Science.gov

Sample records for 48-hr monitoring period

  1. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 09 (PERIODS 1-4 AND FOOD, FRUIT & VEG): CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is divided into two parts: Child Activity Diary and Food Survey. The Child Activity Diary collects information on the child's activities at home over the 48-hr monitoring period. The diary is divided into four time periods over the 48-hr monitoring inter...

  2. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 08 (PERIODS 1-5 AND FOOD, FRUIT & VEG): CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is divided into two parts: Child Activity Diary and Food Survey. The Child Activity Diary collects information on the child's activities at home over the 48-hr monitoring period. The diary is divided into five time periods over the 48-hr monitoring inter...

  3. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form collects information on the child's activities at the day care center over the 48-hr monitoring period. The diary is divided into three time periods over the 48-monitoring interval. The Food Survey collects information on the frequency and types of frui...

  4. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 07: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER POST-MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to provide information on the child's daily activities and potential exposures to pollutants at their homes. It includes questions on chemicals applied and cigarettes smoked at the home over the 48-hr monitoring period. It also collects informati...

  5. 42 CFR 460.190 - Monitoring during trial period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring during trial period. 460.190 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) Federal/State Monitoring § 460.190 Monitoring during trial period. (a) Trial period review. During the trial period, CMS, in cooperation with the State administering agency, conducts...

  6. 42 CFR 460.190 - Monitoring during trial period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Federal/State Monitoring § 460.190 Monitoring during trial period. (a) Trial period...

  7. 42 CFR 460.190 - Monitoring during trial period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Federal/State Monitoring § 460.190 Monitoring during trial period. (a) Trial period...

  8. 42 CFR 460.192 - Ongoing monitoring after trial period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Federal/State Monitoring § 460.192 Ongoing monitoring after trial period....

  9. 42 CFR 460.192 - Ongoing monitoring after trial period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Federal/State Monitoring § 460.192 Ongoing monitoring after trial period....

  10. Optimum temporal update periods for regional ionosphere monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayin, I.; Arikan, F.; Akdogan, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Monitoring of the ionospheric variability is necessary for improving the performance of communication, navigation, and positioning systems. Total electron content (TEC) is an important parameter in analyzing the variability of the ionosphere. Owing to sparse distribution of TEC in a given region, spatial interpolation methods are used for mapping TEC on a dense grid. Typically, TEC maps are produced at time intervals that do not match the variability of the regional ionosphere. To capture the local, small-scale variability, the temporal update period (TUP) in regional TEC monitoring has to be optimized. In this study, the wide sense stationarity (WSS) period is proposed to be used as the optimum TUP of the regional TEC maps. Individual WSS periods of TEC are obtained by the sliding window statistical analysis method. Four types of measures are employed to compute the differences between TEC maps. When WSS periods of the sampling points and the differences of TEC maps are compared with each other, it is observed that for the quiet days of the ionosphere where the general temporal trends dominate, the maximum WSS period in the region can be chosen as the optimum TUP. For the disturbed days of the ionosphere where high temporal and spatial variability is observed, averages or the minimums of WSS periods in a given region have to be chosen as the optimum TUP. Thus, WSS period can be developed into a useful tool in monitoring the ionospheric variability in a given region.

  11. Respiratory monitoring using fibre long period grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allsop, T.; Reeves, R.; Webb, D. J.; Bennion, I.; Earthrowl, T.; Jones, B.; Miller, M.

    2005-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of a series of in-line fibre long period grating curvature sensors on a garment, used to monitor the thoracic and abdominal volumetric tidal movements of a human subject. These results are used to obtain volumetric tidal changes of the human torso showing reasonable agreement with a spirometer used simultaneously to record the volume at the mouth during breathing. The curvature sensors are based upon long period gratings written in a progressive three layered fibre that are insensitive to refractive index changes. The sensor platform consists of the long period grating laid upon a carbon fibre ribbon, which is encapsulated in a low temperature curing silicone rubber.

  12. GPS in pioneering dynamic monitoring of long-period structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.; Sanli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) technology with 10-20-Hz sampling rates allows scientifically justified dynamic measurements of relative displacements of long-period structures. The displacement response of a simulated tall building in real time and permanent deployment of GPS units at the roof of a building are described. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the first permanent deployment of GPS units (in the world) for continuous dynamic monitoring of a tall building. Data recorded from the building during a windy day is analyzed to determine the structural characteristics. When recorded during extreme motions caused by earthquakes and strong winds, such measurements can be used to compute average drift ratios and changes in dynamic characteristics, and therefore can be used by engineers and building owners or managers to assess the structural integrity and performance by establishing pre-established thresholds. Such information can be used to secure public safety and/or take steps to improve the performance of the building.

  13. Monitoring metabolic health of dairy cattle in the transition period.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the importance of energy metabolism in transition dairy cows, its associations with disease and reproduction, and strategies for monitoring cows under field conditions during this critical time. Essentially all dairy cattle experience a period of insulin resistance, reduced feed intake, negative energy balance, hypocalcemia, reduced immune function, and bacterial contamination of the uterus soon before, or in the weeks after calving. One-third of dairy cows may be affected by some form of metabolic or infectious disease in early lactation. Routine, proactive actions, observations, or analysis are intended to accurately and efficiently provide early detection of problems, to provide an opportunity for investigation and intervention in order to limit the consequences and costs of health problems and reduced animal performance or welfare. Methods of early detection include monitoring of disease and culling records, feed intake, milk production, body condition, and simple metabolic tests. Methods, strategies, and interpretation of measurement of peripartum concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) as indicators of aspects of energy status and disease risk are reviewed. High NEFA (> 0.4 mmol/l) in the last 7 to 10 days before expected calving is associated with increased risk of displaced abomasum (DA), retained placenta, culling before 60 days in milk, and less milk production in the first 4 months of lactation. Subclinical ketosis (serum BHB >1200 to 1400 micromol/l) in the first or second week after calving is associated with increased risk of DA, metritis, clinical ketosis, endometritis, prolonged postpartum anovulation, increased severity of mastitis, and lower milk production in early lactation. There are several validated and practical tools for cow-side measurement of ketosis. PMID:20629214

  14. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period April Through June 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-11-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period April through June 2006. Seventeen RCRA sites were sampled during the reporting quarter. Sampled sites include seven monitored under groundwater indicator evaluation (''detection'') programs, eight monitored under groundwater quality assessment programs, and two monitored under final-status programs.

  15. GPS in dynamic monitoring of long-period structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    2000-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) technology with high sampling rates (??? 10 samples per second) allows scientifically justified and economically feasible dynamic measurements of relative displacements of long-period structures-otherwise difficult to measure directly by other means, such as the most commonly used accelerometers that require post-processing including double integration. We describe an experiment whereby the displacement responses of a simulated tall building are measured clearly and accurately in real-time. Such measurements can be used to assess average drift ratios and changes in dynamic characteristics, and therefore can be used by engineers and building owners or managers to assess the building performance during extreme motions caused by earthquakes and strong winds. By establishing threshold displacements or drift ratios and identifying changing dynamic characteristics, procedures can be developed to use such information to secure public safety and/or take steps to improve the performance of the building. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  16. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period July through September 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2007-02-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period July through September 2006. Eighteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) sites were sampled during the reporting quarter.

  17. 40 CFR 97.632 - Monitoring system out-of-control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Monitoring system out-of-control... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.632 Monitoring system out-of-control periods. (a) General...

  18. 40 CFR 97.732 - Monitoring system out-of-control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Monitoring system out-of-control... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.732 Monitoring system out-of-control periods. (a) General...

  19. 40 CFR 97.632 - Monitoring system out-of-control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Monitoring system out-of-control... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.632 Monitoring system out-of-control periods. (a) General...

  20. 40 CFR 97.732 - Monitoring system out-of-control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Monitoring system out-of-control... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.732 Monitoring system out-of-control periods. (a) General...

  1. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA (MONITORING PERIOD 1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes responses for 249 follow-up questionnaires collected during the first week-long monitoring period. The Follow-up Questionnaire was used to provide information on relatively infrequent (e.g., less than daily) activities during the sampling period to explain ...

  2. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Nineteen RCRA groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford site. They include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. Groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim- and final- status federal and state regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of the following programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment or detection. This quarterly report contains data received between July 1 and Sept. 30, 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the July-Sept. quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events not previously reported.

  3. Critical evaluation of factors required to terminate the postclosure monitoring period at solid waste landfills.

    PubMed

    Barlaz, Morton A; Rooker, Alix P; Kjeldsen, Peter; Gabr, Mohammed A; Bordent, Robert C

    2002-08-15

    Regulations governing the disposal of solid waste in landfills specify that they must be monitored for 30 years after closure unless this period is extended by the governing regulatory authority. Given the wide range of conditions under which refuse is buried, technical criteria, rather than a specific time period, are preferable for evaluation of when it is acceptable to terminate postclosure monitoring. The objectives of this paper are to identify and evaluate parameters that can be used to define the end of the postclosure monitoring period and to present a conceptual framework for an investigation of whether postclosure monitoring can be terminated at a landfill. Parameters evaluated include leachate composition and leachate and gas production. Estimates of leachate production from closed landfills are used to assess the potential environmental impacts of a hypothetical release to surface water or groundwater. The acceptability of gaseous releases should be evaluated against criteria for odors, the potential for subsurface migration, and greenhouse gas and ozone precursor emissions. The approach presented here must be tested on a site-specific basis to identify additional data requirements and regulatory activity that might be required to prepare regulators for the large number of requests to terminate postclosure monitoring expected over the next 20 years. An approach in which the frequency and extent of postclosure monitoring is reduced as warranted by site-specific data and impact analysis should provide an effective strategy to manage closed landfills. PMID:12214635

  4. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period April 1, 1993 through June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jungers, D.K.

    1993-10-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between May 24 and August 20, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from samples collected during the April through June quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  5. 77 FR 36583 - NRC Form 5, Occupational Dose Record for a Monitoring Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... the comment submissions into ADAMS. II. Background On December 4, 2007 (72 FR 68043), NRC published a... COMMISSION NRC Form 5, Occupational Dose Record for a Monitoring Period AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Commission) is seeking public comment on the proposed draft NRC Form 5, ``Occupational Dose Record for...

  6. 40 CFR 97.632 - Monitoring system out-of-control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Monitoring system out-of-control periods. 97.632 Section 97.632 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.632...

  7. 40 CFR 97.732 - Monitoring system out-of-control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Monitoring system out-of-control periods. 97.732 Section 97.732 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.732...

  8. 40 CFR 97.532 - Monitoring system out-of-control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Monitoring system out-of-control periods. 97.532 Section 97.532 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX...

  9. 40 CFR 97.432 - Monitoring system out-of-control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Monitoring system out-of-control periods. 97.432 Section 97.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX...

  10. 40 CFR 97.532 - Monitoring system out-of-control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Monitoring system out-of-control periods. 97.532 Section 97.532 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX...

  11. 40 CFR 97.432 - Monitoring system out-of-control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Monitoring system out-of-control periods. 97.432 Section 97.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX...

  12. 40 CFR 97.432 - Monitoring system out-of-control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Monitoring system out-of-control periods. 97.432 Section 97.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX...

  13. 40 CFR 97.532 - Monitoring system out-of-control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Monitoring system out-of-control periods. 97.532 Section 97.532 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX...

  14. Monitoring of respiratory volumes by an long period grating sensor of bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raicevic, N.; Ivanovic, M. D.; Belicev, P.; Petrovic, J.

    2016-02-01

    Here, we present a method of respiratory volumes monitoring using a single fibergrating sensor of bending. Measurements are conducted using simple monochromatic interrogation scheme that relies on a photodiode measurement of the power transmitted through a long period grating (LPG) sensor at fixed wavelength. Good sensor accuracy in measurements of tidal and minute respiratory volumes for different types of breathing is achieved.

  15. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--TIME-ACTIVITY DIARY QUESTIONNAIRE DATA (ALL MONITORING PERIODS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes responses for 249 participants with a total of 428 time-activity diaries. Some participants were studied for more than one monitoring period. The Time Diary and Activity Questionnaire was used for collecting data on detailed (daily) time and location inform...

  16. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA (ALL MONITORING PERIODS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes responses for 249 participants with a total of 444 follow-up questionnaires. Some participants were studied for more than one monitoring period. The Follow-up Questionnaire was used to provide information on relatively infrequent (e.g., less than daily) ac...

  17. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This quarterly report contains data received between January and March 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported. Nineteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford Site. These projects include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. The groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim-status federal (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulation [CFR] Part 265) and state (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303-400) regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of three programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment.

  18. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1 through December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and {open_quotes}Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities{close_quotes} (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 265), as amended. Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. The location of each facility is shown. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between October and December 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  19. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1, 1993 through March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. This quarterly report contains data received between March 8 and May 24, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  20. Sub-daily periodicities in the results of local monitoring using global navigation satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaftan, Vladimir; Ustinov, Alexander

    Nowadays the more attention is focused on the continuous monitoring by using of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) in the study and control of stability of engineering structures and natural objects. The diurnal and semi-diurnal oscillations take place in high frequency GNSS observation. These waves are caused by the presence of the high frequency periodicities in changes of all geospheres, but also in systematic errors of GNSS techniques. Thus the diurnal variations are already found in the coordinates of global and regional networks of CORS stations. They are often related with the influence of Earth's diurnal tides. The purpose of this study is to examine the periodic variations in coordinate increments of local monitoring networks of engineering structures and the earth's surface. But in this case the tidal changes have a small influence because of the relative proximity of the network control points. Results of static GNSS observations in the local network with the control vectors baselines from 170 m to 4.3 km of length were used for the analysis of periodicities. The hourly time series of baseline components of the length of two months were analyzed. Three qualitatively different methods were applied: wavelet transformation (Morlet wavelet function), fast Fourier transformation (FFT), and sequential analysis of the dominant harmonics (dominant analysis) for the more sure detection of hidden periodicities. The results of determination of oscillation spectrum were obtained by the three methods mentioned above. For all baselines their good mutual agreement were obtained. Diurnal and semi-diurnal waves are mainly and the most vividly appeared in the horizontal components, in the height’s component there are also other periodicity of the high and low frequencies. The oscillation’s amplitude reaches 4 mm. It is necessary to clarify the nature of the observed oscillations, which will be the main subject of the following more detailed studies. It is

  1. Periodic leg movement (PLM) monitoring using a distributed body sensor network.

    PubMed

    Madhushri, Priyanka; Ahmed, Beena; Penzel, Thomas; Jovanov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensors networks represent the architecture of choice for distributed monitoring due to the ease of deployment and configuration. We developed a distributed sleep monitoring system which combines wireless inertial sensors SP-10C by Sensoplex controlled by a custom smartphone application as an extension of the polysomnographic (PSG) monitor SOMNOscreen plus from Somnomedics. While existing activity monitors are wired to the SOMNOscreen, our system allows the use of wireless inertial sensors to improve user's comfort during sleep. The system is intended for monitoring of periodic leg movements (PLM) and user's activity during sleep. Wireless sensors are placed on ankle and toes of the foot in a customized sock. An Android app communicates with wireless sensors over Bluetooth Smart (BTS) link and streams 3D accelerometer values, 4D unit quaternion values and timestamps. In this paper we present a novel method of synchronization of data streams from PSG and inertial sensors, and original method of detection of PLM events. The system was tested using five experiments of simulated PLM, and achieved 96.51% of PLM detection accuracy. PMID:26736638

  2. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jungers, D.K.

    1994-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between November 20 and February 25, 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  3. Multi-Period Many-Objective Groundwater Monitoring Design Given Systematic Model Errors and Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollat, J. B.; Reed, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    This study demonstrates how many-objective long-term groundwater monitoring (LTGM) network design tradeoffs evolve across multiple management periods given systematic models errors (i.e., predictive bias), groundwater flow-and-transport forecasting uncertainties, and contaminant observation uncertainties. Our analysis utilizes the Adaptive Strategies for Sampling in Space and Time (ASSIST) framework, which is composed of three primary components: (1) bias-aware Ensemble Kalman Filtering, (2) many-objective hierarchical Bayesian optimization, and (3) interactive visual analytics for understanding spatiotemporal network design tradeoffs. A physical aquifer experiment is utilized to develop a severely challenging multi-period observation system simulation experiment (OSSE) that reflects the challenges and decisions faced in monitoring contaminated groundwater systems. The experimental aquifer OSSE shows both the influence and consequences of plume dynamics as well as alternative cost-savings strategies in shaping how LTGM many-objective tradeoffs evolve. Our findings highlight the need to move beyond least cost purely statistical monitoring frameworks to consider many-objective evaluations of LTGM tradeoffs. The ASSIST framework provides a highly flexible approach for measuring the value of observables that simultaneously improves how the data are used to inform decisions.

  4. Rapid-cadence optical monitoring for short-period variability of ɛ Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, Gary

    2013-07-01

    ɛ Aurigae was observed with CCD cameras and 35 mm SLR camera lenses, at rapid cadence (>1/minute), for long runs (up to 11 hours), on multiple occasions during 2009 - 2011, to monitor for variability of the system at scales of minutes to hours. The lens and camera were changed during the period to improve results, finalizing on a 135 mm focal length Canon f/2 lens (at f/2.8), an ND8 neutral density filter, a Johnson V filter, and an SBIG ST-8XME camera (Kodak KAF-1603ME microlensed chip). Differential photometry was attempted, but because of the large separation between the variable and comparison star (η Aur), noise caused by transient extinction variations was not consistently eliminated. The lowest-noise time series for searching for short-period variability proved to be the extinction-corrected instrumental magnitude of ɛ Aur obtained on "photometric nights", with η Aur used to determine and monitor the extinction coefficient for the night. No flares or short-period variations of ɛ Aur were detected by visual inspection of the light curves from observing runs with noise levels as low as 0.008 magnitudes rms.

  5. "Periodic-table-style" paper device for monitoring heavy metals in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Miaosi; Cao, Rong; Nilghaz, Azadeh; Guan, Liyun; Zhang, Xiwang; Shen, Wei

    2015-03-01

    If a paper-based analytical device (μ-PAD) could be made by printing indicators for detection of heavy metals in chemical symbols of the metals in a style of the periodic table of elements, it could be possible for such μ-PAD to report the presence and the safety level of heavy metal ions in water simultaneously and by text message. This device would be able to provide easy solutions to field-based monitoring of heavy metals in industrial wastewater discharges and in irrigating and drinking water. Text-reporting could promptly inform even nonprofessional users of the water quality. This work presents a proof of concept study of this idea. Cu(II), Ni(II), and Cr(VI) were chosen to demonstrate the feasibility, specificity, and reliability of paper-based text-reporting devices for monitoring heavy metals in water. PMID:25645265

  6. A Gaussian Process Based Online Change Detection Algorithm for Monitoring Periodic Time Series

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Online time series change detection is a critical component of many monitoring systems, such as space and air-borne remote sensing instruments, cardiac monitors, and network traffic profilers, which continuously analyze observations recorded by sensors. Data collected by such sensors typically has a periodic (seasonal) component. Most existing time series change detection methods are not directly applicable to handle such data, either because they are not designed to handle periodic time series or because they cannot operate in an online mode. We propose an online change detection algorithm which can handle periodic time series. The algorithm uses a Gaussian process based non-parametric time series prediction model and monitors the difference between the predictions and actual observations within a statistically principled control chart framework to identify changes. A key challenge in using Gaussian process in an online mode is the need to solve a large system of equations involving the associated covariance matrix which grows with every time step. The proposed algorithm exploits the special structure of the covariance matrix and can analyze a time series of length T in O(T^2) time while maintaining a O(T) memory footprint, compared to O(T^4) time and O(T^2) memory requirement of standard matrix manipulation methods. We experimentally demonstrate the superiority of the proposed algorithm over several existing time series change detection algorithms on a set of synthetic and real time series. Finally, we illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm for identifying land use land cover changes using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data collected for an agricultural region in Iowa state, USA. Our algorithm is able to detect different types of changes in a NDVI validation data set (with ~80% accuracy) which occur due to crop type changes as well as disruptive changes (e.g., natural disasters).

  7. Fetal goiter conservatively monitored during the prenatal period associated with maternal and neonatal euthyroid status.

    PubMed

    Neto, José Ferreira Gomes; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Costa, Jesus Irajacy Fernandes; Dias, Daniel Aguiar; Aguiar, Lindemberg Barbosa; Carvalho, Francisco Herlânio Costa

    2016-01-01

    Congenital goiter is considered a rare occurrence, and may be related to hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, or euthyroidism. In this report, we describe a case of fetal goiter identified in the 34th gestational week in a 41-year-old secundigravida with normal thyroid functions. A conservative approach was followed; the fetal goiter was monitored via ultrasound, which suggested this was a case of hyperthyroidism. After the birth, tests indicated that the newborn was euthyroidic. Consequently, a more detailed study using non-invasive procedures was deemed necessary to discover the precise cause of the fetal goiter during the gestational period. PMID:26866037

  8. Application of long-period grating sensors to respiratory function monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allsop, Thomas D.; Earthrowl, Tim; Revees, Richard; Webb, David J.; Miller, Martin; Jones, Barrie W.; Bennion, Ian

    2004-12-01

    A series of in-line curvature sensors on a garment are used to monitor the thoracic and abdominal movements of a human during respiration. These results are used to obtain volumetric tidal changes of the human torso showing reasonable agreement with a spirometer used simultaneously to record the volume at the mouth during breathing. The curvature sensors are based upon long period gratings written in a progressive three layered fibre that are insensitive to refractive index changes. The sensor platform consists of the long period grating laid upon a carbon fibre ribbon, which is encapsulated in a low temperature curing silicone rubber. An array of sensors is also used to reconstruct the shape changes of a resuscitation manikin during simulated respiration. The data for reconstruction is obtained by two methods of multiplexing and interrogation: firstly using the transmission spectral profile of the LPG's attenuation bands measured using an optical spectrum analyser; secondly using a derivative spectroscopy technique.

  9. Surface-mounted periodic field eddy current sensors for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfine, Neil J.; Zilberstein, Vladimir A.; Schlicker, Darrell E.; Sheiretov, Yanko; Walrath, Karen; Washabaugh, Andrew P.; Van Otterloo, Douglas

    2001-07-01

    Surface mountable eddy current sensors are a revolutionary new concept in nondestructive inspection. These eddy current sensors can be mounted, like a strain gage, at critical locations for detection of crack initiation and monitoring of crack growth. This can be accomplished on a fatigue test article, as well as on in-service aircraft or other structures (patents pending). The mountable periodic field eddy current sensors, described in this paper, can be used as a replacement for standard eddy-current sensors without introducing new requirements. This is not the case with other proposed health monitoring sensors. For critical structures, substantially reduced inspection costs and life extension is possible with permanently mounted eddy current sensors. This is particularly true for difficult-to-access locations that require surface preparation (e.g., sealant or insulation removal) and disassembly when conventional eddy current testing is performed. By enabling eddy current testing in areas currently not accessible to conventional inspection, such as locations deep in an aircraft structure, damage tolerance can be achieved with low cost inspections. Embedded versions might even be mounted between layers, such as in a lapjoint. Surface mountable eddy current sensors are suitable for on-line monitoring and in-service inspections. This paper provides an introduction to surface mountable eddy current sensors, presents specific results from fatigue coupon tests and describes upcoming full-scale aircraft fatigue tests. Also, ongoing efforts to implement this technology on commercial and military aircraft are described. This research has been funded in part by the U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, JENTEK Sensors, Inc., and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company. The goal of this paper is to provide a basic understanding of surface mounted eddy current sensor capabilities and potential, and to promote their broader use in fatigue testing, aircraft health monitoring as well as for

  10. Monitoring Vegetation Phenology and Snow Free Periods with the Daily MODIS BRDF/albedo Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Schaaf, C.; Strahler, A. H.; Zhang, X.; Shuai, Y.; YANG, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of rapidly changing events such as vegetation phenology and seasonal snowfall play important roles in the annual terrestrial energy and carbon cycles and serve as indicators of climate change. The timing of vegetation greenup and senescence impacts essential ecosystem processes while snow free surfaces absorb more solar radiation than high albedo snow covered regions. Recent research has indicated that the duration of the snow-free period at high northern latitudes has increased due to climate change and the longer snow-free periods have affected the composition and extent of vegetation at high latitudes. The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/albedo product has provided measures of surface albedo and vegetation phenology for more than 12 years. The standard V005 product makes use of a linear "kernel-driven" RossThick-LiSparse Reciprocal (RTLSR) BRDF model to describe the reflectance anisotropy of each pixel at a 500-m gridded resolution. In the past this multi-day product was only retrieved every 8 days which has limited its ability to capture rapidly changing events such as ephemeral snow fall and melt and vegetation emergence and senescence. A daily version of the MODIS product still uses all MODIS observations acquired during a 16-day period but utilizes a moving window to improve on the 8-day temporal resolution of the standard V005 NASA data products and allows daily monitoring of land surface change phenomena. Individual observations are weighted by their quality, observation coverage, and proximity to the production date of interest. In this study, we monitor the phenology dynamics over forest, grass and tundra sites and the extent of the snow free period over high latitude areas by using the daily MODIS Nadir BRDF-Adjusted Reflectance (NBAR) data from MODIS BRDF/albedo product.

  11. Monitoring and evaluation of radon mitigation systems over a two-year period

    SciTech Connect

    Prill, R.J.; Fisk, W.J.; Turk, B.H.

    1988-09-01

    Fourteen single-family detached houses in the Spokane, Washington, and Coeur D'Alene, Idaho, area were tracked for two years following mitigation for elevated indoor concentrations of radon. Each house was monitored quarterly using mailed alpha-track radon detectors deployed in each zone of the structure. During the second heating season following mitigation, radon concentrations were monitored continuously for several weeks in seven of the houses, each house and mitigation system was inspected and selected measurements were performed in order to access mitigation system performance. Occupants were also interviewed regarding their maintenance, operation, and subjective evaluation of the radon mitigation system(s). The quarterly alpha-track measurements showed an increase in radon levels in a majority of the homes during many of the follow-up measurement periods compared to concentrations measured immediately after mitigation. The greatest increases in radon concentrations occurred in 3 of the 4 houses equipped with basement pressurization systems where radon levels approached the pre-mitigation levels during at least one of the follow-up measurement periods. In some of the houses mitigated with subsurface ventilation, radon concentrations generally increased over the course of the follow-up periods. Factors causing decreased mitigation system performance included: (1) build up of debris on the soil at the outlet of subsurface pressurization pipes; (2) noisy and vibrating fans were turned off; (3) air-to-air heat exchanger, basement pressurization, and subsurface ventilation fans were turned off and fan speeds reduced; and (4) crawl space vents were closed or sealed. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A device for daily monitoring of the fetus and the mother in the antenatal period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureev, A. Sh.; Zemlyakov, I. Yu.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Zhdanov, D. S.; Kiseleva, E. Yu.; Khohlova, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper describes the principles of operation and design of a specialized device for daily monitoring of the fetus and the mother in the antenatal period of growing. The device consists of a hardware and software system that provides registration and analysis of acoustic data on the condition of the cardiovascular system of the mother and fetus in the mother's abdominal body part. The software is a set of components for analysis, transmission and storage of acoustic data. The results of the analysis can help make a decision about the condition of the cardiovascular system of the fetus and, if necessary, to notify the mother and her physician about the emergency, aiming at preserving the life of the fetus.

  13. Hydrochemical monitoring results in relation to the vogtland-nw bohemian earthquake swarm period 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, H.; Bräuer, K.; Dulski, P.; Faber, E.; Koch, U.; Mrlina, J.; Strauch, G.; Weise, S. M.

    2003-04-01

    The Vogtland-NW Bohemian earthquake swarm area/Central Europe is characterised by carbon dioxide- rich mineral springs and mofetts. The August-December 2000 earthquake period was the strongest compared with the December 1985/86 swarms occurred in the area of Novy Kostel, Czech Republic. Here, we present first results of long-term hydrochemical monitoring studies before, during and after the 2000 swarm period. The swarm 2000 lasted from August 28 until December 26 and consisted of altogether nine sub-swarm episodes, each of them lasting for several days. At the mineral spring Wettinquelle, Bad Brambach/Germany the water chemistry and isotope (D, 18O) composition was monitored weekly and two-weekly, respectively, since May 2000. The mineral spring Wettinquelle is located in a distance of about 10 km from the epicentral area of Novy Kostel. The aim of our investigation was to look for seismic induced or seismic coupled changes of the chemical and isotope composition of the mineral water. We had to separate seismohydrological effects from seasonal and hydrological caused changes. The seasonal caused shifts were found for water temperature and alkaline elements (Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs) as well as for discharge, conductivity, hydrogenecarbonate- concentration, and the concentration of the alkaline earth's (Ca, Mg, Sr). Strain related anomalies which could influence the hydrogeochemistry of the mineral water seems to be visible in the iron- concentration of the spring water, in the methane- concentration of the free gas component and caused probably changes of the groundwater level of the well H3 located about 5 km SE of the Wettinquelle at Skalna.

  14. A Case Report of Clonazepam Dependence: Utilization of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring During Withdrawal Period.

    PubMed

    Kacirova, Ivana; Grundmann, Milan; Silhan, Petr; Brozmanova, Hana

    2016-03-01

    Clonazepam is long-acting benzodiazepine agonist used in short-acting benzodiazepine withdrawal; however, recent observations suggest the existence of its abuse. We demonstrate a 40-year-old man with a 20-year history of psychiatric care with recently benzodiazepine dependence (daily intake of ∼60 mg of clonazepam and 10 mg of alprazolam). High serum levels of both drugs were analyzed 3 weeks before admission to hospitalization (clonazepam 543.9 ng/mL, alprazolam 110 ng/mL) and at the time of admission (clonazepam 286.2 ng/mL, alprazolam 140 ng/mL) without any signs of benzodiazepine intoxication. Gradual withdrawal of clonazepam with monitoring of its serum levels and increase of gabapentin dose were used to minimize physical signs and symptoms of clonazepam withdrawal. Alprazolam was discontinued promptly. Clinical consequences of the treatment were controllable tension, intermittent headache, and rarely insomia. It is the first case report showing utilization of therapeutic drug monitoring during withdrawal period in the patient with extreme toleration to severe benzodiazepine dependence. PMID:26945373

  15. Kepler monitoring of an L dwarf I. The photometric period and white light flares

    SciTech Connect

    Gizis, John E.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Berger, Edo; Williams, Peter K. G.; Vrba, Frederick J.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Metchev, Stanimir

    2013-12-20

    We report on the results of 15 months of monitoring the nearby field L1 dwarf WISEP J190648.47+401106.8 (W1906+40) with the Kepler mission. Supporting observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array and Gemini North Telescope reveal that the L dwarf is magnetically active, with quiescent radio and variable Hα emission. A preliminary trigonometric parallax shows that W1906+40 is at a distance of 16.35{sub −0.34}{sup +0.36} pc, and all observations are consistent with W1906+40 being an old disk star just above the hydrogen-burning limit. The star shows photometric variability with a period of 8.9 hr and an amplitude of 1.5%, with a consistent phase throughout the year. We infer a radius of 0.92 ± 0.07R{sub J} and sin i > 0.57 from the observed period, luminosity (10{sup –3.67} {sup ±} {sup 0.03} L {sub ☉}), effective temperature (2300 ± 75 K), and vsin i (11.2 ± 2.2 km s{sup –1}). The light curve may be modeled with a single large, high latitude dark spot. Unlike many L-type brown dwarfs, there is no evidence of other variations at the ≳ 2% level, either non-periodic or transient periodic, that mask the underlying rotation period. We suggest that the long-lived surface features may be due to starspots, but the possibility of cloud variations cannot be ruled out without further multi-wavelength observations. During the Gemini spectroscopy, we observed the most powerful flare ever seen on an L dwarf, with an estimated energy of ∼1.6 × 10{sup 32} erg in white light emission. Using the Kepler data, we identify similar flares and estimate that white light flares with optical/ultraviolet energies of 10{sup 31} erg or more occur on W1906+40 as often as 1-2 times per month.

  16. Long-term optical monitoring of η Carinae. Multiband light curves for a complete orbital period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Lajús, E.; Fariña, C.; Torres, A. F.; Schwartz, M. A.; Salerno, N.; Calderón, J. P.; von Essen, C.; Calcaferro, L. M.; Giudici, F.; Llinares, C.; Niemela, V.

    2009-01-01

    Context: The periodicity of 5.5 years for some observational events occurring in η Carinae manifests itself across a large wavelength range and has been associated with its binary nature. These events are supposed to occur when the binary components are close to periastron. To detect the previous periastron passage of η Car in 2003, we started an intensive, ground-based, optical, photometric observing campaign. Aims: We continued observing the object to monitor its photometric behavior and variability across the entire orbital cycle. Methods: Our observation program consisted of daily differential photometry from CCD images, which were acquired using a 0.8 m telescope and a standard BVRI filter set at La Plata Observatory. The photometry includes the central object and the surrounding Homunculus nebula. Results: We present up-to-date results of our observing program, including homogeneous photometric data collected between 2003 and 2008. Our observations demonstrated that η Car has continued increasing in brightness at a constant rate since 1998. In 2006, it reached its brightest magnitude (V ~ 4.7) since about 1860. The object then suddenly reverted its brightening trend, fading to V = 5.0 at the beginning of 2007, and has maintained a quite steady state since then. We continue the photometric monitoring of η Car in anticipation of the next “periastron passage”, predicted to occur at the beginning of 2009. Full Table 2 and Table 3 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/493/1093

  17. Monitoring of high refractive index edible oils using coated long period fiber grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Luís.; Viegas, Diana; Santos, José Luís.; de Almeida, Jose Manuel M. M.

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring the quality of high refractive index edible oils is of great importance for the human health. Uncooked edible oils in general are healthy foodstuff, olive oil in particular, however, they are frequently used for baking and cooking. High quality edible oils are made from seeds, nuts or fruits by mechanical processes. Nevertheless, once the mechanical extraction is complete, up to 15% of the oil remains in oil pomace and in the mill wastewater, which can be extracted using organic solvents, often hexane. Optical fiber sensors based on long period fiber gratings (LPFG) have very low wavelength sensitivity when the surround refractive index is higher than the refractive index of the cladding. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) coated LPFG could lead to the realization of high sensitivity chemical sensor for the food industry. In this work LPFG coated with a TiO2 thin film were successfully used for to detect small levels of hexane diluted in edible oils and for real time monitoring the thermal deterioration of edible oils. For a TiO2 coating of 30 nm a wavelength sensitivity of 1361.7 nm/RIU (or 0.97 nm / % V/V) in the 1.4610-1.4670 refractive index range was achieved, corresponding to 0 to 12 % V/V of hexane in olive oil. A sensitivity higher than 638 nm/RIU at 225 ºC was calculated, in the 1.4670-1.4735 refractive index range with a detection limit of thermal deterioration of about 1 minute.

  18. Periodic limb movements of sleep: empirical and theoretical evidence supporting objective at-home monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Marilyn; Goparaju, Balaji; Castillo, Jelina; Alameddine, Yvonne; Bianchi, Matt T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Periodic limb movements of sleep (PLMS) may increase cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity. However, most people with PLMS are either asymptomatic or have nonspecific symptoms. Therefore, predicting elevated PLMS in the absence of restless legs syndrome remains an important clinical challenge. Methods We undertook a retrospective analysis of demographic data, subjective symptoms, and objective polysomnography (PSG) findings in a clinical cohort with or without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from our laboratory (n=443 with OSA, n=209 without OSA). Correlation analysis and regression modeling were performed to determine predictors of periodic limb movement index (PLMI). Markov decision analysis with TreeAge software compared strategies to detect PLMS: in-laboratory PSG, at-home testing, and a clinical prediction tool based on the regression analysis. Results Elevated PLMI values (>15 per hour) were observed in >25% of patients. PLMI values in No-OSA patients correlated with age, sex, self-reported nocturnal leg jerks, restless legs syndrome symptoms, and hypertension. In OSA patients, PLMI correlated only with age and self-reported psychiatric medications. Regression models indicated only a modest predictive value of demographics, symptoms, and clinical history. Decision modeling suggests that at-home testing is favored as the pretest probability of PLMS increases, given plausible assumptions regarding PLMS morbidity, costs, and assumed benefits of pharmacological therapy. Conclusion Although elevated PLMI values were commonly observed, routinely acquired clinical information had only weak predictive utility. As the clinical importance of elevated PLMI continues to evolve, it is likely that objective measures such as PSG or at-home PLMS monitors will prove increasingly important for clinical and research endeavors. PMID:27540316

  19. Monitoring the gestation period of rescued Formosan pangolin (Manis pentadactyla pentadactyla) with progesterone radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Chin, Shih-Chien; Lien, Chen-Yen; Chan, Ya-Ting; Chen, Chun-Lin; Yang, Yi-Ching; Yeh, Lih-Seng

    2012-01-01

    Eight species of pangolin have been identified in the world. However, understanding of pangolin reproductive biology has been limited to fragmentary records. In this study, the concentration of serum progesterone in three pregnant and two nonpregnant rescued female Formosan pangolins (Manis pentadactyla pentadactyla) was monitored using a commercial progesterone radioimmunoassay kit. During gestation, the serum progesterone of pregnant pangolins A, B, and C remained at 28.5-55 ng/ml (n = 31 samples), 10.9-50.1 ng/ml (n = 34), and 12.4 and 33.5 ng/ml with a peak at 47.6 ng/ml (n = 19), respectively, whereas the serum progesterone of nonpregnant pangolins D and E remained at 1.99 ± 1.62 ng/ml (n = 80) and 2.27 ± 1.64 ng/ml (n = 27), respectively. From this study, it was found that female pangolin weighing as low as 2.14 kg was already capable of reproduction. For pregnant pangolins to give birth to viable offspring, their body weight must increase significantly, 63.89 and 134.0% in the study, from the time of inception or early pregnancy until parturition. In addition, study has found that both viable offspring were born fully developed and exceeded 80 g in weight. The period of gestation was found to be as short as 318 or longer than 372 days. Therefore, the Formosan pangolin should only be able to reproduce once a year. This study is the first insight into hormone assay for determining the gestation period of pangolin. Further investigations on the same subject are necessary to establish criteria for the recognition of reproductive status in pangolins. PMID:21866570

  20. Ambient air quality monitoring during the H1N1 influence period in Pune (India).

    PubMed

    Pathak, M; Deshpande, A; Mirashe, P K; Sorte, R B; Ojha, A

    2010-10-01

    Ambient air quality in an urban area is directly linked with activity level in the city including transport, business and industrial activities. Maharashtra Pollution Control Board (MPCB) has established an ambient air quality network in the city including state-of-the-art continuous air quality monitoring stations which indicate short duration air quality variations for criteria and non-criteria pollutants. The influence of H1N1 outbreak in Pune hitting its worst pandemic condition, led the civic authorities to implement stringent isolation measures including closure of schools, colleges, business malls, cinema halls, etc. Additionally, the fear of such a pandemic brought the city to a stand still. It was therefore necessary to assess the impacts of such activity level on ambient air quality in the city. It has been observed that such events have positive impacts on air quality of the city. There was a decrease in PM concentration almost to the tune of 30 to 40% if the impacts of precipitation, i.e. seasonal variations, are taken into account. Similarly, the non criteria pollutants too showed a marked but unusual decrease in their concentrations in this ever growing city. The influence of these in turn led to lowered concentrations of secondary pollutants, i.e. O3. Overall, the ambient air quality of Pune was found to be improved during the study period. PMID:22312797

  1. Results of 5-year photometric monitoring of the intermediate polar V2306 Cygni: correction of the orbital period and evidence of 2-day periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breus, V.; Petrík, K.; Zoła, S.; Baransky, A.; Hegedus, T.

    2015-09-01

    We present the results of 6 years of photometric monitoring of the magnetic cataclysmic variable V2306 Cygni (formerly known as 1WGAJ1958.2+3232) obtained at collaborating observatories. Using (O-C) analysis we tried to study variability of the spin period of the white dwarf, however we cannot make a firm conclusion based on the scatter. Simultaneously, using (O-C) diagram of orbital minima, we found that the value of 0.181545(3) days better corresponds with the light curve, than do previously published orbital period values. We also found that the variability has a 2.01 day period; this variability may be interpreted as possible precession of the accretion disk in this system.

  2. Results of Groundwater Monitoring for the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins Reporting Period: July-December 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2007-04-10

    This is one of a series of reports on Resource Conservation and Recovery Act monitoring at the 183 H basins. It fulfills a requirement of WAC 173-303-645(11)(g) to report twice each year on the effectiveness of the corrective action program. This report covers the period from July through December 2006. The current objective of corrective action monitoring is simply to track trends. Although there is short-term variability in contaminant concentrations, trends over the past 10 years are downward. The current RCRA permit and monitoring plan remain adequate for the objective of tracking trends.

  3. Pop hole use by hens with different keel fracture status monitored throughout the laying period.

    PubMed

    Richards, G J; Wilkins, L J; Knowles, T G; Booth, F; Toscano, M J; Nicol, C J; Brown, S N

    2012-05-12

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of keel fractures on the extent to which free-range hens access the range through pop holes. Over two consecutive laying periods (two production years) a total of 1100 individual birds from one half of a house, divided into four separated flocks, were caught at 25, 35, 45, 55 and 65 weeks, palpated to assess the prevalence and severity of keel fractures and tagged with RFID transponders. Their use of pop holes was subsequently monitored in some cases from week 25 to end of lay at 68 to 70 weeks. At regular intervals (every 10 weeks), the tagged birds were re-caught to assess changes in keel fracture prevalence and severity. The average percentage of birds with fractured keels at 25, 35, 45, 55, 65 and at end of lay (68 to 70 weeks of age) was 5.5, 25.5, 49, 63, 66.5 and 78.5, respectively, across both production years. The effect of keel score on pop hole use was modelled statistically, adjusting for weather conditions and age of the birds. There were significant effects of most of the weather variables recorded, as well as age of the bird, on use of pop holes and also a significant effect of keel score. Higher keel scores resulted in a reduction in pop hole use. A significant statistical interaction between keel score and ambient temperature revealed an accelerated reduction in use as the temperature decreased and keel score increased. It is concluded that the occurrence of keel fractures may affect the birds' ability or willingness to utilise the outdoor range provided by free-range housing systems, thereby reducing the potential welfare advantages of this type of housing. PMID:22447459

  4. Quantification of differences between occupancy and total monitoring periods for better assessment of exposure to particles in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicka, A.; Bohgard, M.; Pagels, J. H.; Dahl, A.; Löndahl, J.; Hussein, T.; Swietlicki, E.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2015-04-01

    For the assessment of personal exposure, information about the concentration of pollutants when people are in given indoor environments (occupancy time) are of prime importance. However this kind of data frequently is not reported. The aim of this study was to assess differences in particle characteristics between occupancy time and the total monitoring period, with the latter being the most frequently used averaging time in the published data. Seven indoor environments were selected in Sweden and Finland: an apartment, two houses, two schools, a supermarket, and a restaurant. They were assessed for particle number and mass concentrations and number size distributions. The measurements using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and two photometers were conducted for seven consecutive days during winter in each location. Particle concentrations in residences and schools were, as expected, the highest during occupancy time. In the apartment average and median PM2.5 mass concentrations during the occupancy time were 29% and 17% higher, respectively compared to total monitoring period. In both schools, the average and medium values of the PM2.5 mass concentrations were on average higher during teaching hours compared to the total monitoring period by 16% and 32%, respectively. When it comes to particle number concentrations (PNC), in the apartment during occupancy, the average and median values were 33% and 58% higher, respectively than during the total monitoring period. In both houses and schools the average and median PNC were similar for the occupancy and total monitoring periods. General conclusions on the basis of measurements in the limited number of indoor environments cannot be drawn. However the results confirm a strong dependence on type and frequency of indoor activities that generate particles and site specificity. The results also indicate that the exclusion of data series during non-occupancy periods can improve the estimates of particle concentrations and

  5. 49 CFR 385.333 - What happens at the end of the 18-month safety monitoring period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... by the end of the 18-month monitoring period through no fault of the motor carrier, the carrier will... (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER... FMCSA will evaluate the motor carrier on the same basis as any other carrier. (b) If a new entrant...

  6. 49 CFR 385.333 - What happens at the end of the 18-month safety monitoring period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... by the end of the 18-month monitoring period through no fault of the motor carrier, the carrier will... (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER... FMCSA will evaluate the motor carrier on the same basis as any other carrier. (b) If a new entrant...

  7. 49 CFR 385.333 - What happens at the end of the 18-month safety monitoring period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... by the end of the 18-month monitoring period through no fault of the motor carrier, the carrier will... (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER... FMCSA will evaluate the motor carrier on the same basis as any other carrier. (b) If a new entrant...

  8. 49 CFR 385.333 - What happens at the end of the 18-month safety monitoring period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... by the end of the 18-month monitoring period through no fault of the motor carrier, the carrier will... (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER... FMCSA will evaluate the motor carrier on the same basis as any other carrier. (b) If a new entrant...

  9. 49 CFR 385.333 - What happens at the end of the 18-month safety monitoring period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... by the end of the 18-month monitoring period through no fault of the motor carrier, the carrier will... (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER... FMCSA will evaluate the motor carrier on the same basis as any other carrier. (b) If a new entrant...

  10. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Aaaaa of... - Periodic Monitoring for Compliance With Opacity and Visible Emissions Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Periodic Monitoring for Compliance With Opacity and Visible Emissions Limits 6 Table 6 to Subpart AAAAA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Lime Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AAAAA, Table 6 Table 6 to...

  11. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Aaaaa of... - Periodic Monitoring for Compliance With Opacity and Visible Emissions Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Periodic Monitoring for Compliance With Opacity and Visible Emissions Limits 6 Table 6 to Subpart AAAAA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Lime Manufacturing Plants Part 63, Subpt. AAAAA, Table 6 Table 6 to...

  12. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Aaaaa of... - Periodic Monitoring for Compliance With Opacity and Visible Emissions Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Periodic Monitoring for Compliance With Opacity and Visible Emissions Limits 6 Table 6 to Subpart AAAAA of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  13. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Aaaaa of... - Periodic Monitoring for Compliance With Opacity and Visible Emissions Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Periodic Monitoring for Compliance With Opacity and Visible Emissions Limits 6 Table 6 to Subpart AAAAA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Lime Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AAAAA, Table 6 Table 6 to...

  14. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Aaaaa of... - Periodic Monitoring for Compliance With Opacity and Visible Emissions Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Periodic Monitoring for Compliance With Opacity and Visible Emissions Limits 6 Table 6 to Subpart AAAAA of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  15. Monitoring dry period intramammary infection incidence and elimination rates using somatic cell count measurements.

    PubMed

    Dufour, S; Dohoo, I R

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the predictive ability of the herd dry period (DP) intramammary infection (IMI) incidence and elimination rates derived from predry and postcalving somatic cell count (SCC) measurements [quarter-level SCC and dairy herd improvement (DHI) composite-level SCC] for monitoring the herd DP IMI incidence and elimination rates. A cohort of 91 Canadian dairy herds was followed from 2007 to 2008. In each herd, a sample of 15 cows was selected each year, and a series of 2 predry and 2 postcalving quarter milk samples were collected. Routine milk bacteriological culture was conducted to identify IMI, SCC was measured on the quarter milk samples, and composite SCC of the last predry and first postcalving DHI tests were obtained. Mastitis pathogens were grouped into 3 categories: major pathogens, minor pathogens, and any pathogens. For each herd, DP bacteriological culture-derived IMI incidence and elimination rates were computed using quarter milk culture data. Similarly, SCC-derived herd incidence and elimination rates were computed using quarter and DHI composite-level SCC measurements and using various SCC thresholds to define new and eliminated IMI. Linear regression was used to compare herd quarter-level and composite-level SCC-derived herd incidence and elimination with DP bacteriological culture-derived IMI incidence and elimination. Herd DP incidences computed by using quarter-level SCC, and with most of the SCC thresholds tested, were significant predictors of the DP major, minor, and any IMI incidences (F-test; P≤0.05). The highest coefficients of determination (R(2)) were obtained with thresholds of 200,000 (R(2): 12%) and 50,000 cells/mL (R(2): 25%) for predicting major and minor IMI, respectively. When using composite DHI SCC measurements, however, substantial losses of predictive power were seen for minor and any IMI incidences compared with quarter-level SCC. For DP major IMI incidence, composite SCC yielded similar

  16. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period July 1, 1991 through September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and 40 CFR 265, Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (EPA 1989). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303 (Ecology 1991). This submittal provides data obtained from groundwater monitoring activities for July 1, 1991 through September 30, 1991. This report contains groundwater monitoring data from Hanford Site groundwater projects. A RCRA network is currently being established at the 100-D Pond. Groundwater chemistry analyses have not yet been performed.

  17. 40 CFR 58.10 - Annual monitoring network plan and periodic network assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or non-source-oriented according to Appendix D to 40 CFR part 58. (10) Any source-oriented monitors... under paragraph 4.5(a)(ii) of Appendix D to 40 CFR part 58. (11) Any source-oriented or non-source... C to 40 CFR part 58. (12) The identification of required NO2 monitors as either near-road or...

  18. 40 CFR 58.10 - Annual monitoring network plan and periodic network assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of any Pb monitors as either source-oriented or non-source-oriented according to Appendix D to 40 CFR... Regional Administrator as allowed for under paragraph 4.5(a)(ii) of Appendix D to 40 CFR part 58. (11) Any... paragraph 2.10 of Appendix C to 40 CFR part 58. (12) The identification of required NO2 monitors as...

  19. 40 CFR 58.10 - Annual monitoring network plan and periodic network assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-oriented according to Appendix D to 40 CFR part 58. (10) Any source-oriented monitors for which a waiver...)(ii) of Appendix D to 40 CFR part 58. (11) Any source-oriented or non-source-oriented site for which a... in lieu of Pb-TSP monitoring as allowed for under paragraph 2.10 of Appendix C to 40 CFR part 58....

  20. The Use of Weighting in Periodicity Searches in All-Sky Monitor Data: Applications to the GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Corbet, Robin; Dubois, Richard; /SLAC

    2009-06-25

    The light curves produced by all-sky monitors, such as the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor and the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), generally have non-uniform error bars. In searching for periodic modulation in this type of data using power spectra it can be important to use appropriate weighting of data points to achieve the best sensitivity. It was recently demonstrated that for Swift BAT data a simple weighting scheme can actually sometimes reduce the sensitivity of the power spectrum depending on source brightness. Instead, a modified weighting scheme, based on the Cochran semi-weighted mean, gives improved results independent of source brightness. We investigate the benefits of weighting power spectra in period searches using simulated GLAST LAT observations of {gamma}-ray binaries.

  1. 40 CFR 58.10 - Annual monitoring network plan and periodic network assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-oriented or non-source-oriented according to Appendix D to 40 CFR part 58. (10) Any source-oriented... under paragraph 4.5(a)(ii) of Appendix D to 40 CFR part 58. (11) Any source-oriented or non-source... Appendix C to 40 CFR part 58. (12) The identification of required NO2 monitors as near-road, area-wide,...

  2. 40 CFR 58.10 - Annual monitoring network plan and periodic network assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-oriented or non-source-oriented according to Appendix D to 40 CFR part 58. (10) Any source-oriented... under paragraph 4.5(a)(ii) of Appendix D to 40 CFR part 58. (11) Any source-oriented or non-source... Appendix C to 40 CFR part 58. (12) The identification of required NO2 monitors as near-road, area-wide,...

  3. Save now, pay later? Multi-period many-objective groundwater monitoring design given systematic model errors and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, P. M.; Kollat, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates how many-objective long-term groundwater monitoring (LTGM) network design tradeoffs evolve across multiple management periods given systematic models errors (i.e., predictive bias), groundwater flow-and-transport forecasting uncertainties, and contaminant observation uncertainties. Our analysis utilizes the Adaptive Strategies for Sampling in Space and Time (ASSIST) framework, which is composed of three primary components: (1) bias-aware Ensemble Kalman Filtering, (2) many-objective hierarchical Bayesian optimization, and (3) interactive visual analytics for understanding spatiotemporal network design tradeoffs. A physical aquifer experiment is utilized to develop a severely challenging multi-period observation system simulation experiment (OSSE) that reflects the challenges and decisions faced in monitoring contaminated groundwater systems. The experimental aquifer OSSE shows both the influence and consequences of plume dynamics as well as alternative cost-savings strategies in shaping how LTGM many-objective tradeoffs evolve. Our findings highlight the need to move beyond least cost purely statistical monitoring frameworks to consider many-objective evaluations of LTGM tradeoffs. The ASSIST framework provides a highly flexible approach for measuring the value of observables that simultaneously improves how the data are used to inform decisions.

  4. Rotation periods and astrometric motions of the Luhman 16AB brown dwarfs by high-resolution lucky-imaging monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Giacobbe, P.; Littlefair, S. P.; Southworth, J.; Bozza, V.; Damasso, M.; Dominik, M.; Hundertmark, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Juncher, D.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Schmidt, R. W.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Sozzetti, A.; Alsubai, K.; Bramich, D. M.; Calchi Novati, S.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Galianni, P.; Gu, S.-H.; Harpsøe, K.; Haugbølle, T.; Henning, Th.; Hinse, T. C.; Kains, N.; Korhonen, H.; Scarpetta, G.; Starkey, D.; Surdej, J.; Wang, X.-B.; Wertz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Photometric monitoring of the variability of brown dwarfs can provide useful information about the structure of clouds in their cold atmospheres.The brown-dwarf binary system Luhman 16AB is an interesting target for such a study, because its components stand at the L/T transition and show high levels of variability. Luhman 16AB is also the third closest system to the solar system, which allows precise astrometric investigations with ground-based facilities. Aims: The aim of the work is to estimate the rotation period and study the astrometric motion of both components. Methods: We have monitored Luhman 16AB over a period of two years with the lucky-imaging camera mounted on the Danish 1.54 m telescope at La Silla, through a special i + z long-pass filter, which allowed us to clearly resolve the two brown dwarfs into single objects. An intense monitoring of the target was also performed over 16 nights, in which we observed a peak-to-peak variability of 0.20 ± 0.02 mag and 0.34 ± 0.02 mag for Luhman 16A and 16B, respectively. Results: We used the 16-night time-series data to estimate the rotation period of the two components. We found that Luhman 16B rotates with a period of 5.1 ± 0.1 h, in very good agreement with previous measurements. For Luhman 16A, we report that it rotates more slowly than its companion, and even though we were not able to get a robust determination, our data indicate a rotation period of roughly 8 h. This implies that the rotation axes of the two components are well aligned and suggests a scenario in which the two objects underwent the same accretion process. The 2-year complete data set was used to study the astrometric motion of Luhman 16AB. We predict a motion of the system that is not consistent with a previous estimate based on two months of monitoring, but cannot confirm or refute the presence of additional planetary-mass bodies in the system. Based on data collected by MiNDSTEp with the Danish 1.54 m telescope at the ESO La

  5. Optical monitoring of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 and possible periodicities in its historical light curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Di-Fu; Hu, Shao-Ming; Tao, Jun; Yin, Hong-Xing; Chen, Xu; Pan, Hong-Jian

    2014-08-01

    We report B, V and R band CCD photometry of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 obtained with the 1.0 m telescope at Weihai Observatory of Shandong University and the 1.56 m telescope at Shanghai Astronomical Observatory from 2005 December to 2013 February. Combining all available data from literature, we have constructed a historical light curve from 1910 to 2013 to study the periodicity of the source using three different methods (the Jurkevich method, the Lomb-Scargle periodogram method and the Discrete Correlation Function method). We find possible periods of P1 = 4 ± 0.1, P2 = 7.5 ± 0.3 and P3 = 15.9 ± 0.3 yr.

  6. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 CFR 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. Long-term laboratory contracts were approved on October 22, 1991. DataChem Laboratories of Salt Lake City, Utah, performs the hazardous chemicals analyses for the Hanford Site. Analyses for coliform bacteria are performed by Columbia/Biomedical Laboratories and for dioxin by TMS Analytical Services, Inc. International Technology Analytical Services Richland, Washington performs the radiochemical analyses. This quarterly report contains data that were received prior to March 8, 1993. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  7. Mechanically induced long period fiber gratings in Er3+ fiber for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido-Navarro, M. G.; Alvarez-Chavez, J. A.; Ceballos-Herrera, D. E.; Escamilla-Ambrosio, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    This work presents preliminary results on wavelength sensitivity due to mechanically induced long period fiber grating (LPFG) on both standard single-mode and Er-doped fibers. The work presents and compares results for both types of fibers under different torsion conditions. In order to apply the torsion one of the fiber ends is fixed while torsion is applied on the other end. A LPFG whose period is 503μm is used to press on the fiber after the torsion, this will allow for micro curvatures to be formed on the fiber, which will in turn generate a periodical index perturbation on it. Here, it was noted that the rejection band shifts to shorter wavelengths for Er-doped fibers. It was detected that for torsion of 6 turns applied to 10cm doped fiber the wavelength peaks can shift up to 25nm, which is longer than similar results reported on standard fibers. Therefore, by using Er-doped fibers this technique will give more sensitive and accurate results on the real conditions of the structure under study. These results can be employed for sensing applications, especially for small to medium size structures, being these structures mechanical, civil or aeronautical. Theoretical calculations and simulations are employed for experimental results validation.

  8. Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor Detection of the Orbital Period of Scorpius X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinde, Keith W.; Levine, Alan M.; Rappaport, Saul A.

    2003-06-01

    The orbital period of Scorpius X-1 has been accepted as 0.787313 days since its discovery in archival optical photometric data by Gottlieb, Wright, & Liller. This period has apparently been confirmed multiple times in the years since in both photometric and spectroscopic optical observations, although to date only marginal evidence has been reported for modulation of the X-ray intensity at that period. We have used data taken with the All Sky Monitor on board the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer over the past 6 years to search for such a modulation. A major difficulty in detecting the orbit in X-ray data is presented by the flaring behavior in this source, wherein the (1.5-12 keV) X-ray intensity can change by up to a factor of 2 within a fraction of a day. These flares contribute nearly white noise to Fourier transforms of the intensity time series and thereby tend to obscure weak modulations, i.e., of a few percent or less. We present herein a technique for substantially reducing the effects of the flaring behavior while, at the same time, retaining much of any periodic orbital modulation, provided only that the two temporal behaviors exhibit different spectral signatures. Through such a search, we have found evidence for orbital modulation at the ~1% level with a period of 0.78893 days. This period is equal within our accuracy to a period (0.78901 days) that differs by 1 cycle yr-1 from the accepted value and that was also detected by Gottlieb et al. at a strength nearly as great as that of the 0.787313 day periodicity. We note that many of the reported optical observations of Sco X-1 have been made within 1 or 2 months of early June, when Sco X-1 transits the meridian at midnight. All periodicity searches based only on such observations would have been subject to the same 1 cycle yr-1 alias that affected the search of Gottlieb and coworkers. These considerations lead us to suggest that the actual period may in fact be 0.78901 days and that further observations will

  9. Indirect monitoring and analysis of truncal stress over extended time periods.

    PubMed

    Bryant, T N; Fernandes, A; Baty, D

    1986-04-01

    Low back pain is a common ailment encountered in clinical practice, yet there has hitherto been no completely satisfactory method for the measurement of truncal stress, which is a major factor in low back pain. Truncal stress has been difficult to record during the course of a working day because subjects were constrained by trailing cables attached to the monitoring equipment. We have used a pressure sensitive transmitter (radio pill) to record intra-abdominal pressure, which has been shown previously to be an indirect measure of truncal stress. The system makes possible multichannel recordings on magnetic tape throughout the working day by using a portable, battery powered recorder strapped to the subject's waist. A novel ferrite rod contributes materially to minimizing artefacts due to signal loss. The recorded data are replayed, at 60 times real time, into a microcomputer programmed to analyse this data. PMID:2940418

  10. [Spectral analysis of fiber bragg grating modulated by double long period grating and its application in smart structure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Lu, Ji-Yun; Liang, Da-Kai; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Zhu

    2009-12-01

    Spectrum of fiber bragg grating (FBG) sensor modulated by double long period grating (LPFG) is proposed in the paper. Double LPFG consists of two LPFGS whose center wavelengths are the same and reflection spectrum of FBG sensor is located in linear range of double LPFG transmission spectrum. Based on spectral analysis of FBG and double LPFG, reflection spectrum of FBG modulated by double LPFG is obtained and studied by use of band-hider filter characteristics for double LPFG. An FBG sensor is attached on the surface of thin steel beam, which is strained by bending, and the center wavelength of FBG sensor will shift. The spectral peak of FBG sensor modulated by double LPFG is changed correspondingly, and the spectral change will lead to variation in exit light intensity from double LPFG. Experiment demonstrates that the relation of filtering light intensity from double LPFG monitored by optical power meter to center wavelength change of FBG sensor is linear and the minimum strain of material (steel beam) detected by the modulation and demodulation system is 1.05 microepsilon. This solution is used in impact monitoring of optical fibre smart structure, and FBG sensor is applied for impulse response signal monitoring induced by low-velocity impact, when impact pendulum is loaded to carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFP). The acquired impact response signal and fast Fourier transform of the signal detected by FBG sensor agree with the measurement results of eddy current displacement meter attached to the FBG sensor. From the results, the present method using FBG sensor is found to be effective for monitoring the impact. The research provides a practical reference in dynamic monitoring of optical fiber smart structure field. PMID:20210187

  11. Sea Ice Monitoring Using Quikscat & Ascat Scatterometers during the Last 15-Year Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard-Ardhuin, F.

    2014-12-01

    Microwave sensors onboard polar orbit satellites are commonly used for sea ice monitoring at high latitude : radiometers are routinely used for this application and scatterometers have also shown they can contribute significantly to it. Since 1991, numerous scatterometers data at C and Ku-bands are available since ERS-1 with NSCAT, QuikSCAT, OSCAT, HY, and ASCAT sensors. In this presentation, we will show how the recent QuikSCAT and ASCAT sensors could be used to build 15-year observation data time series for sea ice monitoring for both Arctic and Antarctic areas. Backscatter data enable to discriminate sea ice from open ocean areas, in particular scatterometers are useful to detect new ice, even at the early stage of growth which is not possible using radiometers. Backscatter data from scatterometer can also be used for sea ice type detection (first year from multi-year sea ice in the Arctic), results and differences between C-band and Ku-band sensors results will be presented. Moreover, sea ice displacement maps can be built in central Arctic from backscatter data, examples will be shown using the merging of scatterometer and radiometer data. We will see in this presentation that Antarctic sea ice displacement maps can also be inferred. From these displacement maps, mean sea surface currents can be estimated. In this presentation we will also focus on the benefit of the use of the two ASCAT sensors that are presently available (onboard MetOp-A -since 2007 and -B, since 2012), in particular for the Antarctic area. This presentation will enhance i) the need of scatterometer data for sea ice application with many examples of the inferred parameters in particular from the U.S. QuikSCAT/SeaWinds and the E.U. MetOp/ASCATs scatterometers ii) the need of the continuity of scatterometers missions and iii) the benefit of the combination of sensors and datasets (scatterometers, scatterometers with radiometers) for a long-term observation of the polar areas. These data are

  12. Instrumentation to Monitor Transient Periodic Developing Flow in Non-Newtonian Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.

    2013-11-15

    Staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have conducted mixing and mobilization experiments with non-Newtonian slurries that exhibit Bingham plastic and shear thinning behavior and shear strength. This paper describes measurement techniques applied to identify the interface between flowing and stationary regions of non-Newtonian slurries that are subjected to transient, periodic, developing flows. Techniques were developed to identify the boundary between the flowing and stationary regions, time to mix, characteristic velocities of the flow field produced by the symmetrically spaced nozzles, and the velocity of the upwell formed in the center of the tank by the intersection of flow from four symmetrically spaced nozzles that impinge upon the tank floor. Descriptions of the instruments and instrument performance are presented. These techniques were an effective approach to characterize mixing phenomena, determine mixing energy required to fully mobilize vessel contents and to determine mixing times for process evaluation.

  13. Dynamical generalized Hurst exponent as a tool to monitor unstable periods in financial time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Raffaello; Di Matteo, T.; Gramatica, Ruggero; Aste, Tomaso

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the use of the Hurst exponent, dynamically computed over a weighted moving time-window, to evaluate the level of stability/instability of financial firms. Financial firms bailed-out as a consequence of the 2007-2008 credit crisis show a neat increase with time of the generalized Hurst exponent in the period preceding the unfolding of the crisis. Conversely, firms belonging to other market sectors, which suffered the least throughout the crisis, show opposite behaviors. We find that the multifractality of the bailed-out firms increase at the crisis suggesting that the multi fractal properties of the time series are changing. These findings suggest the possibility of using the scaling behavior as a tool to track the level of stability of a firm. In this paper, we introduce a method to compute the generalized Hurst exponent which assigns larger weights to more recent events with respect to older ones. In this way large fluctuations in the remote past are less likely to influence the recent past. We also investigate the scaling associated with the tails of the log-returns distributions and compare this scaling with the scaling associated with the Hurst exponent, observing that the processes underlying the price dynamics of these firms are truly multi-scaling.

  14. Monitoring brain activation changes in the early postoperative period after radical prostatectomy using fMRI.

    PubMed

    Seseke, S; Baudewig, J; Ringert, R-H; Rebmann, U; Dechent, P

    2013-09-01

    Urinary incontinence is a major concern following radical prostatectomy. The etiology is multifactorial involving intrinsic sphincter deficiency and/or detrusor hyperactivity and/or decreased bladder compliance. Recent studies employing functional imaging methodology nicely demonstrated the reference regions of the micturition circuit. Based on these landmarks this work complements this field of research by studying patients with bladder dysfunction. Our aim was to evaluate, whether iatrogenic impairment of the pelvic floor muscles after retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) causes detectable changes in fMRI in the early postoperative period. fMRI was performed at 3T in 22 patients before and after RRP with urge to void due to a filled bladder. In a non-voiding model they were instructed to contract or to relax the pelvic floor muscles repetitively. As previously reported in healthy men, contraction and relaxation of pelvic floor muscles induced strong activations in the brainstem and more rostral areas in our group of patients before and after RRP. In general, all of them had stronger activations during contraction than during relaxation in all regions before and after the operation. Even though there was no difference in the activation level when relaxing the pelvic floor before and after the operation, we found stronger activation during contraction when comparing the preoperative with the postoperative level in some of the regions. The results suggest that the same cortical and subcortical networks can be demonstrated for micturition control in patients with prostate cancer as in healthy subjects. However, impaired pelvic floor muscle function after RRP seems to induce different activation intensities. PMID:23583743

  15. Nanofilm-coated long-period fiber grating humidity sensors for corrosion detection in structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shijie; Zhu, Yinian; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2011-04-01

    Long-period gratings (LPGs) have shown their significant promising applications in sensors owing to the attractive features that they posses such as small size, immunity for electromagnetic interference, geometric versatility, multiplexing capability, and resistance to corrosive and hazardous environments. Recent researches have revealed that LPGs written on the standard optical fibers could be used as a powerful sensing platform for structural health monitoring. In this work, we inscribe LPGs into SMF-28 optical fiber by focused-beam CO2 laser, demonstrating as a refractive index sensor for nondestructive chemical detections in the civil infrastructures. Although evanescent-field based LPG sensors have been applied in quantitatively monitoring chemical analytes including moisture, chloride, and corrosion by-product, etc., the sensitivity, selectivity, and response time as well as thermo-stability of such sensors are still the issues for some special purposes. In order to improve those characteristics of the sensors, we propose two types of nano-film to be coated in grating region by electrostatic self-assembly (ESA) deposition processing. The primary coating does not affect on LPG transmission parameters such as resonance wavelength and its intensity that can be used for sensing, but it increases the sensitivity to refractive index change of surrounding material. The secondary coating is for selectively absorption of analyte molecule of interest. Response time of the nanofilm-coated LPG sensor is dependent on the analyte absorption and de-absorption rates as well as the thicknesses of the coating materials, which is also investigated. Multi-channel sensor system is being designed to monitor different analytes simultaneously, which is continuing to further explore the monitoring of structural health conditions through in situ measurements of corrosion in the concrete structures.

  16. Quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares: new clues from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, D.; Lachowicz, P.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Greiner, J.; van der Horst, A. J.; Kanbach, G.; Rau, A.; Bhat, P. N.; Diehl, R.; von Kienlin, A.; Kippen, R. M.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2011-09-01

    Aims: In the past four decades, it has been observed that solar flares display quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) from the lowest, i.e. radio, to the highest, i.e. gamma-ray, frequencies in the electromagnetic spectrum. It remains unclear which mechanism creates these QPPs. In this paper, we analyze four bright solar flares that display compelling signatures of quasi-periodic behavior and were observed with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM ) onboard the Fermi satellite. Because GBM covers over three decades in energy (8 keV to 40 MeV), it is regarded as a key instrument in our attempt to understand the physical processes that drive solar flares. Methods: We tested for periodicity in the time series of the solar flares observed by GBM by applying a classical periodogram analysis. However, in contrast to previous authors, we did not detrend the raw light curve before creating the power spectral density (PSD) spectrum. To assess the significance of the frequencies, we used a method that is commonly applied to X-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. This technique takes into account the underlying continuum of the PSD, which for all of these sources has a P(f) ~ f-α dependence and is typically labeled red-noise. Results: We checked the reliability of this technique by applying it to observations of a solar flare that had been observed by the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI ). These data contain, besides any potential periodicity from the Sun, a 4 s rotational period caused by the rotation of the spacecraft about its axis. We were unable to identify any intrinsic solar quasi-periodic pulsation but we did manage to reproduce the instrumental periodicity. Moreover, with the method adopted here, we do not detect significant QPPs in the four bright solar flares observed by GBM. We stress that for this kind of analyses it is of utmost importance to account appropriately for the red-noise component in the PSD of these astrophysical sources.

  17. Climate Monitoring and Recommendations on the Optimum Sowing Period for the Main Crops in the Transylvanian Plain, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, T.; Moraru, P. I.; Sopterean, M. L.; Pop, A. I.; Cacovean, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Transylvanian Plain (TP) is a geographical region located in north-central Romania and is bordered by large rivers to the north and south, the Somes and the Mures, respectively. TP with an area of approx. 395,616 ha, includes areas of three counties (Cluj - CJ, Mures -MS, Bistrita-Nasaud - BN), has a predominantly agricultural character, and is characterized by hilly climate floor with oceanic influences, 6-10 0C average annual temperatures and 500-700 mm/year average annual precipitations. The presence of the Carpathian mountains ring and the arrangement, almost concentric, of the relief from Transylvanian Depression, determines the development of a zonal sequence of soil types, a horizontal zonality as a direct influence of lithology and indirect of the relief, by changing climate and vegetation. Diversity of the pedogenetical factors - highly fragmented relief, forest and herbaceous vegetation grafted on a lithological background predominantly acid in the north - west and predominantly basic in south - est, parent rock composition and especially their combination in the contact zones, have conditioned in this hilly area of TP a tessellated soil cover. During soil pedogenesis, soil properties and features developed in response to differential lithology and macro/microrelief. Evaluated soils were found to largely be a complex mix of Cernisols, Luvisols and Antrisols. Zoning cultures and establishing the optimum sowing periods was made after the observations arising from practice and after the results obtained in the agricultural experimental research stations. Climate changes in recent years and climate monitoring from TP offers the possibility to check the calendar for the optimum sowing period. Monitorization of the thermal and water regime from TP was performed with twenty HOBO microstations which determine the temperature (to a height of 1 m) and rainfalls, same as temperature (at 10, 30, 50 cm depth in soil) and soil moisture (at 10 cm depth). Recorded

  18. Detecting trends in landscape pattern metrics over a 20-year period using a sampling-based monitoring programme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, J.A.; Stehman, S.V.; Sohl, T.L.; Loveland, T.R.

    2003-01-01

    Temporal trends in landscape pattern metrics describing texture, patch shape and patch size were evaluated in the US Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain Ecoregion. The landscape pattern metrics were calculated for a sample of land use/cover data obtained for four points in time from 1973-1992. The multiple sampling dates permit evaluation of trend, whereas availability of only two sampling dates allows only evaluation of change. Observed statistically significant trends in the landscape pattern metrics demonstrated that the sampling-based monitoring protocol was able to detect a trend toward a more fine-grained landscape in this ecoregion. This sampling and analysis protocol is being extended spatially to the remaining 83 ecoregions in the US and temporally to the year 2000 to provide a national and regional synthesis of the temporal and spatial dynamics of landscape pattern covering the period 1973-2000.

  19. Methane and carbon dioxide emissions from dairy cows in full lactation monitored over a six-month period.

    PubMed

    Kinsman, R; Sauer, F D; Jackson, H A; Wolynetz, M S

    1995-12-01

    Methane and CO2 emissions from a herd of 118 lactating cows were measured directly by continuous monitoring with an infrared gas analyzer from 24 gas sampling locations. A total of 112 d of gas output was recorded between June 1993 and November 1993. Recordings were integrated at .5-h intervals, so that there were 48 data points for each 24-h period. The mean 24-h CH4 emission per cow was 587 +/- 61.3 L; the range was 436 to 721 L. The mean 24-h CO2 emission per cow was 6137 +/- 505 L, and the range was 5032 to 7427 L. These values were not corrected for gas emissions from stored manure, which contributed 5.8 and 6.1%, respectively, to CH4 and CO2 output under conditions of this experiment. PMID:8675759

  20. Methodological challenges in monitoring new treatments for rare diseases: lessons from the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS) are a group of rare hereditary autoinflammatory diseases and encompass Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells Syndrome (MWS), and Neonatal Onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease (NOMID). Canakinumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against IL-1 beta and approved for CAPS patients but requires post-approval monitoring due to low and short exposures during the licensing process. Creative approaches to observational methodology are needed, harnessing novel registry strategies to ensure Health Care Provider reporting and patient monitoring. Methods A web-based registry was set up to collect information on long-term safety and effectiveness of canakinumab for CAPS. Results Starting in November 2009, this registry enrolled 241 patients in 43 centers and 13 countries by December 31, 2012. One-third of the enrolled population was aged < 18; the overall population is evenly divided by gender. Enrolment is ongoing for children. Conclusions Innovative therapies in orphan diseases require post-approval structures to enable in depth understanding of safety and natural history of disease. The rarity and distribution of such diseases and unpredictability of treatment require innovative methods for enrolment and follow-up. Broad international practice-based recruitment and web-based data collection are practical. PMID:24016338

  1. Periodic behavior of soil CO2 emissions in diffuse degassing areas of the Azores archipelago: Application to seismovolcanic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveiros, Fátima; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Ferreira, Teresa; Silva, Catarina; Cruz, José V.

    2014-10-01

    Time series of soil CO2 efflux recorded in the Azores archipelago volcanic-hydrothermal areas feature daily and seasonal variations. The recorded CO2 efflux values were lower during summer than in the winter season. The diurnal CO2 efflux values were higher at dawn and lower in the early afternoon, contrary to that observed in biogenic environments. CO2 efflux cycles correlated well with the environmental variables, such as air temperature, wind speed, and barometric pressure, which also showed low- and high-frequency periodicities. Several simulations were performed here using the Transport of Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat 2 (TOUGH2) geothermal simulator to complement the study of Rinaldi et al. (2012). The effects of the water table depth, air temperature perturbation amplitude, and soil thermal gradient contributed to an explanation of the contrasts observed in the diurnal (S1) and semidiurnal (S2) soil CO2 efflux peaks for the different monitoring sites and seasons. Filtering techniques (multivariate regression analysis and fast Fourier transform filters) were also applied to the recorded time series to remove effects of external variables on the soil CO2 efflux. The resulting time series (the residuals) correspond to the best approach to the deep-seated (volcanic/hydrothermal) CO2 emissions and thus should be used in seismovolcanic monitoring programs. Even if no evident correlation can be established yet between the soil CO2 residuals and seismicity over the monitored time, a seismic swarm that occurred around the end of 2008 might have triggered some deviations from the observed daily cycles.

  2. Long-period Seismicity at the Napoleonville Salt Dome: Implications for Local Seismic Monitoring of Underground Hydrocarbon Storage Caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreger, D. S.; Ford, S. R.; Nayak, A.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of a large sinkhole at the Napoleonville salt dome, Assumption Parish, Louisiana, in August 2012 was accompanied by a rich sequence of complex seismic events, including long-period (LP) events that were recorded 11 km away at Transportable Array station 544A in White Castle, Louisiana. The LP events have relatively little energy at short periods, which make them difficult to detect using standard high-frequency power detectors, and the majority of energy that reaches the station is peaked near 0.4 Hz. The analysis of the local records reveals that the onset of the 0.4 Hz signals coincides with the S-wave arrival, and therefore it may be a shaking induced resonance in a fluid filled cavern. We created a low-frequency (0.1-0.6 Hz) power detector (short-term average / long-term average) that operated on all three components of the broadband instrument, since considerable energy was detected on the horizontal components. The detections from the power detector were then used as templates in three-channel correlation detectors thereby increasing the number of detections by a little more than a factor of two to nearly 3000. The rate of LP events is approximately one event every other day at the beginning of recording in March 2011. Around 2 May 2012 the rate changes to approximately 7 events per day and then increases to 25 events per day at the beginning of July 2012. Finally, in the days leading up to the sinkhole formation there are approximately 200 LP events per day. The analysis of these events could aid in the development of local seismic monitoring methods for underground industrial storage caverns. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site Facilities: Progress report for the period April 1--June 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume set of documents that describes the progress of 10 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period April 1 to June 30, 1988. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled during this period in the 100-N Area and near the 216-A-36B Crib.

  4. Monitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David

    1984-01-01

    Provides guidelines for selecting a monitor to suit specific applications, explains the process by which graphics images are produced on a CRT monitor, and describes four types of flat-panel displays being used in the newest lap-sized portable computers. A comparison chart provides prices and specifications for over 80 monitors. (MBR)

  5. Differentiation of Period, Age, and Cohort Effects on Drug Use 1976-1986. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper Series, Paper 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Patrick M.; And Others

    Conducted as part of the Monitoring the Future project, this study used a cohort-sequential design to examine period, age, and cohort effects on substance use among American youth between the ages of 18 and 28 from the high school classes of 1976 to 1986. This manuscript supersedes Paper 14 in the series which reported on American youth from 18-24…

  6. RCRA Post Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report for CAU 91: Area 3 U-3fi Waste Unit, Nevada Test Site for the Period October 1996-1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley Emer

    1998-01-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Unit, located in Area 3 of the Nevada Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1996-October 1997 period. Inspections of the U-3fi RCRA Unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. The objective of the neutron logging is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128 meter (420 feet) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 m to 82 m (240 to 270 ft).

  7. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Progress Report for the Period July 1 to September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    This report documents the progress of four Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period from July 1 to September 310, 1987. The four disposal facilities are the 300 Area Process Trenches, 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds, and Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste (NRDW) Landfill. This report is the fifth in a series of periodic status reports. During this reporting period, field activities consisted of completing repairs on five monitoring wells originally present around the 183-H Basins and completing construction of 25 monitoring wells around the 200 Area Burial Grounds. The 14 wells in the 200 East Area were completed by Kaiser Engineers Hanford (KEH) and the 11 wells in the 200 West Area were compelted by ONWEGO Well Drilling. The NRDW Landfill interim characterization report was submitted to the WDOE and the USEPA in August 1987. Analytical results for the 300 Area, 183-H, and the NRDW Landfill indicate no deviations from previously established trends. Results from the NRDW Land-fill indiate that the facility has no effect on the ground-water quality beneath the facility, except for the detection of coliform bacteria. A possible source of this contamination is the solid-waste lanfill (SWL) adjacent to the NRDW Landfill. Ground-water monitoring data for the NRDW and SWL will be evaluated together in the future. Aquifer testing was completed in the 25 new wells surrounding the 200 Area buiral grounds. 13 refs., 19 refs., 13 tabs.

  8. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Volume 1, The report and Appendix A, Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    This report documents recent progress on ground-water monitoring projects for four Hanford Site facilities: the 300 Area Process Trenches, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds, and the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste (NRDW) Landfill. The existing ground-water monitoring projects for the first two facilities named in the paragraph above are currently being expanded by adding new wells to the networks. During the reporting period, sampling of the existing wells continued on a monthly basis, and the analytical results for samples collected from September through November 1986 are included and discussed in this document. 8 refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Progress report for the period April 1 to June 30, 1988: Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This is Volume 2 of a two-volume set of documents that describes the progress of 10 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period April 1 to June 30, 1988. This volume discusses as-built diagrams, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled during this period in the 100-N Area (Appendix A) and near the 216-A-36B Crib (Appendix B). Volume 1 discusses the 10 projects. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy under Contract AC06-76RL01830.

  10. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 112: AREA 23 HAZARDOUS WASTE TRENCHES, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 2003 - SEPTEMBER 2004

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit located in Area 23 of the NTS. This annual Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report provides the results of inspections and monitoring for CAU 112. This report includes a summary and analysis of the site inspections, repair and maintenance, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 112 for the current monitoring period, October 2003 through September 2004. Inspections of the CAU 112 RCRA unit were performed quarterly to identify any significant physical changes to the site that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit. The overall condition of the covers and facility was good, and no significant findings were observed. The annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted on August 23, 2004, and the results indicated that no cover subsidence4 has occurred at any of the markers. The elevations of the markers have been consistent for the past 11 years. The total precipitation for the current reporting period, october 2003 to September 2004, was 14.0 centimeters (cm) (5.5 inches [in]) (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory, Special Operations and Research Division, 2004). This is slightly below the average rainfall of 14.7 cm (5.79 in) over the same period from 1972 to 2004. Post-closure monitoring verifies that the CAU 112 trench covers are performing properly and that no water is infiltrating into or out of the waste trenches. Sail moisture measurements are obtained in the soil directly beneath the trenches and compared to baseline conditions for the first year of post-closure monitoring, which began in october 1993. neutron logging was performed twice during this monitoring period along 30 neutron access tubes to obtain soil moisture data and detect any changes that may indicate moisture movement

  11. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the period October 2000-July 2001

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Tobiason

    2002-01-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 2000--July 2001 monitoring period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in July 2001. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began eight years ago. Precipitation for the period October 2000 through July 2001 was 9.42 centimeters (cm) (3.71 inches [in]) (U.S. National Weather Service, 2001). The prior year annual rainfall (January 2000 through December 2000) was 10.44 cm (4.1 1 in.). The recorded average annual rainfall for this site from 1972 to January 2000 is 14.91 cm (5.87 in.). The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the trenches.

  12. High Frequency monitoring of cyanoHABs and cyanotoxin production to characterize periods of greatest risk on an inland reservoir

    EPA Science Inventory

    A monitoring approach combining wet chemistry and high frequency (HF) water quality sensors has been employed to improve our understanding of the ecology of an inland reservoir with a history of cyanoHAB events. Lake Harsha is a multi-use reservoir managed by the USACE in southwe...

  13. Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2004-11-23

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  14. Demonstration of constructed wetlands for treatment of municipal wastewaters, monitoring report for the period, March 1988--October 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Choate, K.D.; Watson, J.T.; Steiner, G.R.

    1990-08-01

    To evaluate the constructed wetland technology, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) implemented a municipal wastewater demonstration project in western Kentucky. Using combined city, State, and TVA appropriated funds, three constructed wetland systems were built at Benton, Hardin, and Pembroke, Kentucky. Demonstration objectives include evaluating relative advantages and disadvantages of these types of systems; determining permit compliance ability; developing, evaluating, and improving basic design and operation criteria; evaluating cost effectiveness; and transferring technology to users and regulators. A demonstration monitoring project was implemented with a partnership of funds from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, other EPA funds through the National Small Flows Clearinghouse (NSFC), and TVA appropriations. TVA is managing the project in cooperation with an interagency team consisting of EPA, Kentucky Division of Water and NSFC. This report, which supersedes the first monitoring report (Choate, et. al., 1989) of these demonstration projects, describes each constructed wetland system, its status, and summarizes monitoring data and plans for each system. 5 refs., 30 figs., 26 tabs.

  15. The joint return period analysis of natural disasters based on monitoring and statistical modeling of multidimensional hazard factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueqin; Li, Ning; Yuan, Shuai; Xu, Ning; Shi, Wenqin; Chen, Weibin

    2015-12-15

    As a random event, a natural disaster has the complex occurrence mechanism. The comprehensive analysis of multiple hazard factors is important in disaster risk assessment. In order to improve the accuracy of risk analysis and forecasting, the formation mechanism of a disaster should be considered in the analysis and calculation of multi-factors. Based on the consideration of the importance and deficiencies of multivariate analysis of dust storm disasters, 91 severe dust storm disasters in Inner Mongolia from 1990 to 2013 were selected as study cases in the paper. Main hazard factors from 500-hPa atmospheric circulation system, near-surface meteorological system, and underlying surface conditions were selected to simulate and calculate the multidimensional joint return periods. After comparing the simulation results with actual dust storm events in 54years, we found that the two-dimensional Frank Copula function showed the better fitting results at the lower tail of hazard factors and that three-dimensional Frank Copula function displayed the better fitting results at the middle and upper tails of hazard factors. However, for dust storm disasters with the short return period, three-dimensional joint return period simulation shows no obvious advantage. If the return period is longer than 10years, it shows significant advantages in extreme value fitting. Therefore, we suggest the multivariate analysis method may be adopted in forecasting and risk analysis of serious disasters with the longer return period, such as earthquake and tsunami. Furthermore, the exploration of this method laid the foundation for the prediction and warning of other nature disasters. PMID:26327640

  16. Hand disinfection in a neonatal intensive care unit: continuous electronic monitoring over a one-year period

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Good hand hygiene compliance is essential to prevent nosocomial infections in healthcare settings. Direct observation of hand hygiene compliance is the gold standard but is time consuming. An electronic dispenser with built-in wireless recording equipment allows continuous monitoring of its usage. The purpose of this study was to monitor the use of alcohol-based hand rub dispensers with a built-in electronic counter in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) setting and to determine compliance with hand hygiene protocols by direct observation. Methods A one-year observational study was conducted at a 27 bed level III NICU at a university hospital. All healthcare workers employed at the NICU participated in the study. The use of bedside dispensers was continuously monitored and compliance with hand hygiene was determined by random direct observations. Results A total of 258,436 hand disinfection events were recorded; i.e. a median (interquartile range) of 697 (559–840) per day. The median (interquartile range) number of hand disinfection events performed per healthcare worker during the day, evening, and night shifts was 13.5 (10.8 - 16.7), 19.8 (16.3 - 24.1), and 16.6 (14.2 - 19.3), respectively. In 65.8% of the 1,168 observations of patient contacts requiring hand hygiene, healthcare workers fully complied with the protocol. Conclusions We conclude that the electronic devices provide useful information on frequency, time, and location of its use, and also reveal trends in hand disinfection events over time. Direct observations offer essential data on compliance with the hand hygiene protocol. In future research, data generated by the electronic devices can be supplementary used to evaluate the effectiveness of hand hygiene promotion campaigns. PMID:23043639

  17. Observation of Periodic and Transient Cosmic Ray Flux Variations by the Daejeon Neutron Monitor and the Seoul muon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Suyeon; Kang, Jeongsoo

    2013-09-01

    Recently, two instruments of cosmic ray are operating in South Korea. One is Seoul muon detector after October 1999 and the other is Daejeon neutron monitor (Kang et al. 2012) after October 2011. The former consists of four small plastic scintillators and the latter is the standard 18 NM 64 type. In this report, we introduce the characteristics of both instruments. We also analyze the flux variations of cosmic ray such as diurnal variation and Forbush decrease. As the result, the muon flux shows the typical seasonal and diurnal variations. The neutron flux also shows the diurnal variation. The phase which shows the maximum flux in the diurnal variation is around 13-14 local time. We found a Forbush decrease on 7 March 2012 by both instruments. It is also identified by Nagoya multi-direction muon telescope and Oulu neutron monitor. The observation of cosmic ray at Jangbogo station as well as in Korean peninsula can support the important information on space weather in local area. It can also enhance the status of Korea in the international community of cosmic ray experiments.

  18. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000

    SciTech Connect

    D. F. Emer

    2001-03-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999-October 2000 period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in August 2000. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began seven years ago. The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. Precipitation for the period October 1999 through October 2000 was 10.44 centimeters (cm) (4.11 inches [in.]) (U.S. National Weather Service, 2000). The prior year annual rainfall (January 1999 through December 1999) was 10.13cm (3.99 in.). The highest 30-day cumulative rainfall occurred on March 8, 2000, with a total of 6.63 cm (2.61 in.). The heaviest daily precipitation occurred on February 23,2000, with a total of 1.70 cm (0.67 in.) falling in that 24-hour period. The recorded average annual rainfall for this site, from 1972 to January 1999, is 15.06 cm (5.93 in.). All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the

  19. Resource conservation and recovery act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988: Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-02-01

    This is Volume 2 of a two-volume set of documents that describes the progress of 12 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988. This volume provides those drilling logs and well inspection/completion reports inadvertently left out of last quarter's report for the 216-A-36B Crib (Appendix A) and as-built diagrams, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled this quarter near the 2101-M Pond. Volume 1 discusses the 12 projects.

  20. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1990-03-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 15 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989. This volume discusses the projects. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the samples aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality. 51 refs., 35 figs., 86 tabs.

  1. Radio Monitoring of the Periodically Variable IR Source LRLL 54361: No Direct Correlation between the Radio and IR Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, Jan; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Palau, Aina; Zapata, Luis A.; Muzerolle, James; Gutermuth, Robert A.

    2015-11-01

    LRLL 54361 is an infrared source located in the star-forming region IC 348 SW. Remarkably, its infrared luminosity increases by a factor of 10 over roughly one week every 25.34 days. To understand the origin of these remarkable periodic variations, we obtained sensitive 3.3 cm JVLA radio continuum observations of LRLL 54361 and its surroundings in six different epochs: three of them during the IR-on state and three during the IR-off state. The radio source associated with LRLL 54361 remained steady and did not show a correlation with the IR variations. We suggest that the IR is tracing the results of fast (with a timescale of days) pulsed accretion from an unseen binary companion, while the radio traces an ionized outflow with an extent of ∼100 AU that smooths out the variability over a period of the order of a year. The average flux density measured in these 2014 observations, 27 ± 5 μJy, is about a factor of two less than that measured about 1.5 years before, 53 ± 11 μJy, suggesting that variability in the radio is present, but over larger timescales than in the IR. We discuss other sources in the field, in particular two infrared/X-ray stars that show rapidly varying gyrosynchrotron emission.

  2. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-12-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

  3. Utility of the multi-component training distress scale to monitor swimmers during periods of training overload.

    PubMed

    Main, Luana C; Warmington, Stuart A; Korn, Emily; Gastin, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the efficacy of the multi-component training distress scale (MTDS), in monitoring swimmers prior to national competition. Twenty-one national-level adolescent swimmers completed eight weeks of testing. Once a week participants completed an 8 × 50 m sprint test, vertical jump test, sit-and-reach test, the MTDS and the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes (REST-Q). All testing was incorporated into the swimmers' normal training programme. The REST-Q accounted for the following variances in performance: flexibility (14.6%, p = 0.009), power output (17.7%, p = 0.003), swimming speed (15.5%, p = 0.006) and swimming endurance (17.5%, p = 0.002). In comparison, the MTDS accounted for the following variances in performance: flexibility (12.1%, p = 0.095), power output (16.4%, p = 0.023), swimming speed (20.5%, p = 0.003) and swimming speed endurance (23.8%, p = 0.001). The findings of the current study suggest that both the REST-Q Sport and the MTDS have the capacity to predict performance on a range of fitness components associated with swimming. PMID:27368060

  4. Arsenic accumulation in a paddy field in Bangladesh: seasonal dynamics and trends over a three-year monitoring period.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Jessica; Voegelin, Andreas; Roberts, Linda C; Hug, Stephan J; Saha, Ganesh C; Ali, M Ashraf; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2010-04-15

    Shallow groundwater, often rich in arsenic (As), is widely used for irrigation of dry season boro rice in Bangladesh. In the long term, this may lead to increasing As contents in rice paddy soils, which threatens rice yields, food quality, and human health. The objective of this study was to quantify gains and losses of soil As in a rice paddy field during irrigation and monsoon flooding over a three-year period. Samples were collected twice a year on a 3D-sampling grid to account for the spatially heterogeneous As distribution within the soil. Gains and losses of soil As in different depth segments were calculated using a mass-balance approach. Annual As input with irrigation water was estimated as 4.4 +/- 0.4 kg ha(-1) a(-1). Within the top 40 cm of soil, the mean As accumulation over three years amounted to 2.4 +/- 0.4 kg ha(-1) a(-1), implying that on average 2.0 kg ha(-1) a(-1) were lost from the soil. Seasonal changes of soil As showed that 1.05 to 2.1 kg ha(-1) a(-1) were lost during monsoon flooding. The remaining As-loss (up to 0.95 kg ha(-1) a(-1)) was attributed to downward flow with percolating irrigation water. Despite these losses, we estimate that total As within the top 40 cm of soil at our field site would further increase by a factor of 1.5 to 2 by the year 2050 under current cultivation practices. PMID:20235529

  5. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1--March 31, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the progress of eight Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988. The facilities represented by the eight projects are the 300 Area Process trenches, 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds, Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, 216-A-36B Crib, 1301-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility, 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility, and 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds. The latter four projects are included in this series of quarterly reports for the first time. This report is the seventh in a series of periodic status reports; the first six cover the period from May 1, 1986, through December 31, 1987 (PNL 1986; 1987a, b, c, d; 1988a). This report satisfies the requirements of Section 17B(3) of the Consent Agreement and Compliance Order issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (1986a) to the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office. 13 refs., 19 figs., 24 tabs.

  6. Insights into the origins of drumbeat earthquakes, periodic low frequency seismicity, and plug degradation from multi-instrument monitoring at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, April 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Andrew; Hernandez, Stephen; Gaunt, Elizabeth; Mothes, Patricia; Hidalgo, Silvana; Ruiz, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Highly-periodic repeating 'drumbeat' earthquakes have been reported from several andesitic and dacitic volcanoes. Physical models for the origin of drumbeat earthquakes incorporate, to different extents, the incremental upward movement of viscous magma. However, the roles played by stick-slip friction, brittle failure, and fluid flow, and the relations between drumbeat earthquakes and other low-frequency seismic signals, remain controversial. Here we report the results of analysis of three weeks of geophysical data recorded during an unrest episode at Tungurahua, an andesitic stratovolcano in Ecuador, during April 2015, by the monitoring network of the Instituto Geofisico of Ecuador. Combined seismic, geodetic, infrasound, and gas monitoring has provided new insights into the origins of periodic low-frequency seismic signals, conduit processes, and the nature of current unrest. Over the three-week period, the relative seismic amplitude (RSAM) correlated closely with short-term deformation rates and gas fluxes. However, the characteristics of the seismic signals, as recorded at a short-period station closest to the summit crater, changed considerably with time. Initially high RSAM and gas fluxes, with modest ash emissions, were associated with continuous and 'pulsed' tremor signals (amplitude modulated, with 30-100 second periods). As activity levels decreased over several days, tremor episodes became increasingly intermittent, and short-lived bursts of low-frequency earthquakes with quasiperiodic inter-event times were observed. Following one day of quiescence, the onset of pronounced low frequency drumbeat earthquakes signalled the resumption of elevated unrest, initially with mean inter-event times of 32 seconds, and later increasing to 74 seconds and longer, with periodicity progressively breaking down over several days. A reduction in RSAM was then followed by one week of persistent, quasiperiodic, longer-duration emergent low-frequency pulses, including

  7. SWIFT-BAT HARD X-RAY SKY MONITORING UNVEILS THE ORBITAL PERIOD OF THE HMXB IGR J18219–1347

    SciTech Connect

    La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; D'Aì, A.; Masetti, N.; D'Elia, V.

    2013-09-20

    IGR J18219–1347 is a hard X-ray source discovered by INTEGRAL in 2010. We have analyzed the X-ray emission of this source exploiting the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey data up to 2012 March and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) data that include also an observing campaign performed in early 2012. The source is detected at a significance level of ∼13 standard deviations in the 88 month BAT survey data, and shows a strong variability along the survey monitoring, going from high intensity to quiescent states. A timing analysis on the BAT data revealed an intensity modulation with a period of P {sub 0} = 72.44 ± 0.3 days. The significance of this modulation is about seven standard deviations in Gaussian statistics. We interpret it as the orbital period of the binary system. The light curve folded at P {sub 0} shows a sharp peak covering ∼30% of the period, superimposed to a flat level roughly consistent with zero. In the soft X-rays the source is detected only in 5 out of 12 XRT observations, with the highest recorded count rate corresponding to a phase close to the BAT folded light-curve peak. The long orbital period and the evidence that the source emits only during a small fraction of the orbit suggests that the IGR J18219–1347 binary system hosts a Be star. The broadband XRT+BAT spectrum is well modeled with a flat absorbed power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff at ∼11 keV.

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress Report for the Period April 1 to June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the progress of 13 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period April 1 to June 30, 1989. These projects are for the 300 area process trenches (300 area), 183-H solar evaporation basins (100-H area), 200 areas low-level burial grounds, nonradioactive dangerous waste landfill (southeast of the 200 areas), 1301-N liquid waste disposal facility (100-N area), 1324-N surface impoundment and 1324-NA percolation pond (100-N area), 1325-N liquid waste disposal facility (100-N area), 216-A-10 crib (200-east area), 216-A-29 ditch (200-east area), 216-A-36B crib (200-east area), 216-B-36B crib (200-east area), 216-B-3 pond (east of the 200-east area), 2101-M pond (200-east area), grout treatment facility (200-east area).

  9. Estimating individual-level exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons throughout the gestational period based on personal, indoor, and outdoor monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, H.; Perera, F.; Pac, A.; Wang, L.; Flak, E.; Mroz, E.; Jacek, R.; Chai-Onn, T.; Jedrychowski, W.; Masters, E.; Camann, D.; Spengler, J.

    2008-11-15

    Current understanding on health effects of long-term polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure is limited by lack of data on time-varying nature of the pollutants at an individual level. In a cohort of pregnant women in Krakow, Poland, we examined the contribution of temporal, spatial, and behavioral factors to prenatal exposure to airborne PAHs within each trimester and developed a predictive model of PAH exposure over the entire gestational period. The observed personal, indoor, and outdoor B(a)P levels we observed in Krakow far exceed the recommended Swedish guideline value for B(a)P of 0.1 ng/m{sup 3}. Based on simultaneously monitored levels, the outdoor PAH level alone accounts for 93% of total variability in personal exposure during the heating season. Living near the Krakow bus depot, a crossroad, and the city, center and time spent outdoors or commuting were not associated with higher personal exposure. During the nonheating season only, a 1-hr increase in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure was associated with a 10-16% increase in personal exposure to the nine measured PAHs. A 1{degree}C decrease in ambient temperature was associated with a 3-5% increase in exposure to benz(a)anthracene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and dibenz(a,h)anthracene, after accounting for the outdoor concentration. A random effects model demonstrated that mean personal exposure at a given gestational period depends on the season, residence location, and ETS. Considering that most women reported spending < 3 hr/day outdoors, most women in the study were exposed to outdoor-originating PAHs within the indoor setting. Cross-sectional, longitudinal monitoring supplemented with questionnaire data allowed development of a gestation-length model of individual-level exposure with high precision and validity.

  10. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-02-01

    This report describes the progress of 12 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988. During this quarter, field activities at the 300 Area process trenches, the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds, the 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, and the 216-A-36B Crib consisted of ground-water sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes well development data, sediment analysis, and water-level measurements. Ground-water sampling was begun at this site, and results will be included in next quarter's report. Twelve new wells were installed during the quarter, two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, size at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells are included in this report. Driller's logs and other drilling and site characterization data will be provided in the next quarterly report. At the 2101-M Pond, construction was completed on four wells, and initial ground-water samples were taken. The drilling logs, geophysical logging data, and as-built diagrams are included in this report in Volume 2. 19 refs., 24 figs., 39 tabs.

  11. Monitoring and source tracking of tetracycline resistance genes in lagoons and groundwater adjacent to swine production facilities over a 3-year period

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koike, S.; Krapac, I.G.; Oliver, H.D.; Yannarell, A.C.; Chee-Sanford, J. C.; Aminov, R.I.; Mackie, R.I.

    2007-01-01

    To monitor the dissemination of resistance genes into the environment, we determined the occurrence of tetracycline resistance (Tcr) genes in groundwater underlying two swine confinement operations. Monitoring well networks (16 wells at site A and 6 wells at site C) were established around the lagoons at each facility. Groundwater (n = 124) and lagoon (n = 12) samples were collected from the two sites at six sampling times from 2000 through 2003. Total DNA was extracted, and PCR was used to detect seven Tcr genes [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(C), tet(H), and tet(Z)]. The concentration of Tcr genes was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. To confirm the Tcr gene source in groundwater, comparative analysis of tet(W) gene sequences was performed on groundwater and lagoon samples. All seven Tcr genes were continually detected in groundwater during the 3-year monitoring period at both sites. At site A, elevated detection frequency and concentration of Tcr genes were observed in the wells located down-gradient of the lagoon. Comparative analysis of tet(W) sequences revealed that the impacted groundwater contained gene sequences almost identical (99.8% identity) to those in the lagoon, but these genes were not found in background libraries. Novel sequence clusters and unique indigenous resistance gene pools were also found in the groundwater. Thus, antibiotic resistance genes in groundwater are affected by swine manure, but they are also part of the indigenous gene pool. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Seasonal, Episodic and Periodic Changes in Terrestrial Water Storage Recorded By DEEP Piezometric Monitoring in the Ganges/Brahmaputra/Meghna DELTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, W. G.; Shamsudduha, M.; Taylor, R. G.; Ahmed, K. M.; Mukherjee, A.; Lapworth, D.; Zahid, A.

    2014-12-01

    Piezometric monitoring in vertical profile at sites across the southern and coastal floodplains of the Ganges/Brahmaputra/Meghna (GBM) delta confirms gravitational flow in sediments of the Bengal Aquifer System (BAS) to a depth of at least 320 m (the maximum depth of measurement). Individual and paired records of groundwater head indicate seasonal recovery and recession of water storage, periodic and episodic ground surface loading, and earth tide responses. Lunar periodicity in groundwater head fluctuation coincident with tide height at one coastal site is consistent with tidal surface loading/unloading. Diurnal tidal fluctuations in the same record change amplitude and shift phase with depth, also indicative of surface loading/unloading. Transience in the surface loading signals with depth is governed by the vertically integrated hydraulic properties of the thick BAS sedimentary sequence. Inland, earth tide responses of smaller amplitude and lacking phase shift with depth are ubiquitous in the background signal. Most records include clearly resolvable episodic deflections in the order of 0.1 m water head and up to 0.5 m water head, near simultaneous with depth, corresponding to individual episodes of rainfall. The episodic head deflections provide a record of change in terrestrial water storage (ΔTWS) comprising undifferentiated surface water flooding, soil moisture and shallow groundwater recharge - a direct land-based equivalent of satellite estimates of ΔTWS. Enigmatic short-term recession from individual deflection peaks may be related to elastic deformation and ground surface lowering under terrestrial water storage loading.

  13. Comparison of precipitation chemistry measurements obtained by the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network and National Atmospheric Deposition Program for the period 1995-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Shaw, Michael J.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Lehmann, Christopher M.B.; Rothert, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    Precipitation chemistry and depth measurements obtained by the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) and the US National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) were compared for the 10-year period 1995–2004. Colocated sets of CAPMoN and NADP instrumentation, consisting of precipitation collectors and rain gages, were operated simultaneously per standard protocols for each network at Sutton, Ontario and Frelighsburg, Ontario, Canada and at State College, PA, USA. CAPMoN samples were collected daily, and NADP samples were collected weekly, and samples were analyzed exclusively by each network’s laboratory for pH, H + , Ca2+  , Mg2+  , Na + , K + , NH+4 , Cl − , NO−3 , and SO2−4 . Weekly and annual precipitation-weighted mean concentrations for each network were compared. This study is a follow-up to an earlier internetwork comparison for the period 1986–1993, published by Alain Sirois, Robert Vet, and Dennis Lamb in 2000. Median weekly internetwork differences for 1995–2004 data were the same to slightly lower than for data for the previous study period (1986–1993) for all analytes except NO−3 , SO2−4 , and sample depth. A 1994 NADP sampling protocol change and a 1998 change in the types of filters used to process NADP samples reversed the previously identified negative bias in NADP data for hydrogen-ion and sodium concentrations. Statistically significant biases (α = 0.10) for sodium and hydrogen-ion concentrations observed in the 1986–1993 data were not significant for 1995–2004. Weekly CAPMoN measurements generally are higher than weekly NADP measurements due to differences in sample filtration and field instrumentation, not sample evaporation, contamination, or analytical laboratory differences.

  14. Laser ultrasonic furnace tube coke monitor. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2 for reporting period August 1, 1998--November 1, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-10

    This report summarizes the technical progress achieved during the first quarter of the ERIP project entitled, ``Laser Ultrasonic Furnace Tube Coke Monitor.`` The focus of work during this reporting period was the testing of a novel device for introducing a broad bandwidth ultrasonic pulse at the surface of a simulated furnace tube. The device employs a sacrificial stand-off composed of a fusible alloy that conforms to hot furnace tube surface upon contact. Conventional high-temperature couplants have a maximum operating temperature of about 550{degrees}C, which limits their use for contact against ethylene cracker furnace tube surfaces that typically operate at about 1000{degrees}C. In the absence of a couplant, insufficient ultrasonic energy can be transmitted from the transducer to the tube surface. By using a fusible alloy, the device efficiently couples the transducer to the hot furnace tube surface, even for rough and convex tube surfaces operating at temperatures of 1800{degrees}F and above. Initial tests confirmed the ability to resolve pulse echoes in a simulated furnace tube using a 5 MHz piezoelectric transducer with a fusible stand-off.

  15. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 91: AREA 3 U3fi INJECTION WELL, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA FOR THE PERIOD NOVEMBER 2003 - OCTOBER 2004

    SciTech Connect

    2005-01-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary of inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This report covers the annual period November 2003 through October 2004. Site inspections of CAU 91 are performed every six months to identify any significant changes that could impact the proper operation of the waste disposal unit. Inspection results for the current period indicate that the overall condition of the concrete pad, perimeter fence, and warning signs is good.

  16. Problem Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ Home Body Getting your period Problem periods Problem periods It’s common to have cramps or feel ... doctor Some common period problems Signs of period problems top One way to know if you may ...

  17. Quarterly report of RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976) groundwater monitoring data for period July 1, 1990 through September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and 40CFR265, Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (EPA 1988b). This submittal provides data obtained from groundwater monitoring activities for July 1, 1990 through September 30, 1990. 26 refs., 21 figs., 30 tabs.

  18. Monitoring and source tracking of tetracycline resistance genes in lagoons and groundwater adjacent to swine production facilities over a three-year period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To monitor the dissemination of resistance genes into the environment we determined the occurrence of tetracycline resistance genes (Tcr) in groundwater underlying two swine confinement operations. Monitoring well networks (sixteen wells at Sites A and six wells at Site C) were established around th...

  19. The optimal period of Ca-EDTA treatment for parthenogenetic activation of porcine oocytes during maturation culture

    PubMed Central

    MORITA, Yasuhiro; TANIGUCHI, Masayasu; TANIHARA, Fuminori; ITO, Aya; NAMULA, Zhao; DO, Lanh Thi Kim; TAKAGI, Mitsuhiro; TAKEMOTO, Tatsuya; OTOI, Takeshige

    2016-01-01

    The changes triggered by sperm-induced activation of oocytes, which are required for normal oocyte development, can be mediated by other agents, thereby inducing the parthenogenesis. In this study, we exposed porcine oocytes to 1 mM Ca-EDTA, a metal-ion chelator, at various intervals during 48 hr of in vitro maturation to determine the optimum period of Ca-EDTA treatment for parthenogenetic activation. When the oocytes were cultured with or without Ca-EDTA from 36 hr (post-12), 24 hr (post-24), 12 hr (post-36) and 0 hr (post-48) after the start of maturation culture, the blastocyst formation rates were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the post-24, post-36 and post-48 groups (3.3%, 4.0% and 2.6%, respectively) than those in the control group without treatment (0%). Furthermore, when the oocytes were cultured with Ca-EDTA for 0 hr (control), 12 hr (pre-12), 24 hr (pre-24), 36 hr (pre-36) and 48 hr (pre-48) from the start of maturation culture, the oocytes formed blastocysts only in the pre-36 and pre-48 groups (0.4% or 0.8%, respectively). Pronuclei (<66.7%) were observed only when the periods of Ca-EDTA treatment were more than 12 hr during maturation culture. In the control group, no pronuclei were detected. Our findings demonstrate that porcine immature oocytes can be parthenogenetically activated by Ca-EDTA treatment for at least 24 hr to 36 hr during maturation culture, leading to pronucleus formation followed by the formation of blastocysts. PMID:26947170

  20. RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report for CAU 91: Area 3 U-3fi Waste Unit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000

    SciTech Connect

    D. F. Emer

    2001-02-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Unit, located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999 to October 2000 period. Inspections of the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. The objective of the neutron-logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128-meter (m) (420-feet [ft]) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft) or to detect changes that maybe indicative of subsidence within the disposal unit itself. Physical inspections of the closure were completed in March and September 2000 and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. The directional survey which is required to be completed every five years was run in the ER3-3 casing to determine if subsidence was occurring in the U-3fi emplacement borehole. Small changes were noted which are attributed to initial settling of the sand pack stemming. No evidence of subsidence within the emplacement borehole was observed. The subsidence survey for the October 1999 to October 2000 monitoring period indicated an increase in elevation of 0.244 centimeters (cm) (0.008 ft) compared to the previous year, July 1999. All changes in subsidence survey data taken to date are so small as to be at the survey instrument resolution level and it is not clear if they represent subsidence or measurement error. There is no clear evidence for any subsidence of the monument. Soil moisture monitoring results indicate dry stable conditions

  1. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects. Quarterly report for the period of February, March and April 1991

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L.

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US DOE Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators. (VC)

  2. Irregular Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... number of days after the last one. The Menstrual Cycle Most girls get their first period between the ... to skip periods or to have an irregular menstrual cycle. Illness, rapid weight change, or stress can also ...

  3. Monitoring non-periodic comet C/2011 L4 PANSTARRS using Joan Oró 0.8 m robotic telescope at OAdM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Rodríguez, D.; Lacruz, J.; Sánchez, A.

    2013-09-01

    Comet C/2011 L4 PANSTARRS was discovered in June 2011 by R. Wainscoat and D. Tholen using the Pan-STARRS telescope located near the summit of Haleakala, on the island of Maui in Hawaii (USA) [1]. Once its orbit was computed it was noticed its non-periodic nature and the favorable geometry during its approach to perihelion in March 2013. It first became visible to the naked eye from the Southern hemisphere, and later on it started to be seen during mid-March from the Northern one. Due to the limited observational period in right conditions we introduce here some observations obtained taken from robotic 0.8 m Telescope Joan Oró (JO) from the Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec (OAdM: www.oadm.cat) and other Spanish observatories.

  4. Non-invasive detection and monitoring of estrus, pregnancy and the postpartum period in pygmy loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus) using fecal estrogen metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurke, M H; Czekala, N M; Fitch-Snyder, H

    1997-01-01

    Estrone-conjugates (E1C) were measured in the feces of six female pygmy lorises (Nycticebus pygmaeus) during estrus (n = 12), pregnancy (n = 4) and the postpartum period (n = 3). Noninvasive feces collection permitted frequent sampling throughout estrus and pregnancy, without disturbance of animals. The estrous period was defined as an increase in fecal E1C levels above an average of 70 ng/g feces with peaks above 100 ng/g feces obtained in consecutive fecal samples collected over a 6- to 11-day period between the end of July and the first third of October. Comparison of the periovulatory profile of E1C and the stage of labial opening of the vagina revealed a high agreement (P < 0.001). In all pregnant females, an E1C rise was found approximately 47 days postestrus, the source of which may be the growing fetal placental unit. Estimated gestation lengths ranged between 187 and 198 days (n = 4). PMID:9050368

  5. The relationship between activity clusters detected by an automatic activity monitor and endocrine changes during the periestrous period in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Aungier, S P M; Roche, J F; Duffy, P; Scully, S; Crowe, M A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between observed estrous-related behavior, activity clusters (AC; detected by automatic activity monitor), endocrine profiles, and ovulation time. Twenty-one cows in estrus (after 2 cloprostenol treatments, 11 d apart) and 12 nonsynchronized cows, to establish Heatime (SCR Engineers Ltd., Netanya, Israel) herd baseline activity, were enrolled. Cows had Heatime monitors applied 3 wk before the trial to establish their own baseline activity level. Cows in standing estrus had ultrasonography and phlebotomy carried out every 4 h to determine dominant follicle size, endocrine profiles, and ovulation time. After ovulation, these procedures were repeated once on d 3 to 6. Heatime alerted estrus in 90% of cows, and incorrectly alerted 17% of AC. The mean±SEM duration for standing estrus was 9±1 and 13±1 h for estrous-related behavior. Estrous-related behavior began after the start of the proestrous estradiol-17β (E2) increase (59±6.5 h). Cows with longer durations of raised proestrous E2 had longer intervals from its onset to the start of standing estrus and AC. The AC duration increased with longer durations of estrous-related behavior. Higher peak E2 occurred with longer standing estrus and estrous-related behavior. As E2 concentration decreased after the peak, 90% of cows still had estrous-related behavior. Duration of estrous-related behavior increased with higher average E2 concentration during the last 8 h before the start of the LH surge. During this surge 90% of cows had all of their standing estrus. As yields increased, so did the magnitude of the preovulatory FSH surges. Higher surges occurred with shorter standing estrus and estrous-related behavior. Cows with shorter LH surges had longer standing estrus. Peak LH preceded the AC peak (6.6±0.8 h). Duration of overlap between the AC start and the LH surge end ranged between 0 and 14 h; 1 cow had none. No association was found between the AC

  6. Laser ultrasonic furnace tube coke monitor. Quarterly technical progress report. Report No. 5 for reporting period May 1, 1999 through August 1, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-15

    The overall aim of the project is to demonstrate the performance and practical use of a probe for measuring the thickness of coke deposits located within the high-temperature tubes of a thermal cracking furnace. The objective of work during this period was to enhance the sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio of the probe measurement. Testing identified that the primary source of signal noise was traced to imperfections in the sacrificial stand-off, which was formed using a casting procedure. Laminations, voids, and impurities contained in the casting result in attenuation and dispersion of the ultrasonic signal. This report describes the work performed to optimize the signal conductance of the sacrificial stand-off.

  7. On application of the complex demodulation for monitoring Earth rotation: Analysis of the nutation and long periodic UT1 data estimated by VieVS CD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, A.; Wielgosz, A.; Bóhm, S.

    2015-08-01

    In the recent work (Bóhm et al., J. Geodynamics, 62(2012), 56-68) we demonstrated the application of the complex demodulation (CD) technique for VLBI estimation of the Earth orientation parameters (EOP). This technique enables simultaneous determination of the long period components of polar motion (x,y), universal time (dUT1=UT1 UTC) and nutation (celestial pole offsets dX,dY) as well as the high frequency (diurnal, semidiurnal, ...) components of polar motion and dUT1. In this work we perform analysis of the retrograde diurnal component of polar motion and the low frequency component of dUT1 estimated by the VieVS CD software. By comparison to the results based on the celestial pole offsets and dUT1 series from the combined solutions IVS and IERS we demonstrate consistency of the CD parametrization with the standard approach.

  8. Climatology of Ultra Violet (UV) irradiance as measured through the Belgian ground-based monitoring network during the time period of 1995-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Praveen; Gillotay, Didier; Depiesse, Cedric

    2016-04-01

    In this study we describe the network of ground-based ultraviolet (UV) radiation monitoring stations in Belgium. The evolution of the entire network, together with the details of measuring instruments is given. The observed cumulative irradiances -UVB, UVA and total solar irradiance (TSI)- over the course of measurement for three stations -a northern (Ostende), central (Uccle) and a southern (Redu)- are shown. The longest series of measurement shown in this study is at Uccle, Brussels, from 1995 till 2014. Thus, the variation of the UV index (UVI), together with the variation of irradiances during summer and winter months at Uccle are shown as a part of this climatological study. The trend of UVB irradiance over the above mentioned three stations is shown. This UVB trend is studied in conjunction with the long-term satellite-based total column ozone value over Belgium, which shows two distinct trends marked by a change point. The total column ozone trend following the change point is positive. It is also seen that the UVB trend is positive for the urban/sub-urban sites: Uccle and Redu. Whereas the UVB trend at Ostende, which is a coastal site, is not positive. A possible explanation of this relation between total column ozone and UVB trend could be associated with aerosols, which is shown in this paper by means of a radiative transfer model based study -as a part of a preliminary investigation. It is seen that the UVI is influenced by the type of aerosols.

  9. Long term changes of tropospheric Nitrogen Dioxide over Pakistan derived from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) during the time period of October 2004 to December 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtaza, Rabbia; Fahim Khokhar, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Urban air pollution is causing huge number of diseases and deaths annually. Nitrogen dioxide is an important component of urban air pollution and a precursor to particulate matter, ground level ozone, and acid rain. The satellite based measurements of nitrogen dioxide from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) can help in analyzing spatio temporal variability in ground level concentrations within a large urban area. In this study, the spatial and temporal distributions of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide Vertical Column Densities (VCDs) over Pakistan are presented from 2004 to 2014. The results showed that the winter season is having high nitrogen dioxide levels as compared to summers. The increase can be attributed to the anthropogenic activities especially thermal power generation and traffic count. Punjab is one of the major provinces with high nitrogen dioxide levels followed by Sindh, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan. Six hotspots have been examined in the present study such as Lahore, Islamabad, Karachi, Faisalabad, Okara and Multan. Emissions of nitrogen compounds from thermal power plants and transportation sector represent a significant fraction of the total nitrogen dioxide emissions to the atmosphere.

  10. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 110: AREA 3 WMD U-3AX/BL CRATER, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA FOR THE PERIOD JULY 2004 - JUNE 2005

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-08-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring report provides the results of inspections and monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110, Area 3 Waste Management Division (WMD) U-3ax/bl Crater. This report includes an analysis and summary of the site inspections, repairs and maintenance, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 110, for the annual period July 2004 through June 2005. Site inspections of the cover were performed quarterly to identify any significant changes to the site requiring action. The overall condition of the cover, cover vegetation, perimeter fence, and use restriction warning signs was good. Settling was observed that exceeded the action level as specified in Section VII.B.7 of the Hazardous Waste Permit Number NEV HW009 (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 2000). This permit states that cracks or settling greater than 15 centimeters (cm) (6 inches [in]) deep that extend 1.0 meter (m) (3 feet [ft]) or more on the cover will be evaluated and repaired within 60 days of detection.

  11. High-sensitivity metal oxides-coated long-period fiber grating sensors for humidity monitoring in high-energy physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berruti, G.; Consales, M.; Borriello, Anna; Giordano, M.; Buontempo, S.; Breglio, Giovanni; Makovec, A.; Petagna, Paolo; Cusano, A.

    2014-05-01

    This contribution deals with a feasibility analysis for the development of radiation tolerant fiber optic humidity sensors based on long period grating (LPG) technology to be applied in high-energy physics (HEP) experiments currently running at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). In particular, here we propose a high-sensitivity LPG sensor coated with a finely tuned titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin layer (~100 nm thick) through the sol gel deposition method. The sensor characterization in the relative humidity (RH) range [0-75] % at four different temperatures (in the range -10°C - 25°C) was carried out to assess sensor performances in real operative conditions required in typical experiments running at CERN. Experimental results demonstrate the very high RH sensitivities of the proposed device (up to 1.4 nm/%RH in correspondence of very low humidity levels), which turned out to be from one to three orders of magnitudes higher than those exhibited by fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors coated with micrometer thin polyimide overlays. The radiation tolerance capability of the TiO2-coated LPG sensor is also investigated by comparing the sensing performances before and after its exposure to 1Mrad dose of γ-ionizing radiation. Collected results demonstrate the strong potentialities of the proposed technology in light of its future exploitation in HEP applications as robust and valid alternative to currently used commercial hygrometers.

  12. Real-time monitoring and massive inversion of source parameters of very long period seismic signals: An application to Stromboli Volcano, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auger, E.; D'Auria, L.; Martini, M.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.

    2006-01-01

    We present a comprehensive processing tool for the real-time analysis of the source mechanism of very long period (VLP) seismic data based on waveform inversions performed in the frequency domain for a point source. A search for the source providing the best-fitting solution is conducted over a three-dimensional grid of assumed source locations, in which the Green's functions associated with each point source are calculated by finite differences using the reciprocal relation between source and receiver. Tests performed on 62 nodes of a Linux cluster indicate that the waveform inversion and search for the best-fitting signal over 100,000 point sources require roughly 30 s of processing time for a 2-min-long record. The procedure is applied to post-processing of a data archive and to continuous automatic inversion of real-time data at Stromboli, providing insights into different modes of degassing at this volcano. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Integration of X-band SAR interferometry, continuous and periodic D-GPS and in-place inclinometers to characterize and monitor a deep-seated earthslide in the Dolomites (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulas, Marco; Corsini, Alessandro; Soldati, Mauro; Marcato, Gianluca; Pasuto, Alessandro; Crespi, Mattia; Mazzoni, Augusto; Benedetti, Elisa; Branzanti, Mara; Manunta, Michele; Ojha, Chandrakanta; Chinellato, Giulia; Cuozzo, Giovanni; Costa, Armin; Monsorno, Roberto; Thiebes, Benni; Piantelli, Elena; Magnani, Massimo; Meroni, Marco; Mair, Volkmar

    2015-04-01

    The Corvara landslide is an active, large-scale, deep-seated and slow moving earthslide of about 30 Mm3 located in the Dolomites (Italy). It is frequently damaging a national road and, occasionally, isolated buildings and recreational ski facilities. Since the mid '90s it has been mapped, dated and monitored thanks to field surveys, boreholes, radiocarbon dating, inclinometers, piezometers and periodic D-GPS measurements, carried out by the Geology and the Forestry Planning offices of the Autonomous Province of Bolzano, the Municipality of Corvara in Badia, the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, the IRPI-CNR of Padua. In 2013, a new phase of characterization and monitoring has started which also involves the EURAC's Institute for Applied Remote Sensing, the geodesy group of University La Sapienza, the CNR-IREA of Naples and the Leica Geosystems office in Italy. This new phase of characterization and monitoring is meant to investigate the opportunities of innovative SAR interferometry, D-GPS and in-place inclinometers techniques to provide for a high frequency monitoring of the study site in support to the analysis of the investigation of forcing factors leading unsteady, nonuniform landslide motion through different seasons of the year. Monitoring results are also expected to provide a validation of innovative interferometric techniques so to fully evaluate their conformity to be used as a long-term monitoring system in land-use planning and risk management procedures. The monitoring infrastructure now integrates: 16 Corner Reflector for satellite X-Band SAR interferometric products, 13 benchmarks for D-GPS periodic surveys, three on-site GPS receivers for continuous positioning and remote ftp data pushing, two in-place inclinometers and a pressure transducer to record pore-pressure variations. The coupling of SAR-based products with GPS records is achieved using especially designed Corner Reflectors having an appendix dedicated to hold Dual-Frequency GPS

  14. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, Melvin R.

    2009-07-30

    proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

  15. Periodized wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Schlossnagle, G.; Restrepo, J.M.; Leaf, G.K.

    1993-12-01

    The properties of periodized Daubechies wavelets on [0,1] are detailed and contrasted against their counterparts which form a basis for L{sup 2}(R). Numerical examples illustrate the analytical estimates for convergence and demonstrate by comparison with Fourier spectral methods the superiority of wavelet projection methods for approximations. The analytical solution to inner products of periodized wavelets and their derivatives, which are known as connection coefficients, is presented, and several tabulated values are included.

  16. Periodic cages.

    PubMed

    Diudea, Mircea V; Nagy, Csaba L; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Ioan; Graovac, Ante; Janezic, Dusanka; Vikić-Topić, Drazen

    2005-01-01

    Various cages are constructed by using three types of caps: f-cap (derived from spherical fullerenes by deleting zones of various size), kf-cap (obtainable by cutting off the polar ring, of size k), and t-cap ("tubercule"-cap). Building ways are presented, some of them being possible isomerization routes in the real chemistry of fullerenes. Periodic cages with ((5,7)3) covering are modeled, and their constitutive typing enumeration is given. Spectral data revealed some electronic periodicity in fullerene clusters. Semiempirical and strain energy calculations complete their characterization. PMID:15807490

  17. Parental Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillington, Audrey M.; Lehman, Stephanie; Clapp, John; Hovell, Melbourne; Sipan, Carol; Blumberg, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period during which many youth experiment with risk practices. This paper examined the association of parental monitoring with a range of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use behaviors among high-risk youth, while controlling for other demographic and environmental variables previously found to be associated with AOD…

  18. Periodic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    Periodic polymers can be made by self assembly, directed self assembly and by photolithography. Such materials provide a versatile platform for 1, 2 and 3D periodic nano-micro scale composites with either dielectric or impedance contrast or both, and these can serve for example, as photonic and or phononic crystals for electromagnetic and elastic waves as well as mechanical frames/trusses. Compared to electromagnetic waves, elastic waves are both less complex (longitudinal modes in fluids) and more complex (longitudinal, transverse in-plane and transverse out-of-plane modes in solids). Engineering of the dispersion relation between wave frequency w and wave vector, k enables the opening of band gaps in the density of modes and detailed shaping of w(k). Band gaps can be opened by Bragg scattering, anti-crossing of bands and discrete shape resonances. Current interest is in our group focuses using design - modeling, fabrication and measurement of polymer-based periodic materials for applications as tunable optics and control of phonon flow. Several examples will be described including the design of structures for multispectral band gaps for elastic waves to alter the phonon density of states, the creation of block polymer and bicontinuous metal-carbon nanoframes for structures that are robust against ballistic projectiles and quasi-crystalline solid/fluid structures that can steer shock waves.

  19. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, For the Period July 2007-June 2008

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-08-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report (PCIMR) provides the results of inspections and monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110, Area 3 WMD [Waste Management Division] U-3ax/bl Crater. This PCIMR includes an analysis and summary of the site inspections, repairs and maintenance, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 110 for the period July 2007 through June 2008. Site inspections of the cover were performed quarterly to identify any significant changes to the site requiring action. The overall condition of the cover, perimeter fence, and use restriction (UR) warning signs was good. However, settling was observed that exceeded the action level as specified in Section VII.B.7 of the Hazardous Waste Permit Number NEV HW021 (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 2005). This permit states that cracks or settling greater than 15 centimeters (6 inches) deep that extend 1.0 meter (m) (3 feet [ft]) or more on the cover will be evaluated and repaired within 60 days of detection. Two areas of settling and cracks were observed on the south and east edges of the cover during the September 2007 inspection that exceeded the action level and required repair. The areas were repaired in October 2007. Additional settling and cracks were observed along the east side of the cover during the December 2007 inspection that exceeded the action level, and the area was repaired in January 2008. Significant animal burrows were also observed during the March 2008 inspection, and small mammal trapping and relocation was performed in April 2008. The semiannual subsidence surveys were performed in September 2007 and March 2008. No significant subsidence was observed in the survey data. Monument 5 shows the greatest amount of subsidence (-0.02 m [-0.08 ft] compared to the baseline survey of 2000). This amount is negligible and near the resolution of the survey instruments; it does not indicate that subsidence is occurring overall on

  20. Implementation of Real-Time Testing of Earthquake Early Warning Algorithms: Using the California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) Infrastructure as a Test Bed for the P Amplitude and Period Monitor for a Single Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, K.; Hauksson, E.; Kanamori, H.; Friberg, P.; Wu, Y.

    2006-12-01

    A necessary first step toward the goal of implementing proof-of-concept projects for earthquake early warning (EEW) is the real-time testing of the seismological algorithms. To provide the most appropriate environment, the CISN has designed and implemented a platform for such testing. We are testing the amplitude (Pd) and period (Tau-c) monitor developed for providing on-site earthquake early warning (EEW) using data from a single seismic station. We have designed and implemented a framework generator that can automatically generate code for waveform- processing systems. The framework generator is based on Code Worker software www.codeworker.org, which provides APIs and a scripting language to build parsers and template processing engines. Higher-level description of the waveform processing system is required to generate the waveform-processing framework. We have implemented Domain Specific Language DSL to provide description of the waveform-processing framework. The framework generator allows the developer to focus more on the waveform processing algorithms and frees him/her from repetitive and tedious coding tasks. It also has an automatic gap detector, transparent buffer management, and built in thread management. We have implemented the waveform-processing framework to process real-time waveforms coming from the dataloggers deployed throughout southern California by the Southern California Seismic Network. The system also has the capability of processing data from archived events to facilitate off-line testing. An application feeds data from MiniSEED packets into the Wave Data Area (WDA). The system that grabs the data from the WDA processes each real-time data stream independently. To verify results, sac files are generated at each processing step. Currently, we are processing broadband data streams from 160 stations and determining Pd and Tau-c as local earthquakes occur in southern California. We present the results from this testing and compare the

  1. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Artificial Imprinting of Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon (Oncorhynchus Nerka) with Synthetic Chemicals: Measurement of Thyroxine Content as an Indicator of the Sensitive Period for Imprinting to Olfactory Cues; 1992 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J.; Tilson, Mary Beth

    1993-09-01

    In 1991, we initiated studies to determine the critical period for thyroxine-induced olfactory imprinting in kokanee salmon. In our preliminary investigation we found that thyroxine [T{sub 4}] levels of Lake Whatcom stock, 1990 year class, kokanee were relatively high in eggs and alevins as compared to post-swimup fry, and peaked at hatch and swimup. Here we report on follow-up studies conducted in 1992 designed to determine if our initial results could be replicated. Additionally, in 1992, we initiated experiments to determine if kokanee could be imprinted to synthetic chemicals--morpholine and phenethyl alcohol--at different life stages. In 1991, whole body thyroxine content [T{sub 4}] was measured in 460 Lake Whatcom stock kokanee and 480 Lake Pend Orielle (Cabinet Gorge) stock kokanee to indicate the critical period for imprinting. Lots of 20 kokanee eggs, alevins and fry from both stocks, reared at the Spokane Tribal hatchery, were collected at weekly intervals from November 1991 to August 1992 and assayed for T{sub 4} content by radioimmunoassay. T{sub 4} levels were monitored in Lake Whatcom stock, 1991 year class fish, from eyed egg (33 days post-fertilization) to fry (248 days post-fertilization) stages. T{sub 4} concentration ({+-} SEM) in eggs was 6.7 {+-} 1.3 rig/g body weight. T{sub 4} peaked on the day of hatch at 13.1 {+-} 2.5 ng/g body weight, then declined to 10.3 {+-} 1.1 ng/g body weight in recently post-hatch alevins. T{sub 4} peaked again at 22.1 {+-} 5.2 ng/g body weight during swimup, then steadily decreased to about 1.0 ng/g body weight in 176-248 day old fry. T{sub 4} levels were monitored in Lake Pend Orielle stock, 1991 year class, fish from the day of fertilization (day 0) to 225 days post-fertilization. T{sub 4} content of eggs was 9.5 {+-} 1.7 ng/g body weight and peaked on the day of hatch (day 53 post-fertilization) at 24.2 {+-} 4.5 ng/g body weight. After declining to 13.0 {+-} 2.9 ng/g body weight on day 81 post-fertilization, T

  2. Enterovirus and Norovirus Monitoring under UCMR3

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule round 3 (UCMR3) monitoring program for enterovirus and norovirus in groundwater. It provides the data on microbial indicators and virus occurrence during the monitoring period. Enteric virus occurrence was ab...

  3. 49 CFR 229.25 - Tests: Every periodic inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... recorder. A microprocessor-based self-monitoring event recorder, if installed, is exempt from periodic... shall be tested including, but not limited to, air pressure monitoring devices, pressure switches,...

  4. 49 CFR 229.25 - Tests: Every periodic inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... recorder. A microprocessor-based self-monitoring event recorder, if installed, is exempt from periodic... shall be tested including, but not limited to, air pressure monitoring devices, pressure switches,...

  5. 49 CFR 229.25 - Tests: Every periodic inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... recorder. A microprocessor-based self-monitoring event recorder, if installed, is exempt from periodic... shall be tested including, but not limited to, air pressure monitoring devices, pressure switches,...

  6. Evolution of periodicity in periodical cicadas

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiromu; Kakishima, Satoshi; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Koyama, Takuya; Sota, Teiji; Cooley, John R.; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in the USA are famous for their unique prime-numbered life cycles of 13 and 17 years and their nearly perfectly synchronized mass emergences. Because almost all known species of cicada are non-periodical, periodicity is assumed to be a derived state. A leading hypothesis for the evolution of periodicity in Magicicada implicates the decline in average temperature during glacial periods. During the evolution of periodicity, the determinant of maturation in ancestral cicadas is hypothesized to have switched from size dependence to time (period) dependence. The selection for the prime-numbered cycles should have taken place only after the fixation of periodicity. Here, we build an individual-based model of cicadas under conditions of climatic cooling to explore the fixation of periodicity. In our model, under cold environments, extremely long juvenile stages lead to extremely low adult densities, limiting mating opportunities and favouring the evolution of synchronized emergence. Our results indicate that these changes, which were triggered by glacial cooling, could have led to the fixation of periodicity in the non-periodical ancestors. PMID:26365061

  7. 28 CFR 524.75 - Periodic review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Periodic review. 524.75 Section 524.75... TRANSFER CLASSIFICATION OF INMATES Central Inmate Monitoring (CIM) System § 524.75 Periodic review. The Warden shall ensure that the status of an inmate's CIM assignment is considered at each program...

  8. 28 CFR 524.75 - Periodic review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Periodic review. 524.75 Section 524.75... TRANSFER CLASSIFICATION OF INMATES Central Inmate Monitoring (CIM) System § 524.75 Periodic review. The Warden shall ensure that the status of an inmate's CIM assignment is considered at each program...

  9. Document Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The charters of Freedom Monitoring System will periodically assess the physical condition of the U.S. Constitution, Declaration of Independence and Bill of Rights. Although protected in helium filled glass cases, the documents are subject to damage from light vibration and humidity. The photometer is a CCD detector used as the electronic film for the camera system's scanning camera which mechanically scans the document line by line and acquires a series of images, each representing a one square inch portion of the document. Perkin-Elmer Corporation's photometer is capable of detecting changes in contrast, shape or other indicators of degradation with 5 to 10 times the sensitivity of the human eye. A Vicom image processing computer receives the data from the photometer stores it and manipulates it, allowing comparison of electronic images over time to detect changes.

  10. Familial Periodic Paralyses

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS NINDS Familial Periodic Paralyses Information Page Synonym(s): Periodic Paralyses Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What are Familial Periodic Paralyses? Is there any treatment? What is the ...

  11. Using nonesterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations during the transition period for herd-level monitoring of increased risk of disease and decreased reproductive and milking performance.

    PubMed

    Ospina, Paula A; McArt, Jessica A; Overton, Thomas R; Stokol, Tracy; Nydam, Daryl V

    2013-07-01

    Dairy cows visit a state of negative energy balance (NEB) as they transition from late gestation to early lactation. At the individual level, there are several metabolic adaptations to manage NEB, including mobilization of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) from body fat reserves and glucose sparing for lactogenesis. Based on current pen-level feeding and management practices, strategies to minimize excessive NEB in both the individual and herd should focus on herd-level testing and management. This article reviews strategies for testing and monitoring of excessive NEB at the herd level through individual testing of 2 energy markers: NEFA and β-hydroxybutyrate. PMID:23809897

  12. Monitoring materials

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for effectively implementing alpha and/or beta and/or gamma monitoring of items or locations as desired. Indirect alpha monitoring by detecting ions generated by alpha emissions, in conjunction with beta and/or gamma monitoring is provided. The invention additionally provides for screening of items prior to alpha monitoring using beta and/or gamma monitoring, so as to ensure that the alpha monitoring apparatus is not contaminated by proceeding direct to alpha monitoring of a heavily contaminated item or location. The invention provides additional versatility in the emission forms which can be monitored, whilst maintaining accuracy and avoiding inadvertent contamination.

  13. Monitoring the source monitoring.

    PubMed

    Luna, Karlos; Martín-Luengo, Beatriz

    2013-11-01

    The hypothesis that the retrieval of correct source memory cues, those leading to a correct source attribution, increases confidence, whereas the retrieval of incorrect source memory cues, those leading to a source misattribution, decreases confidence was tested. Four predictions were derived from this hypothesis: (1) confidence should be higher for correct than incorrect source attribution except; (2) when no source cues are retrieved; (3) only the source misattributions inferred from the retrieval of incorrect source cues will be rated with low confidence; and (4) the number of source cues retrieved, either correct or incorrect, will affect the confidence in the source attributions. To test these predictions, participants read two narratives from two witnesses to a bank robbery, a customer and a teller. Then, participants completed a source monitoring test with four alternatives, customer, teller, both, or neither, and rated their confidence in their source attribution. Results supported the first three predictions, but they also suggested that the number of correct source monitoring cues retrieved did not play a role in the monitoring of the accuracy of the source attributions. Attributions made from the recovery of incorrect source cues could be tagged as dubious or uncertain, thus leading to lowered confidence irrespective of the number of incorrect source cues or whether another correct source cue was also recovered. This research has potential applications for eyewitness memory because it shows that confidence can be an indicator of the accuracy of a source attribution. PMID:23553316

  14. Enhanced Raman Monitor Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westenskow, Dwayne

    1996-01-01

    Monitoring of gaseous contaminants stems from the need to ensure a healthy and safe environment. NASA/Ames needs sensors that are able to monitor common atmospheric gas concentrations as well as trace amounts of contaminant gases. To provide an accurate assessment of air quality, a monitoring system would need to be continuous and on-line with full spectrum capabilities, allowing simultaneous detection of all gas components in a sample, including both combustible and non-combustible gases. The system demands a high degree of sensitivity to detect low gas concentrations in the low-ppm and sub-ppm regions. For clean and healthy air ('good' category), criteria established by the EPA requires that contaminant concentrations not exceed 4 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO) in an 8 hour period, 60 ppb of ozone(O3) in a one hour period and 30 ppb of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in a 24 hour period. One step below this is the National Ambient Air Quality Standard ('moderate' category) which requires that contaminant concentrations not exceed 9 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO), 120 ppb of ozone (O3) and 140 ppb of sulfur dioxide (SO2) for their respective time periods. Ideally a monitor should be able to detect the concentrations specified in the 'good' category. To benchmark current abilities of Raman technology in gas phase analysis, laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the RASCAL II anesthetic gas monitor.

  15. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Measurement of Thyroxin Concentration as an Indicator of the Critical Period for Imprinting in the Kokanee Salmon (Orcorhynchus Nerka) Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Hatcheries; 1991 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J.; Koehler, Valerie A.

    1992-05-01

    Previous investigations have determined that thyroid hormone surges activate olfactory imprinting in anadromous salmonid smolts. The mechanism of action appears to require binding of thyroid hormones to receptors in brain cell nuclei, which stimulates neuron differentiation and wires a pattern of neuron circuitry that allows for the permanent storage of the imprinted olfactory memory. In this study, thyroxine concentrations [T{sub 4}] were measured in 487 Lake Whatcom stock and 70 Lake Roosevelt stock Kokanee salmon to indicate the critical period for imprinting. Eggs, alevins and fry, reared at the Spokane Indian Kokanee Hatchery, were collected from January through August 1991. Sampled fish were flash frozen on dry ice and stored at {minus}80{degrees}C until T{sub 4} was extracted and concentrations determined by radioimmunassay. Mean concentration {+-} SEM of 10--20 individual fish (assayed in duplicate) were determined for each time period. T{sub 4} concentration peaked on the day of hatch at 16.8 ng/g body weight and again at swim-up at 16.0 {+-} 4.7 ng/g body weight. T{sub 4} concentration was 12.5 to 12.9 ng/g body weight in eggs, 7.1 to 15.2 ng/g body weight in. alevins, 4.5 to 11.4 ng/g body weight in 42 to 105 day old fry and 0.1 to 2.9 ng/g body weight in 112 to 185 day old fry. T{sub 4} concentrations were highest in eggs at 13.3 {+-} 2.8 ng/g body weight, then steadily decreased to 0.1 {+-} 0.1 ng/g body weight in older fry. Fry were released in Lake Roosevelt tributaries in July and August 1991, at about 170--180 days post hatching, in order to imprint them to those sites. The results of this study indicate that the time of release was not appropriate for imprinting. If T{sub 4} levels are an accurate guide for imprinting in kokanee, our results suggest that the critical period for imprinting in kokanee is at hatching or swim-up stages.

  16. 40 CFR 97.72 - Out of control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Monitoring and Reporting § 97.72 Out of control periods. (a) Whenever any emission monitoring system fails to meet the quality...) Audit decertification. Whenever both an audit of an emission monitoring system and a review of...

  17. 40 CFR 97.272 - Out of control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Monitoring and Reporting § 97.272 Out of control periods. (a) Whenever any monitoring system fails to meet the quality-assurance and.... (b) Audit decertification. Whenever both an audit of a monitoring system and a review of the...

  18. 40 CFR 97.272 - Out of control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Monitoring and Reporting § 97.272 Out of control periods. (a) Whenever any monitoring system fails to meet the quality-assurance and.... (b) Audit decertification. Whenever both an audit of a monitoring system and a review of the...

  19. 40 CFR 97.72 - Out of control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Monitoring and Reporting § 97.72 Out of control periods. (a) Whenever any emission monitoring system fails to meet the quality...) Audit decertification. Whenever both an audit of an emission monitoring system and a review of...

  20. Period meter for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rusch, Gordon K.

    1976-01-06

    An improved log N amplifier type nuclear reactor period meter with reduced probability for noise-induced scrams is provided. With the reactor at low power levels a sampling circuit is provided to determine the reactor period by measuring the finite change in the amplitude of the log N amplifier output signal for a predetermined time period, while at high power levels, differentiation of the log N amplifier output signal provides an additional measure of the reactor period.

  1. The Periodic Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennigan, Jennifer N.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2013-01-01

    The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy…

  2. Optimal glucose management in the perioperative period.

    PubMed

    Evans, Charity H; Lee, Jane; Ruhlman, Melissa K

    2015-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is a common finding in surgical patients during the perioperative period. Factors contributing to poor glycemic control include counterregulatory hormones, hepatic insulin resistance, decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, use of dextrose-containing intravenous fluids, and enteral and parenteral nutrition. Hyperglycemia in the perioperative period is associated with increased morbidity, decreased survival, and increased resource utilization. Optimal glucose management in the perioperative period contributes to reduced morbidity and mortality. To readily identify hyperglycemia, blood glucose monitoring should be instituted for all hospitalized patients. PMID:25814110

  3. Monitoring that matters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Douglas H.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring is a critically important activity for assessing the status of a system, such as the health of an individual, the balance in one's checking account, profits and losses of a business, the economic activity of a nation, or the size of an animal population. Monitoring is especially vital for evaluating changes in the system associated with specific known impacts occurring to the system. It is also valuable for detecting unanticipated changes in the system and identifying plausible causes of such changes, all in time to take corrective action. Before proceeding, we should define "monitoring." One definition of "monitor" (Microsoft Corporation 2009) is "to check something at regular intervals in order to find out how it is progressing or developing." The key point here is "at regular intervals," suggesting a continuing process. Some definitions do not indicate the repetitive nature of monitoring and are basically synonymous with "observing." Most monitoring, in the strict sense of the word, is intended to persist for long periods of time, perhaps indefinitely or permanently. Similarly, Thompson et al. (1998: 3) referred to the "repeated assessment of status" of something, but noted that the term "monitor" is sometimes used for analogous activities such as collecting baseline information or evaluating projects for either implementation or effectiveness. For their purposes, they restricted the term to involve repeated measurements collected at a specified frequency of time units. Let us adopt that definition, recognizing that repeated measurements imply collecting comparable information on each occasion.

  4. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR COLLECTION OF URINE SAMPLES (SOP-2.14)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP describes the method for collecting urine samples from the study participants (children and their primary caregivers). Urine samples will be approximate 48-hr collections, collected as spot urine samples accumulated over the 48-hr sampling period. If the household or da...

  5. Turkey Sperm Reside in the Tubular Glands in the Urodeum Following Artificial Insemination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A turkey hen in egg production requires 48 hr after the last insemination to maximize the number of sperm in the uterovaginal junction sperm-storage tubules. Where the sperm that continue to fill the oviductal sperm-storage sites during this 48 hr period reside remains unknown. Histological sectio...

  6. Automated Periodical Reference Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellefsen, David

    1985-01-01

    Describes public library reference service which allows patrons to type out search instructions on a computer terminal, review and select references, and receive, by high-speed printer, facsimile copy of selected periodical articles. Development of periodicals center at main county library and use of self-coaching SEARCH HELPER system are…

  7. The Living Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahlik, Mary Schrodt

    2005-01-01

    To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living periodic table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional periodic table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…

  8. Wavelet periodicity detection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, John J.; Pfander, Goetz E.

    1998-10-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of time series with respect to certain known periodicities. In particular, we shall present a fast method aimed at detecting periodic behavior inherent in noise data. The method is composed of three steps: (1) Non-noisy data are analyzed through spectral and wavelet methods to extract specific periodic patterns of interest. (2) Using these patterns, we construct an optimal piecewise constant wavelet designed to detect the underlying periodicities. (3) We introduce a fast discretized version of the continuous wavelet transform, as well as waveletgram averaging techniques, to detect occurrence and period of these periodicities. The algorithm is formulated to provide real time implementation. Our procedure is generally applicable to detect locally periodic components in signals s which can be modeled as s(t) equals A(t)F(h(t)) + N(t) for t in I, where F is a periodic signal, A is a non-negative slowly varying function, and h is strictly increasing with h' slowly varying, N denotes background activity. For example, the method can be applied in the context of epileptic seizure detection. In this case, we try to detect seizure periodics in EEG and ECoG data. In the case of ECoG data, N is essentially 1/f noise. In the case of EEG data and for t in I,N includes noise due to cranial geometry and densities. In both cases N also includes standard low frequency rhythms. Periodicity detection has other applications including ocean wave prediction, cockpit motion sickness prediction, and minefield detection.

  9. Bladder Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation's Bladder Scan Monitor continuously records and monitors bladder fullness and alerts the wearer or caretaker when voiding is required. The sensor is held against the lower abdomen by a belt and connected to the monitor by a cable. The sensor obtains bladder volume data from sound waves reflecting off the bladder wall. The device was developed by Langley Research Center, the Ames Research Center and the NASA Technology Applications Team. It utilizes Langley's advanced ultrasound technology. It is licensed to the ARC for medical applications, and sublicensed to Diagnostics Ultrasound. Central monitoring systems are planned for the future.

  10. Monitoring Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology (Environmental Control Issue), 1977

    1977-01-01

    This section contains a listing of the manufacturers of environmental monitoring instruments. The manufacturers are listed alphabetically under product headings. Addresses are included in a different section. (MA)

  11. Periodized Daubechies wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, J.M.; Leaf, G.K.; Schlossnagle, G.

    1996-03-01

    The properties of periodized Daubechies wavelets on [0,1] are detailed and counterparts which form a basis for L{sup 2}(R). Numerical examples illustrate the analytical estimates for convergence and demonstrated by comparison with Fourier spectral methods the superiority of wavelet projection methods for approximations. The analytical solution to inner products of periodized wavelets and their derivatives, which are known as connection coefficients, is presented, and their use ius illustrated in the approximation of two commonly used differential operators. The periodization of the connection coefficients in Galerkin schemes is presented in detail.

  12. Genealogy of periodic trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    de Adguiar, M.A.M.; Maldta, C.P.; de Passos, E.J.V.

    1986-05-20

    The periodic solutions of non-integrable classical Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom are numerically investigated. Curves of periodic families are given in plots of energy vs. period. Results are presented for this Hamiltonian: H = 1/2(p/sub x//sup 2/ + p/sub y//sup 2/) + 1/2 x/sup 2/ + 3/2 y/sup 2/ - x/sup 2/y + 1/12 x/sup 4/. Properties of the families of curves are pointed out. (LEW)

  13. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be due to this condition include: Kidney stones (a side effect of acetazolamide) Irregular heartbeat during ... 2016:chap 99. Read More Breathing difficulty Carbohydrates Kidney stones Potassium test Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis Weakness Update Date ...

  14. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... high levels of thyroid hormone in their blood ( hyperthyroidism , thyrotoxicosis). Causes This is a rare condition that ... include a family history of periodic paralysis and hyperthyroidism. Symptoms Symptoms involve attacks of muscle weakness or ...

  15. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003156.htm Vaginal bleeding between periods To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. This article discusses vaginal bleeding that occurs between a woman's monthly menstrual ...

  16. Painful periods (dysmenorrhea) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be caused by abnormal conditions such as endometriosis or pelvic inflammatory disease. Unless one of these potentially serious conditions is present, the treatment for painful periods is pain relief. If a ...

  17. Your First Period

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe asthma). Always follow the directions on the bottle about how much to take. Exercise. Place a ... days. Glossary Amenorrhea: The absence of menstrual periods. Egg: The female reproductive cell produced in and released ...

  18. Setting the Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saturnelli, Annette

    1985-01-01

    Examines problems resulting from different forms of the periodic table, indicating that New York State schools use a form reflecting the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry's 1984 recommendations. Other formats used and reasons for standardization are discussed. (DH)

  19. The Periodic Table CD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Alton J.; Holmes, Jon L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of the digitized version of The Periodic Table Videodisc. Provides details about the organization of information and access to the data via Macintosh and Windows computers. (DDR)

  20. Painful periods (dysmenorrhea) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Primary dysmenorrhea is a normal cramping of the lower abdomen caused by hormone-induced uterine contractions before the period. Secondary dysmenorrhea may be caused by abnormal conditions such as ...

  1. Monitoring Ionospheric Variation for a Definite Period Time in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inyurt, S.; Mekik, C.; Yildirim, O.

    2015-12-01

    Ionosphere has been studied by a number of scientists in recent years. Since GPS observations cannot provide TEC value directly, it can be estimated from combination of observations. In this study TEC values derived from GPS observations were produced variations with two hours increments from the eighth day to fifteenth day in months just after beginning of each season, namely January, April, July and October in 2014 for ZONG TUSAGA-Aktif station and 41 other stations (TUSAGA-Aktif, EUREF, IGS). TEC values computed by the Bernese 5.0 software were compared with the Global Ionosphere Model (GIM) TEC values regularly published by Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) and International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2012) TEC values. As a result of this study, with the comparison of GPS TEC values to GIM TEC values, it has become obvious that GPS TEC values are quite similar to the GIM TEC values. The differences of TEC values derived from GPS TEC and GIM TEC change from 0.91 TECU (January) to 1.88 TECU (October). On the other hand, GPS TEC values are also compared with IRI TEC values, and found out that there is a considerable difference between the two TEC values ranging from 6.30 TECU (January) to 15.15 TECU (April). Moreover, TEC values derived from GPS measurements are attained similar to GIM TEC, but found to stray from IRI-2012 TEC values remarkably.

  2. Monitoring very-long-period seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Benítez, M. C.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Wilson, David; Okubo, Paul G.

    2010-09-01

    On 19 March, 2008 eruptive activity returned to the summit of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii with the formation of a new vent within the Halemaumau pit crater. The new vent has been gradually increasing in size, and exhibiting sustained degassing and the episodic bursting of gas slugs at the surface of a lava pond ˜200 m below the floor of Halemaumau. The spectral characteristics, source location obtained by radial semblance, and Hidden Markov Model pattern recognition of the degassing burst signals are consistent with an increase in gas content in the magma transport system beginning in October, 2007. This increase plateaus between March - September 2008, and exhibits a fluctuating pattern until 31 January, 2010, suggesting that the release of gas is slowly diminishing over time.

  3. Ion Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2003-11-18

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  4. Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) and Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smoking Obesity Many people with narcolepsy or rapid eye movement (REM) behavior disorder move their legs periodically during ... brain activity, heart rate, breathing, muscle activity, and eye movements are monitored while people sleep. People may also ...

  5. 40 CFR 60.4172 - Out of control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Electric Steam Generating Units Monitoring and Reporting § 60.4172 Out of control periods. (a) Whenever any... field audit or an audit of any information submitted to the permitting authority or the...

  6. THE ORBITAL PERIOD OF SCORPIUS X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, Robert I.; Britt, Christopher T.

    2012-08-10

    The orbital period of Sco X-1 was first identified by Gottlieb et al. While this has been confirmed on multiple occasions, this work, based on nearly a century of photographic data, has remained the reference in defining the system ephemeris ever since. It was, however, called into question when Vanderlinde et al. claimed to find the one-year alias of the historical period in RXTE/All-Sky Monitor data and suggested that this was the true period rather than that of Gottlieb et al. We examine data from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) spanning 2001-2009. We confirm that the period of Gottlieb et al. is in fact the correct one, at least in the optical, with the one-year alias strongly rejected by these data. We also provide a modern time of minimum light based on the ASAS data.

  7. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Rojith Karanode; Chandran, Suresh Rama; Thirumalnesan, Geetha; Doraisamy, Nedumaran

    2011-07-01

    This article aims at highlighting the importance of suspecting thyrotoxicosis in cases of recurrent periodic flaccid paralysis; especially in Asian men to facilitate early diagnosis of the former condition. A case report of a 28 year old male patient with recurrent periodic flaccid paralysis has been presented. Hypokalemia secondary to thyrotoxicosis was diagnosed as the cause of the paralysis. The patient was given oral potassium intervention over 24 hours. The patient showed complete recovery after the medical intervention and was discharged after 24 hours with no residual paralysis. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is a complication of thyrotoxicosis, more common amongst males in Asia. It presents as acute flaccid paralysis in a case of hyperthyroidism with associated hypokalemia. The features of thyrotoxicosis may be subtle or absent. Thus, in cases of recurrent or acute flaccid muscle paralysis, it is important to consider thyrotoxicosis as one of the possible causes, and take measures accordingly. PMID:21966655

  8. [Periodic abstinence: its possibilities].

    PubMed

    1981-05-01

    Experience with family planning mehods requiring periodic sexual abstinence has been varied. During the last decade interest has centered on 2 methods, the cervical mucus and the sympto-thermal, which are based on identifying the onset of the fertile period. During the 1970s, the Australian physicians John and Evelyn Billings developed the cervical mucus method, in which changes in the quanitity and characteristics of cervical mucus are used to determine the moment of ovulation. The sympto-thermal method depends on identification of the slight rise in basal body temperature that occurs in the latter part of the menstrual cycle as well as cervical mucus changes and sometimes the calendar to determine the fertile period. The Catholic Church has been the main proponent of periodic abstinence methods, but since 1973 the World Health Organization has invested US$3.3 million on research in such methods. The Billings method requires differentiating between dry, wet, and very wet mucus in the vagina and between different consistencies of mucus. The method ususally requires 1-3 months for instruction and sexual abstinence is usually recommended for the 1st month. The average number of days of required abstinence was 9 in a study of 66 women and 15-18 in a study of 870 women. Many women with short menstrual cycles do not experience postmenstrual dry days, in which case abstinence may be required as many as 13 days out of 23. 18.8% of users of periodic abstinence methods in 1 North American study became pregnant in the 1st year, but most were using the calendar method. Women who desired to terminate childbearing had only about 1/2 as many failures with periodic abstinence methods as did women wishing to postpone a birth. PMID:12311397

  9. Electrostatic monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for more simply measuring alpha and/or beta emissions arising from items or locations. The technique uses indirect monitoring of the emissions by detecting ions generated by the emissions, the ions being attracted electrostatically to electrodes for discharge of collection. The apparatus and method employ a chamber which is sealed around the item or location during monitoring with no air being drawn into or expelled from the chamber during the monitoring process. A simplified structure and operations arises as a result, but without impairing the efficiency and accuracy of the detection technique.

  10. Periodically kicked turbulence

    PubMed

    Lohse

    2000-10-01

    Periodically kicked turbulence is theoretically analyzed within a mean-field theory. For large enough kicking strength A and kicking frequency f the Reynolds number grows exponentially and then runs into some saturation. The saturation level Re(sat) can be calculated analytically; different regimes can be observed. For large enough Re we find Re(sat) approximately Af, but intermittency can modify this scaling law. We suggest an experimental realization of periodically kicked turbulence to study the different regimes we theoretically predict and thus to better understand the effect of forcing on fully developed turbulence. PMID:11089041

  11. 40 CFR 97.172 - Out of control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Monitoring and Reporting § 97.172 Out of control periods. (a) Whenever any monitoring system fails to meet the quality-assurance and... system and a review of the initial certification or recertification application reveal that...

  12. 40 CFR 97.372 - Out of control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Monitoring and Reporting § 97.372 Out of control periods. (a) Whenever any monitoring system fails to meet the quality-assurance and... system and a review of the initial certification or recertification application reveal that...

  13. 40 CFR 97.372 - Out of control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Monitoring and Reporting § 97.372 Out of control periods. (a) Whenever any monitoring system fails to meet the quality-assurance and... system and a review of the initial certification or recertification application reveal that...

  14. 40 CFR 97.172 - Out of control periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Monitoring and Reporting § 97.172 Out of control periods. (a) Whenever any monitoring system fails to meet the quality-assurance and... system and a review of the initial certification or recertification application reveal that...

  15. Microcantilever actuation via periodic internal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jungchul; King, William P.

    2007-12-15

    This paper reports electrothermal actuation of silicon microcantilevers having integrated resistive heaters. Periodic electrical excitation induced periodic resistive heating in the cantilever, while the cantilever deflection was monitored with a photodetector. Excitation was either at the cantilever resonant frequency, f{sub 0}, f{sub 0}/2, or f{sub 0}/3. When the time averaged maximum cantilever temperature was 174 deg. C, the cantilever out-of-plane actuation amplitude was 484 nm near the cantilever resonance frequency of 24.9 kHz. This actuation was sufficiently large to operate the cantilever in intermittent contact mode and scan a calibration grating of height of 20 nm.

  16. Environment Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Viking landers touched down on Mars equipped with a variety of systems to conduct automated research, each carrying a compact but highly sophisticated instrument for analyzing Martian soil and atmosphere. Instrument called a Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) had to be small, lightweight, shock resistant, highly automated and extremely sensitive, yet require minimal electrical power. Viking Instruments Corporation commercialized this technology and targeted their primary market as environmental monitoring, especially toxic and hazardous waste site monitoring. Waste sites often contain chemicals in complex mixtures, and the conventional method of site characterization, taking samples on-site and sending them to a laboratory for analysis is time consuming and expensive. Other terrestrial applications are explosive detection in airports, drug detection, industrial air monitoring, medical metabolic monitoring and for military, chemical warfare agents.

  17. Ayurveda during Abbasid's period.

    PubMed

    Husain, S A; Subhaktha, P K

    2000-01-01

    This is a historical paper which deals with a brief account of Abbasid's period. In this article the existence of Ayurveda in Arab countries, arrival of Ayurvedic physicians to Baghdad, their eminence, authenticity and literary additions in medical field has been studied and presented. PMID:12578013

  18. Getting Your Period

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a woman to have a baby. During sexual intercourse, the egg can get fertilized by a male’s sperm and then attach to the lining of the uterus ( endometrium ) and grow into a baby. ( Read more about reproduction. ) Does your period come each month? top Menstrual ...

  19. Astrophysical implications of periodicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Two remarkable discoveries of the last decade have profound implications for astrophysics and for geophysics. These are the discovery by Alvarez et al., that certain mass extinctions are caused by the impact on the earth of a large asteroid or comet, and the discovery by Raup and Sepkoski that such extinctions are periodic, with a cycle time of 26 to 30 million years. The validity of both of these discoveries is assumed and the implications are examined. Most of the phenomena described depend not on periodicity, but just on the weaker assumption that the impacts on the earth take place primarily in showers. Proposed explanations for the periodicity include galactic oscillations, the Planet X model, and the possibility of Nemesis, a solar companion star. These hypotheses are critically examined. Results of the search for the solar companion are reported. The Deccan flood basalts of India have been proposed as the impact site for the Cretaceous impact, but this hypotheisis is in contradiction with the conclusion of Courtillot et al., that the magma flow began during a period of normal magnetic field. A possible resolution of this contradiction is proposed.

  20. Periods and Feynman integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Bogner, Christian; Weinzierl, Stefan

    2009-04-15

    We consider multiloop integrals in dimensional regularization and the corresponding Laurent series. We study the integral in the Euclidean region and where all ratios of invariants and masses have rational values. We prove that in this case all coefficients of the Laurent series are periods.

  1. Periodic Table of Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a periodic table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…

  2. A Modern Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrenden-Harker, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modern Periodic Table based on the electron distribution in the outermost shell and the order of filling of the sublevels within the shells. Enables a student to read off directly the electronic configuration of the element and the order in which filling occurs. (JRH)

  3. Scheduling: Seven Period Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Driven by stable or declining financial resources many school districts are considering the costs and benefits of a seven-period day. While there is limited evidence that any particular scheduling model has a greater impact on student learning than any other, it is clear that the school schedule is a tool that can significantly impact teacher…

  4. Oscillations following periodic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Tiago; Machado, Armando

    2009-06-01

    Three experiments examined behavior in extinction following periodic reinforcement. During the first phase of Experiment 1, four groups of pigeons were exposed to fixed interval (FI 16s or FI 48s) or variable interval (VI 16s or VI 48s) reinforcement schedules. Next, during the second phase, each session started with reinforcement trials and ended with an extinction segment. Experiment 2 was similar except that the extinction segment was considerably longer. Experiment 3 replaced the FI schedules with a peak procedure, with FI trials interspersed with non-food peak interval (PI) trials that were four times longer. One group of pigeons was exposed to FI 20s PI 80s trials, and another to FI 40s PI 160s trials. Results showed that, during the extinction segment, most pigeons trained with FI schedules, but not with VI schedules, displayed pause-peck oscillations with a period close to, but slightly greater than the FI parameter. These oscillations did not start immediately after the onset of extinction. Comparing the oscillations from Experiments 1 and 2 suggested that the alternation of reconditioning and re-extinction increases the reliability and earlier onset of the oscillations. In Experiment 3 the pigeons exhibited well-defined pause-peck cycles since the onset of extinction. These cycles had periods close to twice the value of the FI and lasted for long intervals of time. We discuss some hypotheses concerning the processes underlying behavioral oscillations following periodic reinforcement. PMID:18992793

  5. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreiro, J.E.; Arguelles, D.J.; Rams, H. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is reported in a Hispanic man with an unusual recurrence six weeks after radioactive iodine treatment. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis has now been well characterized in the literature: it occurs primarily in Orientals with an overwhelming male preponderance and a higher association of specific HLA antigens. Clinical manifestations include onset after high carbohydrate ingestion or heavy exertion, with progressive symmetric weakness leading to flaccid paralysis of the extremities and other muscle groups, lasting several hours. If hypokalemia is present, potassium administration may help abort the attack. Although propranolol can be efficacious in preventing further episodes, the only definitive treatment is establishing a euthyroid state. The pathophysiology is still controversial, but reflects altered potassium and calcium dynamics as well as certain morphologic characteristics within the muscle unit itself.

  6. Cells anticipate periodic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-01

    We show that an amoeboid organism can anticipate the timing of periodic events. The plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum moves rapidly under favourable conditions, but stops moving when transferred to less-favourable conditions. Plasmodia exposed to unfavourable conditions, presented in three consecutive pulses at constant intervals, reduced their locomotive speed in response to each episode. When subsequently subjected to favourable conditions, the plasmodia spontaneously reduced their locomotive speed at the time point when the next unfavourable episode would have occurred. This implied anticipation of impending environmental change. After this behaviour had been evoked several times, the locomotion of the plasmodia returned to normal; however, the anticipatory response could subsequently be induced by a single unfavourable pulse, implying recall of the memorized periodicity. We explored the mechanisms underlying these behaviours from a dynamical systems perspective. Our results hint at the cellular origins of primitive intelligence and imply that simple dynamics might be sufficient to explain its emergence.

  7. Periodic minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Alan L.

    1985-04-01

    A minimal surface is one for which, like a soap film with the same pressure on each side, the mean curvature is zero and, thus, is one where the two principal curvatures are equal and opposite at every point. For every closed circuit in the surface, the area is a minimum. Schwarz1 and Neovius2 showed that elements of such surfaces could be put together to give surfaces periodic in three dimensions. These periodic minimal surfaces are geometrical invariants, as are the regular polyhedra, but the former are curved. Minimal surfaces are appropriate for the description of various structures where internal surfaces are prominent and seek to adopt a minimum area or a zero mean curvature subject to their topology; thus they merit more complete numerical characterization. There seem to be at least 18 such surfaces3, with various symmetries and topologies, related to the crystallographic space groups. Recently, glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) was shown by Longley and McIntosh4 to take the shape of the F-surface. The structure postulated is shown here to be in good agreement with an analysis of the fundamental geometry of periodic minimal surfaces.

  8. Technical characteristics of current cardiotocographic monitors.

    PubMed

    Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Nogueira-Reis, Zilma

    2016-01-01

    Cardiotocographic (CTG) monitors are complex electronic devices developed to acquire, process and display foetal heart rate (FHR) and uterine contraction (UC) signals. This chapter describes the main characteristics of current CTG monitors, in order to allow a better understanding of the technology. An ultrasound transducer is used for the external monitoring of FHR signals, whereas a tocodynamometer is used for the external monitoring of UCs. These technologies are recommended for routine clinical use in both the antepartum and intrapartum periods. Foetal electrode and intrauterine pressure sensors provide internal monitoring of FHR and UC signals, respectively, which are more precise than external signals. They are only applicable during labour, after cervical dilatation and ruptured membranes, and they have established contraindications. The registration of foetal movements, simultaneous monitoring of twins and triplets, continuous maternal heart rate monitoring, monitoring of other maternal parameters, alarms, digital outputs and telemetry are other available characteristics in some CTG monitors. PMID:26206513

  9. Monitoring well

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  10. Recreation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    DiGennaro, B.; Merklein, G.H.

    1995-12-31

    Recreational use and recreational facilities are common features at hydropower projects. In fact, the hydropower industry is a major supplier of recreational opportunities contributing to tourism and rural economic growth in many communities across the country, As demands for public recreation have grown, pressure on the hydropower industry to provide more public access and more facilities has increased. This paper looks at recent developments in the FERC licensing and compliance arenas with regard to planning for and monitoring recreation at hydropower facilities. The paper highlights the increased occurrence of recreation monitoring requirements in license articles and discusses methods for complying with such requirements. The paper also looks at how monitoring data can be used to avoid unnecessary developments and to better plan for future recreation use.

  11. Patient monitoring.

    PubMed

    Morton, A

    1976-11-01

    Optimum results are obtained in the care of the critically ill patient if efforts are directed to maintaining the internal environment in a state as near normal as possible. This cannot be done without the use of basic monitoring procedures. Complex investigations may have a legitmate and necessary role as research tools. There is, however, a real risk of complex procedures becoming an end in themselves in general intensive therapy units, where they are apt to distract overworked nurses and medical attendants from the care of their patients. It is important, therfore, for clearcut indications for various monitoring procedures to be defined, and in this paper an attempt has been made to outline alogical approach to the monitoring of critically ill genral surgical patients admitted intensive therapy units. PMID:1071552

  12. Cost-effectiveness of monitoring free flaps.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Shiva; Sharp, David; Jardim, Christopher; Batstone, Martin D

    2016-06-01

    Methods of free flap monitoring have become more sophisticated and expensive. This study aims to determine the cost of free flap monitoring and examine its cost effectiveness. We examined a group of patients who had had free flaps to the head and neck over a two-year period, and combined these results with costs obtained from business managers and staff. There were 132 free flaps with a success rate of 99%. The cost of monitoring was Aus $193/flap. Clinical monitoring during this time period cost Aus$25 476 and did not lead to the salvage of any free flaps. Cost equivalence is reached between monitoring and not monitoring only at a failure rate of 15.8%. This is to our knowledge the first study to calculate the cost of clinical monitoring of free flaps, and to examine its cost-effectiveness. PMID:27015730

  13. Heat exchanger performance monitoring guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Stambaugh, N. ); Closser, W. Jr. ); Mollerus, F.J. )

    1991-12-01

    Fouling can occur in many heat exchanger applications in a way that impedes heat transfer and fluid flow and reduces the heat transfer or performance capability of the heat exchanger. Fouling may be significant for heat exchanger surfaces and flow paths in contact with plant service water. This report presents guidelines for performance monitoring of heat exchangers subject to fouling. Guidelines include selection of heat exchangers to monitor based on system function, safety function and system configuration. Five monitoring methods are discussed: the heat transfer, temperature monitoring, temperature effectiveness, delta P and periodic maintenance methods. Guidelines are included for selecting the appropriate monitoring methods and for implementing the selected methods. The report also includes a bibliography, example calculations, and technical notes applicable to the heat transfer method.

  14. 40 CFR 63.1334 - Parameter monitoring levels and excursions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-minute periods within the hour. For data compression systems approved under § 63.1335(g)(3), monitoring... not available for at least 75 percent of the 15-minute periods when batch emission episodes selected... number of 15-minute periods in the operating time used to determine if monitoring data are...

  15. 40 CFR 63.505 - Parameter monitoring levels and excursions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-minute periods within the hour. For data compression systems approved under § 63.506(g)(3), monitoring... percent of the 15-minute periods when batch emission episodes selected to be controlled are being vented... 15-minute periods in the operating time used to determine if monitoring data are insufficient, as...

  16. 40 CFR 63.505 - Parameter monitoring levels and excursions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-minute periods within the hour. For data compression systems approved under § 63.506(g)(3), monitoring... not available for at least 75 percent of the 15-minute periods when batch emission episodes selected... number of 15-minute periods in the operating time used to determine if monitoring data are...

  17. 40 CFR 63.505 - Parameter monitoring levels and excursions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-minute periods within the hour. For data compression systems approved under § 63.506(g)(3), monitoring... percent of the 15-minute periods when batch emission episodes selected to be controlled are being vented... 15-minute periods in the operating time used to determine if monitoring data are insufficient, as...

  18. 40 CFR 63.505 - Parameter monitoring levels and excursions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-minute periods within the hour. For data compression systems approved under § 63.506(g)(3), monitoring... percent of the 15-minute periods when batch emission episodes selected to be controlled are being vented... 15-minute periods in the operating time used to determine if monitoring data are insufficient, as...

  19. 40 CFR 63.1334 - Parameter monitoring levels and excursions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-minute periods within the hour. For data compression systems approved under § 63.1335(g)(3), monitoring... not available for at least 75 percent of the 15-minute periods when batch emission episodes selected... number of 15-minute periods in the operating time used to determine if monitoring data are...

  20. 40 CFR 63.505 - Parameter monitoring levels and excursions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-minute periods within the hour. For data compression systems approved under § 63.506(g)(3), monitoring... percent of the 15-minute periods when batch emission episodes selected to be controlled are being vented... 15-minute periods in the operating time used to determine if monitoring data are insufficient, as...

  1. Attention Reorients Periodically.

    PubMed

    Dugué, Laura; Roberts, Mariel; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-06-20

    Reorienting of voluntary attention enables the processing of stimuli at previously unattended locations. Although studies have identified a ventral fronto-parietal network underlying attention [1, 2], little is known about whether and how early visual areas are involved in involuntary [3, 4] and even less in voluntary [5] reorienting, and their temporal dynamics are unknown. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the occipital cortex to interfere with attentional reorienting and study its role and temporal dynamics in this process. Human observers performed an orientation discrimination task, with either valid or invalid attention cueing, across a range of stimulus contrasts. Valid cueing induced a behavioral response gain increase, higher asymptotic performance for attended than unattended locations. During subsequent TMS sessions, observers performed the same task, with high stimulus contrast. Based on phosphene mapping, TMS double pulses were applied at one of various delays to a consistent brain location in retinotopic areas (V1/V2), corresponding to the evoked signal of the target or distractor, in a valid or invalid trial. Thus, the stimulation was identical for the four experimental conditions (valid/invalid cue condition × target/distractor-stimulated). TMS modulation of the target and distractor were both periodic (5 Hz, theta) and out of phase with respect to each other in invalid trials only, when attention had to be disengaged from the distractor and reoriented to the target location. Reorientation of voluntary attention periodically involves V1/V2 at the theta frequency. These results suggest that TMS probes theta phase-reset by attentional reorienting and help link periodic sampling in time and attention reorienting in space. PMID:27265395

  2. Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica Nanorice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Paritosh; Landskron, Kai

    2009-02-01

    A periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) with nanorice morphology was successfully synthesized by a template assisted sol-gel method using a chain-type precursor. The PMO is composed of D and T sites in the ratio 1:2. The obtained mesoporous nanorice has a surface area of 753 m2 g-1, one-dimensional channels, and a narrow pore size distribution centered at 4.3 nm. The nanorice particles have a length of ca. 600 nm and width of ca. 200 nm.

  3. Controls on geyser periodicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Rojstaczer, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Geyser eruption frequency is not constant over time and has been shown to vary with small (???10-6) strains induced by seismic events, atmospheric loading, and Earth tides. The geyser system is approximated as a permeable conduit of intensely fractured rock surrounded by a less permeable rock matrix. Numerical simulation of this conceptual model yields a set of parameters that controls geyser existence and periodicity. Much of the responsiveness to remote seismicity and other small strains in the Earth can be explained in terms of variations in permeability and lateral recharge rates.

  4. Controls on geyser periodicity.

    PubMed

    Ingebritsen, S E; Rojstaczer, S A

    1993-11-01

    Geyser eruption frequency is not constant over time and has been shown to vary with small (periodicity. Much of the responsiveness to remote seismicity and other small strains in the Earth can be explained in terms of variations in permeability and lateral recharge rates. PMID:17757358

  5. Periodate oxidation of dextrans

    SciTech Connect

    Mirgorodskaya, O.A.; Poletaeva, L.V.

    1986-03-01

    The authors estimate the degree of oxidation of the thiol group in dextran with various mol. wt. and make an attempt at a kinetic description of the main parameters of the process. Polyglucin was used. The results are shown of experiments done on the estimation of the amount of products formed in the process of oxidation of polyglucin in which the reaction stopped as a result of complete exhaustion of one of the original reagents. To estimate the reactivity of the thiol group toward oxidation, the authors studied the interaction of potassium periodate with alpha-D-glucose, isolated by the monomer unit of dextran.

  6. Photometric Periods of Recent Southern Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Pagnotta, Ashley; Kafka, Stella

    2013-02-01

    We initiated a program to follow the temporal evolution of novae using the SMARTS facilities in 2003. Since then we have followed the evolution of the 68 galactic novae, resulting in the ``Stony Brook/SMARTS Atlas of mostly Southern Novae", a spectroscopic and photometric database. The next step is to undertake a systematic search for orbital periods. We propose here for a week of classical time on the 0.9m to search for photometric periods in the range of a few hours to a few days; we have identified two systems with periods of 1.1 and 5.2 hours. Our targets are recent novae visible in the A semester, mostly in the galactic center region. This complements our continuing longer-term SMARTS monitoring of these systems as they approach quiescence.

  7. Small Active Radiation Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.

    2004-01-01

    A device, named small active radiation monitor, allows on-orbit evaluations during periods of increased radiation, after extravehicular activities, or at predesignated times for crews on such long-duration space missions as on the International Space Station. It also permits direct evaluation of biological doses, a task now performed using a combination of measurements and potentially inaccurate simulations. Indeed the new monitor can measure a full array of radiation levels, from soft x-rays to hard galactic cosmic-ray particles. With refinement, it will benefit commercial (nuclear power-plant workers, airline pilots, medical technicians, physicians/dentists, and others) and military personnel as well as the astronauts for whom thermoluminescent dosimeters are inadequate. Civilian and military personnel have long since graduated from film badges to thermoluminescent dosimeters. Once used, most dosimeters must be returned to a central facility for processing, a step that can take days or even weeks. While this suffices for radiation workers for whom exposure levels are typically very low and of brief duration, it does not work for astronauts. Even in emergencies and using express mail, the results can often be delayed by as much as 24 hours. Electronic dosimeters, which are the size of electronic oral thermometers, and tattlers, small electronic dosimeters that sound an alarm when the dose/dose rate exceeds preset values, are also used but suffer disadvantages similar to those of thermoluminescent dosimeters. None of these devices fully answers the need of rapid monitoring during the space missions. Instead, radiation is monitored by passive detectors, which are read out after the missions. Unfortunately, these detectors measure only the absorbed dose and not the biologically relevant dose equivalent. The new monitor provides a real-time readout, a time history of radiation exposures (both absorbed dose and biologically relevant dose equivalent), and a count of the

  8. Are Mantle Plumes Periodic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampino, Michael R.; Prokoph, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    In the past few years, researchers have uncovered evidence that several kinds of geological and biological events seem to show regular cycles of similar lengths. For example, Rohde and Muller [2005] looked at the record of diversity of marine organisms over the past 540 million years and found evidence for two cycles in the data—a roughly 62-million-year cycle and a longer cycle of about 140 million years. This was followed by reports of an approximately 56-million-year cycle in long-term stratigraphic sequences in sedimentary basins [Meyers and Peters, 2011] and a 59-million-year period in the marine strontium-isotope record [Melott et al., 2012]. A similar period may even exist in atmospheric carbon dioxide over the past 542 million years of the Phanerozoic [Franks et al., 2012]. A cycle of about 140 million years was reported by Veizer et al. [2000] and Mayhew et al. [2008] in long-term fluctuations in global climate.

  9. Program Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Washington, DC.

    Program monitoring permits assessments to be made on a community-based program--its managerial and operational efficiency, its effectiveness, its acceptability by clients, and suitability to needs. It assists a program in defining objectives and developing and implementing quality care in an effective manner. This guide lists kinds of things…

  10. Monitoring well

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  11. Monitoring well

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    1999-01-01

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  12. Transition from non-periodic to periodic explosions.

    PubMed

    Cartes, Carlos; Descalzi, Orazio

    2015-12-13

    We show the existence of periodic exploding dissipative solitons. These non-chaotic explosions appear when higher-order nonlinear and dispersive effects are added to the complex cubic-quintic Ginzburg-Landau equation modelling soliton transmission lines. This counterintuitive phenomenon is the result of period-halving bifurcations leading to order (periodic explosions), followed by period-doubling bifurcations (or intermittency) leading to chaos (non-periodic explosions). PMID:26527807

  13. Sewage Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Every U.S. municipality must determine how much waste water it is processing and more importantly, how much is going unprocessed into lakes and streams either because of leaks in the sewer system or because the city's sewage facilities were getting more sewer flow than they were designed to handle. ADS Environmental Services, Inc.'s development of the Quadrascan Flow Monitoring System met the need for an accurate method of data collection. The system consists of a series of monitoring sensors and microcomputers that continually measure water depth at particular sewer locations and report their findings to a central computer. This provides precise information to city managers on overall flow, flow in any section of the city, location and severity of leaks and warnings of potential overload. The core technology has been expanded upon in terms of both technical improvements, and functionality for new applications, including event alarming and control for critical collection system management problems.

  14. Infrasonic Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, R.W.

    1995-09-11

    Infrasound signals are regular acoustic signals in that they are longitudinal pressure waves albeit at rather low frequency. Many researchers would place infrasound frequencies in the range of 0.1 to 10.0 Hertz, with corresponding wavelengths of 3,300 to 33 meters. As with most wave phenomena, absorption decreases with decreasing frequency and infrasound propagates well in the earth's atmosphere, with geometric loss dominating other losses. This makes infrasound useful in remote monitoring activity such as the CTBT International Monitoring System (IMS). Atmospheric explosions generate a wide spectrum of acoustic frequencies; those in the audible domain are absorbed in the atmosphere and do not propagate to large distance. Lower frequency components are also present, and these do propagate to great distance. As the yield of the explosion decreases, the acoustic energy is concentrated at higher frequency than that for higher yield sources.

  15. Tritium monitor

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1994-06-14

    A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

  16. Tritium monitor

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1994-01-01

    A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

  17. Selective monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homem-de-Mello, Luiz S.

    1992-04-01

    While in NASA's earlier space missions such as Voyager the number of sensors was in the hundreds, future platforms such as the Space Station Freedom will have tens of thousands sensors. For these planned missions it will be impossible to use the comprehensive monitoring strategy that was used in the past in which human operators monitored all sensors all the time. A selective monitoring strategy must be substituted for the current comprehensive strategy. This selective monitoring strategy uses computer tools to preprocess the incoming data and direct the operators' attention to the most critical parts of the physical system at any given time. There are several techniques that can be used to preprocess the incoming information. This paper presents an approach to using diagnostic reasoning techniques to preprocess the sensor data and detect which parts of the physical system require more attention because components have failed or are most likely to have failed. Given the sensor readings and a model of the physical system, a number of assertions are generated and expressed as Boolean equations. The resulting system of Boolean equations is solved symbolically. Using a priori probabilities of component failure and Bayes' rule, revised probabilities of failure can be computed. These will indicate what components have failed or are the most likely to have failed. This approach is suitable for systems that are well understood and for which the correctness of the assertions can be guaranteed. Also, the system must be such that assertions can be made from instantaneous measurements. And the system must be such that changes are slow enough to allow the computation.

  18. Monitoring oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2011-06-01

    Cyanosis was used for a century after dentists began pulling teeth under 100% N(2)O in 1844 because brief (2 min) severe hypoxia is harmless. Deaths came with curare and potent anesthetic respiratory arrest. Leland Clark's invention of a polarographic blood oxygen tension electrode (1954) was introduced for transcutaneous PO2 monitoring to adjust PEEP and CPAP PO2 to prevent premature infant blindness from excess O2 (1972). Oximetry for warning military aviators was tried after WW II but not used for routine monitoring until Takuo Aoyagi (1973) discovered an equation to measure SaO2 by the ratio of ratios of red and IR light transmitted through tissue as it changed with arterial pulses. Pulse oximetry (1982) depended on simultaneous technology improvements of light emitting red and IR diodes, tiny cheap solid state sensors and micro-chip computers. Continuous monitoring of airway anesthetic concentration and oxygen also became very common after 1980. Death from anesthesia fell 10 fold between 1985 and 2000 as pulse oximetry became universally used, but no proof of a causative relationship to pulse oximetry exists. It is now assumed that all anesthesiologist became much more aware of the dangers of prolonged hypoxia, perhaps by using the pulse oximeters. PMID:21717228

  19. Patient Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In photo above, the electrocardiogram of a hospitalized patient is being transmitted by telemetry. Widely employed in space operations, telemetry is a process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where the signals are reconverted to usable information. In this instance, heart readings are picked up by the electrode attached to the patient's body and delivered by wire to the small box shown, which is a telemetry transmitter. The signals are relayed wirelessly to the console in the background, which converts them to EKG data. The data is displayed visually and recorded on a printout; at the same time, it is transmitted to a central control station (upper photo) where a nurse can monitor the condition of several patients simultaneously. The Patient Monitoring System was developed by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, in conjunction with Abbott Medical Electronics, Houston, Texas. In developing the system, SCI drew upon its extensive experience as a NASA contractor. The company applied telemetry technology developed for the Saturn launch vehicle and the Apollo spacecraft; instrumentation technology developed for heart, blood pressure and sleep monitoring of astronauts aboard NASA's Skylab long duration space station; and communications technology developed for the Space Shuttle.

  20. EVALUATION OF DIOXIN EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous samplers and real or semi-real-time continuous monitors for polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and furans provide significant advantages relative to conventional methods of extractive sampling. Continuous samplers collect long term samples over a time period of days to wee...

  1. Quarterly seismic monitoring report 96B

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P.

    1996-06-12

    This report summarizes the location, magnitude, and other pertinent information on earthquakes recorded on and near the Hanford Site by Westinghouse Seismic Monitoring during the period encompassing January 1, 1996 to March 31, 1996.

  2. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, George W.; Kern, Jr., Edward C.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer.

  3. DC current monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canter, Stanley (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A non-intrusive DC current monitor is presented which emulates the theoretical operation of an AC transformer. A conductor, carrying the current to be measured, acts as the primary of a DC current transformer. This current is passed through the center of a secondary coil, and core positioned thereabout, and produces a magnetic flux which induces a current in the secondary proportional to the current flowing in the primary. Means are provided to periodically reset the transformer core such that the measurement inaccuracies associated with core saturation are obviated. A reset current is caused to periodically flow through the secondary coil which produces a magnetic flux oppositely polarized to the flux created by the current in the primary, thus allowing ongoing measurements to be made.

  4. Periodically oscillating plasma sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar

    2005-05-15

    The periodically oscillating plasma sphere, or POPS, is a novel fusion concept first proposed by D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel [Fusion Technol. 38, 28 (1998)]. POPS utilizes the self-similar collapse of an oscillating ion cloud in a spherical harmonic oscillator potential well formed by electron injection. Once the ions have been phase-locked, their coherent motion simultaneously produces very high densities and temperatures during the collapse phase of the oscillation. A requirement for POPS is that the electron injection produces a stable harmonic oscillator potential. This has been demonstrated in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device and verified by particle simulation. Also, the POPS oscillation has been confirmed experimentally through observation that the ions in the potential well exhibit resonance behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the observed POPS frequencies and the theoretical predictions has been observed for a wide range of potential well depths and three different ion species. Practical applications of POPS require large plasma compressions. These large compressions have been observed in particle simulations, although space charge neutralization remains a major issue.

  5. Sleep Monitoring Experiment - Skylab Experiment M133

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This 1970 photograph shows equipment for the Skylab's Sleep Monitoring Experiment (M133), a medical evaluation designed to objectively determine the amount and quality of crewmembers' inflight sleep. The experiment monitored and recorded electroencephalographic (EEG) and electrooculographic (EOG) activity during astronauts' sleep periods. One of the astronauts was selected for this experiment and wore a fitted cap during his sleep periods. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  6. Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 2003-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Onjukka, Sam T.; O'Connor, Glenda M.; Gibbs, Derek

    2007-01-01

    Fish health work continued in this report period as described in the project statement of work. The statements of work for this time period list the work element (Maintain Fish Health - Monitor Fish Health) and description of deliverables.

  7. 40 CFR 433.12 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to be included as a “comment” on the Discharge Monitoring Report required by 40 CFR 122.44(i), formerly 40 CFR 122.62(i). For indirect dischargers, the statement is to be included as a comment to the periodic reports required by 40 CFR 403.12(e). If monitoring is necessary to measure compliance with...

  8. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Furnaces Constructed After October 21, 1974, and On or Before August 17, 1983 § 60.273 Emission monitoring... when the furnace is operating in the melting and refining period. All visible emissions observations... furnace static pressure monitoring device is not required on any EAF equipped with a DEC system...

  9. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Furnaces Constructed After October 21, 1974, and On or Before August 17, 1983 § 60.273 Emission monitoring... when the furnace is operating in the melting and refining period. All visible emissions observations... furnace static pressure monitoring device is not required on any EAF equipped with a DEC system...

  10. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Furnaces Constructed After October 21, 1974, and On or Before August 17, 1983 § 60.273 Emission monitoring... when the furnace is operating in the melting and refining period. All visible emissions observations... furnace static pressure monitoring device is not required on any EAF equipped with a DEC system...

  11. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Furnaces Constructed After October 21, 1974, and On or Before August 17, 1983 § 60.273 Emission monitoring... when the furnace is operating in the melting and refining period. All visible emissions observations... furnace static pressure monitoring device is not required on any EAF equipped with a DEC system...

  12. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Furnaces Constructed After October 21, 1974, and On or Before August 17, 1983 § 60.273 Emission monitoring... when the furnace is operating in the melting and refining period. All visible emissions observations... furnace static pressure monitoring device is not required on any EAF equipped with a DEC system...

  13. 40 CFR 433.12 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to be included as a “comment” on the Discharge Monitoring Report required by 40 CFR 122.44(i), formerly 40 CFR 122.62(i). For indirect dischargers, the statement is to be included as a comment to the periodic reports required by 40 CFR 403.12(e). If monitoring is necessary to measure compliance with...

  14. 7 CFR 771.14 - Loan monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loan monitoring. 771.14 Section 771.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS BOLL WEEVIL ERADICATION LOAN PROGRAM § 771.14 Loan monitoring. (a) Annual and periodic reviews. At least annually, the borrower...

  15. Therapeutic Effectiveness of Setting and Monitoring Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Russell R.

    1978-01-01

    Evaluated therapeutic effectiveness of setting goals in behavioral terms while monitoring subject's progress in attaining these goals. Greater beneficial changes in patient attainment of goals were effected using a structured patient-therapist collaboration on weekly goals. Results indicate the goal attainment model with periodic monitoring is…

  16. 40 CFR 141.623 - Reduced monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... treatment, must be ≤4.0 mg/L at each treatment plant treating surface water or ground water under the direct...). Source water type Population size category Monitoringfrequency 1 Distribution system monitoring location per monitoring period Subpart H: 4.0 mg/L at any treatment plant treating surface water or...

  17. 40 CFR 141.623 - Reduced monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... treatment, must be ≤4.0 mg/L at each treatment plant treating surface water or ground water under the direct...). Source water type Population size category Monitoringfrequency 1 Distribution system monitoring location per monitoring period Subpart H: 4.0 mg/L at any treatment plant treating surface water or...

  18. 40 CFR 141.623 - Reduced monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... treatment, must be ≤4.0 mg/L at each treatment plant treating surface water or ground water under the direct...). Source water type Population size category Monitoringfrequency 1 Distribution system monitoring location per monitoring period Subpart H: 4.0 mg/L at any treatment plant treating surface water or...

  19. 40 CFR 141.623 - Reduced monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... treatment, must be ≤4.0 mg/L at each treatment plant treating surface water or ground water under the direct...). Source water type Population size category Monitoringfrequency 1 Distribution system monitoring location per monitoring period Subpart H: 4.0 mg/L at any treatment plant treating surface water or...

  20. 40 CFR 433.12 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... statement is to be included as a “comment” on the Discharge Monitoring Report required by 40 CFR 122.44(i), formerly 40 CFR 122.62(i). For indirect dischargers, the statement is to be included as a comment to the periodic reports required by 40 CFR 403.12(e). If monitoring is necessary to measure compliance with...

  1. 45 CFR 98.90 - Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Non-compliance and Complaints § 98.90 Monitoring. (a) The Secretary will monitor programs funded under... implementing regulations, the Secretary will issue a preliminary notice to the Lead Agency of possible non... period. (2) If any litigation, claim, negotiation, audit, disallowance action, or other action...

  2. 40 CFR 433.12 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... statement is to be included as a “comment” on the Discharge Monitoring Report required by 40 CFR 122.44(i), formerly 40 CFR 122.62(i). For indirect dischargers, the statement is to be included as a comment to the periodic reports required by 40 CFR 403.12(e). If monitoring is necessary to measure compliance with...

  3. Ammonia Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Akse, James R. (Inventor); Thompson, John O. (Inventor); Atwater, James E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia monitor and method of use are disclosed. A continuous, real-time determination of the concentration of ammonia in an aqueous process stream is possible over a wide dynamic range of concentrations. No reagents are required because pH is controlled by an in-line solid-phase base. Ammonia is selectively transported across a membrane from the process stream to an analytical stream to an analytical stream under pH control. The specific electrical conductance of the analytical stream is measured and used to determine the concentration of ammonia.

  4. Period variations in SZ ARIETIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, R. K.

    1990-06-01

    Results are presented of a detailed period study of the eclipsing binary system SZ Arietis, based on up-to-date collection of minima. A new period (P = 1.7175405 d) of the SZ Ari was found, and the period changes (with the new period) in different portions of the O-C diagram were estimated. The average period change (leaving out an unusual value) was estimated to be about 0.00006 d. The O-C diagram displayed a sinusoidal variation, indicating that the SZ Ari system may be a three-body system, having a period of nearly 66 years.

  5. Monitoring spatial maxima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogerson, Peter

    2005-05-01

    When assessing maps consisting of comparable regional values, it is of interest to know whether the peak, or maximum value, is higher than it would likely be by chance alone. Peaks on maps of crime or disease might be attributable to random fluctuation, or they might be due to an important deviation from the baseline process that produces the regional values. This paper addresses the situation where a series of such maps are observed over time, and it is of interest to detect statistically significant deviations between the observed and expected peaks as quickly as possible. The Gumbel distribution is used as a model for the statistical distribution of extreme values; this distribution does not require the underlying distributions of regional values to be either normal, known, or identical. Cumulative sum surveillance methods are used to monitor these Gumbel variates, and these methods are also extended for use when monitoring smoothed regional values (where the quantity monitored is a weighted sum of values in the immediate geographical neighborhood). The new methods are illustrated by using data on breast cancer mortality for the 217 counties of the northeastern United States, and prostate cancer mortality for the entire United States, during the period 1968-1998.

  6. Doubly Resonant Optical Periodic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Alagappan, G.; Png, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Periodic structures are well known in various branches of physics for their ability to provide a stopband. In this article, using optical periodic structures we showed that, when a second periodicity – very closed to the original periodicity is introduced, large number of states appears in the stopband corresponding to the first periodicity. In the limit where the two periods matches, we have a continuum of states, and the original stopband completely disappears. This intriguing phenomena is uncovered by noticing that, regardless of the proximities of the two periodicities, there is an array of spatial points where the dielectric functions corresponding to the two periodicities interfere destructively. These spatial points mimic photonic atoms by satisfying the standards equations of quantum harmonic oscillators, and exhibit lossless, atom-like dispersions. PMID:26853945

  7. The redoubtable ecological periodic table

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological periodic tables are repositories of reliable information on quantitative, predictably recurring (periodic) habitat–community patterns and their uncertainty, scaling and transferability. Their reliability derives from their grounding in sound ecological principle...

  8. Doubly Resonant Optical Periodic Structure.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, G; Png, C E

    2016-01-01

    Periodic structures are well known in various branches of physics for their ability to provide a stopband. In this article, using optical periodic structures we showed that, when a second periodicity - very closed to the original periodicity is introduced, large number of states appears in the stopband corresponding to the first periodicity. In the limit where the two periods matches, we have a continuum of states, and the original stopband completely disappears. This intriguing phenomena is uncovered by noticing that, regardless of the proximities of the two periodicities, there is an array of spatial points where the dielectric functions corresponding to the two periodicities interfere destructively. These spatial points mimic photonic atoms by satisfying the standards equations of quantum harmonic oscillators, and exhibit lossless, atom-like dispersions. PMID:26853945

  9. 76 FR 8325 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... certain temporary waivers from periodic reporting of service performance measurement. Establishing this...). SUPPLEMENTARY HISTORY: On February 3, 2011, the Postal Service filed a request for temporary waivers from periodic reporting of service performance measurement for various market dominant postal services,...

  10. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Share this page: Was this page ... Monitored Drugs | Common Questions | Related Pages What is therapeutic drug monitoring? Therapeutic drug monitoring is the measurement ...

  11. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  12. Betelgeuse Period Analysis Using VSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, F.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) Betelgeuse was studied using the VSTAR software package and analysis of the observations in the AAVSO database. Period analysis derived a period of 376 days, in comparison with literature periods of 420 days using satellite UV data but significantly different from the VSX period of 2,335 days. The unique set of PEP observations of this star is also shown and advantage of PEP Johnson V observations is shown in comparison with the visual observations.

  13. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR COLLECTION OF FIXED SITE INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR SAMPLES FOR PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-2.12)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP describes the procedures to set up, calibrate, initiate and terminate air sampling for persistent organic pollutants. This method is used to sample air, indoors and outdoors, at homes and at day care centers over a 48-hr period.

  14. Traffic Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mestech's X-15 "Eye in the Sky," a traffic monitoring system, incorporates NASA imaging and robotic vision technology. A camera or "sensor box" is mounted in a housing. The sensor detects vehicles approaching an intersection and sends the information to a computer, which controls the traffic light according to the traffic rate. Jet Propulsion Laboratory technical support packages aided in the company's development of the system. The X-15's "smart highway" can also be used to count vehicles on a highway and compute the number in each lane and their speeds, important information for freeway control engineers. Additional applications are in airport and railroad operations. The system is intended to replace loop-type traffic detectors.

  15. Process Monitor

    2003-12-01

    This library is used to get process information (eg memory and timing). By setting an environment variable, the runtime system loads libprocmon.so while loading your executable. This library causes the SIGPROF signal to be triggered at time intervals. The procmon signal handler calls various system routines (eg clock_gettime, malinfo, getrusage, and ioctl {accessing the /proc filesystem}) to gather information about the process. The information is then printed to a file which can be viewed graphicallymore » via procmon_plot.pl. This information is obtained via a sampling approach. As with any sampling approach, the information it gathers will not be completely accurate. For example, if you are looking at memory high-water mark the memory allocation and freeing could have occurred between samples and thus would not be "seen" by this program. See "Usage" below for environment variables that affect this monitor (eg time between sampling).« less

  16. Periodic optical variability of radio-detected ultracool dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. K.; Golden, A.; Singh, Navtej; Sheehan, B.; Butler, R. F.; Hallinan, G.; Boyle, R. P.; Zavala, R. T.

    2013-12-20

    A fraction of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs are known to be radio active, in some cases producing periodic pulses. Extensive studies of two such objects have also revealed optical periodic variability, and the nature of this variability remains unclear. Here, we report on multi-epoch optical photometric monitoring of six radio-detected dwarfs, spanning the ∼M8-L3.5 spectral range, conducted to investigate the ubiquity of periodic optical variability in radio-detected ultracool dwarfs. This survey is the most sensitive ground-based study carried out to date in search of periodic optical variability from late-type dwarfs, where we obtained 250 hr of monitoring, delivering photometric precision as low as ∼0.15%. Five of the six targets exhibit clear periodicity, in all cases likely associated with the rotation period of the dwarf, with a marginal detection found for the sixth. Our data points to a likely association between radio and optical periodic variability in late-M/early-L dwarfs, although the underlying physical cause of this correlation remains unclear. In one case, we have multiple epochs of monitoring of the archetype of pulsing radio dwarfs, the M9 TVLM 513–46546, spanning a period of 5 yr, which is sufficiently stable in phase to allow us to establish a period of 1.95958 ± 0.00005 hr. This phase stability may be associated with a large-scale stable magnetic field, further strengthening the correlation between radio activity and periodic optical variability. Finally, we find a tentative spin-orbit alignment of one component of the very low mass binary, LP 349–25.

  17. Biological monitoring of airborne pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ditz, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Common plants such as grasses, mosses, and even goldenrod may turn out to have a new high-tech role as monitors of airborne pollution from solid waste incinerators. Certain plants that respond to specific pollutants can provide continuous surveillance of air quality over long periods of time: they are bio-indicators. Other species accumulate pollutants and can serve as sensitive indicators of pollutants and of food-chain contamination: they are bio-accumulators. Through creative use of these properties, biological monitoring can provide information that cannot be obtained by current methods such as stack testing.

  18. Food contamination monitoring in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Capak, K; Katalenić, M; Barisin, A

    2001-06-01

    The Croatian National Institute of Public Health Implements the statistical food safety monitoring programme for foods marketed in Croatia in accordance with effective laws and regulations. Laboratories for food safety control, certified by the Ministry of Health, report their findings in quarterly notifications, using the standard forms and issue statements of compliance or non-compliance with current regulations, specifying the cause in case of the latter. This paper brings the results for the period 1993-99 as an illustration of the monitoring programme. PMID:11370304

  19. Monitoring Physiological Variables with Membrane Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janle, Elsa M.

    1997-01-01

    This project has demonstrated the possibility of using membrane probes in rodents to monitor physiological variables for extended periods of time. The utility of these probes in physiological studies of microgravity has been demonstrated. The feasibility of developing on-line sensors has also been demonstrated and allows for the possibility of developing real-time automated monitoring systems which can be used in ground-base physiological research as well as in research and medical monitoring in space. In addition to space applications these techniques can be extended to medical monitoring in critical care situations on earth as well as facilitating research in many human and animal diseases.

  20. Large minimal period orbits of periodic autonomous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Juan; Tarallo, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    We prove the existence of periodic orbits with minimal period greater than any prescribed number for a natural Lagrangian autonomous system in several variables that is analytic and periodic in each variable and whose potential is nonconstant. Work supported by Acción Integrada Italia-España HI2000-0112, Azione Integrata Italia-Spagna IT-117, MCYT BFM2002-01308, Spain.

  1. Positive periodic solutions of delayed periodic Lotka-Volterra systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei; Chen, Tianping

    2005-01-01

    In this Letter, for a general class of delayed periodic Lotka-Volterra systems, we prove some new results on the existence of positive periodic solutions by Schauder's fixed point theorem. The global asymptotical stability of positive periodic solutions is discussed further, and conditions for exponential convergence are given. The conditions we obtained are weaker than the previously known ones and can be easily reduced to several special cases.

  2. Magnetospheric Periodicities at Saturn Equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbary, J. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Roelof, E.; Paranicas, C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.; Hamilton, D. C.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    For several years before equinox, the energetic charged and neutral particles in Saturn’s magnetosphere displayed strong periodicities near 10.8 hours, the same period observed in radio emissions and magnetic fields. These particle periodicities have now been observed at equinox in electrons, protons, oxygen ions, and neutral hydrogen and oxygen atoms at all energies greater than ~3 keV, the lowest energies measured by the Magnetospheric IMaging Instrument (MIMI) on the Cassini spacecraft. The equinoctial electrons exhibit a very strong period at 10.72 hours, while the protons have essentially no periodicity at all. Water group ions display a notable period at 10.73 hours. Both the electrons and the ions have curious overtones in their spectral structure that may be related to solar wind modulation. The energetic neutral hydrogen and oxygen atoms have strong periods of 10.79 hours at equinox. Within the uncertainties of the measurements, the ENA periods are slightly longer than the charged particle periods, although they cover a somewhat different time interval. For comparison, the Cassini magnetometer observed periodicities in Saturn’s magnetic field of 10.65 hours during the same equinoctial interval. These observations will be interpreted in terms of a wavy magnetodisk model.

  3. Self-Monitoring in Middle Childhood: Personality and Social Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musser, Lynn M.; Browne, Beverly A.

    1991-01-01

    Measures of self-monitoring and other measures were completed by 93 elementary school children on 3 occasions during a 15-month period. Self-monitoring was related to peer acceptance and self-esteem, but the relation may have been influenced by gender. Boys' self-monitoring correlated with popularity measures, whereas girls' did not. (BC)

  4. 40 CFR 31.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program... Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible...

  5. 29 CFR 97.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 97.40 Section... Enforcement § 97.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees...

  6. 40 CFR 31.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program... Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible...

  7. 32 CFR 33.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 33... Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible...

  8. 24 CFR 85.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program..., Retention, and Enforcement § 85.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by...

  9. 7 CFR 3016.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 3016.40... Enforcement § 3016.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees...

  10. 32 CFR 33.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 33... Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible...

  11. 38 CFR 43.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting... Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give...

  16. From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besalú, Emili

    2013-01-01

    A periodic table is constructed from the consideration of periodic properties and the application of the principal components analysis technique. This procedure is useful for objects classification and data reduction and has been used in the field of chemistry for many applications, such as lanthanides, molecules, or conformers classification.…

  17. On the Period-Amplitude and Amplitude-Period Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Examined are Period-Amplitude and Amplitude-Period relationships based on the cyclic behavior of the 12-month moving averages of monthly mean sunspot numbers for cycles 0.23, both in terms of Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 contingency tables and linear regression analyses. Concerning the Period-Amplitude relationship (same cycle), because cycle 23's maximum amplitude is known to be 120.8, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) suggest that its period will be 131 +/- 24 months (using all cycles) or 131 +/- 18 months (ignoring cycles 2 and 4, which have the extremes of period, 108 and 164 months, respectively). Because cycle 23 has already persisted for 142 months (May 1996 through February 2008), based on the latter prediction, it should end before September 2008. Concerning the Amplitude-Period relationship (following cycle maximum amplitude versus preceding cycle period), because cycle 23's period is known to be at least 142 months, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) suggest that cycle 24's maximum amplitude will be about less than or equal to 96.1 +/- 55.0 (using all cycle pairs) or less than or equal to 91.0 +/- 36.7 (ignoring statistical outlier cycle pairs). Hence, cycle 24's maximum amplitude is expected to be less than 151, perhaps even less than 128, unless cycle pair 23/24 proves to be a statistical outlier.

  18. Scaling limits of periodic monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to explore the structure of singly periodic monopoles for different values of the size to period ratio. The transition between a chain of small monopoles and the approximately two dimensional chain of large monopoles takes us through a region with an unintuitive dependence on the periodic direction. The focus is mainly on the smooth SU(2) monopole of charge 2.

  19. Re-engineering the College Library for Periodicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widdicombe, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Two strategies used by the Stevens Institute of Technology (New Jersey) library to manage acquisition of periodicals are described. The first involved a study of circulation of existing titles to pare unused subscriptions, and a concurrent monitoring of faculty research productivity. The second was a shift in resources to electronic media and…

  20. Changing Periods of ST Puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S.; Butterworth, N.; Pearce, A.

    2015-12-01

    ST Puppis is a reasonably bright W Virginis variable star, a Type 2 Cepheid with a record of substantial and erratic period changes—21 during the interval 1900 to 1985 with a range of magnitude from 17.4 to 19.2. It was observed as part of Variable Stars South's Cepheid project by Butterworth in 2014 and 2015 using DSLR photometry in BGR passbands and visually by Pearce in 2015. The known period changes are shown graphically and doubtful ones examined and discarded if necessary. With its period and amplitude with a frequently changing period it is a suitable and worthwhile object for visual observing.

  1. Periodic photospheric and chromospheric modulation in Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Baliunas, S. L.; Hartmann, L.; Nassiopoulos, G. E.; Guinan, E. F.; Sonneborn, G.

    1987-01-01

    The bright cool supergiant Alpha Orionis has been monitored spectroscopically and photometrically over the past three years (1984-1986) in the optical and the ultraviolet wavelength regions. A 420-day periodic modulation of the flux is observed in the optical and ultaviolet continua, and in the Mg II line emission cores. Periodic photospheric pulsations are the most likely explanation of these observations. This identification is based on the large amplitude of the variation, the correlation of the continuum and chromospheric fluxes, and the length of the observed period. Pulsation may heat and extend the atmosphere of Alpha Ori and initiate the mass flow from the star.

  2. Cylinder monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Alderson, J.H.

    1991-12-31

    Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in storage at the Department of Energy (DOE) gaseous diffusion plants, managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are being evaluated to determine their expected storage life. Cylinders evaluated recently have been in storage service for 30 to 40 years. In the present environment, the remaining life for these storage cylinders is estimated to be 30 years or greater. The group of cylinders involved in recent tests will continue to be monitored on a periodic basis, and other storage cylinders will be observed as on a statistical sample population. The program has been extended to all types of large capacity UF{sub 6} cylinders.

  3. Electroencephalographic Monitoring of Cognitive Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Leslie D.; Montgomery, Richard W.; Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Luna, Bernadette

    2000-01-01

    Mental exhaustion often poses a serious risk, even when performance is not apparently degraded. When such fatigue is associated with sustained performance of a single type of cognitive task it may be related to the metabolic energy required for sustained activation of cortical fields specialized for that task. The objective of this study was to adapt EEG to monitor cortical energy dissipation at a functionally specialized site over a long period of repetitive performance of a cognitive task.

  4. Fuel processor temperature monitoring and control

    DOEpatents

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2002-01-01

    In one embodiment, the method of the invention monitors one or more of the following conditions: a relatively low temperature value of the gas stream; a relatively high temperature value of the gas stream; and a rate-of-change of monitored temperature. In a preferred embodiment, the rate of temperature change is monitored to prevent the occurrence of an unacceptably high or low temperature condition. Here, at least two temperatures of the recirculating gas stream are monitored over a period of time. The rate-of-change of temperature versus time is determined. Then the monitored rate-of-change of temperature is compared to a preselected rate-of-change of value. The monitoring of rate-of-change of temperature provides proactive means for preventing occurrence of an unacceptably high temperature in the catalytic reactor.

  5. Quasi-periodicity in relative quasi-periodic tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassò, Francesco; García-Naranjo, Luis C.; Giacobbe, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    At variance from the cases of relative equilibria and relative periodic orbits of dynamical systems with symmetry, the dynamics in relative quasi-periodic tori (namely, subsets of the phase space that project to an invariant torus of the reduced system on which the flow is quasi-periodic) is not yet completely understood. Even in the simplest situation of a free action of a compact and abelian connected group, the dynamics in a relative quasi-periodic torus is not necessarily quasi-periodic. It is known that quasi-periodicity of the unreduced dynamics is related to the reducibility of the reconstruction equation, and sufficient conditions for it are virtually known only in a perturbation context. We provide a different, though equivalent, approach to this subject, based on the hypothesis of the existence of commuting, group-invariant lifts of a set of generators of the reduced torus. Under this hypothesis, which is shown to be equivalent to the reducibility of the reconstruction equation, we give a complete description of the structure of the relative quasi-periodic torus, which is a principal torus bundle whose fibers are tori of a dimension which exceeds that of the reduced torus by at most the rank of the group. The construction can always be done in such a way that these tori have minimal dimension and carry ergodic flow.

  6. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  7. TOLEX-ADCP monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanawa, Kimio; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Taneda, Takeshi

    Since February 1991, the Physical Oceanography Group, Tohoku University has conducted a program to monitor the oceanic current field across the Kuroshio over the Izu Ridge, south of Japan, using the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) system installed on the ferry Ogasawara Maru. This ferry shuttles 58 times in a usual year between Tokyo and Chichijima in the Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands. This ADCP monitoring is regarded as one component of the Tokyo-Ogasawara Line Experiment (TOLEX). In this paper, we will briefly describe our ADCP system and data processing procedures, and will present several aspects of the current fields using the data obtained through January 1996. During the period, the Kuroshio took the bimodal paths of 34°N and 32°30‧N as mean positions on the ship course. In the sea south of the Kuroshio, many cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies with a scale of 200-400 km in diameter were observed with passing time of two-four months.

  8. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, J.E.

    1988-03-31

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

  9. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, James E.

    1989-01-01

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

  10. Final cook temperature monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, John; Matthews, Michael; Glasco, Marc

    2006-04-01

    Fully cooked, ready-to-eat products represent one of the fastest growing markets in the meat and poultry industries. Modern meat cooking facilities typically cook chicken strips and nuggets at rates of 6000 lbs per hour, and it is a critical food safety issue to ensure the products on these lines are indeed fully cooked. Common practice now employs oven technicians to constantly measure final cook temperature with insertion-type thermocouple probes. Prior research has demonstrated that thermal imagery of chicken breasts and other products can be used to predict core temperature of products leaving an oven. In practice, implementation of a system to monitor core temperature can be difficult for several reasons. First, a wide variety of products are typically produced on the same production line and the system must adapt to all products. Second, the products can be often hard to find because they often leave the process in random order and may be touching or even overlapping. Another issue is finite measurement time which is typically only a few seconds. Finally, the system is subjected to a rigorous sanitation cycle and must hold up under wash down conditions. To address these problems, a calibrated 320x240 micro-bolometer camera was used to monitor the temperature of formed, breaded poultry products on a fully cooked production line for a period of one year. The study addressed the installation and operation of the system as well as the development of algorithms used to identify the product on a cluttered conveyor belt. It also compared the oven tech insertion probe measurements to the non-contact monitoring system performance.

  11. Current North American Indian Periodicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blew, Carol Van Antwerp Holliday; And Others

    Approximately 150 newsletters, newspapers, and other periodicals are cited in this bibliography of current sources of information about or directed toward North American Indians. One-sentence descriptions of content, ordering information, and frequency of publication are provided. The majority of the periodicals cited emphasize current events of…

  12. 75 FR 39200 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Counsel, at stephen.sharfman@prc.gov or 202-789-6820. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Regulatory History, 75 FR... a proposed change in certain analytical methods used in periodic reporting. This action responds to... rulemaking proceeding to consider a change in the analytical methods approved for use in periodic...

  13. 76 FR 296 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... consider a proposed change in certain analytical methods used in periodic reporting. The proposed change... rulemaking proceeding to consider changes in the analytical methods approved for use in periodic reporting.\\1... Requesting Initiation of a Proceeding to Consider Proposed Changes in Analytic Principles (Proposals...

  14. Testing for periodicity of extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, David M.; Sepkoski, J. J., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The statistical techniques used by Raup and Sepkoski (1984 and 1986) to identify a 26-Myr periodicity in the biological extinction record for the past 250 Myr are reexamined, responding in detail to the criticisms of Stigler and Wagner (1987). It is argued that evaluation of a much larger set of extinction data using a time scale with 51 sampling intervals supports the finding of periodicity. In a reply by Sigler and Wagner, the preference for a 26-Myr period is attributed to a numerical quirk in the Harland et al. (1982) time scale, in which the subinterval boundaries are not linear interpolations between the stage boundaries but have 25-Myr periodicity. It is stressed that the results of the stringent statistical tests imposed do not disprove periodicity but rather indicate that the evidence and analyses presented so far are inadequate.

  15. Schuler Period in LEO Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Russell J.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2004-01-01

    This paper generalizes and extends the concept of the Schuler oscillation that occurs in the theory of inertial navigation systems, allowing one to see how the Schuler phenomenon affects inertial navigation systems operating in space. We show why a low earth orbit satellite's orbital period is identical to the period of the Schuler pendulum, which is the period of the errors for terrestrial inertial navigation systems. We also show that the generalized form of the Schuler oscillation takes the same form as the Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations for satellite relative motion and that the period of the out-of-plane motion in neighboring satellite relative trajectories is the same as the Schuler period. Finally, we describe how INS gyro drift manifests itself in different coordinate systems for the orbital case. These results may assist orbital flight dynamics and attitude control systems engineers in the design and analysis of INS-equipped spacecraft

  16. Rationalization of Comet Halley's periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belton, M. J. S.

    1990-07-01

    The sense of long axis orientation of Comet Halley during the Vega 1 encounter must be reversed from that deduced by Sagdeev et al. (1986) in order to harmonize the comet nucleus' Vega/Giotto-observed orientations with periodicities extracted from time-series brightness data. It is also demonstrated that Vega/Giotto observations can be satisfied by either a 2.2- or 3.7-day long-axis free precession period. A novel Fourier algorithm is used to reanalyze five independent data sets; strong evidence is adduced for periods harmonically related to a 7.4-day period. The preferred candidate models for Halley's nuclear rotation are characterized by a long-axis precession period of 3.7 days.

  17. LYRA Mid-Term Periodicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauters, L.; Dominique, M.; Dammasch, I. E.

    2016-08-01

    The spectra of the PROBA2/LYRA data, similarly to every other solar time series, show predominant periodicities that can be of solar or instrumental origin. In this article, we compare the main periodicities characterizing the LYRA spectrum to those found in the sunspot number, in the 10.7 cm flux, in an X-ray flare index, and in the sunspot area evolution. We focused on the 2010 to 2014 time range, for which the LYRA data are available, although we also briefly address the evolution of the main periodicities in the longer range. The mid-term periodicities at {˜} 28, {˜} 44, {˜} 54, {˜} 59, {˜} 100, {˜} 110, and {˜} 150 days appear as highly significant in several analyzed datasets. The consistency of distinct periodicities between datasets provides characteristics for the global Sun. This consistency also strengthens the reliability of LYRA data.

  18. Incorporating Spectra Into Periodic Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Alanna; Hong, J.; Protopapas, P.; Kashyap, V.

    2011-09-01

    The Chandra surveys have resulted in a wealth of data on low-luminosity X-ray sources (Lx 1030-34 erg/s) of Galactic scales beyond the local solar neighborhood. Many of these are compact binaries, in particular, cataclysmic variables, often identified by their periodic X-ray variability and spectra. Hong et al. (2009, 2011) have used energy quantiles (Hong, Schlegel & Grindlay, 2004) as a fast, robust indicator of spectral hardness and absorption of the X-ray sources. Energy quantiles also enable a simple but effective illustration of spectral changes with phase in these periodic systems: e.g. absorption by the accreting material is understood to drive the periodic light-curves. An interesting question is how to best make use of the information encapsulated in the periodic change in energy spectrum, along with the periodic change in intensity, especially for cases of ambiguous period determination? And, how to do it computationally efficiently? A first approach is to do the period search in intensity, as is standard; and then use a criterion of spectral variation to verify possible periods. Huijse, Zegers & Protopapas (2011) recently demonstrated a powerful period estimation technique using information potential and correntropy embedded in the light curve. Similar quantities based on energies (or energy quantiles) of X-ray photons can serve as criteria of spectral variation. A different approach treats the spectrum variations and intensity variations completely independently, searching through period-space in each, and then combining the results. A more general method would include both at the same time, looking for statistically significant variations above what is expected for a constant (in intensity and spectrum).

  19. Rotation periods of open-cluster stars, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Marilli, Ettore; Catalano, Santo; Williams, Scott D.; Backman, Dana E.; Laaksonen, Bentley D.; Adige, Vikram; Marschall, Laurence A.; Stauffer, John R.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from a photometric monitoring program of 21 stars observed during 1992 in the Pleiades and Alpha Persei open clusters. Period determinations for 16 stars are given, 13 of which are the first periods reported for these stars. Brightness variations for an additional five cluster stars are also given. One K dwarf member of the alpha Per cluster is observed to have a period of rotation of only 4.39 hr. perhaps the shortest period currently known among BY Draconis variables. The individual photometric measurements have been deposited with the NSSDC. Combining current X-ray flux determinations with known photometric periods, we illustrate the X-ray activity/rotation relation among Pleiades K dwarfs based on available data.

  20. Modular Subsea Monitoring Network (MSM) - Realizing Integrated Environmental Monitoring Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosch, Thomas; Fietzek, Peer

    2016-04-01

    In a variety of scientific and industrial application areas, ranging i.e. from the supervision of hydrate fields over the detection and localization of fugitive emissions from subsea oil and gas production to fish farming, fixed point observatories are useful and applied means. They monitor the water column and/or are placed at the sea floor over long periods of time. They are essential oceanographic platforms for providing valuable long-term time series data and multi-parameter measurements. Various mooring and observatory endeavors world-wide contribute valuable data needed for understanding our planet's ocean systems and biogeochemical processes. Continuously powered cabled observatories enable real-time data transmission from spots of interest close to the shore or to ocean infrastructures. Independent of the design of the observatories they all rely on sensors which demands for regular maintenance. This work is in most cases associated with cost-intensive maintenance on a regular time basis for the entire sensor carrying fixed platform. It is mandatory to encounter this asset for long-term monitoring by enhancing hardware efficiency. On the basis of two examples of use from the area of hydrate monitoring (off Norway and Japan) we will present the concept of the Modular Subsea Monitoring Network (MSM). The modular, scalable and networking capabilities of the MSM allow for an easy adaptation to different monitoring tasks. Providing intelligent power management, combining chemical and acoustical sensors, adaptation of the payload according to the monitoring tasks, autonomous powering, modular design for easy transportation, storage and mobilization, Vessel of Opportunity-borne launching and recovery capability with a video-guided launcher system and a rope recovery system are key facts addressed during the development of the MSM. Step by step the MSM concept applied to the observatory hardware will also be extended towards the gathered data to maximize the

  1. Source Water Quality Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will provide background information on continuous source water monitoring using online toxicity monitors and cover various tools available. Conceptual and practical aspects of source water quality monitoring will be discussed.

  2. Chaos in Periodic Discrete Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuming; Zhang, Lijuan; Yu, Panpan; Huang, Qiuling

    This paper focuses on chaos in periodic discrete systems, whose state space may vary with time. Some close relationships between some chaotic dynamical behaviors of a periodic discrete system and its autonomous induced system are given. Based on these relationships, several criteria of chaos are established and some sufficient conditions for no chaos are given for periodic discrete systems. Further, it is shown that a finite-dimensional linear periodic discrete system is not chaotic in the sense of Li-Yorke or Wiggins. In particular, an interesting problem of whether nonchaotic rules may generate a chaotic system is studied, with some examples provided, one of which surprisingly shows that a composition of globally asymptotically stable maps can be chaotic. In addition, some properties of sign pattern matrices of non-negative square matrices are given for convenience of the study.

  3. Periodical Vandalism: A Chronic Condition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleep, Esther L.

    1982-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the losses due to theft and mutilation in the periodicals collection at Brock University indicates that security needs to be tightened. Nine suggestions for improving security are offered, and six references are cited. (CHC)

  4. 40 CFR 63.1334 - Parameter monitoring levels and excursions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... any of the 15-minute periods within the hour. For data compression systems approved under § 63.1335(g... not available for at least 75 percent of the 15-minute periods when batch emission episodes selected... number of 15-minute periods in the operating time used to determine if monitoring data are...

  5. Building Air Monitoring Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The different components of air monitoring networks, the status of air monitoring in the United States, and the services and activities of the three major American network builders are detailed. International air monitoring networks and alert systems are identified, with emphasis on the Dutch air monitoring network. (BT)

  6. 78 FR 23766 - Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Extension of Public Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Extension of Public Comment Period Proposed Project Assessment and Monitoring of...

  7. A living cell quartz crystal microbalance biosensor for continuous monitoring of cytotoxic responses of macrophages to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    -dose dependent. Lastly, the frequency never reversed at high dose SWCNT (100-150 μg/ml), and apoptosis/necrosis was documented in conventional 24 and 48 hr-assays. Conclusion These data suggest that the new QCMB detects and provides unique information about peak, sub-lethal and toxic exposures of living cells to ENMs before they are detected using conventional cell assays. PMID:21266033

  8. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the child’s activities at the day care center over the 48-h monitoring period. The diary was divided into three time periods over the 48-h monitoring interval. The Food Survey collected information on the frequency and types of fruits, veget...

  9. The neural basis of monitoring goal progress

    PubMed Central

    Benn, Yael; Webb, Thomas L.; Chang, Betty P. I.; Sun, Yu-Hsuan; Wilkinson, Iain D.; Farrow, Tom F. D.

    2014-01-01

    The neural basis of progress monitoring has received relatively little attention compared to other sub-processes that are involved in goal directed behavior such as motor control and response inhibition. Studies of error-monitoring have identified the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as a structure that is sensitive to conflict detection, and triggers corrective action. However, monitoring goal progress involves monitoring correct as well as erroneous events over a period of time. In the present research, 20 healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imagining (fMRI) while playing a game that involved monitoring progress toward either a numerical or a visuo-spatial target. The findings confirmed the role of the dACC in detecting situations in which the current state may conflict with the desired state, but also revealed activations in the frontal and parietal regions, pointing to the involvement of processes such as attention and working memory (WM) in monitoring progress over time. In addition, activation of the cuneus was associated with monitoring progress toward a specific target presented in the visual modality. This is the first time that activation in this region has been linked to higher-order processing of goal-relevant information, rather than low-level anticipation of visual stimuli. Taken together, these findings identify the neural substrates involved in monitoring progress over time, and how these extend beyond activations observed in conflict and error monitoring. PMID:25309380

  10. Smarter radiation monitors for safeguards and security

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.; Pratt, J.C.; Markin, J.T.; Scurry, T. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation monitors for nuclear safeguards and security depend on internal control circuits to determine when diversion of special nuclear materials is taking place. Early monitors depended on analog circuits for this purpose, subsequently, digital logic controllers made better monitoring methods possible. Now, versatile microprocessor systems permit new, more efficient, and more useful monitoring methods. One such method is simple stepwise monitoring, which has variable alarm levels to expedite monitoring where extended monitoring periods are required. Another method, sequential probability ratio logic, tests data as it accumulates against two hypothesis - background, or background plus a transient diversion signal - and terminates monitoring as soon as a decision can be made that meets false-alarm and detection confidence requirements. A third method, quantitative monitoring for personnel, calculates count ratios of high- to low-energy gamma-ray regions to predict whether the material detected is a small quantity of bare material or a larger quantity of shielded material. In addition, microprocessor system subprograms can assist in detector calibration and trouble-shooting. Examples of subprograms are a variance analysis technique to set bias levels in plastic scintillators and a state-of-health routine for detecting malfunctions in digital circuit components.

  11. The neural basis of monitoring goal progress.

    PubMed

    Benn, Yael; Webb, Thomas L; Chang, Betty P I; Sun, Yu-Hsuan; Wilkinson, Iain D; Farrow, Tom F D

    2014-01-01

    The neural basis of progress monitoring has received relatively little attention compared to other sub-processes that are involved in goal directed behavior such as motor control and response inhibition. Studies of error-monitoring have identified the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as a structure that is sensitive to conflict detection, and triggers corrective action. However, monitoring goal progress involves monitoring correct as well as erroneous events over a period of time. In the present research, 20 healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imagining (fMRI) while playing a game that involved monitoring progress toward either a numerical or a visuo-spatial target. The findings confirmed the role of the dACC in detecting situations in which the current state may conflict with the desired state, but also revealed activations in the frontal and parietal regions, pointing to the involvement of processes such as attention and working memory (WM) in monitoring progress over time. In addition, activation of the cuneus was associated with monitoring progress toward a specific target presented in the visual modality. This is the first time that activation in this region has been linked to higher-order processing of goal-relevant information, rather than low-level anticipation of visual stimuli. Taken together, these findings identify the neural substrates involved in monitoring progress over time, and how these extend beyond activations observed in conflict and error monitoring. PMID:25309380

  12. Heat exchanger performance monitoring guidelines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stambaugh, N.; Closser, W. Jr.; Mollerus, F.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fouling can occur in many heat exchanger applications in a way that impedes heat transfer and fluid flow and reduces the heat transfer or performance capability of the heat exchanger. Fouling may be significant for heat exchanger surfaces and flow paths in contact with plant service water. This report presents guidelines for performance monitoring of heat exchangers subject to fouling. Guidelines include selection of heat exchangers to monitor based on system function, safety function and system configuration. Five monitoring methods are discussed: the heat transfer, temperature monitoring, temperature effectiveness, delta P and periodic maintenance methods. Guidelines are included for selecting the appropriate monitoring methods and for implementing the selected methods. The report also includes a bibliography, example calculations, and technical notes applicable to the heat transfer method.

  13. Shortest recurrence periods of novae

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Mariko; Saio, Hideyuki; Hachisu, Izumi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2014-10-01

    Stimulated by the recent discovery of the 1 yr recurrence period nova M31N 2008-12a, we examined the shortest recurrence periods of hydrogen shell flashes on mass-accreting white dwarfs (WDs). We discuss the mechanism that yields a finite minimum recurrence period for a given WD mass. Calculating the unstable flashes for various WD masses and mass accretion rates, we identified a shortest recurrence period of about two months for a non-rotating 1.38 M {sub ☉} WD with a mass accretion rate of 3.6 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. A 1 yr recurrence period is realized for very massive (≳ 1.3 M {sub ☉}) WDs with very high accretion rates (≳ 1.5 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}). We revised our stability limit of hydrogen shell burning, which will be useful for binary evolution calculations toward Type Ia supernovae.

  14. Periodic modulation of the atmosphere of Alpha Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Baliunas, S. L.; Guinan, E. F.; Hartmann, L.; Nassiopoulos, G. E.; Sonneborn, G.

    1988-01-01

    Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse; M2 Iab) was monitored with IUE since 1984. Discovery of a 420-day periodic modulation of the flux in the optical and ultraviolet continua, and in the Mg II h and k line emission cores suggests that periodic photospheric pulsations were present from 1984 to 1986. This behavior continues through 1987. However, the general flux level of the ultraviolet continuum and the Mg II lines is decreasing, and the amplitude of the variation may be reduced. These decreases may be the emerging signature of an additional longer period. The density sensitive C II diagnostic, 2325.4/2328.1, indicates the chromospheric densities range between log N(sub e) (cm-3) = 8.7 and 9.5, but periodicities are not evident.

  15. Bragg interactions in periodic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggard, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The interaction of electromagnetic waves of wavelength lambda with periodic structures of spatial period lambda are studied. The emphasis of the work is on Bragg interactions where lambda approximately equal to 2 lambda/N and the Bragg order N takes on the values 1, 2,.... An extended coupled waves (ECW) theory is developed for the case N greater or equal to 2 and the results of the theory are found to compare favorably with the exact results of Floquet theory. Numerous numerical results are displayed as Brillouin diagrams for the first few Bragg orders. Moreover, explicit expressions for coupling coefficients, bandgap shifts and bandgap widths are derived for singly periodic media. Particular note is taken of phase speeding effects.

  16. On composites with periodic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemat-Nasser, S.; Iwakuma, T.; Hejazi, M.

    1982-01-01

    The overall moduli of a composite with an isotropic elastic matrix containing periodically distributed (anisotropic) inclusions or voids, can be expressed in terms of several infinite series which only depend on the geometry of the inclusions or voids, and hence can be computed once and for all for given geometries. For solids with periodic structures these infinite series play exactly the same role as does Eshelby's tensor for a single inclusion or void in an unbounded elastic medium. For spherical and circular-cylindrical geometries, the required infinite series are calculated and the results are tabulated. These are then used to estimate the overall elastic moduli when either the overall strains or the overall stresses are prescribed, obtaining the same results. These results are compared with other estimates and with experimental data. It is found that the model of composites with periodic structure yields estimates in excellent agreement with the experimental observations.

  17. Correlation monitor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1995-10-01

    This task has been established with the explicit purpose of ensuring the continued availability of the pedigreed and extremely well-characterized material now required for inclusion in all additional and future surveillance capsules in commercial light-water reactors. During this reporting period, concrete was poured and pallets storage racks were installed to provide adequate room for the storage of the correlation monitor material being transferred from its location at the Y-12 Plant to its archival storage location at ORNL. The racks came from surplus material storage at ORNL and hence were obtained at no cost to the HSSI Program. Inquiries into cost-effective means of sheltering the blocks of correlation monitor materials from further weather-related deteriorization were initiated. The most likely approach would be to procure a turn-key sheet metal building installed over the storage racks by an outside contractor to minimize costs. Most of the material has now been transferred from Y-12 to the ORNL storage area. It has been repositioned on new storage pallets and placed into the storage racks, An update of the detailed material inventory was initiated to ascertain the revised location of all blocks. Pieces of HSST plate O3 were distributed to participants in the ASTM cross-comparison exercise on subsize specimen testing technology. The use of the HSST O3 will provide for data from the many varieties of tests to be performed to be compared with the standardized data previously developed. The testing techniques will focus on ways to measure transition temperature and fracture toughness.

  18. Periodicity in marine extinction events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepkoski, J. John, Jr.; Raup, David M.

    1986-01-01

    The periodicity of extinction events is examined in detail. In particular, the temporal distribution of specific, identifiable extinction events is analyzed. The nature and limitations of the data base on the global fossil record is discussed in order to establish limits of resolution in statistical analyses. Peaks in extinction intensity which appear to differ significantly from background levels are considered, and new analyses of the temporal distribution of these peaks are presented. Finally, some possible causes of periodicity and of interdependence among extinction events over the last quarter billion years of earth history are examined.

  19. Detection of latent sequence periodicities.

    PubMed Central

    Pizzi, E; Liuni, S; Frontali, C

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for the automatic detection of serial periodicities in a linear sequence. Its application to DNA subtelomeric sequences from two lower eukaryotes, P.falciparum and S.cerevisiae, reveals ordered patterns organised in hierarchical periodicities, not easily recognizable by other methods. The possible implications concerning the evolution of tandemly repetitive arrays are discussed in light of a model which involves, as successive steps, random repeat modification, the fusion of differently modified repeat versions into longer units, and the amplification of (and/or homogenization to) the more recent repeat units. PMID:2197595

  20. The German Drought Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Andreas; Zink, Matthias; Pommerencke, Julia; Kumar, Rohini; Thober, Stephan; Samaniego, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture droughts reduce the amount of water available to plant growth potentially leading e.g. to crop failure or increased forest fire risk. The threat of human livelihoods in developing countries and large economic losses in developed ones are severe consequences of these events. Monitoring the current state of soil water content allows to improve water management to mitigate the associated damages. Since summer 2014, the German Drought Monitor (GDM, available at: www.ufz.de/droughtmonitor) has been established using an operational hydrological modeling system, which consists of 3 steps: (1) the daily download of meteorological forcing data, consistency check and interpolation of this data, (2) running the mesoscale Hydrologic Model (mHM; Samaniego et al. 2010) and saving the state variables at the end of the model run as restart-file for the next days run, and (3) calculation of the soil moisture index (SMI, Samaniego et al. 2013, JHM) and visualization of the drought data. The hydrological model mHM was used to generate daily soil moisture fields for the period 1954-2013 over the entire area of Germany at a high spatial resolution of 4 x 4 km². The model requires daily precipitation, temperature, and potential evapotranspiration as forcing. A three-layer soil scheme was used to model the soil moisture dynamics over the entire root zone depth. Based on the 60 year simulation of soil moisture, the frequency distributions have been calculated for each grid cell to derive the soil moisture index. In this beta version, we do a monthly online update of the SMI. Furthermore, a trend analysis of drought events for 69 German subregions since 1954 was conducted. It showed that for most parts of Germany, the frequency of abnormally dry conditions increased while the stronger drought situations with SMI<0.2 decreased at the same time. For the coming year, a stakeholder consultation is planned. The aim is to clarify for whom a drought monitor would be useful, what

  1. 40 CFR 141.605 - Subpart V compliance monitoring location recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... HAA5 monitoring for subpart V of this part should be conducted. You must base your recommendations on... systems serving fewer than 500 people, only one location with a dual sample set per monitoring period...

  2. Monitoring of Biomedical License Agreements

    PubMed Central

    Keller, George H.; Ferguson, Steven M.; Pan, Percy

    2009-01-01

    Because technology licensed from research organizations can play a significant role in drug innovation and the generation of novel biomedical products, licensee performance under such agreements must be effectively monitored. This is necessary so that resultant benefits, including public health improvement, may be returned to the innovator(s) as well as society at large. The tasks that comprise monitoring are varied, but all come under the general heading of ‘enforcement of license provisions’. Since 1996, the license monitoring and enforcement program established by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) Group has collected about $US17 million in unpaid and underpaid license royalties through formal financial audits and other investigative activities. During the same period, the Office of Technology Transfer (OTT) settled more than 60 cases of suspected patent infringement, generating around 60 new licenses and collected both back and ongoing royalties. As these numbers show, an active and effective monitoring program is an essential part of any technology transfer or biomedical licensing program. PMID:19960074

  3. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  4. The Period of Salutary Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, John T.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Presents a lesson designed to teach students about the period of Salutary Neglect (100 years before the French and Indian Wars) and its effects on later historical events. Provides an advance organizer which puts students in a situation of salutary neglect and includes student and teacher resources on the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, and the…

  5. The Period of 2167 Erin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montigiana, N.; Benedetti, W.; Mannucci, M.; Riccetti, S.

    2008-09-01

    Analysis of data taken in March and April 2007 by groups from Osservatorio Astronomico Margherita Hack and the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire indicates a likely period of 5.7186 ± 0.0001 h for 2167 Erin. The amplitude of the lightcurve was 0.53 ± 0.02 mag.

  6. Shell Games: Uncovering Periodic Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1983-01-01

    Describes activities (demonstrations/experiments) used to introduce history of periodic properties--without electrons, orbitals, filling shells, or any conception of atoms beyond Dalton's model. Activities supplement first chapter in a currently available chemistry text. Indicates potential danger of experiments if proper safety precautions are…

  7. 78 FR 70904 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION 39 CFR Part 3050 Periodic Reporting AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Proposed rulemaking... Counsel, at 202-789-6820. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Contents I. Introduction II. Petition...

  8. 76 FR 297 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ...The Commission is establishing a docket to consider a proposed change in certain analytical methods used in periodic reporting. This action responds to a Postal Service rulemaking petition. Establishing this docket will allow the Commission to consider the Postal Service's proposal and comments from the...

  9. Periodicities of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Aoki, T.

    2013-01-01

    A highly sensitive all-sky electron multiplier charge-coupled device airglow imager has been operative in Longyearbyen, Norway since October 2011. The imager captures 630.0 nm all-sky images with an exposure time of 4 s, which is about 10 times shorter than that achieved by conventional cooled CCD imagers. This allows us to visualize the structure of polar cap patches without blurring effects and better estimate their periodicities. We present, as one of the first results from the imager, an event of successive appearance of patches on the night of 21 December 2011. A time series of the optical intensity at zenith showed modulations having two distinguished periods, one at 40 min and the other at 5-12 min. One possible explanation is that such a coexistence of two different periodicities is a manifestation of simultaneous occurrence of patch generation processes on the 40 min periodicity was created by large-scale reconfiguration of the dayside convection pattern while the 5-12 min modulations were closely associated with mechanisms driven by pulsed reconnection on the dayside magnetopause. Such a combined effect of multiple patch generation processes may play a role in structuring patches; thus, it would be of particular importance for evaluating the space weather effects in the trans-ionospheric communications environment in the polar cap.

  10. 76 FR 20906 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... a proposed change in certain analytical methods used in periodic reporting. This action responds to... an informal rulemaking proceeding to consider changes in the analytical methods approved for use in... Proceeding to Consider Proposed Changes in Analytic Principles (Proposal One), April 6, 2011...

  11. 76 FR 30893 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... informal rulemaking proceeding to consider changes in analytical principles. Proposal Three involves... proceeding to consider changes in the analytical methods approved for use in periodic reporting.\\1\\ Proposal... of a Proceeding to Consider a Proposed Change in Analytic Principles (Proposal Three), May 18,...

  12. Stability of underwater periodic locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Fangxu; Kanso, Eva

    2013-07-01

    Most aquatic vertebrates swim by lateral flapping of their bodies and caudal fins. While much effort has been devoted to understanding the flapping kinematics and its influence on the swimming efficiency, little is known about the stability (or lack of) of periodic swimming. It is believed that stability limits maneuverability and body designs/flapping motions that are adapted for stable swimming are not suitable for high maneuverability and vice versa. In this paper, we consider a simplified model of a planar elliptic body undergoing prescribed periodic heaving and pitching in potential flow. We show that periodic locomotion can be achieved due to the resulting hydrodynamic forces, and its value depends on several parameters including the aspect ratio of the body, the amplitudes and phases of the prescribed flapping.We obtain closedform solutions for the locomotion and efficiency for small flapping amplitudes, and numerical results for finite flapping amplitudes. This efficiency analysis results in optimal parameter values that are in agreement with values reported for some carangiform fish. We then study the stability of the (finite amplitude flapping) periodic locomotion using Floquet theory. We find that stability depends nonlinearly on all parameters. Interesting trends of switching between stable and unstable motions emerge and evolve as we continuously vary the parameter values. This suggests that, for live organisms that control their flapping motion, maneuverability and stability need not be thought of as disjoint properties, rather the organism may manipulate its motion in favor of one or the other depending on the task at hand.

  13. Rotation periods of open-cluster stars, 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Dasgupta, Amil; Backman, Dana E.; Laaksonen, Bentley D.; Baker, Shawn W.; Marschall, Laurence A.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Kuijken, Konrad; Stauffer, John R.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results from a photometric monitoring program of 15 open cluster stars and one weak-lined T Tauri star during late 1993/early 1994. Several show rotators which are members of the Alpha Persei, Pleiades, and Hyades open clusters have been monitored and period estimates derived. Using all available Pleiades stars with photometric periods together with current X-ray flux measurements, we illustrate the X-ray activity/rotation relation among Pleiades late-G/K dwarfs. The data show a clear break in the rotation-activity relation around P approximately 6-7 days -- in general accordance with previous results using more heterogeneous samples of G/K stars.

  14. 12 CFR 561.6 - Audit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit period. 561.6 Section 561.6 Banks and... SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 561.6 Audit period. The audit period of a savings association means the twelve month period (or other period in the case of a change in audit period) covered by the annual...

  15. 39 CFR 3055.55 - Periodicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Periodicals. 3055.55 Section 3055.55 Postal... Periodic Reporting of Service Performance Achievements § 3055.55 Periodicals. (a) Within County Periodicals. For the Within County Periodicals product within the Periodicals class, report the: (1)...

  16. 39 CFR 3055.55 - Periodicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Periodicals. 3055.55 Section 3055.55 Postal... Periodic Reporting of Service Performance Achievements § 3055.55 Periodicals. (a) Within County Periodicals. For the Within County Periodicals product within the Periodicals class, report the: (1)...

  17. 39 CFR 3055.55 - Periodicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Periodicals. 3055.55 Section 3055.55 Postal... Periodic Reporting of Service Performance Achievements § 3055.55 Periodicals. (a) Within County Periodicals. For the Within County Periodicals product within the Periodicals class, report the: (1)...

  18. 39 CFR 3055.55 - Periodicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Periodicals. 3055.55 Section 3055.55 Postal... Periodic Reporting of Service Performance Achievements § 3055.55 Periodicals. (a) Within County Periodicals. For the Within County Periodicals product within the Periodicals class, report the: (1)...

  19. Analysis of intermittent periodic modes within complex data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huang-Xin; de Paola, Robert; Norwood, William I.

    1993-11-01

    We propose a new analytical technique, cycle length analysis (CLA), which quantifies all intermittent periodic modes of a data set. CLA is especially well suited to the treatment of extended measurements of complex physical, chemical, and biological systems when subjected to variations in underlying dynamical parameters which cannot be controlled precisely or monitored accurately. We demonstrate the application of CLA using (1) a coupled oscillator model under the conditions of continuously varying control parameters and (2) clinical cardiac rhythm data.

  20. 40 CFR 63.1258 - Monitoring Requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section. (i) Periodic verification. For control devices that control vent streams totaling less than 1 ton/yr HAP emissions, before control, monitoring shall consist of a daily verification that the device is... with other streams, the verification may be on a per batch basis. This verification shall include,...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1258 - Monitoring Requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... section. (i) Periodic verification. For control devices that control vent streams totaling less than 1 ton/yr HAP emissions, before control, monitoring shall consist of a daily verification that the device is... with other streams, the verification may be on a per batch basis. This verification shall include,...

  2. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous monitoring system for measuring nitrogen oxides (NOX). The pollutant gas mixtures under Performance Specification 2 and for calibration checks under § 60.13(d) of this part shall be nitrogen dioxide... defined as any 3-hour period during which the average nitrogen oxides emissions (arithmetic average...

  3. 10 CFR 850.24 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.24... areas that may have airborne beryllium, as shown by the baseline inventory and hazard assessment. The... periodic monitoring of workers who work in areas where airborne concentrations of beryllium are at or...

  4. 10 CFR 850.24 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.24... areas that may have airborne beryllium, as shown by the baseline inventory and hazard assessment. The... periodic monitoring of workers who work in areas where airborne concentrations of beryllium are at or...

  5. 10 CFR 850.24 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.24... areas that may have airborne beryllium, as shown by the baseline inventory and hazard assessment. The... periodic monitoring of workers who work in areas where airborne concentrations of beryllium are at or...

  6. 10 CFR 850.24 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.24... areas that may have airborne beryllium, as shown by the baseline inventory and hazard assessment. The... periodic monitoring of workers who work in areas where airborne concentrations of beryllium are at or...

  7. 10 CFR 850.24 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.24... areas that may have airborne beryllium, as shown by the baseline inventory and hazard assessment. The... periodic monitoring of workers who work in areas where airborne concentrations of beryllium are at or...

  8. Interplanetary monitoring platform engineering history and achievements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    In the fall of 1979, last of ten Interplanetary Monitoring Platform Satellite (IMP) missions ended a ten year series of flights dedicated to obtaining new knowledge of the radiation effects in outer space and of solar phenomena during a period of maximum solar flare activity. The technological achievements and scientific accomplishments from the IMP program are described.

  9. 40 CFR 469.13 - Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... that toxic organics do not routinely spill or leak into the wastewater. The permitting authority shall... may allow industrial users of POTWs to make the following certification as a comment to the periodic... monitoring be required, industrial users of POTWs shall submit a solvent management plan that specifies...

  10. 40 CFR 469.13 - Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... that toxic organics do not routinely spill or leak into the wastewater. The permitting authority shall... may allow industrial users of POTWs to make the following certification as a comment to the periodic... monitoring be required, industrial users of POTWs shall submit a solvent management plan that specifies...

  11. 40 CFR 469.13 - Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... that toxic organics do not routinely spill or leak into the wastewater. The permitting authority shall... may allow industrial users of POTWs to make the following certification as a comment to the periodic... monitoring be required, industrial users of POTWs shall submit a solvent management plan that specifies...

  12. Quantum gates by periodic driving

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Z. C.; Wang, W.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Topological quantum computation has been extensively studied in the past decades due to its robustness against decoherence. One way to realize the topological quantum computation is by adiabatic evolutions—it requires relatively long time to complete a gate, so the speed of quantum computation slows down. In this work, we present a method to realize single qubit quantum gates by periodic driving. Compared to adiabatic evolution, the single qubit gates can be realized at a fixed time much shorter than that by adiabatic evolution. The driving fields can be sinusoidal or square-well field. With the sinusoidal driving field, we derive an expression for the total operation time in the high-frequency limit, and an exact analytical expression for the evolution operator without any approximations is given for the square well driving. This study suggests that the period driving could provide us with a new direction in regulations of the operation time in topological quantum computation. PMID:26911900

  13. 14 CFR 171.319 - Approach elevation monitor system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the path following error on any glidepath exceeds the limits specified in § 171.317(d) for a period of... mean error to ±0.067 degree can be satisfied by the following procedure. The integral monitor...

  14. Noncoherent detection of periodic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliardi, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The optimal Bayes detector for a general periodic waveform having uniform delay and additive white Gaussian noise is examined. It is shown that the detector is much more complex than that for the well known cases of pure sine waves (i.e. classical noncoherent detection) and narrowband signals. An interpretation of the optimal processing is presented, and several implementations are discussed. The results have application to the noncoherent detection of optical square waves.

  15. Down hole periodic seismic generator

    DOEpatents

    Hardee, Harry C.; Hills, Richard G.; Striker, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  16. Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator

    DOEpatents

    Hardee, Harry C.; Hills, Richard G.; Striker, Richard P.

    1991-07-16

    An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  17. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. The monitor senses the pressure inside the skull and sends measurements to a recording device. ... are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is ...

  18. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, L.W.

    1982-03-23

    A portal radiation monitor combines .1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  19. Fugitive emissions monitoring trends

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.H.

    1997-02-01

    New Clean Air Act requirements are pushing facilities to reevaluate their monitoring programs. A description of the fugitive emission guidelines is included in this article, along with ideas about monitoring.

  20. Nosepiece respiration monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, A. L.; Long, L. E.; Rice, N. E.

    1968-01-01

    Comfortable, inexpensive nosepiece respiration monitor produces rapid response signals to most conventional high impedance medical signal conditioners. The monitor measures respiration in a manner that produces a large signal with minimum delay.

  1. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, Lyle W.

    1985-01-01

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  2. Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behar, Joseph V.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring is the coordination of environmental (air, water, land, and crops) monitoring networks to collect systematically pollutant exposure data for a specific receptor, usually man. (Author/BB)

  3. [ULTRASOUND MONITORING FEATURES OF POSTOPERATIVE HEPATIC ECHINOCOCCOSIS].

    PubMed

    Melia, Kh; Kokaia, N; Manjgaladze, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate ultrasound features (US) of liver after post operative anti-parasite recurrence treatment of patients with echinococcosis. The clinical analyses of 50 patients were carried out. It was concluded that the use of ultrasound can provide valuable data to the clinician to assess and monitor anti parasitic therapy echinococcosis of liver in post operative period. During the monitoring the positive dynamics of disease was observed in 94,5% of cases, in 5% оf cases toxic hepatites with septic complication was diagnosed, and in 0,5% of cases the disease recurrence was revealed. Ultrasound semiotics of liver after post operative anti-parasite recurrence treatment of patients with echinococcosis was presented. Control and monitoring of patients in the postoperative period echinococcosis with appropriate antirelapse antiparasitic therapy should be held not less than 1-5 years. PMID:26870968

  4. 40 CFR 63.130 - Transfer operations provisions-periodic recordkeeping and reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-periodic recordkeeping and reporting. 63.130 Section 63.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., and Wastewater § 63.130 Transfer operations provisions—periodic recordkeeping and reporting. (a) Each... monitored under § 63.127 of this subpart, and listed in table 7 of this subpart or specified by...

  5. International AGN Watch: Continuous Monitoring of NGC 4151

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    The nucleus of NGC 4151 was observed continuously with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) for 9.3 days, yielding a pair of LWP and SWP spectra every 70 minutes, and during four-hour periods for 4 days prior to and 5 days after the continuous monitoring period. The sampling frequency of the observations is an order of magnitude higher than that of any previous UV monitoring campaign on a Seyfert galaxy.

  6. Global Atmospheric Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallen, Carl C.

    1975-01-01

    The global atmospheric monitoring plans of the World Meteorological Organization are detailed. Single and multipurpose basic monitoring systems and the monitoring of chemical properties are discussed. The relationship of the World Meteorological Organization with the United Nations environment program is discussed. A map of the World…

  7. Remote Monitoring Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhoruchkin, V.K.; Shmelev, V.M.; Roumiantsev, A.N.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of the Remote Monitoring Transparency Program is to evaluate and demonstrate the use of remote monitoring technologies to advance nonproliferation and transparency efforts that are currently being developed by Russia and the United States without compromising the national security to the participating parties. Under a lab-to-lab transparency contract between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Kurchatov Institute (KI RRC), the Kurchatov Institute will analyze technical and procedural aspects of the application of remote monitoring as a transparency measure to monitor inventories of direct- use HEU and plutonium (e.g., material recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons). A goal of this program is to assist a broad range of political and technical experts in learning more about remote monitoring technologies that could be used to implement nonproliferation, arms control, and other security and confidence building measures. Specifically, this program will: (1) begin integrating Russian technologies into remote monitoring systems; (2) develop remote monitoring procedures that will assist in the application of remote monitoring techniques to monitor inventories of HEU and Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons; and (3) conduct a workshop to review remote monitoring fundamentals, demonstrate an integrated US/Russian remote monitoring system, and discuss the impacts that remote monitoring will have on the national security of participating countries.

  8. UTAH VOLUNTEER MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goal 1) Promote and coordinate stream monitoring efforts in Utah as an effective watershed educational tool. Task 1) Inventory and compile an annotated list of existing volunteer monitoring programs and related efforts in Utah. Task 2) Promote monitoring activities throughout the...

  9. An overview of crop growing condition monitoring in China agriculture remote sensing monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qing; Zhou, Qing-bo; Zhang, Li

    2009-07-01

    China is a large agricultural country. To understand the agricultural production condition timely and accurately is related to government decision-making, agricultural production management and the general public concern. China Agriculture Remote Sensing Monitoring System (CHARMS) can monitor crop acreage changes, crop growing condition, agriculture disaster (drought, floods, frost damage, pest etc.) and predict crop yield etc. quickly and timely. The basic principles, methods and regular operation of crop growing condition monitoring in CHARMS are introduced in detail in the paper. CHARMS can monitor crop growing condition of wheat, corn, cotton, soybean and paddy rice with MODIS data. An improved NDVI difference model was used in crop growing condition monitoring in CHARMS. Firstly, MODIS data of every day were received and processed, and the max NDVI values of every fifteen days of main crop were generated, then, in order to assessment a certain crop growing condition in certain period (every fifteen days, mostly), the system compare the remote sensing index data (NDVI) of a certain period with the data of the period in the history (last five year, mostly), the difference between NDVI can indicate the spatial difference of crop growing condition at a certain period. Moreover, Meteorological data of temperature, precipitation and sunshine etc. as well as the field investigation data of 200 network counties were used to modify the models parameters. Last, crop growing condition was assessment at four different scales of counties, provinces, main producing areas and nation and spatial distribution maps of crop growing condition were also created.

  10. 36 CFR 65.7 - Monitoring National Historic Landmarks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring National Historic... INTERIOR NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 65.7 Monitoring National Historic Landmarks. (a) NPS maintains a continuing relationship with the owners of National Historic Landmarks. Periodic...

  11. 36 CFR 65.7 - Monitoring National Historic Landmarks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Monitoring National Historic... INTERIOR NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 65.7 Monitoring National Historic Landmarks. (a) NPS maintains a continuing relationship with the owners of National Historic Landmarks. Periodic...

  12. 36 CFR 65.7 - Monitoring National Historic Landmarks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Monitoring National Historic... INTERIOR NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 65.7 Monitoring National Historic Landmarks. (a) NPS maintains a continuing relationship with the owners of National Historic Landmarks. Periodic...

  13. 36 CFR 65.7 - Monitoring National Historic Landmarks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Monitoring National Historic... INTERIOR NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 65.7 Monitoring National Historic Landmarks. (a) NPS maintains a continuing relationship with the owners of National Historic Landmarks. Periodic...

  14. 36 CFR 65.7 - Monitoring National Historic Landmarks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Monitoring National Historic... INTERIOR NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 65.7 Monitoring National Historic Landmarks. (a) NPS maintains a continuing relationship with the owners of National Historic Landmarks. Periodic...

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM: AGROECOSYSTEM 1992 PILOT PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agroecosystem Resource Group (ARG) of the Environmental Protection Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) has developed a five year program strategy for implementation of a suite of indicators for monitoring agroecosystem status and trends. he five-year period (1991-1995) i...

  16. 28 CFR 66.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the expiration or termination of... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program... Requirements Reports, Records, Retention, and Enforcement § 66.40 Monitoring and reporting program...

  17. 45 CFR 92.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 92... reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the...

  18. 45 CFR 92.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 92... reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the...

  19. 45 CFR 2541.400 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 2541... reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the...

  20. 45 CFR 2541.400 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 2541... reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the...

  1. 13 CFR 143.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the expiration or termination of... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program... Requirements Reports, Records, Retention, and Enforcement § 143.40 Monitoring and reporting program...

  2. 15 CFR 24.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the expiration or termination of... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program... Requirements Reports, Records, Retention, and Enforcement § 24.40 Monitoring and reporting program...

  3. 36 CFR 62.6 - Natural landmark monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Natural landmark monitoring. 62.6 Section 62.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL NATURAL LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 62.6 Natural landmark monitoring. (a) Owner contact. The Field Offices of the NPS maintain periodic...

  4. 36 CFR 62.6 - Natural landmark monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Natural landmark monitoring... INTERIOR NATIONAL NATURAL LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 62.6 Natural landmark monitoring. (a) Owner contact. The Field Offices of the NPS maintain periodic contacts with the owners of designated national...

  5. 32 CFR Appendix H to Part 57 - Monitoring

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance. B. USD(P&R) Oversight (1) On behalf of the USD(P&R), the DoD-CC or designees, shall make periodic... USD(P&R), the ASD(HA), and, where appropriate, to DoDEA, monitored Agencies, and monitoring teams....

  6. Mashup - Based End User Interface for Fleet Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, M.; Popa, A. S.; Slavici, T.; Darvasi, D.

    Fleet monitoring of commercial vehicles has received a major attention in the last period. A good monitoring solution increases the fleet efficiency by reducing the transportation durations, by optimizing the planned routes and by providing determinism at the intermediate and final destinations. This paper presents a fleet monitoring system for commercial vehicles using the Internet as data infrastructure. The mashup concept was implemented for creating a user interface.

  7. Haemocytic periodicity and periodic disorders: Periodic neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, lymphocytosis and anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Hobart A.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated of rhythmic numerical oscillation of each of the blood cells either independently or in combinations. The cyclic changes originate in the marrow of some normal persons and animals without causing illness, and can be induced experimentally. In more than 100 reported instances, periodic oscillations of various cells were accompanied by respective episodes of the disorders named in the title. The disorders may be transitory but usually recur throughout life and occasionally are fatal. All resist therapy. Features in common suggest an interrelationship of the haemal disorders and other disparate heritable periodic diseases. Theoretically, the rhythms are regulated by ubiquitous, inherent, intracellular bioclocks controlled hypothalamically or neurohumorally in relation to a feedback mechanism. Reactions to long cycles are of greater clinical importance than disturbances arising from the circadian rhythm. PMID:4397784

  8. Health Monitoring of a Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Robert H.; Ng, Hok K.; Speyer, Jason L.; Guntur, Lokeshkumar S.; Carpenter, Russell

    2004-01-01

    A health monitoring system based on analytical redundancy is developed for satellites on elliptical orbits. First, the dynamics of the satellite including orbital mechanics and attitude dynamics is modelled as a periodic system. Then, periodic fault detection filters are designed to detect and identify the satellite's actuator and sensor faults. In addition, parity equations are constructed using the algebraic redundant relationship among the actuators and sensors. Furthermore, a residual processor is designed to generate the probability of each of the actuator and sensor faults by using a sequential probability test. Finally, the health monitoring system, consisting of periodic fault detection lters, parity equations and residual processor, is evaluated in the simulation in the presence of disturbances and uncertainty.

  9. 44 CFR 206.112 - Registration period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Registration period. 206.112... Households § 206.112 Registration period. (a) Initial period. The standard FEMA registration period is 60...) Extension of the registration period. The regional administrator or his/her designee may extend...

  10. 43 CFR 10010.45 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Time periods. 10010.45 Section 10010.45... Environmental Impact Statements § 10010.45 Time periods. (a) The minimum review period for a draft EIS will be... proposed reductions in time periods or any extensions of time periods proposed by those agencies....

  11. 43 CFR 10010.45 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Time periods. 10010.45 Section 10010.45... Environmental Impact Statements § 10010.45 Time periods. (a) The minimum review period for a draft EIS will be... proposed reductions in time periods or any extensions of time periods proposed by those agencies....

  12. 43 CFR 10010.45 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Time periods. 10010.45 Section 10010.45... Environmental Impact Statements § 10010.45 Time periods. (a) The minimum review period for a draft EIS will be... proposed reductions in time periods or any extensions of time periods proposed by those agencies....

  13. 43 CFR 10010.45 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Time periods. 10010.45 Section 10010.45... Environmental Impact Statements § 10010.45 Time periods. (a) The minimum review period for a draft EIS will be... proposed reductions in time periods or any extensions of time periods proposed by those agencies....

  14. A Centralized Display for Mission Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    2004-01-01

    Humans traditionally experience a vigilance decrement over extended periods of time on reliable systems. One possible solution to aiding operators in monitoring is to use polar-star displays that will show deviations from normal in a more salient manner. The primary objectives of this experiment were to determine if polar-star displays aid in monitoring and preliminary diagnosis of the aircraft state. This experiment indicated that the polar-star display does indeed aid operators in detecting and diagnosing system events. Subjects were able to notice system events earlier and they subjectively reported the polar-star display helped them in monitoring, noticing an event, and diagnosing an event. Therefore, these results indicate that the polar-star display used for monitoring and preliminary diagnosis improves performance in these areas for system related events.

  15. Rotation period of comet Donati

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the rotation period of comet Donati (1858 VI) whose haloes were approximate parabolic envelopes having foci near the apparent nucleus and vertices toward the sun forward from the tail axis. The regularity and sharpness of the halves suggest that they represent the repetitive ejection of material from an active area which is exposed to solar radiation as the cometary nucleus rotates. Bobrovnikov's results (1954) are used to evaluate the linear expansion velocity of such haloes. This calculation is applied to the comet and a linear correction is used to assess the results.

  16. Long-Period Solar Variability

    SciTech Connect

    GAUTHIER,JOHN H.

    2000-07-20

    Terrestrial climate records and historical observations of the Sun suggest that the Sun undergoes aperiodic oscillations in radiative output and size over time periods of centuries and millenia. Such behavior can be explained by the solar convective zone acting as a nonlinear oscillator, forced at the sunspot-cycle frequency by variations in heliomagnetic field strength. A forced variant of the Lorenz equations can generate a time series with the same characteristics as the solar and climate records. The timescales and magnitudes of oscillations that could be caused by this mechanism are consistent with what is known about the Sun and terrestrial climate.

  17. Rotational periods of asteroids II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccioli, D.; Blanco, C.; Cigna, M.

    2001-06-01

    In the framework of the photoelectric asteroid observational program undertaken at Catania University to collect lightcurves apt to apply the pole computational methods, the V-band lightcurves and the values of the synodic rotational period and of the average B- V colour index of 5 Astrea, 6 Hebe, 12 Victoria, 13 Egeria, 26 Proserpina, 34 Circe, 63 Ausonia, 66 Maja, 102 Miriam, 140 Siwa, 176 Iduna, 181 Eucaris, 241 Germania, 250 Bettina, 258 Tyche, 313 Chaldea, 335 Roberta, 352 Gisela, 419 Aurelia, 471 Papagena, 537 Pauly, 639 Latona and 984 Gretia are presented.

  18. Periodic roads and quantized wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Campos Valadares, Eduardo

    2016-08-01

    We propose a simple approach to determine all possible wheels that can roll smoothly without slipping on a periodic roadbed, while maintaining the center of mass at a fixed height. We also address the inverse problem that of obtaining the roadbed profile compatible with a specific wheel and all other related "quantized wheels." The role of symmetry is highlighted, which might preclude the center of mass from remaining at a fixed height. A straightforward consequence of such geometric quantization is that the gravitational potential energy and the moment of inertia are discrete, suggesting a parallelism between macroscopic wheels and nano-systems, such as carbon nanotubes.

  19. Periodic permanent magnet focused klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Ives, R Lawrence

    2015-04-21

    A periodic permanent magnet (PPM) klystron has beam transport structures and RF cavity structures, each of which has permanent magnets placed substantially equidistant from a beam tunnel formed about the central axis, and which are also outside the extent of a cooling chamber. The RF cavity sections also have permanent magnets which are placed substantially equidistant from the beam tunnel, but which include an RF cavity coupling to the beam tunnel for enhancement of RF carried by an electron beam in the beam tunnel.

  20. Periodic microwave absorption in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Martinek, J.; Stankowski, J. )

    1994-08-01

    A model explaining the presence of a periodic train of microwave absorption lines in the magnetic modulated microwave absorption (MMMA) spectra of high- and low-temperature superconductors is proposed. The model assumes the occurrence of regular superconducting current loops, closed by Josephson junctions, in these materials. The system of such loops is considered within the basic model of the rf superconducting quantum interference device taking into account the effect of thermal fluctuations. The magnetic-field and temperature dependencies of the MMMA obtained on the basis of the proposed model are in qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  1. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H.

    1993-12-31

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC`s program results.

  2. Mobile health monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Walker, William; Aroul, A L Praveen; Bhatia, Dinesh

    2009-01-01

    Advancements are being made towards a cheap and effective means for health monitoring. A mobile monitoring system is proposed for monitoring a bicycle rider using light weight, low power wireless sensors. Biometric and environmental information pertaining to the bicycle rider is captured, transmitted to, and stored in a remote database with little user interaction required. Remote users have real time access to the captured information through a web application. Possible applications for this system include the monitoring of a soldier in the battlefield and the monitoring of a patient during an ambulance ride. PMID:19965041

  3. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie

    2012-07-09

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  4. Suicide during Perinatal Period: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Clinical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Orsolini, Laura; Valchera, Alessandro; Vecchiotti, Roberta; Tomasetti, Carmine; Iasevoli, Felice; Fornaro, Michele; De Berardis, Domenico; Perna, Giampaolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Bellantuono, Cesario

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal period may pose a great challenge for the clinical management and treatment of psychiatric disorders in women. In fact, several mental illnesses can arise during pregnancy and/or following childbirth. Suicide has been considered a relatively rare event during the perinatal period. However, in some mental disorders (i.e., postpartum depression, bipolar disorder, postpartum psychosis, etc.) have been reported a higher risk of suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, or suicide. Therefore, a complete screening of mothers’ mental health should also take into account thoughts of suicide and thoughts about harming infants as well. Clinicians should carefully monitor and early identify related clinical manifestations, potential risk factors, and alarm symptoms related to suicide. The present paper aims at providing a focused review about epidemiological data, risk factors, and an overview about the main clinical correlates associated with the suicidal behavior during the pregnancy and postpartum period. Practical recommendations have been provided as well. PMID:27570512

  5. Suicide during Perinatal Period: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Clinical Correlates.

    PubMed

    Orsolini, Laura; Valchera, Alessandro; Vecchiotti, Roberta; Tomasetti, Carmine; Iasevoli, Felice; Fornaro, Michele; De Berardis, Domenico; Perna, Giampaolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Bellantuono, Cesario

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal period may pose a great challenge for the clinical management and treatment of psychiatric disorders in women. In fact, several mental illnesses can arise during pregnancy and/or following childbirth. Suicide has been considered a relatively rare event during the perinatal period. However, in some mental disorders (i.e., postpartum depression, bipolar disorder, postpartum psychosis, etc.) have been reported a higher risk of suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, or suicide. Therefore, a complete screening of mothers' mental health should also take into account thoughts of suicide and thoughts about harming infants as well. Clinicians should carefully monitor and early identify related clinical manifestations, potential risk factors, and alarm symptoms related to suicide. The present paper aims at providing a focused review about epidemiological data, risk factors, and an overview about the main clinical correlates associated with the suicidal behavior during the pregnancy and postpartum period. Practical recommendations have been provided as well. PMID:27570512

  6. Remote Monitoring Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhoruchkin, V.K.; Shmelev, V.M.; Roumiantsev, A.N.; Croessmann, C.D.; Horton, R.D.; Matter, J.C.; Czajkowski, A.F.; Sheely, K.B.; Bieniawski, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the Remote Monitoring Transparency Program is to evaluate and demonstrate the use of remote monitoring technologies to advance nonproliferation and transparency efforts that are currently being developed by Russia and the US without compromising the national security of the participating parties. Under a lab-to-lab transparency contract between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Kurchatov Institute (KI RRC), the Kurchatov Institute will analyze technical and procedural aspects of the application of remote monitoring as a transparency measure to monitor inventories of direct-use HEU and plutonium (e.g., material recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons). A goal of this program is to assist a broad range of political and technical experts in learning more about remote monitoring technologies that could be used to implement nonproliferation, arms control, and other security and confidence building measures. Specifically, this program will: (1) begin integrating Russian technologies into remote monitoring systems; (2) develop remote monitoring procedures that will assist in the application of remote monitoring techniques to monitor inventories of HEU and Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons; and (3) conduct a workshop to review remote monitoring fundamentals, demonstrate an integrated US/Russian remote monitoring will have on the national security of participating countries.

  7. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.C.

    1993-07-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

  8. Update on compliance assurance monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, L.E.

    1997-12-31

    In August, 1996, EPA released a revised draft of its proposal for a Compliance Assurance Monitoring (CAM) program. The proposal, which is intended to replace the Agency`s highly controversial 1993 proposal for {open_quotes}enhanced monitoring,{close_quotes} must be finalized by mid-1997 under court order. Many had hopes that EPA`s CAM proposal, by focussing on proper operation and maintenance of required control technologies rather than enforcement of numerical emission limitations, would provide a neutral resolution of issues associated with use of continuous compliance methods to enforce standards that were developed using limited, periodic data (and are currently enforceable with periodic stack tests). However, with this second draft of the CAM rule continuing to draw criticism from both industry (primarily for its effect on existing compliance obligations) and environmental groups (in part, for not requiring direct measurement of emissions), EPA appears to be a long way from reaching that goal. In the meantime, sources and states continue to work to meet deadlines for submission of applications and for issuance of Title V operating permits that must address issues currently being debated in the CAM rulemaking.

  9. Anatahan Activity and Monitoring, 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, A.; White, R.; Koyanagi, S.; Trusdell, F.; Kauahikaua, J.; Marso, J.; Ewert, J.

    2005-12-01

    Anatahan volcano began erupting in 2003 and continued with a second eruptive phase in 2004. In January 2005 the volcano began a sequence of eruptions and unrest that continues as of September 2005. The activity has been characterized by punctuated episodes of very steamy strombolian activity and vigorous ash emission. Some of the ash emissions have reached 50,000-foot elevations, with VOG and ash occasionally reaching the Philippines and southernmost Japan, over 1000 miles away. Vigorous ash emission has been almost continuous since June 2005. A M4.8 long-period earthquake (LP) occurred in mid-August, one of the largest LPs recorded on the planet in the last quarter-century. Real-time monitoring consisting of a few telemetered short-period seismometers and acoustic sensors has been severely hampered by ashfall on the small island. Monitoring efforts have been focused on the aircraft/ash hazard, with the goal of providing the FAA and airline industry with rapid notice of seismic signatures that may indicate ash columns rising to the altitude of airline traffic, or nominally above 20,000-30,000 ft.

  10. Periodic bedrock ridges on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David R.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Becker, Scott K.

    2012-03-01

    Evidence for sediment transport and erosion by wind is widespread over the surface of Mars today and was likely a major geomorphic process for much of its geological past. Although Martian surface features resembling aeolian dunes and ripples have been recognized since the Mariner and Viking missions, such features have been interpreted previously as active, indurated, or exhumed sedimentary forms. Here we report evidence based on High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images that show some megaripple forms are eroded into cohesive substrate rather than being composed of loose granular material or fossilized dunes. Exposure of stratigraphic continuity within layered, cohesive material extending crest to trough through features with mean wavelengths of 18 to 51 m demonstrates the primarily erosional formation of what we term periodic bedrock ridges (PBRs). Hence some surfaces on Mars previously considered to be covered by wind-deposited material are actually wind-carved exposures that offer windows into Martian history. PBRs lack the distinctive streamlining associated with wind-parallel yardangs and comparison of PBR orientation to yardangs, megayardangs, and active sedimentary dunes in the same vicinity confirm that these PBRs formed transverse to prevailing winds. Observed wavelengths of PBRs are comparable to those predicted by a simple model for erosional wavelengths of periodic transverse bed forms owing to the spacing of flow separations within the flow. Recognition of these transverse aeolian erosional forms brings up the question of how widespread Martian PBRs are and how many have been misinterpreted as active or indurated (fossilized) sedimentary dunes.

  11. Quasi-periodic spatiotemporal filtering.

    PubMed

    Burghouts, Gertjan J; Geusebroek, Jan-Mark

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents the online estimation of temporal frequency to simultaneously detect and identify the quasiperiodic motion of an object. We introduce color to increase discriminative power of a reoccurring object and to provide robustness to appearance changes due to illumination changes. Spatial contextual information is incorporated by considering the object motion at different scales. We combined spatiospectral Gaussian filters and a temporal reparameterized Gabor filter to construct the online temporal frequency filter. We demonstrate the online filter to respond faster and decay faster than offline Gabor filters. Further, we show the online filter to be more selective to the tuned frequency than Gabor filters. We contribute to temporal frequency analysis in that we both identify ("what") and detect ("when") the frequency. In color video, we demonstrate the filter to detect and identify the periodicity of natural motion. The velocity of moving gratings is determined in a real world example. We consider periodic and quasiperiodic motion of both stationary and nonstationary objects. PMID:16764282

  12. Optical Structural Health Monitoring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckner, Benjamin D.; Markov, Vladimir; Earthman, James C.

    2010-01-01

    This non-destructive, optical fatigue detection and monitoring system relies on a small and unobtrusive light-scattering sensor that is installed on a component at the beginning of its life in order to periodically scan the component in situ. The method involves using a laser beam to scan the surface of the monitored component. The device scans a laser spot over a metal surface to which it is attached. As the laser beam scans the surface, disruptions in the surface cause increases in scattered light intensity. As the disruptions in the surface grow, they will cause the light to scatter more. Over time, the scattering intensities over the scanned line can be compared to detect changes in the metal surface to find cracks, crack precursors, or corrosion. This periodic monitoring of the surface can be used to indicate the degree of fatigue damage on a component and allow one to predict the remaining life and/or incipient mechanical failure of the monitored component. This wireless, compact device can operate for long periods under its own battery power and could one day use harvested power. The prototype device uses the popular open-source TinyOS operating system on an off-the-shelf Mica2 sensor mote, which allows wireless command and control through dynamically reconfigurable multi-node sensor networks. The small size and long life of this device could make it possible for the nodes to be installed and left in place over the course of years, and with wireless communication, data can be extracted from the nodes by operators without physical access to the devices. While a prototype has been demonstrated at the time of this reporting, further work is required in the system s development to take this technology into the field, especially to improve its power management and ruggedness. It should be possible to reduce the size and sensitivity as well. Establishment of better prognostic methods based on these data is also needed. The increase of surface roughness with

  13. Space-Derived Sewer Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The QuadraScan Longterm Flow Monitoring System is a second generation sewer monitor developed by American Digital Systems, Inc.'s founder Peter Petroff. Petroff, a former spacecraft instrumentation designer at Marshall Space Flight Center, used expertise based on principles acquired in Apollo and other NASA programs. QuadraScan borrows even more heavily from space technology, for example in its data acquisition and memory system derived from NASA satellites. "One-time" measurements are often plagued with substantial errors due to the flow of groundwater absorbed into the system. These system sizing errors stem from a basic informational deficiency: accurate, reliable data on how much water flows through a sewer system over a long period of time is very difficult to obtain. City officials are turning to "permanent," or long-term sewer monitoring systems. QuadraScan offers many advantages to city officials such as the early warning capability to effectively plan for city growth in order to avoid the crippling economic impact of bans on new sewer connections in effect in many cities today.

  14. Monitoring the DIRAC distributed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santinelli, R.; Seco, M.; Nandakumar, R.; LHCb DIRAC Team

    2010-04-01

    DIRAC, the LHCb community Grid solution, is intended to reliably run large data mining activities. The DIRAC system consists of various services (which wait to be contacted to perform actions) and agents (which carry out periodic activities) to direct jobs as required. An important part of ensuring the reliability of the infrastructure is the monitoring and logging of these DIRAC distributed systems. The monitoring is done collecting information from two sources - one is from pinging the services or by keeping track of the regular heartbeats of the agents, and the other from the analysis of the error messages generated both by agents and services and collected by a logging system. This allows us to ensure that the components are running properly and to collect useful information regarding their operations. The process status monitoring is displayed using the SLS sensor mechanism that also automatically allows to plot various quantities and keep a history of the system. A dedicated GridMap interface (ServiceMap) allows production shifters and experts to have an immediate, high-impact view of all LHCb critical services status while offering the possibility to refer to details of the SLS and SAM sensors. Error types and statistics provided by the logging service can be accessed via dedicated web interfaces on the DIRAC portal or programmatically via the python based API and CLI.

  15. Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley Williamson

    2003-05-31

    This final project report presents experimental details, results and analysis of continuous onsite ambient fine particulate data at the North Birmingham sampling site during the October, 2001-September, 2002 study period.The host site for these measurement activities is the North Birmingham PM monitoring station by the Jefferson County Health Department in Birmingham, AL.The continuous data include PM{sub 2.5} mass concentrations measured by TEOM, particle sulfate using the R&P 8400S monitor, particle size distributions measured by SMPS and APS monitors, and PM{sub 2.5} light scattering extinction coefficient as measured by nephelometer. During the course of the project, measurement intercomparison data were developed for these instruments and several complementary measurements at the site. The report details the instrument set and operating procedures and describes the resulting data. Report subsections present an overview summary of the data, followed by detailed description of the systematic time behavior of PM{sub 2.5} and other specific particulate size fractions. Specific subsections are included for particle size distribution, light scattering, and particle sulfate data. The final subsection addresses application of the measurements to the practical questions of fine PM generation and transport, source attribution, and PM{sub 2.5} management strategies.

  16. Acoustic Techniques for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankenstein, B.; Augustin, J.; Hentschel, D.; Schubert, F.; Köhler, B.; Meyendorf, N.

    2008-02-01

    Future safety and maintenance strategies for industrial components and vehicles are based on combinations of monitoring systems that are permanently attached to or embedded in the structure, and periodic inspections. The latter belongs to conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and can be enhanced or partially replaced by structural health monitoring systems. However, the main benefit of this technology for the future will consist of systems that can be differently designed based on improved safety philosophies, including continuous monitoring. This approach will increase the efficiency of inspection procedures at reduced inspection times. The Fraunhofer IZFP Dresden Branch has developed network nodes, miniaturized transmitter and receiver systems for active and passive acoustical techniques and sensor systems that can be attached to or embedded into components or structures. These systems have been used to demonstrate intelligent sensor networks for the monitoring of aerospace structures, railway systems, wind energy generators, piping system and other components. Material discontinuities and flaws have been detected and monitored during full scale fatigue testing. This paper will discuss opportunities and future trends in nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring based on new sensor principles and advanced microelectronics. It will outline various application examples of monitoring systems based on acoustic techniques and will indicate further needs for research and development.

  17. Active personal radiation monitor for lunar EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straume, Tore; Borak, Tom; Braby, L. A.; Lusby, Terry; Semones, Edward J.; Vazquez, Marcelo E.

    As astronauts return to the Moon-and this time, work for extended periods-there will be a critical need for crew personnel radiation monitoring as they operate lunar rovers or otherwise perform a myriad of extravehicular activities (EVAs). Our focus is on development of a small personal radiation monitor for lunar EVA that responds to the complex radiation quality and changing dose rates on the Moon. Of particular concern are active monitoring capabilities that provide both early warning and radiation dosimetry information during solar particle events (SPEs). To accomplish this, we are developing small detectors integrated with modern high speed, low power microelectronics to measure dose-rate and dose-mean lineal energy in real time. The monitor is designed to perform over the range of dose rates and LETs expected from both GCR and SPE radiations during lunar EVA missions. The monitor design provides simultaneous measurement of dose-equivalent rates at two tissue-equivalent depths simulating skin and marrow. The compact personal monitor is estimated to be the size of a cell phone and would fit on an EVA spacesuit (e.g., in backpack) or in a toolbox. The four-year development effort (which began December 2007) will result in a prototype radiation monitor field tested and characterized for the major radiations expected on the surface of the Moon. We acknowledge support from NSBRI through grants to NASA Ames Research Center (T. Straume, PI) and Colorado State University (T. Borak, PI).

  18. Flame propagation through periodic vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Dold, J.W.; Kerr, O.S.; Nikolova, I.P.

    1995-02-01

    The discovery of a new class of Navier-Stokes solutions representing steady periodic stretched vortices offers a useful test-bed for examining interactions between flames and complex flow-fields. After briefly describing these vortex solutions and their wide-ranging parameterization in terms of wavelength and amplitude, this article examines their effect on flames of constant normal propagation speed as observed through numerical solutions of an eikonal equation. Over certain ranges of vortex amplitude and flame-speed, a corridor of enhanced flame passage is seen to be created as a leading flame-tip managers to leap-frog between successive vortices. However, for large enough amplitudes of vorticity or small enough flame-speeds, the flame fails to be able to benefit from the advection due to the vortices. It is shown that the leading tips of such flames are effectively trapped by the stretched vortices.

  19. The periodic table in Flatland

    SciTech Connect

    Negadi, T.; Kibler, M.

    1996-01-05

    The D-dimensional Coulomb system serves as a starting point for generating generalized atomic shells. These shells are ordered according to a generalized Madelung rule in D dimensions. This rule together with an Aujbau Prinzip is applied to produce a D-dimensional periodic table. A model is developed to rationalize the ordering of the shells predicted by the generalized Madelung rule. This model is based on the introduction of a Hamiltonian, invariant under the q-deformed algebra U{sub q}(so(D)), that breaks down the SO(D + 1) dynamical symmetry of the hydrogen atom in D dimensions. The D = 2 case (Flatland) is investigated in some detail. It is shown that the neutral atoms and the (moderately) positive ions correspond to the values q = 0.8 and q = 1, respectively, of the deformation parameter q. 55 refs.

  20. Technological advances in perioperative monitoring: Current concepts and clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chilkoti, Geetanjali; Wadhwa, Rachna; Saxena, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Minimal mandatory monitoring in the perioperative period recommended by Association of Anesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland and American Society of Anesthesiologists are universally acknowledged and has become an integral part of the anesthesia practice. The technologies in perioperative monitoring have advanced, and the availability and clinical applications have multiplied exponentially. Newer monitoring techniques include depth of anesthesia monitoring, goal-directed fluid therapy, transesophageal echocardiography, advanced neurological monitoring, improved alarm system and technological advancement in objective pain assessment. Various factors that need to be considered with the use of improved monitoring techniques are their validation data, patient outcome, safety profile, cost-effectiveness, awareness of the possible adverse events, knowledge of technical principle and ability of the convenient routine handling. In this review, we will discuss the new monitoring techniques in anesthesia, their advantages, deficiencies, limitations, their comparison to the conventional methods and their effect on patient outcome, if any. PMID:25788767

  1. Comprehensive air monitoring plan: general monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-31

    Recommendations are provided for general monitoring of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) in ambient air in parts of Colusa, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma counties potentially impacted by emissions from geothermal development projects in the Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area. Recommendations for types, placement, performance guidelines, and criteria and procedure for triggering establishment and termination of CAMP monitoring equipment were determined after examination of four factors: population location; emission sources; meteorological considerations; and data needs of permitting agencies and applicants. Three alternate financial plans were developed. Locations and equipment for immediate installation are recommended for: two air quality stations in communities where the State ambient air quality standard for H/sub 2/S has been exceeded; three air quality trend stations to monitor progress in reduction of H/sub 2/S emissions; two meteorological observation stations to monitor synoptic wind flow over the area; and one acoustic radar and one rawinsonde station to monitor air inversions which limit the depth of the mixing layer.

  2. 40 CFR 63.695 - Inspection and monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... paragraphs (e)(1) through (e)(7) of this section. (1) A continuous parameter monitoring system must be used... reason. The initial semiannual period is the 6-month reporting period addressed by the first semiannual report submitted by the owner or operator in accordance with § 63.697(b)(4) of this subpart. (7)...

  3. 40 CFR 63.695 - Inspection and monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... paragraphs (e)(1) through (e)(7) of this section. (1) A continuous parameter monitoring system must be used... reason. The initial semiannual period is the 6-month reporting period addressed by the first semiannual report submitted by the owner or operator in accordance with § 63.697(b)(4) of this subpart. (7)...

  4. 40 CFR 63.695 - Inspection and monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... paragraphs (e)(1) through (e)(7) of this section. (1) A continuous parameter monitoring system must be used... reason. The initial semiannual period is the 6-month reporting period addressed by the first semiannual report submitted by the owner or operator in accordance with § 63.697(b)(4) of this subpart. (7)...

  5. Analysis and monitoring design for networks

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, V.; Flanagan, D.; Rowan, T.; Batsell, S.

    1998-06-01

    The idea of applying experimental design methodologies to develop monitoring systems for computer networks is relatively novel even though it was applied in other areas such as meteorology, seismology, and transportation. One objective of a monitoring system should always be to collect as little data as necessary to be able to monitor specific parameters of the system with respect to assigned targets and objectives. This implies a purposeful monitoring where each piece of data has a reason to be collected and stored for future use. When a computer network system as large and complex as the Internet is the monitoring subject, providing an optimal and parsimonious observing system becomes even more important. Many data collection decisions must be made by the developers of a monitoring system. These decisions include but are not limited to the following: (1) The type data collection hardware and software instruments to be used; (2) How to minimize interruption of regular network activities during data collection; (3) Quantification of the objectives and the formulation of optimality criteria; (4) The placement of data collection hardware and software devices; (5) The amount of data to be collected in a given time period, how large a subset of the available data to collect during the period, the length of the period, and the frequency of data collection; (6) The determination of the data to be collected (for instance, selection of response and explanatory variables); (7) Which data will be retained and how long (i.e., data storage and retention issues); and (8) The cost analysis of experiments. Mathematical statistics, and, in particular, optimal experimental design methods, may be used to address the majority of problems generated by 3--7. In this study, the authors focus their efforts on topics 3--5.

  6. Capnography: monitoring CO2.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2015-10-01

    MONITORING RESPIRATORY and metabolic function by using capnography to measure end tidal carbon dioxide is standard practice in anaesthesia. It is also becoming more common in intensive care units and during procedural sedation. End tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) monitoring may also be used to assess effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Capnography is now emerging in general medical and surgical wards to monitor respiratory depression in patients using opioid analgesics. Using EtCO2 to monitor respiratory function offers many benefits over pulse oximetry. It is important to understand the differences between these two monitoring methods, and why capnography is increasingly favoured in many situations. An understanding of the physiological processes involved in CO2 excretion allows nurses to use capnography in a safe and meaningful way, while monitoring at-risk patients in acute care. PMID:26638570

  7. Power consumption monitoring using additional monitoring device

    SciTech Connect

    Truşcă, M. R. C. Albert, Ş. Tudoran, C. Soran, M. L. Fărcaş, F.; Abrudean, M.

    2013-11-13

    Today, emphasis is placed on reducing power consumption. Computers are large consumers; therefore it is important to know the total consumption of computing systems. Since their optimal functioning requires quite strict environmental conditions, without much variation in temperature and humidity, reducing energy consumption cannot be made without monitoring environmental parameters. Thus, the present work uses a multifunctional electric meter UPT 210 for power consumption monitoring. Two applications were developed: software which carries meter readings provided by electronic and programming facilitates remote device and a device for temperature monitoring and control. Following temperature variations that occur both in the cooling system, as well as the ambient, can reduce energy consumption. For this purpose, some air conditioning units or some computers are stopped in different time slots. These intervals were set so that the economy is high, but the work's Datacenter is not disturbed.

  8. Sky monitoring with LOBSTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Tichy, V.

    2014-12-01

    The X--ray sky monitoring represents valuable energy spectral extension to optical sky monitoring. Lobster--Eye all--sky monitors are able to provide relatively high sensitivity and good time resolution in the soft X--ray energy range up to 10 keV. The fine time resolution can be used to alert optical robotic telescopes for follow--up and multispectral analyzes in the visible light.

  9. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1990-10-01

    DOE Order 5820.2A requires that low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites active on or after September 1988 and all transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites be monitored periodically to assure that radioactive contamination does not escape from the waste sites and pose a threat to the public or to the environment. This plan describes such a monitoring program for the active LLW disposal sites in SWSA 6 and the TRU waste storage sites in SWSA 5 North. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Monitoring Malware Activity on the LAN Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzewski, Mirosław

    Many security related organizations periodically publish current network and systems security information, with the lists of top malware programs. These lists raises the question how these threats spreads out, if the worms (the only threat with own communication abilities) are low or missing on these lists. The paper discuss the research on malware network activity, aimed to deliver the answer to the question, what is the main infection channel of modern malware, done with the usage of virtual honeypot systems on dedicated, unprotected network. Systems setup, network and systems monitoring solutions, results of over three months of network traffic and malware monitoring are presented, along with the proposed answer to our research question.

  11. Automating the personnel dosimeter monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Compston, M.W.

    1982-12-01

    The personnel dosimetry monitoring program at the Portsmouth uranium enrichment facility has been improved by using thermoluminescent dosimetry to monitor for ionizing radiation exposure, and by automating most of the operations and all of the associated information handling. A thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) card, worn by personnel inside security badges, stores the energy of ionizing radiation. The dosimeters are changed-out periodically and are loaded 150 cards at a time into an automated reader-processor. The resulting data is recorded and filed into a useful form by computer programming developed for this purpose.

  12. Expendable bubble tiltmeter for geophysical monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westphal, J.A.; Carr, M.A.; Miller, W.F.; Dzurisin, D.

    1983-01-01

    An unusually rugged highly sensitive and inexpensive bubble tiltmeter has been designed, tested, and built in quantity. These tiltmeters are presently used on two volcanoes and an Alaskan glacier, where they continuously monitor surface tilts of geological interest. This paper discusses the mechanical, thermal, and electric details of the meter, and illustrates its performance characteristics in both large (>10-4 radian) and small (<10-6 radian) tilt environments. The meter's ultimate sensitivity is better than 2??10-8 radians rms for short periods (hours), and its useful dynamic range is greater than 10 4. Included is a short description of field use of the instrument for volcano monitoring.

  13. Brain Oxygenation Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Smith, Martin

    2016-09-01

    A mismatch between cerebral oxygen supply and demand can lead to cerebral hypoxia/ischemia and deleterious outcomes. Cerebral oxygenation monitoring is an important aspect of multimodality neuromonitoring. It is increasingly deployed whenever intracranial pressure monitoring is indicated. Although there is a large body of evidence demonstrating an association between cerebral hypoxia/ischemia and poor outcomes, it remains to be determined whether restoring cerebral oxygenation leads to improved outcomes. Randomized prospective studies are required to address uncertainties about cerebral oxygenation monitoring and management. This article describes the different methods of monitoring cerebral oxygenation, their indications, evidence base, limitations, and future perspectives. PMID:27521197

  14. Extended Monitoring during Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Nadim; Berzin, Tyler M

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopic sedation has improved procedural and patient outcomes but is associated with attendant risks of oversedation and hemodynamic compromise. Therefore, close monitoring during endoscopic procedures using sedation is critical. This monitoring begins with appropriate staff trained in visual assessment of patients and analysis of basic physiologic parameters. It also mandates an array of devices widely used in practice to evaluate hemodynamics, oxygenation, ventilation, and depth of sedation. The authors review the evidence behind monitoring practices and current society recommendations and discuss forthcoming technologies and techniques that are poised to improve noninvasive monitoring of patients under endoscopic sedation. PMID:27372773

  15. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, James E.; Bolton, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  16. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  17. Environmental monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.C.

    1997-02-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. 52 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Methods of Monitoring Shock

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Ednan K.; Malhotra, Atul; Thompson, B. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Intensive monitoring is a crucial component of the management of shock. However, there is little consensus about optimal strategies for monitoring. Although the pulmonary artery catheter has been widely used, conflicting data exist about the utility of this device. A variety of other techniques have been developed in hopes of providing clinically useful information about myocardial function, intravascular volume, and indices of organ function. In addition, there is evolving evidence that targeting and monitoring certain physiological goals may be most important early in the course of shock. In this chapter, we examine many of the available monitoring techniques and the evidence supporting their use. PMID:16088506

  19. 46 CFR 9.8 - Broken periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Broken periods. 9.8 Section 9.8 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 9.8 Broken periods. In computing extra compensation where the services rendered are in broken periods and less than 2 hours intervene between such broken periods the time served should be...

  20. 34 CFR 75.251 - Budget periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Budget periods. 75.251 Section 75.251 Education Office...-Year Projects § 75.251 Budget periods. (a) The Secretary usually approves a budget period of not more... multi-year project period, the Secretary: (1) Makes a grant to the project for the initial budget...

  1. The Educator's Guide to Computer Periodicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dlabay, Les R.

    1982-01-01

    This annotated directory of periodicals on computers and computer-related topics is divided into three sections: (1) seven major periodicals designed specifically for teachers who wish to use computers as a classroom aid; (2) 12 general-interest computer periodicals for educators; and (3) 15 additional periodicals for specialized interest. (JL)

  2. 20 CFR 627.901 - Transition period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transition period. 627.901 Section 627.901... PROGRAMS UNDER TITLES I, II, AND III OF THE ACT Transition Provisions § 627.901 Transition period. The transition period ended June 30, 1993 unless otherwise stated. The intent of the transition period is...

  3. 46 CFR 9.8 - Broken periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Broken periods. 9.8 Section 9.8 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 9.8 Broken periods. In computing extra compensation where the services rendered are in broken periods and less than 2 hours intervene between such broken periods the time served should be...

  4. 46 CFR 9.8 - Broken periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Broken periods. 9.8 Section 9.8 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 9.8 Broken periods. In computing extra compensation where the services rendered are in broken periods and less than 2 hours intervene between such broken periods the time served should be...

  5. 46 CFR 9.8 - Broken periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Broken periods. 9.8 Section 9.8 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 9.8 Broken periods. In computing extra compensation where the services rendered are in broken periods and less than 2 hours intervene between such broken periods the time served should be...

  6. 46 CFR 9.8 - Broken periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Broken periods. 9.8 Section 9.8 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 9.8 Broken periods. In computing extra compensation where the services rendered are in broken periods and less than 2 hours intervene between such broken periods the time served should be...

  7. A 50 day periodicity in the cosmic ray anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, W.; Ip, W.-H.; Axford, I.

    1983-01-01

    A modulation of the anisotropy of relativistic interplanetary particles with a period of approximately 50 days is discussed. Even though it is not unusual for cosmic ray data to reflect the solar rotation frequency and its harmonics with periods of 25/n days (n being 1, 2, 3, . . .), it is not known how a periodicity of 50 days, which would be a subharmonic, is generated. Since the Cerenkov counter responds to all kinds of relativistic particles, it does not identify the particles that cause the 50 day east-west modulation. Jovian electrons are considered unlikely in that they are most abundant near their source, whereas the modulation has never been reported for ground-based neutron monitors. It is pointed out that since the Cerenkov threshold is somewhat lower than typical neutron monitor cutoffs, it is conceivable that the modulation affects nucleons just in this energy gap. It is also thought that there might be a uniformly distributed component of interplanetary electrons which undergo this peculiar modulation.

  8. March 2007 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-06-01

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 11 monitoring wells and 5 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, and September 2006 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in March 2007, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2005b). The March 2007 sampling represents the fourth monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE. A final sampling event under this program is scheduled for September 2007.

  9. September 2007 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-05-01

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 10 monitoring wells and 6 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, September 2006, and March 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007a). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in September 2007, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b). The September 2007 sampling represents the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE.

  10. 7 CFR 1488.7 - Expiration of period(s) for delivery and/or export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Under CCC Export Credit Sales Program (GSM-5) Financing Export Sales § 1488.7 Expiration of period(s..., the period for delivery may be extended by CCC by the period of such delay. (c) If delivery is...

  11. Characterizing the shortest-period planets found by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Rappaport, Saul A.

    2015-01-01

    It is no coincidence that the first exoplanets known to have rocky compositions, CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b, both have orbital periods shorter than one day. Such ultra-short periods facilitate planet discovery and characterization, by enabling a large number of transits to be observed, enhancing the amplitude of the radial-velocity signal, and allowing a cleaner separation of the radial-velocity signal from the slower spurious variations due to stellar activity. We have constructed a list of 106 planet candidates with periods shorter than one day, based on an independent search of the Kepler database as well as a critical review of previously published candidates. Our survey has revealed that ultra-short-period planets are approximately as common as hot Jupiters, but are almost always smaller than 2 RE. In addition, the ultra-short-period planets tend to be found as part of compact multi-planet systems, in contrast to the 'loneliness' of hot Jupiters. I will describe our ongoing efforts to characterize this new family of planets, with a combination of stellar spectroscopy and radial-velocity monitoring using the Keck telescopes.

  12. Radial velocity planet detection biases at the stellar rotational period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Plavchan, Peter; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David R.; Swift, Jonathan; Kane, Stephen R.

    2016-07-01

    Future generations of precise radial velocity (RV) surveys aim to achieve sensitivity sufficient to detect Earth mass planets orbiting in their stars' habitable zones. A major obstacle to this goal is astrophysical RV noise caused by active areas moving across the stellar limb as a star rotates. In this paper, we quantify how stellar activity impacts exoplanet detection with radial velocities as a function of orbital and stellar rotational periods. We perform data-driven simulations of how stellar rotation affects planet detectability and compile and present relations for the typical time-scale and amplitude of stellar RV noise as a function of stellar mass. We show that the characteristic time-scales of quasi-periodic RV jitter from stellar rotational modulations coincides with the orbital period of habitable-zone exoplanets around early M-dwarfs. These coincident periods underscore the importance of monitoring the targets of RV habitable-zone planet surveys through simultaneous photometric measurements for determining rotation periods and activity signals, and mitigating activity signals using spectroscopic indicators and/or RV measurements at different wavelengths.

  13. Radial Velocity Planet Detection Biases at the Stellar Rotational Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Plavchan, Peter; Asher Johnson, John; Ciardi, David R.; Swift, Jonathan; Kane, Stephen R.

    2016-04-01

    Future generations of precise radial velocity (RV) surveys aim to achieve sensitivity sufficient to detect Earth mass planets orbiting in their stars' habitable zones. A major obstacle to this goal is astrophysical radial velocity noise caused by active areas moving across the stellar limb as a star rotates. In this paper, we quantify how stellar activity impacts exoplanet detection with radial velocities as a function of orbital and stellar rotational periods. We perform data-driven simulations of how stellar rotation affects planet detectability and compile and present relations for the typical timescale and amplitude of stellar radial velocity noise as a function of stellar mass. We show that the characteristic timescales of quasi-periodic radial velocity jitter from stellar rotational modulations coincides with the orbital period of habitable zone exoplanets around early M-dwarfs. These coincident periods underscore the importance of monitoring the targets of RV habitable zone planet surveys through simultaneous photometric measurements for determining rotation periods and activity signals, and mitigating activity signals using spectroscopic indicators and/or RV measurements at different wavelengths.

  14. Gauge interaction as periodicity modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolce, Donatello

    2012-06-01

    The paper is devoted to a geometrical interpretation of gauge invariance in terms of the formalism of field theory in compact space-time dimensions (Dolce, 2011) [8]. In this formalism, the kinematic information of an interacting elementary particle is encoded on the relativistic geometrodynamics of the boundary of the theory through local transformations of the underlying space-time coordinates. Therefore gauge interactions are described as invariance of the theory under local deformations of the boundary. The resulting local variations of the field solution are interpreted as internal transformations. The internal symmetries of the gauge theory turn out to be related to corresponding space-time local symmetries. In the approximation of local infinitesimal isometric transformations, Maxwell's kinematics and gauge invariance are inferred directly from the variational principle. Furthermore we explicitly impose periodic conditions at the boundary of the theory as semi-classical quantization condition in order to investigate the quantum behavior of gauge interaction. In the abelian case the result is a remarkable formal correspondence with scalar QED.

  15. Epigenetics in the perioperative period

    PubMed Central

    Lirk, P; Fiegl, H; Weber, N C; Hollmann, M W

    2015-01-01

    The perioperative period is characterized by profound changes in the body's homoeostatic processes. This review seeks to address whether epigenetic mechanisms may influence an individual's reaction to surgery and anaesthesia. Evidence from animal and human studies suggests that epigenetic mechanisms can explain many facets of susceptibility to acute and chronic pain, making them potential therapeutic targets. Modern pain management is still based upon opiates, and both the developmental expression of opioid receptors and opioid-induced hyperalgesia have been linked to epigenetic mechanisms. In general, opiates seem to increase global DNA methylation levels. This is in contrast to local anaesthetics, which have been ascribed a global demethylating effect. Even though no direct investigations have been carried out, the potential influence of epigenetics on the inflammatory response that follows surgery seems a promising area for research. There is a considerable body of evidence that supports the involvement of epigenetics in the complex process of wound healing. Epigenetics is an important emerging research topic in perioperative medicine, with a huge potential to positively influence patient outcome. PMID:25073649

  16. Dense periodic packings of tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbrielli, Ruggero; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-02-01

    Dense packings of nonoverlapping bodies in three-dimensional Euclidean space R3 are useful models of the structure of a variety of many-particle systems that arise in the physical and biological sciences. Here we investigate the packing behavior of congruent ring tori in R3, which are multiply connected nonconvex bodies of genus 1, as well as horn and spindle tori. Specifically, we analytically construct a family of dense periodic packings of unlinked tori guided by the organizing principles originally devised for simply connected solid bodies [22 Torquato and Jiao, Phys. Rev. E 86, 011102 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.011102]. We find that the horn tori as well as certain spindle and ring tori can achieve a packing density not only higher than that of spheres (i.e., π /√18 =0.7404...) but also higher than the densest known ellipsoid packings (i.e., 0.7707...). In addition, we study dense packings of clusters of pair-linked ring tori (i.e., Hopf links), which can possess much higher densities than corresponding packings consisting of unlinked tori.

  17. 40 CFR 60.584 - Monitoring of operations and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... device, record the average exhaust vent VOC concentration for each 3-hour clock period of printing... monitoring device, the average temperatures for each 3-hour clock period of printing operation when the... addition to the record made by the continuous monitoring device, the average temperature for each...

  18. 40 CFR 63.7535 - How do I monitor and collect data to demonstrate continuous compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Industrial... periods (see § 63.8(c)(7) of this part), and required monitoring system quality assurance or control...-control periods, or required monitoring system quality assurance or control activities in data...

  19. 40 CFR 60.584 - Monitoring of operations and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... device, record the average exhaust vent VOC concentration for each 3-hour clock period of printing... monitoring device, the average temperatures for each 3-hour clock period of printing operation when the... addition to the record made by the continuous monitoring device, the average temperature for each...

  20. 40 CFR 60.584 - Monitoring of operations and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... device, record the average exhaust vent VOC concentration for each 3-hour clock period of printing... monitoring device, the average temperatures for each 3-hour clock period of printing operation when the... addition to the record made by the continuous monitoring device, the average temperature for each...