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Sample records for 48-h median lethal

  1. Determination of the median lethal dose of botulinum serotype E in channel catfish fingerlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The median lethal dose of botulinum serotype E in 5.3-g channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus fingerlings was determined. Five tanks (five fish/tank) were assigned to each of the following treatment groups: 70, 50, 35, 25, or 15 pg of purified botulinum serotype E. Fish were injected intracoelomically...

  2. Comparing median lethal concentration values using confidence interval overlap or ratio tests.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Matthew W; Park, Robert M; Bailer, A John

    2006-05-01

    Experimenters in toxicology often compare the concentration-response relationship between two distinct populations using the median lethal concentration (LC50). This comparison is sometimes done by calculating the 95% confidence interval for the LC50 for each population, concluding that no significant difference exists if the two confidence intervals overlap. A more appropriate test compares the ratio of the LC50s to 1 or the log(LC50 ratio) to 0. In this ratio test, we conclude that no difference exists in LC50s if the confidence interval for the ratio of the LC50s contains 1 or the confidence interval for the log(LC50 ratio) contains 0. A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to compare the confidence interval overlap test to the ratio test. The confidence interval overlap test performs substantially below the nominal alpha = 0.05 level, closer to p = 0.005; therefore, it has considerably less power for detecting true differences compared to the ratio test. The ratio-based method exhibited better type I error rates and superior power properties in comparison to the confidence interval overlap test. Thus, a ratio-based statistical procedure is preferred to using simple overlap of two independently derived confidence intervals.

  3. Core body temperature as adjunct to endpoint determination in murine median lethal dose testing of rattlesnake venom.

    PubMed

    Cates, Charles C; McCabe, James G; Lawson, Gregory W; Couto, Marcelo A

    2014-12-01

    Median lethal dose (LD50) testing in mice is the 'gold standard' for evaluating the lethality of snake venoms and the effectiveness of interventions. As part of a study to determine the murine LD50 of the venom of 3 species of rattlesnake, temperature data were collected in an attempt to more precisely define humane endpoints. We used an 'up-and-down' methodology of estimating the LD50 that involved serial intraperitoneal injection of predetermined concentrations of venom. By using a rectal thermistor probe, body temperature was taken once before administration and at various times after venom exposure. All but one mouse showed a marked, immediate, dose-dependent drop in temperature of approximately 2 to 6°C at 15 to 45 min after administration. The lowest temperature sustained by any surviving mouse was 33.2°C. Surviving mice generally returned to near-baseline temperatures within 2 h after venom administration, whereas mice that did not survive continued to show a gradual decline in temperature until death or euthanasia. Logistic regression modeling controlling for the effects of baseline core body temperature and venom type showed that core body temperature was a significant predictor of survival. Linear regression of the interaction of time and survival was used to estimate temperatures predictive of death at the earliest time point and demonstrated that venom type had a significant influence on temperature values. Overall, our data suggest that core body temperature is a useful adjunct to monitoring for endpoints in LD50 studies and may be a valuable predictor of survival in venom studies.

  4. Estimation of Median Lethal Concentration of Three Isolates of Beauveria bassiana for Control of Megacopta cribraria (Heteroptera: Plataspidae) Bioassayed on Solid Lygus spp. Diet

    PubMed Central

    Portilla, Maribel; Jones, Walker; Perera, Omaththage; Seiter, Nick; Greene, Jeremy; Luttrell, Randall

    2016-01-01

    The kudzu bug, Megacopta cribraria (F.), is an urban nuisance and significant agricultural pest. The median lethal concentrations of three strains of Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo), including the Mississippi Delta native strain (NI8) isolated from Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), the commercial strain BotaniGard® (GHA) (Victor, NY, USA), and the B. bassiana strain isolated from M. cribraria (KUDSC), were estimated on kudzu bug adults. A technique developed to evaluate B. bassiana against L. lineolaris was used. Younger adults (eight days after collection) were treated with NI8 and GHA and older adult (50 days after collection) were treated with NI8, GHA and KUDSC. Higher concentrations (n × 106, n × 107) of NI8 and GHA caused kudzu bug mortality two days after treatment in younger adults and similar concentrations of NI8, GHA, and KUDSC caused mortality one day after treatment in older adults. Lower concentrations (n × 104, n × 105) were not significantly different in mortality between strains. LS50 values of the KUDSC were significantly lower than NI8 and GHA values in older adults. This is the first available information on median lethal concentration of B. bassiana on kudzu bug adults bioassayed on artificial diet. It was determined that B. bassiana (KUDSC and NI8) are highly effective for young adults at very low doses (LC50 1.98–4.98 viable spores per mm2). PMID:27376335

  5. Estimation of Median Lethal Concentration of Three Isolates of Beauveria bassiana for Control of Megacopta cribraria (Heteroptera: Plataspidae) Bioassayed on Solid Lygus spp. Diet.

    PubMed

    Portilla, Maribel; Jones, Walker; Perera, Omaththage; Seiter, Nick; Greene, Jeremy; Luttrell, Randall

    2016-06-30

    The kudzu bug, Megacopta cribraria (F.), is an urban nuisance and significant agricultural pest. The median lethal concentrations of three strains of Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo), including the Mississippi Delta native strain (NI8) isolated from Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), the commercial strain BotaniGard(®) (GHA) (Victor, NY, USA), and the B. bassiana strain isolated from M. cribraria (KUDSC), were estimated on kudzu bug adults. A technique developed to evaluate B. bassiana against L. lineolaris was used. Younger adults (eight days after collection) were treated with NI8 and GHA and older adult (50 days after collection) were treated with NI8, GHA and KUDSC. Higher concentrations (n × 10⁶, n × 10⁷) of NI8 and GHA caused kudzu bug mortality two days after treatment in younger adults and similar concentrations of NI8, GHA, and KUDSC caused mortality one day after treatment in older adults. Lower concentrations (n × 10⁴, n × 10⁵) were not significantly different in mortality between strains. LS50 values of the KUDSC were significantly lower than NI8 and GHA values in older adults. This is the first available information on median lethal concentration of B. bassiana on kudzu bug adults bioassayed on artificial diet. It was determined that B. bassiana (KUDSC and NI8) are highly effective for young adults at very low doses (LC50 1.98-4.98 viable spores per mm²).

  6. Median lethal dose determination for percutaneous exposure to soman and VX in guinea pigs and the effectiveness of decontamination with M291 SDK or SANDIA foam.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Edward D; Schulz, Susan M; Railer, Roy F; Smith, Kelly H

    2012-08-03

    Soman (GD) and VX are chemical warfare agents that can be absorbed through the skin. We determined the median lethal dose (MLD) for the cutaneous application of GD and VX in anesthetized haired guinea pigs and then tested the ability of a currently fielded decontamination kit, the M291 Skin Decontamination Kit (SDK), and decontaminating foam made by SANDIA Labs to decontaminate areas that have been exposed to cutaneous applications of GD and VX. The fur of guinea pigs was clipped on the left flank 24h prior to exposure. Animals were anesthetized and 5 min later neat GD or neat VX was applied. The MLD for percutaneous exposure to GD was 11.6 mg/kg, and to VX it was 0.10mg/kg. To test the ability of the M291 SDK, either GD or VX was applied and removed 1 min later with the pads of the M291 SDK clasped in a pair of forceps and wiped across the flank of the animal. The MLDs for GD and VX removed with the M291 SDK pads were 76.9 mg/kg and 0.87 mg/kg, respectively. When neat GD or neat VX was applied and removed 1 min later in the same manner with gauze soaked in SANDIA foam (MDF-100), the MLDs were 412 mg/kg and 10.4 mg/kg respectively. These data demonstrate that GD and VX are significantly less potent when applied cutaneously than previously reported for subcutaneous injections and indicate that improvement is needed on the limited protective ratio provided by the M291 SDK.

  7. Benzene Generation Testing for Tank 48H Waste Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T

    2005-05-13

    In support for the Aggregation option1, researchers performed a series of tests using actual Tank 48H slurries. The tests were designed to examine potential benzene generation issues if the Tank 48H slurry is disposed to Saltstone. Personnel used the archived Tank 48H sample (HTF-E-03-127, collected September 17, 2003) for the experiments. The tests included a series of three experiments (Tests A, B, and F) performed in duplicate, giving a total of six experiments. Test A used Tank 48H slurry mixed with {approx}20:1 with Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle from Tanks 21H and 22H. Test B used Tank 48H slurry mixed with {approx}2.7:1 with DWPF Recycle from Tanks 21H and 22H, while Test F used Tank 48H slurry as-is. Tests A and B occurred at 45 C, while Test F occurred at 55 C. Over a period of 8 weeks, personnel collected samples for analysis, once per week. Each sample was tested with the in-cell gamma counter. The researchers noted a decline in the cesium activity in solution which is attributed to temperature dependence of the complex slurry equilibrium. Selected samples were sent to ADS for potassium, boron, and cesium analysis. The benzene generation rate was inferred from the TPB destruction which is indirectly measured by the in-growth of cesium, potassium or boron. The results of all the analyses reveal no discernible in-growth of radiocesium, potassium or boron, indicating no significant tetraphenylborate (TPB) decomposition in any of the experiments. From boron measurements, the inferred rate of TPB destruction remained less than 0.332 mg/(L-h) implying a maximum benzene generation rate of <0.325 mg/(L-h).

  8. Lethal levels of selected water quality variables to larval and juvenile Lost River and shortnose suckers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, M.K.; Monda, D.P.; Bellerud, B.L.

    1999-01-01

    Resource managers hypothesize that occasional fish kills during summer-early fall in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, may be linked to unfavorable water quality conditions created by massive algal blooms. In a preliminary effort to address this concern, short-term (96-h-long) laboratory tests were conducted with larval and juvenile Lost River (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose (Chasmistes brevirostris) suckers to determine the upper median lethal concentrations (LC50s; also referred to as median tolerance limits) for pH, un-ionized ammonia, and water temperature, and the lower LC50s for dissolved oxygen. The mean LC50s varied among species and life stages as follows: for pH, 10.30-10.39; for un-ionized ammonia, 0.48-1.06 mg litre-1; for temperature, 30.35-31.82??C; and for dissolved oxygen, 1.34-2.10 mg litre-1. Comparisons of 95% confidence limits indicated that, on average, the 96-h LC50s were not significantly different from those computed for shorter exposure times (i.e., 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h). According to two-way analysis of variance, LC50s for the four water quality variables did not vary significantly (p > 0.05) between fish species. However, LC50s for pH (exposure times of 24 h and 48 h) and dissolved oxygen (exposure times of 48 h, 72 h, and 96 h) differed significantly (p ??? 0.05) between life stages, whereas LC50s for un-ionized ammonia and water temperature did not exhibit significant differences. In general, larvae were more sensitive than juveniles to high pH and low dissolved oxygen concentrations. When compared to ambient water quality conditions in Upper Klamath Lake, our results strongly suggest that near-anoxic conditions associated with the senescence phase of algal blooms are most likely to cause high mortalities of larval and juvenile suckers.

  9. Acute lethal and teratogenic effects of tributyltin chloride and copper chloride on mahi mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) eggs and larvae.

    PubMed

    Adema-Hannes, Rachel; Shenker, Jonathan

    2008-10-01

    Acute and chronic bioassays were used to evaluate the lethal and sublethal effects of copper chloride and tributyltin chloride on mahi mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) embryos, a pelagic life stage often found in the surface microlayer where anthropogenic contaminants can accumulate. Acute bioassay testing determined the median lethal concentration (LC50) for the test organism after 48 h of exposure. Chronic toxicity tests were used to determine the measurement of sublethal parameters, such as developmental abnormalities after 72-h exposures to the toxicants. Embryos were collected 4 h postfertilization and subsequently exposed to 1, 5, 25, 50, and 100 microg/L of copper chloride and 3, 10, 20, 30, and 50 microg/L of tributyltin chloride. Analysis of hatch rate percentage determined that the mean 48-h LC50 of copper chloride and tributyltin chloride was 32.8 and 16.7 microg/L, respectively, based on the pooled data of four experiments with four replicates for each metal. Consistent abnormalities, such as yolk sac swelling, spinal deformities, and decreased hatch rates, were observed for each metal. Teratogenic responses to copper chloride and tributyltin chloride demonstrate the need to investigate further the impacts of pollution in the open oceans to a species indigenous to, and commercially important to, the Florida (USA) coasts. This information could then lead to the future development of a surface microlayer bioassay using mahi mahi embryos.

  10. Treatment of SRS Tank 48H Simulants Using Fenton's Reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, PA

    2003-11-18

    High-level-waste Tank 48H at the Savannah River Site (SRS) contains about 50,000 lb of tetraphenylborate (TPB), which must be destroyed to return the tank to active service. Laboratory-scale tests were conducted to evaluate the use of Fenton's Reagent (hydrogen peroxide and a metal catalyst) to treat simulants of the Tank 48H waste. Samples of the treated slurry and the off-gas were analyzed to determine the reaction products. Process parameters developed earlier by AEA Technology were used for these tests; namely (for 500 mL of waste simulant), reduce pH to 7.5 with nitric acid, heat to boiling, add hydrogen peroxide at 1 mL/min for 1 h, reduce pH to 3.5, and add the remaining peroxide at 2 mL/min. These parameters were developed to minimize the formation of tarry materials during the early part of the reaction and to minimize the concentration of total organic carbon in the final treated slurry. The treated samples contained low concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC) and no detectable TPB. Tests using a mixture of iron and copper salts as the Fenton's catalyst had a lower TOC concentration in the final treated slurry than did tests that used a copper-only catalyst. TPB is known to hydrolyze to benzene, particularly at high temperature and low pH, and copper is known to increase the rate of hydrolysis. Significant amounts of benzene were present in the off-gas from the tests, especially during the early portion of the treatment, indicating that the hydrolysis reaction was occurring in parallel with the oxidation of the TPB by Fenton's reagent. For the reaction conditions used in these tests, approximately equal fractions of the TPB were converted to benzene and carbon dioxide. Minimizing the formation of benzene is important to SRS personnel; however, this consideration was not addressed in the AEA-recommended parameters, since they did not analyze for benzene in the off-gas. Smaller amounts of carbon monoxide and other organics were also produced. One test

  11. Judged Lethality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    75 High Blood Pressure 535 89 17 538 76 Drug Abuse 1,020 1,371 19 95 80 Bronchitis 162 19 43 2,111 85 Pregnancy 67 24 13 787 250 Diabetes 487 101 52...Diseases 4 Mumps 3 Dental Problems 1 Always Overestimated High Blood Pressure 9 Alcoholism 6 Influenza 2 Note: Measles (8), tuberculosis (13), auto...statis- tical lethality rate and total number of people killed (cancer, strokes, heart attacks, emphysema, high blood pressure ) were rather accurately

  12. Crucifixion and median neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Crucifixion as a means of torture and execution was first developed in the 6th century B.C. and remained popular for over 1000 years. Details of the practice, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, have intrigued scholars as historical records and archaeological findings from the era are limited. As a result, various aspects of crucifixion, including the type of crosses used, methods of securing victims to crosses, the length of time victims survived on the cross, and the exact mechanisms of death, remain topics of debate. One aspect of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture, the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. Such a “crucified clench” is depicted across different cultures and from different eras. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the “crucified clench” results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist. PMID:23785656

  13. Tank 48H Waste Composition and Results of Investigation of Analytical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Walker , D.D.

    1997-04-02

    This report serves two purposes. First, it documents the analytical results of Tank 48H samples taken between April and August 1996. Second, it describes investigations of the precision of the sampling and analytical methods used on the Tank 48H samples.

  14. Anomalous median nerve associated with persistent median artery.

    PubMed Central

    Sañudo, J R; Chikwe, J; Evans, S E

    1994-01-01

    A right human forearm showed persistence of the median artery in combination with anomalies of the median nerve and of the palmar circulation. The median nerve formed a ring enclosing the median artery, gave off its 3rd palmar digital branch in the forearm, and had a high palmar cutaneous nerve origin and a double thenar supply. The superficial palmar arch was incomplete. The median artery extended into the hand, providing the 2nd common palmar digital artery and the artery to the radial side of the index finger. It anastomosed with the radial artery in the 1st web space. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7961153

  15. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a

  16. BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

    2008-09-25

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The

  17. CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48H RADIOACTIVEWASTE SAMPLE USING FLUIDIZED BED STEAMREFORMING TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANICDESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C

    2008-07-31

    The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble

  18. ANALYSIS OF TANK 48H SAMPLE HTF-E-05-021

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F

    2005-10-03

    Due to the need for additional HLW storage, successful disposition of the material in Tank 48H and return of the tank to routine service are two critically needed activities. As an initial step in the process, SRNL compositionally characterized the components of the Tank 48H slurry. Previously, a Tank 48H slurry sample was collected on August 23, 2004 (HTF-E-04-049 and HTF-E-04-050). The August 23, 2004 sample contained approximately 2 Liters of Tank 48H slurry. In December 7, 2004, Tank farm personnel added 3,019 gallons of 50 wt% caustic solution to Tank 48H. On March 6, 2005, about of 4L of slurry was pulled from Tank 48H sample using a new 4.2 L sampler and sent to SRNL. Part of this sample was used for saltstone aggregation studies. The remaining Tank 48H sample was placed in a carboy for future analysis. Small portions of this sample were analyzed and the results are reported in this document. This document provides the chemical and radiological characterization of a Tank 48H slurry sample as defined in the Technical Task Request Plan and task technical and quality assurance plan. At the time of the sampling, the Tank 48H volume was 242,190 gallons (69 inches from the bottom of the tank) and the pumps were ran for 27 hours prior to sampling. The sample was collected within approximately 10 minutes of pump shutdown. A description of the sampler and method is given in Appendix A. This report compares results with those reported elsewhere (WSRC-TR-2004-00514 [HTF-E-04-049 and HTF-E-04-050] analysis), CBU-PIT-2005-00066 [Tank 48 Best Estimate Chemical Characterization as of March 17, 2005] and CBU-PIT-2005-00046 [Tank 48 Radionuclide Characterization to Support Material Disposition]. Since there was addition of 3,019 gallons of 50 wt% caustic solution to Tank 48H after issuing the WSRCTR-2004-00514 characterization report, the data from WSRC-TR-2004-00514 needs to be adjusted by dividing the results by a factor of 1.013. This adjustment is necessary to ensure

  19. An IIR median hybrid filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Peter H.; Sartori, Michael A.; Bryden, Timothy M.

    1992-01-01

    A new class of nonlinear filters, the so-called class of multidirectional infinite impulse response median hybrid filters, is presented and analyzed. The input signal is processed twice using a linear shift-invariant infinite impulse response filtering module: once with normal causality and a second time with inverted causality. The final output of the MIMH filter is the median of the two-directional outputs and the original input signal. Thus, the MIMH filter is a concatenation of linear filtering and nonlinear filtering (a median filtering module). Because of this unique scheme, the MIMH filter possesses many desirable properties which are both proven and analyzed (including impulse removal, step preservation, and noise suppression). A comparison to other existing median type filters is also provided.

  20. 48-h glucose infusion in humans: effect on hormonal responses, hunger and food intake.

    PubMed

    Teff, Karen L; Petrova, Maja; Havel, Peter J; Townsend, Raymond R

    2007-04-23

    Experimentally-induced hyperglycemia by prolonged glucose infusion allows investigation of the effects of sustained stimulation of the pancreatic beta-cell on insulin secretion and sensitivity. Hormonal responses to a meal following prolonged glucose infusions have not been investigated. To determine if a 48-h glucose infusion alters hormonal responses to a test meal as well as food intake and hunger in normal weight individuals, 16 subjects (8 men, 8 women, age 18-30 years, mean BMI=21.7+/-1.6 kg/m2) were infused for 48 h with either saline (50 ml/h) or 15% glucose (200 mg/m2/min). Subjects ingested a 600 kcal mixed nutrient meal 3 h after infusion termination. Blood samples were taken during the 48 h and for 4 h following food ingestion. The 48-h glucose infusion elicited a metabolic profile of a glucose intolerant obese subjects, with increased plasma glucose, insulin and leptin (all P<0.01) and increased HOMA-IR (P<0.001). During meal ingestion, early insulin secretion was increased (P<0.05) but post-prandial glucose (P<0.01) and insulin (P<0.01) excursions were lower following the glucose infusion. Post-prandial plasma triglyceride concentrations were increased after glucose compared with saline. Food intake and hunger ratings were not different between the two conditions. Plasma leptin levels were inversely correlated with hunger (P<0.03) in both conditions and with food intake (P<0.003) during the glucose condition only. Thus, a 48-h glucose infusion does not impair post-prandial hormonal responses, alter food intake or hunger in normal weight subjects. The glucose-induced increases in plasma leptin result in a stronger inverse relationship between plasma leptin and hunger as well as food intake. These data are the first to demonstrate a relationship between leptin and hunger in normal weight, non-calorically restricted human subjects.

  1. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  2. Lasers for median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Muschter, R; Gilling, A P

    2001-08-01

    Laser treatment encompases a variety of techniques using different laser wavelengths, application systems, and surgical techniques to achieve contrasting tissue effects such as incision, resection, vaporization, or coagulation. Many studies have proven the clinical efficacy of the various laser techniques for the treatment of benign prostatiuc hyperplasia, including randomized studies versus transurethral prostatectomy (TURP). Recently, long-term follow-up of up to 5 years has demonstrated the durability of the results, although in some of the studies, retreatment rates were higher than after TURP. Median lobes were never seen as a contraindication for treatment in the laser based procedures. Technically, laser treatment techniques such as side-firing transurethral coagulation, contact- and free-beam laser vaporization, interstitial laser coagulation, and the holmium laser-based resection and enucleation are fully suitable for treatment of median lobes. Surprisingly, no studies focussing specifically on laser treatment of median lobes have been published.

  3. Non-Local Euclidean Medians.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Kunal N; Singer, Amit

    2012-11-01

    In this letter, we note that the denoising performance of Non-Local Means (NLM) can be improved at large noise levels by replacing the mean by the Euclidean median. We call this new denoising algorithm the Non-Local Euclidean Medians (NLEM). At the heart of NLEM is the observation that the median is more robust to outliers than the mean. In particular, we provide a simple geometric insight that explains why NLEM performs better than NLM in the vicinity of edges, particularly at large noise levels. NLEM can be efficiently implemented using iteratively reweighted least squares, and its computational complexity is comparable to that of NLM. We provide some preliminary results to study the proposed algorithm and to compare it with NLM.

  4. Studies on fate and toxicity of nanoalumina in male albino rats: Lethality, bioaccumulation and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Gamal M; El-Ala, Kawther S Abou; Ali, Atef A

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to follow-up the distribution, lethality percentile doses (LDs) and bioaccumulation of aluminium oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3-NPs, average diameter 9.83 ± 1.61 nm) in some tissues of male albino rats, and to evaluate its genotoxicity to the brain tissues, during acute and sublethal experiments. The LDs of Al2O3-NPs, including median lethal dose (LD50), were estimated after intraperitoneal injection. The computed LD50 at 24 and 48 h were 15.10 and 12.88 g/kg body weight (b.w.), respectively. For acute experiments, the bioaccumulation of aluminium (Al) in the brain, liver, kidneys, intestine and spleen was estimated after 48 h of injection with a single acute dose (3.9, 6.4 and 8.5 g/kg b.w.), while for sublethal experiments it was after 1, 3, 7, 14 and 28 days of injection with 1.3 g/kg b.w. once in 2 days. Multi-way analysis of variance affirmed that Al uptake, in acute experiments, was significantly affected by the injected doses, organs (brain, liver, kidneys, intestine and spleen) and their interactions, while for sublethal experiments an altogether effect based on time (1, 3, 7, 14, 28 days), doses (0 and 1.3 g), organs and their interactions was reported. In addition, Al accumulated in the brain, liver, kidney, intestine and spleen of rats administered with Al2O3-NPs were significantly higher than the corresponding controls, during acute and sublethal experiments. The uptake of Al by the spleen of rats injected with acute doses was greater than that accumulated by kidney>brain>intestine>liver, whereas the brain of rats injected with sublethal dose accumulated lesser amount of Al followed by the kidney

  5. Disposition of Tank 48H Organics by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2003-12-02

    In order to make space in the Savannah River Site Tank farm, the Tank 48H waste must be removed. Therefore, the Tank 48H waste must be processed to reduce or eliminate levels of nitrates, nitrites, and sodium tetraphenyl borate in order to reduce impacts of these species before it is vitrified. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming is being considered as a candidate technology for destroying the nitrates and the NaTPB prior to melting. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was tasked to perform a proof-of-concept steam reforming test to evaluate the technical feasibility for pretreating the Tank 48H waste. The crucible (bench scale) tests conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center were initiated to optimize and augment the parameters subsequently tested at the pilot scale at INEEL. The purposes of the current study, organic destruction and downstream processing of T48H waste slurry were fulfilled. TPB was destroyed in all 19 samples tested with the simulated FB SR process at operational temperatures 650-725 degrees Celsius. A test temperature of 650 degrees Celsius optimized NO3 destruction during the formation of an Na2CO3 FBSR product. A test temperature of 725 degrees Celsius optimized NO3 destruction during formation of a sodium silicate FBSR product. Destruction of nitrate at greater than 99 per cent was achieved with addition of sugar as a reductant at 1X stoichiometry and total organic carbon analyses indicated that excess reductant was not present in the FBSR product. The use of sugar at 1X stoichiometry appears to ensure that excess reductant is not contained in the FBSR product that would alter the REDuction/OXidation equilibrium of the DWPF melter, while simultaneously assuring that NO3 is destroyed adequately. Destruction of antifoam with the simulated FBSR process was also achieved at operating temperatures between 650-725 degrees Celsius. based on measured total organic carbon.

  6. Persistent digital hyperthermia over a 48 h period does not induce laminitis in horses.

    PubMed

    de Laat, Melody A; Pollitt, Christopher C; Walsh, Donald M; McGowan, Catherine M; Sillence, Martin N

    2012-06-01

    Persistent digital hyperthermia, presumably due to vasodilation, occurs during the developmental and acute stages of insulin-induced laminitis. The objectives of this study were to determine if persistent digital hyperthermia is the principal pathogenic mechanism responsible for the development of laminitis. The potent vasodilator, ATP-MgCl(2) was infused continuously into the distal phalanx of the left forefoot of six Standardbred racehorses for 48 h via intra-osseous infusion to promote persistent digital hyperthermia. The right forefoot was infused with saline solution and acted as an internal control. Clinical signs of lameness at the walk were not detected at 0 h, 24h or 48 h post-infusion. Mean ± SE hoof wall temperatures of the left forefoot (29.4 ± 0.25°C) were higher (P<0.05) than those on the right (27.5 ± 0.38°C). Serum insulin (15.0 ± 2.89 μIU/mL) and blood glucose (5.4 ± 0.22 mM) concentrations remained unchanged during the experiment. Histopathological evidence of laminitis was not detected in any horse. The results demonstrated that digital vasodilation up to 30°C for a period of 48 h does not trigger laminitis in the absence of hyperinsulinaemia. Thus, although digital hyperthermia may play a role in the pathogenesis of laminitis, it is not the sole mechanism involved.

  7. Sample Results From Tank 48H Samples HTF-48-14-158, -159, -169, and -170

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Hang, T.

    2015-04-28

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 48H in support of determining the cause for the unusually high dose rates at the sampling points for this tank. A set of two samples was taken from the quiescent tank, and two additional samples were taken after the contents of the tank were mixed. The results of the analyses of all the samples show that the contents of the tank have changed very little since the analysis of the previous sample in 2012. The solids are almost exclusively composed of tetraphenylborate (TPB) salts, and there is no indication of acceleration in the TPB decomposition. The filtrate composition shows a moderate increase in salt concentration and density, which is attributable to the addition of NaOH for the purposes of corrosion control. An older modeling simulation of the TPB degradation was updated, and the supernate results from a 2012 sample were run in the model. This result was compared to the results from the 2014 recent sample results reported in this document. The model indicates there is no change in the TPB degradation from 2012 to 2014. SRNL measured the buoyancy of the TPB solids in Tank 48H simulant solutions. It was determined that a solution of density 1.279 g/mL (~6.5M sodium) was capable of indefinitely suspending the TPB solids evenly throughout the solution. A solution of density 1.296 g/mL (~7M sodium) caused a significant fraction of the solids to float on the solution surface. As the experiments could not include the effect of additional buoyancy elements such as benzene or hydrogen generation, the buoyancy measurements provide an upper bound estimate of the density in Tank 48H required to float the solids.

  8. The relationship of total copper 48-h LC50s to Daphnia magna dry weight

    SciTech Connect

    Lazorchak, J.M. ); Waller, W.T. )

    1993-05-01

    A study was conducted with Daphnia magna to determine the effect of neonate weight loss or lack of weight gain on experimentally derived copper 48-h LC50s. Standard unfed tests as well as algal-fed (Selenastrum capricornutum) tests were used to look at weight loss and gain. No significant relationship was found between amount of weight loss and copper LC50s. However, dry weight of unfed and algal-fed control organisms could be used to predict total copper LC50s.

  9. Development of Chemical Treatment Alternatives for Tetraphenylborate Destruction in Tank 48H

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.P.

    2003-03-11

    This study assessed chemical treatment options for decomposing the tetraphenylborate in High Level Waste (HLW) Tank 48H. Tank 48H, located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC, contains approximately one million liters of HLW. The tetraphenylborate slurry represents legacy material from commissioning of an In Tank Precipitation process to separate radioactive cesium and actinides from the nonradioactive chemicals. During early operations, the process encountered an unplanned chemical reaction that catalytically decomposed the excess tetraphenylborate producing benzene. Subsequent research indicated that personnel could not control the operations within the existing equipment to both meet the desired treatment rate for the waste and maintain the benzene concentration within allowable concentrations. Since then, the Department of Energy selected an alternate treatment process for handling high-level waste at the site. However, the site must destroy the tetraphenylborate before returning the tank to HLW service. The research focuses on identifying treatments to decompose tetraphenylborate to the maximum extent feasible, with a preference for decomposition methods that produce carbon dioxide rather than benzene. A number of experiments examined whether the use of oxidants, catalysts or acids proved effective in decomposing the tetraphenylborate. Additional experiments developed an understanding of the solid, liquid and gas decomposition products.

  10. Acute and sub-lethal response to mercury in Arctic and boreal calanoid copepods.

    PubMed

    Overjordet, Ida Beathe; Altin, Dag; Berg, Torunn; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Gabrielsen, Geir Wing; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik

    2014-10-01

    Acute lethal toxicity, expressed as LC50 values, is a widely used parameter in risk assessment of chemicals, and has been proposed as a tool to assess differences in species sensitivities to chemicals between climatic regions. Arctic Calanus glacialis and boreal Calanus finmarchicus were exposed to mercury (Hg(2+)) under natural environmental conditions including sea temperatures of 2° and 10°C, respectively. Acute lethal toxicity (96 h LC50) and sub-lethal molecular response (GST expression; in this article gene expression is used as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression is also regulated, e.g., at translation and protein stability level) were studied. The acute lethal toxicity was monitored for 96 h using seven different Hg concentrations. The sub-lethal experiment was set up on the basis of nominal LC50 values for each species using concentrations equivalent to 50, 5 and 0.5% of their 96 h LC50 value. No significant differences were found in acute lethal toxicity between the two species. The sub-lethal molecular response revealed large differences both in response time and the fold induction of GST, where the Arctic species responded both faster and with higher mRNA levels of GST after 48 h exposure. Under the natural exposure conditions applied in the present study, the Arctic species C. glacialis may potentially be more susceptible to mercury exposure on the sub-lethal level.

  11. Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tulika; Noor, Nazia Nagori; Kural, Moolraj; Tripathi, Amita

    2016-01-01

    The multiple pterygium syndrome is consist of wide range of fetal malformations which have a genetic linkage. A defect in embryonic acetylcholine receptor which can be inherited as autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked fashion is the cause of this syndrome. We present a sporadic case of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome. PMID:27843868

  12. RESULTS OF COPPER CATALYZED PEROXIDE OXIDATION (CCPO) OF TANK 48H SIMULANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Pareizs, J.; Newell, J.; Fondeur, F.; Nash, C.; White, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-08-14

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed a series of laboratory-scale experiments that examined copper-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) aided destruction of organic components, most notably tetraphenylborate (TPB), in Tank 48H simulant slurries. The experiments were designed with an expectation of conducting the process within existing vessels of Building 241-96H with minimal modifications to the existing equipment. Results of the experiments indicate that TPB destruction levels exceeding 99.9% are achievable, dependent on the reaction conditions. The following observations were made with respect to the major processing variables investigated. A lower reaction pH provides faster reaction rates (pH 7 > pH 9 > pH 11); however, pH 9 reactions provide the least quantity of organic residual compounds within the limits of species analyzed. Higher temperatures lead to faster reaction rates and smaller quantities of organic residual compounds. Higher concentrations of the copper catalyst provide faster reaction rates, but the highest copper concentration (500 mg/L) also resulted in the second highest quantity of organic residual compounds. Faster rates of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition lead to faster reaction rates and lower quantities of organic residual compounds. Testing with simulated slurries continues. Current testing is examining lower copper concentrations, refined peroxide addition rates, and alternate acidification methods. A revision of this report will provide updated findings with emphasis on defining recommended conditions for similar tests with actual waste samples.

  13. Disposition of Tank 48H Organics By Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) (U)

    SciTech Connect

    JANTZEN, CAROLM.

    2004-03-29

    An In Tank Processing (ITP) technology was developed at the Savannah River Site to remove Cs-137 from high-level waste supernates. During the ITP process monosodium titanate and sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) were added to the salt supernate to adsorb Sr-90/Pu-238 and precipitate Cs-137 as CsTPB, respectively. This process was demonstrated at the SRS in 1983. The demonstration produced 53,000 gallons of 2.5 weight per cent Cs rich precipitate containing TPB, which was later washed and diluted to 250,000 gallons. This material is currently stored in SRS tanks. The washed precipitate was to ultimately be disposed in borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility. Due to safety concerns the ITP process was abandoned in 1998, and new technologies are being researched for Cs-137 removal. In order to make space in the SRS Tank farm, the tank waste must be removed. Therefore, the tank waste must be processed to reduce or eliminate levels of nitrates, nitrites, and sodium tetra phenylborate (NaTPB) in order to reduce impacts of these species before it is vitrified at the DWPF. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a candidate technology for destroying the nitrates and the NaTPB prior to melting. The purposes of the current study, organic destruction and downstream processing of T48H waste slurry were fulfilled. TPB was destroyed in all 19 samples tested with the simulated FBSR process at operational temperatures 650-725 degrees Celsius.

  14. Adaptive marginal median filter for colour images.

    PubMed

    Morillas, Samuel; Gregori, Valentín; Sapena, Almanzor

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a new filter for impulse noise reduction in colour images which is aimed at improving the noise reduction capability of the classical vector median filter. The filter is inspired by the application of a vector marginal median filtering process over a selected group of pixels in each filtering window. This selection, which is based on the vector median, along with the application of the marginal median operation constitutes an adaptive process that leads to a more robust filter design. Also, the proposed method is able to process colour images without introducing colour artifacts. Experimental results show that the images filtered with the proposed method contain less noisy pixels than those obtained through the vector median filter.

  15. Lethal and sub-lethal responses of native freshwater mussels exposed to granular Bayluscide®, a sea lamprey larvicide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newton, Teresa; Boogaard, Michael A.; Gray, Brian R.; Hubert, Terrance D.; Schloesser, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    The invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) poses a substantial threat to fish communities in the Great Lakes. Efforts to control sea lamprey populations typically involve treating tributary streams with lampricides on a recurring cycle. The presence of a substantial population of larval sea lampreys in the aquatic corridor between Lakes Huron and Erie prompted managers to propose a treatment using the granular formulation of Bayluscide® that targets larval sea lampreys that reside in sediments. However, these treatments could cause adverse effects on native freshwater mussels—imperiled animals that also reside in sediments. We estimated the risk of mortality and sub-lethal effects among eight species of adult and sub-adult mussels exposed to Bayluscide® for durations up to 8 h to mimic field applications. Mortality was appreciable in some species, especially in sub-adults (range, 23–51%). The lethal and sub-lethal effects were positively associated with the duration of exposure in most species and life stage combinations. Estimates of the median time of exposure that resulted in lethal and sub-lethal effects suggest that sub-adults were often affected by Bayluscide® earlier than adults. Siphoning activity and burrowing position of mussels during exposure may have moderated the uptake of Bayluscide® and may have influenced lethal and sub-lethal responses. Given that the various species and life stages were differentially affected, it will be difficult to predict the effects of Bayluscide® treatments on mussels.

  16. The lethality test system

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.; Sims, J.R.; Parker, J.V.

    1986-11-01

    The Lethality Test System (LTS), presently under construction at Los Alamos, is an electromagnetic launcher facility designed to perform impact experiments at velocities up to 15 km/s. The launcher is a 25 mm round bore, plasma armature railgun extending 22 m in length. Preinjection is accomplished with a two-stage light gas gun capable of 7 km/s. The railgun power supply utilized traction motors, vacuum interrupters, and pulse transformers. The design of these traction motors, vacuum interrupters and pulse transformers are detailed.

  17. Azotemia (48 h) decreases the risk of brain damage in rats after correction of chronic hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Soupart, A; Penninckx, R; Stenuit, A; Decaux, G

    2000-01-03

    /24 in pooled controls 1 and 2, p < 0.001). In conclusion, we showed for the first time that chronic hyponatremic rats with azotemia (48 h) tolerated large increases in SNa (approximately 30 mEq/l/24 h) without significant brain damage.

  18. Measurement of urinary copper excretion after 48-h d-penicillamine cessation as a compliance assessment in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dzieżyc, Karolina; Litwin, Tomasz; Chabik, Grzegorz; Członkowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of Wilson's disease (WD) with anti-copper agents is effective in most compliant patients. During long-term treatment with chelating agents, a two-day interruption of the treatment should result in normal urinary copper concentrations (<50 μg/dl). The aim of this study was to establish the usefulness of this method as a compliance assessment in these patients. We examined consecutive patients treated with d-penicillamine (DPA) undergoing routine follow-up studies at our center. We performed 24-h urinary copper excretion analysis 48 h after interruption of chelating therapy. Thirty-two patients were enrolled. After DPA cessation, normalization of copper excretion was observed in 91% of reportedly compliant patients. The specificity and sensitivity values of this test were 87% and 77%, respectively. Measurement of 24-h urinary copper excretion after a 48-h interruption of DPA therapy in patients with WD is a reliable method for confirming patients' compliance.

  19. Results Of Copper Catalyzed Peroxide Oxidation (CCPO) Of Tank 48H Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.; Pareizs, J. M.; Newell, J. D.; Fondeur, F. F.; Nash, C. A.; White, T. L.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-13

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed a series of laboratory-scale experiments that examined copper-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) aided destruction of organic components, most notably tetraphenylborate (TPB), in Tank 48H simulant slurries. The experiments were designed with an expectation of conducting the process within existing vessels of Building 241-96H with minimal modifications to the existing equipment. Results of the experiments indicate that TPB destruction levels exceeding 99.9% are achievable, dependent on the reaction conditions. A lower reaction pH provides faster reaction rates (pH 7 > pH 9 > pH 11); however, pH 9 reactions provide the least quantity of organic residual compounds within the limits of species analyzed. Higher temperatures lead to faster reaction rates and smaller quantities of organic residual compounds. A processing temperature of 50°C as part of an overall set of conditions appears to provide a viable TPB destruction time on the order of 4 days. Higher concentrations of the copper catalyst provide faster reaction rates, but the highest copper concentration (500 mg/L) also resulted in the second highest quantity of organic residual compounds. The data in this report suggests 100-250 mg/L as a minimum. Faster rates of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition lead to faster reaction rates and lower quantities of organic residual compounds. An addition rate of 0.4 mL/hour, scaled to the full vessel, is suggested for the process. SRNL recommends that for pH adjustment, an acid addition rate 42 mL/hour, scaled to the full vessel, is used. This is the same addition rate used in the testing. Even though the TPB and phenylborates can be destroyed in a relative short time period, the residual organics will take longer to degrade to <10 mg/L. Low level leaching on titanium occurred, however, the typical concentrations of released titanium are very low (~40 mg/L or less). A small amount of leaching under these conditions is not

  20. Lethality test system

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.; Sims, J.R.; Parker, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    The Lethality Test System (LTS), presently under construction at Los Alamos, is an electromagnetic launcher facility designed to perform impact experiments at velocities up to 15 km/s. The launcher is a 25 mm round bore, plasma armature railgun extending 22 m in length. Preinjection is accomplished with a two-stage gas gun capable of 7 km/s. The railgun power supply utilizes traction motors, vacuum interrupters, and pulse transformers. An assembly of 28 traction motors, equipped with flywheels, stores approximately 80 MJ at 92% of full speed and energizes the primary windings of three pulse transformers at a current of 50 kA. At peak current an array of vacuum interrupters disconnects the transformer primary windings and forces the current to flow in the secondary windings. The secondary windings are connected to the railgun, and by staging the vacuum interrupter openings, a 1 MA to 1.3 MA ramped current waveform will be delivered to the railgun.

  1. The Lethality Test System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, W. M.; Sims, J. R.; Parker, J. V.

    1986-11-01

    The Lethality Test System (LTS) under construction at Los Alamos is an electromagnetic launcher facility designed to perform impact experiments at velocities up to 15 km/sec. The launcher is a 25 mm round bore, plasma armature railgun 22 m in length. Preinjection is accomplished with a two-stage light gas gun capable of 7 km/sec. The railgun power supply utilizes traction motors, vacuum interrupters, and pulse transformers. An assembly of 28 traction motors, equipped with flywheels, stores approximately 80 MJ at 92 percent of full speed and energizes the primary windings of three pulse transformers at a current of 50 kA. At peak current an array of vacuum interrupters disconnects the transformer primary windings and forces the current to flow in the secondary windings. The secondary windings are connected to the railgun, and by staging the vacuum interrupter openings, a 1-1.3 MA ramped current waveform will be delivered to the railgun.

  2. Heterogeneity of Lethals in a "Simple" Lethal Complementation Group

    PubMed Central

    Janca, Frank C.; Woloshyn, Effie P.; Nash, David

    1986-01-01

    Of 24 ethyl methanesulphonate-induced, recessive-lethal mutations in the region 9E1-9F13 of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster , eight fall into a typically homogeneous lethal complementation group associated with the raspberry (ras) locus. Mutations in this group have previously been shown to be pleiotropic, affecting not only ras but also two other genetic entities, gua1 and pur1, which yield auxotrophic mutations.—The eight new mutations have been characterized phenotypically in double heterozygotes with gua1, pur1 and ras mutations. Despite their homogeneity in lethal complementation tests, the mutations prove quite diverse. For example, two mutations have little or no effect on eye color in double heterozygotes with ras2 . The differences between the lethals are allele-specific and cannot be explained as a trivial outcome of a hypomorphic series.—Taken alone, the lethal complementation studies mask the complexity of the locus and the diversity of its recessive lethal alleles. By extension, we argue that the general use of lethal saturation studies provides an unduly simplified image of genetic organization. We suggest that the reason why recessive lethal mutations rarely present complex complementation patterns is that complex loci tend to produce mutations that affect several subfunctions. PMID:3080355

  3. Adaptive Mallow's optimization for weighted median filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachuri, Raghu; Rao, Sathyanarayana S.

    2002-05-01

    This work extends the idea of spectral optimization for the design of Weighted Median filters and employ adaptive filtering that updates the coefficients of the FIR filter from which the weights of the median filters are derived. Mallows' theory of non-linear smoothers [1] has proven to be of great theoretical significance providing simple design guidelines for non-linear smoothers. It allows us to find a set of positive weights for a WM filter whose sample selection probabilities (SSP's) are as close as possible to a SSP set predetermined by Mallow's. Sample selection probabilities have been used as a basis for designing stack smoothers as they give a measure of the filter's detail preserving ability and give non-negative filter weights. We will extend this idea to design weighted median filters admitting negative weights. The new method first finds the linear FIR filter coefficients adaptively, which are then used to determine the weights of the median filter. WM filters can be designed to have band-pass, high-pass as well as low-pass frequency characteristics. Unlike the linear filters, however, the weighted median filters are robust in the presence of impulsive noise, as shown by the simulation results.

  4. FATE OF FISSILE MATERIAL BOUND TO MONOSODIUM TITANATE DURING COOPER CATALYZED PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2012-08-09

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), Tank 48H currently holds approximately 240,000 gallons of slurry which contains potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (TPB). A copper catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) reaction is currently being examined as a method for destroying the TPB present in Tank 48H. Part of the development of that process includes an examination of the fate of the Tank 48H fissile material which is adsorbed onto monosodium titanate (MST) particles. This report details results from experiments designed to examine the potential degradation of MST during CCPO processing and the subsequent fate of the adsorbed fissile material. Experiments were conducted to simulate the CCPO process on MST solids loaded with sorbates in a simplified Tank 48H simulant. Loaded MST solids were placed into the Tank 48H simplified simulant without TPB, and the experiments were then carried through acid addition (pH adjustment to 11), peroxide addition, holding at temperature (50 C) for one week, and finally NaOH addition to bring the free hydroxide concentration to a target concentration of 1 M. Testing was conducted without TPB to show the maximum possible impact on MST since the competing oxidation of TPB with peroxide was absent. In addition, the Cu catalyst was also omitted, which will maximize the interaction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the MST; however, the results may be non-conservative assuming the Cu-peroxide active intermediate is more reactive than the peroxide radical itself. The study found that both U and Pu desorb from the MST when the peroxide addition begins, although to different extents. Virtually all of the U goes into solution at the beginning of the peroxide addition, whereas Pu reaches a maximum of {approx}34% leached during the peroxide addition. Ti from the MST was also found to come into solution during the peroxide addition. Therefore, Ti is present with the fissile in solution. After the peroxide addition is complete, the Pu and Ti are found to

  5. The impact of a 48-h fast on SIRT1 and GCN5 in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Edgett, Brittany A; Scribbans, Trisha D; Raleigh, James P; Matusiak, Jennifer B L; Boonstra, Kristen; Simpson, Craig A; Perry, Christopher G R; Quadrilatero, Joe; Gurd, Brendon J

    2016-09-01

    The present study examined the impact of a 48 h fast on the expression and activation status of SIRT1 and GCN5, the relationship between SIRT1/GCN5 and the gene expression of PGC-1α, and the PGC-1α target PDK4 in the skeletal muscle of 10 lean healthy men (age, 22.0 ± 1.5 years; peak oxygen uptake, 47.2 ± 6.7 mL/(min·kg)). Muscle biopsies and blood samples were collected 1 h postprandial (Fed) and following 48 h of fasting (Fasted). Plasma insulin (Fed, 80.8 ± 47.9 pmol/L; Fasted, not detected) and glucose (Fed, 4.36 ± 0.86; Fasted, 3.74 ± 0.25 mmol/L, p = 0.08) decreased, confirming participant adherence to fasting. Gene expression of PGC-1α decreased (p < 0.05, -24%), while SIRT1 and PDK4 increased (p < 0.05, +11% and +1023%, respectively), and GCN5 remained unchanged. No changes were observed for whole-muscle protein expression of SIRT1, GCN5, PGC-1α, or COX IV. Phosphorylation of SIRT1, AMPKα, ACC, p38 MAPK, and PKA substrates as well as nuclear acetylation status was also unaltered. Additionally, nuclear SIRT1 activity, GCN5, and PGC-1α content remained unchanged. Preliminary findings derived from regression analysis demonstrate that changes in nuclear GCN5 and SIRT1 activity/phosphorylation may contribute to the control of PGC-1α, but not PDK4, messenger RNA expression following fasting. Collectively, and in contrast with previous animal studies, our data are inconsistent with the altered activation status of SIRT1 and GCN5 in response to 48 h of fasting in human skeletal muscle.

  6. Median Citation Index vs Journal Impact Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    2015-03-01

    The Journal Impact Factor is an arithmetic mean: It is the average number of citations, in a year, to a journal's articles that were published the previous two years. But for the vast majority of scholarly journals, the distribution of these citations is skewed (non-symmetric). We argue that a more representative member of the skewed distribution of citations is its median, not the mean. We thus introduce the Median Citation Index (MCI) and compare it to the journal Impact Factor (JIF) as a potentially more suitable choice of the ``center'' of the distribution, or its typical value. Unlike the JIF, the MCI is far less sensitive to outlier (very highly cited) papers or to gaming, and does not lend itself to the hype of calculating it to three decimal digits.

  7. A semblance-guided median filter

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, E.C. ); Toksoz, M.N. ); Purdy, G.M. )

    1993-01-01

    A slowness selective median filter based on information from a local set of traces is described and implemented. The filter is constructed in two steps, the first being an estimation of a preferred slowness and the second, the selection of a median or trimmed mean value to replace the original data point. A symmetric window of traces defining the filter aperture is selected about each trace to be filtered and the filter applied repeatedly to each time point. The preferred slowness is determined by scanning a range of linear moveouts within the user-specified slowness passband. Semblance is computed for each trial slowness and the preferred slowness selected from the peak semblance value. Data points collected along this preferred slowness are then sorted from lowest to highest and in the case of a pure median filter, the middle point(s) selected to replace the original data point. This approach may be sued as a velocity filter to estimate coherent signal within a specified slowness passband and reject coherent energy outside this range. For applications of this type, other velocity estimators may be used in place of the authors semblance measure to provide improved velocity estimation and better filter performance. The filter aperture may also be extended to provide increased velocity estimation, but will result in additional lateral smearing of signal. The authors show that, in addition to a velocity filter, their approach may be used to improve signal-to-noise ratios in noisy data. The median filter tends to suppress the amplitude of random background noise and semblance weighting may be used to reduce the amplitude of background noise further while enhancing coherent signal.

  8. Portfolio optimization using median-variance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Mohd, Wan Rosanisah; Mohamad, Daud; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2013-04-01

    Optimization models have been applied in many decision-making problems particularly in portfolio selection. Since the introduction of Markowitz's theory of portfolio selection, various approaches based on mathematical programming have been introduced such as mean-variance, mean-absolute deviation, mean-variance-skewness and conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) mainly to maximize return and minimize risk. However most of the approaches assume that the distribution of data is normal and this is not generally true. As an alternative, in this paper, we employ the median-variance approach to improve the portfolio optimization. This approach has successfully catered both types of normal and non-normal distribution of data. With this actual representation, we analyze and compare the rate of return and risk between the mean-variance and the median-variance based portfolio which consist of 30 stocks from Bursa Malaysia. The results in this study show that the median-variance approach is capable to produce a lower risk for each return earning as compared to the mean-variance approach.

  9. Passive Immunization against Cachectin/Tumor Necrosis Factor Protects Mice from Lethal Effect of Endotoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, B.; Milsark, I. W.; Cerami, A. C.

    1985-08-01

    A highly specific polyclonal rabbit antiserum directed against murine cachectin/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was prepared. When BALB/c mice were passively immunized with the antiserum or with purified immune globulin, they were protected against the lethal effect of the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide produced by Escherichia coli. The prophylactic effect was dose-dependent and was most effective when the antiserum was administered prior to the injection of the endotoxin. Antiserum to cachectin/TNF did not mitigate the febrile response of endotoxin-treated animals, and very high doses of endotoxin could overcome the protective effect. The median lethal dose of endotoxin in mice pretreated with 50 microliters of the specific antiserum was approximately 2.5 times greater the median lethal dose for controls given nonimmune serum. The data suggest that cachectin/TNF is one of the principal mediators of the lethal effect of endotoxin.

  10. Robust non-local median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Jyohei; Koga, Takanori; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a novel image filter with superior performance on detail-preserving removal of random-valued impulse noise superimposed on natural gray-scale images. The non-local means filter is in the limelight as a way of Gaussian noise removal with superior performance on detail preservation. By referring the fundamental concept of the non-local means, we had proposed a non-local median filter as a specialized way for random-valued impulse noise removal so far. In the non-local processing, the output of a filter is calculated from pixels in blocks which are similar to the block centered at a pixel of interest. As a result, aggressive noise removal is conducted without destroying the detailed structures in an original image. However, the performance of non-local processing decreases enormously in the case of high noise occurrence probability. A cause of this problem is that the superimposed noise disturbs accurate calculation of the similarity between the blocks. To cope with this problem, we propose an improved non-local median filter which is robust to the high level of corruption by introducing a new similarity measure considering possibility of being the original signal. The effectiveness and validity of the proposed method are verified in a series of experiments using natural gray-scale images.

  11. STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138

    SciTech Connect

    Burket, P

    2009-02-24

    This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

  12. Caffeine and modafinil promote adult neuronal cell proliferation during 48 h of total sleep deprivation in rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Surajit; Kauser, Hina; Ray, Koushik; Kishore, Krishna; Kumar, Sanjeev; Panjwani, Usha

    2013-10-01

    It has been established that sleep deprivation (SD) reduces the proliferation of neuronal precursors in the adult hippocampus. It has also been reported that psychostimulant drugs modulate adult neurogenesis. We examined the modulatory role of two psychostimulant drugs modafinil and caffeine on adult neuronal cell proliferation (NCP) during 48 h of total SD. A novel automated cage shaking stimulus was used to induce SD based on animal activity. 5-Bromo-2″-deoxyuridine (BrdU; 50mg/kg/day i.p.) was injected at the onset of the light phase for two days. Rats were successfully sleep deprived for 85-94% of total time. Stereological analysis showed that both caffeine and modafinil treatments during SD improved the number of BrdU positive cells as compared to the SD group. Caffeine treatment during SD, significantly increased early proliferative and post-mitotic stages of doublecortin (DCX) positive cells while modafinil treatment during SD, increased intermediate and post-mitotic stages of DCX positive cells compared to SD+Vehicle group. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) expression on BrdU positive cells as well as in the dentate gyrus (DG) region was decreased significantly after sleep deprivation. Both caffeine and modafinil significantly improved BDNF expression in the DG region. Modafinil, but not caffeine, significantly decreased hippocampal adenosine level during SD in comparison to the SD+Vehicle group. It may be concluded that caffeine or modafinil treatment during 48 h of SD prevents the SD induced decline in neuronal proliferation and differentiation. Caffeine and modafinil induced alterations of NCP during SD may involve modulation of BDNF and adenosine levels.

  13. Treatments (12 and 48 h) with systemic and brain-selective hypothermia techniques after permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rat.

    PubMed

    Clark, Darren L; Penner, Mark; Wowk, Shannon; Orellana-Jordan, Ian; Colbourne, Frederick

    2009-12-01

    Mild hypothermia lessens brain injury when initiated after the onset of global or focal ischemia. The present study sought to determine whether cooling to approximately 33 degrees C provides enduring benefit when initiated 1 h after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO, via electrocautery) in adult rats and whether protection depends upon treatment duration and cooling technique. In the first experiment, systemic cooling was induced in non-anesthetized rats through a whole-body exposure technique that used fans and water mist. In comparison to normothermic controls, 12- and 48-h bouts of hypothermia significantly lessened functional impairment, such as skilled reaching ability, and lesion volume out to a 1-month survival. In the second experiment, brain-selective cooling was induced in awake rats via a water-cooled metal strip implanted underneath the temporalis muscle overlying the ischemic territory. Use of a 48-h cooling treatment significantly mitigated injury and behavioral impairment whereas a 12-h treatment did not. These findings show that while systemic and focal techniques are effective when initiated after the onset of pMCAO, they differ in efficacy depending upon the treatment duration. A direct and uncomplicated comparison between methods is problematic, however, due to unknown gradients in brain temperature and the use of two separate experiments. In summary, prolonged cooling, even when delayed after onset of pMCAO, provides enduring behavioral and histological protection sufficient to suggest that it will be clinically effective. Nonetheless, further pre-clinical work is needed to improve treatment protocols, such as identifying the optimal depth of cooling, and how these factors interact with cooling method.

  14. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Lipofibromatous hamartoma is a rare tumour of peripheral nerves which is characterised by an excessive infiltration of the epineurium and perineurium by fibroadipose tissue. To the best of our knowledge, only approximately 88 cases are reported in the literature. We report a rare case of lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve causing secondary carpal tunnel syndrome in a 25 year old patient. This patient was treated conservatively with decompression and biopsy and experienced a complete resolution of symptoms post-operatively. Magnetic resonance imaging may be used to diagnose this lesion as it has very distinctive characteristics. Multiple conditions have been associated with this lesion and a greater understanding of these associations may clarify the pathogenesis. The architecture of the tumour makes excision very challenging and the surgical management remains controversial. A review of the literature regarding the etiology, pathogenesis and surgical management of lipofibromatous hamartoma is included. PMID:20920178

  15. Censored Median Regression and Profile Empirical Likelihood

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sundarraman

    2007-01-01

    We implement profile empirical likelihood based inference for censored median regression models. Inference for any specified sub-vector is carried out by profiling out the nuisance parameters from the “plug-in” empirical likelihood ratio function proposed by Qin and Tsao. To obtain the critical value of the profile empirical likelihood ratio statistic, we first investigate its asymptotic distribution. The limiting distribution is a sum of weighted chi square distributions. Unlike for the full empirical likelihood, however, the derived asymptotic distribution has intractable covariance structure. Therefore, we employ the bootstrap to obtain the critical value, and compare the resulting confidence intervals with the ones obtained through Basawa and Koul’s minimum dispersion statistic. Furthermore, we obtain confidence intervals for the age and treatment effects in a lung cancer data set. PMID:19112527

  16. Lethal Amanita species in China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qing; Cui, Yang-Yang; Yang, Zhu L

    2016-09-01

    Lethal amanitas (Amanita sect. Phalloideae) cause many casualties worldwide. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies revealed diverse lethal Amanita spp. in China. Here a 5-gene phylogeny (nuc rDNA region encompassing the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 with the 5.8S rDNA, the D1-D3 domains of nuc 28S rDNA, and partial RNA polymerase II second largest subunit, translation elongation factor 1-α and β-tubulin genes) is used to investigate the phylogenetic lineages and species delimitation in this section. Thirteen species are recognized, including four new species, namely A. griseorosea, A. molliuscula, A. parviexitialis, and A. subfuliginea They are documented with morphological, multigene phylogenetic, and ecological evidence, line drawings, and photographs and compared with similar species. A key to the Chinese lethal Amanita species is provided.

  17. TASK TECHNICAL AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN FOR THE CHARACTERIZATION AND LEACHING OF A THERMOWELL AND CONDUCTIVITY PROBE PIPE SAMPLE FROM TANK 48H

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F

    2005-11-02

    A key component for the accelerated implementation and operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is the recovery of Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a type IIIA tank with a maximum capacity of 1.3 million gallons. The material on the Tank 48H internal tank surfaces is estimated to have a total volume of approximately 115 gallons consisting of mostly water soluble solids with approximately 20 wt% insoluble solids (33 Kg TPB). This film is assumed to be readily removable. The material on the internal equipment/surfaces of Tank 48H is presumed to be easily removed by slurry pump operation. For Tank 49H, the slurry pumps were operated almost continuously for approximately 6 months after which time the tank was inspected and the film was found to be removed. The major components of the Tank 49H film were soluble solids--Na{sub 3}H(CO){sub 2}, Al(OH){sub 3}, NaTPB, NaNO{sub 3} and NaNO{sub 2}. Although the Tank 48H film is expected to be primarily soluble solids, it may not behave the same as the Tank 49H film. Depending on when the Recycle material or inhibited water can be added to Tank 48H, the tank may not be allowed to agitate for this same amount of time. The tank will be filled above 150 inches and agitated at least once during the Aggregation process. If the material cannot be removed after completion of these batches, the material may be removed with additional fill and agitation operations. There is a risk that this will not remove the material from the internal surfaces. As a risk mitigation activity, properties of the film and the ease of removing the film from the tank will be evaluated prior to initiating Aggregation. This task will investigate the dissolution of Tank 48H solid deposits in inhibited water and DWPF recycle. To this end, tank personnel plan to cut and remove a thermowell pipe from Tank 48H and submit the cut pieces to SRNL for both characterization and leaching behavior. A plan for the removal, packaging and transport of the thermowell pipe

  18. Role of endotoxemia in cardiovascular dysfunction and lethality: virulent and nonvirulent Escherichia coli challenges in a canine model of septic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, W D; Danner, R L; Quezado, Z M; Banks, S M; Elin, R J; Hosseini, J M; Natanson, C

    1996-01-01

    We investigated whether the severity of septic shock is determined by virulence factors associated with or the levels of endotoxemia produced by two Escherichia coli strains. Canines were challenged intraperitoneally with an E. coli strain (O6:H1:K2) that has virulence factors associated with human disease or with an equal dose of a nonvirulent strain (O86:H8) that lacks these factors. Both strains were administered in viable, heat-killed, and purified endotoxin forms. Median survival times with the virulent strain compared with the nonvirulent strain were shorter with viable bacteria (5 x 10(10) CFU/kg) (144 h versus > 672 h; Wilcoxon, P = 0.03), longer with heat-killed bacteria (5 x 10(9) CFU/kg) ( > 676 h versus 26 h; P = 0.03), and similar with purified endotoxin (15 mg/kg) (28 h versus 48 h; P = 0.71). However, whether the challenge contained viable bacteria, heat-killed bacteria, or purified endotoxin, the virulent strain produced less endotoxemia (P = 0.001). Hence, the changing outcomes with differing forms of the two strains cannot be attributed solely to endotoxin levels. The viable virulent strain caused less endotoxemia but more harm, and this does not appear to be explained by a more potent endotoxin or other heat-stable component. This study suggests that circulating endotoxin levels per se are less important in the outcome of septic shock than virulence factors associated with E. coli strains. Furthermore, the data call into question the significance of the endotoxin concentration in the blood in predicting the severity of shock and the lethality of gram-negative infections. PMID:8550184

  19. Geometric median for missing rainfall data imputation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burhanuddin, Siti Nur Zahrah Amin; Deni, Sayang Mohd; Ramli, Norazan Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    Missing data is a common problem faced by researchers in environmental studies. Environmental data, particularly, rainfall data are highly vulnerable to be missed, which is due to several reasons, such as malfunction instrument, incorrect measurements, and relocation of stations. Rainfall data are also affected by the presence of outliers due to the temporal and spatial variability of rainfall measurements. These problems may harm the quality of rainfall data and subsequently, produce inaccuracy in the results of analysis. Thus, this study is aimed to propose an imputation method that is robust towards the presence of outliers for treating the missing rainfall data. Geometric median was applied to estimate the missing values based on the available rainfall data from neighbouring stations. The method was compared with several conventional methods, such as normal ratio and inverse distance weighting methods, in order to evaluate its performance. Thirteen rainfall stations in Peninsular Malaysia were selected for the application of the imputation methods. The results indicated that the proposed method provided the most accurate estimation values compared to both conventional methods based on the least mean absolute error. The normal ratio was found to be the worst method in estimating the missing rainfall values.

  20. Median filtering algorithms for multichannel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovhannisyan, A.; Chilingarian, A.

    2011-05-01

    Particle detectors of worldwide networks are continuously measuring various secondary particle fluxes incident on Earth surface. At the Aragats Space Environmental Center (ASEC), the data of 12 cosmic ray particle detectors with a total of ˜280 measuring channels (count rates of electrons, muons and neutrons channels) are sent each minute via wireless bridges to a MySQL database. These time series are used for the different tasks of off-line physical analysis and for online forewarning services. Usually long time series contain several types of errors (gaps due to failures of high or low voltage power supply, spurious spikes due to radio interferences, abrupt changes of mean values of several channels or/and slowly trends in mean values due to aging of electronics components, etc.). To avoid erroneous physical inference and false alarms of alerting systems we introduce offline and online filters to "purify" multiple time-series. In the presented paper we classify possible mistakes in time series and introduce median filtering algorithms for online and off-line "purification" of multiple time-series.

  1. Albumin decrease is associated with spontaneous preterm delivery within 48 h in women with threatened preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yujing J; Taylor, Lorne; Larsen, Brett G; Chua, Hon Nian; Pung, Soke May; Lee, Mary W F; Tucholska, Monika; Tate, Stephen; Kupchak, Peter; Pennell, Craig E; Pawson, Tony; Lye, Stephen J

    2015-01-02

    Threatened preterm labor (TPTL) accounts for ∼30% of pregnancy-related hospital admissions. Maternal peripheral leukocytes can be used to monitor a variety of physiological processes occurring in the body. Two high-throughput mass spectrometry methodologies, SWATH and iTRAQ, were used to study differentially expressed peripheral blood leukocyte lysate proteins in symptomatic women admitted for TPTL who had a preterm birth within 48 h (n = 16) and those who did not (n = 24). The SWATH spectral library consisted of 783 proteins. SWATH methodology quantified 258 proteins (using ≥2 peptides) and 5 proteins (ALBU, ANXA6, HNRPK, HSP90A, and PDIA1) were differentially expressed (p < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U). iTRAQ workflow identified 765 proteins; 354 proteins were quantified and 14 proteins (MIF, UBIQ, HXK3, ALBU, HNRPD, ST1A2, RS15A, RAP1B, CAN1, IQGA2, ST1A1, COX5A, ADDA, and UBQL1) were significantly different between the two groups of women (p < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U). Albumin was the only common differentially expressed protein in both SWATH (28% decrease) and iTRAQ studies (45% decrease). This decrease in albumin was validated using ELISA (11% decrease, p < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U) in another 23 TPTL women. This work suggests that albumin is a broad indicator of leukocyte activation with impending preterm birth and provides new future work directions to understand the pathophysiology of TPTL.

  2. ICG angiography predicts burn scarring within 48 h of injury in a porcine vertical progression burn model.

    PubMed

    Fourman, Mitchell S; McKenna, Peter; Phillips, Brett T; Crawford, Laurie; Romanelli, Filippo; Lin, Fubao; McClain, Steve A; Khan, Sami U; Dagum, Alexander B; Singer, Adam J; Clark, Richard A F

    2015-08-01

    The current standard of care in determining the need to excise and graft a burn remains with the burn surgeon, whose clinical judgment is often variable. Prior work suggests that minimally invasive perfusion technologies are useful in burn prognostication. Here we test the predictive capabilities of Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) and indocyanine green dye (ICG) angiography in the prediction of burn scarring 28 days after injury using a previously validated porcine burn model that shows vertical progression injury. Twelve female Yorkshire swine were burned using a 2.5 × 2.5 cm metal bar at variable temperature and application times to create distinct burn depths. Six animals (48 injuries total) each were analyzed with LDI or ICG angiography at 1, 24, 48, and 72 h following injury. A linear regression was then performed correlating perfusion measurements against wound contraction at 28 days after injury. ICG angiography showed a peak linear correlate (r(2)) of .63 (95% CI .34 to .92) at 48 h after burn. This was significantly different from the LDI linear regression (p < .05), which was measured at r(2) of .20 (95% CI .02 to .39). ICG angiography linear regression was superior to LDI at all timepoints. Findings suggest that ICG angiography may have significant potential in the prediction of long-term burn outcomes.

  3. Derivation of Human Lethal Doses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-19

    emergency medicine, pharmacology, forensic medicine, and industrial chemical toxicology, in addition to a poison information center. The authors presented...Meditsinskaya Ekspeertiza. Forensic Medical Examination, 26(2), 48, 1983 (as cited in Sax’s). This reference is not available for review. Rat – LD50...mg/kg No LDLo, MLD, or lethal dose for humans Rat – LD50 (Bulletin of the Entomological Society of America, 1969) (as cited in Sax’s). This

  4. The Heterogeneous P-Median Problem for Categorization Based Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Simon J.; Aloise, Daniel; DeSarbo, Wayne S.

    2012-01-01

    The p-median offers an alternative to centroid-based clustering algorithms for identifying unobserved categories. However, existing p-median formulations typically require data aggregation into a single proximity matrix, resulting in masked respondent heterogeneity. A proposed three-way formulation of the p-median problem explicitly considers…

  5. Thermal Screening Of Residues From Acidification And Copper-Catalyzed Peroxide Oxidation Of Tank 48H Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F. F.; Newell, J. D.; Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-10-04

    This study evaluated the residues generated from copper-catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) of Tank 48H simulant. The first step of the CCPO calls for pH adjustment of the simulant, and early testing used either 15wt% or 50wt % nitric acid to reach a slurry pH of between 12 and 5. Residues obtained by ambient temperature pH adjustment with 50wt % nitric acid followed by oxidation with 50 wt % hydrogen peroxide at 35, 50, and 65°C (from a recently conducted Copper Catalyzed Peroxide Oxidation or CCPO) were also analyzed. Slurry samples at pH 7 or lower especially made from adding nitric acid at the process equivalent of one gallon per minute had the largest enthalpy of decomposition. The thermogravimetric characteristics of some samples from the CCPO test generated at pH 9 or lower exhibited rapid weight loss. Taken together, residues generated at pH 9 or lower may be classified as energetic upon decomposition in confined spaces or under adiabatic conditions. Therefore, additional testing is recommended with larger (up to 50mL) samples in an adiabatic calorimeter. To minimize risk of formation of energetic byproducts, an intermediate slurry pH of 9 or greater is recommended following the acidification step in the CCPO and prior to start of peroxide addition. In practice, process temperature needs to reach 150°C or greater to decompose residues obtained a pH 9 or lower which is unlikely. Oxidation temperature had no significant effect on the thermal characteristics of the final residues generated.

  6. Histological Evaluation of Prostate Tissue Response to Image-Guided Transurethral Thermal Therapy After a 48h Recovery Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyes, Aaron; Tang, Kee; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Image-guided transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy shows strong potential for sparing of critical adjacent structures during prostate cancer treatment. Preclinical experiments were conducted to provide further information on the extent of the treatment margin. Four experiments were carried out in a canine model to investigate the pathology of this margin during the early stages of recovery and were compared to previous results obtained immediately post-treatment. Sedated animals were placed in a 1.5T clinical MRI, and the heating device was positioned accurately within the prostatic urethra with image guidance. Using an MRI-compatible system, the ultrasound device was rotated 365° treating a prescribed volume contained within the gland. Quantitative temperature maps were acquired throughout the treatment, providing feedback information for device control. Animals were allowed to recover and, after 48h, an imaging protocol including T2 and contrast enhanced (CE) MRI was repeated before the animals were sacrificed. Prostate sections were stained with H&E. Careful slice alignment methods during histological procedures and image registration were employed to ensure good correspondence between MR images and microscopy. Although T2 MRI revealed no lesion acutely, a hypo-intense region was clearly visible 2 days post-treatment. The lesion volume defined by CE-MRI increased appreciably during this time. Whole-mount H&E sections showed that the margin between coagulated and normal-appearing cells narrowed during recovery, typically to a width of under 1mm compared to 3mm acutely. These results illustrate the high level of precision achievable with transurethral thermal therapy and suggest methods to monitor the physiological response non-invasively.

  7. 2009 PILOT SCALE FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING TESTING USING THE THOR (THERMAL ORGANIC REDUCTION) PROCESS: ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR TANK 48H ORGANIC DESTRUCTION - 10408

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.; Jantzen, C.; Burket, P.; Crawford, C.; Daniel, G.; Aponte, C.; Johnson, C.

    2009-12-28

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) must empty the contents of Tank 48H, a 1.3 million gallon Type IIIA HLW storage tank, to return this tank to service. The tank contains organic compounds, mainly potassium tetraphenylborate that cannot be processed downstream until the organic components are destroyed. The THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) technology, herein after referred to as steam reforming, has been demonstrated to be a viable process to remove greater than 99.9% of the organics from Tank 48H during various bench scale and pilot scale tests. These demonstrations were supported by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and the Department of Energy (DOE) has concurred with the SRR recommendation to proceed with the deployment of the FBSR technology to treat the contents of Tank 48H. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed and proved the concept with non-radioactive simulants for SRR beginning in 2003. By 2008, several pilot scale campaigns had been completed and extensive crucible testing and bench scale testing were performed in the SRNL Shielded Cells using Tank 48H radioactive sample. SRNL developed a Tank 48H non-radioactive simulant complete with organic compounds, salt, and metals characteristic of those measured in a sample of the radioactive contents of Tank 48H. FBSR Pilot Scaled Testing with the Tank 48H simulant has demonstrated the ability to remove greater than 98% of the nitrites and greater than 99.5% of the nitrates from the Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily alkali carbonate. The alkali carbonate is soluble and, thus, amenable to pumping as a liquid to downstream facilities for processing. The FBSR technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration (ESTD) pilot scale steam reformer at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. Additional ESTD tests were completed in 2008 and in 2009 that further demonstrated the

  8. Electroshock weapons can be lethal!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    Electroshock weapons (EWs)-stun guns, tasers, riot shields-are electroconductive devices designed to safely incapacitate healthy men neuromuscularly, so they are called nonlethal or less-lethal. EW firms seeking large nonmilitary markets targeted law enforcement and corrections personnel, who began using EWs in prisons/jails and on public patrol in 1980 in the USA. This shifted the EW-shocked population from healthy soldiers to a heterogeneous mix of both sexes, ages 6-92, in a wide variety of health conditions! An EW operates by disrupting normal physiological processes, producing transient effects in healthy people. But if a person's health is sufficiently compromised, the margin of safety can be lost, resulting in death or permanent health problems. 325 people have died after EW shock since 1980. Did the EW cause these deaths? Evidence indicates that EWs do play a causal role in most such deaths. EWs can be lethal for people in diabetic shock^1 (hypoglycemia), which may be why Robert Dziekanski-a Polish immigrant to Canada-died so quickly after he was tasered at Vancouver Airport: not having eaten for over 10 hours, he likely was severely hypoglycemic. The EW death rate in North America is 30 times higher than need be, because EW users have not been properly trained to use EWs on a heterogeneous population safely! ^1J. Clinical Engineering 30(3):111(2005).

  9. Development of synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bingliang

    2014-10-09

    The concept of synthetic lethality (the creation of a lethal phenotype from the combined effects of mutations in two or more genes) has recently been exploited in various efforts to develop new genotype-selective anticancer therapeutics. These efforts include screening for novel anticancer agents, identifying novel therapeutic targets, characterizing mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy, and improving efficacies through the rational design of combination therapy. This review discusses recent developments in synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics, including poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitors for BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutant cancers, checkpoint inhibitors for p53 mutant cancers, and small molecule agents targeting RAS gene mutant cancers. Because cancers are caused by mutations in multiple genes and abnormalities in multiple signaling pathways, synthetic lethality for a specific tumor suppressor gene or oncogene is likely cell context-dependent. Delineation of the mechanisms underlying synthetic lethality and identification of treatment response biomarkers will be critical for the success of synthetic lethality anticancer therapy.

  10. Papillary Carcinoma in Median Aberrant Thyroid (Ectopic) - Case Report

    PubMed Central

    K, Shashidhar; Deshmane, Vijaya Laxmi; Kumar, Veerendra; Arjunan, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Median ectopic thyroid may be encountered anywhere from the foramen caecum to the diaphragm. Non lingual median aberrant thyroid (incomplete descent) usually found in the infrahyoid region and malignant transformation in this ectopic thyroid tissue is very rare. We report an extremely rare case of papillary carcinoma in non lingual median aberrant thyroid in a 25-year-old female. The differentiation between a carcinoma arising in the median ectopic thyroid tissue and a metastatic papillary carcinoma from an occult primary in the main thyroid gland is also discussed. PMID:25121039

  11. Impact of endpoint definition on the outcome of antifungal susceptibility tests with Candida species: 24- versus 48-h incubation and 50 versus 80% reduction in growth.

    PubMed

    St-Germain, G

    2001-01-01

    The growth inhibition patterns of 764 clinical yeast isolates, in response to amphotericin B, flucytosine, itraconazole and fluconazole, were studied in order to determine the frequency of trailing growth and any impact this, as well as 24- or 48-h incubation periods, may have on minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results. A broth microdilution method following National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standard No. M27A recommendations was used. Trailing growth was observed mainly with azoles. Furthermore, over 98% of isolates exhibiting a trailing effect at 24 h with fluconazole and itraconazole were either Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis. When comparing 24- and 48-h IC50 values, discrepancies were observed with itraconazole and fluconazole, respectively, in 18 and 11% of C. albicans and 24 and 30% of C. tropicalis. When comparing IC50 and IC80 values at 24 h, discrepancies were again essentially seen with itraconazole and fluconazole, respectively, in 11 and 10% of C. albicans, and 17 and 27% of C. tropicalis. In susceptibility tests performed with a microdilution method and read spectrophotometrically, 48-h IC80 values result in an unlikely high number of resistant isolates, indicating that a 24-h incubation and a 50% reduction in optical density may correlate better with clinical outcome.

  12. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics of Daphnia magna responses after sub-lethal exposure to triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Vera; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2016-09-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products are a class of emerging contaminants that are present in wastewater effluents, surface water, and groundwater around the world. There is a need to determine rapid and reliable bioindicators of exposure and the toxic mode of action of these contaminants to aquatic organisms. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was used to determine the metabolic profile of Daphnia magna after exposure to a range of sub-lethal concentrations of triclosan (6.25-100μg/L), carbamazepine (1.75-14mg/L) and ibuprofen (1.75-14mg/L) for 48h. Sub-lethal triclosan exposure suggested a general oxidative stress condition and the branched-chain amino acids, glutamine, glutamate, and methionine emerged as potential bioindicators. The aromatic amino acids, serine, glycine and alanine are potential bioindicators for sub-lethal carbamazepine exposure that may have altered energy metabolism. The potential bioindicators for sub-lethal ibuprofen exposure are serine, methionine, lysine, arginine and leucine, which showed a concentration-dependent response. The differences in the metabolic changes were related to the dissimilar modes of toxicity of triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics gave an improved understanding of how these emerging contaminants impact the keystone species D. magna.

  13. Sperm fertility and viability following 48h of refrigeration: evaluation of different extenders for the preservation of bull semen in liquid state.

    PubMed

    Crespilho, A M; Nichi, M; Guasti, P N; Freitas-Dell'Aqua, C P; Sá Filho, M F; Maziero, R R; Dell'aqua, J A; Papa, F O

    2014-05-01

    Two experiments were conducted to compare the effectiveness of different extenders conventionally used for semen cryopreservation to maintain the viability and fertility of cooled bull semen. In Experiment 1, sperm samples obtained from 20 Nellore bulls were preserved at 5°C for 48h using two extenders containing 20% of egg yolk [Tris (TRIS-R) and Botu-Bov(®) (BB)] and another composed of 1% soy lecithin [Botu-Bov(®)-Lecithin (BB-L)] as substitutes for animal origin products. The samples were evaluated at 6, 24 and 48h for plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity, quantification of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (ng of TBARS/10(8) cells) and sperm motility parameters by computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA). In Experiment 2, pregnancy rate (P/AI) of 973 fixed-time artificially inseminated Nellore cows were compared when cows were inseminated with conventionally cryopreserved semen in TRIS-egg yolk glycerol (TRIS-C Control, n=253) or semen cooled for 48h in TRIS-R (n=233), BB (n=247) or BB-L (n=240). Although none of the extenders used was effective on maintaining total progressive motility and cellular integrity throughout the 48-h of the refrigeration period (P<0.01), BB-L conferred greater protection against oxidative stress (P<0.05) than egg yolk-based medias. The P/AI for semen samples preserved in TRIS-C, TRIS-R, BB and BB-L were 39.92(a), 25.32(b), 26.32(b) and 33.33(ab), respectively. These results demonstrate that the three conventional extenders used for semen cryopreservation do not provide the protection required to maintain bull semen fertility under refrigeration for a 48-h period, resulting in reduced pregnancy rates. However, the use of lecithin-based medium instead of egg yolk results in greater protection against lipid peroxidation, producing P/AI results comparable to those obtained using frozen semen.

  14. Alcohol Consumption and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Kenneth E.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Swann, Alan C.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Lee, Roberta K.; Bayer, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a case-control study of the association between nearly lethal suicide attempts and facets of alcohol consumption; namely, drinking frequency, drinking quantity, binge drinking, alcoholism, drinking within 3 hours of suicide attempt, and age began drinking. In bivariate analyses, all measures were associated with nearly lethal suicide…

  15. Comparison of the lethal effects of chemical warfare nerve agents across multiple ages.

    PubMed

    Wright, Linnzi K M; Lee, Robyn B; Vincelli, Nicole M; Whalley, Christopher E; Lumley, Lucille A

    2016-01-22

    Children may be inherently more vulnerable than adults to the lethal effects associated with chemical warfare nerve agent (CWNA) exposure because of their closer proximity to the ground, smaller body mass, higher respiratory rate, increased skin permeability and immature metabolic systems. Unfortunately, there have only been a handful of studies on the effects of CWNA in pediatric animal models, and more research is needed to confirm this hypothesis. Using a stagewise, adaptive dose design, we estimated the 24h median lethal dose for subcutaneous exposure to seven CWNA in both male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at six different developmental times. Perinatal (postnatal day [PND] 7, 14 and 21) and adult (PND 70) rats were more susceptible than pubertal (PND 28 and 42) rats to the lethal effects associated with exposure to tabun, sarin, soman and cyclosarin. Age-related differences in susceptibility were not observed in rats exposed to VM, Russian VX or VX.

  16. Variation of lead-induced lethality in estradiol-treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, G.R.

    1982-03-01

    Studies were undertaken to test the female sex hormone ..beta..-estradiol for its ability to modify lethality in young adult female and male mice exposed to lead acetate. Mice were injected with ..beta..-estradiol on day -1 and 0, and immediately after the second injection lead acetate was administered at four subgroup dosages ranging from 75 to 600 mg/kg body weight. Control mice were injected with only lead acetate. On day 4, 6, and 8 after Pb, the median lethal dosages (LD/sub 50/s) were calculated from the observed mortality ratios by a method for moving averages. LD/sub 50/ values were considerably lower for the Pb- and ..beta..-estradiol-injected groups than for the controls. Data from these experiments indicate that the ..beta..-estradiol treatments render both female and male mice more vulnerable to the lethal effects of lead acetate.

  17. Median and ulnar antidromic sensory studies to the fourth digit.

    PubMed

    Berkson, Andrew; Lohman, James; Buschbacher, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The literature documents multiple reports of neurological injury resulting from both the implantation and the removal of orthopedic devices. These injuries can be easily and objectively evaluated with nerve conduction studies. This study was undertaken to derive a normative database for median and ulnar sensory conduction studies to the fourth digit. Testing was done utilizing a 14-cm antidromic technique on 192 asymptomatic subjects with no risk factors for neuropathy. The subjects were studied bilaterally. Onset latency, peak latency, onset-to-peak amplitude, peak-to-peak amplitude, rise time, and duration were recorded. Increasing age and body mass index were associated with decreasing amplitudes and area. No other demographic factors correlated with differences in waveform measurements. Mean onset latency was 2.7 +/- 0.3 ms for the median nerve and 2.6 +/- 0.2 for the ulnar nerve. Mean peak latency was 3.4 +/- 0.3 ms for the median nerve and 3.3 +/- 0.3 ms for the ulnar nerve. Mean onset-to-peak amplitude was 21 +/- 12 muV for the median nerve and 23 +/- 12muV for the ulnar nerve. Mean peak-to-peak amplitude was 34 +/- 20 muV for the median nerve and 36 +/- 23 muV for the ulnar nerve. Mean area was 25 +/- 17 nVs for the median nerve and 28 +/- 19 nVs for the ulnar nerve. Mean rise time was 0.7 +/- 0.1 ms for the median nerve and 0.7 +/- 0.2 ms for the ulnar nerve. Mean duration was 1.9 +/- 0.4 ms for the median nerve and 1.9 +/- 0.5 ms for the ulnar nerve. The mean difference in onset and peak latency between the median and ulnar nerves (median minus ulnar) was 0.1 +/- 0.2 ms. The upper limit of normal difference of median greater than ulnar onset and peak latency was 0.5 ms. The upper limit of normal difference of ulnar greater than median onset latency was 0.2 ms (0.3 ms for peak latency). The upper limit of normal drop in median peak-to-peak amplitude from one side to the other was 56%. For the ulnar nerve this value was 73%.

  18. Models for pulmonary lethality and morbidity after irradiation from internal and external sources

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, B.R.; Filipy, R.E.; Hahn, E.F.

    1989-05-01

    This report provides a hazard-function model for estimating the risk of death from radiation pneumonitis and/or pulmonary fibrosis following a light-water nuclear power accident. A similar model is also provided for estimating the prevalence of respiratory functional morbidity among those that survive death from acute effects. Hazard-function models for lethality and for morbidity were constructed using the cumulative hazard estimator H, which is related to the risk estimator R through the equation R = 1-exp(-H). The estimator H can be calculated using information provided in the report. The method of calculation depends on the exposure scenario. In general, the total normalized dose X for lethality or for morbidity is calculated. For lethality, X = 1 corresponds to a median lethal dose (LD/sub 50/); for morbidity, X = 1 corresponds to a median effective dose (ED/sub 50/). H is related to X by the equation H = 1n(2)X/sup V/, where V depends on the type of radiation (or radiations) involved. Contributions to X can arise from each of two main modes of exposure: (1) brief exposure of the lung, at a relatively high dose rate, to mainly external gammas, followed by (2) chronic internal alpha, and/or beta, and/or gamma irradiation of the lung. Equations are provided for calculating the contributions to X from both modes of exposure. 73 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Lethal entanglement in baleen whales.

    PubMed

    Cassoff, Rachel M; Moore, Kathleen M; McLellan, William A; Barco, Susan G; Rotsteins, David S; Moore, Michael J

    2011-10-06

    Understanding the scenarios whereby fishing gear entanglement of large whales induces mortality is important for the development of mitigation strategies. Here we present a series of 21 cases involving 4 species of baleen whales in the NW Atlantic, describing the available sighting history, necropsy observations, and subsequent data analyses that enabled the compilation of the manners in which entanglement can be lethal. The single acute cause of entanglement mortality identified was drowning from entanglement involving multiple body parts, with the animal's inability to surface. More protracted causes of death included impaired foraging during entanglement, resulting in starvation after many months; systemic infection arising from open, unresolved entanglement wounds; and hemorrhage or debilitation due to severe gear-related damage to tissues. Serious gear-induced injury can include laceration of large vessels, occlusion of the nares, embedding of line in growing bone, and massive periosteal proliferation of new bone in an attempt to wall off constricting, encircling lines. These data show that baleen whale entanglement is not only a major issue for the conservation of some baleen whale populations, but is also a major concern for the welfare of each affected individual.

  20. Lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millson, Charles E.; Wilson, Michael; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Thurrell, Wendy; Mlkvy, Peter; Davies, Claire; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with a large number of gastroduodenal disorders. Clearance of the bacteria has been shown to benefit patients with duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers, and certain rare types of gastric tumors. Broad-spectrum antibiotics are the mainstay of current treatment strategies but side-effects, poor compliance, and drug resistance limit their usefulness. We sensitized H. pylori with toluidine blue, haematoporphyrin derivative, aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine, methylene blue or protoporphyrin IX prior to exposure to low-power laser light from either a gallium aluminum arsenide laser or a helium neon gas laser. All 5 sensitizers caused reductions of greater than 1000-fold in the number of viable bacteria. Light alone had no effect and only HpD caused a significant decrease in bacterial numbers without laser light. Next, we sensitized H. mustelae on explanted ferret gastric mucosa (ex vivo) with the same sensitizers and exposed them to light from a copper vapor pumped dye laser tuned appropriately. MB caused significant reductions in bacterial counts. Successful lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter pylori both in vitro and ex vivo raises the possibility of a local method for eradicating the bacteria, especially as the bacteria are only found in those parts of the upper gastrointestinal tract that are accessible to the endoscope.

  1. A Reduction in Maximal Incremental Exercise Test Duration 48 h Post Downhill Run Is Associated with Muscle Damage Derived Exercise Induced Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chrismas, Bryna C. R.; Taylor, Lee; Siegler, Jason C.; Midgley, Adrian W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) and muscle soreness reduce treadmill maximal incremental exercise (MIE) test duration, and true maximal physiological performance as a consequence of exercise induced pain (EIP) and perceived effort. Methods: Fifty (14 female), apparently healthy participants randomly allocated into a control group (CON, n = 10), or experimental group (EXP, n = 40) visited the laboratory a total of six times: visit 1 (familiarization), visit 2 (pre 1), visit 3 (pre 2), visit 4 (intervention), visit 5 (24 h post) and visit 6 (48 h post). Both groups performed identical testing during all visits, except during visit 4, where only EXP performed a 30 min downhill run and CON performed no exercise. During visits 2, 3, and 6 all participants performed MIE, and the following measurements were obtained: time to exhaustion (TTE), EIP, maximal oxygen consumption (V·O2max), rate of perceived exertion (RPE), maximum heart rate (HRmax), maximum blood lactate (BLamax), and the contribution of pain to terminating the MIE (assessed using a questionnaire). Additionally during visits 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 the following markers of EIMD were obtained: muscle soreness, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), creatine kinase (CK). Results: There were no significant differences (p ≥ 0.32) between any trials for any of the measures obtained during MIE for CON. In EXP, TTE decreased by 34 s (3%), from pre 2 to 48 h post (p < 0.001). There was a significant association between group (EXP, CON) and termination of the MIE due to “pain” during 48 h post (χ2 = 14.7, p = 0.002). Conclusion: EIMD resulted in premature termination of a MIE test (decreased TTE), which was associated with EIP, MVC, and VA. The exact mechanisms responsible for this require further investigation. PMID:28337151

  2. Left ventricular function during lethal and sublethal endotoxemia in swine

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, R.D.; Nightingale, L.M.; Kish, P.; Weber, P.B.; Loegering, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    Previous studies suggested that after a median lethal dose (LD50) of endotoxin, cardiac contractility was depressed in nonsurviving dogs. The canine cardiovascular system is unlike humans in that dogs have a hepatic vein sphincter that is susceptible to adrenergic stimulation capable of raising hepatic and splanchnic venous pressures. The authors retested the hypothesis that lethality after endotoxin administration is associated with cardiac contractile depression in pigs, because of the hepatic circulation in this species is similar to that of humans. They compared cardiac mechanical function of pigs administered a high dose (250 g/kg) or a low dose (100 g/kg) endotoxin by use of the slope of the end-systolic pressure-diameter relationship (ESPDR) as well as other measurements of cardiac performance. In all the pigs administered a high dose, ESPDR demonstrated a marked, time-dependent depression whereas we observed no significant ESPDR changes after low endotoxin doses. The other cardiodynamic variables were uninterpretable, due to the significant changes in heart rate, end-diastolic diameter (preload), and aortic diastolic pressure (afterload). Plasma myocardia depressant factor activity accumulated in all endotoxin-administered animals, tending to be greater in the high-dose group. In this group, both subendocardial blood flow and global function were depressed, whereas pigs administered the low dose endotoxin demonstrated slight, but nonsignificant, increases in flow and function. These observations indicate that myocardial contractile depression is associated with a lethal outcome to high doses of endotoxin. Myocardial perfusion was measured using radiolabeled microspheres infused into the left atria.

  3. 1. VIEW OF MEDIAN FROM GORDON HIGHWAY OVERPASS, LOOKING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF MEDIAN FROM GORDON HIGHWAY OVERPASS, LOOKING WEST SHOWING REVOLUTIONARY WAR MONUMENT 56/1 - Greene Street Historic District, Greene Street, Gordon Highway to Augusta Canal Bridge, Augusta, Richmond County, GA

  4. 2. HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, VIEW FROM MEDIAN OF MERRITT PARKWAY TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, VIEW FROM MEDIAN OF MERRITT PARKWAY TO EAST ROCKS ROAD BRIDGE, CA. 1940. COLLECTION CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION. - Merritt Parkway, East Rocks Road Bridge, Spanning Merritt Parkway, Norwalk, Fairfield County, CT

  5. 12. VIEW FROM PARKWAY MEDIAN TO SPORT HILL ROAD BRIDGE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW FROM PARKWAY MEDIAN TO SPORT HILL ROAD BRIDGE, Copy of photograph ca. 1940. Collection Connecticut Department of Transportation. - Merritt Parkway, Bridge No. 744, Spanning Merritt Parkway at Route 59, Fairfield, Fairfield County, CT

  6. ANALYSES OF HTF-48-12-20/24 (FEBRUARY, 2012) AND ARCHIVED HTF-E-05-021 TANK 48H SLURRY SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Peters, T.

    2012-08-02

    Personnel characterized a Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) archived sample of Tank 48H slurry (HTF-E-05-021) in addition to the composite of samples HTF-48-12-20 and HTF-48-12-24, which were both retrieved in February 2012. The combined February 2012 sample is referred to as HTF-48-12-20/24 in this report. The results from these analyses are compared with Tank 48H samples analyzed in 2003, 2004, and 2005. This work supports the effort to demonstrate copper-catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) of organic content in this material. The principal findings with respect to the chemical and physical characteristics of the most recent sample are: (1) The measured potassium tetraphenylborate (KTPB) solid concentration is 1.76 wt %; (2) Titanium was in line with 2004 and 2005 slurry measurements at 897 mg/L, it represents 0.1535 {+-} 0.0012 wt % monosodium titanate (MST); (3) The measured insoluble solids content was 1.467 wt %; (4) The free hydroxide concentration in the Tank 48H filtrate sample (1.02 {+-} 0.02 M) is close to the Tank 48H limit (1.0 M); (5) Carbonate reported by total inorganic carbon (TIC, 1.39 {+-} 0.03 M) is more than double the concentrations measured in past (2003-2005) samples; (6) The soluble potassium content (measured at 286 {+-} 23 mg/L) in the filtrate is in line with all past measurements; and (7) The measured {sup 137}Cs concentration is 7.81E + 08 {+-} 3.9E + 07 dpm/mL of slurry (1.33 {+-} 5% Ci/gallon or 3.18E + 05 {+-} 5% curies of {sup 137}Cs in the tank) in the slurry which is in agreement with the 2005 report of 3.14E + 05 {+-} 1.5% curies of {sup 137}Cs in the tank. The filtrate {sup 137}Cs concentration is 2.57E + 07 {+-} 2.6E + 05 dpm/mL. This result is consistent with previous results. Significant analytical data are summarized in Table 1.

  7. Caffeine and modafinil given during 48 h sleep deprivation modulate object recognition memory and synaptic proteins in the hippocampus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, M; Sahu, S; Kumari, P; Kauser, H; Ray, K; Panjwani, U

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of caffeine/modafinil on sleep deprivation (SD) induced alterations in recognition memory and synaptic proteins. The data revealed a beneficial effect of caffeine/modafinil against deficit in the familiar object retrieval performance and object exploration ratio after 48 h SD. Caffeine treatment prevented the SD induced down-regulation of synaptophysin and synapsin I proteins with no change in PSD-95 protein in hippocampus. However, modafinil administration improved the down-regulation of synaptophysin, synapsin I and PSD-95 proteins in hippocampus. Hence, caffeine/modafinil can serve as counter measures in amelioration of SD induced consequences at behavioural and protein levels.

  8. Median nerve (anatomical variations) and carpal tunel syndrome - revisited.

    PubMed

    Mizia, Ewa; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof; Depukat, Pawel; Klimek-Piotrowska, Wieslawa; Pasternak, Artur; Mroz, Izabela; Bonczar, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome belongs to the most common causative factors of surgical interventions in the wrist region. Anatomy of carpal tunnel and median nerve is a subject of current revision. Authors paid attention to etiology of the syndrome based on review of literature and their own anatomical studies. They remind basic knowledge on the median nerve and indicate that only based on number of dissections a good orthopedic surgeon may acquire experience necessary to perform procedures in a most appropriate way.

  9. Adaptive median filtering for preprocessing of time series measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paunonen, Matti

    1993-01-01

    A median (L1-norm) filtering program using polynomials was developed. This program was used in automatic recycling data screening. Additionally, a special adaptive program to work with asymmetric distributions was developed. Examples of adaptive median filtering of satellite laser range observations and TV satellite time measurements are given. The program proved to be versatile and time saving in data screening of time series measurements.

  10. Two cases of lethal nitrazepam poisoning.

    PubMed

    Brødsgaard, I; Hansen, A C; Vesterby, A

    1995-06-01

    This case report describes two cases of lethal poisoning caused by a combination of advanced chronic disease and an overdose of nitrazepam. In both cases, a relatively small blood concentration of nitrazepam was found postmortem.

  11. Lethality and Autonomous Robots: An Ethical Stance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Lethality and Autonomous Robots : An Ethical Stance Ronald C. Arkin and Lilia Moshkina College of Computing Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta... autonomous robots that maintain an ethical infrastructure to govern their behavior will be referred to as humane-oids. 2. Understanding the Ethical...2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Lethality and Autonomous Robots : An Ethical Stance 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  12. Non-Lethal Weapons (NLW) Reference Book

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    v Section A COUNTER-PERSONNEL (CP) FIELDED NLW Non-Lethal Capability Sets ( NLCS ) 1 Escalation of Force-Mission Modules (EoF-MM) 1...Weapons, 27 September 1999. Policy References Section A CP Fielded NLW 1 Non-Lethal Capability Sets ( NLCS ). A versatile package of commercial...and government off-the-shelf mission enhancing equipment and munitions. NLCS provide the warfighter with a variety of acoustic, optical distraction

  13. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sturiale, Alessandro; Alemanno, Giovanni; Giudici, Francesco; Addasi, Rami; Bellucci, Francesco; Tonelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is a rare condition characterized by postprandial abdominal pain, bowel function disorder and weight loss. We report the first case to our knowledge of Crohn's disease and Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient was a 33 year-old female with a previous diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Acute postprandial abdominal pain affected the patient every day; she was, therefore, referred to US-Doppler and magnetic resonance angiography of the abdominal vessels and received a diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. Consequently, the patient was surgically treated, releasing the vascular compression. After the operation, she reported a complete relief from postprandial pain which was one of her major concerns. Subocclusive symptoms occurred after six months due to the inflammatory reactivation of the terminal ileitis. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is mainly based on the exclusion of other intestinal disorders but it should be always confirmed using noninvasive tests such as US-Doppler, angio-CT or magnetic resonance angiography. CONCLUSION This case demonstrates that the Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome could be the major cause of symptoms, even in presence of other abdominal disorders. PMID:23500743

  14. Lethal melanoma in children: a clinicopathological study of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Granada, Carlos N; Lezcano, Cecilia; Scolyer, Richard A; Mihm, Martin C; Piris, Adriano

    2016-12-01

    Melanoma in children is rare, representing 3% of paediatric malignancies and <1% of all melanomas. Very few detailed descriptions of bona fide lethal childhood melanomas exist in the literature. We performed a retrospective clinicopathological review of 12 paediatric (≤16 years) melanoma patients who died of metastatic disease, including detailed assessment of architectural and cytomorphological features. There were nine prepubertal patients (median age 7 years old) and three postpubertal cases (median age 15 years old). The patients died on average 45.7 months after diagnosis with the prepubertal subcohort showing a relatively longer time from diagnosis to death. The tumours were bulky (average tumour thickness=10mm), showed brisk mitotic activity (average mitotic count per mm(2)=7), and were formed by large expansile nodules with sheet-like growth pattern and infiltrative borders in the majority of cases (83%). Cytologically, large grossly pleomorphic epithelioid cells with massive eosinophilic macronucleoli were present in most cases (75%). In this cohort, we did not identify specific features of melanoma that were unique to children. Although melanomas are extremely rarely encountered in childhood, the above-cited unequivocal malignant features should prompt an outright diagnosis of melanoma even in a paediatric patient.

  15. Interpolated histogram method for area optimised median computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Kaushal D.; Darji, Anand D.

    2013-04-01

    The article describes an area efficient algorithm for real-time approximate median computation on VLSI platforms. The improvement in performance and area optimisation are achieved through linear interpolation within a reduced number of histogram bins. In order to reduce the hardware utilisation further, an approximation technique for interpolation is also proposed. This approach extends the utility of the histogram method to data sets having a large dynamic range. The performance of the proposed algorithm in terms of mean squared error (MSE) and resource utilisation is provided and compared to that of the existing algorithms. This comparison indicates that more than 60% optimisation in resources is achieved with marginal compromise in the accuracy of the median. The proposed algorithm finds applications in the areas of image processing, time series analysis and median absolute deviation (MAD) computation.

  16. Landscaping of highway medians and roadway safety at unsignalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyun; Fabregas, Aldo; Lin, Pei-Sung

    2016-05-01

    Well-planted and maintained landscaping can help reduce driving stress, provide better visual quality, and decrease over speeding, thus improving roadway safety. Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Standard Index (SI-546) is one of the more demanding standards in the U.S. for landscaping design criteria at highway medians near intersections. The purposes of this study were to (1) empirically evaluate the safety results of SI-546 at unsignalized intersections and (2) quantify the impacts of geometrics, traffic, and landscaping design features on total crashes and injury plus fatal crashes. The studied unsignalized intersections were divided into (1) those without median trees near intersections, (2) those with median trees near intersections that were compliant with SI-546, and (3) those with median trees near intersections that were non-compliant with SI-546. A total of 72 intersections were selected, for which five-year crash data from 2006-2010 were collected. The sites that were compliant with SI-546 showed the best safety performance in terms of the lowest crash counts and crash rates. Four crash predictive models-two for total crashes and two for injury crashes-were developed. The results indicated that improperly planted and maintained median trees near highway intersections can increase the total number of crashes and injury plus fatal crashes at a 90% confidence level; no significant difference could be found in crash rates between sites that were compliant with SI-546 and sites without trees. All other conditions remaining the same, an intersection with trees that was not compliant with SI-546 had 63% more crashes and almost doubled injury plus fatal crashes than those at intersections without trees. The study indicates that appropriate landscaping in highway medians near intersections can be an engineering technology that not only improves roadway environmental quality but also maintains intersection safety.

  17. The Structural Variation Is Associated with the Embryonic Lethality of a Novel Red Egg Mutant Fuyin-lre of Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Chen, Anli; Liao, Pengfei; Li, Qiongyan; Zhao, Qiaoling; Yang, Weike; Zhu, Shuifen; Wu, Fang; He, Rongfan; Dong, Zhanpeng; Huang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori presents several types of egg color mutations, all of which have been extensively discussed in sericulture. While the red egg mutation has been previously observed, lethal red-egg mutants have not been reported. In the present work, the red egg mutant Fuyin-lre (Fuyin-lethal red egg) was discovered from the Fuyin germplasm resource of B. mori. This mutant features red-colored eggs and embryonic lethality. Genetic analysis showed that Fuyin-lre follows recessive inheritance, with the red egg gene re governing the egg color, and the embryonic lethality of Fuyin-lre may be caused by mutations of other genes closely linked to re. Digital gene expression (DGE) was employed to compare the transcription profiles of Fuyin and Fuyin-lre eggs after 24 and 48 h of incubation. A total of 48 differentially expressed genes followed the same expression patterns in both groups at both time points (FDR < 0.01 and log 2 Ratio ≥ 1). Further analyses indicated that 8 out of the 48 genes (including re) were closely linked to re. These 8 genes were highly expressed in wild-type Fuyin and the red egg mutant re but showed nearly absent expression in Fuyin-lre. Sequencing of the re gene confirmed that the re gene itself does not induce embryonic lethality, and structure analysis showed that the structural variation of the region where the 8 genes were located may be associated with the embryonic lethality of Fuyin-lre. The present work provides a good foundation for future studies on the mechanism of embryonic lethality and embryonic development in Fuyin-lre.

  18. Iatrogenic selective lesion of the median nerve at the elbow.

    PubMed

    Di Fabio, Roberto; Casali, Carlo; Pierelli, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    A lesion of the median nerve may occur as a consequence of a compression by a haematoma or for a direct damage of the axons caused by a needle insertion. To date, no investigation reported a very selective lesion of the median nerve at the elbow, with the suffering limited only to the fibres for the first digit. A 53 year-old left-handed violinist underwent an arterial blood gas drawing. The patient complained immediately of an electrical shock impression going down the arm, followed by pin sensation into the first finger. A tingling sensation associated with numbness in the first fingertip and difficulty in the index-thumb pinch became progressively evident. The ENG-EMG findings showed an impairment mainly of the sensory fibres innervating the first digit and a drop of the motor action potential amplitude when the nerve was stimulated at the elbow. We reported a very partial lesion of the left median nerve at the elbow in a violinist who had a selective involvement of the fibres for his first digit. Even minimal lesions of the median nerve may impair severely the quality of life of patients.

  19. Mean, Median and Mode from a Decision Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Melinda Miller; Scariano, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The classroom activity described here allows mathematically mature students to explore the role of mean, median and mode in a decision-making environment. While students discover the importance of choosing a measure of central tendency, their understanding of probability distributions, maximization, and prediction is reinforced through active…

  20. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AND MEDIAN. REPLICATING WERNER HEGEMANN PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AND MEDIAN. REPLICATING WERNER HEGEMANN PHOTO TAKEN CIRCA 1909 SEEN FROM TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT CHANNING WAY LOOKING NW. Photograph by Fredrica Drotos and Michael Kelly, July 9, 2006 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Elementary School Teachers' Understanding of the Mean and Median

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobbe, Tim

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a snapshot of elementary school teachers' understanding of the mean and median. The research is presented in light of recent work regarding preservice teachers' understanding of the mean. Common misconceptions are identified which lead to potential implications for teacher preparation programs. One of the primary concerns…

  2. Revision of the Solanum medians complex (Solanum section Petota)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solanum medians is a widely distributed wild potato species growing along the coast and along the western slopes of the Andes from central Peru and northern Chile, from along the coastal lomas near sea level to 3800 m. Fertile diploid and triploid cytotypes are common, are believed to associated wit...

  3. August median streamflow on ungaged streams in Eastern Coastal Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2004-01-01

    Methods for estimating August median streamflow were developed for ungaged, unregulated streams in eastern coastal Maine. The methods apply to streams with drainage areas ranging in size from 0.04 to 73.2 square miles and fraction of basin underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer ranging from 0 to 71 percent. The equations were developed with data from three long-term (greater than or equal to 10 years of record) continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations, 23 partial-record streamflow- gaging stations, and 5 short-term (less than 10 years of record) continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations. A mathematical technique for estimating a standard low-flow statistic, August median streamflow, at partial-record streamflow-gaging stations and short-term continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations was applied by relating base-flow measurements at these stations to concurrent daily streamflows at nearby long-term continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations (index stations). Generalized least-squares regression analysis (GLS) was used to relate estimates of August median streamflow at streamflow-gaging stations to basin characteristics at these same stations to develop equations that can be applied to estimate August median streamflow on ungaged streams. GLS accounts for different periods of record at the gaging stations and the cross correlation of concurrent streamflows among gaging stations. Thirty-one stations were used for the final regression equations. Two basin characteristics?drainage area and fraction of basin underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer?are used in the calculated regression equation to estimate August median streamflow for ungaged streams. The equation has an average standard error of prediction from -27 to 38 percent. A one-variable equation uses only drainage area to estimate August median streamflow when less accuracy is acceptable. This equation has an average standard error of prediction from -30 to 43 percent. Model error is larger than

  4. Lethal Dietary Toxicities of Environmental Contaminants and Pesticides to Coturnix

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Camardese, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Five-day subacute dietary toxicity tests of 193 potential environmental contaminants, pesticides, organic solvents, and various adjuvants are presented for young coturnix (Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica Temminck and Schlegel). The report provides the most comprehensive data base available for avian subacute dietary toxicity tests and is primarily intended for use in ranking toxicities by a standard method that has a reasonable degree of environmental relevance. Findings are presented in two parts: Part I is a critique of selected drugs that includes discussion of subacute toxicity in relation to chemical class and structure, pesticide formulation, and age of animals; Part II is a summary of toxicologic findings for each test substance and provides a statistically basis for comparing toxicities. Data presented include the median lethal concentration (LC50), slope of the probit regression curve (dose-response curve), response chronology, and food consumption. We observed that: 1) fewer than 15% of the compounds were classed 'very' or 'highly' toxic (i.e, LC50 < 200 ppm) and all of these were either chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphates, or organometallics; 2) subacute toxicity may vary widely among structurally similar chemicals and between different formulations of the same chemical; therefore, conclusions about lethal hazard must be made cautiously until the actual formulation of inset has been tested: 3) inclusion of a general standard in each battery of tests is useful for detection of atypical trials and monitoring population changes but should not be used indiscriminantly for adjusting LC50's for intertest differences unless the chemicals of concern and the standard elicit their toxicities through the same action; 4) although other species have been tested effectively under the subacute protocol, coturnix were ideal for the stated purpose of this research because they are inexpensive, well-adapted to the laboratory environment, and yield good intertest

  5. Median polish for quality assurance of a PET scanner.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, K J; Rucker, R H

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity data for the PC 4600, a multiplanar positron emission tomograph system, were obtained over a period of several months during installation and routine clinical operation. These data were analyzed using the exploratory data analysis techniques of median polish (MP), box and whisker plots, and coded residuals. These techniques proved to be useful in spotting trends and identifying problems. Median polish had advantages over traditional percent difference techniques under some conditions because it allows separate study of more than one effect and is particularly resistant to the influence of outliers. The other exploratory data analysis techniques used are of value in interpreting the results of the MP procedure. The methods presented have direct application to any quantitative multiplanar emission tomographic imaging quality assurance program.

  6. Bayesian median regression for temporal gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Keming; Vinciotti, Veronica; Liu, Xiaohui; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.

    2007-09-01

    Most of the existing methods for the identification of biologically interesting genes in a temporal expression profiling dataset do not fully exploit the temporal ordering in the dataset and are based on normality assumptions for the gene expression. In this paper, we introduce a Bayesian median regression model to detect genes whose temporal profile is significantly different across a number of biological conditions. The regression model is defined by a polynomial function where both time and condition effects as well as interactions between the two are included. MCMC-based inference returns the posterior distribution of the polynomial coefficients. From this a simple Bayes factor test is proposed to test for significance. The estimation of the median rather than the mean, and within a Bayesian framework, increases the robustness of the method compared to a Hotelling T2-test previously suggested. This is shown on simulated data and on muscular dystrophy gene expression data.

  7. Fascicular Topography of the Human Median Nerve for Neuroprosthetic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Martínez, Ignacio; Badia, Jordi; Pascual-Font, Arán; Rodríguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    One of the most sought-after applications of neuroengineering is the communication between the arm and an artificial prosthetic device for the replacement of an amputated hand or the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. For that, an electrode is placed around or inside the median nerve to serve as interface for recording and stimulation of nerve signals coming from the fascicles that innervate the muscles responsible for hand movements. Due to the lack of a standard procedure, the electrode implantation by the surgeon is strongly based on intuition, which may result in poor performance of the neuroprosthesis because of the suboptimal location of the neural interface. To provide morphological data that can aid the neuroprosthetic surgeon with this procedure, we investigated the fascicular topography of the human median nerve along the forearm and upper arm. We first performed a description of the fascicular content and branching patterns along the length of the arm. Next we built a 3D reconstruction of the median nerve so we could analyze the fascicle morphological features in relation to the arm level. Finally, we characterized the motor content of the median nerve fascicles in the upper arm. Collectively, these results indicate that fascicular organization occurs in a short segment distal to the epicondyles and remains unaltered until the muscular branches leave the main trunk. Based on our results, overall recommendations based on electrode type and implant location can be drawn to help and aid the neuroprosthetic procedure. Invasive interfaces would be more convenient for the upper arm and the most proximal third of the forearm. Epineural electrodes seem to be most suitable for the forearm segment after fascicles have been divided from the main trunk. PMID:27445660

  8. Determination of the median toxic dose of type C botulism in lactating dairy cows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moeller, R.B.; Puschner, B.; Walker, R.L.; Rocke, T.; Galey, F.D.; Cullor, J.S.; Ardans, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Because of the difficulty in identifying botulinum toxin in cattle, it is hypothesized that cattle are sensitive to levels of toxin below the detection limits of current diagnostic techniques (the mouse protection bioassay and the immunostick enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] for type C botulinum toxin). Using an up-down method for toxicologic testing, the median toxic dose (MTD50) for cattle was determined. Four lactating Holstein cows were dosed at 0.125 or 0.25 ng/kg with Clostridium botulinum type C toxin and failed to develop clinical signs of botulism during the 7-day observation period. Three cows given 0.50 ng/kg of toxin developed clinical signs of botulism. From these results, the MTD50 was calculated at 0.388 ng/kg (3.88 mouse lethal doses/kg) using the trim-logit method. These results suggest that cattle are 12.88 times more sensitive to type C botulinum toxin than a mouse on a per kilogram weight basis. The mouse protection bioassay and the immunostick ELISA for type C botulinum toxin failed to identify the presence of the toxin in the serum, blood, and milk samples taken from all 7 animals.

  9. Weighted median image sharpeners for the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marco; Paredes, José L; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2002-01-01

    A class of robust weighted median (WM) sharpening algorithms is developed in this paper. Unlike traditional linear sharpening methods, weighted median sharpeners are shown to be less sensitive to background random noise or to image artifacts introduced by JPEG and other compression algorithms. These concepts are extended to include data dependent weights under the framework of permutation weighted medians leading to tunable sharpeners that, in essence, are insensitive to noise and compression artifacts. Permutation WM sharpeners are subsequently generalized to smoother/sharpener structures that can sharpen edges and image details while simultaneously filter out background random noise. A statistical analysis of the various algorithms is presented, theoretically validating the characteristics of the proposed sharpening structures. A number of experiments are shown for the sharpening of JPEG compressed images and sharpening of images with background film-grain noise. These algorithms can prove useful in the enhancement of compressed or noisy images posted on the World Wide Web (WWW) as well as in other applications where the underlying images are unavoidably acquired with noise.

  10. Microseismic event denoising via adaptive directional vector median filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing; Lu, Ji-Ren; Jiang, Tian-Qi; Liang, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel denoising scheme via Radon transform-based adaptive vector directional median filters named adaptive directional vector median filter (AD-VMF) to suppress noise for microseismic downhole dataset. AD-VMF contains three major steps for microseismic downhole data processing: (i) applying Radon transform on the microseismic data to obtain the parameters of the waves, (ii) performing S-transform to determine the parameters for filters, and (iii) applying the parameters for vector median filter (VMF) to denoise the data. The steps (i) and (ii) can realize the automatic direction detection. The proposed algorithm is tested with synthetic and field datasets that were recorded with a vertical array of receivers. The P-wave and S-wave direct arrivals are properly denoised for poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) records. In the simulation case, we also evaluate the performance with mean square error (MSE) in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The result shows that the distortion of the proposed method is very low; the SNR is even less than 0 dB.

  11. Median statistics estimates of Hubble and Newton's constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethapudi, Suryarao; Desai, Shantanu

    2017-02-01

    Robustness of any statistics depends upon the number of assumptions it makes about the measured data. We point out the advantages of median statistics using toy numerical experiments and demonstrate its robustness, when the number of assumptions we can make about the data are limited. We then apply the median statistics technique to obtain estimates of two constants of nature, Hubble constant (H0) and Newton's gravitational constant ( G , both of which show significant differences between different measurements. For H0, we update the analyses done by Chen and Ratra (2011) and Gott et al. (2001) using 576 measurements. We find after grouping the different results according to their primary type of measurement, the median estimates are given by H0 = 72.5^{+2.5}_{-8} km/sec/Mpc with errors corresponding to 95% c.l. (2 σ) and G=6.674702^{+0.0014}_{-0.0009} × 10^{-11} Nm2kg-2 corresponding to 68% c.l. (1σ).

  12. Median Robust Extended Local Binary Pattern for Texture Classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Lao, Songyang; Fieguth, Paul W; Guo, Yulan; Wang, Xiaogang; Pietikäinen, Matti

    2016-03-01

    Local binary patterns (LBP) are considered among the most computationally efficient high-performance texture features. However, the LBP method is very sensitive to image noise and is unable to capture macrostructure information. To best address these disadvantages, in this paper, we introduce a novel descriptor for texture classification, the median robust extended LBP (MRELBP). Different from the traditional LBP and many LBP variants, MRELBP compares regional image medians rather than raw image intensities. A multiscale LBP type descriptor is computed by efficiently comparing image medians over a novel sampling scheme, which can capture both microstructure and macrostructure texture information. A comprehensive evaluation on benchmark data sets reveals MRELBP's high performance-robust to gray scale variations, rotation changes and noise-but at a low computational cost. MRELBP produces the best classification scores of 99.82%, 99.38%, and 99.77% on three popular Outex test suites. More importantly, MRELBP is shown to be highly robust to image noise, including Gaussian noise, Gaussian blur, salt-and-pepper noise, and random pixel corruption.

  13. Pegfilgrastim Improves Survival of Lethally Irradiated Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Kim G; Farese, Ann M; Blaauw, Erica C; Gibbs, Allison M; Smith, Cassandra P; Katz, Barry P; Tong, Yan; Prado, Karl L; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2015-06-01

    Leukocyte growth factors (LGF), such as filgrastim, pegfilgrastim and sargramostim, have been used to mitigate the hematologic symptoms of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) after radiation accidents. Although these pharmaceuticals are currently approved for treatment of chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, such approval has not been granted for myelosuppression resulting from acute radiation exposure. Regulatory approval of drugs used to treat radiological or nuclear exposure injuries requires their development and testing in accordance with the Animal Efficacy Rule, set forth by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To date, filgrastim is the only LGF that has undergone efficacy assessment conducted under the Animal Efficacy Rule. To confirm the efficacy of another LGF with a shorter dosing regimen compared to filgrastim, we evaluated the use of pegfilgrastim (Neulasta(®)) in a lethal nonhuman primate (NHP) model of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS). Rhesus macaques were exposed to 7.50 Gy total-body irradiation (the LD(50/60)), delivered at 0.80 Gy/min using linear accelerator 6 MV photons. Pegfilgrastim (300 μg/kg, n = 23) or 5% dextrose in water (n = 23) was administered on day 1 and 8 postirradiation and all animals received medical management. Hematologic and physiologic parameters were evaluated for 60 days postirradiation. The primary, clinically relevant end point was survival to day 60; secondary end points included hematologic-related parameters. Pegfilgrastim significantly (P = 0.0014) increased 60 day survival to 91.3% (21/23) from 47.8% (11/23) in the control. Relative to the controls, pegfilgrastim also significantly: 1. decreased the median duration of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia; 2. improved the median time to recovery of absolute neutrophil count (ANC) ≥500/μL, ANC ≥1,000/μL and platelet (PLT) count ≥20,000/μL; 3. increased the mean ANC at nadir; and 4. decreased the incidence of Gram-negative bacteremia. These data

  14. Sarcocystis species lethal for domestic pigeons.

    PubMed

    Olias, Philipp; Gruber, Achim D; Kohls, Andrea; Hafez, Hafez M; Heydorn, Alfred Otto; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Lierz, Michael

    2010-03-01

    A large number of Sarcocystis spp. infect birds as intermediate hosts, but pigeons are rarely affected. We identified a novel Sarcocystis sp. that causes lethal neurologic disease in domestic pigeons in Germany. Experimental infections indicated transmission by northern goshawks, and sequence analyses indicated transnational distribution. Worldwide spread is possible.

  15. Deadly Lessons: Understanding Lethal School Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mark H., Ed.; Petrie, Carol V., Ed.; Braga, Anthony A., Ed.; McLaughlin, Brenda L., Ed.

    This collection of papers is the outcome of the National Academies' effort to glean information from six different case studies of student-perpetrated school shootings. Part 1, "Case Studies of Lethal School Violence," includes: "The Copycat Factor: Mental Illness, Guns, and the Shooting Incident at Heritage High School, Rockdale…

  16. The evolution of lethal intergroup violence.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Raymond C

    2005-10-25

    Recent findings and analyses in evolutionary biology, archaeology, and ethnology provide a favorable conjuncture for examining the evolution of lethal intergroup violence among hominids during the 2.9-million-year Paleolithic time span. Here, I seek to identify and investigate the main turning points in this evolutionary trajectory and to delineate the periodization that follows from this inquiry.

  17. Medical Conditions and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikeda, Robin M.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Simon, Thomas R.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Durant, Tonji M.; Swahn, Monica H.

    2002-01-01

    This population-based, case-control study examined physical illness as a risk factor for suicidal behavior. Case patients were more likely than controls to report having any serious medical conditions. Results suggest that young men with medical conditions are at increased risk for nearly lethal suicide attempts. (Contains 33 references and 3…

  18. Social Security: a financial appraisal for the median voter.

    PubMed

    Galasso, V

    Several explanations have been proposed for why voters continue to support unfunded social security systems. Browning (1975) suggests that the extremely large unfunded pension systems of most democracies depend on the existence of a voting majority composed of middle-aged and older people who fail to fully internalize the cost of financing the system. In fact, when voting, economically rational workers consider only their current and future contributions to the system and their expected pension benefits--not their past contributions, which they regard as sunk costs. If, for a majority of voters, the expected continuation return from social security exceeds the return from alternative assets, an unfunded social security system is politically sustainable. This article explores the validity of Browning's proposition by quantifying the returns that U.S. voters in presidential elections from 1964 to 1996 have obtained, or expect to obtain, from Social Security. Did "investments" in Social Security outperform alternative forms of investment, such as mutual funds or pension funds, for a majority of the voters? What can be expected for the future? The U.S. Social Security system redistributes income within age cohorts on the basis of sex, income, and marital status. To account for some of these features, the median voter is represented by a family unit whose members--a husband who accounts for 70 percent of household earnings and a wife who accounts for 30 percent--make joint economic and voting decisions. Thus, retirement and survival benefits paid out to the spouse of an insured worker can be included in the calculation of Social Security returns. Interval estimates of voters' family incomes from the U.S. Census Bureau were used to obtain the median voter's household earnings. The median voter's age is derived from the ages of those who voted in presidential elections, not from the ages of the entire electorate. The median voter's contributions to Social Security are the

  19. Lethality and synthetic lethality in the genome-wide metabolic network of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ghim, Cheol-Min; Goh, Kwang-Il; Kahng, Byungnam

    2005-12-21

    Recent genomic analyses on the cellular metabolic network show that reaction flux across enzymes are diverse and exhibit power-law behavior in its distribution. While intuition might suggest that the reactions with larger fluxes are more likely to be lethal under the blockade of its catalysing gene products or gene knockouts, we find, by in silico flux analysis, that the lethality rarely has correlations with the flux level owing to the widespread backup pathways innate in the genome-wide metabolism of Escherichia coli. Lethal reactions, of which the deletion generates cascading failure of following reactions up to the biomass reaction, are identified in terms of the Boolean network scheme as well as the flux balance analysis. The avalanche size of a reaction, defined as the number of subsequently blocked reactions after its removal, turns out to be a useful measure of lethality. As a means to elucidate phenotypic robustness to a single deletion, we investigate synthetic lethality in reaction level, where simultaneous deletion of a pair of nonlethal reactions leads to the failure of the biomass reaction. Synthetic lethals identified via flux balance and Boolean scheme are consistently shown to act in parallel pathways, working in such a way that the backup machinery is compromised.

  20. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wallner, K; Smathers, S; Sutlief, S; Corman, J; Ellis, W

    2000-06-20

    Our aim was to document the technical and clinical course of prostate brachytherapy patients with radiographic evidence of median lobe hyperplasia (MLH). Eight patients with MLH were identified during our routine brachytherapy practice, representing 9% of the 87 brachytherapy patients treated during a 6-month period. No effort was made to avoid brachytherapy in patients noted to have MLH on diagnostic work-up. Cystoscopic evaluation was not routinely performed. Postimplant axial computed tomographic (CT) images of the prostate were obtained at 0.5 cm intervals. Preimplant urinary obstructive symptoms were quantified by the criteria of the American Urologic Association (AUA). Each patient was contacted during the writing of this report to update postimplant morbidity information. There was no apparent association between the degree of MLH and preimplant prostate volume or AUA score. Intraoperatively, we were able to visualize MLH by transrectal ultrasound and did not notice any particular difficulty placing sources in the MLH tissue or migration of sources out of the tissue. The prescription isodose covered from 81% to 99% of the postimplant CT-defined target volume, achieving adequate dose to the median lobe tissue in all patients. Two of the eight patients developed acute, postimplant urinary retention. The first patient required intermittent self-catheterization for 3 months and then resumed spontaneous urination. MLH does not appear to be a strong contraindication to prostate brachytherapy, and prophylactic resection of hypertrophic tissue in such patients is probably not warranted. Int. J. Cancer (Radiat. Oncol. Invest.) 90, 152-156 (2000).

  1. Neural Organization of the Median Ocellus of the Dragonfly

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, John E.; Chappell, Richard L.

    1972-01-01

    Two types of presumed synaptic contacts have been recognized by electron microscopy in the synaptic plexus of the median ocellus of the dragonfly. The first type is characterized by an electron-opaque, button-like organelle in the presynaptic cytoplasm, surrounded by a cluster of synaptic vesicles. Two postsynaptic elements are associated with these junctions, which we have termed button synapses. The second synaptic type is characterized by a dense cluster of synaptic vesicles adjacent to the presumed presynaptic membrane. One postsynaptic element is observed at these junctions. The overwhelming majority of synapses seen in the plexus are button synapses. They are found most commonly in the receptor cell axons where they synaptically contact ocellar nerve dendrites and adjacent receptor cell axons. Button synapses are also seen in the ocellar nerve dendrites where they appear to make synapses back onto receptor axon terminals as well as onto adjacent ocellar nerve dendrites. Reciprocal and serial synaptic arrangements between receptor cell axon terminals, and between receptor cell axon terminals and ocellar nerve dendrites are occasionally seen. It is suggested that the lateral and feedback synapses in the median ocellus of the dragonfly play a role in enhancing transients in the postsynaptic responses. PMID:5049076

  2. Morphometric studies of the muscular branch of the median nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Olave, E; Prates, J C; Gabrielli, C; Pardi, P

    1996-01-01

    The branch from the median nerve to the thenar muscles has a proximal and lateral (recurrent) course and is vulnerable to lesions that affect these muscles. Because of its anatomical-clinical importance, this branch was studied in 60 palmar regions from 30 cadavers of adult individuals of both sexes, aged between 23 and 77 y. It arose from the lateral branch of the median nerve in 83.3% of the cases. Its origin was distal to the flexor retinaculum in 48.3%, at the distal margin of the retinaculum in 31.6%, in the carpal tunnel in 18.3% and proximal to the retinaculum in 1.7%; it pierced the retinaculum in 15%. The point of recurrence of the branch was localised topographically to 34.6 +/- 3.6 mm from the distal wrist crease; the angle between its recurrent course and the longitudinal axis of the hand averaged 66.8 degrees. In 50% of the cases the muscular branch innervated abductor pollicis brevis (APB), opponens pollicis (OP) and the superficial head of flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), in 40% it supplied only APB and OP, and in 10% a short muscular branch gave rise to independent branches in the palm and which supplied APB, OP and the superficial head of FPB. The so called "accessory thenar branch' was found in 38.3%. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8886966

  3. Color demosaicking using deinterlacing and median-based filtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Tsung; Chen, Wen-Jan; Tai, Shen-Chuan

    2010-10-01

    Color demosaicking is critical to the image quality of single-sensor-based imaging devices. Caused by the sampling pattern of color filter array (CFA), the demosaicked images typically suffer from visual color artifacts in regions of high frequency and sharp edge structures, degrading the quality of camera output. We present a new high-quality demosaicking algorithm by taking advantage of deinterlacing and median-based filtering techniques. We treat the sampled green data of Bayer CFA as a form of diagonal interlaced green planes and make use of some key concepts about spatial deinterlacing to help the edge estimation in terms of both various directions and accuracy. In addition, a specific edge feature, sharp line edge of width 1 pixel, can also be handed well by the proposed method. The median-based filtering techniques are developed for suppressing most visual demosaicking artifacts, such as zipper effect, false color artifact, and interpolation artifact. Experimental results show that our algorithm is effective in suppressing visual artifacts, preserving the edges of image with sharpness and satisfying visual inspection, while keeping computational efficiency.

  4. Lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease.

    PubMed

    Vuopala, K; Ignatius, J; Herva, R

    1995-01-01

    Fifteen infants (11 families) with lethal arthrogryposis and anterior horn motor neuron loss are described. The clinical presentation was the fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) with multiple contractures and facial anomalies. At autopsy neurogenic muscular atrophy was present in all infants. The spinal cord showed a paucity of anterior horn motor neurons in the 12 infants studied. Both male and female infants were affected. Nine cases were sporadic, whereas in two families there were three affected cases. Consanguinity between the parents was reported in one family with one affected child. This and the recurrence of the condition speak for autosomal recessive inheritance. Detailed neuropathological examination and documentation of the clinical features are needed for a better delineation of and genetic counseling for perinatally lethal arthrogryposis.

  5. Henipaviruses-unanswered questions of lethal zoonoses.

    PubMed

    Field, Hume; Kung, Nina

    2011-12-01

    The highly lethal Hendra and Nipah viruses have been described for little more than a decade, yet within that time have been aetiologically associated with major livestock and human health impacts, albeit on a limited scale. Do these emerging pathogens pose a broader threat, or are they inconsequential 'viral chatter'. Given their lethality, and the evident multi-generational human-to-human transmission associated with Nipah virus in Bangladesh, it seems prudent to apply the precautionary principle. While much is known of their clinical, pathogenic and epidemiologic features in livestock species and humans, a number of fundamental questions regarding the relationship between the viruses, their natural fruit-bat host and the environment remain unanswered. In this paper, we pose and probe these questions in context, and offer perspectives based primarily on our experience with Hendra virus in Australia, augmented with Nipah virus parallels.

  6. PARP inhibitors: Synthetic lethality in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2017-03-17

    PARP inhibitors (PARPi), a cancer therapy targeting poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, are the first clinically approved drugs designed to exploit synthetic lethality, a genetic concept proposed nearly a century ago. Tumors arising in patients who carry germline mutations in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 are sensitive to PARPi because they have a specific type of DNA repair defect. PARPi also show promising activity in more common cancers that share this repair defect. However, as with other targeted therapies, resistance to PARPi arises in advanced disease. In addition, determining the optimal use of PARPi within drug combination approaches has been challenging. Nevertheless, the preclinical discovery of PARPi synthetic lethality and the route to clinical approval provide interesting lessons for the development of other therapies. Here, we discuss current knowledge of PARP inhibitors and potential ways to maximize their clinical effectiveness.

  7. Lethality and entropy of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Manke, Thomas; Demetrius, Lloyd; Vingron, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We characterize protein interaction networks in terms of network entropy. This approach suggests a ranking principle, which strongly correlates with elements of functional importance, such as lethal proteins. Our combined analysis of protein interaction networks and functional profiles in single cellular yeast and multi-cellular worm shows that proteins with large contribution to network entropy are preferentially lethal. While entropy is inherently a dynamical concept, the present analysis incorporates only structural information. Our result therefore highlights the importance of topological features, which appear as correlates of an underlying dynamical property, and which in turn determine functional traits. We argue that network entropy is a natural extension of previously studied observables, such as pathway multiplicity and centrality. It is also applicable to networks in which the processes can be quantified and therefore serves as a link to study questions of structural and dynamical robustness in a unified way.

  8. Lethality and Autonomous Systems: The Roboticist Demographic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    humanoid (22%), and other (23%); 9) Media Influence: only 18% said that media had a strong or very strong influence on their attitude to robots ...and whether certain emotions would be appropriate in a military robot . The Wars question was worded as follows: To what extent do you think ...Lethality and Autonomous Systems: The Roboticist Demographic Lilia V. Moshkina and Ronald C. Arkin Mobile Robot Laboratory, College of

  9. Lethality Rate Estimation and Testing Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-11

    AUTHOR(S) Steven W. Rust, Paul I. Feder, Frederick R. Todt, Ronald L. Joiner Ila. TYPE OF REPORT 13b, IME .OVFRE 8 14. ATE OF PORT (VeerMontl.vay) 15...GD, and VX Administered Topically to Rabbits " (MREF Protocol 21, May 1985) to compare liquid or powder experimental decontaminants against the dual...chemical surety materick (CSM). The standardized screen is based on a lethality endpoint in laboratory albino rabbits . An essential aspect of this testing

  10. Complement component 5 promotes lethal thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Tomohiro; Yoshioka, Kengo; Mizuno, Masashi; Shimizu, Mie; Nagano, Fumihiko; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Tsuboi, Naotake; Maruyama, Shoichi; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Imai, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular histones promote platelet aggregation and thrombosis; this is followed by induction of coagulation disorder, which results in exhaustion of coagulation factors. Complement component 5 (C5) is known to be associated with platelet aggregation and coagulation system activation. To date, the pathological mechanism underlying liver injury has remained unclear. Here, we investigated whether C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. C5-sufficient and C5-deficient mice received single tail vein injections of purified, unfractionated histones obtained from calf thymus (45–75 μg/g). Subsequently, the mice were monitored for survival for up to 72 h. Based on the survival data, the 45 μg/g dose was used for analysis of blood cell count, liver function, blood coagulation ability, and promotion of platelet aggregation and platelet/leukocyte aggregate (PLA) production by extracellular histones. C5-deficient mice were protected from lethal thrombosis and had milder thrombocytopenia, consumptive coagulopathy, and liver injury with embolism and lower PLA production than C5-sufficient mice. These results indicate that C5 is associated with coagulation disorders, PLA production, and embolism-induced liver injury. In conclusion, C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. PMID:28205538

  11. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    PubMed

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.

  12. Lethal Interpersonal Violence in the Middle Pleistocene

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M.; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin. PMID:26018668

  13. Stress-Related Signaling Pathways in Lethal and Non-Lethal Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Fang, Fang; Gerke, Travis; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Lambe, Mats; Sesso, Howard D.; Sweeney, Christopher J.; Wilson, Kathryn M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Loda, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent data suggest that neuroendocrine signaling may influence progression in some cancers. We aimed to determine whether genes within the five major stress-related signaling pathways are differentially expressed in tumor tissue when comparing prostate cancer patients with lethal and non-lethal disease. Experimental Design We measured mRNA expression of 51 selected genes involved in predetermined stress-related signaling pathways (adrenergic, glucocorticoid, dopaminergic, serotoninergic, and muscarinic systems) in tumor tissue and normal prostate tissue collected from prostate cancer patients in the Physicians’ Health Study (n=150; n=82 with normal) and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (n=254; n=120 with normal). We assessed differences in pathway expression in relation to prostate cancer lethality as the primary outcome, and to biomarkers as secondary outcomes. Results Differential mRNA expression of genes within the adrenergic (p=0.001), glucocorticoid (p<0.0001), serotoninergic (p=0.0019), and muscarinic (p=0.0045) pathways in tumor tissue was associated with the risk of lethality. The adrenergic pathway was also statistically significant (p=0.001) when comparing against differential expression of genes not involved in the pathways. In adjacent normal prostate tissue, none of the pathways was clearly differentially expressed between lethal and non-lethal prostate cancer. The glucocorticoid and adrenergic pathways were associated with cell proliferation, while the glucocorticoid pathway was additionally associated with angiogenesis and perineural invasion. Conclusions Our study suggests that stress-related signaling pathways, particularly the adrenergic and glucocorticoid, may be dysregulated in the tumors of men whose prostate cancer proves to be lethal, and motivates further investigation of these pathways in functional studies. PMID:26490316

  14. Enhancement of Multispectral Chromosome Image Classification Using Vector Median Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvelis, Petros S.; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I.

    Multiplex in-situ hybridization (M-FISH) is a combinatorial labeling technique in which each chromosome is labeled with 5 fluors and a DNA stain and is used for chromosome analysis. Although M-FISH facilitates the visual detection of gross anomalies, misclassified pixels and cross-hybridization often makes manual examination difficult and introduces operator bias. The success of the technique largely depends on the accuracy of pixel classification. In this work we study the use of nonlinear Vector Median Filtering (VMF) methods to induce the accuracy of pixel classification. We have evaluated our methodology using a subset of images publicly available and the classifier was trained and tested on non-overlapping chromosome images. An overall accuracy of 74.13% is reported when introducing VMF.

  15. Acute and Subchronic Toxicity Study of the Median Septum of Juglans regia in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ravanbakhsh, Asma; Mahdavi, Majid; Jalilzade-Amin, Ghader; Javadi, Shahram; Maham, Masoud; Mohammadnejad, Daryosh; Rashidi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Median septum of Juglans regia L. (Juglandaceae) with anti-diabetic effects has been used in Iranian traditional medicine. The present study estimates both oral acute and subchronic toxicities. Methods: In the oral acute toxicity study, female Wistar rats were treated with doses of 10, 100, 1000, 1600, 2900 and 5000 mg/ kg of the Juglans regia septum of methanol extract (JRSME), and were monitored for 14 days. In subchronic study, JRSME was administered by gavage at dose of 1000 mg/kg daily in Wistar rats for 28 days. Antioxidant status and biochemical examinations were fulfilled, and the vital organs were subjected to pathological analyses. Results: The extract did not produce any toxic signs or deaths; the medium lethal dose must be higher than 5000 mg/kg. In subchronic study, No significant morphological and histopathological changes were observed in the studied tissues. There was a significant increase in serum malondialdehyde (MDA) level in treated group compared to control after 4 weeks of JRSME intake. The treatment of rats resulted in a significant reduction of serum urea level (p<0.05), kidney’s xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) activity (p<0.001) and elevation of aldehyde oxidase (AO) activity (p<0.05) in kidney. In the treated group, the mean diameter of glomerulus and proximal urine tube epithelium stature was slightly greater than control group. A significant increase in serum MDA level is subject for further studies. Conclusion: This study showed that the extract has no acute or subacute adverse effects with dose of 1000 mg/kg. The administration of JRSME may improve kidney structure and function and help in treatment of some chronic diseases. PMID:28101461

  16. ANALYSIS OF THE LEACHING EFFICIENCY OF INHIBITED WATER AND TANK 23H SIMULANT IN REMOVING RESIDUES ON TANK 48H WALLS

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F; Thomas02 White, T; Lawrence Oji, L; Chris Martino, C; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2006-07-31

    Solid residues on two sets of thermowell pipe samples from the D2 riser in SRS Tank 48H were characterized. The residue thickness was determined using the ASTM standard D 3483-05 and was found to be three order of magnitudes below the 1mm thickness estimated from an earlier video of the tank cooling coil inspection. The actual estimated thickness ranged from 4 to 20.4 microns. The mass per unit area ranged from 1 to 5.3 milligrams per square inch. The residues appear to consist primarily of potassium tetraphenylborate (39.8 wt% KTPB) and dried salt solution (33.5 wt% total of nitrates, nitrites and oxalate salts), although {approx}30% of the solid mass was not accounted for in the mass balance. No evidence of residue buildup was found inside the pipe, as expected. The residue leaching characteristics were measured by placing one pipe in inhibited water and one pipe in DWPF Recycle simulant. After soaking for less than 4 weeks, the inhibited water was 95.4% effective at removing the residue and the DWPF Recycle simulant was 93.5% effective. The surface appearance of the pipes after leaching tests appeared close to the clean shiny appearance of a new pipe. Total gamma counts of leachates averaged 48.1 dpm/ml, or an equivalent of 2.35E-11 Ci/gm Cs-137 (dry solids basis), which is much lower than the 1.4 E-03 Ci/gm expected for Tank 48 dry slurry solids.

  17. Chronic exposure to sub-lethal beta-amyloid (Abeta) inhibits the import of nuclear-encoded proteins to mitochondria in differentiated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Sirk, Daniel; Zhu, Ziping; Wadia, Jehangir S; Shulyakova, Natalya; Phan, Nam; Fong, Jamie; Mills, Linda R

    2007-12-01

    Studies on amyloid beta (Abeta|), the peptide thought to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, have implicated mitochondria in Abeta-mediated neurotoxicity. We used differentiated PC12 cells stably transfected with an inducible green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein containing an N'-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence (mtGFP), to examine the effects of sub-lethal Abeta on the import of nuclear-encoded proteins to mitochondria. Exposure to sub-lethal Abeta(25-35) (10 mumol/L) for 48 h inhibited mtGFP import to mitochondria; average rates decreased by 20 +/- 4%. Concomitant with the decline in mtGFP, cytoplasmic mtGFP increased significantly while mtGFP expression and intramitochondrial mtGFP turnover were unchanged. Sub-lethal Abeta(1-42) inhibited mtGFP import and increased cytoplasmic mtGFP but only after 96 h. The import of two endogenous nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins, mortalin/mtHsp70 and Tom20 also declined. Prior to the decline in import, mitochondrial membrane potential (mmp), and reactive oxygen species levels were unchanged in Abeta-treated cells versus reverse phase controls. Sustained periods of decreased import were associated with decreased mmp, increased reactive oxygen species, increased vulnerability to oxygen-glucose deprivation and altered mitochondrial morphology. These findings suggest that an Abeta-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial protein import, and the consequent mitochondrial impairment, may contribute to Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Lethal Forethought: Delayed Reward Discounting Differentiates High- and Low-Lethality Suicide Attempts in Old Age

    PubMed Central

    Dombrovski, Alexandre Y.; Szanto, Katalin; Siegle, Greg J.; Wallace, Meredith L.; Forman, Steven D.; Sahakian, Barbara; Reynolds, Charles F.; Clark, Luke

    2011-01-01

    Background The decision to commit suicide may be impulsive, but lethal suicidal acts often involve planning and forethought. People who attempt suicide make disadvantageous decisions in other contexts, but nothing is known about the way they decide about the future. Can the willingness to postpone future gratification differentiate between individuals prone to serious, premeditated and less serious, unplanned suicidal acts? Methods Four groups of depressed participants aged 60+ made choices between smaller immediate and larger delayed monetary rewards: 15 who made high-lethality suicide attempts, 14 who made low-lethality suicide attempts, 12 who seriously contemplated suicide, and 42 people with depression but no history of suicidal thoughts. The reference group was 31 psychiatrically healthy elders. Results Individuals who had made low-lethality attempts displayed an exaggerated preference for immediate rewards compared to non-suicidal depressed and healthy controls. Those who had carried out high-lethality suicide attempts were more willing to delay future rewards, compared to low-lethality attempters. Better planned suicide attempts were also associated with willingness to wait for larger rewards. These effects were unchanged after accounting for education, global cognitive function, substance use disorders, psychotropic medications, and possible brain injury from attempts. Discount rates were correlated with having debt but were not significantly associated with income, hopelessness, depressive severity, premorbid IQ, age at first attempt, or choice of violent means. Conclusions While clinicians often focus on impulsivity in patients at risk for suicide, these data suggest that identifying biological characteristics and treatments for non-impulsive suicidal older people may be even more important. PMID:21329911

  19. Case series of 226 γ-hydroxybutyrate-associated deaths: lethal toxicity and trauma.

    PubMed

    Zvosec, Deborah L; Smith, Stephen W; Porrata, Trinka; Strobl, A Quinn; Dyer, Jo Ellen

    2011-03-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and its prodrugs are drugs of abuse that were also sold as "dietary supplements." Users present to emergency departments with overdose, impaired driving, withdrawal, and associated trauma. We compiled a series of GHB-associated deaths to elucidate lethal risks, GHB concentrations, cointoxicants, products, uses, and medical interventions. Death records were reviewed for toxicology, autopsy findings, and history. Inclusion cutoffs were as follows: 5/10 mg/L of GHB (antemortem blood/urine) and 50/20/7 mg/L of GHB (postmortem blood/urine/vitreous). Of 226 deaths included, 213 had cardiorespiratory arrest and 13 had fatal accidents. Seventy-eight deaths (35%) had no cointoxicants. Sixteen deaths involved "supplements" and 1 involved pharmaceutical GHB (Xyrem, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Palo Alto, CA). Postmortem blood GHB was 18 to 4400 mg/L (median, 347 mg/L) in deaths negative for cointoxicants. Cardiorespiratory arrest occurred prehospital in 100% of 184 cases with available history. Of 72 cases with antemortem adverse effects reported, medical assistance was delayed or absent in 66; of these, acute GHB ingestion was known in 51, including 40 left to "sleep off" adverse effects. Thirty others were left "sleeping" and found dead. γ-Hydroxybutyrate is lethal even without cointoxicants, directly and through fatal accidents. Medical interventions were frequently delayed or absent despite known GHB ingestion, and witnessed adverse events and cardiorespiratory arrest occurred prehospital. Education is needed about the lethality of GHB and the necessity for prompt medical intervention.

  20. Lethal and sublethal effects of a methomyl-based insecticide in Hoplobatrachus rugulosus

    PubMed Central

    Trachantong, Waret; Saenphet, Supap; Saenphet, Kanokporn; Chaiyapo, Monruedee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the lethal and sublethal toxicity of a methomyl-based insecticide in Hoplobatrachus rugulosus, as methomyl-based insecticides are applied in massive amounts and agrochemicals have effects on the decline in amphibian populations. To evaluate the toxic effects of methomyl from agricultural application, a methomyl-based insecticide containing 40% methomyl was selected. The median lethal concentration of 96 hours of methomyl exposure was 8.69 ppm for H. rugulosus tadpoles. The lethal concentration also produced severe histological damage in the livers and kidneys of the exposed tadpoles. The sublethal concentration used for methomyl was 144 ppb during the metamorphosis period. It was found that the sublethal concentration of the methomyl compound could decrease growth, metamorphosis time, and size, disturb biochemical parameters, and produce histological damage. In livers, methomyl effects increased oxidative stress and dramatically decreased the glycogen level of the treated froglets. Mononuclear infiltration, blood congestion, amorphous substances, and hepatocytes vacuolization were observed throughout liver tissue. The methomyl-based insecticide also increased oxidative stress and decreased nitric oxide levels in the kidneys of the exposed froglets. Renal tissue damage including blood congestion, amorphous substances, and Bowman’s capsule spaces reduction were found in the methomyl exposure group. The methomyl compound also produced vacuoles in various stages of oocytes, but no histological damage was found in testicular tissue. Our results indicated strong toxic effects of the methomyl-based insecticide on H. rugulosus, a broadly tolerant anuran. PMID:28190921

  1. Lethal and sublethal effects of a methomyl-based insecticide in Hoplobatrachus rugulosus.

    PubMed

    Trachantong, Waret; Saenphet, Supap; Saenphet, Kanokporn; Chaiyapo, Monruedee

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the lethal and sublethal toxicity of a methomyl-based insecticide in Hoplobatrachus rugulosus, as methomyl-based insecticides are applied in massive amounts and agrochemicals have effects on the decline in amphibian populations. To evaluate the toxic effects of methomyl from agricultural application, a methomyl-based insecticide containing 40% methomyl was selected. The median lethal concentration of 96 hours of methomyl exposure was 8.69 ppm for H. rugulosus tadpoles. The lethal concentration also produced severe histological damage in the livers and kidneys of the exposed tadpoles. The sublethal concentration used for methomyl was 144 ppb during the metamorphosis period. It was found that the sublethal concentration of the methomyl compound could decrease growth, metamorphosis time, and size, disturb biochemical parameters, and produce histological damage. In livers, methomyl effects increased oxidative stress and dramatically decreased the glycogen level of the treated froglets. Mononuclear infiltration, blood congestion, amorphous substances, and hepatocytes vacuolization were observed throughout liver tissue. The methomyl-based insecticide also increased oxidative stress and decreased nitric oxide levels in the kidneys of the exposed froglets. Renal tissue damage including blood congestion, amorphous substances, and Bowman's capsule spaces reduction were found in the methomyl exposure group. The methomyl compound also produced vacuoles in various stages of oocytes, but no histological damage was found in testicular tissue. Our results indicated strong toxic effects of the methomyl-based insecticide on H. rugulosus, a broadly tolerant anuran.

  2. Lethal and sublethal toxicity of didecyldimethylammonium chloride in early life stages of white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus.

    PubMed

    Teh, Swee Joo; Wong, Cecilia; Furtula, Vesna; Teh, Foo-Ching

    2003-09-01

    This study was conducted to describe the acute lethality and latent toxicity of didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) on early life stages of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Fish responses to 0, 10, 50, 100, 250, 500 microg/L concentrations of DDAC were determined using a 96-h standard static renewal method for acute toxicity testing, with three replicates per concentration. Twenty fish per replicate were tested for 3, 11, and 42-d-old larvae, and 7 fish per replicate were tested for 78-d-old juveniles. Following exposure, survival and growth were evaluated in exposed fish raised in clean water for 2 weeks. The 96-h median lethal concentration (LC50) values for DDAC were 10.0 to 50.0, 58.5, and 99.7 microg/L for 3, 11, and 42-d-old larvae and 100 to 250 microg/L for 78-d-old juveniles. Significant decreases in larval growth and survival were noted at all tested concentrations and in all sturgeon age groups. Results of this study reveal age- and concentration-dependent responses to DDAC. Among the age groups tested, the 3-d-old larvae were the most sensitive group. Results also revealed that 96-h lethality testing alone is not adequate for determining the toxicity of DDAC to white sturgeon.

  3. Fitness of transgenic mosquito Aedes aegypti males carrying a dominant lethal genetic system.

    PubMed

    Massonnet-Bruneel, Blandine; Corre-Catelin, Nicole; Lacroix, Renaud; Lees, Rosemary S; Hoang, Kim Phuc; Nimmo, Derric; Alphey, Luke; Reiter, Paul

    2013-01-01

    OX513A is a transgenic strain of Aedes aegypti engineered to carry a dominant, non-sex-specific, late-acting lethal genetic system that is repressed in the presence of tetracycline. It was designed for use in a sterile-insect (SIT) pest control system called RIDL® (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal gene) by which transgenic males are released in the field to mate with wild females; in the absence of tetracycline, the progeny from such matings will not survive. We investigated the mating fitness of OX513A in the laboratory. Male OX513A were as effective as Rockefeller (ROCK) males at inducing refractoriness to further mating in wild type females and there was no reduction in their ability to inseminate multiple females. They had a lower mating success but yielded more progeny than the wild-type comparator strain (ROCK) when one male of each strain was caged with a ROCK female. Mating success and fertility of groups of 10 males-with different ratios of RIDL to ROCK-competing for five ROCK females was similar, but the median longevity of RIDL males was somewhat (18%) lower. We conclude that the fitness under laboratory conditions of OX513A males carrying a tetracycline repressible lethal gene is comparable to that of males of the wild-type comparator strain.

  4. Neural Organization of the Median Ocellus of the Dragonfly

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Richard L.; Dowling, John E.

    1972-01-01

    Intracellular responses from receptors and postsynaptic units have been recorded in the median ocellus of the dragonfly. The receptors respond to light with a graded, depolarizing potential and a single, tetrodotoxin-sensitive impulse at "on." The postsynaptic units (ocellar nerve dendrites) hyperpolarize during illumination and show a transient, depolarizing response at "off." The light-evoked slow potential responses of the postsynaptic units are not altered by the application of tetrodotoxin to the ocellus. It appears, therefore, that the graded receptor potential, which survives the application of tetrodotoxin, is responsible for mediating synaptic transmission in the ocellus. Comparison of pre- and postsynaptic slow potential activity shows (a) longer latencies in postsynaptic units by 5–20 msec, (b) enhanced photosensitivity in postsynaptic units by 1–2 log units, and (c) more transient responses in postsynaptic units. It is suggested that enhanced photosensitivity of postsynaptic activity is a result of summation of many receptors onto the postsynaptic elements, and that transients in the postsynaptic responses are related to the complex synaptic arrangements in the ocellar plexus to be described in the following paper. PMID:5049075

  5. Posterolateral approach to ruptured median and paramedian cervical disk.

    PubMed

    Fager, C A

    1983-12-01

    The trend toward anterior diskectomy for median and paramedian cervical disk rupture has tended to obscure progressive development of the posterolateral approach to these lesions. Modifications of surgical technique from the classic posterior approach have allowed direct access to these lesions, provided for satisfactory decompression of the spinal cord, especially when there is associated spondylosis, and avoided all of the disadvantages of anterior disk surgery. Of 28 patients operated on since 1950, 26 have had significant preoperative myelopathy or myeloradiculopathy. Two patients with obvious spinal cord compression and massive myelographic defects had no neurologic deficit. Improvement has been observed in every patient; 16 patients have had full recovery, and 8 others have had minor residual symptoms and asymptomatic signs. Although four patients have been lost to follow-up, they were all seen at least once after operation. No instance of increased deficit has been seen postoperatively, in contrast to the author's experience with spondylotic myelopathy. Postoperative contrast studies, which have now been performed on eight patients, confirm satisfactory excision of these lesions and decompression.

  6. Approximate Median Regression for Complex Survey Data with Skewed Response

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Raphael André; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Sinha, Debajyoti; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Pan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ready availability of public-use data from various large national complex surveys has immense potential for the assessment of population characteristics using regression models. Complex surveys can be used to identify risk factors for important diseases such as cancer. Existing statistical methods based on estimating equations and/or utilizing resampling methods are often not valid with survey data due to complex survey design features. That is, stratification, multistage sampling and weighting. In this paper, we accommodate these design features in the analysis of highly skewed response variables arising from large complex surveys. Specifically, we propose a double-transform-both-sides (DTBS) based estimating equations approach to estimate the median regression parameters of the highly skewed response; the DTBS approach applies the same Box-Cox type transformation twice to both the outcome and regression function. The usual sandwich variance estimate can be used in our approach, whereas a resampling approach would be needed for a pseudo-likelihood based on minimizing absolute deviations (MAD). Furthermore, the approach is relatively robust to the true underlying distribution, and has much smaller mean square error than a MAD approach. The method is motivated by an analysis of laboratory data on urinary iodine (UI) concentration from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. PMID:27062562

  7. Estimation of median lethal concentration of three isolates of Beauveria bassiana for control of Megacopta cribraria (Heteroptera: Plataspidae) bioassayed on solid Lugys Spp. Diet²

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana is a potential candidate for biological control of a variety of pests. The objectives of this study were isolate and identify the fungus from Kudzu bugs and determine its infectivity comparing with two highly pathogenic isolates including the Mississipp...

  8. Issues surrounding lethal injection as a means of capital punishment.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Frank; Whisman, Tyler; Fink, Joseph L

    2008-12-01

    Lethal injection as a method of state-sanctioned capital punishment was initially proposed in the United States in 1977 and used for the first time in 1982. Most lethal injection protocols use a sequential drug combination of sodium thiopental, pancuronium bromide, and potassium chloride. Lethal injection was originally introduced as a more humane form of execution compared with existing mechanical methods such as electrocution, toxic gassing, hanging, or firing squad. Lethal injection has not, however, been without controversy. Several states are considering whether lethal injection meets constitutional scrutiny forbidding cruel and unusual punishment. Recently in the case of Ralph Baze and Thomas C. Bowling, Petitioners, v John D. Rees, Commissioner, Kentucky Department of Corrections et al, the United States Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the lethal injection protocol as carried out in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Most of the debate has surrounded the dosing and procedures used in lethal injection and whether the drug combinations and measures for administering the drugs truly produce a timely, pain-free, and fail-safe death. Many have also raised issues regarding the "medicalization" of execution and the ethics of health care professionals' participation in any part of the lethal injection process. As a result of all these issues, the future of lethal injection as a means of execution in the United States is under significant scrutiny. Outcomes of ongoing legislative and judicial reviews might result in cessation of lethal injection in totality or in alterations involving specific drug combinations or administration procedures.

  9. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin reduces human alveolar epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2012-12-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness.

  10. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  11. OUP: lethal gene drive selects inbreeding

    PubMed Central

    Bull, James J.

    2017-01-01

    The use of ‘selfish’ gene drive systems to suppress or even extinguish populations has been proposed on theoretical grounds for almost half a century. Creating these genes has recently become possible with CRISPR technology. One seemingly feasible approach, originally proposed by Burt, is to create a homing endonuclease gene (HEG) that inserts into an essential gene, enabling heterozygote viability but causing homozygote lethality. With 100% segregation distortion in gametes, such genes can cause profound population suppression if resistance does not evolve. Here, population genetic models are used to consider the evolution of inbreeding (specifically selfing) as a possible response to a recessively lethal HEG with complete segregation distortion. Numerical analyses indicate a rich set of outcomes, but selfing often evolves in response to the HEG, with a corresponding partial restoration of mean fitness. Whether selfing does indeed evolve and its effect in restoring fitness depends heavily on the magnitude of inbreeding depression. Overall, these results point toward an underappreciated evolutionary response to block the harmful effects of a selfish gene. They raise the possibility that extreme population suppression may be resisted by mechanisms that are independent of the molecular basis of gene drive. At the same time, the evolution of inbreeding is not assured even if the genetic basis for inbreeding is present. As the models here strictly apply to hermaphrodites (plants), an important next step is to consider inbreeding in populations with separate sexes. PMID:28013241

  12. A lethal combination for cancer cells: synthetic lethality screenings for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Elisa; Lucca, Chiara; Foiani, Marco

    2010-11-01

    In recent years, cancer drug discovery has faced the challenging task of integrating the huge amount of information coming from the genomic studies with the need of developing highly selective target-based strategies within the context of tumour cells that experience massive genome instability. The combination between genetic and genomic technologies has been extremely useful and has contributed to efficiently transfer certain approaches typical of basic science to drug discover projects. An example comes from the synthetic lethal approaches, very powerful procedures that employ the rational used by geneticists working on model organisms. Applying the synthetic lethality (SL) screenings to anticancer therapy allows exploiting the typical features of tumour cells, such as genome instability, without changing them, as opposed to the conventional anticancer strategies that aim at counteracting the oncogenic signalling pathways. Recent and very encouraging clinical studies clearly show that certain promising anticancer compounds work through a synthetic lethal mechanism by targeting pathways that are specifically essential for the viability of cancer cells but not of normal cells. Herein we describe the rationale of the synthetic lethality approaches and the potential applications for anticancer therapy.

  13. Suicide Intent and Accurate Expectations of Lethality: Predictors of Medical Lethality of Suicide Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gregory K.; Henriques, Gregg R.; Sosdjan, Daniella; Beck, Aaron T.

    2004-01-01

    The degree of intent to commit suicide and the severity of self-injury were examined in individuals (N = 180) who had recently attempted suicide. Although a minimal association was found between the degree of suicide intent and the degree of lethality of the attempt, the accuracy of expectations about the likelihood of dying was found to moderate…

  14. Potential lethal and non-lethal effects of predators on dispersal of spider mites.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Hatsune; Yano, Shuichi

    2014-11-01

    Predators can affect prey dispersal lethally by direct consumption or non-lethally by making prey hesitate to disperse. These lethal and non-lethal effects are detectable only in systems where prey can disperse between multiple patches. However, most studies have drawn their conclusions concerning the ability of predatory mites to suppress spider mites based on observations of their interactions on a single patch or on heavily infested host plants where spider mites could hardly disperse toward intact patches. In these systems, specialist predatory mites that penetrate protective webs produced by spider mites quickly suppress the spider mites, whereas generalist predators that cannot penetrate the webs were ineffective. By using a connected patch system, we revealed that a generalist ant, Pristomyrmex punctatus Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), effectively prevented dispersal of spider mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae), by directly consuming dispersing individuals. We also revealed that a generalist predatory mite, Euseius sojaensis Ehara (Acari: Phytoseiidae), prevented between-patch dispersal of T. kanzawai by making them hesitate to disperse. In contrast, a specialist phytoseiid predatory mite, Neoseiulus womersleyi Schicha, allowed spider mites to escape an initial patch, increasing the number of colonized patches within the system. Our results suggest that ants and generalist predatory mites can effectively suppress Tetranychus species under some conditions, and should receive more attention as agents for conservation biological control in agroecosystems.

  15. Gonadosomatic mosaicism for lethal mutations in Drosophila lethal mutations disturbing larval development

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A.I.; Sakharova, N.Yu.

    1988-11-01

    Phenogenetic analysis of autonomous lethal mutations obtained by the method of gonadosomatic mosaicism which manifested during larval stages, established that the nuclei of hypodermal cells, salivary glands suprapharyngeal ganglion, pharynx, esophagus, gizzard, and hindgut are the derivatives of the same nucleus (from the first two nuclei of cleavage) as the nuclei of the cells of the imaginal-somatic tissues.

  16. Apparent lethal concentrations of pyrolysis products of some polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Marcussen, W. H.; Furst, A.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-nine samples of polymeric materials were evaluated to determine the apparent lethal concentrations of their pyrolysis products. The materials were compared on the basis of the apparent lethal concentration for 50 percent of the test animals. Relative toxicity rankings based o apparent lethal concentration values can differ significantly depending on whether they are based on weight of sample charged or weight of sample pyrolyzed. The ranking of polyphenylene sulfide is particularly sensitive to this difference.

  17. Ants defend aphids against lethal disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Charlotte; Agrawal, Anurag A; Hajek, Ann E

    2010-04-23

    Social insects defend their own colonies and some species also protect their mutualist partners. In mutualisms with aphids, ants typically feed on honeydew produced by aphids and, in turn guard and shelter aphid colonies from insect natural enemies. Here we report that Formica podzolica ants tending milkweed aphids, Aphis asclepiadis, protect aphid colonies from lethal fungal infections caused by an obligate aphid pathogen, Pandora neoaphidis. In field experiments, bodies of fungal-killed aphids were quickly removed from ant-tended aphid colonies. Ant workers were also able to detect infective conidia on the cuticle of living aphids and responded by either removing or grooming these aphids. Our results extend the long-standing view of ants as mutualists and protectors of aphids by demonstrating focused sanitizing and quarantining behaviour that may lead to reduced disease transmission in aphid colonies.

  18. Lethal Synergism between Influenza and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Jennifer M; Ashar, Harshini K; Chow, Vincent TK; Teluguakula, Narasaraju

    2016-01-01

    The devastating synergism of bacterial pneumonia with influenza viral infections left its mark on the world over the last century. Although the details of pathogenesis remain unclear, the synergism is related to a variety of factors including pulmonary epithelial barrier damage which exposes receptors that influence bacterial adherence and the triggering of an exaggerated innate immune response and cytokine storm, which further acts to worsen the injury. Several therapeutics and combination therapies of antibiotics, anti-inflammatories including corticosteroids and toll-like receptor modifiers, and anti-virals are being discussed. This mini review summarizes recent developments in unearthing the pathogenesis of the lethal synergism of pneumococcal co-infection following influenza, as well as addresses potential therapeutic options and combinations of therapies currently being evaluated. PMID:27981251

  19. Statistical tests for recessive lethal-carriers.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, M A; Haseman, J K

    1979-08-01

    This paper presents a statistical method for testing whether a male mouse is a recessive lethal-carrier. The analysis is based on a back-cross experiment in which the male mouse is mated with some of his daughters. The numbers of total implantations and intrauterine deaths in each litter are recorded. It is assumed that, conditional on the number of total implantations, the number of intrauterine deaths follows a binomial distribution. Using computer-simulated experimentation it is shown that the proposed statistical method, which is sensitive to the pattern of intrauterine death rates, is more powerful than a test based only on the total number of implant deaths. The proposed test requires relatively simple calculations and can be used for a wide range of values of total implantations and background implant mortality rates. For computer-simulated experiments, there was no practical difference between the empirical error rate and the nominal error rate.

  20. Snakebites and ethnobotany in the northwest region of Colombia: Part II: neutralization of lethal and enzymatic effects of Bothrops atrox venom.

    PubMed

    Otero, R; Núñez, V; Jiménez, S L; Fonnegra, R; Osorio, R G; García, M E; Díaz, A

    2000-08-01

    Twelve of 74 ethanolic extracts of plants used by traditional healers for snakebites in the northwest region of Colombia, were active against lethal effect of Bothrops atrox venom when they were i.p. injected into mice (18-20 g). After preincubation of sublethal doses of every extract (0.5-4.0 mg/mouse) with 1.5 i.p. lethal dose 50% (LD50) (99.3 microg) of venom, seven of them demonstrated 100% neutralizing capacity within 48 h. These were the stem barks of Brownea rosademonte (Caesalpiniaceae) and Tabebuia rosea (Bignoniaceae); rhizomes of Renealmia alpinia (Zingiberaceae) and Heliconia curtispatha (Heliconiaceae); the whole plants of Pleopeltis percussa (Polypodiaceae) and Trichomanes elegans (Hymenophyllaceae); and the ripe fruits of Citrus limon (Rutaceae). The other five extracts showing partial neutralization (45-80%; 10-30% survival rate in the control group receiving the venom alone; P<0.05) were: leaves, branches and stem of Costus lasius (Costaceae); the whole plant of Sida acuta (Malvaceae); rhizomes of Dracontium croatii (Araceae); leaves and branches of Bixa orellana (Bixaceae) and Struthanthus orbicularis (Loranthaceae). When the extracts were independently administered per oral or i.p. route 60 min before an i.m. venom injection (204 microg=1.5 i.m. LD50), C. limon, T. elegans, B. orellana and T. rosea extracts had partial and significant neutralizing capacity against B. atrox venom lethal effect. C. limon extract was also partially effective when it was administered either i.v. 15 min before or i.p. 5 min after an i.m. venom injection. Three of the 12 extracts with anti-lethal effect (C. limon, D. croatii and S. acuta) were devoid of antiphospholipase A2 activity, when they were tested against one minimum indirect hemolytic dose of B. atrox venom (2 microg) in agarose-erythrocyte-egg yolk gels.

  1. [Endoscopic fenestration of median supratentorial cerebrospinal fluid cysts].

    PubMed

    Melikian, A G; Ozerova, V I; Bragina, N N; Kolycheva, M V

    1999-01-01

    supplemented by ventricular septal fenestration and third-ventricular bottom perforation. Twelve patients were followed up for 6 to 36.5 months (mean 15 months). There has been no information about 6 patients since their discharge. In 12 (66.5%) surgery yielded expected results and the fenestration of cystic walls was followed by their retraction and a steady-state regression of local and/or hypertensive symptoms. In 5 (28%) patients, the complaints and clinical data remained unchanged despite although incomplete but objective cystic relaxation. This was most frequently noted in patients (n = 4) with arachnoidal cysts of the interpedicular cistern and the third ventricle who had endocrine disorders. In one case the operation was stopped due to bleeding. Totally, 5 patients were found to have complications (hemorrhage, ventriculitis). None patient died. Some aspects of indications for endoscopy and surgical techniques are considered. It is concluded that endoscopic internal bypass surgery in patients wit median cystic liquor malformations is the treatment of choice. When equipment is adjusted, fenestration of the membranous walls of these cysts by using an endoscope is reliable and safe. Such patients may be recommended endoscopic technology used as the method of choice.

  2. Coregistering 3D Models, Range, and Optical Imagery Using Least-Median Squares Fitting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    coregistration estimation algorithms. We consider the use of median filtering in the construction of consistent correspondences. Finally, we test our coregistration with a median filtering system on real ATR data.

  3. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of spinosad on bumble bees (Bombus impatiens Cresson).

    PubMed

    Morandin, Lora A; Winston, Mark L; Franklin, Michelle T; Abbott, Virginia A

    2005-07-01

    Recent developments of new families of pesticides and growing awareness of the importance of wild pollinators for crop pollination have stimulated interest in potential effects of novel pesticides on wild bees. Yet pesticide toxicity studies on wild bees remain rare, and few studies have included long-term monitoring of bumble bee colonies or testing of foraging ability after pesticide exposure. Larval bees feeding on exogenous pollen and exposed to pesticides during development may result in lethal or sub-lethal effects during the adult stage. We tested the effects of a naturally derived biopesticide, spinosad, on bumble bee (Bombus impatiens Cresson) colony health, including adult mortality, brood development, weights of emerging bees and foraging efficiency of adults that underwent larval development during exposure to spinosad. We monitored colonies from an early stage, over a 10-week period, and fed spinosad to colonies in pollen at four levels: control, 0.2, 0.8 and 8.0 mg kg(-1), during weeks 2 through 5 of the experiment. At concentrations that bees would likely encounter in pollen in the wild (0.2-0.8 mg kg(-1)) we detected minimal negative effects to bumble bee colonies. Brood and adult mortality was high at 8.0 mg kg(-1) spinosad, about twice the level that bees would be exposed to in a 'worst case' field scenario, resulting in colony death two to four weeks after initial pesticide exposure. At more realistic concentrations there were potentially important sub-lethal effects. Adult worker bees exposed to spinosad during larval development at 0.8 mg kg(-1) were slower foragers on artificial complex flower arrays than bees from low or no spinosad treated colonies. Inclusion of similar sub-lethal assays to detect effects of pesticides on pollinators would aid in development of environmentally responsible pest management strategies.

  4. 76 FR 39474 - Monthly Median Cost of Funds Reporting, and Publication of Cost of Funds Indices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Monthly Median Cost of Funds Reporting, and Publication of Cost of Funds.... 1550-0021, Monthly Median Cost of Funds Reporting, and Publication of Cost of Funds Indices. SUMMARY: The OTS is terminating the collection of data used to calculate and publish the Monthly Median Cost...

  5. Syn-Lethality: An Integrative Knowledge Base of Synthetic Lethality towards Discovery of Selective Anticancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-juan; Mishra, Shital K.; Wu, Min; Zhang, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a novel strategy for anticancer therapies, whereby mutations of two genes will kill a cell but mutation of a single gene will not. Therefore, a cancer-specific mutation combined with a drug-induced mutation, if they have SL interactions, will selectively kill cancer cells. While numerous SL interactions have been identified in yeast, only a few have been known in human. There is a pressing need to systematically discover and understand SL interactions specific to human cancer. In this paper, we present Syn-Lethality, the first integrative knowledge base of SL that is dedicated to human cancer. It integrates experimentally discovered and verified human SL gene pairs into a network, associated with annotations of gene function, pathway, and molecular mechanisms. It also includes yeast SL genes from high-throughput screenings which are mapped to orthologous human genes. Such an integrative knowledge base, organized as a relational database with user interface for searching and network visualization, will greatly expedite the discovery of novel anticancer drug targets based on synthetic lethality interactions. The database can be downloaded as a stand-alone Java application. PMID:24864230

  6. Chronic Exposure of Corals to Fine Sediments: Lethal and Sub-Lethal Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Smith, Luke D.; Cooper, Timothy F.; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l−1 TSS (25 mg cm−2 day−1) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l−1 TSS (83 mg cm−2 day−1) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue. PMID:22662225

  7. The Influence of Geographic Mobility on Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lloyd B.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Powell, Kenneth E.; Simon, Thomas R.; Mercy, James A.; Lee, Roberta K.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Swann, Alan C.; Bayer, Timothy; O'Carroll, Patrick W.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a population-based, case-control study of nearly lethal suicide attempts with 153 cases and 513 controls. Results indicate that moving in the past year is positively associated with a nearly lethal suicide attempt, as are specific characteristics of the move. Findings confirm and extend prior research by demonstrating a relationship…

  8. Chloride and sulphate toxicity to Hydropsyche exocellata (Trichoptera, Hydropsychidae): Exploring intraspecific variation and sub-lethal endpoints.

    PubMed

    Sala, Miquel; Faria, Melissa; Sarasúa, Ignacio; Barata, Carlos; Bonada, Núria; Brucet, Sandra; Llenas, Laia; Ponsá, Sergio; Prat, Narcís; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Cañedo-Arguelles, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    The rivers and streams of the world are becoming saltier due to human activities. In spite of the potential damage that salt pollution can cause on freshwater ecosystems, this is an issue that is currently poorly managed. Here we explored intraspecific differences in the sensitivity of freshwater fauna to two major ions (Cl(-) and SO4(2-)) using the net-spinning caddisfly Hydropsyche exocellata Dufour 1841 (Trichoptera, Hydropsychidae) as a model organism. We exposed H. exocellata to saline solutions (reaching a conductivity of 2.5mScm(-1)) with Cl(-):SO4(2-) ratios similar to those occurring in effluents coming from the meat, mining and paper industries, which release dissolved salts to rivers and streams in Spain. We used two different populations, coming from low and high conductivity streams. To assess toxicity, we measured sub-lethal endpoints: locomotion, symmetry of the food-capturing nets and oxidative stress biomarkers. According to biomarkers and net building, the population historically exposed to lower conductivities (B10) showed higher levels of stress than the population historically exposed to higher conductivities (L102). However, the differences between populations were not strong. For example, net symmetry was lower in the B10 than in the L102 only 48h after treatment was applied, and biomarkers showed a variety of responses, with no discernable pattern. Also, treatment effects were rather weak, i.e. only some endpoints, and in most cases only in the B10 population, showed a significant response to treatment. The lack of consistent differences between populations and treatments could be related to the high salt tolerance of H. exocellata, since both populations were collected from streams with relatively high conductivities. The sub-lethal effects tested in this study can offer an interesting and promising tool to monitor freshwater salinization by combining physiological and behavioural bioindicators.

  9. Lethal and sublethal toxicity of the industrial chemical epichlorohydrin on Rhinella arenarum (Anura, Bufonidae) embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Hutler Wolkowicz, Ianina R; Aronzon, Carolina M; Pérez Coll, Cristina S

    2013-12-15

    Lethal and sublethal toxicity of the major chemical used in epoxide compounds, epichlorohydrin (ECH) was evaluated on the early life cycle of the common South American toad, Rhinella arenarum (Anura, Bufonidae). The stages evaluated were (according to Del Conte and Sirlin): early blastula (S.3-S.4), gastrula (S.10-S.12), rotation (S.15), tail bud (S.17), muscular response (S.18), gill circulation (S.20), open mouth (S.21), opercular folds (S.23) and complete operculum (S.25). The LC50 and EC50 values for lethal and sublethal effects were calculated. The early blastula was the most sensitive stage to ECH both for continuously and pulse-exposures (LC50-24h=50.9 mg L(-1)), while S.20 was the most resistant (LC50-24h=104.9 mg L(-1)). Among sublethal effects, early blastula was also the most sensitive stage (LOEC-48 h=20 mg L(-1)) and it has a Teratogenic Index of 2.5, which indicates the teratogenic potential of the substance. The main abnormalities were persistent yolk plugs, cell dissociation, tumors, hydropsy, oral malformations, axial/tail flexures, delayed development and reduced body size. ECH also caused neurotoxicity including scarce response to stimuli, reduction in the food intake, general weakness, spasms and shortening, erratic or circular swimming. Industrial contamination is considered an important factor on the decline of amphibian populations. Considering the available information about ECH's toxicity and its potential hazard to the environment, this work shows the first results of its developmental toxicity on a native amphibian species, Rhinella arenarum.

  10. Antidotes to anthrax lethal factor intoxication. Part 1: Discovery of potent lethal factor inhibitors with in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Kim, Seongjin; Moayeri, Mahtab; Cregar-Hernandez, Lynne; McKasson, Linda; Margosiak, Stephen A; Leppla, Stephen H; Johnson, Alan T

    2010-11-15

    Sub-nanomolar small molecule inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor have been identified using SAR and Merck L915 (4) as a model compound. One of these compounds (16) provided 100% protection in a rat lethal toxin model of anthrax disease.

  11. Lethal body burdens of polar narcotics: Chlorophenols

    SciTech Connect

    Wezel, A.P. van; Punte, S.S.; Opperhuizen, A.

    1995-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to measure in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) the lethal body burden (LBB) of three chlorophenols that are known as polar narcotic chemicals. The LBBs of the chlorophenols were compared to LBBs of nonpolar narcotic chemicals to consider if the two classes of narcotic chemicals differ on a body burden level. The LBB of the most acidic chlorophenol was measured at two different levels of pH exposure to determine the influence of the degree of ionization on the magnitude of the LBB. Both n-octanol/water partition coefficients and n-hexane/water partition coefficients of the chlorophenols were determined at different pH levels to consider the influence of ionization on the partition coefficient and to determine the importance of a polar group in the organic phase on the partitioning behavior. Partitioning to n-octanol and n-hexane was used as input in a model to simulate the equilibrium partitioning between hydrophobic and nonhydrophobic and target and nontarget compartments in the fish.

  12. Inhibitors of the Metalloproteinase Anthrax Lethal Factor

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Allison B.; Turk, Benjamin E.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, a rod shaped, spore forming, gram positive bacteria, is the etiological agent of anthrax. B. anthracis virulence is partly attributable to two secreted bipartite protein toxins, which act inside host cells to disrupt signaling pathways important for host defense against infection. These toxins may also directly contribute to mortality in late stage infection. The zinc-dependent metalloproteinase anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a critical component of one of these protein toxins and a prime target for inhibitor development to produce anthrax therapeutics. Here, we describe recent efforts to identify specific and potent LF inhibitors. Derivatization of peptide substrate analogs bearing zinc-binding groups has produced potent and specific LF inhibitors, and X-ray crystallography of LF-inhibitor complexes has provided insight into features required for high affinity binding. Novel inhibitor scaffolds have been identified through several approaches, including fragment-based drug discovery, virtual screening, and high-throughput screening of diverse compound libraries. Lastly, efforts to discover LF inhibitors have led to the development of new screening strategies, such as the use of full-length proteins as substrates, that may prove useful for other proteases as well. Overall, these efforts have led to a collection of chemically and mechanistically diverse molecules capable of inhibiting LF activity in vitro and in cells, as well as in animal models of anthrax infection. PMID:27072692

  13. Lethal Mutagenesis Failure May Augment Viral Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Paff, Matthew L.; Stolte, Steven P.; Bull, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis, the attempt to extinguish a population by elevating its mutation rate, has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach for treating viral infections. In support of the concept, in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. However, the one known mutagenic drug used on patients commonly fails to cure infections, and in vitro studies typically find a wide range of mutagenic conditions permissive for viral growth. A key question becomes how subsequent evolution is affected if the viral population is mutated but avoids extinction—Is viral adaptation augmented rather than suppressed? Here we consider the evolution of highly mutated populations surviving mutagenesis, using the DNA phage T7. In assays using inhibitory hosts, whenever resistance mutants were observed, the mutagenized populations exhibited higher frequencies, but some inhibitors blocked plaque formation by even the mutagenized stock. Second, outgrowth of previously mutagenized populations led to rapid and potentially complete fitness recovery but polymorphism was slow to decay, and mutations exhibited inconsistent patterns of change. Third, the combination of population bottlenecks with mutagenesis did cause fitness declines, revealing a vulnerability that was not apparent from mutagenesis of large populations. The results show that a population surviving high mutagenesis may exhibit enhanced adaptation in some environments and experience little negative fitness consequences in many others. PMID:24092771

  14. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers.

  15. Lethal methemoglobinemia and automobile exhaust inhalation.

    PubMed

    Vevelstad, Merete; Morild, Inge

    2009-05-30

    Inhalation of automobile exhaust gas often leads to death by CO intoxication. In some cases the measured carbon monoxide hemoglobin saturation level (COHb) is considerably below what is considered to be lethal. The death in such cases has been attributed to a combination of a high CO2 and a low O2 tension. In a recent case the deceased was found dead in a car equipped with a catalytic converter, with a hose leading exhaust from the engine to the interior of the car. Analysis revealed a moderately elevated COHb and a high methemoglobin saturation level (MetHb) in peripheral blood. No ethanol, narcotics or drugs were detected. Reports mentioning MetHb or methemoglobinemia in post-mortem cases are surprisingly scarce, and very few have related exhaust gas deaths to methemoglobinemia. High-degree methemoglobinemia causes serious tissue hypoxia leading to unconsciousness, arrhythmia and death. The existing literature in this field and the knowledge that exhaust fumes contain nitrogen oxide gases (NOx) that by inhalation and absorption can result in severe methemoglobinemia, led us to postulate that this death could possibly be attributed to a combination of methemoglobinemia and a moderately high COHb concentration.

  16. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; de Bono, Johann S.; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. PMID:25232177

  17. Influence of UVB radiation on the lethal and sublethal toxicity of dispersed crude oil to planktonic copepod nauplii.

    PubMed

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Harvey, Tracy E; Connelly, Tara L; Baca, Sarah; Buskey, Edward J

    2016-06-01

    Toxic effects of petroleum to marine zooplankton have been generally investigated using dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons and in the absence of sunlight. In this study, we determined the influence of natural ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation on the lethal and sublethal toxicity of dispersed crude oil to naupliar stages of the planktonic copepods Acartia tonsa, Temora turbinata and Pseudodiaptomus pelagicus. Low concentrations of dispersed crude oil (1 μL L(-1)) caused a significant reduction in survival, growth and swimming activity of copepod nauplii after 48 h of exposure. UVB radiation increased toxicity of dispersed crude oil by 1.3-3.8 times, depending on the experiment and measured variables. Ingestion of crude oil droplets may increase photoenhanced toxicity of crude oil to copepod nauplii by enhancing photosensitization. Photoenhanced sublethal toxicity was significantly higher when T. turbinata nauplii were exposed to dispersant-treated oil than crude oil alone, suggesting that chemical dispersion of crude oil may promote photoenhanced toxicity to marine zooplankton. Our results demonstrate that acute exposure to concentrations of dispersed crude oil and dispersant (Corexit 9500) commonly found in the sea after oil spills are highly toxic to copepod nauplii and that natural levels of UVB radiation substantially increase the toxicity of crude oil to these planktonic organisms. Overall, this study emphasizes the importance of considering sunlight in petroleum toxicological studies and models to better estimate the impact of crude oil spills on marine zooplankton.

  18. Prophylactic treatment with Bacopa monnieri leaf powder mitigates paraquat-induced oxidative perturbations and lethality in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Muralidhara

    2010-04-01

    Environmental exposure to the oxidant-producing herbicide, paraquat (PQ) (1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride) has long been implicated as a risk factor in Parkinson's disease (PD). PQ-induced oxidative stress has been exploited as a model to screen putative neuroprotective compounds employing Drosophila. In the present study, we investigated the prophylactic efficacy of Bacopa monnieri (BM) against PQ-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunctions and lethality. Exposure of adult male flies (Oregon K) to PQ alone (40 mM in 5% sucrose) resulted in 50% mortality at 48 h. Prophylaxis (7 days) with BM extract (0.1%) offered significant protection (40%) against PQ-induced mortality. Further, oxidative impairments and mitochondrial dysfunctions were monitored among Drosophila exposed to PQ (20, 40 mM) for 24 h. Significant induction of oxidative stress was observed in terms of enhanced malondialdehyde and hydroperoxide levels, and elevated activities of antioxidant enzymes (catalase and SOD). Mitochondrial dysfunctions included of significant reduction in the activities of succinate dehydrogenase (23%), complex I-III (26%), and complex II-III (30%) enzymes. Interestingly, prophylaxis with BM extract prevented the oxidative stress induction by PQ and restored the activity of ETC complexes, suggesting clearly its specific effect on the mitochondria. While the precise mechanism of action of BM needs further investigations, it may be related to its ability to enhance antioxidant defences and thus mitigate PQ-induced oxidative stress in Drosophila.

  19. Review and Assessment of Chlorine Mammalian Lethality Data and the Development of a Human Estimate R-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    BR; and Hartman, SE, Ratios as a Size Adjustment in Morphometrics , American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 91: 441-468, 1993. 18 Vanderburgh, PM...C2T was used for the toxic load model. After the median lethal C2T was determined, the geometric mean of all the individual exposure durations (T...was then calculated for each species dataset. The L(C2T)50 was assumed to be associated with this geometric mean time, which was found to equal

  20. Establishing Genetic Interactions by a Synthetic Dosage Lethality Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, E. S.; Hyland, K. M.; Hieter, P.; Li, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have devised a genetic screen, termed synthetic dosage lethality, in which a cloned ``reference'' gene is inducibly overexpressed in a set of mutant strains carrying potential ``target'' mutations. To test the specificity of the method, two reference genes, CTF13, encoding a centromere binding protein, and ORC6, encoding a subunit of the origin of replication binding complex, were overexpressed in a large collection of mutants defective in either chromosome segregation or replication. CTF13 overexpression caused synthetic dosage lethality in combination with ctf14-42 (cbf2, ndc10), ctf17-61 (chl4), ctf19-58 and ctf19-26. ORC6 overexpression caused synthetic dosage lethality in combination with cdc2-1, cdc6-1, cdc14-1, cdc16-1 and cdc46-1. These relationships reflect specific interactions, as overexpression of CTF13 caused lethality in kinetochore mutants and overexpression of ORC6 caused lethality in replication mutants. In contrast, only one case of dosage suppression was observed. We suggest that synthetic dosage lethality identifies a broad spectrum of interacting mutations and is of general utility in detecting specific genetic interactions using a cloned wild-type gene as a starting point. Furthermore, synthetic dosage lethality is easily adapted to the study of cloned genes in other organisms. PMID:8722765

  1. Key tissue targets responsible for anthrax-toxin-induced lethality.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Zhang, Yi; Moayeri, Mahtab; Liu, Jie; Crown, Devorah; Fattah, Rasem J; Wein, Alexander N; Yu, Zu-Xi; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H

    2013-09-05

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax disease, is lethal owing to the actions of two exotoxins: anthrax lethal toxin (LT) and oedema toxin (ET). The key tissue targets responsible for the lethal effects of these toxins are unknown. Here we generated cell-type-specific anthrax toxin receptor capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2)-null mice and cell-type-specific CMG2-expressing mice and challenged them with the toxins. Our results show that lethality induced by LT and ET occurs through damage to distinct cell types; whereas targeting cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells is required for LT-induced mortality, ET-induced lethality occurs mainly through its action in hepatocytes. Notably, and in contradiction to what has been previously postulated, targeting of endothelial cells by either toxin does not seem to contribute significantly to lethality. Our findings demonstrate that B. anthracis has evolved to use LT and ET to induce host lethality by coordinately damaging two distinct vital systems.

  2. Differences in response of two model estuarine crustaceans after lethal and sublethal exposures to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Key, Peter B; Simonik, Elizabeth; Kish, Nicole; Chung, Katy W; Fulton, Michael H

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the in vitro and in vivo effects of an acetylcholinesterase enzyme inhibitor (chlorpyrifos) in two estuarine crustaceans: grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) and mysid (Americamysis bahia). The differences in response were quantified after lethal and sublethal exposures to chlorpyrifos and in vitro assays with chlorpyrifos-oxon. Results from the in vitro experiments indicated that the target enzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), in the two species was similar in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos inhibition with IC50s of 0.98 nM and 0.89 nM for grass shrimp and mysids, respectively. In vivo experiments showed that mysids were significantly more sensitive to chlorpyrifos-induced AChE inhibition after 24 h of exposure. The in vivo EC50s for AChE inhibition were 1.23 μg L(-1) for grass shrimp and 0.027 μg L(-1) for mysids. Median lethal concentrations (24h LC50 values) were 1.06 μg L(-1) for grass shrimp and 0.068 μg L(-1) for mysids. The results suggest that differences in the response of these two crustaceans are likely related to differences in uptake and metabolism rather than target site sensitivity.

  3. Effects of whole-body VX vapor exposure on lethality in rats.

    PubMed

    Benton, B J; McGuire, J M; Sommerville, D R; Dabisch, P A; Jakubowski, E M; Matson, K L; Mioduszewski, R J; Thomson, S A; Crouse, C L

    2006-12-01

    Male and female rats were whole-body exposed to VX vapor in a 1000-L single-pass exposure chamber. Estimated exposure dosages producing lethal (LCT50) effects in 50% of exposed male and female rats were established for 10, 60, and 240 min exposure durations. A potency comparison with GB and GF shows that VX becomes increasingly more potent than these G agents with increasing exposure duration. VX is approximately 4-30 times more potent than GB and 5-15 times more potent than GF. Gender differences in the estimated median dosages were not significant at the 10, 60, and 240 min exposure durations. An empirical toxic load model was developed and the toxic load exponent for lethality (n) in the equation Cn x T = k was determined to be n = 0.92. The VX-G regeneration assay was successfully used as a biomarker for the presence of VX in the blood plasma and RBC fractions of the blood 24 h postexposure.

  4. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: specific activity and influence on the production of acetic acid, ethanol and higher alcohols in the first 48 h of fermentation of grape must.

    PubMed

    Millán, C; Mauricio, J C; Ortega, J M

    1990-01-01

    The changes in the specific activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-I and ADH-II) and aldehyde dehydrogenases [AIDH-NADP+ and AIDH-NAD(P)+] from Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the first 48 h of fermentation of grape must were investigated. The biosynthesis of ADH-I and AIDH-NADP+ took place basically during the adaptation of the yeasts to the must (first 4 h), while that of ADH-II occurred immediately after exponential growth (after 12 h). From the products produced by the yeast, only the specific rate of production of ethanol was found to be directly related to the specific activity of ADH-I.

  5. A method for determining the median line of measured cylindrical and conical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecki, Dariusz; Zwierzchowski, Jarosław

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents a novel method for the determination of the median line of the cylindrical and conical surfaces. This method can be incorporated into virtually any cylindricity measurement strategy, including the bird-cage strategy and the helical line strategy. In the study, a median line was determined by minimizing the functional made up of two components. The form of the first component results from the classic definition of the median line provided in the corresponding standard. The other, termed the bending energy, is responsible for ensuring appropriate smoothness of the median line. In order to solve this variational problem, the median line was approximated by means of linear combination of cubic B-spline functions. A simulation and experiments were conducted to establish the suitability of the algorithm developed for the determination of the median line using the helical-line and the cross-section measurement strategy.

  6. Somatic Mosaicism for a Lethal TRPV4 Mutation Results in Non-Lethal Metatropic Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Michael M.; Kang, Taekyu; Lachman, Ralph S.; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in TRPV4, which encodes the Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Subfamily V Member 4 calcium channel, result in a series of musculoskeletal disorders that include a set of peripheral neuropathies and a broad phenotypic spectrum of skeletal dysplasias. The skeletal pheno-types range from brachyolmia, in which there is scoliosis with mild short stature, through perinatal lethal metatropic dysplasia. We describe a case with phenotypic findings consistent with metatropic dysplasia, but in whom no TRPV4 mutation was detected by Sanger sequence analysis. Exome sequence analysis identified a known lethal metatropic dysplasia mutation, TRPV4L618P, which was present at lower frequency than would be expected for a heterozygous change. The affected individual was shown to be a somatic mosaic for the mutation, providing an explanation for the milder than expected phenotype. The data illustrate that high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA can facilitate detection of mosaicism with higher sensitivity than Sanger sequence analysis and identify a new genetic mechanism for metatropic dysplasia. PMID:27530454

  7. Acceptable differences in sensory and motor latencies between the median and ulnar nerves.

    PubMed

    Grossart, Elizabeth A; Prahlow, Nathan D; Buschbacher, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The median and ulnar nerves are often studied during the same electrodiagnostic examination. The sensory and motor latencies of these nerves have been compared to detect a common electrodiagnostic entity: median neuropathy at the wrist. However, this comparison could also be used to diagnose less common ulnar pathology. For this reason, it is important to establish normal values for comparing median and ulnar sensory and motor latencies. Previous research deriving these differences in latency has had some limitations. The purpose of this study was to derive an improved normative database for the acceptable differences in latency between the median and ulnar sensory and motor nerves of the same limb. Median and ulnar sensory and motor latencies were obtained from 219 and 238 asymptomatic risk-factor-free subjects, respectively. An analysis of variance was performed to determine whether physical characteristics, specifically age, race, gender, height, or body mass index (as an indicator of obesity), correlated with differences in latency. Differences in sensory latencies were unaffected by physical characteristics. The upper limit of normal difference between median and ulnar (median longer than ulnar) onset latency was 0.5 ms (97th percentile), whereas the peak latency value was 0.4 ms (97th percentile). The upper limit of normal difference between ulnar-versus-median (ulnar longer than median) onset latency was 0.3 ms (97th percentile), whereas the peak-latency value was 0.5 ms (97th percentile). The mean difference in motor latencies correlated with age, with older subjects having a greater variability. In subjects aged 50 and over, the mean difference in median-versus-ulnar latency was 0.9 ms +/- 0.4 ms. The upper limit of normal difference (median longer than ulnar) was 1.7 ms (97th percentile). The upper limit of normal ulnar motor latency is attained if the ulnar latency comes within 0.3 ms of the median latency. In individuals less than 50 years of age, the

  8. Anthrax lethal factor inhibitors as potential countermeasure of the infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B V S Suneel; Malik, Siddharth; Grandhi, Pradeep; Dayam, Raveendra; Sarma, J A R P

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax Lethal Factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease, one of the virulence factor of anthrax infection. Three forms of the anthrax infection have been identified: cutaneous (through skin), gastrointestinal (through alimentary tract), and pulmonary (by inhalation of spores). Anthrax toxin is composed of protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF). Protective antigen mediates the entry of Lethal Factor/Edema Factor into the cytosol of host cells. Lethal factor (LF) inactivates mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inducing cell death, and EF is an adenylyl cyclase impairing host defenses. In the past few years, extensive studies are undertaken to design inhibitors targeting LF. The current review focuses on the small molecule inhibitors targeting LF activity and its structure activity relationships (SAR).

  9. Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease presenting as hydrops fetalis

    PubMed Central

    BenHamida, Emira; Ayadi, Imene; Ouertani, Ines; Chammem, Maroua; Bezzine, Ahlem; BenTmime, Riadh; Attia, Leila; Mrad, Ridha; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease is very rare and is considered a variant of type 2 Gaucher disease that occurs in the neonatal period. The most distinct features of perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease are non-immune hydrops fetalis. Less common signs of the disease are hepatosplenomegaly, ichthyosis and arthrogryposis. We report a case of Gaucher's disease (type 2) diagnosed in a newborn who presented with Hydrops Fetalis. PMID:26327947

  10. Conflict Without Casualties: Non-Lethal Weapons in Irregular Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Recognizing this, in 2006 the British Royal Marines reached out to the international community and, along with U.S. Marines, established a non-lethal...obstruction. But as the scenario intensified, they moved into the city alleys for a more authentic feel. British Royal Marine Capt. Rhys Hopkins stated...89 United States Federal News Service, “ Royal Marines Teach Non-Lethal Crowd Control for 2007

  11. Field Evaluation of Lethal Ovitrap against Dengue Vectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0217 TITLE: Field Evaluation of Lethal Ovitrap against Dengue Vectors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Lane Foil CONTRACTING...2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Field Evaluation of Lethal Ovitrap against Dengue Vectors 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-02-1-0217 5c. PROGRAM...to effectively sample dengue mosquito vector populations, particularly Aedes aegypti for over a decade. Modifying a standard ovitrap by incorporating

  12. Median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Reser, Diana; Caliskan, Etem; Tolboom, Herman; Guidotti, Andrea; Maisano, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Sternotomy is considered to be the gold standard incision in cardiac surgery, resulting in low failure rates and excellent proven long-term outcomes. It can also be used in thoracic surgery for mediastinal, bilateral pulmonary or lower trachea and main stem bronchus surgery. Sternotomy has to be performed properly to avoid short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. The surgical technique is well established and certain principles are recognized to be crucial to minimize complications. The identification of the correct landmarks, midline tissue preparation, osteotomy with the avoidance of injury to underlying structures like pleura, pericardium, innominate vein, brachiocephalic artery and ectatic ascending aorta, and targeted bleeding control are important steps of the procedure. As important as the performance of a proper sternotomy is a correct sternal closure. An override or shift of the sternal edges has to be avoided by placing the wires at a proper distance from each other without injuring the thoracic pedicle. The two sternal halves have to be tightly re-approximated to facilitate healing of the bone and to avoid instability, which is a risk factor for wound infection. With a proper performance of sternotomy and sternal closure, instability and wound infections are rare and depend on patient-related risk factors.

  13. Bleomycin: female-specific dominant lethal effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Sudman, P D; Rutledge, J C; Bishop, J B; Generoso, W M

    1992-12-01

    Limited comparative data in mice indicate that chemical mutagens that induce dominant lethal mutations in males are not necessarily effective in females, but those which are effective in females are generally equally or more effective in males. Recently, however, a few chemicals have been identified that are female-specific with respect to induction of dominant lethal mutations. The antitumor antibiotic adriamycin is among them. Another antitumor antibiotic, bleomycin was examined for its ability to induce dominant lethal mutations in the reproductive cells of male and female mice. No dominant lethal or cytotoxic effects were observed in males treated with bleomycin, even at a maximum tolerated dose. In females, on the other hand, a dose nearly 1/4 of that used in males induced not only a high level of dominant lethal mutations but also killed oocytes in certain stages of follicular development. The effectiveness of bleomycin in inducing dominant lethal mutations in mouse oocytes makes it a valuable tool for investigating whether gonadal transport, inherent differences in the configuration of chromatin in the germ cells of the two sexes or other factors are responsible for the differential susceptibility to bleomycin, which implies potential gender-specific genetic risk in cancer chemotherapy.

  14. Mechanism by which caffeine potentiates lethality of nitrogen mustard.

    PubMed Central

    Lau, C C; Pardee, A B

    1982-01-01

    Caffeine is synergistic with many DNA-damaging agents in increasing lethality to mammalian cells. The mechanism is not well understood. Our results show that caffeine potentiates the lethality of the nitrogen mustard 2-chloro-N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-methylethanamine (HN2) by inducing damaged cells to undergo mitosis before properly repairing lesions in their DNA. Treatment with low doses of HN2 (0.5 microM for 1 hr) caused little lethality in baby hamster kidney cells (90% survival). These cells were arrested in G2 shortly after treatment with HN2 as shown by flow microfluorimetry and autoradiography. After an arrest of 6 hr, HN2-treated cells began to move into mitosis and from then on behaved like normal cells. Repair synthesis was shown to continue during the G2 arrest by using synchronized cells pulse labeled with [3H]thymidine after HN2 treatment and autoradiography. Caffeine (2mM) increased the lethality of HN2 by 5- to 10-fold. It prevented the G2 arrest. Caffeine did not prevent these HN2-treated cells from entering or completing S phase but rather allowed them to divide without finishing the repair processes and as a consequence caused nuclear fragmentation after mitosis. Caffeine-induced nuclear fragmentation and enhanced lethality were proportional, as shown with dose--response curves and time dependence. In addition, both lethality and nuclear fragmentation were abolished by low doses of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. Images PMID:6953438

  15. Misregulation of Sex-Lethal and Disruption of Male-Specific Lethal Complex Localization in Drosophila Species Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Pal Bhadra, Manika; Bhadra, Utpal; Birchler, James A.

    2006-01-01

    A major model system for the study of evolutionary divergence between closely related species has been the unisexual lethality resulting from reciprocal crosses of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Sex-lethal (Sxl), a critical gene for sex determination, is misregulated in these hybrids. In hybrid males from D. melanogaster mothers, there is an abnormal expression of Sxl and a failure of localization of the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex to the X chromosome, which causes changes in gene expression. Introduction of a Sxl mutation into this hybrid genotype will allow expression of the MSL complex but there is no sequestration to the X chromosome. Lethal hybrid rescue (Lhr), which allows hybrid males from this cross to survive, corrects the SXL and MSL defects. The reciprocal cross of D. simulans mothers by D. melanogaster males exhibits underexpression of Sxl in embryos. PMID:16951071

  16. Near-medians that avoid the corners; a combinatorial probability approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The breakpoint median for a set of k ≥ 3 random genomes tends to approach (any) one of these genomes ("corners") as genome length increases, although there are diminishing proportion of medians equidistant from all k ("medians in the middle"). Algorithms are likely to miss the latter, and this has consequences for the general case where input genomes share some or many gene adjacencies, where the tendency for the median to be closer to one input genome may be an artifact of the corner tendency. Results We present a simple sampling procedure for constructing a "near median" that represents a compromise among k random genomes and that has only a slightly greater breakpoint distance to all of them than the median does. We generalize to the realistic case where genomes share varying proportions of gene adjacencies. We present a supplementary sampling scheme that brings the constructed genome even closer to median status. Conclusions Our approach is of particular use in the phylogenetic context where medians are repeatedly calculated at ancestral nodes, and where the corner effect prevents different parts of the phylogeny from communicating with each other. PMID:25572274

  17. The Influence of the Elderly on School Spending in a Median Voter Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Deborah; Kenny, Lawrence W.

    2008-01-01

    How do the elderly influence school spending if they are a minority of the population? We estimate the determinants of school spending in a median voter model, comparing four assumptions about how the elderly influence the identity of the median voter. Using a county-level panel, we find that elderly preferences are best characterized by assuming…

  18. A case of epidermoid median raphe cyst traversing the corpora cavernosa

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Alice; Capolicchio, John-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Median raphe cysts are congenital lesions that typically have a superficial appearance. We present a very unusual case of a deep perineal mass in a six-year-old boy. The lesion extends into the corpus cavernosum, suggesting that the anomaly was an early embryological event. Histopathological features are consistent with an epidermoid type of median raphe cyst. PMID:28360959

  19. Short-term isotretinoin-induced elkonyxis and median nail dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Alli, Nuran; Dogan, Sibel

    2016-03-01

    Elkonyxis and median nail distrophy are very rare nail fold disorders due to the damage in nail matrix and proximal nail fold. Herein, we report a patient with both elkonyxis and median nail distrophy occured two months into a treatment course of isotretinoin that is to our knowledge for the first time.

  20. Shadow Probability of Detection and False Alarm for Median-Filtered SAR Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter; Miller, John A.; Bishop, Edward E.; Horndt, Volker

    2014-06-01

    Median filtering reduces speckle in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery while preserving edges, at the expense of coarsening the resolution, by replacing the center pixel of a sliding window by the median value. For shadow detection, this approach helps distinguish shadows from clutter more easily, while preserving shadow shape delineations. However, the nonlinear operation alters the shadow and clutter distributions and statistics, which must be taken into consideration when computing probability of detection and false alarm metrics. Depending on system parameters, median filtering can improve probability of detection and false alarm by orders of magnitude. Herein, we examine shadow probability of detection and false alarm in a homogeneous, ideal clutter background after median filter post-processing. Some comments on multi-look processing effects with and without median filtering are also made.

  1. The Median-Median Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Graphing bivariate data in a scatter plot and drawing an approximate line of best fit for the data have become commonly recommended activities for middle school and high school students. The graphing calculator has provided a mechanism for students both to approximate a best-fit line and to calculate the best-fit line using a built-in option. Two…

  2. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion-extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  3. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion–extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  4. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Impairs Innate Immune Functions of Alveolar Macrophages and Facilitates Bacillus anthracis Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-14

    germinate into vegetative bacteria (10, 23), which are capable of secreting anthrax lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin . In the lymph nodes, bacteria ...inability of AM to completely eradicate bacteria suggests that intracellularly secreted lethal FIG. 5. Lethal toxin impairs bactericidal activity but...Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Impairs Innate Immune Functions of Alveolar Macrophages and Facilitates Bacillus anthracis

  5. Middle cerebral artery median peak systolic velocity validation: effect of measurement technique.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Tamula M; Alexander, Amy; Szychowski, Jeff M; Owen, John

    2010-09-01

    We sought to validate center-specific published medians and estimate the effects of sonologist and Doppler measurement techniques on middle cerebral artery (MCA) peak systolic velocity (PSV) values. We studied 154 gravidas with normal singletons who underwent MCA PSV measurement at 18 to 35 weeks' gestation by one of three experienced sonologists. Pregnancies complicated by a known fetal anomaly (structural or aneuploidy), amniotic fluid volume disturbance, intrauterine growth restriction, multiple gestation, or isoimmunization were excluded. MCA PSV was measured using both manual caliper and auto-trace techniques. Regression models of log-transformed PSV values and gestational age were developed. Although auto-trace medians were significantly lower than those obtained with manual calipers ( P < 0.0001), they more closely approximated published medians used in clinical practice. Minimal intersonologist differences (maximum mean difference <3 cm/s) were statistically significant ( P < 0.01). Compared with manual caliper, auto-trace measurement yielded significantly lower medians. However, center-specific medians obtained by our sonologists using auto-trace more closely approximated published standards. Estimated interobserver variability suggested that different sonologists may utilize the same median values. We suggest that centers that utilize Doppler velocimetry for the prediction of fetal anemia examine their measurement protocol and consider formal confirmation of their own center-specific median values.

  6. The Rorschach Suicide Constellation: assessing various degrees of lethality.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J C; Piers, C; Hilsenroth, M J; Holdwick, D J; Padawer, J R

    2001-04-01

    In this article we examine the relation between the Rorschach Comprehensive System's Suicide Constellation (S-CON; Exner, 1993; Exner & Wiley, 1977) and lethality of suicide attempts during the course of patients' hospitalization at the Austen Riggs Center (Stockbridge, MA). Patient records were rated as nonsuicidal (n = 37), parasuicidal (n = 37), or near-lethal (n = 30) based on the presence and lethality of self-destructive acts. Diagnostic efficiency statistics utilizing a cutoff score of 7 or more positive indicators successfully predicted which patients would engage in near-lethal suicidal activity relative to parasuicidal patients (overall correct classification rate [OCC] = .79), nonsuicidal inpatients (OCC = .79), and college students (OCC = .89). Although these predictions were influenced by relatively high base rates in the hospital population (14.5%), base rate estimates were calculated for other hypothetical populations revealing different prediction estimates that should be considered when judging the relative efficacy of the S-CON. Logistic regression analysis revealed that an S-CON score of 7 or more was the sole predictor of near-lethal suicide attempts among 9 psychiatric and demographic variables.

  7. Embolization in a Patient with Ruptured Anterior Inferior Pancreaticoduodenal Arterial Aneurysm with Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yozo; Banno, Tatsuo; Arakawa, Toshinao; Hara, Masaki

    2002-08-15

    In median arcuate ligament syndrome, the root of the celiac artery is compressed and narrowed by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm during expiration, causing abdominal angina.Aneurysm may be formed in arteries of the pancreas and duodenum due toa chronic increase in blood flow from the superior mesenteric artery into the celiac arterial region. We report a patient saved by embolization with coils of ruptured aneurysm that developed with markedly dilated anterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery due to median arcuate ligament syndrome.

  8. Anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel: a brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Civelek, Erdinc; Cansever, Tufan; Kabatas, Serdar; Yilmaz, Cem

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common focal peripheral neuropathy. Increased pressure in the carpal tunnel results in median nerve compression and impaired nerve perfusion, leading to discomfort and paresthesia in the affected hand. Surgical division of the transverse carpal ligament is preferred in severe cases of CTS and should be considered when conservative measures fail. A through knowledge of the normal and variant anatomy of the median nerve in the wrist is fundamental in avoiding complications during carpal tunnel release. This paper aims to briefly review the anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel and its implications in carpal tunnel surgery.

  9. Evaluation of lethal and non-lethal sampling methods for the detection of white sturgeon iridovirus infection in white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus (Richardson).

    PubMed

    Drennan, J D; Lapatra, S E; Samson, C A; Ireland, S; Eversman, K F; Cain, K D

    2007-06-01

    Pectoral fin tissue of white sturgeon was investigated as a potential non-lethal sample source for the detection of white sturgeon iridovirus (WSIV) infection. Histopathology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results using fin tissue were compared with the standard lethal histopathology sampling method that utilizes head tissue. Tissues for each of the three sampling methods were collected weekly for 8 weeks from individual sturgeon undergoing an experimental cohabitation challenge with fish infected with the Abernathy isolate of WSIV. Non-lethal fin histopathological evaluation did not reveal infection during the first 3 weeks of sampling, while non-lethal PCR and the lethal method were variable. However, all three sampling methods were equally capable of identifying infection from 4 to 8 weeks post-exposure. Of the survivors tested, all were negative by PCR and the lethal method, and only one fish was identified as being positive by non-lethal fin histopathology. In another experiment, all three sampling methods were applied to asymptomatic WSIV carriers in a case study conducted at the Kootenai Tribal Sturgeon Conservation Hatchery. Results showed that both lethal and non-lethal fin histopathology were equally effective in detecting infection, but PCR was unable to identify this strain of WSIV. Depending on the virus isolate, these results suggest that non-lethal sampling of fin tissue (histopathology or PCR) is comparable with the lethal sampling method at identifying WSIV infection once infection is established, and under certain circumstances may provide an alternative to lethal sampling.

  10. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects.

    PubMed

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-09

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  11. The effects of anthrax lethal toxin on host barrier function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Auth, Roger D; Frucht, David M

    2011-06-01

    The pathological actions of anthrax toxin require the activities of its edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF) enzyme components, which gain intracellular access via its receptor-binding component, protective antigen (PA). LF is a metalloproteinase with specificity for selected mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MKKs), but its activity is not directly lethal to many types of primary and transformed cells in vitro. Nevertheless, in vivo treatment of several animal species with the combination of LF and PA (termed lethal toxin or LT) leads to morbidity and mortality, suggesting that LT-dependent toxicity is mediated by cellular interactions between host cells. Decades of research have revealed that a central hallmark of this toxicity is the disruption of key cellular barriers required to maintain homeostasis. This review will focus on the current understanding of the effects of LT on barrier function, highlighting recent progress in establishing the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects.

  12. Crossover Suppressors and Balanced Recessive Lethals in CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Robert K.

    1978-01-01

    Two dominant suppressors of crossing over have been identified following X-ray treatment of the small nematode C. elegans. They suppress crossing over in linkage group II (LGII) about 100-fold and 50-fold and are both tightly linked to LGII markers. One, called C1, segregates independently of all other linkage groups and is homozygous fertile. The other is a translocation involving LGII and X. The translocation also suppresses crossing over along the right half of X and is homozygous lethal. C1 has been used as a balancer of LGII recessive lethal and sterile mutations induced by EMS. The frequencies of occurrence of lethals and steriles were approximately equal. Fourteen mutations were assigned to complementation groups and mapped. They tended to map in the same region where LGII visibles are clustered. PMID:631558

  13. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  14. Potential Impacts of Highway Median Barriers on Wildlife: State of the Practice and Gap Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevenger, Anthony P.; Kociolek, Angela V.

    2013-11-01

    Median barriers separate lanes of traffic moving in opposite directions on multilane highways. Such traffic safety devices can reduce head-on collisions but also have the potential to reduce landscape permeability by impeding wildlife movements across highways. Median barriers may also increase the risk of wildlife-vehicle collisions if an animal becomes trapped or confused amid barriers searching for a place to cross. A 2002 Transportation Research Board report highlighted the need to better understand the potential impacts of highway median barriers on wildlife. This lack of information can cause significant project delays and increase transportation project costs. This study represents the first attempt in North America to bring together information about highway median and roadside barriers and wildlife and provide preliminary guidelines to balance the needs of motorist safety and wildlife movements.

  15. Suppression of impulse noise in medical images with the use of Fuzzy Adaptive Median Filter.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Abdullah; Güler, Inan

    2006-12-01

    A new rule based fuzzy filter for removal of highly impulse noise, called Rule Based Fuzzy Adaptive Median (RBFAM) Filter, is aimed to be discussed in this paper. The RBFAM filter is an improved version of Adaptive Median Filter (AMF) and is presented in the aim of noise reduction of images corrupted with additive impulse noise. The filter has three stages. Two of those stages are fuzzy rule based and last stage is based on standard median and adaptive median filter. The proposed filter can preserve image details better then AMF while suppressing additive salt & pepper or impulse type noise. In this paper, we placed our preference on bell-shaped membership function instead of triangular membership function in order to observe better results. Experimental results indicates that the proposed filter is improvable with increased fuzzy rules to reduce more noise corrupted images and to remove salt and pepper noise in a more effective way than what AMF filter does.

  16. Removing Noises Induced by Gamma Radiation in Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging Using a Temporal Median Filter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Zhan, Yonghua; Kang, Fei; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) can provide information of medical radionuclides used in nuclear imaging based on Cerenkov radiation, which makes it possible for optical means to image clinical radionuclide labeled probes. However, the exceptionally weak Cerenkov luminescence (CL) from Cerenkov radiation is susceptible to lots of impulse noises introduced by high energy gamma rays generating from the decays of radionuclides. In this work, a temporal median filter is proposed to remove this kind of impulse noises. Unlike traditional CLI collecting a single CL image with long exposure time and smoothing it using median filter, the proposed method captures a temporal sequence of CL images with shorter exposure time and employs a temporal median filter to smooth a temporal sequence of pixels. Results of in vivo experiments demonstrated that the proposed temporal median method can effectively remove random pulse noises induced by gamma radiation and achieve a robust CLI image. PMID:27648450

  17. Potential impacts of highway median barriers on wildlife: state of the practice and gap analysis.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Anthony P; Kociolek, Angela V

    2013-11-01

    Median barriers separate lanes of traffic moving in opposite directions on multilane highways. Such traffic safety devices can reduce head-on collisions but also have the potential to reduce landscape permeability by impeding wildlife movements across highways. Median barriers may also increase the risk of wildlife-vehicle collisions if an animal becomes trapped or confused amid barriers searching for a place to cross. A 2002 Transportation Research Board report highlighted the need to better understand the potential impacts of highway median barriers on wildlife. This lack of information can cause significant project delays and increase transportation project costs. This study represents the first attempt in North America to bring together information about highway median and roadside barriers and wildlife and provide preliminary guidelines to balance the needs of motorist safety and wildlife movements.

  18. Estimates of Median Flows for Streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    The Kansas State Legislature, by enacting Kansas Statute KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., mandated the criteria for determining which Kansas stream segments would be subject to classification by the State. One criterion for the selection as a classified stream segment is based on the statistic of median flow being equal to or greater than 1 cubic foot per second. As specified by KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., median flows were determined from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging-station data by using the most-recent 10 years of gaged data (KSA) for each streamflow-gaging station. Median flows also were determined by using gaged data from the entire period of record (all-available hydrology, AAH). Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating median flows for uncontrolled stream segments. The drainage area of the gaging stations on uncontrolled stream segments used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. A logarithmic transformation of the data was needed to develop the best linear relation for computing median flows. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. Tobit analyses of KSA data yielded a model standard error of prediction of 0.285 logarithmic units, and the best equations using Tobit analyses of AAH data had a model standard error of prediction of 0.250 logarithmic units. These regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute median flows for the uncontrolled stream segments on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Measured median flows from gaging stations were incorporated into the regression-estimated median flows along the stream segments where available. The segments that were uncontrolled were interpolated using gaged data weighted according to the drainage area and the bias between the

  19. Estimates of median flows for streams on the Kansas surface water register

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2002-01-01

    The Kansas State Legislature, by enacting Kansas Statute KSA 82a-2001 et. seq., mandated the criteria for determining which Kansas stream segments would be subject to classification by the State. One criterion for the selection as a classified stream segment is based on the statistic of median flow being equal to or greater than 1 cubic foot per second. As specified by KSA 82a-2001 et. seq., median flows were determined from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging-station data by using the most-recent 10-years of gaged data (KSA) for each streamflow-gaging station. Median flows also were determined by using gaged data from the entire period of record (all-available hydrology, AAH). Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating median flows for uncontrolled stream segments. The drainage area of the uncontrolled gaging stations used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. A logarithmic transformation of the data was needed to develop the best linear relation for computing median flows. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. Tobit analyses of KSA data yielded a root mean square error of 0.285 logarithmic units, and the best equations using Tobit analyses of AAH data had a root mean square error of 0.247 logarithmic units. These equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute median flows for the uncontrolled stream segments on the Kansas Surface Water Register. Measured median flows from gaging stations were incorporated into the regression-estimated median flows along the stream segments where available. The segments that were uncontrolled were interpolated using gaged data weighted according to the drainage area and the bias between the regression-estimated and gaged flow information. On

  20. Non-Lethal Weapons for Today’s Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Douglas J. Jerothe Lieutenant Colonel Paul L. Scholl Susan D. LeVine Kevin J. Swenson Kelley S. Hughes Alicia J. Owsiak Publication Management Bethel...Davel robert.davel@ conus.army.mil 573-563-7092 U.S. Air Force Sal Hernandez salvador.hernandez@ us.af.mil 210-925-5015 U.S. Marine Corps Scott H...Force Base, Nev. (DoD Photo by Alicia J. Owsiak) DoD Non-Lethal Weapons Program 2011 DoD Non-Lethal Weapons Program 2011 Colombian Marine

  1. Advantages of less-tech, less-than-lethal technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marts, Donna J.; Overlin, Trudy K.

    1995-05-01

    This paper illustrates the advantages of developing less-tech technologies by reporting on two less-tech, less-than-lethal prototype law enforcement tools developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The devices were developed for the National Institute of Justice, less- than-lethal weapons program: 1) an air bag restraint device for use in restraining suspects who become violent during transport in patrol vehicles, and 2) a retractable spiked barrier strip for stopping fleeing vehicles during high-speed pursuit. The success of both projects relied on developing design requirements in conjunction with the actual users of the devices.

  2. Analyzing the influence of median cross-section design on highway safety using vehicle dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Stine, Jason S; Hamblin, Bridget C; Brennan, Sean N; Donnell, Eric T

    2010-11-01

    Although vehicle dynamics simulations have long been used in vehicle design and crash reconstruction, their use for highway design is rare. This paper investigates the safety of highway medians through iterative simulations of off-road median encroachments. The commercially available software CarSim was used to simulate over one hundred thousand encroachments, representing the entire passenger vehicle fleet and a wide range of encroachment angles, departure speeds, steering inputs, and braking inputs. Each individual simulation output was then weighted using data from previous studies to reflect the probability of each specific accident scenario occurring in a real-life median encroachment. Results of this analysis illustrate the relative influence of median cross-section geometry on the resulting accident outcomes. The simulations indicate that the overall safety of a highway median depends on the occurrence of both vehicle rollover and median crossover events, and the cross-section shape, slope, and width are all shown to greatly affect each of these incidents. An evaluation of the simulation results was conducted with vehicle trajectories from previous experimental crash tests. Further assessment of the aggregate simulation results to actual crash data was achieved through comparison with several databases of crash statistics. Both efforts showed a strong agreement between the simulations and the real-life crash data.

  3. Hormone-dependence of sarin lethality in rats: sex differences and stage of the estrous cycle

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carl D.; Wright, Linnzi K.M.; Garcia, Gregory E.; Lee, Robyn B.; Lumley, Lucille A.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs) are highly toxic compounds that cause a cascade of symptoms and death, if exposed casualties are left untreated. Numerous rodent models have investigated the toxicity and mechanisms of toxicity of CWNAs, but most are limited to male subjects. Given the profound physiological effects of circulating gonadal hormones in female rodents, it is possible that the daily cyclical fluctuations of these hormones affect females’ sensitivity to the lethal effects of CWNAs, and previous reports that included female subjects did not control for the stage of the hormonal cycle. The aim of the current study was to determine the 24-hour median lethal dose (LD50) of the CWNA sarin in male, ovariectomized (OVEX) female, and female rats during different stages of the estrous cycle (diestrus, proestrus, and estrus). Additionally, baseline activity levels of plasma acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, and carboxylesterase were measured to determine differences among the groups. Results indicated that females in proestrus had a significantly higher LD50 of sarin compared to OVEX and estrous females. Although some sex differences were observed in the activity levels of plasma esterases, they were not consistent and likely not large enough to significantly affect the LD50s. These results suggest that hormonal cyclicity can influence the outcome of CWNA-related studies using female rodents, and that this variability can be minimized by controlling for the stage of the cycle. Additional research is necessary to determine the precise mechanism of the observed differences because it is unlikely to be solely explained by plasma esterase activity. PMID:26079828

  4. Hormone-dependence of sarin lethality in rats: Sex differences and stage of the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carl D; Wright, Linnzi K M; Garcia, Gregory E; Lee, Robyn B; Lumley, Lucille A

    2015-09-15

    Chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs) are highly toxic compounds that cause a cascade of symptoms and death, if exposed casualties are left untreated. Numerous rodent models have investigated the toxicity and mechanisms of toxicity of CWNAs, but most are limited to male subjects. Given the profound physiological effects of circulating gonadal hormones in female rodents, it is possible that the daily cyclical fluctuations of these hormones affect females' sensitivity to the lethal effects of CWNAs, and previous reports that included female subjects did not control for the stage of the hormonal cycle. The aim of the current study was to determine the 24-hour median lethal dose (LD50) of the CWNA sarin in male, ovariectomized (OVEX) female, and female rats during different stages of the estrous cycle (diestrus, proestrus, and estrus). Additionally, baseline activity levels of plasma acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, and carboxylesterase were measured to determine differences among the groups. Results indicated that females in proestrus had a significantly higher LD50 of sarin compared to OVEX and estrous females. Although some sex differences were observed in the activity levels of plasma esterases, they were not consistent and likely not large enough to significantly affect the LD50s. These results suggest that hormonal cyclicity can influence the outcome of CWNA-related studies using female rodents, and that this variability can be minimized by controlling for the stage of the cycle. Additional research is necessary to determine the precise mechanism of the observed differences because it is unlikely to be solely explained by plasma esterase activity.

  5. Hormone-dependence of sarin lethality in rats: Sex differences and stage of the estrous cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Carl D. Wright, Linnzi K.M.; Garcia, Gregory E.; Lee, Robyn B.; Lumley, Lucille A.

    2015-09-15

    Chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs) are highly toxic compounds that cause a cascade of symptoms and death, if exposed casualties are left untreated. Numerous rodent models have investigated the toxicity and mechanisms of toxicity of CWNAs, but most are limited to male subjects. Given the profound physiological effects of circulating gonadal hormones in female rodents, it is possible that the daily cyclical fluctuations of these hormones affect females' sensitivity to the lethal effects of CWNAs, and previous reports that included female subjects did not control for the stage of the hormonal cycle. The aim of the current study was to determine the 24-hour median lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) of the CWNA sarin in male, ovariectomized (OVEX) female, and female rats during different stages of the estrous cycle (diestrus, proestrus, and estrus). Additionally, baseline activity levels of plasma acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, and carboxylesterase were measured to determine differences among the groups. Results indicated that females in proestrus had a significantly higher LD{sub 50} of sarin compared to OVEX and estrous females. Although some sex differences were observed in the activity levels of plasma esterases, they were not consistent and likely not large enough to significantly affect the LD{sub 50}s. These results suggest that hormonal cyclicity can influence the outcome of CWNA-related studies using female rodents, and that this variability can be minimized by controlling for the stage of the cycle. Additional research is necessary to determine the precise mechanism of the observed differences because it is unlikely to be solely explained by plasma esterase activity. - Highlights: • The LD{sub 50} of sarin was determined in female rats throughout the stages of the estrous cycle. • Females in proestrus had a significantly higher LD{sub 50} compared to estrous or ovariectomized females. • No sex differences were observed between male and female rats

  6. The PA endonuclease inhibitor RO-7 protects mice from lethal challenge with influenza A or B viruses.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremy C; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Vogel, Peter; Gasser, Rodolfo; Najera, Isabel; Govorkova, Elena A

    2017-02-13

    Current influenza treatment relies on a single class of antiviral drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), raising concern over the potential emergence of resistant variants and necessitating the development of novel drugs. In recent years, investigational inhibitors targeting the endonuclease activity of the influenza acidic polymerase (PA) protein have yielded encouraging results, although there are only limited data on their in vivo efficacy. Here, we examined the antiviral potential of the PA endonuclease inhibitor RO-7 in prophylactic and therapeutic regimens in BALB/c mice inoculated with influenza A/California/04/2009 (H1N1)pdm09 or B/Brisbane/60/2008 viruses, which represent currently circulating antigenic variants. RO-7 was administered to mice intraperitoneally twice daily at dosages of 6, 15, or 30 mg/kg/day for 5 days, starting 4 h before or 24 or 48 h after virus inoculation, and showed no adverse effects. Prophylactic administration completely protected mice from lethal infection by influenza A or B virus. The level of therapeutic protection conferred depended upon the time of treatment initiation and RO-7 dosage, resulting in 60%-100% and 80%-100% survival with influenza A and B viruses, respectively. RO-7 treatment significantly decreased virus titers in the lung and lessened the extent and severity of lung damage. No PA endonuclease-inhibitor resistance was observed in viruses isolated from lungs of RO-7-treated mice, and the viruses remained susceptible to the drug at nanomolar concentrations in phenotypic assays. These in vivo efficacy results further highlight the potential of RO-7 for development as antiviral therapy for influenza A and B virus infections.

  7. Determining median urinary iodine concentration that indicates adequate iodine intake at population level.

    PubMed Central

    Delange, François; de Benoist, Bruno; Burgi, Hans

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Urinary iodine concentration is the prime indicator of nutritional iodine status and is used to evaluate population-based iodine supplementation. In 1994, WHO, UNICEF and ICCIDD recommended median urinary iodine concentrations for populations of 100- 200 micro g/l, assuming the 100 micro g/l threshold would limit concentrations <50 micro g/l to median urinary iodine concentrations >100 micro g/l. The total population was 55 892, including 35 661 (64%) schoolchildren. Median urinary iodine concentrations were 111-540 (median 201) micro g/l for all populations, 100-199 micro g/l in 23 (48%) populations and >/=200 micro g/l in 25 (52%). The frequencies of values <50 micro g/l were 0-20.8 (mean 4.8%) overall and 7.2% and 2.5% in populations with medians of 100-199 micro g/l and >200 micro g/l, respectively. The frequency reached 20% only in two places where iodine had been supplemented for <2 years. CONCLUSION: The frequency of urinary iodine concentrations <50 micro g/l in populations with median urinary iodine concentrations >/=100 micro g/l has been overestimated. The threshold of 100 micro g/l does not need to be increased. In populations, median urinary iodine concentrations of 100-200 micro g/l indicate adequate iodine intake and optimal iodine nutrition. PMID:12219154

  8. Science or slaughter: need for lethal sampling of sharks.

    PubMed

    Heupel, M R; Simpfendorfer, C A

    2010-10-01

    General consensus among scientists, commercial interests, and the public regarding the status of shark populations is leading to an increasing need for the scientific community to provide information to help guide effective management and conservation actions. Experience from other marine vertebrate taxa suggests that public, political, and media pressures will play an increasingly important part in setting research, management, and conservation priorities. We examined the potential implications of nonscientific influences on shark research. In particular, we considered whether lethal research sampling of sharks is justified. Although lethal sampling comes at a cost to a population, especially for threatened species, the conservation benefits from well-designed studies provide essential data that cannot be collected currently in any other way. Methods that enable nonlethal collection of life-history data on sharks are being developed (e.g., use of blood samples to detect maturity), but in the near future they will not provide widespread or significant benefits. Development of these techniques needs to continue, as does the way in which scientists coordinate their use of material collected during lethal sampling. For almost half of the known shark species there are insufficient data to determine their population status; thus, there is an ongoing need for further collection of scientific data to ensure all shark populations have a future. Shark populations will benefit most when decisions about the use of lethal sampling are made on the basis of scientific evidence that is free from individual, political, public, and media pressures.

  9. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The... determine the total number of implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal...

  10. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The... determine the total number of implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal...

  11. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The... determine the total number of implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal...

  12. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The... determine the total number of implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal...

  13. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The... determine the total number of implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal...

  14. Evaluation of lethality estimates for combustion gases in military scenarios.

    PubMed

    Smith, S M; Stuhmiller, J H; Januszkiewicz, A J

    1996-12-31

    To meet the military objective of determining criteria for incapacitation and lethality from toxic gas exposures, a series of small animal tests and data analyses were conducted. Carbon monoxide (CO), a narcotic gas and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), an irritant gas, along with carbon dioxide (CO2) were tested individually and in the following mixtures: (CO + CO2), (NO2 + CO2) and (NO2 + CO + CO2). A group of six animals was exposed to each of the gases and their combinations, lethality and biophysical data were collected. We conclude that our observations of lethality from single toxic gases can be correlated with a fractional effective dose (FED) description, in which external concentrations are corrected for minute volume changes. Multiple gas exposures clearly demonstrate synergistic effects because lethality rates greatly exceed those expected from statistically independent causes. Simple addition of the FED values, however, overstates the effect and implies a competition between the narcotic and irritant gas effects. The N-Gas model, while being an additive FED model, does not appear to be in a form that could guide the setting of military exposure standards.

  15. The "Lethal Chamber": Further Evidence of the Euthanasia Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elks, Martin A.

    1993-01-01

    Historical discussions of the euthanasia or "lethal chamber" option in relation to people with mental retardation are presented. The paper concludes that eugenic beliefs in the primacy of heredity over environment and the positive role of natural selection may have condoned the poor conditions characteristic of large, segregated institutions and…

  16. Histopathological effects of anthrax lethal factor on rat liver.

    PubMed

    Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Ozbek, Elvan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, has become an increasingly important scientific topic due to its potential role in bioterrorism. The lethal toxin (LT) of B. anthracis consists of lethal factor (LF) and a protective antigen (PA). This study investigated whether only lethal factor was efficient as a hepatotoxin in the absence of the PA. To achieve this aim, LF (100 µg/kg body weight, dissolved in sterile distilled water) or distilled water vehicle were intraperitoneally injected once into adult rats. At 24 h post-injection, the hosts were euthanized and their livers removed and tissue samples examined under light and electron microscopes. As a result of LF application, hepatic injury - including cytoplasmic and nuclear damage in hepatocytes, sinusoidal dilatation, and hepatocellular lysis - became apparent. Further, light microscopic analyses of liver sections from the LF-injected rats revealed ballooning degeneration and cytoplasmic loss within hepatocytes, as well as peri-sinusoidal inflammation. Additionally, an increase in the numbers of Kupffer cells was evident. Common vascular injuries were also found in the liver samples; these injuries caused hypoxia and pathological changes. In addition, some cytoplasmic and nuclear changes were detected within the liver ultrastructure. The results of these studies allow one to suggest that LF could be an effective toxicant alone and that PA might act in situ to modify the effect of this agent (or the reverse situation wherein LF modifies effects of PA) such that lethality results.

  17. The Lethal "Femme Fatale" in the Noir Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Traces the lethal seductress through Hollywood's "noir" history from "Double Indemnity" (1944) to "The Last Seduction" (1996). Examines how this figure largely abjures traditional romance and passive domesticity, choosing instead to apply her sexuality to homicidal plots toward greed. Argues that her narrative…

  18. Conditional lethality strains for the biological control of Anastrepha species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pro-apoptotic cell death genes are promising candidates for biologically-based autocidal control of pest insects as demonstrated by tetracycline (tet)-suppressible systems for conditional embryonic lethality in Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) and the medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Cc). However, for medfly...

  19. Help-Seeking Behavior Prior to Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Lauren Seymour; Ikeda, Robin M.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo

    2002-01-01

    The association between help-seeking and nearly lethal suicide attempts was evaluated using data from a population-based, case-control study. Measures of help-seeking included type of consultant contacted, and whether suicide was discussed. Findings suggest efforts to better understand the role of help-seeking in suicide prevention deserves…

  20. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  1. Empirical Complexities in the Genetic Foundations of Lethal Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bull, James J.; Joyce, Paul; Gladstone, Eric; Molineux, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    From population genetics theory, elevating the mutation rate of a large population should progressively reduce average fitness. If the fitness decline is large enough, the population will go extinct in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. Lethal mutagenesis has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach to viral treatment, and several in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. Yet only one empirical study has tested the genetic models underlying lethal mutagenesis, and the theory failed on even a qualitative level. Here we provide a new level of analysis of lethal mutagenesis by developing and evaluating models specifically tailored to empirical systems that may be used to test the theory. We first quantify a bias in the estimation of a critical parameter and consider whether that bias underlies the previously observed lack of concordance between theory and experiment. We then consider a seemingly ideal protocol that avoids this bias—mutagenesis of virions—but find that it is hampered by other problems. Finally, results that reveal difficulties in the mere interpretation of mutations assayed from double-strand genomes are derived. Our analyses expose unanticipated complexities in testing the theory. Nevertheless, the previous failure of the theory to predict experimental outcomes appears to reside in evolutionary mechanisms neglected by the theory (e.g., beneficial mutations) rather than from a mismatch between the empirical setup and model assumptions. This interpretation raises the specter that naive attempts at lethal mutagenesis may augment adaptation rather than retard it. PMID:23934886

  2. A Multivariate Model of Stakeholder Preference for Lethal Cat Management

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Dara M.; Jacobson, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying stakeholder beliefs and attitudes is critical for resolving management conflicts. Debate over outdoor cat management is often described as a conflict between two groups, environmental advocates and animal welfare advocates, but little is known about the variables predicting differences among these critical stakeholder groups. We administered a mail survey to randomly selected stakeholders representing both of these groups (n = 1,596) in Florida, where contention over the management of outdoor cats has been widespread. We used a structural equation model to evaluate stakeholder intention to support non-lethal management. The cognitive hierarchy model predicted that values influenced beliefs, which predicted general and specific attitudes, which in turn, influenced behavioral intentions. We posited that specific attitudes would mediate the effect of general attitudes, beliefs, and values on management support. Model fit statistics suggested that the final model fit the data well (CFI = 0.94, RMSEA = 0.062). The final model explained 74% of the variance in management support, and positive attitudes toward lethal management (humaneness) had the largest direct effect on management support. Specific attitudes toward lethal management and general attitudes toward outdoor cats mediated the relationship between positive (p<0.05) and negative cat-related impact beliefs (p<0.05) and support for management. These results supported the specificity hypothesis and the use of the cognitive hierarchy to assess stakeholder intention to support non-lethal cat management. Our findings suggest that stakeholders can simultaneously perceive both positive and negative beliefs about outdoor cats, which influence attitudes toward and support for non-lethal management. PMID:24736744

  3. June and August median streamflows estimated for ungaged streams in southern Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2010-01-01

    Methods for estimating June and August median streamflows were developed for ungaged, unregulated streams in southern Maine. The methods apply to streams with drainage areas ranging in size from 0.4 to 74 square miles, with percentage of basin underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer ranging from 0 to 84 percent, and with distance from the centroid of the basin to a Gulf of Maine line paralleling the coast ranging from 14 to 94 miles. Equations were developed with data from 4 long-term continuous-record streamgage stations and 27 partial-record streamgage stations. Estimates of median streamflows at the continuous-record and partial-record stations are presented. A mathematical technique for estimating standard low-flow statistics, such as June and August median streamflows, at partial-record streamgage stations was applied by relating base-flow measurements at these stations to concurrent daily streamflows at nearby long-term (at least 10 years of record) continuous-record streamgage stations (index stations). Weighted least-squares regression analysis (WLS) was used to relate estimates of June and August median streamflows at streamgage stations to basin characteristics at these same stations to develop equations that can be used to estimate June and August median streamflows on ungaged streams. WLS accounts for different periods of record at the gaging stations. Three basin characteristics-drainage area, percentage of basin underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer, and distance from the centroid of the basin to a Gulf of Maine line paralleling the coast-are used in the final regression equation to estimate June and August median streamflows for ungaged streams. The three-variable equation to estimate June median streamflow has an average standard error of prediction from -35 to 54 percent. The three-variable equation to estimate August median streamflow has an average standard error of prediction from -45 to 83 percent. Simpler one-variable equations that use only

  4. August Median Streamflow on Ungaged Streams in Eastern Aroostook County, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lombard, Pamela J.; Tasker, Gary D.; Nielsen, Martha G.

    2003-01-01

    Methods for estimating August median streamflow were developed for ungaged, unregulated streams in the eastern part of Aroostook County, Maine, with drainage areas from 0.38 to 43 square miles and mean basin elevations from 437 to 1,024 feet. Few long-term, continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations with small drainage areas were available from which to develop the equations; therefore, 24 partial-record gaging stations were established in this investigation. A mathematical technique for estimating a standard low-flow statistic, August median streamflow, at partial-record stations was applied by relating base-flow measurements at these stations to concurrent daily flows at nearby long-term, continuous-record streamflow- gaging stations (index stations). Generalized least-squares regression analysis (GLS) was used to relate estimates of August median streamflow at gaging stations to basin characteristics at these same stations to develop equations that can be applied to estimate August median streamflow on ungaged streams. GLS accounts for varying periods of record at the gaging stations and the cross correlation of concurrent streamflows among gaging stations. Twenty-three partial-record stations and one continuous-record station were used for the final regression equations. The basin characteristics of drainage area and mean basin elevation are used in the calculated regression equation for ungaged streams to estimate August median flow. The equation has an average standard error of prediction from -38 to 62 percent. A one-variable equation uses only drainage area to estimate August median streamflow when less accuracy is acceptable. This equation has an average standard error of prediction from -40 to 67 percent. Model error is larger than sampling error for both equations, indicating that additional basin characteristics could be important to improved estimates of low-flow statistics. Weighted estimates of August median streamflow, which can be used when

  5. Application of the median method to estimate the kinetic constants of the substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Pedro L; Astudillo-Castro, Carolina; Gajardo, Diego; Flores, Sebastián

    2017-04-07

    In 1974, Eisenthal and Cornish-Bowden published the direct linear plot method, which used the median to estimate the Vmax and Km from a set of initial rates as a function of substrate concentrations. The robustness of this non-parametric method was clearly demonstrated by comparing it with the least-squares method. The authors commented that the method cannot readily be generalized to equations of more than two parameters. Unfortunately, this comment has been misread by other authors. Comments such as "this method cannot be extended directly to equations with more than two parameters" were found in some publications. In addition, recently, the most drastic comment was published: "this method cannot be applied for the analysis of substrate inhibition." Given all of these presumptions, we have been motivated to publish a demonstration of the contrary: the median method can be applied to more than two-parameter equations, using as an example, the substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation. A computer algorithm was written to evaluate the effect of simulated experimental error of the initial rates on the estimation of Vmax, Km and KS. The error was assigned to different points of the experimental design. Four different KS/Km ratios were analyzed with the values 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000. The results indicated that the least-squares method was slightly better than the median method in terms of accuracy and variance. However, the presence of outliers affected the estimation of kinetic constants using the least-squares method more severely than the median method. The estimation of KS using the median method to estimate 1/KS was much better than the direct estimation of KS, causing a negative effect of non-linearity of KS in the kinetic equation. Considering that the median method is free from the assumptions of the least-squares method and the arbitrary assumptions implicit in the linearization methods to estimate the kinetic constants Vmax, Km and KS from the substrate

  6. Calculation of statistic estimates of kinetic parameters from substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation using the median method.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Pedro L; Astudillo-Castro, Carolina; Gajardo, Diego; Flores, Sebastián

    2017-04-01

    We provide initial rate data from enzymatic reaction experiments and tis processing to estimate the kinetic parameters from the substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation using the median method published by Eisenthal and Cornish-Bowden (Cornish-Bowden and Eisenthal, 1974; Eisenthal and Cornish-Bowden, 1974). The method was denominated the direct linear plot and consists in the calculation of the median from a dataset of kinetic parameters Vmax and Km from the Michaelis-Menten equation. In this opportunity we present the procedure to applicate the direct linear plot to the substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation; a three-parameter equation. The median method is characterized for its robustness and its insensibility to outlier. The calculations are presented in an Excel datasheet and a computational algorithm was developed in the free software Python. The kinetic parameters of the substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation Vmax , Km and Ks were calculated using three experimental points from the dataset formed by 13 experimental points. All the 286 combinations were calculated. The dataset of kinetic parameters resulting from this combinatorial was used to calculate the median which corresponds to the statistic estimator of the real kinetic parameters. A comparative statistical analyses between the median method and the least squares was published in Valencia et al. [3].

  7. Comparative study of peritoneal macrophage functions in mice receiving lethal and non-lethal doses of LPS.

    PubMed

    Víctor, V M; De la Fuente, M

    2000-01-01

    In previous studies, we have observed changes in several functions of peritoneal macrophages from female BALB/c mice with lethal endotoxic shock caused by intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli O55:B5 lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 mg/kg), which were associated with a high production of superoxide anion and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). In the present work, both a lethal dose (250 mg/kg) and a non-lethal dose (100 mg/kg) of LPS were used in female Swiss mice. In peritoneal macrophages, the following functions were studied at 2, 4, 12 and 24 h after LPS injection: adherence to substrate, chemotaxis, ingestion of particles, and superoxide anion and TNF-alpha production. In both groups, the results showed a stimulation of adherence, ingestion and superoxide production as well as a decrease of chemotaxis, whereas TNF-alpha could not be detected in either of the two groups. These effects were more evident with the 250 mg/kg dose, especially as regards superoxide anion production, which was higher in the animals treated with a lethal dose of LPS.

  8. ANATOMIC STUDY OF THE NERVOUS COMMUNICATION BETWEEN THE MEDIAN AND MUSCULOUCUTANEOUS NERVE

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Edie Benedito; Vieira, Luiz Ângelo; Cavalheiro, Cristina Schmitt; Razuk, Mauro; Almargo, Marco Antonio Pires; Caetano, Mauricio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the incidence of nerve communication between the musculocutaneous and median nerve. Methods: Anatomical dissection of 40 limbs from 20 fetal cadavers was performed at the Laboratory of Anatomy, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas e da Saúde da Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo. Results: A communicating branch was found in 10 upper limbs. In nine limbs there was a musculocutaneous-median anastomosis (type I); and in one limb there was a median-musculocutaneous anastomosis (type II). Conclusion: It is very important to know these anatomical variations, especially when considering clinical examination, diagnostic, prognostic and surgical treatment. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:28243174

  9. Regularization of DT-MR images using a successive Fermat median filtering method.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kiwoon; Kim, Dongyoun; Kim, Sunghee; Park, Insung; Jeong, Jaewon; Kim, Taehwan; Hong, Cheolpyo; Han, Bongsoo

    2008-05-21

    Tractography using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) is a method to determine the architecture of axonal fibers in the central nervous system by computing the direction of greatest diffusion in the white matter of the brain. To reduce the noise in DT-MRI measurements, a tensor-valued median filter, which is reported to be denoising and structure preserving in the tractography, is applied. In this paper, we proposed the successive Fermat (SF) method, successively using Fermat point theory for a triangle contained in the two-dimensional plane, as a median filtering method. We discussed the error analysis and numerical study about the SF method for phantom and experimental data. By considering the computing time and the image quality aspects of the numerical study simultaneously, we showed that the SF method is much more efficient than the simple median (SM) and gradient descents (GD) methods.

  10. Solitary median maxillary central incisor, short stature, choanal atresia/midnasal stenosis (SMMCI) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hall, R K; Bankier, A; Aldred, M J; Kan, K; Lucas, J O; Perks, A G

    1997-12-01

    This article describes a series of 21 consecutive cases, each involving a solitary median maxillary central incisor; the patients were seen in the Department of Dentistry or the Victorian Clinical Genetics Unit, Murdoch Institute, at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, from 1966 to 1997. The spectrum of anomalies and associated features present in these cases--solitary median maxillary central incisor, choanal atresia, and holoprosencephaly--is described, and the literature related to the features, including genetic studies in these conditions, is reviewed. We relate our findings in these cases to current knowledge of developmental embryology. It is hoped that the findings, together with our interpretation of them, will help to clarify understanding of solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome. This syndrome was previously considered a simple midline defect of the dental lamina, but it is now recognized as a possible predictor of holoprosencephalies of varying degrees in the proband, in members of the proband's family, and in the family's descendants.

  11. The Geometric Median on Riemannian Manifolds with Application to Robust Atlas Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, P. Thomas; Venkatasubramanian, Suresh; Joshi, Sarang

    2009-01-01

    One of the primary goals of computational anatomy is the statistical analysis of anatomical variability in large populations of images. The study of anatomical shape is inherently related to the construction of transformations of the underlying coordinate space, which map one anatomy to another. It is now well established that representing the geometry of shapes or images in Euclidian spaces undermines our ability to represent natural variability in populations. In our previous work we have extended classical statistical analysis techniques, such as averaging, principal components analysis, and regression, to Riemannian manifolds, which are more appropriate representations for describing anatomical variability. In this paper we extend the notion of robust estimation, a well established and powerful tool in traditional statistical analysis of Euclidian data, to manifold-valued representations of anatomical variability. In particular, we extend the geometric median, a classic robust estimator of centrality for data in Euclidean spaces. We formulate the geometric median of data on a Riemannian manifold as the minimizer of the sum of geodesic distances to the data points. We prove existence and uniqueness of the geometric median on manifolds with non-positive sectional curvature and give sufficient conditions for uniqueness on positively curved manifolds. Generalizing the Weiszfeld procedure for finding the geometric median of Euclidean data, we present an algorithm for computing the geometric median on an arbitrary manifold. We show that this algorithm converges to the unique solution when it exists. In this paper we exemplify the robustness of the estimation technique by applying the procedure to various manifolds commonly used in the analysis of medical images. Using this approach, we also present a robust brain atlas estimation technique based on the geometric median in the space of deformable images. PMID:19056498

  12. The geometric median on Riemannian manifolds with application to robust atlas estimation.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, P Thomas; Venkatasubramanian, Suresh; Joshi, Sarang

    2009-03-01

    One of the primary goals of computational anatomy is the statistical analysis of anatomical variability in large populations of images. The study of anatomical shape is inherently related to the construction of transformations of the underlying coordinate space, which map one anatomy to another. It is now well established that representing the geometry of shapes or images in Euclidian spaces undermines our ability to represent natural variability in populations. In our previous work we have extended classical statistical analysis techniques, such as averaging, principal components analysis, and regression, to Riemannian manifolds, which are more appropriate representations for describing anatomical variability. In this paper we extend the notion of robust estimation, a well established and powerful tool in traditional statistical analysis of Euclidian data, to manifold-valued representations of anatomical variability. In particular, we extend the geometric median, a classic robust estimator of centrality for data in Euclidean spaces. We formulate the geometric median of data on a Riemannian manifold as the minimizer of the sum of geodesic distances to the data points. We prove existence and uniqueness of the geometric median on manifolds with non-positive sectional curvature and give sufficient conditions for uniqueness on positively curved manifolds. Generalizing the Weiszfeld procedure for finding the geometric median of Euclidean data, we present an algorithm for computing the geometric median on an arbitrary manifold. We show that this algorithm converges to the unique solution when it exists. In this paper we exemplify the robustness of the estimation technique by applying the procedure to various manifolds commonly used in the analysis of medical images. Using this approach, we also present a robust brain atlas estimation technique based on the geometric median in the space of deformable images.

  13. Median and quantile tests under complex survey design using SAS and R.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Caudill, Samuel P; Li, Ruosha; Caldwell, Kathleen L

    2014-11-01

    Techniques for conducting hypothesis testing on the median and other quantiles of two or more subgroups under complex survey design are limited. In this paper, we introduce programs in both SAS and R to perform such a test. A detailed illustration of the computations, macro variable definitions, input and output for the SAS and R programs are also included in the text. Urinary iodine data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) are used as examples for comparing medians between females and males as well as comparing the 75th percentiles among three salt consumption groups.

  14. Laparoscopic Treatment of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Chronic Severe Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Divarci, Emre; Celtik, Ulgen; Dokumcu, Zafer; Celik, Ahmet; Ergun, Orkan

    2017-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by chronic postprandial abdominal pain and weight loss caused by compression on celiac artery. A 17-year-old girl with chronic severe abdominal pain and weight loss was referred to our clinic. Other causes of chronic abdominal pain were investigated and excluded. The compression on celiac artery was detected on Doppler ultrasound and diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography angiography. The patient underwent laparoscopic release of median arcuate ligament. There were no intraoperative complications; however, partial pain response was observed postoperatively that necessitated para-spinal ganglion blockage. The patient is symptom-free in 1-year follow-up period. PMID:28082779

  15. Strategy for enhanced transgenic strain development for embryonic conditionnal lethality in Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here the first reproductive sterility system for the tephritid pest, Anastrepha suspensa, is presented, based on lethality primarily in embryos heterozygous for a lethal conditional transgene combination. The tetracycline-suppressible system uses the cellularization-specific A. suspensa serendipity...

  16. Lethal aggression in Pan is better explained by adaptive strategies than human impacts.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael L; Boesch, Christophe; Fruth, Barbara; Furuichi, Takeshi; Gilby, Ian C; Hashimoto, Chie; Hobaiter, Catherine L; Hohmann, Gottfried; Itoh, Noriko; Koops, Kathelijne; Lloyd, Julia N; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Mitani, John C; Mjungu, Deus C; Morgan, David; Muller, Martin N; Mundry, Roger; Nakamura, Michio; Pruetz, Jill; Pusey, Anne E; Riedel, Julia; Sanz, Crickette; Schel, Anne M; Simmons, Nicole; Waller, Michel; Watts, David P; White, Frances; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Wrangham, Richard W

    2014-09-18

    Observations of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) provide valuable comparative data for understanding the significance of conspecific killing. Two kinds of hypothesis have been proposed. Lethal violence is sometimes concluded to be the result of adaptive strategies, such that killers ultimately gain fitness benefits by increasing their access to resources such as food or mates. Alternatively, it could be a non-adaptive result of human impacts, such as habitat change or food provisioning. To discriminate between these hypotheses we compiled information from 18 chimpanzee communities and 4 bonobo communities studied over five decades. Our data include 152 killings (n = 58 observed, 41 inferred, and 53 suspected killings) by chimpanzees in 15 communities and one suspected killing by bonobos. We found that males were the most frequent attackers (92% of participants) and victims (73%); most killings (66%) involved intercommunity attacks; and attackers greatly outnumbered their victims (median 8:1 ratio). Variation in killing rates was unrelated to measures of human impacts. Our results are compatible with previously proposed adaptive explanations for killing by chimpanzees, whereas the human impact hypothesis is not supported.

  17. Histopathological changes in snail, Pomacea canaliculata, exposed to sub-lethal copper sulfate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Dummee, Vipawee; Tanhan, Phanwimol; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Damrongphol, Praneet; Pokethitiyook, Prayad

    2015-12-01

    The acute toxicity test of Cu including range-finding and definitive test, was performed on golden apple snails, Pomacea canaliculata. The median lethal concentrations (LC50) of Cu at exposure times of 24, 48, 72 and 96 h were 330, 223, 177 and 146 µg/L, respectively. P. canaliculata were exposed to Cu at 146 µg/L for 96 h to study bioaccumulation and histopathological alterations in various organs. Snails accumulated elevated levels of Cu in gill, and lesser amounts in the digestive tract, muscle, and digestive gland. Histopathological investigation revealed several alterations in the epithelia of gill, digestive tract (esophagus, intestine, rectum), and digestive gland. The most striking changes were observed in the epithelium of the gill in which there was loss of cilia, an increase in number of mucus cells, and degeneration of columnar cells. Similar changes occurred in digestive tract epithelium. The digestive gland showed moderate alterations, vacuolization and degeneration of cells and an increase in the number of basophilic cells. We concluded that, P. canaliculata has a great potential as a bioindicator for Cu, and a biomarker for monitoring Cu contamination in aquatic environment.

  18. Shortened Lifespan and Lethal Hemorrhage in a Hemophilia A Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pollpeter, Molly J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemophilia A animal models have helped advance our understanding of factor VIII deficiency. Previously, factor VIII deficient mouse models were reported to have a normal life span without spontaneous bleeds. However, the bleeding frequency and survival in these animals has not been thoroughly evaluated. Objective To investigate the survival and lethal bleeding frequency in two strains of E-16 hemophilia A mice. Methods We prospectively studied factor VIII deficient hemizygous affected males (n = 83) and homozygous affected females (n = 55) for survival and bleeding frequency. Animals were evaluated for presence and location of bleeds as potential cause of death. Results and Conclusions Hemophilia A mice had a median survival of 254 days, which is significantly shortened compared to wild type controls (p < 0.0001). In addition, the hemophilia A mice experienced hemorrhage in several tissues. This previously-underappreciated shortened survival in the hemophilia A murine model provides new outcomes for investigation of therapeutics and also reflects the shortened lifespan of patients if left untreated. PMID:27144769

  19. Median nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the New Jersey Highlands Region estimated using regression models and land-surface characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Ronald J.; Chepiga, Mary M.; Cauller, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    The Kaplan-Meier method of estimating summary statistics from left-censored data was applied in order to include nondetects (left-censored data) in median nitrate-concentration calculations. Median concentrations also were determined using three alternative methods of handling nondetects. Treatment of the 23 percent of samples that were nondetects had little effect on estimated median nitrate concentrations because method detection limits were mostly less than median values.

  20. A Systems Biology Approach to Link Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation with Lethal Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    progression of prostate cancer to a lethal disease . We aim to identify patients with lethal prostate cancer using a systems biology approach focused on...activation which are associated with lethal disease . (Months 1 to 18) Task 1A: Perform gene profiling of tumors and determine whether a set of genes and...panel to be assessed for correlation with lethal disease . (Month 1 to 18) Accomplishments: In the first 12 months of the grant we have (i

  1. A Systems Biology Approach to Link Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation with Lethal Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    independent data sets for association with lethal disease; ii) inform and increase power for identification of new SNPs in GWAS datasets associated with...for association with lethal disease; ii) inform and increase power for identification of new SNPs in GWAS datasets associated with lethal outcome...low risk/non-lethal prostate cancer cohort. We initially planned to use EDRN samples, but due to the samples being committed to a GWAS analysis, it

  2. Post-exposure Treatment with Anti-rabies VHH and Vaccine Significantly Improves Protection of Mice from Lethal Rabies Infection

    PubMed Central

    Terryn, Sanne; Francart, Aurélie; Rommelaere, Heidi; Stortelers, Catelijne; Van Gucht, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) against rabies infection consists of a combination of passive immunisation with plasma-derived human or equine immune globulins and active immunisation with vaccine delivered shortly after exposure. Since anti-rabies immune globulins are expensive and scarce, there is a need for cheaper alternatives that can be produced more consistently. Previously, we generated potent virus-neutralising VHH, also called Nanobodies, against the rabies glycoprotein that are effectively preventing lethal disease in an in vivo mouse model. The VHH domain is the smallest antigen-binding functional fragment of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies that can be manufactured in microbial expression systems. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of half-life extended anti-rabies VHH in combination with vaccine for PEP in an intranasal rabies infection model in mice. The PEP combination therapy of systemic anti-rabies VHH and intramuscular vaccine significantly delayed the onset of disease compared to treatment with anti-rabies VHH alone, prolonged median survival time (35 versus 14 days) and decreased mortality (60% versus 19% survival rate), when treated 24 hours after rabies virus challenge. Vaccine alone was unable to rescue mice from lethal disease. As reported also for immune globulins, some interference of anti-rabies VHH with the antigenicity of the vaccine was observed, but this did not impede the synergistic effect. Post exposure treatment with vaccine and human anti-rabies immune globulins was unable to protect mice from lethal challenge. Anti-rabies VHH and vaccine act synergistically to protect mice after rabies virus exposure, which further validates the possible use of anti-rabies VHH for rabies PEP. PMID:27483431

  3. Effects of lethal and sublethal concentrations of the herbicide, triclopyr butoxyethyl ester, in the diet of zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Holmes, S B; Thompson, D G; Wainio-Keizer, K L; Capell, S S; Staznik, B

    1994-07-01

    Lethal and sublethal effects of dietary triclopyr butoxyethyl ester (TBEE) on zebra finches (Poephila guttata Gould) were determined in laboratory experiments conducted between 8 January and 1 May 1991. The 8-day median lethal dietary concentration, LC50 (95% confidence interval), of TBEE to zebra finches was 1,923 (1,627 to 2,277) mg/kg. In the sublethal effects experiment, when birds were exposed to 500 mg/kg TBEE in the diet for 29 days, food consumption and body weight were significantly depressed (P < 0.05). Similar prolonged exposures to 50 and 150 mg/kg TBEE in the diet had no significant effect on food consumption or body weight (P > 0.05). Perch-hopping activity was depressed relative to controls in the 500 mg/kg group, and elevated in the 150 mg/kg group, but neither of these differences was significantly (P > 0.05). Disappearance of TBEE residues from treated seeds over the 29 day experimental period followed an exponential decay model, with half-lives in the order of 15 to 18 days. On the basis of our observation that TBEE had no significant adverse effects at a concentration greater than the maximum expected environmental concentration, we propose that forestry applications of triclopyr at registered dosage rates pose little risk to wild songbirds.

  4. The "p"-Median Model as a Tool for Clustering Psychological Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Hans-Friedrich; Steinley, Douglas; Brusco, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The "p"-median clustering model represents a combinatorial approach to partition data sets into disjoint, nonhierarchical groups. Object classes are constructed around "exemplars", that is, manifest objects in the data set, with the remaining instances assigned to their closest cluster centers. Effective, state-of-the-art implementations of…

  5. Bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to tophaceous compression of the median nerves.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C Y; Yu, C L; Tsai, S T

    1996-01-01

    A 65-year-old man with long-term gouty arthritis developed bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. At surgery a chalky substance, which showed negative birefringence on polarized microscopy, was found infiltrating around the intensely inflamed transverse carpal ligaments. In differential diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, tophaceous compression over the median nerve should be taken into consideration.

  6. Adaptive two-pass median filter based on support vector machines for image restoration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Chao; Yu, Pao-Ta

    2004-02-01

    In this letter, a novel adaptive filter, the adaptive two-pass median (ATM) filter based on support vector machines (SVMs), is proposed to preserve more image details while effectively suppressing impulse noise for image restoration. The proposed filter is composed of a noise decision maker and two-pass median filters. Our new approach basically uses an SVM impulse detector to judge whether the input pixel is noise. If a pixel is detected as a corrupted pixel, the noise-free reduction median filter will be triggered to replace it. Otherwise, it remains unchanged. Then, to improve the quality of the restored image, a decision impulse filter is put to work in the second-pass filtering procedure. As for the noise suppressing both fixed-valued and random-valued impulses without degrading the quality of the fine details, the results of our extensive experiments demonstrate that the proposed filter outperforms earlier median-based filters in the literature. Our new filter also provides excellent robustness at various percentages of impulse noise.

  7. Effect of wrist angle on median nerve appearance at the proximal carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ping Yeap; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of wrist angle, sex, and handedness on the changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameters, namely longitudinal diameter (D1) and vertical diameter (D2). Ultrasound examination was conducted to examine the median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel in both dominant and nondominant hands of men (n = 27) and women (n = 26). A total of seven wrist angles were examined: neutral; 15°, 30°, and 45° extension; and 15°, 30°, and 45° flexion. Our results indicated sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry of MNCSA, D1 and D2 measurements. MNCSA was significantly reduced when the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions. At flexion positions, D1 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In contrast, at extension positions, D2 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In conclusion, this study showed that MNCSA decreased as the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions in both dominant and nondominant hands of both sexes, whereas deformation of the median nerve differed between wrist flexion and extension.

  8. Preservice Elementary Teachers' Conceptual and Procedural Knowledge of Mean, Median, and Mode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth, Randall E.; Bergner, Jennifer A.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes aspects of the statistical content knowledge of 46 preservice elementary school teachers. The preservice teachers responded to a written item designed to assess their knowledge of mean, median, and mode. The data produced in response to the written item were examined in light of the Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome…

  9. Persistent median artery in the carpal tunnel and anastomosis with superficial palmar arch

    PubMed Central

    Bijannejad, Dariush; Azandeh, Saeed; Javadnia, Fatemeh; Gholami, Mohammad Reza; Gharravi, Anneh Mohammad; zhaleh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Persistent median artery (PMA) in present cadaver originated from the brachial artery and anastomosed with the superficial palmar arch (SPA). As the PMA may be the cause of carpal tunnel syndrome and SPA is the main source of arterial supply, knowledge of which are important for the hand surgical interventions. PMID:27583265

  10. User Guide for the 2014-15 Teacher Median Student Growth Percentile Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    On March 22, 2016, the New Jersey Department of Education ("the Department") published a broadcast memo sharing secure district access to 2014-15 median Student Growth Percentile (mSGP) data for all qualifying teachers. These data describe student growth from the last school year, and comprise 10% of qualifying teachers' 2014-15…

  11. A Comparison among Worker Types Using a Composites Approach and Median Splits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziz, Shahnaz; Wuensch, Karl L.; Brandon, Howard R.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined Spence and Robbins' (1992) worker types in terms of correlates of workaholism (e.g., work-life imbalance, obsessive-compulsive behavior). A survey was administered to professionals, who were then classified into different worker types following the traditional median-split technique. The data were also analyzed with…

  12. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1203 - ISO Headform-Basic, Reference, and Median Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false ISO Headform-Basic, Reference, and Median Planes 2 Figure 2 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part...

  13. VIEW OF CRESCENTSHAPED ISLAND/MEDIAN WITH LARGE MONKEYPOD TREE AT SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CRESCENT-SHAPED ISLAND/MEDIAN WITH LARGE MONKEYPOD TREE AT SOUTHEAST “CORNER” OF BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Income Inequality, the Median Voter, and the Support for Public Education. NBER Working Paper No. 16097

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Sean; Evans, William N.

    2010-01-01

    Using a panel of U.S. school districts spanning 1970-2000, we examine the relationship between income inequality and fiscal support for public education. In contrast with recent theoretical and empirical work suggesting a negative relationship between inequality and public spending, we find results consistent with a median voter model, in which…

  15. Simulation of Median Plane Effects in the Extraction Region of the C235 Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jongen, Y.; Karamysheva, G.; Shirkov, S.

    2010-01-05

    The Study of beam dynamics in the C235 cyclotron dedicated for proton therapy is presented. Results of computer simulations of the particle motion in the measured magnetic field are given. This of the median plane effects in the extraction region was carried out. The tolerance on the radial component of the magnetic field was defined using these simulations.

  16. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1203 - ISO Headform-Basic, Reference, and Median Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false ISO Headform-Basic, Reference, and Median Planes 2 Figure 2 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1203 - ISO Headform-Basic, Reference, and Median Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false ISO Headform-Basic, Reference, and Median Planes 2 Figure 2 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1203 - ISO Headform-Basic, Reference, and Median Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false ISO Headform-Basic, Reference, and Median Planes 2 Figure 2 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1203 - ISO Headform-Basic, Reference, and Median Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false ISO Headform-Basic, Reference, and Median Planes 2 Figure 2 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part...

  20. Optimal Partitioning of a Data Set Based on the "p"-Median Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael J.; Kohn, Hans-Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    Although the "K"-means algorithm for minimizing the within-cluster sums of squared deviations from cluster centroids is perhaps the most common method for applied cluster analyses, a variety of other criteria are available. The "p"-median model is an especially well-studied clustering problem that requires the selection of "p" objects to serve as…

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Visualizes Median Nerve Entrapment due to Radius Fracture and Allows Immediate Surgical Release

    PubMed Central

    Yanagibayashi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Naoto; Yoshida, Ryuichi; Sekido, Mitsuru

    2015-01-01

    Median nerve entrapment with forearm fracture is rare, and surgical exploration in the early stage is rarely performed. We report the case of a 19-year-old man presenting with severe pain and numbness of the thumb, index, and middle fingers and half of the ring finger along with weakness of abduction and opposition of the thumb after fracture of the radial shaft. These symptoms remained unimproved despite precise closed reduction and cast immobilization. The radius fracture was barely displaced, but complaints were increasing, particularly when the wrist and/or fingers were stretched. This suggested direct involvement of the median nerve at the fracture site, so magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the forearm was performed to identify any entrapment. Short tau inversion recovery MRI visualized significant deviation and entrapment of the median nerve at the fracture site. Surgical release of the entrapment was performed immediately, and complaints resolved shortly thereafter. A positive Tinel sign from the palm to the fingertips and recovery of abduction and opposition of the thumb were seen at 6 months postoperatively. This report highlights the utility of MRI for detecting median nerve entrapment at a fracture site, allowing immediate surgical release. PMID:25685575

  2. Median-Based Overlap Analysis for Single Case Data: A Second Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Richard I.; Hagan-Burke, Shanna

    2007-01-01

    This article takes a further look at the percentage of data points exceeding the median (PEM) analysis method for single-case research data, first presented in this journal by Hsen-Hsing Ma. Ma examined the relationship between PEM and the established percentage of nonoverlapping data (PND) and then applied PEM in a meta-analysis of 61 data sets,…

  3. Synthetic lethality between PAXX and XLF in mammalian development

    PubMed Central

    Balmus, Gabriel; Barros, Ana C.; Wijnhoven, Paul W.G.; Lescale, Chloé; Hasse, Hélène Lenden; Boroviak, Katharina; le Sage, Carlos; Doe, Brendan; Speak, Anneliese O.; Galli, Antonella; Jacobsen, Matt; Deriano, Ludovic; Adams, David J.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    PAXX was identified recently as a novel nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair factor in human cells. To characterize its physiological roles, we generated Paxx-deficient mice. Like Xlf−/− mice, Paxx−/− mice are viable, grow normally, and are fertile but show mild radiosensitivity. Strikingly, while Paxx loss is epistatic with Ku80, Lig4, and Atm deficiency, Paxx/Xlf double-knockout mice display embryonic lethality associated with genomic instability, cell death in the central nervous system, and an almost complete block in lymphogenesis, phenotypes that closely resemble those of Xrcc4−/− and Lig4−/− mice. Thus, combined loss of Paxx and Xlf is synthetic-lethal in mammals. PMID:27798842

  4. Analyzing cost-effectiveness of ulnar and median nerve transfers to regain forearm flexion.

    PubMed

    Wali, Arvin R; Park, Charlie C; Brown, Justin M; Mandeville, Ross

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Peripheral nerve transfers to regain elbow flexion via the ulnar nerve (Oberlin nerve transfer) and median nerves are surgical options that benefit patients. Prior studies have assessed the comparative effectiveness of ulnar and median nerve transfers for upper trunk brachial plexus injury, yet no study has examined the cost-effectiveness of this surgery to improve quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The authors present a cost-effectiveness model of the Oberlin nerve transfer and median nerve transfer to restore elbow flexion in the adult population with upper brachial plexus injury. METHODS Using a Markov model, the authors simulated ulnar and median nerve transfers and conservative measures in terms of neurological recovery and improvements in quality of life (QOL) for patients with upper brachial plexus injury. Transition probabilities were collected from previous studies that assessed the surgical efficacy of ulnar and median nerve transfers, complication rates associated with comparable surgical interventions, and the natural history of conservative measures. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), defined as cost in dollars per QALY, were calculated. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios less than $50,000/QALY were considered cost-effective. One-way and 2-way sensitivity analyses were used to assess parameter uncertainty. Probabilistic sampling was used to assess ranges of outcomes across 100,000 trials. RESULTS The authors' base-case model demonstrated that ulnar and median nerve transfers, with an estimated cost of $5066.19, improved effectiveness by 0.79 QALY over a lifetime compared with conservative management. Without modeling the indirect cost due to loss of income over lifetime associated with elbow function loss, surgical treatment had an ICER of $6453.41/QALY gained. Factoring in the loss of income as indirect cost, surgical treatment had an ICER of -$96,755.42/QALY gained, demonstrating an overall lifetime cost savings due to

  5. 76 FR 6054 - Use of Less-Than-Lethal Force: Delegation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ...-1146-F] RIN 1120-AB46 Use of Less-Than-Lethal Force: Delegation AGENCY: Bureau of Prisons, Justice... regulation on the use of chemical agents and other non-lethal (less-than-lethal) force to clarify that the... 39584), regarding the use of [[Page 6055

  6. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  7. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  8. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  9. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  10. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... agents or non-lethal weapons. The Warden may authorize the use of chemical agents or non-lethal...

  11. Developing Non-Lethal Weapons: The Human Effects Characterization Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Review Board ( HERB ). The board provides Non-Lethal Weapons Program Managers and Milestone Decision Authorities with: • An assessment of the...quality and completeness of human effects information • Potential human effects risks • Recommendations to mitigate these risks The HERB consists of...and U.S. Coast Guard. The DoD Instruction states that “… the HERB review ensures human effects of NLWs are evaluated consistently.” In addition to

  12. Autopsy observations in lethal short-rib polydactyly syndromes.

    PubMed

    Okiro, Patricia; Wainwright, Helen; Spranger, Jürgen; Beighton, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The short rib-polydactyly syndromes are a heterogeneous group of lethal autosomal recessive disorders (SRP I-IV), which result from cellular ciliary dysfunction during embryogenesis. Diagnosis is conventionally based on radiographic imaging. Since 1976, postmortem investigations of 5 affected fetuses or stillbirths have been undertaken and the visceral abnormalities have been documented. These anomalies are discussed in the context of prenatal differential diagnosis and prognostication following imaging in pregnancy and at autopsy following miscarriage or stillbirth.

  13. Non-Lethal Weapons: Considerations for the Joint Force Commander

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-10

    a derivative of the opiate fentanyl, used by Russian military forces against Chechen terrorists in Moscow in October 2002. Unable to control the...populations. Instigators can organize and agitate a mob to engage in threatening behavior, and may attempt to employ lethal means from within that... mob . Combatants may seek shelter in homes, businesses, religious buildings, or medical facilities. It is in these scenarios that NLWs hold so much

  14. [Lethal achondrogenesis: a review of 56 cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schulte, M J; Lenz, W; Vogel, M

    1978-07-01

    54 cases with lethal achondrogenesis from the literature as well as two own cases are reviewed and analyzed with regard to the following characteristics: sex, hydramnios, breech presentation, duration of pregnancy, length and weight at birth, head circumference, length of upper and lower extremities, clinical and radiological data, age of mother and father at time of birth, familial occurrence and consanguinity of parents, histological, histochemical and electronmicroscopic tissue examination.

  15. Institute for Non-Lethal Defense Technologies Report: Ballistic Gelatin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    can be easily recovered, making this model ideal for forensics, and the wound profile visualization has proved to be a tool for wound treatment ...calibrated to reproduce measurements observed in living animal tissue. This allows prediction of wound characteristics for a given projectile without animal...must still interpret the data collected from wound profiles to determine projectile efficiency or lethality. In spite of difficulties with cost

  16. Molecular foundations of reproductive lethality in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Muralla, Rosanna; Lloyd, Johnny; Meinke, David

    2011-01-01

    The SeedGenes database (www.seedgenes.org) contains information on more than 400 genes required for embryo development in Arabidopsis. Many of these EMBRYO-DEFECTIVE (EMB) genes encode proteins with an essential function required throughout the life cycle. This raises a fundamental question. Why does elimination of an essential gene in Arabidopsis often result in embryo lethality rather than gametophyte lethality? In other words, how do mutant (emb) gametophytes survive and participate in fertilization when an essential cellular function is disrupted? Furthermore, why do some mutant embryos proceed further in development than others? To address these questions, we first established a curated dataset of genes required for gametophyte development in Arabidopsis based on information extracted from the literature. This provided a basis for comparison with EMB genes obtained from the SeedGenes dataset. We also identified genes that exhibited both embryo and gametophyte defects when disrupted by a loss-of-function mutation. We then evaluated the relationship between mutant phenotype, gene redundancy, mutant allele strength, gene expression pattern, protein function, and intracellular protein localization to determine what factors influence the phenotypes of lethal mutants in Arabidopsis. After removing cases where continued development potentially resulted from gene redundancy or residual function of a weak mutant allele, we identified numerous examples of viable mutant (emb) gametophytes that required further explanation. We propose that the presence of gene products derived from transcription in diploid (heterozygous) sporocytes often enables mutant gametophytes to survive the loss of an essential gene in Arabidopsis. Whether gene disruption results in embryo or gametophyte lethality therefore depends in part on the ability of residual, parental gene products to support gametophyte development. We also highlight here 70 preglobular embryo mutants with a zygotic pattern

  17. Infantile pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis: a lethal form of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Eiméar; McNally, Paul; O'Sullivan, Maureen; Phelan, Ethna; Sumner, Kelli; Best, D Hunter; McMahon, Colin J

    2016-04-01

    We describe the cases of two children who both presented in infancy with recurrent severe pulmonary hypertensive crises. Exhaustive clinical work-up failed to identify an underlying aetiology. The patients had no clinical response to steroids, immunoglobulins, or pulmonary vasodilators. Post-mortem examination revealed extensive invasive pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis. There was no evidence of pulmonary venous occlusive disease. Given the lethal nature of this condition, early consideration of referral to a lung transplant centre should be considered in selected patients.

  18. Non-Lethal Weapons: Setting Our Phasers on Stun? Potential Stratetgic Blessings and Curses of Non-Lethal Weapons on the Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    Guided Munition (ERGM)54 and other long range delivery vehicles such as mortars , shoulder launched weapons, artillery, missiles, guided bombs , and...launchers, mortars , field artillery, and aircraft ordnance. 5. Malodorants Malodorous substances can be very useful operationally in counter...a Non-Lethal Mortar Munition, an 81 mm round designed to deliver and dispense non-lethal payloads up to 1.5 km. A sixth weapon is a non-lethal

  19. The median problems on linear multichromosomal genomes: graph representation and fast exact solutions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Andrew Wei

    2010-09-01

    In genome rearrangement, given a set of genomes G and a distance measure d, the median problem asks for another genome q that minimizes the total distance [Formula: see text]. This is a key problem in genome rearrangement based phylogenetic analysis. Although this problem is known to be NP-hard, we have shown in a previous article, on circular genomes and under the DCJ distance measure, that a family of patterns in the given genomes--represented by adequate subgraphs--allow us to rapidly find exact solutions to the median problem in a decomposition approach. In this article, we extend this result to the case of linear multichromosomal genomes, in order to solve more interesting problems on eukaryotic nuclear genomes. A multi-way capping problem in the linear multichromosomal case imposes an extra computational challenge on top of the difficulty in the circular case, and this difficulty has been underestimated in our previous study and is addressed in this article. We represent the median problem by the capped multiple breakpoint graph, extend the adequate subgraphs into the capped adequate subgraphs, and prove optimality-preserving decomposition theorems, which give us the tools to solve the median problem and the multi-way capping optimization problem together. We also develop an exact algorithm ASMedian-linear, which iteratively detects instances of (capped) adequate subgraphs and decomposes problems into subproblems. Tested on simulated data, ASMedian-linear can rapidly solve most problems with up to several thousand genes, and it also can provide optimal or near-optimal solutions to the median problem under the reversal/HP distance measures. ASMedian-linear is available at http://sites.google.com/site/andrewweixu .

  20. Thrombosis of the persistent median artery as a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome - case study.

    PubMed

    Rzepecka-Wejs, Ludomira; Multan, Aleksandra; Konarzewska, Aleksandra

    2012-12-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most frequent neuropathy of the upper extremity, that mainly occurs in manual workers and individuals, whose wrist is overloaded by performing repetitive precise tasks. In the past it was common among of typists, seamstresses and mechanics, but nowadays it is often caused by long hours of computer keyboard use. The patient usually complains of pain, hypersensitivity and paresthesia of his hand and fingers in the median nerve distribution. The symptoms often increase at night. In further course of the disease atrophy of thenar muscles is observed. In the past the diagnosis was usually confirmed in nerve conduction studies. Nowadays a magnetic resonance scan or an ultrasound scan can be used to differentiate the cause of the symptoms. The carpal tunnel syndrome is usually caused by compression of the median nerve passing under the flexor retinaculum due to the presence of structures reducing carpal tunnel area, such as an effusion in the flexor tendons sheaths (due to overload or in the course of rheumatoid diseases), bony anomalies, muscle and tendon variants, ganglion cysts or tumors. In some cases diseases of upper extremity vessels including abnormalities of the persistent median artery may also result in carpal tunnel syndrome. We present a case of symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome caused by thrombosis of the persistent median artery which was diagnosed in ultrasound examination. The ultrasound scan enabled for differential diagnosis and resulted in an immediate referral to clinician, who recommended instant commencement on anticoagulant treatment. The follow-up observation revealed nearly complete remission of clinical symptoms and partial recanalization of the persistent median artery.

  1. Anatomic variations in the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve among adults in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Mofikoya, Bolaji O; Ugburo, Andrew O

    2012-01-01

    Dysesthesias due to palmar cutaneous branch of median nerve injuries infrequently follow carpal tunnel release surgeries. Objective: To determine the course of palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve in wrist of adult Nigerians, identify the common variations, determine its relations to the palmaris longus (PL) in the region of the distal wrist crease. And on these basis, suggest a safe incision for carpal tunnel surgery in Nigerians. Materials and Methods: Detailed anatomic dissection of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve was carried out with the aid of a loupe magnification on 40 Nigerian cadaver wrists. The origin, course in the distal forearm, wrist and proximal palm was traced. Measurements of the distances between the radial and ulnar branches of the nerve and the PL were made. The distance between origin of the nerve and the distal wrist crease was measured as well. The common branching pattern of the nerve was noted. Results: The palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve was present in all dissected wrists. The mean distance of the radial branch to PL was 0.81 cm (SD ± 0.3 cm), while the ulnar branch was 0.3 cm (SD ± 0.1 cm). from same structure. The mean distance from the origin to the distal wrist crease is 4.5 cm (SD ± 2.1 cm). We noted the terminal distal branching pattern of the nerve to be highly variable. Conclusion: The Palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve is safe with an incision made at least 0.5 cm ulnar to the PL in carpal tunnel surgeries in Nigerians. PMID:24027400

  2. A median-based test under informative dropout: the one-sample case.

    PubMed

    Liang, W M; Brown, M B

    1997-10-01

    We consider a clinical trial in which the outcome can be assessed by a continuous measure and where dropouts tend to have poorer efficacy than completers. When each subject can act as his/her own control, efficacy is measured by the difference between the outcome measurements at two times. When all subjects complete the protocol, a paired t-test can be used to test for a treatment effect, i.e., whether or not the mean difference is zero. When a patient does not return for the final evaluation, a measure of efficacy cannot be computed for that subject. Often, data from dropouts are ignored and only the observed pairs are used to analyze the data. When the reason for dropping out is not random, the result may be misleading. In this paper, we assume that (1) the distribution of the measure of efficacy (i.e., the change between two outcome measurements) is Gaussian, (2) dropouts would have worse efficacy than the median if they were observed, and (3) the dropout rate is less than 50%. We propose a median-based t-like statistic using the sample median in place of the sample mean. The variance of the median is estimated using only data from the complete half-sample, i.e., the half-sample with better efficacy. Simulations under five patterns of dropouts are performed to compare the proposed statistic with the paired t-test. The results show that the median-based statistic provides a conservative bound for the test of significance of the treatment. In contrast, because the paired t-test does not preserve its level of significance, except when the dropout mechanism is uniform, the paired t-test should not be used for trials in which dropouts tend to have poorer efficacy than completers.

  3. Crystallographic studies of the Anthrax lethal toxin. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, C.A.

    1996-07-01

    The lethal form of Anthrax results from the inhalation of anthrax spores. Death is primarily due to the effects of the lethal toxin (Protective Antigen (PA) + Lethal Factor) from the causative agent, Bacillus anthracis. All the Anthrax vaccines currently in use or under development contain or produce PA, the major antigenic component of anthrax toxin, and there is a clear need for an improved vaccine for human use. In the previous report we described the first atomic resolution structure of PA, revealing that the molecule is composed largely of beta-sheets organized into four domains. This information can be used in the design. of recombinant PA vaccines. In this report we describe additional features of the full-length PA molecule derived from further crystallographic refinement and careful examination of the structure. We compare two crystal forms of PA grown at different pH values and discuss the functional implications. A complete definition of the function of each domain must await the crystal structure of the PA63 heptamer. We have grown crystals of the heptamer under both detergent and detergent-free conditions, and made substantial progress towards the crystal structure. The mechanism of anthrax intoxication in the light of our results is reviewed.

  4. Lethal injection, autonomy and the proper ends of medicine.

    PubMed

    Silver, David

    2003-04-01

    Gerald Dworkin has argued that it is inconsistent with the proper ends of medicine for a physician to participate in an execution by lethal injection. He does this by proposing a principle by which we are to judge whether an action is consistent with the proper ends of medicine. I argue: (a) that this principle, if valid, does not show that it is inconsistent with the proper ends of medicine for a physician to participate in an execution by lethal injection; and (b) that this principle is not valid, and this is because it mistakenly views the promotion of patient autonomy as one of the proper ends of medicine. Rather, I propose, we should view respect for a patient's autonomy as a constraint on the pursuit of the proper ends of medicine, rather than as one of the proper ends itself. With this revised understanding of the proper ends of medicine, we can conclude that it is inconsistent with the proper ends of medicine for a physician to participate in an execution by lethal injection.

  5. Skin penetration assessment of less lethal kinetic energy munitions.

    PubMed

    Bir, Cynthia A; Stewart, Shelby J; Wilhelm, Marianne

    2005-11-01

    The development of less-lethal technologies has provided law enforcement personnel with an alternative to lethal force. Although the less lethal projectile was produced to engender non-penetrating wounds, case studies show that there have been a number of reported penetrating injuries ranging from minor to significant in morbidity. The objective of this study was to determine the energy per unit area required to penetrate various regions of the body. Eight unembalmed postmortem human specimens were procured for this testing. Each specimen sustained a maximum of 25 impacts consisting of shots to the anterior and posterior thorax, abdomen, and legs. A 12-gauge, fin-stabilized, rubber rocket round was used as the impactor for all of the conducted tests. The energy density required for 50% risk of penetration varied from 23.99 J/cm2 for the location on the anterior rib (p = 0.000) to 52.74 J/cm2 for the location on the posterior rib (p = 0.001).

  6. Synthetic lethal interactions for the development of cancer therapeutics: biological and methodological advancements.

    PubMed

    Mizuarai, Shinji; Kotani, Hidehito

    2010-12-01

    Synthetic lethal interaction is defined as a combination of two mutations that is lethal when present in the same cell; each individual mutation is non-lethal. Synthetic lethal interactions attract attention in cancer research fields since the discovery of synthetic lethal genes with either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) provides novel cancer therapeutic targets. Due to the selective lethal effect on cancer cells harboring specific genetic alterations, it is expected that targeting synthetic lethal genes would provide wider therapeutic windows compared with cytotoxic chemotherapeutics. Here, we review the current status of the application of synthetic lethal screening in cancer research fields from biological and methodological viewpoints. Very recent studies seeking to identify synthetic lethal genes with K-RAS and p53, which are known to be the most frequently occurring oncogenes and TSGs, respectively, are introduced. Among the accumulating amount of research on synthetic lethal interactions, the synthetic lethality between BRCA1/2 and PARP1 inhibition has been clinically proven. Thus, both preclinical and clinical data showing a preferential anti-tumor effect on BRCA1/2 deficient tumors by a PARP1 inhibitor are the best examples of the synthetic lethal approach of cancer therapeutics. Finally, methodological progress regarding synthetic lethal screening, including barcode shRNA screening and in vivo synthetic lethal screening, is described. Given the fact that an increasing number of synthetic lethal genes for major cancerous genes have been validated in preclinical studies, this intriguing approach awaits clinical verification of preferential benefits for cancer patients with specific genetic alterations as a clear predictive factor for tumor response.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide-induced lethality and cytokine production in aged mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tateda, K; Matsumoto, T; Miyazaki, S; Yamaguchi, K

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to define the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sensitivity of aged mice in terms of lethality and cytokine production and to determine down-regulating responses of corticosterone and interleukin 10 (IL-10). The 50% lethal doses of LPS in young (6- to 7-week-old) and aged (98- to 102-week-old) mice were 601 and 93 microg per mouse (25.6 and 1.6 mg per kg of body weight), respectively. Aged mice were approximately 6.5-fold more sensitive to the lethal toxicity of LPS in micrograms per mouse (16-fold more sensitive in milligrams per kilogram) than young mice. Levels in sera of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) IL-1alpha, and IL-6 after intraperitoneal injection of 100 microg of LPS peaked at 1.5, 3, and 3 h, respectively, and declined thereafter in both groups of mice. However, the peak values of these cytokines were significantly higher in aged than in young mice (P < 0.05). Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detectable at 3 h, and sustained high levels were still detected after 12 h in both age groups. Although there were no significant differences in levels of IFN-gamma in sera from both groups, aged mice showed higher IFN-gamma levels throughout the 3- to 12-h study period. Administration of increasing doses of LPS revealed that aged mice had a lower threshold to IL-1alpha production than young mice. In addition, aged mice were approximately 4-fold more sensitive to the lethal toxicity of exogenous TNF in units per mouse (10-fold more sensitive in units per kilogram) than young mice. With regard to down-regulating factors, corticosterone amounts were similar at basal levels and no differences in kinetics after the LPS challenge were observed, whereas IL-10 levels in sera were significantly higher in aged mice at 1.5 and 3 h than in young mice (P < 0.01). These results indicate that aged mice are more sensitive to the lethal toxicities of LPS and TNF than young mice. We conclude that a relatively activated, or primed, state for LPS

  8. Highly variable recessive lethal or nearly lethal mutation rates during germ-line development of male Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian-Jun; Pan, Xue-Rong; Hu, Jing; Ma, Li; Wu, Jian-Min; Shao, Ye-Lin; Barton, Sara A; Woodruff, Ronny C; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Fu, Yun-Xin

    2011-09-20

    Each cell of higher organism adults is derived from a fertilized egg through a series of divisions, during which mutations can occur. Both the rate and timing of mutations can have profound impacts on both the individual and the population, because mutations that occur at early cell divisions will affect more tissues and are more likely to be transferred to the next generation. Using large-scale multigeneration screening experiments for recessive lethal or nearly lethal mutations of Drosophila melanogaster and recently developed statistical analysis, we show for male D. melanogaster that (i) mutation rates (for recessive lethal or nearly lethal) are highly variable during germ cell development; (ii) first cell cleavage has the highest mutation rate, which drops substantially in the second cleavage or the next few cleavages; (iii) the intermediate stages, after a few cleavages to right before spermatogenesis, have at least an order of magnitude smaller mutation rate; and (iv) spermatogenesis also harbors a fairly high mutation rate. Because germ-line lineage shares some (early) cell divisions with somatic cell lineage, the first conclusion is readily extended to a somatic cell lineage. It is conceivable that the first conclusion is true for most (if not all) higher organisms, whereas the other three conclusions are widely applicable, although the extent may differ from species to species. Therefore, conclusions or analyses that are based on equal mutation rates during development should be taken with caution. Furthermore, the statistical approach developed can be adopted for studying other organisms, including the human germ-line or somatic mutational patterns.

  9. Meaningful power grip recovery after salvage reconstruction of a median nerve avulsion injury with a pedicled vascularized ulnar nerve

    PubMed Central

    Van Slyke, Aaron C; Jansen, Leigh A; Hynes, Sally; Hicks, Jane; Bristol, Sean; Carr, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    In cases of median nerve injury alongside an unsalvageable ulnar nerve, a vascularized ulnar nerve graft to reconstruct the median nerve is a viable option. While restoration of median nerve sensation is consistently reported, recovery of significant motor function is less frequently observed. The authors report a case involving a previously healthy man who sustained upper arm segmental median and ulnar nerve injuries and, after failure of sural nerve grafts, was treated with a pedicled vascularized ulnar nerve graft to restore median nerve function. Long-term follow-up showed near full fist, with 12 kg of grip strength, key pinch with 1.5 kg of strength and protective sensation in the median nerve distribution. The present case demonstrates that pedicled ulnar vascularized nerve grafts can provide significant improvements to median nerve sensory and motor function in a heavily scarred environment. PMID:26665144

  10. Temporal changes in tissue repair permit survival of diet-restricted rats from an acute lethal dose of thioacetamide.

    PubMed

    Ramaiah, S K; Bucci, T J; Warbritton, A; Soni, M G; Mehendale, H M

    1998-10-01

    Although, diet restriction (DR) has been shown to substantially increase longevity while reducing or delaying the onset of age-related diseases, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of DR on acute toxic outcomes. An earlier study (S. K. Ramaiah et al., 1998, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 150, 12-21) revealed that a 35% DR compared to ad libitum (AL) feeding leads to a substantial increase in liver injury of thioacetamide (TA) at a low dose (50 mg/kg, i.p.). Higher liver injury was accompanied by enhanced survival. A prompt and enhanced tissue repair response in DR rats at the low dose (sixfold higher liver injury) occurred, whereas at equitoxic doses (50 mg/kg in DR and 600 mg/kg in AL rats) tissue repair in AL rats was substantially diminished and delayed. The extent of liver injury did not appear to be closely related to the extent of stimulated tissue repair response. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the time course (0-120 h) of liver injury and liver tissue repair at the high dose (600 mg TA/kg, i.p., lethal in AL rats) in AL and DR rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (225-275 g) were 35% diet restricted compared to their AL cohorts for 21 days and on day 22 they received a single dose of TA (600 mg/kg, i.p.). Liver injury was assessed by plasma ALT and by histopathological examination of liver sections. Tissue repair was assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation into hepatonuclear DNA and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry during 0-120 h after TA injection. In AL-fed rats hepatic necrosis was evident at 12 h, peaked at 60 h, and persisted thereafter until mortality (3 to 6 days). Peak liver injury was approximately twofold higher in DR rats compared to that seen in AL rats. Hepatic necrosis was evident at 36 h, peaked at 48 h, persisted until 96 h, and returned to normal by 120 h. Light microscopy of liver sections revealed progression of hepatic injury in AL rats whereas injury regressed

  11. Cannieu-Riche anastomosis of the ulnar to median nerve in the hand: case report.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, G; Ioannidis, O; Martoglou, S

    2010-01-01

    We observed in a male cadaver the presence of a new type of very long Cannieu-Riche anastomosis between the proximal portion of the deep branch of the ulnar nerve for the adductor pollicis and ramus of the recurrent branch of the median nerve to the superficial head of the flexor pollicis brevis. The clinical relevance of such a communication is the possible preservation of the function of all or part of thenar muscles from the ulnar nerve in case of median nerve lesion. The ignorance of that anomaly can induce obscure clinical, surgical and electroneuromyographical findings. We report on the incidence, the double innervation and the clinical significance of Cannieu-Riche anastomosis and provide a new classification of the various types of this nerval connection.

  12. The de novo design of median molecules within a property range of interest.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nathan; McKay, Ben; Gasteiger, Johann

    2004-12-01

    In this paper an application is presented of the median molecule workflow to the de novo design of novel molecular entities with a property profile of interest. Median molecules are structures that are optimised to be similar to a set of existing molecules of interest as an approach for lead exploration and hopping. An overview of this workflow is provided together with an example of an instance using the similarity to camphor and menthol as objectives. The methodology of the experiments is defined and the workflow is applied to designing novel molecules for two physical property datasets: mean molecular polarisability and aqueous solubility. This paper concludes with a discussion of the characteristics of this method.

  13. Blind detection of median filtering in digital images: a difference domain based approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chenglong; Ni, Jiangqun; Huang, Jiwu

    2013-12-01

    Recently, the median filtering (MF) detector as a forensic tool for the recovery of images' processing history has attracted wide interest. This paper presents a novel method for the blind detection of MF in digital images. Following some strongly indicative analyses in the difference domain of images, we introduce two new feature sets that allow us to distinguish a median-filtered image from an untouched image or average-filtered one. The effectiveness of the proposed features is verified with evidence from exhaustive experiments on a large composite image database. Compared with prior arts, the proposed method achieves significant performance improvement in the case of low resolution and strong JPEG post-compression. In addition, it is demonstrated that our method is more robust against additive noise than other existing MF detectors. With analyses and extensive experimental researches presented in this paper, we hope that the proposed method will add a new tool to the arsenal of forensic analysts.

  14. Median nerve entrapment and ulnar nerve palsy following elbow dislocation in a child.

    PubMed

    Petratos, Dimitrios V; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A; Morakis, Emmanouil A; Matsinos, George S

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a rare case of a child who presented with neglected intra-articular entrapment of the median nerve, ulnar nerve palsy, and intra-articular incarceration of the medial epicondyle following closed reduction of an elbow dislocation. In the present case, as in most other cases, the diagnosis and treatment were delayed. Careful initial and postreduction neurological examination, as well as careful interpretation of the plain radiographs, is necessary for early detection of any nerve complications and associated fractures of an elbow dislocation. The authors' opinion is that a child with an elbow dislocation, which is initially neurologically intact but advances to a median or ulnar nerve deficit after the reduction, must undergo early surgical exploration, especially when the dislocation is associated with a medial epicondyle fracture.

  15. A crack extraction algorithm based on improved median filter and Hessian matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yafeng; Zhao, Qiancheng; He, Yongbiao; Lu, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at the problems of existing crack extraction algorithms which are difficult to achieve fast and accurate crack extraction of image, an algorithm of crack detection based on Median Filter and Hessian Matrix is proposed. Firstly, median filter of crack gray image in 4 directions, Level, 45 degree, vertical and -45 degree, is conducted, by which noises are removed and roughly extracted crack is obtained. Then according to the Hessian matrix feature of extracting image linear feature, convolution of Differential operation of the Hessian matrix is adopted, and crack is further extracted through eigenvalues response and changing standard deviation of Gaussian function. The proposed algorithm validity is verified by comparison with other crack extraction algorithm. The results show that this algorithm has obvious accuracy rate in crack extraction.

  16. Median Nerve Trauma in a Rat Model of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorder

    PubMed Central

    CLARK, BRIAN D.; BARR, ANN E.; SAFADI, FAYEZ F.; BEITMAN, LISA; AL-SHATTI, TALAL; AMIN, MAMTA; GAUGHAN, JOHN P.; BARBE, MARY F.

    2006-01-01

    Anatomical and physiological changes were evaluated in the median nerves of rats trained to perform repetitive reaching. Motor degradation was evident after 4 weeks. ED1-immunoreactive macrophages were seen in the transcarpal region of the median nerve of both forelimbs by 5–6 weeks. Fibrosis, characterized by increased immunoexpression of collagen type I by 8 weeks and connective tissue growth factor by 12 weeks, was evident. The conduction velocity (NCV) within the carpal tunnel showed a modest but significant decline after 9–12 weeks. The lowest NCV values were found in animals that refused to participate in the task for the full time available. Thus, both anatomical and physiological signs of progressive tissue damage were present in this model. These results, together with other recent findings indicate that work-related carpal tunnel syndrome develops through mechanisms that include injury, inflammation, fibrosis and subsequent nerve compression. PMID:12908929

  17. DiGeorge syndrome associated with solitary median maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huai-Chih; Shyur, Shyh-Dar; Huang, Li-Hsin; Chang, Yi-Chi; Wen, Da-Chin; Liang, Pei-Hsuan; Lin, Mao-Tsair

    2005-01-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by dysgenesis of the thymus and parathyroid glands, conotruncal cardiac anomalies, and other dysmorphic features. Although most patients have a common microscopic deletion in chromosome 22q11.2, marked clinical variability exists. A solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) is a rare dental anomaly which may be an isolated occurrence or associated with congenital nasal airway abnormalities or holoprosencephaly. We report a patient with DiGeorge syndrome who was diagnosed at nearly 1 month of age and was later found to have a solitary median central incisor. Initially, the patient presented with recurrent episodes of respiratory distress attributed to partial airway obstruction, one of the phenotypic features of SMMCI. A fluorescence in situ hybridization study showed a chromosome 22q11.2 deletion.

  18. Inference for the median residual life function in sequential multiple assignment randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Kelley M; Ko, Jin H; Wahed, Abdus S

    2014-04-30

    In survival analysis, median residual lifetime is often used as a summary measure to assess treatment effectiveness; it is not clear, however, how such a quantity could be estimated for a given dynamic treatment regimen using data from sequential randomized clinical trials. We propose a method to estimate a dynamic treatment regimen-specific median residual life (MERL) function from sequential multiple assignment randomized trials. We present the MERL estimator, which is based on inverse probability weighting, as well as, two variance estimates for the MERL estimator. One variance estimate follows from Lunceford, Davidian and Tsiatis' 2002 survival function-based variance estimate and the other uses the sandwich estimator. The MERL estimator is evaluated, and its two variance estimates are compared through simulation studies, showing that the estimator and both variance estimates produce approximately unbiased results in large samples. To demonstrate our methods, the estimator has been applied to data from a sequentially randomized leukemia clinical trial.

  19. Single-stage repair of aortic coarctation and multiple concomitant cardiac lesions through a median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Kervan, Umit; Yurdakok, Okan; Genc, Bahadir; Ozen, Anil; Saritas, Ahmet; Kucuker, Seref Alp; Pac, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Through a median sternotomy, we performed a single-stage repair of severe aortic coarctation, ventricular septal defect, patent foramen ovale, and mitral valve insufficiency. The severe aortic coarctation was repaired by interposing a synthetic graft between the distal ascending aorta and the descending aorta. We first repaired the coarctation with the 38-year-old man on cardiopulmonary bypass, before aortic cross-clamping, in order to shorten the cross-clamp time.

  20. Recurrent Primary Synovial Sarcoma of Median Nerve: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A K; Jayakrishnan, K N; Acharya, A M

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of intraneural synovial sarcoma of the median nerve in a 39 year old lady with multiple local recurrences over thirteen years with no distant metastasis. The diagnosis of biphasic type of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. At the time of the fourth recurrence below elbow amputation was performed. This case is being reported for its rarity and propensity for local recurrence without distant metastasis.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Laser Microsurgical Median Glossotomy for Resection of Lingual Dermoid Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Corvers, Kristien; Hens, Greet; Meulemans, Jeroen; Delaere, Pierre; Hermans, Robert; Vander Poorten, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are epithelial-lined cavities with skin adnexae in the capsule. Only 7% is present in the head and neck. Between 2004 and 2013, four patients with a lingual dermoid cyst underwent a microsurgical carbon dioxide laser resection via a median sagittal glossotomy approach. This approach is an elegant technique combining superior visualization, hemostasis, and little postoperative edema with good wound healing, allowing for perfect function preservation of the tongue. PMID:27504448

  2. Noise and Outlier Removal from Jet Engine Health Signals Using Weighted FIR Median Hybrid Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, R.

    2002-11-01

    The removal of noise and outliers from measurement signals is a major problem in jet engine health monitoring. Typical measurement signals found in most jet engines include low rotor speed, high rotor speed, fuel flow and exhaust gas temperature. Deviations in these measurements from a baseline 'good' engine are often called measurement deltas and the health signals used for fault detection, isolation, trending and data mining. Linear filters such as the FIR moving average filter and IIR exponential average filter are used in the industry to remove noise and outliers from the jet engine measurement deltas. However, the use of linear filters can lead to loss of critical features in the signal that can contain information about maintenance and repair events that could be used by fault isolation algorithms to determine engine condition or by data mining algorithms to learn valuable patterns in the data. Non-linear filters such as the median and weighted median hybrid filters offer the opportunity to remove noise and gross outliers from signals while preserving features. In this study, a comparison of traditional linear filters popular in the jet engine industry is made with the median filter and the subfilter weighted FIR median hybrid (SWFMH) filter. Results using simulated data with implanted faults shows that the SWFMH filter results in a noise reduction of over 60 per cent compared to only 20 per cent for FIR filters and 30 per cent for IIR filters. Preprocessing jet engine health signals using the SWFMH filter would greatly improve the accuracy of diagnostic systems.

  3. Non-parametric estimation for the difference or ratio of median failure times for paired observations.

    PubMed

    Jung, S H; Su, J Q

    1995-02-15

    We propose a non-parametric method to calculate a confidence interval for the difference or ratio of two median failure times for paired observations with censoring. The new method is simple to calculate, does not involve non-parametric density estimates, and is valid asymptotically even when the two underlying distribution functions differ in shape. The method also allows missing observations. We report numerical studies to examine the performance of the new method for practical sample sizes.

  4. Effects of Wrist Posture and Fingertip Force on Median Nerve Blood Flow Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Katherine E.; Tat, Jimmy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess nerve hypervascularization using high resolution ultrasonography to determine the effects of wrist posture and fingertip force on median nerve blood flow at the wrist in healthy participants and those experiencing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms. Methods. The median nerves of nine healthy participants and nine participants experiencing symptoms of CTS were evaluated using optimized ultrasonography in five wrist postures with and without a middle digit fingertip press (0, 6 N). Results. Both wrist posture and fingertip force had significant main effects on mean peak blood flow velocity. Blood flow velocity with a neutral wrist (2.87 cm/s) was significantly lower than flexed 30° (3.37 cm/s), flexed 15° (3.27 cm/s), and extended 30° (3.29 cm/s). Similarly, median nerve blood flow velocity was lower without force (2.81 cm/s) than with force (3.56 cm/s). A significant difference was not found between groups. Discussion. Vascular changes associated with CTS may be acutely induced by nonneutral wrist postures and fingertip force. This study represents an early evaluation of intraneural blood flow as a measure of nerve hypervascularization in response to occupational risk factors and advances our understanding of the vascular phenomena associated with peripheral nerve compression. PMID:28286771

  5. A study of median nerve entrapment neuropathy at wrist in uremic patients.

    PubMed

    Shende, V S; Sharma, R D; Pawar, S M; Waghmare, S N

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy seen in uremic patients. The study was undertaken to estimate the frequency of CTS in uremic patients and to identify the most sensitive electrodiagnostic test. Study was conducted on 80 subjects of age 30-60 years. End-stage kidney disease patients were recruited for the clinical evaluation, motor nerve conduction studies (NCS), sensory NCS, F wave study and median-versus-ulnar comparison studies (palm-to-wrist mixed comparison study, digit 4 sensory latencies study and lumbrical-interossei comparison study). Among three different diagnostic modalities, frequency of CTS was found to be 17.5% with clinical evaluation, 15% with routine NCS studies and 25% with median-versus-ulnar comparison studies. Among the median-versus-ulnar comparison studies, lumbrical-interossei comparison study was found to be most sensitive (90%). The comparative tests for CTS are more sensitive compared to routine NCS and clinical examination. Among the comparative tests, lumbrical-interossei comparison study is the most sensitive. Early diagnosis of CTS may help patients of uremia to seek proper treatment at an appropriate time.

  6. A study of median nerve entrapment neuropathy at wrist in uremic patients

    PubMed Central

    Shende, V. S.; Sharma, R. D.; Pawar, S. M.; Waghmare, S. N.

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy seen in uremic patients. The study was undertaken to estimate the frequency of CTS in uremic patients and to identify the most sensitive electrodiagnostic test. Study was conducted on 80 subjects of age 30–60 years. End-stage kidney disease patients were recruited for the clinical evaluation, motor nerve conduction studies (NCS), sensory NCS, F wave study and median-versus-ulnar comparison studies (palm-to-wrist mixed comparison study, digit 4 sensory latencies study and lumbrical-interossei comparison study). Among three different diagnostic modalities, frequency of CTS was found to be 17.5% with clinical evaluation, 15% with routine NCS studies and 25% with median-versus-ulnar comparison studies. Among the median-versus-ulnar comparison studies, lumbrical-interossei comparison study was found to be most sensitive (90%). The comparative tests for CTS are more sensitive compared to routine NCS and clinical examination. Among the comparative tests, lumbrical-interossei comparison study is the most sensitive. Early diagnosis of CTS may help patients of uremia to seek proper treatment at an appropriate time. PMID:26199474

  7. Selection of optimum median-filter-based ambiguity removal algorithm parameters for NSCAT. [NASA scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, Scott; Dunbar, R. Scott; Hsiao, S. Vincent; Long, David G.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Scatterometer, NSCAT, is an active spaceborne radar designed to measure the normalized radar backscatter coefficient (sigma0) of the ocean surface. These measurements can, in turn, be used to infer the surface vector wind over the ocean using a geophysical model function. Several ambiguous wind vectors result because of the nature of the model function. A median-filter-based ambiguity removal algorithm will be used by the NSCAT ground data processor to select the best wind vector from the set of ambiguous wind vectors. This process is commonly known as dealiasing or ambiguity removal. The baseline NSCAT ambiguity removal algorithm and the method used to select the set of optimum parameter values are described. An extensive simulation of the NSCAT instrument and ground data processor provides a means of testing the resulting tuned algorithm. This simulation generates the ambiguous wind-field vectors expected from the instrument as it orbits over a set of realistic meoscale wind fields. The ambiguous wind field is then dealiased using the median-based ambiguity removal algorithm. Performance is measured by comparison of the unambiguous wind fields with the true wind fields. Results have shown that the median-filter-based ambiguity removal algorithm satisfies NSCAT mission requirements.

  8. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Tamara L.; Evans, Peter J.; Seitz, William H.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 minutes of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p < 0.001) and resulted in increased carpal arch height (p < 0.01), increased carpal arch curvature (p < 0.001), and increased radial distribution of the carpal arch area (p < 0.05). It was also shown that wrist compression reduced the flattening of the median nerve, as indicated by changes in the nerve’s circularity and flattening ratio (p < 0.001). Statement of clinical significance This study demonstrated that the carpal arch can be non-invasively augmented by applying compressive force across the wrist, and that this strategy may decompress the median nerve providing symptom relief to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26662276

  9. Does Pulsed Magnetic Field Therapy Influence Nerve Regeneration in the Median Nerve Model of the Rat?

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E.; Lamia, Androniki; Fregnan, Federica; Smeets, Ralf; Becker, Stephan T.; Sinis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of pulsed magnetic field therapy on peripheral nerve regeneration after median nerve injury and primary coaptation in the rat. Both median nerves were surgically exposed and denervated in 24 female Wistar rats. A microsurgical coaptation was performed on the right side, whereas on the left side a spontaneous healing was prevented. The study group underwent a daily pulsed magnetic field therapy; the other group served as a control group. The grasping force was recorded 2 weeks after the surgical intervention for a period of 12 weeks. The right median nerve was excised and histologically examined. The histomorphometric data and the functional assessments were analyzed by t-test statistics and one-way ANOVA. One-way ANOVA indicated a statistically significant influence of group affiliation and grasping force (P = 0.0078). Grasping strength was higher on a significant level in the experimental group compared to the control group permanently from the 9th week to the end of the study. T-test statistics revealed a significantly higher weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle (P = 0.0385) in the experimental group. The histological evaluation did not reveal any statistically significant differences concerning the histomorphometric parameters. Our results suggest that the pulsed magnetic field therapy has a positive influence on the functional aspects of neural regeneration. More studies are needed to precisely evaluate and optimize the intensity and duration of the application. PMID:25143937

  10. Sternal wrapping for the prevention of sternal morbidity in elderly osteoporotic patients undergoing median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Kirbas, Ahmet; Celik, Sezai; Gurer, Onur; Yildiz, Yahya; Isik, Omer

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis, a major risk factor for sternum-related morbidity after median sternotomy, is quite prevalent among the elderly. In this prospective study, we investigated the potential of sternal protection by use of the "sternal wrapping method" in elderly osteoporotic patients who were undergoing median sternotomy.For this study, we chose 100 elderly osteoporotic patients who were scheduled to undergo median sternotomy. During surgery, we wrapped the sternal edges with polyvinyl chloride tubing in 50 patients (group 1) and omitted the sternal wrapping in the remaining 50 patients (group 2). We then compared the groups with regard to postoperative pain, bleeding, early and late sternum-related morbidity, sternal fractures, and duration of hospitalization.Sternal wrapping was associated with fewer sternal fractures, less chest pain, and shorter hospital stays. Overall sternal morbidity was significantly less common among patients with sternal wrapping (4% vs. 20%, P = 0.03); however, the difference in individual rates for early and late dehiscence or deep sternal infection did not reach statistical significance.Sternal wrapping using polyvinyl chloride tubes provides mechanical protection and, apparently, less postoperative chest pain and shorter hospitalizations. Probably, it reduces sternum-related complications, particularly in high-risk patients. Its benefits, however, should be confirmed in larger studies.

  11. Recursive Gauss-Seidel median filter for CT lung image denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti Octorina; Faudzi, Ahmad Athif Mohd.; Mengko, Tati Latifah; Suzumori, Koichi

    2017-02-01

    Poisson and Gaussian noises have been known to affect Computed Tomography (CT) image quality during reconstruction. Standard median (SM) Filter has been widely used to reduce the unwanted impulsive noises. However, it cannot perform satisfactorily once the noise density is high. Recursive median (RM) filter has also been proposed to optimize the denoising. On the other hand, the image quality is degraded. In this paper, we propose a hybrid recursive median (RGSM) filtering technique by using Gauss-Seidel Relaxation to enhance denoising and preserve image quality in RM filter. First, the SM filtering was performed, followed by Gauss-Seidel, and combined to generate secondary approximation solution. This scheme was iteratively done by applying the secondary approximation solution to the successive iterations. Progressive noise reduction was accomplished in every iterative stage. The last stage generated the final solution. Experiments on CT lung images show that the proposed technique has higher noise reduction improvements compared to the conventional RM filtering. The results have also confirmed better anatomical quality preservation. The proposed technique may improve lung nodules segmentation and characterization performance.

  12. Extracts of Renealmia alpinia (Rottb.) MAAS Protect against Lethality and Systemic Hemorrhage Induced by Bothrops asper Venom: Insights from a Model with Extract Administration before Venom Injection

    PubMed Central

    Patiño, Arley Camilo; Quintana, Juan Carlos; Gutiérrez, José María; Rucavado, Alexandra; Benjumea, Dora María; Pereañez, Jaime Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Renealmia alpinia (Rottb.) MAAS, obtained by micropropagation (in vitro) and wild forms have previously been shown to inhibit some toxic activities of Bothrops asper snake venom if preincubated before injection. In this study, assays were performed in a murine model in which extracts were administered for three days before venom injection. R. alpinia extracts inhibited lethal activity of B. asper venom injected by intraperitoneal route. Median Effective Dose (ED50) values were 36.6 ± 3.2 mg/kg and 31.7 ± 5.4 mg/kg (p > 0.05) for R. alpinia wild and in vitro extracts, respectively. At a dose of 75 mg/kg, both extracts totally inhibited the lethal activity of the venom. Moreover, this dose prolonged survival time of mice receiving a lethal dose of venom by the intravenous route. At 75 mg/kg, both extracts of R. alpinia reduced the extent of venom-induced pulmonary hemorrhage by 48.0% (in vitro extract) and 34.7% (wild extract), in agreement with histological observations of lung tissue. R. alpinia extracts also inhibited hemorrhage in heart and kidneys, as evidenced by a decrease in mg of hemoglobin/g of organ. These results suggest the possibility of using R. alpinia as a prophylactic agent in snakebite, a hypothesis that needs to be further explored. PMID:25941768

  13. Lethal and sublethal effects of azadirachtin on the bumblebee Bombus terrestris (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Wagner Faria; De Meyer, Laurens; Guedes, Raul Narciso C; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Azadirachtin is a biorational insecticide commonly reported as selective to a range of beneficial insects. Nonetheless, only few studies have been carried out with pollinators, usually emphasizing the honeybee Apis mellifera and neglecting other important pollinator species such as the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. Here, lethal and sublethal effects of azadirachtin were studied on B. terrestris via oral exposure in the laboratory to bring out the potential risks of the compound to this important pollinator. The compound was tested at different concentrations above and below the maximum concentration that is used in the field (32 mg L(-1)). As most important results, azadirachtin repelled bumblebee workers in a concentration-dependent manner. The median repellence concentration (RC50) was estimated as 504 mg L(-1). Microcolonies chronically exposed to azadirachtin via treated sugar water during 11 weeks in the laboratory exhibited a high mortality ranging from 32 to 100 % with a range of concentrations between 3.2 and 320 mg L(-1). Moreover, no reproduction was scored when concentrations were higher than 3.2 mg L(-1). At 3.2 mg L(-1), azadirachtin significantly inhibited the egg-laying and, consequently, the production of drones during 6 weeks. Ovarian length decreased with the increase of the azadirachtin concentration. When azadirachtin was tested under an experimental setup in the laboratory where bumblebees need to forage for food, the sublethal effects were stronger as the numbers of drones were reduced already with a concentration of 0.64 mg L(-1). Besides, a negative correlation was found between the body mass of male offspring and azadirachtin concentration. In conclusion, our results as performed in the laboratory demonstrated that azadirachtin can affect B. terrestris with a range of sublethal effects. Taking into account that sublethal effects are as important as lethal effects for the development and survival of the colonies of B. terrestris

  14. Distributions of median nutrient and chlorophyll concentrations across the Red River Basin, USA.

    PubMed

    Longing, D; Haggard, B E

    2010-01-01

    Acquisition and compilation of water-quality data for an 11-yr time period (1996-2006) from 589 stream and river stations were conducted to support nutrient criteria development for the multistate Red River Basin shared by Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Ten water-quality parameters were collected from six data sources (USGS, Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality, Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality, Oklahoma Conservation Commission, Oklahoma Water Resources Board, and Texas Commission on Environmental Quality), and an additional 13 parameters were acquired from at least one source. Median concentrations of water-quality parameters were calculated at each individual station and frequency distributions (minimum, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th percentiles, and maximum) of the median concentrations were calculated. Across the Red River Basin, median values for total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and sestonic chlorophyll-a (chl-a) ranged from < 0.02 to 20.2 mg L(-1), < 0.01 to 6.66 mg L(-1), and 0.10 to 262 microg L(-1), respectively. Overall, the 25th percentiles of TN data specific to the Red River Basin were generally similar to the USEPA-recommended ecoregion nutrient criteria of 0.31 to 0.88 mg L(-1), whereas median TP and chl-a data specific to the Red River Basin showed 25th percentiles higher than the USEPA-recommended criteria (0.010-0.067 mg TP L(-1); 0.93-3.00 microg chl-a L(-1)). The unique location of the Red River Basin in the south-central United States places it near the boundaries of several aggregate ecoregions; therefore, the development of ecoregion nutrient criteria likely requires using data specific to the Red River Basin, as shown in these analyses. This study provided basin-specific frequency distribution of median concentrations of water-quality parameters as the first step to support states in developing nutrient criteria to protect designated uses in the multijurisdictional Red River Basin.

  15. Effects of grip force on median nerve deformation at different wrist angles

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroki; Muraki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of grip on changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameter in the radial-ulnar direction (D1) and dorsal-palmar direction (D2) at three wrist angles. Twenty-nine healthy participants (19 men [mean age, 24.2 ± 1.6 years]; 10 women [mean age, 24.0 ± 1.6 years]) were recruited. The median nerve was examined at the proximal carpal tunnel region in three grip conditions, namely finger relaxation, unclenched fist, and clenched fist. Ultrasound examinations were performed in the neutral wrist position (0°), at 30°wrist flexion, and at 30°wrist extension for both wrists. The grip condition and wrist angle showed significant main effects (p < 0.01) on the changes in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. Furthermore, significant interactions (p < 0.01) were found between the grip condition and wrist angle for the MNCSA, D1, and D2. In the neutral wrist position (0°), significant reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2 were observed when finger relaxation changed to unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Clenched fist condition caused the highest deformations in the median nerve measurements (MNCSA, approximately −25%; D1, −13%; D2, −12%). The MNCSA was significantly lower at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension than in the neutral wrist position (0°) at unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Notably, clenched fist condition at 30°wrist flexion showed the highest reduction of the MNCSA (−29%). In addition, 30°wrist flexion resulted in a lower D1 at clenched fist condition. In contrast, 30°wrist extension resulted in a lower D2 at both unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Our results suggest that unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions cause reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. More importantly, unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension can lead to further deformation of the median nerve. PMID:27688983

  16. Rifaximin diminishes neutropenia following potentially lethal whole-body radiation.

    PubMed

    Jahraus, Christopher D; Schemera, Bettina; Rynders, Patricia; Ramos, Melissa; Powell, Charles; Faircloth, John; Brawner, William R

    2010-07-01

    Terrorist attacks involving radiological or nuclear weapons are a substantial geopolitical concern, given that large populations could be exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation. Because of this, evaluating potential countermeasures against radiation-induced mortality is critical. Gut microflora are the most common source of systemic infection following exposure to lethal doses of whole-body radiation, suggesting that prophylactic antibiotic therapy may reduce mortality after radiation exposure. The chemical stability, easy administration and favorable tolerability profile of the non-systemic antibiotic, rifaximin, make it an ideal potential candidate for use as a countermeasure. This study evaluated the use of rifaximin as a countermeasure against low-to-intermediate-dose whole-body radiation in rodents. Female Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were irradiated with 550 cGy to the whole body and were evaluated for 30 d. Animals received methylcellulose, neomycin (179 mg/kg/d) or variably dosed rifaximin (150-2000 mg/kg/d) one hour after irradiation and daily throughout the study period. Clinical assessments (e.g. body weight) were made daily. On postirradiation day 30, blood samples were collected and a complete blood cell count was performed. Animals receiving high doses of rifaximin (i.e. 1000 or 2000 mg/kg/d) had a greater increase in weight from the day of irradiation to postirradiation day 30 compared with animals that received placebo or neomycin. For animals with an increase in average body weight from irradiation day within 80-110% of the group average, methylcellulose rendered an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of 211, neomycin rendered an ANC of 334, rifaximin 300 mg/kg/d rendered an ANC of 582 and rifaximin 1000 mg/kg/d rendered an ANC of 854 (P = 0.05 for group comparison). Exposure to rifaximin after near-lethal whole-body radiation resulted in diminished levels of neutropenia.

  17. Acute toxoplasmosis leads to lethal overproduction of Th1 cytokines.

    PubMed

    Mordue, D G; Monroy, F; La Regina, M; Dinarello, C A; Sibley, L D

    2001-10-15

    Virulence in Toxoplasma gondii is strongly influenced by the genotype of the parasite. Type I strains uniformly cause rapid death in mice regardless of the host genotype or the challenge dose. In contrast, the outcome of infections with type II strains is highly dependent on the challenge dose and the genotype of the host. To understand the basis of acute virulence in toxoplasmosis, we compared low and high doses of the RH strain (type I) and the ME49/PTG strain (type II) of T. gondii in outbred mice. Differences in virulence were reflected in only modestly different growth rates in vivo, and both strains disseminated widely to different tissues. The key difference in the virulent RH strain was the ability to reach high tissue burdens rapidly following a low dose challenge. Lethal infections caused by type I (RH) or type II (PTG) strain infections were accompanied by extremely elevated levels of Th1 cytokines in the serum, including IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-12, and IL-18. Extensive liver damage and lymphoid degeneration accompanied the elevated levels of cytokines produced during lethal infection. Increased time of survival following lethal infection with the RH strain was provided by neutralization of IL-18, but not TNF-alpha or IFN-gamma. Nonlethal infections with a low dose of type II PTG strain parasites were characterized by a modest induction of Th1 cytokines that led to control of infection and minimal damage to host tissues. Our findings establish that overstimulation of immune responses that are normally necessary for protection is an important feature of acute toxoplasmosis.

  18. Preparation and characterization of cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Saebel, Crystal E.; Carbone, Ryan; Dabous, John R.; Lo, Suet Y.; Siemann, Stefan

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor (CoLF) is highly active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoLF can be prepared by bio-assimilation and direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lethal factor binds cobalt tightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic spectrum of CoLF reveals penta-coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of CoLF with thioglycolic acid follows a 2-step mechanism. -- Abstract: Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase involved in the cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases near their N-termini. The current report concerns the preparation of cobalt-substituted LF (CoLF) and its characterization by electronic spectroscopy. Two strategies to produce CoLF were explored, including (i) a bio-assimilation approach involving the cultivation of LF-expressing Bacillus megaterium cells in the presence of CoCl{sub 2}, and (ii) direct exchange by treatment of zinc-LF with CoCl{sub 2}. Independent of the method employed, the protein was found to contain one Co{sup 2+} per LF molecule, and was shown to be twice as active as its native zinc counterpart. The electronic spectrum of CoLF suggests the Co{sup 2+} ion to be five-coordinate, an observation similar to that reported for other Co{sup 2+}-substituted gluzincins, but distinct from that documented for the crystal structure of native LF. Furthermore, spectroscopic studies following the exposure of CoLF to thioglycolic acid (TGA) revealed a sequential mechanism of metal removal from LF, which likely involves the formation of an enzyme: Co{sup 2+}:TGA ternary complex prior to demetallation of the active site. CoLF reported herein constitutes the first spectroscopic probe of LF's active site, which may be utilized in future studies to gain further insight into the enzyme's mechanism and inhibitor interactions.

  19. Filgrastim Improves Survival in Lethally Irradiated Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Farese, Ann M.; Cohen, Melanie V.; Katz, Barry P.; Smith, Cassandra P.; Gibbs, Allison; Cohen, Daniel M.; MacVittie, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of individuals exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation is of paramount concern to health professionals and government agencies. We evaluated the efficacy of filgrastim to increase survival of nonhuman primates (NHP) exposed to an approximate mid-lethal dose (LD50/60) (7.50 Gy) of LINAC-derived photon radiation. Prior to total-body irradiation (TBI), nonhuman primates were randomized to either a control (n =22) or filgrastim-treated (n =24) cohorts. Filgrastim (10 μg/kg/d) was administered beginning 1 day after TBI and continued daily until the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was >1,000/μL for 3 consecutive days. All nonhuman primates received medical management as per protocol. The primary end point was all cause overall mortality over the 60 day in-life study. Secondary end points included mean survival time of decedents and all hematologic-related parameters. Filgrastim significantly (P < 0.004) reduced 60 day overall mortality [20.8% (5/24)] compared to the controls [59.1% (13/22)]. Filgrastim significantly decreased the duration of neutropenia, but did not affect the absolute neutrophil count nadir. Febrile neutropenia (ANC <500/μL and body temperature ≥103°F) was experienced by 90.9% (20/22) of controls compared to 79.2% (19/24) of filgrastim-treated animals (P = 0.418). Survival was significantly increased by 38.3% over controls. Filgrastim, administered at this dose and schedule, effectively mitigated the lethality of the hematopoietic subsyndrome of the acute radiation syndrome. PMID:23210705

  20. Studies on the Chick-lethal Toxin of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    A toxin which is lethal for two week old chicks has been recovered from strains of Escherichia coli O78:K80 of bovine and avian origin and from avian isolates of serogroups O2, O45 and O109. The toxin is heat-labile, antigenic, high in protein, inactivated by pronase, trypsin, amylase, and pancreatic lipase. The toxin may be precipitated by ammonium sulfate or TCA treatment from the supernatant obtained by repeated centrifugation of sonicated cells. Considerable purification has been obtained by column chromatography using Sepharose 6B. PMID:4270809

  1. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (112). Perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia (PLH).

    PubMed

    Kritsaneepaiboon, S; Jaruratanasirikul, S; Dissaneevate, S

    2006-11-01

    A two-hour-old female infant presented with respiratory distress and short limbs. Neonatal radiographs showed micromelic dwarfism and generalised demineralisation, especially at the ribs, long bones of both forearms and both fibulae. The spine showed a flattened shape. All long bones showed metaphyseal irregularities and flaring. Normal serum calcium and elevated serum phosphorus were found, while serum alkaline phosphatase was markedly reduced. A diagnosis of perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia was made. The aetiology, clinical manifestations, radiographical findings, laboratory assays, prenatal diagnosis and treatment of hypophosphatasia are discussed.

  2. Perinatal lethal type II osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, Imene Dahmane; Hamida, Emira Ben; Rebeh, Rania Ben; Chaouachi, Sihem; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    We report a new case of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type II which is a perinatal lethal form. First trimester ultrasound didn't identified abnormalities. Second trimester ultrasound showed incurved limbs, narrow chest, with hypomineralization and multiple fractures of ribs and long bones. Parents refused pregnancy termination; they felt that the diagnosis was late. At birth, the newborn presented immediate respiratory distress. Postnatal examination and bone radiography confirmed the diagnosis of OI type IIA. Death occurred on day 25 of life related to respiratory failure.

  3. Intimate partner homicide: new insights for understanding lethality and risks.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Brynn E; Murphy, Sharon B; Moynihan, Mary M; Dudley-Fennessey, Erin; Stapleton, Jane G

    2015-02-01

    Research on covictims, family members, and close friends who have lost loved ones to intimate partner homicide (IPH) is a neglected area of study. We conducted phenomenological interviews with covictims to gain insights into risk and lethality, examined affidavits from criminal case files, and reviewed news releases. The data uncovered acute risk factors prior to the homicide, identified changes in the perpetrators' behavior and the perpetrators' perceived loss of control over the victim, and described barriers that victims faced when attempting to gain safety. Findings suggest that recognizing acute risk factors is an important area for future IPH research.

  4. The Role of BRCA1 in Lethal Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Fiore C, Fall K, Martin N, Ma J, Sinnott J, Giovannucci E, Stampfer M, Sesso HD, Kantoff PW, Finn S, Loda M, Mucci L. Immunohistochemical expression...Sinnott J, Giovannucci E, Stampfer M, Sesso HD, Kantoff PW, Finn S, Loda M, Mucci L. Immunohistochemical expression of BRCA1 and lethal prostate cancer...Judson2,3, Kathryn Penney2,3, Richard Flavin1, Jennifer Stark2,3, Christopher Fiore1, Katja Fall2,3,10, Neil Martin3,6, Jing Ma2, Jennifer Sinnott2,5, Edward

  5. Importance of Tissue Morphology Relative to Patient Reports of Symptoms and Functional Limitations Resulting From Median Nerve Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Kevin D.; Li, Xiaobai; Sommerich, Carolyn M.; Case-Smith, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Significant data exist for the personal, environmental, and occupational risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome. Few data, however, explain the interrelationship of tissue morphology to these factors among patients with clinical presentation of median nerve pathology. Therefore, our primary objective was to examine the relationship of various risk factors that may be predictive of subjective reports of symptoms or functional deficits accounting for median nerve morphology. Using diagnostic ultrasonography, we observed real-time median nerve morphology among 88 participants with varying reports of symptoms or functional limitations resulting from median nerve pathology. Body mass index, educational level, and nerve morphology were the primary predictive factors. Monitoring median nerve morphology with ultrasonography may provide valuable information for clinicians treating patients with symptoms of median nerve pathology. Sonographic measurements may be a useful clinical tool for improving treatment planning and provision, documenting patient status, or measuring clinical outcomes of prevention and rehabilitation interventions. PMID:23245784

  6. The role of protein interactions in mediating essentiality and synthetic lethality.

    PubMed

    Talavera, David; Robertson, David L; Lovell, Simon C

    2013-01-01

    Genes are characterized as essential if their knockout is associated with a lethal phenotype, and these "essential genes" play a central role in biological function. In addition, some genes are only essential when deleted in pairs, a phenomenon known as synthetic lethality. Here we consider genes displaying synthetic lethality as "essential pairs" of genes, and analyze the properties of yeast essential genes and synthetic lethal pairs together. As gene duplication initially produces an identical pair or sets of genes, it is often invoked as an explanation for synthetic lethality. However, we find that duplication explains only a minority of cases of synthetic lethality. Similarly, disruption of metabolic pathways leads to relatively few examples of synthetic lethality. By contrast, the vast majority of synthetic lethal gene pairs code for proteins with related functions that share interaction partners. We also find that essential genes and synthetic lethal pairs cluster in the protein-protein interaction network. These results suggest that synthetic lethality is strongly dependent on the formation of protein-protein interactions. Compensation by duplicates does not usually occur mainly because the genes involved are recent duplicates, but is more commonly due to functional similarity that permits preservation of essential protein complexes. This unified view, combining genes that are individually essential with those that form essential pairs, suggests that essentiality is a feature of physical interactions between proteins protein-protein interactions, rather than being inherent in gene and protein products themselves.

  7. Lethal action of quinolones against a temperature-sensitive dnaB replication mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xilin; Malik, Muhammad; Chan, Nymph; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Wang, Jian-Ying; Li, Xinying; Drlica, Karl

    2006-01-01

    Inhibition of DNA replication in an Escherichia coli dnaB-22 mutant failed to block quinolone-mediated lethality. Inhibition of protein synthesis by chloramphenicol inhibited nalidixic acid lethality and, to a lesser extent, ciprofloxacin lethality in both dnaB-22 and wild-type cells. Thus, major features of quinolone-mediated lethality do not depend on ongoing replication.

  8. Lethal and sub-lethal effects on the Asian common toad Duttaphrynus melanostictus from exposure to hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Vindhya A K; Weerasena, Jagathpriya; Lakraj, G Pemantha; Perera, Inoka C; Dangalle, Chandima D; Handunnetti, Shiroma; Premawansa, Sunil; Wijesinghe, Mayuri R

    2016-08-01

    Chromium discharged in industrial effluents frequently occurs as an environmental pollutant, but the lethal and sub-lethal effects the heavy metal might cause in animals exposed to it have been insufficiently investigated. Selecting the amphibian Duttaphrynus melanostictus, we carried out laboratory tests to investigate the effects of short and long term exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in both tadpoles and adult toads. The concentrations used were 0.002, 0.02, 0.2, 1.0 and 2.0mg/L, the first three corresponding to field levels. In vitro exposures were also carried out using toad erythrocytes and Cr(VI) concentrations of 0.0015, 0.003, 0.015, 0.03, 0.15mg/L. Mortality, growth retardation, developmental delays and structural aberrations were noted in the metal-treated tadpoles, with increasing incidence corresponding to increase in Cr(VI) level and duration of exposure. Many of the sub-lethal effects were evident with long term exposure to environmentally relevant levels of the toxicant. Changes in selected blood parameters and erythrocyte morphometry were also detected in Cr(VI) exposed toads, indicating anaemic and leucopenic conditions. In the genotoxicity study, DNA damage indicated by comet assay and increased micronuclei frequency, occurred at the low Cr(VI) concentrations tested. The multiple deleterious effects of exposure to chromium signal the need for monitoring and controlling the discharge of chromium to the environment. The dose-dependency and genotoxic effects observed in this widely distributed Asian toad indicates its suitability for monitoring heavy metal pollution in aquatic systems.

  9. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine benthic invertebrates and fish.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changkeun; Hong, Seongjin; Kwon, Bong-Oh; Lee, Jung-Ho; Ryu, Jongseong; Park, Young-Gyu; Kang, Seong-Gil; Khim, Jong Seong

    2016-08-01

    Concern about leakage of carbon dioxide (CO2) from deep-sea storage in geological reservoirs is increasing because of its possible adverse effects on marine organisms locally or at nearby coastal areas both in sediment and water column. In the present study, we examined how elevated CO2 affects various intertidal epibenthic (benthic copepod), intertidal endobenthic (Manila clam and Venus clam), sub-tidal benthic (brittle starfish), and free-living (marine medaka) organisms in areas expected to be impacted by leakage. Acute lethal and sub-lethal effects were detected in the adult stage of all test organisms exposed to varying concentrations of CO2, due to the associated decline in pH (8.3 to 5.2) during 96-h exposure. However, intertidal organisms (such as benthic copepods and clams) showed remarkable resistance to elevated CO2, with the Venus clam being the most tolerant (LpH50 = 5.45). Sub-tidal species (such as brittle starfish [LpH50 = 6.16] and marine medaka [LpH50 = 5.91]) were more sensitive to elevated CO2 compared to intertidal species, possibly because they have fewer defensive capabilities. Of note, the exposure duration might regulate the degree of acute sub-lethal effects, as evidenced by the Venus clam, which showed a time-dependent effect to elevated CO2. Finally, copper was chosen as a model toxic element to find out the synergistic or antagonistic effects between ocean acidification and metal pollution. Combination of CO2 and Cu exposure enhances the adverse effects to organisms, generally supporting a synergistic effect scenario. Overall, the significant variation in the degree to which CO2 adversely affected organisms (viz., working range and strength) was clearly observed, supporting the general concept of species-dependent effects of elevated CO2.

  10. Comparing biomarker responses during thermal acclimation: A lethal vs non-lethal approach in a tropical reef clownfish.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Carolina; Madeira, Diana; Diniz, Mário S; Cabral, Henrique N; Vinagre, Catarina

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge of thermal stress biology for most tropical fish species in reef ecosystems under climate change is still quite limited. Thus, the objective of this study was to measure the time-course changes of thermal stress biomarkers in the commercially exploited coral reef fish Amphiprion ocellaris, during a laboratory simulated event of increased temperature. Heat shock protein 70kDa (Hsp70) and total ubiquitin (Ub) were determined in the muscle (lethal method) and in the fin (non-lethal alternative method) under two temperature treatments (control - 26°C and elevated temperature - 30°C) throughout one month with weekly samplings. Results suggest that biomarker basal levels are tissue-specific and influence the degree of response under temperature exposure. Responses were highly inducible in the muscle but not in fin tissue, indicating that the latter is not reliable for monitoring purposes. Thermal stress was observed in the muscle after one week of exposure (both biomarkers increased significantly) and Ub levels then decreased, suggesting the animals were able to acclimate by maintaining high levels of Hsp70 and through an effective protein turnover. In addition, the results show that mortality rates did not differ between treatments. This indicates that A. ocellaris is capable of displaying a plastic response to elevated temperature by adjusting the protein quality control system to protect cell functions, without decreasing survival. Thus, this coral reef fish species presents a significant acclimation potential under ocean warming scenarios of +4°C. Monitoring of thermal stress through a non-lethal method, fin-clipping, although desirable proved to be inadequate for this species.

  11. An outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species.

    PubMed

    Inoshima, Yasuo; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Masahiko

    2013-08-30

    An outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis at a Japanese aquarium involved 3 otariids: a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), a South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) and a South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens). In a span of about a week in February 2012, 3 otariids showed diarrhea and were acutely low-spirited; subsequently, all three animals died within a period of 3 days. Markedly increased aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase activities were observed. Necrotic hepatitis and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in liver hepatocytes and intestinal epithelial cells were observed in the South American sea lion on histological examination. Otarine adenovirus DNA was detected from the livers of all three animals by polymerase chain reaction and determination of the sequences showed that all were identical. These results suggest that a single otarine adenovirus strain may have been the etiological agent of this outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis among the different otariid species, and it may be a lethal threat to wild and captive otariids. This is the first evidence of an outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species.

  12. Lethal Mutagenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Induced by Favipiravir.

    PubMed

    de Ávila, Ana I; Gallego, Isabel; Soria, Maria Eugenia; Gregori, Josep; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rice, Charles M; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis is an antiviral approach that consists in extinguishing a virus by an excess of mutations acquired during replication in the presence of a mutagen. Here we show that favipiravir (T-705) is a potent mutagenic agent for hepatitis C virus (HCV) during its replication in human hepatoma cells. T-705 leads to an excess of G → A and C → U transitions in the mutant spectrum of preextinction HCV populations. Infectivity decreased significantly in the presence of concentrations of T-705 which are 2- to 8-fold lower than its cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50). Passaging the virus five times in the presence of 400 μM T-705 resulted in virus extinction. Since T-705 has undergone advanced clinical trials for approval for human use, the results open a new approach based on lethal mutagenesis to treat hepatitis C virus infections. If proven effective for HCV in vivo, this new anti-HCV agent may be useful in patient groups that fail current therapeutic regimens.

  13. Lethal Mutagenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Induced by Favipiravir

    PubMed Central

    de Ávila, Ana I.; Gallego, Isabel; Soria, Maria Eugenia; Gregori, Josep; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rice, Charles M.; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis is an antiviral approach that consists in extinguishing a virus by an excess of mutations acquired during replication in the presence of a mutagen. Here we show that favipiravir (T-705) is a potent mutagenic agent for hepatitis C virus (HCV) during its replication in human hepatoma cells. T-705 leads to an excess of G → A and C → U transitions in the mutant spectrum of preextinction HCV populations. Infectivity decreased significantly in the presence of concentrations of T-705 which are 2- to 8-fold lower than its cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50). Passaging the virus five times in the presence of 400 μM T-705 resulted in virus extinction. Since T-705 has undergone advanced clinical trials for approval for human use, the results open a new approach based on lethal mutagenesis to treat hepatitis C virus infections. If proven effective for HCV in vivo, this new anti-HCV agent may be useful in patient groups that fail current therapeutic regimens. PMID:27755573

  14. Injury Risk Assessment of Non-Lethal Projectile Head Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as “force wall approach” suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the “force wall approach” and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics. PMID:25400712

  15. Effectiveness of lethal, directed wolf-depredation control in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, E.K.; Paul, W.J.; Mech, L.D.; Weisberg, S.

    2008-01-01

    Wolf (Canis lupus) depredations on livestock in Minnesota, USA, are an economic problem for many livestock producers, and depredating wolves are lethally controlled. We sought to determine the effectiveness of lethal control through the analysis of data from 923 government-verified wolf depredations from 1979 to 1998. We analyzed the data by 1) assessing the correlations between the number of wolves killed in response to depredations with number of depredations the following year at state and local levels, and 2) the time to the next depredation. No analysis indicated that trapping wolves substantially reduced the following year's depredations at state or local levels. However, more specific analyses indicated that in certain situations, killing wolves was more effective than no action (i.e., not trapping). For example, trapping and killing adult males decreased the re-depredation risk. At sheep farms, killing wolves was generally effective. Attempting to trap, regardless of the results, seemed more effective at reducing depredations than not trapping, suggesting that mere human activity near depredation sites might deter future depredations.

  16. Injury risk assessment of non-lethal projectile head impacts.

    PubMed

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as "force wall approach" suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the "force wall approach" and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics.

  17. Engineered female-specific lethality for control of pest Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Jin, Li; Walker, Adam S; Fu, Guoliang; Harvey-Samuel, Timothy; Dafa'alla, Tarig; Miles, Andrea; Marubbi, Thea; Granville, Deborah; Humphrey-Jones, Nerys; O'Connell, Sinead; Morrison, Neil I; Alphey, Luke

    2013-03-15

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a pest control strategy involving the mass release of radiation-sterilized insects, which reduce the target population through nonviable matings. In Lepidoptera, SIT could be more broadly applicable if the deleterious effects of sterilization by irradiation could be avoided. Moreover, male-only release can improve the efficacy of SIT. Adequate methods of male-only production in Lepidoptera are currently lacking, in contrast to some Diptera. We describe a synthetic genetic system that allows male-only moth production for SIT and also replaces radiation sterilization with inherited female-specific lethality. We sequenced and characterized the doublesex (dsx) gene from the pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella). Sex-alternate splicing from dsx was used to develop a conditional lethal genetic sexing system in two pest moths: the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) and pink bollworm. This system shows promise for enhancing existing pink bollworm SIT, as well as broadening SIT-type control to diamondback moth and other Lepidoptera.

  18. Killing Range: Explaining Lethality Variance within a Terrorist Organization.

    PubMed

    Asal, Victor; Gill, Paul; Rethemeyer, R Karl; Horgan, John

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (PIRA) brigade level behavior during the Northern Ireland Conflict (1970-1998) and identifies the organizational factors that impact a brigade's lethality as measured via terrorist attacks. Key independent variables include levels of technical expertise, cadre age, counter-terrorism policies experienced, brigade size, and IED components and delivery methods. We find that technical expertise within a brigade allows for careful IED usage, which significantly minimizes civilian casualties (a specific strategic goal of PIRA) while increasing the ability to kill more high value targets with IEDs. Lethal counter-terrorism events also significantly affect a brigade's likelihood of killing both civilians and high-value targets but in different ways. Killing PIRA members significantly decreases IED fatalities but also significantly decreases the possibility of zero civilian IED-related deaths in a given year. Killing innocent Catholics in a Brigade's county significantly increases total and civilian IED fatalities. Together the results suggest the necessity to analyze dynamic situational variables that impact terrorist group behavior at the sub-unit level.

  19. Equation of state and fragmentation issues in computational lethality analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the status of computational analysis of hypervelocity impact lethality in relatively nontechnical terms from the perspective of the author. It is not intended to be a review of the technical literature on the problems of concern. The discussion is focused by concentrating on two phenomenology areas which are of particular concern in computational impact studies. First, the material`s equation of state, specifically the treatment of expanded states of metals undergoing shock vaporization, is discussed. Second, the process of dynamic fragmentation is addressed. In both cases, the context of the discussion deals with inaccuracies and difficulties associated with numerical hypervelocity impact simulations. Laboratory experimental capabilities in hypervelocity impact for impact velocities greater than 10.0 km/s are becoming increasingly viable. This paper also gives recommendations for experimental thrusts which utilize these capabilities that will help to resolve the uncertainties in the numerical lethality studies that are pointed out in the present report.

  20. Deep structure of Porcupine Basin and nature of the Porcupine Median Ridge from seismic refraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watremez, L.; Chen, C.; Prada, M.; Minshull, T. A.; O'Reilly, B.; Reston, T. J.; Wagner, G.; Gaw, V.; Klaeschen, D.; Shannon, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Porcupine Basin is a narrow V-shaped failed rifted basin located offshore SW Ireland. It is of Permo-Triassic to Cenozoic age, with the main rifting phase in the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. Porcupine Basin is a key study area to learn about the processes of continental extension and to understand the thermal history of this rifted basin. Previous studies show increasing stretching factors, from less than 1.5 to the North to more than 6 to the South. A ridge feature, the Porcupine Median Ridge, has been identified in the middle of the southernmost part of the basin. During the last three decades, this ridge has been successively interpreted as a volcanic structure, a diapir of partially serpentinized mantle, or a block of continental crust. Its nature still remains debated today. In this study, we use arrival times from refractions and wide-angle reflections in the sedimentary, crustal and mantle layers to image the crustal structure of the thinnest part of the basin, the geometry of the continental thinning from margin to margin, and the Porcupine Median Ridge. The final velocity model is then compared with coincident seismic reflection data. We show that (1) the basin is asymmetric, (2) P-wave velocities in the uppermost mantle are lower than expected for unaltered peridotites, implying upper-mantle serpentinisation, (3) the nature of Porcupine Median Ridge is probably volcanic, and (4) the amount of thinning is greater than shown in previous studies. We discuss the thermal implications of these results for the evolution of this rift system and the processes leading to the formation of failed rifts. This project is funded by the Irish Shelf Petroleum Studies Group (ISPSG) of the Irish Petroleum Infrastructure Programme Group 4.

  1. CT image artifacts from brachytherapy seed implants: A postprocessing 3D adaptive median filter

    SciTech Connect

    Basran, Parminder S.; Robertson, Andrew; Wells, Derek

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To design a postprocessing 3D adaptive median filter that minimizes streak artifacts and improves soft-tissue contrast in postoperative CT images of brachytherapy seed implantations. Methods: The filter works by identifying voxels that are likely streaks and estimating more reflective voxel intensity by using voxel intensities in adjacent CT slices and applying a median filter over voxels not identified as seeds. Median values are computed over a 5x5x5 mm region of interest (ROI) within the CT volume. An acrylic phantom simulating a clinical seed implant arrangement and containing nonradioactive seeds was created. Low contrast subvolumes of tissuelike material were also embedded in the phantom. Pre- and postprocessed image quality metrics were compared using the standard deviation of ROIs between the seeds, the CT numbers of low contrast ROIs embedded within the phantom, the signal to noise ratio (SNR), and the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the low contrast ROIs. The method was demonstrated with a clinical postimplant CT dataset. Results: After the filter was applied, the standard deviation of CT values in streak artifact regions was significantly reduced from 76.5 to 7.2 HU. Within the observable low contrast plugs, the mean of all ROI standard deviations was significantly reduced from 60.5 to 3.9 HU, SNR significantly increased from 2.3 to 22.4, and CNR significantly increased from 0.2 to 4.1 (all P<0.01). The mean CT in the low contrast plugs remained within 5 HU of the original values. Conclusion: An efficient postprocessing filter that does not require access to projection data, which can be applied irrespective of CT scan parameters has been developed, provided the slice thickness and spacing is 3 mm or less.

  2. Shear Strain and Motion of the Subsynovial Connective Tissue and Median Nerve During Single Digit Motion

    PubMed Central

    Yoshii, Yuichi; Zhao, Chunfeng; Henderson, Jacqueline; Zhao, Kristin D.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to measure the relative motion of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon, its adjacent subsynovial connective tissue, and the median nerve during single digit motion within the carpal tunnel in human cadaver specimens, and estimate the relative motions of these structures in different wrist positions. Methods Using fluoroscopy during simulated single digit flexion, we measured the relative motion of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon, subsynovial connective tissue and median nerve within the carpal tunnel in twelve human cadavers. Measurements were obtained for three wrist positions: neutral; 60 degrees flexion; and 60 degrees extension. After testing with an intact carpal tunnel was completed, the flexor retinaculum was cut with a scalpel and the same testing procedure was repeated for each wrist position. The relative motions of the tendon, subsynovial connective tissue and median nerve were compared using a shear index, defined as the ratio of the difference in motion along the direction of tendon excursion between two tissues divided by tendon excursion, expressed as a percentage. Results Both tendon-subsynovial connective tissue and tendon-nerve shear index were significantly higher in the 60 degrees of wrist flexion and extension positions, compared to the neutral position. After division of the flexor retinaculum, the shear index in the 60 degrees of wrist extension position remained significantly different, compared to the neutral position. Conclusions In summary, we have found that the relative motion between a tendon and subsynovial connective tissue in the carpal tunnel is maximal at extremes of wrist motion. These positions may predispose the subsynovial connective tissue to shear injury. PMID:19121732

  3. SIMP-1 model: Mapping of fo F2 monthly medians over the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshchinskaya, T. Yu.; Mikhailov, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The System of Ionosphere Monitoring and Prediction (SIMP-1), an empirical model of the monthly median state of the ionosphere, includes several blocks for a global description of the ionosphere in the D and E regions and F1 and F2 layers. In this paper, the principles of the creation of the block of the foF2 monthly medians over the Northern Hemisphere, including local models of foF2 based on data from groundbased ionospheric sounding stations and the multiquadric method of mapping, are described. It is shown that the use of effective ionospheric indices of solar activity, rather than the traditionally used sunspot number R 12 makes it possible to increase the accuracy of the approximated dependence of foF2 median values on the solar activity level. The local foF2 models are created in the form of a function of the ionospheric index T over 75 stations of the Northern Hemisphere for 12 months of the year and 24 moments of Universal Time. The multiquadric method, which enables the recovery of a surface exactly through foF2 values at the given station, is used for the foF2 mapping. A comparison of the SIMP-1 model with the CCIR, Prognoz MPCh, and SMI-88 (which is an ionospheric standard in RF) is performed. It is shown that the local models show a high accuracy of approximation of the foF2 observed variations, whereas the multiquadric method provides, on the whole, a higher accuracy of description of the foF2 planetary distribution. The results confirm the high efficiency of the proposed approach.

  4. Median Nerve Somatosensory Evoked Potential in HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Boostani, Reza; Poorzahed, Ali; Ahmadi, Zahra; Mellat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a progressive Myelopathy that mainly involves the corticospinal tract. Despite pronounced involvement of the lower limbs, patients also have abnormalities in their upper limbs. So, we studied somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) of the median nerve in HAM/TSP patients to determine the extent of the involvement of the pathway of the central nervous system, especially the cervical spinal cord. Methods In this cross sectional study, 48 patients with HAM/TSP who were referred to Qaem Hospital in Mashhad from October 2010 to October 2011 were evaluated for various indices, including SSEPs of the median nerve for N9, N11, N13, and N20 waveforms and also N11–13 and N13–20 Inter Peak Latency (IPL), severity of disease (based on Osama criteria), disease duration (less or more than 2 years), age, and gender. SPSS software was used for data analysis. The t-test was used for quantitative data, and the chi-squared test was used for the qualitative variables. Results Thirty-four patients (70.2%) were females. The mean age was 45.6 ± 14.2 years. About SSEPs indices of the median nerve, N9 and N11 were normal in all patients, but N13 (50%), N20 (16.7%), IPL11–13 (58.3%), and IPL13–20 (22.9%) were abnormal. No significant relationships were found between age, gender, disease duration, and SSEPs indices (p > 0.05), but IPL11–13 and IPL13–20 had significant relationships with disease disability (p = 0.017 and p = 0.01, respectively). Conclusion Despite the lack of obvious complaints of upper limbs, SSEPs indices of the median nerve from the cervical spinal cord to the cortex were abnormal, which indicated extension of the lesion from the thoracic spinal cord up to the cervical spinal cord and thalamocortical pathways. Also, abnormalities in the cervical spinal cord had a direct correlation with the severity of disability in patients with HAM/TSP. PMID:27382445

  5. Peripheral nerve lipoma: Case report of an intraneural lipoma of the median nerve and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Alisson Roberto; Finger, Guilherme; Schuster, Marcelo N.; Gobbato, Pedro Luis

    2016-01-01

    Adipose lesions rarely affect the peripheral nerves. This can occur in two different ways: Direct compression by an extraneural lipoma, or by a lipoma originated from the adipose cells located inside the nerve. Since its first description, many terms have been used in the literature to mention intraneural lipomatous lesions. In this article, the authors report a case of a 62-year-old female who presented with an intraneural median nerve lipoma and review the literature concerning the classification of adipose lesions of the nerve, radiological diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27695575

  6. Ruptured median and paramedian lumbar disk. A review of 243 cases.

    PubMed

    Fager, C A

    1985-03-01

    Ruptured median and paramedian lumbar disks present special problems for the surgeon, not the least of which is adequate laminectomy to provide satisfactory decompression and release of the disk fragment without trauma to the cauda equina. The surgical technique described was used over a 10-year period in a series of 243 patients and emphasized the principles of sufficient removal of bone and posterolateral approach. Although 72% of patients had complete or partial myelographic block, unilateral symptoms and neurologic signs predominated. Full recovery with minimal or no neurologic deficit was recorded in 85% of patients, with a recurrence rate of 6%. In no patient was neurologic deficit greater than before operation.

  7. Median and Ulnar 14-cm Antidromic Sensory Studies to the Third and Fifth Digits-A Comparison of Amplitude.

    PubMed

    Buschbacher, Ralph M; Berkson, Andrew; Mottley, Douglas; Omar, Zaliha

    2006-01-01

    There are multiple reports of peripheral nerve injury following the implantation or removal of surgical hardware. Electrodiagnostic testing can be useful in assessing the chronicity, severity, and recovery of such a nerve injury. The purpose of this study is to establish a normative data set to allow for comparison of median and ulnar antidromic sensory peak-to-peak amplitude values. Median and ulnar antidromic sensory studies to digits 3 and 5 are commonly performed in electrodiagnosis to aid in the diagnosis of a variety of clinical conditions. Numerous studies have examined normal latency and amplitude values for these studies. To our knowledge there has been one other study that compared the relationship between median and ulnar sensory amplitude results taken from the same limb. That study had limited generalizability to the population at large. One hundred-nineteen volunteers were tested with antidromic sensory technique to digits 3 and 5 at 14-cm stimulation distance. Peak latency and peak-to-peak amplitude were recorded. Possible relationships between age, gender, height, weight, BMI, and median and ulnar amplitude were examined through simple linear regressions. Age, weight, height, and BMI were all found to negatively correlate with both median and ulnar amplitude. Female subjects were found to have statistically greater median and ulnar amplitudes than male subjects. Factors were said to be statistically significant at the P median peak latency was 3.2 +/- 0.3 ms. The mean ulnar peak latency was 3.2 +/- 0.4 ms. The mean median peak-to-peak amplitude was 87 +/- 36 muV. The mean ulnar peak-to-peak amplitude was 72 +/- 34 muV. The upper limit of normal difference (2.5th percentile) in median-versus-ulnar amplitude was a 56% drop from median-to-ulnar amplitude, or a 59% drop from ulnar-to-median amplitude. This allows for amplitude comparisons to be made between these two nerves.

  8. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of five pesticides used in rice farming on the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Rico, Andreu; Sabater, Consuelo; Castillo, María-Ángeles

    2016-05-01

    The toxicity of five pesticides typically used in rice farming (trichlorfon, dimethoate, carbendazim, tebuconazole and prochloraz) was evaluated on different lethal and sub-lethal endpoints of the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The evaluated endpoints included: avoidance behaviour after an exposure period of 2 days; and mortality, weight loss, enzymatic activities (cholinesterase, lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase) and histopathological effects after an exposure period of 14 days. Carbendazim was found to be highly toxic to E. fetida (LC50=2mg/kg d.w.), significantly reducing earthworm weight and showing an avoidance response at soil concentrations that are close to those predicted in rice-fields and in surrounding ecosystems. The insecticide dimethoate showed a moderate acute toxicity (LC50=28mg/kg d.w.), whereas the rest of tested pesticides showed low toxicity potential (LC50 values above 100mg/kg d.w.). For these pesticides, however, weight loss was identified as a sensitive endpoint, with NOEC values approximately 2 times or lower than the calculated LC10 values. The investigated effects on the enzymatic activities of E. fetida and the observed histopathological alterations (longitudinal and circular muscle lesions, edematous tissues, endothelial degeneration and necrosis) proved to be sensitive biomarkers to monitor pesticide contamination and are proposed as alternative measures to evaluate pesticide risks on agro-ecosystems.

  9. Is Atyaephyra desmarestii a useful candidate for lethal and sub-lethal toxicity tests on pharmaceutical compounds?

    PubMed

    Nieto, Elena; Blasco, Julián; González-Ortegón, Enrique; Drake, Pilar; Hampel, Miriam

    2013-12-15

    Single and mixture toxicity tests on three pharmaceutical compounds, Diclofenac (DF), Ibuprofen (IB) and Carbamazepine (CBZ), were carried out with the freshwater shrimp Atyaephyra desmarestii. Lethal and sublethal responses were analyzed for single compounds. Lethal concentrations (LC50) obtained for each individual compound, after 96 h of exposure, were 6.3 mg L(-1) for DF, 13.3 mg L(-1) for IB and 94.3 mg L(-1) for CBZ. The selected sublethal endpoints of food ingestion, osmoregulatory capacity and respiration rates were not affected by the exposures to environmentally-relevant concentrations. Based on mortality data obtained, the predictive no effect concentration (PNEC) was calculated for each of the compounds, and compared with predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) reported in surface waters. The environmental risk of each compound was estimated as the ratio between PEC/PNEC, and indicated that IB could represent a medium risk in freshwater environments. Additionally, binary and ternary mixture toxicity assays of the selected compounds were carried out. The data obtained was applied to two predictive toxicity models: Concentration Addition (CA) and Independent Action (IA). Finally, risk assessment was estimated using risk quotients (RQ) for the compound mixtures based on EC50 and LC50 values.

  10. Lethality and histopathological alterations caused by Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom from Argentina: Neutralization of lethality by experimental and therapeutic antivenoms.

    PubMed

    de Roodt, Adolfo Rafael; Lago, Néstor Rubén; Lanari, Laura Cecilia; Laskowicz, Rodrigo Daniel; Costa de Oliveira, Vanessa; Neder de Román, Estela; de Titto, Ernesto Horacio; Damin, Carlos Fabián

    2017-01-01

    Although the spiders of the genus Phoneutria cause envenomation and their presence has been described in several provinces of the north of Argentina, they are not as common as other spiders of sanitary importance. In the present work, we studied the toxicity of samples of venom of Phoneutria spiders from the provinces of Misiones (where severe envenomation and deaths by Phoneutria have been recorded) and Jujuy (where no deaths have been recorded and severe envenomations are not frequent). To this end, we assessed the lethal potency in mice and guinea pigs and the histopathological alterations caused by both venoms, as well as the neutralization by the commonly used therapeutic antivenom produced by the Butantan Institute in Brazil and by an experimental antivenom developed with venom of P. nigriventer from Misiones. There were no differences in the lethality of the venoms of spiders from both regions. Post mortem examination showed that the heart and lungs were the most affected organs, while important pulmonary edema was seen macroscopically. Histological analysis showed edema, atelectasis, emphysema and cardiac lesion in both experimental models. The antivenoms assayed showed good neutralization of the venoms in the two experimental models. Despite the different geographic origins, the venoms showed similar toxicity and both the experimental antivenom and therapeutic antivenmos were able to neutralize the venoms of Argentinean P. nigriventer.

  11. Superficial brachial artery: A possible cause for idiopathic median nerve entrapment neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nkomozepi, Pilani; Xhakaza, Nkosi; Swanepoel, Elaine

    2017-02-15

    Nerve entrapment syndromes occur because of anatomic constraints at specific locations in both upper and lower limbs. Anatomical locations prone to nerve entrapment syndromes include sites where a nerve courses through fibro-osseous or fibromuscular tunnels or penetrates a muscle. The median nerve (MN) can be entrapped by the ligament of Struthers; thickened biceps aponeurosis; between the superficial and deep heads of the pronator teres muscle and by a thickened proximal edge of flexor digitorum superficialis muscle. A few cases of MN neuropathies encountered are reported to be idiopathic. The superficial branchial artery (SBA) is defined as the artery running superficial to MN or its roots. This divergence from normal anatomy may be the possible explanation for idiopathic median nerve entrapment neuropathy. This study presents three cases with unilateral presence of the SBA encountered during routine undergraduate dissection at the University of Johannesburg. Case 1: SBA divided into radial and ulnar arteries. Brachial artery (BA) terminated as deep brachial artery. Case 2: SBA continued as radial artery (RA). BA terminated as ulnar artery (UA), anterior and posterior interosseous arteries. Case 3: SBA continued as UA. BA divided into radial and common interosseous arteries. Arteries that take an unusual course are more vulnerable to iatrogenic injury during surgical procedures and may disturb the evaluation of angiographic images during diagnosis. In particular, the presence of SBA may be a course of idiopathic neuropathies.

  12. Underwater sound localization of pure tones in the median plane by harbor seals (Phoca vitulina).

    PubMed

    Byl, Jenny Ann; Miersch, Lars; Wieskotten, Sven; Dehnhardt, Guido

    2016-12-01

    In an underwater environment the physical characteristics of sound propagation differ considerably from those in air. For this reason, sound localization underwater is associated with difficulties, especially in the median plane. It was the approach of the present study to investigate whether harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) are able to determine the direction of a tonal signal form above or below in the underwater environment. Minimum audible angles (MAAs) or the angular range in which the animals could localize a pure tone stimulus in the vertical plane were obtained for frequencies from 0.35 up to 16 kHz. Testing was conducted with four male harbor seals in a semi-circle area of 6 m in diameter in about 2.5 m depth, by using a two alternative forced choice method. The results show that harbor seals are able to localize a pure tone in the median plane under water with a high performance for low frequency stimuli between 350 Hz and 2 kHz with MAAs ranging from below 2.5° up to about 25°. For higher frequencies the animals show strong individual differences.

  13. Visualization of spatiotemporal behavior of discrete maps via generation of recursive median elements.

    PubMed

    Daya Sagar, B S

    2010-02-01

    Spatial interpolation is one of the demanding techniques in Geographic Information Science (GISci) to generate interpolated maps in a continuous manner by using two discrete spatial and/or temporal data sets. Noise-free data (thematic layers) depicting a specific theme at varied spatial or temporal resolutions consist of connected components either in aggregated or in disaggregated forms. This short paper provides a simple framework: 1) to categorize the connected components of layered sets of two different time instants through their spatial relationships and the Hausdorff distances between the companion-connected components and 2) to generate sequential maps (interpolations) between the discrete thematic maps. Development of the median set, using Hausdorff erosion and dilation distances to interpolate between temporal frames, is demonstrated on lake geometries mapped at two different times and also on the bubonic plague epidemic spread data available for 11 consecutive years. We documented the significantly fair quality of the median sets generated for epidemic data between alternative years by visually comparing the interpolated maps with actual maps. They can be used to visualize (animate) the spatiotemporal behavior of a specific theme in a continuous sequence.

  14. Escalated median dose for pituitary macroadenomas using intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.; Murray, B.; Underwood, L.; Halls, S.; Roa, W

    2004-03-31

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) has become an established treatment for pituitary macroadenomas. This study is an investigation into the possible dosimetric advantages of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for such critically located tumors. Three consecutive patients with pituitary macroadenoma previously treated with 3D CRT were replanned with inverse-planned IMRT using Helax-TMS (V.6.0, Helax AB, Uppsala, Sweden. Fusion of computed tomography (CT) with postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed within the planning system to define the gross tumor volume (GTV), planning target volume (PTV), and normal structures including the optic chiasm. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the 3D CRT plans were then compared with those of the corresponding prospective IMRT plans. Both techniques maintained critical structure doses below tolerance levels while maintaining a minimum dose of 45 Gy to 100% of the PTV. While IMRT plans deliver consistently more heterogeneous dose distributions to the PTV, the median PTV dose is elevated in the IMRT plans compared with the 3D CRT plans. For critically located tumors like these pituitary macroadenomas, IMRT allows escalation of the median dose to the tumor without an accompanying loss in critical structure sparing or creating unacceptable cold spots within the PTV.

  15. Median and Ulnar Neuropathy Assessment in Parkinson's Disease regarding Symptom Severity and Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yardimci, Nilgul; Cemeroglu, Ozlem; Ozturk, Eda; Gürlü, Gülsüm; Şahin, Esra; Bozkurt, Saliha; Cengiz, Tugba; Karali, Gulderen; Cakirbay, Hasim; İlhan, Atilla

    2016-01-01

    Background. While increasing evidence suggests comorbidity of peripheral neuropathy (PNP) and Parkinson's disease (PD), the pathogenesis of PNP in PD is still a debate. The aim of this article is to search the core PD symptoms such as rigidity and tremor as contributing factors to mononeuropathy development while emphasizing each individual patient's asymmetric symptom severity. Methods. We studied 62 wrists and 62 elbows of 31 patients (mean age 66.48 ± 10.67) and 64 wrists and 64 elbows of 32 age-gender matched healthy controls (mean age 62.03 ± 10.40, p = 0.145). The Hoehn and Yahr disability scale and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rated Scale were used to determine the severity of the disease. Results. According to electrodiagnostic criteria, we confirmed median neuropathy in 16.12% (bilateral in two-thirds of the patients) and ulnar neuropathy in 3.22% of the PD group. While mean age (p = 0.003), age at PD onset (p = 0.019), and H&Y scores (p = 0.016) were significant, tremor and rigidity scores were not. The comparison of the mean indices of electrophysiologic parameters indicated subclinical median and ulnar nerve demyelination both at the wrist and at the elbow in the patient groups where a longer disease duration and mild tremor and rigidity scores are prominent, remarkably. Conclusion. A disease related peripheral neurodegeneration beyond symptom severity occurs in PD.

  16. Median estimation of chemical constituents for sampling on two occasions under a log‐normal model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Sampling from a finite population on multiple occasions introduces dependencies between the successive samples when overlap is designed. Such sampling designs lead to efficient statistical estimates, while they allow estimating changes over time for the targeted outcomes. This makes them very popular in real‐world statistical practice. Sampling with partial replacement can also be very efficient in biological and environmental studies where estimation of toxicants and its trends over time is the main interest. Sampling with partial replacement is designed here on two occasions in order to estimate the median concentration of chemical constituents quantified by means of liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Such data represent relative peak areas resulting from the chromatographic analysis. They are therefore positive‐valued and skewed data, and are commonly fitted very well by the log‐normal model. A log‐normal model is assumed here for chemical constituents quantified in mainstream cigarette smoke in a real case study. Combining design‐based and model‐based approaches for statistical inference, we seek for the median estimation of chemical constituents by sampling with partial replacement on two time occasions. We also discuss the limitations of extending the proposed approach to other skewed population models. The latter is investigated by means of a Monte Carlo simulation study. PMID:26013679

  17. Rule-based fuzzy vector median filters for 3D phase contrast MRI segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundareswaran, Kartik S.; Frakes, David H.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2008-02-01

    Recent technological advances have contributed to the advent of phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PCMRI) as standard practice in clinical environments. In particular, decreased scan times have made using the modality more feasible. PCMRI is now a common tool for flow quantification, and for more complex vector field analyses that target the early detection of problematic flow conditions. Segmentation is one component of this type of application that can impact the accuracy of the final product dramatically. Vascular segmentation, in general, is a long-standing problem that has received significant attention. Segmentation in the context of PCMRI data, however, has been explored less and can benefit from object-based image processing techniques that incorporate fluids specific information. Here we present a fuzzy rule-based adaptive vector median filtering (FAVMF) algorithm that in combination with active contour modeling facilitates high-quality PCMRI segmentation while mitigating the effects of noise. The FAVMF technique was tested on 111 synthetically generated PC MRI slices and on 15 patients with congenital heart disease. The results were compared to other multi-dimensional filters namely the adaptive vector median filter, the adaptive vector directional filter, and the scalar low pass filter commonly used in PC MRI applications. FAVMF significantly outperformed the standard filtering methods (p < 0.0001). Two conclusions can be drawn from these results: a) Filtering should be performed after vessel segmentation of PC MRI; b) Vector based filtering methods should be used instead of scalar techniques.

  18. Exact intervals and tests for median when one sample value possibly an outliner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, G. J.; Walsh, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Available are independent observations (continuous data) that are believed to be a random sample. Desired are distribution-free confidence intervals and significance tests for the population median. However, there is the possibility that either the smallest or the largest observation is an outlier. Then, use of a procedure for rejection of an outlying observation might seem appropriate. Such a procedure would consider that two alternative situations are possible and would select one of them. Either (1) the n observations are truly a random sample, or (2) an outlier exists and its removal leaves a random sample of size n-1. For either situation, confidence intervals and tests are desired for the median of the population yielding the random sample. Unfortunately, satisfactory rejection procedures of a distribution-free nature do not seem to be available. Moreover, all rejection procedures impose undesirable conditional effects on the observations, and also, can select the wrong one of the two above situations. It is found that two-sided intervals and tests based on two symmetrically located order statistics (not the largest and smallest) of the n observations have this property.

  19. Median and common peroneal neuropathy in coir workers of Alappuzha district, Kerala

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Anand, Biji; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Coir work, in a large number of people involves mechanically rolling the coconut fibers into coir which is later subjected to various processes. The primary work is done as a cottage industry specially by women in the sitting posture for several hours. This study reports evidence of median and common peroneal neuropathy electrophysiologically in people who had been engaged in this job for several years. This study was initiated to establish the possible relationship between coir work and symptomatic neuropathies which was seen in that region with all investigations “for other causes not” contributing to the etiological diagnosis. Subjects and Methods: One hundred and forty-two upper limbs and 142 lower limbs in patients engaged in long years of coir work but having no symptoms were evaluated electrophysiologically with informed consent and financial compensation, appropriate inclusion and exclusion criteria were followed as described in the text. Results: There is electrophysiological evidence for median and common peroneal neuropathy in persons engaged in long years of coir work. Conclusions: Coir workers neuropathy appears to be a new occupational neuropathy which can be prevented by following simple preventive measures. PMID:28298838

  20. Median and Ulnar Neuropathy Assessment in Parkinson's Disease regarding Symptom Severity and Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Cemeroglu, Ozlem; Ozturk, Eda; Gürlü, Gülsüm; Şahin, Esra; Bozkurt, Saliha; Cengiz, Tugba; Karali, Gulderen; Cakirbay, Hasim; İlhan, Atilla

    2016-01-01

    Background. While increasing evidence suggests comorbidity of peripheral neuropathy (PNP) and Parkinson's disease (PD), the pathogenesis of PNP in PD is still a debate. The aim of this article is to search the core PD symptoms such as rigidity and tremor as contributing factors to mononeuropathy development while emphasizing each individual patient's asymmetric symptom severity. Methods. We studied 62 wrists and 62 elbows of 31 patients (mean age 66.48 ± 10.67) and 64 wrists and 64 elbows of 32 age-gender matched healthy controls (mean age 62.03 ± 10.40, p = 0.145). The Hoehn and Yahr disability scale and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rated Scale were used to determine the severity of the disease. Results. According to electrodiagnostic criteria, we confirmed median neuropathy in 16.12% (bilateral in two-thirds of the patients) and ulnar neuropathy in 3.22% of the PD group. While mean age (p = 0.003), age at PD onset (p = 0.019), and H&Y scores (p = 0.016) were significant, tremor and rigidity scores were not. The comparison of the mean indices of electrophysiologic parameters indicated subclinical median and ulnar nerve demyelination both at the wrist and at the elbow in the patient groups where a longer disease duration and mild tremor and rigidity scores are prominent, remarkably. Conclusion. A disease related peripheral neurodegeneration beyond symptom severity occurs in PD. PMID:27843673

  1. Acute effects of neural mobilization and infrared on the mechanics of the median nerve

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Monara Kedma; Fontenele dos Santos, Gabrielly; Martins e Silva, Diandra Caroline; Mota de Freitas, Ana Cláudia; Henriques, Isadora Ferreira; Andrade, Peterson Marco; Machado, Dionis de Castro; Teixeira, Silmar; Neves, Marco Orsini; Dias, Gildário; Silva-Júnior, Fernando; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed the acute effects of infrared and neural mobilization on the median nerve on the range of elbow extension of the dominant limb. [Subjects and Methods] Forty participants from university, neurologically asymptomatic, 12 males and 28 females (22.8 ± 1.9 years), were randomly divided into four groups: Group 1 (control) rested for 25 minutes in the supine position; Group 2 received the specific neural mobilization for the median nerve; Group 3 received an application of infrared for 15 minutes on the forearm; Group 4 received the same application of infrared followed by neural mobilization. The goniometric parameters of elbow extension were evaluated after the intervention. [Results] Significant differences of extension value were observed between Group 1 and Group 3 (15.75 degrees), and between Group 1 and Group 4 (14.60 degrees), and the average higher in Group 3 (26.35 degrees). [Conclusion] This research provides new experimental evidence that NM in relation to superficial heat produces an immediate effect on elbow range of motion versus NM isolated. PMID:27390402

  2. Characterizing the continuously acquired cardiovascular time series during hemodialysis, using median hybrid filter preprocessing noise reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Scott; Bowyer, Andrea; Harrap, Stephen B

    2015-01-01

    The clinical characterization of cardiovascular dynamics during hemodialysis (HD) has important pathophysiological implications in terms of diagnostic, cardiovascular risk assessment, and treatment efficacy perspectives. Currently the diagnosis of significant intradialytic systolic blood pressure (SBP) changes among HD patients is imprecise and opportunistic, reliant upon the presence of hypotensive symptoms in conjunction with coincident but isolated noninvasive brachial cuff blood pressure (NIBP) readings. Considering hemodynamic variables as a time series makes a continuous recording approach more desirable than intermittent measures; however, in the clinical environment, the data signal is susceptible to corruption due to both impulsive and Gaussian-type noise. Signal preprocessing is an attractive solution to this problem. Prospectively collected continuous noninvasive SBP data over the short-break intradialytic period in ten patients was preprocessed using a novel median hybrid filter (MHF) algorithm and compared with 50 time-coincident pairs of intradialytic NIBP measures from routine HD practice. The median hybrid preprocessing technique for continuously acquired cardiovascular data yielded a dynamic regression without significant noise and artifact, suitable for high-level profiling of time-dependent SBP behavior. Signal accuracy is highly comparable with standard NIBP measurement, with the added clinical benefit of dynamic real-time hemodynamic information. PMID:25678827

  3. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Patil, V. S.; Nagle, Sunila

    2009-01-01

    A case of lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve in an adult is described in this article. A 33-year-old male presented with tingling, numbness and swelling in the palm of the left non dominant hand that had been present for a few months. Examination revealed that there was fullness in the volar aspect of the wrist and in the inter-thenar area. Another mass was present at the base of the index finger, which appeared to be involving subcutaneous tissues. The clinical diagnosis was carpal tunnel syndrome due to a space occupying tumor mass in the carpal tunnel. On exploration of the carpal tunnel, a large median nerve was seen 4 cm proximal to the wrist crease line and extending distally until it divided into its branches. Another mass was present at the base of the index finger, which was adherent to the skin. The radial digital nerve of the index finger was normal in size. For the enlarged nerve, an epineurotomy was performed and a biopsy was taken. Another biopsy was taken from the distal mass. His postoperative period was uneventful. In July 2004, at the end of 5 years, the patient had no symptoms and the size of the tumor had not increased. PMID:19881034

  4. Median Survival Time of Endometrial Cancer Patients with Lymphovascular Invasion at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Asyikeen, Wan Adnan Wan Nor; Siti-Azrin, Ab Hamid; Jalil, Nur Asyilla Che; Zin, Anani Aila Mat; Othman, Nor Hayati

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecologic malignancy among females worldwide. The purpose of this study was to determine the median survival time of endometrial cancer patients at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). Methods A list of 121 endometrial cancer cases registered at Hospital USM between 2000 until 2011 was retrospectively reviewed. The survival time of the endometrial cancer patients was estimated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Log-rank tests were performed to compare the survival of the patients based on socio-demographics and clinical presentation. Results Only 108 patients, 87.0%, were included who were of Malay ethnicity. Previous history included menopause in 67.6% of patients and diabetes mellitus in 39.8% of patients; additionally, 63.4% of patients were nulliparous. Tumour staging was as follows: 24.5% stage I, 10.8% stage II, 26.5% stage III and 38.2% stage IV. The overall median survival time of the endometrial cancer patients was 70.20 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 51.79, 88.61). The significant factors were age, the presence of lymphovascular invasion and treatment received. Conclusion The overall survival of endometrial cancer was low. A prospective study needs to be carried out to discover more effective and accurate tests for the early detection of endometrial cancer. PMID:28090178

  5. Characterization of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland and median eminence of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Gonzalez, M.A.; Calvo, J.R.; Rubio, A.; Goberna, R.; Guerrero, J.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of specific melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland (HG) and median eminence (ME) of the rat was studied using ({sup 125}I)melatonin. Binding of melatonin to membrane crude preparations of both tissues was dependent on time and temperature. Thus, maximal binding was obtained at 37{degree}C after 30-60 min incubation. Binding was also dependent on protein concentration. The specific binding of ({sup 125}I)melatonin was saturable, exhibiting only the class of binding sites in both tissues. The dissociation constants (Kd) were 170 and 190 pM for ME and HG, respectively. The concentration of the binding sites in ME was 8 fmol/mg protein, and in the HG 4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, binding of ({sup 125}I)melatonin to ME or HG was inhibited by increasing concentration of native melatonin; 50% inhibition was observed at about 702 and 422 nM for ME and HG, respectively. Additionally, the ({sup 125}I)melatonin binding to the crude membranes was not affected by the addition of different drugs such as norepinephrine, isoproterenol, phenylephrine, propranolol, or prazosin. The results confirm the presence of melatonin binding sites in median eminence and show, for the first time, the existence of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland.

  6. Consistent Estimation in Mendelian Randomization with Some Invalid Instruments Using a Weighted Median Estimator

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Jack; Davey Smith, George; Haycock, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Developments in genome‐wide association studies and the increasing availability of summary genetic association data have made application of Mendelian randomization relatively straightforward. However, obtaining reliable results from a Mendelian randomization investigation remains problematic, as the conventional inverse‐variance weighted method only gives consistent estimates if all of the genetic variants in the analysis are valid instrumental variables. We present a novel weighted median estimator for combining data on multiple genetic variants into a single causal estimate. This estimator is consistent even when up to 50% of the information comes from invalid instrumental variables. In a simulation analysis, it is shown to have better finite‐sample Type 1 error rates than the inverse‐variance weighted method, and is complementary to the recently proposed MR‐Egger (Mendelian randomization‐Egger) regression method. In analyses of the causal effects of low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol and high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol on coronary artery disease risk, the inverse‐variance weighted method suggests a causal effect of both lipid fractions, whereas the weighted median and MR‐Egger regression methods suggest a null effect of high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol that corresponds with the experimental evidence. Both median‐based and MR‐Egger regression methods should be considered as sensitivity analyses for Mendelian randomization investigations with multiple genetic variants. PMID:27061298

  7. 76 FR 21750 - State Median Income Estimate for a Four-Person Family: Notice of the Federal Fiscal Year (FFY...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families State Median Income Estimate for a Four-Person Family: Notice of the Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2012 State Median Income Estimates for Use Under the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) AGENCY: Administration for Children and Families,...

  8. 77 FR 15376 - State Median Income Estimates for a Four-Person Household: Notice of the Federal Fiscal Year (FFY...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families State Median Income Estimates for a Four-Person Household: Notice of the Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2013 State Median Income Estimates for Use Under the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) AGENCY: Administration for Children and Families,...

  9. Fatally flawed? A review and ethical analysis of lethal congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, D J C; Thiele, P; Watkins, A; De Crespigny, L

    2012-10-01

    Prenatally diagnosed abnormalities that are associated with death in the newborn period are often referred to as 'lethal malformations'. Yet, for many of the commonly described lethal malformations long-term survival is possible if supportive interventions are provided. In this paper we analyse and review fetal or congenital lethal abnormalities. The designation 'lethal' overlaps with the concept of 'medical futility'. The term is used for a heterogenous group of conditions, and hinders clear communication and counselling. We argue that the term should be avoided, and propose in its place a set of key questions that should be addressed by counselling.

  10. Impulsivity, aggression and brain structure in high and low lethality suicide attempters with borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Soloff, Paul; White, Richard; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity and aggressiveness are trait dispositions associated with the vulnerability to suicidal behavior across diagnoses. They are associated with structural and functional abnormalities in brain networks involved in regulation of mood, impulse and behavior. They are also core characteristics of borderline personality disorder (BPD), a disorder defined, in part, by recurrent suicidal behavior. We assessed the relationships between personality traits, brain structure and lethality of suicide attempts in 51 BPD attempters using multiple regression analyses on structural MRI data. BPD was diagnosed by the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline Patients-revised, impulsivity by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), aggression by the Brown-Goodwin Lifetime History of Aggression (LHA), and high lethality by a score of 4 or more on the Lethality Rating Scale (LRS). Sixteen High Lethality attempters were compared to 35 Low Lethality attempters, with no significant differences noted in gender, co-morbidity, childhood abuse, BIS or LHA scores. Degree of medical lethality (LRS) was negatively related to gray matter volumes across multiple fronto-temporal-limbic regions. Effects of impulsivity and aggression on gray matter volumes discriminated High from Low Lethality attempters and differed markedly within lethality groups. Lethality of suicide attempts in BPD may be related to the mediation of these personality traits by specific neural networks. PMID:24656768

  11. Risks of non-lethal weapon use: case studies of three French victims of stinger grenades.

    PubMed

    Scolan, V; Herry, C; Carreta, M; Stahl, C; Barret, L; Romanet, J P; Paysant, F

    2012-11-30

    The development of non-lethal weapons started in the 1960s. In France, they have been used by the police for about 10 years. We relate the cases of three French women, victims of stinger grenades, non-lethal weapons recently adopted by the French law enforcement to distract and disperse crowds. The three victims presented serious injuries requiring emergency surgical care. One lost her eye. Based on these cases, we discuss the lethal character of these weapons and propose measures to be taken to prevent their dramatic consequences. Although the danger is obviously less than for firearms, stinger grenades are nonetheless potentially lethal and cause serious physical injuries.

  12. The role of sub-lethal weapons in human rights abuse.

    PubMed

    Wright, S

    2001-01-01

    This article is based on two recent reports contracted by the European Parliament (EP), which assessed sub-lethal weapons as flexible tools of political control. It analyses the role and function of existing weapons systems in human rights abuses using examples from Indonesia, Israel, Kenya, Northern Ireland and Turkey. These weapons are designed to 'appear' rather than 'be' safe and, since they augment rather than replace lethal technologies, their use can distort conflicts and actually bridge the firewall between use of less-lethal and lethal technologies.

  13. [Median cleft of the upper lip. Apropos of 3 cases. The Association for the Study of Facial Clefts].

    PubMed

    Vanrenterghem, L; Joly, B; Podvin, A; Poupart; Bayart, M

    1993-01-01

    The authors report three cases of Median Cleft of the upper lip, a clinical entity really deserving the term of "hare lip", a very ancient denomination who dates back to the Tang Dynasty and unfairly used to describe the usual lateral clefts of the lip. The denominations of "true" and "false" median cleft lips recovering respectively such different embryopathic realities as clefts of the median element with varying degrees of vertical separation and as agenesis of the fronto-nasal process accompanied with cerebral anomalies are no more used now. Median clefts of the upper lip can be included in the "neurocristopathies" by less or more precocious dysneurulation of the fronto-nasal process creating anomalies from various single midline defects of the upper lip of our three cases, to associated midline defects like in the Median Cleft face syndrome (fronto-nasal dysplasia) described by De Myer and Sedano to holoprosencephaly (arhinencephaly), which are rarely associated.

  14. Mechanisms of Lethal Cerebrovascular Accidents in Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W

    2016-05-01

    A case of intracerebral hemorrhage in Turner syndrome is reported with an analysis of possible causes of cerebrovascular accidents in this condition. A 42-year-old woman with known Turner syndrome died soon after hospital admission having been found unconscious at her home address. At autopsy, she showed typical features of Turner syndrome with short stature, webbing of the neck, underdeveloped breasts, and an increased carrying angle of the arm. Death was due to a large left-sided intracerebral hemorrhage extending from the left basal ganglia into the white matter of the frontal lobe and lateral ventricle. Cases of unexpected death in Turner syndrome may arise from occult cerebrovascular accidents which may be hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic. Associated features include hypertension, vascular malformations, accelerated atherogenesis, cystic medial necrosis, and moyamoya syndrome. The possibility of Turner syndrome should be considered in cases where there has been a lethal cerebrovascular event in a younger woman.

  15. Lethal arthrogryposis multiplex congenital (fetal akinesia deformation sequence, FADS).

    PubMed

    Porter, H J

    1995-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenital (AMC) is the presence at birth of multiple congenital contractures in an intact skeleton. The severity of the condition is highly variable and the possible underlying causes are numerous. Fetal immobility and lesions of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and muscle, along with mechanical restriction of the fetus in utero are the pathogenic mechanisms that need to be considered. Etiological factors that have been implicated in the development of AMC include genetic conditions, infections, drugs, toxins, maternal hyperthermia, and maternal illness. This review will concentrate on the severe end of the spectrum of AMC that results in disease that is lethal pre- or postnatally, and will discuss the pathology, pathogenesis, etiology, and practical approach to this diversely expressed condition.

  16. Recovery of microorganisms from potentially lethal radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsa, Joseph; Lucht, Lisa; Blank, Greg

    1995-02-01

    Dose response curves for inactivation of microorganisms are central in the design of any process intending to use irradiation for the improvement of the microbiological quality of any treated materials, be it food or medical supplies. Under some conditions a fraction of irradiated microorganisms is able to recover from a potentially lethal dose. This recovery phenomenon must be considered in determining the efficacy of irradiation in microbial inactivation. In this work the recovery phenomenon was examined in eleven species of microorganisms. Variables examined included dose, radiation type, post-irradiation holding temperature, and nutritient medium used to culture the organism. Kinetics of damage repair and fixation were also examined. Results indicate that, for certain species of microorganisms, recovery can significantly lower the killing efficacy of irradiation.

  17. Inhibition of retrograde transport protects mice from lethal ricin challenge.

    PubMed

    Stechmann, Bahne; Bai, Siau-Kun; Gobbo, Emilie; Lopez, Roman; Merer, Goulven; Pinchard, Suzy; Panigai, Laetitia; Tenza, Danièle; Raposo, Graça; Beaumelle, Bruno; Sauvaire, Didier; Gillet, Daniel; Johannes, Ludger; Barbier, Julien

    2010-04-16

    Bacterial Shiga-like toxins are virulence factors that constitute a significant public health threat worldwide, and the plant toxin ricin is a potential bioterror weapon. To gain access to their cytosolic target, ribosomal RNA, these toxins follow the retrograde transport route from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum, via endosomes and the Golgi apparatus. Here, we used high-throughput screening to identify small molecule inhibitors that protect cells from ricin and Shiga-like toxins. We identified two compounds that selectively block retrograde toxin trafficking at the early endosome-TGN interface, without affecting compartment morphology, endogenous retrograde cargos, or other trafficking steps, demonstrating an unexpected degree of selectivity and lack of toxicity. In mice, one compound clearly protects from lethal nasal exposure to ricin. Our work discovers the first small molecule that shows efficacy against ricin in animal experiments and identifies the retrograde route as a potential therapeutic target.

  18. Cocaethylene is more potent than cocaine in mediating lethality.

    PubMed

    Hearn, W L; Rose, S; Wagner, J; Ciarleglio, A; Mash, D C

    1991-06-01

    Cocaethylene is a pharmacologically active cocaine metabolite that is formed in the presence of ethanol by the activity of liver enzymes. The pharmacology of cocaethylene has not been extensively investigated and its acute toxicity is unknown. The acute toxicity of cocaethylene was compared to cocaine in Swiss-Webster mice. The LD50 of cocaethylene was 60.7 mg/kg and 63.8 mg/kg in female and male mice, respectively. In comparison, the LD50 of cocaine was 93.0 mg/kg in both female and male mice. These studies demonstrate that the cocaine-alcohol metabolite, cocathylene, is more potent in mediating lethality than the parent drug.

  19. Evaluation of Lethal Giant Larvae as a Schistosomiasis Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yufan; Qiao, Hongbin; Shi, Yanli; Han, Yu; Liu, Jinming; Li, Hao; Lu, Ke; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease of humans, and it is considered to be the second most devastating parasitic disease after malaria. Eggs produced by normally developed female worms are important in the transmission of the parasite, and they responsible for the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis. The tumor suppressor gene lethal giant larvae (lgl) has an essential function in establishing apical-basal cell polarity, cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue organization. In our earlier study, downregulation of the lgl gene induced a significant reduction in the egg hatching rate of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) eggs. In this study, the Sjlgl gene was used as a vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis, and vaccination achieved and maintained a stable reduction of the egg hatching rate, which is consistent with previous studies, in addition to reducing the worm burden and liver egg burden in some trials. PMID:27957496

  20. Clinical Effects and Lethal and Forensic Aspects of Propofol*

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Propofol is a potent intravenous anesthetic agent that rapidly induces sedation and unconsciousness. The potential for propofol dependency, recreational use and abuse has only recently been recognized and several cases of accidental overdose and suicide have emerged. In addition, the first documented case of murder using propofol was reported a few months ago and a high profile case of suspected homicide with propofol is currently under investigation. A number of analytical methods have been employed to detect and quantify propofol concentrations in biological specimens. The reported propofol related deaths and post-mortem blood and tissue levels are reviewed. Importantly, limitations of propofol detection are discussed and future considerations are presented. Because propofol has the potential for diversion with lethal consequences, the forensic scientist must have a basic understanding of its clinical indications and uses, pharmacologic properties, and detection methods. In addition, medical institutions should develop systems to prevent and detect diversion of this potential drug of abuse. PMID:20950316

  1. [Medical aspects of common non-lethal weapons].

    PubMed

    Kunz, Sebastian Niko; Grove, Christina; Monticelli, Fabio

    2014-03-01

    The development and provision of non-lethal weapons (NLW) allow military and law enforcement personnel to exploit gradual engagement in countering potentially hazardous threats. Chemical, kinetic and electrical weapons systems are used to curb violence in civilian crowds. With inappropriate usage, these technologies can cause potentially fatal injuries that are not only of clinical, but also of legal relevance. In this context, the practicing physician is faced with treatment as well as assessment issues of new forms of injuries. In order to assure medical care and to be able to draw competent expert's conclusions, a detailed knowledge of the medical effects of these NLW is necessary. The review at hand presents today's most popular NLW and gives an overview of their possible injury potential and required treatments.

  2. Collateral Lethality: A new therapeutic strategy in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Florian L.; Aquilanti, Elisa A.; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic deletion of tumor suppressor genes (TSG) is a rite of passage for virtually all human cancers. The synthetic lethal paradigm has provided a framework for the development of molecular targeted therapeutics that are functionally linked to the loss of specific TSG functions. In the course of genomic events that delete TSGs, a large number of genes with no apparent direct role in tumor promotion also sustain deletion as a result of chromosomal proximity to the target TSG. In this perspective, we review the novel concept of “collateral lethality”, which has served to identify cancer-specific therapeutic vulnerabilities resulting from co-deletion of passenger genes neighboring TSG. The large number of collaterally deleted genes, playing diverse functions in cell homeostasis, offers a rich repertoire of pharmacologically targetable vulnerabilities presenting novel opportunities for the development of personalized anti-neoplastic therapies. PMID:26870836

  3. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Isildar, M.; Bakale, G.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenic and lethal effects of ionizing radiation on histidine-deficient auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium were studied to improve the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The auxotrophs were divided into two groups - one which is sensitive to base-pair substitutions and another sensitive to frameshifts. These groups were composed of parent-daughter pairs in which the chemical mutagenicity enhancing plasmid, pKM101, is absent in the parent strain and present in the daughter. Co-60 ..gamma..-radiation and 250 kV x-rays were used to irradiate the bacteria. Irradiation of the frameshift - sensitive strains which carry the pKm101 plasmid doubled the absolute number of induced revertants whereas irradiation of the base-pair substitution sensitive strain which also carries the pKm101 plasmid produced nearly no change in the number of induced revertants. A nearly negligible effect on the mutation rate was observed for all parent strains. (ACR)

  4. Drug target validation: Lethal infection blocked by inducible peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jianshi; Wendler, Philip; Connelly, Gene; Lim, Audrey; Zhang, Jiansu; King, Megan; Li, Tongchuan; Silverman, Jared A.; Schimmel, Paul R.; Tally, Francis P.

    2000-01-01

    Genome projects are generating large numbers of potential new targets for drug discovery. One challenge is target validation, proving the usefulness of a specific target in an animal model. In this paper, we demonstrate a new approach to validation and assay development. We selected in vitro specific peptide binders to a potential pathogen target. By inducing the expression of a selected peptide in pathogen cells causing a lethal infection in mice, the animals were rescued. Thus, by combining in vitro selection methods for peptide binders with inducible expression in animals, the target's validity was rigorously tested and demonstrated. This approach to validation can be generalized and has the potential to become a valuable tool in the drug discovery process.

  5. Double lethal coconut crab (Birgus latro L.) poisoning.

    PubMed

    Maillaud, C; Lefebvre, S; Sebat, C; Barguil, Y; Cabalion, P; Cheze, M; Hnawia, E; Nour, M; Durand, F

    2010-01-01

    We report a double lethal coconut crab Birgus latro L. poisoning in New Caledonia. Both patients died after showing gastro-intestinal symptoms, major bradycardia with marked low blood pressure, and finally asystolia. Both had significative hyperkaliemia, suggesting a digitaline-like substance intoxication. Traditional knowledge in the Loyalty Islands relates coconut crab toxicity to the consumption of the Cerbera manghas fruit by the crustacean. Elsewhere previous descriptions of human poisoning with the kernel of fruits of trees belonging to the genus Cerbera, known to contain cardiotoxic cardenolides, appear to be very similar to our cases. Cardenolides assays were performed on patient's serum samples, fruit kernel and on the crustacean guts, which lead us to suppose these two fatal cases were the result of a neriifolin intoxication, this toxin having been transmitted through the coconut crab.

  6. DDE in birds: Lethal residues and loss rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, W.H.; Stickel, L.F.; Dyrland, R.A.; Hughes, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Lethal brain residues of DDE were determined experimentally in four species of wild birds (male common grackels (Quiscalus quiscula ), immature female red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus ), adult male brown-headed cowbirds (Molathrus ater ), and immature female starlings (Sturnus vulgaris ) given dietary dosage of 1,500 ppm DDE until one-half had died, then sacrificing the survivors, chemically analyzing the tissues, and comparing results in dead birds and survivors. In all species, residues of 300 to 400 ppm of DDE in the brain were considered to show increasing likelihood of death from DDE, confirming results of an earlier study with a single species. Body residues (ppm wet weight) were not diagnostic, overlapping grossly in dead birds and survivors, but averaging higher in survivors.

  7. Aroclor 1254 residues in birds: Lethal levels and loss rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, W.H.; Stickel, L.F.; Dyrland, R.A.; Hughes, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Lethal residues of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined experimentally in four species of wild birds (male common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula ), immature female red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus ), adult male brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater ) and immature female starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)) given dietary dosage of 1,500 ppm of Aroclor 1254) until one-half had died, sacrificing the survivors, chemically analyzing the tissues, and comparing results in dead birds and survivors. For all species, residues of 310 ppm or higher in the brain showed increasing likelihood of death from PCB poisoning. Residues in dead birds did not differ among species except for starlings (Sturnus vulgaris ), which averaged slightly lower than the others. However, the species differed in the length of time to 50% mortality and in the levels of PCBs in brains at sacrifice.

  8. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection and lethal chytridiomycosis in caecilian amphibians (Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Gower, David J; Doherty-Bone, Thomas; Loader, Simon P; Wilkinson, Mark; Kouete, Marcel T; Tapley, Benjamin; Orton, Frances; Daniel, Olivia Z; Wynne, Felicity; Flach, Edmund; Müller, Hendrik; Menegon, Michele; Stephen, Ian; Browne, Robert K; Fisher, Mathew C; Cunningham, Andrew A; Garner, Trenton W J

    2013-06-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is commonly termed the 'amphibian chytrid fungus' but thus far has been documented to be a pathogen of only batrachian amphibians (anurans and caudatans). It is not proven to infect the limbless, generally poorly known, and mostly soil-dwelling caecilians (Gymnophiona). We conducted the largest qPCR survey of Bd in caecilians to date, for more than 200 field-swabbed specimens from five countries in Africa and South America, representing nearly 20 species, 12 genera, and 8 families. Positive results were recovered for 58 specimens from Tanzania and Cameroon (4 families, 6 genera, 6+ species). Quantities of Bd were not exceptionally high, with genomic equivalent (GE) values of 0.052-17.339. In addition, we report the first evidence of lethal chytridiomycosis in caecilians. Mortality in captive (wild-caught, commercial pet trade) Geotrypetes seraphini was associated with GE scores similar to those we detected for field-swabbed, wild animals.

  9. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase 6 Restores Innate Immune Cells in Bone Marrow in a Lethal Septic Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ting; Li, Yongqing; Liu, Baoling; Pan, Baihong; Cheng, Xin; Georgoff, Patrick; Alam, Hasan B.

    2015-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated that Tubastatin A, a selective inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 6, improves survival, and increases circulating monocyte count and bacterial clearance in a lethal model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in mice. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of inhibition of HDAC6 on the bone marrow cell population. Methods C57BL/6J mice were subjected to CLP, and 1 h later given an intraperitoneal injection of either Tubastatin A (70 mg/kg) dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or DMSO alone (n=9/group). Sham-operated animals were treated in an identical fashion, without CLP. Forty-eight hours later, bone marrow cells were flushed out from the femurs and tibias. Erythrocytes were lysed, and a single-cell suspension was made for analysis. Cells were washed, blocked with anti-mouse CD16/32, stained with anti-mouse B220 PE-Cy7, CD3 APC-eFluor® 780, CD11b FITC, Gr-1 PerCP-Cy5.5 and F4/80 Antigen APC, and subjected to flow cytometry. Data was acquired on an LSRII Flow Cytometer (BD Biosciences) and analyzed with FlowJo (Flowjo, LLC). Results In comparison to the sham group, CLP animals showed decreased percentage of innate immune cells (CD11b+; 62.1±3.1 vs. 32.9±4.9%, p=0.0025) and macrophages (CD11b+ F4/80+; 44.6±3.4 vs. 19.8±2.6%, p=0.0002), and increased percentage of T lymphocytes (CD3+; 1.1±0.2 vs. 3.3±0.4%, p=0.0082) in the bone marrow 48 h after CLP. Treatment with Tubastatin A restored the innate immune cells (32.9±4.9 vs. 54.0±4.1%, p=0.0112) and macrophages (19.8±2.6 vs. 47.1±4.6%, p=0.0001), and increased the percentage of neutrophils (CD11b+ Gr-1+; 28.4±3.9 vs. 48.0±4.0%, p=0.0075). The percentages of B (B220+) and T lymphocytes were not significantly altered by Tubastatin A, compared to the vehicle-treated CLP animals. Conclusions Selective inhibition of HDAC6 in this lethal septic model restored the innate immune cell and macrophage populations, and increased the neutrophil

  10. The receptors that mediate the direct lethality of anthrax toxin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Zhang, Yi; Hoover, Benjamin; Leppla, Stephen H

    2012-12-27

    Tumor endothelium marker-8 (TEM8) and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2) are the two well-characterized anthrax toxin receptors, each containing a von Willebrand factor A (vWA) domain responsible for anthrax protective antigen (PA) binding. Recently, a cell-based analysis was used to implicate another vWA domain-containing protein, integrin β1 as a third anthrax toxin receptor. To explore whether proteins other than TEM8 and CMG2 function as anthrax toxin receptors in vivo, we challenged mice lacking TEM8 and/or CMG2. Specifically, we used as an effector protein the fusion protein FP59, a fusion between the PA-binding domain of anthrax lethal factor (LF) and the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A. FP59 is at least 50-fold more potent than LF in the presence of PA, with 2 μg PA + 2 μg FP59 being sufficient to kill a mouse. While TEM8(-/-) and wild type control mice succumbed to a 5 μg PA + 5 μg FP59 challenge, CMG2(-/-) mice were completely resistant to this dose, confirming that CMG2 is the major anthrax toxin receptor in vivo. To detect whether any toxic effects are mediated by TEM8 or other putative receptors such as integrin β1, CMG2(-/-)/TEM8(-/-) mice were challenged with as many as five doses of 50 μg PA + 50 μg FP59. Strikingly, the CMG2(-/-)/TEM8(-/-) mice were completely resistant to the 5-dose challenge. These results strongly suggest that TEM8 is the only minor anthrax toxin receptor mediating direct lethality in vivo and that other proteins implicated as receptors do not play this role.

  11. An exome sequencing strategy to diagnose lethal autosomal recessive disorders.

    PubMed

    Ellard, Sian; Kivuva, Emma; Turnpenny, Peter; Stals, Karen; Johnson, Matthew; Xie, Weijia; Caswell, Richard; Lango Allen, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Rare disorders resulting in prenatal or neonatal death are genetically heterogeneous. For some conditions, affected fetuses can be diagnosed by ultrasound scan, but this is not usually possible until mid-gestation. There is often limited fetal DNA available for investigation. We investigated a strategy for diagnosing autosomal recessive lethal disorders in non-consanguineous pedigrees with multiple affected fetuses. Exome sequencing was performed to identify genes where each parent is heterozygous for a rare non-synonymous-coding or splicing variant. Putative pathogenic variants were tested for cosegregation in affected fetuses and unaffected siblings. In eight couples of European ancestry, we found on average 1.75 genes (range 0-4) where both parents were heterozygous for rare potentially deleterious variants. A proof-of-principle study detected heterozygous DYNC2H1 variants in a couple whose five fetuses had short-rib polydactyly. Prospective analysis of two couples with multiple pregnancy terminations for fetal akinesia syndrome was performed and a diagnosis was obtained in both the families. The first couple were each heterozygous for a previously reported GLE1 variant, p.Arg569His or p.Val617Met; both were inherited by their two affected fetuses. The second couple were each heterozygous for a novel RYR1 variant, c.14130-2A>G or p.Ser3074Phe; both were inherited by their three affected fetuses but not by their unaffected child. Biallelic GLE1 and RYR1 disease-causing variants have been described in other cases with fetal akinesia syndrome. We conclude that exome sequencing of parental samples can be an effective tool for diagnosing lethal recessive disorders in outbred couples. This permits early prenatal diagnosis in future pregnancies.

  12. An exome sequencing strategy to diagnose lethal autosomal recessive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, Sian; Kivuva, Emma; Turnpenny, Peter; Stals, Karen; Johnson, Matthew; Xie, Weijia; Caswell, Richard; Lango Allen, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Rare disorders resulting in prenatal or neonatal death are genetically heterogeneous. For some conditions, affected fetuses can be diagnosed by ultrasound scan, but this is not usually possible until mid-gestation. There is often limited fetal DNA available for investigation. We investigated a strategy for diagnosing autosomal recessive lethal disorders in non-consanguineous pedigrees with multiple affected fetuses. Exome sequencing was performed to identify genes where each parent is heterozygous for a rare non-synonymous-coding or splicing variant. Putative pathogenic variants were tested for cosegregation in affected fetuses and unaffected siblings. In eight couples of European ancestry, we found on average 1.75 genes (range 0–4) where both parents were heterozygous for rare potentially deleterious variants. A proof-of-principle study detected heterozygous DYNC2H1 variants in a couple whose five fetuses had short-rib polydactyly. Prospective analysis of two couples with multiple pregnancy terminations for fetal akinesia syndrome was performed and a diagnosis was obtained in both the families. The first couple were each heterozygous for a previously reported GLE1 variant, p.Arg569His or p.Val617Met; both were inherited by their two affected fetuses. The second couple were each heterozygous for a novel RYR1 variant, c.14130-2A>G or p.Ser3074Phe; both were inherited by their three affected fetuses but not by their unaffected child. Biallelic GLE1 and RYR1 disease-causing variants have been described in other cases with fetal akinesia syndrome. We conclude that exome sequencing of parental samples can be an effective tool for diagnosing lethal recessive disorders in outbred couples. This permits early prenatal diagnosis in future pregnancies. PMID:24961629

  13. Tumor expression of adiponectin receptor 2 and lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Kelly, Rachel; Gerke, Travis; Jordahl, Kristina; Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Loda, Massimo; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Finn, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) in aggressive prostate cancer we used immunohistochemistry to characterize AdipoR2 protein expression in tumor tissue for 866 men with prostate cancer from the Physicians’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. AdipoR2 tumor expression was not associated with measures of obesity, pathological tumor stage or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at diagnosis. However, AdipoR2 expression was positively associated with proliferation as measured by Ki-67 expression quartiles (P-trend < 0.0001), with expression of fatty acid synthase (P-trend = 0.001), and with two measures of angiogenesis (P-trend < 0.1). An inverse association was observed with apoptosis as assessed by the TUNEL assay (P-trend = 0.006). Using Cox proportional hazards regression and controlling for age at diagnosis, Gleason score, year of diagnosis category, cohort and baseline BMI, we identified a statistically significant trend for the association between quartile of AdipoR2 expression and lethal prostate cancer (P-trend = 0.02). The hazard ratio for lethal prostate cancer for the two highest quartiles, as compared to the two lowest quartiles, of AdipoR2 expression was 1.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–3.0). Results were similar when additionally controlling for categories of PSA at diagnosis and Ki-67 expression quartiles. These results strengthen the evidence for the role of AdipoR2 in prostate cancer progression. PMID:25863129

  14. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of an EV71 virus-like particle vaccine against lethal challenge in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyang; Gao, Fan; Mao, Qunying; Shao, Jie; Jiang, Liping; Liu, Dawei; Wang, Yiping; Yao, Xin; Wu, Xing; Sun, Bo; Zhao, Dandan; Ma, Youlei; Lu, Jingcai; Kong, Wei; Jiang, Chunlai; Liang, Zhenglun

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71(EV71) has caused severe epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in the Asia Pacific in recent years, particularly in infants and pre-school children. It has become a serious public health threat, as currently there are no approved vaccines or antiviral drugs for EV71 infection. Many EV71 vaccines have been under development worldwide, however the main focus is inactivated EV71 vaccines. For example, the inactivated EV71 vaccine has recently finished phase III clinical trial in Mainland China. There have been very few studies on EV71 virus like particles (VLPs). In this study, the immunogenicity and protective potency of the EV71 VLPs produced in insect cells were evaluated in mice with different dosages. Our results showed that EV71 VLPs could elicit high titers of neutralizing antibodies (NTAbs) in a dose-dependent manner and NTAbs were sustained after the second injection with an average GMT (geometric mean titer) level from 19 to 2960 in immunized mice. Survival rates were 100%, 100%, 85%, and 40% after challenge with 15 LD50 (median lethal dose) of EV71 in these newborn mice, respectively. ED50 (50% effective dose) of VLPs was 0.20 μg/dose in newborn mice, while NTAb titer under this dosage was about 50. Passive protection was determined with 2 methods and demonstrated that the survival rates were positively correlated with NTAb titers, which at 24 and 54 induced 50% survival rates in experimental animals. The ED50 of VLP vaccines and the passive NTAb titers were also analyzed. The maternal NTAb titer was similar as the passive NTAb titer in the mouse model challenged with our lethal mouse EV71 strain. Hence, our work has provided preliminary data on the protection potency of VLPs as a vaccine candidate and would facilitate future VLP vaccine development.

  15. Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A Concurrent with Schwannomas of the Spinal Cord and Median Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Joo Young; Chung, Ki Wha; Park, Eun Kyung; Park, Sun Wha

    2009-01-01

    We identified Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) in a family with schwannomas in the spinal cord and median nerve. The CMT1A in this family showed an autosomal dominant pattern, like other CMT patients with PMP22 duplication, and the family also indicated a possible genetic predisposition to schwannomas by 'mother-to-son' transmission. CMT1A is mainly caused by duplication of chromosome 17p11.2-p12 (PMP22 gene duplication). A schwannoma is a benign encapsulated tumor originating from a Schwann cell. A case of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) concurrent with schwannoma has been previously reported. Although it seems that the co-occurrence of CMT1A and schwannomas in a family would be the result of independent events, we could not completely ignore the possibility that the coincidence of two diseases might be due to a shared genetic background. PMID:19654968

  16. A widely displaced Galeazzi-equivalent lesion with median nerve compromise.

    PubMed

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil; Fu, Katherine

    2012-08-18

    We present the case of a 14-year-old boy with a right distal radial fracture accompanied by a severely displaced complete distal ulnar physeal separation and associated median nerve compromise. This injury is known as Galeazzi-equivalent lesion in children and is an extremely rare injury associated with growth arrest. Recognition of the lesion can be difficult but wide displacement may be associated with other significant injuries such as neurovascular compromise. Prompt intervention reversed the neurological symptoms. At 10-month postoperation there was neither growth arrest nor loss of motion. Complete separation of the ulna physis remains often because of soft tissue interposition or capsule problems and prompt reduction is recommended in the literature as a priority.

  17. Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome associated with unique cleft palate: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Holla, Goda; Ramakrishna, Yeluri; Holla, Anup; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2014-01-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome is a rare dental anomaly that affects 1:50,000 live births. SMMCI syndrome is characterized by the presence of a single central incisor located on the maxillary midline in both primary and permanent dentitions. It may occur as an isolated finding or in association with developmental defects and systemic involvement. Congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI syndrome can include short stature, mild forms of deviation in craniofacial morphology, mild to severe intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, and cleft lip and/or palate. This report describes a clinical case of a 7-year-old girl with SMMCI syndrome--in addition to bilateral residual cleft and associated nasal regurgitation--that was treated with a removable maxillary obturator.

  18. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the elbow with rdial, median and ulnar nerve compression.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Chen, Qiang; Shen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare, idiopathic proliferative disorder of the synovium. While, PVNS of elbow is extremely rare. We report an 82-year-old female patient with 20-year-history of gradually increased PVNS in her left elbow. The multiple masses were located in anterior, medial and lateral of elbow. Her radial, median and ulnar nerves were compressed by the tumor. We resected tumor of extra-articular part piecemeally and released the compression of nerves. After the surgery, the patient gained a functional recovery. Two years after surgery she had a tumor recurrence, but without any symptoms of nerve compression syndromes. We discussed its clinical diagnosis, radiological features, MRI findings, pathophysiology, and treatment.

  19. Malleable Fuzzy Local Median C Means Algorithm for Effective Biomedical Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Arunkumar; Balakrishnan, Nagaraj; Varatharaj, Mithya

    2016-12-01

    The traditional way of clustering plays an effective role in the field of segmentation which was developed to be more effective and also in the recent development the extraction of contextual information can be processed with ease. This paper presents a modified Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) algorithm that provides the better segmentation in the contour grayscale regions of the biomedical images where effective cluster is needed. Malleable Fuzzy Local Median C-Means (M-FLMCM) is the proposed algorithm, proposed to overcome the disadvantage of the traditional FCM method in which the convergence time requirement is more, lack of ability to remove the noise, and the inability to cluster the contour region such as images. M-FLMCM shows promising results in the experiment with real-world biomedical images. The experiment results, with 96 % accuracy compared to the other algorithms.

  20. Median nerve stimulation modulates extracellular signals in the primary motor area of a macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Papazachariadis, Odysseas; Dante, Vittorio; Ferraina, Stefano

    2013-08-29

    Aiming to better define the functional influence of somatosensory stimuli on the primary motor cortex (M1) of primates, we investigated changes in extracellular neural activity induced by repetitive median nerve stimulation (MNS). We described neural adaptation and signal integration in both the multiunit activity (MUA) and the local field potential (LFP). To identify integration of initial M1 activity in the MNS response, we tested the correlation between peak amplitude responses and band energy preceding the peaks. Most of the sites studied in the M1 resulted responsive to MNS. MUA response peak amplitude decreased significantly in time in all sites during repetitive MNS, LFP response peak amplitude instead resulted more variable. Similarly, correlation analysis with the initial activity revealed a significant influence when tested using MUA peak amplitude modulation and a less significant correlation when tested using LFP peak amplitude. Our findings improve current knowledge on mechanisms underlying early M1 changes consequent to afferent somatosensory stimuli.

  1. Median-prior tomography reconstruction combined with nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jianhua; Yu, Jun

    2007-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming increasingly important in the fields of medicine and biology. Penalized iterative algorithms based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation for image reconstruction in emission tomography place conditions on which types of images are accepted as solutions. The recently introduced median root prior (MRP) favors locally monotonic images. MRP can preserve sharp edges, but a steplike streaking effect and much noise are still observed in the reconstructed image, both of which are undesirable. An MRP tomography reconstruction combined with nonlinear anisotropic diffusion interfiltering is proposed for removing noise and preserving edges. Analysis shows that the proposed algorithm is capable of producing better reconstructed images compared with those reconstructed by conventional maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), MAP, and MRP-based algorithms in PET image reconstruction.

  2. A widely displaced Galeazzi-equivalent lesion with median nerve compromise

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil; Fu, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 14-year-old boy with a right distal radial fracture accompanied by a severely displaced complete distal ulnar physeal separation and associated median nerve compromise. This injury is known as Galeazzi-equivalent lesion in children and is an extremely rare injury associated with growth arrest. Recognition of the lesion can be difficult but wide displacement may be associated with other significant injuries such as neurovascular compromise. Prompt intervention reversed the neurological symptoms. At 10-month postoperation there was neither growth arrest nor loss of motion. Complete separation of the ulna physis remains often because of soft tissue interposition or capsule problems and prompt reduction is recommended in the literature as a priority. PMID:22907852

  3. Does the median preoptic nucleus contribute to sympathetic hyperactivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats?

    PubMed

    Mourão, Aline A; Moreira, Marina C S; Melo, Aryanne B S; Lopes, Paulo R; Rebelo, Ana C S; Rosa, Daniel A; Freiria-Oliveira, André H; Colombari, Eduardo; Pedrino, Gustavo R

    2016-02-01

    The present study sought to determine the involvement of median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) in the regulation of the cardiovascular function and renal sympathetic activity in normotensive (NT) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). MnPO inhibition evoked by Muscimol (4mM) nanoinjections, elicited fall in MAP and renal sympathoinhibition in NT-rats. Surprisingly, in SHRs these responses were greater than in NT-rats. These results demonstrated, for the first time that MnPO was involved in the tonic control of sympathetic activity in NT and SHRs. Furthermore, our data suggest the MnPO involvement in the increased sympathetic outflow and consequent arterial hypertension observed in SHRs.

  4. Distribution patterns of the muscular branch of the median nerve in the thenar region.

    PubMed Central

    Olave, E; Prates, J C; Del Sol, M; Sarmento, A; Gabrielli, C

    1995-01-01

    Studies on the distribution patterns of the muscular branch of the median nerve to the thenar muscles are scarce. Available accounts give only general descriptions. To establish the distribution pattern more precisely, we dissected 60 palmar regions from 30 cadavers of adult individuals, ranging in age from 23 to 77 y. The distribution pattern of the muscular branch was classified into 3 types. In 50% of subjects there were branches to the superficial head of flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and opponens pollicis (OP) (type I). In 40% there were branches only to APB and OP (type II). In the remainder (type III) the muscular branch provided independent branches to APB, OP and FPB, to APB and OP, or to APB and FPB, after dividing precociously. Types I and II were further subdivided according to the site, direction and number of the individual branches. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7649846

  5. Visual and somesthetic influences on postural orientation in the median plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemire, K.; Cohen, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    We investigated optic and somesthetic contributions to perceived body orientation in the pitch dimension. In a within-subject factorial design, each of 12 subjects attempted to set his/her body erect or 45 degrees back from erect while restrained in a movable bed surrounded by an adjustable box. The box provided a visual environment consisting of either a grid pattern, two luminous lines, or complete darkness. Both the grid pattern and the luminous lines were effective at biasing settings of body position when the box was pitched; the pitched grid was more effective than the pitched lines. Although the pitch of the box influenced orientation to both goals, the effect was greater for the diagonal goal than for the erect goal. We present a model of postural orientation in the median plane that involves vestibular, somatosensory, and visual inputs.

  6. Negative-pressure wound therapy and laparoscopic omentoplasty for deep sternal wound infections after median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    De Brabandere, Kristof; Jacobs-Tulleneers-Thevissen, Daniel; Czapla, Jens; La Meir, Mark; Delvaux, Georges; Wellens, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Deep sternal wound infection remains one of the most serious complications in patients who undergo median sternotomy for coronary artery bypass surgery.We describe our experience in treating 6 consecutive patients with our treatment protocol that combines aggressive débridement, broad-spectrum antibiotics, negative-pressure wound therapy, omentoplasty with laparoscopically harvested omentum, and the use of bilateral pectoral muscle advancement flaps.The number of débridements needed in order to attain clinically clean wounds and negative cultures varied between 1 and 10, with a median of 5. The length of stay after omentoplasty and bilateral pectoral muscle advancement flap placement varied between 11 and 22 days. One of the 6 patients developed a small wound dehiscence that was treated conservatively. No bleeding related to vacuum-assisted closure therapy was identified. Three patients had pneumonia. Two of the 3 patients had an episode of acute renal failure. The 30-day mortality rate was zero, although 1 patient died in the hospital 43 days after the reconstructive surgery, of multiple-organ failure due to pneumonia that was induced by end-stage pulmonary fibrosis. No patient died between hospital discharge and the most recent follow-up date (4-12 mo). Late local follow-up results, both functional and aesthetic, were good.We conclude that negative-pressure wound therapy-in combination with omentoplasty using laparoscopically harvested omentum and with the use of bilateral pectoral advancement flaps-is a valuable technique in the treatment of deep sternal wound infection because it produces good functional and aesthetic results.

  7. Hepatitis B virus infection is associated with younger median age at diagnosis and death in cancers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Li; Luo, Hui-Yan; Li, Chao-Feng; Jin, Ying; Zeng, Zhao-Lei; Ju, Huai-Qiang; Wu, Qi-Nian; Wang, Yun; Mao, Min-Jie; Liu, Wan-Li; Jia, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Hui-Zhong; Li, Yu-Hong; Wang, Feng; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2017-04-01

    Several non-hepatocellular cancers were linked with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This study was aimed to quantify the potential associations between HBV infection and multiple non-hepatocellular cancers. Continuous cases, including 5,715 non-cancer and 40,963 cancer cases diagnosed from 2008 to 2014 in Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center were analyzed. HBV DNA and hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) were examed in gastric cancer tissues by polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining. After adjusting for age, sex, year of diagnosis, smoking, drinking and family history of cancer, significant associations were found between serum HBsAg and frequently reported HBV-related non-hepatocellular cancers, including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, cholangiocarcinoma and pancreatic cancer (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] and 95% confidence ratio [CI]: 1.89 [1.65 - 2.16]), as well as total other non-hepatocellular cancers (AOR and 95% CI: 1.12 [1.03 - 1.22]). The median ages at diagnosis, all-cause death and cancer-specific death of serum HBsAg positive cancer patients were all significantly younger than those with serum HBsAg negative. HBV DNA was detected in 12.4% (34/275) gastric cancer tissues and HBcAg was most commonly detected in lymphocytes. This was the first report that HBV infection had a modest but significant nonspecific association with total non-hepatocellular cancers. Median age at diagnosis and death was significantly younger in serum HBsAg positive cancer patients. The underlying mechanism need further investigation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Food Environments and Childhood Weight Status: Effects of Neighborhood Median Income

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Mona; Sequist, Thomas; Block, Jason; Duncan, Dustin T.; Melly, Steven J.; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Taveras, Elsie M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: A key aspect of any intervention to improve obesity is to better understand the environment in which decisions are being made related to health behaviors, including the food environment. Methods: Our aim was to examine the extent to which proximity to six types of food establishments is associated with BMI z-score and explore potential effect modification of this relationship. We used geographical information software to determine proximity from 49,770 pediatric patients' residences to six types of food establishments. BMI z-score obtained from the electronic health record was the primary outcome. Results: In multivariable analyses, living in closest proximity to large (β, −0.09 units; 95% confidence interval [CI], −0.13, −0.05) and small supermarkets (−0.08 units; 95% CI, −0.11, −0.04) was associated with lower BMI z-score; living in closest proximity to fast food (0.09 units; 95% CI, 0.03, 0.15) and full-service restaurants (0.07 units; 95% CI, 0.01, 0.14) was associated with a higher BMI z-score versus those living farthest away. Neighborhood median income was an effect modifier of the relationships of convenience stores and full-service restaurants with BMI z-score. In both cases, closest proximity to these establishments had more of an adverse effect on BMI z-score in lower-income neighborhoods. Conclusions: Living closer to supermarkets and farther from fast food and full-service restaurants was associated with lower BMI z-score. Neighborhood median income was an effect modifier; convenience stores and full-service restaurants had a stronger adverse effect on BMI z-score in lower-income neighborhoods. PMID:25923838

  9. Effects of Cold Therapy on Pain and Breathing Exercises Among Median Sternotomy Patients.

    PubMed

    Zencir, Gülbanu; Eser, Ismet

    2016-12-01

    The most painful activities during the days following cardiac surgery are coughing and deep breathing exercises. Cold therapy is an effective nonpharmacological method that decreases the pain during coughing and mobilization. In this study, the effects of cold therapy on pain and breathing exercises among patients with median sternotomy following cardiac surgery were investigated in a randomized crossover clinical trial. Data were collected from patients with median sternotomy (N = 34) in the first two postoperative days. Because of the crossover design of the study, each patient was taken as a simultaneous control. Gel pack application was used as the cold therapy. Patients underwent four episodes of deep breathing and coughing exercises using an incentive spirometer (volumetric). Patients were evaluated according to the visual analogue scale for pain intensity before and after deep breathing and coughing exercise sessions. The pain score was 3.44 ± 2.45 at baseline for deep breathing and coughing exercises on the first day. The reported postoperative pain in the gel-pack group was not significantly different before and after the deep breathing and coughing exercises, but it significantly increased in the no-gel-pack group (p < .001). Although the interaction between the treatment and time was significant (partial eta-squared: .09), the gel-pack group had a lower change in average pain levels. This interaction was not significant in terms of spirometric values. In conclusion, cold therapy had a positive effect on pain management in the early period of post-cardiac surgery but was not effective for the pain associated with breathing exercises.

  10. Hybrid (laparoscopy + stent) treatment of celiac trunk compression syndrome (Dunbar syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS))

    PubMed Central

    Michalik, Maciej; Lech, Paweł; Majda, Kaja; Gutowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Celiac trunk (CT) compression syndrome caused by the median arcuate ligament (MAL) is a rarely diagnosed disease because of its nonspecific symptoms, which cause a delay in the correct diagnosis. Intestinal ischemia occurs, which causes symptoms of abdominal angina. One method of treatment for this disease is surgical release of the CT – the intersection of the MAL. Laparoscopy is the first step of the hybrid technique combined with percutaneous angioplasty and stenting of the CT. Aim To demonstrate the usefulness and advantages of the laparoscopic approach in the treatment of Dunbar syndrome. Material and methods Between 2013 and 2016 in the General and Minimally Invasive Surgery Department of the Medical Sciences Faculty of the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, 6 laparoscopic procedures were performed because of median arcuate ligament syndrome. During the laparoscopy the MAL was cut with a harmonic scalpel. One month after laparoscopy 5 patients had Doppler percutaneous angioplasty of the CT with stent implantation in the Vascular Surgery Department in Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin. Results In one case, there was a conversion of laparoscopic surgery to open due to unmanageable intraoperative bleeding. In one case, postoperative ultrasound examination of the abdominal cavity demonstrated the presence of a large hematoma in the retroperitoneal space. All patients reported relief of symptoms in the first days after the operation. Conclusions The hybrid method, combining laparoscopy and angioplasty, seems to be a long-term solution, which increases the comfort of the patient, brings the opportunity for normal functioning and minimizes the risk of restenosis. PMID:28194242

  11. Median Modified Wiener Filter for nonlinear adaptive spatial denoising of protein NMR multidimensional spectra.

    PubMed

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Abbas, Ahmed; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-26

    Denoising multidimensional NMR-spectra is a fundamental step in NMR protein structure determination. The state-of-the-art method uses wavelet-denoising, which may suffer when applied to non-stationary signals affected by Gaussian-white-noise mixed with strong impulsive artifacts, like those in multi-dimensional NMR-spectra. Regrettably, Wavelet's performance depends on a combinatorial search of wavelet shapes and parameters; and multi-dimensional extension of wavelet-denoising is highly non-trivial, which hampers its application to multidimensional NMR-spectra. Here, we endorse a diverse philosophy of denoising NMR-spectra: less is more! We consider spatial filters that have only one parameter to tune: the window-size. We propose, for the first time, the 3D extension of the median-modified-Wiener-filter (MMWF), an adaptive variant of the median-filter, and also its novel variation named MMWF*. We test the proposed filters and the Wiener-filter, an adaptive variant of the mean-filter, on a benchmark set that contains 16 two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR-spectra extracted from eight proteins. Our results demonstrate that the adaptive spatial filters significantly outperform their non-adaptive versions. The performance of the new MMWF* on 2D/3D-spectra is even better than wavelet-denoising. Noticeably, MMWF* produces stable high performance almost invariant for diverse window-size settings: this signifies a consistent advantage in the implementation of automatic pipelines for protein NMR-spectra analysis.

  12. Reciprocal Control of Drinking Behavior by Median Preoptic Neurons in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Stephen B. G.; Machado, Natalia L. S.; Geerling, Joel C.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of glutamatergic neurons in the subfornical organ drives drinking behavior, but the brain targets that mediate this response are not known. The densest target of subfornical axons is the anterior tip of the third ventricle, containing the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), a region that has also been implicated in fluid and electrolyte management. The neurochemical composition of this region is complex, containing both GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, but the possible roles of these neurons in drinking responses have not been addressed. In mice, we show that optogenetic stimulation of glutamatergic neurons in MnPO/OVLT drives voracious water consumption, and that optogenetic stimulation of GABAergic neurons in the same region selectively reduces water consumption. Both populations of neurons have extensive projections to overlapping regions of the thalamus, hypothalamus, and hindbrain that are much more extensive than those from the subfornical organ, suggesting that the MnPO/OVLT serves as a key link in regulating drinking responses. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT) are known to regulate fluid/electrolyte homeostasis, but few studies have examined this issue with an appreciation for the neurochemical heterogeneity of these nuclei. Using Cre-Lox genetic targeting of Channelrhodospin-2 in transgenic mice, we demonstrate that glutamate and GABA neurons in the MnPO/OVLT reciprocally regulate water consumption. Stimulating glutamatergic MnPO/OVLT neurons induced water consumption, whereas stimulating GABAergic MnPO neurons caused a sustained and specific reduction in water consumption in dehydrated mice, the latter highlighting a heretofore unappreciated role of GABAergic MnPO neurons in thirst regulation. These observations represent an important advance in our understanding of the neural circuits involved in

  13. a Median-Based Depthmap Fusion Strategy for the Generation of Oriented Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothermel, M.; Haala, N.; Fritsch, D.

    2016-06-01

    Due to good scalability, systems for image-based dense surface reconstruction often employ stereo or multi-baseline stereo methods. These types of algorithms represent the scene by a set of depth or disparity maps which eventually have to be fused to extract a consistent, non-redundant surface representation. Generally the single depth observations across the maps possess variances in quality. Within the fusion process not only preservation of precision and detail but also density and robustness with respect to outliers are desirable. Being prune to outliers, in this article we propose a local median-based algorithm for the fusion of depth maps eventually representing the scene as a set of oriented points. Paying respect to scalability, points induced by each of the available depth maps are streamed to cubic tiles which then can be filtered in parallel. Arguing that the triangulation uncertainty is larger in the direction of image rays we define these rays as the main filter direction. Within an additional strategy we define the surface normals as the principle direction for median filtering/integration. The presented approach is straight-forward to implement since employing standard oc- and kd-tree structures enhanced by nearest neighbor queries optimized for cylindrical neighborhoods. We show that the presented method in combination with the MVS (Rothermel et al., 2012) produces surfaces comparable to the results of the Middlebury MVS benchmark and favorably compares to an state-of-the-art algorithm employing the Fountain dataset (Strecha et al., 2008). Moreover, we demonstrate its capability of depth map fusion for city scale reconstructions derived from large frame airborne imagery.

  14. Peripheral and segmental spinal abnormalities of median and ulnar somatosensory evoked potentials in Hirayama's disease

    PubMed Central

    Polo, A; Dossi, M; Fiaschi, A; Zanette, G; Rizzuto, N

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the origin of juvenile muscle atrophy of the upper limbs (Hirayama's disease, a type of cervical myelopathy of unknown origin). Subjects: Eight male patients were studied; data from 10 normal men were used as control. Methods: Median and ulnar nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) were recorded. Brachial plexus potentials at Erb's point (EP), dorsal horn responses (N13), and subcortical (P14) and cortical potentials (N20) were evaluated. Tibial nerve SEP and motor evoked potentials (MEP) were also recorded from scalp and spinal sites to assess posterior column and pyramidal tract conduction, respectively. Results: The most important SEP findings were: a very substantial attenuation of both the EP potentials and the N13 spinal responses; normal amplitude of the scalp N20; and normal latency of the individual peaks (EP-N9-N13-P14-N20). Although both nerves were involved, abnormalities in response to median nerve stimulation were more significant than those in response to ulnar nerve stimulation. There was little correlation between the degree of alterations observed and the clinical state. Latencies of both spinal and cortical potentials were normal following tibial nerve stimulation. The mean latency of cervical MEP and the central conduction time from the thenar eminence were slightly but significantly longer in patients than in controls. Conclusions: The findings support the hypothesis that this disease, which is clinically defined as a focal spinal muscle atrophy of the upper limb, may also involve the sensory system; if traumatic injury caused by stretching plays a role in the pathogenesis, the damage cannot be confined to the anterior horn of the spinal cord. PMID:12700306

  15. Median Modified Wiener Filter for nonlinear adaptive spatial denoising of protein NMR multidimensional spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Abbas, Ahmed; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Denoising multidimensional NMR-spectra is a fundamental step in NMR protein structure determination. The state-of-the-art method uses wavelet-denoising, which may suffer when applied to non-stationary signals affected by Gaussian-white-noise mixed with strong impulsive artifacts, like those in multi-dimensional NMR-spectra. Regrettably, Wavelet's performance depends on a combinatorial search of wavelet shapes and parameters; and multi-dimensional extension of wavelet-denoising is highly non-trivial, which hampers its application to multidimensional NMR-spectra. Here, we endorse a diverse philosophy of denoising NMR-spectra: less is more! We consider spatial filters that have only one parameter to tune: the window-size. We propose, for the first time, the 3D extension of the median-modified-Wiener-filter (MMWF), an adaptive variant of the median-filter, and also its novel variation named MMWF*. We test the proposed filters and the Wiener-filter, an adaptive variant of the mean-filter, on a benchmark set that contains 16 two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR-spectra extracted from eight proteins. Our results demonstrate that the adaptive spatial filters significantly outperform their non-adaptive versions. The performance of the new MMWF* on 2D/3D-spectra is even better than wavelet-denoising. Noticeably, MMWF* produces stable high performance almost invariant for diverse window-size settings: this signifies a consistent advantage in the implementation of automatic pipelines for protein NMR-spectra analysis. PMID:25619991

  16. Postchallenge Administration of Brincidofovir Protects Healthy and Immune-Deficient Mice Reconstituted with Limited Numbers of T Cells from Lethal Challenge with IHD-J-Luc Vaccinia Virus

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Kevin Tyler; Cruz, Stephanie; Thomas, Antonia; Diaz, Claudia G.; Keilholz, Laurie; Grossi, Irma M.; Trost, Lawrence C.; Golding, Hana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protection from lethality by postchallenge administration of brincidofovir (BCV, CMX001) was studied in normal and immune-deficient (nude, nu/nu) BALB/c mice infected with vaccinia virus (VACV). Whole-body bioluminescence imaging was used to record total fluxes in the nasal cavity, lungs, spleen, and liver and to enumerate pox lesions on tails of mice infected via the intranasal route with 105 PFU of recombinant IHD-J-Luc VACV expressing luciferase. Areas under the flux curve (AUCs) were calculated for individual mice to assess viral loads. A three-dose regimen of 20 mg/kg BCV administered every 48 h starting either on day 1 or day 2 postchallenge protected 100% of mice. Initiating BCV treatment earlier was more efficient in reducing viral loads and in providing protection from pox lesion development. All BCV-treated mice that survived challenge were also protected from rechallenge with IHD-J-Luc or WRvFire VACV without additional treatment. In immune-deficient mice, BCV protected animals from lethality and reduced viral loads while animals were on the drug. Viral recrudescence occurred within 4 to 9 days, and mice succumbed ∼10 to 20 days after treatment termination. Nude mice reconstituted with 105 T cells prior to challenge with 104 PFU of IHD-J-Luc and treated with BCV postchallenge survived the infection, cleared the virus from all organs, and survived rechallenge with 105 PFU of IHD-J-Luc VACV without additional BCV treatment. Together, these data suggest that BCV protects immunocompetent and partially T cell-reconstituted immune-deficient mice from lethality, reduces viral dissemination in organs, prevents pox lesion development, and permits generation of VACV-specific memory. IMPORTANCE Mass vaccination is the primary element of the public health response to a smallpox outbreak. In addition to vaccination, however, antiviral drugs are required for individuals with uncertain exposure status to smallpox or for whom vaccination is contraindicated

  17. Antidotes to anthrax lethal factor intoxication. Part 2: structural modifications leading to improved in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongjin; Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Moayeri, Mahtab; Crown, Devorah; Cregar-Hernandez, Lynne; McKasson, Linda; Margosiak, Stephen A; Leppla, Stephen H; Johnson, Alan T

    2011-04-01

    New anthrax lethal factor inhibitors (LFIs) were designed based upon previously identified potent inhibitors 1a and 2. Combining the new core structures with modifications to the C2-side chain yielded analogs with improved efficacy in the rat lethal toxin model.

  18. We want what’s best for our baby: Prenatal Parenting of Babies with Lethal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Côté-Arsenault, Denise; Krowchuk, Heidi; Hall, Wendasha Jenkins; Denney-Koelsch, Erin

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on qualitative research into the experience of couples who chose to continue their pregnancies after receiving a lethal fetal diagnosis, and to embrace the parenting of their baby in the shortened time they have. This analysis of interview data is part of a larger research project describing parents’ experiences of continuing pregnancy with a known lethal fetal diagnosis (LFD). PMID:26594107

  19. Improving on Army Field Gauze for Lethal Vascular Injuries: Challenges in Dressing Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accounting for half of all deaths, uncontrolled hemorrhage remains the leading cause of death on the battlefield. Gaining hemostatic control of lethal vascular injuries sustained in combat using topical agents remains a challenge. Recent animal testing using a lethal arterial injury model compared a...

  20. Lethal endotoxic shock using alpha-galactosylceramide sensitization as a new experimental model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroyasu; Koide, Naoki; Hassan, Ferdaus; Islam, Shamima; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Kakumu, Shinichi; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Yokochi, Takashi

    2006-03-01

    The effect of alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated lethality was examined. Administration of LPS killed all mice pretreated with alpha-GalCer, but not untreated control mice. The lethal shock in alpha-GalCer-sensitized mice was accompanied by severe pulmonary lesions with marked infiltration of inflammatory cells and massive cell death. On the other hand, hepatic lesions were focal and mild. A number of cells in pulmonary and hepatic lesions underwent apoptotic cell death. alpha-GalCer sensitization was ineffective for the development of the systemic lethal shock in Valpha14-positive natural killer T cell-deficient mice. Sensitization with alpha-GalCer led to the circulation of a high level of interferon (IFN)-gamma and further augmented the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in response to LPS. The lethal shock was abolished by the administration of anti-IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha antibody. Further, the lethal shock did not occur in TNF-alpha-deficient mice. Taken together, alpha-GalCer sensitization rendered mice very susceptible to LPS-mediated lethal shock, and IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were found to play a critical role in the preparation and execution of the systemic lethal shock, respectively. The LPS-mediated lethal shock using alpha-GalCer sensitization might be useful for researchers employing experimental models of sepsis and septic shock.

  1. Examining the Impact of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Comorbidity on the Medical Lethality of Adolescent "Suicide Attempts"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Manama O'Brien, Kimberly H.; Berzin, Stephanie C.

    2012-01-01

    Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of "suicide attempts" among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N = 375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without…

  2. The Danger Assessment: Validation of a Lethality Risk Assessment Instrument for Intimate Partner Femicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Webster, Daniel W.; Glass, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    The Danger Assessment (DA) is an instrument designed to assess the likelihood of lethality or near lethality occurring in a case of intimate partner violence. This article describes the development, psychometric validation, and suggestions for use of the DA. An 11-city study of intimate partner femicide used multivariate analysis to test the…

  3. Expression of potentially lethal damage in Chinese hamster cells exposed to hematoporphyrin derivative photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Gomer, C J; Rucker, N; Ferrario, A; Murphree, A L

    1986-07-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether the expression and/or repair of potentially lethal damage could be observed in mammalian cells exposed to hemataporphyrin derivative (HPD) photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photodynamic therapy was combined with posttreatment protocols known to inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage in cells treated with X-rays, ultraviolet radiation, or alkylating agents. Potentiation of lethal damage from photodynamic therapy was induced by hypothermia (4 degrees C) following short (1 h) or extended (16 h) HPD incubation conditions. Caffeine potentiated the lethal effects of PDT only when cells were incubated with HPD for extended time periods. However, 3-aminobenzamide had no effect on the cytotoxic actions of PDT following either short or extended HPD incubations. Recovery from potentially lethal damage expressed by posttreatment hypothermia was complete within 1 h, while recovery from potentially lethal damage expressed by posttreatment caffeine required time periods of up to 24 h. The lack of effect of 3-aminobenzamide on expression of potentially lethal damage following photodynamic therapy may be related to direct inhibition of adenosine diphosphoribose transferase by photodynamic therapy. These results indicate that the expression and repair of potentially lethal damage can be observed in cells treated with PDT and will vary as a function of porphyrin incubation conditions.

  4. Effects of Training with Lethal Chemicals on Job Proficiency and Job Confidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Paula; And Others

    A study was designed to determine if soldiers trained to use chemical agents are more proficient in performing their jobs in an environment where lethal chemical agents are used and more confident of their ability to survive. A treatment group, composed of 150 soldiers, knew that their training would involve lethal agents in the Chemical…

  5. Co-lethality studied as an asset against viral drug escape: the HIV protease case

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Co-lethality, or synthetic lethality is the documented genetic situation where two, separately non-lethal mutations, become lethal when combined in one genome. Each mutation is called a "synthetic lethal" (SL) or a co-lethal. Like invariant positions, SL sets (SL linked couples) are choice targets for drug design against fast-escaping RNA viruses: mutational viral escape by loss of affinity to the drug may induce (synthetic) lethality. Results From an amino acid sequence alignment of the HIV protease, we detected the potential SL couples, potential SL sets, and invariant positions. From the 3D structure of the same protein we focused on the ones that were close to each other and accessible on the protein surface, to possibly bind putative drugs. We aligned 24,155 HIV protease amino acid sequences and identified 290 potential SL couples and 25 invariant positions. After applying the distance and accessibility filter, three candidate drug design targets of respectively 7 (under the flap), 4 (in the cantilever) and 5 (in the fulcrum) amino acid positions were found. Conclusions These three replication-critical targets, located outside of the active site, are key to our anti-escape strategy. Indeed, biological evidence shows that 2/3 of those target positions perform essential biological functions. Their mutational variations to escape antiviral medication could be lethal, thus limiting the apparition of drug-resistant strains. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Shamil Sunyaev and Claus Wilke. PMID:20565756

  6. In-continuity neuroma of the median nerve after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Depaoli, R; Coscia, D R; Alessandrino, F

    2015-03-01

    Iatrogenic injuries of the median nerve after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome resulting in the formation of a neuroma are rare. We present here the case of two patients, one with a bifid median nerve, showing in-continuity neuroma after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome. The patients reported persistent post-operative pain and showing symptoms. In both cases, ultrasound showed an in-continuity neuroma with a hypoechoic and enlarged median nerve at the carpal tunnel. The case report shows that ultrasound may be helpful in confirming the clinical diagnosis of neuroma and it is useful for evaluation of the percentage of the area affected by the tear.

  7. Examining the impact of psychiatric diagnosis and comorbidity on the medical lethality of adolescent suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    McManama O'Brien, Kimberly H; Berzin, Stephanie C

    2012-08-01

    Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of suicide attempts among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N=375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without substance abuse. Regression results indicated having depression comorbid with any other diagnosis was not associated with medical lethality. However, having a substance abuse disorder was associated with higher suicide attempt lethality, highlighting the importance of substance abuse as a risk factor for lethal suicide attempts in adolescents. This finding stimulates critical thinking around the understanding of suicidal behavior in youth and the development and implementation of treatment strategies for suicidal adolescents with substance abuse disorders.

  8. Osteogenesis imperfecta lethal in infancy: case report and scanning electron microscopic studies of the deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Levin, L S; Rosenbaum, K N; Brady, J M; Dorst, J P

    1982-12-01

    Radiologic evaluation of the skeleton and scanning electron microscopic studies of the teeth were performed on an infant boy with a lethal osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) syndrome who died at 10 mo of pneumonia. The skeletal findings included ribs that were focally expanded by fracture calluses, flat vertebral bodies, and wide limb bones. On fractured tooth surfaces, the enamel and dentin were normal as was the dentin calcification front. Although microscopic abnormalities have been noted in teeth from previously reported infants with lethal OI, a few studies also report infants with normal teeth. These differences in dental findings may indicate heterogeneity in OI lethal in infancy. Results of our study indicate that, until the primary biochemical defects in the OI syndromes are elucidated, examination of teeth from other infants with lethal OI and detailed evaluation of other clinical and skeletal features will aid in delineating heterogeneity and variation in expression in lethal OI.

  9. Suppression of a Lethal Trisomic Phenotype in Drosophila Melanogaster by Increased Dosage of an Unlinked Locus

    PubMed Central

    Dorer, D. R.; Cadden, M. A.; Gordesky-Gold, B.; Harries, G.; Christensen, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most extreme examples of gene dosage sensitivity is the Triplo-lethal locus (Tpl) on the third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster, which is lethal when present in either one or three copies. Increased dosage of an unlinked locus, Isis, suppresses the triplo-lethal phenotype of Tpl, but not the haplo-lethal phenotype. We have mapped Isis to the X chromosome region 7E3-8A5, and shown that the suppression is a gene dosage effect. Altered dosage of Isis in the presence of two copies of Tpl has no obvious effects. By examining the interactions between Isis dosage and Tpl we suggest that Isis does not directly repress Tpl expression, but acts downstream on the triplo-lethal phenotype of Tpl. PMID:8514133

  10. Lethal and sublethal effects of ammonia to juvenile Lampsilis mussels (Unionidae) in sediment and water-only exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newton, T.J.; Bartsch, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity of two juvenile unionid mussels (Lampsilis cardium and Lampsilis higginsii) to ammonia in 96-h water-only and sediment tests by use of mortality and growth measurements. Twenty mussels were placed in chambers buried 2.5 cm into reference sediments to approximate pore-water exposure (sediment tests) or elevated above the bottom of the experimental units (water-only tests). In the sediment tests, a pH gradient existed between the overlying water (mean 8.0), sediment-water interface (mean 7.7), and 2.5 cm depth (mean 7.4). We assumed that mussels were exposed to ammonia in pore water and report effect concentrations in pore water, but if they were exposed to the higher pH water, more of the ammonia would be in the toxic un-ionized (NH 3) form. The only differences in toxicity and growth between mussel species occurred in some of the water-only tests. In sediment tests, median lethal concentrations (LC50s) ranged from 124 to 125 ??g NH3-N/L. In water-only tests, LC50s ranged from 157 to 372 ??g NH3-N/L. In sediment tests, median effective concentrations (EC50s based on growth) ranged from 30 to 32 ??g NH3-N/L. Juvenile mussels in the water-only tests grew poorly and did not exhibit a dose-response relation. These data demonstrate that growth is a sensitive and valuable endpoint for studies on ammonia toxicity with juvenile freshwater mussels and that growth should be measured via sediment tests. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  11. Geomagnetic activity that corresponds to the median of the F2-layer critical frequency at various latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deminov, M. G.; Deminova, G. F.

    2016-09-01

    On the basis of the F2-layer critical frequency foF2 for the noon at some European stations for 1958-2005, it is found that the geomagnetic activity corresponding to the foF2 median is systematically lower than that averaged over the month; the difference increases with an increase in latitude. Moreover, the dispersion of geomagnetic activity for the foF2 median at relatively high latitudes is lower than at middle latitudes. These regularities are related to the fact that high geomagnetic activity usually leads to a distinct deviation of foF2 from the typical average value, i.e., from the foF2 median, and such deviation is more substantial at relatively high latitudes. That is why the geomagnetic activity for the foF2 median is lower at relatively high latitudes than at middle latitudes.

  12. Median artery of the forearm in human fetuses in northeastern Brazil: anatomical study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Aragão, José Aderval; da Silva, Ana Caroline Ferreira; Anunciação, Caio Barretto; Reis, Francisco Prado

    2017-01-01

    A persistent median artery is a rare anomaly. It accompanies the median nerve along its course in the forearm and is of variable origin. It is associated with other local anatomical variations and may contribute significantly towards formation of the superficial palmar arch. In embryos, it is responsible mainly for the blood supply to the hand. The objective of this study was to research the frequency, type (forearm or palmar) and origin of the median artery in fetuses, correlating its presence with sex and body side. Red-colored latex was injected into 32 brachial arteries of human fetuses until its arrival in the hand could be seen. Twenty-four hours after the injection, the median arteries were dissected without the aid of optical instruments. Among the 32 forearms dissected, the median artery was present in 81.25 % (26) of the cases, and it was found more frequently in females and on the left side. Regarding origin, most of the median arteries originated in the common interosseous artery (38.5 %) and anterior interosseous artery (34.6 %). The mean length of the median arteries was 21.1 mm for the palmar type and 19.8 mm for the forearm type. The median artery has a high rate of persistence. It is important to be aware of this anatomical variation, since its presence may give rise to difficulties during routine surgical procedures on the wrist. Its presence may cause serious functional complications in the carpal tunnel, anterior interosseous nerve, round pronator syndromes, and ischemia of the hand.

  13. Median filtering detection using variation of neighboring line pairs for image forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Kang Hyeon

    2016-09-01

    Attention to tampering by median filtering (MF) has recently increased in digital image forensics. For the MF detection (MFD), this paper presents a feature vector that is extracted from two kinds of variations between the neighboring line pairs: the row and column directions. Of these variations in the proposed method, one is defined by a gradient difference of the intensity values between the neighboring line pairs, and the other is defined by a coefficient difference of the Fourier transform (FT) between the neighboring line pairs. Subsequently, the constructed 19-dimensional feature vector is composed of these two parts. One is the extracted 9-dimensional from the space domain of an image and the other is the 10-dimensional from the frequency domain of an image. The feature vector is trained in a support vector machine classifier for MFD in the altered images. As a result, in the measured performances of the experimental items, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC, ROC) by the sensitivity (PTP: the true positive rate) and 1-specificity (PFP: the false-positive rate) are above 0.985 and the classification ratios are also above 0.979. Pe (a minimal average decision error) ranges from 0 to 0.024, and PTP at PFP=0.01 ranges from 0.965 to 0.996. It is confirmed that the grade evaluation of the proposed variation-based MF detection method is rated as "Excellent (A)" by AUC is above 0.9.

  14. Microneurography in relation to intraneural topography: somatotopic organisation of median nerve fascicles in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hallin, R G

    1990-01-01

    Microneurography was performed in median nerve sensory fascicles with concentric needle electrodes and with conventional tungsten microneedles. The latter electrodes preferentially recorded activity from the myelinated fibres in the whole fascicle. By contrast, due to its special design, a concentric needle can record activity selectively from even a small part of a fascicle. High amplitude signals in C fibres can be discriminated close to Schwann cells that envelope unmyelinated axons. Apart from being biased for activity in thin fibres, the concentric needles can also record signals from nearby myelinated fibres. The palmar receptive fields of such fibre groups were not congruent with the areas traditionally attributed to multiunit skin afferents in humans, namely the innervation zone(s) of one or two adjacent digital nerve(s). Instead, the multiunit fields often comprised small parts of a digital nerve innervation area, frequently only the pulp of a finger. Single units were always localised within previously screened multiunit areas. Contrary to some previously accepted tenets it is probable that single unit activity in myelinated fibres in these studies is recorded extra-axonally near to a node of Ranvier. The findings also suggest the presence of a somatotopy in human limb nerve fascicles, comparable to that previously established in the spinal cord and the somatosensory cortex. Images PMID:2246655

  15. Improved visibility of character conflicts in quasi-median networks with the EMPOP NETWORK software

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Bettina; Röck, Alexander W.; Dür, Arne; Parson, Walther

    2014-01-01

    Aim To provide a valuable tool for graphical representation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) data that enables visual emphasis on complex substructures within the network to highlight possible ambiguities and errors. Method We applied the new NETWORK graphical user interface, available via EMPOP (European DNA Profiling Group Mitochondrial DNA Population Database; www.empop.org) by means of two mtDNA data sets that were submitted for quality control. Results The quasi-median network torsi of the two data sets resulted in complex reticulations, suggesting ambiguous data. To check the corresponding raw data, accountable nodes and connecting branches of the network could be identified by highlighting induced subgraphs with concurrent dimming of their complements. This is achieved by accentuating the relevant substructures in the network: mouse clicking on a node displays a list of all mtDNA haplotypes included in that node; the selection of a branch specifies the mutation(s) connecting two nodes. It is indicated to evaluate these mutations by means of the raw data. Conclusion Inspection of the raw data confirmed the presence of phantom mutations due to suboptimal electrophoresis conditions and data misinterpretation. The network software proved to be a powerful tool to highlight problematic data and guide quality control of mtDNA data tables. PMID:24778097

  16. Hemodynamic monitoring of large animal chronic studies after median sternotomy: experiences with different telemetric physiological devices.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yasuhiro; Pitsillides, Koullis; Ferro, Giuseppe; Kagawa, Hiroshi; Centola, Luca; Kinouchi, Katsushi; Zhu, Liqun; Ferrier, William T; Talken, Linda; Nasirov, Teimour; Riemer, R Kirk; Reinhartz, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Telemetric physiological monitoring systems (TPMS) have enabled accurate continuous measurement of animal blood pressures and flows. However, few studies describe approaches for use of TPMS in the great vessels or inside the heart. We describe our initial experiences using two types of TPMSs. Twelve lambs (20-37 kg) underwent sternotomy. Two lambs were not instrumented and were killed at 14 days to confirm normal sternal wound healing (sham group, n = 2). Ten lambs underwent placement of either standard indwelling pressure-monitoring catheter and perivascular-flow-probe (CFP group, n = 3) or TPMS implantation (TPMS group, n = 7). The TPMS used were EG1-V3S2T-M2 (EG1, n = 5; Transonic Endogear Inc.) and Physio Tel Digital L21 (PTD, n = 2; Data Sciences Inc.). Two deaths because of respiratory problems occurred in TPMS group, attributed to lung compression by the implanted device. In TPMS group, more consistent trends of blood pressures and flows were recorded, and management of animals was easier and less labor-intensive. Comparing the two TPMSs, the initiation and renewal costs for each case was $28 K vs. $20 K and $1,700 vs. $0, (PTD versus EG1, respectively). In conclusion, TPMS implantation was feasible via median sternotomy in lambs. Telemetric physiological monitoring systems significantly improve reliability of hemodynamic monitoring in chronic survival animal study. EG1 was less costly than PTD.

  17. The utility of median somatosensory evoked potentials in anoxic-ischemic coma.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Ted L

    2009-01-01

    The early recognition of comatose patients with a hopeless prognosis--regardless of how aggressively they are managed--is of utmost importance. Median somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) supplement and enhance neurological examination findings in anoxic-ischemic coma and are useful as an early guide in predicting outcome. The key finding is that bilateral absence of cortical evoked potentials reliably predicts unfavorable outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest. The author studied 50 comatose patients with preserved brainstem function after cardiac arrest. All 23 patients with bilateral absence of cortical evoked potentials died without awakening. Neuropathological study in seven patients disclosed widespread ischemic changes or frank cortical laminar necrosis. The remaining 27 patients with normal or delayed central conduction times had an uncertain prognosis because some died without awakening or entered a persistent vegetative state. The majority of patients with normal central conduction times had a good outcome, whereas a delay in central conduction times increased the likelihood of neurological deficit or death. Greater use of SSEP in anoxic-ischemic coma would identify those patients unlikely to recover and would avoid costly medical care that is to no avail.

  18. Relapse after orthodontic correction of maxillary median diastema: a follow-up evaluation of consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Shashua, D; Artun, J

    1999-06-01

    An evaluation of 96 treated orthodontic patients with maxillary median diastema ranging from 0.50 mm to 5.62 mm (mean 1.22, SD 0.85) was performed 4.0 to 9.0 years after completion of active treatment. Pre- and posttreatment data were gathered from available records. Follow-up data were gathered from records and interviews of 37 patients, and from phone interviews of 59 patients. The incidence of diastema relapse was 49% when scored as either presence of a measurable space at follow-up, a history of orthodontic or prosthetic retreatment to close a reopened space, or continued use of a retainer to control relapse tendency. Logistic regression analysis revealed that pretreatment diastema size and presence of a family member with a similar condition were the only significant risk factors for relapse (p<0.05), while pretreatment spacing in the maxillary anterior dentition approached significance (p = 0.10). No association was found between relapse and presence of an abnormal frenum or an osseous intermaxillary cleft, although patients with an abnormal frenum had a wider pretreatment diastema than those with a normal frenum (p<0.05). Fremitus of the maxillary incisors was the only parameter at follow-up associated with space reopening (p<0.01).

  19. Machining risk of beryllium disease and sensitization with median exposures below 2 micrograms/m3.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, K; Mroz, M M; Newman, L S; Martyny, J; Zhen, B

    1996-07-01

    We examined the prevalence of beryllium sensitization in relation to work process and beryllium exposure measurements in a beryllia ceramics plant that had operated since 1980. We interviewed 136 employees (97.8% of the workforce), ascertained beryllium sensitization with the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation blood test, and reviewed historical industrial hygiene measurements. Of eight beryllium-sensitized employees (5.9%), six (4.4% of participating employees) had granulomatous disease on transbronchial lung biopsy. Machinists had a sensitization rate of 14.3% compared to a rate of 1.2% among other employees. Machining had significantly higher general area and breathing zone measurements than did other processes in the time period in which most beryllium-sensitized cases had started machining work. Daily weighted average (DWA) estimates of exposure for matching processes also exceeded estimates for other work processes in that time period, with a median DWA of 0.9 microgram/m3. Machining process DWAs accounted for the majority of DWAs exceeding the 2.0 micrograms/m3 OSHA standard, with 8.1% of machining DWAs above the standard. We conclude that lowering machining process-related exposures may be important to lowering risk of beryllium disease.

  20. Quantitative analysis of orofacial development and median clefts in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Allyson E; Dickinson, Amanda J

    2014-05-01

    Xenopus has become a useful tool to study the molecular mechanisms underlying orofacial development. However, few quantitative analyses exist to describe the anatomy of this region. In this study we combine traditional facial measurements with geometric morphometrics to describe anatomical changes in the orofacial region during normal and abnormal development. Facial measurements and principal component (PC) analysis indicate that during early tadpole development the face expands primarily in the midface region accounting for the development of the upper jaw and primary palate. The mouth opening correspondingly becomes flatter and wider as it incorporates the jaw elements. A canonical variate analysis of orofacial and mouth opening shape emphasized that changes in the orofacial shape occur gradually. Orofacial anatomy was quantified after altered levels of retinoic acid using all-trans retinoic acid or an inhibitor of retinoic acid receptors or by injecting antisense oligos targeting RALDH2. Such perturbations resulted in major decreases in the width of the midface and the mouth opening illustrated in facial measurements and a PC analysis. The mouth opening shape also had a gap in the primary palate resulting in a median cleft in the mouth opening that was only illustrated quantitatively in the morphometric analysis. Finally, canonical and discriminant function analysis statistically distinguished the orofacial and mouth opening shape changes among the different modes used to alter retinoic acid signaling levels. By combining quantitative analyses with molecular studies of orofacial development we will be better equipped to understand the complex morphogenetic processes involved in palate development and clefting.

  1. Action spectra and chromatic mechanisms of cells in the median ocelli of dragonflies.

    PubMed

    Chappell, R L; DeVoe, R D

    1975-04-01

    Spectral sensitivities were recorded intracellulary in median ocelli of Anax junius, Aeschnatuberculifera, and Libellulapulcella. All cells had peak sensitivities at 360 and 500 nm while UV-blue+green cells found only in Anax had a third peak sensitivity at 440 nm. Ratios of UV-to-green sensitivities varied from cell to cell in each ocellus, but no UV-only or green-only cells were recorded. Half of the cells tested had a reverse Purkinje shift: They were more sensitive in the green at low illuminations but more sensitive in the UV at high illuminations; their intensity-response curves at 370 and 520 nm crossed but became parallel for large responses. Wave-lengths 420 nm and shorter elicited a family of low intensity-response curves with one slope; wavelengths 440 nm and longer elicities a family of curves with another slope. Orange-adapting lights selectively adapted sensitivity in the green, but UV-adapting lights had little selective effect. Amounts of log-selective adaptation were proportional to log orange-adapting intensity. It is concluded that two spectral mechanisms can be recorded from each cell, possibly by coupling of UV and green cells or possibly because each cell contains two visual pigments. Selective chromatic adaptations may provide the ocellus with a kind of "authomatic color control," while the reverse Purkinje shift could extend the ocellus' sensitivity to prevailing skylight.

  2. Action spectra and chromatic mechanisms of cells in the median ocelli of dragonflies

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Spectral sensitivities were recorded intracellulary in median ocelli of Anax junius, Aeschnatuberculifera, and Libellulapulcella. All cells had peak sensitivities at 360 and 500 nm while UV-blue+green cells found only in Anax had a third peak sensitivity at 440 nm. Ratios of UV-to- green sensitivities varied from cell to cell in each ocellus, but no UV- only or green-only cells were recorded. Half of the cells tested had a reverse Purkinje shift: They were more sensitive in the green at low illuminations but more sensitive in the UV at high illuminations; their intensity-response curves at 370 and 520 nm crossed but became parallel for large responses. Wave-lengths 420 nm and shorter elicited a family of low intensity-response curves with one slope; wavelengths 440 nm and longer elicities a family of curves with another slope. Orange-adapting lights selectively adapted sensitivity in the green, but UV-adapting lights had little selective effect. Amounts of log-selective adaptation were proportional to log orange-adapting intensity. It is concluded that two spectral mechanisms can be recorded from each cell, possibly by coupling of UV and green cells or possibly because each cell contains two visual pigments. Selective chromatic adaptations may provide the ocellus with a kind of "authomatic color control," while the reverse Purkinje shift could extend the ocellus' sensitivity to prevailing skylight. PMID:1151320

  3. Using least median of squares for structural superposition of flexible proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Shen; Fang, Yi; Ramani, Karthik

    2009-01-01

    Background The conventional superposition methods use an ordinary least squares (LS) fit for structural comparison of two different conformations of the same protein. The main problem of the LS fit that it is sensitive to outliers, i.e. large displacements of the original structures superimposed. Results To overcome this problem, we present a new algorithm to overlap two protein conformations by their atomic coordinates using a robust statistics technique: least median of squares (LMS). In order to effectively approximate the LMS optimization, the forward search technique is utilized. Our algorithm can automatically detect and superimpose the rigid core regions of two conformations with small or large displacements. In contrast, most existing superposition techniques strongly depend on the initial LS estimating for the entire atom sets of proteins. They may fail on structural superposition of two conformations with large displacements. The presented LMS fit can be considered as an alternative and complementary tool for structural superposition. Conclusion The proposed algorithm is robust and does not require any prior knowledge of the flexible regions. Furthermore, we show that the LMS fit can be extended to multiple level superposition between two conformations with several rigid domains. Our fit tool has produced successful superpositions when applied to proteins for which two conformations are known. The binary executable program for Windows platform, tested examples, and database are available from . PMID:19159484

  4. Robust principal axes determination for point-based shapes using least median of squares.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Shen; Ramani, Karthik

    2009-04-01

    A robust technique for determining the principal axes of a 3D shape represented by a point set, possibly with noise, is presented. We use techniques from robust statistics to guide the classical principal component analysis (PCA) computation. Our algorithm is based on a robust statistics method: least median of squares (LMS), for outlier detection. Using this method, an outlier-free major region of the shape is extracted, which ignores the effect on other minor regions regarded as the outliers of the shape.In order to effectively approximate the LMS optimization, the forward search technique is utilized. We start from a small outlier-free subset robustly chosen as the major region, where an octree is used for accelerating computation. Then the region is iteratively increased by adding samples at a time. Finally, by treating the points on minor regions as outliers, we are able to define the principal axes of the shape as one of the major region. One of the advantages of our algorithm is that it automatically disregards outliers and distinguishes the shape as the major and minor regions during the principal axes determination without any extra segmentation procedure. The presented algorithm is simple and effective and gives good results for point-based shapes. The application on shape alignment is considered for demonstration purpose.

  5. A median redshift of 2.4 for galaxies bright at submillimetre wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Chapman, S C; Blain, A W; Ivison, R J; Smail, Ian R

    2003-04-17

    A significant fraction of the energy emitted in the early Universe came from very luminous galaxies that are largely hidden at optical wavelengths (because of interstellar dust grains); this energy now forms part of the cosmic background radiation at wavelengths near 1 mm (ref. 1). Some submillimetre (submm) galaxies have been resolved from the background radiation, but they have been difficult to study because of instrumental limitations. This has impeded the determination of their redshifts (z), which is a crucial element in understanding their nature and evolution. Here we report spectroscopic redshifts for ten submm galaxies that were identified using high-resolution radio observations. The median redshift for our sample is 2.4, with a quartile range of 1.9-2.8. This population therefore coexists with the peak activity of quasars, suggesting a close relationship between the growth of massive black holes and luminous dusty galaxies. The space density of submm galaxies at redshifts over 2 is about 1,000 times greater than that of similarly luminous galaxies in the present-day Universe, so they represent an important component of star formation at high redshifts.

  6. Effects of muscle fiber type and size on EMG median frequency and conduction velocity.

    PubMed

    Kupa, E J; Roy, S H; Kandarian, S C; De Luca, C J

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes an in vitro method for comparing surface-detected electromyographic median frequency (MF) and conduction velocity (CV) parameters with histochemical measurements of muscle fiber type composition and cross-sectional area (CSA). Electromyographic signals were recorded during electrically elicited tetanic contractions from rat soleus, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm muscles placed in an oxygenated Krebs bath. Fibers were typed as slow oxidative, fast oxidative glycolytic, and fast glycolytic based on histochemical enzyme stains. Muscles with a greater percentage of fast glycolytic and fast oxidative glycolytic fibers exhibited greater initial values of MF and CV as well as a greater reduction in these variables over the course of the contraction. Regression indicated that fiber type composition could be predicted based on two MF parameters. A weighted measure of muscle fiber CSA was found to be linearly related to both initial MF and CV. The results of this study suggest that MF and CV parameters recorded during a muscular contraction are related to muscle fiber type composition and muscle fiber CSA.

  7. Scaling and entropy in p-median facility location along a line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastner, Michael T.

    2011-09-01

    The p-median problem is a common model for optimal facility location. The task is to place p facilities (e.g., warehouses or schools) in a heterogeneously populated space such that the average distance from a person's home to the nearest facility is minimized. Here we study the special case where the population lives along a line (e.g., a road or a river). If facilities are optimally placed, the length of the line segment served by a facility is inversely proportional to the square root of the population density. This scaling law is derived analytically and confirmed for concrete numerical examples of three US interstate highways and the Mississippi River. If facility locations are permitted to deviate from the optimum, the number of possible solutions increases dramatically. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we compute how scaling is affected by an increase in the average distance to the nearest facility. We find that the scaling exponents change and are most sensitive near the optimum facility distribution.

  8. Extra-median spread of sensory symptoms in carpal tunnel syndrome suggests the presence of pain-related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Giampietro; Marani, Silvia; Tamburin, Stefano

    2006-06-01

    Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may complain of sensory symptoms outside the typical median nerve distribution. The study is aimed to understand which clinical features are associated with the extra-median distribution of symptoms in CTS. We recruited 241 consecutive CTS patients. After selection, 103 patients (165 hands) were included. The symptoms distribution was evaluated with a self-administered hand symptoms diagram. Patients underwent objective evaluation, neurographic study and a self-administered questionnaire on subjective complaints. No clinical or electrodiagnostic signs of ulnar nerve involvement were found in the 165 hands. Median distribution of symptoms was found in 60.6% of hands, glove distribution in 35.2% and ulnar distribution in 4.2%. Objective measures of median nerve lesion (tactile hypaesthesia and thenar muscles hypasthenia) and neurographic involvement were significantly more severe in median hands than in the other groups. Subjective complaints (nocturnal pain, numbness and tingling sensations) were significantly more severe in glove hands. Neurophysiological and objective measures were not correlated with subjective complaints. The severity of the objective examination and neurographic involvement and the intensity of sensory complaints appear to be independent factors that influence the symptoms distribution. Extra-median spread of sensory symptoms was associated with higher levels of pain and paresthesia. We suggest that central nervous system mechanisms of plasticity may underlie the spread of symptoms in CTS.

  9. Internet suicide: communities of affirmation and the lethality of communication.

    PubMed

    Niezen, Ronald

    2013-04-01

    As a tool of instant information dissemination and social networking, the Internet has made possible the formation and affirmation of public identities based on personality traits that are usually characterized by clinicians as pathological. The wide variety of online communities of affirmation reveals new conditions for permissiveness and inclusiveness in expressions of these socially marginal and clinically pathologized identities. Much the same kind of discourse common to these online communities is evident in some suicide forums. Web sites with suicide as their central raison d'être, taken together, encompass a wide range of ideas and commitments, including many that provide collective affirmation outside of (and often with hostility toward) professional intervention. The paradox of a potentially life-affirming effect of such forums runs counter to a stark dualism between online therapy versus "prochoice" forums and, by extension, to simple models of the influence of ideas on the lethality of suicide. Different forums either intensify or mitigate self-destructive tendencies in ways that are significant for understanding the place of communication in the occurrence of suicide and for therapeutic practice.

  10. Rescue of lethal subunits into functional K+ channels.

    PubMed Central

    Taglialatela, M; Payne, J P; Drewe, J A; Brown, A M

    1994-01-01

    In a chimeric, voltage-dependent K+ channel (CHM), the valine at position 369 and the leucine at position 374 interact within the pore or P-region to regulate ion permeation and block. Here we show that the point mutation, CHM V369L, abolished channel function whereas previous experiments showed that CHM V369 and CHM V369I are functional. Coinjection of "lethal" CHM V369L cRNA with CHM L374V cRNA but not CHM cRNA generated functional heteromultimers. The whole-cell Rb+/K+ conductance ratio was 2.98 +/- 0.43 for CHM L374V and was reduced to 0.87 +/- 0.04 for the coexpressed CHM V369L and CHM L374V subunits. When single-channel currents were recorded, a single class of CHM V369L/CHM L374V heteromultimers was identified. This class was readily distinguishable from CHM L374V homomultimers by K+ conductance, gating, and blockade by internal tetraethylammonium. Coinjection experiments at various RNA ratios suggest that the CHM V369L/CHM L374V heteromultime, assuming it to be a tetramer, was composed of three CHM L374V subunits and one CHM V369L subunit. It appears that in the critical P-region of CHM position 369 may tolerate only one leucine. Images FIGURE 7 PMID:8130337

  11. Evolution of the Drosophila Feminizing Switch Gene Sex-lethal

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Thomas W.; Dorsett, Maia; Sun, Sha; Harrison, Melissa M.; Dines, Jessica; Sefton, Louise; Megna, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) controls all aspects of female development. Since melanogaster males lacking Sxl appear wild type, Sxl would seem to be functionally female specific. Nevertheless, in insects as diverse as honeybees and houseflies, Sxl seems not to determine sex or to be functionally female specific. Here we describe three lines of work that address the questions of how, when, and even whether the ancestor of melanogaster Sxl ever shed its non-female-specific functions. First, to test the hypothesis that the birth of Sxl's closest paralog allowed Sxl to lose essential ancestral non-female-specific functions, we determined the CG3056 null phenotype. That phenotype failed to support this hypothesis. Second, to define when Sxl might have lost ancestral non-female-specific functions, we isolated and characterized Sxl mutations in D. virilis, a species distant from melanogaster and notable for the large amount of Sxl protein expression in males. We found no change in Sxl regulation or functioning in the 40+ MY since these two species diverged. Finally, we discovered conserved non-sex-specific Sxl mRNAs containing a previously unknown, potentially translation-initiating exon, and we identified a conserved open reading frame starting in Sxl male-specific exon 3. We conclude that Drosophila Sxl may appear functionally female specific not because it lost non-female-specific functions, but because those functions are nonessential in the laboratory. The potential evolutionary relevance of these nonessential functions is discussed. PMID:20837995

  12. Sub-lethal ammonia toxicity in largemouth bass.

    PubMed

    Suski, C D; Kieffer, J D; Killen, S S; Tufts, B L

    2007-03-01

    Guidelines for ammonia toxicity in fish are often determined using static exposure tests with immature fish over a 96-h period. These results may not be relevant to aquaculture, hauling or angling tournament scenarios where mature fish can be exposed to ammonia for shorter durations, often following additional stressors such as handling. The current study sought to quantify (1) the impact of ambient ammonia on the ability of largemouth bass to recover from exercise, (2) the behavioural response of largemouth bass to elevated ambient ammonia and (3) the concentration of ammonia that can accumulate in a live-release vessel at an angling tournament. After approximately 3 h, total ammonia (T(amm)) concentrations in a live-release vessel at an angling tournament were almost 200 muM. Exposure of fish to 1000 microM T(amm) (a value approximately 80% below the criteria maximum concentration for largemouth bass) caused significant reductions in ventilation rates, and increases in erratic swimming and irregular ventilation. Exposure to 100 microM T(amm) impaired the ability of largemouth bass to recover from exercise relative to fish recovering in fresh water. Therefore, sub-lethal ambient ammonia concentrations cause physiological disturbances that can impair the recovery of largemouth bass from exercise.

  13. 'Immobile' (im), a recessive lethal mutation of Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Droin, A; Beauchemin, M L

    1975-10-01

    'Immobile' (im) is a recessive lethal mutation discovered in the F3 of a Xenopus (Xenopus laevis laevis) originating from a mesodermal nucleus of a neurula transplanted into an enucleated egg. The im embryos do not contract after mechanical stimulation nor do they present any spontaneous contraction from the neurula stage onwards. Development proceeds normally during the first days after which deformation of the lower jaw and tail are observed. The im tadpoles die when normal controls are at the feeding stage. Nevous and muscular tissues are histologically normal in the mutant tadpoles; at advanced stages, however, an irregularity in the path of the myofibrils is observed which is especially conspicuous in the electron microscope. Cholinesterases and ATPase are present in the mutant muscles. Parabiosis and chimerae experiments have shown that parabionts and grafts behave according to their own genotype. Cultures of presumptive axial systems with or without ectoderm lead to the conclusion that, first of all, the abnormality is situated in the mesodermal cells and secondly that the first muscular contractions in normal Xenopus laevis are of myogenic origin. The banding pattern of the myofibrils is normal as was shown by obtaining contractions of glycerol extracted in myoblasts with ATP. It seems therefore that in this mutation, the abnormality is situated in the membraneous system of the muscular cell, sarcoplasmic reticulum and/or tubular system as is probably the case in the mdg mutation of the mouse.

  14. Gene family encoding the major toxins of lethal Amanita mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Hallen, Heather E; Luo, Hong; Scott-Craig, John S; Walton, Jonathan D

    2007-11-27

    Amatoxins, the lethal constituents of poisonous mushrooms in the genus Amanita, are bicyclic octapeptides. Two genes in A. bisporigera, AMA1 and PHA1, directly encode alpha-amanitin, an amatoxin, and the related bicyclic heptapeptide phallacidin, a phallotoxin, indicating that these compounds are synthesized on ribosomes and not by nonribosomal peptide synthetases. alpha-Amanitin and phallacidin are synthesized as proproteins of 35 and 34 amino acids, respectively, from which they are predicted to be cleaved by a prolyl oligopeptidase. AMA1 and PHA1 are present in other toxic species of Amanita section Phalloidae but are absent from nontoxic species in other sections. The genomes of A. bisporigera and A. phalloides contain multiple sequences related to AMA1 and PHA1. The predicted protein products of this family of genes are characterized by a hypervariable "toxin" region capable of encoding a wide variety of peptides of 7-10 amino acids flanked by conserved sequences. Our results suggest that these fungi have a broad capacity to synthesize cyclic peptides on ribosomes.

  15. Hemolysis-induced lethality involves inflammasome activation by heme

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Fabianno F.; Alves, Letícia S.; Rodrigues, Danielle; Fernandez, Patricia L.; de Oliveira, Rosane B.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2014-01-01

    The increase of extracellular heme is a hallmark of hemolysis or extensive cell damage. Heme has prooxidant, cytotoxic, and inflammatory effects, playing a central role in the pathogenesis of malaria, sepsis, and sickle cell disease. However, the mechanisms by which heme is sensed by innate immune cells contributing to these diseases are not fully characterized. We found that heme, but not porphyrins without iron, activated LPS-primed macrophages promoting the processing of IL-1β dependent on nucleotide-binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3). The activation of NLRP3 by heme required spleen tyrosine kinase, NADPH oxidase-2, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and K+ efflux, whereas it was independent of heme internalization, lysosomal damage, ATP release, the purinergic receptor P2X7, and cell death. Importantly, our results indicated the participation of macrophages, NLRP3 inflammasome components, and IL-1R in the lethality caused by sterile hemolysis. Thus, understanding the molecular pathways affected by heme in innate immune cells might prove useful to identify new therapeutic targets for diseases that have heme release. PMID:25225402

  16. Sticky foam as a less-than-lethal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Steven H.

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in 1994 completed a project funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to determine the applicability of sticky foam for correctional applications. Sticky foam is an extremely tacky, tenacious material used to block, entangle, and impair individuals. The NIJ project developed a gun capable of firing multiple shots of sticky foam, tested the gun and sticky foam effectiveness on SNL volunteers acting out prison and law enforcement scenarios, and had the gun and sticky foam evaluated by correctional representatives. Based on the NIJ project work, SNL supported the Marine Corps Mission, Operation United Shield, with sticky foam guns and supporting equipment to assist in the withdrawal of UN Peacekeepers from Somalia. Prior to the loan of the waste disposal, use limitations, use protocol and precautions, emergency facial clean-up, skin clean-up, gun filling, targeting and firing, and gun cleaning. The Marine Corps successfully used the sticky foam guns as part of that operation. This paper describes these recent developments of sticky foam for non-lethal uses and some of the lessons learned from scenario and application testing.

  17. TGF-β Tumor Suppression Through A Lethal EMT

    PubMed Central

    David, Charles J.; Huang, Yun-Han; Chen, Mo; Su, Jie; Zou, Yilong; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Massagué, Joan

    2016-01-01

    TGF-β signaling can be pro-tumorigenic or tumor suppressive. We investigated this duality in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), which, with other gastrointestinal cancers, exhibits frequent inactivation of the TGF-β mediator Smad4. We show that TGF-β induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), generally considered a pro-tumorigenic event. However, in TGF-β sensitive PDA cells, EMT becomes lethal by converting TGF-β-induced Sox4 from an enforcer of tumorigenesis into a promoter of apoptosis. This is the result of an EMT-linked remodeling of the cellular transcription factor landscape, including the repression of the gastrointestinal lineage-master regulator Klf5. Klf5 cooperates with Sox4 in oncogenesis and prevents Sox4-induced apoptosis. Smad4 is required for EMT but dispensable for Sox4 induction by TGF-β. TGF-β-induced Sox4 is thus geared to bolster progenitor identity, while simultaneous Smad4-dependent EMT strips Sox4 of an essential partner in oncogenesis. Our work demonstrates that TGF-β tumor suppression functions through an EMT-mediated disruption of a lineage-specific transcriptional network. PMID:26898331

  18. Non-Lethal Endotoxin Injection: A Rat Model of Hypercoagulability.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Marjory B; Turk, James R; Guerrero, Abraham; Narayanan, Padma K; Nolan, John P; Besteman, Elizabeth G; Wilson, Dennis W; Thomas, Roberta A; Fishman, Cindy E; Thompson, Karol L; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Pierson, Jennifer B; Paulman, April; Chiang, Alan Y; Schultze, Albert E

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammation co-activates coagulation, which unchecked culminates in a lethal syndrome of multi-organ microvascular thrombosis known as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We studied an endotoxin-induced inflammatory state in rats to identify biomarkers of hemostatic imbalance favoring hypercoagulability. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS at 15 mg/kg body weight resulted in peripheral leukopenia and widespread neutrophilic sequestration characteristic of an acute systemic inflammatory response. Early indicators of hemostatic pathway activation developed within 4 hours, including increased circulating concentrations of procoagulant extracellular vesicles (EVs), EVs expressing endothelial cell and platelet membrane markers, and high concentration of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and D-dimers. Inflammation persisted throughout the 48-hour observation period; however, increases were found in a subset of serum microRNA (miRNA) that coincided with gradual resolution of hemostatic protein abnormalities and reduction in EV counts. Dose-adjusted LPS treatment in rats provides a time-course model to develop biomarker profiles reflecting procoagulant imbalance and rebalance under inflammatory conditions.

  19. Missing upper beak: a new lethal mutation in domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Silversides, F G; Urrutia, M S; Crawford, R D

    1982-01-01

    A new condition affecting the facial structure of domestic fowl is described. It is controlled by an autosomal recessive gene having complete penetrance. The mutation has been named missing upper beak and the gene symbol mub is proposed. The condition is an obligate lethal. Mortality occurs on the twelfth day of incubation or during the hatching process. One chick hatched unaided and five were assisted from the shell; none of these survived beyond 11 days of age. They had partial vision and hearing, they could vocalize and had normal balance, but they were unable to eat. Major phenotypic effects of the mutation are absence of the upper beak and absence of eyelids. All or part of the upper eyelid is always missing; the lower eyelid and nictitating membrane may be present or absent. Premaxilla and nasal bones are greatly reduced causing the upper beak to be rudimentary. Other membranous bones of the head are reduced causing the face to be shortened. Cartilaginous bones appear not to be affected. It is postulated that the condition results from a defect in membrane formation during embryonic development.

  20. Lethal Lullabies: A History of Opium Use in Infants.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Poppy extract accompanied the human infant for more than 3 millenia. Motives for its use included excessive crying, suspected pain, and diarrhea. In antiquity, infantile sleeplessness was regarded as a disease. When treatment with opium was recommended by Galen, Rhazes, and Avicenna, baby sedation made its way into early medical treatises and pediatric instructions. Dabbing maternal nipples with bitter substances and drugging the infant with opium were used to hasten weaning. A freerider of gum lancing, opiates joined the treatment of difficult teething in the 17th century. Foundling hospitals and wet-nurses used them extensively. With industrialization, private use was rampant among the working class. In German-speaking countries, poppy extracts were administered in soups and pacifiers. In English-speaking countries, proprietary drugs containing opium were marketed under names such as soothers, nostrums, anodynes, cordials, preservatives, and specifics and sold at the doorstep or in grocery stores. Opium's toxicity for infants was common knowledge; thousands of cases of lethal intoxication had been reported from antiquity. What is remarkable is that the willingness to use it in infants persisted and that physicians continued to prescribe it for babies. Unregulated trade, and even that protected by governments, led to greatly increased private use of opiates during the 19th century. Intoxication became a significant factor in infant mortality. As late as 1912, the International Hague Convention forced governments to implement legislation that effectively curtailed access to opium and broke the dangerous habit of sedating infants.

  1. Baicalin Protects Mice from Lethal Infection by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Qi, Zhimin; Liu, Yan; He, Wenqi; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Quan; Dong, Jing; Deng, Xuming

    2017-01-01

    Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 poses grave challenges to public health by its ability to cause severe colonic diseases and renal failure in both human and animals. Shiga-like toxins are the major pathogenic factor for some highly virulent E. coli expecially Shiga-like toxin 2. Conventional treatments such as antibiotics can facilitate the release of the toxin thus potentially exacerbate the diseases. Small molecule inhibitors and antibodies capable of neutralizing the toxins are the two major venues for the development of therapeutics against enterohemorrhagic serotype E. coli infection. While promising and potentially effective at clinical settings, these approaches need to overcome obstacles such as the limited routes of administration, responses from the host immune system, which are known to differ greatly among individuals. Our previous studies demonstrate that Baicalin (BAI), a flavonoid compound isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis protects against rStx2-induced cell cytotoxicity and also protects mice from lethal rStx2 challenges by inducing Stx2 to form inactive oligomers. In this manuscript, we present some exciting work showing that baicalin is an effective agent for therapeutic treatment of STEC O157:H7 infection.

  2. Embryonic Lethals and T-DNA Insertional Mutagenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Errampalli, D; Patton, D; Castle, L; Mickelson, L; Hansen, K; Schnall, J; Feldmann, K; Meinke, D

    1991-01-01

    T-DNA insertional mutagenesis represents a promising approach to the molecular isolation of genes with essential functions during plant embryo development. We describe in this report the isolation and characterization of 18 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana defective in embryo development following seed transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Random T-DNA insertion was expected to result in a high frequency of recessive embryonic lethals because many target genes are required for embryogenesis. The cointegrate Ti plasmid used in these experiments contained the nopaline synthase and neomycin phosphotransferase gene markers. Nopaline assays and resistance to kanamycin were used to estimate the number of functional inserts present in segregating families. Nine families appeared to contain a T-DNA insert either within or adjacent to the mutant gene. Eight families were clearly not tagged with a functional insert and appeared instead to contain mutations induced during the transformation process. DNA gel blot hybridization with internal and right border probes revealed a variety of rearrangements associated with T-DNA insertion. A general strategy is presented to simplify the identification of tagged embryonic mutants and facilitate the molecular isolation of genes required for plant embryogenesis. PMID:12324593

  3. Activated mouse eosinophils protect against lethal respiratory virus infection.

    PubMed

    Percopo, Caroline M; Dyer, Kimberly D; Ochkur, Sergei I; Luo, Janice L; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Lee, James J; Lee, Nancy A; Domachowske, Joseph B; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2014-01-30

    Eosinophils are recruited to the airways as a prominent feature of the asthmatic inflammatory response where they are broadly perceived as promoting pathophysiology. Respiratory virus infections exacerbate established asthma; however, the role of eosinophils and the nature of their interactions with respiratory viruses remain uncertain. To explore these questions, we established acute infection with the rodent pneumovirus, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), in 3 distinct mouse models of Th2 cytokine-driven asthmatic inflammation. We found that eosinophils recruited to the airways of otherwise naïve mice in response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but not ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, are activated by and degranulate specifically in response to PVM infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated eosinophils from both Aspergillus antigen and cytokine-driven asthma models are profoundly antiviral and promote survival in response to an otherwise lethal PVM infection. Thus, although activated eosinophils within a Th2-polarized inflammatory response may have pathophysiologic features, they are also efficient and effective mediators of antiviral host defense.

  4. Immunohistochemical expression of BRCA1 and lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Judson, Gregory; Penney, Kathryn; Flavin, Richard; Stark, Jennifer; Fiore, Christopher; Fall, Katja; Martin, Neil; Ma, Jing; Sinnott, Jennifer; Giovannucci, Edward; Stampfer, Meir; Sesso, Howard D.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Finn, Stephen; Loda, Massimo; Mucci, Lorelei

    2011-01-01

    BRCA1 functions as a tumor suppressor; recent work suggests that BRCA1 may also induce cell-cycle arrest to allow for DNA repair. We hypothesized that BRCA1 expression in prostate tumor tissue may be associated with prostate cancer progression through regulation of the cell-cycle. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate BRCA1 protein expression in archival tumors samples from 393 prostate cancer cases in the Physicians' Health Study. The men were followed prospectively from diagnosis to development of metastases and mortality. Fifteen percent of tumors stained positive for BRCA1. BRCA1 positive tumors had substantially increased tumor proliferation index compared to negative tumors (47.0 Ki67 positive nuclei vs. 10.3, p=0.0016), and were more likely to develop lethal cancer compared to BRCA1 negative tumors (Hazard ratio=4.6; 95% Confidence interval: 2.4, 8.7). These findings strengthen the hypothesis that BRCA1 plays a role in cell-cycle control and demonstrate that BRCA1 is a marker of clinical prostate cancer prognosis. PMID:20388772

  5. Non-Lethal Endotoxin Injection: A Rat Model of Hypercoagulability

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Marjory B.; Turk, James R.; Guerrero, Abraham; Narayanan, Padma K.; Nolan, John P.; Besteman, Elizabeth G.; Wilson, Dennis W.; Thomas, Roberta A.; Fishman, Cindy E.; Thompson, Karol L.; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Pierson, Jennifer B.; Paulman, April; Chiang, Alan Y.; Schultze, Albert E.

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammation co-activates coagulation, which unchecked culminates in a lethal syndrome of multi-organ microvascular thrombosis known as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We studied an endotoxin-induced inflammatory state in rats to identify biomarkers of hemostatic imbalance favoring hypercoagulability. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS at 15 mg/kg body weight resulted in peripheral leukopenia and widespread neutrophilic sequestration characteristic of an acute systemic inflammatory response. Early indicators of hemostatic pathway activation developed within 4 hours, including increased circulating concentrations of procoagulant extracellular vesicles (EVs), EVs expressing endothelial cell and platelet membrane markers, and high concentration of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and D-dimers. Inflammation persisted throughout the 48-hour observation period; however, increases were found in a subset of serum microRNA (miRNA) that coincided with gradual resolution of hemostatic protein abnormalities and reduction in EV counts. Dose-adjusted LPS treatment in rats provides a time-course model to develop biomarker profiles reflecting procoagulant imbalance and rebalance under inflammatory conditions. PMID:28081568

  6. Lethal fighting between honeybee queens and parasitic workers (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Moritz, Robin F A; Pflugfelder, Jochen; Crewe, Robin M

    2003-08-01

    Pheromonal signals associated with queen and worker policing prevent worker reproduction and have been identified as important factors for establishing harmony in the honeybee (Apis mellifera) colony. However, "anarchic workers", which can evade both mechanisms, have been detected at low frequency in several honeybee populations. Worker bees of the Cape honeybee, Apis mellifera capensis, also show this anarchistic trait but to an extreme degree. They can develop into so called "pseudoqueens", which release a pheromonal bouquet very similar to that of queens. They prime and release very similar reactions in sterile workers to those of true queens (e.g. suppress ovary activation; release retinue behavior). Here we show in an experimental bioassay that lethal fights between these parasitic workers and the queen (similar to queen-queen fights) occur, resulting in the death of either queen or worker. Although it is usually the queen that attacks the parasitic workers and kills many of them, in a few cases the workers succeeded in killing the queen. If this also occurs in a parasitized colony where the queen encounters many parasitic workers, she may eventually be killed in one of the repeated fights she engages in.

  7. Lethal Mutagenesis of HIV with Mutagenic Nucleoside Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeb, Lawrence A.; Essigmann, John M.; Kazazi, Farhad; Zhang, Jue; Rose, Karl D.; Mullins, James I.

    1999-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replicates its genome and mutates at exceptionally high rates. As a result, the virus is able to evade immunological and chemical antiviral agents. We tested the hypothesis that a further increase in the mutation rate by promutagenic nucleoside analogs would abolish viral replication. We evaluated deoxynucleoside analogs for lack of toxicity to human cells, incorporation by HIV reverse transcriptase, resistance to repair when incorporated into the DNA strand of an RNA\\cdot DNA hybrid, and mispairing at high frequency. Among the candidates tested, 5-hydroxydeoxycytidine (5-OH-dC) fulfilled these criteria. In seven of nine experiments, the presence of this analog resulted in the loss of viral replicative potential after 9-24 sequential passages of HIV in human CEM cells. In contrast, loss of viral replication was not observed in 28 control cultures passaged in the absence of the nucleoside analog, nor with other analogs tested. Sequence analysis of a portion of the HIV reverse transcriptase gene demonstrated a disproportionate increase in G -> A substitutions, mutations predicted to result from misincorporation of 5-OH-dC into the cDNA during reverse transcription. Thus, "lethal mutagenesis" driven by the class of deoxynucleoside analogs represented by 5-OH-dC could provide a new approach to treating HIV infections and, potentially, other viral infections.

  8. Baicalin Protects Mice from Lethal Infection by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Qi, Zhimin; Liu, Yan; He, Wenqi; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Quan; Dong, Jing; Deng, Xuming

    2017-01-01

    Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 poses grave challenges to public health by its ability to cause severe colonic diseases and renal failure in both human and animals. Shiga-like toxins are the major pathogenic factor for some highly virulent E. coli expecially Shiga-like toxin 2. Conventional treatments such as antibiotics can facilitate the release of the toxin thus potentially exacerbate the diseases. Small molecule inhibitors and antibodies capable of neutralizing the toxins are the two major venues for the development of therapeutics against enterohemorrhagic serotype E. coli infection. While promising and potentially effective at clinical settings, these approaches need to overcome obstacles such as the limited routes of administration, responses from the host immune system, which are known to differ greatly among individuals. Our previous studies demonstrate that Baicalin (BAI), a flavonoid compound isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis protects against rStx2-induced cell cytotoxicity and also protects mice from lethal rStx2 challenges by inducing Stx2 to form inactive oligomers. In this manuscript, we present some exciting work showing that baicalin is an effective agent for therapeutic treatment of STEC O157:H7 infection. PMID:28337193

  9. Sticky foam as a less-than-lethal technology

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Labs (SNL) in 1994 completed a project funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to determine the applicability of sticky foam for correctional applications. Sticky foam is an extremely tacky, tenacious material used to block, entangle, and impair individuals. The NIJ project developed a gun capable of firing multiple shots of sticky foam, tested the gun and sticky foam effectiveness on SNL volunteers acting out prison and law enforcement scenarios, and had the gun and sticky foam evaluated by correctional representatives. Based on the NIJ project work, SNL supported the Marine Corps Mission, Operation United Shield, with sticky foam guns and supporting equipment to assist in the withdrawal of UN Peacekeepers from Somalia. Prior to the loan of the equipment, the Marines were given training in sticky foam characterization, toxicology, safety issues, cleanup and waste disposal, use limitations, use protocol and precautions, emergency facial clean-up, skin cleanup, gun filling, targeting and firing, and gun cleaning. The Marine Corps successfully used the sticky foam guns as part of that operation. This paper describes these recent developments of sticky foam for non-lethal uses and some of the lessons learned from scenario and application testing.

  10. Lethal and sublethal effects of three insecticides on two developmental stages of Xenopus laevis and comparison with other amphibians.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuangying; Wages, Mike R; Cai, Qingsong; Maul, Jonathan D; Cobb, George P

    2013-09-01

    It has been suggested that Xenopus laevis is less sensitive than other amphibians to some chemicals, and therefore, that the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX) may have limited use in risk assessments for other amphibians. However, comparisons are based mostly on results of FETAX, which emphasizes embryos. Larval X. laevis may be more sensitive to chemicals than embryos and may serve as a better life stage in risk assessments. The present study was conducted to determine the lethal and sublethal effects of 3 insecticides (malathion, endosulfan, and α-cypermethrin) on X. laevis embryos and larvae and to compare toxicity of X. laevis with that of other amphibians. All 3 insecticides have different modes of action, and they caused mortality, malformations, and growth inhibition in both developmental stages. Compared with embryos, larvae were more sensitive to endosulfan and α-cypermethrin but not to malathion. Xenopus laevis larvae had low sensitivity to endosulfan, median sensitivity to malathion, and high sensitivity to α-cypermethrin/cypermethrin relative to other larval amphibians. Our results suggest that X. laevis larvae may generate more protective toxicity estimates in risk assessments than embryos. Xenopus laevis may have limited use in evaluating risk of organochlorine insecticides to other amphibians but may provide useful toxicity thresholds for pyrethroid and perhaps organophosphorus insecticides.

  11. Identification of lethal cluster of genes in the yeast transcription network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, K.; Jeong, H.; Kahng, B.

    2006-05-01

    Identification of essential or lethal genes would be one of the ultimate goals in drug designs. Here we introduce an in silico method to select the cluster with a high population of lethal genes, called lethal cluster, through microarray assay. We construct a gene transcription network based on the microarray expression level. Links are added one by one in the descending order of the Pearson correlation coefficients between two genes. As the link density p increases, two meaningful link densities pm and ps are observed. At pm, which is smaller than the percolation threshold, the number of disconnected clusters is maximum, and the lethal genes are highly concentrated in a certain cluster that needs to be identified. Thus the deletion of all genes in that cluster could efficiently lead to a lethal inviable mutant. This lethal cluster can be identified by an in silico method. As p increases further beyond the percolation threshold, the power law behavior in the degree distribution of a giant cluster appears at ps. We measure the degree of each gene at ps. With the information pertaining to the degrees of each gene at ps, we return to the point pm and calculate the mean degree of genes of each cluster. We find that the lethal cluster has the largest mean degree.

  12. Connectivity Homology Enables Inter-Species Network Models of Synthetic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Jacunski, Alexandra; Dixon, Scott J.; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic lethality is a genetic interaction wherein two otherwise nonessential genes cause cellular inviability when knocked out simultaneously. Drugs can mimic genetic knock-out effects; therefore, our understanding of promiscuous drugs, polypharmacology-related adverse drug reactions, and multi-drug therapies, especially cancer combination therapy, may be informed by a deeper understanding of synthetic lethality. However, the colossal experimental burden in humans necessitates in silico methods to guide the identification of synthetic lethal pairs. Here, we present SINaTRA (Species-INdependent TRAnslation), a network-based methodology that discovers genome-wide synthetic lethality in translation between species. SINaTRA uses connectivity homology, defined as biological connectivity patterns that persist across species, to identify synthetic lethal pairs. Importantly, our approach does not rely on genetic homology or structural and functional similarity, and it significantly outperforms models utilizing these data. We validate SINaTRA by predicting synthetic lethality in S. pombe using S. cerevisiae data, then identify over one million putative human synthetic lethal pairs to guide experimental approaches. We highlight the translational applications of our algorithm for drug discovery by identifying clusters of genes significantly enriched for single- and multi-drug cancer therapies. PMID:26451775

  13. Medial septal and median raphe innervation of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing interneurons in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Papp, E C; Hajos, N; Acsády, L; Freund, T F

    1999-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-immunoreactive interneurons are known to form three anatomically and neurochemically well-characterized neuron populations in the hippocampus. Two of these establish synaptic contacts selectively with other GABAergic cells (interneuron-selective cells), whereas the third type innervates pyramidal cell bodies and proximal dendrites like a conventional basket cell. Our aim was to examine which of the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing interneuron populations are among the targets of GABAergic septohippocampal and serotonergic raphe-hippocampal pathways. Anterograde tracing with Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin combined with double immunocytochemistry for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide was used at the light and electron microscopic levels. Our results show that both interneuron-selective cells and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing basket cells receive synaptic input from the medial septum and median raphe nucleus. The GABAergic component of the septohippocampal pathway establishes multiple contacts on both cell types. In the case of the raphe-hippocampal projection, single or double contacts were more frequent on vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive interneuron selective cells (76%), whereas multiple contacts predominated on basket cells (83%). The extrinsic GABAergic innervation of interneuron-selective cells in the hippocampus indicates a complex interaction among GABAergic systems, which might ensure the timing and rhythmic synchronization of inhibitory processes in the hippocampus. On the other hand, our results suggest that the serotonergic effect on perisomatic inhibition is exerted via vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-containing basket cells that are functionally distinct from their parvalbumin-positive relatives, which appear to escape control of serotonergic as well as local interneuron-selective cells.

  14. Noise assessment of a coal train rail line in a freeway median - a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.S.

    1983-06-01

    The site chosen by the Virginia Port Authority (VPA) to construct a new coal terminal in Portsmouth, Virginia on the west bank of the Elizabeth River is inaccessible by existing rail lines. The only avaialable route for a new rail line to the site which would not displace established businesses and residences was through an unused right-of-way held by the Virginia Department of Highways and Transportation (VDHandT). The right-of-way is being reserved for the eventual construction of the Western Freeway to connect with I-664. VPA and VDHandT developed a plan whereby a double rail line would be constructed in the median of the as yet unbuilt freeway which would not interfere with construction of the freeway at a later date. Heavy residential development along both sides of the right-of-way in a two mile long strip through the Churchland area near the proposed coal terminal dictated a need for a detailed noise assessment as a part of the EIS. Acoustic models were used to predict noise levels due to the highway and railroad separately and combined, both with and without an 18-foot high absorptive barrier, for the worst-hour Leq(H), an average 24-hour period (Le q (24)), and the day/night noise level (LDN). The 18-foot high barrier was used as an illustration of a possible mitigative measure which could be employed. No cost/benefit analysis of a barrier has been conducted at this point, however.

  15. Functional connectivity of the dorsal and median raphe nuclei at rest

    PubMed Central

    Beliveau, Vincent; Svarer, Claus; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Knudsen, Gitte M.; Greve, Douglas N.; Fisher, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter critically involved in a broad range of brain functions and implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses including major depression, anxiety and sleep disorders. Despite being widely distributed throughout the brain, there is limited knowledge on the contribution of 5-HT to intrinsic brain activity. The dorsal raphe (DR) and median raphe (MR) nuclei are the source of most serotonergic neurons projecting throughout the brain and thus provide a compelling target for a seed-based probe of resting-state activity related to 5-HT. Here we implemented a novel multimodal neuroimaging approach for investigating resting-state functional connectivity (FC) between DR and MR and cortical, subcortical and cerebellar target areas. Using [11C]DASB positron emission tomography (PET) images of the brain serotonin transporter (5-HTT) combined with structural MRI from 49 healthy volunteers, we delineated DR and MR and performed a seed-based resting-state FC analysis. The DR and MR seeds produced largely similar FC maps: significant positive FC with brain regions involved in cognitive and emotion processing including anterior cingulate, amygdala, insula, hippocampus, thalamus, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Significant negative FC was observed within pre- and postcentral gyri for the DR but not for the MR seed. We observed a significant association between DR and MR FC and regional 5-HTT binding. Our results provide evidence for a resting-state network related to DR and MR and comprising regions receiving serotonergic innervation and centrally involved in 5-HT related behaviors including emotion, cognition and reward processing. These findings provide a novel advance in estimating resting-state FC related to 5-HT signaling, which can benefit our understanding of its role in behavior and neuropsychiatric illnesses. PMID:25963733

  16. Median preoptic nucleus mediates the cardiovascular recovery induced by hypertonic saline in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Nathalia Oda; Naves, Lara Marques; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos Luiz; Freiria-Oliveira, André Henrique; Colombari, Eduardo; Rosa, Daniel Alves; Reis, Angela Adamski da Silva; Ianzer, Danielle; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Changes in plasma osmolarity, through central and peripheral osmoreceptors, activate the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) that modulates autonomic and neuroendocrine adjustments. The present study sought to determine the participation of MnPO in the cardiovascular recovery induced by hypertonic saline infusion (HSI) in rats submitted to hemorrhagic shock. The recordings of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) were carried out on male Wistar rats (250-300 g). Hemorrhagic shock was induced by blood withdrawal over 20 min until the MAP values of approximately 60 mmHg were attained. The nanoinjection (100 nL) of GABAA agonist (Muscimol 4 mM; experimental group (EXP)) or isotonic saline (NaCl 150 mM; control (CONT)) into MnPO was performed 2 min prior to intravenous overload of sodium through HSI (3 M NaCl, 1.8 mL/kg, b.wt.). Hemorrhagic shock reduced the MAP in control (62 ± 1.1 mmHg) and EXP (61 ± 0.4 mmHg) equipotently. The inhibition of MnPO impaired MAP (CONT: 104 ± 4.2 versus EXP: 60 ± 6.2 mmHg) and RVC (CONT: 6.4 ± 11.4 versus EXP: -53.5 ± 10.0) recovery 10 min after HSI. The overall results in this study demonstrated, for the first time, that the MnPO plays an essential role in the HSI induced resuscitation during hypovolemic hemorrhagic shock.

  17. Communication between the musculocutaneous and median nerves in the arm: an anatomical study and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, Luis Ernesto; Forero, Pedro Luis; Buitrago, Edna Rocío

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency and features of communication between the musculocutaneous nerve (MCN) and median nerve (MN) in a sample of the Colombian population, and assess its clinical implication. Methods The arms of 53 cadaver specimens that had been subjected to necropsy at the National Institute of Forensic Medicine, in Bucaramanga, Colombia, were studied. The structures of the anterior compartment of the arm were dissected and characterized regarding the presence of communication between the MCN and MN. Results A communicating branch was found in 21/106 upper limbs (19.8%), occurring bilaterally in 10 (47.6%) and unilaterally in 11 (52.4%), without significant difference regarding the side of occurrence (p = 0.30). In 17% of the cases, there was MCN-MN communication in which the communicating branch was seen leaving the MCN after piercing the coracobrachialis muscle (Type I). In 2.8%, the connection was from the MN to the MCN (Type II). The length of the communicating branch was 57.8 ± 33.4 mm. The distances from the proximal and distal points of this branch to the coracoid process were 138 ± 39.4 mm and 188 ± 48.3 mm, respectively. The communicating branch was located mostly in the middle third of the arm. Conclusions The frequency of MCN-MN communication observed in the present study is in the middle of the range of what was reported in previous studies. MCN-MN connections need to be taken into account in diagnosing and managing peripheral nerve lesions of the upper limbs. PMID:26535190

  18. Functional connectivity of the dorsal and median raphe nuclei at rest.

    PubMed

    Beliveau, Vincent; Svarer, Claus; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Knudsen, Gitte M; Greve, Douglas N; Fisher, Patrick M

    2015-08-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter critically involved in a broad range of brain functions and implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses including major depression, anxiety and sleep disorders. Despite being widely distributed throughout the brain, there is limited knowledge on the contribution of 5-HT to intrinsic brain activity. The dorsal raphe (DR) and median raphe (MR) nuclei are the source of most serotonergic neurons projecting throughout the brain and thus provide a compelling target for a seed-based probe of resting-state activity related to 5-HT. Here we implemented a novel multimodal neuroimaging approach for investigating resting-state functional connectivity (FC) between DR and MR and cortical, subcortical and cerebellar target areas. Using [(11)C]DASB positron emission tomography (PET) images of the brain serotonin transporter (5-HTT) combined with structural MRI from 49 healthy volunteers, we delineated DR and MR and performed a seed-based resting-state FC analysis. The DR and MR seeds produced largely similar FC maps: significant positive FC with brain regions involved in cognitive and emotion processing including anterior cingulate, amygdala, insula, hippocampus, thalamus, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Significant negative FC was observed within pre- and postcentral gyri for the DR but not for the MR seed. We observed a significant association between DR and MR FC and regional 5-HTT binding. Our results provide evidence for a resting-state network related to DR and MR and comprising regions receiving serotonergic innervation and centrally involved in 5-HT related behaviors including emotion, cognition and reward processing. These findings provide a novel advance in estimating resting-state FC related to 5-HT signaling, which can benefit our understanding of its role in behavior and neuropsychiatric illnesses.

  19. Evolution of the Median Tectonic Line fault zone, SW Japan, during exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigematsu, Norio; Kametaka, Masao; Inada, Noriyuki; Miyawaki, Masahiro; Miyakawa, Ayumu; Kameda, Jun; Togo, Tetsuhiro; Fujimoto, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    Like many crustal-scale fault zones, the Median Tectonic Line (MTL) fault zone in Japan preserves fault rocks that formed across a broad range of physical conditions. We examined the architecture of the MTL at a large new outcrop in order to understand fault behaviours under different crustal levels. The MTL here strikes almost E-W, dips to the north, and juxtaposes the Sanbagawa metamorphic rocks to the south against the Izumi Group sediments to the north. The fault core consists mainly of Sanbagawa-derived fault gouges. The fault zone can be divided into several structural units, including two slip zones (upper and lower slip zones), where the lower slip zone is more conspicuous. Crosscutting relationships among structures and kinematics indicate that the fault zone records four stages of deformation. Microstructures and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicate that the four stages of deformation occurred under different temperature conditions. The oldest deformation (stage 1) was widely distributed, and had a top-to-the-east (dextral) sense of slip at deep levels of the seismogenic zone. Deformation with the same sense of slip, then became localised in the lower slip zone (stage 2). Subsequently, the slip direction in the lower slip zone changed to top-to-the-west (sinistral-normal) (stage 3). The final stage of deformation (stage 4) involved top-to-the-north normal faulting along the two slip zones within the shallow crust (near the surface). The widely distributed stage 1 damage zone characterises the deeper part of the seismogenic zone, while the sets of localised principal slip zones and branching faults of stage 4 characterise shallow depths. The fault zone architecture described in this paper leads us to suggest that fault zones display different behaviours at different crustal levels.

  20. Effect of lithium on behavioral disinhibition induced by electrolytic lesion of the median raphe nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Pezzato, Fernanda A.; Can, Adem; Hoshino, Katsumasa; Horta, José de Anchieta C.; Mijares, Miriam G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Alterations in brainstem circuits have been proposed as a possible mechanism underlying the etiology of mood disorders. Projections from the median raphe nucleus (MnR) modulate dopaminergic activity in the forebrain and are also part of a behavioral disinhibition/inhibition system that produces phenotypes resembling behavioral variations manifested during manic and depressive phases of bipolar disorder. Objective Assess the effect of chronic lithium treatment on behavioral disinhibition induced by MnR lesions. Methods MnR electrolytic lesions were performed in C57BL/6J mice, with sham operated and intact animals as control groups. Following recovery, mice were chronically treated with lithium (LiCl, added in chow) followed by behavioral testing. Results MnR lesion induced manic-like behavioral alterations including hyperactivity in the open field (OF), stereotyped circling, anxiolytic/risk taking in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and light/dark box (LDB) tests, and increased basal body temperature. Lithium was specifically effective in reducing OF hyperactivity and stereotypy but did not reverse (EPM) or had a nonspecific effect (LDB) on anxiety/risk taking measures. Additionally, lithium decreased saccharin preference and prevented weight loss during single housing. Conclusions Our data support electrolytic lesions of the MnR as an experimental model of a hyper-excitable/disinhibited phenotype consistent with some aspects of mania that are attenuated by the mood stabilizer lithium. Given lithium’s relatively specific efficacy in treating mania, these data support the hypothesis that manic symptoms derive not only from the stimulation of excitatory systems but also from inactivation or decreased activity of inhibitory mechanisms. PMID:25345734