA Multi-Frequency Closeup View (201K) Blue and white area shows the nebula surrounding the black hole or neutron star lurking in the center of the supernova. This nebula is apparent at a higher radio frequency (15 GHz). The red and also the contours show the distorted, expanding shell of material thrown off in the supernova explosion. This shell is seen at a lower radio frequency (5 GHz). CREDIT: Michael F. Bietenholz and Norbert Bartel, York University, Michael Rupen, NRAO, NRAO/AUI/NSF A supernova is the explosion of a massive star after it exhausts its supply of nuclear fuel and

  6. A decametric wavelength radio telescope for interplanetary scintillation observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1975-01-01

    A phased array, electrically steerable radio telescope (with a total collecting area of 18 acres), constructed for the purpose of remotely sensing electron density irregularity structure in the solar wind, is presented. The radio telescope is able to locate, map, and track large scale features of the solar wind, such as streams and blast waves, by monitoring a large grid of natural radio sources subject to rapid intensity fluctuation (interplanetary scintillation) caused by the irregularity structure. Observations verify the performance of the array, the receiver, and the scintillation signal processing circuitry of the telescope.

  7. Interplanetary scintillation observations with the Cocoa Cross radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.; Shawhan, S. D.; Erskine, F. T.; Huneke, A. H.; Mitchell, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    Physical and electrical parameters for the 34.3-MHz Cocoa Cross radio telescope are given. The telescope is dedicated to the determination of solar-wind characteristics in and out of the ecliptic plane through measurement of electron-density irregularity structure as determined from IPS (interplanetary scintillation) of natural radio sources. The collecting area (72,000 sq m), angular resolution (0.4 deg EW by 0.6 deg NS), and spatial extent (1.3 km EW by 0.8 km NS) make the telescope well suited for measurements of IPS index and frequency scale for hundreds of weak radio sources without serious confusion effects.

  8. Radio astronomers, X-ray astronomers and the space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longair, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    The use of the Space Telescope and the study of objects in the radio and X-ray wavebands, particularly extragalactic objects, are discussed. The scientific objectives of a number of projects which involve observations with the Space Telescope are described.

  9. Development of new solar radio telescope in NICT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Yuki; Watari, Shinichi; Ishii, Mamoru; Ishibashi, Hiromitsu; Iwai, Kazumasa

    Solar radio burst is one of the most important events for not only space weather forecasting but also investigating high-energy phenomena in solar corona. The GHz solar radio waves are synchrotron radiation emitted by high energy electrons at lower corona. On the other hand, the MHz solar radio bursts, especially type II and III bursts, are radiated via mode conversion of Langmuir waves excited by high energy electrons. These high energy electrons are accelerated at reconnection regions in solar flare and shock waves in solar corona. Therefore, MHz and GHz solar radio waves are closely related each other through the accelerated high energy electrons. So, wide frequency range (MHz to GHz) radio wave observations with high time resolution are required to comprehensively understand high energy phenomena in solar corona. We have been operating solar radio spectrograph called HiRAS for over twenty years in Hiraiso Solar Observatory, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), but the system has been decrepit and radio wave environment in Hiraiso is getting worse. So, we have developed a new solar radio telescope in Yamagawa radio observation facility, NICT. The frequency range and time resolution in the system is 70MHz to 9.0GHz and 8 msec. In this presentation, we introduce status in progress for our new solar radio telescope.

  10. A School Radio Telescope for Two Metres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Codling, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the arrangement, specifications, and operation of a setup designed for use as a student project to record radio storms, continuous level of the quiet sun, and scientific satellites operating near the amateur 2-m band. Included is an example of records of solar activity during 1968-73. (CC)

  11. The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Pan, Zhichen

    2016-07-01

    The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST) is a Chinese megascience project funded by the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) of the People's Republic of China. The National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) is in charge of its construction and subsequent operation. Upon its expected completion in September 2016, FAST will surpass the 305 m Arecibo Telescope and the 100 m Green Bank Telescope in terms of absolute sensitivity in the 70 MHz to 3 GHz bands. In this paper, we report on the project, its current status, the key science goals, and plans for early science.

  12. Construction of a Novel Interferometric Array of Small Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Dalit; Timbie, P.

    2006-12-01

    Interferometric arrays of large numbers of antennas are under study for a variety of programs, such as the Square Kilometer Array and instruments optimized for observing the cosmic microwave background radiation. The Wisconsin Small Telescope Array for Radio-waves (WSTAR) will serve as a test of a simple and inexpensive method for building an adding interferometer with a large number of antennas. The approach creates a simple analog correlator from an ordinary receiver. Signals from each radio antenna are phase-modulated between 0 and 180 degrees at unique frequencies. The signals are added together and then enter a receiver/spectrometer. The visibilities from each baseline are decoded by phase-sensitive detection of the receiver output at the appropriate modulation frequencies. The scheme can be extended to an arbitrary number of antennas and has minimal computational requirements. WSTAR will consist of three small radio telescopes of 2.5 meter diameter which closely follow the Small Radio Telescope (SRT) design developed at the MIT Haystack Observatory. WSTAR will operate as a three-dish adding interferometer of variable spacing. The initial configuration is an equilateral triangle with 10 m spacing. At this stage, one telescope has been successfully constructed and is undergoing initial testing. Completion of the array is expected in 2007. This poster will present the adding algorithm and its significance as well as the construction details of WSTAR. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program and the Department of Defense's ASSURE program through NSF Award AST-0453442.

  13. Observations of cometary parent molecules with the IRAM radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colom, P.; Despois, D.; Paubert, G.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, Jacques

    1992-01-01

    Several rotational transitions of HCN, H2S, H2CO, and CH3OH were detected in comets P/Brorsen-Metcalf 1989 X, Austin (1989c1) and Levy (1990c) with the Institute for Millimeter Radioastronomy (IRAM) 30-m radio telescope. This allows us to determine the production rates of these molecules and to probe the physical conditions of the coma.

  14. Radio and Optical Telescopes for School Students and Professional Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosmer, Laura; Langston, G.; Heatherly, S.; Towner, A. P.; Ford, J.; Simon, R. S.; White, S.; O'Neil, K. L.; Haipslip, J.; Reichart, D.

    2013-01-01

    The NRAO 20m telescope is now on-line as a part of UNC's Skynet worldwide telescope network. The NRAO is completing integration of radio astronomy tools with the Skynet web interface. We present the web interface and astronomy projects that allow students and astronomers from all over the country to become Radio Astronomers. The 20 meter radio telescope at NRAO in Green Bank, WV is dedicated to public education and also is part of an experiment in public funding for astronomy. The telescope has a fantastic new web-based interface, with priority queuing, accommodating priority for paying customers and enabling free use of otherwise unused time. This revival included many software and hardware improvements including automatic calibration and improved time integration resulting in improved data processing, and a new ultra high resolution spectrometer. This new spectrometer is optimized for very narrow spectral lines, which will allow astronomers to study complex molecules and very cold regions of space in remarkable detail. In accordance with focusing on broader impacts, many public outreach and high school education activities have been completed with many confirmed future activities. The 20 meter is now a fully automated, powerful tool capable of professional grade results available to anyone in the world. Drop by our poster and try out real-time telescope control!

  15. High-precision pointing with the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppi, Sergio; Pernechele, Claudio; Pisanu, Tonino; Morsiani, Marco

    2010-07-01

    We present here the systems aimed to measure and minimize the pointing errors for the Sardinia Radio Telescope: they consist of an optical telescope to measure errors due to the mechanical structure deformations and a lasers system for the errors due to the subreflector displacement. We show here the results of the tests that we have done on the Medicina 32 meters VLBI radio telescope. The measurements demonstrate we can measure the pointing errors of the mechanical structure, with an accuracy of about ~1 arcsec. Moreover, we show the technique to measure the displacement of the subreflector, placed in the SRT at 22 meters from the main mirror, within +/-0.1 mm from its optimal position. These measurements show that we can obtain the needed accuracy to correct also the non repeatable pointing errors, which arise on time scale varying from seconds to minutes.

  16. Launch Will Create a Radio Telescope Larger than Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NASA and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory are joining with an international consortium of space agencies to support the launch of a Japanese satellite next week that will create the largest astronomical "instrument" ever built -- a radio telescope more than two-and-a-half times the diameter of the Earth that will give astronomers their sharpest view yet of the universe. The launch of the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Space Observatory Program (VSOP) satellite by Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) is scheduled for Feb. 10 at 11:50 p.m. EST (1:50 p.m. Feb. 11, Japan time.) The satellite is part of an international collaboration led by ISAS and backed by Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA; the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Socorro, NM; the Canadian Space Agency; the Australia Telescope National Facility; the European VLBI Network and the Joint Institute for Very Long Baseline Interferometry in Europe. Very long baseline interferometry is a technique used by radio astronomers to electronically link widely separated radio telescopes together so they work as if they were a single instrument with extraordinarily sharp "vision," or resolving power. The wider the distance between telescopes, the greater the resolving power. By taking this technique into space for the first time, astronomers will approximately triple the resolving power previously available with only ground-based telescopes. The satellite system will have resolving power almost 1,000 times greater than the Hubble Space Telescope at optical wavelengths. The satellite's resolving power is equivalent to being able to see a grain of rice in Tokyo from Los Angeles. "Using space VLBI, we can probe the cores of quasars and active galaxies, believed to be powered by super massive black holes," said Dr. Robert Preston, project scientist for the U.S. Space Very Long

  17. Radio Telescopes Will Add to Cassini-Huygens Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-12-01

    When the European Space Agency's Huygens spacecraft makes its plunge into the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan on January 14, radio telescopes of the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) will help international teams of scientists extract the maximum possible amount of irreplaceable information from an experiment unique in human history. Huygens is the 700-pound probe that has accompanied the larger Cassini spacecraft on a mission to thoroughly explore Saturn, its rings and its numerous moons. The Green Bank Telescope The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for GBT gallery) The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia and eight of the ten telescopes of the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), located at Pie Town and Los Alamos, NM, Fort Davis, TX, North Liberty, IA, Kitt Peak, AZ, Brewster, WA, Owens Valley, CA, and Mauna Kea, HI, will directly receive the faint signal from Huygens during its descent. Along with other radio telescopes in Australia, Japan, and China, the NRAO facilities will add significantly to the information about Titan and its atmosphere that will be gained from the Huygens mission. A European-led team will use the radio telescopes to make extremely precise measurements of the probe's position during its descent, while a U.S.-led team will concentrate on gathering measurements of the probe's descent speed and the direction of its motion. The radio-telescope measurements will provide data vital to gaining a full understanding of the winds that Huygens encounters in Titan's atmosphere. Currently, scientists know little about Titan's winds. Data from the Voyager I spacecraft's 1980 flyby indicated that east-west winds may reach 225 mph or more. North-south winds and possible vertical winds, while probably much weaker, may still be significant. There are competing theoretical models of Titan's winds, and the overall picture is best summarized as

  18. Radio Telescopes "Save the Day," Produce Data on Titan's Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    In what some scientists termed "a surprising, almost miraculous turnabout," radio telescopes, including major facilities of the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), have provided data needed to measure the winds encountered by the Huygens spacecraft as it descended through the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan last month -- measurements feared lost because of a communication error between Huygens and its "mother ship" Cassini. The Green Bank Telescope The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for GBT gallery) A global network of radio telescopes, including the NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia and eight of the ten antennas of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), recorded the radio signal from Huygens during its descent on January 14. Measurements of the frequency shift caused by the craft's motion, called Doppler shift, are giving planetary scientists their first direct information about Titan's winds. "When we began working with our international partners on this project, we thought our telescopes would be adding to the wind data produced by the two spacecraft themselves. Now, with the ground-based telescopes providing the only information about Titan's winds, we are extremely proud that our facilities are making such a key contribution to our understanding of this fascinating planetary body," said Dr. Fred K.Y. Lo, Director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). Early analysis of the radio-telescope data shows that Titan's wind flows from west to east, in the direction of the moon's rotation, at all altitudes. The highest wind speed, nearly 270 mph, was measured at an altitude of about 75 miles. Winds are weak near Titan's surface and increase in speed slowly up to an altitude of about 37 miles, where the spacecraft encountered highly-variable winds that scientists think indicate a region of vertical wind shear. The ground-based Doppler

  19. Argentina: A Country With Many Attributes To Host Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, G.; Giacani, E.; Arnal, M.; Levato, H.; Morras, R.; Reynoso, E.

    2006-08-01

    Argentina is participating in the international call for proposals of sites to install the large radio interferometer "Square Kilometre Array" (SKA). The process of site selection involved the preparation and submission of many studies to characterize the properties of the potential sites: from electromagnetic pollution (radio frequency interferences, RFI) to tropospheric conditions, including land costs, climatic issues, topography, national regulations, etc. In this work we will summarize the many attributes that make Argentina an ideal place in the world to install radio telescopes. Briefly, we will show the advantages of an excellent site located near the Andes ridge at an altitude of ~2650 m above sea level, within the borders of an Astronomical Protected Reserve. The site offers an almost ideal overlap for simultaneous observations with all the large telescopes in Northern Chile and the extra bonus of the Galactic Centre almost culminating at the zenith. The existence of good infrastructure (roads, power supply, telecommunications, either existing, under construction, or planned for the near future), together with low land prices, low operating costs, highly skilled workforce and a well established astronomical community, will be described. In addition to this site, there are other places within the country adequate for the installation of radio telescopes. We will explain the strong support for incoming astronomical projects provided by the highest level of both National and Provincial Governments, including regulatory issues for RFI protection.

  20. Detecting cosmic rays with the LOFAR radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellart, P.; Nelles, A.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Frieswijk, W.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; James, C. W.; Krause, M.; Mevius, M.; Scholten, O.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.; van den Akker, M.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Bähren, L.; Beck, R.; Bell, M. E.; Bennema, P.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; Brentjens, M.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Coolen, A.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; de Jong, A.; de Vos, M.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Ferrari, C.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Grit, T.; Hamaker, J. P.; Hassall, T. E.; Heald, G.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Holties, H. A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Klijn, W.; Kohler, J.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; McKean, J. P.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Mol, J. D.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Munk, H.; Nijboer, R.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Overeem, R.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Renting, A.; Romein, J. W.; Röttgering, H.; Schoenmakers, A.; Schwarz, D.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Stappers, B. W.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Toribio, C.; van Leeuwen, J.; van Nieuwpoort, R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Vermaas, N.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; Vogt, C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wise, M. W.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Zensus, A.

    2013-12-01

    The low frequency array (LOFAR), is the first radio telescope designed with the capability to measure radio emission from cosmic-ray induced air showers in parallel with interferometric observations. In the first ~2 years of observing, 405 cosmic-ray events in the energy range of 1016-1018 eV have been detected in the band from 30-80 MHz. Each of these air showers is registered with up to ~1000 independent antennas resulting in measurements of the radio emission with unprecedented detail. This article describes the dataset, as well as the analysis pipeline, and serves as a reference for future papers based on these data. All steps necessary to achieve a full reconstruction of the electric field at every antenna position are explained, including removal of radio frequency interference, correcting for the antenna response and identification of the pulsed signal.

  1. The microwave holography system for the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, G.; Bolli, P.; Busonera, G.; Pisanu, T.; Poppi, S.; Gaudiomonte, F.; Zacchiroli, G.; Roda, J.; Morsiani, M.; López-Pérez, J. A.

    2012-09-01

    Microwave holography is a well-established technique for mapping surface errors of large reflector antennas, particularly those designed to operate at high frequencies. We present here a holography system based on the interferometric method for mapping the primary reflector surface of the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT). SRT is a new 64-m-diameter antenna located in Sardinia, Italy, equipped with an active surface and designed to operate up to 115 GHz. The system consists mainly of two radio frequency low-noise coherent channels, designed to receive Ku-band digital TV signals from geostationary satellites. Two commercial prime focus low-noise block converters are installed on the radio telescope under test and on a small reference antenna, respectively. Then the signals are amplified, filtered and downconverted to baseband. An innovative digital back-end based on FPGA technology has been implemented to digitize two 5 MHz-band signals and calculate their cross-correlation in real-time. This is carried out by using a 16-bit resolution ADCs and a FPGA reaching very large amplitude dynamic range and reducing post-processing time. The final holography data analysis is performed by CLIC data reduction software developed within the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM, Grenoble, France). The system was successfully tested during several holography measurement campaigns, recently performed at the Medicina 32-m radio telescope. Two 65-by-65 maps, using an on-the-fly raster scan with on-source phase calibration, were performed pointing the radio telescope at 38 degrees elevation towards EUTELSAT 7A satellite. The high SNR (greater than 60 dB) and the good phase stability led to get an accuracy on the surface error maps better than 150 μm RMS.

  2. Astronomers Make First Images With Space Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-07-01

    Marking an important new milestone in radio astronomy history, scientists at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, have made the first images using a radio telescope antenna in space. The images, more than a million times more detailed than those produced by the human eye, used the new Japanese HALCA satellite, working in conjunction with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and Very Large Array (VLA) ground-based radio telescopes. The landmark images are the result of a long-term NRAO effort supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). "This success means that our ability to make detailed radio images of objects in the universe is no longer limited by the size of the Earth," said NRAO Director Paul Vanden Bout. "Astronomy's vision has just become much sharper." HALCA, launched on Feb. 11 by Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), is the first satellite designed for radio astronomy imaging. It is part of an international collaboration led by ISAS and backed by NRAO; Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); the Canadian Space Agency; the Australia Telescope National Facility; the European VLBI Network and the Joint Institute for Very Long Baseline Interferometry in Europe. On May 22, HALCA observed a distant active galaxy called PKS 1519-273, while the VLBA and VLA also observed it. Data from the satellite was received by a tracking station at the NRAO facility in Green Bank, West Virginia. Tape-recorded data from the satellite and from the radio telescopes on the ground were sent to NRAO's Array Operations Center (AOC) in Socorro, NM. In Socorro, astronomers and computer scientists used a special-purpose computer to digitally combine the signals from the satellite and the ground telescopes to make them all work together as a single, giant radio telescope. This dedicated machine, the VLBA Correlator, built as

  3. An African VLBI Network of radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaylard, M. J.; Bietenholz, M. F.; Combrinck, L.; Booth, R. S.; Buchner, S. J.; Fanaroff, B. L.; MacLeod, G. C.; Nicolson, G. D.; Quick, J. F. H.; Stronkhorst, P.; Venkatasubramani, T. L.

    The advent of international wideband communication by optical fibre has produced a revolution in communications and the use of the internet. Many African countries are now connected to undersea fibre linking them to other African countries and to other continents. Previously international communication was by microwave links through geostationary satellites. These are becoming redundant in some countries as optical fibre takes over, as this provides 1000 times the bandwidth of the satellite links. In the 1970's and 1980's some two dozen large (30m diameter class) antennas were built in various African countries to provide the satellite links. Twenty six are currently known in 19 countries. As these antennas become redundant, the possibility exists to convert them for radio astronomy at a cost of roughly one tenth that of a new antenna of similar size. HartRAO, SKA South Africa and the South African Department of Science and Technology (DST) have started exploring this possibility with some of the African countries.

  4. The history of radio telescopes, 1945-1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Woodruff T.

    2009-08-01

    Forged by the development of radar during World War II, radio astronomy revolutionized astronomy during the decade after the war. A new universe was revealed, centered not on stars and planets, but on the gas between the stars, on explosive sources of unprecedented luminosity, and on hundreds of mysterious discrete sources with no optical identifications. Using “radio telescopes” that looked nothing like traditional (optical) telescopes, radio astronomers were a very different breed from traditional (optical) astronomers. This pathbreaking of radio astronomy also made it much easier for later “astronomies” and their “telescopes” (X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, gamma-ray) to become integrated into astronomy after the launch of the space age in the 1960s. This paper traces the history of radio telescopes from 1945 through about 1990, from the era of converted small-sized, military radar antennas to that of large interferometric arrays connected by complex electronics and computers; from the era of strip-chart recordings measured by rulers to powerful computers and display graphics; from the era of individuals and small groups building their own equipment to that of Big Science, large collaborations and national observatories.

  5. Launch Will Create a Radio Telescope Larger than Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NASA and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory are joining with an international consortium of space agencies to support the launch of a Japanese satellite next week that will create the largest astronomical "instrument" ever built -- a radio telescope more than two-and-a-half times the diameter of the Earth that will give astronomers their sharpest view yet of the universe. The launch of the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Space Observatory Program (VSOP) satellite by Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) is scheduled for Feb. 10 at 11:50 p.m. EST (1:50 p.m. Feb. 11, Japan time.) The satellite is part of an international collaboration led by ISAS and backed by Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA; the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Socorro, NM; the Canadian Space Agency; the Australia Telescope National Facility; the European VLBI Network and the Joint Institute for Very Long Baseline Interferometry in Europe. Very long baseline interferometry is a technique used by radio astronomers to electronically link widely separated radio telescopes together so they work as if they were a single instrument with extraordinarily sharp "vision," or resolving power. The wider the distance between telescopes, the greater the resolving power. By taking this technique into space for the first time, astronomers will approximately triple the resolving power previously available with only ground-based telescopes. The satellite system will have resolving power almost 1,000 times greater than the Hubble Space Telescope at optical wavelengths. The satellite's resolving power is equivalent to being able to see a grain of rice in Tokyo from Los Angeles. "Using space VLBI, we can probe the cores of quasars and active galaxies, believed to be powered by super massive black holes," said Dr. Robert Preston, project scientist for the U.S. Space Very Long

  6. Performance Analysis of Paraboloidal Reflector Antennas in Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeap, Kim Ho; Law, Young Hui; Rizman, Zairi Ismael; Cheong, Yuen Kiat; Ong, Chu En; Chong, Kok Hen

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis on the performance of the three most commonly used paraboloidal reflector antennas in radio telescopes - i.e. the prime focus, Cassegrain, and Gregorian antennas. In our study, we have adopted the design parameters for the Cassegrain configuration used in the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) project. The parameters are subsequently re-calculated so as to meet the design requirement of the Gregorian and prime focus configurations. The simulation results obtained from GRASP reveal that the prime focus configuration produces the lowest side lobes and the highest main lobe level. Such configuration, however, has the disadvantage of being highly susceptible to thermal ground noise radiation. The radiation characteristics produced by both the Cassegrain and Gregorian configurations are very close to each other. Indeed, the results show that there is no significant advantage between the two designs. Hence, we can conclude that both co! nfigurations are comparable in the application of radio telescopes.

  7. K-ART (Korea Array Radio Telescope) and Monitoring of Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Sook; Lim, Soon-Wook; Park, Yong-Sun

    2010-12-01

    Korea Array Radio Telescope (K-ART), a proto-type radio array telescope, is designed for 300-450 MHz wavebands. The system is located in the Jeju Island of the South Korea, and is currently in its testing mode since last mid-October 2010. It is primarily designed for monitoring solar activity and radio transients. K-ART has a capacity to monitor transients for about 2 hours per day, with a spatial resolution of about 10 minutes and a timing resolution of milliseconds. The sensitivity is expected to be a few mJy or less. We propose to monitor radio transients such as X-ray binaries, cataclysmic variables and quasars, on the target-of-opportunity mode, in addition to the scheduled observation.

  8. The Allen Telescope Array: The First Widefield, Panchromatic, Snapshot Radio Camera for Radio Astronomy and SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, J.; Backer, D.; Blitz, L.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bower, G. C.; Cheng, C.; Croft, S.; Dexter, M.; Engargiola, G.; Fields, E.; Forster, J.; Gutierrez-Kraybill, C.; Heiles, C.; Helfer, T.; Jorgensen, S.; Keating, G.; Lugten, J.; MacMahon, D.; Milgrome, O.; Thornton, D.; Urry, L.; van Leeuwen, J.; Werthimer, D.; Williams, P. H.; Wright, M.; Tarter, J.; Ackermann, R.; Atkinson, S.; Backus, P.; Barott, W.; Bradford, T.; Davis, M.; Deboer, D.; Dreher, J.; Harp, G.; Jordan, J.; Kilsdonk, T.; Pierson, T.; Randall, K.; Ross, J.; Shostak, S.; Fleming, M.; Cork, C.; Vitouchkine, A.; Wadefalk, N.; Weinreb, S.

    2009-08-01

    The first 42 elements of the Allen Telescope Array (ATA-42) are beginning to deliver data at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory in Northern California. Scientists and engineers are actively exploiting all of the flexibility designed into this innovative instrument for simultaneously conducting surveys of the astrophysical sky and conducting searches for distant technological civilizations. This paper summarizes the design elements of the ATA, the cost savings made possible by the use of COTS components, and the cost/performance trades that eventually enabled this first snapshot radio camera. The fundamental scientific program of this new telescope is varied and exciting; some of the first astronomical results will be discussed.

  9. A Tour of the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardenski, Brooke; Stephan, George R.

    1997-01-01

    Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) is located in a remote area of the Mojave Desert, 40 miles north of Barstow, California. The antenna, identified as DSS-12, is a 34-meter diameter dish, 11 times the diameter of a ten foot microwave dish used for satellite television. DSS-12 has been used by NASA to communicate with robotic space probes for more than thirty years.

  10. The Five-Hundred Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (fast) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Rendong; Li, Di; Jin, Chengjin; Wang, Qiming; Zhu, Lichun; Zhu, Wenbai; Zhang, Haiyan; Yue, Youling; Qian, Lei

    Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) is a Chinese mega-science project to build the largest single dish radio telescope in the world. Its innovative engineering concept and design pave a new road to realize a huge single dish in the most effective way. FAST also represents Chinese contribution in the international efforts to build the square kilometer array (SKA). Being the most sensitive single dish radio telescope, FAST will enable astronomers to jump-start many science goals, such as surveying the neutral hydrogen in the Milky Way and other galaxies, detecting faint pulsars, looking for the first shining stars, hearing the possible signals from other civilizations, etc. The idea of sitting a large spherical dish in a karst depression is rooted in Arecibo telescope. FAST is an Arecibo-type antenna with three outstanding aspects: the karst depression used as the site, which is large to host the 500-meter telescope and deep to allow a zenith angle of 40 degrees; the active main reflector correcting for spherical aberration on the ground to achieve a full polarization and a wide band without involving complex feed systems; and the light-weight feed cabin driven by cables and servomechanism plus a parallel robot as a secondary adjustable system to move with high precision. The feasibility studies for FAST have been carried out for 14 years, supported by Chinese and world astronomical communities. Funding for FAST has been approved by the National Development and Reform Commission in July of 2007 with a capital budget ~ 700 million RMB. The project time is 5.5 years from the commencement of work in March of 2011 and the first light is expected to be in 2016. This review intends to introduce the project of FAST with emphasis on the recent progress since 2006. In this paper, the subsystems of FAST are described in modest details followed by discussions of the fundamental science goals and examples of early science projects.

  11. Teaching Astronomy at Columbus State University using Small Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Zodiac T.

    2006-12-01

    Astronomy is inherently fascinating to students but dark skies and good weather are not often scheduled during the school day. Radio telescopes provide an all-weather, all-day opportunity for astronomical observations. Columbus State University (CSU) has installed two “Small Radio Telescopes” for use by undergraduate students to pursue extra-curricular research in introductory astronomy. These telescopes are relatively affordable and are designed to be remotely operated through a Windows, Linux, or Macintosh environment. They are capable of diffraction-limited observations of the Sun and galactic Hydrogen in the ‘L-band’. A comprehensive website of projects suitable for high-school students and undergraduates is maintained by a group at MIT. This website ensures users are not left to explore the telescope’s abilities blindly. Students with varied interests learn about the nature of science by using an instrument that doesn’t lend itself to pretty pictures. Radio telescopes also provide a slight engineering flavor drawing in students who might not otherwise be interested in astronomy. This poster will provide a summary of installation, calibration, and future plans, and will share some observations by undergraduates at CSU.

  12. Phase Retrieval for Radio Telescope and Antenna Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Phase-retrieval is a general term used in optics to describe the estimation of optical imperfections or "aberrations." The purpose of this innovation is to develop the application of phase retrieval to radio telescope and antenna control in the millimeter wave band. Earlier techniques do not approximate the incoherent subtraction process as a coherent propagation. This approximation reduces the noise in the data and allows a straightforward application of conventional phase retrieval techniques for radio telescope and antenna control. The application of iterative-transform phase retrieval to radio telescope and antenna control is made by approximating the incoherent subtraction process as a coherent propagation. Thus, for systems utilizing both positive and negative polarity feeds, this approximation allows both surface and alignment errors to be assessed without the use of additional hardware or laser metrology. Knowledge of the antenna surface profile allows errors to be corrected at a given surface temperature and observing angle. In addition to imperfections of the antenna surface figure, the misalignment of multiple antennas operating in unison can reduce or degrade the signal-to-noise ratio of the received or broadcast signals. This technique also has application to the alignment of antenna array configurations.

  13. SETI reloaded: Next generation radio telescopes, transients and cognitive computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    The Search for Extra-terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) using radio telescopes is an area of research that is now more than 50 years old. Thus far, both targeted and wide-area surveys have yet to detect artificial signals from intelligent civilisations. In this paper, I argue that the incidence of co-existing intelligent and communicating civilisations is probably small in the Milky Way. While this makes successful SETI searches a very difficult pursuit indeed, the huge impact of even a single detection requires us to continue the search. A substantial increase in the overall performance of radio telescopes (and in particular future wide-field instruments such as the Square Kilometre Array - SKA), provide renewed optimism in the field. Evidence for this is already to be seen in the success of SETI researchers in acquiring observations on some of the world's most sensitive radio telescope facilities via open, peer-reviewed processes. The increasing interest in the dynamic radio sky, and our ability to detect new and rapid transient phenomena such as Fast Radio Bursts (FRB) is also greatly encouraging. While the nature of FRBs is not yet fully understood, I argue they are unlikely to be the signature of distant extra-terrestrial civilisations. As astronomers face a data avalanche on all sides, advances made in related areas such as advanced Big Data analytics, and cognitive computing are crucial to enable serendipitous discoveries to be made. In any case, as the era of the SKA fast approaches, the prospects of a SETI detection have never been better.

  14. Solar and Planetary Observations with a Lunar Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassim, N.; Weiler, K. W.; Lazio, J. W.; MacDowall, R. J.; Jones, D. L.; Bale, S. D.; Demaio, L.; Kasper, J. C.

    2006-05-01

    Ground-based radio telescopes cannot observe at frequencies below about 10 MHz (wavelengths longer than 30 m) because of ionospheric absorption. The Lunar Imaging Radio Array (LIRA) is a mission concept in which an array of radio telescopes is deployed on the Moon, as part of the Vision for Space Exploration, with the aim of extending radio observations to lower frequencies than are possible from the Earth. LIRA would provide the capability for dedicated monitoring of solar and planetary bursts as well as the search for magnetospheric emissions from extrasolar planets. The highest sensitivity observations can be accomplished by locating LIRA on the far side of the Moon. The array would be composed of 10-12 radial arms, each 1-2 km in length. Each arm would have several hundred dipole antennas and feedlines printed on a very thin sheet of kapton with a total mass of about 300 kg. This would provide a convenient way to deploy thousands of individual antennas and a centrally condensed distribution of array baselines. The lunar farside provides shielding from terrestrial natural and technological radio interference and freedom from the corrupting influence of Earth's ionosphere. This paper will describe the science case for LIRA as well as various options for array deployment and data transmission to Earth. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Basic research in radio astronomy at the NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  15. Ideas for future large single dish radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärcher, Hans J.; Baars, Jacob W. M.

    2014-07-01

    The existing large single dish radio telescopes of the 100m class (Effelsberg, Green Bank) were built in the 1970s and 1990s. With some active optics they work now down to 3 millimeter wavelength where the atmospheric quality of the site is also a limiting factor. Other smaller single dish telescopes (50m LMT Mexico, 30m IRAM Spain) are located higher and reach sub-millimeter quality, and the much smaller 12m antennas of the ALMA array reach at a very high site the Terahertz region. They use advanced technologies as carbon fiber structures and flexible body control. We review natural limits to telescope design and use the examples of a number of telescopes for an overview of the available state-of-the-art in design, engineering and technologies. Without considering the scientific justification we then offer suggestions to realize ultimate performance of huge single dish telescopes (up to 160m). We provide an outlook on design options, technological frontiers and cost estimates.

  16. Development of a Low Cost Spectrometer for the Small Radio Telescope (SRT), Very Small Radio Telescope (VSRT), and Ozone spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson-Rollins, Marc; Rogers, A. E.

    2014-01-01

    Several instruments used for education, outreach and scientific investigations could benefit from a low cost spectrometer. These include the Small Radio Telescope known as the "SRT", a very small radio telescope known as the "VSRT", and an 11 GHz Ozone spectrometer. The SRT is used to observe the Sun and the 21-cm hydrogen line. The SRTs, which until recently were available commercially, are still in operation at many universities and are used for student projects including measuring the Galactic rotation curve of our Galaxy. These instruments, which were initially primarily used to help teach students how to analyze scientific data, are now used for scientific investigations that have resulted in publications in science journals. Recently a low cost USB "dongle" for digital TV has become available. It has been adapted for use as a software defined radio by amateur radio groups. Linux-based software was developed to adapt the device to form a low cost digital spectrometer for the SRT by integrating open source code into the existing C code written for the SRT. Some challenges faced when trying to integrate the USB TV dongle into the SRT system and software will be discussed. To test the effectiveness of the USB TV Dongle based SRT several astronomical observations were made and compared to the older SRT system. These observations show promise for the device replacing older SRT systems at a fraction of the cost and effort and as a possible replacement for the VSRT and Ozone spectrometer.

  17. The UTMOST - rebirth of the Molonglo Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Anne J.; Flynn, Chris

    2015-08-01

    The Molongo Radio Telescope, a large cylindrical paraboloid interferometer located near Canberra in Australia, has been redeveloped with a digital receiver system and optic fibre transmission network leading to a hybrid signal processor incorporating a GPU supercomputer and programmable-logic chip based filterbanks. Data rates up to 22 Gbytes/sec will be processed in real-time. The new configuration is 10 times more efficient than the previous system with substantially increased sensitivity and bandwidth (centred on 843 MHz) and a field of view of about 8 square degrees. The mechanical infrastructure has been retained; hence the angular resolution remains at 43 arcsec. The key science goals of the new instrument include increasing the Fast Radio Burst discovery rate by an order of magnitude or more over our long term rate with the Parkes Telescope, pulsar timing and commensal imaging of diffuse radio sources. Novel methods of RFI excision have been demonstrated. The talk will present the elements of the new system and some recent science results.

  18. Improved method for pointing characterization of large radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David R.

    2000-07-01

    In order to upgrade existing large radio telescopes or develop new ones, it is necessary to employ sophisticated active controls to meet the higher requirements on surface precision and pointing accuracy. However, in order for these high- performance controllers to maintain stability, they require an accurate characterization of the telescope structure. A finite element model (FEM) is sufficient to prove controller concepts, but does not have the level of accuracy required for final controller implementation. This results in a need for experimental characterization of the structure. A significant problem is that the structural behavior of the telescope is typically measured at the encoders, while the critical performance is the actual pointing on the sky. Conventional pointing measurements are excellent for obtaining the actual pointing direction, but are insufficient for structural characterization. Conversely, conventional physical measurements are excellent for determining structural behavior, but are not suitable for high accuracy calculation of the final pointing. We describe a new method for taking pointing measurements to quantify the static and dynamic tracking errors in the telescope. This is accomplished by combining pointing measurements at a high sample rate with simultaneous data taken from sensors on the structure. In the simplest form, the method allows improvement of the telescope controller and some indication of the relative importance of static and dynamic effects. More complete implementations of the approach can provide information about the major contributors of pointing error, improvements to the FEM, and extraction of the force distribution history on the structure. Such data will be essential if future telescope upgrades and designs are to take advantage of complex control and metrology.

  19. Youngest Radio Pulsar Revealed with Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-04-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's (NSF) newly commissioned Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have detected remarkably faint radio signals from an 820 year-old pulsar, making it the youngest radio-emitting pulsar known. This discovery pushes the boundaries of radio telescope sensitivity for discovering pulsars, and will enable scientists to conduct observations that could lead to a better understanding of how these stars evolve. The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope "Important questions about pulsars may be answered by long-term monitoring of objects such as the one we just detected," said Fernando Camilo of Columbia University in New York City. "Young pulsars are particularly rare, and being able to study such a young one at radio wavelengths provides an outstanding opportunity to learn critical facts about their evolution and workings." The results of this research, based on observations conducted on February 22-23, 2002, were accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Scientists have long suspected that a pulsar - a rapidly spinning, superdense neutron star - was born when a giant star ended its life in a cataclysmic supernova explosion observed in late summer of 1181, as suggested by Japanese and Chinese historical records. For the past 20 years, astronomers have searched this supernova remnant (3C58), located 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, for the telltale pulsations of a newly born pulsar. Late in 2001, data from NASA's Chandra X-ray satellite confirmed its existence, but it remained an elusive quarry for radio telescopes. "We believed from historical records and certainly knew from recent X-ray observations that this star was there," Camilo remarked, "but despite many attempts, no one had been able to find any radio pulsations from it because the signals are, it turns out, incredibly weak." For comparison, this pulsar's radio emission is some 250

  20. Engineering and science highlights of the KAT-7 radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, A. R.; Alberts, T.; Armstrong, R. P.; Barta, A.; Bauermeister, E. F.; Bester, H.; Blose, S.; Booth, R. S.; Botha, D. H.; Buchner, S. J.; Carignan, C.; Cheetham, T.; Cloete, K.; Coreejes, G.; Crida, R. C.; Cross, S. D.; Curtolo, F.; Dikgale, A.; de Villiers, M. S.; du Toit, L. J.; Esterhuyse, S. W. P.; Fanaroff, B.; Fender, R. P.; Fijalkowski, M.; Fourie, D.; Frank, B.; George, D.; Gibbs, P.; Goedhart, S.; Grobbelaar, J.; Gumede, S. C.; Herselman, P.; Hess, K. M.; Hoek, N.; Horrell, J.; Jonas, J. L.; Jordaan, J. D. B.; Julie, R.; Kapp, F.; Kotzé, P.; Kusel, T.; Langman, A.; Lehmensiek, R.; Liebenberg, D.; Liebenberg, I. J. V.; Loots, A.; Lord, R. T.; Lucero, D. M.; Ludick, J.; Macfarlane, P.; Madlavana, M.; Magnus, L.; Magozore, C.; Malan, J. A.; Manley, J. R.; Marais, L.; Marais, N.; Marais, S. J.; Maree, M.; Martens, A.; Mokone, O.; Moss, V.; Mthembu, S.; New, W.; Nicholson, G. D.; van Niekerk, P. C.; Oozeer, N.; Passmoor, S. S.; Peens-Hough, A.; Pińska, A. B.; Prozesky, P.; Rajan, S.; Ratcliffe, S.; Renil, R.; Richter, L. L.; Rosekrans, D.; Rust, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Schwardt, L. C.; Seranyane, S.; Serylak, M.; Shepherd, D. S.; Siebrits, R.; Sofeya, L.; Spann, R.; Springbok, R.; Swart, P. S.; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L.; Theron, I. P.; Tiplady, A.; Toruvanda, O.; Tshongweni, S.; van den Heever, L.; van der Merwe, C.; van Rooyen, R.; Wakhaba, S.; Walker, A. L.; Welz, M.; Williams, L.; Wolleben, M.; Woudt, P. A.; Young, N. J.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-08-01

    The construction of the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7) array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scientific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular, we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stirling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Streaming Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used for scientific observations where it has a niche in mapping low surface-brightness continuum sources, some extended H I haloes and OH masers in star-forming regions. It can also be used to monitor continuum source variability, observe pulsars, and make Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations.

  1. A METHOD TO IMPROVE THE SENSITIVITY OF RADIO TELESCOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Lieu, Richard; Duan, Lingze; Kibble, T. W. B.

    2015-01-10

    As an extension of the ideas of Hanbury-Brown and Twiss, a method is proposed to eliminate the phase noise of white chaotic light in the regime where it is dominant, and to measure the much smaller Poisson fluctuations from which the incoming flux can be reconstructed. The best effect is achieved when the timing resolution is finer than the inverse bandwidth of the spectral filter. There may be applications to radio astronomy at the phase noise dominated frequencies of 1-10 GHz, in terms of potentially increasing the sensitivity of telescopes by an order of magnitude.

  2. Short History of Fixed-Reflector Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, R. G.

    2016-02-01

    From the 66 m parabolic reflector built in 1947 at Jodrell Bank to the 305 m Arecibo dish completed nearly two decades later, radio astronomers in the early days experimented with fixed reflecting mirrors to achieve large collecting areas. In this brief history I will consider the over half-dozen such instruments (of which I am aware) built by 1970, and their main achievements. I will discuss the likely reasons for the success of some of these telescopes, as well as their short-comings, and the lessons for future instruments like FAST.

  3. Foundation design for a radio telescope on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, Koon Meng; Johnson, Stewart W.; Yuan, Zehong

    1990-01-01

    A foundation design for a 122 m diameter dish-type radio telescope on the moon is presented. The 1.2 m wide and 43 m diameter circular strip footing was analyzed for settlement due to compaction during installation and also for total and differential settlement under in-service laods. An axisymmetrical finite element code of the uppdated Lagrangian formulation was used. Interface slip elements were also used. The nonlinear hyperbolic stress-strain model parameters for the regolith were derived from load-deflection characteristics of astronauts' bootprints and the Rover tracks.

  4. Computer-aided structural design of a lunar radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akgul, Ferhat; Gerstle, Walter H.; Johnson, Stewart W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a computer-aided structural design of the main reflector of a fully steerable radio telescope to be located (in the 21st century) on the moon, and presents the results of the structural analysis of the reflector. The reflector is a paraboloid with a surface area of 12,660 sq m and a focal ratio of 0.42. The reflector's surface will be covered by a 5.08 cm-thick sandwich panel made of thin-walled aluminum cells filled with low-density foam. The low weight of the design will be achieved by using graphite-epoxy as the structural material.

  5. A History of Radio Telescope Arrays Developed at Clark Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polisensky, E. J.; Kassim, N. E.

    2005-12-01

    Over the course of nearly three decades, a series of state of the art low frequency radio telescopes were developed in the dry lake bed of Clark Lake east of San Diego by Professor Bill Erickson and his colleagues and students. These instruments helped open the first window on the very poorly explored region of the electromagnetic spectrum below 100 MHz. Institutions involved with the construction and operation of the instruments included Convair (now General Dynamics), the University of Maryland, the University of California at San Diego, the University of Iowa, and the Goddard Space Flight Center.

  6. The South Pole, Antarctica, Solar Radio Telescope (SPASRT) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrard, A. J.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Gary, D. E.; Kujawski, J. T.; Nita, G. M.; Melville, R.; Stillinger, A.; Jeffer, G.

    2014-12-01

    The study of the sun in the radio portion of the electromagnetic spectrum furthers our understanding of fundamental solar processes observed in the X-ray, UV, and visible regions of the spectrum. For example, the study of solar radio bursts, which have been shown to cause serious disruptions of technologies at Earth, are essential for advancing our knowledge and understanding of solar flares and their relationship to coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles, as well as the underlying particle acceleration mechanisms associated with these processes. In addition, radio coverage of the solar atmosphere could yield completely new insights into the variations of output solar energy, including Alfven wave propagation through the solar atmosphere and into the solar wind, which can potentially modulate and disturb the solar wind and Earth's geospace environment. In this presentation we discuss the development, construction, and testing of the South Pole, Antarctica, Solar Radio Telescope that is planned for installation at South Pole. The system will allow for 24-hour continuous, long-term observations of the sun across the 1-18 GHz frequency band and allow for truly continuous solar observations. We show that this system will enable unique scientific investigations of the solar atmosphere.

  7. A refracting radio telescope. [using ionosphere as lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P.; Da Rosa, A. V.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of extraterrestrial radio sources at the lower end of the radio frequency spectrum are limited by reflection of waves from the topside ionosphere and by the large size of antenna apertures necessary for the realization of narrow beamwidths. The use of the ionosphere as a lens is considered. The lens is formed by the release of chemicals such as H2 and H2O at the F2-layer peak. These chemicals promote dissociative recombination of O(+) in the ionosphere resulting in a local reduction in plasma density. Gradients in electron density in the vicinity of the gas release tend to focus rays propagating through the depleted region. Preliminary calculations indicate that a lens capable of focusing cosmic radio waves in the 1 to 10 MHz frequency range may be produced by the release of 100 kg of H2 at the peak of the nighttime F layer. The beamwidth of a refracting radio telescope using this lens may be less than 1/5 degree.

  8. A Small-Radio-Telescope Network for VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, D. B.; Cobb, M. L.

    2004-12-01

    In the last several years, high schools, colleges, universities, and even some private amateur radio astronomers have put some 120 copies of the commercially-available Haystack Small Radio Telescope (SRT) into operation. Haystack Observatory is now working on a new version of the SRT, designed to be used in an interferometer (see paper by Vats and Rogers, this conference). We show how the new SRT, or other similar small radio telescopes, could be adapted for educational and scientific VLBI observations of continuum and OH line sources, with a relatively small additional investment. We propose that one or more large radio telescopes join a network of the small antennas, so that fringes would be readily detected between the large antenna(s) and the small antennas. An 85-foot antenna such as those at PARI or the 40-meter antenna of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory would serve nicely as a base station. Eventually, as data storage and transmission capacity continue to improve, the small antennas should be able to operate on their own. Our emphasis is on a simple, inexpensive VLBI system. The most critical item is good frequency standard. For observations at 21 or 18 cm, a rubidium standard is good enough. (Inexpensive Rb standards can be found on E-bay!) Local time at each station would come from GPS receivers which readily provide sub-microsecond timing accuracy. One-bit data sampling at rates on the order of 10 megasamples per second could be performed with a simple box interfaced to a PC via USB. Sampled data would first be recorded to the PC hard drive, and then sent on CD-ROM or DVD through the mail or by internet to a central correlation facility. Correlation and data analysis for the network would be performed on PCs as well. We suggest an observing scenario comprised of scans that are several minutes long and taken several times per hour during the apparition of a compact source. The total data for the 10-12 hours that a source is "up" for a USA network would

  9. Fine spectral structures in Jovian decametric radio emission observed by ground-based radio telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.

    2014-04-01

    Jupiter with the largest planetary magnetosphere in the solar system emits intense coherent non-thermal radio emission in a wide frequency range. This emission is a result of a complicated interaction between the dynamic Jovian magnetosphere and energetic particles supplying the free energy from planetary rotation and the interaction between Jupiter and the Galilean moons. Decametric radio emission (DAM) is the strongest component of Jovian radiation observed in a frequency range from few MHz up to 40 MHz. This emission is generated via cyclotron maser mechanism in sources located along Jovian magnetic field lines. Depending on the time scales the Jovian DAMexhibits different complex spectral structures. We present the observations of the Jovian decametric radio emission using the large ground-based radio telescope URAN- 2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. This telescope is one of the largest low frequency telescopes in Europe equipped with high performance digital radio spectrometers. The antenna array of URAN-2 consists of 512 crossed dipoles with an effective area of 28 000m2 and beam pattern size of 3.5 x 7 deg. (at 25 MHz). The instrument enables continuous observations of the Jovian radio during long period of times. Jovian DAM was observed continuously since Sep. 2012 (depending on Jupiter visibility) with relatively high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100ms) in the broad frequency range (8-32MHz). We have detected a big amount of the fine spectral structures in the dynamic spectra of DAM such as trains of S-bursts, quasi-continuous narrowband emission, narrow-band splitting events and zebra stripe-like patterns. We analyzed mainly the fine structures associated with non-Io controlled DAM. We discuss how the observed narrowband structures which most probably are related to the propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jupiter's ionosphere can be used to study the plasma parameters in the inner Jovian magnetosphere.

  10. Background Information: Deciphering Gamma Ray Burst Physics With Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    For 30 years, Gamma Ray Bursts, now known to be the most energetic explosions in the sky, have intrigued scientists and constituted one of the greatest mysteries in astrophysics. Such basic details as their exact locations in the sky and their distances from Earth remained unknown or subject to intense debate until just last year. With the discovery of "afterglows" at X-ray, visible, infrared and radio wavelengths, scientists have been able to study the physics of these explosive fireballs for the first time. Radio telescopes, the NSF's VLA in particular, are vitally important in this quest for the answers about Gamma Ray Bursts. Planned improvements to the VLA will make it an even more valuable tool in this field. Since their first identification in 1967 by satellites orbited to monitor compliance with the atmospheric nuclear test ban, more than 2,000 Gamma Ray Bursts have been detected. The celestial positions of the bursts have only been well-localized since early 1997, when the Italian- Dutch satellite Beppo-SAX went into operation. Since Beppo-SAX began providing improved information on burst positions, other instruments, both orbiting and ground-based, have been able to study the afterglows. So far, X-ray afterglows have been seen in about a dozen bursts, visible-light afterglows in six and radio afterglows in three. The search for radio emission from Gamma Ray Bursts has been an ongoing, target-of-opportunity program at the VLA for more than four years, led by NRAO scientist Dale Frail. The detection of afterglows "opens up a new era in the studies of Gamma Ray Bursts," Princeton University theorist Bohdan Paczynski wrote in a recent scientific paper. Optical studies of GRB 970508 indicated a distance of at least seven billion light-years, the first distance measured for a Gamma Ray Burst. VLA studies of the same burst showed that the fireball was about a tenth of a light-year in diameter a few days after the explosion and that it was expanding at very

  11. The Nançay Radio Telescope Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theureau, G.; Martin, J.-M.; Cognard, I.; Borsenberger, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Nançay radio telescope (NRT) is a national facility, the fourth single-dish instrument in the world for its collecting area. It provides spectral and/or continuum data in the frequency range 1.06 to 3.5 GHz, and covers various scientific fields in solar system astronomy (comets, planets...), galactic astronomy (pulsars, late type stars, star forming regions, microquasars...) and extragalactic astronomy (HI in galaxies, large scale structure of the universe, quasars...). Two on-line databases {http://klun.obs-nancay.fr} and a general archive are being designed to fullfill the VO standards: HIG (HI profiles of Galaxies) contains reduced 1-D 21-cm spectra for ˜4500 galaxies; NAP (Nançay Archive of Pulsars) provides a few thousand pulse profiles from regular timing observations of ˜40 pulsars; NRTA (Nançay Radio Telescope Archive) will host all NRT data from the backends (correlator, digital spectrometer and pulsar dedispersors). Most of the data consist of dynamical spectra (time-frequency domain). The package which is used for the database management and for the data-processing pipeline is the Pleinpot software, which has been developed for the hyperleda database {http://leda.univ-lyon1.fr/install/mirror.html}.

  12. Design and Construction of a Radio Telescope for Undergraduate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stathis, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    Radio telescopes provide a practical and economical alternative to optical observatories for astrophysics research and education at primarily undergraduate physics and astronomy institutions. Ithaca College is in the testing phase of development for a low cost, flexible frequency band radio telescope which I have developed as the research component of my undergraduate thesis. I have constructed a three-stage low noise superheterodyne radiometer on custom printed circuit boards for signal detection, which is mounted on a 3 meter parabolic antenna. Data collection and signal processing is achieved using custom software written in MATLAB. We are currently performing preliminary drift continuum observations of the Sun and Milky Way at Ku band frequencies. We expect that the receiver can also be easily adapted to measure spectral emission of neutral hydrogen and OH masers at L band. I present my design methods for the radiometer and printed circuit boards, including measured noise characteristics and SPICE simulations, as well as an overview of applied signal processing methods and a discussion of observable celestial sources.

  13. Radio Telescopes' Precise Measurements Yield Rich Scientific Payoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    Having the sharpest pictures always is a big advantage, and a sophisticated radio-astronomy technique using continent-wide and even intercontinental arrays of telescopes is yielding extremely valuable scientific results in a wide range of specialties. That's the message delivered to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Austin, Texas, by Mark Reid of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, a leading researcher in the field of ultra-precise astronomical position measurements. Very Long Baseline Interferometry provides extremely high precision that can extend use of the parallax technique to many more celestial objects. Parallax is a direct means of measuring cosmic distances by detecting the slight shift in an object’s apparent position in the sky caused by Earth’s orbital motion. Credit: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF "Using radio telescopes, we are measuring distances and motions of celestial bodies with unprecedented accuracy. That's helping us better understand many processes ranging from star formation to the scale of the entire Universe," Reid said. The observing technique, called Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), was pioneered in 1967, but has come into continuous use only in the past 10-15 years. The National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a system of 10 radio-telescope antennas ranging from Hawaii to the Caribbean, was dedicated in 1993. There are other VLBI systems in Europe and Asia, and large radio telescopes around the world cooperate regularly to increase sensitivity. VLBI observations routinely produce images hundreds of times more detailed than those made at visible-light wavelengths by the Hubble Space Telescope. Several groups of researchers from across the globe use the VLBA to study stellar nurseries in our own Milky Way Galaxy and measure distances to regions where new stars are forming. The key has been to improve measurement accuracy to a factor of a hundred times better than that produced by the

  14. Engineering and Science Highlights of the KAT-7 Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, A. R.; Alberts, T.; Armstrong, R. P.; Barta, A.; Bauermeister, E. F.; Bester, H.; Blose, S.; Booth, R. S.; Botha, D. H.; Buchner, S. J.; Carignan, C.; Cheetham, T.; Cloete, K.; Coreejes, G.; Crida, R. C.; Cross, S. D.; Curtolo, F.; Dikgale, A.; de Villiers, M. S.; du Toit, L. J.; Esterhuyse, S. W. P.; Fanaroff, B.; Fender, R. P.; Fijalkowski, M.; Fourie, D.; Frank, B.; George, D.; Gibbs, P.; Goedhart, S.; Grobbelaar, J.; Gumede, S. C.; Herselman, P.; Hess, K. M.; Hoek, N.; Horrell, J.; Jonas, J. L.; Jordaan, J. D. B.; Julie, R.; Kapp, F.; Kotzé, P.; Kusel, T.; Langman, A.; Lehmensiek, R.; Liebenberg, D.; Liebenberg, I. J. V.; Loots, A.; Lord, R. T.; Lucero, D. M.; Ludick, J.; Macfarlane, P.; Madlavana, M.; Magnus, L.; Magozore, C.; Malan, J. A.; Manley, J. R.; Marais, L.; Marais, N.; Marais, S. J.; Maree, M.; Martens, A.; Mokone, O.; Moss, V.; Mthembu, S.; New, W.; Nicholson, G. D.; van Niekerk, P. C.; Oozeer, N.; Passmoor, S. S.; Peens-Hough, A.; Pińska, A. B.; Prozesky, P.; Rajan, S.; Ratcliffe, S.; Renil, R.; Richter, L. L.; Rosekrans, D.; Rust, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Schwardt, L. C.; Seranyane, S.; Serylak, M.; Shepherd, D. S.; Siebrits, R.; Sofeya, L.; Spann, R.; Springbok, R.; Swart, P. S.; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L.; Theron, I. P.; Tiplady, A.; Toruvanda, O.; Tshongweni, S.; van den Heever, L.; van der Merwe, C.; van Rooyen, R.; Wakhaba, S.; Walker, A. L.; Welz, M.; Williams, L.; Wolleben, M.; Woudt, P. A.; Young, N. J.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-05-01

    The construction of the KAT-7 array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scientific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stirling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Streaming Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used for scientific observations where it has a niche in mapping low surface-brightness continuum sources, some extended HI halos and OH masers in star-forming regions. It can also be used to monitor continuum source variability, observe pulsars, and make VLBI observations.

  15. A radio telescope for the calibration of radio sources at 32 gigahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, M. S.; Stewart, S. R.; Bowen, J. G.; Paulsen, E. B.

    1994-08-01

    A 1.5-m-diameter radio telescope has been designed, developed, and assembled to directly measure the flux density of radio sources in the 32-GHz (Ka-band) frequency band. The main goal of the design and development was to provide a system that could yield the greatest absolute accuracy yet possible with such a system. The accuracy of the measurements have a heritage that is traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. At the present time, the absolute accuracy of flux density measurements provided by this telescope system, during Venus observations at nearly closest approach to Earth, is plus or minus 5 percent, with an associated precision of plus or minus 2 percent. Combining a cooled high-electron mobility transistor low-noise amplifier, twin-beam Dicke switching antenna, and accurate positioning system resulted in a state-of-the-art system at 32 GHz. This article describes the design and performance of the system as it was delivered to the Owens Valley Radio Observatory to support direct calibrations of the strongest radio sources at Ka-band.

  16. A radio telescope for the calibration of radio sources at 32 gigahertz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatti, M. S.; Stewart, S. R.; Bowen, J. G.; Paulsen, E. B.

    1994-01-01

    A 1.5-m-diameter radio telescope has been designed, developed, and assembled to directly measure the flux density of radio sources in the 32-GHz (Ka-band) frequency band. The main goal of the design and development was to provide a system that could yield the greatest absolute accuracy yet possible with such a system. The accuracy of the measurements have a heritage that is traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. At the present time, the absolute accuracy of flux density measurements provided by this telescope system, during Venus observations at nearly closest approach to Earth, is plus or minus 5 percent, with an associated precision of plus or minus 2 percent. Combining a cooled high-electron mobility transistor low-noise amplifier, twin-beam Dicke switching antenna, and accurate positioning system resulted in a state-of-the-art system at 32 GHz. This article describes the design and performance of the system as it was delivered to the Owens Valley Radio Observatory to support direct calibrations of the strongest radio sources at Ka-band.

  17. The synthesis telescope at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landecker, T. L.; Dewdney, P. E.; Burgess, T. A.; Gray, A. D.; Higgs, L. A.; Hoffmann, A. P.; Hovey, G. J.; Karpa, D. R.; Lacey, J. D.; Prowse, N.; Purton, C. R.; Roger, R. S.; Willis, A. G.; Wyslouzil, W.; Routledge, D.; Vaneldik, J. F.

    2000-09-01

    We describe an aperture synthesis radio telescope optimized for studies of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM), providing the ability to image extended structures with high angular resolution over wide fields. The telescope produces images of atomic hydrogen emission using the 21-cm H I spectral line, and, simultaneously, continuum emission in two bands centred at 1420 MHz and 408 MHz, including linearly polarized emission at 1420 MHz, with synthesized beams of 1' and 3.4' at the respective frequencies. A full synthesis can achieve a continuum sensitivity (rms) of 0.28 mJy/beam at 1420 MHz and 3.8 mJy/beam at 408 MHz, and the 256-channel H I spectrometer has an rms sensitivity of 3.5B-0.5sin delta K per channel, for total spectrometer bandwidth B MHz and declination delta . The tuning range of the telescope permits studies of Galactic and nearby extragalactic objects. The array uses 9 m antennas, which provide very wide fields of view of 3.1°\\ and 9.6°\\ (at the 10% level), at the two frequencies, and also allow data to be gathered on short baselines, yielding extremely good sensitivity to extended structure. Single-antenna data are also routinely incorporated into images to ensure complete coverage of emission on all angular scales down to the resolution limit. In this paper we describe the telescope and its receiver and correlator systems in detail, together with calibration and observing strategies that make this instrument an efficient survey machine.

  18. Coordinated observations using the world largest low-frequency radio telescopes and space misiions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Zarka, Ph.; Kolyadin, V. L.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Stepkin, S. V.; Panchenko, M.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.; Fischer, G.; Ulyanov, O. M.; Melnik, V. N.; Litvinenko, G. V.; Sidorchuk, M. A.; Bubnov, I. N.; Vasilyeva, Ya. Yu.; Bojko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V.; Mann, G.; Kalinichenko, N. N.; Falkovich, I. S.; Koval, A. A.; Mylostna, K.; Pylaev, O. S.; Shepelev, V. A.; Reznik, A. P.

    2013-09-01

    The positive possibilities of astrophysical objects studies(including the Solar system investigations) using coordinated observations with the largest existing and coming low frequency radio telescopes are shown. The observations of the Sun, Jupiter, Saturn, ant others with UTR-2, URAN, NDA radio telescopes, and WIND, Cassini and STEREO space missions at frequencies lower than 40 MHz have been carried out.

  19. Metric Observations of Saturn with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtin, Regis D.; Pandey-Pommier, Mamta; Gautier, Daniel; Zarka, Philippe; Hofstadter, Mark D.

    2014-11-01

    We used the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (Pune, India) to observe Saturn at three wavelengths in the metric domain - 0.49 m (610 MHz), 1.28 m (235 MHz), and 2.0 m (150 MHz) - with the aim of constraining the deep atmospheric ammonia and water vapor concentrations around 10-20 kbar. We have obtained a clean detection at 0.49 m, with a disk brightness temperature of 216 ± 23 K, and no significant emission outside the disk, thus confirming model predictions about the weakness of synchrotron radiation by magnetospheric electrons. The initial measurements at the longer wavelengths were affected by strong ionospheric scintillation and RFI interferences. These measurements have been repeated and are expected to help reducing the initial error bars. We will discuss the constraints resulting from these observations on Saturn's deep atmospheric composition.

  20. Embracing the Wave: Using the Very Small Radio Telescope to Teach Students about Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Needles, M. M.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Doherty, M.; Minnigh, S.; Arndt, M. B.; Pratap, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Very Small Radio Telescope (VSRT) is a low-cost educational tool appropriate for laboratory demonstrations of the nature of radio waves and the principles of interferometry for use in both high school and undergraduate physics/astronomy classes. The system consists of small direct broadcast antenna dishes and other commercially available parts and can be assembled for under $500. Complete teaching units have been developed and tested by high school physics teachers to demonstrate radio wave transmission and exponential absorption though materials (Beer's law), the polarization of electromagnetic waves (Malus' law), the inverse square law, and interferometry. These units can be used to explore the properties of electromagnetic waves, including similarities and differences between radio and visible light, while challenging students' misconceptions about a wavelength regime that is important to both astronomy and everyday life. In addition, the VSRT can be used as a radio astronomical interferometer to measure the diameter of the Sun at 12 GHz. Full details, including a parts list, comprehensive assembly instructions, informational memos, teaching units, software, and conformance to national and Massachusetts educational standards, are available on the web at http://www.haystack.mit.edu/edu/undergrad/VSRT/index.html . Development of the VSRT at MIT Haystack Observatory is made possible through funding provided by the National Science Foundation.

  1. Lunar Radio Telescopes: A Staged Approach for Lunar Science, Heliophysics, Astrobiology, Cosmology, and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Bowman, Judd D.; Burns, Jack O.; Farrell, W. M.; Jones, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Stewart, K. P.; Weiler, K.

    2012-01-01

    Observations with radio telescopes address key problems in cosmology, astrobiology, heliophysics, and planetary science including the first light in the Universe (Cosmic Dawn), magnetic fields of extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the lunar ionosphere. The Moon is a unique science platform because it allows access to radio frequencies that do not penetrate the Earth's ionosphere and because its far side is shielded from intense terrestrial emissions. The instrument packages and infrastructure needed for radio telescopes can be transported and deployed as part of Exploration activities, and the resulting science measurements may inform Exploration (e.g., measurements of lunar surface charging). An illustrative roadmap for the staged deployment of lunar radio telescopes

  2. Thermal behavior of the Medicina 32-meter radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisanu, Tonino; Buffa, Franco; Morsiani, Marco; Pernechele, Claudio; Poppi, Sergio

    2010-07-01

    We studied the thermal effects on the 32 m diameter radio-telescope managed by the Institute of Radio Astronomy (IRA), Medicina, Bologna, Italy. The preliminary results show that thermal gradients deteriorate the pointing performance of the antenna. Data has been collected by using: a) two inclinometers mounted near the elevation bearing and on the central part of the alidade structure; b) a non contact laser alignment optical system capable of measuring the secondary mirror position; c) twenty thermal sensors mounted on the alidade trusses. Two series of measurements were made, the first series was performed by placing the antenna in stow position, the second series was performed while tracking a circumpolar astronomical source. When the antenna was in stow position we observed a strong correlation between the inclinometer measurements and the differential temperature. The latter was measured with the sensors located on the South and North sides of the alidade, thus indicating that the inclinometers track well the thermal deformation of the alidade. When the antenna pointed at the source we measured: pointing errors, the inclination of the alidade, the temperature of the alidade components and the subreflector position. The pointing errors measured on-source were 15-20 arcsec greater than those measured with the inclinometer.

  3. Identifying the source of perytons at the Parkes radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, E.; Keane, E. F.; Barr, E. D.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sarkissian, J.; Edwards, P. G.; Stevens, J.; Brem, C.; Jameson, A.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Johnston, S.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Kudale, P. Chandra S.; Bhandari, S.

    2015-08-01

    `Perytons' are millisecond-duration transients of terrestrial origin, whose frequency-swept emission mimics the dispersion of an astrophysical pulse that has propagated through tenuous cold plasma. In fact, their similarity to FRB 010724 had previously cast a shadow over the interpretation of `fast radio bursts' (FRBs), which otherwise appear to be of extragalactic origin. Until now, the physical origin of the dispersion-mimicking perytons had remained a mystery. We have identified strong out-of-band emission at 2.3-2.5 GHz associated with several peryton events. Subsequent tests revealed that a peryton can be generated at 1.4 GHz when a microwave oven door is opened prematurely and the telescope is at an appropriate relative angle. Radio emission escaping from microwave ovens during the magnetron shut-down phase neatly explains all of the observed properties of the peryton signals. Now that the peryton source has been identified, we furthermore demonstrate that the microwave ovens on site could not have caused FRB 010724. This and other distinct observational differences show that FRBs are excellent candidates for genuine extragalactic transients.

  4. Metric Observations of Saturn with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtin, R.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Gautier, D.; Zarka, P.; Hofstadter, M.; Hersant, F.; Girard, J.

    2015-12-01

    We used the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT, India) to observe Saturn in the metric domain – at 0.49 m (610 MHz), 1.28 m (235 MHz), and 2.0 m (150 MHz) -with the aim of constraining the deep atmospheric ammonia and water vapor concentrations around 10-20 kbar. We have obtained a clean detection at 610 MHz, with a disk brightness temperature Tb= 216 ± 32 K, and no significant emission outside of the disk, thus confirming model predictions about the weakness of synchrotron radiation by magnetospheric electrons (Lorenzato et al. 2012, Lorenzato et al. 2012). A marginal detection was obtained at 235 MHz, with Tb= 404 ± 249 K, while an upper limit of 1210 K was set at 150 MHz. Unfortunately, some of the GMRT measurements were affected by strong ionospheric scintillation or radio frequency interferences (RFI). Although the reduction of the LOFAR measurements is much more complex, results are expected in the near future and they will complement nicely with those obtained with the GMRT. We will discuss the constraints resulting from these observations on Saturn's deep atmospheric composition.

  5. Saving a Radio Telescope...or...Kids Can Make a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, Susan

    1985-01-01

    Students at Jones Middle School (Upper Arlington, Ohio) became involved when a nearby radio telescope was threatened by a land sale. Students not only learned about the basics of telescope use but also wrote to various local and national officials to "save the telescope." (DH)

  6. Radio Telescopes to Keep Sharp Eye on Mars Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    As NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander descends through the Red Planet's atmosphere toward its landing on May 25, its progress will be scrutinized by radio telescopes from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). At NRAO control rooms in Green Bank, West Virginia, and Socorro, New Mexico, scientists, engineers and technicians will be tracking the faint signal from the lander, 171 million miles from Earth. The GBT Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF To make a safe landing, Phoenix must make a risky descent, slowing down from nearly 13,000 mph at the top of the Martian atmosphere to only 5 mph in the final seconds before touchdown. NASA officials point out that fewer than half of all Mars landing missions have been successful, but the scientific rewards of success are worth the risk. Major events in the spacecraft's atmospheric entry, descent and landing will be marked by changes in the Doppler Shift in the frequency of the vehicle's radio signal. Doppler Shift is the change in frequency caused by relative motion between the transmitter and receiver. At Green Bank, NRAO and NASA personnel will use the giant Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to follow the Doppler changes and verify that the descent is going as planned. The radio signal from Phoenix is designed to be received by other spacecraft in Mars orbit, then relayed to Earth. However, the GBT, a dish antenna with more than two acres of collecting surface and highly-sensitive receivers, can directly receive the transmissions from Phoenix. "We'll see the frequency change as Phoenix slows down in the Martian atmosphere, then there will be a big change when the parachute deploys," said NRAO astronomer Frank Ghigo. When the spacecraft's rocket thrusters slow it down for its final, gentle touchdown, its radio frequency will stabilize, Ghigo said. "We'll have confirmation of these major events through our direct reception several seconds earlier than the controllers at NASA's Jet Propulsion

  7. Detection of a bright radio flare of Cygnus X-1 at 7.2 GHz with the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egron, E.; Pellizzoni, A.; Bachetti, M.; Navarrini, A.; Trois, A.; Pilia, M.; Iacolina, M. N.; Melis, A.; Concu, R.; Loru, S.; Sessini, A.; Grinberg, V.; Nowak, M.; Markoff, S.; Pottschmidt, K.; Rodriguez, J.; Wilms, J.; Ballhausen, R.; Corbel, S.; Eikmann, W.; Fuerst, F.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Marongiu, M.; Possenti, A.

    2016-05-01

    In the framework of radio monitoring of NS/BH Galactic Binaries with Sardinia Radio Telescope (www.srt.inaf.it) during SRT Early Science Program S0013 (PI Egron), we detected Cyg X-1 in C-band through on-the-fly mapping centered on the source position (see also Atels #8921, #8849, #8821).

  8. Space-based radio telescopes and an orbiting deep-space relay station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, R. V.

    1979-01-01

    Foremost among the candidates for early utilization of the Shuttle-launched self-deployable structures are the space-based radio telescopes. Several space-based telescopes are examined including an orbiting VLBI terminal, an orbiting submillimeter telescope, and a large ambient deployable IR telescope. Particular consideration is given to the high-gain Orbiting Deep-Space Relay Station for communication with deep-space probes. Details of deployable antenna technology are discussed.

  9. A Distributed Datacube Analysis Service for Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, V.; Rosolowsky, E.

    2011-07-01

    Current- and next-generation radio telescopes are poised to produce data at an unprecedented rate. We are developing the cyberinfrastructure to enable distributed processing and storage of FITS data cubes from these telescopes. In this contribution, we will present the data storage and network infrastructure that enables efficient searching, extraction and transfer of FITS datacubes. The infrastructure combines the iRODS distributed data management with a custom spatially-enabled PostgreSQL database. The data management system ingests FITS cubes, automatically populating the metadata database using FITS header data. Queries to the metadata service return matching records using VOTable format. The iRODS system allows for a distributed network of fileservers to store large data sets redundantly with a minimum of upkeep. Transfers between iRODS data sites use parallel I/O streams for maximum speed. Files are staged to the optimal host for download by an end user. The service can automatically extract subregions of individual or adjacent cubes registered to user-defined astrometric grids using the Montage package. The data system can query multiple surveys and return spatially registered data cubes to the user. Future development will allow the data system to utilize distributed processing environment to analyze datasets, returning only the calculation results to the end user. This cyberinfrastructure project combines many existing, open-source packages into a single deployment of a data system. The codebase can also function on two-dimensional images. The project is funded by CANARIE under the Network-Enabled Platforms 2 program.

  10. Initial Results Obtained with the First TWIN VLBI Radio Telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell

    PubMed Central

    Schüler, Torben; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Plötz, Christian; Neidhardt, Alexander; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bernhart, Simone; la Porta, Laura; Halsig, Sebastian; Nothnagel, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) uses radio telescopes as sensor networks to determine Earth orientation parameters and baseline vectors between the telescopes. The TWIN Telescope Wettzell 1 (TTW1), the first of the new 13.2 m diameter telescope pair at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany, is currently in its commissioning phase. The technology behind this radio telescope including the receiving system and the tri-band feed horn is depicted. Since VLBI telescopes must operate at least in pairs, the existing 20 m diameter Radio Telescope Wettzell (RTW) is used together with TTW1 for practical tests. In addition, selected long baseline setups are investigated. Correlation results portraying the data quality achieved during first initial experiments are discussed. Finally, the local 123 m baseline between the old RTW telescope and the new TTW1 is analyzed and compared with an existing high-precision local survey. Our initial results are very satisfactory for X-band group delays featuring a 3D distance agreement between VLBI data analysis and local ties of 1 to 2 mm in the majority of the experiments. However, S-band data, which suffer much from local radio interference due to WiFi and mobile communications, are about 10 times less precise than X-band data and require further analysis, but evidence is provided that S-band data are well-usable over long baselines where local radio interference patterns decorrelate. PMID:26263991

  11. Initial Results Obtained with the First TWIN VLBI Radio Telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell.

    PubMed

    Schüler, Torben; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Plötz, Christian; Neidhardt, Alexander; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bernhart, Simone; la Porta, Laura; Halsig, Sebastian; Nothnagel, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) uses radio telescopes as sensor networks to determine Earth orientation parameters and baseline vectors between the telescopes. The TWIN Telescope Wettzell 1 (TTW1), the first of the new 13.2 m diameter telescope pair at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany, is currently in its commissioning phase. The technology behind this radio telescope including the receiving system and the tri-band feed horn is depicted. Since VLBI telescopes must operate at least in pairs, the existing 20 m diameter Radio Telescope Wettzell (RTW) is used together with TTW1 for practical tests. In addition, selected long baseline setups are investigated. Correlation results portraying the data quality achieved during first initial experiments are discussed. Finally, the local 123 m baseline between the old RTW telescope and the new TTW1 is analyzed and compared with an existing high-precision local survey. Our initial results are very satisfactory for X-band group delays featuring a 3D distance agreement between VLBI data analysis and local ties of 1 to 2 mm in the majority of the experiments. However, S-band data, which suffer much from local radio interference due to WiFi and mobile communications, are about 10 times less precise than X-band data and require further analysis, but evidence is provided that S-band data are well-usable over long baselines where local radio interference patterns decorrelate. PMID:26263991

  12. Radio Telescope Reveals Secrets of Massive Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    . As the material moves from the outer edge of the disk inward, magnetic field lines perpendicular to the disk are twisted, forming a tightly-coiled bundle that, astronomers believe, propels and confines the ejected particles. Closer to the black hole, space itself, including the magnetic fields, is twisted by the strong gravitational pull and rotation of the black hole. Theorists predicted that material moving outward in this close-in acceleration region would follow a corkscrew-shaped path inside the bundle of twisted magnetic fields. They also predicted that light and other radiation emitted by the moving material would brighten when its rotating path was aimed most directly toward Earth. Marscher and his colleagues predicted there would also be a flare later when the material hits a stationary shock wave called the "core" some time after it has emerged from the acceleration region. "That behavior is exactly what we saw," Marscher said, when his team followed an outburst from BL Lac. In late 2005 and early 2006, the astronomers watched BL Lac with an international collection of telescopes as a knot of material was ejected outward through the jet. As the material sped out from the neighborhood of the black hole, the VLBA could pinpoint its location, while other telescopes measured the properties of the radiation emitted from the knot. Bright bursts of light, X-rays, and gamma rays came when the knot was precisely at locations where the theories said such bursts would be seen. In addition, the alignment of the radio and light waves -- a property called polarization -- rotated as the knot wound its corkscrew path inside the tight throat of twisted magnetic fields. "We got an unprecedented view of the inner portion of one of these jets and gained information that's very important to understanding how these tremendous particle accelerators work," Marscher said. In addition to the continent-wide VLBA, an array of 10 radio telescopes spread from Hawaii to the Virgin

  13. Development of precision structure of a large-size space radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astavin, A. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Komaev, R. V.; Moisheev, A. A.; Tsvelev, V. M.; Serebrennikov, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents methods for the design and engineering concepts, which made it possible to develop and manufacture the space radio telescope with a large size and high accuracy of the effective reflector area and focal assembly position.

  14. Preliminary Space VLBI Requirements for Observing Time on Ground Radio Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, David L.; Murphy, David W.; Preston, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An initial estimate has been made of the observing time required on ground radio telescopes by the space VLBI missions Radioastron and VSOP. Typical science programs have been adopted for both missions.

  15. Design and Performance of a Wideband Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinreb, Sander; Imbriale, William A.; Jones, Glenn; Mani, Handi

    2012-01-01

    The Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) is an outreach project, a partnership involving NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Lewis Center for Educational Research (LCER), and the Apple Valley Unified School District near the NASA Goldstone deep space communication complex. This educational program currently uses a 34-meter antenna, DSS12, at Goldstone for classroom radio astronomy observations via the Internet. The current program utilizes DSS12 in two narrow frequency bands around S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.45 GHz), and is used by a training program involving a large number of secondary school teachers and their classrooms. To expand the program, a joint JPL/LCER project was started in mid-2006 to retrofit an additional existing 34-meter beam-waveguide antenna, DSS28, with wideband feeds and receivers to cover the 0.5-to- 14-GHz frequency bands. The DSS28 antenna has a 34-meter diameter main reflector, a 2.54-meter subreflector, and a set of beam waveguide mirrors surrounded by a 2.43-meter tube. The antenna was designed for high power and a narrow frequency band around 7.2 GHz. The performance at the low end of the frequency band desired for the educational program would be extremely poor if the beam waveguide system was used as part of the feed system. Consequently, the 34-meter antenna was retrofitted with a tertiary offset mirror placed at the vertex of the main reflector. The tertiary mirror can be rotated to use two wideband feeds that cover the 0.5-to-14-GHz band. The earlier designs for both GAVRT and the DSN only used narrow band feeds and consequently, only covered a small part of the S- and X-band frequencies. By using both a wideband feed and wideband amplifiers, the entire band from 0.5 to 14 GHz is covered, expanding significantly the science activities that can be studied using this system.

  16. Impact of network geometry, observation schemes and telescope structure deformations on local ties: simulations applied to Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbondanza, Claudio; Sarti, Pierguido

    2012-03-01

    The 64-m Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) is currently under construction in Sardinia (Italy). To ensure future surveying and monitoring operations at an utmost level of accuracy, we aim at selecting the optimal design and the most cost-effective solution for the establishment of the local ground control network (LGCN). We simulate and test 45 data sets corresponding to 5 different network configurations. We investigate the influence of 2 LGCN geometries (14 or 8 ground markers) and 3 terrestrial observation schemes (based on redundant forward intersections or side shots) on the precision and accuracy of the conventional reference point (CRP) of SRT and the simulated tie vector with a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) station. In addition, thermal and gravitational deformations of the radio telescope structure are simulated as systematic errors introduced into the observations and their effects on the CRP estimates are quantified. The state-of-the-art of CRP surveying and computation, based on terrestrial indirect methods, is applied. We show how terrestrial indirect methods can estimate the position of the radio telescope CRP to the millimeter precision level. With our simulations, we prove that limiting the LGCN to a 8-point configuration ensures the same precision on the CRP obtained with a 14-point network. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in the absence of telescope deformations, side shots, despite the lower redundancy, preserve a precision similar to that of redundant forward intersections. We show that the deformations due to gravitational flexure and thermal expansion of the radio telescope cannot be neglected in the tie vector computation, since they may bias the CRP estimate by several millimeters degrading its accuracy but not impacting on its formal precision. We highlight the dependency of the correlation matrices of the solutions on the geometry of the network and the observation schemes. Similarly, varying the extent of telescope deformations

  17. The impact of F.F. Gardner on our early research with the Parkes Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, D. K.; Whiteoak, J. B.

    2005-06-01

    Frank Gardner, who died in 2002, aged 78, was one of the driving forces in the early years of the Parkes Radio Telescope, and it is hard to separate Frank from any of the early discoveries. An inventive receiver engineer who turned radio astronomer with the commissioning of the Parkes Telescope, Frank was a pioneer in radio polarization and spectral line observations. The present authors both benefited greatly from their association with him. In this paper we outline those early scientific discoveries and tell some of the tales that reveal his character.

  18. Solar observations with a low frequency radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myserlis, I.; Seiradakis, J.; Dogramatzidis, M.

    2012-01-01

    We have set up a low frequency radio monitoring station for solar bursts at the Observatory of the Aristotle University in Thessaloniki. The station consists of a dual dipole phased array, a radio receiver and a dedicated computer with the necessary software installed. The constructed radio receiver is based on NASA's Radio Jove project. It operates continuously, since July 2010, at 20.1 MHz (close to the long-wavelength ionospheric cut-off of the radio window) with a narrow bandwidth (~5 kHz). The system is properly calibrated, so that the recorded data are expressed in antenna temperature. Despite the high interference level of an urban region like Thessaloniki (strong broadcasting shortwave radio stations, periodic experimental signals, CBs, etc), we have detected several low frequency solar radio bursts and correlated them with solar flares, X-ray events and other low frequency solar observations. The received signal is monitored in ordinary ASCII format and as audio signal, in order to investigate and exclude man-made radio interference. In order to exclude narrow band interference and calculate the spectral indices of the observed events, a second monitoring station, working at 36 MHz, is under construction at the village of Nikiforos near the town of Drama, about 130 km away of Thessaloniki. Finally, we plan to construct a third monitoring station at 58 MHz, in Thessaloniki. This frequency was revealed to be relatively free of interference, after a thorough investigation of the region.

  19. The new 64m Sardinia Radio Telescope and VLBI facilities in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Gabriele; Feretti, Luigina; Prandoni, Isabella; Giroletti, Marcello

    2015-08-01

    The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) is a new major radio astronomical facility available in Italy for single dish and interferometric observations. It represents a flexible instrument for Radio Astronomy, Geodynamical studies and Space Science, either in single dish or VLBI mode. The SRT combines a 64m steerable collecting area, one of the largest all over the World with state-of-the-art technology (including an active surface) to enable high efficiency observations up to the 3-mm band.This new radio telescope together with the two 32m antennas in Noto and Medicina can be used for VLBI observations on a national basis (VLBIT). Data can be correlated in a short time (in real time soon) thanks to fiber-optics connection among the radio telescopes and the software correlator installed at the Radio Astronomy Institute in Bologna (IRA/INAF). In the poster I will present capabilities of the SRT telescope as well as the VLBIT project and I will shortly discuss the scientific prospects of the VLBIT.

  20. Synchronized observations by using the STEREO and the largest ground-based decametre radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.; Mann, G.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Kaiser, M. L.; Briand, C.; Zarka, P.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Koval, A. A.; Mel'nik, V. N.; Mukha, D. V.; Panchenko, M.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the approach to simultaneous (synchronous) solar observations of radio emission by using the STEREO-WAVES instruments (frequency range 0.125-16 MHz) and the largest ground-based low-frequency radio telescope. We illustrate it by the UTR-2 radio telescope implementation (10-30 MHz). The antenna system of the radio telescope is a T-shape-like array of broadband dipoles and is located near the village Grakovo in the Kharkiv region (Ukraine). The third observation point on the ground in addition to two space-based ones improves the space-mission performance capabilities for the determination of radio-emission source directivity. The observational results from the high sensitivity antenna UTR-2 are particularly useful for analysis of STEREO data in the condition of weak event appearances during solar activity minima. In order to improve the accuracy of flux density measurements, we also provide simultaneous observations with a large part of the UTR-2 radio telescope array and its single dipole close to the STEREO-WAVES antennas in sensitivity. This concept has been studied by comparing the STEREO data with ground-based records from 2007-2011 and shown to be effective. The capabilities will be useful in the implementation of new instruments (LOFAR, LWA, MWA, etc.) and during the future Solar Orbiter mission.

  1. Design and Construction of a New 1420 MHz Receiver System for a 12-meter Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemley, Cameron; Castelaz, M. W.

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2013, a new 1420 MHz receiver system was designed and constructed for the 12-meter radio telescope at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). The new radio receiver system consists of a feedhorn (which is a duplicate of the feedhorn that is currently installed on PARI’s 4.6-meter radio telescope), a low-noise amplifier, a bandpass filter, a downconverter, a SpectraCyber 1420 MHz Hydrogen Line Spectrometer, CommScope CNT-600 braided coaxial cable, and a power supply. Each component was individually tested on the preexisting 4.6-meter radio telescope receiver system before being installed on the 12-meter telescope. This testing process revealed that the spectrometer that was intended for use in the new 12-meter receiver system would require 12-bit software, which was acquired soon thereafter. The new receiver system was then assembled on a rolling cart for further testing. After the 1420 MHz receiver system was moved outside, it successfully detected its first extraterrestrial radio signal. The next step of this project was the installation of the feedhorn at the focus of the 12-meter parabolic reflector and the mounting of the additional receiver system components inside the radio frequency (RF) room of the 12-meter telescope. Following its installation on the 12-meter telescope, the new receiver system was connected to the PARI network via ethernet using a device called a SitePlayer Telnet. The 12-meter telescope was focused by taking continuum scans of Virgo A during its meridian crossing. The positioning of the feedhorn had to be adjusted several times before the new radio receiver system was precisely focused. After focusing the 12-meter telescope, spectra were taken of both the Orion Nebula and the Crab Nebula to test the abilities of the new 1420 MHz receiver system. As a final test of both the angular resolution and time resolution of the new radio receiver system, the 12-meter telescope was used to observe the pulsar PSR J

  2. Prototype 10-meter radio telescope antenna and mount design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    A prototype radio antenna of 10.4 meters diameter and 0.41 meter focal length, intended for use at the shortest radio wavelengths transmitted by the atmosphere, was successfully completed. The surface accuracy is at least four times better than that of any existing antenna in this size class: 50 micrometer rms. A prototype mount is being constructed and will be ready by early 1976. The development of an improved antenna of identical size, but heavier weight has been continued.

  3. The five-hundred-meter aperture spherical radio telescope (FAST) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Rendong; Li, Di

    2013-04-01

    Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) is a Chinese "mega-science" project to build the largest single dish radio telescope in the world. Its engineering concept and design pave a new road to realize a huge single dish in an effective way. Being the most sensitive single dish radio telescope, FAST will enable astronomers to jump-start many science goals, such as surveying the neutral hydrogen in the Milky Way and other galaxies, detecting faint pulsars, hearing the possible signals from other civilizations, etc. The feasibility studies for FAST have been carried out for 14 years, supported by Chinese and international astronomy communities. The National Development and Reform Commission approved the funding proposal of FAST in 2007 with a capital budget close to 700 million RMB. The project time is 5.5 years from the commencement of work in March of 2011 and the first light is expected in 2016.

  4. Investigation of onboard quantum time scale for orbital flight of a space radio telescope (the RadioAstron project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoviev, A. N.

    2015-05-01

    Results of observing the operation of instrumentation of the ground-space complex of the Radio-Astron project during space flight conditions of the radio observatory are presented. The technology of quality evaluation of the data received from the space radio telescope (SRT) is considered. The dependence of readings of the onboard frame counter on SRT radial velocity and distance is determined. Technology of constructing a model of the ground-space atomic clocks and onboard quantum time scale based on the results of radio astronomic observations is tested. The method of measurement of the coherent cumulative navigation delay using the onboard quantum time scale is considered. The results of observation of the effect of relativistic and kinematic time dilation onboard the SRT are presented.

  5. Adding Context to James Webb Space Telescope Surveys with Current and Future 21 cm Radio Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, A. P.; Morales, M. F.; Lidz, A.; Malloy, M.; Sutter, P. M.

    2015-02-01

    Infrared and radio observations of the Epoch of Reionization promise to revolutionize our understanding of the cosmic dawn, and major efforts with the JWST, MWA, and HERA are underway. While measurements of the ionizing sources with infrared telescopes and the effect of these sources on the intergalactic medium with radio telescopes should be complementary, to date the wildly disparate angular resolutions and survey speeds have made connecting proposed observations difficult. In this paper we develop a method to bridge the gap between radio and infrared studies. While the radio images may not have the sensitivity and resolution to identify individual bubbles with high fidelity, by leveraging knowledge of the measured power spectrum we are able to separate regions that are likely ionized from largely neutral, providing context for the JWST observations of galaxy counts and properties in each. By providing the ionization context for infrared galaxy observations, this method can significantly enhance the science returns of JWST and other infrared observations.

  6. The Position and Attitude of Sub-reflector Modeling for TM65 m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. X.; Chen, L.; Wang, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    In the course of astronomical observations, with changes in angle of pitch, the large radio telescope will have different degrees of deformation in the sub-reflector support, back frame, main reflector etc, which will lead to the dramatic decline of antenna efficiency in both high and low elevation. A sub-reflector system of the Tian Ma 65 m radio telescope has been installed in order to compensate for the gravitational deformations of the sub-reflector support and the main reflector. The position and attitude of the sub-reflector are variable in order to improve the pointing performance and the efficiency at different elevations. In this paper, it is studied that the changes of position and attitude of the sub-reflector have influence on the efficiency of antenna in the X band and Ku band. A model has been constructed to determine the position and attitude of the sub-reflector with elevation, as well as the point compensation model, by observing the radio source. In addition, antenna efficiency was tested with sub-reflector position adjusted and fixed. The results show that the model of sub-reflector can effectively improve the efficiency of the 65 m radio telescope. In X band, the aperture efficiency of the radio telescope reaches more than 60% over the entire elevation range.

  7. Observations of OH in comet Levy with the Nancay radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Colom, P.; Crovisier, Jacques; Gerard, E.; Bourgois, G.

    1992-01-01

    Due to extremely favorable excitation conditions, comet Levy (1990c) exhibited in August-September 1990 the strongest OH 18-cm signal ever recorded in a comet at the Nancay radio telescope. This unique opportunity was used to measure the OH satellite lines at 1612 and 1721 MHz, to perform extensive mapping of the OH radio emission and to make a sensitive evaluation of the cometary magnetic field, of the H2O outflow velocity and of the OH production rate.

  8. RFI profiles of prime candidate sites for the first radio astronomical telescope in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Bahari Ramadzan Syed Adnan, Syed; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2010-03-01

    Radio astronomy is a very young research field in South East Asia. There has not been a research-grade radio telescope built in this part of the world yet. A plan has been proposed by the University of Malaya's Radio Cosmology Research Laboratory to build a medium-sized radio telescope in order to eventually join the global projects of the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Network and Square Kilometer Array (SKA). Main parameters taken into consideration in finding the main prime candidate sites involves features that produce Radio Frequency Interference (RFI). These features are mainly telecommunication and satellite navigation signals and population density. Other important features considered are rainfall level, land contour and availability for future collaboration with institutions at the chosen sites. In this paper we described the experimental procedure and the RFI measurement on our five prime candidate's sites in Malaysia, covering frequency band from 1 MHz to 2000 MHz. The levels and sources of RFI on these sites were monitored and analyzed. The RFI level in Langkawi showed the lowest average of -100.33dBm(4.4×106Jy). These RFI have been found to fluctuate relatively lowly (between 1 dB m and 2 dB m). This site is also ideally located close to the Langkawi National Observatory and we recommend that this site as the best site to build the first research-grade radio telescope in this region.

  9. Temperature deformations of the mirror of a radio telescope antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avdeyev, V. I.; Grach, S. A.; Kozhakhmetov, K. K.; Kostenko, F. I.

    1979-01-01

    The stress informed state of the mirror of an antenna, with a diameter of 3 m, for a radio interferometer used in space, and located in a temperature field is examined. The mirror represents a parabolic shell, consisting of 19 identical parts. The problem is based on representations of the thermoelasticity of thin shells.

  10. Radio telescopes. January 1976-December 1980 (citations from the Energy Data Base). Report for January 1976-December 1980. [86 references

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    This retrospective bibliography contains global information on theory, research, design, construction and applications of radio telescopes especially for space exploration. Computer controlled, x-ray and refracting radio telescopes are also included. (Contains 86 citations, fully indexed and including a table of contents.)

  11. The Role of the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Project in Promoting Scientific Efficacy among Middle and High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibe, Mary; Deutscher, Rebecca

    This study investigated the effects on student scientific efficacy after participation in the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) project. In the GAVRT program, students use computers to record extremely faint radio waves collected by the telescope and analyze real data. Scientific efficacy is a type of self-knowledge a person uses to…

  12. Calibration of low-frequency radio telescopes using the galactic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Erickson, W. C.; Manning, R.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2001-01-01

    We consider the calibration of flux densities of radio bursts from decametric to kilometric wavelengths using ground-based and space-based data. The method we derive is applicable to low-frequency radio telescopes where galactic background radiation is the principal contribution to system temperature. It can be particularly useful for telescopes of low angular resolution observing spectra of radio bursts from the Sun and the planets because absolute calibration of these telescopes is very difficult with conventional techniques. Here we apply the method to observations from about 7 to 47 MHz that were made on the ground with the Bruny Island Radio Spectrometer located in Tasmania, Australia, and those from about 20 kHz to 13.8 MHz were made with the radio experiment WAVES on the WIND spacecraft. The spectrum of the galactic background radiation from <1 to >30 MHz has been carefully measured with low-resolution telescopes, starting more than a decade ago. We use this known spectrum to calibrate both BIRS and WAVES on an absolute scale. The accuracy we achieve is about a factor of two, whereas the flux densities of solar and planetary radio sources vary by many orders of magnitude. Our method permits inter-calibration of ground-based and space-based observations, and allows corrections to be made for instrumental uncertainties on both radio experiments. In addition, on the ground, it allows the spectra to be corrected for ionospheric absorption and partial ground reflections. As an application we show the spectrum of a solar type III burst observed from 47 MHz to 20 kHz. Its flux density was largest, S~ 10-17 W m-2 Hz-1, at about 3 MHz, while at 60 kHz and at 47 MHz it was lower by a factor of about 300.

  13. Revealing the Hidden Wave: Using the Very Small Radio Telescope to Teach High School Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Michael; Fish, Vincent L.; Needles, Madeleine

    2011-01-01

    Scientists and teachers have worked together to produce teaching materials for the Very Small Radio Telescope (VSRT), an easy-to-use, low-cost apparatus that can be used in multiple laboratory experiments in high school and university physics and astronomy classes. In this article, we describe the motivation for the VSRT and several of the…

  14. Very long baseline interferometry using a radio telescope in Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulvestad, J. S.; Edwards, C. D.; Linfield, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    Successful Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations at 2.3 GHz were made using an antenna aboard an Earth-orbiting spacecraft as one of the receiving telescopes. These observations employed the first deployed satellite (TDRSE-E for East) of the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Fringes were found for 3 radio sources on baselines between TDRSE and telescopes in Australia and Japan. The purpose of this experiment and the characteristics of the spacecraft that are related to the VLBI observations are described. The technical obstacles to maintaining phase coherence between the orbiting antenna and the ground stations, as well as the calibration schemes for the communication link between TDRSE and its ground station at White Sands, New Mexico are explored. System coherence results and scientific results for the radio source observations are presented. Using all available calibrations, a coherence of 84% over 700 seconds was achieved for baselines to the orbiting telescope.

  15. A multifrequency study of giant radio sources - I. Low-frequency Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of selected sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Saikia, D. J.; Machalski, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present low-frequency observations with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope of a sample of giant radio sources, and high-frequency observations of three of these sources with the Very Large Array. From multifrequency observations of the lobes, we estimate the magnetic field strengths using three different approaches, and show that these differ at most by a factor of ~3. For these large radio sources, the inverse-Compton losses usually dominate over synchrotron losses when estimates of the classical minimum energy magnetic field are used, consistent with earlier studies. However, this is often not true if the magnetic fields are close to the values estimated using the formalism of Beck & Krause. We also examine the spectral indices of the cores and any evidence of recurrent activity in these sources. We probe the environment using the symmetry parameters of these sources and suggest that their environments are often asymmetric on scales of ~1 Mpc, consistent with earlier studies.

  16. Calibration and Imaging for the Next Generation of Radio Synthesis Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, T. J.

    2007-10-01

    The next big improvements in scientific capability in radio astronomy are expected to come from large increases in sensitivity and field of view, leading to telescopes that are ideally suited to surveying the radio sky. For the last fifteen years radio astronomers around the world have been competing and collaborating to come up with designs for a Square Kilometer Array (SKA), which will be roughly fifty times more sensitive than the Very Large Array and three orders of magnitude faster at surveying. The challenge of building such a telescope at a relatively affordable cost (1 Billion Euros) has led to a number of innovative designs. The common element of the leading designs is an increasing reliance on digital technology for beam forming. In this paper, I review the two main areas of innovation, aperture arrays and phased array feeds, and describe how these solve some problems but raise others, particularly for calibration and imaging.

  17. The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope project and its early science opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Nan, Rendong; Pan, Zhichen

    2013-03-01

    The National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science (NAOC), has started building the largest antenna in the world. Known as FAST, the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope is a Chinese mega-science project funded by the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC). FAST also represents part of Chinese contribution to the international efforts to build the square kilometer array (SKA). Upon its finishing around September of 2016, FAST will be the most sensitive single-dish radio telescope in the low frequency radio bands between 70 MHz and 3 GHz. The design specifications of FAST, its expected capabilities, and its main scientific aspirations were described in an overview paper by Nan et al. (2011). In this paper, we briefly review the design and the key science goals of FAST, speculate the likely limitations at the initial stages of FAST operation, and discuss the opportunities for astronomical discoveries in the so-called early science phase.

  18. Radio Telescope Focal Container for the Russian VLBI Network of New Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipatov, Alexander; Mardyshkin, Vyacheslav; Cherepanov, Andrey; Chernov, Vitaly; Diky, Dmitry; Khvostov, Evgeny; Yevstigneyev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the development of the structure of receivers for Russian radio telescopes. The development of these radio telescopes is undertaken within the project for creating a Russian small-antenna-based radio interferometer of new generation. It is shown that for small antennas (10. 12 meter) the principal unit, which provides the best SNR, is the so-called focal container placed at primary focus. It includes the primary feed, HEMT LNA, and cryogenic cooling system down to 20. K. A new multi-band feed based on traveling wave resonators is used. It has small dimensions, low weight, and allows working with circular polarizations. Thus it can be placed into focal container and cooled with the LNA. A sketch of the focal container, with traveling-wave-resonator feed, and calculations of the expected parameters of the multi-band receiver are presented.

  19. A performance assessment of the Green Bank Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, M. A. B.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1997-08-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the results of a computational study performed to evaluate the electrical performance of the Green Bank Telescope reflector antenna. All computed patterns were obtained with the program PRAC (Parabolic Reflector Analysis Code), developed by the authors, and with the commercial code GRASP7. The patterns and performance values, not published anywhere else as far as the authors know, indicate that low cross polarization (XPOL) performance can be achieved with a dual offset configuration, provided that a low XPOL feed is employed.

  20. A synthetic aperture radio telescope for ICME observations as a potential payload of SPORT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Sun, W.; Liu, H.; Xiong, M.; Liu, Y. D.; Wu, J.

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a potential payload for the Solar Polar ORbit Telescope (SPORT), a space weather mission proposed by the National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This is a synthetic aperture radio imager designed to detect radio emissions from interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), which is expected to be an important instrument to monitor the propagation and evolution of ICMEs. The radio telescope applies a synthetic aperture interferometric technique to measure the brightness temperature of ICMEs. Theoretical calculations of the brightness temperature utilizing statistical properties of ICMEs and the background solar wind indicate that ICMEs within 0.35 AU from the Sun are detectable by a radio telescope at a frequency <= 150 MHz with a sensitivity of <=1 K. The telescope employs a time shared double rotation scan (also called a clock scan), where two coplanar antennas revolve around a fixed axis at different radius and speed, to fulfill sampling of the brightness temperature. An array of 4+4 elements with opposite scanning directions are developed for the radio telescope to achieve the required sensitivity (<=1K) within the imaging refreshing time (~30 minutes). This scan scheme is appropriate for a three-axis stabilized spacecraft platform while keeping a good sampling pattern. We also discuss how we select the operating frequency, which involves a trade-off between the engineering feasibility and the scientific goal. Our preliminary results indicate that the central frequency of 150 MHz with a bandwidth of 20 MHz, which requires arm lengths of the two groups of 14m and 16m, respectively, gives an angular resolution of 2°, a field of view of ×25° around the Sun, and a time resolution of 30 minutes.

  1. A new manufacturing technology of radio telescope panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengzhi; Chen, Yi

    2015-10-01

    Through a new manufacturing technology, achieved the machining of high precision composite radio panel. It adopts foil sticking in a vacuum, metal bonding, rubber precision compensation, stress release and other technology. Through designing the manufacturing process, and adopting a large number of experiment scheme to improve, finally summarized a technical route of high feasibility and accurate process parameters. At last, by the measurement of PGI Dimension red outside precision detector (the surface detection accuracy of which can reach 2 um) for surface precision of experimental panels, we verified the feasibility and reliability of this technique and provided the reliable data to support for practice application of this technology.

  2. Upgraded Siberian Solar Radio Telescope: new opportunities to diagnose energetic particles in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Alexey; Altyntsev, Alexander; Sergey, Lesovoi; Fleishman, Gregory

    Energetic electrons are a key factor of solar flares and therefore knowing their parameters is highly important for understanding the flare mechanisms and verifying the flare models. Radio emission offers multiple promising diagnostic tools, because this emission is produced by these energetic particles in the corona, at or near the particle acceleration sites. However, high diagnostic potential of radio observations has not yet been fully utilized due to two main reasons: (1) lack of well-calibrated observations with high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions and (2) lack of accurate and reliable theoretical models and fast numerical tools capable of recovering the emission source parameters from the radio data. Here we report on the recent and anticipated progress in both these science components - instrumentation and modeling. To this end the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (Badary, Russia) is now being significantly upgraded in order to convert this instrument into a multi-wavelength imaging spectropolarimetry radioheliograph. At stage 1, the instrument will produce two-dimensional images of the Sun with high temporal and spatial resolution at five frequencies simultaneously in the 4-8 GHz range; this stage will be completed in 2015. Final (stage 2) configuration of the Upgraded Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (expected to be completed in 2019) will perform imaging observations at 15 frequencies in the 3-24 GHz range. At the same time, we are developing new theoretical methods and computer codes to analyze and interpret the anticipated observational data; the recent achievements include the "fast gyrosynchrotron codes", gyroresonance codes, and the 3D simulation tool "GX Simulator" freely available via the SSW distribution. In this presentation, we discuss the approaches to diagnosing the solar energetic particles with radio observations, including the recent advances and the opportunities coming from the construction of the Multiwavelength Siberian Solar

  3. A symbiotic approach to SETI observations: use of maps from the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J. C.; Israel, F. P.

    1982-01-01

    High spatial resolution continuum radio maps produced by the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) of The Netherlands at frequencies near the 21 cm HI line have been examined for anomalous sources of emmission coincident with the locations of nearby bright stars. From a total of 542 stellar positions investigated, no candidates for radio stars or ETI signals were discovered to formal limits on the minimum detectable signal ranging from 7.7 x 10(-22) W/m2 to 6.4 x 10(-24) W/m2. This preliminary study has verified that data collected by radio astronomers at large synthesis arrays can profitably be analysed for SETI signals (in a non-interfering manner) provided only that the data are available in the form of a more or less standard two dimensional map format.

  4. On the assurance of the design accuracy of the space radio telescope RadioAstron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorchuk, S. D.; Arkhipov, M. Yu.

    2014-09-01

    The results are given of the theoretical calculations and the results of measurements of the shape of the reflecting surface of the space telescope conducted during the manufacture of individual elements and assembly of the product as a whole.

  5. FAST - Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Ren-Dong

    2009-01-01

    The idea of sitting a large spherical dish in Karst depression is rooted in Arecibo telescope hosted by the NAIC of Cornell University. FAST is an Arecibo-type antenna with 3 outstanding aspects: the unique karst depression as the site; the active main reflector which corrects spherical aberration on the ground to achieve full polarization and wide band without involving complex feed system; and the light focus cabin driven by cables and servomechanism plus a parallel robot as secondary adjustable system to carry the most precise parts of the receivers. These design features will enable FAST to jumpstart many of science goals, such as HI neutral hydrogen line survey, pulsar survey, largest station in VLBI network, spectral line observations and Search for alien's technologies. The feasibility studies for FAST have been carried out for 14 years, being supported by Chinese and world astronomical communities. Funding for Project FAST has been approved by the National Development and Reform commission NDRC in July of 2007 with a capital budget 600 millions RMB and a project time of 5.5 years from the foundation. The first light is expected to be in early 2014. This work is supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 10433020). More than a hundred research personnel from over thirty research teams were involved in this research. On behalf of project FAST, I wish to make special recognition to their diligent work and great contribution to the project.

  6. The solar polar radio telescope mission: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weiying; Zhang, Cheng; Zheng, Jianhua; Wu, Ji; Wang, C. B.; Wang, Chi; Wang, S.

    : The solar polar orbit telescope (SPORT) is a mission proposed for the observation of ICMEs. The main payload is a synthetic aperture radiometer working at meter wave band taking images of the high density interplanetary plasma clouds formed by ICMEs and follows the propagation if it from the surface of the Sun all the way to as far as 0.5 AU or even further. With such a capability of observation, also the SPORT will study transient high energy phenomenon, the magnetic topology, temperature and density as well as velocity of the solar wind in the inner interplanetary heliosphere. In the practical part, the mission is also very useful for space weather forecast in advance of the geo-storm events. Other instruments are also selected to be on board of the solar polar orbit mission for in-situ measurement, such as fluxgate magnetometer, solar wind ion detector and high energy particle detectors. In this paper, we describe the scientific objective, basic principles and feasibility of the interferometric radiometer, general mission design and the status of the SPORT mission.

  7. Constraints on the flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitink, S.; Scholten, O.; Bacelar, J.; Braun, R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Falcke, H.; Singh, K.; Stappers, B.; Strom, R. G.; Yahyaoui, R. Al

    2010-10-01

    Context. Ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos and cosmic rays initiate particle cascades underneath the Moon's surface. These cascades have a negative charge excess and radiate Cherenkov radio emission in a process known as the Askaryan effect. The optimal frequency window for observation of these pulses with radio telescopes on the Earth is around 150 MHz. Aims: By observing the Moon with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope array we are able to set a new limit on the UHE neutrino flux. Methods: The PuMa II backend is used to monitor the Moon in 4 frequency bands between 113 and 175 MHz with a sampling frequency of 40 MHz. The narrowband radio interference is digitally filtered out and the dispersive effect of the Earth's ionosphere is compensated for. A trigger system is implemented to search for short pulses. By inserting simulated pulses in the raw data, the detection efficiency for pulses of various strength is calculated. Results: With 47.6 hours of observation time, we are able to set a limit on the UHE neutrino flux. This new limit is an order of magnitude lower than existing limits. In the near future, the digital radio array LOFAR will be used to achieve an even lower limit.

  8. Time and Frequency Synchronization on the Virac Radio Telescope RT-32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukovs, V.

    2016-04-01

    One of the main research directions of Ventspils International Radio Astronomy Centre (VIRAC) is radio astronomy and astrophysics. The instrumental base for the centre comprised two fully steerable parabolic antennas, RT-16 and RT-32 (i.e. with the mirror diameter of 16 m and 32 m). After long reconstruction, radio telescope RT-32 is currently equipped with the receiving and data acquisition systems that allow observing in a wide frequency range from 327 MHz to 9 GHz. New Antenna Control Unit (ACU) allows stable, fast and precise pointing of antenna. Time and frequency distribution service provide 5, 10 and 100 MHz reference frequency, 1PPS signals and precise time stamps by NTP protocol and in the IRIG-B format by coaxial cable. For the radio astronomical observations, main requirement of spatially Very Long Base Line Interferometric (VLBI) observations for the observatory is precise synchronization of the received and sampled data and linking to the exact time stamps. During October 2015, radio telescope RT-32 performance was tested in several successful VLBI experiments. The obtained results confirm the efficiency of the chosen methods of synchronization and the ability to reproduce them on similar antennas.

  9. Radio telescopes as the detectors of super-high-energy neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagkesamansky, R. D.; Zheleznykh, I. M.

    1991-01-01

    The registration of super high energy neutrinos is a very difficult and also very important problem that requires construction of detectors with large effective target masses. Askaryan pointed out the possibility of registering cascades in dense media by the Cherenkov radio emission of an excess of negative charges in the cascades which arose in interaction between high energy particles and the atoms of medium. The telescopes for cosmic high energy neutrino detection by radioemission of cascades induced underground, but whose development continues in the atmosphere were proposed by others. The effective target masses of such detectors could be approx. 10(exp 9) tons and more. The properties of Cherenkov radio emission of cascades and the properties of ice in the Antarctic Region make it possible to propose Radio Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detection (RAMAND): antennas should be placed on the ice surface of approx. 10 sq km to search for radio signals for neutrino (muon) cascades of energy. It is evident from data given that the largest radio telescopes gives the opportunity for registration of the cascades induced by neutrinos with the energies E is greater than or = 10(exp 20) eV.

  10. The likelihood ratio as a tool for radio continuum surveys with Square Kilometre Array precursor telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, K.; Smith, D. J. B.; Jarvis, M. J.; Bonfield, D. G.; Fleuren, S.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of the likelihood ratio method as a tool for identifying optical and infrared counterparts to proposed radio continuum surveys with Square Kilometre Array (SKA) precursor and pathfinder telescopes. We present a comparison of the infrared counterparts identified by the likelihood ratio in the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey to radio observations with 6, 10 and 15 arcsec resolution. We cross-match a deep radio catalogue consisting of radio sources with peak flux density >60 ?Jy with deep near-infrared data limited to Ks≲ 22.6. Comparing the infrared counterparts from this procedure to those obtained when cross-matching a set of simulated lower resolution radio catalogues indicates that degrading the resolution from 6 arcsec to 10 and 15 arcsec decreases the completeness of the cross-matched catalogue by approximately 3 and 7 per cent respectively. When matching against shallower infrared data, comparable to that achieved by the VISTA Hemisphere Survey, the fraction of radio sources with reliably identified counterparts drops from ˜89 per cent, at Ks≲ 22.6, to 47 per cent with Ks≲ 20.0. Decreasing the resolution at this shallower infrared limit does not result in any further decrease in the completeness produced by the likelihood ratio matching procedure. However, we note that radio continuum surveys with the MeerKAT and eventually the SKA, will require long baselines in order to ensure that the resulting maps are not limited by instrumental confusion noise.

  11. Intra-day Variability Observations at 5 GHz with the Urumqi 25-meter Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H.-G.; Liu, X.

    2007-10-01

    Radio intra-day variability (IDV) in compact flat-spectrum quasars and BL Lac objects has proven to be an important tool to investigate the emission of AGN and the propagation effect in the interstellar medium. We present the preliminary results of Urumqi 25 meter radio telescope IDV searches around some scintillation pulsars. The targets are from JVAS and CLASS samples around five pulsars, J0332+5434, J0826+2637, J1932+1059, J2022+2854, and J2022+5154.

  12. Single-Dish Radio Polarimetry in the F-GAMMA Program with the Effelsberg 100-m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuchert, Tobias; Kadler, Matthias; Wilms, Jörn; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Fuhrmann, Lars; Myserlis, Ioannis; Nestoras, Ioannis; Kraus, Alex; Bach, Uwe; Ros, Eduardo; Grossberger, Christoph; Schulz, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Studying the variability of polarized AGN jet emission in the radio band is crucial for understanding the dynamics of moving shocks as well as the structure of the underlying magnetic field. The 100-m Effelsberg Telescope is a high-quality instrument for studying the long-term variability of both total and polarized intensity as well as the electric-vector position angle. Since 2007, the F-GAMMA program has been monitoring the linear polarized emission of roughly 60 blazars at 11 frequencies between 2.7 and 43 GHz. Here, we describe the calibration of the polarimetric data at 5 and 10 GHz and the resulting F-GAMMA full-Stokes light curves for the exemplary case of the radio galaxy 3C 111.

  13. Correlated Oscillations Due to Similar Multipath Effects Seen in Two Widely Separated Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diep, P. N.; Phuong, N. T.; Darriulat, P.; Nhung, P. T.; Anh, P. T.; Dong, P. N.; Hoai, D. T.; Thao, N. T.

    2014-07-01

    A multipath mechanism similar to that used in Australia sixty years ago by the Sea-cliff Interferometer is shown to generate correlations between the periods of oscillations observed by two distant radio telescopes pointed to the Sun. The oscillations are the result of interferences between the direct wave detected in the main antenna lobe and its reflection on ground detected in a side lobe. A model is made of such oscillations in the case of two observatories located at equal longitudes and opposite tropical latitudes, respectively in Ha Noi (Viet Nam) and Learmonth (Australia), where similar radio telescopes are operated at 1.4 GHz. Simple specular reflection from ground is found to give a good description of the observed oscillations and to explain correlations that had been previously observed and for which no satisfactory interpretation, instrumental or other, had been found.

  14. High-Tech 'Heart' of New-Generation Radio Telescope Passes First Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    The Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA), part of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), took a giant step toward completion on August 7 with successful testing of advanced digital hardware designed to combine signals from its upgraded radio-telescope antennas to produce high resolution images of celestial objects. Successful Moment NRAO Crew Views Successful Computer Display Of WIDAR "First Fringes" Seated, front to back: Barry Clark, Ken Sowinski, Michael Rupen, Kevin Ryan. Standing, front to rear: Mark McKinnon, Rick Perley, Hichem Ben Frej. CREDIT: Dave Finley, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for larger file. By upgrading the 1970s-era electronics of its original Very Large Array (VLA), NRAO is creating a major new radio telescope that is ten times more sensitive than before. Using the EVLA, astronomers will observe fainter and more-distant objects than previously possible and use vastly improved analysis tools to decipher their physics. The heart of the new electronics that makes this transformation possible is a high-performance, special-purpose supercomputer, called the WIDAR Correlator. It has been designed and is being built by the National Research Council of Canada at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) of the Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, and serves as Canada's contribution to the EVLA project. The design of the correlator incorporates an NRC-patented new digital electronic architecture. The successful test, at the VLA site 50 miles west of Socorro, New Mexico, used prototype correlator electronics to combine the signals from two upgraded VLA antennas to turn them into a single, high-resolution telescope system, called an interferometer. The technical term for this achievement is called "first fringes." Each upgraded EVLA antenna produces 100 times more data than an original VLA antenna. When all 27 antennas are upgraded, they will pump data into the WIDAR correlator at a rate equal to 48 million digital telephone calls. To

  15. A complete VLBI delay model for deforming radio telescopes: the Effelsberg case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artz, T.; Springer, A.; Nothnagel, A.

    2014-12-01

    Deformations of radio telescopes used in geodetic and astrometric very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations belong to the class of systematic error sources which require correction in data analysis. In this paper we present a model for all path length variations in the geometrical optics of radio telescopes which are due to gravitational deformation. The Effelsberg 100 m radio telescope of the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, Bonn, Germany, has been surveyed by various terrestrial methods. Thus, all necessary information that is needed to model the path length variations is available. Additionally, a ray tracing program has been developed which uses as input the parameters of the measured deformations to produce an independent check of the theoretical model. In this program as well as in the theoretical model, the illumination function plays an important role because it serves as the weighting function for the individual path lengths depending on the distance from the optical axis. For the Effelsberg telescope, the biggest contribution to the total path length variations is the bending of the main beam located along the elevation axis which partly carries the weight of the paraboloid at its vertex. The difference in total path length is almost 100 mm when comparing observations at 90 and at 0 elevation angle. The impact of the path length corrections is validated in a global VLBI analysis. The application of the correction model leads to a change in the vertical position of mm. This is more than the maximum path length, but the effect can be explained by the shape of the correction function.

  16. Performance of a Quad-Ridged Feed in a Wideband Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Akgiray, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    A new quad-ridged, flared horn achieving nearly constant beamwidth and excellent return loss over a 6:1 frequency bandwidth is described. The system performance in two Radio Telescopes: 1) A 12-meter symmetric dual shaped reflector system intended for geodetic very long baseline interferometry and 2) A 15-meter offset dual shaped reflector intended for the SKA is presented showing it to be excellent wideband feed choice.

  17. Reoptimization of the Ohio State University radio telescope for the NASA SETI program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    The Ohio State University radiotelescope is the second largest radio telescope in the United States, equivalent in collecting area (2200 sq m) to a 175-foot diameter dish. For the past 17 years it has been dedicated fulltime to SETI, and it is now being considered by NASA for selection as the NASA dedicated SETI observatory. The telescope was originally designed, optimized, and used as an all-sky survey instrument to create detailed maps and catalogs of the radio astronomical sky. For the SETI Program, some re-optimizations are required. Right ascension tracking for one to two hours (depending on the declination) was achieved by exploiting the exceptionally large f/d ratio of the telescope. The feed horns were mounted on a large moveable, rubber-tired cart which is capable of a total motion of 100 feet. The cart can carry many horns, making possible simultaneous observations at many sky directions and frequency ranges. Rapid declination movement and its automation will be accomplished through simplification of the existing braking system, and replacement of older mechanical sensors by modern electronic inclinometers and proximity detectors. Circular polarization capability will be achieved through an increase in the number of horizontal wires in the reflector mesh, or addition of a finer mesh on top of the existing one. The telescope has great inherent resistance to radio frequency interference, due to its ground-mounted feed horns and shielding by the large reflectors of half the horizon. The resistance was recently increased further by installation of rolled-edges and diffraction-trapping gratings on the feed horns. If further shielding should be required, inexpensive side shields could be added to the telescope, making it a totally closed structure on all four sides.

  18. Reflector adjustment for a large radio telescope based on active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tongying; Zhang, Zhenchao; Li, Aihua; Wang, You

    2012-09-01

    The reflector deformation caused by gravity, temperature, humidity, wind loading and so on can reduce the global performance of a large radio telescope. In this paper, considering the characteristics of the primary reflector of a 13.7 m millimeter-wave telescope a novel reflector adjustment method based on active optics has therefore been proposed to control the active surface of the reflector through the communication between the active surface computer and embedded intelligent controller with a large quantity of displacement actuators, in which the active surface computer estimates and controls the real time active surface figure at any elevation angle, reduces or eliminates the adverse effects of the reflector deformation to increase the resolution and sensitivity of the radio telescope due to the more radio signals collected. A Controller Area Network /Ethernet protocol converter is designed for the communication between the active surface control computer as a host computer in Ethernet and the displacement actuator controller in Controller Area Network. The displacement actuator is driven by a stepper motor and controlled by an intelligent controller with the data from the active surface computer. The closed-loop control of the stepper motor improves the control accuracy greatly through the feedback link based on the optical encoder.

  19. Safe and secure remote control for the Twin Radio Telescope Wettzell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neidhardt, A.; Ettl, M.; Mühlbauer, M.; Kronschnabl, G.; Alef, W.; Himwich, E.; Beaudoin, C.; Plötz, C.; Lovell, J.

    2013-08-01

    More VLBI stations, more experiments, more data and a faster analysis for a real-time monitoring of earth parameters and reference frames are the goals of the future VLBI2010 network. One key technology is e-VLBI. But also the control might follow to adapt and to manage these new challenges. Therefore the Technische Universität München (TUM), Germany realizes concepts for continuous quality monitoring and station remote control in cooperation with the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, Germany. The development is funded by the European Seventh Framework program in the three year project “Novel EXploration Pushing Robust e-VLBI Services (NEXPReS)” of the European VLBI Network (EVN). Within this project, the TUM focuses on developments for a safe, secure and reliable remote control (e-RemoteCtrl) of the NASA Field System with authentication, authorization and user roles to operate and automate radio telescopes, like the new Twin Radio Telescope Wettzell (TTW) at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany. One of these telescopes will become operative this year, so that this is a first real-life test for the new control software and realizations.

  20. Subreflector model depending on elevation for the Tianma 65m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zheng-Xiong; Wang, Jin-Qing; Chen, Lan

    2016-08-01

    A subreflector adjustment system for the Tianma 65 m radio telescope, administered by Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, has been installed to compensate for gravitational deformation of the main reflector and the structure supporting the subreflector. The position and attitude of the subreflector are variable in order to improve the efficiency at different elevations. The subreflector model has the goal of improving the antenna's performance. A new fitting formulation which is different from the traditional formulation is proposed to reduce the fitting error in the Y direction. The only difference in the subreflector models of the 65m radio telescope is the bias of a constant term in the Z direction. We have investigated the effect of movements of the subreflector on the pointing of the antenna. The results of these performance measurements made by moving the antenna in elevation show that the subreflector model can effectively improve the efficiency of the 65 m radio telescope at each elevation. An antenna efficiency of about 60% at the Ku band is reached in the whole angular range of elevation.

  1. Reliability-centered maintenance for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, G.; Formentin, F.; Rampini, F.

    2014-07-01

    In the last years, EIE GROUP has been more and more involved in large optical telescopes and radio antennas array projects. In this frame, the paper describes a fundamental aspect of the Logistic Support Analysis (LSA) process, that is the application of the Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodology for the generation of maintenance plans for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antennas arrays. This helps maintenance engineers to make sure that the telescopes continue to work properly, doing what their users require them to do in their present operating conditions. The main objective of the RCM process is to establish the complete maintenance regime, with the safe minimum required maintenance, carried out without any risk to personnel, telescope and subsystems. At the same time, a correct application of the RCM allows to increase the cost effectiveness, telescope uptime and items availability, and to provide greater understanding of the level of risk that the organization is managing. At the same time, engineers shall make a great effort since the initial phase of the project to obtain a telescope requiring easy maintenance activities and simple replacement of the major assemblies, taking special care on the accesses design and items location, implementation and design of special lifting equipment and handling devices for the heavy items. This maintenance engineering framework is based on seven points, which lead to the main steps of the RCM program. The initial steps of the RCM process consist of: system selection and data collection (MTBF, MTTR, etc.), definition of system boundaries and operating context, telescope description with the use of functional block diagrams, and the running of a FMECA to address the dominant causes of equipment failure and to lay down the Critical Items List. In the second part of the process the RCM logic is applied, which helps to determine the appropriate maintenance tasks for each identified failure mode. Once

  2. Results from the Fly’s Eye Fast Radio Transient Search at the Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemion, Andrew; Bower, G.; Dexter, M.; Foster, G.; Mallard, W.; McMahon, P.; Wagner, M.; Werthimer, D.; Allen Telescope Array Team

    2011-01-01

    The relatively unexplored fast radio transient parameter space is known to be home to a variety of interesting sources, including rotating radio transients (RRATs), γ-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and pulsar giant pulses. In addition, a variety of hypothesized but as yet unobserved phenomena, such as primordial black hole evap- oration (Rees, 1977), prompt emission associated with coalescing massive objects (Hansen & Lyutikov, 2008) and hyper-flares from magnetars (Popov & Postnov, 2007) have been suggested. The announcement by Lorimer et al. of the detection of a powerful ( 30 Jy) and highly dispersed (DM 375 pc cm-3) radio pulse in Parkes multi-beam survey data (Lorimer et al., 2007), and subsequent consternation, have demonstrated both the potential utility of bright radio pulses as probes of the ISM and IGM, as well as the need for wide-field surveys characterizing the fast radio transient population. We present results from the 450-hour Fly’s Eye survey for powerful dispersed radio pulses at the Allen Telescope Array (ATA). The Fly’s Eye spectrometer processes 44 independent signal paths, each with a bandwidth of 209 MHz centered at 1420 MHz, and produces 128-channel power spectra accumulated for 0.6ms. Independent antenna-pointings of the extant 42-dish ATA yields a maximum total field-of-view of approximately 198 square degrees.

  3. A SURVEY OF RADIO RECOMBINATION LINES USING THE OOTY RADIO TELESCOPE AT 328 MHz IN THE INNER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Baddi, Raju

    2012-02-15

    A survey of radio recombination lines in the Galactic plane with longitude -32 Degree-Sign < l < +80 Degree-Sign and latitude b < {+-}3 Degree-Sign using Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) at 328 MHz is reported. ORT observations were made using a New Digital Backend (NDB) recently added to the telescope. With the NDB ORT had a beam of 2.{sup 0}3 Multiplication-Sign 2.{sup 0}2 sec({delta}) and a passband of {approx}1 MHz in the spectral line mode. The above-mentioned Galactic region was divided into {approx}2 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 2 Degree-Sign patches with the ORT beam pointed to the center. The ORT observations form a study of the distribution of extended low-density warm-ionized medium (ELDWIM) in the inner Galaxy using H271{alpha} RLs. By obtaining kinematical distances using V{sub LSR} of the H271{alpha} RLs, the distribution of ELDWIM clouds within the inner Galaxy has been deduced for the region given above.

  4. The Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) Science Education Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, D. C.; Klein, M. J.; Wolff, S. E.

    2004-12-01

    The Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Project (GAVRT) offers a unique opportunity for students in grades K through 12 to not only learn about science through radio astronomy, but to actually do it. GAVRT is a science education partnership involving NASA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Lewis Center for Educational Research (LCER). Following a preparation period using curriculum especially written for the Project, teachers connect to the Operations Control Center at LCER where trained operators assist the students to conduct remotely controlled radio astronomy observations using a 34-m diameter antenna located at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex. Students use computers to record extremely faint radio waves collected by the radio telescope and analyze real data. Scientists at JPL and other research institutions ultimately validate and incorporate the data into their research. Through this process students have the opportunity to become part of a science/education team, participating with scientists in ongoing missions and special observing campaigns. Their measurements are often included in papers appearing in major scientific journals. They learn that they can make valuable contributions to the world of science. This presentation will detail the types of data and the "campaigns" in which the students are conducting observations of the radiation belts of Jupiter, the deep atmosphere of Uranus and Saturn, and the time variations in the radio emission from distant Quasars. It will describe how the student-produced data are valued by the scientists and how the involvement of the scientists impacts the attitudes and abilities of students in the classroom. The JPL contribution to this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. NRAO 12-Meter Radio Telescope Detects Molecular Emission from Comet Hyakutake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-05-01

    Observations of Comet Hyakutake with the National Science Foundation's millimeter-wave radio telescope in Arizona have revealed new information about our Solar System's original material, including the first detection of the Carbonyl Sulfide (OCS) molecule in a comet. Since mid-March, the 12-Meter telescope, part of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and located on Kitt Peak in Arizona, has been used by four separate research teams to measure the emission from primordial molecular species within the bright Comet Hyakutake (C/1996 B2). Results obtained near the comet's closest approach on March 25th have yielded a wealth of information about the primordial composition of this comet. Comets are thought to be remnants from the formation of our Solar System, and as such, can provide valuable information about the early stages of our Solar System's chemical and physical development. Especially important is the study of cometary "parent molecules" -- molecules which have been present since the comet's birth, but have not been disturbed by chemical processing. Studying these molecules gives radio astronomers a very accurate "snapshot" of the material from which our Solar System, including Earth, was formed. The 12-Meter Telescope allows astronomers to observe what scientists call "millimeter waves," electromagnetic waves with wavelengths of just a few millimeters. These waves are shorter than radio microwaves and longer than infrared waves. Numerous molecules emit radiation at these wavelengths and thus can be detected by the 12-Meter telescope. The 12-Meter telescope, more than 25 years old, inaugurated the science of millimeter-wavelength molecular astronomy and is the instrument responsible for the discovery of dozens of molecules in space. Observations by Maria Womack (Pennsylvania State University), Michel C. Festou (Observatoire Midi Pyrenees, Toulouse), and Alan Stern (Southwest Research Institute) have measured the abundances of a number of suspected

  6. A dynamic thermal model for design and control of an 800-element open-air radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, Michael; Greve, Albert

    2011-09-01

    In earlier work we have described the thermal modelling for design and control of a fully insulated, and sometimes ventilated, high precision radio telescope. For such an insulated telescope the modelling of the time-variable dynamic influence of the thermal environment (air, sky and ground radiation, insolation) is relatively simple. The modelling becomes however quite complex for an open-air radio telescope where each individual member of the reflector backup structure (BUS) and the support structure (fork or yoke) is exposed under a different and time-dependent aspect angle to the thermal environment, which applies in particular to solar radiation. We present a time-dependent 800-element thermal model of an open-air telescope. Using the IRAM 30-m radio telescope as the basic mechanical structure, we explain how the temperature induced, real-time pointing and reflector surface deformations can be derived when using as input the day of the year, the thermal environment, and the geographic position of the telescope and its changing pointing direction. Thermal modelling and results similar to those reported here can be used for radio telescope design and real-time control of pointing and surface adjustment of a telescope with active panels.

  7. A high speed networked signal processing platform for multi-element radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Peeyush; Subrahmanya, C. R.

    2011-08-01

    A new architecture is presented for a Networked Signal Processing System (NSPS) suitable for handling the real-time signal processing of multi-element radio telescopes. In this system, a multi-element radio telescope is viewed as an application of a multi-sensor, data fusion problem which can be decomposed into a general set of computing and network components for which a practical and scalable architecture is enabled by current technology. The need for such a system arose in the context of an ongoing program for reconfiguring the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) as a programmable 264-element array, which will enable several new observing capabilities for large scale surveys on this mature telescope. For this application, it is necessary to manage, route and combine large volumes of data whose real-time collation requires large I/O bandwidths to be sustained. Since these are general requirements of many multi-sensor fusion applications, we first describe the basic architecture of the NSPS in terms of a Fusion Tree before elaborating on its application for the ORT. The paper addresses issues relating to high speed distributed data acquisition, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based peer-to-peer networks supporting significant on-the fly processing while routing, and providing a last mile interface to a typical commodity network like Gigabit Ethernet. The system is fundamentally a pair of two co-operative networks, among which one is part of a commodity high performance computer cluster and the other is based on Commercial-Off The-Shelf (COTS) technology with support from software/firmware components in the public domain.

  8. Using the Very Large Array (VLA) and other radio telescopes to perform a parasitic search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes several attempts to utilize various radio telescopes in a manner that is termed 'parasitic', that is in a manner that does not interrupt or seriously impact the standard astronomical observing programs in progress at the radio observatories. In the extreme case, only recorded astronomical data are accessed off-line, after the fact, without any burden on the observatory at all.

  9. Using the Very Large Array (VLA) and other radio telescopes to perform a parasitic Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes several attempts to utilize various radio telescopes in a manner that we term "parasitic," that is in a manner that does not interrupt or seriously impact the standard astronomical observing programs in progress at the radio observatories. In the extreme case, only recorded astronomical data are accessed off-line, after the fact, without any burden on the observatory at all.

  10. A Low-cost 21 cm Horn-antenna Radio Telescope for Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nimesh A.; Patel, Rishi N; Kimberk, Robert S; Test, John H; Krolewski, Alex; Ryan, James; Karkare, Kirit S; Kovac, John M; Dame, Thomas M.

    2014-06-01

    Small radio telescopes (1-3m) for observations of the 21 cm hydrogen line are widely used for education and outreach. A pyramidal horn was used by Ewen & Purcell (1951) to first detect the 21cm line at Harvard. Such a horn is simple to design and build, compared to a parabolic antenna which is usually purchased ready-made. Here we present a design of a horn antenna radio telescope that can be built entirely by students, using simple components costing less than $300. The horn has an aperture of 75 cm along the H-plane, 59 cm along the E-plane, and gain of about 20 dB. The receiver system consists of low noise amplifiers, band-pass filters and a software-defined-radio USB receiver that provides digitized samples for spectral processing in a computer. Starting from construction of the horn antenna, and ending with the measurement of the Galactic rotation curve, took about 6 weeks, as part of an undergraduate course at Harvard University. The project can also grow towards building a two-element interferometer for follow-up studies.

  11. CO observations of galaxies with the Nobeyama 45-M telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofue, Y.; Handa, T.; Hayashi, M.; Nakai, N.

    1987-01-01

    High-resolution (15 inch), filled aperture maps of the CO (J = 1-0) line emission were obtained for several nearby, CO-bright galaxies like M82, M83, IC342, and NGC891 in order to study star forming activity in these galaxies.

  12. Green Bank Telescope and Swift X-Ray Telescope Observations of the Galactic Center Radio Magnetar SGR J1745-2900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Ryan S.; Archibald, Robert F.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Scholz, Paul

    2015-06-01

    We present results from eight months of Green Bank Telescope 8.7 GHz observations and nearly 18 months of Swift X-ray telescope observations of the radio magnetar SGR J1745-2900. We tracked the radio and X-ray flux density, polarization properties, profile evolution, rotation, and single-pulse behavior. We identified two main periods of activity. The first is characterized by approximately 5.5 months of relatively stable evolution in radio flux density, rotation, and profile shape, while in the second these properties varied substantially. Specifically, a third profile component emerged and the radio flux also became more variable. The single pulse properties also changed, most notably with a larger fraction of pulses with pulse widths ˜5-20 ms in the erratic state. Bright single pulses are well described by a log-normal energy distribution at low energies, but with an excess at high energies. The 2-10 keV flux decayed steadily since the initial X-ray outburst, while the radio flux remained stable to within ˜20% during the stable state. A joint pulsar timing analysis of the radio and X-ray data shows a level of timing noise unprecedented in a radio magnetar, though during the time covered by the radio data alone the timing noise was at a level similar to that observed in other radio magnetars. While SGR J1745-2900 is similar to other radio magnetars in many regards, it differs by having experienced a period of relative stability in the radio that now appears to have ended, while the X-ray properties evolved independently.

  13. Simple, robust digital controller for the Onsala 20-m radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olberg, Michael; Lindeborg, Claes; Seyf, Alexander; Kastengren, Carl Fredrik

    1995-06-01

    As part of a general upgrade of the 20 m radio telescope at Onsala Space Observatory a new digital control loop has been implemented using discrete time state space control theory. The model of the telescope is reduced to second order. The controller has been designed for two different modes, corresponding to small (tracking) and large (slewing) reference position changes. For the tracking mode the control includes position error integration and reference value feedforward. For the slewing mode the velocity is controlled with regard to maximum allowed acceleration and control voltage. Incremental encoders on both axes are the only inputs to the system, consequently the velocity is reconstructed via a current estimator. The main objective was to create a robust controller, given the uncertainties in the parameters and non-linearities of the telescope system. The control loop runs on a standard VMEbus CPU- board in parallel with astronomical coordinate transformation routines, display, and watchdog programs. The result is a stand-alone telescope unit which is controlled through high level commands using ethernet or serial communication lines.

  14. Biggest Radio-Telescope in Northern Europe, the RT-32 in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monstein, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Hidden in the dense coastal forests of Slítere a mysterious ex-Soviet spy center is now used for science. Almost everyone including me who entered the site of the two large radio telescopes called Irbene, are amazed by the surrealistic atmosphere of the abandoned ghost town and two large radio dish antennas in the middle of nowhere. This article will tell more about this site; see also [1]. As the Cold War between the US and USSR entered the space age, the need for Space espionage led to the Soviets designing ways to track and decode signals from US satellites. The project began in 1967 when the remote areas of the Ventspils district were allocated for secret buildup of a site codenamed "Starlet". The location was chosen because of low population and dense forest areas of Slí;tere that also were part of the Soviet border zone - ensuring that no strangers could ever discover it.

  15. Very long baseline interferometric observations made with an orbiting radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, G. S.; Linfield, R. P.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Edwards, C. D.; Jordan, J. F., Jr.; Di Nardo, J.; Christensen, C. S.; Preston, R. A.; Skjerve, L. J.; Blaney, K. B.

    1986-01-01

    An orbiting spacecraft and ground observatories have been used to obtain interferometric observations of cosmic radio sources. The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) was used as the orbiting observatory in conjunction with two 64-meter radio telescopes at ground observatories, one in Australia and one in Japan. The quasars 1730-130 (NRAO 530), 1510-089, and 1741-038 were observed at a frequency of 2.3 gigahertz, and a maximum projected baseline of 1.4 earth diameters was achieved. All quasar observations for which valid data were acquired resulted in detected fringes. Many of the techniques proposed for a dedicated very long baseline interferometry observatory in space were used successfully in this experiment.

  16. Spectral observations of active region sources with RATAN-600 and WSRT. [Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alissandrakis, C. E.; Gel'frejkh, G. B.; Borovik, V. N.; Korzhavin, A. N.; Bogod, V. M.; Nindos, A.; Kundu, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    We present spectral observations of neutral line and sunspot associated sources obtained with the RATAN-600 radio telescope and the WSRT in the wavelength range of 2 to 6 cm. Sources associated with large sunspots have flat spectra, while neutral line sources have very steep spectra. In the case of a large spot we estimated the magnetic field to be at least 2700 G at the base of the transition region and 1800 G in the low corona. We consider possible interpretations of the radio emission above the neutral lines. Gyroresonance emission at the fourth harmonic is inadequate, whereas emission from a small population of nonthermal electrons (total number 10 exp 30 to 10 exp 31) with a delta = 3 power law distribution seems to be sufficient.

  17. Analyzing the capability of a radio telescope in a bistatic space debris observation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhe; Zhao, You; Gao, Peng-Qi

    2013-12-01

    A bistatic space debris observation system using a radio telescope as the receiving part is introduced. The detection capability of the system at different working frequencies is analyzed based on real instruments. The detection range of targets with a fixed radar cross section and the detection ability of small space debris at a fixed range are discussed. The simulations of this particular observation system at different transmitting powers are also implemented and the detection capability is discussed. The simulated results approximately match the actual experiments. The analysis in this paper provides a theoretical basis for developing a space debris observation system that can be built in China.

  18. Rayleigh beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope.

    PubMed

    Padin, S

    2014-12-01

    Millimeter-wavelength Rayleigh scattering from water droplets in a cloud is proposed as a means of generating a bright beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope. A λ=3  mm transmitter, with an output power of a few watts, illuminating a stratiform cloud, can generate a beacon with the same flux as Mars in 10 GHz bandwidth, but the beacon has a narrow line width, so it is extremely bright. The key advantage of the beacon is that it can be used at any time, and positioned anywhere in the sky, as long as there are clouds. PMID:25607971

  19. Monitoring the Communication Channel from Puschshino to Moscow in the Project of Space Radio Telescope "radioastron"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumsky, D. V.; Isaev, E. A.; Samodurov, V. A.; Isaev, K. A.

    The need for transmission and storage of large amounts of scientific data in the project space radio telescope "Radioastron" required us to organize a reliable communication channel between the tracking station in Pushchino and treatment centers in Moscow. Network management data requires us to an integrated approach and covers the organization secure access to manage network devices, timely replacement of equipment and software upgrades, backups, as well as documentation of the network infrastructure. The reliability of the channel is highly dependent on continuous monitoring of network and server equipment and communication lines.

  20. Radio OH observations of P/Halley with the NRAO 43-m telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claussen, M. J.; Schloerb, F. Peter

    1987-01-01

    Results of the radio OH emission from Comet Halley obtained with the 43-m NRAO telescope over the period from July 1985 to May 1986 show the global properties to be close to those predicted by Schloerb and Gerard (1985). The OH production rates are found to be well correlated with heliocentric magnitude estimates and to roughly follow the production rates determined from UV OH observations. After correction for the Greenstein effect, the mean velocities suggest that there is anisotropic outgassing of the parent molecule. An increase in the linewidths of the OH emission near and after perihelion is also noted.

  1. Development of a Multi-frequency Interferometer Telescope for Radio Astronomy (MITRA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingala, Dominique Guelord Kumamputu

    2015-03-01

    This dissertation describes the development and construction of the Multi-frequency Interferometer Telescope for Radio Astronomy (MITRA) at the Durban University of Technology. The MITRA station consists of 2 antenna arrays separated by a baseline distance of 8 m. Each array consists of 8 Log-Periodic Dipole Antennas (LPDAs) operating from 200 MHz to 800 MHz. The design and construction of the LPDA antenna and receiver system is described. The receiver topology provides an equivalent noise temperature of 113.1 K and 55.1 dB of gain. The Intermediate Frequency (IF) stage was designed to produce a fixed IF frequency of 800 MHz. The digital Back-End and correlator were implemented using a low cost Software Defined Radio (SDR) platform and Gnu-Radio software. Gnu-Octave was used for data analysis to generate the relevant received signal parameters including total power, real, and imaginary, magnitude and phase components. Measured results show that interference fringes were successfully detected within the bandwidth of the receiver using a Radio Frequency (RF) generator as a simulated source. This research was presented at the IEEE Africon 2013 / URSI Session Mauritius, and published in the proceedings.

  2. A year of operation of Melibea e-Callisto Solar Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russu, A.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Prieto, M.; Monstein, C.; Ivanov, H.; Rodríguez-Pacheco, J.; Blanco, J. J.

    2015-08-01

    The e-CALLISTO (Compound Astronomical Low-cost Low-frequency Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatory) is a worldwide radio-spectrograph network with 24 hours a day solar radio burst monitoring. The e-CALLISTO network is led by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETHZ Zurich), which work up collaborations with local host institutions. In 2013 the University of Alcalá joined the e-CALLISTO network with the installation of two Solar Radio Telescopes (SRT): the EA4RKU-SRT that was located at the University of Alcalá from January 2013 till June 2013 and the Melibea-SRT that is located at Peralejos de las Truchas (Guadalajara) in operation from June 2013. The Spanish e-Callisto SRTs provide routine data to the network. We present examples of type III and type II radio-bursts observed by Melibea during its first year of operation and study their relation with soft X-ray flares observed by GOES and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events observed by space-borne instrumentation.

  3. Back to the future: science and technology directions for radio telescopes of the twenty-first century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, James M.

    2009-08-01

    The early days of radio astronomy showed incredibly diverse experimentation in ways to sample the electromagnetic spectrum at radio wavelengths. In addition to obtaining adequate sensitivity by building large collection areas, a primary goal also was to achieve sufficient angular resolution to localize radio sources for multi-wavelength identification. This led to many creative designs and the invention of aperture synthesis and VLBI. Some of the basic telescope types remain to the present day, now implemented across the entire radio spectrum from wavelengths of tens of meters to submillimeter wavelengths. In recent years, as always, there is still the drive for greater sensitivity but a primary goal is now to achieve very large fields of view to complement high resolution and frequency coverage, leading to a new phase of experimentation. This is the “back to the future” aspect of current research and development for next-generation radio telescopes. In this paper I summarize the scientific motivations for development of new technology and telescopes since about 1990 and going forward for the next decade and longer. Relevant elements include highly optimized telescope optics and feed antenna designs, innovative fabrication methods for large reflectors and dipole arrays, digital implementations, and hardware vs. software processing. The emphasis will be on meter and centimeter wavelength telescopes but I include a brief discussion of millimeter wavelengths to put the longer wavelength enterprises into perspective. I do not discuss submillimeter wavelengths because they are covered in other papers.

  4. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, Arun; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Manoharan, P. K.; Krishnakumar, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a bandwidth of about four times larger (16 MHz) than that of the legacy system as well as its fluctuation spectrum with high temporal and frequency resolutions. The key point is that all the above modes operate in real time. This paper presents the design aspects of PONDER and outlines the design methodology for future similar backends. It also explains the principal operations of PONDER, illustrates its capabilities for a variety of pulsar and IPS observations and demonstrates its usefulness for a variety of astrophysical studies using the high sensitivity of the ORT.

  5. Measurements of Antenna Surface for Millimeter-Wave Space Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamegai, Kazuhisa; Tsuboi, Masato; Doi, Akihiro; Sato, Eiichi

    2011-06-01

    In the construction of a space radio telescope, it is essential to use materials with a low noise factor and high mechanical robustness for the antenna surface. We present the results of measurements of the reflection performance of two candidates for antenna surface materials for use in a radio telescope installed in a new millimeter-wave astronomical satellite, ASTRO-G. To estimate the amount of degradation caused by fluctuations in the thermal environment in the projected orbit of the satellite, a thermal cycle test was carried out for two candidates, namely, copper foil carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) and aluminum-coated CFRP. At certain points during the thermal cycle test, the reflection loss of the surfaces was measured precisely by using a radiometer in the 41-45 GHz band. In both candidates, cracks appeared on the surface after the thermal cycle test, where the number density of the cracks increased as the thermal cycle progressed. The reflection loss also increased in proportion to the number density of the cracks. Nevertheless, the loss of the copper foil surface met the requirements of ASTRO-G at the end of the equivalent life, whereas that of the aluminum-coated surface exceeded the maximal value in the requirement even before the end of the cycle.

  6. A COMBINED LOW-RADIO FREQUENCY/X-RAY STUDY OF GALAXY GROUPS. I. GIANT METREWAVE RADIO TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS AT 235 MHz AND 610 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Giacintucci, Simona; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Vrtilek, Jan; David, Laurence P.; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Gitti, Myriam; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Ponman, Trevor; Venturi, Tiziana; Athreya, Ramana M.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Murgia, Matteo; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.

    2011-05-10

    We present new Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations at 235 MHz and 610 MHz of 18 X-ray bright galaxy groups. These observations are part of an extended project, presented here and in future papers, which combines low-frequency radio and X-ray data to investigate the interaction between central active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the intra-group medium (IGM). The radio images show a very diverse population of group-central radio sources, varying widely in size, power, morphology, and spectral index. Comparison of the radio images with Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray images shows that groups with significant substructure in the X-ray band and marginal radio emission at {approx}>1 GHz host low-frequency radio structures that correlate with substructures in IGM. Radio-filled X-ray cavities, the most evident form of AGN/IGM interaction in our sample, are found in half of the systems and are typically associated with small, low-, or mid-power double radio sources. Two systems, NGC5044 and NGC4636, possess multiple cavities, which are isotropically distributed around the group center, possibly due to group weather. In other systems the radio/X-ray correlations are less evident. However, the AGN/IGM interaction can manifest itself through the effects of the high-pressure medium on the morphology, spectral properties, and evolution of the radio-emitting plasma. In particular, the IGM can confine fading radio lobes in old/dying radio galaxies and prevent them from dissipating quickly. Evidence for radio emission produced by former outbursts that co-exist with current activity is found in six groups of the sample.

  7. 21-cm Observations with the Morehead Radio Telescope: Involving Undergraduates in Observing Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malphrus, B. K.; Combs, M. S.; Kruth, J.

    2000-12-01

    Herein we report astronomical observations made by undergraduate students with the Morehead Radio Telescope (MRT). The MRT, located at Morehead State University, Morehead, Kentucky, is small aperture (44-ft.) instrument designed by faculty, students, and industrial partners to provide a research instrument and active laboratory for undergraduate astronomy, physics, pre-engineering, and computer science students. Small aperture telescopes like the MRT have numerous advantages as active laboratories and as research instruments. The benefits to students are based upon a hands-on approach to learning concepts in astrophysics and engineering. Students are provided design and research challenges and are allowed to pursue their own solutions. Problem-solving abilities and research design skills are cultivated by this approach. Additionally, there are still contributions that small aperture centimeter-wave instruments can make. The MRT operates over a 6 MHz bandwidth centered at 1420 MHz (21-cm), which corresponds to the hyperfine transition of atomic hydrogen (HI). The HI spatial distribution and flux density associated with cosmic phenomena can be observed and mapped. The dynamics and kinematics of celestial objects can be investigated by observing over a range of frequencies (up to 2.5 MHz) with a 2048-channel back-end spectrometer, providing up to 1 KHz frequency resolution. The sensitivity and versatility of the telescope design facilitate investigation of a wide variety of cosmic phenomena, including supernova remnants, emission and planetary nebulae, extended HI emission from the Milky Way, quasars, radio galaxies, and the sun. Student observations of galactic sources herein reported include Taurus A, Cygnus X, and the Rosette Nebula. Additionally, we report observations of extragalactic phenomena, including Cygnus A, 3C 147, and 3C 146. These observations serve as a performance and capability test-bed of the MRT. In addition to the astronomical results of these

  8. eVLBI Observations with the 305 m Arecibo Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momjian, E.; Ghosh, T.; Salter, C.; Venkataraman, A.

    2004-12-01

    Using the newly acquired Mark5A data acquisition system, we present the first eVLBI results from the Arecibo. The Mark 5A system, developed by Haystack Observatory, is a Gbps VLBI data system based on magnetic disk technology. Incorporating primarily low-cost PC-based components, it can record data at rates of up to 1024 Mbps on to an array of inexpensive, removable IDE/ATA disks. Until now, VLBI has been severely inconvenienced because the data had to be recorded onto tape or disk and then shipped for correlation. Consequently, it was impossible to judge the success of the observations until weeks or months after it had been performed. The solution, to link the telescopes electronically in real-time, now enables us to cross-correlate e data as it arrives. This technique, naturally called eVLBI, is now possible with high-bandwidth network connectivity having become a reality. The first eVLBI observations with the Arecibo radio telescope took place on September 10, 2004. Using the Mark 5A , the ICRF (The International Celestial Reference Frame) source, 0528+134, was observed at 1.6 GHz using an internationtal VLBI array. Along with Arecibo, the EVN telescopes in Cambridge (UK), Torun (Poland) and Westerbork (Netherlands) participated in these observations. The data from all these stations were directly transfered to JIVE, and an on-line correlation was performed. The observations resulted in the first transatlantic eVLBI image, and Arecibo-Torun is believed to be the longest real-time interferometer baseline yet created. These new observations gave an exciting glimpse of the future of radio astronomy, and led to the first scientific eVLBI observations on September 22, 2004. The Arecibo Observatory is part of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, which is operated by Cornell Univ. under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  9. Novel technology for the the Effelsberg 100-m Radio Telescope and MeerKAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Michael; Kraus, Alex; Wieching, Gundolf

    2015-08-01

    The 100-m radio telescope of the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR) is a unique European astronomical facility that combines superb sensitivity and wide frequency coverage (300 MHz - 95 GHz) with distinct versatility, making the telescope not only a cutting edge instrument for front-line research but also a testbed for emerging and future technology.Even more than 40 years old, the telescope has been continuously modernized and is heavily involved in various kinds of astronomical research as stand-alone instrument as well as in several VLBI networks. Currently, a large upgrade of the receiver suite at the telescope is ongoing. Several new, state-of-the-are broad-band receivers have been installed recently or are under constructions. Along with the new receivers, modern digital backends are being designed. We report on the current status of these upgrades by presenting some „highlights" and giving an outlook on the activities planned for the future.The technology developed and tested during these upgrades also finds application in the MeerKAT observatory in South Africa. MeerKAT is a fully funded radio observatory under construction in the Northern Cape of South Africa. When complete, MeerKAT’s 64 13.5-m dishes will form the - by far - most sensitive telescope in the Southern hemisphere, being equivalent to a 110 m dish. Due to the dish design with an offset Gregorian feed it will be 60%more sensitive than large center feed single dishes of comparable size.MPIfR is designing and constructing a 1.75- 3.44 GHz Receiver system for MeerKAT. The receiver will allow observations at a frequency range at currently unavailable sensitivity and spatial resolution in the Southern hemisphere. Combined with its powerful MPIfR Pulsar search backend it is expected to detect more than 1600 normal and 270 millisecond pulsars. In addition MeerKat will open up science that stays for its own but also prepares future observations with SKA and complements future SKA

  10. Frequency Calibration of Molecular Line Observing System of the TM65m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wu, Y. J.; Qiao, H. H.; Wang, J. Z.; Zuo, X. T.

    2015-11-01

    In order to carry out molecular line observations with the TM65m radio telescope, we carry out the frequency calibration and test observations of DIBAS (Digital Backend System), which is the spectrometer of the telescope. First, we test the performance of DIBAS with PCAL signals. We find that the spectral resolution is equal to the channel width, and the inaccuracy of spectral resolution is much lower than the channel width. Second, we observed hhco\\ lines toward two sources. The centroid velocity of calibrated data is consistent with GBT (Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope) observations. At last, we observed 1665 MHz OH maser lines toward W3(OH) for one hour. The line shapes keep stable, and the RMS (Root Mean Squares) noise levels are consistent with theoretical values. We also observed 6.7 GHz methanol masers toward W3(OH) for several scans with a separation of about one hour. The line shapes of each scans are well consistent with each other.

  11. Using the Very Large Array (VLA) and other radio telescopes to perform a parasitic Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

    PubMed

    Tarter, J

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes several attempts to utilize various radio telescopes in a manner that we term "parasitic," that is in a manner that does not interrupt or seriously impact the standard astronomical observing programs in progress at the radio observatories. In the extreme case, only recorded astronomical data are accessed off-line, after the fact, without any burden on the observatory at all. PMID:11539666

  12. THE ALLEN TELESCOPE ARRAY FLY'S EYE SURVEY FOR FAST RADIO TRANSIENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Siemion, Andrew P.V.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Wagner, Mark I.; Werthimer, Dan; Backer, Don; Foster, Griffin; McMahon, Peter L.; Cordes, Jim; Van Leeuwen, Joeri

    2012-01-10

    The relatively unexplored fast radio transient parameter space is known to be home to a variety of interesting sources, including pulsars, pulsar giant pulses, and non-thermal emission from planetary magnetospheres. In addition, a variety of hypothesized but as-yet-unobserved phenomena such as primordial black hole evaporation and prompt emission associated with coalescing massive objects have been suggested. The 2007 announcement by Lorimer et al. of the detection of a bright (30 Jy) radio pulse that was inferred to be of extragalactic origin and the subsequent consternation have demonstrated both the need for wide-field surveys characterizing the fast-transient parameter space and the potential utility of bright radio pulses as probes of the interstellar medium and intergalactic medium. Here we present results from the 450 hr, 150 deg{sup 2} Fly's Eye survey for bright dispersed radio pulses at the Allen Telescope Array (ATA). The Fly's Eye Spectrometer produces 128 channel power spectra over a 209 MHz bandwidth, centered at 1430 MHz, on 44 independent signal paths originating with 30 independent ATA antennae. Data were dedispersed between 0 and 2000 pc cm{sup -3} and searched for pulses with dispersion measures greater than 50 pc cm{sup -3} between 625 {mu}s and 5 s in duration. No pulses were detected in the survey, implying a limiting rate of less than 2 sky{sup -1} hr{sup -1} for 10 ms duration pulses having apparent energy densities greater than 440 kJy {mu}s, or mean flux densities greater than 44 Jy. Here we present details of the instrument, experiment, and observations, including a discussion of our results in light of other single pulse searches.

  13. The Morehead State University 18 Meter Radio Telescope Project: Involving Undergraduates in Observational Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malphrus, B. K.; Combs, M. S.; Kruth, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Space Science Center at Morehead State University is in the process of developing a large aperture (18-21 meter) cm-wave radio telescope, the Morehead Radio Telescope (MRT). The telescope will be located in the mountainous region of Eastern Kentucky. The instrument will serve as a research instrument and active laboratory for undergraduate astronomy, physics, pre-engineering, and computer science students. The antenna system will be engaged in science programs (in astrophysics) and in satellite mission support services (telemetry, tracking, and control). The benefits to students are based upon a hands-on approach to learning concepts in astrophysics and engineering. Additionally, there are still research contributions that small aperture centimeter-wave instruments can make including long-term observations of microvariability in AGNs, observations of transient events, and surveys. The MRT will operate three receiver systems including an L-band receiver (1.4-1.7 GHz) covering the "water hole", an S-band receiver (2.2-2.4 GHz) and a Ku-band receiver (11.2- 12.7 GHz) for continuum observations and satellite telemetry. The technical specifications for the instrument have been developed and an RFP has been issued inviting antenna vendors to submit proposals. The reflector will have a surface accuracy of 0.020 inches RMS over the entire surface, which will support relatively high frequency (Ku-band) observations. The antenna system will be full-motion and have a slew speed of 2 deg per second and an acceleration of 2 deg per second2. The HI and OH spatial distribution associated with cosmic phenomena will be investigated as well as dynamics and kinematics (particularly in HI) by observing over a range of frequencies (up to 2.5 MHz) with a 2048-channel back-end spectrometer, providing up to 1 KHz frequency resolution. The sensitivity and versatility of the telescope design will facilitate investigation of a wide variety of cosmic phenomena. The MRT is funded by

  14. Discovery of millisecond pulsars in radio searches of southern Fermi Large Area Telescope sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, M. J.; Johnston, S.; Ray, P. S.; Ferrara, E. C.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Çelik, Ö.; Belfiore, A.; Donato, D.; Cheung, C. C.; Abdo, A. A.; Camilo, F.; Freire, P. C. C.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, A. K.; Kramer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Ransom, S. M.; Romani, R. W.; Smith, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Weltevrede, P.; Wood, K. S.

    2011-06-01

    Using the Parkes Radio Telescope, we have carried out deep observations of 11 unassociated gamma-ray sources. Periodicity searches of these data have discovered two millisecond pulsars, PSR J1103-5403 (1FGL J1103.9-5355) and PSR J2241-5236 (1FGL J2241.9-5236), and a long-period pulsar, PSR J1604-44 (1FGL J1604.7-4443). In addition, we searched for but did not detect any radio pulsations from six gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi satellite to a level of ˜0.04 mJy (for pulsars with a 10 per cent duty cycle). The timing of the millisecond pulsar PSR J1103-5403 has shown that its position is 9 arcmin from the centroid of the gamma-ray source. Since these observations were carried out, independent evidence has shown that 1FGL J1103.9-5355 is associated with the flat spectrum radio source PKS 1101-536. It appears certain that the pulsar is not associated with the gamma-ray source, despite the seemingly low probability of a chance detection of a radio millisecond pulsar. We consider that PSR J1604-44 is a chance discovery of a weak, long-period pulsar and is unlikely to be associated with 1FGL J1604.7-4443. PSR J2241-5236 has a spin period of 2.2 ms and orbits a very low mass companion with a 3.5-h orbital period. The relatively high flux density and low dispersion measure of PSR J2241-5236 make it an excellent candidate for high precision timing experiments. The gamma rays of 1FGL J2241.9-5236 have a spectrum that is well modelled by a power law with an exponential cut-off, and phase binning with the radio ephemeris results in a multipeaked gamma-ray pulse profile. Observations with Chandra have identified a coincident X-ray source within 0.1 arcsec of the position of the pulsar obtained by radio timing.

  15. The Hitachi and Takahagi 32 m radio telescopes: Upgrade of the antennas from satellite communication to radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonekura, Yoshinori; Saito, Yu; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Soon, Kang Lou; Momose, Munetake; Yokosawa, Masayoshi; Ogawa, Hideo; Kimura, Kimihiro; Abe, Yasuhiro; Nishimura, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Fujisawa, Kenta; Tomoaki, Oyama; Kono, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Sawada-Satoh, Satoko; Hideyuki, Kobayashi; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Honma, Mareki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Sato, Katsuhisa; Ueno, Yuji; Jike, Takaaki; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Hirota, Tomoya; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Niinuma, Kotaro; Sorai, Kazuo; Takaba, Hiroshi; Hachisuka, Kazuya; Kondo, Tetsuro; Sekido, Mamoru; Murata, Yasuhiro; Nakai, Naomasa; Omodaka, Toshihiro

    2016-05-01

    The Hitachi and Takahagi 32 m radio telescopes (former satellite communication antennas) were so upgraded as to work at 6, 8, and 22 GHz. We developed the receiver systems, IF systems, back-end systems (including samplers and recorders), and reference systems. We measured the performance of the antennas. The system temperature including the atmosphere toward the zenith, T_sys^{ast }, is measured to be ˜30-40 K for 6 GHz and ˜25-35 K for 8 GHz. T_sys^{ast } for 22 GHz is measured to be ˜40-100 K in winter and ˜150-500 K in summer seasons, respectively. The aperture efficiency is 55%-75% for Hitachi at 6 GHz and 8 GHz, and 55%-65% for Takahagi at 8 GHz. The beam sizes at 6 GHz and 8 GHz are ˜4{^'.}6 and ˜3{^'.}8, respectively. The side-lobe level is less than 3%-4% at 6 and 8 GHz. Pointing accuracy was measured to be better than ˜0{^'.}3 for Hitachi and ˜0{^'.}6 for Takahagi. We succeeded in VLBI observations in 2010 August, indicating good performance of the antenna. We started single-dish monitoring observations of 6.7 GHz methanol maser sources in 2012 December, and found several new sources showing short-term periodic variation of the flux density.

  16. Areal-Time Spying Software for the Driving System in the 25m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Lan-Feng; Aili, Yusupu; Zhao, Rong-Bing; Yu, Yun

    2008-06-01

    The Spying software, which is running on Windows platform, is showing the working state of the driving system in the 25m radio telescope in real time. It is programmed in the MFC method. This software achieves the serial communication between the host-computer and the client-computer by using the MSComm control and the network communication between the server and the client by using the WinSock control, both provided by Microsoft. It also has additional functions, such as recording the information history, browsing history, alarming when an error occured and so on. Users can search data and generate charts in information history by using Excel which has been linked to the spying software. The timer message ensures all the parameters from different machines shown in the digital format simultaneously. Friendly user interface and simple operation reach the initial aims.

  17. The Establishment of Pointing Model for the TM65 m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin-feng, Yu; Jin-qing, Wang; Rong-bing, Zhao; Jian, Dong; Xiu-ting, Zuo; Wei, Gou; Qing-hui, Liu; Qing-yuan, Fan

    2015-10-01

    The method to establish the pointing model of the 65-meter radio telescope of Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (TM65 m) is described. The single-point data are collected by means of "cross scan", then, they are fitted with a model including both the Gaussian and nonlinear terms. It is also simulated and analyzed how the antenna beam is broadened in the scanning process because of the angular size of a source. And the orbit prediction of sources is used to improve the modelling efficiency. Finally, an eight-parameter pointing model is built after fitting all the collected single-point errors. It is verified that the model works well in the X band and other low-frequency bands, the pointing accuracy at the X band attains 12.36 arcsec.

  18. Surface Accuracy Analysis of Single Panels for the Shanghai 65-M Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Li; Liu, Guoxi; Jin, Chao; Yan, Feng; An, Tao; Zhiqiang, Shen

    We presented the surface accuracy measurements of 5 single panels of the Shanghai 65-meter radio telescope by employing the coordinate measuring machine and laser tracker. The measurement data obtained from the two instruments were analyzed with the common point transformation and CAD surface fitting techniques, respectively. The derived rms uncertainties of panel accuracy from two methods are consistent with each other, and both match the design specification. The simulations of the effects of manufacturing error, gravity, temperature and wind on the panel surface accuracy with the finite element analysis method suggest that the first two factors account for primary sources of the accuracy uncertainty. The panel deformation under concentrated load was analyzed through finite element analysis and experiment, and the comparison error is 5.6%. There is not plastic deformation when people of weight below 70kg installs and remedies the panel.

  19. Technical considerations on using the large Nancay radio telescope for SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.; Biraud, F.; Heidmann, J.; Tarter, J.

    1990-01-01

    The Nancay decimetric Radio Telescope (NRT) in Nancay, France, is described, and its potential use for Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) observations is discussed. The conclusion reached is that the NRT is well suited for SETI observations because of its large collecting area, its large sky coverage, and its wideband frequency capability. However, a number of improvements are necessary in order to take full advantage of the system in carrying out an efficient SETI program. In particular, system sensitivity should be increased. This can be achieved through a series of improvements to the system, including lowering the ground pickup noise through the use of ground reflectors and more efficient feed design, and by using low-noise amplifier front ends.

  20. Observations of Extended Green Objects in the 1.35-cm H2O Line on the 22-m Pushchino Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnitskii, G. M.; Lekht, E. E.; Bayandina, O. S.; Val'tts, I. E.; Khan, E. R.

    2016-01-01

    Observations of H2O maser sources at 1.35 cm associated with extended regions of 4.5-µm emission (indicated as "green" on Spitzer survey maps—so-called Extended Green Objects, EGOs) are reported. EGOs are considered as characteristic signposts of regions of formation of massive stars, which host high-velocity outflows, as well as methanol, water, and hydroxyl masers. The observations were carried out in January-May 2015 on the 22-meter radio telescope of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory. The sample studied includes 24 EGOs north of declination -29° taken from the Spitzer GLIMPSE survey, together with one of the brightest Class I methanol masers G6.05-1.45 (M8E) and the Class I methanol maser in an IRDC G359.94+0.17. H2O maser emission was detected toward 11 of the EGOs: G11.94-0.62, G14.33-0.64, G16.59-0.06, G23.01-0.41, G24.943+0.074, G28.83-0.25, G34.3+0.2, G34.403+0.233, G35.20-0.74, G45.47+0.07, and G49.267-0.337. These including the well known H2O maser in the W44 region, G34.3+0.2. H2O emission from G28.83-0.25 was detected for the first time, at 77.6 km/s, with a flux density of 19 Jy in January and 16 Jy in February 2015. The source was probably caught at an early stage of the propagation of a shock wave. The Class I methanol masers G359.94+0.17 and G6.05-1.45 (M8E) and 13 of the EGOs were not detected in the H2O line, with 3s upper limits of ~6-7 Jy. Spectra and maser-emission parameters are given for the detected H2Omasers, for some of which strong variability of the H2O maser emission was observed. The detected H2Omasers, together with the Class I methanol masers and extended 4.5-µm emission, are associated with a very early stage in the development of young stellar objects in the regions of the EGOs. However, this sample of EGOs is not uniform. The presence of 44-GHz Class I methanol masers together with EGOs cannot be considered the only sign of early stages of star formation.

  1. The standing wave phenomenon in radio telescopes. Frequency modulation of the WSRT primary beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popping, A.; Braun, R.

    2008-03-01

    Context: Inadequacies in the knowledge of the primary beam response of current interferometric arrays often form a limitation to the image fidelity, particularly when “mosaicing” over multiple telescope pointings. Aims: We hope to overcome these limitations by constructing a frequency-resolved, full-polarization empirical model for the primary beam of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). Methods: Holographic observations, sampling angular scales between about 5 arcmin and 11 degrees, were obtained of a bright compact source (3C 147). These permitted measurement of voltage response patterns for seven of the fourteen telescopes in the array and allowed calculation of the mean cross-correlated power beam. Good sampling of the main-lobe, near-in, and far-side-lobes out to a radius of more than 5 degrees was obtained. Results: A robust empirical beam model was detemined in all polarization products (XX, XY, YX and YY) and at frequencies between 1322 and 1457 MHz with 1 MHz resolution. Substantial departures from axi-symmetry are apparent in the main-lobe as well as systematic differences between the polarization properties. Surprisingly, many beam properties are modulated at the 5 to 10% level with changing frequency. These include: (1) the main beam area, (2) the side-lobe to main-lobe power ratio, and (3) the effective telescope aperture. These semi-sinusoidsal modulations have a basic period of about 17 MHz, consistent with the natural “standing wave” period of a 8.75 m focal distance. The deduced frequency modulations of the beam pattern were verified in an independent long duration observation using compact continuum sources at very large off-axis distances. Conclusions: Application of our frequency-resolved beam model should enable higher dynamic range and improved image fidelity for interferometric observations in complex fields, although at the expense of an increased computational load. The beam modulation with frequency can not be as easily

  2. Panel positioning error and support mechanism for a 30-m THz radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, De-Hua; Okoh, Daniel; Zhou, Guo-Hua; Li, Ai-Hua; Li, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Jing-Quan

    2011-06-01

    A 30-m TeraHertz (THz) radio telescope is proposed to operate at 200 μm with an active primary surface. This paper presents sensitivity analysis of active surface panel positioning errors with optical performance in terms of the Strehl ratio. Based on Ruze's surface error theory and using a Monte Carlo simulation, the effects of six rigid panel positioning errors, such as piston, tip, tilt, radial, azimuthal and twist displacements, were directly derived. The optical performance of the telescope was then evaluated using the standard Strehl ratio. We graphically illustrated the various panel error effects by presenting simulations of complete ensembles of full reflector surface errors for the six different rigid panel positioning errors. Study of the panel error sensitivity analysis revealed that the piston error and tilt/tip errors are dominant while the other rigid errors are much less important. Furthermore, as indicated by the results, we conceived of an alternative Master-Slave Concept-based (MSC-based) active surface by implementating a special Series-Parallel Concept-based (SPC-based) hexapod as the active panel support mechanism. A new 30-m active reflector based on the two concepts was demonstrated to achieve correction for all the six rigid panel positioning errors in an economically feasible way.

  3. Primary Beam and Dish Surface Characterization at the Allen Telescope Array by Radio Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, G. R.; Ackermann, R. F.; Nadler, Z. J.; Blair, Samantha K.; Davis, M. M.; Wright, M. C. H.; Forster, J. R.; Deboer, D. R.; Welch, W. J.; Atkinson, Shannon; Backer, D. C.; Backus, P. R.; Barott, William; Bauermeister, Amber; Blitz, Leo; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Bradford, Tucker; Cheng, Calvin; Croft, Steve; Dexter, Matt; Dreher, John; Engargiola, Greg; Fields, E. D.; Heiles, Carl; Helfer, Tamara; Jordan, Jane; Jorgensen, Susan; Kilsdonk, Tom; Gutierrez-Kraybill, Colby; Keating, Garrett; Law, Casey; Lugten, John; MacMahon, D. H. E.; McMahon, Peter; Milgrome, Oren; Siemion, Andrew; Smolek, Ken; Thornton, Douglas; Pierson, Tom; Randall, Karen; Ross, John; Shostak, Seth; Tarter, J. C.; Urry, Lynn; Werthimer, Dan; Williams, Peter K. G.; Whysong, David

    2011-06-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a cm-wave interferometer in California, comprising 42 antenna elements with 6-m diameter dishes. We characterize the antenna optical accuracy using two-antenna interferometry and radio holography. The distortion of each telescope relative to the average is small, with RMS differences of 1% of beam peak value. Holography provides images of dish illumination, characterizing as-built mirror surfaces. Maximal distortions across ~ 2 meter lengths appear to result from mounting stresses or solar radiation. Experimental RMS errors are 0.7 mm at night and 3 mm under worst-case solar illumination. For frequencies 4, 10, and 15 GHz, the nighttime values indicate sensitivity losses of 1, 10 and 20%, respectively. ATA's wide-bandwidth receiver permits observations over a continuous range 0.5-11.2 GHz. We probe the antenna optical gain and beam pattern stability as a function of focus position and observation frequency, concluding that ATA can produce high fidelity images over a decade of simultaneous observation frequencies. We quantify solar heating effects on antenna sensitivity and pointing accuracy. We find that during the day, observations >=5 GHz will suffer some sensitivity loss and it may be necessary to make antenna pointing corrections on a 1-2 hourly basis.

  4. Gamma-ray and Radio Properties of Six Pulsars Detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltevrede, P.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; Desvignes, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hobbs, G.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Makeev, A.; Manchester, R. N.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Venter, C.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wang, N.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed γ-rays for PSRs J0631+1036, J0659+1414, J0742-2822, J1420-6048, J1509-5850, and J1718-3825 using the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly known as GLAST). Although these six pulsars are diverse in terms of their spin parameters, they share an important feature: their γ-ray light curves are (at least given the current count statistics) single peaked. For two pulsars, there are hints for a double-peaked structure in the light curves. The shapes of the observed light curves of this group of pulsars are discussed in the light of models for which the emission originates from high up in the magnetosphere. The observed phases of the γ-ray light curves are, in general, consistent with those predicted by high-altitude models, although we speculate that the γ-ray emission of PSR J0659+1414, possibly featuring the softest spectrum of all Fermi pulsars coupled with a very low efficiency, arises from relatively low down in the magnetosphere. High-quality radio polarization data are available showing that all but one have a high degree of linear polarization. This allows us to place some constraints on the viewing geometry and aids the comparison of the γ-ray light curves with high-energy beam models.

  5. Permanent Monitoring of the Reference Point of the 20m Radio Telescope Wettzell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neidhardt, Alexander; Losler, Michael; Eschelbach, Cornelia; Schenk, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    To achieve the goals of the VLBI2010 project and the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), an automated monitoring of the reference points of the various geodetic space techniques, including Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), is desirable. The resulting permanent monitoring of the local-tie vectors at co-location stations is essential to obtain the sub-millimeter level in the combinations. For this reason a monitoring system was installed at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell by the Geodetic Institute of the University of Karlsruhe (GIK) to observe the 20m VLBI radio telescope from May to August 2009. A specially developed software from GIK collected data from automated total station measurements, meteorological sensors, and sensors in the telescope monument (e.g., Invar cable data). A real-time visualization directly offered a live view of the measurements during the regular observation operations. Additional scintillometer measurements allowed refraction corrections during the post-processing. This project is one of the first feasibility studies aimed at determining significant deformations of the VLBI antenna due to, for instance, changes in temperature.

  6. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: measuring radio galaxy bias through cross-correlation with lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Rupert; Lindsay, Sam N.; Sherwin, Blake D.; de Bernardis, Francesco; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Gallardo, Patricio; Henderson, Shawn; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renée; Jarvis, Matt; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Madhavacheril, Mathew; McMahon, Jeff; Moodley, Kavilan; Naess, Sigurd; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sehgal, Neelima; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; van Engelen, Alexander; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-07-01

    We correlate the positions of radio galaxies in the FIRST survey with the cosmic microwave background lensing convergence estimated from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope over 470 deg2 to determine the bias of these galaxies. We remove optically cross-matched sources below redshift z = 0.2 to preferentially select active galactic nuclei (AGN). We measure the angular cross-power spectrum C_l^{κ g} at 4.4σ significance in the multipole range 100 < l < 3000, corresponding to physical scales within ≈2-60 Mpc at an effective redshift zeff = 1.5. Modelling the AGN population with a redshift-dependent bias, the cross-spectrum is well fitted by the Planck best-fitting Λ cold dark matter cosmological model. Fixing the cosmology and assumed redshift distribution of sources, we fit for the overall bias model normalization, finding b(zeff) = 3.5 ± 0.8 for the full galaxy sample and b(zeff) = 4.0 ± 1.1(3.0 ± 1.1) for sources brighter (fainter) than 2.5 mJy. This measurement characterizes the typical halo mass of radio-loud AGN: we find log (M_halo / M_{⊙}) = 13.6^{+0.3}_{-0.4}.

  7. The discovery of strong extragalactic polarization using the Parkes Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracewell, Ronald N.

    2002-12-01

    By the end of 1961, interferometry to arc-minute precision in the East-West direction had resolved the compact source at the centre of Centaurus A into two equal components spaced about 5‧ in right ascension and with measured widths. Were they on the dark bar of the associated extragalactic nebula, NGC 5128, and perhaps indicatios of a toroidal source, or were they in the perpendicular direction and on their way out to feed the extended radio source Centaurus A? The 6‧.7 pencil beam of the Parkes Radio Telescope, employed in an unusual scanning mode, was capable of just separating the peaks and resolving the ambiguity in declination. In 1962 April, I carried out the first observations of linear polarization in Centaurus A using the Parkes antenna, and these were soon followed by other observations made by Brian Cooper and Marcus Price and then by Frank Gardner and John Whiteoak. Because the research papers reporting these pioneering observations were not published in chronological order and the dates of the observations and submission of the manuscripts ware not mentioned in them there has been considerable confusion surrounding the discovery history of Centaurus A polarization at Parkes, and this has been compounded by a misleading contemporary newspaper report, uninformed folklore, and conflicting recollectioms printed 30 years after the event. This paper clarifies the situation by presenting a first-hand account of the original observations and associated publications.

  8. Discovery and Follow-up of Rotating Radio Transients with the Green Bank and LOFAR Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lynch, R. S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kondratiev, V. I.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Ransom, S. M.; Archibald, A. M.; Boyles, J.; Jenet, F. A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Levin, L.; Lorimer, D. R.; Madsen, E. C.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J. K.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2015-08-01

    We have discovered 21 Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs) in data from the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) 350 MHz Drift-scan and the Green Bank North Celestial Cap pulsar surveys using a new candidate sifting algorithm. RRATs are pulsars with sporadic emission that are detected through their bright single pulses rather than Fourier domain searches. We have developed RRATtrap, a single-pulse sifting algorithm that can be integrated into pulsar survey data analysis pipelines in order to find RRATs and Fast Radio Bursts. We have conducted follow-up observations of our newly discovered sources at several radio frequencies using the GBT and Low Frequency Array, yielding improved positions and measurements of their periods, dispersion measures (DMs), and burst rates, as well as phase-coherent timing solutions for four of them. The new RRATs have DMs ranging from 15 to 97 {pc} {{cm}}-3, periods of 240 ms to 3.4 s, and estimated burst rates of 20 to 400 pulses hr-1 at 350 MHz. We use this new sample of RRATs to perform statistical comparisons between RRATs and canonical pulsars in order to shed light on the relationship between the two populations. We find that the DM and spatial distributions of the RRATs agree with those of the pulsars found in the same survey. We find evidence that slower pulsars (i.e., P\\gt 200 ms) are preferentially more likely to emit bright single pulses than are faster pulsars (P\\lt 200 ms), although this conclusion is tentative. Our results are consistent with the proposed link between RRATs, transient pulsars, and canonical pulsars as sources in various parts of the pulse activity spectrum.

  9. Jet Emission in Young Radio Sources: A Fermi Large Area Telescope Gamma-Ray View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, G.; Siemiginowska, A.; Kelly, B. C.; Stawarz, Ł.; Celotti, A.; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of the beamed jet component to the high-energy emission in young and compact extragalactic radio sources, focusing for the first time on the γ-ray band. We derive predictions on the γ-ray luminosities associated with the relativistic jet assuming a leptonic radiative model. The high-energy emission is produced via Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in a spherical region at the considered scales (lsim10 kpc). Simulations show a wide range of γ-ray luminosities, with intensities up to ~1046-1048 erg s-1 depending on the assumed jet parameters. We find a highly linear relation between the simulated X-ray and γ-ray luminosities that can be used to select candidates for γ-ray detection. We compare the simulated luminosity distributions in the radio, X-ray, and γ-ray regimes with observations for the largest sample of X-ray-detected young radio quasars. Our analysis of ~4-yr Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data does not yield any statistically significant detections. However, the majority of the model-predicted γ-ray fluxes for the sample are near or below the current Fermi-LAT flux threshold and compatible with the derived upper limits. Our study gives constraints on the minimum jet power (L jet, kin/L disk > 0.01) of a potential jet contribution to the X-ray emission in the most compact sources (lsim 1 kpc) and on the particle-to-magnetic field energy density ratio that are in broad agreement with equipartition assumptions.

  10. Jet emission in young radio sources: A Fermi large area telescope gamma-ray view

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, G.; Siemiginowska, A.; Kelly, B. C.; Stawarz, Ł.; Celotti, A.; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-01-10

    We investigate the contribution of the beamed jet component to the high-energy emission in young and compact extragalactic radio sources, focusing for the first time on the γ-ray band. We derive predictions on the γ-ray luminosities associated with the relativistic jet assuming a leptonic radiative model. The high-energy emission is produced via Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in a spherical region at the considered scales (≲10 kpc). Simulations show a wide range of γ-ray luminosities, with intensities up to ∼10{sup 46}-10{sup 48} erg s{sup –1} depending on the assumed jet parameters. We find a highly linear relation between the simulated X-ray and γ-ray luminosities that can be used to select candidates for γ-ray detection. We compare the simulated luminosity distributions in the radio, X-ray, and γ-ray regimes with observations for the largest sample of X-ray-detected young radio quasars. Our analysis of ∼4-yr Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data does not yield any statistically significant detections. However, the majority of the model-predicted γ-ray fluxes for the sample are near or below the current Fermi-LAT flux threshold and compatible with the derived upper limits. Our study gives constraints on the minimum jet power (L {sub jet,} {sub kin}/L {sub disk} > 0.01) of a potential jet contribution to the X-ray emission in the most compact sources (≲ 1 kpc) and on the particle-to-magnetic field energy density ratio that are in broad agreement with equipartition assumptions.

  11. Continent-Spanning Radio Telescope Blazes Trails At the Frontiers of Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    The supersharp radio "vision" of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) is revealing unprecedented details of astronomical objects from stars in our own cosmic neighborhood to galaxies billions of light-years away. Astronomers from across North America and beyond are presenting the results of VLBA research at the American Astronomical Society's (AAS) meeting in Chicago. "The VLBA is one of the most powerful tools in the world for astronomy," said Paul Vanden Bout, Director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), which operates the VLBA. "It can produce images hundreds of times more detailed than those produced by the Hubble Space Telescope, and that capability has yielded some spectacular scientific results." Examples of VLBA research presented at the AAS meeting include the most accurate measurement ever made of the distance to another galaxy; the detection of our Solar System's orbital motion around the center of our own Galaxy; a "movie" showing the expansion of debris from a star's explosion in a galaxy 11 million light-years away; and a "movie" of gas motions in the atmosphere of a star more than 1,000 light-years away -- the first time gas motions have ever been tracked in a star other than the Sun. With ten giant dish antennas spread from Hawaii in the Pacific to St. Croix in the Caribbean, all working together as a single telescope, the VLBA is "the world's biggest astronomical instrument," Vanden Bout said. The VLBA has been in full operation for more than five years. A pair of sessions at the AAS meeting is devoted to reports of research using the VLBA. In more than 40 scientific presentations, astronomers tell how they used the VLBA to gain valuable new information about nearly every area from the frontiers of astrophysics. Some of those reporting on their VLBA research are graduate students working on their Ph.D degrees. "We are particularly proud that this instrument, one of the world's premier facilities

  12. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  13. The Expanded Very Large Array: A Radio Telescope for the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    The world's most productive and widely-used radio telescope, the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA), can be improved tenfold with an expansion project proposed by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "This project will ensure that the scientific community has a state-of-the-art research tool to meet the astronomical research challenges of the 21st Century," said Paul Vanden Bout, NRAO Director. Aerial View of the VLA Plans for the Expanded VLA (EVLA) and its potential for new scientific contributions were described today in a series of presentations at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Rochester, NY. The EVLA project plans to replace dated equipment left over from the VLA's original construction in the 1970s and add eight new radio- telescope dish antennas to the current, 27-dish system. It received a strong endorsement last month when the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee of the National Academy of Sciences gave the project one of its highest ratings as a priority for the next decade in its report entitled "Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium." "The Survey Committee's endorsement shows that the astronomical research community strongly supports the Expanded VLA," said NRAO astronomer Jim Ulvestad, who spoke to reporters at the AAS meeting. "The VLA has long been a unique and critical resource for all of astronomy, and we look forward to turning it into a dramatic, new research tool." The VLA Expansion Project will use modern electronics and computer technology to greatly improve the VLA's ability to observe faint celestial objects and to analyze their radio emissions. A set of eight new dish antennas, added to the current 27-antenna system, will allow the VLA to produce images with ten times greater detail. The project will build on the VLA's current infrastructure, including its 230-ton dish antennas, the railroad tracks for moving those antennas, and the existing buildings and access roads. The

  14. New-generation data acquisition and control system for continuum radio-astronomic observations with RATAN-600 radio telescope: Development, observations, and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsybulev, P. G.

    2011-01-01

    A new Data Acquisition and Control System for performing continuum radio-astronomical observations with the RATAN-600 radio telescope is presented. One of the "building blocks" of the system is the Embedded Radiometric Data Acquisition System (ER-DAS) developed at the RATAN-600. It is a measurement facility meant for digitizing and reducing radiometer signals and for transmitting the result of these operations via Ethernet networks. ER-DAS system is shown to have a low self-noise level and to lack 1/ f-type noise. The measurement facility is shown to operate efficiently in radio-astronomical observations. Radiometric measurements of the parameters of high-sensitivity radiometers are illustrated in the case of the measurements of radiometer gain fluctuations.

  15. Characterizing foreground for redshifted 21 cm radiation: 150 MHz Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhik; Prasad, Jayanti; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Ali, Sk. Saiyad; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2012-11-01

    Foreground removal is a major challenge for detecting the redshifted 21 cm neutral hydrogen (H I) signal from the Epoch of Reionization. We have used 150 MHz Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations to characterize the statistical properties of the foregrounds in four different fields of view. The measured multifrequency angular power spectrum Cℓ(Δν) is found to have values in the range 104-2 × 104 mK2 across 700 ≤ ℓ ≤ 2 × 104 and Δν ≤ 2.5 MHz, which is consistent with model predictions where point sources are the most dominant foreground component. The measured Cℓ(Δν) does not show a smooth Δν dependence, which poses a severe difficulty for foreground removal using polynomial fitting. The observational data were used to assess point source subtraction. Considering the brightest source (˜1 Jy) in each field, we find that the residual artefacts are less than 1.5 per cent in the most sensitive field (FIELD I). Considering all the sources in the fields, we find that the bulk of the image is free of artefacts, the artefacts being localized to the vicinity of the brightest sources. We have used FIELD I, which has an rms noise of 1.3 mJy beam-1, to study the properties of the radio source population to a limiting flux of 9 mJy. The differential source count is well fitted with a single power law of slope -1.6. We find there is no evidence for flattening of the source counts towards lower flux densities which suggests that source population is dominated by the classical radio-loud active galactic nucleus. The diffuse Galactic emission is revealed after the point sources are subtracted out from FIELD I. We find Cℓ ∝ ℓ-2.34 for 253 ≤ ℓ ≤ 800 which is characteristic of the Galactic synchrotron radiation measured at higher frequencies and larger angular scales. We estimate the fluctuations in the Galactic synchrotron emission to be ℓ(ℓ+1)Cℓ/2π≃10 K at ℓ = 800 (θ > 10 arcmin). The measured Cℓ is dominated by

  16. News and Views: Research council resource allocations: managing demand; e-MERLIN radio telescope network is up and running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    The research councils discovered in December the allocation of money from the UK government's Comprehensive Spending Review, and have set out their delivery plans outlining how they will spend it. Details and decisions will follow consultation in the coming months. The first image from eMerlin, the UK's national radio astronomy facility, shows the power of the enhanced network of radio telescopes spread over 220 km and now linked by fibre optics. These links and advanced receivers will allow astronomers to see in a single day what would have previously taken them more than a year of observations.

  17. UNC SKYNET adds NRAO 20m Radio Telescope: Dynamic Research and Funding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, Glen; Hosmer, L.; Heatherly, S.; Towner, A. P.; Reichart, D.; Haipslip, J.

    2013-01-01

    The University of North Carolina (UNC) and NRAO have teamed up to deliver dynamic, realtime optical and Radio observations of the universe, using the web-based SKYNET queuing system developed at UNC. A 20m telescope is outfitted with cryogenically cooled receivers and a reprogrammable spectrometer. To get started see: http://www.gb.nrao.edu/20m/fantastic/ for connections to the observing system, educational activities and opportunities to purchase observing time. The SKYNET goal is to provide the finest research tools to high schools, colleges and independent researchers. This is accomplished through the capabilities to use existing observing modes and through reprogram the University of California, Berkeley's Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) systems for custom digital hardware development. This provides a door for engineering and computer science students to create real-time, high capability data acquisition and processing tools. We will demo the 20m observing system and its capabilities. The NSF funded this construction project with the goal of making the network self funding. We are looking for collaborators with targeted research projects wanting to take advantage of the powerful observing tools.

  18. 12 GHz Radio-Holographic Surface Measurements of the RRI 10.4~m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanyam, R.; Venkatesh, S.; Raju, S. B.

    2009-09-01

    A modern Q-band low noise amplifier (LNA) front-end is being fitted to the 10.4~m millimeter-wave telescope at the Raman Research Institute (RRI) to support observations in the 40-50~GHz frequency range. To assess the suitability of the surface for this purpose, we measured the deviations of the primary surface from an ideal paraboloid using radio holography. We used the 11.6996 GHz beacon signal from the GSAT3 satellite, a 1.2~m reference antenna, commercial Ku-band Low Noise Block Convereters (LNBC) as the receiver front-ends and a Stanford Research Systems (SRS) lock-in amplifier as the backend. The LNBCs had independent free-running first local oscillators (LO). Yet, we recovered the correlation by using a radiatively injected common tone that served as the second local oscillator. With this setup, we mapped the surface deviations on a 64 × 64 grid and measured an rms surface deviation of ˜ 350~μm with a measurement accuracy of ˜ 50~μm.

  19. Enabling a high throughput real time data pipeline for a large radio telescope array with GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, R. G.; Clark, M. A.; Dale, K.; Mitchell, D. A.; Ord, S. M.; Wayth, R. B.; Pfister, H.; Greenhill, L. J.

    2010-10-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a next-generation radio telescope currently under construction in the remote Western Australia Outback. Raw data will be generated continuously at 5 GiB s-1, grouped into 8 s cadences. This high throughput motivates the development of on-site, real time processing and reduction in preference to archiving, transport and off-line processing. Each batch of 8 s data must be completely reduced before the next batch arrives. Maintaining real time operation will require a sustained performance of around 2.5 TFLOP s-1 (including convolutions, FFTs, interpolations and matrix multiplications). We describe a scalable heterogeneous computing pipeline implementation, exploiting both the high computing density and FLOP-per-Watt ratio of modern GPUs. The architecture is highly parallel within and across nodes, with all major processing elements performed by GPUs. Necessary scatter-gather operations along the pipeline are loosely synchronized between the nodes hosting the GPUs. The MWA will be a frontier scientific instrument and a pathfinder for planned peta- and exa-scale facilities.

  20. The New ALMA Prototype 12 M Telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziurys, Lucy M.; Folkers, Thomas W.; Emerson, Nicholas J.; Freund, Robert; Lauria, Eugene F.; Forbes, David; Reiland, George P.; McColl, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) recently acquired the European 12 m prototype antenna of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) project from the European Southern Observatory (ESO). The antenna was located at the Very Large Array (VLA) site near Socorro, New Mexico. In November 2013, the 97 ton antenna was transported to Kitt Peak, Arizona in two major parts: the 40 ft. reflector and the base/receiver cabin. The antenna, which replaced the former NRAO 12 m telescope, was reassembled in the dome at Kitt Peak. Recommissioning began in January 2014, and scientific observations commenced in early 2015. The instrument is now fully operational with a measured surface accuracy of 53 microns, rms, and a pointing accuracy of 2 arc seconds. Further antenna improvements are in progress. The new 12 m currently supports a dual polarization, 3 mm receiver (84-116 GHz) with ALMA Band 3 sideband-separating mixers. A multiband receiver also covering the 4 mm (67 – 90 GHz), 2 mm (130-180 GHz) and 1 mm (210-280 GHz) regions with dual polarization, sideband-separating mixers is currently under construction. A new digital backend, the ARO Wideband Spectrometer (AROWS: 4 x 4 GHz total bandwidth ), is also in the development stage.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a radio-quiet galaxy at redshift z = 3.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giavalisco, Mauro; Macchetto, F. Duccio; Madau, Piero; Sparks, William B.

    1995-01-01

    We have observed with the Wide Field/Planetary Camera (WF/PC) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) a radio-quiet Ly alpha-emitting galaxy at redshift z = 3.428 (G2 below). The images probe the rest-frame UV light around 1250 A with an angular resolution of approx. = 0.1 sec, corresponding to 1.4 h(exp -1, sub 50) kpc at redshift z = 3.4 (in this Letter we use q(sub 0) = 0 and H(sub 0) = 50 h(exp -1, sub 50) km/s/Mpc). The light profile of the central approx. 10h(exp -1, sub 50) kpc region is well fitted by an r(exp 1/4) law with r(sub e) approx. = 1.3 h(exp -1, sub 50) kpc, suggesting a dynamically relaxed state. The outer regions are characterized by the presence of substructures, such as an elongated formation and low surface brightness nebulosities. The isophotal analysis shows no evidence of an active galactic nuclei (AGN)-like unresolved source in the center. The structural properties of G2 are consistent with a dynamically hot stellar system observed during an early phase of star formation, very likely the progenitor of an elliptical or the bulge of a spiral galaxy.

  2. Efficient Multi-Beaming for the Next Generation of Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampson, G. A.; de Wild, R.; Smolders, A. B.

    The next generation of astronomical radio telescopes will have the possibility of generating multiple beams on sky, unlike existing single beam systems. This can occur as the problem of obtaining sufficient sensitivity has been simplified by distributing the collecting area over a hierarchy of collecting elements. Technology, in the form of computing power, can take advantage of this hierarchy to form efficient multiple simultaneous beams on the sky. The theoretical foundation of the multi-beam beamformer is introduced in this paper and simulation results presented. The technique is based on the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) which results in an efficient implementation. The twiddle factors of the FFT reduce to simple 900 rotations in the case of a four point FFT. The resulting design for THEA is shown to produce nine simultaneous beams and can be implemented on a relatively small FPGA. Additional phase control is required to steer the beams across the sky and implemented using complex multipliers. It will be shown that for particular array sizes the implementation results in nine beams for the cost of one.

  3. Radioastron (Spectr-R Project)—a radio telescope much larger than the earth: main parameters and prelaunch tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Yu. A.; Andreyanov, V. V.; Babakin, N. G.; Babyshkin, V. E.; Belousov, K. G.; Belyaev, A. A.; Biryukov, A. V.; Bubnov, A. E.; Bykadorov, A. A.; Vasil'kov, V. I.; Vinogradov, I. S.; Gvamichava, A. S.; Zinoviev, A. N.; Komaev, R. V.; Kanevskiy, B. Z.; Kardashev, N. S.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Kovalev, Yu. Yu.; Kovalenko, A. V.; Korneev, Yu. A.; Kostenko, V. I.; Kreisman, B. B.; Kukushkin, A. Yu.; Larionov, M. G.; Likhachev, S. F.; Likhacheva, L. N.; Medvedev, S. Yu.; Melekhin, M. V.; Mizyakina, T. A.; Nikolaev, N. Ya.; Novikov, B. S.; Novikov, I. D.; Pavlenko, Yu. K.; Ponomarev, Yu. N.; Popov, M. V.; Pyshnov, V. N.; Rozhkov, V. M.; Sakharov, B. A.; Serebrennikov, V. A.; Smirnov, A. I.; Stepanyants, V. A.; Fedorchuk, S. D.; Shatskaya, M. V.; Sheikhet, A. I.; Shirshakov, A. E.; Yakimov, V. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Russian Academy of Sciences and the Russian Federal Space Agency are planning to launch Radioastron in 2011, which is a unique space observatory with a 10-meter reflector antenna. In conjunction with the largest ground-based radio telescopes and tracking stations, it forms the first system that will be able to carry out studies with a resolution millions of times greater than that of eyesight.

  4. Simultaneous Chandra X ray, Hubble Space Telescope Ultraviolet, and Ulysses Radio Observations of Jupiter's Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; Lugaz, N.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Cravens, T. E.; Gladstone, G. R.; Ford, P.; Grodent, D.; Bhardwaj. A.; MacDowall, R. J.; Desch, M. D. 8; Majeed, T.

    2005-01-01

    Observations of Jupiter carried out by the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-S) instrument over 24-26 February 2003 show that the auroral X-ray spectrum consists of line emission consistent with high-charge states of precipitating ions, and not a continuum as might be expected from bremsstrahlung. The part of the spectrum due to oxygen peaks around 650 eV, which indicates a high fraction of fully stripped oxygen in the precipitating ion flux. A combination of the OVIII emission lines at 653 eV and 774 eV, as well as the OVII emission lines at 561 eV and 666 eV, are evident in the measure auroral spectrum. There is also line emission at lower energies in the spectral region extending from 250 to 350 eV, which could be from sulfur and/or carbon. The Jovian auroral X-ray spectra are significantly different from the X-ray spectra of comets. The charge state distribution of the oxygen ions implied by the measured auroral X-ray spectra strongly suggests that independent of the source of the energetic ions, magnetospheric or solar wind, the ions have undergone additional acceleration. This spectral evidence for ion acceleration is also consistent with the relatively high intensities of the X rays compared with the available phase space density of the (unaccelerated) source populations of solar wind or magnetospheric ions at Jupiter, which are orders of magnitude too small to explain the observed emissions. The Chandra X-ray observations were executed simultaneously with observations at ultraviolet wavelengths by the Hubble Space Telescope and at radio wavelengths by the Ulysses spacecraft. These additional data sets suggest that the source of the X rays is magnetospheric in origin and that the precipitating particles are accelerated by strong field-aligned electric fields, which simultaneously create both the several-MeV energetic ion population and the relativistic electrons observed in situ by Ulysses that are correlated with approx.40 min quasi

  5. Tracking of Mars Express and Venus Express spacecraft with VLBI radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molera Calvés, G.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Wagner, J.; Cimò, G.; Gurvits, L.; Duev, D.

    2010-12-01

    The ESA Mars Express and Venus Express spacecraft (S/C) have been observed for the last two years with the European VLBI radio telescopes of Metsähovi (FI), Wettzell (GE), Yebes (SP), Medicina, Matera, Noto (IT), Puschino (RU) and Onsala (SW). The campaign is in the framework of the assessment study and preparation of the European VLBI Network to the upcoming ESA and other deep space missions. It also offers new opportunities for applications of radio astronomy techniques to planetary science, geophysics and geodesy. Observations are carried out either in single- or multi-dish modes when S/C is locked to the ESA’s ESTRACK ground stations (Cebreros or New Nortia) observing the two way link. Data are recorded locally at the stations using standard VLBI equipment and transferred to the Metsähovi for processing. Further on, the data are transferred from Metsähovi to Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe for further post-analysis. High dynamic range of the S/C signal detections allowed us to determine the apparent topocentric frequency of the S/C carrier line and accompanying ranging tones down to milli-Hz spectral accuracy and to extract the phase of the S/C signal carrier line. With multi-station observations, the respective phases can be calibrated on the per-baseline basis using VLBI phase referencing technique and observations of background quasars close to S/C in their celestial position using far-field VLBI delay model for quasars and near-field model for S/C. The post-analysis of the S/C tracking data enables us to study several parameters of the S/C signals. Of these, the phase fluctuations of the signal can be used for characterization of the interplanetary plasma density fluctuations along the signal propagation line at different spatial and temporal scales and different solar elongations. These fluctuations are well represented by a near-Kolmogorov spectrum. Multi-station observations can distinguish the contributions of propagation effects in the plasma

  6. a High Temperature Superconductor Microwave Filter Working in C-Band for the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolli, P.; Cresci, L.; Huang, F.; Mariotti, S.; Panella, D.

    A planar band-pass filter based on High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) has been designed for possible implementation in the cryogenic front-end of the C-band receiver for the Sardinia Radio Telescope. The band-pass filter is designed to operate at relatively high frequencies: center frequency 6.7 GHz with 30% bandwidth. Seven nominally identical filters have been fabricated to test different carrier materials and connector types aimed to keep the fabrication of the HTS filter simpler and more cost competitive. In addition to the conventional approach, silver plating, copper carriers and SMA connectors have been used. Cryogenic scattering parameter measurements show a good agreement with numerical results: the average of the transmission losses turns out to be in the range 0.15-0.25 dB depending on the prototypes, whereas the reflection coefficient is below -16 dB. The insertion loss has been also measured by using a radiometric approach based on the cold attenuator method showing consistent results with those given by the Vector Network Analyzer. Multiple cool-down measurements have been performed successfully proving the data repeatability both in short- and medium-term. Concerning alternative technical solutions, the SMA connectors and silver plating appear to be valid options whereas the copper carriers are inclined to destroy the circuit. Finally, numerical simulations and experimental measurements on a traditional copper filter operating at 20 K show that the HTS filter improves the losses of about 0.2 dB with respect to the copper one.

  7. Detection of Solar Wind Disturbances: Mexican Array Radio Telescope IPS Observations at 140 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Hernandez, E.; Gonzalez-Esparza, J. A.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ontiveros-Hernandez, V.; Villanueva-Hernandez, P.

    2015-09-01

    The interplanetary scintillation (IPS) technique is a remote-sensing method for monitoring solar-wind perturbations. The Mexican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART) is a single-station instrument operating at 140 MHz, fully dedicated to performing solar-wind studies employing the IPS technique. We report MEXART solar-wind measurements (scintillation indices and solar-wind velocities) using data obtained during the 2013 and 2014 campaigns. These solar-wind measurements were calculated employing a new methodology based on the wavelet transform (WT) function. We report the variation of the scintillation indices versus the heliocentric distance for two IPS sources (3C48 and 3C147). We found different average conditions of the solar-wind density fluctuations in 2013 and 2014. We used the fittings of the radial dependence of the scintillation index to calculate g-indices. Based on the g-index value, we identified 17 events that could be associated with strong compression regions in the solar wind. We present the first ICME identifications in our data. We associated 14 IPS events with preceding CME counterparts by employing white-light observations from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. We found that most of the IPS events, detected during the solar maximum of Cycle 24 were associated with complex CME events. For the IPS events associated with single CME counterparts, we found a deceleration tendency of the CMEs as they propagate in the interplanetary medium. These results show that the instrument detects solar-wind disturbances, and the WT methodology provides solar-wind information with good accuracy. The MEXART observations will complement solar-wind IPS studies using other frequencies, and the tracking of solar-wind disturbances by other stations located at different longitudes.

  8. The Architecture of an LWA Station - A New Phased-array Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Joseph; Rickard, L.; Ellingson, S.; Taylor, G.; Pihlstrom, Y.; Kassim, N.; Ray, P.; Clarke, T.; D'Addario, L.; Navarro, R.; Cohen, A.; Crane, P.; Hicks, B.; Polisensky, E.; Schmitt, H.; Cox, L.

    2009-05-01

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) is part of a new class of large low-frequency interferometric telescopes. The complete LWA will consist of more than 50 phased array "stations" distributed over a roughly 400 km diameter region in New Mexico. Each station will consist of 256 pairs of dipole-type antennas whose signals are formed into beams, with outputs transported to a central location for high-resolution aperture synthesis imaging. The resulting image sensitivity is estimated to be a few mJy with a resolution of 8" to 2" (20 to 80 MHz). Phase I of the LWA is nearly complete, with completion of PDR, construction of the first full station (LWA-1) in 2009-10, and operation as a stand-alone instrument in 2010. Utilizing modern FPGA computing, LWA-1 will form four independent (in both frequency and pointing) beams on the sky, and provide instantaneous bandwidths of 8 MHz per beam, spectral resolutions down to 100 Hz, and temporal resolutions down to 0.1 ms in the range of 10 to 88 MHz. Signals from 512 dipole antennas will be digitized without frequency conversion (a homodyne receiver architecture), allowing direct beam-formation of the entire LWA bandwidth. As the station will operate as a fully electronic phased array, very little repointing time is required. This will allow the beams to be cycled rapidly among many calibration sources on millisecond timescales. This scheme could provide real-time calibration of the turbulent ionospheric conditions, which limit both resolution and sensitivity at low-frequencies. The LWA Project is funded through a contract from the Office of Naval Research to the University of New Mexico. Partnering with UNM are the Naval Research Laboratory, Virginia Tech, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the University of Iowa. Basic research in radio astronomy at the Naval Research Laboratory is supported by 6.1 base funding.

  9. A real-time coherent dedispersion pipeline for the giant metrewave radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Kishalay; Gupta, Yashwant

    2016-02-01

    A fully real-time coherent dedispersion system has been developed for the pulsar back-end at the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The dedispersion pipeline uses the single phased array voltage beam produced by the existing GMRT software back-end (GSB) to produce coherently dedispersed intensity output in real time, for the currently operational bandwidths of 16 MHz and 32 MHz. Provision has also been made to coherently dedisperse voltage beam data from observations recorded on disk. We discuss the design and implementation of the real-time coherent dedispersion system, describing the steps carried out to optimise the performance of the pipeline. Presently functioning on an Intel Xeon X5550 CPU equipped with a NVIDIA Tesla C2075 GPU, the pipeline allows dispersion free, high time resolution data to be obtained in real-time. We illustrate the significant improvements over the existing incoherent dedispersion system at the GMRT, and present some preliminary results obtained from studies of pulsars using this system, demonstrating its potential as a useful tool for low frequency pulsar observations. We describe the salient features of our implementation, comparing it with other recently developed real-time coherent dedispersion systems. This implementation of a real-time coherent dedispersion pipeline for a large, low frequency array instrument like the GMRT, will enable long-term observing programs using coherent dedispersion to be carried out routinely at the observatory. We also outline the possible improvements for such a pipeline, including prospects for the upgraded GMRT which will have bandwidths about ten times larger than at present.

  10. Six millisecond pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and the radio/gamma-ray connection of millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, C. M.; Guillemot, L.; Çelik, Ö.; Weltevrede, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Smith, D. A.; Kerr, M.; Zavlin, V. E.; Cognard, I.; Eatough, R. P.; Freire, P. C. C.; Janssen, G. H.; Camilo, F.; Desvignes, G.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hou, X.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A.; Manchester, R. N.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Shannon, R.; Theureau, G.; Webb, N.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing ephemerides provided by various radio observatories. We also present confirmation of the gamma-ray pulsations from a sixth source, PSR J2051-0827. Five of these six MSPs are in binary systems: PSRs J1713+0747, J1741+1351, J1600-3053 and the two black widow binary pulsars PSRs J0610-2100 and J2051-0827. The only isolated MSP is the nearby PSR J1024-0719, which is also known to emit X-rays. We present X-ray observations in the direction of PSRs J1600-3053 and J2051-0827. While PSR J2051-0827 is firmly detected, we can only give upper limits for the X-ray flux of PSR J1600-3053. There are no dedicated X-ray observations available for the other three objects. The MSPs mentioned above, together with most of the MSPs detected by Fermi, are used to put together a sample of 30 gamma-ray MSPs. This sample is used to study the morphology and phase connection of radio and gamma-ray pulse profiles. We show that MSPs with pulsed gamma-ray emission which is phase-aligned with the radio emission present the steepest radio spectra and the largest magnetic fields at the light cylinder among all MSPs. Also, we observe a trend towards very low, or undetectable, radio linear polarization levels. These properties could be attributed to caustic radio emission produced at a range of different altitudes in the magnetosphere. We note that most of these characteristics are also observed in the Crab pulsar, the only other radio pulsar known to exhibit phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray emission.

  11. The Morehead Radio Telescope: Design and Fabrication of a Research Instrument for Undergraduate Faculty and Student Research in Radio Frequency Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malphrus, B. K.

    1996-12-01

    Faculty and students of the Departments of Physical Sciences and Industrial Education and Technology at Morehead State University have designed and assembled the Morehead Radio Telescope (MRT) to provide a research instrument for undergraduate astronomy and physics students and an active laboratory for physics, engineering, and computer science undergraduates and faculty. The instrument will function as a research and educational instrument for undergraduate students, faculty, and science teachers throughout Kentucky. The goals of the MRT program are to enhance the curricula in physics, physical science, electronics, and science education programs by serving to provide: 1.) a research instrument for investigations in astronomy and astrophysics; 2.) an active laboratory in astronomy, physics, electrical engineering, and computer science; and 3.) a research instrument and laboratory for science teacher education and inservice programs. The MRT utilizes a 40-foot parabolic reflector, a low-noise hydrogen line receiver and a fully- automated alt-azimuth positioning system. The telescope incorporates a modular design in which components may be easily removed for use in laboratory investigations and for student research and design projects. The performance characteristics of the telescope allow a varied and in-depth scientific program. The sensitivity and versatility of the telescope design facilitate the investigation of a wide variety of astrophysically interesting phenomena.

  12. Detection of GRS 1915+105 and SS 433 at 7.2 GHz and 21.4 GHz with the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egron, E.; Pellizzoni, A.; Bachetti, M.; Navarrini, A.; Trois, A.; Pilia, M.; Iacolina, M. N.; Melis, A.; Concu, R.; Loru, S.; Ballhausen, R.; Corbel, S.; Eikmann, W.; Fuerst, F.; Grinberg, V.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Marongiu, M.; Nowak, M.; Possenti, A.; Pottschmidt, K.; Rodriguez, J.; Wilms, J.

    2016-04-01

    In the frame of radio monitoring of Galactic NS/BH X-ray binaries with the Sardinia Radio Telescope (www.srt.inaf.it), we detected GRS 1915+105 and SS 433 in the C- and K-bands through single-dish on-the-fly mapping centered on the sources.

  13. A SEARCH FOR RAPIDLY SPINNING PULSARS AND FAST TRANSIENTS IN UNIDENTIFIED RADIO SOURCES WITH THE NRAO 43 METER TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Deborah; Crawford, Fronefield; Gilpin, Claire; Langston, Glen

    2013-04-15

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g., sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a different epoch with a new 800 MHz backend on the NRAO 43 m Telescope at a center frequency of 1200 MHz. Our search was sensitive to sub-millisecond pulsars in highly accelerated binary systems and to short transient pulses. No periodic or transient signals were detected from any of the target sources. We conclude that diffractive scintillation, dispersive smearing, and binary acceleration are unlikely to have prevented detection of the large majority of the sources if they are pulsars, though we cannot rule out eclipsing, nulling or intermittent emission, or radio interference as possible factors for some non-detections. Other (speculative) possibilities for what these sources might include radio-emitting magnetic cataclysmic variables or older pulsars with aligned magnetic and spin axes.

  14. Fermi Large Area Telescope Detection of Extended Gamma-Ray Emission from the Radio Galaxy Fornax A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Georganopoulos, M.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kensei, S.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Schmid, J.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, Ł.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-07-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of extended γ-ray emission from the lobes of the radio galaxy Fornax A using 6.1 years of Pass 8 data. After Centaurus A, this is now the second example of an extended γ-ray source attributed to a radio galaxy. Both an extended flat disk morphology and a morphology following the extended radio lobes were preferred over a point-source description, and the core contribution was constrained to be \\lt 14% of the total γ-ray flux. A preferred alignment of the γ-ray elongation with the radio lobes was demonstrated by rotating the radio lobes template. We found no significant evidence for variability on ˜0.5 year timescales. Taken together, these results strongly suggest a lobe origin for the γ-rays. With the extended nature of the \\gt 100 {{MeV}} γ-ray emission established, we model the source broadband emission considering currently available total lobe radio and millimeter flux measurements, as well as X-ray detections attributed to inverse Compton (IC) emission off the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Unlike the Centaurus A case, we find that a leptonic model involving IC scattering of CMB and extragalactic background light (EBL) photons underpredicts the γ-ray fluxes by factors of about ˜2–3, depending on the EBL model adopted. An additional γ-ray spectral component is thus required, and could be due to hadronic emission arising from proton–proton collisions of cosmic rays with thermal plasma within the radio lobes.

  15. Fermi Large Area Telescope Detection of Extended Gamma-Ray Emission from the Radio Galaxy Fornax A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Georganopoulos, M.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kensei, S.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Schmid, J.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, Ł.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-07-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of extended γ-ray emission from the lobes of the radio galaxy Fornax A using 6.1 years of Pass 8 data. After Centaurus A, this is now the second example of an extended γ-ray source attributed to a radio galaxy. Both an extended flat disk morphology and a morphology following the extended radio lobes were preferred over a point-source description, and the core contribution was constrained to be \\lt 14% of the total γ-ray flux. A preferred alignment of the γ-ray elongation with the radio lobes was demonstrated by rotating the radio lobes template. We found no significant evidence for variability on ∼0.5 year timescales. Taken together, these results strongly suggest a lobe origin for the γ-rays. With the extended nature of the \\gt 100 {{MeV}} γ-ray emission established, we model the source broadband emission considering currently available total lobe radio and millimeter flux measurements, as well as X-ray detections attributed to inverse Compton (IC) emission off the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Unlike the Centaurus A case, we find that a leptonic model involving IC scattering of CMB and extragalactic background light (EBL) photons underpredicts the γ-ray fluxes by factors of about ∼2–3, depending on the EBL model adopted. An additional γ-ray spectral component is thus required, and could be due to hadronic emission arising from proton–proton collisions of cosmic rays with thermal plasma within the radio lobes.

  16. Analysis of Tracking Measuring Method of Focus Cabin of Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope(FAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hui; Zhu, Lichun

    2015-08-01

    FAST (Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope) project is one of the Chinese mega-Science Projects to build the largest single dish radio telescope in the world. FAST has three outstanding innovation aspects: in the karst depression which is large to host the 500-meter telescope, an active main reflector correcting for spherical aberration on the ground to achieve a full polarization is being built, the light-weight feed focus cabin in which a parallel robot as a secondary adjustable system to move with high precision is driven by cables and servomechanism plus. The part of main reflector which is illuminated by the feed is continually adjusted to fit the paraboloid of revolution in real time when tracking the radio source. How to get high precise real-time feedback data of moving focus cabin’s position when tracking the source is one of the crucial problems for the astronomical observation.At present 24 steady basis pillars for measurement whose position coordinates are already known, have been built in the construction field of FAST. Total stations will be installed on one of those pillars, and prisms will be installed on focus cabin. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy and reliability of two measuring method: the space distance intersection calculation method and polar measuring method. The space distance intersection calculation method is only using multiple measuring distances between three pillars and prism and known coordinates of pillars to calculate the prism’s coordinates, the polar measurement is using the measuring distance and angles to get the prism’s coordinate.

  17. Antenna Performance Measurements at L, S, C, and X Bands for the TM65m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin-qing; Zhao, Rong-bing; Yu, Lin-feng; Yin, Hai-ling; Lao, Bao-qiang; Wu, Ya-jun; Li, Bin; Dong, Jian; Jiang, Yong-bin; Xia, Bo; Zuo, Xiu-ting; Gou, Wei; Guo, Wen; Wu, Xiao-cong; Lu, Xue-jiang; Liu, Qing-hui; Fan, Qing-yuan; Jiang, Dong-rong; Qian, Zhi-han

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we reported the measured results of the antenna efficiency, sensitivity, and system noise temperature of the TM65m radio telescope. The key parameters describing a radio astronomy receiving system were introduced at first. Then, we discussed the measurement methods and the measuring errors. Finally, the measured results of the antenna efficiency, sensitivity, and system noise temperature performances at the L, S, C, and X bands were given. The results show that the efficiency and SEFD (System Equivalent Flux Density) decrease dramatically at both low and high elevations when the position of the subreflector is fixed. The antenna efficiencies at the C and X bands can be raised to 60% and more in the whole elevation range when the subreflector (servo) model is activated. The system noise temperature is independent to the subreflector model. Among the four wavebands, the C-band sensitivity and system noise temperature are optimal.

  18. Measuring the Solar Magnetic Field with STEREO A Radio Transmissions: Faraday Rotation Observations using the 100m Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelski, A.; Jensen, E.; Wexler, D.; Heiles, C.; Kepley, A.; Kuiper, T.; Bisi, M.

    2016-04-01

    The STEREO mission spacecraft recently passed through superior conjunction, providing an opportunity to probe the solar corona using radio transmissions. Strong magnetic field and dense plasma environment induce Faraday rotation of the linearly polarized fraction of the spacecraft radio carrier signal. Variations in the Faraday rotation signify changes in magnetic field components and plasma parameters, and thus can be used to gain understanding processes of the quiescent sun as well as active outbursts including coronal mass ejections. Our 2015 observing campaign resulted in a series of measurements over several months with the 100m Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to investigate the coronal Faraday rotation at various radial distances. These observations reveal notable fluctuations in the Faraday rotation of the signal in the deep corona, and should yield unique insights into coronal magnetohydrodynamics down to a 1.5 solar radius line-of-sight solar elongation.

  19. A Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope Multifrequency Radio Study of the Isothermal Core of the Poor Galaxy Cluster AWM 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacintucci, Simona; Vrtilek, Jan M.; Murgia, Matteo; Raychaudhury, Somak; O'Sullivan, Ewan J.; Venturi, Tiziana; David, Laurence P.; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Clarke, Tracy E.; Athreya, Ramana M.

    2008-07-01

    We present a detailed radio morphological study and spectral analysis of the wide-angle tail radio source 4C +24.36 associated with the dominant galaxy in the relaxed galaxy cluster AWM 4. Our study is based on new high-sensitivity GMRT observations at 235, 327, and 610 MHz and on literature and archival data at other frequencies. We find that the source major axis is likely oriented at a small angle with respect to the plane of the sky. The wide-angle tail morphology can be reasonably explained by adopting a simple hydrodynamical model in which both ram pressure (driven by the motion of the host galaxy) and buoyancy forces contribute to bend the radio structure. The spectral index progressively steepens along the source major axis from α ~ 0.3 in the region close to the radio nucleus to beyond 1.5 in the lobes. The results of the analysis of the spectral index image allow us to derive an estimate of the radiative age of the source of ~160 Myr. The cluster X-ray-emitting gas has a relaxed morphology and short cooling time, but its temperature profile is isothermal out to at least 160 kpc from the center. Therefore, we seek evidence of energy ejection from the central AGN to prevent catastrophic cooling. We find that the energy injected by 4C +24.36 in the form of synchrotron luminosity during its lifetime is far less than the energy required to maintain the high gas temperature in the core. We also find that it is not possible for the central source to eject the requisite energy in the intracluster gas in terms of the enthalpy of buoyant bubbles of relativistic fluid, without creating discernible large cavities in the existing X-ray XMM-Newton observations.

  20. Dynamic scheduling and planning parallel observations on large Radio Telescope Arrays with the Square Kilometre Array in mind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Johannes

    2011-12-01

    Scheduling, the task of producing a time table for resources and tasks, is well-known to be a difficult problem the more resources are involved (a NP-hard problem). This is about to become an issue in Radio astronomy as observatories consisting of hundreds to thousands of telescopes are planned and operated. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which Australia and New Zealand bid to host, is aiming for scales where current approaches -- in construction, operation but also scheduling -- are insufficent. Although manual scheduling is common today, the problem is becoming complicated by the demand for (1) independent sub-arrays doing simultaneous observations, which requires the scheduler to plan parallel observations and (2) dynamic re-scheduling on changed conditions. Both of these requirements apply to the SKA, especially in the construction phase. We review the scheduling approaches taken in the astronomy literature, as well as investigate techniques from human schedulers and today's observatories. The scheduling problem is specified in general for scientific observations and in particular on radio telescope arrays. Also taken into account is the fact that the observatory may be oversubscribed, requiring the scheduling problem to be integrated with a planning process. We solve this long-term scheduling problem using a time-based encoding that works in the very general case of observation scheduling. This research then compares algorithms from various approaches, including fast heuristics from CPU scheduling, Linear Integer Programming and Genetic algorithms, Branch-and-Bound enumeration schemes. Measures include not only goodness of the solution, but also scalability and re-scheduling capabilities. In conclusion, we have identified a fast and good scheduling approach that allows (re-)scheduling difficult and changing problems by combining heuristics with a Genetic algorithm using block-wise mutation operations. We are able to explain and eradicate two problems in the

  1. Terrestrial monitoring of a radio telescope reference point using comprehensive uncertainty budgeting. Investigations during CONT14 at the Onsala Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösler, Michael; Haas, Rüdiger; Eschelbach, Cornelia

    2016-05-01

    During the 15-day-long global very long baseline interferometry campaign CONT14, a terrestrial monitoring campaign was carried out at the Onsala Space Observatory. The goal of these efforts was to monitor the reference point of the Onsala 20 m radio telescope during normal telescope operations. Parts of the local site network as well as a number of reflectors that were mounted on the 20 m radio telescope were observed in an automated and continual way using the in-house-developed software package HEIMDALL. The analysis of the observed data was performed using a new concept for a coordinate-based network adjustment to allow the full adjustment process in a true Cartesian global reference frame. The Akaike Information Criterion was used to select the preferable functional model for the network adjustment. The comprehensive stochastic model of this network adjustment process considers over 25 parameters, and, to describe the persistence of the observations performed during the monitoring with a very high measurement frequency, includes also time-dependent covariances. In total 15 individual solutions for the radio telescope reference point were derived, based on monitoring observations during the normal operation of the radio telescope. Since the radio telescope was moving continually, the influence of timing errors was studied and considered in the adjustment process. Finally, recursive filter techniques were introduced to combine the 15 individual solutions. Accuracies at the sub-millimeter level could be achieved for the radio telescope reference point. Thus, the presented monitoring concept fulfills the requirement proposed by the global geodetic observing system.

  2. a Simulation Tool Assisting the Design of a Close Range Photogrammetry System for the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffa, F.; Pinna, A.; Sanna, G.

    2016-06-01

    The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) is a 64 m diameter antenna, whose primary mirror is equipped with an active surface capable to correct its deformations by means of a thick network of actuators. Close range photogrammetry (CRP) was used to measure the self-load deformations of the SRT primary reflector from its optimal shape, which are requested to be minimized for the radio telescope to operate at full efficiency. In the attempt to achieve such performance, we conceived a near real-time CRP system which requires the cameras to be installed in fixed positions and at the same time to avoid any interference with the antenna operativeness. The design of such system is not a trivial task, and to assist our decision we therefore developed a simulation pipeline to realistically reproduce and evaluate photogrammetric surveys of large structures. The described simulation environment consists of (i) a detailed description of the SRT model, included the measurement points and the camera parameters, (ii) a tool capable of generating realistic images accordingly to the above model, and (iii) a self-calibrating bundle adjustment to evaluate the performance in terms of RMSE of the camera configurations.

  3. System and method for phase retrieval for radio telescope and antenna control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed herein are systems, methods, and non-transitory computer-readable storage media for radio phase retrieval. A system practicing the method gathers first data from radio waves associated with an object observed via a first aperture, gathers second data from radio waves associated with the object observed via an introduced second aperture associated with the first aperture, generates reduced noise data by incoherently subtracting the second data from the first data, and performs phase retrieval for the radio waves by modeling the reduced noise data using a single Fourier transform. The first and second apertures are at different positions, such as side by side. This approach can include determining a value Q which represents a ratio of wavelength times a focal ratio divided by pixel spacing. This information can be used to accurately measure and correct alignment errors or other optical system flaws in the apertures.

  4. Infrared-faint radio sources are at high redshifts. Spectroscopic redshift determination of infrared-faint radio sources using the Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Sharp, R.; Spitler, L. R.; Parker, Q. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are characterised by relatively high radio flux densities and associated faint or even absent infrared and optical counterparts. The resulting extremely high radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousands were previously known only for high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs), suggesting a link between the two classes of object. However, the optical and infrared faintness of IFRS makes their study difficult. Prior to this work, no redshift was known for any IFRS in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) fields which would help to put IFRS in the context of other classes of object, especially of HzRGs. Aims: This work aims at measuring the first redshifts of IFRS in the ATLAS fields. Furthermore, we test the hypothesis that IFRS are similar to HzRGs, that they are higher-redshift or dust-obscured versions of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of IFRS was spectroscopically observed using the Focal Reducer and Low Dispersion Spectrograph 2 (FORS2) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The data were calibrated based on the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF) and redshifts extracted from the final spectra, where possible. This information was then used to calculate rest-frame luminosities, and to perform the first spectral energy distribution modelling of IFRS based on redshifts. Results: We found redshifts of 1.84, 2.13, and 2.76, for three IFRS, confirming the suggested high-redshift character of this class of object. These redshifts and the resulting luminosities show IFRS to be similar to HzRGs, supporting our hypothesis. We found further evidence that fainter IFRS are at even higher redshifts. Conclusions: Considering the similarities between IFRS and HzRGs substantiated in this work, the detection of IFRS, which have a significantly higher sky density than HzRGs, increases the number of active galactic nuclei in the early universe and adds to the problems of explaining the formation of

  5. Discovery of the Millisecond Pulsar PSR J2043+1711 in a Fermi Source with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Cognard, I.; Johnson, T. J.; Takahashi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Desvignes, G.; Camilo, F.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; Janssen, G. H.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Kramer, M.; Parent, D.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Smith, D. A.; Stappers, W.; Theureau, G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar PSR J2043+1711 in a search of a Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source with no known associations, with the Nancay Radio Telescope. The new pulsar, confirmed with the Green Bank Telescope, has a spin period of 2.38 ms, is relatively nearby (d approx. < 2 kpc) and is in a 1.48-d orbit around a low-mass companion, probably an He-type white dwarf. Using an ephemeris based on Arecibo, Nancay and Westerbork timing measurements, pulsed gamma-ray emission was detected in the data recorded by the Fermi LAT. The gamma-ray light curve and spectral properties are typical of other gamma-ray millisecond pulsars seen with Fermi. X-ray observations of the pulsar with Suzaku and the Swift X-ray Telescope yielded no detection. At 1.4 GHz, we observe strong flux density variations because of interstellar diffractive scintillation; however, a sharp peak can be observed at this frequency during bright scintillation states. At 327 MHz, the pulsar is detected with a much higher signal-to-noise ratio and its flux density is far more steady. However, at that frequency the Arecibo instrumentation cannot yet fully resolve the pulse profile. Despite that, our pulse time-of-arrival measurements have a post-fit residual rms of 2 micro s. This and the expected stability of this system have made PSR J2043+1711 one of the first new Fermi-selected millisecond pulsars to be added to pulsar gravitational wave timing arrays. It has also allowed a significant measurement of relativistic delays in the times of arrival of the pulses due to the curvature of space-time near the companion, but not yet with enough precision to derive useful masses for the pulsar and the companion. Nevertheless, a mass for the pulsar between 1.7 and 2.0 solar Mass can be derived if a standard millisecond pulsar formation model is assumed. In this paper, we also present a comprehensive summary of pulsar searches in Fermi LAT sources with the Nancay Radio Telescope to date.

  6. A Radio Synoptic Survey Telescope for the Next Decade and Beyond: A Square-Kilometer Array Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Steven T.

    2007-12-01

    The "Radio Synoptic Survey Telescope” (RSST) is a concept being developed in the US, in collaboration with the International SKA partners, as a proposal for a mid-frequency Square Kilometer Array (SKA) . This poster presents a preliminary sketch of the concept meant to encourage community feedback. The RSST would have the sensitivity to detect HI in normal galaxies out to a redshift z>1.5 (requiring a "square kilometer” of collecting area or more). It would also have high continuum polarimetric sensitivity for deep imaging and AGN studies. The core frequency coverage is proposed to be 0.4-1.4 GHz to cover HI to z=2.5 (a "Hydrogen Cosmological Evolution Telescope") with the possibility of extension of the upper frequency limit to 3 GHz or higher (a "Gravity Astrophysics Telescope"). Evaluation and costing of the various options will be an area of focus in the next few years. The RSST would operate primarily in Synoptic Survey mode, with the majority of the observing time ( 75% or more) devoted to large surveys that scan the sky on day to week cadences. There would likely be 10%-25% of time available for follow-up targeted observations and general observer projects. Examples of key surveys include (but are not exclusive to): (1) Cosmological HI Large Deep Survey; (2) Deep Continuum Survey; and a (3) Transient Monitoring Program. These surveys would be largely commensal, and would consist of sub-surveys of different regions to different depths. Science targets include "billion galaxy” cosmological redshift surveys (e.g. Baryon Acoustic Oscillations for dark energy studies), HI evolution studies, rotation measure surveys, radio supernova and GRB searches, pulsar searches and studies, and the discovery of new phenomena. Preliminary designs are based on development underway by the US-SKA consortium, the International SKA, and the general US radio astronomy community.

  7. Improved flux limits for neutrinos with energies above 10(22) eV from observations with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope.

    PubMed

    Scholten, O; Buitink, S; Bacelar, J; Braun, R; de Bruyn, A G; Falcke, H; Singh, K; Stappers, B; Strom, R G; al Yahyaoui, R

    2009-11-01

    Particle cascades initiated by ultrahigh energy neutrinos in the lunar regolith will emit an electromagnetic pulse with a time duration of the order of nanoseconds through a process known as the Askaryan effect. It has been shown that in an observing window around 150 MHz there is a maximum chance for detecting this radiation with radio telescopes commonly used in astronomy. In 50 h of observation time with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope array we have set a new limit on the flux of neutrinos, summed over all flavors, with energies in excess of 4x10(22) eV. PMID:20365914

  8. Optical properties of high-frequency radio sources from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Ekers, Ronald D.; Bannister, Keith W.; Chhetri, Rajan; Hancock, Paul J.; Johnston, Helen M.; Massardi, Marcella; Murphy, Tara

    2011-11-01

    Our current understanding of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) comes predominantly from studies at frequencies of 5 GHz and below. With the recent completion of the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey, we can now gain insight into the high-frequency radio properties of AGN. This paper presents supplementary information on the AT20G sources in the form of optical counterparts and redshifts. Optical counterparts were identified using the SuperCOSMOS data base and redshifts were found from either the 6dF Galaxy Survey or the literature. We also report 144 new redshifts. For AT20G sources outside the Galactic plane, 78.5 per cent have optical identifications and 30.9 per cent have redshift information. The optical identification rate also increases with increasing flux density. Targets which had optical spectra available were examined to obtain a spectral classification. There appear to be two distinct AT20G populations; the high luminosity quasars that are generally associated with point-source optical counterparts and exhibit strong emission lines in the optical spectrum, and the lower luminosity radio galaxies that are generally associated with passive galaxies in both the optical images and spectroscopic properties. It is suggested that these different populations can be associated with different accretion modes (cold-mode or hot-mode). We find that the cold-mode sources have a steeper spectral index and produce more luminous radio lobes, but generally reside in smaller host galaxies than their hot-mode counterparts. This can be attributed to the fact that they are accreting material more efficiently. Lastly, we compare the AT20G survey with the S-cubed semi-empirical (S3-SEX) models and conclude that the S3-SEX models need refining to correctly model the compact cores of AGN. The AT20G survey provides the ideal sample to do this.

  9. GIANT METREWAVE RADIO TELESCOPE DETECTION OF TWO NEW H I 21 cm ABSORBERS AT z ≈ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kanekar, N.

    2014-12-20

    I report the detection of H I 21 cm absorption in two high column density damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs) at z ≈ 2 using new wide-band 250-500 MHz receivers on board the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. The integrated H I 21 cm optical depths are 0.85 ± 0.16 km s{sup –1} (TXS1755+578) and 2.95 ± 0.15 km s{sup –1} (TXS1850+402). For the z = 1.9698 DLA toward TXS1755+578, the difference in H I 21 cm and C I profiles and the weakness of the radio core suggest that the H I 21cm absorption arises toward radio components in the jet, and that the optical and radio sightlines are not the same. This precludes an estimate of the DLA spin temperature. For the z = 1.9888 DLA toward TXS1850+402, the absorber covering factor is likely to be close to unity, as the background source is extremely compact, with the entire 5 GHz emission arising from a region of ≤ 1.4 mas in size. This yields a DLA spin temperature of T{sub s} = (372 ± 18) × (f/1.0) K, lower than typical T{sub s} values in high-z DLAs. This low spin temperature and the relatively high metallicity of the z = 1.9888 DLA ([Zn/H] =(– 0.68 ± 0.04)) are consistent with the anti-correlation between metallicity and spin temperature that has been found earlier in damped Lyα systems.

  10. A New Astronomical Facility for Peru: Converting a Telecommunication's 32 Meter Parabolic Antenna into a Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitsuka, J. K.; Ishitsuka, M.; Inoue, M.; Kaifu, N.; Miyama, S.; Tsuboi, M.; Ohishi, M.; Fujisawa, K.; Kasuga, T.; Kondo, T.; Horiuchi, S.; Umemoto, T.; Miyoshi, M.; Miyazawa, K.; Bushimata, T.; Vidal, E. D.

    2006-08-01

    In 1984 Nippon Electric Company constructed an INTELSAT antenna at 3,370 meters above the sea level on the Peruvian Andes. Entel Peru, the Peruvian telecommunications company, managed the antenna station until 1993. This year the government transferred the station to a private telecommunications company, Telefónica del Peru. Since the satellite communications were rapidly replaced by transoceanic fiber optics, the beautiful 32 meters parabolic antenna has been unused since 2002.. In cooperation with the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan we began to convert the antenna into a radio telescope. Because researches on interstellar medium around Young Stellar Objects (YSO) will be able to observe the methanol masers that emit at 6.7 GHz, initially we will monitor the 6.7 GHz methanol masers and survey the southern sky. An ambient temperature receiver with Trx= 60 K was developed at Nobeyama Radio Observatory and is ready to be installed. The antenna control system is the Field System FS9 software installed in a Linux PC. An interface between the antenna and the PC was developed at Kashima Space Research Center in Japan. In the near future we plan to install the 2 GHz, 8 GHz, 12 GHz and 22 GHz receivers. The unique location and altitude of the Peruvian Radio Observatory will be useful for VLBI observations in collaboration with global arrays such as the VLBA array for astronomical observation and geodetic measurements. For Peru where few or almost no astronomical observational instruments are available for research, the implementation of the first radio observatory is a big and challenging step, and foster sciences at graduate and postgraduate levels of universities. Worldwide telecommunications antennas possibly are unused and with relative few investment could be transformed into a useful observational instrument.

  11. Ray-tracing and physical-optics analysis of the aperture efficiency in a radio telescope.

    PubMed

    Olmi, Luca; Bolli, Pietro

    2007-07-01

    The performance of telescope systems working at microwave or visible-IR wavelengths is typically described in terms of different parameters according to the wavelength range. Most commercial ray-tracing packages have been specifically designed for use with visible-IR systems and thus, though very flexible and sophisticated, do not provide the appropriate parameters to fully describe microwave antennas and to compare with specifications. We demonstrate that the Strehl ratio is equal to the phase efficiency when the apodization factor is taken into account. The phase efficiency is the most critical contribution to the aperture efficiency of an antenna and the most difficult parameter to optimize during the telescope design. The equivalence between the Strehl ratio and the phase efficiency gives the designer/user of the telescope the opportunity to use the faster commercial ray-tracing software to optimize the design. We also discuss the results of several tests performed to check the validity of this relationship that we carried out using a ray-tracing software, ZEMAX, and a full Physical Optics software, GRASP9.3, applied to three different telescope designs that span a factor of approximately 10 in terms of D/lambda. The maximum measured discrepancy between phase efficiency and Strehl ratio varies between approximately 0.4% and 1.9% up to an offset angle of >40 beams, depending on the optical configuration, but it is always less than 0.5% where the Strehl ratio is >0.95. PMID:17571151

  12. Big-Data Perspective to Operating an SKA-Type Synthesis Array Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugha Sundaram, GA

    2015-08-01

    Of the two forerunner sites, viz. Australia and South Africa, where pioneering advancements to state-of-the-art in synthesis array radio astronomy instrumentation are being attempted in the form of pathfinders to the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), for its eventual deployment, a diversity of site-dependent topology and design metrics exists. Towards addressing some of the fundamental mysteries in physics at the micro- and macro-cosm levels, that form the Key Science Projects (KSPs) for the SKA, and interfacing them to an optimally designed array conguration, a critical evaluation of their radio imaging capabilities and metrics becomes paramount. Here, the various KSPs and instrument design specifications are discussed, for relative merits and adaptability to either site, from invoking well-founded and established array-design and optimization principles designed into a customized software tool. Since the problem of array design is one that encompasses variables on several scales such as separation distances between the radio interferometric pair (termed the baseline), factors such as redundancy, flux and phase calibration, bandwidth, integration time, clock synchronization for the correlation process at the detector, and many other ambient-defined parameters, there is a significant component of big data involved in the complex visibilities that are to be Fourier transformed from the spatial to the radio-sky domain (to generate a radio sky map) using vast computational infrastructure, with robust data connectivity and data handling facilities to support this. A crucial requirement exists to make the general public aware of the implications of such a massive scale scientific and technological venture, which shall be the focus of this presentation.

  13. Low-noise room-temperature and cryogenic mixers for 80-120 GHz. [design for use on radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of two new mixers designed to operate in the 80-120-GHz range on 36-ft radio telescope. It is shown that for a hard-driven diode the parasitic resistance and capacitance are the primary factors influencing the design of the diode mount. A room-temperature mixer is described which achieves a single-sideband (SSB) conversion loss (L) of 5.5 dB, and a SSB noise temperature (Tm) of 500 K (excluding the IF contribution) with a 1.4-GHz IF. A cryogenically cooled version, using a quartz structure to support the diode chip and contact whisker, achieves values of L = 5.8 dB and Tm = 300 K with a 4.75-GHz IF. The mixers use high-quality Schottky-barrier diodes in a one-quarter-height waveguide mount.

  14. Development of the remote diagnosis system of the solar radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Susumu; Shinohara, Noriyuki; Sekiguchi, Hideaki

    2005-04-01

    "The remote diagnosis system" which we have developed is the one to monitor the operation conditions of two systems of solar radio observation (Nobeyama Radioheliograph and Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters) from the remote place. Under the condition of very limited human power, it is necessary to minimize the load of observers without degrading data quality. Thereupon, we have mulled measures to alleviate the load of observers, and worked out "the remote diagnosis system" which enables us to monitor the operation conditions and detect troubles, if any, in early stages, even if we are away from the observatory building where control system are concentrated. The plan was materialized by adopting an access through the INTERNET to the section where needed information for diagnosis is gathered.

  15. Analysis of the GPS Observations of the Site Survey at Sheshan 25-m Radio Telescope in August 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, L.; Cheng, Z. Y.; Li, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    The processing of the GPS observations of the site survey at Sheshan 25-m radio telescope in August 2008 is reported. Because each session in this survey is only about six hours, not allowing the subdaily high frequency variations in the station coordinates to be reasonably smoothed, and because there are serious cycle slips in the observations and a large volume of data would be rejected during the software automatic adjustment of slips, the ordinary solution settings of GAMIT needed to be adjusted by loosening the constraints in the a priori coordinates to 10 m, adopting the "quick" mode in the solution iteration, and combining Cview manual operation with GAMIT automatic fixing of cycle slips. The resulting coordinates of the local control polygon in ITRF2005 are then compared with conventional geodetic results. Due to large rotations and translations in the two sets of coordinates (geocentric versus quasi-topocentric), the seven transformation parameters cannot be solved for directly. With various trial solutions it is shown that with a partial pre-removal of the large parameters, high precision transformation parameters can be obtained with post-fit residuals at the millimeter level. This analysis is necessary to prepare the follow-on site and transformation survey of the VLBI and SLR telescopes at Sheshan

  16. Providing hydrogen maser timing stability to orbiting VLBI radio telescope observations by post-measurement compensation of linked frequency standard imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springett, James C.

    1994-01-01

    Orbiting VLBI (OVLBI) astronomical observations are based upon measurements acquired simultaneously from ground-based and earth-orbiting radio telescopes. By the mid-1990s, two orbiting VLBI observatories, Russia's Radioastron and Japan's VSOP, will augment the worldwide VLBI network, providing baselines to earth radio telescopes as large as 80,000 km. The challenge for OVLBI is to effectuate space to ground radio telescope data cross-correlation (the observation) to a level of integrity currently achieved between ground radio telescopes. VLBI radio telescopes require ultrastable frequency and timing references in order that long term observations may be made without serious cross-correlation loss due to frequency source drift and phase noise. For this reason, such instruments make use of hydrogen maser frequency standards. Unfortunately, space-qualified hydrogen maser oscillators are currently not available for use on OVLBI satellites. Thus, the necessary long-term stability needed by the orbiting radio telescope may only be obtained by microwave uplinking a ground-based hydrogen maser derived frequency to the satellite. Although the idea of uplinking the frequency standard intrinsically seems simple, there are many 'contaminations' which degrade both the long and short term stability of the transmitted reference. Factors which corrupt frequency and timing accuracy include additive radio and electronic circuit thermal noise, slow or systematic phase migration due to changes of electronic circuit temporal operating conditions (especially temperature), ionosphere and troposphere induced scintillations, residual Doppler-incited components, and microwave signal multipath propagation. What is important, though, is to realize that ultimate stability does not have to be achieved in real-time. Instead, information needed to produce a high degree of coherence in the subsequent cross-correlation operation may be derived from a two-way coherent radio link, recorded and later

  17. Bent-tailed radio sources in the australia telescope large area survey of the Chandra deep field south

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghan, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, supplemented by the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South. Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 BT sources, 4 diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (1 relic, 2 halos, and 1 unclassified object), and a further 7 complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range 10{sup 22} ≤ P {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} ≤ 10{sup 26} W Hz{sup –1}, with redshifts up to 2 and linear extents from tens of kiloparsecs up to about 1 Mpc. This is the first systematic study of such sources down to such low powers and high redshifts and demonstrates the complementary nature of searches in deep, limited area surveys as compared to shallower, large surveys. Of the sources presented here, one is the most distant BT source yet detected at a redshift of 2.1688. Two of the sources are found to be associated with known clusters: a wide-angle tail source in A3141 and a putative radio relic which appears at the infall region between the galaxy group MZ 00108 and the galaxy cluster AMPCC 40. Further observations are required to confirm the relic detection, which, if successful, would demonstrate this to be the least powerful relic yet seen with P {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} = 9 × 10{sup 22} W Hz{sup –1}. Using these data, we predict future 1.4 GHz all-sky surveys with a resolution of ∼10 arcsec and a sensitivity of 10 μJy will detect of the order of 560,000 extended low-surface-brightness radio sources of which 440,000 will have a BT morphology.

  18. Bent-tailed Radio Sources in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey of the Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, supplemented by the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South. Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 BT sources, 4 diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (1 relic, 2 halos, and 1 unclassified object), and a further 7 complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range 1022 <= P 1.4 GHz <= 1026 W Hz-1, with redshifts up to 2 and linear extents from tens of kiloparsecs up to about 1 Mpc. This is the first systematic study of such sources down to such low powers and high redshifts and demonstrates the complementary nature of searches in deep, limited area surveys as compared to shallower, large surveys. Of the sources presented here, one is the most distant BT source yet detected at a redshift of 2.1688. Two of the sources are found to be associated with known clusters: a wide-angle tail source in A3141 and a putative radio relic which appears at the infall region between the galaxy group MZ 00108 and the galaxy cluster AMPCC 40. Further observations are required to confirm the relic detection, which, if successful, would demonstrate this to be the least powerful relic yet seen with P 1.4 GHz = 9 × 1022 W Hz-1. Using these data, we predict future 1.4 GHz all-sky surveys with a resolution of ~10 arcsec and a sensitivity of 10 μJy will detect of the order of 560,000 extended low-surface-brightness radio sources of which 440,000 will have a BT morphology.

  19. Evaluation Of Damage And Deformation Of Rt-32 Radio Telescope / Radioteleeskopa Rt-32 Deformācijas Un Bojājumu Novērtējums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffe, R.; Jěkabsons, N.; Běrziņš, A.; Klapers, M.; Upnere, S.

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of the work was to analyze the operation of the large radio telescope RT-32 at the Ventspils International Radio Astronomy Centre (VIRAC). The analysis has been performed in order to evaluate dimensional changes in the RT- 32 structural base due to reorientation of the antenna mirror. Three different orientations of the dish were considered, and the dimensional changes in the load carrying substructure were measured. The measurements were made to estimate possible effect of the geometrical changes of the antenna due to gravitational loads on the overall performance of the radio telescope with respect to the obtained astronomical results, their accuracy and validity. Comprehensive mapping and classification of the corrosive damage of steel elements in the antenna have been done. A preliminary numerical analysis by the finite element method was carried out to demonstrate the overall effect of the damaged steel beams on the geometrical distortion of the antenna surface.

  20. Digital Signal Processing for Large Radio Telescopes: The Challenge of Power Consumption and How To Solve It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addario, Larry

    2014-04-01

    Radio astronomy is on the verge of a huge expansion of capabilities as we move toward the SKA era. This is happening in three ways simultaneously: building more collecting aperture; increasing field of view to support surveys, sometimes covering the entire sky at once; and increasing instantaneous bandwidth from 30% (original VLA) to 300%. All of these put increased demands on the signal processing needed to combine and analyze the signals so as to produce products that facilitate scientific interpretation. A straightforward scaling of what has previously been done leads to machines that are not only large and expensive, but that consume more power than can be provided within a reasonable telescope operating budget. For example, the largest correlator so far built is that of the ALMA telescope in Chile. It handles N=64 antennas at a bandwidth of B=8 GHz and consumes about 65 kW (correlation only). If the same technology were used to build a correlator for N=3000, B=1 GHz, and 100 simultaneous beams, as is desired in SKA Phase 2, it would use about 1.8 GW. At present rates, that power would cost more than $2 billion per year. That does not include power to drive the antennas nor for post-correlation processing. This paper discusses only the digital electronics of a large telescope, starting at the A-to-D converters and including filter banks, beam formers, and correlators. It is shown that their power consumption can be reduced to a small fraction of the total used by the telescope. We get some help from Moore's Law, but it is not nearly enough; two more things must be done. First, careful attention must be paid to the signal processing architecture so as to minimize power-wasting operations. It turns out that much more power is used to move data from place to place and to store and retrieve it in temporary buffers than for arithmetic operations. Minimizing power does not necessarily minimize construction cost, but it is likely to minimize life-cycle cost. Second

  1. Deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a compact radio galaxy at z = 2.390

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, Rogier; Mathis, Douglas F.; Keel, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The radio galaxy with the highest redshift in the Leiden-Berkeley Deep Survey, 53W002, is described and examined in terms of UV profile in relation to an early-type galaxy. The HST WFC images have a resolution of 0.2 arcsec FWHM, and the I- and V-band structures are assessed. The source is elongated in a manner similar to the Ly alpha cloud in V, and the structure is highly compact in I. The present object with a young starburst has very high central UV surface brightnesses relative to nearby luminous early-type galaxies, while the light profiles are similar. The data are concluded to suggest that 53W002 is a young galaxy that has a regular light profile at z = 2.390 even though it has been forming stars since not more than about 0.5 Gyr before z = 2.390. Such a scenario is consistent with concurrent dynamical collapse and star formation in the compact radio galaxy.

  2. Direct imaging of planetary systems with a ground-based radio telescope array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Dayton L.

    1994-01-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory's proposed Millimeter Array (MMA) will bring unprecedented sensitivity, angular resolution, and image dynamic range to the millimeter wavelength region of the spectrum. An obvious question is whether such an instrument could be used to detect planets orbiting nearby stars. The techniques of aperture synthesis imaging developed for centimeter wavelength radio arrays are capable of producing images whose dynamic ranges greatly exceed the brightness ratio of a solar-type star and a Jupiter-like planet at sub-millimeter or millimeter wavelengths. The angular resolution required to separate a star and planet at a few pc distance can be obtained with baselines of several km. The greatest challenge is sensitivity. At the highest possible observing frequencies (approximately 300 GHz for typical high, dry sites, and approximately 900 GHz from the Antarctic plateau), the proposed MMA will be unable to detect the thermal emission from a Jupiter-like planet a few pc away. An upgraded MMA operating near 300 GHz with twice the currently proposed number of antennas, a 20% fractional bandwidth, and improved receivers could detect Jupiter at 4 pc in a few months. Building such an array on the Antarctic plateau and operating at approximately 900 GHz would allow Jupiter at 4 pc to be detected in approximately one day of observing time.

  3. Computer-aided design of reflector antennas - The Green Bank Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Marco A. B.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the electrical performance of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) reflector antenna, operating as single- and dual-offset configurations, as well as a general overview of the GBT system. The GBT dual-offset Gregorian configuration is designed for low cross polarization (XPOL) using the dual-offset reflector antenna (DORA) synthesis package code. The procedure implemented in DORA to upgrade an existing main reflector to a low cross-polarized dual-offset Gregorian reflector antenna is also described. All computed patterns were obtained with the parabolic reflector analysis code (PRAC) program, and with the commercial code GRASP7. The GBT radiation patterns and performance values indicate that low XPOL performance can be achieved with a dual-offset configuration, provided that a low XPOL feed is used. The GBT configuration is employed as a case example for the aforementioned procedure.

  4. The low-noise 115-GHz receiver on the Columbia-GISS 4-ft radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cong, H.-I.; Kerr, A. R.; Mattauch, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The superheterodyne millimeter-wave radiometer on the Columbia-GISS 4-ft telescope is described. This receiver uses a room-temperature Schottky diode mixer, with a resonant-ring filter as LO diplexer. The diplexer has low signal loss, efficient LO power coupling, and suppresses most of the LO noise at both sidebands. The receiver IF section has a parametric amplifier as its first stage with sufficient gain to overcome the second-stage amplifier noise. A broad-banded quarter-wave impedance transformer minimizes the mismatch between mixer and paramp. At 115 GHz, the SSB receiver noise temperature is 860 K, which is believed to be the lowest figure so far reported for a room-temperature receiver at this frequency.

  5. Radio continuum observations of local star-forming galaxies using the Caltech Continuum Backend on the green bank telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Rabidoux, Katie; Pisano, D. J.; Kepley, Amanda A.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Balser, Dana S.

    2014-01-01

    We observed radio continuum emission in 27 local (D < 70 Mpc) star-forming galaxies with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope between 26 GHz and 40 GHz using the Caltech Continuum Backend. We obtained detections for 22 of these galaxies at all four sub-bands and four more marginal detections by taking the average flux across the entire bandwidth. This is the first detection (full or marginal) at these frequencies for 22 of these galaxies. We fit spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all of the four sub-band detections. For 14 of the galaxies, SEDs were best fit by a combination of thermal free-free and nonthermal synchrotron components. Eight galaxies with four sub-band detections had steep spectra that were only fit by a single nonthermal component. Using these fits, we calculated supernova rates, total number of equivalent O stars, and star formation rates within each ∼23'' beam. For unresolved galaxies, these physical properties characterize the galaxies' recent star formation on a global scale. We confirm that the radio-far-infrared correlation holds for the unresolved galaxies' total 33 GHz flux regardless of their thermal fractions, though the scatter on this correlation is larger than that at 1.4 GHz. In addition, we found that for the unresolved galaxies, there is an inverse relationship between the ratio of 33 GHz flux to total far-infrared flux and the steepness of the galaxy's spectral index between 1.4 GHz and 33 GHz. This relationship could be an indicator of the timescale of the observed episode of star formation.

  6. The NIF 4.5-m nTOF Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, M J; Bond, E J; Clancy, T J; Eckart, M J; Khater, H Y; Glebov, V Y

    2012-05-07

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator/photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring DD and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield benchmarks from below 1E9 (DD) to nearly 1E15 (DT). The detectors demonstrated DT yield measurement precisions better than 5%, but the absolute accuracy relies on cross calibration with independent measurements of absolute neutron yield. The 4.5-m nTOF data have provided a useful testbed for testing improvements in nTOF data processing, especially with respect to improving the accuracies of the detector impulse response functions. The resulting improvements in data analysis methods have produced more accurate results. In summary, results from the NIF 4.5-m nTOF detectors have provided consistent measurements of DD and DT neutron yields from laser-fusion implosions.

  7. The Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestage, R. M.; Constantikes, K. T.; Hunter, T. R.; King, L. J.; Lacasse, R. J.; Lockman, F. J.; Norrod, R. D.

    2009-08-01

    The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory is the world's premiere single-dish radio telescope operating at centimeter to long millimeter wavelengths. This paper describes the history, construction, and main technical features of the telescope.

  8. PROBING FINE-SCALE IONOSPHERIC STRUCTURE WITH THE VERY LARGE ARRAY RADIO TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A. S.; Roettgering, H. J. A.

    2009-08-15

    High-resolution ({approx}1 arcmin) astronomical imaging at low frequency ({<=}150 MHz) has only recently become practical with the development of new calibration algorithms for removing ionospheric distortions. In addition to opening a new window in observational astronomy, the process of calibrating the ionospheric distortions also probes ionospheric structure in an unprecedented way. Here we explore one aspect of this new type of ionospheric measurement: the differential refraction of celestial source pairs as a function of their angular separation. This measurement probes variations in the spatial gradient of the line-of-sight total electron content (TEC) to {approx}10{sup -3} TECU km{sup -1} (1 TECU = 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}) accuracy over spatial scales of under 10 km to over 100 km. We use data from the VLA Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS), a nearly complete 74 MHz survey of the entire sky visible to the VLA telescope in Socorro, New Mexico. These data comprise over 500 hr of observations, all calibrated in a standard way. While ionospheric spatial structure varies greatly from one observation to the next, when analyzed over hundreds of hours, statistical patterns become apparent. We present a detailed characterization of how the median differential refraction depends on source pair separation, elevation, and time of day. We find that elevation effects are large, but geometrically predictable and can be 'removed' analytically using a 'thin-shell' model of the ionosphere. We find significantly greater ionospheric spatial variations during the day than at night. These diurnal variations appear to affect the larger angular scales to a greater degree indicating that they come from disturbances on relatively larger spatial scales (hundreds of kilometers, rather than tens of kilometers)

  9. CAVITIES AND SHOCKS IN THE GALAXY GROUP HCG 62 AS REVEALED BY CHANDRA, XMM-NEWTON, AND GIANT METREWAVE RADIO TELESCOPE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Gitti, Myriam; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Giacintucci, Simona; David, Laurence P.; Vrtilek, Jan; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Raychaudhury, Somak

    2010-05-01

    We report on the results of an analysis of Chandra, XMM-Newton, and new Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) data of the X-ray bright compact group of galaxies HCG 62, which is one of the few groups known to possess clear, small X-ray cavities in the inner regions. This is part of an ongoing X-ray/low-frequency radio study of 18 groups, initially chosen for the availability of good-quality X-ray data and evidence for active galactic nucleus/hot gas interaction. At higher frequency (1.4 GHz), the HCG 62 cavity system shows minimal if any radio emission, but the new GMRT observations at 235 MHz and 610 MHz clearly detect extended low-frequency emission from radio lobes corresponding to the cavities. By means of the synergy of X-ray and low-frequency radio observations, we compare and discuss the morphology, luminosity, and pressure of the gas and of the radio source. We find that the radio source is radiatively inefficient, with a ratio of radio luminosity to mechanical cavity power of {approx}10{sup -4}, and that the radio pressure of the lobes is about 1 order of magnitude lower than the X-ray pressure of the surrounding thermal gas. Thanks to the high spatial resolution of the Chandra surface brightness and temperature profiles, we also identify a shock front located at 36 kpc to the southwest of the group center, close to the southern radio lobe, with a Mach number {approx}1.5 and a total power which is about 1 order of magnitude higher than the cavity power. Such a shock may have heated the gas in the southern region, as indicated by the temperature map. The shock may also explain the arc-like region of enriched gas seen in the iron abundance map, as this may be produced by a non-Maxwellian electron distribution near its front.

  10. Design of broadband antenna elements for a low-frequency radio telescope using Pareto genetic algorithm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkhoff, A.; Ling, H.

    2009-12-01

    We apply Pareto genetic algorithm (GA) optimization to the design of antenna elements for use in the Long Wavelength Array (LWA), a large, low-frequency radio telescope currently under development. By manipulating antenna geometry, the Pareto GA simultaneously optimizes the received Galactic background or “sky” noise level and radiation patterns of the antenna over all frequencies. Geometrical constraints are handled explicitly in the GA in order to guarantee the realizability, and to impart control over the monetary cost of the generated designs. The antenna elements considered are broadband planar dipoles arranged horizontally over the ground. It is demonstrated that the Pareto GA approach generates a set of designs, which exhibit a wide range of trade-offs between the two design objectives, and satisfy all constraints. Multiple GA executions are performed to determine how antenna performance trade-offs are affected by different geometrical constraint values, feed impedance values, radiating element shapes and orientations, and ground conditions. Two different planar dipole antenna designs are constructed, and antenna input impedance and sky noise drift scan measurements are performed to validate the results of the GA.

  11. Bounds on dark matter properties from radio observations of Ursa Major II using the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Aravind; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Voytek, Tabitha C.; Spekkens, Kristine; Mason, Brian; Aguirre, James; Willman, Beth

    2013-10-01

    Radio observations of the Ursa Major II dwarf spheroidal galaxy obtained using the Green Bank Telescope are used to place bounds on weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter properties. Dark matter annihilation releases energy in the form of charged particles which emit synchrotron radiation in the magnetic field of the dwarf galaxy. We compute the expected synchrotron radiation intensity from WIMP annihilation to various primary channels. The predicted synchrotron radiation is sensitive to the distribution of dark matter in the halo, the diffusion coefficient D0, the magnetic field strength B, the particle mass mχ, the annihilation rate ⟨σav⟩, and the annihilation channel. Limits on ⟨σav⟩, mχ, B, and D0 are obtained for the e+e-, μ+μ-, τ+τ-, and bb¯ channels. Constraints on these parameters are sensitive to uncertainties in the measurement of the dark matter density profile. For the best fit halo parameters derived from stellar kinematics, we exclude 10 GeV WIMPs annihilating directly to e+e- at the thermal rate ⟨σav⟩=2.18×10-26cm3/s at the 2σ level, for B>0.6μG (1.6μG) and D0=0.1(1.0)× the Milky Way diffusion value.

  12. Europe and US to Collaborate on the Design and Development of a Giant Radio Telescope Project in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    High Goals for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Representatives from the U.S. and Europe signed an agreement today in Washington to continue collaboration on the first phase of a giant new telescope project. The telescope will image the Universe with unprecedented sensitivity and sharpness at millimeter wavelengths (between the radio and infrared spectral regions). It will be a major step for astronomy, making it possible to study the origins of galaxies, stars and planets. This project is a prime example of a truly global project, an essential development in view of the ever-increasing complexity and cost of front-line astronomical facilities. The U.S. side of the project is run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) , operated by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (NSF). The European side of the project is a collaboration between the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) , the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (MPG) , the Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy (NFRA) and Nederlandse Onderzoekschool Voor Astronomie (NOVA) , and the United Kingdom Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC). The Europe-U.S. agreement signed today may be formally extended in the very near future to include Japan, following an already existing tripartite declaration of intent. Dr. Robert Eisenstein, NSF's Assistant Director Mathematical and Physical Sciences, called the project "a path-breaking international partnership that will open far-reaching opportunities for astronomical observations. This array would enable astronomers to explore the detailed processes through which the stars and planets form and give us a vastly improved understanding of the formation of the first galaxies in the very early universe." Eisenstein welcomed the collaboration with Europe and Japan's interest in becoming a major partner. Speaking on behalf of

  13. Joint Measurements of Flare Flux Densities at 210 - 212 GHz by Two Different Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, J.-P.; Trottet, G.; Giménez de Castro, G.; Lüthi, T.; Kaufmann, P.

    2014-04-01

    Multiple-beam observations of solar flares at submillimeter wavelengths need detection with at least four beams to derive the flux density of the emitting source, its size, and centroid position. When this condition is not fulfilled, the assumptions on the location and/or size of the emitting source have to be made in order to compute . Otherwise, only a flux density range can be estimated. We report on simultaneous flare observations at 212 and 210 GHz obtained by the Solar Submillimeter Telescope (SST) and the Bernese Multibeam Radiometer for Kosma (BEMRAK), respectively, during two solar events on 28 October 2003. For both events, BEMRAK utilized four beam information to calculate the source flux density F 210, its size and position. On the other hand, the SST observed the events with only one beam, at low solar elevation angles and during high atmospheric attenuation. Therefore, because of these poor observing conditions at 212 GHz, only a flux density range Δ F 212 could be estimated. The results show that Δ F 212 is within a factor of 2.5 of the flux density F 210. This factor can be significantly reduced ( e.g. 1.4 for one of the studied events) by an appropriate choice of the 212 GHz source position using flare observations at other wavelengths. By adopting the position and size of the 210 GHz source measured by BEMRAK, the flux density at 212 GHz, F 212b, is comparable to F 210 within the uncertainties, as expected. Therefore our findings indicate that even during poor observing conditions, the SST can provide an acceptable estimate of the flux density at 212 GHz. This is a remarkable fact since the SST and BEMRAK use quite different procedures for calibration and flux density determination. We also show that the necessary assumptions made on the size of the emitting source at 212 GHz in order to estimate its flux density are not critical, and therefore do not affect the conclusions of previous studies at this frequency.

  14. Practical Limits in the Sensitivity-Linearity Trade-off for Radio Telescope Front Ends in the HF and VHF-low Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, R. H.; Ellingson, S. W.; Brendler, J.

    2016-03-01

    Radio telescope front ends must have simultaneously low noise and sufficiently-high linearity to accommodate interfering signals. Typically these are opposing design goals. For modern radio telescopes operating in the HF (3-30MHz) and VHF-low (30-88MHz) bands, the problem is more nuanced in that front end noise temperature may be a relatively small component of the system temperature, and increased linearity may be required due to the particular interference problems associated with this spectrum. In this paper, we present an analysis of the sensitivity-linearity trade-off at these frequencies, applicable to existing commercially-available monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifiers in single-ended, differential, and parallelized configurations. This analysis and associated findings should be useful in the design and upgrade of front ends for low frequency radio telescopes. The analysis is demonstrated explicitly for one of the better-performing amplifiers encountered in this study, the Mini-Circuits PGA-103, and is confirmed by hardware measurements. We also present a design based on the Mini-Circuits HELA-10 amplifier, which is better-suited for applications where linearity is a primary concern.

  15. Single-Dish Performance of KVN 21 m Radio Telescopes: Simultaneous Observations at 22 and 43 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Sung; Byun, Do-Young; Oh, Chung Sik; Han, Seog-Tae; Je, Do-Heung; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wi, Seog-Oh; Cho, Se-Hyung; Sohn, Bong Won; Kim, Jaeheon; Lee, Jeewon; Oh, Se-Jin; Song, Min-Gyu; Kang, Jiman; Chung, Moon-Hee; Lee, Jeong Ae; Oh, Junghwan; Bae, Jae-Han; Yun, So-Young; Lee, Jung-Won; Kim, Bong Gyu; Chung, Hyunsoo; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Goo; Ryoung Kim, Hyo; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Jung, Taehyun; Park, Pulun; Kim, Min Joong; Yoon, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Won-Ju

    2011-12-01

    We report simultaneous multifrequency observing performance at 22 and 43 GHz of the 21 m shaped-Cassegrain radio telescopes of the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). KVN is the first millimeter-dedicated VLBI network in Korea having a maximum baseline length of 480 km. It currently operates at 22 and 43 GHz and is planned to operate in four frequency bands: 22, 43, 86, and 129 GHz. The unique quasi optics of KVN enable simultaneous multifrequency observations based on efficient beam filtering and accurate antenna-beam alignment at 22 and 43 GHz. We found that the offset of the beams is within less than 5'' over all pointing directions of the antenna. The dual-polarization, cooled, high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) receivers at 22 and 43 GHz result in receiver noise temperatures less than 40 K at 21.25-23.25 GHz and 80 K at 42.11-44.11 GHz. The pointing accuracies have been measured to be 3'' in azimuth and elevation for all antennas. The measured aperture efficiencies are 65%(K)/67%(Q), 62%(K)/59%(Q), and 66%(K)/60%(Q) for the three KVN antennas, KVNYS, KVNUS, and KVNTN, respectively. The main-beam efficiencies are measured to be 50%(K)/52%(Q), 48%(K)/50%(Q), and 50%(K)/47%(Q) for KVNYS, KVNUS, and KVNTN, respectively. The estimated Moon efficiencies are 77%(K)/90%(Q), 74%(K)/79%(Q), and 80%(K)/86%(Q) for KVNYS, KVNUS, and KVNTN, respectively. The elevation dependence of the aperture efficiencies is quite flat for elevations greater than 20°.

  16. Research Experience for Teachers at NRAO-Green Bank: Calibration of Data from the Green Bank Telescope and Classroom Activities in Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. H.; Maddalena, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    The NSF-funded "Research Experience for Teachers" project provides teachers an opportunity to work on a current scientific or engineering research project. This paper will present the results of research conducted with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) as well as classroom activities that will use GBT data. In order to determine the accuracy of the calibration of receivers on cm-wave radio telescopes, engineers must periodically determine the equivalent temperature of a receiver's calibration noise diode. The traditional methods utilize hot-cold loads and usually achieve an accuracy of no better than 5%, have a very coarse frequency resolution, and require days of labor. Using observations with the GBT of standard astronomical flux calibrators, we measured the noise diode temperatures for four receivers that cover 1 to 10 GHz. By comparing the detected power from the calibrators to that generated by the noise diodes we were able to determine the temperature of the noise diodes to an accuracy of 1% with very good frequency resolution (1 MHz). The astronomically determined values agree, with few exceptions, to the less accurate values generated by the receiver engineer. In contrast to the methods employed by engineers, the astronomical determinations took only a few hours. Using data collected from the GBT and the NRAO 140-foot telescope, high-school students at Breck School in Golden Valley, MN will use the Hands-On Universe (HOU) software to analyze fits files containing data from a 100 square-degree region of the Orion Nebula. Instead of always relying on optical images from personal observations or the HOU groups at Lawrence Hall of Science or Yerkes, students can now use radio images. Comparing radio images with those derived at optical wavelengths should prove enlightening for students, many of whom have misconceptions concerning radio astronomy.

  17. Discovery of Radio Pulsations from the X-ray Pulsar JO205+6449 in Supernova Remnant 3C58 with the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camilo, F.; Stairs, I. H.; Lorimer, D. R.; Backer, D. C.; Ransom, S. M.; Klein, B.; Wielebinski, R.; Kramer, M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Arzoumanian, Z.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report the discovery with the 100m Green Bank Telescope of 65 ms radio pulsations from the X-ray pulsar J0205+6449 at the center of supernova remnant 3C58, making this possibly the youngest radio pulsar known. From our observations at frequencies of 820 and 1375 MHz, the free electron column density to USSR J0205+6449 is found to be 140.7 +/- 0.3/cc pc. The barycentric pulsar period P and P(dot) determined from a phase-coherent timing solution are consistent with the values previously measured from X-ray observations. The averaged radio profile of USSR J0205+6449 consists of one sharp pulse of width = 3 ms = 0.05 P. The pulsar is an exceedingly weak radio source, with pulse-averaged flux density in the 1400 MHz band of approximately 45 micro-Jy and a spectral index of approximately -2.1. Its radio luminosity of approximately 0.5 may kpc(exp 2) at 1400 MHz is lower than that of approximately 99% of known pulsar and is the lowest among known young pulsars.

  18. Discovery of Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Young Radio Pulsar PSR J1028-5819 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, Guido; Baring, Matthew G.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, Thompson H.; Caliandro, G.A.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz) in the error circle of the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of {gamma}-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The {gamma}-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase separation of 0.460 {+-} 0.004, trailing the very narrow radio pulse by 0.200 {+-} 0.003 in phase, very similar to that of other known {gamma}-ray pulsars. The measured {gamma}-ray flux gives an efficiency for the pulsar of {approx}10-20% (for outer magnetosphere beam models). No evidence of a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen in the current Fermi data but limits on associated emission are weak because the source lies in a crowded region with high background emission. However, the improved angular resolution afforded by the LAT enables the disentanglement of the previous COS-B and EGRET source detections into at least two distinct sources, one of which is now identified as PSR J1028-5819.

  19. HI studies of extremely metal-deficient galaxies - II. Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of SBS 1129+576

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekta; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Pustilnik, Simon A.

    2006-10-01

    We present Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope HI observations of an extremely metal-deficient galaxy SBS 1129+576. SBS 1129+576 has a weighted mean oxygen abundance of 12 + log (O/H) = 7.41 +/- 0.07, or 1/18 of the solar value. Our HI observations show that the galaxy is strongly interacting with a companion (projected separation ~27 kpc) galaxy, SBS 1129+577. HI emission from a third, smaller galaxy, SDSS J113227.68+572142.3, is also present in the data cube. We study the HI morphology and kinematics of this small group at angular resolutions ranging from ~40 to 8arcsec. The low-resolution map shows a bridge of emission connecting the two larger galaxies and a large one-armed spiral distortion of the disc of SBS 1129+577. We measure HI masses of ~4.2 × 108, ~2.7 × 109 and ~2.1 × 108Msolar for SBS 1129+576, SBS 1129+577 and the gas in the bridge, respectively. Assuming that most of the bridge gas originally came from SBS 1129+576, approximately one-third of its original gas mass has been stripped off. The third smaller galaxy has an HI mass of (MHI ~ 1.1 × 107Msolar) and does not show any sign of interaction with the other two galaxies. The higher-resolution maps show that SBS 1129+577 has a central bar and a ring surrounding the bar; there is also a hint of an integral-shaped warp in SBS 1129+576. All these features are very likely to have been induced by the tidal interaction. In both SBS 1129+576 and SBS 1129+577, there is, in general, a good correspondence between regions with high HI column density and those with ongoing star formation. The two brightest HII regions in SBS 1129+576 have (inclination-corrected) gas column densities of ~1.6 × 1021 and ~1.8 × 1021 atoms cm-2, respectively. The inclination-corrected HI column density near the HII regions in SBS 1129+577 is generally above ~2.0 × 1021 atoms cm-2. These values are close to the threshold density for star formation observed in other blue compact galaxies. In contrast to SBS 1129+576 and SBS 1129

  20. Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of neutral atomic hydrogen gas in the COSMOS field at z ˜ 0.37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Jonghwan; Lah, Philip; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Briggs, Frank H.; Colless, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of H I spectral stacking analysis of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations targeting the Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The GMRT data cube contains 474 field galaxies with redshifts known from the zCOSMOS-bright 10 k catalogue. Spectra for the galaxies are co-added and the stacked spectrum allows us to make a ˜3σ measurement of the average H I mass. Using this average H I mass, along with the integral optical B-band luminosity of the galaxies and the luminosity density of the COSMOS field, a volume normalization is applied to obtain the cosmic H I mass density (ΩH I). We find a cosmic H I mass density of ΩH I = (0.42 ± 0.16) × 10-3 at z ˜ 0.37, which is the highest redshift measurement of ΩH I ever made using H I spectral stacking. The value we obtained for ΩH I at z ˜ 0.37 is consistent with that measured from large blind 21-cm surveys at z = 0, as well as measurements from other H I stacking experiments at lower redshifts. Our measurement, in conjunction with earlier measurements, indicates that there has been no significant evolution of H I gas abundance over the last 4 Gyr. A weighted mean of ΩH I from all 21-cm measurements at redshifts z ≲ 0.4 gives ΩH I = (0.35 ± 0.01) × 10-3. The ΩH I measured (from H I 21-cm emission measurements) at z ≲ 0.4 is, however, approximately half that measured from damped Lyman-α absorption (DLA) systems at z ≳ 2. Deeper surveys with existing and upcoming instruments will be critical to understand the evolution of ΩH I in the redshift range intermediate between z ˜ 0.4 and the range probed by DLA observations.

  1. Innovative and Improved Efficiency on the Design of a control System SOftware for CBSS 6m Radio Telescope using LabView in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EKEOMA Opara, Fidelis

    2015-08-01

    Software has been provided for controlling the antenna and selection of sources in a 6m radio telescope. In this work the most challenging aspect is the maintainance of the pointing accuracy of the final structure with pointing tolerance of about 0.0003 or 1 arcsecond. Using LabView, the voltage through the I/Q is read with a DAQ virtual instrument. The values are then calculated with the dish at its zero position, hence the control system is fully implemented and tested to work at full efficiency.

  2. OH radio observations of comets P/Brorsen-Metcalf (1989o), Okazaki-Levy-Rudenko (1989r), Aarseth-Brewington (1989a1), and Austin (1989c1) at the Nancay radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Gerard, E.; Bourgois, G.

    1990-01-01

    The 1667 MHz and 1665 MHz transitions of the OH radical were recently monitored in several comets with the Nancay radio telescope: P/Brorsen-Metcalf (1989o) (August 4 to October 31, 1989), Okazaki-Levy-Rudenko (1989r) (October 3 to December 2, 1989), Aarseth-Brewington (1989a1) (December 8 to 30, 1989), and Austin (1989c1) (February 15 to June 14, 1990). Present gas expansion measurements obtained from the analysis of the line shapes are presented and the long term variations of the water production rate, as measured from the OH radio lines. On October 13, 1989, the occultation of a background source by comet Okazaki-Levy-Rudenko (1989r) was fortuitously observed. A preliminary report of this observation is given. Further analysis of the data is continuing.

  3. Robust constraint on a drifting proton-to-electron mass ratio at z=0.89 from methanol observation at three radio telescopes.

    PubMed

    Bagdonaite, J; Daprà, M; Jansen, P; Bethlem, H L; Ubachs, W; Muller, S; Henkel, C; Menten, K M

    2013-12-01

    A limit on a possible cosmological variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ is derived from methanol (CH3OH) absorption lines in the benchmark PKS1830-211 lensing galaxy at redshift z=0.89 observed with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope, the Institute de Radio Astronomie Millimétrique 30-m telescope, and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Ten different absorption lines of CH3OH covering a wide range of sensitivity coefficients K(μ) are used to derive a purely statistical 1σ constraint of Δμ/μ=(1.5±1.5)×10(-7) for a lookback time of 7.5 billion years. Systematic effects of chemical segregation, excitation temperature, frequency dependence, and time variability of the background source are quantified. A multidimensional linear regression analysis leads to a robust constraint of Δμ/μ=(-1.0±0.8(stat)±1.0(sys))×10(-7). PMID:24476248

  4. The Beaming Structures of Jupiter’s Decametric Common S-bursts Observed from the LWA1, NDA, and URAN2 Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Masafumi; Lecacheux, Alain; Clarke, Tracy E.; Higgins, Charles A.; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Dowell, Jayce; Imai, Kazumasa; Brazhenko, Anatolii I.; Frantsuzenko, Anatolii V.; Konovalenko, Alexandr A.

    2016-08-01

    On 2015 February 21, simultaneous observations of Jupiter's decametric radio emission between 10 and 33 MHz were carried out using three powerful low-frequency radio telescopes: the Long Wavelength Array Station One in the USA, the Nançay Decameter Array in France, and the URAN2 telescope in Ukraine. We measured the lag times of short-bursts (S-bursts) for 105 minutes of data over effective baselines of up to 8460 km by using cross-correlation analysis of the spectrograms from each instrument. Of particular interest is the measurement of the beaming thickness of S-bursts, testing if either flashlight- or beacon-like beaming is emanating from Jupiter. We find that the lag times for all pairs drift slightly as time elapses, in agreement with expectations from the flashlight-like beaming model. This leads to a new constraint of the minimum beaming thickness of 2.″66. Also, we find that most of the analyzed data abound with S-bursts, whose occurrence probability peaks at 17–18 MHz.

  5. From Potts Hill (Australia) to Pune (India): The journey of a radio astronomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarup, Govind

    2006-06-01

    In this paper I recapitulate my initiation into the field of radio astronomy during 1953-1955 at CSIRO, Australia; the transfer of thirty-two parabolic dishes of six-feet (1.8-m) diameter from Potts Hill, Sydney, to India in 1958; and their erection at Kalyan, near Bombay (Mumbai), in 1963-1965. The Kalyan Radio Telescope was the first modern radio telescope built in India. This led to the establishment of a very active radio astronomy group at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, which subsequently built two world-class radio telescopes during the last forty years and also contributed to the development of an indigenous microwave antenna industry in India. The Ooty Radio Telescope, built during 1965-1970, has an ingenious design which takes advantage of India's location near the Earth's Equator. The long axis of this 530 m × 30 m parabolic cylinder was made parallel to the Equator, by placing it on a hill with the same slope as the geographic latitude (11 degrees), thus allowing it to track celestial sources continuously for 9.5 hours every day. By utilizing lunar occultations, the telescope was able to measure the angular sizes of a large number of faint radio galaxies and quasars with arc-second resolution for the first time. Subsequently, during the 1990s, the group set up the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) near Pune in western India, in order to investigate certain astrophysical phenomena which are best studied at decimetre and metre wavelengths. The GMRT is an array of thirty fully-steerable parabolic dishes of 45 m diameter, which operates at several frequencies below 1.43 GHz. These efforts have also contributed to the recent international proposal to construct the Square Kilometre Array (SKA).

  6. Deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of 53W044 - An S0 radio galaxy at z = 0.311

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    1993-01-01

    Images of the Wide Field Camera (WFC) and Faint-Object Camera (FOC) of the radio galaxy 53W044 are presented. The WFC images are used to examine the structure of the galaxy, and show evidence for a significant disk, on the basis of which 53W044 is classified as an S0. This radio galaxy is near the maximum radio power associated with sources in S0 host galaxies. The FOC image is combined with ground-based spectroscopy to study 53W044's stellar population, which appears normal for an E/S0 galaxy of modest luminosity. No evidence is found for a significant contribution from a nuclear blue-continuum source, and the stellar population is old with a continuum level at 2100 A, consistent with what is seen in nearby radio galaxies.

  7. Optical identifications of radio sources with accurate positions using the United Kingdom Schmidt Telescope (UKST) IIIa-J plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, A.

    1986-01-01

    Several programs are making use of UKST Sky Survey plates to identify southern radio sources. The fine-grain modern plates and accurate radio positions give a much improved identification rate. It seems that it will very soon be possible to determine whether or not there is a quasar redshift cut-off at z of about 4. There is an urgent need for more accurate fundamental reference star positions in the South.

  8. The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  9. RATAN-600 radio telescope in the 24th solar-activity cycle. III. System of data acquisition and control of the solar spectral facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, S. V.; Garaimov, V. I.

    2011-07-01

    We report the development of a multichannel data acquisition and control system for the Spectral and Polarization High-Resolution Solar Research System, installed at the RATAN-600 radio telescope. This facility provides high-speed registration of signals from 240 channels and controls the preparation for observations and the process of automatic observations. The hardware is made in the form factor of 3U Evromekhanika modules. The measurement facility is controlled by the software based on the QT cross-platform library (the open source version), which can be run both on Linux and Windows operating systems. The data are written to a magnetic carrier and then transferred to the computer network of the Special Astrophysical Observatory for archiving, and can be accessed by external users.

  10. The Radio/Gamma-Ray Connection in Active Galactic Nuclei in the Era of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Angelakis, E.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Gehrels, N.; Hays, E.; MeEnery, J. E.; Scargle, J. D.; Thompson, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed statistical analysis of the correlation between radio and gamma-ray emission of the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by Fermi during its first year of operation, with the largest data sets ever used for this purpose.We use both archival interferometric 8.4 GHz data (from the Very Large Array and ATCA, for the full sample of 599 sources) and concurrent single-dish 15 GHz measurements from the OwensValley RadioObservatory (OVRO, for a sub sample of 199 objects). Our unprecedentedly large sample permits us to assess with high accuracy the statistical significance of the correlation, using a surrogate data method designed to simultaneously account for common-distance bias and the effect of a limited dynamical range in the observed quantities. We find that the statistical significance of a positive correlation between the centimeter radio and the broadband (E > 100 MeV) gamma-ray energy flux is very high for the whole AGN sample, with a probability of <10(exp -7) for the correlation appearing by chance. Using the OVRO data, we find that concurrent data improve the significance of the correlation from 1.6 10(exp -6) to 9.0 10(exp -8). Our large sample size allows us to study the dependence of correlation strength and significance on specific source types and gamma-ray energy band. We find that the correlation is very significant (chance probability < 10(exp -7)) for both flat spectrum radio quasars and BL Lac objects separately; a dependence of the correlation strength on the considered gamma-ray energy band is also present, but additional data will be necessary to constrain its significance.

  11. A 4mm spectroscopic dual-beam receiver for the Robert C. Byrd green bank radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Steven; Frayer, David; Stennes, Mike; Simon, Robert; Watts, Galen; Norrod, Roger; Bryerton, Eric; Srikanth, Sivasankaran; Pospieszalski, Marian

    2012-09-01

    With a 100-meter aperture, and recent improvements to its surface accuracy and servo system upgrades, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope is the most sensitive telescope operating at 90 GHz. A dual-feed heterodyne receiver is developed for observations at the lower frequency end of the 3-4mm atmospheric window (67 to 93 GHz). The science goals are primarily molecular spectroscopic studies of star formation and astrochemistry both internal and external to the Milky Way galaxy. Studies of the structural and physical properties of star-forming, cold-cloud cores will be revolutionized with molecular spectroscopy of the deuterium and other important species within the band. Essential for spectroscopy is the ability to remove slow gain and atmospheric variations. An optical table external to the cooled components rotates into the path of either beam an ambient temperature load, an offset mirror for viewing an internal cold load, or a quarter-wave plate that produces circular polarization for VLBI observations. A composite waveguide window comprised of HDPE, Zitex, and z-cut quartz provides a high-strength, low-loss medium for transmission of the signal to the cooled corrugated feed horn. An orthomode transducer separates the polarization components which are amplified by low noise HEMT amplifiers. Warm W-band MMIC amplifiers are required to compensate a negative gain slope and to reduce noise contributions from the down conversion to the GBT IF frequencies. Initial science results and receiver performance during commissioning observations will be presented along with details of the component design.

  12. A Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope search for associated H I 21 cm absorption in high-redshift flat-spectrum sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aditya, J. N. H. S.; Kanekar, Nissim; Kurapati, Sushma

    2016-02-01

    We report results from a Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope search for `associated' redshifted H I 21 cm absorption from 24 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), at 1.1 < z < 3.6, selected from the Caltech-Jodrell Bank Flat-spectrum (CJF) sample. 22 out of 23 sources with usable data showed no evidence of absorption, with typical 3σ optical depth detection limits of ≈0.01 at a velocity resolution of ≈30 km s-1. A single tentative absorption detection was obtained at z ≈ 3.530 towards TXS 0604+728. If confirmed, this would be the highest redshift at which H I 21 cm absorption has ever been detected. Including 29 CJF sources with searches for redshifted H I 21 cm absorption in the literature, mostly at z < 1, we construct a sample of 52 uniformly selected flat-spectrum sources. A Peto-Prentice two-sample test for censored data finds (at ≈3σ significance) that the strength of H I 21 cm absorption is weaker in the high-z sample than in the low-z sample; this is the first statistically significant evidence for redshift evolution in the strength of H I 21 cm absorption in a uniformly selected AGN sample. However, the two-sample test also finds that the H I 21 cm absorption strength is higher in AGNs with low ultraviolet or radio luminosities, at ≈3.4σ significance. The fact that the higher luminosity AGNs of the sample typically lie at high redshifts implies that it is currently not possible to break the degeneracy between AGN luminosity and redshift evolution as the primary cause of the low H I 21 cm opacities in high-redshift, high-luminosity AGNs.

  13. Bistatic Sounding of High-Latitude Ionospheric Irregularities Using a Decameter EKB Radar and an UTR-2 Radio Telescope: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berngardt, O. I.; Kutelev, K. A.; Kurkin, V. I.; Grkovich, K. V.; Yampolsky, Yu. M.; Kashcheyev, A. S.; Kashcheyev, S. B.; Galushko, V. G.; Grigorieva, S. A.; Kusonsky, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    We present the first results of the joint Russian-Ukrainian experiments for recording of signals from the EKB radar of the Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Arti observatory of the Institute of Geophysics of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Sverdlovsk region, Russia) at a distance of over 1600 km by using a coherent receiving system and a high-gain phased array of the UTR-2 radio telescope (S.Ya. Braude Radioastronomical Observatory (RAO) of the Institute of Radio Astronomy of the Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences (IRA UNAS), Kharkov region, Ukraine). It is shown that two pulse sequences that are identical to the transmitted EKB radar signal, but arrive with different delays were observed at the reception point. The sequence which was received first corresponded to the direct-signal propagation along the great-circle arc. The second sequence was received with delays corresponding to a path length of 2800 to 3400 km and was the result of scattering of the transmitted radar signal by high-latitude ionospheric irregularities. The Doppler frequency shift of the scattered signal was range-dependent and varied from -3 to +4 Hz, which corresponded to the radial component of the ionospheric irregularity velocity from -43 to +58 m/s. To interpret the results of the experiments, we numerically simulated the signal propagation based on the actual ionospheric conditions at an appropriate time. Ionospheric characteristics were retrieved by the vertical ionospheric sounding technique, with the ionosonde located in close proximity to the EKB radar. Comparison between monostatic radar diagnostic results and bistatic sounding results has shown a good agreement of the retrieved parameters of the high-latitude ionospheric irregularities.

  14. Simulations of cm-wavelength Sunyaev-Zel'dovich galaxy cluster and point source blind sky surveys and predictions for the RT32/OCRA-f and the Hevelius 100-m radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, Bartosz; Birkinshaw, Mark; Wilkinson, Peter; Kus, Andrzej

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the effectiveness of blind surveys for radio sources and galaxy cluster thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects (TSZEs) using the four-pair, beam-switched OCRA-f radiometer on the 32-m radio telescope in Poland. The predictions are based on mock maps that include the cosmic microwave background, TSZEs from hydrodynamical simulations of large scale structure formation, and unresolved radio sources. We validate the mock maps against observational data, and examine the limitations imposed by simplified physics. We estimate the effects of source clustering towards galaxy clusters from NVSS source counts around Planck-selected cluster candidates, and include appropriate correlations in our mock maps. The study allows us to quantify the effects of halo line-of-sight alignments, source confusion, and telescope angular resolution on the detections of TSZEs. We perform a similar analysis for the planned 100-m Hevelius radio telescope (RTH) equipped with a 49-beam radio camera and operating at frequencies up to 22 GHz.We find that RT32/OCRA-f will be suitable for small-field blind radio source surveys, and will detect 33+17-11 new radio sources brighter than 0.87 mJy at 30 GHz in a 1 deg2 field at > 5σ CL during a one-year, non-continuous, observing campaign, taking account of Polish weather conditions. It is unlikely that any galaxy cluster will be detected at 3σ CL in such a survey. A 60-deg2 survey, with field coverage of 22 beams per pixel, at 15 GHz with the RTH, would find <1.5 galaxy clusters per year brighter than 60 μJy (at 3σ CL), and would detect about 3.4 × 104 point sources brighter than 1 mJy at 5σ CL, with confusion causing flux density errors lesssim 2% (20%) in 68% (95%) of the detected sources.A primary goal of the planned RTH will be a wide-area (π sr) radio source survey at 15 GHz. This survey will detect nearly 3 × 105 radio sources at 5σ CL down to 1.3 mJy, and tens of galaxy clusters, in one year of operation with typical weather

  15. Measuring the 21 cm Power Spectrum from the Epoch of Reionization with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciga, Gregory

    The Epoch of Reionization (EoR) is the transitional period in the universe's evolution which starts when the first luminous sources begin to ionize the intergalactic medium for the first time since recombination, and ends when the most of the hydrogen is ionized by about a redshift of 6. Observations of the 21cm emission from hyperfine splitting of the hydrogen atom can carry a wealth of cosmological information from this epoch since the redshifted line can probe the entire volume. The GMRT-EoR experiment is an ongoing effort to make a statistical detection of the power spectrum of 21cm neutral hydrogen emission due to the patchwork of neutral and ionized regions present during the transition. In this work we detail approximately five years of observations at the GMRT, comprising over 900 hours, and an in-depth analysis of about 50 hours which have lead to the first upper limits on the 21cm power spectrum in the range z = 8.1 to 9.2. This includes a concentrated radio frequency interference (RFI) mitigation campaign around the GMRT area, a novel method for removing broadband RFI with a singular value decomposition, and calibration with a pulsar as both a phase and polarization calibrator. Preliminary results from 2011 showed a 2-sigma upper limit to the power spectrum of (70 mK). 2. However, we find that foreground removalstrategies tend to reduce the cosmological signal significantly, and modeling this signal loss is crucial for interpretation of power spectrum measurements. Using a simulated signal to estimate the transfer function of the real 21cm signal through the foreground removal procedure, we are able to find the optimal level of foreground removal and correct for the signal loss. Using this correction, we report a 2-sigma upper limit of (248 mK)2 at k = 0.5 h Mpc-1.

  16. A study of the strong pulses detected from PSR B0656+14 using the Urumqi 25-m radio telescope at 1540 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Guo-Cun; Esamdin, Ali; Hu, Hui-Dong; Qian, Mao-Fei; Li, Jing; Wang, Na

    2012-12-01

    We report on the properties of strong pulses from PSR B0656+14 by analyzing the data obtained using the Urumqi 25-m radio telescope at 1540 MHz from August 2007 to September 2010. In 44 h of observational data, a total of 67 pulses with signal-to-noise ratios above a 5σ threshold were detected. The peak flux densities of these pulses are 58 to 194 times that of the average profile, and their pulse energies are 3 to 68 times that of the average pulse. These pulses are clustered around phases about 5° ahead of the peak of the average profile. Compared with the width of the average profile, they are relatively narrow, with the full widths at half-maximum ranging from 0.28° to 1.78°. The distribution of pulse-energies follows a lognormal distribution. These sporadic strong pulses detected from PSR B0656+14 have different characteristics from both typical giant pulses and its regular pulses.

  17. Extragalactic Radio Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerman, Kenneth I.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses new problems arising from the growing observational data through radio telescope arrays, involving the origin of radio sources, apparent superluminal velocities, conversion of radio sources to relativistic particles, and the nature of compact opaque and extended transparent sources. New physics may be needed to answer these cosmological…

  18. Multi-epoch Measurements of the Galactic Center 6667 MHz) and the Blazar 0716+714 (1 & 3 MHz) taken from the Allen Telescope Array at Hat Creek Radio Observatory in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Aaron; Harp, G.

    2014-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a 42 radio dish array located in Hat Creek, CA and is used to search for traces of Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) and to study the interstellar medium. The ATA has taken multi-epoch measurements of the Galactic Center 6667 MHz) and the intraday variable Blazar 0716+714 (1 & 3MHz) and are imaged on 10 second timescales to search for intensity fluctuations on timescales 10s and beyond. We utilize software developed and focused on antenna system temperatures to minimize Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) in order to enhance calibration and signal variability. We will discuss potential radio bursts from the Galactic Center, possibly originating from the descent of the gas cloud G2 into the Galactic Center.

  19. THE ALLEN TELESCOPE ARRAY TWENTY-CENTIMETER SURVEY-A 690 DEG{sup 2}, 12 EPOCH RADIO DATA SET. I. CATALOG AND LONG-DURATION TRANSIENT STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Steve; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Backer, Don; Bauermeister, Amber; Blitz, Leo; Bock, Douglas; Cheng, Calvin; Dexter, Matt; Engargiola, Greg; Fields, Ed; Ackermann, Rob; Atkinson, Shannon; Backus, Peter; Bradford, Tucker; Davis, Mike; Dreher, John; Barott, William C.; Cork, Chris; Fleming, Matt; DeBoer, Dave

    2010-08-10

    We present the Allen Telescope Array Twenty-centimeter Survey (ATATS), a multi-epoch (12 visits), 690 deg{sup 2} radio image and catalog at 1.4 GHz. The survey is designed to detect rare, very bright transients as well as to verify the capabilities of the ATA to form large mosaics. The combined image using data from all 12 ATATS epochs has rms noise {sigma} = 3.94 mJy beam{sup -1} and dynamic range 180, with a circular beam of 150'' FWHM. It contains 4408 sources to a limiting sensitivity of 5{sigma} = 20 mJy beam{sup -1}. We compare the catalog generated from this 12 epoch combined image to the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), a legacy survey at the same frequency, and find that we can measure source positions to better than {approx}20''. For sources above the ATATS completeness limit, the median flux density is 97% of the median value for matched NVSS sources, indicative of an accurate overall flux calibration. We examine the effects of source confusion due to the effects of differing resolution between ATATS and NVSS on our ability to compare flux densities. We detect no transients at flux densities greater than 40 mJy in comparison with NVSS and place a 2{sigma} upper limit of 0.004 deg{sup -2} on the transient rate for such sources. These results suggest that the {approx}>1 Jy transients reported by Matsumara et al. may not be true transients, but rather variable sources at their flux density threshold.

  20. Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of neutral atomic hydrogen gas in the COSMOS field at z˜ 0.37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Jonghwan; Lah, Philip; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Briggs, Frank H.; Colless, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of HI spectral stacking analysis of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations targeting the COSMOS field. The GMRT data cube contains 474 field galaxies with redshifts known from the zCOSMOS-bright 10k catalogue. Spectra for the galaxies are co-added and the stacked spectrum allows us to make a $\\sim 3\\sigma$ measurement of the average HI mass. Using this average HI mass along with the integral optical $B$-band luminosity of the galaxies and the luminosity density of the COSMOS field, a volume normalisation is applied to obtain the cosmic HI mass density ($\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$). We find a cosmic HI mass density of $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ = (0.42 $\\pm$ 0.16) $\\times$ 10$^{-3}$ at $z \\sim 0.37$, which is the highest-redshift measurement of $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ ever made using HI spectral stacking. The value we obtained for $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ at $z \\sim 0.37$ is consistent with that measured from large blind 21-cm surveys at $z = 0$ as well as measurements from other HI stacking experiments at lower redshifts. Our measurement in conjunction with earlier measurements indicates that there has been no significant evolution of HI gas abundance over the last 4 Gyr. A weighted mean of $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ from all 21-cm measurements at redshifts $z \\lesssim 0.4$ gives $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ = (0.35 $\\pm$ 0.01) $\\times$ 10$^{-3}$. The $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ measured (from HI 21-cm emission measurements) at $z \\lesssim 0.4$ is however approximately half that measured from Damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ Absorption (DLA) systems at $z \\gtrsim 2$. Deeper surveys with existing and upcoming instruments will be critical to understand the evolution of $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ in the redshift range intermediate between $z \\sim 0.4$ and the range probed by DLA observations.

  1. The Allen Telescope Array Twenty-centimeter Survey—A 690 deg2, 12 Epoch Radio Data Set. I. Catalog and Long-duration Transient Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Steve; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Ackermann, Rob; Atkinson, Shannon; Backer, Don; Backus, Peter; Barott, William C.; Bauermeister, Amber; Blitz, Leo; Bock, Douglas; Bradford, Tucker; Cheng, Calvin; Cork, Chris; Davis, Mike; DeBoer, Dave; Dexter, Matt; Dreher, John; Engargiola, Greg; Fields, Ed; Fleming, Matt; Forster, James R.; Gutierrez-Kraybill, Colby; Harp, Gerry; Helfer, Tamara; Hull, Chat; Jordan, Jane; Jorgensen, Susanne; Keating, Garrett; Kilsdonk, Tom; Law, Casey; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Lugten, John; MacMahon, Dave; McMahon, Peter; Milgrome, Oren; Pierson, Tom; Randall, Karen; Ross, John; Shostak, Seth; Siemion, Andrew; Smolek, Ken; Tarter, Jill; Thornton, Douglas; Urry, Lynn; Vitouchkine, Artyom; Wadefalk, Niklas; Welch, Jack; Werthimer, Dan; Whysong, David; Williams, Peter K. G.; Wright, Melvyn

    2010-08-01

    We present the Allen Telescope Array Twenty-centimeter Survey (ATATS), a multi-epoch (12 visits), 690 deg2 radio image and catalog at 1.4 GHz. The survey is designed to detect rare, very bright transients as well as to verify the capabilities of the ATA to form large mosaics. The combined image using data from all 12 ATATS epochs has rms noise σ = 3.94 mJy beam-1 and dynamic range 180, with a circular beam of 150'' FWHM. It contains 4408 sources to a limiting sensitivity of 5σ = 20 mJy beam-1. We compare the catalog generated from this 12 epoch combined image to the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), a legacy survey at the same frequency, and find that we can measure source positions to better than ~20''. For sources above the ATATS completeness limit, the median flux density is 97% of the median value for matched NVSS sources, indicative of an accurate overall flux calibration. We examine the effects of source confusion due to the effects of differing resolution between ATATS and NVSS on our ability to compare flux densities. We detect no transients at flux densities greater than 40 mJy in comparison with NVSS and place a 2σ upper limit of 0.004 deg-2 on the transient rate for such sources. These results suggest that the gsim1 Jy transients reported by Matsumara et al. may not be true transients, but rather variable sources at their flux density threshold.

  2. Radio Jove: Jupiter Radio Astronomy for Citizens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Charles; Thieman, J. R.; Flagg, R.; Reyes, F. J.; Sky, J.; Greenman, W.; Brown, J.; Typinski, D.; Ashcraft, T.; Mount, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio JOVE is a hands-on educational activity that brings the radio sounds of the Sun, Jupiter, the Milky Way Galaxy, and terrestrial radio noise to students, teachers, and the general public. Participants may build a simple radio telescope kit, make scientific observations, and interact with professional radio observatories in real-time over the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) includes science information, construction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for teachers and students. Radio Jove is continually expanding its participants with over 1800 kits sold to more than 70 countries worldwide. Recently some of our most dedicated observers have upgraded their Radio Jove antennas to semi-professional observatories. We have spectrographs and wide band antennas, some with 8 MHz bandwidth and some with dual polarization capabilities. In an effort to add to the science literature, these observers are coordinating their efforts to pursue some basic questions about Jupiter’s radio emissions (radio source locations, spectral structure, long term changes, etc.). We can compare signal and ionosphere variations using the many Radio Jove observers at different locations. Observers are also working with members of the Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope to coordinate observations of Jupiter; Radio Jove is planning to make coordinated observations while the Juno Mission is active beginning in 2015. The Radio Jove program is overviewed, its hardware and software are highlighted, recent sample observations are shown, and we demonstrate that we are capable of real citizen science.

  3. Present-day radio-astronomical systems of aperture synthesis (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseitlin, N. M.

    The characteristics of a number of synthetic-aperture radio telescopes are presented. Particular consideration is given to cruciform and T-shaped radio telescopes consisting of 'linear' antennas (Mills crosses); multielement radio telescopes with immobile antennas; multielement radio telescopes with immobile and moving elements; and millimeter-wave interferometers.

  4. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Heeschen, David; Backer, Donald C.; Cohen, Marshall H.; Davis, Michael; Depater, Imke; Deyoung, David; Dulk, George A.; Fisher, J. R.; Goss, W. Miller

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) scientific opportunities (millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength astronomy; meter to hectometer astronomy; the Sun, stars, pulsars, interstellar masers, and extrasolar planets; the planets, asteroids, and comets; radio galaxies, quasars, and cosmology; and challenges for radio astronomy in the 1990's); (2) recommendations for new facilities (the millimeter arrays, medium scale instruments, and small-scale projects); (3) continuing activities and maintenance, upgrading of telescopes and instrumentation; (4) long range programs and technology development; and (5) social, political, and organizational considerations.

  5. Simulations of cm-wavelength Sunyaev-Zel'dovich galaxy cluster and point source blind sky surveys and predictions for the RT32/OCRA-f and the Hevelius 100-m radio telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, Bartosz; Kus, Andrzej; Birkinshaw, Mark; Wilkinson, Peter E-mail: Mark.Birkinshaw@bristol.ac.uk E-mail: ajk@astro.uni.torun.pl

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the effectiveness of blind surveys for radio sources and galaxy cluster thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects (TSZEs) using the four-pair, beam-switched OCRA-f radiometer on the 32-m radio telescope in Poland. The predictions are based on mock maps that include the cosmic microwave background, TSZEs from hydrodynamical simulations of large scale structure formation, and unresolved radio sources. We validate the mock maps against observational data, and examine the limitations imposed by simplified physics. We estimate the effects of source clustering towards galaxy clusters from NVSS source counts around Planck-selected cluster candidates, and include appropriate correlations in our mock maps. The study allows us to quantify the effects of halo line-of-sight alignments, source confusion, and telescope angular resolution on the detections of TSZEs. We perform a similar analysis for the planned 100-m Hevelius radio telescope (RTH) equipped with a 49-beam radio camera and operating at frequencies up to 22 GHz.We find that RT32/OCRA-f will be suitable for small-field blind radio source surveys, and will detect 33{sup +17}{sub −11} new radio sources brighter than 0.87 mJy at 30 GHz in a 1 deg{sup 2} field at > 5σ CL during a one-year, non-continuous, observing campaign, taking account of Polish weather conditions. It is unlikely that any galaxy cluster will be detected at 3σ CL in such a survey. A 60-deg{sup 2} survey, with field coverage of 2{sup 2} beams per pixel, at 15 GHz with the RTH, would find <1.5 galaxy clusters per year brighter than 60 μJy (at 3σ CL), and would detect about 3.4 × 10{sup 4} point sources brighter than 1 mJy at 5σ CL, with confusion causing flux density errors ∼< 2% (20%) in 68% (95%) of the detected sources.A primary goal of the planned RTH will be a wide-area (π sr) radio source survey at 15 GHz. This survey will detect nearly 3 × 10{sup 5} radio sources at 5σ CL down to 1.3 mJy, and tens of galaxy clusters

  6. Radio Pulsation Search and Imaging Study of SGR J1935+2154

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surnis, Mayuresh. P.; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Maan, Yogesh; Krishnakumar, M. A.; Manoharan, P. K.; Naidu, Arun

    2016-08-01

    We present the results obtained from imaging observations and a search for radio pulsations toward the magnetar SGR J1935+2154 made using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and the Ooty Radio Telescope. We present the high-resolution radio image of the supernova remnant (SNR) G57.2+0.8, which is positionally associated with SGR J1935+2154. We did not detect significant periodic radio pulsations from the magnetar, with 8σ upper limits on its flux density of 0.4 and 0.2 mJy at 326.5 and 610 MHz, respectively, for an assumed duty cycle of 10%. The corresponding 6σ upper limits at the two frequencies for any burst emission with an assumed width of 10 ms are 0.5 Jy and 63 mJy, respectively. No continuum radio point source was detected at the position of SGR J1935+2154 with a 3σ upper limit of 1.2 mJy. We also did not detect significant diffuse radio emission in a radius of 70 arc s coinciding with the recently reported diffuse X-ray emission, with a 3σ upper limit of 4.5 mJy. Using the archival HI spectra, we estimate the distance of SNR G57.2+0.8 to be 11.7 ± 2.8 kpc. Based on the measured HI column density (N H ) along this line of sight, we argue that the magnetar could be physically associated with SNR G57.2+0.8. Based on the present data, we cannot rule out either a pulsar wind nebula or a dust-scattering halo origin for the diffuse X-ray emission seen around the magnetar.

  7. Alignment and phasing of deployable telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolf, N. J.; Ulich, B. L.

    1983-01-01

    The experiences in coaligning and phasing the Multi-Mirror Telescope (MMT), together with studies in setting up radio telescopes, are presented. These experiences are discussed, and on the basis they furnish, schemes are suggested for coaligning and phasing four large future telescopes with complex primary mirror systems. These telescopes are MT2, a 15-m-equivalent MMT, the University of California Ten Meter Telescope, the 10 m sub-mm wave telescope of the University of Arizona and the Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, and the Large Deployable Reflector, a future space telescope for far-IR and sub-mm waves.

  8. Space Telescope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    This pamphlet describes the Space Telescope, an unmanned multi-purpose telescope observatory planned for launch into orbit by the Space Shuttle in the 1980s. The unique capabilities of this telescope are detailed, the major elements of the telescope are described, and its proposed mission operations are outlined. (CS)

  9. Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Geoffrey

    2007-05-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a pioneering centimeter-wavelength radio telescope that will produce science that cannot be done with any other instrument. The ATA is the first radio telescope designed for commensal observing; it will undertake the most comprehensive and sensitive SETI surveys ever done as well as the deepest and largest area continuum and spectroscopic surveys. Science operations will commence this year with a 42-element array. The ATA will ultimately comprise 350 6-meter dishes at Hat Creek in California, and will make possible large, deep radio surveys that were not previously feasible. The telescope incorporates many new design features including hydroformed antenna surfaces, a log-periodic feed covering the entire range of frequencies from 500 MHz to 11.2 GHz, low noise, wide-band amplifiers with a flat response over the entire band. The full array has the sensitivity of the Very Large Array but with a survey capability that is greater by an order of magnitude due to the wide field of view of the 6-meter dishes. Even with 42 elements, the ATA will be one of the most powerful radio survey telescopes. Science goals include the Five GHz sky survey (FiGSS) to match the 1.4-GHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey within the first year of operation with the 42 element array, and a deep all-sky survey of extragalactic hydrogen to investigate galaxy evolution and intergalactic gas accretion. Transient and variable source surveys, pulsar science, spectroscopy of new molecular species in the galaxy, large-scale mapping of galactic magnetic filaments, and wide-field imaging of comets and other solar system objects are among the other key science objectives of the ATA. SETI surveys will reach sufficient sensitivity to detect an Arecibo planetary radar from 1,000,000 stars to distances of 300 pc.

  10. The Radio Jove Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Radio love Project is a hands-on education and outreach project in which students, or any other interested individuals or groups build a radio telescope from a kit, operate the radio telescope, transmit the resulting signals through the internet if desired, analyze the results, and share the results with others through archives or general discussions among the observers. Radio love is intended to provide an introduction to radio astronomy for the observer. The equipment allows the user to observe radio signals from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and Earth-based radiation both natural and man-made. The project was started through a NASA Director's Discretionary Fund grant more than ten years ago. it has continued to be carried out through the dedicated efforts of a group of mainly volunteers. Dearly 1500 kits have been distributed throughout the world. Participation can also be done without building a kit. Pre-built kits are available. Users can also monitor remote radio telescopes through the internet using free downloadable software available through the radiosky.com website. There have been many stories of prize-winning projects, inspirational results, collaborative efforts, etc. We continue to build the community of observers and are always open to new thoughts about how to inspire the observers to still greater involvement in the science and technology associated with Radio Jove.

  11. Degradation of Gadd45 mRNA by nonsense-mediated decay is essential for viability

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jonathan O; Moore, Kristin A; Chapin, Alex; Hollien, Julie; Metzstein, Mark M

    2016-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway functions to degrade both abnormal and wild-type mRNAs. NMD is essential for viability in most organisms, but the molecular basis for this requirement is unknown. Here we show that a single, conserved NMD target, the mRNA coding for the stress response factor growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible 45 (GADD45) can account for lethality in Drosophila lacking core NMD genes. Moreover, depletion of Gadd45 in mammalian cells rescues the cell survival defects associated with NMD knockdown. Our findings demonstrate that degradation of Gadd45 mRNA is the essential NMD function and, surprisingly, that the surveillance of abnormal mRNAs by this pathway is not necessarily required for viability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12876.001 PMID:26952209

  12. Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark; Flanagan, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    Space telescopes have been a dominant force in astrophysics and astronomy over the last two decades. As Lyman Spitzer predicted in 1946, space telescopes have opened up much of the electromagnetic spectrum to astronomers, and provided the opportunity to exploit the optical performance of telescopes uncompromised by the turbulent atmosphere. This special section of Optical Engineering is devoted to space telescopes. It focuses on the design and implementation of major space observatories from the gamma-ray to far-infrared, and highlights the scientific and technical breakthroughs enabled by these telescopes. The papers accepted for publication include reviews of major space telescopes spanning the last two decades, in-depth discussions of the design considerations for visible and x-ray telescopes, and papers discussing concepts and technical challenges for future space telescopes.

  13. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave; McEnery, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Gamma Ray Astronomy as enhanced by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope and Radio Astronomy as a synergistic relationship. Gamma rays often represent a significant part of the energy budget of a source; therefore, gamma-ray studies can be critical to understanding physical processes in such sources. Radio observations offer timing and spatial resolutions vastly superior to anything possible with gamma-ray telescopes; therefore radio is often the key to understanding source structure. Gamma-ray and radio observations can complement each other, making a great team. It reviews the Fermi Guest Investigator (GI) program, and calls for more cooperative work that involves Fermi and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a system of ten radio telescopes.

  14. Millimetre observations of comets P/Brorsen-Metcalf (1989o) and Austin (1989c1) with the IRAM 30-m radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colom, P.; Despois, D.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Paubert, G.

    1990-01-01

    Millimeter observations with the IRAM 30 m telescope were conducted in comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf (1989o) on September 1989 and Austin (1989c1) on April and May 1990. The HCN J(1-0) and J(3-2) lines were detected in both comets. The HCN production rate relative to water in P/Brorsen-Metcalf is comparable to that previously measured in comet P/Halley, while that inferred in comet Austin might be smaller by a factor of two. The H2CO(3 sub 12 - 2 sub 11) transition, marginally observed in comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf, was firmly detected in May 1990 in comet Austin. Observations performed at offset positions suggest that the source of H2CO might be distributed. The H2CO abundance is on the order of 0.5 percent that of water for both comets, assuming a scalelength of 10(exp 4) km at 1 AU from the Sun for the distributed source. During the May observing period of comet Austin, two new species were detected for the first time in a comet: hydrogen sulfide (H2S) through its 1(sub 10) - 1(sub 01) ortho line at 169 GHz, and methanol (CH3OH) through J(3-2) delta K = 0 transitions at 145 GHz. Preliminary estimates of their abundances are 1.5 x 10(exp -3) for H2S and 8 x 10(exp -3) for CH3OH.

  15. The future for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Rene P.; Hassall, Tom

    2013-12-01

    THE TRANSIENT UNIVERSE Rene P Breton and Tom Hassall argue that, while radio astronomy has always involved transient phenomena, exploration of this part of the electromagnetic spectrum has been falling behind because of the lack of data. But the advent of a new generation of radio telescopes such as LOFAR, could change that.

  16. Nobeyama 45m CO Galactic Plane Survey: Filament properties and star formation in M17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Atsushi; Umemoto, Tomofumi; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Kuno, Nario; Tosaki, Tomoka; Fujita, Shinji; Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Tsuda, Yuya; Ohashi, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    We present the 12CO(J=1-0), 13CO(J=1-0), and C18O(J=1-0) maps of M17 molecular clouds obtained as part of the Nobeyama 45m CO Galactic Plane Survey. The observations cover the entire area of M17 Cloud A and M17 SW with an angular resolution of ~15" which corresponds to ~0.15 pc, and they can be used to trace the formation and evolution of filamentary structure of molecular clouds in GMC scale. The Cloud A consists of a couple of twisted filaments, they are extended in parallel toward the HII region. The typicall width of the filaments is ~0.4 pc in 13CO intensity map. They are twisted with an interval of ~5 pc, and an amplitude of ~2 pc. Some filaments have a bright rim structure in 8μm at the filament edge facing the HII region. Therefore, the filaments might be formed by the feedback of the HII region. The mass distribution have a gradient depending on the distance of M17 HII region. Most of the filaments have points where the line mass exceed the critical value of 16 M⊙ pc-1. This indicates that the high-density cores can be formed on the most of the filaments in the Cloud A. In addition, YSOs distribution from MYStIX infrared excess source catalog shows that the most of YSOs are on the filaments in the Cloud A. Hence the filamentally structure plays an important role to form stars in Cloud A. However, the fact that most of the OB stars are located away from filaments suggests that the Cloud A filaments could not trigger the formation of the M17 cluster including OB stars. We found high-velocity clumps (Vlsr~23 km sec-1) which are associated with OB stars. The distribution of high-velocity clumps is anticorrelated with Cloud A and M17 SW. The Cloud A filaments (Vlsr~20 km sec-1) are corresponding to IRDCs identified by Spitzer, while the high-velocity clumps have no IRDC counterpart. Therefore, Cloud A filaments are located near side of the HII region and the high-velocity clumps are located far side of the HII region. One possibility which satisfy the

  17. The Large Millimeter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D. H.; Schloerb, F. P.; LMT Project Team

    2009-05-01

    This paper, presented on behalf of the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) project team, describes the status and near-term plans for the telescope and its initial instrumentation. The LMT is a bi-national collaboration between México and the USA, led by the Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE) and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, to construct, commission and operate a 50 m diameter millimeter-wave radio telescope. Construction activities are nearly complete at the LMT site, at an altitude of ˜ 4600 m on the summit of Sierra Negra, an extinct volcano in the Mexican state of Puebla. Full movement of the telescope, under computer control in both azimuth and elevation, has been achieved. First-light at centimeter wavelengths on astronomical sources was obtained in November 2006. Installation of precision surface segments for millimeter-wave operation is underway, with the inner 32 m diameter of the surface now complete and ready to be used to obtain first-light at millimeter wavelengths in 2008. Installation of the remainder of the reflector will continue during the next year and be completed in 2009 for final commissioning of the antenna. The full LMT antenna, outfitted with its initial complement of scientific instruments, will be a world-leading scientific research facility for millimeter-wave astronomy.

  18. The Large Millimeter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schloerb, F. Peter

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented on behalf of the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) project team, describes the status and near-term plans for the telescope and its initial instrumentation. The LMT is a bi-national collaboration between Mexico and the USA, led by the Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE) and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, to construct, commission and operate a 50m-diameter millimeter-wave radio telescope. Construction activities are nearly complete at the 4600m LMT site on the summit of Sierra Negra, an extinct volcano in the Mexican state of Puebla. Full movement of the telescope, under computer control in both azimuth and elevation, has been achieved. First-light at centimeter wavelengths on astronomical sources was obtained in November 2006. Installation of precision surface segments for millimeter-wave operation is underway, with the inner 32m-diameter of the surface now complete and ready to be used to obtain first light at millimeter wavelengths in 2008. Installation of the remainder of the reflector will continue during the next year and be completed in 2009 for final commissioning of the antenna. The full LMT antenna, outfitted with its initial complement of scientific instruments, will be a world-leading scientific research facility for millimeter-wave astronomy.

  19. Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, Jane R.

    2011-01-01

    The science of astronomy depends on modern-day temples called telescopes. Astronomers make pilgrimages to remote mountaintops where these large, intricate, precise machines gather light that rains down from the Universe. Bit, since Earth is a bright, turbulent planet, our finest telescopes are those that have been launched into the dark stillness of space. These space telescopes, named after heroes of astronomy (Hubble, Chandra, Spitzer, Herschel), are some of the best ideas our species has ever had. They show us, over 13 billion years of cosmic history, how galaxies and quasars evolve. They study planets orbiting other stars. They've helped us determine that 95% of the Universe is of unknown composition. In short, they tell us about our place in the Universe. The next step in this journey is the James Webb Space Telescope, being built by NASA, Europe, and Canada for a 2018 launch; Webb will reveal the first galaxies that ever formed.

  20. SNAP telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis,R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar,A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland,S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kim, A.G.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder, E.V.; Loken,S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi,H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto,E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will require a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction limited images spanning a one degree field in the visible and near infrared wavelength regime. This requirement, equivalent to nearly one billion pixel resolution, places stringent demands on its optical system in terms of field flatness, image quality, and freedom from chromatic aberration. We discuss the advantages of annular-field three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) telescopes for applications such as SNAP, and describe the features of the specific optical configuration that we have baselined for the SNAP mission. We discuss the mechanical design and choice of materials for the telescope. Then we present detailed ray traces and diffraction calculations for our baseline optical design. We briefly discuss stray light and tolerance issues, and present a preliminary wavefront error budget for the SNAP Telescope. We conclude by describing some of tasks to be carried out during the upcoming SNAP research and development phase.

  1. Teaching Telescopes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, John S.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses experience of teaching optical experiments with emphasis upon the student's design and construction of refracting and reflecting telescopes. Concludes that the student's interest and acquired knowledge are greatly enhanced through the use of realistic experiments. (CC)

  2. ARISE - Advanced Radio Interferometry Between Space and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulvestad, J. S.; Linfield, R. P.; Wannier, P. G.; Preston, R. A.; Hirabayashi, H.; Zensus, J. A.; Veal, G. R.

    1995-01-01

    A mission is described called ARISE, Advanced Radio Interferometry between Space and Earth. ARISE will will provide affordable very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) using second- generation VLBI and one or more inflatable space radio telescopes.

  3. Radio outburst of BL Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buemi, C. S.; Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Giroletti, M.; Orienti, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Bach, U.

    2013-04-01

    We report on extremely high radio flux of BL Lacertae at 43 and 8 GHz. Observations at 43 GHz with the 32 m radio telescope in Noto (Italy) revealed a flux density of 10.5 +/- 0.2 Jy on 2013 April 10.65, while observations at 8 GHz with the 32 m radio telescope in Medicina (Italy) detected a flux density of 8.2 +/- 0.7 Jy on April 12.22. These extremely high radio fluxes show that the radio activity likely correlated to the strong optical, near-infrared, and gamma-ray activity of 2011-2012 (see ATels #4028, #4031, #4155, #4271, #4277, #4349, #4565, #4600), and X-ray activity of late 2012 (ATels #4557, #4627), is far to be exhausted.

  4. The Greenland Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, Paul; Blundell, Raymond

    2012-09-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, acquired the ALMA North America prototype antenna - a state-of-the-art 12-m diameter dish designed for submillimeter astronomy. Together with the MIT-Haystack Observatory and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, the plan is to retrofit this antenna for cold-weather operation and equip it with a suite of instruments designed for a variety of scientific experiments and observations. The primary scientific goal is to image the shadow of the Super-Massive Black Hole in M87 in order to test Einstein’s theory of relativity under extreme gravity. This requires the highest angular resolution, which can only be achieved by linking this antenna with others already in place to form a telescope almost the size of the Earth. We are therefore developing plans to install this antenna at the peak of the Greenland ice-sheet. This location will produce an equivalent North-South separation of almost 9,000 km when linked to the ALMA telescope in Northern Chile, and an East-West separation of about 6,000 km when linked to SAO and ASIAA’s Submillimeter Array on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and will provide an angular resolution almost 1000 times higher than that of the most powerful optical telescopes. Given the quality of the atmosphere at the proposed telescope location, we also plan to make observations in the atmospheric windows at 1.3 and 1.5 THz. We will present plans to retrofit the telescope for cold-weather operation, and discuss potential instrumentation and projected time-line.

  5. Observations of Solar Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, Giorla

    2011-05-01

    A low frequency radio telescope has been recently been constructed on the campus of the The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) and has begun conducting observations at 20MHz as part of NASA'a Radio Jove program. This instrument is capable of observations of solar radio emission including strong prompt radio emission associated with solar burst events. We will discuss solar observations conducted with this instrument as well as an effort to conduct coincident observations with the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) and the Long Wavelength Array (LWA).

  6. Division x: Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Russ; Chapman, Jessica; Rendong, Nan; Carilli, Christopher; Giovannini, Gabriele; Hills, Richard; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Jonas, Justin; Lazio, Joseph; Morganti, Raffaella; Rubio, Monica; Shastri, Prajval

    2012-04-01

    This triennium has seen a phenomenal investment in development of observational radio astronomy facilities in all parts of the globe at a scale that significantly impacts the international community. This includes both major enhancements such as the transition from the VLA to the EVLA in North America, and the development of new facilities such as LOFAR, ALMA, FAST, and Square Kilometre Array precursor telescopes in Australia and South Africa. These developments are driven by advances in radio-frequency, digital and information technologies that tremendously enhance the capabilities in radio astronomy. These new developments foreshadow major scientific advances driven by radio observations in the next triennium. We highlight these facility developments in section 3 of this report. A selection of science highlight from this triennium are summarized in section 2.

  7. Radio spectra of intermediate-luminosity broad-line radio galaxies .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelakis, E.; Kadler, M.; Lewis, K.; Sambruna, R. M.; Eracleous, M.; Zensus, J. A.

    Within the context of investigating possible differences between the mechanisms at play in Radio Loud AGN and those in Radio Quiet ones, we study the spectral characteristics of a selected sample of Intermediate-Luminosity Broad-Line Radio Galaxies in X-rays, optical, IR and radio. Here, we present the radio spectra acquired with the 100-m radio telescope in Effelsberg between 2.6 and 32 GHz. These measurements reveal a large variety of spectral shapes urging for radio imaging that would disclose the source morphology. Such studies could potentially discriminate between different mechanisms.

  8. The Radio JOVE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, L.; Thieman, J.; Higgins, C.

    1999-09-01

    Radio JOVE is an interactive educational activity which brings the radio sounds of Jupiter and the Sun to students, teachers, and the general public. This is accomplished through the construction of a simple radio telescope kit and the use of a real-time radio observatory on the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/) will contain science information, instruction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for students and teachers. Our target audience is high school science classes, but subjects can be tailored to college undergraduate physics and astronomy courses or even to middle school science classes. The goals of the project are: 1) Educate people about planetary and solar radio astronomy, space physics, and the scientific method 2) Provide teachers and students with a hands-on radio astronomy exercise as a science curriculum support activity by building and using a simple radio telescope receiver/antenna kit 3) Create the first ever online radio observatory which provides real-time data for those with internet access 4) Allow interactions among participating schools by facilitating exchanges of ideas, data, and observing experiences. Our current funding will allow us to impact 100 schools by partially subsidizing their participation in the program. We expect to expand well beyond this number as publicity and general interest increase. Additional schools are welcome to fully participate, but we will not be able to subsidize their kit purchases. We hope to make a wide impact among the schools by advertising through appropriate newsletters, space grant consortia, the INSPIRE project (http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/inspire/), electronic links, and science and education meetings. We would like to acknoledge support from the NASA/GSFC Director's Discretionary Fund, the STScI IDEAS grant program and the NASA/GSFC Space Science Data Operations Office.

  9. Infrared telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.; Hendricks, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    The development of the Infrared Telescope for Spacelab 2 is discussed. The design, development, and testing required to interface a stationary superfluid helium dewar with a scanning cryostate capable of operating in the zero-g environment in the space shuttle bay is described.

  10. Selecting Your First Telescope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Sherwood

    1982-01-01

    Designed for first-time telescope purchasers, provides information on how a telescope works; major telescope types (refractors, reflectors, compound telescopes); tripod, pier, altazimuth, and equatorial mounts; selecting a telescope; visiting an astronomy club; applications/limitations of telescope use; and tips on buying a telescope. Includes a…

  11. Structure Model Analysis of the Kashima 34m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Junichi; Nakamura, Toshio; Saita, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Junji; Yuge, Kouhei

    2001-03-01

    Deformation analysis of the Kashima 34-m radio telescope is performed. Although the telescope has a large aperture and accurate reflector panels, the dish support structures determine the high-frequency performance. Especially in millimeter wavelength, deformations above 1-mm affect the telescope efficiency seriously. We have modeled 34-m telescopes into elements and used a finite element method FEM to simulate accurate telescope deformations. The first results we obtained agreed well with the realistic deformation. Future analysis and telescope evaluations based on computer simulations are possible with this FEM model.

  12. Study on fault diagnose expert system for large astronomy telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-jing; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Tang, Peng-yi; Wu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Guang-yu; Zhang, Hong-fei; Wang, Jian

    2014-08-01

    The development of astronomical techniques and telescopes currently entered a new vigorous period. The telescopes have trends of the giant, complex, diversity of equipment and wide span of control despite of optical, radio space telescopes. That means, for telescope observatory, the control system must have these specifications: flexibility, scalability, distributive, cross-platform and real-time, especially the fault locating and fault processing is more important when fault or exception arise. Through the analysis of the structure of large telescopes, fault diagnosis expert system of large telescope based on the fault tree and distributed log service is given.

  13. Remote access and operation of telescopes by the scientific users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Amy, S.; Brodrick, D.; Carretti, E.; Hoyle, S.; Indermuehle, B.; McConnell, D.; Mader, S.; Mirtschin, P.; Preisig, B.; Smith, M.; Stevens, J.; Wark, R.; Wieringa, M.; Wu, X.

    2014-08-01

    The Australia Telescope National Facility operates three radio telescopes: the Parkes 64m Telescope, the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), and the Mopra 22m Telescope. Scientific operation of all these is conducted by members of the investigating teams rather than by professional operators. All three can now be accessed and controlled from any location served by the internet, the telescopes themselves being unattended for part or all of the time. Here we describe the rationale, advantages, and means of implementing this operational model.

  14. Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Khater, H. Y.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2012-10-15

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator/photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y{sub n}) measurements from below 10{sup 9} (DD) to nearly 10{sup 15} (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y{sub n} precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of {+-}10% and precision of {+-}1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y{sub n} measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

  15. Radio-Optical Alignments in a Low Radio Luminosity Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Mark; Ridgway, Susan E.; Wold, Margrethe; Lilje, Per B.; Rawlings, Steve

    1999-01-01

    We present an optically-based study of the alignment between the radio axes and the optical major axes of eight z approximately 0.7 radio galaxies in a 7C sample. The radio galaxies in this sample are approximately 20-times less radio luminous than 3C galaxies at the same redshift, and are significantly less radio-luminous than any other well-defined samples studied to date. Using Nordic Optical Telescope images taken in good seeing conditions at rest-frame wavelengths just longward of the 4000A break, we find a statistically significant alignment effect in the 7C sample. Furthermore, in two cases where the aligned components are well separated from the host we have been able to confirm spectroscopically that they are indeed at the same redshift as the radio galaxy. However, a quantitative analysis of the alignment in this sample and in a corresponding 3C sample from HST (Hubble Space Telescope) archival data indicates that the percentage of aligned flux may be lower and of smaller spatial scale in the 7C sample. Our study suggests that alignments on the 50-kpc scale are probably closely related to the radio luminosity, whereas those on the 15 kpc scale are not. We discuss these results in the context of popular models for the alignment effect.

  16. Radio Map of the Andromeda Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Macleod, J M

    1964-07-24

    The University of Illinois radio telescope has resolved the 610.5 Mcy/sec disk component of radio emission from the large galaxy M 31 into several discrete concentrations. In two cases, these correspond to the crossing of the optical major axis by spiral arms. A spur of emission extends southeast from the galaxy near the minor axis. PMID:17816977

  17. A Teaching Lab in Radio Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kirk R.; Cudaback, David D.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a study in which participants in a summer institute for secondary science teachers performed a series of experiments with a radio telescope. Concludes that a radio astronomy teaching facility would encourage students to use their own initiative and strategy in working with the scientific concepts involved. (MLH)

  18. The Golden Years of Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.

    2016-01-01

    The 1960s were the Golden Years of Radio Astronomy. During this decade a new generation of young scientists discovered quasars, pulsars, the cosmic microwave background, cosmic masers, giant molecular clouds, radio source variability, superluminal motion, radio recombination lines, the rotation of Mercury and Venus, the Venus Greenhouse effect, Jupiter's radiation belts, and opened up the high redshift Universe. On the technical side, the 1960s saw the completion of the NRAO 140-ft and 300-ft radio telescopes, the Haystack, Arecibo and Parkes antennas, the Owens Valley Interferometer, the first practical demonstrations of aperture synthesis, VLBI, and CLEAN, the Cambridge 1-mile radio telescope, the most precise tests of GR light bending, and the introduction of the 4th test of GR. Following sessions at the recent IAU 29th General Assembly on the "Golden Years of Radio Astronomy," we will discuss the circumstances surrounding these transformational discoveries which changed the course of modern astronomy.

  19. EMC Techniques for a Complex Project: Karoo Array Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, H. C.; van der Merwe, P. S.; Otto, A. J.; Wiid, P. G.; Andriambeloson, J. A.; Langat, P. K.; Kruizinga, B.

    2012-05-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is to be the most sensitive radio astronomy receiver ever constructed. The Karoo Array Telescope (KAT) region, part of an SKA bidding site in South Africa, has been proclaimed a radio quiet zone. This paper describes several contributions our group has made to the strategies used in the management of environmental RFI and self- generated emissions. Additionally, we are interested in the hardening of telescopes against lightning.

  20. Robotic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerlof, C. W.

    2001-05-01

    Since the discovery of gamma-ray bursts, a number of groups have attempted to detect correlated optical transients from these elusive objects. Following the flight of the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory in 1991, a prompt burst coordinate alert service, BACODINE (now GCN) became available to ground-based telescopes. Several instruments were built to take advantage of this facility, culminating in the discovery of a bright optical flash associated with GRB990123. To date, that single observation remains unique - no other prompt flashes have been seen for a dozen or so other bursts observed with comparably short response times. Thus, GRB prompt optical luminosities may be considerably dimmer than observed for the GRB990123 event or even absent altogether. A new generation of instruments is prepared to explore these possibilties using burst coordinates provided by HETE-2, Swift, Ballerina, Agile and other satellite missions. These telescopes have response times as short as a few seconds and reach limiting magnitudes, m_v 20, guaranteeing a sensitivity sufficient to detect the afterglow many hours later. Results from these experiments should provide important new data about the dynamics and locale of GRBs.

  1. The Radio Jove Project: Citizen Science Contributes to Jupiter Decametric Radio Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J.; Higgins, C. A.; Sky, J.; Cecconi, B.; Garcia, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Radio Jove Project is a hands-on educational activity in which students, teachers, and the general public build a simple radio telescope, usually from a kit, to observe single frequency decameter wavelength radio emissions from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and the Earth. Regular monitoring of Jupiter and solar radio storms is typical, and Radio Jove amateur observations have improved in their scientific utility. Some observers have upgraded their equipment to make spectroscopic observations in the frequency band from 15-30 MHz. These observations can be particularly useful when made in conjunction with professional telescopes such as the Long Wavelength Array (LWA), the Nancay Decametric Array, the Ukrainian UTR-2 Radio Telescope, etc. The coming Juno mission to Jupiter will observe the radio emissions while in orbit at Jupiter and will benefit from the Earth-based perspective provided by frequent monitoring of the emissions. With these goals in mind work is now underway to provide simple methods of archiving the Radio Jove observations for use by the amateur and professional radio science community in scientifically useful and easily analyzed formats. The data will be ingested to both Radio Jove specific databases and to archives containing a variety of "waves" data. Methods are being developed to assure the scientific validity of contributed data such as certification of the observers. Amateur scientists have made overwhelming contributions to optical astronomy and we believe the same is possible within the radio astronomy community as well.

  2. Detection of Radio Transients from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Christian

    2011-05-01

    A core-collapse supernova (SN) would produce an expanding shell of charged particles which interact with the surrounding magnetic field of the progenitor star producing a transient radio pulse. Approximately one supernova event per century is expected in a galaxy. The radio waves emitted are detectable by a new generation of low-frequency radio telescope arrays. We present details of an ongoing search for such events by the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) and the Long Wavelength Array (LWA).

  3. The Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Allen Telescope Array Team

    2010-01-01

    The ATA is a 42-element centimeter wavelength array located in Hat Creek, California and jointly operated by UC Berkeley Radio Astronomy Laboratory and the SETI Institute. Since the ATA dedication in Fall 2007, activities have been focused on commissioning the array, retrofitting a handful of components including the feed, developing an operations model, creation of pipeline processing for correlator imaging data, early science observations, and launching of the major surveys for which the telescope was built. The retrofit of the feed improves feed mechanical robustness as well as high frequency performance. Science programs launched include imaging radio transient and static sky surveys (ATATS and PiGSS), commensal SETI and transient surveys of the Galactic Center, targeted SETI observations of nearby stars, the Fly's Eye transient survey, broadband spectra of nearby star-forming galaxies, polarimetric observations of bright radio sources, observations of hydrogen in nearby galaxies and galaxy groups, molecular line observations in the Galaxy, and observations of Jupiter and the Moon. The baseline Square Kilometer Array (SKA) design, a large-N-small-diameter (LNSD) array with wide-band single-pixel feeds and an offset Gregorian antenna, bears a strong resemblance to the ATA. Additional ATA contributions to the SKA include configuration studies for LNSD arrays, the use of fiber optics for broadband data transmission, the use of flexible FPGA-based digital electronics, passive cooling of antennas, and implementation of commensal observing modes. The ATA is currently used for exploration of calibration and imaging algorithms necessary for the SKA. I will summarize current technical status and performance, the results from early science and surveys, and ATA contributions to SKA development.

  4. CONSTRAINING RADIO EMISSION FROM MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Dib, R.; Champion, D. J.; Hessels, J. W. T.

    2012-01-10

    We report on radio observations of five magnetars and two magnetar candidates carried out at 1950 MHz with the Green Bank Telescope in 2006-2007. The data from these observations were searched for periodic emission and bright single pulses. Also, monitoring observations of magnetar 4U 0142+61 following its 2006 X-ray bursts were obtained. No radio emission was detected for any of our targets. The non-detections allow us to place luminosity upper limits of L{sub 1950} {approx}< 1.60 mJy kpc{sup 2} for periodic emission and L{sub 1950,single} {approx}< 7.6 Jy kpc{sup 2} for single pulse emission. These are the most stringent limits yet for the magnetars observed. The resulting luminosity upper limits together with previous results are discussed, as is the importance of further radio observations of radio-loud and radio-quiet magnetars.

  5. Radio quiet, please! - protecting radio astronomy from interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel, W.

    2011-06-01

    The radio spectrum is a finite and increasingly precious resource for astronomical research, as well as for other spectrum users. Keeping the frequency bands used for radio astronomy as free as possible of unwanted Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) is crucial. The aim of spectrum management, one of the tools used towards achieving this goal, includes setting regulatory limits on RFI levels emitted by other spectrum users into the radio astronomy frequency bands. This involves discussions with regulatory bodies and other spectrum users at several levels - national, regional and worldwide. The global framework for spectrum management is set by the Radio Regulations of the International Telecommunication Union, which has defined that interference is detrimental to radio astronomy if it increases the uncertainty of a measurement by 10%. The Radio Regulations are revised every three to four years, a process in which four organisations representing the interests of the radio astronomical community in matters of spectrum management (IUCAF, CORF, CRAF and RAFCAP) participate actively. The current interests and activities of these four organisations range from preserving what has been achieved through regulatory measures, to looking far into the future of high frequency use and giant radio telescope use.

  6. Construction Milestone Announced on Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-04-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory announces completion of a major construction milestone on the world's largest fully steerable radio telescope - the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The last of 2,004 aluminum surface panels was recently installed on the GBT's two-acre (100 m x 110 m) collecting dish. The telescope is located at NRAO's Green Bank site, in rural Pocahontas County, West Virginia. The GBT will be used to study everything from the formation of galaxies in the early universe, to the chemical make-up of the dust and gas inside galaxies and in the voids that separate them, to the birth processes of stars. In conjunction with other instruments, it will help make highly accurate radar maps of some familiar objects in our own solar system. The GBT is an engineering marvel. At 485 feet tall, it is comparable in height to the Washington Monument. It weighs 16 million pounds, yet by swiveling the dish in both azimuth and elevation, it can be pointed to any point in the sky with exquisite accuracy. Additionally, the telescope's two-acre collecting dish has many novel features. Most radio telescopes in use today use receivers suspended above the dish by four struts. These struts block some of the surface of the dish, scattering some of the incoming radio waves from celestial objects under study. The GBT's offset feedarm has no struts to block incoming radio waves. The GBT also boasts an active surface. The surface of the dish is composed of 2,004 panels. On the underside of the dish, actuators are located at each corner (i.e., intersection of four panels). These actuators are motors that move the surface panels up and down, keeping the (paraboloid) shape of the dish precisely adjusted, no matter what the tilt of the telescope. The combination of its unblocked aperture and active surface promise that the GBT will display extremely high sensitivity to faint radio signals. The GBT itself is not the only precious national resource in

  7. Fast Method of Detection of Periodical Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, A. E.; Samodourov, V. A.; Oreshko, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    A fast method for searching periodical radio sources based on the Fast Fourier Transform at the radio telescope LPA LPI (the Large Phased Array of the Lebedev Physical Institute) is described. Examples of detection of already known pulsars and a list of new periodical radio sources with coordinates, period, and dispersion measure are presented.

  8. Radio Detection of Air Showers with LOFAR and AERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    Radio detection of extensive air showers is a new method to measure the properties of high-energy cosmic rays. Recent results are reviewed from the LOFAR radio telescope and the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  9. Neutrino telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, H.

    2012-09-15

    Neutrino astrophysics offers a new possibility to observe our Universe: high-energy neutrinos, produced by the most energetic phenomena in our Galaxy and in the Universe, carry complementary (if not exclusive) information about the cosmos: this young discipline extends in fact the conventional astronomy beyond the usual electromagnetic probe. The weak interaction of neutrinos with matter allows them to escape from the core of astrophysical objects and in this sense they represent a complementary messenger with respect to photons. However, their detection on Earth due to the small interaction cross section requires a large target mass. The aim of this article is to review the scientific motivations of the high-energy neutrino astrophysics, the detection principles together with the description of a running apparatus, the experiment ANTARES, the performance of this detector with some results, and the presentation of other neutrino telescope projects.

  10. Internet Resources for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andernach, H.

    A subjective overview of Internet resources for radio-astronomical information is presented. Basic observing techniques and their implications for the interpretation of publicly available radio data are described, followed by a discussion of existing radio surveys, their level of optical identification, and nomenclature of radio sources. Various collections of source catalogues and databases for integrated radio source parameters are reviewed and compared, as well as the web interfaces to interrogate the current and ongoing large-area surveys. Links to radio observatories with archives of raw (uv-) data are presented, as well as services providing images, both of individual objects or extracts (``cutouts'') from large-scale surveys. While the emphasis is on radio continuum data, a brief list of sites providing spectral line data, and atomic or molecular information is included. The major radio telescopes and surveys under construction or planning are outlined. A summary is given of a search for previously unknown optically bright radio sources, as performed by the students as an exercise, using Internet resources only. Over 200 different links are mentioned and were verified, but despite the attempt to make this report up-to-date, it can only provide a snapshot of the situation as of mid-1998.

  11. Radio emission from supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, K. W.; Panagia, N.; Sramek, R. A.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Stockdale, C. J.; Williams, C. L.

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 30 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85 - 110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements. 2) At a time ˜3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+beta ) beta ˜ -0.7 to beta ˜ -2.7 without change in the spectral index (nu +alpha ; alpha ˜ -0.81). This decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay with an e-folding time of ˜ 1100 days. 3) The best overall fit to all of the data is a model including both non-thermal synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) and a thermal free-free absorbing (FFA) components at early times, evolving to a constant spectral index, optically thin decline rate, until a break in that decline rate at day ˜3100, as mentioned above.

  12. Educational Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arafeh, Sousan

    1999-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of the radio in education and the crucial role of the radio in distance education in first half of the 20th century; dramatic social changes in the 1960s that led to a review of educational institutions and of educational media; and the radio today as a neglected but inexpensive medium of communication that should be…

  13. Global Astrophysical Telescope System - telescope No. 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Krzysztof; Baranowski, Roman; Fagas, Monika; Borczyk, Wojciech; Dimitrov, Wojciech; Polińska, Magdalena

    2014-02-01

    We present the new, second spectroscopic telescope of Poznań Astronomical Observatory. The telescope allows automatic simultaneous spectroscopic and photometric observations and is scheduled to begin operation from Arizona in autumn 2013. Together with the telescope located in Borowiec, Poland, it will constitute a perfect instrument for nearly continuous spectroscopic observations of variable stars. With both instruments operational, the Global Astrophysical Telescope System will be established.

  14. Firefighters' Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Public Technology Inc. asked for NASA assistance to devise the original firefighter's radio. Good short-range radio communications are essential during a fire to coordinate hose lines, rescue victims, and otherwise increase efficiency. Useful firefighting tool is lower cost, more rugged short range two-way radio. Inductorless electronic circuit replaced inductances and coils in radio circuits with combination of transistors and other low-cost components. Substitution promises reduced circuit size and cost. Enhanced electrical performance made radio more durable and improved maintainability by incorporating modular construction.

  15. Radio Galaxy Zoo: host galaxies and radio morphologies derived from visual inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, J. K.; Wong, O. I.; Willett, K. W.; Norris, R. P.; Rudnick, L.; Shabala, S. S.; Simmons, B. D.; Snyder, C.; Garon, A.; Seymour, N.; Middelberg, E.; Andernach, H.; Lintott, C. J.; Jacob, K.; Kapińska, A. D.; Mao, M. Y.; Masters, K. L.; Jarvis, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Paget, E.; Simpson, R.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Bamford, S.; Burchell, T.; Chow, K. E.; Cotter, G.; Fortson, L.; Heywood, I.; Jones, T. W.; Kaviraj, S.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Maksym, W. P.; Polsterer, K.; Borden, K.; Hollow, R. P.; Whyte, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present results from the first 12 months of operation of Radio Galaxy Zoo, which upon completion will enable visual inspection of over 170 000 radio sources to determine the host galaxy of the radio emission and the radio morphology. Radio Galaxy Zoo uses 1.4 GHz radio images from both the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) and the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) in combination with mid-infrared images at 3.4 μm from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and at 3.6 μm from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present the early analysis of the WISE mid-infrared colours of the host galaxies. For images in which there is >75 per cent consensus among the Radio Galaxy Zoo cross-identifications, the project participants are as effective as the science experts at identifying the host galaxies. The majority of the identified host galaxies reside in the mid-infrared colour space dominated by elliptical galaxies, quasi-stellar objects and luminous infrared radio galaxies. We also find a distinct population of Radio Galaxy Zoo host galaxies residing in a redder mid-infrared colour space consisting of star-forming galaxies and/or dust-enhanced non-star-forming galaxies consistent with a scenario of merger-driven active galactic nuclei (AGN) formation. The completion of the full Radio Galaxy Zoo project will measure the relative populations of these hosts as a function of radio morphology and power while providing an avenue for the identification of rare and extreme radio structures. Currently, we are investigating candidates for radio galaxies with extreme morphologies, such as giant radio galaxies, late-type host galaxies with extended radio emission and hybrid morphology radio sources.

  16. Radio observations of a hard X-ray selected sample of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unger, S. W.; Lawrence, A.; Wilson, A. S.; Elvis, M.; Wright, A. E.

    1987-01-01

    Radio observations of a hard X-ray selected sample of active galaxies obtained with the VLA and Parkes radio telescopes are discussed, and the ratio of the radio to X-ray flux density is used to determine the degree of radio-loudness of the galaxies. A continuous distribution of the degree of radio loudness is found amongst the sample galaxies, and no evidence for distinct radio-quiet and radio-loud populations is noted. The X-ray and radio luminosity is shown to be nonlinearly correlated, with the radio-loud objects all having high X-ray luminosity.

  17. Radio communications with extra-terrestrial civilizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotelnikov, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    Communications between civilizations within our galaxy at the present level of radio engineering is possible, although civilizations must begin to search for each other to achieve this. If an extra-terrestrial civilization possessing a technology at our level wishes to make itself known and will transmit special radio signals to do this, then it can be picked up by us at a distance of several hundreds of light years using already existing radio telescopes and specially built radio receivers. If it wishes, this civilization can also send us information without awaiting our answer.

  18. Gamma-ray burster counterparts - Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Cline, Thomas L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barat, C.; Estulin, I. V.; Evans, W. D.; Fenimore, E. E.; Hurley, K.

    1989-01-01

    Many observers and theorists have suggested that gamma-ray bursters (GRBs) are related to highly magnetized rotating, neutron stars, in which case an analogy with pulsars implies that GRBs would be prodigious emitters of polarized radio emission during quiescence. The paper reports on a survey conducted with the Very Large Array radio telescope of 10 small GRB error regions for quiescent radio emission at wavelengths of 2, 6, and 20 cm. The sensitivity of the survey varied from 0.1 to 0.8 mJy. The observations did indeed reveal four radio sources inside the GRB error regions.

  19. Observing Solar and Jovian Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grippaldi, Joseph

    2011-05-01

    A recently constructed low frequency radio telescope has been constructed on the campus of the The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) has recently begun conducting observations at 20MHz as part of NASA'a Radio Jove program. This instrument is capable of observations of Jovian radio emission including strong prompt radio emission associated with the Jovian moon Io. We will discuss Jovian observations conducted with this instrument as an effort to conduct coincident observation with the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) and the Long Wavelength Array (LWA).

  20. Radio wave.

    PubMed

    Elkin, V

    1992-01-01

    In developing countries with high rates of poverty and illiteracy, radio is emerging as an excellent medium for delivering information on health issues, family planning, nutrition, and agricultural development. Since radio does not require wired electricity, it can reach remote rural populations. Surveys have found that between 50-75% of poor rural households in developing countries own radios, and the majority listen to educational radio at least once a week. A program that reaches the urban poor outside of Lima, Peru, has been instrumental in controlling the spread of cholera. A Bolivian station broadcasts 8 hours of literacy, health, agricultural, and cultural programming a day to an audience of more than 2 million Aymara Indians. Small village radio stations with a broadcast range of 15 miles can be established for under US$400 and can generally achieve sustainability through local fundraising events such as raffles. In many cases, listeners have become broadcasters at their local radio stations. PMID:12286181

  1. Radio receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankov, V. N.; Barulin, L. G.; Zhodzishskii, M. I.; Malyshev, I. V.; Petrusinskii, V. V.

    The book is concerned with the design of microelectronic radio receivers and their components based on semiconductor and hybrid integrated circuits. Topics discussed include the hierarchical structure of radio receivers, the synthesis of structural schemes, the design of the principal functional units, and the design of radio receiver systems with digital signal processing. The discussion also covers the integrated circuits of multifunctional amplifiers, analog multipliers, charge-transfer devices, frequency filters, piezoelectronic devices, and microwave amplifiers, filters, and mixers.

  2. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, A. D.; Keith, M.; Hobbs, G.; Norris, R. P.; Mao, M. Y.; Middelberg, E.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50 per cent duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  3. Coherent large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J. E.

    Present ground-based telescopes are compared with those of the future. The inherent limitations of ground-based telescopes are reviewed, and existing telescopes and their evolution are briefly surveyed in order to see the trends that led to the present period of innovative telescope design. The major telescope types and the critical design factors that must be considered in designing large telescopes for the future are reviewed, emphasizing economicality. As an example, the Ten Meter Telescope project at the University of California is discussed in detail, including the telescope buildings, domes, and apertures, the telescope moving weights, the image quality, and the equipment. Finally, a brief review of current work in progress on large telescopes is given.

  4. Radio Quiet Zones (RQZ) - Working with national communication administrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzioumis, Anastasios

    Radio Astronomy detects extremely faint radio signals from space, and hence is very susceptible to Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) from other radio communication services. Although radio astronomy has been allocated some radio bands by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), cosmic radio emissions occur over the whole of the electromagnetic spectrum. Thus, there is a need for radio telescopes to operate over very wide radio bands and avoid RFI. Radio Quiet Zones (RQZ) in various forms have been implemented around many radio astronomy observatories, to minimise the impact of RFI on radio astronomy observations by coordinating with nearby radiocommunication services. The history and characteristics of such RQZ around the world will be reviewed, with emphasis on recent experience. For the next generation radio astronomy telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), it will be of critical importance to minimise RFI over the whole operating frequency range 200 MHz - 25 GHz. Progress towards establishing strict RQZ for the SKA will be reviewed. The main experience and lesson learned is that it is critical to work closely with national communication administrations. Work on RQZ in international bodies and the implications for radio sciences will also be discussed.

  5. A comparison between the radio and the X-ray spectra of broad-line radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelakis, E.; Kadler, M.; Lewis, K.; Sambruna, R. M.; Eracleous, M.; Zensus, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    We present the spectral characteristics of a sample of Intermediate-Luminosity Broad-Line Radio Galaxies in X-rays, optical and radio. Here, we focus on the radio spectra acquired with the 100 m radio telescope in Effelsberg between 2.6 GHz and 32 GHz. These measurements reveal different spectral shapes urging for radio imaging that would disclose the source morphology. Comparing them with the X-ray spectra acquired with XMM-Newton, we find that sources with steep radio spectrum are heavily obscured whereas flat spectrum ones appear unabsorbed in accordance with unified scheme.

  6. Development of Radio Astronomy at Centre for Basic Space Science Observatory, Nsukka Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliyu, Nasiru; Okere, Bonaventure I.; Lanre, Daniyan O.; Ezechi, Nwachukwu E.

    2015-08-01

    Radio telescopes for research, teaching and learning at Centre for Basic Space Science (CBSS) observatory are currently in place of development. A small parabolic radio telescope with diameter of 3.0 m working at 1420 MHz is already available for general purpose of radio astronomical observations. In addition, a Radio Jove telescope with dual dipole antenna working at 20 MHz and Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID) monitor working at 24 KHz are also available. It is suitable to monitor daily solar burst, solar flares as well as Jupiter decametric emission. More over, CBSS radio interferometers are now under construction. It consists of non-tracking Radio Jove array and SID monitor as well as two radio telescope tracking interferometers. The latter is planned to utilize up to 4 antennas. Multi frequency receivers are made available at 24 KHz, 20 and 1420 MHz and will be used for VLBI in the near future.

  7. Educational Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    This report summarizes information about the history, technology, and operation of educational radio in the U.S. Also presented are the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) rules and regulations concerning the licensing and channel assignment of educational radio, and its auxiliary special broadcast services. Included are the application…

  8. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Schaffer, R. D.; Gorenstein, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of Radio Astronomy Operations during April and May 1981 are reported. Work in progres in support of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel, Twin Quasi-Stellar Object VLBI, is reported.

  9. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.; Manchester, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio and radar astronomy operations during July and August 1980 are reported. A brief update on the OSS-sponsored planetary radio astronomy experiment is provided. Also included are two updates, one each from Spain and Australia on current host country activities.

  10. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Gulkis, S.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio astronomy operations during the first quarter of 1981 are reported. Results of the use of a low noise maser are presented, as well as updates in DSN support of experiments sanctioned by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel.

  11. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Niell, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the DSN in support of Radio and Radar Astronomy Operations during September through December 1980 are described. Emphasis is on a report of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel: that of VLBI observations of the energetic galactic object SS-433.

  12. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  13. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give…

  14. CO Observations of the High Redshift Radio Galaxy 53W002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Toru; Ohta, Kouji; Tomita, Akihiko; Takata, Tadafumi

    1995-10-01

    We observed a high redshift radio galaxy 53W002 at z =2.390 with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope aiming at a detection of a redshifted ^12^CO (J=1-0) emission line. The galaxy was discovered in the Leiden Berkeley Deep Survey and is known to have a blue SED and is a candidate for a genuinely young galaxy. We detected a weak (-5 mJy) emission-line feature at z = 2.392; the feature was significant in our November 1993 observations and marginally confirmed in the follow-up observations held in December 1993 and February 1994. If the detected emission-line feature is really a redshifted CO emission line associated with 53W002, its luminosity is 1.2 x 10^11^ h^-2^ K km s^-1^ pc^2^ (q_0_ = 0.5), or M(H_2_) ~ 5 x 10^11^ h^-2^ M_sun_, adopting the galactic CO-to-H_2_ conversion factor.

  15. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Williams, Christopher L.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2007-10-01

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect clumpiness of the circumstellar material. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85-110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements rather well. 2) At mid-cm wavelengths there is often deviation from the fitted radio light curves, particularly near the peak flux density, and considerable shorter term deviations in the declining portion when the emission has become optically thin. 3) At a time ~3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+β)β~-0.7 to β~-2.7 without change in the spectral index (ν+αα~-0.81). However, this decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay starting at day ~3100 with an e-folding time of ~1100 days. 4) The best overall fit to all of the data is

  16. Radio detections of southern ultracool dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, C.; Murphy, T.; Ravi, V.; Hobbs, G.; Lo, K.; Ward, C.

    2016-04-01

    We report the results of a volume-limited survey using the Australia Telescope Compact Array to search for transient and quiescent radio emission from 15 Southern hemisphere ultracool dwarfs. We detect radio emission from 2MASSW J0004348-404405 increasing the number of radio loud ultracool dwarfs to 22. We also observe radio emission from 2MASS J10481463-3956062 and 2MASSI J0339352-352544, two sources with previous radio detections. The radio emission from the three detected sources shows no variability or flare emission. Modelling this quiescent emission we find that it is consistent with optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission from a magnetosphere with an emitting region radius of (1-2)R*, magnetic field inclination 20°-80°, field strength ˜10-200 G, and power-law electron density ˜104-108 cm-3. Additionally, we place upper limits on four ultracool dwarfs with no previous radio observations. This increases the number of ultracool dwarfs studied at radio frequencies to 222. Analysing general trends of the radio emission for this sample of 15 sources, we find that the radio activity increases for later spectral types and more rapidly rotating objects. Furthermore, comparing the ratio of the radio to X-ray luminosities for these sources, we find 2MASS J10481463-3956062 and 2MASSI J0339352-352544 violate the Güdel-Benz relation by more than two orders of magnitude.

  17. Use of evolutionary algorithms for telescope scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, Ruud; Jansen, Mischa; Baan, Arno; van Hemert, Jano; de Wolf, Hans

    2002-07-01

    LOFAR, a new radio telescope, will be designed to observe with up to 8 independent beams, thus allowing several simultaneous observations. Scheduling of multiple observations parallel in time, each having their own constraints, requires a more intelligent and flexible scheduling function then operated before. In support of the LOFAR radio telescope project, and in co-operation with Leiden University, Fokker Space has started a study to investigate the suitability of the use of evolutionary algorithms applied to complex scheduling problems. After a positive familiarization phase, we now examine the potential use of evolutionary algorithms via a demonstration project. Results of the familiarization phase, and the first results of the demonstration project are presented in this paper.

  18. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P.F.; Cameron, R.A.; Digel, S.W.; Thompson, D.J.; Wood, K.S.

    2007-01-03

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-band blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  19. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P. F.; Cameron, R. A.; Digel, S. W.; Thompson, D. J.; Wood, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-spectrum blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  20. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Cameron, R. A.; Digel, S. W.; Wood, K. S.

    2006-01-01

    Because gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies, the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority needs include: (1) radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-spectrum blazar flare measurements; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for unidentified gamma-ray sources. Work on the first three of these activities is needed before launch. The GLAST Large Area Telescope is an international effort, with U.S. funding provided by the Department of Energy and NASA.

  1. Radio Loud AGNs are Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaberge, Marco; Gilli, Roberto; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Norman, Colin

    2015-06-01

    We measure the merger fraction of Type 2 radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z\\gt 1 using new samples. The objects have Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken with Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the IR channel. These samples are compared to the 3CR sample of radio galaxies at z\\gt 1 and to a sample of non-active galaxies. We also consider lower redshift radio galaxies with HST observations and previous generation instruments (NICMOS and WFPC2). The full sample spans an unprecedented range in both redshift and AGN luminosity. We perform statistical tests to determine whether the different samples are differently associated with mergers. We find that all (92%-14%+8%) radio-loud galaxies at z\\gt 1 are associated with recent or ongoing merger events. Among the radio-loud population there is no evidence for any dependence of the merger fraction on either redshift or AGN power. For the matched radio-quiet samples, only 38%-15+16 are merging systems. The merger fraction for the sample of non-active galaxies at z\\gt 1 is indistinguishable from radio-quiet objects. This is strong evidence that mergers are the triggering mechanism for the radio-loud AGN phenomenon and the launching of relativistic jets from supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We speculate that major black hole (BH)–BH mergers play a major role in spinning up the central SMBHs in these objects.

  2. Workshop on Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Steve; Gaensler, Bryan

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryWe are entering a new era in the study of variable and transient radio sources. This workshop discussed the instruments and the strategies employed to study those sources, how they are identified and classified, how results from different surveys can be compared, and how radio observations tie in with those at other wavelengths. The emphasis was on learning what common ground there is between the plethora of on-going projects, how methods and code can be shared, and how best practices regarding survey strategy could be adopted. The workshop featured the four topics below. Each topic commenced with a fairly brief introductory talk, which then developed into discussion. By way of preparation, participants had been invited to upload and discuss one slide per topic to a wiki ahead of the workshop. 1. Telescopes, instrumentation and survey strategy. New radio facilities and on-going projects (including upgrades) are both studying the variability of the radio sky, and searching for transients. The discussion first centred on the status of those facilities, and on projects with a time-domain focus, both ongoing and planned, before turning to factors driving choices of instrumentation, such as phased array versus single pixel feeds, the field of view, spatial and time resolution, frequency and bandwidth, depth, area, and cadence of the surveys. 2. Detection, pipelines, and classification. The workshop debated (a) the factors that influence decisions to study variability in the (u,v) plane, in images, or in catalogues, (b) whether, and how much, pipeline code could potentially be shared between one project and another, and which software packages are best for different approaches, (c) how data are stored and later accessed, and (d) how transients and variables are defined and classified. 3. Statistics, interpretation, and synthesis. It then discussed how (i) the choice of facility and strategy and (ii) detection and classification schemes

  3. Optimization of 100-meter Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strain, Douglas

    1994-01-01

    Candidate designs for NRAO's 100-m clear-aperture radio telescope were evaluated and optimized by JPL using JPL-developed structural optimization and analysis software. The weight of a non-optimum design was reduced from 9.4 million pounds to 9.2 million pounds. The half-pathlength error due to gravity deformations was reduced from 0.041-inch rms to 0.034-inch rms.

  4. NRO 10-m submillimeter telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukita, Nobuharu; Kawabe, Ryohei; Ishiguro, Masato; Ezawa, Hajime; Sekimoto, Yutaro; Hasegawa, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Keizo; Matsumoto, Soichi

    2000-07-01

    A 10-m submillimeter telescope designed for interferometric observations at bands from 3 to 0.3 mm has constructed at Nobeyama Radio Observatory. The telescope is an engineering model for a large millimeter and sub-millimeter array, and will be operated for developments of sub-millimeter observation techniques at a remote site. We have fabricated lightweight machined aluminum panels (15 kg m-2) that have a surface accuracy of 5 micrometer rms. They have a typical size of 0.8 m X 0.6 m, and are supported with three motorized screws. The back-up structure is constructed of a central hub of low thermal expansion alloy, and CFRP honeycomb boards and tubes. Holography measurements will be made with a nearby transmitter at 3 mm. The overall surface accuracy is expected to be < 25 micrometer rms; the goal being 17 micrometer rms. We have achieved an accuracy of 0.03' rms for angle encoders. The drive and control system is designed to achieve a pointing error of 1'.0 rms with no wind and at night. Under a wind velocity of 7 m s-1, the pointing error increases to 2'.0 rms. An optical telescope of 10-cm diameter mounted on the center hub will be used to characterize pointing and tracking accuracy. Thermal effects on the pointing and surface accuracy will be investigated using temperature measurements and FEM analyses. The fast position switching capability is also demanded to cancel atmospheric fluctuations. The antenna is able to drive both axes at a maximum velocity of 3 deg s-2 with a maximum acceleration of 6 deg. s-2. The telescope is currently equipped with SIS receivers for 100, 150, 230, and 345 GHz and a continuum backend and an FX-type digital autocorrelator with an instantaneous bandwidth of 512 MHz and 1024 channel outputs.

  5. SCIENTIFIC EFFICIENCY OF GROUND-BASED TELESCOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2012-10-01

    I scanned the six major astronomical journals of 2008 for all 1589 papers that are based on new data obtained from ground-based optical/IR telescopes worldwide. Then I collected data on numbers of papers, citations to them in 3+ years, the most-cited papers, and annual operating costs. These data are assigned to four groups by telescope aperture. For instance, while the papers from telescopes with an aperture >7 m average 1.29 more citations than those with an aperture of 2 to <4 m, this represents a small return for a factor of four difference in operating costs. Among the 17 papers that have received {>=}100 citations in 3+ years, only half come from the large (>7 m) telescopes. I wonder why the large telescopes do so relatively poorly and suggest possible reasons. I also found that papers based on archival data, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, produce 10.6% as many papers and 20.6% as many citations as those based on new data. Also, the 577.2 papers based on radio data produced 36.3% as many papers and 33.6% as many citations as the 1589 papers based on optical/IR telescopes.

  6. Optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected telescopes.

    PubMed

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Highest resolution imaging in astronomy is achieved by interferometry, connecting telescopes over increasingly longer distances and at successively shorter wavelengths. Here, we present the first diffraction-limited images in visual light, produced by an array of independent optical telescopes, connected electronically only, with no optical links between them. With an array of small telescopes, second-order optical coherence of the sources is measured through intensity interferometry over 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, and two-dimensional images reconstructed. The technique aims at diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometre-long baselines to reach resolutions showing details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets. Intensity interferometry circumvents problems of atmospheric turbulence that constrain ordinary interferometry. Since the electronic signal can be copied, many baselines can be built up between dispersed telescopes, and over long distances. Using arrays of air Cherenkov telescopes, this should enable the optical equivalent of interferometric arrays currently operating at radio wavelengths. PMID:25880705

  7. Optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Highest resolution imaging in astronomy is achieved by interferometry, connecting telescopes over increasingly longer distances and at successively shorter wavelengths. Here, we present the first diffraction-limited images in visual light, produced by an array of independent optical telescopes, connected electronically only, with no optical links between them. With an array of small telescopes, second-order optical coherence of the sources is measured through intensity interferometry over 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, and two-dimensional images reconstructed. The technique aims at diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometre-long baselines to reach resolutions showing details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets. Intensity interferometry circumvents problems of atmospheric turbulence that constrain ordinary interferometry. Since the electronic signal can be copied, many baselines can be built up between dispersed telescopes, and over long distances. Using arrays of air Cherenkov telescopes, this should enable the optical equivalent of interferometric arrays currently operating at radio wavelengths. PMID:25880705

  8. Scientific Efficiency of Ground-based Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2012-10-01

    I scanned the six major astronomical journals of 2008 for all 1589 papers that are based on new data obtained from ground-based optical/IR telescopes worldwide. Then I collected data on numbers of papers, citations to them in 3+ years, the most-cited papers, and annual operating costs. These data are assigned to four groups by telescope aperture. For instance, while the papers from telescopes with an aperture >7 m average 1.29 more citations than those with an aperture of 2 to <4 m, this represents a small return for a factor of four difference in operating costs. Among the 17 papers that have received >=100 citations in 3+ years, only half come from the large (>7 m) telescopes. I wonder why the large telescopes do so relatively poorly and suggest possible reasons. I also found that papers based on archival data, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, produce 10.6% as many papers and 20.6% as many citations as those based on new data. Also, the 577.2 papers based on radio data produced 36.3% as many papers and 33.6% as many citations as the 1589 papers based on optical/IR telescopes.

  9. Radio transients: an antediluvian review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fender, R. P.; Bell, M. E.

    2011-09-01

    We are at the dawn of a new golden age for radio astronomy, with a new generation of facilities under construction and the global community focused on the Square Kilometre Array as its goal for the next decade. These new facilities offer orders of magnitude improvements in survey speed compared to existing radio telescopes and arrays. Furthermore, the study of transient and variable radio sources, and what they can tell us about the extremes of astrophysics as well as the state of the diffuse intervening media, have been embraced as key science projects for these new facilities. In this paper we review the studies of the populations of radio transients made to date, largely based upon archival surveys. Many of these radio transients and variables have been found in the image plane, and their astrophysical origin remains unclear. We take this population and combine it with sensitivity estimates for the next generation arrays to demonstrate that in the coming decade we may find ourselves detecting 10^5 image plane radio transients per year, providing a vast and rich field of research and an almost limitless set of targets for multi-wavelength follow up.

  10. Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Chernov, S. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Tchekhovskoy, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  11. Telescopes and space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Maran, S. P.

    1976-01-01

    The necessity for different types of telescopes for astronomical investigations is discussed. Major findings in modern astronomy by ground-based and spaceborne telescopes are presented. Observations of the Crab Nebula, solar flares, interstellar gas, and the Black Hole are described. The theory of the oscillating universe is explored. Operating and planned telescopes are described.

  12. Coma-compensation telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacFarlane, Malcolm J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A telescope for eliminating on axis coma due to tilt of the secondary mirror in infrared astronomy. The secondary mirror of a reflecting telescope is formed to cause field coma to always be equal and opposite at the optical axis of the telescope to tilt coma regardless of the angle through the secondary mirror is tilted with respect to the optical axis.

  13. The space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Papers concerning the development of the Space Telescope which were presented at the Twenty-first Annual Meeting of the American Astronautical Society in August, 1975 are included. Mission planning, telescope performance, optical detectors, mirror construction, pointing and control systems, data management, and maintenance of the telescope are discussed.

  14. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Shaffer, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) 26- and 64-meter antenna stations were utilized in support of Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel experiments. Within a time span of 10 days, in May 1983 (267.75 hours total), nine RAES experiments were supported. Most of these experiments involved multifacility interferometry using Mark 3 data recording terminals and as many as six non-DSN observatories. Investigations of black holes, quasars, galaxies, and radio sources are discussed.

  15. Photoelectric spectrophotometry of radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. K. C.; Oke, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    The absolute energy distributions from 3200 to 10,000 A of 26 3CR radio galaxies are determined on the basis of spectrophotometric observations with the multichannel spectrometer of the Hale 5-m telescope. It is found that there is a continuous range of emission-line characteristics and UV excess in the sample and that a strong correlation exists between the nonthermal component luminosity and hydrogen emission, which favors the hypothesis that direct photoionization by the nuclear radiation is responsible for the emission lines observed. Calculations are performed which show that in almost all cases the power-law component model provides sufficient UV photons to produce the observed H-beta line. Indications are obtained that the optical nuclear component is related to the radio emission in some complex manner and that strong radio galaxies tend to be accompanied by UV excess and emission lines.

  16. ATST telescope mount: telescope of machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, Paul; Stolz, Günter; Bonomi, Giovanni; Dreyer, Oliver; Kärcher, Hans

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, and will be able to provide the sharpest views ever taken of the solar surface. The telescope has a 4m aperture primary mirror, however due to the off axis nature of the optical layout, the telescope mount has proportions similar to an 8 meter class telescope. The technology normally used in this class of telescope is well understood in the telescope community and has been successfully implemented in numerous projects. The world of large machine tools has developed in a separate realm with similar levels of performance requirement but different boundary conditions. In addition the competitive nature of private industry has encouraged development and usage of more cost effective solutions both in initial capital cost and thru-life operating cost. Telescope mounts move relatively slowly with requirements for high stability under external environmental influences such as wind buffeting. Large machine tools operate under high speed requirements coupled with high application of force through the machine but with little or no external environmental influences. The benefits of these parallel development paths and the ATST system requirements are being combined in the ATST Telescope Mount Assembly (TMA). The process of balancing the system requirements with new technologies is based on the experience of the ATST project team, Ingersoll Machine Tools who are the main contractor for the TMA and MT Mechatronics who are their design subcontractors. This paper highlights a number of these proven technologies from the commercially driven machine tool world that are being introduced to the TMA design. Also the challenges of integrating and ensuring that the differences in application requirements are accounted for in the design are discussed.

  17. Amateur Planetary Radio Data Archived for Science and Education: Radio Jove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J.; Cecconi, B.; Sky, J.; Garcia, L. N.; King, T. A.; Higgins, C. A.; Fung, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Radio Jove Project is a hands-on educational activity in which students, teachers, and the general public build simple radio telescopes, usually from a kit, to observe single frequency decameter wavelength radio emissions from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and the Earth usually with simple dipole antennas. Some of the amateur observers have upgraded their receivers to spectrographs and their antennas have become more sophisticated as well. The data records compare favorably to more sophisticated professional radio telescopes such as the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) and the Nancay Decametric Array. Since these data are often carefully calibrated and recorded around the clock in widely scattered locations they represent a valuable database useful not only to amateur radio astronomers but to the professional science community as well. Some interesting phenomena have been noted in the data that are of interest to the professionals familiar with such records. The continuous monitoring of radio emissions from Jupiter could serve as useful "ground truth" data during the coming Juno mission's radio observations of Jupiter. Radio Jove has long maintained an archive for thousands of Radio Jove observations, but the database was intended for use by the Radio Jove participants only. Now, increased scientific interest in the use of these data has resulted in several proposals to translate the data into a science community data format standard and store the data in professional archives. Progress is being made in translating Radio Jove data to the Common Data Format (CDF) and also in generating new observations in that format as well. Metadata describing the Radio Jove data would follow the Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) standard. The proposed archive to be used for long term preservation would be the Planetary Data System (PDS). Data sharing would be achieved through the PDS and the Paris Astronomical Data Centre (PADC) and the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO

  18. 3.6 and 4.5 m Phase Curves of the Highly Irradiated Eccentric Hot Jupiter WASP-14b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ian; Knutson, Heather A.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Kataria, Tiffany; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Schwartz, Joel; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Deming, Drake; Désert, Jean-Michel; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Langton, Jonathan; Laughlin, Gregory; Showman, Adam P.; Todorov, Kamen

    2015-10-01

    We present full-orbit phase curve observations of the eccentric (e ∼ 0.08) transiting hot Jupiter WASP-14b obtained in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands using the Spitzer Space Telescope. We use two different methods for removing the intrapixel sensitivity effect and compare their efficacy in decoupling the instrumental noise. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.1882% ± 0.0048% and 0.2247% ± 0.0086% at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, respectively, are both consistent with a blackbody temperature of 2402 ± 35 K. We place a 2σ upper limit on the nightside flux at 3.6 μm and find it to be 9% ± 1% of the dayside flux, corresponding to a brightness temperature of 1079 K. At 4.5 μm, the minimum planet flux is 30% ± 5% of the maximum flux, corresponding to a brightness temperature of 1380 ± 65 K. We compare our measured phase curves to the predictions of one-dimensional radiative transfer and three-dimensional general circulation models. We find that WASP-14b’s measured dayside emission is consistent with a model atmosphere with equilibrium chemistry and a moderate temperature inversion. These same models tend to overpredict the nightside emission at 3.6 μm, while underpredicting the nightside emission at 4.5 μm. We propose that this discrepancy might be explained by an enhanced global C/O ratio. In addition, we find that the phase curves of WASP-14b (7.8 MJup) are consistent with a much lower albedo than those of other Jovian mass planets with thermal phase curve measurements, suggesting that it may be emitting detectable heat from the deep atmosphere or interior processes.

  19. The First Steps of Radio Astronomy in Czestochowa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosik, M.; Starzyński, S.; Szcześniak, M.; Szcześniak, R.; Ceglarek, A.

    2007-12-01

    In the paper, technical documentation and the principle of operation is presented. "KLAUDIA" radio telescope was built in Rabka in 2007 and it is used to receive secondary radio waves, emitted by the Earth's ionosphere at frequency of 40 kHz.

  20. Optical identifications of southern compact radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jauncey, David L.; Savage, Ann; Morabito, David D.; Preston, Robert A.; Nicolson, George C.

    1989-01-01

    Optical identifications are presented for 158 radio sources, mostly from the Southern Hemisphere, based on the coincidence between the position of the optical object and the compact milliarcsecond radio nucleus. Radio positions with an accuracy of typically 0.3 arcsec rms were measured from the observed delay and fringe rate of VLBI observations at 2.29 GHz on an Australia-to-South Africa baseline. Optical identifications and positions were measured from the UK Schmidt Telescope deep IIIa-J Southern Sky Survey plates, where available.

  1. Python Ephemeris Module for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, T. B.

    2013-05-01

    An extension of the Python pyephem module was developed for Deep Space Network (DSN) radio astronomy. The class DSS( ) provides the geodetic coordinates of the DSN stations as well as other properties such as antenna diameter. The class Quasar( ) provides positional data for the sources in the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array (NRAO VLA) Calibrator Handbook and flux estimates based the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) Database or the VLA Calibrator Handbook. Flux calibration data are also available for the bright planets. Class Pulsar( ) provides the data from the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) Pulsar Catalogue in Python format.

  2. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  3. SkyView Virtual Telescope:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Thomas A.; McDonald, Laura M.; Scollick, Keith A.

    2015-11-01

    The SkyView Virtual telescope provides access to survey datasets ranging from radio through the gamma-ray regimes. Over 100 survey datasets are currently available. The SkyView library referenced here is used as the basis for the SkyView web site (at http://skvyiew.gsfc.nasa.gov) but is designed for individual use by researchers as well. SkyView's approach to access surveys is distinct from most other toolkits. Rather than providing links to the original data, SkyView attempts to immediately re-render the source data in the user-requested reference frame, projection, scaling, orientation, etc. The library includes a set of geometry transformation and mosaicking tools that may be integrated into other applications independent of SkyView.

  4. Voyager spacecraft radio observations of Jupiter: Initial cruise results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Riddle, A. C.; Lecacheux, A.; Pearce, J. B.; Alexander, J. K.; Warwick, J. W.; Thieman, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Jupiter's low-frequency radio emission were detected by the planetary radio astronomy instruments onboard the two Voyager spacecraft. The emission is surprisingly similar in morphology but opposite in polarization to the high-frequency Jovian radio noise that were observed with ground-based telescopes for more than two decades. Several possible explanations for the behavior of the low-frequency emission are examined, but none of them is completely satisfactory.

  5. Medium power amplifiers covering 90 - 130 GHz for telescope local oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Bryerton, Eric; Pukala, David; Peralta, Alejandro; Hu, Ming; Schmitz, Adele

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a set of power amplifier (PA) modules containing InP High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) Monolithic Millimeter-wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) chips. The chips were designed and optimized for local oscillator sources in the 90-130 GHz band for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array telescope. The modules feature 20-45 mW of output power, to date the highest power from solid state HEMT MMIC modules above 110 GHz.

  6. Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickola, Marisa; Gaylard, Mike; Quick, Jonathan; Combrinck, Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    HartRAO provides the only fiducial geodetic site in Africa, and it participates in global networks for VLBI, GNSS, SLR, and DORIS. This report provides an overview of geodetic VLBI activities at HartRAO during 2012, including the conversion of a 15-m alt-az radio telescope to an operational geodetic VLBI antenna.

  7. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.; Mahoney, M. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Knowles, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities.

  8. Twin-Telescope Wettzell (TTW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, H.; Dassing, R.; Kronschnabl, G.; Schlüter, W.; Schwarz, W.; Lauber, P.; Kilger, R.

    2007-07-01

    Following the recommendations made by the VLBI2010 vision report of the IVS, a proposal has been made to construct a Twin Telescope for the Fundamental Station Wettzell in order to meet the future requirements of the next VLBI generation. The Twin Telescope consists of two identical radiotelescopes. It is a project of the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG). This article summarizes the project and some design ideas for the Twin-Telescope. %ZALMA (2005). Technical Specification for Design, Manufacturing, Transport and Integration on Site of the ALMA ANTENNAS, Doc. ALMA-34.00.00.00.006-BSPE. Behrend, D. (2006). VLBI2010 Antenna Specs, Data sheet. DeBoer, D. (2001). The ATA Offset Gregorian Antenna, ATA Memo #16, February 10. Imbriale, W.A. (2006). Design of a Wideband Radio Telescope, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and S. Weinreb and H. Mandi, California Institute of Technology. Kilger, R. (2007). TWIN-Design studies, Presentation for the IVS board members (internal document),Wettzell. Kronschnabl, G. (2006). Subject: Memo from Bill Petrachenko, E-mail to the Twin-Working Group (in German), July. Lindgren, ETS-Lindgren (2005). The Model 3164-05 Open Boundary Quadridge Horn, Data Sheet. Niell, A., A. Whitney, W. Petrachenko, W. Schlüter, N. Vandenberg, H.Hase, Y. Koyama, C. Ma, H. Schuh, G. Tucari (2006). in: IVS Annual Report 2005, pg. 13-40, NASA/TP-2006-214136, April. Olsson, R., Kildal, P.-S., and Weinreb, S. (2006). IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, Vol. 54, No. 2, February. Petrachenko, B. (2006). The Case For and Against Multiple Antennas at a Site, IVS Memorandum, 2006-019v01. Petrachenko, B. (2006). IVS Memorandum, 2006-016v01. RFSpin (2004). Double Ridged Waveguide Horn-Model DRH20, Antenna Specifications, Data Sheet. Rohde&Schwarz (2004). SHF Antennas Crossed Log- Periodic Antennas HL024A1/S1, Data Sheet. Rohde&Schwarz (2004). SHF Antennas Log-Periodic Antennas HL050/HL050S1, Data Sheet. Rogers, A.E.E. (2006). Simulations of broadband

  9. Radio Seeing Monitor Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiriart, David; Valdez, Jorge; Zaca, Placido; Medina, José L.

    2002-10-01

    A two-element interferometer for monitoring atmospheric phase fluctuations (radio seeing) is presented; this uses the unmodulated beacon signal at 11.715 GHz from a geostationary satellite. The system measures phase differences on the signal received by two small antennas separated by 50 m. The system incorporates the best features from previous designs: a heterodyne phase-lock receiver and an IQ demodulator system. Phase fluctuations measured at this frequency may be extrapolated to millimetric and submillimetric wavelengths since the atmosphere is not dispersive at these frequencies. The instrument has been tested at the Observatory San Pedro Martir (Mexico) at 2800 m above sea level. The final destination of the instrument is Cerro la Negra (Mexico), where the Large Millimeter Telescope is under construction, at an altitude of 4600 m.

  10. Abell 1033: birth of a radio phoenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gasperin, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Dawson, W. A.; Brüggen, M.; Bonafede, A.; Simionescu, A.

    2015-04-01

    Extended steep-spectrum radio emission in a galaxy cluster is usually associated with a recent merger. However, given the complex scenario of galaxy cluster mergers, many of the discovered sources hardly fit into the strict boundaries of a precise taxonomy. This is especially true for radio phoenixes that do not have very well defined observational criteria. Radio phoenixes are aged radio galaxy lobes whose emission is reactivated by compression or other mechanisms. Here, we present the detection of a radio phoenix close to the moment of its formation. The source is located in Abell 1033, a peculiar galaxy cluster which underwent a recent merger. To support our claim, we present unpublished Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Chandra observations together with archival data from the Very Large Array and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We discover the presence of two subclusters displaced along the N-S direction. The two subclusters probably underwent a recent merger which is the cause of a moderately perturbed X-ray brightness distribution. A steep-spectrum extended radio source very close to an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is proposed to be a newly born radio phoenix: the AGN lobes have been displaced/compressed by shocks formed during the merger event. This scenario explains the source location, morphology, spectral index, and brightness. Finally, we show evidence of a density discontinuity close to the radio phoenix and discuss the consequences of its presence.

  11. Information Content in Radio Waves: Student Investigations in Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K.; Scaduto, T.

    2013-12-01

    We describe an inquiry-based instructional unit on information content in radio waves, created in the summer of 2013 as part of a MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA) NSF Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program. This topic is current and highly relevant, addressing science and technical aspects from radio astronomy, geodesy, and atmospheric research areas as well as Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Projects and activities range from simple classroom demonstrations and group investigations, to long term research projects incorporating data acquisition from both student-built instrumentation as well as online databases. Each of the core lessons is applied to one of the primary research centers at Haystack through an inquiry project that builds on previously developed units through the MIT Haystack RET program. In radio astronomy, students investigate the application of a simple and inexpensive software defined radio chip (RTL-SDR) for use in systems implementing a small and very small radio telescope (SRT and VSRT). Both of these systems allow students to explore fundamental principles of radio waves and interferometry as applied to radio astronomy. In ionospheric research, students track solar storms from the initial coronal mass ejection (using Solar Dynamics Observatory images) to the resulting variability in total electron density concentrations using data from the community standard Madrigal distributed database system maintained by MIT Haystack. Finally, students get to explore very long-baseline interferometry as it is used in geodetic studies by measuring crustal plate displacements over time. Alignment to NextGen standards is provided for each lesson and activity with emphasis on HS-PS4 'Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer'.

  12. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Hales, C. A.; Seymour, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Huynh, M. T.; Lenc, E.; Mao, M. Y.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects that have flux densities of several mJy at 1.4 GHz, but that are invisible at 3.6 μm when using sensitive Spitzer observations with μJy sensitivities. Their nature is unclear and difficult to investigate since they are only visible in the radio. Aims: High-resolution radio images and comprehensive spectral coverage can yield constraints on the emission mechanisms of IFRS and can give hints to similarities with known objects. Methods: We imaged a sample of 17 IFRS at 4.8 GHz and 8.6 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to determine the structures on arcsecond scales. We added radio data from other observing projects and from the literature to obtain broad-band radio spectra. Results: We find that the sources in our sample are either resolved out at the higher frequencies or are compact at resolutions of a few arcsec, which implies that they are smaller than a typical galaxy. The spectra of IFRS are remarkably steep, with a median spectral index of -1.4 and a prominent lack of spectral indices larger than -0.7. We also find that, given the IR non-detections, the ratio of 1.4 GHz flux density to 3.6 μm flux density is very high, and this puts them into the same regime as high-redshift radio galaxies. Conclusions: The evidence that IFRS are predominantly high-redshift sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) is strong, even though not all IFRS may be caused by the same phenomenon. Compared to the rare and painstakingly collected high-redshift radio galaxies, IFRS appear to be much more abundant, but less luminous, AGN-driven galaxies at similar cosmological distances.

  13. The Volatile Composition of Comet C/2003 K4 (LINEAR) at Near-IR Wavelengths—Comparisons with Results from the NanÇay Radio Telescope and from the Odin, Spitzer, and SOHO Space Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; DiSanti, M. A.; Bonev, B. P.

    2015-07-01

    We observed comet C/2003 K4 (LINEAR) using NIRSPEC at the Keck Observatory on UT 2004 November 28, when the comet was at 1.28 AU from the Sun (post-perihelion) and 1.38 AU from Earth. We detected six gaseous species (H2O, OH*, C2H6, CH3OH, CH4, and HCN) and obtained upper limits for three others (H2CO, C2H2, and NH3). Our results indicate a water production rate of (1.72 ± 0.18) × 1029 molecules s‑1, in reasonable agreement with production rates from SOHO (on the same day), Odin (one day earlier), and Nançay (about two weeks earlier). We also report abundances (relative to water) for seven trace species: CH3OH (∼1.8%), CH4 (∼0.9%), and C2H6 (∼0.4%) that were consistent with mean values among Oort cloud (OC) comets, while NH3 (<0.55%), HCN (∼0.07%), H2CO (<0.07%), and C2H2 (<0.04%) were “lower” than the mean values in other OC comets. We extracted inner-coma rotational temperatures for four species (H2O, C2H6, CH3OH, and CH4), all of which are consistent with 70 K (within 1σ). The extracted ortho-para ratio for water was 3.0 ± 0.15, corresponding to spin temperatures larger than 39 K (at the 1σ level) and agreeing with those obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope at the 2σ level.

  14. JWST Pathfinder Telescope Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kennard, Scott H.; Broccolo, Ronald T.; Ellis, James M.; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Hahn, Walter G.; Amon, John N.; Mt. Pleasant, Stephen M.; Texter, Scott; Atkinson, Charles B.; McKay, Andrew; Levi, Joshua; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. In 2014, a major risk reduction effort related to the Alignment, Integration, and Test (AI&T) of the segmented telescope was completed. The Pathfinder telescope includes two Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA's) and the Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA) onto a flight-like composite telescope backplane. This pathfinder allowed the JWST team to assess the alignment process and to better understand the various error sources that need to be accommodated in the flight build. The successful completion of the Pathfinder Telescope provides a final integration roadmap for the flight operations that will start in August 2015.

  15. JWST pathfinder telescope integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kennard, Scott H.; Broccolo, Ronald T.; Ellis, James M.; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Hahn, Walter G.; Amon, John N.; Mt. Pleasant, Stephen M.; Texter, Scott; Atkinson, Charles B.; McKay, Andrew; Levi, Joshua; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2015-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. In 2014, a major risk reduction effort related to the Alignment, Integration, and Test (AI and T) of the segmented telescope was completed. The Pathfinder telescope includes two Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA's) and the Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA) onto a flight-like composite telescope backplane. This pathfinder allowed the JWST team to assess the alignment process and to better understand the various error sources that need to be accommodated in the flight build. The successful completion of the Pathfinder Telescope provides a final integration roadmap for the flight operations that will start in August 2015.

  16. Automated telescope scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    1988-01-01

    With the ever increasing level of automation of astronomical telescopes the benefits and feasibility of automated planning and scheduling are becoming more apparent. Improved efficiency and increased overall telescope utilization are the most obvious goals. Automated scheduling at some level has been done for several satellite observatories, but the requirements on these systems were much less stringent than on modern ground or satellite observatories. The scheduling problem is particularly acute for Hubble Space Telescope: virtually all observations must be planned in excruciating detail weeks to months in advance. Space Telescope Science Institute has recently made significant progress on the scheduling problem by exploiting state-of-the-art artificial intelligence software technology. What is especially interesting is that this effort has already yielded software that is well suited to scheduling groundbased telescopes, including the problem of optimizing the coordinated scheduling of more than one telescope.

  17. Automated telescope scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    1988-08-01

    With the ever increasing level of automation of astronomical telescopes the benefits and feasibility of automated planning and scheduling are becoming more apparent. Improved efficiency and increased overall telescope utilization are the most obvious goals. Automated scheduling at some level has been done for several satellite observatories, but the requirements on these systems were much less stringent than on modern ground or satellite observatories. The scheduling problem is particularly acute for Hubble Space Telescope: virtually all observations must be planned in excruciating detail weeks to months in advance. Space Telescope Science Institute has recently made significant progress on the scheduling problem by exploiting state-of-the-art artificial intelligence software technology. What is especially interesting is that this effort has already yielded software that is well suited to scheduling groundbased telescopes, including the problem of optimizing the coordinated scheduling of more than one telescope.

  18. Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) will be an 8 m class deployable, radiatively cooled telescope, optimized for the 1-5 μm band, with zodiacal background limited sensitivity from 0.6 to 10 μm or longer, operating for 10 yr near the Earth-Sun second LAGRANGIAN POINT (L2). It will be a general-purpose observatory, operated by the SPACE TELESCOPE SCIENCE INSTITUTE (STScI) for competitively s...

  19. South Pole Telescope optics.

    PubMed

    Padin, S; Staniszewski, Z; Keisler, R; Joy, M; Stark, A A; Ade, P A R; Aird, K A; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Dobbs, M A; Halverson, N W; Heimsath, S; Hills, R E; Holzapfel, W L; Lawrie, C; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leong, J; Lu, W; Lueker, M; McMahon, J J; Meyer, S S; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Vieira, J D

    2008-08-20

    The South Pole Telescope is a 10 m diameter, wide-field, offset Gregorian telescope with a 966-pixel, millimeter-wave, bolometer array receiver. The telescope has an unusual optical system with a cold stop around the secondary. The design emphasizes low scattering and low background loading. All the optical components except the primary are cold, and the entire beam from prime focus to the detectors is surrounded by cold absorber. PMID:18716649

  20. The Antarctic Submillimetre Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minier, V.; Olmi, L.; Durand, G.; Daddi, E.; Israel, F.; Kramer, C.; Lagage, P.-O.; de Petris, M.; Sabbatini, L.; Spinoglio, L.; Schneider, N.; Tothill, N.; Tremblin, P.; Valenziano, L.; Veyssière, C.

    This report aims to provide a summary of the status of our Antarctic Submillimetre Telescope (AST) project up to date. It is a very new project for Antarctic astronomy. Necessary prerequisites for a future deployment of a large size telescope infrastructure have been tested in years 2007 and 2008. The knowledge of the transmission, frost formation and temperature gradient were fundamental parameters before starting a feasibility study. The telescope specifications and requirements are currently discussed with the industrial partnership.

  1. LISA Telescope Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The results of a LISA telescope sensitivity analysis will be presented, The emphasis will be on the outgoing beam of the Dall-Kirkham' telescope and its far field phase patterns. The computed sensitivity analysis will include motions of the secondary with respect to the primary, changes in shape of the primary and secondary, effect of aberrations of the input laser beam and the effect the telescope thin film coatings on polarization. An end-to-end optical model will also be discussed.

  2. The Multiple Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, J. M.; Ulich, B. L.; Shannon, R. R.; Carleton, N. P.; Geary, J. C.; Latham, D. W.; Angel, J. R. P.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Low, F. J.; Weymann, R. J.

    The Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT), located on top of Mount Hopkins (2600 m) in Arizona, consists of six main telescope systems, each of which is a classical Cassegrain with a 1.8 m diameter parabolic primary with focal ratio f/2.7, and a hyperbolic secondary producing a final f/31.6 for each of the individual telescopes. The most significant departures of the MMT from conventional optical telescope technology are (1) the use of light-weight 'egg-crate' mirrors, which reduced the telescope weight, (2) the use of an alt-azimuth mount, which simplifies the gravitational effects on the structure, (3) the use of a ball-bearing support rather than hydrostatic bearings, resulting in cost savings and less maintenance, (4) the use of spur gear drives rather than worm gears, and (5) the use of multiple coaligned light collectors rather than a single monolithic mirror. Early multiple objective telescopes are discussed, and the early history of the MMT project is given. The design and performance of the telescope are explained, and MMT instrumentation (spectrograph, optical design, detector, infrared photometer, SAO CCD camera) is given. Astronomical research with the telescope is discussed, along with plans for future multiple objective telescopes.

  3. The first VERITAS telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, J.; Atkins, R. W.; Badran, H. M.; Blaylock, G.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Byrum, K. L.; Carter-Lewis, D. A.; Celik, O.; Chow, Y. C. K.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Daniel, M. K.; de la Calle Perez, I.; Dowdall, C.; Dowkontt, P.; Duke, C.; Falcone, A. D.; Fegan, S. J.; Finley, J. P.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L. F.; Gibbs, K.; Gillanders, G.; Glidewell, O. J.; Grube, J.; Gutierrez, K. J.; Gyuk, G.; Hall, J.; Hanna, D.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, S. B.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Jung, I.; Kaaret, P.; Kenny, G. E.; Kieda, D.; Kildea, J.; Knapp, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; LeBohec, S.; Linton, E.; Little, E. K.; Maier, G.; Manseri, H.; Milovanovic, A.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Ogden, P. A.; Ong, R. A.; Petry, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pizlo, F.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E. T.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Sleege, G.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Syson, A.; Toner, J. A.; Valcarcel, L.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; White, R. J.; Williams, D. A.; Wagner, R.

    2006-07-01

    The first atmospheric Cherenkov telescope of VERITAS (the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System) has been in operation since February 2005. We present here a technical description of the instrument and a summary of its performance. The calibration methods are described, along with the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the telescope and comparisons between real and simulated data. The analysis of TeV γ-ray observations of the Crab Nebula, including the reconstructed energy spectrum, is shown to give results consistent with earlier measurements. The telescope is operating as expected and has met or exceeded all design specifications.

  4. ATST telescope pier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, Paul; Manuel, Eric; Dreyer, Oliver; Kärcher, Hans

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world with a 4m aperture primary mirror. The off axis nature of the telescope optical layout, has the proportions of an 8 metre class telescope. Accordingly the instrumentation for solar observations a 16m diameter co-rotating laboratory (Coude Rotator) is also located within the telescope pier. The pier has a lower cylindrical profile with an upper conical section to support both the telescope mount with a 9m bearing diameter and contain the 16m diameter Coudé rotator. The performance of this pier cannot be considered in isolation but must account for ancillary equipment, access and initial installation. The Coude rotator structure and bearing system are of similar size to the telescope base structure and therefore this is the proverbial 'ship in a bottle' problem. This paper documents the competing requirements on the pier design and the balancing of these as the design progresses. Also summarized is the evolution of the design from a conceptual traditional reinforced concrete pier to a composite concrete and steel framed design. The stiffness requirements of the steel frame was a unique challenge for both the theoretical performance and overall design strategy considering constructability. The development of design acceptance criteria for the pier is discussed along with interfacing of the AandE firm responsible for the pier design and the telescope designer responsible for the telescope performance.

  5. Telescope performance verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swart, Gerhard P.; Buckley, David A. H.

    2004-09-01

    While Systems Engineering appears to be widely applied on the very large telescopes, it is lacking in the development of many of the medium and small telescopes currently in progress. The latter projects rely heavily on the experience of the project team, verbal requirements and conjecture based on the successes and failures of other telescopes. Furthermore, it is considered an unaffordable luxury to "close-the-loop" by carefully analysing and documenting the requirements and then verifying the telescope's compliance with them. In this paper the authors contend that a Systems Engineering approach is a keystone in the development of any telescope and that verification of the telescope's performance is not only an important management tool but also forms the basis upon which successful telescope operation can be built. The development of the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) has followed such an approach and is now in the verification phase of its development. Parts of the SALT verification process will be discussed in some detail to illustrate the suitability of this approach, including oversight by the telescope shareholders, recording of requirements and results, design verification and performance testing. Initial test results will be presented where appropriate.

  6. LUTE telescope structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthven, Gregory

    1993-01-01

    The major objective of the Lunar Ultraviolet Transit Experiment (LUTE) Telescope Structural Design Study was to investigate the feasibility of designing an ultralightweight 1-m aperture system within optical performance requirements and mass budget constraints. This study uses the results from our previous studies on LUTE as a basis for further developing the LUTE structural architecture. After summarizing our results in Section 2, Section 3 begins with the overall logic we used to determine which telescope 'structural form' should be adopted for further analysis and weight estimates. Specific telescope component analysis showing calculated fundamental frequencies and how they compare with our derived requirements are included. 'First-order' component stress analyses to ensure telescope optical and structural component (i.e. mirrors & main bulkhead) weights are realistic are presented. Layouts of both the primary and tertiary mirrors showing dimensions that are consistent with both our weight and frequency calculations also form part of Section 3. Section 4 presents our calculated values for the predicted thermally induced primary-to-secondary mirror despace motion due to the large temperature range over which LUTE must operate. Two different telescope design approaches (one which utilizes fused quartz metering rods and one which assumes the entire telescope is fabricated from beryllium) are considered in this analysis. We bound the secondary mirror focus mechanism range (in despace) based on these two telescope configurations. In Section 5 we show our overall design of the UVTA (Ultraviolet Telescope Assembly) via an 'exploded view' of the sub-system. The 'exploded view' is annotated to help aid in the understanding of each sub-assembly. We also include a two view layout of the UVTA from which telescope and telescope component dimensions can be measured. We conclude our study with a set of recommendations not only with respect to the LUTE structural architecture

  7. The MIDAS telescope for microwave detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Amaral Soares, E.; Berlin, A.; Bogdan, M.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Carvalho, W. R.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Facal San Luis, P.; Genat, J. F.; Hollon, N.; Mills, E.; Monasor, M.; Privitera, P.; Ramos de Castro, A.; Reyes, L. C.; Richardson, M.; Rouille d'Orfeuil, B.; Santos, E. M.; Wayne, S.; Williams, C.; Zas, E.; Zhou, J.

    2013-08-01

    We present the design, implementation and data taking performance of the MIcrowave Detection of Air Showers (MIDAS) experiment, a large field of view imaging telescope designed to detect microwave radiation from extensive air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays. This novel technique may bring a tenfold increase in detector duty cycle when compared to the standard fluorescence technique based on detection of ultraviolet photons. The MIDAS telescope consists of a 4.5 m diameter dish with a 53-pixel receiver camera, instrumented with feed horns operating in the commercial extended C-Band (3.4-4.2 GHz). A self-trigger capability is implemented in the digital electronics. The main objectives of this first prototype of the MIDAS telescope - to validate the telescope design, and to demonstrate a large detector duty cycle - were successfully accomplished in a dedicated data taking run at the University of Chicago campus prior to installation at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  8. Enhancing GLAST Science Through Complementary Radio Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvestad, James S.

    2006-12-01

    Radio astronomical observations with state-of-the-art instrumentation will be critical for achieving the maximum science return from the GLAST mission. Radio nterferometers with baselines of thousands of kilometers, such as the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), will provide sub-milliarcsecond imaging of GLAST blazars. High-frequency VLBA imaging, repeatable at intervals of days to weeks, will image the region where gamma-ray flares occur in blazars and help determine the location of the gamma-ray emission. Multi-frequency arcsecond-scale imaging with interferometers having baselines of one to tens of kilometers, particularly the Very Large Array, will provide efficient discrimination among the candidates for unidentified gamma-ray sources. Pulsar timing with single-dish radio telescopes such as the Green Bank Telescope will enable accurate registration of gamma-ray photons with pulsar ephemerides for studies of the pulsar emission mechanisms. Along with these contemporaneous radio/GLAST observing programs, we will discuss briefly some of the recent radio programs that have been conducted in preparation for GLAST launch. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  9. Three revolutions in cosmical science from the telescope to the Sputnik

    SciTech Connect

    Alfven, H. )

    1989-01-01

    The changes in astronomy brought about by the telescope, the radio telescope, and the Sputnik are discussed. The concept of the plasma universe introduced by the development of the Sputnik is explained and compared to previous concepts of the universe. The possibility of a fourth revolution in our concept of the universe is addressed. 17 refs.

  10. Towards a Lunar Epoch of Reionization Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Lazio, J.; MacDowall, R.; Weiler, K.; Burns, J.

    2007-05-01

    Low-frequency radio astronomy is recognized as one of the few areas of astronomy that would clearly benefit from lunar basing. This is particularly true for locations on the far side of the Moon, a unique location because it provides simultaneous shielding from terrestrial interference and from strong solar radio bursts (half of the time). All lunar based instruments are also free of the serious effects of Earth's ionosphere, which is opaque at frequencies below 20-30 MHz and introduces large phase errors below 100 MHz. As a first step, a relatively small radio array on the near side of the Moon (ROLSS, the Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science) has been proposed to NASA's Lunar Sortie Science Opportunity program. ROLSS will be able to image radio emission from coronal mass ejections (type II radio bursts) and fast electron streams (type III bursts), and will also produce the first high-resolution images of the sky at low frequencies. It is possible that solar observations below a few MHz may be limited by the transient lunar ionosphere; a simple experiments to monitor the lunar ionosphere with riometry (LAPS, the Lunar Array Precursor Station), has also been proposed to the Lunar Sortie Science program. Finally, the lunar far side is the best location for large radio arrays designed to produce the highest quality images of redshifted neutral Hydrogen before and during the epoch of reionization. This is an area of fundamental importance, and will require a large number of array antenna elements. One concept for this far-future array is MERIT, the Moon-based Epoch of Reionization Imaging Telescope), which is partly based on technologies to be demonstrated by ROLSS. This work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  11. The School of Galactic Radio Astronomy: An Internet Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, M. W.; Cline, J. D.; Osborne, C. S.; Moffett, D. A.; Case, J.

    2001-12-01

    The School of Galactic Radio Astronomy (SGRA) takes its name from the source SGR-A, the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. SGRA is based at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) as an experience-based school room for use by middle and high school teachers and their students. Their scientific educational experience at SGRA relies on Internet access to PARI's remote-controlled 4.6-m radio telescope which is equipped with a 1420 MHz receiver. The 1420 MHz signal may either be recorded as a spectrum over a 4 MHz bandpass, or mapped over extended regions. Teachers, classes, and Independent Study students access the 4.6-m radio telescope via the SGRA webpage. The SGRA webpage has four components: Radio Astronomy Basics, Observing, Guides, and Logbook. The Radio Astronomy Basics section summarizes the concepts of electromagnetic waves, detection of electromagnetic waves, sources of astronomical radio waves, and how astronomers use radio telescopes. The Observing section is the link to controlling the radio telescope and receiver. The Observing page is designed in the same way a control room at an observatory is designed. Controls include options of source selection, coordinate entry, slew, set, and guide selection, and tracking. Also within the Observing section is the curriculum which presents eight modules based on relevant radio astronomy topics and objects. The Guides webpage contains atlases of the astronomical sky, catalogs, examples of observing sessions, and data reduction software that can be downloaded for analysis offline. The LOGBOOK page is primarily a guestbook, and evaluation form. We acknowledge support from the Space Telescope Science Institute IDEAS Program, and the South Carolina State University PAIR Program.

  12. Sensivity studies for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, Tarek Hassan

    2015-06-01

    Since the creation of the first telescope in the 17th century, every major discovery in astrophysics has been the direct consequence of the development of novel observation techniques, opening new windows in the electromagnetic spectrum. After Karl Jansky discovered serendipitously the first radio source in 1933, Grote Reber built the first parabolic radio telescope in his backyard, planting the seed of a whole new field in astronomy. Similarly, new technologies in the 1950s allowed the establishment of other fields, such as the infrared, ultraviolet or the X-rays. The highest energy end of the electromagnetic spectrum, the γ-ray range, represents the last unexplored window for astronomers and should reveal the most extreme phenomena that take place in the Universe. Given the technical complexity of γ-ray detection and the extremely relative low fluxes, γ-ray astronomy has undergone a slower development compared to other wavelengths. Nowadays, the great success of consecutive space missions together with the development and refinement of new detection techniques from the ground, has allowed outstanding scientific results and has brought gamma-ray astronomy to a worthy level in par with other astronomy fields. This work is devoted to the study and improvement of the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), the next generation of ground based γ-ray detectors, designed to observe photons with the highest energies ever observed from cosmic sources.

  13. Video Telescope Operating Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Divers, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Exotic pet veterinarians frequently have to operate on small animals, and magnification is commonly used. Existing endoscopy equipment can be used with a mechanical arm and telescope to enable video telescope operating microscopy. The additional equipment items and their specifics are described, and several case examples are provided. PMID:26117519

  14. High resolution telescope

    DOEpatents

    Massie, Norbert A.; Oster, Yale

    1992-01-01

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activites. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  15. High resolution telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, N.A.; Oster, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. High resolution telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, N.A.; Oster, Y.

    1990-12-31

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Inherent small telescope projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    As we stand on the verge of substantial access to the new generation of giant telescopes (Gemini, VLT and others) it is timely to consider the range of science that can be undertaken with the substantial number of smaller telescopes that are spread around the globe. While providing survey science input to the giant telescopes, or simultaneous monitoring capability for space missions, is a clearly important role (see previous contributions), it should not be forgotten that there are still many outstanding scientific programmes that can be undertaken on smaller telescopes in their own right. There is a danger of these opportunities being overlooked in the stampede to abandon the smaller telescope 'baggage' in the hope of acquiring access to more giant telescope time. I will try to demonstrate that the most effective and efficient use of all our telescope time requires access to a broad range of complementary facilities. I will therefore describe here some of the projects currently being undertaken with smaller telescopes as well as some of those planned for future facilities such as ROBONET.

  18. Telescope With Reflecting Baffle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linlor, W. I.

    1985-01-01

    Telescope baffle made from combination of reflecting surfaces. In contrast with previous ellipsoidal reflecting baffles, new baffle reflects skew rays more effectively and easier to construct. For infrared telescopes, reflecting baffles better than absorbing baffles because heat load reduced, and not necessary to contend with insufficiency of infrared absorption exhibited by black coatings.

  19. Goddard Robotic Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Takanori; Donato, Davide; Gehrels, Neil; Okajima, Takashi; Ukwatta, Tilan N.

    2009-05-25

    We are constructing the 14'' fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up the Swift/Fermi Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of the Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT) Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Our telescope system consists of the 14'' Celestron Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), the Astro-Physics 1200GTO mount, the Apogee U47 CCD camera, the JMI's electronic focuser, and the Finger Lake Instrumentation's color filter wheel with U, B, V, R and I filters. With the focal reducer, 20'x20' field of view has been achieved. The observatory dome is the Astro Haven's 7 ft clam-shell dome. We started the scientific observations on mid-November 2008. While not observing our primary targets (GRBs and AGNs), we are planning to open our telescope time to the public for having a wider use of our telescope in both a different research field and an educational purpose.

  20. Fiber-linked telescope array: description and laboratory tests of a two-channel prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alleman, J. J.; Reynaud, F.; Connes, P.

    1995-05-01

    We present a complete two-telescope version of a fiber-linked coherent array that is meant to be used for mounting on the dish of a radio telescope. This was built with 20-cm amateur telescopes and includes three different servo subsystems for guiding, nulling of the air path difference, and fiber length control. Laboratory tests of the fully integrated system in front of a star simulator are described.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polidan, Ronald S.

    1991-01-01

    A general overview of the performance and current status of the Hubble Space Telescope is presented. Most key spacecraft subsystems are operating well, equaling or exceeding specifications. Spacecraft thermal properties, power, and communications, are superb. The only spacecraft subsystem to have failed, a gyro, is briefly discussed. All science instruments are functioning extremely well and are returning valuable scientific data. The two significant problems effecting the Hubble Space Telescope science return, the pointing jitter produced by thermally induced bending of the solar array wings and the optical telescope assembly spherical aberration, are discussed and plans to repair both problems are mentioned. The possible restoration of full optical performance of the axial scientific instruments through the use of the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement, currently under study for the 1993 servicing mission, is discussed. In addition, an overview of the scientific performance of the Hubble Space Telescope is presented.

  2. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D.

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The default parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST

  3. The solar optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Objectives of the Solar Optical Telescope are to study the physics of the Sun on the scale at which many of the important physical processes occur and to attain a resolution of 73km on the Sun or 0.1 arc seconds of angular resolution. Topics discussed in this overview of the Solar Optical Telescope include: why is the Solar Optical Telescope needed; current picture of the Sun's atmosphere and convection zone; scientific problems for the Solar Optical Telescope; a description of the telescope; the facility - science management, contamination control, and accessibility to the instruments; the scientific instruments - a coordinated instrument package for unlocking the Sun's secrets; parameters of the coordinated instrument package; science operations from the Space Shuttle; and the dynamic solar atmosphere.

  4. The Radio Sky in the STARLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fultz, C.; Smith, T.; Buck, S.; Harris, R.; Boltuch, D.; Hund, L.; Moffett, D.; Walsh, L.; LaFratta, M.; Castelaz, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    The STARLAB is a portable planetarium created, produced, and distributed by Learning Technologies, Ltd. Upon entering the STARLAB, images are projected onto the ceiling of the planetarium's dome using custom, interchangeable projection cylinders mounted on top of an ultrabright point light source. The STARLAB is ideal for teaching students about astronomy since it may be easily transported to schools across the nation. In order to take advantage of this powerful teaching tool, one of the foremost priorities of the Sensing the Radio Sky project was the development a projection cylinder that would visually interpret the quantitative data taken with radio telescopes and present that information in a form that students could understand and appreciate. The final version of the cylinder demonstrates a variety of topics relevant to an understanding of radio astronomy. When using the Radio Sky cylinder in the STARLAB, teachers may discuss the differences between optical and radio astronomy such as the structure of the Milky Way Galaxy, different sources of electromagnetic radiation, and important radio sources within and outside of the Galaxy. In addition, the flexibility of the cylinder's design allows for a variety of educational activities to be conducted within the STARLAB, all complemented by the Radio Sky cylinder's unique presentation of the Galaxy in radio wavelengths. We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

  5. Large Binocular Telescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.; Salinari, Piero

    1998-08-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Project is a collaboration between institutions in Arizona, Germany, Italy, and Ohio. With the addition of the partners from Ohio State and Germany in February 1997, the Large Binocular Telescope Corporation has the funding required to build the full telescope populated with both 8.4 meter optical trans. The first of two 8.4 meter borosilicate honeycomb primary mirrors for LBT was cast at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab in 1997. The baseline optical configuration of LBT includes adaptive infrared secondaries of a Gregorian design. The F/15 secondaries are undersized to provide a low thermal background focal plane. The interferometric focus combining the light from the two 8.4 meter primaries will reimage the two folded Gregorian focal planes to three central locations. The telescope elevation structure accommodates swing arms which allow rapid interchange of the various secondary and tertiary mirrors. Maximum stiffness and minimal thermal disturbance were important drivers for the design of the telescope in order to provide the best possible images for interferometric observations. The telescope structure accommodates installation of a vacuum bell jar for aluminizing the primary mirrors in-situ on the telescope. The detailed design of the telescope structure was completed in 1997 by ADS Italia (Lecco) and European Industrial Engineering (Mestre). A series of contracts for the fabrication and machining of the telescope structure had been placed at the end of 1997. The final enclosure design was completed at M3 Engineering & Technology (Tucson), EIE and ADS Italia. During 1997, the telescope pier and the concrete ring wall for the rotating enclosure were completed along with the steel structure of the fixed portion of the enclosure. The erection of the steel structure for the rotating portion of the enclosure will begin in the Spring of 1998.

  6. Millisecond solar radio spikes observed at 1420 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, B. P.; Kus, A. J.

    We present results from observations of narrowband solar millisecond radio spikes at 1420 MHz. Observing data were collected between February 2000 and December 2001 with the 15-m radio telescope at the Centre for Astronomy Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, Poland, equipped with a radio spectrograph that covered the 1352-1490 MHz frequency band. The radio spectrograph has 3 MHz frequency resolution and 80 microsecond time resolution. We analyzed the individual radio spike duration, bandwidth and rate of frequency drift. A part of the observed spikes showed well-outlined subtle structures. On dynamic radio spectrograms of the investigated events we notice complex structures formed by numerous individual spikes known as chains of spikes and distinctly different structure of columns. Positions of active regions connected with radio spikes emission were investigated. It turns out that most of them are located near the center of the solar disk, suggesting strong beaming of the spikes emission.

  7. Radio Quiet Protection at the Australian Square Kilometre array site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Smith, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Radio astronomy relies on the detection of very faint signals from the universe. Many radio telescopes are now detrimentally affected by radio frequency interference (RFI), which results from a wide range of active spectrum users such as communications, aviation and satellites. This is why many new radio observatories are being sited at increasingly remote locations.The site for the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders in Australia is the Murchison Radio-Astronomy Observatory (MRO). The MRO is located more than 350km from the nearest population centre and has a large radio-quiet zone that is managed under a range of legislative agreements.In this talk I will describe the radio quiet zone, what protection it gives, how it works and how astronomers interact with the spectrum management authorities.

  8. Space Telecommunications Radio System STRS Cognitive Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briones, Janette C.; Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    Radios today are evolving from awareness toward cognition. A software defined radio (SDR) provides the most capability for integrating autonomic decision making ability and allows the incremental evolution toward a cognitive radio. This cognitive radio technology will impact NASA space communications in areas such as spectrum utilization, interoperability, network operations, and radio resource management over a wide range of operating conditions. NASAs cognitive radio will build upon the infrastructure being developed by Space Telecommunication Radio System (STRS) SDR technology. This paper explores the feasibility of inserting cognitive capabilities in the NASA STRS architecture and the interfaces between the cognitive engine and the STRS radio. The STRS architecture defines methods that can inform the cognitive engine about the radio environment so that the cognitive engine can learn autonomously from experience, and take appropriate actions to adapt the radio operating characteristics and optimize performance.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio continuum and gas reservoir in NGC 3998 (Frank+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, B. S.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T.; Nyland, K.; Serra, P.

    2016-06-01

    The study of the radio continuum and HI emission of NGC 3998 was done with deep radio observations at L-band using the WSRT telescope. Here we provide the radio continuum image and spectral line cube as presented in the paper. The radio continuum was imaged using uniform (robust=-2) weighting, and is at a resolution of roughly 15". The HI data cube was imaged using a robustness of 0.4, with a taper of 30". (2 data files).

  10. The Influence of Wind Turbines on Radio Astronomical Observations in Irbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukovs, D.

    2016-04-01

    The reflection and diffraction of external communication and navigational transmitters from tall constructions and moving blades of wind turbines produce some short-pulse additional electromagnetic interference strong enough to fully disturb radio astronomical observations. The problem of short-pulse electromagnetic interference is distinctive to all radio telescopes surrounded by wind turbines. This problem became significant for Ventspils International Radio Astronomy Centre (VIRAC) after new wind park "Platene" of Winergy Ltd. was built in 2012 and radio telescopes RT-16 and RT-32 renovated and equipped with cryogenic high sensitive receivers. The paper deals with the analysis and evaluation of intensities and probabilities of short-pulse interferences produced by wind park "Platene" and its possible impact on radio astronomical observations at VIRAC radio telescopes.

  11. Imaging interplanetary CMEs at radio frequency from solar polar orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji; Sun, Weiying; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Hao; Yan, Jingye; Wang, Chi; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Shui

    2011-09-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) represent a great concentration of mass and energy input into the lower corona. They have come to be recognized as the major driver of physical conditions change in the Sun-Earth system. Consequently, observations of CMEs are important for understanding and ultimately predicting space weather conditions. This paper discusses a proposed mission, the Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope (SPORT) mission, which will observe the propagation of interplanetary CMEs to distances of near 0.35 AU from the Sun. The orbit of SPORT is an elliptical solar polar orbit. The inclination angle between the orbit and ecliptic plane should be about 90°. The main payload on board SPORT will be an imaging radiometer working at the meter wavelength band (radio telescope), which can follow the propagation of interplanetary CMEs. The images that are obtained by the radio telescope embody the brightness temperature of the objectives. Due to the very large size required for the antenna aperture of the radio telescope, we adopt interferometric imaging technology to reduce it. Interferometric imaging technology is based on indirect spatial frequency domain measurements plus Fourier transformation. The SPORT spacecraft will also be equipped with a set of optical and in situ measurement instruments such as a EUV solar telescope, a solar wind ion instrument, an energetic particle detector, a magnetometer, a wave detector and a solar radio burst spectrometer.

  12. Two Easily Made Astronomical Telescopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, M.; Jacobs, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The directions and diagrams for making a reflecting telescope and a refracting telescope are presented. These telescopes can be made by students out of plumbing parts and easily obtainable, inexpensive, optical components. (KR)

  13. Lunar Interferometric Radio Array: LIRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, J.; Pixton, S.; Roberts, C.; Reyhanoglu, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Lunar Interferometric Radio Array (LIRA) is a performance driven design, with emphasis on utilizing the unique attributes of the far-side of the moon as a platform for radio astronomy. LIRA consists of three independent Lunar Telescope Units (LTUs), autonomously landed on the moon, and a communications relay satellite orbiting at libration point two (L2). Each LTU deploys a large inflatable spheroid, whose underside has been impregnated with a reflective coating. The spheroid is then gradually hardened into a shell by the suns ultraviolet radiation. LIRA achieves broadband capabilities by operating each LTU independently (tuned to offset frequencies), or provides high resolution observations as a three-element interferometer. The interferometer is functional with as few as two elements, yet will achieve greater resolution with additional elements. Thus, LIRA delivers both redundancy and the possibility for future expansion. Data processing, including interferometric synthesis, occurs at an earth-based ground station, eliminating the need for complex onboard data manipulation.

  14. Millimeter and submillimeter observations of nearby radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, G. R.; Patten, Brian M.

    1991-01-01

    Radio galaxies are often observed to be strong long wavelength infrared sources. Twenty-six radio galaxies with strong compact cores were observed at wavelengths near 1 mm with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The detections and upper limits establish the presence of excess infrared emission for almost all of the galaxies in the sample. The exceptions are the BL Lac objects, which have smooth continuous spectra from radio to infrared wavelengths. The spectral energy distributions of the infrared emission from the radio galaxies favor a thermal origin due to emission from cool interstellar dust. The amounts of dust inferred to be present approach those observed in large spirals.

  15. The large binocular telescope.

    PubMed

    Hill, John M

    2010-06-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Observatory is a collaboration among institutions in Arizona, Germany, Italy, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, and Virginia. The telescope on Mount Graham in Southeastern Arizona uses two 8.4 m diameter primary mirrors mounted side by side. A unique feature of the LBT is that the light from the two Gregorian telescope sides can be combined to produce phased-array imaging of an extended field. This cophased imaging along with adaptive optics gives the telescope the diffraction-limited resolution of a 22.65 m aperture and a collecting area equivalent to an 11.8 m circular aperture. This paper describes the design, construction, and commissioning of this unique telescope. We report some sample astronomical results with the prime focus cameras. We comment on some of the technical challenges and solutions. The telescope uses two F/15 adaptive secondaries to correct atmospheric turbulence. The first of these adaptive mirrors has completed final system testing in Firenze, Italy, and is planned to be at the telescope by Spring 2010. PMID:20517352

  16. The GREGOR Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, C.; Lagg, A.; Puschmann, K. G.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Sobotka, M.; Soltau, D.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Volkmer, R.; von der Luehe, O.; Solanki, S. K.; Balthasar, H.; Bello Gonzalez, N.; Berkefeld, T.; Collados Vera, M.; Hofmann, A.; Kneer, F.

    2012-12-01

    The 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope is a new facility for high-resolution observations of the Sun. The telescope is located at the Spanish Observatorio del Teide on Tenerife. The telescope incorporates advanced designs for a foldable-tent dome, an open steel-truss telescope structure, and active and passive means to minimize telescope and mirror seeing. Solar fine structure can be observed with a dedicated suite of instruments: a broad-band imaging system, the "GREGOR Fabry-Perot Interferometer", and the "Grating Infrared Spectrograph". All post-focus instruments benefit from a high-order (multi-conjugate) adaptive optics system, which enables observations close to the diffraction limit of the telescope. The inclusion of a spectrograph for stellar activity studies and the search for solar twins expands the scientific usage of the GREGOR to the nighttime domain. We report on the successful commissioning of the telescope until the end of 2011 and the first steps towards science verification in 2012.

  17. Coordinated observations of PHEMU at radio wavelengths.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Kraus, A.; Mack, K.-H.

    We present preliminary results for our study of mutual phenomena of the Galilean satellites performed at radio wavelengths with the Medicina and Noto antennas of the Istituto di Radioastronomia \\textendash{} INAF, and with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope of the Max-Planck-Institute for Radioastronomy. Measurements of the radio flux density variation occurred during the mutual occultations of Io by Europa and Ganymede were carried out during the PHEMU09 campaign at K- and Q-band. Flux density variations observed for the first time at radio wavelengths are consistent with the typical optical patterns measured when partial occultations occurred. The flux density drops indicate a non-linear dependence with the percentage of overlapped area.

  18. Need a Classroom Stimulus? Introduce Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derman, Samuel

    2010-04-01

    Silently, invisibly, ceaselessly, our planet Earth is showered by radio waves from every direction and from every region of space. This radio energy originates in our solar system, throughout the Milky Way galaxy, and far beyond, out to the remotest reaches of the universe. Detecting and unraveling the origins of these invisible signals is what radio astronomy is all about. This ever-present radiation provides astronomers with an alternate, non-optical window to the universe, revealing exotic and unfamiliar phenomena previously undetected by even the most powerful optical telescopes. For physics teachers, a classroom discussion of these radio discoveries, however brief, offers an opportunity for igniting interest (and possibly a career option) in even the most apathetic of students. This paper describes, first, the background of some of these events, and second (in the appendixes), a selection of numerical problems so that students can derive for themselves the truly mind-stretching features of these celestial objects.

  19. Coherent emission in fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2014-05-01

    The fast (ms) radio bursts reported by Lorimer et al. Science 318, 777 (2007) and Thornton et al. Science 341, 53 (2013) have extremely high brightness temperatures if at the inferred cosmological distances. This implies coherent emission by "bunches" of charges. Fast radio bursts, like the giant pulses of the Crab pulsar, display banded spectra that may be harmonics of plasma frequency emission by plasma turbulence and are inconsistent with emission by charge distributions moving relativistically. We model the emission region as a screen of half-wave dipole radiators resonant around the frequencies of observation, the maximally bright emission mechanism of nonrelativistic charges, and calculate the implied charge bunching. From this we infer the minimum electron energy required to overcome electrostatic repulsion. If fast radio bursts are the counterparts of Galactic events, their Galactic counterparts may be detected from any direction above the horizon by radio telescopes in their far sidelobes or by small arrays of dipoles.

  20. Gamma-Rays from Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madejski, Greg

    2016-07-01

    In this presentation, I will overview the properties of radio galaxies gleaned from observations of their gamma-ray emission, including that arising from the nuclear, and extended components. The gamma-ray spectra of radio galaxies measured by the Fermi-LAT and ground based Air Cerenkov telescopes will be considered in the context of their broad-band emission. The presentation will cover the most compelling models for emission processes, and will attempt to constrain the location of the nuclear gamma-ray emission. This will be compared to the observational properties of blazars, which are believed to be radio galaxies with jets pointing along our line of sight. Finally, I will discuss our best estimates for the contribution of unresolved radio galaxies to the diffuse gamma-ray emission.

  1. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  2. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  3. Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Naidu, Arun; Joshi, B. C.; Roy, Jayashree; Kate, G.; Pethe, Kaiwalya; Galande, Shridhar; Jamadar, Sachin; Mahajan, S. P.; Patil, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a case study of Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) payload to probe the corona and the solar disturbances at solar offsets greater than 2 solar radii, i.e., at frequencies below 30 MHz. The LORE can be complimentary to the planned Indian solar mission, “Aditya-L1” and its other payloads as well as synergistic to ground-based interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations, which are routinely carried out by the Ooty Radio Telescope. We discuss the baseline design and technical details of the proposed LORE and its particular suitability for providing measurements on the detailed time and frequency structure of fast drifting type-III and slow drifting type-II radio bursts with unprecedented time and frequency resolutions. We also brief the gonio-polarimetry, which is possible with better-designed antennas and state-of-the-art electronics, employing FPGAs and an intelligent data management system. These would enable us to make a wide range of studies, such as nonlinear plasma processes in the Sun-Earth distance, in-situ radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary CME driven shocks, nature of ICMEs driving decelerating IP shocks and space weather effects of solar wind interaction regions.

  4. The Auger Engineering Radio Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Benjamin

    2012-11-01

    High and ultra-high energy cosmic rays hitting the Earth's atmosphere cause extensive air showers (EAS). In recent years, these cosmic rays have been extensively studied at the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. The EAS mainly consist of charged particles, especially electrons and positrons, which cause electro-magnetic emission in the MHz range by interaction with the Earth's magnetic field. To measure this radio emission, AERA, the Auger Engineering Radio Array, was deployed in October 2010 and commenced regular data acquisition in April 2011. AERA was designed as an engineering array for technology and methodology development towards future large-scale radio arrays. It will allow studies on the radio emission mechanism and the physics capabilities of the detection technique. AERA's unique site within the surface detector array (SD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides the possibility of coincident hybrid and super-hybrid EAS detection especially in overlap with the fluorescence telescopes Coihueco and HEAT. Besides a description of the setup, we present an overview of analyses of commissioning data taken between November 2010 and April 2011. Also, we show the first hybrid and self-triggered events detected with AERA in April 2011.

  5. Self-correction of telescope surface errors using a correlating focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, T. J.; Napier, P. J.

    The effects on the performance of a large radio telescope of aberrations such as reflector surface errors, defocussing, coma and pointing errors can be removed if the telesocpe is equipped with an array feed in its focal plane. If the cross correlations between all possible pairs of array elements are measured, then aberration-free images of radio sources can be obtained. Because of the great cost of building very precise large structures in space, in the future this concept may offer the possibility of a more economical design for a large, high frequency, space-born radio telescope.

  6. Telescopic vision contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Eric J.; Beer, R. Dirk; Arianpour, Ashkan; Ford, Joseph E.

    2011-03-01

    We present the concept, optical design, and first proof of principle experimental results for a telescopic contact lens intended to become a visual aid for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), providing magnification to the user without surgery or external head-mounted optics. Our contact lens optical system can provide a combination of telescopic and non-magnified vision through two independent optical paths through the contact lens. The magnified optical path incorporates a telescopic arrangement of positive and negative annular concentric reflectors to achieve 2.8x - 3x magnification on the eye, while light passing through a central clear aperture provides unmagnified vision.

  7. Lear jet telescope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, E. F.; Goorvitch, D.; Dix, M. G.; Hitchman, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The telescope system was designed as a multi-user facility for observations of celestial objects at infrared wavelengths, where ground-based observations are difficult or impossible due to the effects of telluric atmospheric absorption. The telescope is mounted in a Lear jet model 24B which typically permits 70 min. of observing per flight at altitudes in excess of 45,000 ft (13 km). Telescope system installation is discussed, along with appropriate setup and adjustment procedures. Operation of the guidance system is also explained, and checklists are provided which pertain to the recommended safe operating and in-flight trouble-shooting procedures for the equipment.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-02-01

    An overview of the mission of the Hubble Space Telescope, a joint project between NASA and the European Space Agency which will be used to study deep space, as well as our solar system is presented. The video contains animations depicting the Hubble Space Telescope in orbit, as well as footage of scientists at the Space Telescope Science Institute making real time observations. The images Hubble acquires will be downloaded into a database that contains images of over 19,000,0000 celestial objects called the Star Catalog.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the mission of the Hubble Space Telescope, a joint project between NASA and the European Space Agency which will be used to study deep space, as well as our solar system is presented. The video contains animations depicting the Hubble Space Telescope in orbit, as well as footage of scientists at the Space Telescope Science Institute making real time observations. The images Hubble acquires will be downloaded into a database that contains images of over 19,000,000 celestial objects called the Star Catalog.

  10. Ritchey-Chretien Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosin, S.; Amon, M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A Ritchey-Chretien telescope is described which was designed to respond to images located off the optical axis by using two transparent flat plates positioned in the ray path of the image. The flat plates have a tilt angle relative to the ray path to compensate for astigmatism introduced by the telescope. The tilt angle of the plates is directly proportional to the off axis angle of the image. The plates have opposite inclination angles relative to the ray paths. A detector which is responsive to the optical image as transmitted through the plates is positioned approximately on the sagittal focus of the telescope.

  11. Multi-use lunar telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genet, Russell M.; Genet, David R.; Talent, David L.; Drummond, Mark; Hine, Butler P.; Boyd, Louis J.; Trueblood, Mark

    1992-01-01

    The objective of multi-use telescopes is to reduce the initial and operational costs of space telescopes to the point where a fair number of telescopes, a dozen or so, would be affordable. The basic approach is to develop a common telescope, control system, and power and communications subsystem that can be used with a wide variety of instrument payloads, i.e., imaging CCD cameras, photometers, spectrographs, etc. By having such a multi-use and multi-user telescope, a common practice for earth-based telescopes, development cost can be shared across many telescopes, and the telescopes can be produced in economical batches.

  12. Multi-use lunar telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Mark; Hine, Butler; Genet, Russell; Genet, David; Talent, David; Boyd, Louis; Trueblood, Mark; Filippenko, Alexei V. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The objective of multi-use telescopes is to reduce the initial and operational costs of space telescopes to the point where a fair number of telescopes, a dozen or so, would be affordable. The basic approach is to develop a common telescope, control system, and power and communications subsystem that can be used with a wide variety of instrument payloads, i.e., imaging CCD cameras, photometers, spectrographs, etc. By having such a multi-use and multi-user telescope, a common practice for earth-based telescopes, development cost can be shared across many telescopes, and the telescopes can be produced in economical batches.

  13. The AMiBA Hexapod Telescope Mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Patrick M.; Kesteven, Michael; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Jiang, Homin; Lin, Kai-Yang; Umetsu, Keiichi; Huang, Yau-De; Raffin, Philippe; Chen, Ke-Jung; Ibañez-Romano, Fabiola; Chereau, Guillaume; Huang, Chih-Wei Locutus; Chen, Ming-Tang; Ho, Paul T. P.; Pausch, Konrad; Willmeroth, Klaus; Altamirano, Pablo; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Su-Wei; Han, Chih-Chiang; Kubo, Derek; Li, Chao-Te; Liao, Yu-Wei; Liu, Guo-Chin; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Oshiro, Peter; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Wei, Ta-Shun; Wu, Jiun-Huei Proty; Birkinshaw, Mark; Chiueh, Tzihong; Lancaster, Katy; Lo, Kwok Yung; Martin, Robert N.; Molnar, Sandor M.; Patt, Ferdinand; Romeo, Bob

    2009-04-01

    The Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) is the largest hexapod astronomical telescope in current operation. We present a description of this novel hexapod mount with its main mechanical components—the support cone, universal joints, jack screws, and platform—and outline the control system with the pointing model and the operating modes that are supported. The AMiBA hexapod mount performance is verified based on optical pointing tests and platform photogrammetry measurements. The photogrammetry results show that the deformations in the inner part of the platform are less than 120 μm rms. This is negligible for optical pointing corrections, radio alignment, and radio phase errors for the currently operational seven-element compact configuration. The optical pointing error in azimuth and elevation is successively reduced by a series of corrections to about 0farcm 4 rms which meets our goal for the seven-element target specifications.

  14. Detecting axionlike particles with gamma ray telescopes.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2007-12-01

    We propose that axionlike particles (ALPs) with a two-photon vertex, consistent with all astrophysical and laboratory bounds, may lead to a detectable signature in the spectra of high-energy gamma-ray sources. This occurs as a result of gamma rays being converted into ALPs in the magnetic fields of efficient astrophysical accelerators according to the "Hillas criterion", such as jets of active galactic nuclei or hot spots of radio galaxies. The discovery of such an effect is possible by GLAST in the 1-100 GeV range and by ground-based gamma-ray telescopes in the TeV range. PMID:18233353

  15. Planetary Radar with the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Alyson; Ford, John M.; Watts, Galen

    2014-11-01

    The large aperture and sensitive receivers of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) make it an attractive receiving station for bistatic radar experiments. Consequently, it has been used as a receive station for radar observations since its commissioning in 2001. The GBT is equipped with receivers for all common planetary radar transmitters at P, S, and X band, as well as for future radars at up to 86 GHz. We describe the technical capabilities of the GBT and its instrumentation in terms of its tracking and RF performance, the available radar backends, and select science results obtained through the use of the GBT.

  16. CFRP solutions for the innovative telescopes design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampini, Francesco; Marchiori, Gianpietro

    2006-02-01

    The new frontiers of the research in the astronomic field require the use of more and more advanced high-performance structures. Only an adequate technological innovation of conventional telescopes and radio-telescopes allow to obtain structures able to meet the new specification of the projects. Besides, technological innovation is founded not only on the identification of more and more sophisticated mechanisms and optical instruments, but also on the development of new materials and manufacturing processes for the entire structure that constitute an instrument such as a telescope or a radio-telescope. Among these materials, the use of the carbon fibre is highly important. This material, which is already widely used in the aerospace and automotive fields, shall join also the astronomic field for ground instruments. Thanks to the experience acquired with instruments like ALMA, the industry of composites is now able to guarantee different solutions at relatively low costs that allow the instruments of new generation to move extremely important steps in the development of scientific research. Not just materials, but also processes, through which the materials are worked and manufactured, are extremely important. The use of technologies, such as hand lay-up vacuum bag, compression moulding, table rolling of composite tubes, filament winding, poltrusion and Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM), allow to identify the ideal solution both for big dimension objects, such as backup structure, main mirror structure of quadripod legs, and relatively small objects, such as actuators, adjusters system, etc. The wide choice, concerning the use of composite materials, and their techniques of production, allow the technicians to satisfy the exigencies of astronomers be they addressed to simple control of the weights or of the stiffness of the structures, or to specific thermal behaviour of the piece itself.

  17. Control systems of the large millimeter telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, W.; Souccar, K.

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents the analysis results (in terms of settling time, bandwidth, and servo error in wind disturbances) of four control systems designed for the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). The first system, called PP, consists of the proportional and integral (PI) controllers in the rate and position loops, and is widely used in the antenna and radio telescope industry. The analysis shows that the PP control system's performance is remarkably good when compared to similar control systems applied to typical antennas. This performance is achieved because the LMT structure is exceptionally rigid; however, it does not meet the stringent LMT pointing requirements. The second system, called PL, consists of the PI controller in the rate loop, and the linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) controller in the position loop. This type of controller is implemented in the NASA Deep Space Network antennas, where pointing accuracy is twice that of the PP control system. The third system, called LP, consists of the LQG controller in the rate loop, and the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller in the position loop. This type of loop has not been yet implemented at known antennas or radio telescopes, but the analysis shows that its pointing accuracy is the ten times better than the PP control system. The fourth system, called LL, consists of the LQG controller in both the rate loop and the position loop. It is the best of the four, with accuracy 250 times better than the PP system. It is thus worth further investigation to identify implementation challenges for telescopes with high pointing requirements.

  18. RADIO ALTIMETERS

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A radio ranging device is described which utilizes a superregenerative oscillator having alternate sending and receiving phases with an intervening ranging interval between said phases, means for varying said ranging interval, means responsive to an on-range noise reduction condition for stopping said means for varying the ranging interval and indicating means coupled to the ranging interval varying means and calibrated in accordance with one-half the product of the ranging interval times the velocity of light whereby the range is indicated.

  19. Composite Space Telescope Truss

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA engineers are recycling an idea for a lightweight, compact space telescope structure from the early 1990s. The 315 struts and 84 nodes were originally designed to enable spacewalking astronaut...

  20. Hubble Space Telescope Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of a sky full of glittering jewels. The HST peered into the Sagittarius star cloud, a narrow dust free region, providing this spectacular glimpse of a treasure chest full of stars.

  1. Webb Telescope: Planetary Evolution

    NASA Video Gallery

    Stars and planets form in the dark, inside vast, cold clouds of gas and dust. The James Webb Space Telescope's large mirror and infrared sensitivity will let astronomers peer inside dusty knots whe...

  2. Building a Telescope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linas, Chris F.

    1988-01-01

    Provides information on the parts, materials, prices, dimensions, and tools needed for the construction of a telescope that can be used in high school science laboratories. Includes step-by-step directions and a diagram for assembly. (RT)

  3. Telescopes and space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Maran, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in contemporary astronomy and astrophysics is shown to depend on complementary investigations with sensitive telescopes operating in several wavelength regions, some of which can be on the Earth's surface and others of which must be in space.

  4. The Onsala Twin Telescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, R.

    2013-08-01

    This paper described the Onsala Twin Telescope project. The project aims at the construction of two new radio telescopes at the Onsala Space Observatory, following the VLBI2010 concept. The project starts in 2013 and is expected to be finalized within 4 years. Z% O. Rydbeck. Chalmers Tekniska Högskola, Göteborg, ISBN 91-7032-621-5, 407-823, 1991. B. Petrachenko, A. Niell, D. Behrend, B. Corey, J. Böhm, P. Charlot, A. Collioud, J. Gipson, R. Haas, Th. Hobiger, Y. Koyama, D. MacMillan, Z. Malkin, T. Nilsson, A. Pany, G. Tuccari, A. Whitney, and J. Wresnik. Design Aspects of the VLBI2010 System. NASA/TM-2009-214180, 58 pp., 2009. R. Haas, G. Elgered, J. Löfgren, T. Ning, and H.-G. Scherneck. Onsala Space Observatory - IVS Network Station. In K. D. Baver and D. Behrend, editors, International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2011 Annual Report, NASA/TP-2012-217505, 88-91, 2012. H.-G. Scherneck, G. Elgered, J. M. Johansson, and B. O. Rönnäng. Phys. Chem. Earth, Vol. 23, No. 7-8, 811-823, 1998. A. R. Whitney. Ph.D. thesis, Dept. of Electrical engineering, MIT Cambridge, MA., 1974. B. A. Harper, J. D. Kepert, and J. D. Ginger. Guidelines for converting between various wind averaging periods in tropical cyclone conditions. WMO/TD-No. 1555, 64 pp., 2010 (available at \\url{http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/www/tcp/documents/WMO_TD_1555_en.pdf})

  5. Large Binocular Telescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.

    1997-03-01

    The large binocular telescope (LBT) project have evolved from concepts first proposed in 1985. The present partners involved in the design and construction of this 2 by 8.4 meter binocular telescope are the University of Arizona, Italy represented by the Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri and the Research Corporation based in Tucson, Arizona. These three partners have committed sufficient funds to build the enclosure and the telescope populated with a single 8.4 meter optical train -- approximately 40 million dollars (1989). Based on this commitment, design and construction activities are now moving forward. Additional partners are being sought. The next mirror to be cast at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab in the fall of 1996 will be the first borosilicate honeycomb primary for LBT. The baseline optical configuration of LBT includes wide field Cassegrain secondaries with optical foci above the primaries to provide a corrected one degree field at F/4. The infrared F/15 secondaries are a Gregorian design to allow maximum flexibility for adaptive optics. The F/15 secondaries are undersized to provide a low thermal background focal plane which is unvignetted over a 4 arcminute diameter field-of-view. The interferometric focus combining the light from the two 8.4 meter primaries will reimage two folded Gregorian focal planes to a central location. The telescope elevation structure accommodates swing arms which allow rapid interchange of the various secondary and tertiary mirrors. Maximum stiffness and minimal thermal disturbance continue to be important drivers for the detailed design of the telescope. The telescope structure accommodates installation of a vacuum bell jar for aluminizing the primary mirrors in-situ on the telescope. The detailed design of the telescope structure will be completed in 1996 by ADS Italia (Lecco) and European Industrial Engineering (Mestre). The final enclosure design is now in progress at M3 Engineering (Tucson), EIE and ADS Italia

  6. Hubble Space Telescope Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This image illustrates the overall Hubble Space Telescope (HST) configuration. The HST is the product of a partnership between NASA, European Space Agency Contractors, and the international community of astronomers. It is named after Edwin P. Hubble, an American Astronomer who discovered the expanding nature of the universe and was the first to realize the true nature of galaxies. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The major elements of the HST are the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), the Support System Module (SSM), and the Scientific Instruments (SI). The HST is approximately the size of a railroad car, with two cylinders joined together and wrapped in a silvery reflective heat shield blanket. Wing-like solar arrays extend horizontally from each side of these cylinders, and dish-shaped anternas extend above and below the body of the telescope. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Connecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company of Sunnyvale, California produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  7. Optical tracking telescope compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbart, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    In order to minimize the effects of parameter variations in the dynamics of an optical tracking telescope, a model referenced parameter adaptive control system is described that - in conjunction with more traditional forms of compensation - achieves a reduction of rms pointing error by more than a factor of six. The adaptive compensation system utilizes open loop compensation, closed loop compensation, and model reference compensation to provide the precise input to force telescope axis velocity to follow the ideal velocity.

  8. LISA Telescope Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) for the detection of Gravitational Waves is a very long baseline interferometer which will measure the changes in the distance of a five million kilometer arm to picometer accuracies. As with any optical system, even one with such very large separations between the transmitting and receiving, telescopes, a sensitivity analysis should be performed to see how, in this case, the far field phase varies when the telescope parameters change as a result of small temperature changes.

  9. Monitoring Radio Frequency Interference in Southwest Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The radio signals received from astronomical objects are extremely weak. Because of this, radio sources are easily shrouded by interference from devices such as satellites and cell phone towers. Radio astronomy is very susceptible to this radio frequency interference (RFI). Possibly even worse than complete veiling, weaker interfering signals can contaminate the data collected by radio telescopes, possibly leading astronomers to mistaken interpretations. To help promote student awareness of the connection between radio astronomy and RFI, an inquiry-based science curriculum was developed to allow high school students to determine RFI levels in their communities. The Quiet Skies Project_the result of a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)_encourages students to collect and analyze RFI data and develop conclusions as a team. Because the project focuses on electromagnetic radiation, it is appropriate for physics, physical science, chemistry, or general science classes. My class-about 50 students from 15 southwest Virginia high schools-participated in the Quiet Skies Project and were pioneers in the use of the beta version of the Quiet Skies Detector (QSD), which is used to detect RFI. Students have been involved with the project since 2005 and have collected and shared data with NRAO. In analyzing the data they have noted some trends in RFI in Southwest Virginia.

  10. The radio source around Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Duncan, R. A.; Lim, J.; Nelson, G. J.; Drake, S. A.; Kundu, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution radio observations of the peculiar southern star Eta Carinae, made with the Australian Telescope. The images, at 8 and 9 GHz with a resolution of 1.0 arcsec show a source of dimension 10 arcsec and total flux of 0.7 Jy dominated by a strong central peak. The radio emission is unpolarized and offers no support to models which invoke degenerate stars or more exotic objects within the core of Eta Car. In these data we find no evidence for more than one energy source in the core with arcsecond separations as some infrared observations have suggested. Several levels of structure are evident in the radio image, which shows symmetry on the larger scales. Conventional formulae for stellar wind radio sources give a mass loss rate of order 3 x 10(exp -4) Solar Mass/yr based on the radio flux in the central peak, which yields a wind momentum flux of order 20% of the momentum flux available from the star's radiation field. The radio emission at these frequencies is consistent with thermal emission from gas flowing away from a 'luminous blue variable' star (LBV) Eta Car is probably the brightest thermal stellar wind radio source in the sky.

  11. WSRT Radio Observations of SN 2010br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, A. J.; Kamble, A. P.; Paragi, Z.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Granot, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Garrett, M. A.; Strom, R.

    2010-05-01

    We observed the position of the Type Ibc supernova SN 2010br (CBET 2245, ATel #2587) with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope at 4.8 GHz, at May 11 14.34 UT to May 12 2.31 UT. We do not detect a radio source at the position of the supernova (CBET 2245). The three-sigma rms noise in the map around that position is 102 microJy per beam, and the formal flux measurement for a point source is 42 ± 34 microJy.

  12. WSRT Radio Observations of PTF10bzf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, A. P.; van der Horst, A. J.; Paragi, Z.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Granot, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Garrett, M. A.; Strom, R.

    2010-03-01

    We observed the position of the broad-line Type Ic supernova PTF10bzf (ATel 2470) with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope at 4.8 GHz, at March 13 17.89 UT to March 14 1.45 UT. We do not detect a radio source at the position of the supernova (ATel #2470). The three-sigma rms noise in the map around that position is 126 microJy per beam, and the formal flux measurement for a point source is 30 ± 42 microJy.

  13. Optimized trigger for ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray and neutrino observations with the low frequency radio array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K.; Mevius, M.; Scholten, O.; Anderson, J. M.; van Ardenne, A.; Arts, M.; Avruch, M.; Asgekar, A.; Bell, M.; Bennema, P.; Bentum, M.; Bernadi, G.; Best, P.; Boonstra, A.-J.; Bregman, J.; van de Brink, R.; Broekema, C.; Brouw, W.; Brueggen, M.; Buitink, S.; Butcher, H.; van Cappellen, W.; Ciardi, B.; Coolen, A.; Damstra, S.; Dettmar, R.; van Diepen, G.; Dijkstra, K.; Donker, P.; Doorduin, A.; Drost, M.; van Duin, A.; Eisloeffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Garrett, M.; Gerbers, M.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Grit, T.; Gruppen, P.; Gunst, A.; van Haarlem, M.; Hoeft, M.; Holties, H.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, L. A.; Huijgen, A.; James, C.; de Jong, A.; Kant, D.; Kooistra, E.; Koopman, Y.; Koopmans, L.; Kuper, G.; Lambropoulos, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Loose, M.; Maat, P.; Mallary, C.; McFadden, R.; Meulman, H.; Mol, J.-D.; Morawietz, J.; Mulder, E.; Munk, H.; Nieuwenhuis, L.; Nijboer, R.; Norden, M. J.; Noordam, J.; Overeem, R.; Paas, H.; Pandey, V. N.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.; Reich, W.; de Reijer, J.; Renting, A.; Riemers, P.; Roettgering, H.; Romein, J.; Roosjen, J.; Ruiter, M.; Schoenmakers, A.; Schoonderbeek, G.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Stappers, B.; Steinmetz, M.; Stiepel, H.; Stuurwold, K.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Ter Veen, S.; Vermeulen, R.; de Vos, M.; Vogt, C.; van der Wal, E.; Weggemans, H.; Wijnholds, S.; Wise, M.; Wucknitz, O.; Yattawatta, S.; van Zwieten, J.

    2012-02-01

    When an ultra-high energy neutrino or cosmic-ray strikes the Lunar surface a radio-frequency pulse is emitted. We plan to use the LOFAR radio telescope to detect these pulses. In this work we propose an efficient trigger implementation for LOFAR optimized for the observation of short radio pulses.

  14. Radio tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, J. C.; Komarek, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    The principles and techniques of deep space radio tracking are described along with the uses of tracking data in navigation and radio science. Emphasis is placed on the measurement functions of radio tracking.

  15. The Multiple-Mirror Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carleton, Nathaniel P.; Hoffmann, William F.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the basic design and principle of operating an optical-infrared telescope, the MMT. This third largest telescope in the world represents a new stage in telescope design; it uses a cluster of six reflecting telescopes, and relies on an automatic sensing and control system. (GA)

  16. The Future of Small Telescopes In The New Millennium. Volume II - The Telescopes We Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswalt, T. D.

    2003-06-01

    An invaluable reference for any student, scientist or administrator, using small telescopes for research. An essential collection of data and opinions for those charged with setting scientific and funding priorities. This three-volume set, The Future of Small Telescopes in the New Millennium details the essential roles that small telescopes should play in 21st century science and how their future productivity can be maximized. Over 70 experts from all corners of the international astronomical community have created a definitive reference on the present and future of "big science with small telescopes." Despite highly publicized closures of telescopes smaller than 4-m in aperture at national facilities and their omission from national science priority studies, the oft-lamented demise of the small telescope has been greatly exaggerated. In fact, the future of these workhorses of astronomy will be brighter than ever if creative steps are taken now. This three-volume set defines the essential roles that small telescopes should play in 21st century science and the ways in which a productive future for them can be realized. A wide cross-section of the astronomical community has contributed to a definitive assessment of the present and a vision for the future. Volume 2: The Telescopes We Use Small cost-effective optical-, radio- and space-based facilities face similar problems in scientific prioritization and funding. Volume 2 highlights how current small facilities are evolving to meet the scientific priorities and economical realities of the 21st century through standardization of instrumentation, use of off-the-shelf technology, specialization, optical improvements, new modes of scheduling, automation, and internet access. The Future of Small Telescopes in the New Millennium is a fundamental resource for those looking to undertake new projects with small telescopes, for those that are responsible for their operation, and for those called upon to help set scientific

  17. Wide field imaging problems in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, T. J.; Golap, K.; Bhatnagar, S.

    2005-03-01

    The new generation of synthesis radio telescopes now being proposed, designed, and constructed face substantial problems in making images over wide fields of view. Such observations are required either to achieve the full sensitivity limit in crowded fields or for surveys. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA Consortium, Tech. Rep., 2004), now being developed by an international consortium of 15 countries, will require advances well beyond the current state of the art. We review the theory of synthesis radio telescopes for large fields of view. We describe a new algorithm, W projection, for correcting the non-coplanar baselines aberration. This algorithm has improved performance over those previously used (typically an order of magnitude in speed). Despite the advent of W projection, the computing hardware required for SKA wide field imaging is estimated to cost up to $500M (2015 dollars). This is about half the target cost of the SKA. Reconfigurable computing is one way in which the costs can be decreased dramatically.

  18. SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE, FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE, AND THE BLAZAR SEQUENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Sambruna, R. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Maraschi, L.

    2010-02-10

    Using public Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and Swift Burst Alert Telescope observations, we constructed the first sample of blazars selected at both hard X-rays and gamma rays. Studying its spectral properties, we find a luminosity dependence of the spectral slopes at both energies. Specifically, luminous blazars, generally classified as flat spectrum radio quasars, have hard continua in the medium-hard X-ray range but soft continua in the LAT gamma-ray range (photon indices GAMMA{sub X} {approx}< 2 and GAMMA{sub G} {approx}> 2), while lower luminosity blazars, classified as BL Lacs, have opposite behavior, i.e., soft X-ray and hard gamma-ray continua (GAMMA{sub X} {approx}> 2.4 and GAMMA{sub G} < 2). The trends are confirmed by detailed Monte Carlo simulations explicitly taking into account the observational biases of both instruments. Our results support the so-called blazar sequence which was originally based on radio samples of blazars and radio luminosities. We also argue that the X-ray-to-gamma-ray continua of blazars may provide independent insights into the physical conditions around the jet, complementing/superseding the ambiguities of the traditional classification based on optical properties.

  19. SPA Meteor Section Results: Radio Draconids 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Alastair

    2012-08-01

    Information determined from an analysis by the SPA Meteor Section of radio meteor data collected during the 2011 Draconid epoch is presented and discussed. A strong single maximum for the shower was found on October 8, with a mean time of 20 h05 m ± 5 m UT, and that activity was above half the maximum flux level between ˜ 19 h20 m to 20 h45 m UT. A comparison is given too with the IMO's preliminary visual and video findings, which suggested a quite close correlation between all three observing techniques in what was detected. A possibility that more somewhat larger particles/brighter meteors may have been present between ˜ 19 h40 m to 20 h20 m UT is noted too.

  20. Study of Radio sources and interferences detected by MEXART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva Hernandez, P.; Gonzalez Esparza, J. A.; Carrillo, A.; Andrade, E.; Jeyacumar, S.; Kurtz, S.

    2007-05-01

    The Mexican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART) is a radio telescope that will perform studies of solar wind disturbances using the Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) technique. The radiotelescope is its final calibration stage, and in this work we report two testings: the interference signals detected around the operation frequency, and the transit of the main radio sources detected by individual lines of 64 dipoles. These radio sources are: Sun, Casiopea, Crab nebula, Cygnus and Virgo. These testings allow us to know the response of the array elements in order to calibrate them. The final operation of the MEXART requires that the signal detected and transmitted by each East-West line of 64 dipoles arrives at the butler matrix (control room) with the same phase and amplitude.

  1. Cyclostationary approaches for spatial RFI mitigation in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellbourg, Grégory; Weber, Rodolphe; Capdessus, Cécile; Boonstra, Albert-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Radio astronomical observations are increasingly corrupted by radio frequency interferences (RFIs), and real time filtering algorithms are becoming essential. In this article, it is shown how spatial processing techniques can limit the impact of the incoming RFIs for phased array radio telescopes. The proposed approaches are based on estimation of the RFI spatial signature. It requires the diagonalization of either the classic correlation matrix or the cyclic correlation matrix of the array. Different diagonalization techniques are compared. Then, RFI detection and RFI filtering techniques are illustrated through simulations on data acquired with the Low Frequency Array Radio telescope, LOFAR. The originality of the study is the use of the cyclostationarity property, in order to improve the spatial separation between cosmic sources and RFIs.

  2. MULTI-WAVELENGTH AFTERGLOWS OF FAST RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Gao, He; Zhang, Bing

    2014-09-01

    The physical origin of fast radio bursts (FRBs) is unknown. Detecting electromagnetic counterparts to FRBs in other wavelengths is essential to measure their distances and to determine their physical origin. Assuming that at least some of them are of cosmological origin, we calculate their afterglow light curves in multiple wavelengths (X-rays, optical, and radio) by assuming a range of total kinetic energies and redshifts. We focus on forward shock emission, but also consider the possibility that some of the FRBs might have bright reverse shock emission. In general, FRB afterglows are too faint to be detected by current detectors. Only if an FRB has a very low radiative efficiency in radio (hence, a very large kinetic energy), and when it is close enough to observe can its afterglow be detected in the optical and radio bands. We discuss observational strategies for detecting these faint afterglows using future telescopes such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and Expanded Very Large Array.

  3. GRB 030329: 3 years of radio afterglow monitoring.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, A J; Kamble, A; Wijers, R A M J; Resmi, L; Bhattacharya, D; Rol, E; Strom, R; Kouveliotou, C; Oosterloo, T; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2007-05-15

    Radio observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are essential for our understanding of the physics of relativistic blast waves, as they enable us to follow the evolution of GRB explosions much longer than the afterglows in any other wave band. We have performed a 3-year monitoring campaign of GRB 030329 with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescopes and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. Our observations, combined with observations at other wavelengths, have allowed us to determine the GRB blast wave physical parameters, such as the total burst energy and the ambient medium density, as well as to investigate the jet nature of the relativistic outflow. Further, by modelling the late-time radio light curve of GRB 030329, we predict that the Low-Frequency Array (30-240 MHz) will be able to observe afterglows of similar GRBs, and constrain the physics of the blast wave during its non-relativistic phase. PMID:17293318

  4. Transit telescope designs optimized for multiple object spectroscopy with fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Instruments to simultaneously study the spectra of many objects in the field of view of a telescope can be made using fused silica fibers. The spectrograph at the 2.3m telescope of the University of Arizona has been modified for such operation, and is used routinely to study the dynamics of galaxy clusters. Consideration has been given to how the multifiber technique can best be used to obtain spectra of the many faint objects identified by deep transit survey instruments and new space and radio telescopes. A transit survey such as that planned by McGraw et al. (1980), with CCDs at the focus of a 2m transit telescope, will identify objects down to 24th magnitude, and down to 22nd magnitude will give very complete data on variability and optical energy distribution. A telescope with much larger aperture is required for spectroscopic follow up. It is suggested that large telescopes dedicated to this type of work can be made and operated for only a fraction of the cost of a general-purpose telescope.

  5. The South Pole Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhl, J.E.; Ade, P.A.R.; Carlstrom, J.E.; Cho, H.M.; Crawford,T.; Dobbs, M.; Greer, C.H.; Halverson, N.W.; Holzapfel, W.L.; Lanting,T.M.; Lee, A.T.; Leitch, E.M.; Leong, J.; Lu, W.; Lueker, M.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S.S.; Mohr, J.J.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Runyan, M.C.; Schwan, D.; Sharp, M.K.; Spieler, H.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A.A.

    2004-11-04

    A new 10 meter diameter telescope is being constructed for deployment at the NSF South Pole research station. The telescope is designed for conducting large-area millimeter and sub-millimeter wave surveys of faint, low contrast emission, as required to map primary and secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. To achieve the required sensitivity and resolution, the telescope design employs an off-axis primary with a 10 m diameter clear aperture. The full aperture and the associated optics will have a combined surface accuracy of better than 20 microns rms to allow precision operation in the submillimeter atmospheric windows. The telescope will be surrounded with a large reflecting ground screen to reduce sensitivity to thermal emission from the ground and local interference. The optics of the telescope will support a square degree field of view at 2mm wavelength and will feed a new 1000-element micro-lithographed planar bolometric array with superconducting transition-edge sensors and frequency-multiplexed readouts. The first key project will be to conduct a survey over 4000 degrees for galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect. This survey should find many thousands of clusters with a mass selection criteria that is remarkably uniform with redshift. Armed with redshifts obtained from optical and infrared follow-up observations, it is expected that the survey will enable significant constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy.

  6. Monolithic afocal telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, William T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An afocal monolithic optical element formed of a shallow cylinder of optical material (glass, polymer, etc.) with fast aspheric surfaces, nominally confocal paraboloids, configured on the front and back surfaces. The front surface is substantially planar, and this lends itself to deposition of multi-layer stacks of thin dielectric and metal films to create a filter for rejecting out-of-band light. However, an aspheric section (for example, a paraboloid) can either be ground into a small area of this surface (for a Cassegrain-type telescope) or attached to the planar surface (for a Gregorian-type telescope). This aspheric section of the surface is then silvered to create the telescope's secondary mirror. The rear surface of the cylinder is figured into a steep, convex asphere (again, a paraboloid in the examples), and also made reflective to form the telescope's primary mirror. A small section of the rear surface (approximately the size of the secondary obscuration, depending on the required field of the telescope) is ground flat to provide an unpowered surface through which the collimated light beam can exit the optical element. This portion of the rear surface is made to transmit the light concentrated by the reflective surfaces, and can support the deposition of a spectral filter.

  7. The Travelling Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murabona Oduori, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The telescope has been around for more than 400 years, and through good use of it scientists have made many astonishing discoveries and begun to understand our place in the universe. Most people, however, have never looked through one. Yet it is a great tool for cool science and observation especially in a continent and country with beautifully dark skies. The Travelling Telescope project aims to invite people outside under the stars to learn about those curious lights in the sky.The Travelling Telescope aims to promote science learning to a wide range of Kenyan schools in various locations exchanging knowledge about the sky through direct observations of celestial bodies using state of the art telescopes. In addition to direct observing we also teach science using various hands-on activities and astronomy software, ideal for explaining concepts which are hard to understand, and for a better grasp of the sights visible through the telescope. We are dedicated to promoting science using astronomy especially in schools, targeting children from as young as 3 years to the youth, teachers, their parents and members of the public. Our presentation focuses on the OAD funded project in rural coastal Kenya.

  8. Spectroradiometry with space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauluhn, Anuschka; Huber, Martin C. E.; Smith, Peter L.; Colina, Luis

    2015-12-01

    Radiometry, i.e. measuring the power of electromagnetic radiation—hitherto often referred to as "photometry"—is of fundamental importance in astronomy. We provide an overview of how to achieve a valid laboratory calibration of space telescopes and discuss ways to reliably extend this calibration to the spectroscopic telescope's performance in space. A lot of effort has been, and still is going into radiometric "calibration" of telescopes once they are in space; these methods use celestial primary and transfer standards and are based in part on stellar models. The history of the calibration of the Hubble Space Telescope serves as a platform to review these methods. However, we insist that a true calibration of spectroscopic space telescopes must directly be based on and traceable to laboratory standards, and thus be independent of the observations. This has recently become a well-supported aim, following the discovery of the acceleration of the cosmic expansion by use of type-Ia supernovae, and has led to plans for launching calibration rockets for the visible and infrared spectral range. This is timely, too, because an adequate exploitation of data from present space missions, such as Gaia, and from many current astronomical projects like Euclid and WFIRST demands higher radiometric accuracy than is generally available today. A survey of the calibration of instruments observing from the X-ray to the infrared spectral domains that include instrument- or mission-specific estimates of radiometric accuracies rounds off this review.

  9. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The defaultmore » parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST« less

  10. Centaurus A galaxy, type EO peculiar elliptical, also radio source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Centaurus A galaxy, type EO peculiar elliptical, also radio source. CTIO 4-meter telescope, 1975. NGC 5128, a Type EO peculiar elliptical galaxy in the constellation Centaurus. This galaxy is one of the most luminous and massive galaxies known and is a strong source of both radio and X-ray radiation. Current theories suggest that the nucleus is experiencing giant explosions involving millions of stars and that the dark band across the galactic disk is material being ejected outward. Cerro Toloto 4-meter telescope photo. Photo credit: National Optical Astronomy Observatories

  11. Cygnus X-2 in a radio quiet state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushton, A.; Bach, U.; Spencer, R.; Kadler, M.; Church, M.; Balucinska-Church, M.; Wilms, J.; Hanke, M.; Zola, S.; Schulz, N.

    2009-05-01

    The neutron star X-ray binary Cygnus X-2 was observed using the e- EVN (European VLBI Network) on May 12/13th 2009 between 23:00-13:00 UT at 5 GHz. The radio telescopes participating with the e-EVN at 5 GHz were Effelsberg, Medicina, Onsala 25m, Torun, Sheshan, Yebes, Jodrell Bank MKII, Cambridge and Knockin. A maximum data rate of 1024 Mbps were achieved from four telescopes (Effelsberg, Onsala, Torun and Jodrell Bank MKII).

  12. Redshifts of southern radio sources. VII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Graeme L.; Jauncey, David L.; Wright, Alan E.; Batty, Michael J.; Savage, Ann; Peterson, Bruce A.; Gulkis, Sam

    1988-01-01

    Redshifts and low-resolution spectral data are presented for 47 objects, most of which are QSOs identified with flat-spectrum radio sources from the Parkes 2.7 GHz survey. These data were taken with the 3.9 m Anglo-Australian Telescope using both the IPCS and FORS spectrographs. The total spectral coverage is 3200-9500 A. Three objects are optical counterparts identified with IRAS sources.

  13. Grote Reber, Radio Astronomy Pioneer, Dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    Grote Reber, one of the earliest pioneers of radio astronomy, died in Tasmania on December 20, just two days shy of his 91st birthday. Reber was the first person to build a radio telescope dedicated to astronomy, opening up a whole new "window" on the Universe that eventually produced such landmark discoveries as quasars, pulsars and the remnant "afterglow" of the Big Bang. His self- financed experiments laid the foundation for today's advanced radio-astronomy facilities. Grote Reber Grote Reber NRAO/AUI photo "Radio astronomy has changed profoundly our understanding of the Universe and has earned the Nobel Prize for several major contributions. All radio astronomers who have followed him owe Grote Reber a deep debt for his pioneering work," said Dr. Fred Lo, director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "Reber was the first to systematically study the sky by observing something other than visible light. This gave astronomy a whole new view of the Universe. The continuing importance of new ways of looking at the Universe is emphasized by this year's Nobel Prizes in physics, which recognized scientists who pioneered X-ray and neutrino observations," Lo added. Reber was a radio engineer and avid amateur "ham" radio operator in Wheaton, Illinois, in the 1930s when he read about Karl Jansky's 1932 discovery of natural radio emissions coming from outer space. As an amateur operator, Reber had won awards and communicated with other amateurs around the world, and later wrote that he had concluded "there were no more worlds to conquer" in radio. Learning of Jansky's discovery gave Reber a whole new challenge that he attacked with vigor. Analyzing the problem as an engineer, Reber concluded that what he needed was a parabolic-dish antenna, something quite uncommon in the 1930s. In 1937, using his own funds, he constructed a 31.4-foot-diameter dish antenna in his back yard. The strange contraption attracted curious attention from his neighbors and became

  14. Radio Telescopes Zoom into a Black Hole's Jets

    NASA Video Gallery

    Centaurus A is a giant elliptical active galaxy 12 million light-years away. At its heart lies a black hole with a mass of 55 million suns. Now, the TANAMI project has provided the best-ever image ...

  15. Very Long Baseline Interferometry Experiment on Giant Radio Pulses of Crab Pulsar toward Fast Radio Burst Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takefuji, K.; Terasawa, T.; Kondo, T.; Mikami, R.; Takeuchi, H.; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kita, H.; Sekido, M.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment on giant radio pulses (GPs) from the Crab pulsar in the radio 1.4–1.7 GHz range to demonstrate a VLBI technique for searching for fast radio bursts (FRBs). We carried out the experiment on 2014 July 26 using the Kashima 34 m and Usuda 64 m radio telescopes of the Japanese VLBI Network (JVN) with a baseline of about 200 km. During the approximately 1 hr observation, we could detect 35 GPs by high-time-resolution VLBI. Moreover, we determined the dispersion measure (DM) to be 56.7585 ± 0.0025 on the basis of the mean DM of the 35 GPs detected by VLBI. We confirmed that the sensitivity of a detection of GPs using our technique is superior to that of a single-dish mode detection using the same telescope.

  16. Ultrathin zoom telescopic objective.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Wang, Di; Liu, Chao; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2016-08-01

    We report an ultrathin zoom telescopic objective that can achieve continuous zoom change and has reduced compact volume. The objective consists of an annular folded lens and three electrowetting liquid lenses. The annular folded lens undertakes the main part of the focal power of the lens system. Due to a multiple-fold design, the optical path is folded in a lens with the thickness of ~1.98mm. The electrowetting liquid lenses constitute a zoom part. Based on the proposed objective, an ultrathin zoom telescopic camera is demonstrated. We analyze the properties of the proposed objective. The aperture of the proposed objective is ~15mm. The total length of the system is ~18mm with a tunable focal length ~48mm to ~65mm. Compared with the conventional zoom telescopic objective, the total length has been largely reduced. PMID:27505830

  17. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide straw man mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible and/or UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST

  18. Radio SETI Observations of the Anomalous Star KIC 8462852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, G. R.; Richards, Jon; Shostak, Seth; Tarter, J. C.; Vakoch, Douglas A.; Munson, Chris

    2016-07-01

    We report on a search for the presence of signals from extraterrestrial intelligence in the direction of the star system KIC 8462852. Observations were made at radio frequencies between 1 and 10 GHz using the Allen Telescope Array. No narrowband radio signals were found at a level of 180–300 Jy in a 1 Hz channel, or medium band signals above 10 Jy in a 100 kHz channel.

  19. Cosmological Fast Radio Bursts from Binary White Dwarf Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiyama, Kazumi

    2014-10-01

    So far, ~10 fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been reported by the Parks radio telescope and the Arecibo observatory. The dispersion measures indicate that the sources are at cosmological distance, and the full sky event rate can be quite large ~10,000/day. If this is really the case, the FRBs are a promising target of multi-messenger astronomy in the coming years. I will present our cosmological binary white dwarf merger model, and also discuss future prospects of FRB astrophysics

  20. Site selection for a radio astronomy observatory in Turkey: atmospherical, meteorological, and radio frequency analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küçük, Ibrahim; Üler, Ipek; Öz, Şükriye; Onay, Sedat; Özdemir, Ali Rıza; Gülşen, Mehmet; Sarıkaya, Mikail; Dag˜Tekin, Nazlı Derya; Özeren, Ferhat Fikri

    2012-03-01

    Selecting the future site for a large Turkish radio telescope is a key issue. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is now in the stage of construction at a site near Karaman City, in Turkey. A single-dish parabolic radio antenna of 30-40 m will be installed near a building that will contain offices, laboratories, and living accommodations. After a systematic survey of atmospheric, meteorological, and radio frequency interference (RFI) analyses, site selection studies were performed in a predetermined location in Turkey during 2007 and 2008. In this paper, we described the experimental procedure and the RFI measurements on our potential candidate's sites in Turkey, covering the frequency band from 1 to 40 GHz.