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Sample records for 4b core protein

  1. Cellular immunogenicity of a multi-epitope peptide vaccine candidate based on hepatitis C virus NS5A, NS4B and core proteins in HHD-2 mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Jun; Lü, Xin; Lei, Ying-Feng; Yang, Jing; Yao, Min; Lan, Hai-Yun; Zhang, Jian-Min; Jia, Zhan-Sheng; Yin, Wen; Xu, Zhi-Kai

    2013-04-01

    To develop a vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV), a multi-epitope peptide was synthesized from nonstructural proteins containing HLA-A2 epitopes inducing mainly responses in natural infection. The engineered vaccine candidate, VAL-44, consists of multiple epitopes from the HCV NS5A, NS4B and core proteins. Immunization with the VAL-44 peptide induced higher CTL responses than those by the smaller VL-20 peptide. VAL-44 induced antigen-specific IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells. VAL-44 elicited a Th1-biased immune response with secretion of high amounts of IFN-γ and IL-2, compared with VL-20. These results suggest that VAL-44 can elicit strong cellular immune responses. The VAL-44 peptide stimulated IFN-γ production from viral-specific peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients infected with HCV. These results suggest that VAL-44 could be developed as a potential HCV multi-epitope peptide vaccine. PMID:23333413

  2. Mutations in the classical swine fever virus NS4B protein affects virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NS4B is one of the non-structural proteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), the etiological agent of a severe, highly lethal disease of swine. Protein domain analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of the NS4B protein of highly pathogenic CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) identified a Toll/Inte...

  3. K-Ras4B proteins are expressed in the nucleolus: Interaction with nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Birchenall-Roberts, Maria C; Fu, Tao; Kim, Soo-Gyung; Huang, Ying K; Dambach, Michael; Resau, James H; Ruscetti, Francis W

    2006-09-22

    Kirsten Ras4B (K-Ras4B) is a potent onco-protein that is expressed in the majority of human cell types and is frequently mutated in carcinomas. K-Ras4B, like other members of the Ras family of proteins, is considered to be a cytoplasmic protein that must be localized to the plasma membrane for activation. Here, using confocal microscopy and biochemical analysis, we show that K-Ras4B, but not H-Ras or the closely related K-Ras4A, is also present in the nucleoli of normal and transformed cells. Subcellular fractionation and immunostaining show that K-Ras4B is located not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleolar compartment. Modification of a C-terminal hexa-lysine motif unique to K-Ras4B results in exclusively cytoplasmic forms of the protein. Nucleolin, a pleiotropic regulator of cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, is also characterized by a nucleolar-like nuclear appearance. We show that K-Ras4B and nucleolin co-localize within the nucleus and that nucleolin physically associates with K-Ras4B. Inhibition of K-Ras4B/nucleolin association blocked nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B. Using siRNA to knockdown the expression of nucleolin eliminated the nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B and significantly repressed the activation of the well-characterized K-Ras4B transcriptional target Ap-1, but stimulated Elk1. These data provide evidence of a nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B and describe a functional association between K-Ras4B and nucleolin. PMID:16889753

  4. K-Ras4B proteins are expressed in the nucleolus: Interaction with nucleolin

    SciTech Connect

    Birchenall-Roberts, Maria C. . E-mail: birchena@mail.ncifcrf.gov; Fu, Tao; Kim, Soo-Gyung; Huang, Ying K.; Dambach, Michael; Resau, James H.; Ruscetti, Francis W.

    2006-09-22

    Kirsten Ras4B (K-Ras4B) is a potent onco-protein that is expressed in the majority of human cell types and is frequently mutated in carcinomas. K-Ras4B, like other members of the Ras family of proteins, is considered to be a cytoplasmic protein that must be localized to the plasma membrane for activation. Here, using confocal microscopy and biochemical analysis, we show that K-Ras4B, but not H-Ras or the closely related K-Ras4A, is also present in the nucleoli of normal and transformed cells. Subcellular fractionation and immunostaining show that K-Ras4B is located not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleolar compartment. Modification of a C-terminal hexa-lysine motif unique to K-Ras4B results in exclusively cytoplasmic forms of the protein. Nucleolin, a pleiotropic regulator of cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, is also characterized by a nucleolar-like nuclear appearance. We show that K-Ras4B and nucleolin co-localize within the nucleus and that nucleolin physically associates with K-Ras4B. Inhibition of K-Ras4B/nucleolin association blocked nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B. Using siRNA to knockdown the expression of nucleolin eliminated the nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B and significantly repressed the activation of the well-characterized K-Ras4B transcriptional target Ap-1, but stimulated Elk1. These data provide evidence of a nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B and describe a functional association between K-Ras4B and nucleolin.

  5. Characterization of Dengue Virus NS4A and NS4B Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jing; Xie, Xuping; Wang, Qing-Yin; Dong, Hongping; Lee, Michelle Yueqi; Kang, Congbao

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Flavivirus replication is mediated by a membrane-associated replication complex where viral membrane proteins NS2A, NS2B, NS4A, and NS4B serve as the scaffold for the replication complex formation. Here, we used dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) as a model to characterize viral NS4A-NS4B interaction. NS4A interacts with NS4B in virus-infected cells and in cells transiently expressing NS4A and NS4B in the absence of other viral proteins. Recombinant NS4A and NS4B proteins directly bind to each other with an estimated Kd (dissociation constant) of 50 nM. Amino acids 40 to 76 (spanning the first transmembrane domain, consisting of amino acids 50 to 73) of NS4A and amino acids 84 to 146 (also spanning the first transmembrane domain, consisting of amino acids 101 to 129) of NS4B are the determinants for NS4A-NS4B interaction. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis suggests that NS4A residues 17 to 80 form two amphipathic helices (helix α1, comprised of residues 17 to 32, and helix α2, comprised of residues 40 to 47) that associate with the cytosolic side of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and helix α3 (residues 52 to 75) that transverses the ER membrane. In addition, NMR analysis identified NS4A residues that may participate in the NS4A-NS4B interaction. Amino acid substitution of these NS4A residues exhibited distinct effects on viral replication. Three of the four NS4A mutations (L48A, T54A, and L60A) that affected the NS4A-NS4B interaction abolished or severely reduced viral replication; in contrast, two NS4A mutations (F71A and G75A) that did not affect NS4A-NS4B interaction had marginal effects on viral replication, demonstrating the biological relevance of the NS4A-NS4B interaction to DENV-2 replication. Taken together, the study has provided experimental evidence to argue that blocking the NS4A-NS4B interaction could be a potential antiviral approach. IMPORTANCE Flavivirus NS4A and NS4B proteins are essential components of the ER membrane

  6. High expression of vacuolar protein sorting 4B (VPS4B) is associated with accelerated cell proliferation and poor prognosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dawei; Hu, Baoying; Wei, Lixian; Xiong, Yicheng; Wang, Gang; Ni, Tingting; Zong, Chunyan; Ni, Runzhou; Lu, Cuihua

    2015-03-01

    Vacuolar protein sorting 4B (VPS4B) is a member of ATPase family proteins that have been shown to play important roles in the formation of MVBs, virus budding and abscission of cytokinesis. In this study, we investigated the prognostic role of VPS4B in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its effect on the growth of HCC cells. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that VPS4B was significantly upregulated in 98 HCC tissues, compared with adjacent nontumorous samples. Meanwhile, clinicopathological variables and univariate and multivariate survival analyses showed that high VPS4B expression was correlated with multiple clinicopathological factors, including AJCC stage, microvascular invasion, Ki-67 and a poor prognosis. More importantly, univariate and multivariate survival analyses demonstrated that VPS4B served as an independent prognostic factor for survival in HCC patients. Furthermore, we found that VPS4B was lowly expressed in serum-starved Huh7 and HepG2 HCC cells, and was progressively increased after serum-refeeding. To study whether VPS4B could regulate the proliferation of HCC cells, VPS4B was knocked down in both Huh7 and HepG2 cells through the transfection of VPS4B-siRNA oligos. Flow cytometry and CCK-8 assay results indicated that interference of VPS4B led to cell cycle arrest and reduced cell proliferation of HCC cells. Taken together, our results implied that VPS4B could be a candidate prognostic biomarker as well as a potential therapeutical target of HCC. PMID:25547899

  7. Identification of RNA-Binding Protein LARP4B as a Tumor Suppressor in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Koso, Hideto; Yi, Hungtsung; Sheridan, Paul; Miyano, Satoru; Ino, Yasushi; Todo, Tomoki; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2016-04-15

    Transposon-based insertional mutagenesis is a valuable method for conducting unbiased forward genetic screens to identify cancer genes in mice. We used this system to elucidate factors involved in the malignant transformation of neural stem cells into glioma-initiating cells. We identified an RNA-binding protein, La-related protein 4b (LARP4B), as a candidate tumor-suppressor gene in glioma. LARP4B expression was consistently decreased in human glioma stem cells and cell lines compared with normal neural stem cells. Moreover, heterozygous deletion of LARP4B was detected in nearly 80% of glioblastomas in The Cancer Genome Atlas database. LARP4B loss was also associated with low expression and poor patient survival. Overexpression of LARP4B in glioma cell lines strongly inhibited proliferation by inducing mitotic arrest and apoptosis in four of six lines as well as in two patient-derived glioma stem cell populations. The expression levels of CDKN1A and BAX were also upregulated upon LARP4B overexpression, and the growth-inhibitory effects were partially dependent on p53 (TP53) activity in cells expressing wild-type, but not mutant, p53. We further found that the La module, which is responsible for the RNA chaperone activity of LARP4B, was important for the growth-suppressive effect and was associated with BAX mRNA. Finally, LARP4B depletion in p53 and Nf1-deficient mouse primary astrocytes promoted cell proliferation and led to increased tumor size and invasiveness in xenograft and orthotopic models. These data provide strong evidence that LARP4B serves as a tumor-suppressor gene in glioma, encouraging further exploration of the RNA targets potentially involved in LARP4B-mediatd growth inhibition. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2254-64. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26933087

  8. Identification of an NTPase motif in classical swine fever virus NS4B protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of swine caused by CSF virus (CSFV), a positive sense single-stranded RNA virus in the genus Pestivirus of the Flaviviridae family. Here, we have identified, within CSFV non-structural (NS) protein NS4B, conserved sequence el...

  9. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus NS4b Protein Inhibits Host RNase L Activation

    PubMed Central

    Thornbrough, Joshua M.; Jha, Babal K.; Yount, Boyd; Goldstein, Stephen A.; Li, Yize; Elliott, Ruth; Sims, Amy C.; Baric, Ralph S.; Silverman, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is the first highly pathogenic human coronavirus to emerge since severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2002. Like many coronaviruses, MERS-CoV carries genes that encode multiple accessory proteins that are not required for replication of the genome but are likely involved in pathogenesis. Evasion of host innate immunity through interferon (IFN) antagonism is a critical component of viral pathogenesis. The IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS)-RNase L pathway activates upon sensing of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Activated RNase L cleaves viral and host single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), which leads to translational arrest and subsequent cell death, preventing viral replication and spread. Here we report that MERS-CoV, a lineage C Betacoronavirus, and related bat CoV NS4b accessory proteins have phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity and antagonize OAS-RNase L by enzymatically degrading 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A), activators of RNase L. This is a novel function for NS4b, which has previously been reported to antagonize IFN signaling. NS4b proteins are distinct from lineage A Betacoronavirus PDEs and rotavirus gene-encoded PDEs, in having an amino-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS) and are localized mostly to the nucleus. However, the expression level of cytoplasmic MERS-CoV NS4b protein is sufficient to prevent activation of RNase L. Finally, this is the first report of an RNase L antagonist expressed by a human or bat coronavirus and provides a specific mechanism by which this occurs. Our findings provide a potential mechanism for evasion of innate immunity by MERS-CoV while also identifying a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27025250

  10. Conserved patterns hidden within group A Streptococcus M protein hypervariability recognize human C4b-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Buffalo, Cosmo Z; Bahn-Suh, Adrian J; Hirakis, Sophia P; Biswas, Tapan; Amaro, Rommie E; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-01-01

    No vaccine exists against group A Streptococcus (GAS), a leading cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. A severe hurdle is the hypervariability of its major antigen, the M protein, with >200 different M types known. Neutralizing antibodies typically recognize M protein hypervariable regions (HVRs) and confer narrow protection. In stark contrast, human C4b-binding protein (C4BP), which is recruited to the GAS surface to block phagocytic killing, interacts with a remarkably large number of M protein HVRs (apparently ∼90%). Such broad recognition is rare, and we discovered a unique mechanism for this through the structure determination of four sequence-diverse M proteins in complexes with C4BP. The structures revealed a uniform and tolerant 'reading head' in C4BP, which detected conserved sequence patterns hidden within hypervariability. Our results open up possibilities for rational therapies that target the M-C4BP interaction, and also inform a path towards vaccine design. PMID:27595425

  11. Naturally Occurring Deletion Mutants of the Pig-Specific, Intestinal Crypt Epithelial Cell Protein CLCA4b without Apparent Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Stephanie; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Binder, Stefanie; Van Hook, Matthew J.; Thoreson, Wallace B.; Gruber, Achim D.; Mundhenk, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The human CLCA4 (chloride channel regulator, calcium-activated) modulates the intestinal phenotype of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients via an as yet unknown pathway. With the generation of new porcine CF models, species-specific differences between human modifiers of CF and their porcine orthologs are considered critical for the translation of experimental data. Specifically, the porcine ortholog to the human CF modulator gene CLCA4 has recently been shown to be duplicated into two separate genes, CLCA4a and CLCA4b. Here, we characterize the duplication product, CLCA4b, in terms of its genomic structure, tissue and cellular expression patterns as well as its in vitro electrophysiological properties. The CLCA4b gene is a pig-specific duplication product of the CLCA4 ancestor and its protein is exclusively expressed in small and large intestinal crypt epithelial cells, a niche specifically occupied by no other porcine CLCA family member. Surprisingly, a unique deleterious mutation of the CLCA4b gene is spread among modern and ancient breeds in the pig population, but this mutation did not result in an apparent phenotype in homozygously affected animals. Electrophysiologically, neither the products of the wild type nor of the mutated CLCA4b genes were able to evoke a calcium-activated anion conductance, a consensus feature of other CLCA proteins. The apparently pig-specific duplication of the CLCA4 gene with unique expression of the CLCA4b protein variant in intestinal crypt epithelial cells where the porcine CFTR is also present raises the question of whether it may modulate the porcine CF phenotype. Moreover, the naturally occurring null variant of CLCA4b will be valuable for the understanding of CLCA protein function and their relevance in modulating the CF phenotype. PMID:26474299

  12. Altered Expression of High Molecular Weight Heat Shock Proteins after OCT4B1 Suppression in Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Mohammad Reza; Kazemi Arababadi, Mohammad; Asadi, Malek Hossein; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objective OCT4B1, a novel variant of OCT4, is expressed in cancer cell lines and tis- sues. Based on our previous reports, OCT4B1 appears to have a crucial role in regulating apoptosis as well as stress response [heat shock proteins (HSPs)] pathways. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of OCT4B1 silencing on the expression of high molecular weight HSPs in three different human tumor cell lines. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, OCT4B1 expression was suppressed in AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma), 5637 (bladder tumor) and U-87MG (brain tumor) cell lines using RNAi strategy. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array was em- ployed for expression level analysis and the fold changes were calculated using RT2 Pro- filer PCR array data analysis software version 3.5. Results Our data revealed up-regulation of HSPD1 (from HSP60 family) as well as HSPA14, HSPA1L, HSPA4, HSPA5 and HSPA8 (from HSP70 family) following OCT4B1 knock-down in all three cell lines. In contrast, the expression of HSP90AA1 and HSP90AB1 (from HSP90 family) as well as HSPA1B and HSPA6 (from HSP70 family) was down-regulated under similar conditions. Other stress-related genes showed varying ex- pression pattern in the examined tumor cell lines. Conclusion Our data suggest a direct or indirect correlation between the expression of OCT4B1 and HSP90 gene family. However, OCT4B1 expression was not strongly corre- lated with the expression of HSP70 and HSP60 gene families. PMID:26862520

  13. The interaction between the Hepatitis C proteins NS4B and NS5A is involved in viral replication

    PubMed Central

    David, Naama; Yaffe, Yakey; Hagoel, Lior; Elazar, Menashe; Glenn, Jeffrey S.; Hirschberg, Koret; Sklan, Ella H.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicates in membrane associated, highly ordered replication complexes (RCs). These complexes include viral and host proteins necessary for viral RNA genome replication. The interaction network among viral and host proteins underlying the formation of these RCs is yet to be thoroughly characterized. Here, we investigated the association between NS4B and NS5A, two critical RC components. We characterized the interaction between these proteins using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and a mammalian two-hybrid system. Specific tryptophan residues within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of NS4B were shown to mediate this interaction. Domain I of NS5A, was sufficient to mediate its interaction with NS4B. Mutations in the NS4B CTD tryptophan residues abolished viral replication. Moreover, one of these mutations also affected NS5A hyperphosphorylation. These findings provide new insights into the importance of the NS4B–NS5A interaction and serve as a starting point for studying the complex interactions between the replicase subunits. PMID:25462354

  14. Human C3b- and C4b-regulatory proteins: a new multi-gene family.

    PubMed

    Holers, V M; Cole, J L; Lublin, D M; Seya, T; Atkinson, J P

    1985-06-01

    The complement cascade is regulated to prevent inappropriate activation. This regulation is targeted not only at the initiation of the cascade but also at the amplification andjunctional (C3) steps. Five glycoproteins with both complement regulatory activity and binding affinity for C3b/C4b have been characterized. In plasma these molecules are factor H(H) and C4-binding protein (C4-bp) and, on cells, they are the C3b/C4b receptor (CR1), decay-accelerating factor (DAF), and gp45-70. Here Michael Holers and his colleagues review structural, functional and genetic studies of these proteins and discuss the evidence for a new multi-gene family with a common ancestral protein. PMID:25289982

  15. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus ORF4b protein inhibits type I interferon production through both cytoplasmic and nuclear targets

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Ye, Fei; Zhu, Na; Wang, Wenling; Deng, Yao; Zhao, Zhengdong; Tan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel and highly pathogenic human coronavirus and has quickly spread to other countries in the Middle East, Europe, North Africa and Asia since 2012. Previous studies have shown that MERS-CoV ORF4b antagonizes the early antiviral alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) response, which may significantly contribute to MERS-CoV pathogenesis; however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we found that ORF4b in the cytoplasm could specifically bind to TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and IκB kinase epsilon (IKKε), suppress the molecular interaction between mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and IKKε, and inhibit IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) phosphorylation and subsequent IFN-β production. Further analysis showed that ORF4b could also inhibit IRF3 and IRF7-induced production of IFN-β, whereas deletion of the nuclear localization signal of ORF4b abrogated its ability to inhibit IRF3 and IRF7-induced production of IFN-β, but not IFN-β production induced by RIG-I, MDA5, MAVS, IKKε, and TBK-1, suggesting that ORF4b could inhibit the induction of IFN-β in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Collectively, these results indicate that MERS-CoV ORF4b inhibits the induction of type I IFN through a direct interaction with IKKε/TBK1 in the cytoplasm, and also in the nucleus with unknown mechanism. Viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade or thwart a host’s antiviral responses. A novel human coronavirus (HCoV), Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), is distinguished from other coronaviruses by its high pathogenicity and mortality. However, virulence determinants that distinguish MERS-CoV from other HCoVs have yet to be identified. MERS-CoV ORF4b antagonizes the early antiviral response, which may contribute to MERS-CoV pathogenesis. Here, we report the identification of the interferon (IFN) antagonism mechanism of MERS-CoV ORF4b. MERS-CoV ORF4b inhibits the production

  16. Farnesylated and methylated KRAS4b: high yield production of protein suitable for biophysical studies of prenylated protein-lipid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, William K.; Esposito, Dominic; Abreu Blanco, Maria; Alexander, Patrick; Bindu, Lakshman; Bittner, Cammi; Chertov, Oleg; Frank, Peter H.; Grose, Carissa; Jones, Jane E.; Meng, Zhaojing; Perkins, Shelley; Van, Que; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Fivash, Matthew; Nissley, Dwight V.; McCormick, Frank; Holderfield, Matthew; Stephen, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Prenylated proteins play key roles in several human diseases including cancer, atherosclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. KRAS4b, which is frequently mutated in pancreatic, colon and lung cancers, is processed by farnesylation, proteolytic cleavage and carboxymethylation at the C-terminus. Plasma membrane localization of KRAS4b requires this processing as does KRAS4b-dependent RAF kinase activation. Previous attempts to produce modified KRAS have relied on protein engineering approaches or in vitro farnesylation of bacterially expressed KRAS protein. The proteins produced by these methods do not accurately replicate the mature KRAS protein found in mammalian cells and the protein yield is typically low. We describe a protocol that yields 5–10 mg/L highly purified, farnesylated, and methylated KRAS4b from insect cells. Farnesylated and methylated KRAS4b is fully active in hydrolyzing GTP, binds RAF-RBD on lipid Nanodiscs and interacts with the known farnesyl-binding protein PDEδ. PMID:26522388

  17. Identification of a new dengue virus inhibitor that targets the viral NS4B protein and restricts genomic RNA replication.

    PubMed

    van Cleef, Koen W R; Overheul, Gijs J; Thomassen, Michael C; Kaptein, Suzanne J F; Davidson, Andrew D; Jacobs, Michael; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; van Rij, Ronald P

    2013-08-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an important human arthropod-borne virus with a major impact on public health. Nevertheless, a licensed vaccine or specific treatment is still lacking. We therefore screened the NIH Clinical Collection (NCC), a library of drug-like small molecules, for inhibitors of DENV replication using a cell line that contains a stably replicating DENV serotype 2 (DENV2) subgenomic replicon. The most potent DENV inhibitor in the NCC was δ opioid receptor antagonist SDM25N. This compound showed antiviral activity against wild-type DENV2 in both Hela and BHK-21 cells, but not in the C6/36 cell line derived from the mosquito Aedes albopictus. The structurally related compound naltrindole also inhibited DENV replication, albeit less potently. Using a transient subgenomic replicon, we demonstrate that SDM25N restricts genomic RNA replication rather than translation of the viral genome. We identified a single amino acid substitution (F164L) in the NS4B protein that confers resistance to SDM25N. Remarkably, an NS4B amino acid substitution (P104L), which was previously shown to confer resistance to the DENV inhibitor NITD-618, also provided resistance to SDM25N. In conclusion, we have identified a new DENV inhibitor, SDM25N, which restricts genomic RNA replication by - directly or indirectly - targeting the viral NS4B protein. PMID:23735301

  18. Distinct and overlapping functions of the cullin E3 ligase scaffolding proteins CUL4A and CUL4B.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Jeffrey; Zhou, Pengbo

    2015-11-15

    The cullin 4 subfamily of genes includes CUL4A and CUL4B, which share a mostly identical amino acid sequence aside from the elongated N-terminal region in CUL4B. Both act as scaffolding proteins for modular cullin RING ligase 4 (CRL4) complexes which promote the ubiquitination of a variety of substrates. CRL4 function is vital to cells as loss of both genes or their shared substrate adaptor protein DDB1 halts proliferation and eventually leads to cell death. Due to their high structural similarity, CUL4A and CUL4B share a substantial overlap in function. However, in some cases, differences in subcellular localization, spatiotemporal expression patterns and stress-inducibility preclude functional compensation. In this review, we highlight the most essential functions of the CUL4 genes in: DNA repair and replication, chromatin-remodeling, cell cycle regulation, embryogenesis, hematopoiesis and spermatogenesis. CUL4 genes are also clinically relevant as dysregulation can contribute to the onset of cancer and CRL4 complexes are often hijacked by certain viruses to promote viral replication and survival. Also, mutations in CUL4B have been implicated in a subset of patients suffering from syndromic X-linked intellectual disability (AKA mental retardation). Interestingly, the antitumor effects of immunomodulatory drugs are caused by their binding to the CRL4CRBN complex and re-directing the E3 ligase towards the Ikaros transcription factors IKZF1 and IKZF3. Because of their influence over key cellular functions and relevance to human disease, CRL4s are considered promising targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26344709

  19. Eukaryotic initiation factor 4B and the poly(A)-binding protein bind eIF4G competitively.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shijun; Gallie, Daniel R

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4G functions as a scaffold protein that assembles components of the translation initiation complex required to recruit the 40S ribosomal subunit to an mRNA. Although many eukaryotes express two highly similar eIF4G isoforms, those in plants are highly divergent in size and sequence from one another and are referred to as eIF4G and eIFiso4G. Although the domain organization of eIFiso4G differs substantially from eIF4G orthologs in other species, the domain organization of plant eIF4G is largely unknown despite the fact that it is more similar in size and sequence to eIF4G of other eukaryotes. In this study, we show that eIF4G differs from eIFiso4G in that it contains two distinct interaction domains for the poly(A) binding protein (PABP) and eIF4B but is similar to eIFiso4G in having two eIF4A interaction domains. PABP and eIF4B bind the same N-terminal region of eIF4G as they do to a region C-proximal to the HEAT-1 domain in the middle domain of eIF4G, resulting in competitive binding between eIF4B and PABP to each site. eIF4G also differs from eIFiso4G in that no competitive binding was observed between PABP and eIF4A or between eIF4B and eIF4A to its HEAT-1-containing region. These results demonstrate that despite substantial differences in size, sequence, and domain organization, PABP and eIF4B bind to eIF4G and eIFiso4G competitively. PMID:26824014

  20. Aminoterminal amphipathic α-helix AH1 of hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 4B possesses a dual role in RNA replication and virus production.

    PubMed

    Gouttenoire, Jérôme; Montserret, Roland; Paul, David; Castillo, Rosa; Meister, Simon; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Penin, François; Moradpour, Darius

    2014-10-01

    Nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B) is a key organizer of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication complex formation. In concert with other nonstructural proteins, it induces a specific membrane rearrangement, designated as membranous web, which serves as a scaffold for the HCV replicase. The N-terminal part of NS4B comprises a predicted and a structurally resolved amphipathic α-helix, designated as AH1 and AH2, respectively. Here, we report a detailed structure-function analysis of NS4B AH1. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance structural analyses revealed that AH1 folds into an amphipathic α-helix extending from NS4B amino acid 4 to 32, with positively charged residues flanking the helix. These residues are conserved among hepaciviruses. Mutagenesis and selection of pseudorevertants revealed an important role of these residues in RNA replication by affecting the biogenesis of double-membrane vesicles making up the membranous web. Moreover, alanine substitution of conserved acidic residues on the hydrophilic side of the helix reduced infectivity without significantly affecting RNA replication, indicating that AH1 is also involved in virus production. Selective membrane permeabilization and immunofluorescence microscopy analyses of a functional replicon harboring an epitope tag between NS4B AH1 and AH2 revealed a dual membrane topology of the N-terminal part of NS4B during HCV RNA replication. Luminal translocation was unaffected by the mutations introduced into AH1, but was abrogated by mutations introduced into AH2. In conclusion, our study reports the three-dimensional structure of AH1 from HCV NS4B, and highlights the importance of positively charged amino acid residues flanking this amphipathic α-helix in membranous web formation and RNA replication. In addition, we demonstrate that AH1 possesses a dual role in RNA replication and virus production, potentially governed by different topologies of the N-terminal part of NS4B. PMID:25392992

  1. Hepatitis C virus and its protein NS4B activate the cancer-related STAT3 pathway via the endoplasmic reticulum overload response.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingbao; Li, Shanshan; Yu, Xilan; Fang, Xiaonan; Xu, Ahui; Huang, Mingjie; Wu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Yunli; Guo, Fenglin; Xu, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress induces the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which plays an important role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We have previously reported that hepatitis C virus (HCV) and its protein NS4B induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via the endoplasmic reticulum overload response (EOR) in human hepatocytes. Here, we found that NS4B and HCV induce STAT3 activation and stimulate the expression of cancer-related STAT3 target genes, including VEGF, c-myc, MMP-9 and Mcl-1, by EOR in human hepatocytes. Moreover, the cancer-related STAT3 pathway activated by NS4B and HCV via EOR were found to promote human hepatocyte viability. Taken together, these findings revealed that HCV NS4B might contribute to HCC by activating the EOR-mediated cancer-related STAT3 pathway, and this could provide novel insights into HCV-induced HCC. PMID:27180099

  2. Stringent Regulation of Complement Lectin Pathway C3/C5 Convertase By C4b-Binding Protein (C4bp)

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Nenoo; Rajagopalan, Rema; Salvi, Veena P.

    2009-01-01

    The complement lectin pathway, an essential component of the innate immune system, is geared for rapid recognition of infections as each C4b deposited via this pathway is capable of forming a C3/C5 convertase. In the present study, role of C4b-binding protein (C4BP) in regulating the lectin pathway C3/C5 convertase assembled on zymosan and sheep erythrocytes coated with mannan (EMan) was examined. While the C4BP concentration for inhibiting 50% (IC50) formation of surface-bound C3 convertase on the two surfaces was similar to that obtained for the soluble C3 convertase (1.05 nM), ∼3- and 41-fold more was required to inhibit assembly of the C5 convertase on zymosan (2.81 nM) and EMan (42.66 nM). No difference in binding interactions between C4BP and surface-bound C4b alone or in complex with C3b was observed. Increasing the C4b density on zymosan (14,000-431,000 C4b/Zym) increased the number of C4b bound per C4BP from 2.87 to 8.23 indicating that at high C4b density all seven α-chains of C4BP are engaged in C4b-binding. In contrast, the number of C4b bound per C4BP remained constant (3.79 ± 0.60) when the C4b density on EMan was increased. The data also show that C4BP regulates assembly and decay of the lectin pathway C3/C5 convertase more stringently than the classical pathway C3/C5 convertase because of a ∼7 to 13-fold greater affinity for C4b deposited via the lectin pathway than the classical pathway. C4BP thus regulates efficiently the four times greater potential of the lectin pathway than the classical pathway in generating the C3/C5 convertase and hence production of pro-inflammatory products, which are required to fight infections but occasionally cause pathological inflammatory reactions. PMID:19660812

  3. Increasing Rate of Cleavage at Boundary between Non-structural Proteins 4B and 5A Inhibits Replication of Hepatitis C Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Herod, Morgan R.; Jones, Daniel M.; McLauchlan, John; McCormick, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    In hepatitis C virus, non-structural proteins are cleaved from the viral polyprotein by viral encoded proteases. Although proteolytic processing goes to completion, the rate of cleavage differs between different boundaries, primarily due to the sequence at these positions. However, it is not known whether slow cleavage is important for viral replication or a consequence of restrictions on sequences that can be tolerated at the cleaved ends of non-structural proteins. To address this question, mutations were introduced into the NS4B side of the NS4B5A boundary, and their effect on replication and polyprotein processing was examined in the context of a subgenomic replicon. Single mutations that modestly increased the rate of boundary processing were phenotypically silent, but a double mutation, which further increased the rate of boundary cleavage, was lethal. Rescue experiments relying on viral RNA polymerase-induced error failed to identify second site compensatory mutations. Use of a replicon library with codon degeneracy did allow identification of second site compensatory mutations, some of which fell exclusively within the NS5A side of the boundary. These mutations slowed boundary cleavage and only enhanced replication in the context of the original lethal NS4B double mutation. Overall, the data indicate that slow cleavage of the NS4B5A boundary is important and identify a previously unrecognized role for NS4B5A-containing precursors requiring them to exist for a minimum finite period of time. PMID:22084249

  4. The Xenopus laevis Atg4B Protease: Insights into Substrate Recognition and Application for Tag Removal from Proteins Expressed in Pro- and Eukaryotic Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Steffen; Görlich, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    During autophagy, members of the ubiquitin-like Atg8 protein family get conjugated to phosphatidylethanolamine and act as protein-recruiting scaffolds on the autophagosomal membrane. The Atg4 protease produces mature Atg8 from C-terminally extended precursors and deconjugates lipid-bound Atg8. We now found that Xenopus laevis Atg4B (xAtg4B) is ideally suited for proteolytic removal of N-terminal tags from recombinant proteins. To implement this strategy, an Atg8 cleavage module is inserted in between tag and target protein. An optimized xAtg4B protease fragment includes the so far uncharacterized C-terminus, which crucially contributes to recognition of the Xenopus Atg8 homologs xLC3B and xGATE16. xAtg4B-mediated tag cleavage is very robust in solution or on-column, efficient at 4°C and orthogonal to TEV protease and the recently introduced proteases bdSENP1, bdNEDP1 and xUsp2. Importantly, xLC3B fusions are stable in wheat germ extract or when expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but cleavable by xAtg4B during or following purification. We also found that fusions to the bdNEDP1 substrate bdNEDD8 are stable in S. cerevisiae. In combination, or findings now provide a system, where proteins and complexes fused to xLC3B or bdNEDD8 can be expressed in a eukaryotic host and purified by successive affinity capture and proteolytic release steps. PMID:25923686

  5. The Xenopus laevis Atg4B Protease: Insights into Substrate Recognition and Application for Tag Removal from Proteins Expressed in Pro- and Eukaryotic Hosts.

    PubMed

    Frey, Steffen; Görlich, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    During autophagy, members of the ubiquitin-like Atg8 protein family get conjugated to phosphatidylethanolamine and act as protein-recruiting scaffolds on the autophagosomal membrane. The Atg4 protease produces mature Atg8 from C-terminally extended precursors and deconjugates lipid-bound Atg8. We now found that Xenopus laevis Atg4B (xAtg4B) is ideally suited for proteolytic removal of N-terminal tags from recombinant proteins. To implement this strategy, an Atg8 cleavage module is inserted in between tag and target protein. An optimized xAtg4B protease fragment includes the so far uncharacterized C-terminus, which crucially contributes to recognition of the Xenopus Atg8 homologs xLC3B and xGATE16. xAtg4B-mediated tag cleavage is very robust in solution or on-column, efficient at 4°C and orthogonal to TEV protease and the recently introduced proteases bdSENP1, bdNEDP1 and xUsp2. Importantly, xLC3B fusions are stable in wheat germ extract or when expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but cleavable by xAtg4B during or following purification. We also found that fusions to the bdNEDP1 substrate bdNEDD8 are stable in S. cerevisiae. In combination, or findings now provide a system, where proteins and complexes fused to xLC3B or bdNEDD8 can be expressed in a eukaryotic host and purified by successive affinity capture and proteolytic release steps. PMID:25923686

  6. Fine Mapping of the Interaction between C4b-Binding Protein and Outer Membrane Proteins LigA and LigB of Pathogenic Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Breda, Leandro C. D.; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica M.; da Silva, Ludmila B.; Barbosa, Angela S.; Blom, Anna M.; Yung-Fu, Chang; Isaac, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The complement system consists of more than 40 proteins that participate in the inflammatory response and in pathogen killing. Complement inhibitors are necessary to avoid the excessive consumption and activation of this system on host cells. Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic leptospires are able to escape from complement activation by binding to host complement inhibitors Factor H [FH] and C4b-binding protein (C4BP) while non-pathogenic leptospires are rapidly killed in the presence of fresh serum. In this study, we demonstrate that complement control protein domains (CCP) 7 and 8 of C4BP α-chain interact with the outer membrane proteins LcpA, LigA and LigB from the pathogenic leptospire L. interrogans. The interaction between C4BP and LcpA, LigA and LigB is sensitive to ionic strength and inhibited by heparin. We fine mapped the LigA and LigB domains involved in its binding to C4BP and heparin and found that both interactions are mediated through the bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains 7 and 8 (LigA7-8 and LigB7-8) of both LigA and LigB and also through LigB9-10. Therefore, C4BP and heparin may share the same binding sites on Lig proteins. PMID:26517116

  7. Leptospira interrogans Lsa23 protein recruits plasminogen, factor H and C4BP from normal human serum and mediates C3b and C4b degradation.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Gabriela H; Atzingen, Marina V; de Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2016-02-01

    It has been reported that pathogenic Leptospira are resistant to normal human serum (NHS) due to their ability to evade the complement immune system by interacting with factor H (FH) and C4b-binding protein (C4BP) regulators. Moreover, plasmin generation on the leptospiral surface diminishes C3b and IgG deposition, decreasing opsonophagocytosis by immune competent cells. We have previously reported that Lsa23 (LIC11360) is a multipurpose protein capable of binding purified extracellular matrix molecules, FH, C4BP and plasminogen (PLG)/plasmin in the presence of PLG activators. In this work, we provide further evidence that Lsa23 is located at the bacterial surface by using immunofluorescence microscopy. We show that Lsa23 has the ability to acquire FH, C4BP and PLG from NHS, and use these interactions to evade innate immunity. The binding with the complement regulators FH and C4BP preserves factor I (FI) activity, leading to C3b and C4b degradation products, respectively. C3b and C4b alpha-chain cleavage was also observed when Lsa23 bound to PLG generating plasmin, an effect blocked by the protease inhibitor aprotinin. Lsa23 also inhibited lytic activity by NHS mediated by both classical and alternative complement pathways. Thus, Lsa23 has the ability to block both pathways of the complement system, and may help pathogenic Leptospira to escape complement-mediated clearance in human hosts. Indeed, NHS treated with Lsa23 confers a partial serum resistance phenotype to Leptospira biflexa, whereas blocking this protein with anti-Lsa23 renders pathogenic L. interrogans more susceptible to complement-mediated killing. Thus, Lsa23 is a multifunctional protein involved in many pathways, featuring C4b cleavage by plasmin, knowledge that may help in the development of preventive approaches to intervene with human complement escape by this versatile pathogen. PMID:26614523

  8. Random close packing in protein cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, Jennifer C.; Smith, W. Wendell; Regan, Lynne; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2016-03-01

    Shortly after the determination of the first protein x-ray crystal structures, researchers analyzed their cores and reported packing fractions ϕ ≈0.75 , a value that is similar to close packing of equal-sized spheres. A limitation of these analyses was the use of extended atom models, rather than the more physically accurate explicit hydrogen model. The validity of the explicit hydrogen model was proved in our previous studies by its ability to predict the side chain dihedral angle distributions observed in proteins. In contrast, the extended atom model is not able to recapitulate the side chain dihedral angle distributions, and gives rise to large atomic clashes at side chain dihedral angle combinations that are highly probable in protein crystal structures. Here, we employ the explicit hydrogen model to calculate the packing fraction of the cores of over 200 high-resolution protein structures. We find that these protein cores have ϕ ≈0.56 , which is similar to results obtained from simulations of random packings of individual amino acids. This result provides a deeper understanding of the physical basis of protein structure that will enable predictions of the effects of amino acid mutations to protein cores and interfaces of known structure.

  9. Random close packing in protein cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohern, Corey

    Shortly after the determination of the first protein x-ray crystal structures, researchers analyzed their cores and reported packing fractions ϕ ~ 0 . 75 , a value that is similar to close packing equal-sized spheres. A limitation of these analyses was the use of `extended atom' models, rather than the more physically accurate `explicit hydrogen' model. The validity of using the explicit hydrogen model is proved by its ability to predict the side chain dihedral angle distributions observed in proteins. We employ the explicit hydrogen model to calculate the packing fraction of the cores of over 200 high resolution protein structures. We find that these protein cores have ϕ ~ 0 . 55 , which is comparable to random close-packing of non-spherical particles. This result provides a deeper understanding of the physical basis of protein structure that will enable predictions of the effects of amino acid mutations and design of new functional proteins. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Institute for Biological, Physical, and Engineering Sciences, National Library of Medicine training grant T15LM00705628 (J.C.G.), and National Science Foundation DMR-1307712 (L.R.).

  10. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  11. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  12. Binding of complement regulators factor H and C4b binding protein to group A streptococcal strains isolated from tonsillar tissue and blood.

    PubMed

    Suvilehto, Jari; Jarva, Hanna; Seppänen, Mikko; Siljander, Tuula; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Meri, Seppo

    2008-06-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is the most common pathogen causing bacterial pharyngitis. We isolated streptococcal strains from tonsils removed from patients with tonsillar disease (n=202) and studied their ability to bind the complement regulators factor H (FH) and C4b binding protein (C4BP) using 125 I-labeled proteins. Blood isolates of GAS (n=10) were obtained from patients with bacteraemia. Streptococci were isolated from 21% of the tonsillitis patients. The emm and T types of the GAS strains were determined. Of the 26 GAS strains studied, only six could bind FH and/or C4BP above the threshold levels. The fraction of the offered radioactive protein bound ranged between 6-12% for FH and 19-56% for C4BP. The clinical course of the tonsillar disease was not related to the binding of FH or C4BP by GAS. The binding strains were mostly of the T4M4 or T28M28 type. From the invasive strains (n=10), three bound FH (binding level: 8-11%) and two C4BP (36-39%). The binding correlated only partially to M-protein (emm) type suggesting that the binding was not exclusively due to M-protein. The results indicate that complement regulator binding by GAS is only partially related to pathogenicity and not a universal property of all group A streptococci. PMID:18538613

  13. Selective Phosphodiesterase 4B Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Tripuraneni, Naga Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) is a member of the phosphodiesterase family of proteins that plays a critical role in regulating intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by controlling its rate of degradation. It has been demonstrated that this isoform is involved in the orchestra of events which includes inflammation, schizophrenia, cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, contractility of the myocardium, and psoriatic arthritis. Phosphodiesterase 4B has constituted an interesting target for drug development. In recent years, a number of PDE4B inhibitors have been developed for their use as therapeutic agents. In this review, an up-to-date status of the inhibitors investigated for the inhibition of PDE4B has been given so that this rich source of structural information of presently known PDE4B inhibitors could be helpful in generating a selective and potent inhibitor of PDE4B. PMID:25853062

  14. Saturn-like charge-transfer complexes Li4&B36, Li5&B36(+), and Li6&B36(2+): exohedral metalloborospherenes with a perfect cage-like B36(4-) core.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wen-Juan; Chen, Qiang; Li, Hai-Ru; Yan, Miao; Mu, Yue-Wen; Lu, Hai-Gang; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2016-04-21

    Based on extensive first-principles theory calculations, we present the possibility of construction of the Saturn-like charge-transfer complexes Li4&B36 (2), Li5&B36(+) (3), and Li6&B36(2+) (4) all of which contain a perfect cage-like B36(4-) (1) core composed of twelve interwoven boron double chains with a σ + π double delocalization bonding pattern, extending the Bn(q) borospherene family from n = 38-42 to n = 36 with the highest symmetry of Th. PMID:27029411

  15. Structural and computational analysis of peptide recognition mechanism of class-C type penicillin binding protein, alkaline D-peptidase from Bacillus cereus DF4-B.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shogo; Okazaki, Seiji; Ishitsubo, Erika; Kawahara, Nobuhiro; Komeda, Hidenobu; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline D-peptidase from Bacillus cereus DF4-B, called ADP, is a D-stereospecific endopeptidase reacting with oligopeptides containing D-phenylalanine (D-Phe) at N-terminal penultimate residue. ADP has attracted increasing attention because it is useful as a catalyst for synthesis of D-Phe oligopeptides or, with the help of substrate mimetics, L-amino acid peptides and proteins. Structure and functional analysis of ADP is expected to elucidate molecular mechanism of ADP. In this study, the crystal structure of ADP (apo) form was determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The fold of ADP is similar to that of the class C penicillin-binding proteins of type-AmpH. Docking simulations and fragment molecular orbital analyses of two peptides, (D-Phe)4 and (D-Phe)2-(L-Phe)2, with the putative substrate binding sites of ADP indicated that the P1 residue of the peptide interacts with hydrophobic residues at the S1 site of ADP. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation of ADP for 50 nsec suggested that the ADP forms large cavity at the active site. Formation of the cavity suggested that the ADP has open state in the solution. For the ADP, having the open state is convenient to bind the peptides having bulky side chain, such as (D-Phe)4. Taken together, we predicted peptide recognition mechanism of ADP. PMID:26370172

  16. The pathogenesis-related protein PR-4b from Theobroma cacao presents RNase activity, Ca2+ and Mg2+ dependent-DNase activity and antifungal action on Moniliophthora perniciosa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The production and accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins (PR proteins) in plants in response to biotic or abiotic stresses is well known and is considered as a crucial mechanism for plant defense. A pathogenesis-related protein 4 cDNA was identified from a cacao-Moniliophthora perniciosa interaction cDNA library and named TcPR-4b. Results TcPR-4b presents a Barwin domain with six conserved cysteine residues, but lacks the chitin-binding site. Molecular modeling of TcPR-4b confirmed the importance of the cysteine residues to maintain the protein structure, and of several conserved amino acids for the catalytic activity. In the cacao genome, TcPR-4b belonged to a small multigene family organized mainly on chromosome 5. TcPR-4b RT-qPCR analysis in resistant and susceptible cacao plants infected by M. perniciosa showed an increase of expression at 48 hours after infection (hai) in both cacao genotypes. After the initial stage (24-72 hai), the TcPR-4b expression was observed at all times in the resistant genotypes, while in the susceptible one the expression was concentrated at the final stages of infection (45-90 days after infection). The recombinant TcPR-4b protein showed RNase, and bivalent ions dependent-DNase activity, but no chitinase activity. Moreover, TcPR-4b presented antifungal action against M. perniciosa, and the reduction of M. perniciosa survival was related to ROS production in fungal hyphae. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of a PR-4 showing simultaneously RNase, DNase and antifungal properties, but no chitinase activity. Moreover, we showed that the antifungal activity of TcPR-4b is directly related to RNase function. In cacao, TcPR-4b nuclease activities may be related to the establishment and maintenance of resistance, and to the PCD mechanism, in resistant and susceptible cacao genotypes, respectively. PMID:24920373

  17. Epididymal C4b-binding protein is processed and degraded during transit through the duct and is not essential for fertility.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Mayumi I; Zsigmond, Eva; Kudo, Akihiko; Kawakami, Hayato; Yoshida, Kaoru; Yoshida, Manabu; Kawano, Natsuko; Miyado, Kenji; Nonaka, Masaru; Wetsel, Rick A

    2015-04-01

    C4b-binding protein (C4BP) is known as one of the circulating complement regulators that prevents excessive activation of the host-defense complement system. We have reported previously that C4BP is expressed abundantly in the rodent epididymis, one of the male reproductive organs connecting the testis and vas deferens, where immature spermatozoa acquire their motility and fertilizing ability during their transit through the duct. Epididymal C4BP (EpC4BP) is synthesized androgen-dependently by the epithelial cells, secreted into the lumen, and bound to the outer membrane of the passing spermatozoa. In this study, we found that EpC4BP is secreted as a large oligomer, similar to the serum C4BP, but is digested during the epididymal transit and is almost lost from both the luminal fluid and the sperm surface in the vas deferens. Such a processing pattern is not known in serum C4BP, suggesting that EpC4BP and serum C4BP might have different functional mechanisms, and that there is a novel function of EpC4BP in reproduction. In addition, the disappearance of EpC4BP from the sperm surface prior to ejaculation suggests that EpC4BP works only in the epididymis and would not work in the female reproductive tract to protect spermatozoa from complement attack. Next, we generated C4BP-deficient (C4BP-/-) mice to examine the possible role of EpC4BP in reproduction. However, the C4BP-/- mice were fertile and no significant differences were observed between the C4BP-/- and wild-type mouse spermatozoa in terms of morphology, motility, and rate of the spontaneous acrosome reaction. These results suggest that EpC4BP is involved in male reproduction, but not essential for sperm maturation. PMID:25468721

  18. Imaging protein complex formation in the autophagy pathway: analysis of the interaction of LC3 and Atg4B(C74A) in live cells using Förster resonance energy transfer and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Lewis J; Kenworthy, Anne K

    2012-01-01

    The protein microtubule-associated protein 1, light chain 3 (LC3) functions in autophagosome formation and plays a central role in the autophagy pathway. Previously, we found LC3 diffuses more slowly in cells than is expected for a freely diffusing monomer, suggesting it may constitutively associate with a macromolecular complex containing other protein components of the pathway. In the current study, we used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to investigate the interactions of LC3 with Atg4B(C74A), a catalytically inactive mutant of the cysteine protease involved in lipidation and de-lipidation of LC3, as a model system to probe protein complex formation in the autophagy pathway. We show Atg4B(C74A) is in FRET proximity with LC3 in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of living cells, consistent with previous biochemical evidence that suggests these proteins directly interact. In addition, overexpressed Atg4B(C74A) diffuses significantly more slowly than predicted based on its molecular weight, and its translational diffusion coefficient is significantly slowed upon coexpression with LC3 to match that of LC3 itself. Taken together, these results suggest Atg4B(C74A) and LC3 are contained within the same multiprotein complex and that this complex exists in both the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of living cells. PMID:22352642

  19. De Havilland DH-4B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1928-01-01

    De Havilland DH-4B: In one of the earliest engine studies conducted by the NACA at Langley, this De Havilland DH-4B had a Roots-type supercharger installed and tested. Direct measurements of engine power in flight were also performed with this DH-4B.

  20. De novo design of the hydrophobic cores of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Desjarlais, J. R.; Handel, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed and experimentally tested a novel computational approach for the de novo design of hydrophobic cores. A pair of computer programs has been written, the first of which creates a "custom" rotamer library for potential hydrophobic residues, based on the backbone structure of the protein of interest. The second program uses a genetic algorithm to globally optimize for a low energy core sequence and structure, using the custom rotamer library as input. Success of the programs in predicting the sequences of native proteins indicates that they should be effective tools for protein design. Using these programs, we have designed and engineered several variants of the phage 434 cro protein, containing five, seven, or eight sequence changes in the hydrophobic core. As controls, we have produced a variant consisting of a randomly generated core with six sequence changes but equal volume relative to the native core and a variant with a "minimalist" core containing predominantly leucine residues. Two of the designs, including one with eight core sequence changes, have thermal stabilities comparable to the native protein, whereas the third design and the minimalist protein are significantly destabilized. The randomly designed control is completely unfolded under equivalent conditions. These results suggest that rational de novo design of hydrophobic cores is feasible, and stress the importance of specific packing interactions for the stability of proteins. A surprising aspect of the results is that all of the variants display highly cooperative thermal denaturation curves and reasonably dispersed NMR spectra. This suggests that the non-core residues of a protein play a significant role in determining the uniqueness of the folded structure. PMID:8535237

  1. Amino acid substitutions in the non-structural proteins 4A or 4B modulate the induction of autophagy in West Nile virus infected cells independently of the activation of the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for outbreaks of meningitis and encephalitis. Whereas the activation of autophagy in cells infected with other flaviviruses is well known, the interaction of WNV with the autophagic pathway still remains unclear and there are reports describing opposite findings obtained even analyzing the same viral strain. To clarify this controversy, we first analyzed the induction of autophagic features in cells infected with a panel of WNV strains. WNV was determined to induce autophagy in a strain dependent manner. We observed that all WNV strains or isolates analyzed, except for the WNV NY99 used, upregulated the autophagic pathway in infected cells. Interestingly, a variant derived from this WNV NY99 isolated from a persistently infected mouse increased LC3 modification and aggregation. Genome sequencing of this variant revealed only two non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions when compared to parental NY99 strain. These nucleotide substitutions introduced one amino acid replacement in NS4A and other in NS4B. Using genetically engineered viruses we showed that introduction of only one of these replacements was sufficient to upregulate the autophagic pathway. Thus, in this work we have shown that naturally occurring point mutations in the viral non-structural proteins NS4A and NS4B confer WNV with the ability to induce the hallmarks of autophagy such as LC3 modification and aggregation. Even more, the differences on the induction of an autophagic response observed among WNV variants in infected cells did not correlate with alterations on the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), suggesting an uncoupling of UPR and autophagy during flavivirus infection. The findings here reported could help to improve the knowledge of the cellular processes involved on flavivirus–host cell interactions and contribute to the design of effective strategies to combat these pathogens. PMID:25642225

  2. The Roles of Endoplasmic Reticulum Overload Response Induced by HCV and NS4B Protein in Human Hepatocyte Viability and Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingjie; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Qinghua; Ye, Li; Liu, Jing; Zhu, Xiangdong; Sun, Ruina; Guo, Yunli

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and its infection triggers ER stress. In response to ER stress, ER overload response (EOR) can be activated, which involves the release of Ca2+ from ER, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). We have previously reported that HCV NS4B expression activates NF-κB via EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway. Here, we showed that NS4B expression and HCV infection activated cancer-related NF-κB signaling pathway and induced the expression of cancer-related NF-κB target genes via EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway. Moreover, we found that HCV-activated EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway had profound effects on host cell viability and HCV replication. HCV infection induced human hepatocyte death by EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway, whereas activation of EOR-Ca2+-ROS-NF-κB pathway increased the cell viability. Meanwhile, EOR-Ca2+-ROS-NF-κB pathway inhibited acute HCV replication, which could alleviate the detrimental effect of HCV on cell viability and enhance chronic HCV infection. Together, our findings provide new insights into the functions of EOR-Ca2+-ROS-NF-κB pathway in natural HCV replication and pathogenesis. PMID:25875501

  3. C/EBPβ-LAP*/LAP Expression Is Mediated by RSK/eIF4B-Dependent Signalling and Boosted by Increased Protein Stability in Models of Monocytic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Martin; Friesenhagen, Judith; Westphal, Andreas; Pietsch, Daniel; Brand, Korbinian

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor C/EBPβ plays a key role in monocytic differentiation and inflammation. Its small isoform LIP is associated with proliferation at early premonocytic developmental stages and regulated via mTOR-dependent signalling. During later stages of (pre)monocytic differentiation there is a considerable increase in the large C/EBPβ isoforms LAP*/LAP which inhibit proliferation thus supporting terminal differentiation. Here, we showed in different models of monocytic differentiation that this dramatic increase in the LAP*/LAP protein and LAP/LIP ratio was accompanied by an only modest/retarded mRNA increase suggesting an important role for (post)translational mechanisms. We found that LAP*/LAP formation was induced via MEK/RSK-dependent cascades, whereas mTOR/S6K1 were not involved. Remarkably, LAP*/LAP expression was dependent on phosphorylated eIF4B, an acceleratory protein of RNA helicase eIF4A. PKR inhibition reduced the expression of eIF4B and C/EBPβ in an eIF2α-independent manner. Furthermore, under our conditions a marked stabilisation of LAP*/LAP protein occurred, accompanied by reduced chymotrypsin-like proteasome/calpain activities and increased calpastatin levels. Our study elucidates new signalling pathways inducing LAP*/LAP expression and indicates new alternative PKR functions in monocytes. The switch from mTOR- to RSK-mediated signalling to orchestrate eIF4B-dependent LAP*/LAP translation, accompanied by increased protein stability but only small mRNA changes, may be a prototypical example for the regulation of protein expression during selected processes of differentiation/proliferation. PMID:26646662

  4. Structural characterization of Mumps virus fusion protein core

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueyong; Xu Yanhui; Lou Zhiyong; Zhu Jieqing; Hu Xuebo; Gao, George F.; Qiu Bingsheng . E-mail: Qiubs@sun.im.ac.cn; Rao Zihe . E-mail: raozh@xtal.tsinghua.edu.cn; Tien, Po . E-mail: tienpo@sun.im.ac.cn

    2006-09-29

    The fusion proteins of enveloped viruses mediating the fusion between the viral and cellular membranes comprise two discontinuous heptad repeat (HR) domains located at the ectodomain of the enveloped glycoproteins. The crystal structure of the fusion protein core of Mumps virus (MuV) was determined at 2.2 A resolution. The complex is a six-helix bundle in which three HR1 peptides form a central highly hydrophobic coiled-coil and three HR2 peptides pack against the hydrophobic grooves on the surface of central coiled-coil in an oblique antiparallel manner. Fusion core of MuV, like those of simian virus 5 and human respiratory syncytium virus, forms typical 3-4-4-4-3 spacing. The similar charecterization in HR1 regions, as well as the existence of O-X-O motif in extended regions of HR2 helix, suggests a basic rule for the formation of the fusion core of viral fusion proteins.

  5. High-resolution crystal structure of human Dim2/TXNL4B

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tengchuan; Guo, Feng; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yuzhu

    2013-01-01

    TXNL4A (thioredoxin-like 4A) is an essential protein conserved from yeast to humans and is a component of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. TXNL4B was identified as a TXNL4-family protein that also interacts with Prp6, an integral component of the U4/U6·U5 tri-snRNP complex, and has been shown to function in pre-mRNA splicing. A crystal structure of TXNL4B was determined at 1.33 Å resolution and refined to an R work of 0.13 and an R free of 0.18 with one native dimer in the asymmetric unit. Residues 1–33 of TXNL4B have previously been reported to be responsible for its interaction with Prp6. However, this region extends to the β-sheet core of the thioredoxin-fold structure of TXNL4B. This suggests that the interpretation of the previously reported GST pull-down results without considering the structure and stability of TXNL4B is debatable. PMID:23519793

  6. Interaction of structural core protein of Classical Swine Fever Virus with endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway protein OS9

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) Core protein is involved in virus RNA protection, transcription regulation and virus virulence. To discover additional Core protein functions a yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify host proteins that interact with Core. Among the identified host proteins, t...

  7. Immunological Properties of Hepatitis B Core Antigen Fusion Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael J.; Hastings, Gillian Z.; Brown, Alan L.; Grace, Ken G.; Rowlands, David J.; Brown, Fred; Clarke, Berwyn E.

    1990-04-01

    The immunogenicity of a 19 amino acid peptide from foot-and-mouth disease virus has previously been shown to approach that of the inactivated virus from which it was derived after multimeric particulate presentation as an N-terminal fusion with hepatitis B core antigen. In this report we demonstrate that rhinovirus peptide-hepatitis B core antigen fusion proteins are 10-fold more immunogenic than peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and 100-fold more immunogenic than uncoupled peptide with an added helper T-cell epitope. The fusion proteins can be readily administered without adjuvant or with adjuvants acceptable for human and veterinary application and can elicit a response after nasal or oral dosing. The fusion proteins can also act as T-cell-independent antigens. These properties provide further support for their suitability as presentation systems for "foreign" epitopes in the development of vaccines.

  8. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  9. Variants in CUL4B are Associated with Cerebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A.; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K.; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M.; Yntema, Helger G.; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Brunner, Han G.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F. Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A.A.P.; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A. James; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B. PMID:25385192

  10. Phosphorylation of vaccinia virus core proteins during transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Moussatche, N; Keller, S J

    1991-01-01

    The phosphorylation of vaccinia virus core proteins has been studied in vitro during viral transcription. The incorporation of [gamma-32P]ATP into protein is linear for the first 2 min of the reaction, whereas incorporation of [3H]UTP into RNA lags for 1 to 2 min before linear synthesis. At least 12 different proteins are phosphorylated on autoradiograms of acrylamide gels, and the majority of label is associated with low-molecular-weight proteins. If the transcription reaction is reduced by dropping the pH to 7 from its optimal of 8.5, two proteins (70 and 80 kDa) are no longer phosphorylated. RNA isolated from the pH 7 transcription reaction hybridized primarily to the vaccinia virus HindIII DNA fragments D to F, whereas the transcripts synthesized at pH 8.5 hybridized to almost all of the HindIII-digested vaccinia virus DNA fragments. The differences between the pH 7.0 and 8.5 transcription reactions in phosphorylation and transcription could be eliminated by preincubating the viral cores with 2 mM ATP. In sum, the results suggest that the phosphorylation of the 70- and 80-kDa peptides may contribute to the regulation of early transcription. Images PMID:2016772

  11. Effects of the interactions of classical swine fever virus core protein with proteins of SUMOylation pathway on virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The classical swine fever virus (CSFV) nucleocapsid or Core protein serves a protective function for the viral RNA, and acts as a transcriptional regulator. However studies involving the CSFV Core protein have been limited. To gain insight into other functions of the Core protein, particularly into ...

  12. Boeing F4B-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    The Boeing F4B-4 was seen to differ from earlier F4Bs in having a vertical fin with slightly more area. The Boeing model 235 was not fitted with a NACA cowling, but rather the less efficient 'Townend' ring around the Pratt & Whitney Wasp radials cylinders. This aircraft was much used by both the Navy and the Army Air Corps in the late 1920's and early 1930's. The Army variation was known as the P-12E. The engine cowling was a British development known as the 'Townend' ring. It differed from the NACA cowling and was less effective in reducing the drag.

  13. What makes a protein a protein? Hydrophobic core designs that specify stability and structural properties.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, M.; Balasubramanian, S.; Fleming, K. G.; Nagi, A. D.; O'Brien, R.; Sturtevant, J. M.; Regan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Here we describe how the systematic redesign of a protein's hydrophobic core alters its structure and stability. We have repacked the hydrophobic core of the four-helix-bundle protein, Rop, with altered packing patterns and various side chain shapes and sizes. Several designs reproduce the structure and native-like properties of the wild-type, while increasing the thermal stability. Other designs, either with similar sizes but different shapes, or with decreased sizes of the packing residues, destabilize the protein. Finally, overpacking the core with the larger side chains causes a loss of native-like structure. These results allow us to further define the roles of tight residue packing and the burial of hydrophobic surface area in the construction of native-like proteins. PMID:8844848

  14. Expression of proteoglycan core proteins in human bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, K P; Gallagher, J T; David, G

    1999-01-01

    Heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs) present on the surface of bone marrow stromal cells and in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have important roles in the control of adhesion and growth of haemopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The two main groups of proteoglycans which contain heparan sulphate chains are members of the syndecan and glypican families. In this study we have identified the main surface membrane and matrix-associated HSPGs present in normal human bone marrow stroma formed in long-term culture. Proteoglycans were extracted from the adherent stromal layers and treated with heparitinase and chondroitinase ABC. The core proteins were detected by Western blotting using antibodies directed against syndecans-1-4, glypican-1 and the ECM HSPG, perlecan. Stromal cell expression at the RNA level was detected by Northern blotting and by reverse transcription PCR. Glypican-1, syndecan-3 and syndecan-4 were the major cell-membrane HSPG species and perlecan was the major ECM proteoglycan. There was no evidence for expression of syndecan-1 protein. Syndecan-3 was expressed mainly as a variant or processed 50-55 kDa core protein and in lower amounts as the characteristic 125 kDa core protein. These results suggest that syndecan-3, syndecan-4 and glypican-1 present on the surface of marrow stromal cells, together with perlecan in the ECM, may be responsible for creating the correct stromal 'niche' for the maintenance and development of haemopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The detection of a variant form of syndecan-3 as a major stromal HSPG suggests a specific role for this syndecan in haemopoiesis. PMID:10527946

  15. Assembly and solution structure of the core retromer protein complex.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Suzanne J; Shaw, Daniel J; Cowieson, Nathan P; Owen, David J; Teasdale, Rohan D; Collins, Brett M

    2011-01-01

    Retromer is a peripheral membrane protein complex that has pleiotropic roles in endosomal membrane trafficking. The core of retromer possesses three subunits, VPS35, VPS29 and VPS26, that play different roles in binding to cargo, regulatory proteins and complex stabilization. We have performed an investigation of the thermodynamics of core retromer assembly using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrating that VPS35 acts as the central subunit to which VPS29 and VPS26 bind independently. Furthermore, we confirm that the conserved PRLYL motif of the large VPS35 subunit is critical for direct VPS26 interaction. Heat capacity measurements of VPS29 and VPS26 binding to VPS35 indicate extensive binding interfaces and suggest conformational alterations in VPS29 or VPS35 upon complex formation. Solution studies of the retromer core using small-angle X-ray scattering allow us to propose a model whereby VPS35 forms an extended platform with VPS29 and VPS26 bound at distal ends, with the potential for forming dimeric assemblies. PMID:20875039

  16. The novel complement inhibitor human CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) protein promotes factor I-mediated degradation of C4b and C3b and inhibits the membrane attack complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Esparza, Astrid; Kalchishkova, Nikolina; Kurbasic, Emila; Jiang, Wen G; Blom, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) is a transmembrane protein containing 15 consecutive complement control protein (CCP) domains, which are characteristic for complement inhibitors. We expressed a membrane-bound fragment of human CSMD1 composed of the 15 C-terminal CCP domains and demonstrated that it inhibits deposition of C3b by the classical pathway on the surface of Chinese hamster ovary cells by 70% at 6% serum and of C9 (component of membrane attack complex) by 90% at 1.25% serum. Furthermore, this fragment of CSMD1 served as a cofactor to factor I-mediated degradation of C3b. In all functional assays performed, well-characterized complement inhibitors were used as positive controls, whereas Coxsackie adenovirus receptor, a protein with no effect on complement, was a negative control. Moreover, attenuation of expression in human T47 breast cancer cells that express endogenous CSMD1 significantly increased C3b deposition on these cells by 45% at 8% serum compared with that for the controls. Furthermore, by expressing a soluble 17-21 CCP fragment of CSMD1, we found that CSMD1 inhibits complement by promoting factor I-mediated C4b/C3b degradation and inhibition of MAC assembly at the level of C7. Our results revealed a novel complement inhibitor for the classical and lectin pathways. PMID:23964079

  17. Pasiflora proteins are novel core components of the septate junction.

    PubMed

    Deligiannaki, Myrto; Casper, Abbie L; Jung, Christophe; Gaul, Ulrike

    2015-09-01

    Epithelial sheets play essential roles as selective barriers insulating the body from the environment and establishing distinct chemical compartments within it. In invertebrate epithelia, septate junctions (SJs) consist of large multi-protein complexes that localize at the apicolateral membrane and mediate barrier function. Here, we report the identification of two novel SJ components, Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2, through a genome-wide glial RNAi screen in Drosophila. Pasiflora mutants show permeable blood-brain and tracheal barriers, overelongated tracheal tubes and mislocalization of SJ proteins. Consistent with the observed phenotypes, the genes are co-expressed in embryonic epithelia and glia and are required cell-autonomously to exert their function. Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2 belong to a previously uncharacterized family of tetraspan membrane proteins conserved across the protostome-deuterostome divide. Both proteins localize at SJs and their apicolateral membrane accumulation depends on other complex components. In fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments we demonstrate that pasiflora proteins are core SJ components as they are required for complex formation and exhibit restricted mobility within the membrane of wild-type epithelial cells, but rapid diffusion in cells with disrupted SJs. Taken together, our results show that Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2 are novel integral components of the SJ and implicate a new family of tetraspan proteins in the function of these ancient and crucial cell junctions. PMID:26329602

  18. Pasiflora proteins are novel core components of the septate junction

    PubMed Central

    Deligiannaki, Myrto; Casper, Abbie L.; Jung, Christophe; Gaul, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial sheets play essential roles as selective barriers insulating the body from the environment and establishing distinct chemical compartments within it. In invertebrate epithelia, septate junctions (SJs) consist of large multi-protein complexes that localize at the apicolateral membrane and mediate barrier function. Here, we report the identification of two novel SJ components, Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2, through a genome-wide glial RNAi screen in Drosophila. Pasiflora mutants show permeable blood-brain and tracheal barriers, overelongated tracheal tubes and mislocalization of SJ proteins. Consistent with the observed phenotypes, the genes are co-expressed in embryonic epithelia and glia and are required cell-autonomously to exert their function. Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2 belong to a previously uncharacterized family of tetraspan membrane proteins conserved across the protostome-deuterostome divide. Both proteins localize at SJs and their apicolateral membrane accumulation depends on other complex components. In fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments we demonstrate that pasiflora proteins are core SJ components as they are required for complex formation and exhibit restricted mobility within the membrane of wild-type epithelial cells, but rapid diffusion in cells with disrupted SJs. Taken together, our results show that Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2 are novel integral components of the SJ and implicate a new family of tetraspan proteins in the function of these ancient and crucial cell junctions. PMID:26329602

  19. Homogeneous Protein Analysis by Magnetic Core-Shell Nanorod Probes.

    PubMed

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Altantzis, Thomas; Bals, Sara; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-04-13

    Studying protein interactions is of vital importance both to fundamental biology research and to medical applications. Here, we report on the experimental proof of a universally applicable label-free homogeneous platform for rapid protein analysis. It is based on optically detecting changes in the rotational dynamics of magnetically agitated core-shell nanorods upon their specific interaction with proteins. By adjusting the excitation frequency, we are able to optimize the measurement signal for each analyte protein size. In addition, due to the locking of the optical signal to the magnetic excitation frequency, background signals are suppressed, thus allowing exclusive studies of processes at the nanoprobe surface only. We study target proteins (soluble domain of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 - sHER2) specifically binding to antibodies (trastuzumab) immobilized on the surface of our nanoprobes and demonstrate direct deduction of their respective sizes. Additionally, we examine the dependence of our measurement signal on the concentration of the analyte protein, and deduce a minimally detectable sHER2 concentration of 440 pM. For our homogeneous measurement platform, good dispersion stability of the applied nanoprobes under physiological conditions is of vital importance. To that end, we support our measurement data by theoretical modeling of the total particle-particle interaction energies. The successful implementation of our platform offers scope for applications in biomarker-based diagnostics as well as for answering basic biology questions. PMID:27023370

  20. The Native Form and Maturation Process of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Kohichiroh; Wakita, Takaji; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Funahashi, Shin-Ichi; Ichikawa, Masumi; Kajita, Tadahiro; Moradpour, Darius; Wands, Jack R.; Kohara, Michinori

    1998-01-01

    The maturation and subcellular localization of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein were investigated with both a vaccinia virus expression system and CHO cell lines stably transformed with HCV cDNA. Two HCV core proteins, with molecular sizes of 21 kDa (p21) and 23 kDa (p23), were identified. The C-terminal end of p23 is amino acid 191 of the HCV polyprotein, and p21 is produced as a result of processing between amino acids 174 and 191. The subcellular localization of the HCV core protein was examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Although HCV core protein resided predominantly in the cytoplasm, it was also found in the nucleus and had the same molecular size as p21 in both locations, as determined by subcellular fractionation. The HCV core proteins had different immunoreactivities to a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Antibody 5E3 stained core protein in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, C7-50 stained core protein only in the cytoplasm, and 499S stained core protein only in the nucleus. These results clearly indicate that the p23 form of HCV core protein is processed to p21 in the cytoplasm and that the core protein in the nucleus has a higher-order structure different from that of p21 in the cytoplasm. HCV core protein in sera of patients with HCV infection was analyzed in order to determine the molecular size of genuinely processed HCV core protein. HCV core protein in sera was found to have exactly the same molecular weight as the p21 protein. These results suggest that p21 core protein is a component of native viral particles. PMID:9621068

  1. Antivirals interacting with hepatitis B virus core protein and core mutations may misdirect capsid assembly in a similar fashion.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Hans Jörg; Deres, Karl; Mildenberger, Maria; Schröder, Claus H

    2003-12-15

    Recently, heteroarylpyrimidines (HAP) have been identified as potent inhibitors of capsid maturation. Here we discuss the HAP mode of action comparing the aggregation phenotype of wild-type and mutant core proteins with the respective phenotype imposed by HAP or other agents interacting with core protein. Pertinent tests include core fusion protein-mediated transactivation in a two-hybrid system and capsid formation. The finding that transactivation appeared to be unaffected by HAP, or by mutations preventing assembly, is surprising and raises the question for the structure of the interacting hybrid core proteins: Are they monomers, dimers or even oligomers? A direct activity of core fusion monomers is not excluded but considered to be highly unlikely due to rapid homodimerisation. A role of core fusion dimers in transactivation would indicate distinct interactions with a differential sensitivity to HAP. Regarding significance of data gained in two-hybrid systems, caution is necessary, since the site of transactivation is the nucleus, whereas the real site of the core protein interactions during replication is the cytoplasm. Apparently, HAP leave the monomer-monomer interface of HBV core protein unaffected but prevent capsid maturation by interacting with a region known to be crucial for dimer multimerisation and formation of stable capsids. It is suggested to use antivirals as tools for the elucidation of early steps in genome replication and capsid assembly. A frame for this could be the hypothesis that the virus uses soluble core protein, namely intracellular maturation intermediates of HbeAg for a core targeted self-restriction of replication. PMID:14637185

  2. Structural optimization of calcium carbonate cores as templates for protein encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Sudareva, Natalia; Popova, Helen; Saprykina, Natalia; Bronnikov, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    The calcium carbonate (CaCO3) cores being templates for model proteins encapsulation were obtained for developing oral drug delivery systems. The influence of the characteristics of the core formation (the time, the temperature, the stirring intensity, the ultrasound treatment and drying conditions) on the size and morphology of the carbonate cores was studied. The core size was shown to decrease with increasing the stirring time and stirring intensity. Statistical analysis of the scanning electron microscopy images of the carbonate cores allowed finding a correlation between their mean diameter and the parameters of the core formation. The regularities of proteins loading into porous CaCO3 cores were determined, and different loading methods were compared quantitatively. The co-precipitation method gives cores with the proteins load about five times as much as the adsorption method. The influence of protein properties and the ionic environment of protein molecules on the loading parameters were shown. PMID:24697174

  3. Core protein: a pleiotropic keystone in the HBV lifecycle

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnick, Adam; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Tan, Zhenning; Lewellyn, Eric; Turner, William; Francis, Samson

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a small virus whose genome has only four open reading frames. We argue that the simplicity of the virion correlates with a complexity of functions for viral proteins. We focus on the HBV core protein (Cp), a small (183 residue) protein that self-assembles to form the viral capsid. However, its functions are a little more complicated than that. In an infected cell Cp modulates every step of the viral lifecycle. Cp is bound to nuclear viral DNA and affects its epigenetics. Cp correlates with RNA specificity. Cp assembles specifically on a reverse transcriptase-viral RNA complex or, apparently, nothing at all. Indeed Cp has been one of the model systems for investigation of virus self-assembly. Cp participates in regulation of reverse transcription. Cp signals completion of reverse transcription to support virus secretion. Cp carries both nuclear localization signals and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) binding sites; both of these functions appear to be regulated by contents of the capsid. Cp can be targeted by antivirals -- while self-assembly is the most accessible of Cp activities, we argue that it makes sense to engage the broader spectrum of Cp function. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on “From the discovery of the Australia antigen to the development of new curative therapies for hepatitis B: an unfinished story.” PMID:26129969

  4. The expanded FindCore method for identification of a core atom set for assessment of protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Snyder, David A; Grullon, Jennifer; Huang, Yuanpeng J; Tejero, Roberto; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2014-02-01

    Maximizing the scientific impact of NMR-based structure determination requires robust and statistically sound methods for assessing the precision of NMR-derived structures. In particular, a method to define a core atom set for calculating superimpositions and validating structure predictions is critical to the use of NMR-derived structures as targets in the CASP competition. FindCore (Snyder and Montelione, Proteins 2005;59:673-686) is a superimposition independent method for identifying a core atom set and partitioning that set into domains. However, as FindCore optimizes superimposition by sensitively excluding not-well-defined atoms, the FindCore core may not comprise all atoms suitable for use in certain applications of NMR structures, including the CASP assessment process. Adapting the FindCore approach to assess predicted models against experimental NMR structures in CASP10 required modification of the FindCore method. This paper describes conventions and a standard protocol to calculate an "Expanded FindCore" atom set suitable for validation and application in biological and biophysical contexts. A key application of the Expanded FindCore method is to identify a core set of atoms in the experimental NMR structure for which it makes sense to validate predicted protein structure models. We demonstrate the application of this Expanded FindCore method in characterizing well-defined regions of 18 NMR-derived CASP10 target structures. The Expanded FindCore protocol defines "expanded core atom sets" that match an expert's intuition of which parts of the structure are sufficiently well defined to use in assessing CASP model predictions. We also illustrate the impact of this analysis on the CASP GDT assessment scores. PMID:24327305

  5. Both core and F proteins of hepatitis C virus could enhance cell proliferation in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wen-Ta; Li, Hui-Chun; Lee, Shen-Kao; Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Yang, Chee-Hing; Chen, Hung-Ling; Lo, Shih-Yen

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •HCV core and F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice. •β-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by core protein in the transgenic mice. •β-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. •Expression of SMA protein was enhanced by core but not myc-F protein. -- Abstract: The role of the protein encoded by the alternative open reading frame (ARF/F/core+1) of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome in viral pathogenesis remains unknown. The different forms of ARF/F/core+1 protein were labile in cultured cells, a myc-tag fused at the N-terminus of the F protein made it more stable. To determine the role of core and F proteins in HCV pathogenesis, transgenic mice with either protein expression under the control of Albumin promoter were generated. Expression of core protein and F protein with myc tag (myc-F) could be detected by Western blotting analysis in the livers of these mice. The ratio of liver to body weight is increased for both core and myc-F transgenic mice compared to that of wild type mice. Indeed, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein, a proliferation marker, was up-regulated in the transgenic mice with core or myc-F protein. Further analyses by microarray and Western blotting suggested that β-catenin signaling pathway was activated by either core or myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. These transgenic mice were further treated with either Diethynitrosamine (a tumor initiator) or Phenobarbital (a tumor promoter). Phenobarbital but not Diethynitrosamine treatment could increase the liver/body weight ratio of these mice. However, no tumor formation was observed in these mice. In conclusion, HCV core and myc-F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice possibly through β-catenin signaling pathway.

  6. Importin β Can Bind Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Empty Core-Like Particles and Induce Structural Changes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Pierson, Elizabeth E; Keifer, David Z; Delaleau, Mildred; Gallucci, Lara; Cazenave, Christian; Kann, Michael; Jarrold, Martin F; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids are found in many forms: immature single-stranded RNA-filled cores, single-stranded DNA-filled replication intermediates, mature cores with relaxed circular double-stranded DNA, and empty capsids. A capsid, the protein shell of the core, is a complex of 240 copies of core protein. Mature cores are transported to the nucleus by a complex that includes both importin α and importin β (Impα and Impβ), which bind to the core protein's C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we have investigated the interactions of HBV core protein with importins in vitro. Strikingly, empty capsids and free core protein can bind Impβ without Impα. Cryo-EM image reconstructions show that the CTDs, which are located inside the capsid, can extrude through the capsid to be bound by Impβ. Impβ density localized on the capsid exterior near the quasi-sixfold vertices, suggested a maximum of 30 Impβ per capsid. However, examination of complexes using single molecule charge-detection mass spectrometry indicate that some complexes include over 90 Impβ molecules. Cryo-EM of capsids incubated with excess Impβ shows a population of damaged particles and a population of "dark" particles with internal density, suggesting that Impβ is effectively swallowed by the capsids, which implies that the capsids transiently open and close and can be destabilized by Impβ. Though the in vitro complexes with great excess of Impβ are not biological, these results have implications for trafficking of empty capsids and free core protein; activities that affect the basis of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27518410

  7. The Expanded FindCore Method for Identification of a Core Atom Set for Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, David A.; Grullon, Jennifer; Huang, Yuanpeng J.; Tejero, Roberto; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    Maximizing the scientific impact of NMR-based structure determination requires robust and statistically sound methods for assessing the precision of NMR-derived structures. In particular, a method to define a core atom set for calculating superimpositions and validating structure predictions is critical to the use of NMR-derived structures as targets in the CASP competition. FindCore (D.A. Snyder and G.T. Montelione PROTEINS 2005;59:673–686) is a superimposition independent method for identifying a core atom set, and partitioning that set into domains. However, as FindCore optimizes superimposition by sensitively excluding not-well-defined atoms, the FindCore core may not comprise all atoms suitable for use in certain applications of NMR structures, including the CASP assessment process. Adapting the FindCore approach to assess predicted models against experimental NMR structures in CASP10 required modification of the FindCore method. This paper describes conventions and a standard protocol to calculate an “Expanded FindCore” atom set suitable for validation and application in biological and biophysical contexts. A key application of the Expanded FindCore method is to identify a core set of atoms in the experimental NMR structure for which it makes sense to validate predicted protein structure models. We demonstrate the application of this Expanded FindCore method in characterizing well-defined regions of 18 NMR-derived CASP10 target structures. The Expanded FindCore protocol defines “expanded core atom sets” that match an expert’s intuition of which parts of the structure are sufficiently well-defined to use in assessing CASP model predictions. We also illustrate the impact of this analysis on the CASP GDT assessment scores. PMID:24327305

  8. Sumoylation of the Core Protein in Classical Swine Fever Virus is Essential for Virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The classical swine fever virus core protein makes up the nucleocapsid of the virus, and is serves both as a protective function for the viral RNA and a transcriptional regulator in the host cell. To identify host proteins that interact with the viral Core protein we utilized the yeast two-hybrid to...

  9. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus production by aptamers against the core protein.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shali; Yu, Xiaoyan; Gao, Yimin; Xue, Binbin; Wu, Xinjiao; Wang, Xiaohong; Yang, Darong; Zhu, Haizhen

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is essential for virus assembly. HCV core protein was expressed and purified. Aptamers against core protein were raised through the selective evolution of ligands by the exponential enrichment approach. Detection of HCV infection by core aptamers and the antiviral activities of aptamers were characterized. The mechanism of their anti-HCV activity was determined. The data showed that selected aptamers against core specifically recognize the recombinant core protein but also can detect serum samples from hepatitis C patients. Aptamers have no effect on HCV RNA replication in the infectious cell culture system. However, the aptamers inhibit the production of infectious virus particles. Beta interferon (IFN-β) and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) are not induced in virally infected hepatocytes by aptamers. Domains I and II of core protein are involved in the inhibition of infectious virus production by the aptamers. V31A within core is the major resistance mutation identified. Further study shows that the aptamers disrupt the localization of core with lipid droplets and NS5A and perturb the association of core protein with viral RNA. The data suggest that aptamers against HCV core protein inhibit infectious virus production by disrupting the localization of core with lipid droplets and NS5A and preventing the association of core protein with viral RNA. The aptamers for core protein may be used to understand the mechanisms of virus assembly. Core-specific aptamers may hold promise for development as early diagnostic reagents and potential therapeutic agents for chronic hepatitis C. PMID:24307579

  10. Importin β Can Bind Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Empty Core-Like Particles and Induce Structural Changes

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Elizabeth E.; Keifer, David Z.; Delaleau, Mildred; Gallucci, Lara; Cazenave, Christian; Kann, Michael; Jarrold, Martin F.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids are found in many forms: immature single-stranded RNA-filled cores, single-stranded DNA-filled replication intermediates, mature cores with relaxed circular double-stranded DNA, and empty capsids. A capsid, the protein shell of the core, is a complex of 240 copies of core protein. Mature cores are transported to the nucleus by a complex that includes both importin α and importin β (Impα and Impβ), which bind to the core protein’s C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we have investigated the interactions of HBV core protein with importins in vitro. Strikingly, empty capsids and free core protein can bind Impβ without Impα. Cryo-EM image reconstructions show that the CTDs, which are located inside the capsid, can extrude through the capsid to be bound by Impβ. Impβ density localized on the capsid exterior near the quasi-sixfold vertices, suggested a maximum of 30 Impβ per capsid. However, examination of complexes using single molecule charge-detection mass spectrometry indicate that some complexes include over 90 Impβ molecules. Cryo-EM of capsids incubated with excess Impβ shows a population of damaged particles and a population of “dark” particles with internal density, suggesting that Impβ is effectively swallowed by the capsids, which implies that the capsids transiently open and close and can be destabilized by Impβ. Though the in vitro complexes with great excess of Impβ are not biological, these results have implications for trafficking of empty capsids and free core protein; activities that affect the basis of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27518410

  11. HCV core protein induces hepatic lipid accumulation by activating SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook Hwan; Hong, Sung Pyo; Kim, KyeongJin; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Kwang Jin; Cheong, JaeHun . E-mail: molecule85@pusan.ac.kr

    2007-04-20

    Hepatic steatosis is a common feature in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. HCV core protein plays an important role in the development of hepatic steatosis in HCV infection. Because SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) and PPAR{gamma} (peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor {gamma}) are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism of hepatocyte, we sought to determine whether HCV core protein may impair the expression and activity of SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}. In this study, it was demonstrated that HCV core protein increases the gene expression of SREBP1 not only in Chang liver, Huh7, and HepG2 cells transiently transfected with HCV core protein expression plasmid, but also in Chang liver-core stable cells. Furthermore, HCV core protein enhanced the transcriptional activity of SREBP1. In addition, HCV core protein elevated PPAR{gamma} transcriptional activity. However, HCV core protein had no effect on PPAR{gamma} gene expression. Finally, we showed that HCV core protein stimulates the genes expression of lipogenic enzyme and fatty acid uptake associated protein. Therefore, our finding provides a new insight into the mechanism of hepatic steatosis by HCV infection.

  12. Generation and Characterization of a Cyp4b1 Null Mouse and the Role of CYP4B1 in the Activation and Toxicity of Ipomeanol

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    4-Ipomeanol (IPO) is a prototypical pulmonary toxin that requires P450-mediated metabolic activation to reactive intermediates in order to elicit its toxic effects. CYP4B1 is a pulmonary enzyme that has been shown, in vitro, to have a high capacity for bioactivating IPO. In order to determine, unambiguously, the role of CYP4B1 in IPO bioactivation in vivo, we generated Cyp4b1 null mice following targeted disruption of the gene downstream of exon 1. Cyp4b1 −/− mice are viable and healthy, with no overt phenotype, and no evidence of compensatory upregulation of other P450 isoforms in any of the tissues examined. Pulmonary and renal microsomes prepared from male Cyp4b1 −/− mice exhibited no detectable expression of the protein and catalyzed the in vitro bioactivation of IPO at < 10% of the rates observed in tissue microsomes from Cyp4b1 +/+ animals. Administration of IPO (20mg/kg) to Cyp4b1 +/+ mice resulted in characteristic lesions in the lung, and to a lesser extent in the kidney, which were completely absent in Cyp4b1 −/− mice. We conclude that CYP4B1 is a critical enzyme for the bioactivation of IPO in vivo and that the Cyp4b1 −/− mouse is a useful model for studying CYP4B1-dependent metabolism and toxicity. PMID:23748241

  13. Identification of a Functional, CRM-1-Dependent Nuclear Export Signal in Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Maillard, Patrick; Minisini, Rosalba; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roohvand, Farzin; Pecheur, Eve-Isabelle; Pirisi, Mario; Budkowska, Agata

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. HCV core protein is involved in nucleocapsid formation, but it also interacts with multiple cytoplasmic and nuclear molecules and plays a crucial role in the development of liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. The core protein is found mostly in the cytoplasm during HCV infection, but also in the nucleus in patients with hepatocarcinoma and in core-transgenic mice. HCV core contains nuclear localization signals (NLS), but no nuclear export signal (NES) has yet been identified. We show here that the aa(109–133) region directs the translocation of core from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by the CRM-1-mediated nuclear export pathway. Mutagenesis of the three hydrophobic residues (L119, I123 and L126) in the identified NES or in the sequence encoding the mature core aa(1–173) significantly enhanced the nuclear localisation of the corresponding proteins in transfected Huh7 cells. Both the NES and the adjacent hydrophobic sequence in domain II of core were required to maintain the core protein or its fragments in the cytoplasmic compartment. Electron microscopy studies of the JFH1 replication model demonstrated that core was translocated into the nucleus a few minutes after the virus entered the cell. The blockade of nucleocytoplasmic export by leptomycin B treatment early in infection led to the detection of core protein in the nucleus by confocal microscopy and coincided with a decrease in virus replication. Our data suggest that the functional NLS and NES direct HCV core protein shuttling between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, with at least some core protein transported to the nucleus. These new properties of HCV core may be essential for virus multiplication and interaction with nuclear molecules, influence cell signaling and the pathogenesis of HCV infection. PMID:22039426

  14. Neuroblastoma patient outcomes, tumor differentiation, and ERK activation are correlated with expression levels of the ubiquitin ligase UBE4B

    PubMed Central

    Woodfield, Sarah E.; Guo, Rong Jun; Liu, Yin; Major, Angela M.; Hollingsworth, Emporia Faith; Indiviglio, Sandra; Whittle, Sarah B.; Mo, Qianxing; Bean, Andrew J.; Ittmann, Michael; Lopez-Terrada, Dolores; Zage, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Background UBE4B is an E3/E4 ubiquitin ligase whose gene is located in chromosome 1p36.22. We analyzed the associations of UBE4B gene and protein expression with neuroblastoma patient outcomes and with tumor prognostic features and histology. Methods We evaluated the association of UBE4B gene expression with neuroblastoma patient outcomes using the R2 Platform. We screened neuroblastoma tumor samples for UBE4B protein expression using immunohistochemistry. FISH for UBE4B and 1p36 deletion was performed on tumor samples. We then evaluated UBE4B expression for associations with prognostic factors and with levels of phosphorylated ERK in neuroblastoma tumors and cell lines. Results Low UBE4B gene expression is associated with poor outcomes in patients with neuroblastoma and with worse outcomes in all patient subgroups. UBE4B protein expression was associated with neuroblastoma tumor differentiation, and decreased UBE4B protein levels were associated with high-risk features. UBE4B protein levels were also associated with levels of phosphorylated ERK. Conclusions We have demonstrated associations between UBE4B gene expression and neuroblastoma patient outcomes and prognostic features. Reduced UBE4B protein expression in neuroblastoma tumors was associated with high-risk features, a lack of differentiation, and with ERK activation. These results suggest UBE4B may contribute to the poor prognosis of neuroblastoma tumors with 1p36 deletions and that UBE4B expression may mediate neuroblastoma differentiation. PMID:27014418

  15. Determining the one, two, three, or four long and short loci of human complement C4 in a major histocompatibility complex haplotype encoding C4A or C4B proteins.

    PubMed

    Chung, Erwin K; Yang, Yan; Rupert, Kristi L; Jones, Karla N; Rennebohm, Robert M; Blanchong, Carol A; Yu, C Yung

    2002-10-01

    The complex genetics of human complement C4 with unusually frequent variations in the size and number of C4A and C4B, as well as their neighboring genes, in the major histocompatibility complex has been a hurdle for accurate epidemiological studies of diseases associated with C4. A comprehensive series of novel or improved techniques has been developed to determine the total gene number of C4 and the relative dosages of C4A and C4B in a diploid genome. These techniques include (1) definitive genomic restriction-fragment-length polymorphisms (RFLPs) based on the discrete duplication patterns of the RCCX (RP-C4-CYP21-TNX) modules and on the specific nucleotide changes for C4A and C4B isotypes; (2) module-specific PCR to give information on the total number of C4 genes by comparing the relative quantities of RP1- or TNXB-specific fragments with TNXA-RP2 fragments; (3) labeled-primer single-cycle DNA polymerization procedure of amplified C4d genomic DNA for diagnostic RFLP analysis of C4A and C4B; and (4) a highly reproducible long-range-mapping method that employs PmeI-digested genomic DNA for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, to yield precise information on the number of long and short C4 genes in a haplotype. Applications of these vigorously tested techniques may clarify the roles that human C4A and C4B gene-dosage variations play in infectious and autoimmune diseases. PMID:12224044

  16. TRC8-dependent degradation of hepatitis C virus immature core protein regulates viral propagation and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa, Sayaka; Okamoto, Toru; Sugiyama, Yukari; Kouwaki, Takahisa; Ito, Ayano; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Ono, Chikako; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Okochi, Masayasu; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Chayama, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Shoji, Ikuo; Moriishi, Kohji; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Signal-peptide peptidase (SPP) is an intramembrane protease that participates in the production of the mature core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here we show that SPP inhibition reduces the production of infectious HCV particles and pathogenesis. The immature core protein produced in SPP-knockout cells or by treatment with an SPP inhibitor is quickly degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Oral administration of the SPP inhibitor to transgenic mice expressing HCV core protein (CoreTg) reduces the expression of core protein and ameliorates insulin resistance and liver steatosis. Moreover, the haploinsufficiency of SPP in CoreTg has similar effects. TRC8, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is required for the degradation of the immature core protein. The expression of the HCV core protein alters endoplasmic reticulum (ER) distribution and induces ER stress in SPP/TRC8 double-knockout cells. These data suggest that HCV utilizes SPP cleavage to circumvent the induction of ER stress in host cells. PMID:27142248

  17. TRC8-dependent degradation of hepatitis C virus immature core protein regulates viral propagation and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Sayaka; Okamoto, Toru; Sugiyama, Yukari; Kouwaki, Takahisa; Ito, Ayano; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Ono, Chikako; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Okochi, Masayasu; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Chayama, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Shoji, Ikuo; Moriishi, Kohji; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Signal-peptide peptidase (SPP) is an intramembrane protease that participates in the production of the mature core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here we show that SPP inhibition reduces the production of infectious HCV particles and pathogenesis. The immature core protein produced in SPP-knockout cells or by treatment with an SPP inhibitor is quickly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Oral administration of the SPP inhibitor to transgenic mice expressing HCV core protein (CoreTg) reduces the expression of core protein and ameliorates insulin resistance and liver steatosis. Moreover, the haploinsufficiency of SPP in CoreTg has similar effects. TRC8, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is required for the degradation of the immature core protein. The expression of the HCV core protein alters endoplasmic reticulum (ER) distribution and induces ER stress in SPP/TRC8 double-knockout cells. These data suggest that HCV utilizes SPP cleavage to circumvent the induction of ER stress in host cells. PMID:27142248

  18. Mutations in classical swine fever virus NS4B affect virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NS4B is one of the non-structural proteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), a virus causing a severe disease in swine. Protein domain analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of NS4B in highly pathogenic CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) identified a Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor like domain (TIR...

  19. Photocontrolled reversible morphology conversion of protein nanowires mediated by an azobenzene-cored dendrimer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongcheng; Zhao, Linlu; Wang, Tingting; An, Guo; Fu, Shuang; Li, Xiumei; Deng, Xiaoli; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-05-21

    A novel strategy to construct photocontrolled protein nanowires with reversible morphology was reported through photoisomerizable azobenzene-cored dendrimer evoked protein self-assembly. Furthermore, the curvature of the protein nanowires could be switched by alternatively irradiating with visible light and ultraviolet light. PMID:27062988

  20. Dynamics of lipid droplets induced by the hepatitis C virus core protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lyn, Rodney K.; Kennedy, David C.; Stolow, Albert; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pezacki, John Paul

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatitis C virus uses lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind. {yields} HCV core proteins on LDs facilitate viral particle assembly. {yields} We used a novel combination of CARS, two-photon fluorescence, and DIC microscopies. {yields} Particle tracking experiments show that core slowly affects LD localization. {yields} Particle tracking measured the change in speed and directionality of LD movement. -- Abstract: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health problem, with limited treatment options and no vaccine available. HCV uses components of the host cell to proliferate, including lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind and facilitate viral particle assembly. We have measured the dynamics of HCV core protein-mediated changes in LDs and rates of LD movement on microtubules using a combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon fluorescence (TPF), and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopies. Results show that the HCV core protein induces rapid increases in LD size. Particle tracking experiments show that HCV core protein slowly affects LD localization by controlling the directionality of LD movement on microtubules. These dynamic processes ultimately aid HCV in propagating and the molecules and interactions involved represent novel targets for potential therapeutic intervention.

  1. Expression of the Novel Hepatitis C Virus Core+1/ARF Protein in the Context of JFH1-Based Replicons

    PubMed Central

    Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Karakasiliotis, Ioannis; Vassilaki, Niki; Sakellariou, Panagiotis; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus contains a second open reading frame within the core gene, designated core+1/ARF. Here we demonstrate for the first time expression of core+1/ARF protein in the context of a bicistronic JFH1-based replicon and report the production of two isoforms, core+1/L (long) and core+1/S (short), with different kinetics. PMID:25694591

  2. Sequential processing of hepatitis C virus core protein by host cell signal peptidase and signal peptide peptidase: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Pène, V; Hernandez, C; Vauloup-Fellous, C; Garaud-Aunis, J; Rosenberg, A R

    2009-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is believed to play critical roles in the virus morphogenesis and pathogenesis. In HCV polyprotein, core protein terminates with a signal peptide followed by E1 envelope protein. It has remained unclear whether cleavage by host cell signal peptidase (SP) at the core-E1 junction to generate the complete form of core protein, which is anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, is absolutely required for cleavage within the signal peptide by host cell signal peptide peptidase (SPP) to liberate the mature form of core protein, which is then free for trafficking to lipid droplets. In this study, the possible sources of disagreement in published reports have been examined, and we conclude that a product generated upon inhibition of SP-catalysed cleavage at the core-E1 junction in heterologous expression systems was incorrectly identified as mature core protein. Moreover, inhibition of this cleavage in the most relevant model of human hepatoma cells replicating a full-length HCV genome was shown to abolish interaction of core protein with lipid droplets and production of infectious progeny virus. These results firmly establish that SPP-catalysed liberation of mature core protein is absolutely dependent on prior cleavage by SP at the correct core-E1 site to generate the complete form of core protein, consistent with this obligatory order of processing playing a role in HCV infectious cycle. PMID:19281487

  3. Specific Polymorphisms in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 3 Core Protein Associated with Intracellular Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Ravi; McHutchison, John; Patel, Keyur; Qiang, Guan; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2008-01-01

    Background Steatosis is a common histological finding and a poor prognostic indicator in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In HCV genotype 3–infected patients, the etiology of steatosis appears to be closely correlated with unknown viral factors that increase intracellular lipid levels. We hypothesize that specific sequence polymorphisms in HCV genotype 3 core protein may be associated with hepatic intracellular lipid accumulation. Methods Using selected serum samples from 8 HCV genotype 3–infected patients with or without steatosis, we sequenced the HCV core gene to identify candidate polymorphisms associated with increased intracellular lipid levels. Results Two polymorphisms at positions 182 and 186 of the core protein correlated with the presence (P = .03) and absence (P = .005) of intrahepatic steatosis. Transfected liver cell lines expressing core protein with steatosis-associated polymorphisms had increased intracellular lipid levels compared with non–steatosis-associated core isolates, as measured by oil red O staining (P = .02). Site-specific mutagenesis performed at positions 182 and 186 in steatosis-associated core genes yielded proteins that had decreased intracellular lipid levels in transfected cells (P = .03). Conclusions We have identified polymorphisms in HCV core protein genotype 3 that produce increased intracellular lipid levels and thus may play a significant role in lipid metabolism or trafficking, contributing to steatosis. PMID:18177246

  4. A Cul-3-BTB ubiquitylation pathway regulates junctional levels and asymmetry of core planar polarity proteins

    PubMed Central

    Strutt, Helen; Searle, Elizabeth; Thomas-MacArthur, Victoria; Brookfield, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric localisation of core planar polarity proteins at apicolateral junctions is required to specify cell polarity in the plane of epithelia. This asymmetric distribution of the core proteins is proposed to require amplification of an initial asymmetry by feedback loops. In addition, generation of asymmetry appears to require the regulation of core protein levels, but the importance of such regulation and the underlying mechanisms is unknown. Here we show that ubiquitylation acts through more than one mechanism to control core protein levels in Drosophila, and that without this regulation cellular asymmetry is compromised. Levels of Dishevelled at junctions are regulated by a Cullin-3-Diablo/Kelch ubiquitin ligase complex, the activity of which is most likely controlled by neddylation. Furthermore, activity of the deubiquitylating enzyme Fat facets is required to maintain Flamingo levels at junctions. Notably, ubiquitylation does not alter the total cellular levels of Dishevelled or Flamingo, but only that of the junctional population. When junctional core protein levels are either increased or decreased by disruption of the ubiquitylation machinery, their asymmetric localisation is reduced and this leads to disruption of planar polarity at the tissue level. Loss of asymmetry by altered core protein levels can be explained by reference to feedback models for amplification of asymmetry. PMID:23487316

  5. Discovery of Fluoromethylketone-Based Peptidomimetics as Covalent ATG4B (Autophagin-1) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zongxing; Kuhn, Bernd; Aebi, Johannes; Lin, Xianfeng; Ding, Haiyuan; Zhou, Zheng; Xu, Zhiheng; Xu, Danqing; Han, Li; Liu, Cheng; Qiu, Hongxia; Zhang, Yuxia; Haap, Wolfgang; Riemer, Claus; Stahl, Martin; Qin, Ning; Shen, Hong C; Tang, Guozhi

    2016-08-11

    ATG4B or autophagin-1 is a cysteine protease that cleaves ATG8 family proteins. ATG4B plays essential roles in the autophagosome formation and the autophagy pathway. Herein we disclose the design and structural modifications of a series of fluoromethylketone (FMK)-based peptidomimetics as highly potent ATG4B inhibitors. Their structure-activity relationship (SAR) and protease selectivity are also discussed. PMID:27563406

  6. Intramembrane proteolysis promotes trafficking of hepatitis C virus core protein to lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    McLauchlan, John; Lemberg, Marius K; Hope, Graham; Martoglio, Bruno

    2002-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major causative pathogen associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The virus has a positive-sense RNA genome encoding a single polyprotein with the virion components located in the N-terminal portion. During biosynthesis of the polyprotein, an internal signal sequence between the core protein and the envelope protein E1 targets the nascent polypeptide to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for translocation of E1 into the ER. Following membrane insertion, the signal sequence is cleaved from E1 by signal peptidase. Here we provide evidence that after cleavage by signal peptidase, the signal peptide is further processed by the intramembrane-cleaving protease SPP that promotes the release of core protein from the ER membrane. Core protein is then free for subsequent trafficking to lipid droplets. This study represents an example of a potential role for intramembrane proteolysis in the maturation of a viral protein. PMID:12145199

  7. Self-Assembly of Nucleocapsid-Like Particles from Recombinant Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Meghan; Lorinczi, Marta; Rijnbrand, René; Lemon, Stanley M.; Watowich, Stanley J.

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about the assembly pathway and structure of hepatitis C virus (HCV) since insufficient quantities of purified virus are available for detailed biophysical and structural studies. Here, we show that bacterially expressed HCV core proteins can efficiently self-assemble in vitro into nucleocapsid-like particles. These particles have a regular, spherical morphology with a modal distribution of diameters of approximately 60 nm. Self-assembly of nucleocapsid-like particles requires structured RNA molecules. The 124 N-terminal residues of the core protein are sufficient for self-assembly into nucleocapsid-like particles. Inclusion of the carboxy-terminal domain of the core protein modifies the core assembly pathway such that the resultant particles have an irregular outline. However, these particles are similar in size and shape to those assembled from the 124 N-terminal residues of the core protein. These results provide novel opportunities to delineate protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions critical for HCV assembly, to study the molecular details of HCV assembly, and for performing high-throughput screening of assembly inhibitors. PMID:11160716

  8. Structural requirements for assembly and homotypic interactions of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Meehyein; Ha, Youngju; Park, Hae-Joon

    2006-12-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is involved in the assembly of nucleocapsid particles, as well as regulation of cellular and viral gene expression. To investigate the biological properties of the viral core protein and viral RNA assembly, two recombinant core proteins, the mature core protein (named C179) and a C-terminal truncated protein (named C124), were expressed and purified. To confirm their ability to generate viral particles, the production of nucleocapsid-like particles was monitored using transmission electron microscopy (EM). The EM analysis revealed that exposure of these proteins to the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of the viral RNA resulted in generation of spherical particles of 30-140nm in diameter. Interestingly, a cross-linking analysis revealed that C124 required an RNA component for homotypic interactions. In contrast, C179 successfully assembled in the absence of nucleic acids. Additionally, RNA-mediated conversion of the C124 structure into a more stable state was maintained even after RNase treatment. Therefore, our results indicate that the basic N-terminal domain of the viral core protein utilizes RNA components to induce conformational changes or efficient homotypic interactions, while the C-terminal domain may contain key peptide sequences for initiating spontaneous multimerization at the early stages of viral assembly. PMID:16949699

  9. Advantages to the use of rodent hepadnavirus core proteins as vaccine platforms.

    PubMed

    Billaud, Jean-Noel; Peterson, Darrell; Lee, Byung O; Maruyama, Toshiyuki; Chen, Antony; Sallberg, Matti; Garduño, Fermin; Goldstein, Phillip; Hughes, Janice; Jones, Joyce; Milich, David

    2007-02-19

    The hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) has been proposed as a useful particulate carrier platform for poorly immunogenic peptidic and carbohydrate B cell epitopes. However, biochemical and immunologic impediments have plagued this technology. Specifically, the "assembly" problem characterized by the low yield of unstable hybrid particles resulting from the insertion of foreign sequences and the "pre-existing immunity" problem due to the fact that the HBcAg is derived from a human pathogen have limited the development of this carrier technology. As a means of addressing the "pre-existing immunity" problem we have used the core proteins from the rodent hepdnaviruses. A number of advantages to the use of the rodent hepadnaviral core proteins as opposed to the HBcAg for vaccine design were defined including: equal or superior immunogenicity at the T and B cell levels; the use of the rodent core proteins does not compromise the anti-HBc diagnostic assay; the efficacy of the rodent core proteins as vaccine carriers will not be limited by pre-existing anti-HBc antibodies that are present in previously and currently HBV-infected persons; and the HBcAg-specific tolerance present in HBV chronic carriers can be circumvented by the use of the rodent core proteins. PMID:17178179

  10. Virus-producing cells determine the host protein profiles of HIV-1 virion cores

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Upon HIV entry into target cells, viral cores are released and rearranged into reverse transcription complexes (RTCs), which support reverse transcription and also protect and transport viral cDNA to the site of integration. RTCs are composed of viral and cellular proteins that originate from both target and producer cells, the latter entering the target cell within the viral core. However, the proteome of HIV-1 viral cores in the context of the type of producer cells has not yet been characterized. Results We examined the proteomic profiles of the cores purified from HIV-1 NL4-3 virions assembled in Sup-T1 cells (T lymphocytes), PMA and vitamin D3 activated THP1 (model of macrophages, mMΦ), and non-activated THP1 cells (model of monocytes, mMN) and assessed potential involvement of identified proteins in the early stages of infection using gene ontology information and data from genome-wide screens on proteins important for HIV-1 replication. We identified 202 cellular proteins incorporated in the viral cores (T cells: 125, mMΦ: 110, mMN: 90) with the overlap between these sets limited to 42 proteins. The groups of RNA binding (29), DNA binding (17), cytoskeleton (15), cytoskeleton regulation (21), chaperone (18), vesicular trafficking-associated (12) and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway-associated proteins (9) were most numerous. Cores of the virions from SupT1 cells contained twice as many RNA binding proteins as cores of THP1-derived virus, whereas cores of virions from mMΦ and mMN were enriched in components of cytoskeleton and vesicular transport machinery, most probably due to differences in virion assembly pathways between these cells. Spectra of chaperones, cytoskeletal proteins and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway components were similar between viral cores from different cell types, whereas DNA-binding and especially RNA-binding proteins were highly diverse. Western blot analysis showed that within the group of overlapping proteins, the level of

  11. HCV core protein uses multiple mechanisms to induce oxidative stress in human hepatoma Huh7 cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander V; Smirnova, Olga A; Petrushanko, Irina Y; Ivanova, Olga N; Karpenko, Inna L; Alekseeva, Ekaterina; Sominskaya, Irina; Makarov, Alexander A; Bartosch, Birke; Kochetkov, Sergey N; Isaguliants, Maria G

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is accompanied by the induction of oxidative stress, mediated by several virus proteins, the most prominent being the nucleocapsid protein (HCV core). Here, using the truncated forms of HCV core, we have delineated several mechanisms by which it induces the oxidative stress. The N-terminal 36 amino acids of HCV core induced TGF\\(\\upbeta\\)1-dependent expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases 1 and 4, both of which independently contributed to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The same fragment also induced the expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2, which, however, made no input into ROS production. Amino acids 37-191 of HCV core up-regulated the transcription of a ROS generating enzyme cytochrome P450 2E1. Furthermore, the same fragment induced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1\\(\\upalpha\\). The latter triggered efflux of Ca2+ from ER to mitochondria via mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, leading to generation of superoxide anions, and possibly also H2O2. Suppression of any of these pathways in cells expressing the full-length core protein led to a partial inhibition of ROS production. Thus, HCV core causes oxidative stress via several independent pathways, each mediated by a distinct region of the protein. PMID:26035647

  12. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi; Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko; Horie, Toshiharu

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ((59)Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca(2+) uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. PMID:25545986

  13. Sequence and structural implications of a bovine corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycan core protein. Protein 37B represents bovine lumican and proteins 37A and 25 are unique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Brown, S. J.; Vergnes, J. P.; Hassell, J. R.; Mann, M. M.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Amino acid sequence from tryptic peptides of three different bovine corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycan (KSPG) core proteins (designated 37A, 37B, and 25) showed similarities to the sequence of a chicken KSPG core protein lumican. Bovine lumican cDNA was isolated from a bovine corneal expression library by screening with chicken lumican cDNA. The bovine cDNA codes for a 342-amino acid protein, M(r) 38,712, containing amino acid sequences identified in the 37B KSPG core protein. The bovine lumican is 68% identical to chicken lumican, with an 83% identity excluding the N-terminal 40 amino acids. Location of 6 cysteine and 4 consensus N-glycosylation sites in the bovine sequence were identical to those in chicken lumican. Bovine lumican had about 50% identity to bovine fibromodulin and 20% identity to bovine decorin and biglycan. About two-thirds of the lumican protein consists of a series of 10 amino acid leucine-rich repeats that occur in regions of calculated high beta-hydrophobic moment, suggesting that the leucine-rich repeats contribute to beta-sheet formation in these proteins. Sequences obtained from 37A and 25 core proteins were absent in bovine lumican, thus predicting a unique primary structure and separate mRNA for each of the three bovine KSPG core proteins.

  14. Proteomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum core metabolism: relative protein expression profiles and growth phase-dependent changes in protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium thermocellum produces H2 and ethanol, as well as CO2, acetate, formate, and lactate, directly from cellulosic biomass. It is therefore an attractive model for biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Optimization of end-product yields and titres is crucial for making biofuel production economically feasible. Relative protein expression profiles may provide targets for metabolic engineering, while understanding changes in protein expression and metabolism in response to carbon limitation, pH, and growth phase may aid in reactor optimization. We performed shotgun 2D-HPLC-MS/MS on closed-batch cellobiose-grown exponential phase C. thermocellum cell-free extracts to determine relative protein expression profiles of core metabolic proteins involved carbohydrate utilization, energy conservation, and end-product synthesis. iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation) based protein quantitation was used to determine changes in core metabolic proteins in response to growth phase. Results Relative abundance profiles revealed differential levels of putative enzymes capable of catalyzing parallel pathways. The majority of proteins involved in pyruvate catabolism and end-product synthesis were detected with high abundance, with the exception of aldehyde dehydrogenase, ferredoxin-dependent Ech-type [NiFe]-hydrogenase, and RNF-type NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Using 4-plex 2D-HPLC-MS/MS, 24% of the 144 core metabolism proteins detected demonstrated moderate changes in expression during transition from exponential to stationary phase. Notably, proteins involved in pyruvate synthesis decreased in stationary phase, whereas proteins involved in glycogen metabolism, pyruvate catabolism, and end-product synthesis increased in stationary phase. Several proteins that may directly dictate end-product synthesis patterns, including pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductases, alcohol dehydrogenases, and a putative bifurcating hydrogenase

  15. PCNA-binding proteins in the archaea: novel functionality beyond the conserved core.

    PubMed

    MacNeill, Stuart A

    2016-08-01

    Sliding clamps play an essential role in coordinating protein activity in DNA metabolism in all three domains of life. In eukaryotes and archaea, the sliding clamp is PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen). Across the diversity of the archaea PCNA interacts with a highly conserved set of proteins with key roles in DNA replication and repair, including DNA polymerases B and D, replication factor C, the Fen1 nuclease and RNAseH2, but this core set of factors is likely to represent a fraction of the PCNA interactome only. Here, I review three recently characterised non-core archaeal PCNA-binding proteins NusS, NreA/NreB and TIP, highlighting what is known of their interactions with PCNA and their functions in vivo and in vitro. Gaining a detailed understanding of the non-core PCNA interactome will provide significant insights into key aspects of chromosome biology in divergent archaeal lineages. PMID:26886233

  16. The Contribution of Missense Mutations in Core and Rim Residues of Protein-Protein Interfaces to Human Disease.

    PubMed

    David, Alessia; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2015-08-28

    Missense mutations at protein-protein interaction sites, called interfaces, are important contributors to human disease. Interfaces are non-uniform surface areas characterized by two main regions, "core" and "rim", which differ in terms of evolutionary conservation and physicochemical properties. Moreover, within interfaces, only a small subset of residues ("hot spots") is crucial for the binding free energy of the protein-protein complex. We performed a large-scale structural analysis of human single amino acid variations (SAVs) and demonstrated that disease-causing mutations are preferentially located within the interface core, as opposed to the rim (p<0.01). In contrast, the interface rim is significantly enriched in polymorphisms, similar to the remaining non-interacting surface. Energetic hot spots tend to be enriched in disease-causing mutations compared to non-hot spots (p=0.05), regardless of their occurrence in core or rim residues. For individual amino acids, the frequency of substitution into a polymorphism or disease-causing mutation differed to other amino acids and was related to its structural location, as was the type of physicochemical change introduced by the SAV. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the different distribution and properties of disease-causing SAVs and polymorphisms within different structural regions and in relation to the energetic contribution of amino acid in protein-protein interfaces, thus highlighting the importance of a structural system biology approach for predicting the effect of SAVs. PMID:26173036

  17. Molecular cloning and transient expression in COS7 cells of a novel human PDE4B cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, HSPDE4B3.

    PubMed Central

    Huston, E; Lumb, S; Russell, A; Catterall, C; Ross, A H; Steele, M R; Bolger, G B; Perry, M J; Owens, R J; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    5'-Rapid amplification of cDNA ends, done on poly(A)+ RNA from human U87 cells, was used to identify 420 bp of novel 5' sequence of a PDE4B cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE). This identified an open reading frame encoding a putative 721-residue 'long-form' PDE4B splice variant, which we term HSPDE4B3. HSPDE4B3 differs from the two known PDE4B forms by virtue of its unique 79-residue N-terminal region, compared with the unique N-terminal regions of 94 and 39 residues found in HSPDE4B1 and HSPDE4B2 respectively. In transfected COS7 cells the two long forms, HSPDE4B1 and HSPDE4B3, had molecular masses of approx. 104 and approx. 103 kDa respectively. Expressed in COS-7 cells, the three HSPDE4B isoforms were found in the high-speed supernatant (cytosol) fraction as well as both the high-speed pellet (P2) and low-speed pellet (P1) fractions. All isoforms showed similar Km values for cAMP hydrolysis (1.5-2.6 microM). The maximal activities of the soluble cytosolic activity of the two long forms were very similar, whereas that of the short form, HSPDE4B2, was approx. 4-fold higher. Particulate-associated HSPDE4B1 and HSPDE4B2 were less active (approx. 40%) than their cytosol forms, whereas particulate HSPDE4B3 was similar in activity to its cytosolic form. Particulate and cytosolic forms of HSPDE4B1 and HSPDE4B3 were similarly inhibited by rolipram ¿4-[3-(cyclopentoxyl)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-pyrrolidone¿, the selective inhibitor of PDE4 (IC50 0.05-0.1 microM), whereas particulate-associated HSPDE4B2 was profoundly (approx. 10-fold) more sensitive (IC50 0.02 microM) to rolipram inhibition than its cytosolic form (IC50 0.2 microM). The various particulate-associated HSPDE4B isoforms showed very different susceptibilities to solubilization with the detergent Triton X-100 and high NaCl concentration. A novel cDNA, called pRPDE74, was obtained by screening a rat olfactory lobe cDNA library. This contained an open reading frame encoding a 721-residue protein that showed

  18. Accommodation of a highly symmetric core within a symmetric protein superfold.

    PubMed

    Brych, Stephen R; Kim, Jaewon; Logan, Timothy M; Blaber, Michael

    2003-12-01

    An alternative core packing group, involving a set of five positions, has been introduced into human acidic FGF-1. This alternative group was designed so as to constrain the primary structure within the core region to the same threefold symmetry present in the tertiary structure of the protein fold (the beta-trefoil superfold). The alternative core is essentially indistinguishable from the WT core with regard to structure, stability, and folding kinetics. The results show that the beta-trefoil superfold is compatible with a threefold symmetric constraint on the core region, as might be the case if the superfold arose as a result of gene duplication/fusion events. Furthermore, this new core arrangement can form the basis of a structural "building block" that can greatly simplify the de novo design of beta-trefoil proteins by using symmetric structural complementarity. Remaining asymmetry within the core appears to be related to asymmetry in the tertiary structure associated with receptor and heparin binding functionality of the growth factor. PMID:14627732

  19. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi; Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko; Horie, Toshiharu

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ({sup 59}Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. - Highlights: • Iron accumulation in the livers of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is thought to exacerbate oxidative stress. • The impact of iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing cells were examined. • Mitochondrial iron uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. • Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates

  20. Specific Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase-4B Results in Anxiolysis and Facilitates Memory Acquisition.

    PubMed

    McGirr, Alexander; Lipina, Tatiana V; Mun, Ho-Suk; Georgiou, John; Al-Amri, Ahmed H; Ng, Enoch; Zhai, Dongxu; Elliott, Christina; Cameron, Ryan T; Mullins, Jonathan G L; Liu, Fang; Baillie, George S; Clapcote, Steven J; Roder, John C

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a core feature of dementia and a prominent feature in psychiatric disease. As non-redundant regulators of intracellular cAMP gradients, phosphodiesterases (PDE) mediate fundamental aspects of brain function relevant to learning, memory, and higher cognitive functions. Phosphodiesterase-4B (PDE4B) is an important phosphodiesterase in the hippocampal formation, is a major Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) binding partner and is itself a risk gene for psychiatric illness. To define the effects of specific inhibition of the PDE4B subtype, we generated mice with a catalytic domain mutant form of PDE4B (Y358C) that has decreased ability to hydrolyze cAMP. Structural modeling predictions of decreased function and impaired binding with DISC1 were confirmed in cell assays. Phenotypic characterization of the PDE4B(Y358C) mice revealed facilitated phosphorylation of CREB, decreased binding to DISC1, and upregulation of DISC1 and β-Arrestin in hippocampus and amygdala. In behavioral assays, PDE4B(Y358C) mice displayed decreased anxiety and increased exploration, as well as cognitive enhancement across several tests of learning and memory, consistent with synaptic changes including enhanced long-term potentiation and impaired depotentiation ex vivo. PDE4B(Y358C) mice also demonstrated enhanced neurogenesis. Contextual fear memory, though intact at 24 h, was decreased at 7 days in PDE4B(Y358C) mice, an effect replicated pharmacologically with a non-selective PDE4 inhibitor, implicating cAMP signaling by PDE4B in a very late phase of consolidation. No effect of the PDE4B(Y358C) mutation was observed in the prepulse inhibition and forced swim tests. Our data establish specific inhibition of PDE4B as a promising therapeutic approach for disorders of cognition and anxiety, and a putative target for pathological fear memory. PMID:26272049

  1. Discovery of Dengue Virus NS4B Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Dong, Hongping; Zou, Bin; Karuna, Ratna; Wan, Kah Fei; Zou, Jing; Susila, Agatha; Yip, Andy; Shan, Chao; Yeo, Kim Long; Xu, Haoying; Ding, Mei; Chan, Wai Ling; Gu, Feng; Seah, Peck Gee; Liu, Wei; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Kang, CongBao; Lescar, Julien; Blasco, Francesca; Smith, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1 to -4) represent the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral pathogens in humans. No clinically approved vaccine or antiviral is currently available for DENV. Here we report a spiropyrazolopyridone compound that potently inhibits DENV both in vitro and in vivo. The inhibitor was identified through screening of a 1.8-million-compound library by using a DENV-2 replicon assay. The compound selectively inhibits DENV-2 and -3 (50% effective concentration [EC50], 10 to 80 nM) but not DENV-1 and -4 (EC50, >20 μM). Resistance analysis showed that a mutation at amino acid 63 of DENV-2 NS4B (a nonenzymatic transmembrane protein and a component of the viral replication complex) could confer resistance to compound inhibition. Genetic studies demonstrate that variations at amino acid 63 of viral NS4B are responsible for the selective inhibition of DENV-2 and -3. Medicinal chemistry improved the physicochemical properties of the initial “hit” (compound 1), leading to compound 14a, which has good in vivo pharmacokinetics. Treatment of DENV-2-infected AG129 mice with compound 14a suppressed viremia, even when the treatment started after viral infection. The results have proven the concept that inhibitors of NS4B could potentially be developed for clinical treatment of DENV infection. Compound 14a represents a potential preclinical candidate for treatment of DENV-2- and -3-infected patients. IMPORTANCE Dengue virus (DENV) threatens up to 2.5 billion people and is now spreading in many regions in the world where it was not previously endemic. While there are several promising vaccine candidates in clinical trials, approved vaccines or antivirals are not yet available. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a spiropyrazolopyridone as a novel inhibitor of DENV by targeting the viral NS4B protein. The compound potently inhibits two of the four serotypes of DENV (DENV-2 and -3) both in vitro and in vivo. Our

  2. Regulation of K-Ras4B Membrane Binding by Calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Benjamin; Kapoor, Shobhna; Waldmann, Herbert; Winter, Roland; Weise, Katrin

    2016-07-12

    K-Ras4B is a membrane-bound small GTPase with a prominent role in cancer development. It contains a polybasic farnesylated C-terminus that is required for the correct localization and clustering of K-Ras4B in distinct membrane domains. PDEδ and the Ca(2+)-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) are known to function as potential binding partners for farnesylated Ras proteins. However, they differ in the number of interaction sites with K-Ras4B, leading to different modes of interaction, and thus affect the subcellular distribution of K-Ras4B in different ways. Although it is clear that Ca(2+)-bound CaM can play a role in the dynamic spatial cycle of K-Ras4B in the cell, the exact molecular mechanism is only partially understood. In this biophysical study, we investigated the effect of Ca(2+)/CaM on the interaction of GDP- and GTP-loaded K-Ras4B with heterogeneous model biomembranes by using a combination of different spectroscopic and imaging techniques. The results show that Ca(2+)/CaM is able to extract K-Ras4B from negatively charged membranes in a nucleotide-independent manner. Moreover, the data demonstrate that the complex of Ca(2+)/CaM and K-Ras4B is stable in the presence of anionic membranes and shows no membrane binding. Finally, the influence of Ca(2+)/CaM on the interaction of K-Ras4B with membranes is compared with that of PDEδ, which was investigated in a previous study. Although both CaM and PDEδ exhibit a hydrophobic binding pocket for farnesyl, they have different effects on membrane binding of K-Ras4B and hence should be capable of regulating K-Ras4B plasma membrane localization in the cell. PMID:27410739

  3. Crystal structure of a core spliceosomal protein interface.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Matthew J; Edwards, Ross A; Ritchie, Dustin B; Kent, Oliver A; Golas, Monika M; Stark, Holger; Lührmann, Reinhard; Glover, J N Mark; MacMillan, Andrew M

    2006-01-31

    The precise excision of introns from precursor mRNAs (pre-mRNAs) in eukaryotes is accomplished by the spliceosome, a complex assembly containing five small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles. Human p14, a component of the spliceosomal U2 and U11/U12 snRNPs, has been shown to associate directly with the pre-mRNA branch adenosine early in spliceosome assembly and within the fully assembled spliceosome. Here we report the 2.5-A crystal structure of a complex containing p14 and a peptide derived from the p14-associated U2 snRNP component SF3b155. p14 contains an RNA recognition motif (RRM), the surface of which is largely occluded by a C-terminal alpha-helix and a portion of the SF3b155 peptide. An analysis of RNA.protein crosslinking to wild-type and mutant p14 shows that the branch adenosine directly interacts with a conserved aromatic within a pocket on the surface of the complex. This result, combined with a comparison of the structure with known RRMs and pseudoRRMs as well as model-building by using the electron cryomicroscopy structure of a spliceosomal U11/U12 di-snRNP, suggests that p14.SF3b155 presents a noncanonical surface for RNA recognition at the heart of the mammalian spliceosome. PMID:16432215

  4. [Research Progress in the Core Proteins of the Classical Swine Fever Virus].

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuzhen; Zhao, Dantong; Liu, Guoying; He, Fan; Liu, Bin; Fu, Shaoyin; Hao, Yongqing; Zhang, Wenguang

    2015-09-01

    The core protein (CP) of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is one of its structural proteins. Apart from forming the nucleocapsid to protect internal viral genomic RNA, this protein is involved in transcriptional regulation. Also, during viral infection, the CP is involved in interactions with many host proteins. In this review, we combine study of this protein with its disorders, structural/functional characteristics, as well as its interactions with the non-structural proteins NS3, NS5B and host proteins such as SUMO-1, UBC9, OS9 and IQGAP1. We also summarize the important part played by the CP in CSFV pathogenicity, virulence and replication of genomic RNA. We also provide guidelines for further studies in the CP of the CSFV. PMID:26738299

  5. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling. PMID:27362237

  6. Core-Shell Electrospun Fibers Encapsulating Chromophores or Luminescent Proteins for Microscopically Controlled Molecular Release.

    PubMed

    Romano, Luigi; Camposeo, Andrea; Manco, Rita; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Core-shell fibers are emerging as interesting microstructures for the controlled release of drugs, proteins, and complex biological molecules, enabling the fine control of microreservoirs of encapsulated active agents, of the release kinetics, and of the localized delivery. Here we load luminescent molecules and enhanced green fluorescent proteins into the core of fibers realized by coaxial electrospinning. Photoluminescence spectroscopy evidences unaltered molecular emission following encapsulation and release. Moreover, the release kinetics is microscopically investigated by confocal analysis at individual-fiber scale, unveiling different characteristic time scales for diffusional translocation at the core and at the shell. These results are interpreted by a two stage desorption model for the coaxial microstructure, and they are relevant in the design and development of efficient fibrous systems for the delivery of functional biomolecules. PMID:26870885

  7. Secondary Structure and Membrane Topology of the Full-Length Dengue Virus NS4B in Micelles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wong, Ying Lei; Lee, Michelle Yueqi; Li, Qingxin; Wang, Qing-Yin; Lescar, Julien; Shi, Pei-Yong; Kang, CongBao

    2016-09-19

    Dengue virus nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B) is a membrane protein consisting of 248 residues with a crucial role in virus replication and interference with the host innate immunity. The dengue virus serotype 3 NS4B was reconstituted into lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (LMPG) micelles. Backbone resonance assignment of NS4B was obtained using conventional solution NMR experiments. Further studies suggested that NS4B contained eleven helices and six of them form five potential transmembrane regions. This study provides atomic level information for an important drug target to control flavivirus infections. PMID:27554985

  8. Secondary structure and membrane topology of dengue virus NS4B N-terminal 125 amino acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Kim, Young Mee; Zou, Jing; Wang, Qing-Yin; Gayen, Shovanlal; Wong, Ying Lei; Lee, Le Tian; Xie, Xuping; Huang, Qiwei; Lescar, Julien; Shi, Pei-Yong; Kang, CongBao

    2015-12-01

    The transmembrane NS4B protein of dengue virus (DENV) is a validated antiviral target that plays important roles in viral replication and invasion of innate immune response. The first 125 amino acids of DENV NS4B are sufficient for inhibition of alpha/beta interferon signaling. Resistance mutations to NS4B inhibitors are all mapped to the first 125 amino acids. In this study, we expressed and purified a protein representing the first 125 amino acids of NS4B (NS4B(1-125)). This recombinant NS4B(1-125) protein was reconstituted into detergent micelles. Solution NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that there are five helices (α1 to α5) present in NS4B(1-125). Dynamic studies, together with a paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiment demonstrated that four helices, α2, α3, α4, and α5 are embedded in the detergent micelles. Comparison of wild type and V63I mutant (a mutation that confers resistance to NS4B inhibitor) NS4B(1-125) proteins demonstrated that V63I mutation did not cause significant conformational changes, however, V63 may have a molecular interaction with residues in the α5 transmembrane domain under certain conditions. The structural and dynamic information obtained in study is helpful to understand the structure and function of NS4B. PMID:26403837

  9. Characterization of the fusion core in zebrafish endogenous retroviral envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jian; Zhang, Huaidong; Gong, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2015-05-08

    Zebrafish endogenous retrovirus (ZFERV) is the unique endogenous retrovirus in zebrafish, as yet, containing intact open reading frames of its envelope protein gene in zebrafish genome. Similarly, several envelope proteins of endogenous retroviruses in human and other mammalian animal genomes (such as syncytin-1 and 2 in human, syncytin-A and B in mouse) were identified and shown to be functional in induction of cell–cell fusion involved in placental development. ZFERV envelope protein (Env) gene appears to be also functional in vivo because it is expressible. After sequence alignment, we found ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes, especially in the regions of N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR) which were crucial for membrane fusion. We expressed the regions of N + C protein in the ZFERV Env (residues 459–567, including predicted NHR and CHR) to characterize the fusion core structure. We found N + C protein could form a stable coiled-coil trimer that consists of three helical NHR regions forming a central trimeric core, and three helical CHR regions packing into the grooves on the surface of the central core. The structural characterization of the fusion core revealed the possible mechanism of fusion mediated by ZFERV Env. These results gave comprehensive explanation of how the ancient virus infects the zebrafish and integrates into the genome million years ago, and showed a rational clue for discovery of physiological significance (e.g., medicate cell–cell fusion). - Highlights: • ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes. • The fusion core of ZFERV Env forms stable coiled-coil trimer including three NHRs and three CHRs. • The structural mechanism of viral entry mediated by ZFERV Env is disclosed. • The results are helpful for further discovery of physiological function of ZFERV Env in zebrafish.

  10. Sending proteins to dense core secretory granules: still a lot to sort out

    PubMed Central

    Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Reudelhuber, Timothy L.

    2007-01-01

    The intracellular sorting of peptide hormone precursors to the dense core secretory granules (DCSGs) is essential for their bioactivation. Despite the fundamental importance of this cellular process, the nature of the sorting signals for entry of proteins into DCSGs remains a source of vigorous debate. This review highlights recent discoveries that are consistent with a model in which several protein domains, acting in a cell-specific fashion and at different steps in the sorting process, act in concert to regulate the entry of proteins into DCSGs. PMID:17438078

  11. Breaking and Restoring the Hydrophobic Core of a Centromere-binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Sadia; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Warwicker, Jim; Hayes, Finbarr

    2015-01-01

    The ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) superfamily of DNA-binding proteins is dispersed widely in procaryotes. The dimeric RHH fold is generated by interlocking of two monomers into a 2-fold symmetrical structure that comprises four α-helices enwrapping a pair of antiparallel β-strands (ribbon). Residues in the ribbon region are the principal determinants of DNA binding, whereas the RHH hydrophobic core is assembled from amino acids in both the α-helices and ribbon element. The ParG protein encoded by multiresistance plasmid TP228 is a RHH protein that functions dually as a centromere binding factor during segrosome assembly and as a transcriptional repressor. Here we identify residues in the α-helices of ParG that are critical for DNA segregation and in organization of the protein hydrophobic core. A key hydrophobic aromatic amino acid at one position was functionally substitutable by other aromatic residues, but not by non-aromatic hydrophobic amino acids. Nevertheless, intramolecular suppression of the latter by complementary change of a residue that approaches nearby from the partner monomer fully restored activity in vivo and in vitro. The interactions involved in assembling the ParG core may be highly malleable and suggest that RHH proteins are tractable platforms for the rational design of diverse DNA binding factors useful for synthetic biology and other purposes. PMID:25713077

  12. Adaptive Evolution and Functional Redesign of Core Metabolic Proteins in Snakes

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wanjun; Wang, Zhengyuan O.; Pollock, David D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Adaptive evolutionary episodes in core metabolic proteins are uncommon, and are even more rarely linked to major macroevolutionary shifts. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted extensive molecular evolutionary analyses on snake mitochondrial proteins and discovered multiple lines of evidence suggesting that the proteins at the core of aerobic metabolism in snakes have undergone remarkably large episodic bursts of adaptive change. We show that snake mitochondrial proteins experienced unprecedented levels of positive selection, coevolution, convergence, and reversion at functionally critical residues. We examined Cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI) in detail, and show that it experienced extensive modification of normally conserved residues involved in proton transport and delivery of electrons and oxygen. Thus, adaptive changes likely altered the flow of protons and other aspects of function in CO, thereby influencing fundamental characteristics of aerobic metabolism. We refer to these processes as “evolutionary redesign” because of the magnitude of the episodic bursts and the degree to which they affected core functional residues. Conclusions/Significance The evolutionary redesign of snake COI coincided with adaptive bursts in other mitochondrial proteins and substantial changes in mitochondrial genome structure. It also generally coincided with or preceded major shifts in ecological niche and the evolution of extensive physiological adaptations related to lung reduction, large prey consumption, and venom evolution. The parallel timing of these major evolutionary events suggests that evolutionary redesign of metabolic and mitochondrial function may be related to, or underlie, the extreme changes in physiological and metabolic efficiency, flexibility, and innovation observed in snake evolution. PMID:18493604

  13. Control of vertebrate core planar cell polarity protein localization and dynamics by Prickle 2

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Mitchell T.; Wallingford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is a ubiquitous property of animal tissues and is essential for morphogenesis and homeostasis. In most cases, this fundamental property is governed by a deeply conserved set of ‘core PCP’ proteins, which includes the transmembrane proteins Van Gogh-like (Vangl) and Frizzled (Fzd), as well as the cytoplasmic effectors Prickle (Pk) and Dishevelled (Dvl). Asymmetric localization of these proteins is thought to be central to their function, and understanding the dynamics of these proteins is an important challenge in developmental biology. Among the processes that are organized by the core PCP proteins is the directional beating of cilia, such as those in the vertebrate node, airway and brain. Here, we exploit the live imaging capabilities of Xenopus to chart the progressive asymmetric localization of fluorescent reporters of Dvl1, Pk2 and Vangl1 in a planar polarized ciliated epithelium. Using this system, we also characterize the influence of Pk2 on the asymmetric dynamics of Vangl1 at the cell cortex, and we define regions of Pk2 that control its own localization and those impacting Vangl1. Finally, our data reveal a striking uncoupling of Vangl1 and Dvl1 asymmetry. This study advances our understanding of conserved PCP protein functions and also establishes a rapid, tractable platform to facilitate future in vivo studies of vertebrate PCP protein dynamics. PMID:26293301

  14. Core-Shell Model of Folding-Unfolding Transitions (UFT) in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aroutiounian, Svetlana

    2008-03-01

    There are ˜10^N conformations for a protein of length N to sort out randomly in search of lowest free energy state. Can protein folding be simple and fast? Core-shell model introduces principles, proposes mechanisms and scores residues of fast, reversible UFT in protein. According to it, during UFT the realm of intra-residual interactions leads the residue motion. The scaffold of hydrophilic residues forms external shell of unstructured, tube-like protein in unfolded state, just as the hydrophobic residues form internal scaffold -- core, of the protein in folded state. As UFT proceeds, residue slides into lowest-score position permitted by its structure. Model accounts for experimentally observed features of UFT. It is based on three principles: 1) During UFT protein is virtual - its features or structure are inferred only statistically and with limited precision; 2) Mechanism of UFT memory is not longitudinal, but transverse; 3) Native design overrides specific features of residues - the alphabet of amino acids assumes an intrinsic score-function. Per-residue mechanism of UFT is proposed and score-function is described. Difference graphs of transitional score-function and average genome-wide abundance index show that our score-function is the order parameter of UFT in protein and by virtue of being it, reveals transitional key residues. It echoes the multiple-tier and funnel concepts of FEL perspective. Monte Carlo simulations of UFT in myoglobin illustrate the idea.

  15. Lack of Cul4b, an E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Component, Leads to Embryonic Lethality and Abnormal Placental Development

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jupeng; Qian, Yanyan; Sun, Wenjie; Zou, Yongxin; Guo, Chenhong; Chen, Bingxi; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin

    2012-01-01

    Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) complexes participate in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, transcription, signal transduction and development. Serving as the scaffold protein, cullins are crucial for the assembly of ligase complexes, which recognize and target various substrates for proteosomal degradation. Mutations in human CUL4B, one of the eight members in cullin family, are one of the major causes of X-linked mental retardation. We here report the generation and characterization of Cul4b knockout mice, in which exons 3 to 5 were deleted. In contrast to the survival to adulthood of human hemizygous males with CUL4B null mutation, Cul4b null mouse embryos show severe developmental arrest and usually die before embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5). Accumulation of cyclin E, a CRL (CUL4B) substrate, was observed in Cul4b null embryos. Cul4b heterozygotes were recovered at a reduced ratio and exhibited a severe developmental delay. The placentas in Cul4b heterozygotes were disorganized and were impaired in vascularization, which may contribute to the developmental delay. As in human CUL4B heterozygotes, Cul4b null cells were selected against in Cul4b heterozygotes, leading to various degrees of skewed X-inactivation in different tissues. Together, our results showed that CUL4B is indispensable for embryonic development in the mouse. PMID:22606329

  16. Molecular cloning and subcellular distribution of the novel PDE4B4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase isoform.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Malcolm; McSorley, Theresa; Olsen, Aileen E; Johnston, Lee Ann; Thomson, Neil C; Baillie, George S; Houslay, Miles D; Bolger, Graeme B

    2003-01-01

    We have isolated cDNAs encoding PDE4B4, a new cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE4) isoform with novel properties. The amino acid sequence of PDE4B4 demonstrates that it is encoded by the PDE4B gene, but that it differs from the previously isolated PDE4B1, PDE4B2 and PDE4B3 isoforms by the presence of a novel N-terminal region of 17 amino acids. PDE4B4 contains both of the upstream conserved region 1 (UCR1) and UCR2 regulatory units that are characteristic of 'long' PDE4 isoforms. RNase protection demonstrated that PDE4B4 mRNA is expressed preferentially in liver, skeletal muscle and various regions of the brain, which differs from the pattern of tissue distribution of the other known PDE4B long forms, PDE4B1 and PDE4B3. Expression of PDE4B4 cDNA in COS7 cells produced a protein of 85 kDa under denaturing conditions. Subcellular fractionation of recombinant, COS7-cell expressed PDE4B4 showed that the protein was localized within the cytosol, which was confirmed by confocal microscopic analysis of living COS7 cells transfected with a green fluorescent protein-PDE4B4 chimaera. PDE4B4 exhibited a K(m) for cAMP of 5.4 microM and a V(max), relative to that of the long PDE4B1 isoform, of 2.1. PDE4B4 was inhibited by the prototypical PDE4 inhibitor rolipram [4-[3-(cyclopentoxyl)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-pyrrolidinone] with an IC(50) of 83 nM. Treatment of COS7 cells with forskolin, to elevate cAMP levels, produced activation of PDE4B4, which was associated with the phosphorylation of PDE4B4 on Ser-56 within UCR1. The unique tissue distribution and intracellular targeting of PDE4B4 suggests that this isoform may have a distinct functional role in regulating cAMP levels in specific cell types. PMID:12441002

  17. Interaction between core protein of classical swine fever virus with cellular IQGAP1 proetin appears essential for virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we show that IQGAP1, a cellular protein that plays a pivotal role as a regulator of the cytoskeleton affecting cell adhesion, polarization and migration, interacts with Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) Core protein. Sequence analyses identified a defined set of residues within CSFV Core prote...

  18. Structure of the TatC core of the twin-arginine protein transport system.

    PubMed

    Rollauer, Sarah E; Tarry, Michael J; Graham, James E; Jääskeläinen, Mari; Jäger, Franziska; Johnson, Steven; Krehenbrink, Martin; Liu, Sai-Man; Lukey, Michael J; Marcoux, Julien; McDowell, Melanie A; Rodriguez, Fernanda; Roversi, Pietro; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Robinson, Carol V; Sansom, Mark S P; Palmer, Tracy; Högbom, Martin; Berks, Ben C; Lea, Susan M

    2012-12-13

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is one of two general protein transport systems found in the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membrane and is conserved in the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts. The defining, and highly unusual, property of the Tat pathway is that it transports folded proteins, a task that must be achieved without allowing appreciable ion leakage across the membrane. The integral membrane TatC protein is the central component of the Tat pathway. TatC captures substrate proteins by binding their signal peptides. TatC then recruits TatA family proteins to form the active translocation complex. Here we report the crystal structure of TatC from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This structure provides a molecular description of the core of the Tat translocation system and a framework for understanding the unique Tat transport mechanism. PMID:23201679

  19. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A; Chobot, Sarah E; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie; Discher, Bohdana M

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26672896

  20. On the mineral core of ferritin-like proteins: structural and magnetic characterization.

    PubMed

    García-Prieto, A; Alonso, J; Muñoz, D; Marcano, L; Abad Díaz de Cerio, A; Fernández de Luis, R; Orue, I; Mathon, O; Muela, A; Fdez-Gubieda, M L

    2016-01-14

    It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS)) and a magnetic study of the mineral core biomineralized by horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and three prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins: bacterial ferritin (FtnA) and bacterioferritin (Bfr) from Escherichia coli and archaeal ferritin (PfFtn) from Pyrococcus furiosus. The prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins have been studied under native conditions and inside the cells for the sake of preserving their natural attributes. They share with HoSF a nanocrystalline structure rather than an amorphous one as has been frequently reported. However, the presence of phosphorus changes drastically the short-range order and magnetic response of the prokaryotic cores with respect to HoSF. The superparamagnetism observed in HoSF is absent in the prokaryotic proteins, which show a pure atomic-like paramagnetic behaviour attributed to phosphorus breaking the Fe-Fe exchange interaction. PMID:26666195

  1. Heterologous Expression of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein in Oil Seeds of Brassica napus L.

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Sara; Roohvand, Farzin; Ajdary, Soheila; Ehsani, Parastoo; Hatef Salmanian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis c virus (HCV), prevalent among 3% of the world population, is a major worldwide public health concern and an effective vaccination could help to overcome this problem. Plant seeds as low-cost vaccine expression platforms are highly desirable to produce antigens. Objectives: The present study was aimed at investigating the possible expression of recombinant HCV core protein, as a leading HCV vaccine candidate, in canola (Brassica napus) plant seeds in order to be used as an effective immunogen for vaccine researches. Materials and Methods: A codon-optimized gene harboring the Kozak sequence, 6 × His-tag, HCVcp (1 - 122 residues) and KDEL (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu) peptide in tandem was designed and expressed under the control of the seed specific promoter, fatty acid elongase 1 (FAE1), to accumulate the recombinant protein in canola (B. napus L.) seeds. Transgenic lines were screened and the presence of the transgene was confirmed in the T0 plants by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The quantity and quality of the HCV core protein (HCVcp) in transgenic seeds were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot, respectively. Results: Western blot analysis using anti-His antibody confirmed the presence of a 15 kDa protein in the seeds of T1 transgenic lines. The amount of antigenic protein accumulated in the seeds of these transgenic lines was up to 0.05% of the total soluble protein (TSP). Conclusions: The canola oilseeds could provide a useful expression system to produce HCV core protein as a vaccine candidate. PMID:26855744

  2. Protein 4.1R core domain structure and insights into regulation of cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Han, B G; Nunomura, W; Takakuwa, Y; Mohandas, N; Jap, B K

    2000-10-01

    The crystal structure of the core domain (N-terminal 30 kDa domain) of cytoskeletal protein 4.1R has been determined and shows a cloverleaf-like architecture. Each lobe of the cloverleaf contains a specific binding site for either band 3, glycophorin C/D or p55. At a central region of the molecule near where the three lobes are joined are two separate calmodulin (CaM) binding regions. One of these is composed primarily of an alpha-helix and is Ca 2+ insensitive; the other takes the form of an extended structure and its binding with CaM is dramatically enhanced by the presence of Ca 2+, resulting in the weakening of protein 4.1R binding to its target proteins. This novel architecture, in which the three lobes bind with three membrane associated proteins, and the location of calmodulin binding sites provide insight into how the protein 4.1R core domain interacts with membrane proteins and dynamically regulates cell shape in response to changes in intracellular Ca2+ levels. PMID:11017195

  3. A new role for reticulon-4B/NOGO-B in the intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Feo, Juan Antonio; Puerto, Marta; Fernández-Mena, Carolina; Verdejo, Cristina; Lara, José Manuel; Díaz-Sánchez, María; Álvarez, Emilio; Vaquero, Javier; Marín-Jiménez, Ignacio; Bañares, Rafael; Menchén, Luis

    2015-06-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by an impaired intestinal barrier function. We aimed to investigate the role of reticulon-4B (RTN-4B/NOGO-B), a structural protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, in intestinal barrier function and IBD. We used immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, real-time PCR, and Western blotting to study tissue distribution and expression levels of RTN-4B/NOGO-B in control and IBD samples from mouse and humans. We also targeted RTN-4B/NOGO-B using siRNAs in cultured human intestinal epithelial cell (IECs). Epithelial barrier permeability was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurement. RTN-4B/NOGO-B is expressed in the intestine mainly by IECs. Confocal microscopy revealed a colocalization of RTN-4B, E-cadherin, and polymerized actin fibers in tissue and cultured IECs. RTN-4B mRNA and protein expression were lower in the colon of IL-10(-/-) compared with wild-type mice. Colocalization of RTN-4B/E-cadherin/actin was reduced in the colon of IL-10(-/-) mice. Analysis of endoscopic biopsies from IBD patients showed a significant reduction of RTN-4B/NOGO-B expression in inflamed mucosa compared with control. Treatment of IECs with H2O2 reduced TEER values and triggered phosphorylation of RTN-4B in serine 107 residues as well as downregulation of RTN-4B expression. Acute RTN-4B/NOGO-B knockdown by siRNAs resulted in a decreased TEER values and reduction of E-cadherin and α-catenin expression and in the amount of F-actin-rich filaments in IECs. Epithelial RTN-4B/NOGO-B was downregulated in human and experimental IBD. RTN-4B participates in the intestinal epithelial barrier function, most likely via its involvement in E-cadherin, α-catenin expression, and actin cytoskeleton organization at sites of cell-to-cell contacts. PMID:25907690

  4. 49 CFR 173.4b - De minimis exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... “Scientific research specimens, 49 CFR 173.4b applies.” (6) Documentation. (i) For transportation by highway... “Scientific research specimens, 49 CFR 173.4b applies” and the number of packages indicated. (iii) For... the statement “Scientific research specimens, 49 CFR 173.4b applies” and the number of...

  5. 49 CFR 173.4b - De minimis exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... “Scientific research specimens, 49 CFR 173.4b applies.” (6) Documentation. (i) For transportation by highway... “Scientific research specimens, 49 CFR 173.4b applies” and the number of packages indicated. (iii) For... the statement “Scientific research specimens, 49 CFR 173.4b applies” and the number of...

  6. 49 CFR 173.4b - De minimis exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... “Scientific research specimens, 49 CFR 173.4b applies.” (6) Documentation. (i) For transportation by highway... “Scientific research specimens, 49 CFR 173.4b applies” and the number of packages indicated. (iii) For... the statement “Scientific research specimens, 49 CFR 173.4b applies” and the number of...

  7. 49 CFR 173.4b - De minimis exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... “Scientific research specimens, 49 CFR 173.4b applies.” (6) Documentation. (i) For transportation by highway... “Scientific research specimens, 49 CFR 173.4b applies” and the number of packages indicated. (iii) For... the statement “Scientific research specimens, 49 CFR 173.4b applies” and the number of...

  8. 49 CFR 173.4b - De minimis exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false De minimis exceptions. 173.4b Section 173.4b Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS General § 173.4b De minimis exceptions. (a) Packing Group II and III materials...

  9. Structure binding relationship of human surfactant protein D and various lipopolysaccharide inner core structures.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Anika; Wehle, Marko; Geissner, Andreas; Crouch, Erika C; Kang, Yu; Yang, You; Anish, Chakkumkal; Santer, Mark; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-09-01

    As a major player of the innate immune system, surfactant protein D (SP-D) recognizes and promotes elimination of various pathogens such as Gram-negative bacteria. SP-D binds to l-glycero-d-manno-heptose (Hep), a constituent of the partially conserved lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner core of many Gram-negative bacteria. Binding and affinity of trimeric human SP-D to Hep in distinct LPS inner core glycans differing in linkages and adjacent residues was elucidated using glycan array and surface plasmon resonance measurements that were compared to in silico interaction studies. The combination of in vitro assays using defined glycans and molecular docking and dynamic simulation approaches provides insights into the interaction of trimeric SP-D with those glycan ligands. Trimeric SP-D wildtype recognized larger LPS inner core oligosaccharides with slightly enhanced affinity than smaller compounds suggesting the involvement of stabilizing secondary interactions. A trimeric human SP-D mutant D324N+D325N+R343K resembling rat SP-D bound to various LPS inner core structures in a similar pattern as observed for the wildtype but with higher affinity. The selective mutation of SP-D promotes targeting of LPS inner core oligosaccharides on Gram-negative bacteria to develop novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27350640

  10. Transcriptional Activation of the Interleukin-2 Promoter by Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bergqvist, Anders; Rice, Charles M.

    2001-01-01

    Most patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) become chronic carriers. Viruses that efficiently establish persistent infections must have effective ways of evading host defenses. In the case of HCV, little is known about how chronic infections are established or maintained. Besides hepatocytes, several reports suggest that HCV can infect T and B lymphocytes. Since T cells are essential for viral clearance, direct or indirect effects of HCV on T-cell function could influence the outcome of infection. Given that T-cell growth and differentiation require the cytokine interleukin 2 (IL-2), we asked whether HCV might modulate synthesis of IL-2. Portions of the HCV polyprotein were expressed in Jurkat cells under a variety of conditions. We found that the highly conserved HCV core protein, in combination with other stimuli, was able to dramatically activate transcription from the IL-2 promoter. The carboxy-terminal hydrophobic portion of the core protein was required for this activity. Activation was dependent on nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), occurred in cells deficient in the tyrosine kinase p56lck, and could be blocked by addition of cyclosporin A and by depletion of calcium. These results suggest that the HCV core protein can activate transcription of the IL-2 promoter through the NFAT pathway. This novel activity may have consequences for T-cell development and establishment of persistent infections. PMID:11134290

  11. A role for the perlecan protein core in the activation of the keratinocyte growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselli, G; Eichstetter, I; Iozzo, R V

    2001-01-01

    Perlecan, a widespread heparan sulphate (HS) proteoglycan, is directly involved in the storing of angiogenic growth factors, mostly members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) gene family. We have previously shown that antisense targeting of the perlecan gene causes a reduced growth and responsiveness to FGF7 [also known as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF)] in human cancer cells, and that the perlecan protein core interacts specifically with FGF7. In the present paper, we have investigated human colon carcinoma cells in which the perlecan gene was disrupted by targeted homologous recombination. After screening over 1000 clones, we obtained two clones heterozygous for the null mutation with no detectable perlecan, indicating that the other allele was non-functioning. The perlecan-deficient cells grew more slowly, did not respond to FGF7 with or without the addition of heparin, and were less tumorigenic than control cells. Paradoxically, the perlecan-deficient cells displayed increased FGF7 surface binding. However, the perlecan protein core was required for functional activation of the KGF receptor and downstream signalling. Because heparin could not substitute for perlecan, the HS chains are not critical for FGF7-mediated signalling in this cell system. These results provide the first genetic evidence that the perlecan protein core is a molecular entity implicated in FGF7 binding and activation of its receptor. PMID:11563979

  12. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A

    2015-12-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010-001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010-001-E2 binds at the dimer-dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein-protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010-001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein-protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties. PMID:26598693

  13. LAPTM4B facilitates late endosomal ceramide export to control cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Blom, Tomas; Li, Shiqian; Dichlberger, Andrea; Bäck, Nils; Kim, Young Ah; Loizides-Mangold, Ursula; Riezman, Howard; Bittman, Robert; Ikonen, Elina

    2015-10-01

    Lysosome-associated protein transmembrane-4b (LAPTM4B) associates with poor prognosis in several cancers, but its physiological function is not well understood. Here we use novel ceramide probes to provide evidence that LAPTM4B interacts with ceramide and facilitates its removal from late endosomal organelles (LEs). This lowers LE ceramide in parallel with and independent of acid ceramidase-dependent catabolism. In LAPTM4B-silenced cells, LE sphingolipid accumulation is accompanied by lysosomal membrane destabilization. However, these cells resist ceramide-driven caspase-3 activation and apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents or gene silencing. Conversely, LAPTM4B overexpression reduces LE ceramide and stabilizes lysosomes but sensitizes to drug-induced caspase-3 activation. Together, these data uncover a cellular ceramide export route from LEs and identify LAPTM4B as its regulator. By compartmentalizing ceramide, LAPTM4B controls key sphingolipid-mediated cell death mechanisms and emerges as a candidate for sphingolipid-targeting cancer therapies. PMID:26280656

  14. INPP4B is an oncogenic regulator in human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, S T; Chi, M N; Yang, R H; Guo, X Y; Zan, L K; Wang, C Y; Xi, Y F; Jin, L; Croft, A; Tseng, H-Y; Yan, X G; Farrelly, M; Wang, F H; Lai, F; Wang, J F; Li, Y P; Ackland, S; Scott, R; Agoulnik, I U; Hondermarck, H; Thorne, R F; Liu, T; Zhang, X D; Jiang, C C

    2016-01-01

    Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) negatively regulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling and is a tumor suppressor in some types of cancers. However, we have found that it is frequently upregulated in human colon cancer cells. Here we show that silencing of INPP4B blocks activation of Akt and serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 3 (SGK3), inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation and retards colon cancer xenograft growth. Conversely, overexpression of INPP4B increases proliferation and triggers anchorage-independent growth of normal colon epithelial cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that the effect of INPP4B on Akt and SGK3 is associated with inactivation of phosphate and tensin homolog through its protein phosphatase activity and that the increase in INPP4B is due to Ets-1-mediated transcriptional upregulation in colon cancer cells. Collectively, these results suggest that INPP4B may function as an oncogenic driver in colon cancer, with potential implications for targeting INPP4B as a novel approach to treat this disease. PMID:26411369

  15. RAMONA-4B development for SBWR safety studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Aronson, A.L.; Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.J.; Mallen, A.N.

    1993-12-31

    The Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) is a revolutionary design of a boiling-water reactor. The reactor is based on passive safety systems such as natural circulation, gravity flow, pressurized gas, and condensation. SBWR has no active systems, and the flow in the vessel is by natural circulation. There is a large chimney section above the core to provide a buoyancy head for natural circulation. The reactor can be shut down by either of four systems; namely, scram, Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD), Alternate Rod Insertion (ARI), and Standby Liquid Control System (SLCS). The safety injection is by gravity drain from the Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS) and Suppression Pool (SP). The heat sink is through two types of heat exchangers submerged in the tank of water. These heat exchangers are the Isolation Condenser (IC) and the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS). The RAMONA-4B code has been developed to simulate the normal operation, reactivity transients, and to address the instability issues for SBWR. The code has a three-dimensional neutron kinetics coupled to multiple parallel-channel thermal-hydraulics. The two-phase thermal hydraulics is based on a nonhomogeneous nonequilibrium drift-flux formulation. It employs an explicit integration to solve all state equations (except for neutron kinetics) in order to predict the instability without numerical damping. The objective of this project is to develop a Sun SPARC and IBM RISC 6000 based RAMONA-4B code for applications to SBWR safety analyses, in particular for stability and ATWS studies.

  16. Differential Effects of Hydrophobic Core Packing Residues for Thermodynamic and Mechanical Stability of a Hyperthermophilic Protein.

    PubMed

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Batchelor, Matthew; Hoffmann, Toni; Wilson, Michael C; Hughes, Megan L; Paci, Emanuele; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-26

    Proteins from organisms that have adapted to environmental extremes provide attractive systems to explore and determine the origins of protein stability. Improved hydrophobic core packing and decreased loop-length flexibility can increase the thermodynamic stability of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms. However, their impact on protein mechanical stability is not known. Here, we use protein engineering, biophysical characterization, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to measure the effect of altering hydrophobic core packing on the stability of the cold shock protein TmCSP from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. We make two variants of TmCSP in which a mutation is made to reduce the size of aliphatic groups from buried hydrophobic side chains. In the first, a mutation is introduced in a long loop (TmCSP L40A); in the other, the mutation is introduced on the C-terminal β-strand (TmCSP V62A). We use MD simulations to confirm that the mutant TmCSP L40A shows the most significant increase in loop flexibility, and mutant TmCSP V62A shows greater disruption to the core packing. We measure the thermodynamic stability (ΔGD-N) of the mutated proteins and show that there is a more significant reduction for TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG = 63%) than TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG = 47%), as might be expected on the basis of the relative reduction in the size of the side chain. By contrast, SMFS measures the mechanical stability (ΔG*) and shows a greater reduction for TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG* = 8.4%) than TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG* = 2.5%). While the impact on the mechanical stability is subtle, the results demonstrate the power of tuning noncovalent interactions to modulate both the thermodynamic and mechanical stability of a protein. Such understanding and control provide the opportunity to design proteins with optimized thermodynamic and mechanical properties. PMID:27338140

  17. Cell Autonomous and Nonautonomous Function of CUL4B in Mouse Spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yan; Liu, Liren; Yang, Chenyi; Lin, Congxing; Veith, George Michael; Wang, Caihong; Sutovsky, Peter; Zhou, Pengbo; Ma, Liang

    2016-03-25

    CUL4B ubiquitin ligase belongs to the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase family. Although sharing many sequence and structural similarities, CUL4B plays distinct roles in spermatogenesis from its homologous protein CUL4A. We previously reported that genetic ablation ofCul4ain mice led to male infertility because of aberrant meiotic progression. In the present study, we generated Cul4bgerm cell-specific conditional knock-out (Cul4b(Vasa)),as well asCul4bglobal knock-out (Cul4b(Sox2)) mouse, to investigate its roles in spermatogenesis. Germ cell-specific deletion of Cul4bled to male infertility, despite normal testicular morphology and comparable numbers of spermatozoa. Notably, significantly impaired sperm mobility caused by reduced mitochondrial activity and glycolysis level were observed in the majority of the mutant spermatozoa, manifested by low, if any, sperm ATP production. Furthermore,Cul4b(Vasa)spermatozoa exhibited defective arrangement of axonemal microtubules and flagella outer dense fibers. Our mass spectrometry analysis identified INSL6 as a novel CUL4B substrate in male germ cells, evidenced by its direct polyubiquination and degradation by CUL4B E3 ligase. Nevertheless,Cul4bglobal knock-out males lost their germ cells in an age-dependent manner, implying failure of maintaining the spermatogonial stem cell niche in somatic cells. Taken together, our results show that CUL4B is indispensable to spermatogenesis, and it functions cell autonomously in male germ cells to ensure spermatozoa motility, whereas it functions non-cell-autonomously in somatic cells to maintain spermatogonial stemness. Thus, CUL4B links two distinct spermatogenetic processes to a single E3 ligase, highlighting the significance of ubiquitin modification during spermatogenesis. PMID:26846852

  18. On the mineral core of ferritin-like proteins: structural and magnetic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Prieto, A.; Alonso, J.; Muñoz, D.; Marcano, L.; Abad Díaz de Cerio, A.; Fernández de Luis, R.; Orue, I.; Mathon, O.; Muela, A.; Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS)) and a magnetic study of the mineral core biomineralized by horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and three prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins: bacterial ferritin (FtnA) and bacterioferritin (Bfr) from Escherichia coli and archaeal ferritin (PfFtn) from Pyrococcus furiosus. The prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins have been studied under native conditions and inside the cells for the sake of preserving their natural attributes. They share with HoSF a nanocrystalline structure rather than an amorphous one as has been frequently reported. However, the presence of phosphorus changes drastically the short-range order and magnetic response of the prokaryotic cores with respect to HoSF. The superparamagnetism observed in HoSF is absent in the prokaryotic proteins, which show a pure atomic-like paramagnetic behaviour attributed to phosphorus breaking the Fe-Fe exchange interaction.It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM

  19. Domain 3 of Hepatitis C Core Protein is Sufficient for Intracellular Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Ravi; Qiang, Guan; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide with steatosis, or “fatty liver”, being a frequent histologic finding. In previous work, we identified sequence polymorphisms within domain 3 (d3) of genotype 3 HCV Core protein that correlated with steatosis and in vitro lipid accumulation. In this study, we investigated the sufficiency of d3 to promote lipid accumulation, the role of HCV genotype in d3 lipid accumulation and the subcellular distribution of d3. Methods Stable cell lines expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions with HCV Core d3 from genotype 3 steatosis (d3S), non-steatosis (d3NS) and genotype 1 (d3G1) isolates were analyzed by immunofluorescence (IF), Oil Red O (ORO) staining and triglyceride (TG) quantitation Results Cells expressing d3S had significantly more ORO than d3NS or d3G1 cells (p values: 0.02 and <0.0001 respectively) as well as TG (p=0.03 and 0.003 respectively). IF analysis showed domain 3 does not co-localize to lipid droplets but partially co-localizes to the Golgi. Conclusions Our results suggest that HCV Core d3 is sufficient to mediate the accumulation of lipid by a mechanism that is independent of domains 1 and 2. Our results also suggest that altered lipid trafficking may be involved. PMID:19852667

  20. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M.; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010–001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010–001-E2 binds at the dimer–dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein–protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010–001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein–protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties. PMID:26598693

  1. Expression of human inducible nitric oxide synthase in a tetrahydrobiopterin (H4B)-deficient cell line: H4B promotes assembly of enzyme subunits into an active dimer.

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, E; Billiar, T R; Robbins, P D; Loftus, M; Stuehr, D J

    1995-01-01

    Murine inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) is catalytically active only in dimeric form. Assembly of its purified subunits into a dimer requires H4B. To understand the structure-activity relationships of human iNOS, we constitutively expressed recombinant human iNOS in NIH 3T3 cells by using a retroviral vector. These cells are deficient in de novo H4B biosynthesis and the role of H4B in the expression and assembly of active iNOS in an intact cell system could be studied. In the absence of added H4B, NO synthesis by the cells was minimal, whereas cells grown with supplemental H4B or the H4B precursor sepiapterin generated NO (74.1 and 63.3 nmol of nitrite per 10(6) cells per 24 h, respectively). NO synthesis correlated with an increase in intracellular H4B but no increase in iNOS protein. Instead, an increased percentage of dimeric iNOS was observed, rising from 20% in cytosols from unsupplemented cells to 66% in H4B-supplemented cell cytosols. In all cases, only dimeric iNOS displayed catalytic activity. Cytosols prepared from H4B-deficient cells exhibited little iNOS activity but acquired activity during a 60- to 120-min incubation with H4B, reaching final activities of 60-72 pmol of citrulline per mg of protein per min. Reconstitution of cytosolic NO synthesis activity was associated with conversion of monomers into dimeric iNOS during the incubation. Thus, human iNOS subunits dimerize to form an active enzyme, and H4B plays a critical role in promoting dimerization in intact cells. This reveals a post-translational mechanism by which intracellular H4B can regulate iNOS expression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8524846

  2. Heterogeneous Expression of the Core Circadian Clock Proteins among Neuronal Cell Types in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Zhijing; Ribelayga, Christophe P.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in metabolism, physiology, and behavior originate from cell-autonomous circadian clocks located in many organs and structures throughout the body and that share a common molecular mechanism based on the clock genes and their protein products. In the mammalian neural retina, despite evidence supporting the presence of several circadian clocks regulating many facets of retinal physiology and function, the exact cellular location and genetic signature of the retinal clock cells remain largely unknown. Here we examined the expression of the core circadian clock proteins CLOCK, BMAL1, NPAS2, PERIOD 1(PER1), PERIOD 2 (PER2), and CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2) in identified neurons of the mouse retina during daily and circadian cycles. We found concurrent clock protein expression in most retinal neurons, including cone photoreceptors, dopaminergic amacrine cells, and melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells. Remarkably, diurnal and circadian rhythms of expression of all clock proteins were observed in the cones whereas only CRY2 expression was found to be rhythmic in the dopaminergic amacrine cells. Only a low level of expression of the clock proteins was detected in the rods at any time of the daily or circadian cycle. Our observations provide evidence that cones and not rods are cell-autonomous circadian clocks and reveal an important disparity in the expression of the core clock components among neuronal cell types. We propose that the overall temporal architecture of the mammalian retina does not result from the synchronous activity of pervasive identical clocks but rather reflects the cellular and regional heterogeneity in clock function within retinal tissue. PMID:23189207

  3. Myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants selectively disrupt the protein core of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Martin D.; Whitelock, John M.; Malle, Ernst; Chuang, Christine Y.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Nilasaroya, Anastasia; Davies, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The potent oxidants hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypobromous acid (HOBr) are produced extracellularly by myeloperoxidase, following release of this enzyme from activated leukocytes. The subendothelial extracellular matrix is a key site for deposition of myeloperoxidase and damage by myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants, with this damage implicated in the impairment of vascular cell function during acute inflammatory responses and chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan, a key component of the subendothelial extracellular matrix, regulates important cellular processes and is a potential target for HOCl and HOBr. It is shown here that perlecan binds myeloperoxidase via its heparan sulfate side chains and that this enhances oxidative damage by myeloperoxidase-derived HOCl and HOBr. This damage involved selective degradation of the perlecan protein core without detectable alteration of its heparan sulfate side chains, despite the presence of reactive GlcNH2 resides within this glycosaminoglycan. Modification of the protein core by HOCl and HOBr (measured by loss of immunological recognition of native protein epitopes and the appearance of oxidatively-modified protein epitopes) was associated with an impairment of its ability to support endothelial cell adhesion, with this observed at a pathologically-achievable oxidant dose of 425 nmol oxidant/mg protein. In contrast, the heparan sulfate chains of HOCl/HOBr-modified perlecan retained their ability to bind FGF-2 and collagen V and were able to promote FGF-2-dependent cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data highlight the potential role of perlecan oxidation, and consequent deregulation of cell function, in vascular injuries by myeloperoxidase-derived HOCl and HOBr. PMID:19788922

  4. Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Promotes miR-122 Destabilization by Inhibiting GLD-2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Cho, Hee; Kim, Minwoo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Oh, Jong-Won

    2016-07-01

    The liver-specific microRNA miR-122, which has essential roles in liver development and metabolism, is a key proviral factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV). Despite its crucial role in the liver and HCV life cycle, little is known about the molecular mechanism of miR-122 expression regulation by HCV infection. Here, we show that the HCV core protein downregulates the abundance of miR-122 by promoting its destabilization via the inhibition of GLD-2, a non-canonical cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase. The decrease in miR-122 expression resulted in the dysregulation of the known functions of miR-122, including its proviral activity for HCV. By high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs from human liver biopsies, we found that the 22-nucleotide (nt) prototype miR-122 is modified at its 3' end by 3'-terminal non-templated and templated nucleotide additions. Remarkably, the proportion of miR-122 isomers bearing a single nucleotide tail of any ribonucleotide decreased in liver specimens from patients with HCV. We found that these single-nucleotide-tailed miR-122 isomers display increased miRNA activity and stability over the 22-nt prototype miR-122 and that the 3'-terminal extension is catalyzed by the unique terminal nucleotidyl transferase activity of GLD-2, which is capable of adding any single ribonucleotide without preference of adenylate to the miR-122 3' end. The HCV core protein specifically inhibited GLD-2, and its interaction with GLD-2 in the cytoplasm was found to be responsible for miR-122 downregulation. Collectively, our results provide new insights into the regulatory role of the HCV core protein in controlling viral RNA abundance and miR-122 functions through miR-122 stability modulation. PMID:27366906

  5. Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Promotes miR-122 Destabilization by Inhibiting GLD-2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Cho, Hee; Kim, Minwoo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Oh, Jong-Won

    2016-01-01

    The liver-specific microRNA miR-122, which has essential roles in liver development and metabolism, is a key proviral factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV). Despite its crucial role in the liver and HCV life cycle, little is known about the molecular mechanism of miR-122 expression regulation by HCV infection. Here, we show that the HCV core protein downregulates the abundance of miR-122 by promoting its destabilization via the inhibition of GLD-2, a non-canonical cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase. The decrease in miR-122 expression resulted in the dysregulation of the known functions of miR-122, including its proviral activity for HCV. By high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs from human liver biopsies, we found that the 22-nucleotide (nt) prototype miR-122 is modified at its 3′ end by 3′-terminal non-templated and templated nucleotide additions. Remarkably, the proportion of miR-122 isomers bearing a single nucleotide tail of any ribonucleotide decreased in liver specimens from patients with HCV. We found that these single-nucleotide-tailed miR-122 isomers display increased miRNA activity and stability over the 22-nt prototype miR-122 and that the 3′-terminal extension is catalyzed by the unique terminal nucleotidyl transferase activity of GLD-2, which is capable of adding any single ribonucleotide without preference of adenylate to the miR-122 3′ end. The HCV core protein specifically inhibited GLD-2, and its interaction with GLD-2 in the cytoplasm was found to be responsible for miR-122 downregulation. Collectively, our results provide new insights into the regulatory role of the HCV core protein in controlling viral RNA abundance and miR-122 functions through miR-122 stability modulation. PMID:27366906

  6. Hepatitis C virus core protein impairs metabolic disorder of liver cell via HOTAIR-Sirt1 signalling.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Qin; Gu, Xin-Yu; Hu, Jin-Xing; Ping, Yu; Li, Hua; Yan, Jing-Ya; Li, Juan; Sun, Ran; Yu, Zu-Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    It has been suggested that Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is associated with metabolic disorders of liver cell. However, the precise mechanism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore the impact of HCV core protein on hepatocyte metabolism by HepG2 and the possible involvement of long non-coding (lnc) RNAs in this process. The effect of HCV core protein on lncRNAs expression was examined with quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Manipulation of HVC core protein and lncRNA HOTAIR was to evaluate the role of interaction between them on cell metabolism-related gene expression and cellular metabolism. The potential downstream Sirt1 signal was examined by western blotting and qRT-PCR. Our data suggested that suppression of HOTAIR abrogates HCV core protein-induced reduction in Sirt1 and differential expression of glucose- and lipid-metabolism-related genes. Also it benefits for metabolic homoeostasis of hepatocyte indicated by restoration of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and NAD/NADH ratio. By manipulation of HOTAIR, we concluded that HOTAIR negatively regulates Sirt1 expression through affecting its promotor methylation. Moreover, overexpression of Sirt1 reverses pcDNA-HOTAIR-induced glucose- and lipid-metabolism-related gene expression. Our study suggests that HCV core protein causes dysfunction of glucose and lipid metabolism in liver cells through HOTAIR-Sirt1 signalling pathway. PMID:27129296

  7. Conservation of distantly related membrane proteins: photosynthetic reaction centers share a common structural core.

    PubMed

    Sadekar, Sumedha; Raymond, Jason; Blankenship, Robert E

    2006-11-01

    Photosynthesis was established on Earth more than 3 billion years ago. All available evidences suggest that the earliest photosynthetic organisms were anoxygenic and that oxygen-evolving photosynthesis is a more recent development. The reaction center complexes that form the heart of the energy storage process are integral membrane pigment proteins that span the membrane in vectorial fashion to carry out electron transfer. The origin and extent of distribution of these proteins has been perplexing from a phylogenetic point of view mostly because of extreme sequence divergence. A series of integral membrane proteins of known structure and varying degrees of sequence identity have been compared using combinatorial extension-Monte Carlo methods. The proteins include photosynthetic reaction centers from proteobacteria and cyanobacterial photosystems I and II, as well as cytochrome oxidase, bacteriorhodopsin, and cytochrome b. The reaction center complexes show a remarkable conservation of the core structure of 5 transmembrane helices, strongly implying common ancestry, even though the residual sequence identity is less than 10%, whereas the other proteins have structures that are unrelated. A relationship of sequence with structure was derived from the reaction center structures; with characteristic decay length of 1.6 A. Phylogenetic trees derived from the structural alignments give insights into the earliest photosynthetic reaction center, strongly suggesting that it was a homodimeric complex that did not evolve oxygen. PMID:16887904

  8. High CHMP4B expression is associated with accelerated cell proliferation and resistance to doxorubicin in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baoying; Jiang, Dawei; Chen, Yuyan; Wei, Lixian; Zhang, Shusen; Zhao, Fengbo; Ni, Runzhou; Lu, Cuihua; Wan, Chunhua

    2015-04-01

    Charged multivesicular body protein 4B (CHMP4B), a subunit of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III complex, plays an important part in cytokinetic membrane abscission and the late stage of mitotic cell division. In this study, we explored the prognostic significance of CHMP4B in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its impact on the physiology of HCC cells. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses showed that CHMP4B was significantly upregulated in HCC tissues, compared with adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Meanwhile, clinicopathological analysis revealed that high CHMP4B expression was correlated with multiple clinicopathological variables, including AFP, cirrhosis, AJCC stage, Ki-67 expression, and poor prognosis. More importantly, univariate and multivariate survival analyses demonstrated that CHMP4B served as an independent prognostic factor for survival of HCC patients. Using HCC cell cultures, we found that the expression of CHMP4B was progressively upregulated after the release from serum starvation. To verify whether CHMP4B could regulate the proliferation of HCC cells, CHMP4B was knocked down through the transfection of CHMP4B-siRNA oligos. Flow cytometry and CCK-8 assays indicated that interference of CHMP4B led to cell cycle arrest and proliferative impairment of HCC cells. Additionally, depletion of CHMP4B expression could increase the sensitivity to doxorubicin in HepG2 and Huh7 cells. Taken together, our results implied that CHMP4B could be a promising prognostic biomarker as well as a potential therapeutic target of HCC. PMID:25874485

  9. Hepatitis C virus core protein: carboxy-terminal boundaries of two processed species suggest cleavage by a signal peptide peptidase.

    PubMed

    Hüssy, P; Langen, H; Mous, J; Jacobsen, H

    1996-10-01

    The expression and processing of hepatitis C virus core protein was analyzed. Two protein bands, 21 kDa (P21), corresponding to the full-length core, and 19 kDa (P19), were detected as major products when core protein was expressed in the standard rabbit reticulocyte lysate system or in Sf9 insect cells. Core proteins with amino-terminal hexa-histidine tags were expressed which allowed the purification of the hexa-histidine P19 core with NI(2+)-NTA columns. With the help of mass spectrometry, the molecular weight of hexa-histidine-P19 was analyzed and its carboxy-terminus could be calculated. Fusion proteins of truncated core/core-E1 species fused to mouse dihydrofolate reductase (mDHFR) showed cleavage in the expected region. Cleavage sites could be determined by amino-terminal protein sequencing of the DHFR-fusion partner. Our data show that there are not one but two core products with an apparent molecular weight of about 19 kDa, ending either at amino acid leucine 179 or leucine 182, respectively. These cleavages in the hydrophobic, carboxy-terminal region of HCV core suggest processing by (a) recently proposed eucaryotic signal peptide peptidase(s) (F. Lyko et al. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 19873-19878). Furthermore, our results demonstrate that cleavage at these sites and the formation of the P19 species does not require previous processing at the signalase site (position 191/192) of the HCV-polyprotein. PMID:8862403

  10. UBE4B targets phosphorylated p53 at serines 15 and 392 for degradation.

    PubMed

    Du, Cheng; Wu, Hong; Leng, Roger P

    2016-01-19

    Phosphorylation of p53 is a key mechanism responsible for the activation of its tumor suppressor functions in response to various stresses. In unstressed cells, p53 is rapidly turned over and is maintained at a low basal level. After DNA damage or other forms of cellular stress, the p53 level increases, and the protein becomes metabolically stable. However, the mechanism of phosphorylated p53 regulation is unclear. In this study, we studied the kinetics of UBE4B, Hdm2, Pirh2, Cop1 and CHIP induction in response to p53 activation. We show that UBE4B coimmunoprecipitates with phosphorylated p53 at serines 15 and 392. Notably, the affinity between UBE4B and Hdm2 is greatly decreased after DNA damage. Furthermore, we observe that UBE4B promotes endogenous phospho-p53(S15) and phospho-p53(S392) degradation in response to IR. We demonstrate that UBE4B and Hdm2 repress p53S15A, p53S392A, and p53-2A(S15A, S392A) functions, including p53-dependent transactivation and growth inhibition. Overall, our results reveal that UBE4B plays an important role in regulating phosphorylated p53 following DNA damage. PMID:26673821

  11. Interferon regulatory factor 4b (IRF4b) in Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus: Sequencing, ubiquitous tissue distribution and inducible expression by poly(I:C) and DNA virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dahai; Chen, Jinjing; Zhang, Haiyan; Hu, Mengzhu; Lou, Huimin; Liu, Qiuming; Zhang, Shicui; Hu, Guobin

    2016-09-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) in mammals is known to be critical in regulation of development and functions of lymphomyeloid cell lineages. Recent studies have demonstrated its involvement in immune responses to bacterial and viral challenges in teleosts. In this study, an IRF4 gene was cloned from Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and its expression in response to polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] and lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV) stimulations was studied in vivo. The cloned gene spans over 5.9 kb, comprises eight exons and seven introns and encodes a putative protein of 456 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence possesses a conserved DNA-binding domain (DBD), an IRF-association domain (IAD) and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Phylogenetic analysis clustered it into the teleost IRF4b clade and, thus, it was named Paralichthys olivaceus (Po)IRF4b. The constitutive expression of PoIRF4b transcripts was detectable in all examined organs, with highest levels found in lymphomyeloid-rich tissues. They were induced by both poly(I:C) and LCDV with a similar inducibility in immune or non-immune organs. Two waves of induced expression of PoIRF4b were observed with the two stimuli during a 7-day time course in the immune organs, with the early-phase induction being stronger. The maximum increases of PoIRF4b transcript levels ranged from 1.3 to 4.0-fold and appeared at day 1-5 post-injection depending on different organs and stimuli. In both stimulation cases, the strongest induction was detected in spleen and the weakest in muscle. These results indicate that PoIRF4b may participate in regulation of immune responses of flounders to both RNA and DNA virus infections. PMID:27084058

  12. HCV 3a Core Protein Increases Lipid Droplet Cholesteryl Ester Content via a Mechanism Dependent on Sphingolipid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Branche, Emilie; Conzelmann, Stéphanie; Parisot, Clotilde; Potma, Eric O.; Riezman, Howard; Negro, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients often develop steatosis and the HCV core protein alone can induce this phenomenon. To gain new insights into the pathways leading to steatosis, we performed lipidomic profiling of HCV core protein expressing-Huh-7 cells and also assessed the lipid profile of purified lipid droplets isolated from HCV 3a core expressing cells. Cholesteryl esters, ceramides and glycosylceramides, but not triglycerides, increased specifically in cells expressing the steatogenic HCV 3a core protein. Accordingly, inhibitors of cholesteryl ester biosynthesis such as statins and acyl-CoA cholesterol acyl transferase inhibitors prevented the increase of cholesteryl ester production and the formation of large lipid droplets in HCV core 3a-expressing cells. Furthermore, inhibition of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis by myriocin - but not of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis by miglustat - affected both lipid droplet size and cholesteryl ester level. The lipid profile of purified lipid droplets, isolated from HCV 3a core-expressing cells, confirmed the particular increase of cholesteryl ester. Thus, both sphingolipid and cholesteryl ester biosynthesis are affected by the steatogenic core protein of HCV genotype 3a. These results may explain the peculiar lipid profile of HCV-infected patients with steatosis. PMID:25522003

  13. Detection of specific antibodies to HCV-ARF/CORE+1 protein in patients treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Karamitros, T; Kakkanas, A; Katsoulidou, A; Sypsa, V; Dalagiorgou, G; Mavromara, P; Hatzakis, A

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause for chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. The HCV-ARF/core+1 protein is an alternative product of HCV core-encoding sequence of unknown biological function. Highly purified HCV core and ARF/core+1 recombinant proteins from HCV genotype 1a and HCV-ARF/core+1 recombinant protein from HCV genotype 3a were expressed in Escherichia coli. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we assessed the prevalence of anti-ARF/core+1 antibodies in 90 chronic hepatitis C patients infected with HCV genotypes 1a/1b or 3a, treated with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN-a-2a) plus ribavirin. Samples derived from 92 healthy blood donors were used as negative controls. All HCV-RNA-positive serum samples reacted with core 1a antigen, while 15 (37.5%) of 40 and 14 (28%) of 50 patients infected with HCV-1a/1b and HCV-3a, respectively, were found to have anti-ARF/core+1 antibodies into their serum before treatment initiation. These antibodies were persistently present during treatment follow-up and linked to elevated levels of HCV-RNA at baseline. PMID:22329372

  14. Structure of Protein Phosphatase 2A Core Enzyme Bound to Tumor-Inducing Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Xing,Y.; Xu, Y.; Chen, Y.; Jeffrey, P.; Chao, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Strack, S.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular functions and has been shown to be an important tumor suppressor. The core enzyme of PP2A comprises a 65 kDa scaffolding subunit and a 36 kDa catalytic subunit. Here we report the crystal structures of the PP2A core enzyme bound to two of its inhibitors, the tumor-inducing agents okadaic acid and microcystin-LR, at 2.6 and 2.8 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The catalytic subunit recognizes one end of the elongated scaffolding subunit by interacting with the conserved ridges of HEAT repeats 11-15. Formation of the core enzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced structural rearrangement. The scaffolding subunit exhibits considerable conformational flexibility, which is proposed to play an essential role in PP2A function. These structures, together with biochemical analyses, reveal significant insights into PP2A function and serve as a framework for deciphering the diverse roles of PP2A in cellular physiology.

  15. Modulation of protein release from biodegradable core-shell structured fibers prepared by coaxial electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongliang; Hu, Yingqian; Zhao, Pengcheng; Li, Yan; Zhu, Kangjie

    2006-10-01

    Biodegradable core-shell structured fibers with poly(epsilon-caprolactone) as shell and bovine serum albumin (BSA)-containing dextran as core were prepared by coaxial electrospinning for incorporation and controlled release of proteins. BSA loading percent in the fibers and its release rate could be conveniently varied by the feed rate of the inner dope during electrospinning. With the increase in the feed rate of the inner dope, there was an associated increase in the loading percent and accelerated release of BSA. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was added to the shell section of the fibers to further finely modulate the release behavior of BSA. It was revealed that the release rate of BSA increased with the PEG percent in the shell section. By varying the feed rate of the inner dope and PEG content, most of BSA could be released from the core-shell structured fibers within the period of time ranging from 1 week to more than 1 month. The effect of the feed rate of the inner dope and addition of PEG into the shell section on the fiber morphology was also examined by scanning electron microscope. PMID:16544305

  16. Aquareovirus NS80 Initiates Efficient Viral Replication by Retaining Core Proteins within Replication-Associated Viral Inclusion Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liming; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Hong; Yan, Shicui; Chen, Qingxiu; Zhang, Fuxian; Fang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Viral inclusion bodies (VIBs) are specific intracellular compartments for reoviruses replication and assembly. Aquareovirus nonstructural protein NS80 has been identified to be the major constituent for forming globular VIBs in our previous study. In this study, we investigated the role of NS80 in viral structural proteins expression and viral replication. Immunofluorescence assays showed that NS80 could retain five core proteins or inner-capsid proteins (VP1-VP4 and VP6), but not outer-capsid proteins (VP5 and VP7), within VIBs in co-transfected or infected cells. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that NS80 could interact with each core protein respectively. In addition, we found that newly synthesized viral RNAs co-localized with VIBs. Furthermore, time-course analysis of viral structural proteins expression showed that the expression of NS80 was detected first, followed by the detection of inner shell protein VP3, and then of other inner-capsid proteins, suggesting that VIBs were essential for the formation of viral core frame or progeny virion. Moreover, knockdown of NS80 by shRNA not only inhibited the expression of aquareovirus structural proteins, but also inhibited viral infection. These results indicated that NS80-based VIBs were formed at earlier stage of infection, and NS80 was able to coordinate the expression of viral structural proteins and viral replication. PMID:25938226

  17. Structure of the protein core of the glypican Dally-like and localization of a region important for hedgehog signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Sung; Saunders, Adam M.; Hamaoka, Brent Y.; Beachy, Philip A.; Leahy, Daniel J.

    2011-09-20

    Glypicans are heparan sulfate proteoglycans that modulate the signaling of multiple growth factors active during animal development, and loss of glypican function is associated with widespread developmental abnormalities. Glypicans consist of a conserved, approximately 45-kDa N-terminal protein core region followed by a stalk region that is tethered to the cell membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. The stalk regions are predicted to be random coil but contain a variable number of attachment sites for heparan sulfate chains. Both the N-terminal protein core and the heparan sulfate attachments are important for glypican function. We report here the 2.4-{angstrom} crystal structure of the N-terminal protein core region of the Drosophila glypican Dally-like (Dlp). This structure reveals an elongated, {alpha}-helical fold for glypican core regions that does not appear homologous to any known structure. The Dlp core protein is required for normal responsiveness to Hedgehog (Hh) signals, and we identify a localized region on the Dlp surface important for mediating its function in Hh signaling. Purified Dlp protein core does not, however, interact appreciably with either Hh or an Hh:Ihog complex.

  18. Pulsatile protein release from monodisperse liquid-core microcapsules of controllable shell thickness

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yujie; Pack, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pulsatile delivery of proteins, in which release occurs over a short time after a period of little or no release, is desirable for many applications. This paper investigates the effect of biodegradable polymer shell thickness on pulsatile protein release from biodegradable polymer microcapsules. Methods Using precision particle fabrication (PPF) technology, monodisperse microcapsules were fabricated encapsulating bovine serum albumin (BSA) in a liquid core surrounded by a drug-free poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) shell of uniform, controlled thickness from 14 to 19 μm. Results When using high molecular weight PLG (Mw 88 kDa), microparticles exhibited the desired core-shell structure with high BSA loading and encapsulation efficiency (55-65%). These particles exhibited very slow release of BSA for several weeks followed by rapid release of 80-90% of the encapsulated BSA within seven days. Importantly, with increasing shell thickness the starting time of the pulsatile release could be controlled from 25 to 35 days. Conclusions Biodegradable polymer microcapsules with precisely controlled shell thickness provide pulsatile release with enhanced control of release profiles. PMID:24831313

  19. The glycosylation-dependent interaction of perlecan core protein with LDL: implications for atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Ashline, David; Liu, Li; Tassa, Carlos; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Ravid, Katya; Layne, Matthew D.; Reinhold, Vernon; Robbins, Phillips W.

    2015-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan in the arterial wall. Previous studies have linked it to atherosclerosis. Perlecan contains a core protein and three HS side chains. Its core protein has five domains (DI–DV) with disparate structures and DII is highly homologous to the ligand-binding portion of LDL receptor (LDLR). The functional significance of this domain has been unknown. Here, we show that perlecan DII interacts with LDL. Importantly, the interaction largely relies on O-linked glycans that are only present in the secreted DII. Among the five repeat units of DII, most of the glycosylation sites are from the second unit, which is highly divergent and rich in serine and threonine, but has no cysteine residues. Interestingly, most of the glycans are capped by the negatively charged sialic acids, which are critical for LDL binding. We further demonstrate an additive effect of HS and DII on LDL binding. Unlike LDLR, which directs LDL uptake through endocytosis, this study uncovers a novel feature of the perlecan LDLR-like DII in receptor-mediated lipoprotein retention, which depends on its glycosylation. Thus, perlecan glycosylation may play a role in the early LDL retention during the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:25528754

  20. Heat shock protein 90AB1 and hyperthermia rescue infectivity of HIV with defective cores.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pheroze; Sloan, Barbara; Torbett, Bruce E; Stoddart, Cheryl A

    2013-02-01

    We previously showed that reduced infectivity of HIV with incompletely processed capsid-spacer protein 1 (CA-SP1) is rescued by cellular activation or increased expression of HSP90AB1, a member of the cytosolic heat shock protein 90 family. Here we show that HSP90AB1 is present in HIV virions and that HSP90AB1, but not nonfunctional mutated HSP90AB1(E42A+D88A), restores infectivity to HIV with mutations in CA that alter core stability. Further, the CA mutants were hypersensitive to pharmacological inhibition of HSP90AB1. In agreement with Roesch et al. (2012), we found that culturing HIV at 39.5°C enhanced viral infectivity up to 30-fold in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (p=0.002) and rescued CA-mutant infectivity in nonactivated cells, concurrent with elevated expression of HSP90AB1 during hyperthermia. In sum, the transdominant effect of HSP90AB1 on CA-mutant HIV infectivity suggests a potential role for this class of cellular chaperones in HIV core stability and uncoating. PMID:23200770

  1. The hepatitis C virus core protein can modulate RNA-dependent RNA synthesis by the 2a polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Y.; Cheng Kao, C.

    2014-01-01

    RNA replication enzymes are multi-subunit protein complexes whose activity can be modulated by other viral and cellular factors. For genotype 1b Hepatitis C virus (HCV), the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) subunit of the replicase, NS5B, has been reported to interact with the HCV Core protein to decrease RNA synthesis (Kang et al., 2009). Here we used a cell-based assay for RNA synthesis to examine the Core–NS5B interaction of genotype 2a HCV. Unlike the 1b NS5B, the activity of the 2a NS5B was stimulated by the Core protein. Using the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, the 2a Core co-localized with 2a NS5B when they were transiently expressed in cells. The two proteins can form a coimmunoprecipitable complex. Deletion analysis showed that the N-terminal 75 residues of 2a Core were required to contact 2a NS5B to modulate its activity. The C-terminal transmembrane helix of 2a NS5B also contributes to the interaction with the 2a Core. To determine the basis for the differential effects of the Core–RdRp interaction, we found that the 2a RdRp activity was enhanced by both the 1b Core and 2a Core. However, the 1b NS5B activity was slightly inhibited by either Core protein. The replication of the 2a JFH-1 replicon was increased by co-expressed 2a Core while the genotype 1b Con1 replicon was not significantly affected by the corresponding Core. Mutations in 2a NS5B that affected the closed RdRp structure were found to be less responsive to 2a Core. Finally, we determined that RNA synthesis by the RdRps from genotypes 2a, 3a and 4a HCV were increased by the Core proteins from HCV of genotypes 1–4. These results reveal another difference between RNA syntheses by the different genotype RdRps and add additional examples of a viral structural protein regulating viral RNA synthesis. PMID:24874198

  2. Systems biology-based discovery of a potential Atg4B agonist (Flubendazole) that induces autophagy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Guo, Mingrui; Li, Jing; Zheng, Yaxin; Zhang, Shouyue; Xie, Tao; Liu, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the autophagy-related protein 4B(ATG4B) and its targeted candidate agonist in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) therapy. In this study, the identification of Atg4B as a novel breast cancer target for screening candidate small molecular agonists was performed by phylogenetic analysis, network construction, molecular modelling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In vitro, MTT assay, electron microscopy, western blot and ROS measurement were used for validating the efficacy of the candidate compounds. We used the phylogenetic analysis of Atg4B and constructed their protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Also, we screened target compounds of Atg4 proteins from Drugbank and ZINC. Flubendazole was validated for its anti-proliferative efficacy in MDA-MB-231 cells. Further MD simulation results supported the stable interaction between Flubendazole and Atg4B. Moreover, Flubendazole induced autophagy and increased ROS production. In conclusion, in silico analysis and experimental validation together demonstrate that Flubendazole can target Atg4B in MDA-MB-231 cells and induce autophagy, which may shed light on the exploration of this compound as a potential new Atg4B targeted drug for future TNBC therapy. PMID:26299935

  3. Characterization of epiphycan, a small proteoglycan with a leucine-rich repeat core protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, H J; Rosenberg, L; Choi, H U; Garza, S; Höök, M; Neame, P J

    1997-07-25

    The epiphysis of developing bones is a cartilaginous structure that is eventually replaced by bone during skeletal maturation. We have separated a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan, epiphycan, from decorin and biglycan by using dissociative extraction of bovine fetal epiphyseal cartilage, followed by sequential ion-exchange, gel permeation, hydrophobic, and Zn2+ chelate chromatographic steps. Epiphycan is a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan family, contains seven leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), is related to osteoglycin (osteoinductive factor) (Bentz, H., Nathan, R. M., Rosen, D. M., Armstrong, R. M., Thompson, A. Y., Segarini, P. R., Mathews, M. C., Dasch, J., Piez, K. A., and Seyedin, S. M. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 20805-20810), and appears to be the bovine equivalent of the chick proteoglycan PG-Lb (Shinomura, T., and Kimata, K. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 1265-1270). The intact proteoglycan had a median size of approximately 133 kDa. The core protein was 46 kDa by electrophoretic analysis, had a calculated size of 34,271 Da, and had two approximately equimolar N termini (APTLES ... and ETYDAT ... ) separated by 11 amino acids. There were at least three O-linked oligosaccharides in the N-terminal region of the protein, based on blank cycles in Edman degradation and corresponding serine or threonine residues in the translated cDNA sequence. The glycosaminoglycans ranged in size from 23 to 34 kDa were more heterogeneous than those in other dermatan sulfate small leucine-rich proteoglycans and were found in the acidic N-terminal region of the protein core, N-terminal to the LRRs. A four-cysteine cluster was present at the N terminus of the LRRs, and a disulfide-bonded cysteine pair was present at the C terminus of the protein core. The seventh LRR and an N-linked oligosaccharide were between the two C-terminal cysteines. An additional potential N-glycosylation site near the C terminus did not appear to be substituted at a significant level. PMID:9228042

  4. p15RS/RPRD1A (p15INK4b-related sequence/regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain-containing protein 1A) interacts with HDAC2 in inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Yanquan; Li, Jun; Wang, Yinyin; Ren, Fangli; Zhou, Yifan; Wu, Yinyuan; Feng, Yarui; Zhou, Yu; Su, Fuqin; Jia, Baoqing; Wang, Dong; Chang, Zhijie

    2015-04-10

    We previously reported that p15RS (p15INK4b-related sequence), a regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain containing protein, inhibited Wnt signaling by interrupting the formation of the β-catenin·TCF4 complex. However, how p15RS functions as an intrinsic repressor to repress transcription remains unclear. In this study, we show that p15RS, through a specific interaction with HDAC2 (histone deacetylase 2), a deacetylase that regulates gene transcription, maintains histone H3 in a deacetylated state in the promoter region of Wnt-targeted genes where β-catenin·TCF4 is bound. We observed that histone deacetylase inhibitors impair the ability of p15RS in inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Depletion of HDAC2 markedly disabled p15RS inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription. Interestingly, overexpression of p15RS decreases the level of acetylated histone H3 in the c-MYC promoter. Finally, we demonstrate that p15RS significantly enhances the association of HDAC2 and TCF4 and enhances the occupancy of HDAC2 to DNA, resulting in the deacetylation of histone H3 and the failure of β-catenin interaction. We propose that p15RS acts as an intrinsic transcriptional repressor for Wnt/β-catenin-mediated gene transcription at least partially through recruiting HDAC2 to occupy the promoter and maintaining deacetylated histone H3. PMID:25697359

  5. LARP4B is an AU-rich sequence associated factor that promotes mRNA accumulation and translation.

    PubMed

    Küspert, Maritta; Murakawa, Yasuhiro; Schäffler, Katrin; Vanselow, Jens T; Wolf, Elmar; Juranek, Stefan; Schlosser, Andreas; Landthaler, Markus; Fischer, Utz

    2015-07-01

    mRNAs are key molecules in gene expression and subject to diverse regulatory events. Regulation is accomplished by distinct sets of trans-acting factors that interact with mRNAs and form defined mRNA-protein complexes (mRNPs). The resulting "mRNP code" determines the fate of any given mRNA and thus controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. The La-related protein 4B (LARP4B) belongs to an evolutionarily conserved family of RNA-binding proteins characterized by the presence of a La-module implicated in direct RNA binding. Biochemical experiments have shown previously direct interactions of LARP4B with factors of the translation machinery. This finding along with the observation of an association with actively translating ribosomes suggested that LARP4B is a factor contributing to the mRNP code. To gain insight into the function of LARP4B in vivo we tested its mRNA association at the transcriptome level and its impact on the proteome. PAR-CLIP analyses allowed us to identify the in vivo RNA targets of LARP4B. We show that LARP4B binds to a distinct set of cellular mRNAs by contacting their 3' UTRs. Biocomputational analysis combined with in vitro binding assays identified the LARP4B-binding motif on mRNA targets. The reduction of cellular LARP4B levels leads to a marked destabilization of its mRNA targets and consequently their reduced translation. Our data identify LARP4B as a component of the mRNP code that influences the expression of its mRNA targets by affecting their stability. PMID:26001795

  6. Visualizing and Quantifying Intracellular Behavior and Abundance of the Core Circadian Clock Protein PERIOD2.

    PubMed

    Smyllie, Nicola J; Pilorz, Violetta; Boyd, James; Meng, Qing-Jun; Saer, Ben; Chesham, Johanna E; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Krogager, Toke P; Spiller, David G; Boot-Handford, Raymond; White, Michael R H; Hastings, Michael H; Loudon, Andrew S I

    2016-07-25

    Transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs) are a conserved molecular motif of circadian clocks. The principal clock in mammals is the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. In SCN neurons, auto-regulatory feedback on core clock genes Period (Per) and Cryptochrome (Cry) following nuclear entry of their protein products is the basis of circadian oscillation [1, 2]. In Drosophila clock neurons, the movement of dPer into the nucleus is subject to a circadian gate that generates a delay in the TTFL, and this delay is thought to be critical for oscillation [3, 4]. Analysis of the Drosophila clock has strongly influenced models of the mammalian clock, and such models typically infer complex spatiotemporal, intracellular behaviors of mammalian clock proteins. There are, however, no direct measures of the intracellular behavior of endogenous circadian proteins to support this: dynamic analyses have been limited and often have no circadian dimension [5-7]. We therefore generated a knockin mouse expressing a fluorescent fusion of native PER2 protein (PER2::VENUS) for live imaging. PER2::VENUS recapitulates the circadian functions of wild-type PER2 and, importantly, the behavior of PER2::VENUS runs counter to the Drosophila model: it does not exhibit circadian gating of nuclear entry. Using fluorescent imaging of PER2::VENUS, we acquired the first measures of mobility, molecular concentration, and localization of an endogenous circadian protein in individual mammalian cells, and we showed how the mobility and nuclear translocation of PER2 are regulated by casein kinase. These results provide new qualitative and quantitative insights into the cellular mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:27374340

  7. UBE4B Levels Are Correlated with Clinical Outcomes in Neuroblastoma Patients and with Altered Neuroblastoma Cell Proliferation and Sensitivity to EGFR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zage, Peter E.; Sirisaengtaksin, Natalie; Liu, Yin; Gireud, Monica; Brown, Brandon S.; Palla, Shana; Richards, Kristen N.; Hughes, Dennis P.M.; Bean, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The UBE4B gene, located on chromosome 1p36, encodes a ubiquitin ligase that interacts with Hrs, a protein involved in EGFR trafficking, suggesting a link between EGFR trafficking and neuroblastoma pathogenesis. We have analyzed the roles of UBE4B in the outcomes of neuroblastoma patients and in neuroblastoma tumor cell proliferation, EGFR trafficking, and response to EGFR inhibition. Methods We examined the association of UBE4B expression with neuroblastoma patient survival using available microarray datasets. We measured UBE4B and EGFR protein levels in patient tumor samples and EGFR degradation rates in neuroblastoma cell lines and analyzed the effects of UBE4B on neuroblastoma tumor cell growth. The effects of the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab were examined in neuroblastoma cells expressing wild-type and mutant UBE4B. Results Low UBE4B gene expression is associated with poor outcomes in patients with neuroblastoma. UBE4B overexpression reduced neuroblastoma tumor cell proliferation, and UBE4B expression was inversely related to EGFR expression in patient tumor samples. EGFR degradation rates correlated with cellular UBE4B levels. Enhanced expression of catalytically active UBE4B resulted in reduced sensitivity to EGFR inhibition. Conclusions We have demonstrated associations between UBE4B expression and neuroblastoma patient outcomes and between UBE4B and EGFR expression in neuroblastoma tumor samples. Moreover, levels of UBE4B influenced neuroblastoma tumor cell proliferation, EGFR degradation, and response to EGFR inhibition. These results suggest UBE4B-mediated GFR trafficking may contribute to the poor prognosis of neuroblastoma tumors with 1p36 deletions, and that UBE4B expression may be a marker that can predict responses of neuroblastoma tumors to treatment. PMID:22990745

  8. Spindle assembly checkpoint proteins are positioned close to core microtubule attachment sites at kinetochores

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiaohu; Cheerambathur, Dhanya; Gassmann, Reto; Suzuki, Aussie; Lawrimore, Josh; Desai, Arshad; Salmon, E.D.

    2013-01-01

    Spindle assembly checkpoint proteins have been thought to reside in the peripheral corona region of the kinetochore, distal to microtubule attachment sites at the outer plate. However, recent biochemical evidence indicates that checkpoint proteins are closely linked to the core kinetochore microtubule attachment site comprised of the Knl1–Mis12–Ndc80 (KMN) complexes/KMN network. In this paper, we show that the Knl1–Zwint1 complex is required to recruit the Rod–Zwilch–Zw10 (RZZ) and Mad1–Mad2 complexes to the outer kinetochore. Consistent with this, nanometer-scale mapping indicates that RZZ, Mad1–Mad2, and the C terminus of the dynein recruitment factor Spindly are closely juxtaposed with the KMN network in metaphase cells when their dissociation is blocked and the checkpoint is active. In contrast, the N terminus of Spindly is ∼75 nm outside the calponin homology domain of the Ndc80 complex. These results reveal how checkpoint proteins are integrated within the substructure of the kinetochore and will aid in understanding the coordination of microtubule attachment and checkpoint signaling during chromosome segregation. PMID:23979716

  9. High resolution crystal structure of human Dim2/TXNL4B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TXNL4A (thioredoxin like 4A) is an essential protein conserved from yeast to human and is a component of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. TXNL4B was identified as a TXNL4 family protein that also interacts with prp6, an integral component of the U4/U6•U5 tri-snRNP complex, and was shown to function...

  10. DISC1, PDE4B, and NDE1 at the centrosome and synapse

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Nicholas J.; Ogawa, Fumiaki; Antolin-Fontes, Beatriz; Chubb, Jennifer E.; Carlyle, Becky C.; Christie, Sheila; Claessens, Antoine; Porteous, David J.; Millar, J. Kirsty

    2008-12-26

    Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a risk factor for schizophrenia and other major mental illnesses. Its protein binding partners include the Nuclear Distribution Factor E Homologs (NDE1 and NDEL1), LIS1, and phosphodiesterases 4B and 4D (PDE4B and PDE4D). We demonstrate that NDE1, NDEL1 and LIS1, together with their binding partner dynein, associate with DISC1, PDE4B and PDE4D within the cell, and provide evidence that this complex is present at the centrosome. LIS1 and NDEL1 have been previously suggested to be synaptic, and we now demonstrate localisation of DISC1, NDE1, and PDE4B at synapses in cultured neurons. NDE1 is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependant Protein Kinase A (PKA), whose activity is, in turn, regulated by the cAMP hydrolysis activity of phosphodiesterases, including PDE4. We propose that DISC1 acts as an assembly scaffold for all of these proteins and that the NDE1/NDEL1/LIS1/dynein complex is modulated by cAMP levels via PKA and PDE4.

  11. Strategies for crystallizing a chromatin protein in complex with the nucleosome core particle

    PubMed Central

    Makde, Ravindra D.; Tan, Song

    2013-01-01

    The molecular details for how chromatin factors and enzymes interact with the nucleosome are critical to understand fundamental genetic processes including cell division and gene regulation. A structural understanding of such processes has been hindered by the difficulty producing diffraction quality crystals of chromatin proteins in complex with the nucleosome. We describe here the steps used to grow crystals of the 300 kDa RCC1 chromatin factor/nucleosome core particle complex which diffract to 2.9 Å resolution. These steps included both pre- and post-crystallization strategies potentially useful to other complexes. We screened multiple variant RCC1-nucleosome core particle complexes assembled using different RCC1 homologs and deletion variants, and nucleosomes containing nucleosomal DNA with different sequences and lengths as well as histone deletion variants. We found that using RCC1 from different species produced different crystal forms of the RCC1-nucleosome complex consistent with key crystal packing interactions mediated by RCC1. Optimization of post-crystallization soaks to dehydrate the crystals dramatically improved the diffraction quality of the RCC1/nucleosome crystal from 5.0 to 2.9 Å resolution. PMID:23928047

  12. Essential role for the ATG4B protease and autophagy in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Sandra; Maciel, Mariana; Herrera, Iliana; Nava, Teresa; Vergara, Fabián; Gaxiola, Miguel; López-Otín, Carlos; Selman, Moisés; Pardo, Annie

    2015-04-01

    Autophagy is a critical cellular homeostatic process that controls the turnover of damaged organelles and proteins. Impaired autophagic activity is involved in a number of diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis suggesting that altered autophagy may contribute to fibrogenesis. However, the specific role of autophagy in lung fibrosis is still undefined. In this study, we show for the first time, how autophagy disruption contributes to bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in vivo using an Atg4b-deficient mouse as a model. Atg4b-deficient mice displayed a significantly higher inflammatory response at 7 d after bleomycin treatment associated with increased neutrophilic infiltration and significant alterations in proinflammatory cytokines. Likewise, we found that Atg4b disruption resulted in augmented apoptosis affecting predominantly alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells. At 28 d post-bleomycin instillation Atg4b-deficient mice exhibited more extensive and severe fibrosis with increased collagen accumulation and deregulated extracellular matrix-related gene expression. Together, our findings indicate that the ATG4B protease and autophagy play a crucial role protecting epithelial cells against bleomycin-induced stress and apoptosis, and in the regulation of the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. PMID:25906080

  13. Recognition of Heptoses and the Inner Core of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides by Surfactant Protein D

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,H.; Head, J.; Kosma, P.; Brade, H.; Muller-Loennies, S.; Sheikh, S.; McDonald, B.; Smith, K.; Cafarella, T.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria are important mediators of bacterial virulence that can elicit potent endotoxic effects. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) shows specific interactions with LPS, both in vitro and in vivo. These interactions involve binding of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) to LPS oligosaccharides (OS); however, little is known about the mechanisms of LPS recognition. Recombinant neck+CRDs (NCRDs) provide an opportunity to directly correlate binding interactions with a crystallographic analysis of the binding mechanism. In these studies, we examined the interactions of wild-type and mutant trimeric NCRDs with rough LPS (R-LPS). Although rat NCRDs bound more efficiently than human NCRDs to Escherichia coli J-5 LPS, both proteins exhibited efficient binding to solid-phase Rd2-LPS and to Rd2-LPS aggregates presented in the solution phase. Involvement of residues flanking calcium at the sugar binding site was demonstrated by reciprocal exchange of lysine and arginine at position 343 of rat and human CRDs. The lectin activity of hNCRDs was inhibited by specific heptoses, including l-glycero-{alpha}-d-manno-heptose (l, d-heptose), but not by 3-deoxy-{alpha}-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo). Crystallographic analysis of the hNCRD demonstrated a novel binding orientation for l, d-heptose, involving the hydroxyl groups of the side chain. Similar binding was observed for a synthetic {alpha}1{yields}3-linked heptose disaccharide corresponding to heptoses I and II of the inner core region in many LPS. 7-O-Carbamoyl-l, d-heptose and d-glycero-{alpha}-d-manno-heptose were bound via ring hydroxyl groups. Interactions with the side chain of inner core heptoses provide a potential mechanism for the recognition of diverse types of LPS by SP-D.

  14. Role of inter-domain cavity in the attachment of the orange carotenoid protein to the phycobilisome core and to the fluorescence recovery protein.

    PubMed

    Zlenko, Dmitry V; Krasilnikov, Pavel M; Stadnichuk, Igor N

    2016-01-01

    Using molecular modeling and known spatial structure of proteins, we have derived a universal 3D model of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) and phycobilisome (PBS) interaction in the process of non-photochemical PBS quenching. The characteristic tip of the phycobilin domain of the core-membrane linker polypeptide (LCM) forms the attachment site on the PBS core surface for interaction with the central inter-domain cavity of the OCP molecule. This spatial arrangement has to be the most advantageous one because the LCM, as the major terminal PBS-fluorescence emitter, accumulates energy from the most other phycobiliproteins within the PBS before quenching by OCP. In agreement with the constructed model, in cyanobacteria, the small fluorescence recovery protein is wedged in the OCP's central cavity, weakening the PBS and OCP interaction. The presence of another one protein, the red carotenoid protein, in some cyanobacterial species, which also can interact with the PBS, also corresponds to this model. PMID:25905572

  15. Identity of the core proteins of the large chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans synthesized by skeletal muscle and prechondrogenic mesenchyme.

    PubMed Central

    Carrino, D A; Dennis, J E; Drushel, R F; Haynesworth, S E; Caplan, A I

    1994-01-01

    Large, chondroitin sulphate-containing proteoglycans are synthesized by three prominent tissue in the embryonic chick limb. One of these proteoglycans is aggrecan, the phenotype-specific proteoglycan of cartilage. Another, PG-M, is produced by prechondrogenic mesenchymal cells. The third, M-CSPG, is made by developing skeletal muscle cells. While the carbohydrate components of PG-M and M-CSPG share some similarities, both of these proteoglycans clearly have different carbohydrate moieties from those of aggrecan. To compare these three proteoglycans at another level, their core protein structures were analysed in three ways: by the presence or absence of monoclonal antibody epitopes, by one-dimensional peptide display of the cyanogen bromide-cleaved core proteins and by electron microscopic imaging of the molecules. Monoclonal antibodies whose epitopes are present in aggrecan core protein were tested with core protein preparations from M-CSPG and PG-M. One of these, 7D1, recognizes both PG-M and M-CSPG, while another, 1C6, shows no reactivity for the non-cartilage proteoglycans. The absence of 1C6 reactivity is of interest, as its epitope is in a region of the aggrecan core protein known to have a functional homologue in the core proteins of PG-M and M-CSPG. The cyanogen bromide-fragmented peptide pattern of M-CSPG is the same as that of PG-M, and both are different from that of aggrecan. The aggrecan pattern has one prominent large band (molecular mass 130 kDa), some less prominent large bands (molecular mass 70-100 kDa) and several smaller bands. In contrast, the PG-M and M-CSPG patterns show no bands with molecular masses > 73 kDa, and the smaller bands (molecular mass < 40 kDa) have a different pattern to that of the smaller bands from aggrecan. The electron microscopic images of aggrecan show a core protein with one end having two globular regions separated by a short linear segment; adjacent to this is a long linear segment, which sometimes contains a third

  16. In situ preparation and protein delivery of silicate–alginate composite microspheres with core-shell structure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chengtie; Fan, Wei; Gelinsky, Michael; Xiao, Yin; Chang, Jiang; Friis, Thor; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2011-01-01

    The efficient loading and sustained release of proteins from bioactive microspheres remain a significant challenge. In this study, we have developed bioactive microspheres which can be loaded with protein and then have a controlled rate of protein release into a surrounding medium. This was achieved by preparing a bioactive microsphere system with core-shell structure, combining a calcium silicate (CS) shell with an alginate (A) core by a one-step in situ method. The result was to improve the microspheres' protein adsorption and release, which yielded a highly bioactive material with potential uses in bone repair applications. The composition and the core-shell structure, as well as the formation mechanism of the obtained CS–A microspheres, were investigated by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometer dot and line-scanning analysis. The protein loading efficiency reached 75 per cent in CS–A microspheres with a core-shell structure by the in situ method. This is significantly higher than that of pure A or CS–A microspheres prepared by non-in situ method, which lack a core-shell structure. CS–A microspheres with a core-shell structure showed a significant decrease in the burst release of proteins, maintaining sustained release profile in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at both pH 7.4 and 4.3, compared with the controls. The protein release from CS–A microspheres is predominantly controlled by a Fickian diffusion mechanism. The CS–A microspheres with a core-shell structure were shown to have improved apatite-mineralization in simulated body fluids compared with the controls, most probably owing to the existence of bioactive CS shell on the surface of the microspheres. Our results indicate that the core-shell structure of CS–A microspheres play an important role in enhancing protein delivery and mineralization, which makes these composite materials promising candidates for application in bone

  17. Bioengineered vaults: self-assembling protein shell-lipophilic core nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Daniel C; Marsden, Matthew D; Shen, Sean; Toso, Daniel B; Wu, Xiaomeng; Loo, Joseph A; Zhou, Z Hong; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Wender, Paul A; Zack, Jerome A; Rome, Leonard H

    2014-08-26

    We report a novel approach to a new class of bioengineered, monodispersed, self-assembling vault nanoparticles consisting of a protein shell exterior with a lipophilic core interior designed for drug and probe delivery. Recombinant vaults were engineered to contain a small amphipathic α-helix derived from the nonstructural protein 5A of hepatitis C virus, thereby creating within the vault lumen a lipophilic microenvironment into which lipophilic compounds could be reversibly encapsulated. Multiple types of electron microscopy showed that attachment of this peptide resulted in larger than expected additional mass internalized within the vault lumen attributable to incorporation of host lipid membrane constituents spanning the vault waist (>35 nm). These bioengineered lipophilic vaults reversibly associate with a sample set of therapeutic compounds, including all-trans retinoic acid, amphotericin B, and bryostatin 1, incorporating hundreds to thousands of drug molecules per vault nanoparticle. Bryostatin 1 is of particular therapeutic interest because of its ability to potently induce expression of latent HIV, thus representing a preclinical lead in efforts to eradicate HIV/AIDS. Vaults loaded with bryostatin 1 released free drug, resulting in activation of HIV from provirus latency in vitro and induction of CD69 biomarker expression following intravenous injection into mice. The ability to preferentially and reversibly encapsulate lipophilic compounds into these novel bioengineered vault nanoparticles greatly advances their potential use as drug delivery systems. PMID:25061969

  18. Bioengineered Vaults: Self-Assembling Protein Shell–Lipophilic Core Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel approach to a new class of bioengineered, monodispersed, self-assembling vault nanoparticles consisting of a protein shell exterior with a lipophilic core interior designed for drug and probe delivery. Recombinant vaults were engineered to contain a small amphipathic α-helix derived from the nonstructural protein 5A of hepatitis C virus, thereby creating within the vault lumen a lipophilic microenvironment into which lipophilic compounds could be reversibly encapsulated. Multiple types of electron microscopy showed that attachment of this peptide resulted in larger than expected additional mass internalized within the vault lumen attributable to incorporation of host lipid membrane constituents spanning the vault waist (>35 nm). These bioengineered lipophilic vaults reversibly associate with a sample set of therapeutic compounds, including all-trans retinoic acid, amphotericin B, and bryostatin 1, incorporating hundreds to thousands of drug molecules per vault nanoparticle. Bryostatin 1 is of particular therapeutic interest because of its ability to potently induce expression of latent HIV, thus representing a preclinical lead in efforts to eradicate HIV/AIDS. Vaults loaded with bryostatin 1 released free drug, resulting in activation of HIV from provirus latency in vitro and induction of CD69 biomarker expression following intravenous injection into mice. The ability to preferentially and reversibly encapsulate lipophilic compounds into these novel bioengineered vault nanoparticles greatly advances their potential use as drug delivery systems. PMID:25061969

  19. Methionine Oxidation Perturbs the Structural Core of the Prion Protein and Suggests a Generic Misfolding Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Younan, Nadine D.; Nadal, Rebecca C.; Davies, Paul; Brown, David R.; Viles, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and misfolding of the prion protein (PrPC) are fundamental to prion diseases. We have therefore probed the effect of oxidation on the structure and stability of PrPC. Urea unfolding studies indicate that H2O2 oxidation reduces the thermodynamic stability of PrPC by as much as 9 kJ/mol. 1H-15N NMR studies indicate methionine oxidation perturbs key hydrophobic residues on one face of helix-C as follows: Met-205, Val-209, and Met-212 together with residues Val-160 and Tyr-156. These hydrophobic residues pack together and form the structured core of the protein, stabilizing its ternary structure. Copper-catalyzed oxidation of PrPC causes a more significant alteration of the structure, generating a monomeric molten globule species that retains its native helical content. Further copper-catalyzed oxidation promotes extended β-strand structures that lack a cooperative fold. This transition from the helical molten globule to β-conformation has striking similarities to a misfolding intermediate generated at low pH. PrP may therefore share a generic misfolding pathway to amyloid fibers, irrespective of the conditions promoting misfolding. Our observations support the hypothesis that oxidation of PrP destabilizes the native fold of PrPC, facilitating the transition to PrPSc. This study gives a structural and thermodynamic explanation for the high levels of oxidized methionine in scrapie isolates. PMID:22654104

  20. The hypervariable region of K-Ras4B is responsible for its specific interactions with Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sherwin J.; Nolet, Ryan P.; Calvert, Richard J.; Anderson, Lucy M.; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    K-Ras4B belongs to the family of p21 Ras GTPases, which play an important role in cell proliferation, survival and motility. The p21 Ras proteins such as K-Ras4B, K-Ras4A, H-Ras, and N-Ras, share 85% sequence homology and activate very similar signaling pathways. Only the C-terminal hypervariable regions differ significantly. A growing body of literature demonstrates that each Ras isoform possesses unique functions in normal physiological processes as well as in pathogenesis. One of the central questions in the field of Ras biology is how these very similar proteins achieve such remarkable specificity in protein-protein interactions that regulate signal transduction pathways. Here we explore specific binding of K-Ras4B to calmodulin. Using NMR techniques and isothermal titration calorimetry we demonstrate that the hypervariable region of K-Ras contributes in a major way to the interaction with calmodulin while the catalytic domain of K-Ras4B provides a way to control the interaction by nucleotide binding. The hypervariable region of K-Ras4B binds specifically to the C-terminal domain of Ca2+-loaded calmodulin with micromolar affinity, while the GTP-γ-S loaded catalytic domain of K-Ras4B may interact with the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. PMID:19583261

  1. Conformational Stability of Mammalian Prion Protein Amyloid Fibrils Is Dictated by a Packing Polymorphism within the Core Region*

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Nathan J.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Chen, Shugui; Smirnovas, Vytautas; Surewicz, Witold K.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian prion strains are believed to arise from the propagation of distinct conformations of the misfolded prion protein PrPSc. One key operational parameter used to define differences between strains has been conformational stability of PrPSc as defined by resistance to thermal and/or chemical denaturation. However, the structural basis of these stability differences is unknown. To bridge this gap, we have generated two strains of recombinant human prion protein amyloid fibrils that show dramatic differences in conformational stability and have characterized them by a number of biophysical methods. Backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments revealed that, in sharp contrast to previously studied strains of infectious amyloid formed from the yeast prion protein Sup35, differences in β-sheet core size do not underlie differences in conformational stability between strains of mammalian prion protein amyloid. Instead, these stability differences appear to be dictated by distinct packing arrangements (i.e. steric zipper interfaces) within the amyloid core, as indicated by distinct x-ray fiber diffraction patterns and large strain-dependent differences in hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics for histidine side chains within the core region. Although this study was limited to synthetic prion protein amyloid fibrils, a similar structural basis for strain-dependent conformational stability may apply to brain-derived PrPSc, especially because large strain-specific differences in PrPSc stability are often observed despite a similar size of the PrPSc core region. PMID:24338015

  2. Glycosaminoglycan-free small proteoglycan core protein is secreted by fibroblasts from a patient with a syndrome resembling progeroid.

    PubMed Central

    Kresse, H; Rosthøj, S; Quentin, E; Hollmann, J; Glössl, J; Okada, S; Tønnesen, T

    1987-01-01

    A male patient, 4 years 9 mo old and having progeroidal appearance, exhibited delayed mental development and multiple abnormalities of connective tissues including growth failure, osteopenia of all and dysplasia of some bones, defective deciduous teeth, loose but elastic skin, delayed wound healing with formation of thin atrophic scars, scanty scalp hair, hypotonic muscles, and hypermobile joints. Skin fibroblasts of the patient converted only about half of the core protein of the small proteodermatan sulfate to a mature glycosaminoglycan chain-bearing proteoglycan. The remaining core protein, which contained complex-type asparagine-bound oligosaccharides, was secreted with almost normal kinetics. Xylosyltransferase activity and the synthesis of other proteoglycan types were normal. Normal induction of glycosaminoglycan synthesis occurred in the presence of 1 mM, but there was very little induction in the presence of 0.01 mM p-nitrophenyl-beta-xyloside. An antibody against an N-terminal pentadecapeptide of the core protein recognized the glycosaminoglycan-free core protein from the patient less well than the chain-bearing protein treated with chondroitin ABC lyase. Though these results do not define the basic defect unambiguously, they provide the first report of a disorder being due to an abnormality in small proteoglycan biosynthesis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:3631078

  3. Hepatitis B virus core protein enhances human telomerase reverse transcriptase expression and hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation in a c-Ets2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Gai, Xiaoxiao; Zhao, Peiqing; Pan, Yingfang; Shan, Haixia; Yue, Xuetian; Du, Juan; Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Peng; Ma, Hongxin; Guo, Min; Yang, Xiaoyun; Sun, Wensheng; Gao, Lifen; Ma, Chunhong; Liang, Xiaohong

    2013-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus core protein can regulate viral replication and host gene expression. However, it is unclear whether and how hepatitis B virus core protein regulates hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation. Induction of hepatitis B virus core protein over-expression significantly enhanced the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells, while knockdown of hepatitis B virus core protein expression inhibited the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Altered hepatitis B virus core protein expression significantly changed the growth of implanted hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo. Microarray analysis indicated that hepatitis B virus core protein up-regulated human telomerase reverse transcriptase expression, which was further validated by over-expression and knockdown assays in vitro. Furthermore, knockdown of human telomerase reverse transcriptase expression mitigated the hepatitis B virus core protein-enhanced hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and clone formation in vitro. Luciferase assays indicated that hepatitis B virus core protein enhanced the promoter activity of human telomerase reverse transcriptase, which was dependent on the binding of c-Ets2 to the promoter region between -192 and -187. In addition, hepatitis B virus core protein enhanced human telomerase reverse transcriptase transcription in HepG2 cells, but not in the c-Ets2-silencing HepG2 cells. Moreover, hepatitis B virus core protein promoted c-Ets2 nuclear translocation. Finally, significantly higher levels of human telomerase reverse transcriptase expression and nuclear c-Ets2 accumulation were detected in hepatitis B virus core protein-positive hepatocellular carcinoma samples. Our findings demonstrate that hepatitis B virus core protein promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation by up-regulating the c-Ets2-dependent expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase. PMID:23542016

  4. Cloning and sequencing of the cDNA encoding a core protein of the paired helical filament of Alzheimer's disease: Identification as the microtubule-associated protein tau

    SciTech Connect

    Goedert, M.; Wischik, C.M.; Crowther, R.A.; Walker, J.E.; Klug, A. )

    1988-06-01

    Screening of cDNA libraries prepared from the frontal cortex of an Alzheimer's disease patient and from fetal human brain has led to isolation of the cDNA for a core protein of the paired helical filament of Alzheimer's disease. The partial amino acid sequence of this core protein was used to design synthetic oligonucleotide probes. The cDNA encodes a protein of 352 amino acids that contains a characteristic amino acid repeat in its carboxyl-terminal half. This protein is highly homologous to the sequence of the mouse microtubule-associated protein tau and thus constitutes the human equivalent of mouse tau. RNA blot analysis indicates the presence of two major transcripts, 6 and 2 kilobases long, with a wide distribution in normal human brain. Tau protein mRNAs were found in normal amounts in the frontal cortex from patients with Alzheimer's disease. The proof that at least part of tau protein forms a component of the paired helical filament core opens the way to understanding the mode of formation of paired helical filaments and thus, ultimately, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Effect of subdomain interactions on methyl group dynamics in the hydrophobic core of villin headpiece protein

    PubMed Central

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Do, Tien; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqianq

    2014-01-01

    Thermostable villin headpiece protein (HP67) consists of the N-terminal subdomain (residues 10–41) and the autonomously folding C-terminal subdomain (residues 42–76) which pack against each other to form a structure with a unified hydrophobic core. The X-ray structures of the isolated C-terminal subdomain (HP36) and its counterpart in HP67 are very similar for the hydrophobic core residues. However, fine rearrangements of the free energy landscape are expected to occur because of the interactions between the two subdomains. We detect and characterize these changes by comparing the µs-ms time scale dynamics of the methyl-bearing side chains in isolated HP36 and in HP67. Specifically, we probe three hydrophobic side chains at the interface of the two subdomains (L42, V50, and L75) as well as at two residues far from the interface (L61 and L69). Solid-state deuteron NMR techniques are combined with computational modeling for the detailed characterization of motional modes in terms of their kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. The effect of interdomain interactions on side chain dynamics is seen for all residues but L75. Thus, changes in dynamics because of subdomain interactions are not confined to the site of perturbation. One of the main results is a two-to threefold increase in the value of the activation energies for the rotameric mode of motions in HP67 compared with HP36. Detailed analysis of configurational entropies and heat capacities complement the kinetic view of the degree of the disorder in the folded state. PMID:24243806

  6. Stepwise Loss of Fluorescent Core Protein V from Human Adenovirus during Entry into Cells ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Puntener, Daniel; Engelke, Martin F.; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Strunze, Sten; Wilhelm, Corinne; Greber, Urs F.

    2011-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (Ads) replicate and assemble particles in the nucleus. They organize a linear double-strand DNA genome into a condensed core with about 180 nucleosomes, by the viral proteins VII (pVII), pX, and pV attaching the DNA to the capsid. Using reverse genetics, we generated a novel, nonconditionally replicating Ad reporter by inserting green fluorescent protein (GFP) at the amino terminus of pV. Purified Ad2-GFP-pV virions had an oversized complete genome and incorporated about 38 GFP-pV molecules per virion, which is about 25% of the pV levels in Ad2. GFP-pV cofractionated with the DNA core, like pV, and newly synthesized GFP-pV had a subcellular localization indistinguishable from that of pV, indicating that GFP-pV is a valid reporter for pV. Ad2-GFP-pV completed the replication cycle, although at lower yields than Ad2. Incoming GFP-pV (or pV) was not imported into the nucleus. Virions lost GFP-pV at two points during the infection process: at entry into the cytosol and at the nuclear pore complex, where capsids disassemble. Disassembled capsids, positive for the conformation-specific antihexon antibody R70, were devoid of GFP-pV. The loss of GFP-pV was reduced by the macrolide antibiotic leptomycin B (LMB), which blocks nuclear export and adenovirus attachment to the nuclear pore complex. LMB inhibited the appearance of R70 epitopes on Ad2 and Ad2-GFP-pV, indicating that the loss of GFP-pV from Ad2-GFP-pV is an authentic step in the adenovirus uncoating program. Ad2-GFP-pV is genetically complete and hence enables detailed analyses of infection and spreading dynamics in cells and model organisms or assessment of oncolytic adenoviral potential. PMID:21047958

  7. Removal of Available Decorin Core-Protein from Powdered Bovine Hide by Treatments used to Process Intact Hides into Leather

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a modification of a previously developed sandwich Elisa procedure to measure decorin core-protein (DCP), we determined the available decorin content of a sample of raw powdered bovine hide before and after treatment with the reagents used in the early steps of the process for converting a hide...

  8. Neuronal BC RNAs cooperate with eIF4B to mediate activity-dependent translational control

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Taesun; Muslimov, Ilham A.; Tsokas, Panayiotis; Berardi, Valerio; Zhong, Jun; Sacktor, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    In neurons, translational regulation of gene expression has been implicated in the activity-dependent management of synapto-dendritic protein repertoires. However, the fundamentals of stimulus-modulated translational control in neurons remain poorly understood. Here we describe a mechanism in which regulatory brain cytoplasmic (BC) RNAs cooperate with eukaryotic initiation factor 4B (eIF4B) to control translation in a manner that is responsive to neuronal activity. eIF4B is required for the translation of mRNAs with structured 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs), exemplified here by neuronal protein kinase Mζ (PKMζ) mRNA. Upon neuronal stimulation, synapto-dendritic eIF4B is dephosphorylated at serine 406 in a rapid process that is mediated by protein phosphatase 2A. Such dephosphorylation causes a significant decrease in the binding affinity between eIF4B and BC RNA translational repressors, enabling the factor to engage the 40S small ribosomal subunit for translation initiation. BC RNA translational control, mediated via eIF4B phosphorylation status, couples neuronal activity to translational output, and thus provides a mechanistic basis for long-term plastic changes in nerve cells. PMID:25332164

  9. Controlled protein embedment onto Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles for immuno-labeling of nanosilver surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Hwan; Lee, Jeong Min; Jung, Yongwon

    2014-05-28

    Difficulties in stable conjugation of biomolecules to nanosilver surfaces have severely limited the use of silver nanostructures in biological applications. Here, we report a facile antibody conjugation onto gold/silver (Au/Ag) core-shell nanoparticles by stable and uniform embedment of an antibody binding protein, protein G, in silver nanoshells. A rigid helical peptide linker with a terminal cysteine residue was fused to protein G. A mixture of the peptide-fused protein G and space-filling free peptide was reacted with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to form a protein G-linked peptide layer on the particle surface. Uniform silver nanoshells were successfully formed on these protein G-AuNPs, while stably embedding protein G-linked peptide layers. Protein G specifically targets the Fc region of an antibody and thus affords properly orientated antibodies on the particle surface. Compared to Au nanoparticles of similar size with randomly adsorbed antibodies, the present immuno-labeled Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles offered nearly 10-fold higher sensitivities for naked-eye detection of surface bound antigens. In addition, small dye molecules that were bonded to the peptide layer on Au nanoparticles exhibited highly enhanced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals upon Ag shell formation. The present strategy provides a simple but efficient way to conjugate antibodies to nanosilver surfaces, which will greatly facilitate wider use of the superior optical properties of silver nanostructures in biological applications. PMID:24801432

  10. Interferon gamma production by peripheral blood lymphocytes to hepatitis C virus core protein in chronic hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Iwata, K; Wakita, T; Okumura, A; Yoshioka, K; Takayanagi, M; Wands, J R; Kakumu, S

    1995-10-01

    Evidence suggests that cellular immunity to hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein may be important in the pathogenesis of viral infection. Therefore, interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) derived from patients with chronic HCV infection (genotype 1b) was examined. The cellular immune response was evaluated with a recombinant HCV core fusion protein derived from a patient with genotype 1b. To identify the immunodominant epitopes, IFN-gamma production in responders was also assessed with a panel of nine synthetic peptides that covered the entire core region. It was found that mononuclear cells from 24 (52%) of 46 patients with chronic liver disease responded to the core protein; asymptomatic HCV carriers demonstrated a lower response rate (14%, P < .05). More important, individuals who had received IFN-alpha treatment and went into clinical and virological remission had a higher response rate (75%, P < .05) compared with those with ongoing hepatitis whose treatment failed (31%). Of 25 patients whose mononuclear cells responded to HCV core protein, 18 had a significant response to one or more peptides; 12 patients reacted to a peptide mixture containing hydrophilic sequences. The core peptide amino acid sequence 141 to 160 was recognized in 9 patients. Interestingly, 7 of 8 patients bearing HLA DR 4 and w53 haplotypes recognized the peptide sequence 141 to 160. Thus, IFN-gamma production of the mononuclear cell response appeared to be HLA DR restricted, and the responding cells were identified as CD4+ T cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7557851

  11. Dual effects of hepatitis C virus Core protein on the transcription of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 gene.

    PubMed

    Kwun, H J; Jang, K L

    2003-07-01

    Transcription of p21 was activated in hepatitis C virus (HCV) Core-expressing HepG2 cells where its upstream p53 was stabilized. However, this effect was not absolutely required for the activation of p21 by Core, as demonstrated in Hep3B cells. In addition, an opposite effect on the transcription of p21 was observed in NIH3T3 and primary hepatocytes, where p53 was not decreased by Core. To explain the p53-independent regulation of p21 by Core, we identified a Core-responsive element between positions -74 and -83 of the p21 promoter, exactly overlapped with a tumour growth factor beta (TGF-beta)/butyrate responsive element. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Core could activate the p21 through the element by stimulating a butyrate pathway, whereas this was inhibited through a TGF-beta pathway. The opposing effects of Core protein on the transcription of p21 might be important in understanding the progression of hepatic disease in HCV-positive patients. PMID:12823590

  12. A role for eukaryotic initiation factor 4B overexpression in the pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Horvilleur, E; Sbarrato, T; Hill, K; Spriggs, R V; Screen, M; Goodrem, P J; Sawicka, K; Chaplin, L C; Touriol, C; Packham, G; Potter, K N; Dirnhofer, S; Tzankov, A; Dyer, M J S; Bushell, M; MacFarlane, M; Willis, A E

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated expression of factors that control protein synthesis is associated with poor prognosis of many cancers, but the underlying mechanisms are not well defined. Analysis of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) translatome revealed selective upregulation of mRNAs encoding anti-apoptotic and DNA repair proteins. We show that enhanced synthesis of these proteins in DLBCL is mediated by the relief of repression that is normally imposed by structure in the 5′-untranslated regions of their corresponding mRNAs. This process is driven by signaling through mammalian target of rapamycin, resulting in increased synthesis of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4B complex (eIF4B), a known activator of the RNA helicase eIF4A. Reducing eIF4B expression alone is sufficient to decrease synthesis of proteins associated with enhanced tumor cell survival, namely DAXX, BCL2 and ERCC5. Importantly, eIF4B-driven expression of these key survival proteins is directly correlated with patient outcome, and eIF4B, DAXX and ERCC5 are identified as novel prognostic markers for poor survival in DLBCL. Our work provides new insights into the mechanisms by which the cancer-promoting translational machinery drives lymphomagenesis. PMID:24135829

  13. A Nucleotide Binding Motif in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS4B Mediates HCV RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Einav, Shirit; Elazar, Menashe; Danieli, Tsafi; Glenn, Jeffrey S.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of viral hepatitis. There is no effective therapy for most patients. We have identified a nucleotide binding motif (NBM) in one of the virus's nonstructural proteins, NS4B. This structural motif binds and hydrolyzes GTP and is conserved across HCV isolates. Genetically disrupting the NBM impairs GTP binding and hydrolysis and dramatically inhibits HCV RNA replication. These results have exciting implications for the HCV life cycle and novel antiviral strategies. PMID:15452248

  14. Papain digestion of crude Trichoderma reesei cellulase: Purification and properties of cellobiohydrolase I and II core proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Brown, J.P.; Evans, B.R.; Affholter, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    Papain digestion of a crude Trichoderma reesei cellulose preparation followed by gel filtration on a Superdex column resulted in the separation of cellobiohydrolase (CBH) I and II core proteins (cp). They were further purified to apparent homogeneity by chromatofocusing. N-terminal protein sequencing of the CBH II cp preparation confirmed its identity. A comparison of the catalytic activity and cellulose-binding ability of these core proteins was made. The major differences between them were the findings that CBH II cp possessed a sixfold higher specific activity toward p-nitrophenylcellobioside than the native CBH II preparation and still bound to microcrystalline cellulose, unlike CBH I cp. Neither CBH I cp nor CBH II cp had activity toward carboxymethylcellulose, but both were able to hydrolyze barley b-glucan. These data suggest that removal of the cellulose-binding domain and hinge region from CBH I and II have different effects on their properties.

  15. MCNP4B{sup {trademark}} verification and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.; Court, J.D.

    1996-08-01

    Several new features and bug fixes have been incorporated into the new release of MCNP. As required by the MCNP Software Quality Assurance Plan, these changes to the code and the test set are documented here for user reference. This document summarizes the new MCNP4B features and corrections, separated into major and minor groupings. Also included are a code cleanup section and a section delineating problems identified in LA-12839 which have not been corrected. Finally, we document the MCNP4B test set modifications and explain how test set coverage has been improved.

  16. Pyrazolopyridines as potent PDE4B inhibitors: 5-Heterocycle SAR

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Charlotte J.; Ballantine, Stuart P.; Coe, Diane M.; Cook, Caroline M.; Delves, Christopher J.; Dowle, Mike D.; Edlin, Chris D.; Hamblin, J. Nicole; Holman, Stuart; Johnson, Martin R.; Jones, Paul S.; Keeling, Sue E.; Kranz, Michael; Lindvall, Mika; Lucas, Fiona S.; Neu, Margarete; Solanke, Yemisi E.; Somers, Don O.; Trivedi, Naimisha A.; Wiseman, Joanne O.

    2012-05-03

    Following the discovery of 4-(substituted amino)-1-alkyl-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-5-carboxamides as potent and selective phosphodiesterase 4B inhibitors, [Hamblin, J. N.; Angell, T.; Ballentine, S., et al. Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.2008, 18, 4237] the SAR of the 5-position was investigated further. A range of substituted heterocycles showed good potencies against PDE4. Optimisation using X-ray crystallography and computational modelling led to the discovery of 16, with sub-nM inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} production from isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  17. miR-937 contributes to the lung cancer cell proliferation by targeting INPP4B.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zeng, Daxiong; Chen, Ying; Li, Ning; Lv, Yantian; Li, Yong; Xu, Xiao; Xu, Guopeng

    2016-06-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, microRNAs play critical role in the initiation and development of lung cancer. Here, we used MTT assay, colony formation assay, soft agar growth assay and BrdU incorporation assay to investigate miR-937's role in lung cancer. We found that miR-937 was upregulated in lung cancer tissues and cells. Overexpression of miR-937 in A549 promoted anchorage -dependent and -independent growth, whereas knockdown of miR-937 reduced this effect. Meanwhile, we also found miR-937 overexpression increased CCND1 and c-Myc levels in both mRNA and protein levels, knockdown of miR-937 reduced this effect, confirming miR-937 promoted cell proliferation. Mechanism analyses found polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) was the target of miR-937, miR-937 directly bound to the 3'UTR of INPP4B, knockdown of INPP4B in A549 with miR-937 inhibitor promoted anchorage -dependent and -independent growth, suggesting miR-937 contributed to cell proliferation of lung cancer by inhibiting INPP4B, it might be a valuable target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:27179609

  18. The spliceosomal snRNP core complex of Trypanosoma brucei: Cloning and functional analysis reveals seven Sm protein constituents

    PubMed Central

    Palfi, Zsofia; Lücke, Stephan; Lahm, Hans-Werner; Lane, William S.; Kruft, Volker; Bragado-Nilsson, Elisabeth; Séraphin, Bertrand; Bindereif, Albrecht

    2000-01-01

    Each of the trypanosome small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) U2, U4/U6, and U5, as well as the spliced leader (SL) RNP, contains a core of common proteins, which we have previously identified. This core is unusual because it is not recognized by anti-Sm Abs and it associates with an Sm-related sequence in the trypanosome small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Using peptide sequences derived from affinity-purified U2 snRNP proteins, we have cloned cDNAs for five common proteins of 8.5, 10, 12.5, 14, and 15 kDa of Trypanosoma brucei and identified them as Sm proteins SmF (8.5 kDa), -E (10 kDa), -D1 (12.5 kDa), -G (14 kDa), and -D2 (15 kDa), respectively. Furthermore, we found the trypanosome SmB (T. brucei) and SmD3 (Trypanosoma cruzi) homologues through database searches, thus completing a set of seven canonical Sm proteins. Sequence comparisons of the trypanosome proteins revealed several deviations in highly conserved positions from the Sm consensus motif. We have identified a network of specific heterodimeric and -trimeric Sm protein interactions in vitro. These results are summarized in a model of the trypanosome Sm core, which argues for a strong conservation of the Sm particle structure. The conservation extends also to the functional level, because at least one trypanosome Sm protein, SmG, was able to specifically complement a corresponding mutation in yeast. PMID:10900267

  19. Interaction of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein with Janus Kinase Is Required for Efficient Production of Infectious Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choongho

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is responsible for the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV core protein plays not only a structural role in the virion morphogenesis by encapsidating a virus RNA genome but also a non-structural role in HCV-induced pathogenesis by blocking innate immunity. Especially, it has been shown to regulate JAK-STAT signaling pathway through its direct interaction with Janus kinase (JAK) via its proline-rich JAK-binding motif (79PGYPWP84). However, little is known about the physiological significance of this HCV core-JAK association in the context of the virus life cycle. In order to gain an insight, a mutant HCV genome (J6/JFH1-79A82A) was constructed to express the mutant core with a defective JAK-binding motif (79AGYAWP84) using an HCV genotype 2a infectious clone (J6/JFH1). When this mutant HCV genome was introduced into hepatocarcinoma cells, it was found to be severely impaired in its ability to produce infectious viruses in spite of its robust RNA genome replication. Taken together, all these results suggest an essential requirement of HCV core-JAK protein interaction for efficient production of infectious viruses and the potential of using core-JAK blockers as a new anti-HCV therapy. PMID:24009866

  20. Familial C4B Deficiency and Immune Complex Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Soto, K; Wu, YL; Ortiz, A; Aparício, SR; Yu, CY

    2010-01-01

    Homozygous complement C4B deficiency is described in a Southern European young female patient with Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type III characterized by renal biopsies with strong complement C4 and IgG deposits. Low C4 levels were independent of clinical evolution or type of immunosuppression and were found in three other family members without renal disease or infections. HLA typing revealed that the patient has homozygous A*02, Cw*06, B*50 at the class I region, and DRB1*08 and DQB1*03 at the class II region. Genotypic and phenotypic studies demonstrated that the patient has homozygous monomodular RCCX in the HLA class III region, with single long C4A genes coding for C4A3 and complete C4B deficiency. Her father, mother, son and niece have heterozygous C4B deficiency. The patient’s deceased brother had a history of Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (HSP), an immune complex-mediated proliferative glomerulonephritis. These findings challenge the putative pathophysiological roles of C4A and C4B and underscore the need to perform functional assays, C4 allotyping and genotyping on patients with persistently low serum levels of a classical pathway complement component and glomerulopathy associated with immune deposits. PMID:20580617

  1. Characterization of an Additional Splice Acceptor Site Introduced into CYP4B1 in Hominoidae during Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Oliver T.; Roellecke, Katharina; Freund, Marcel; Gombert, Michael; Lottmann, Nadine; Steward, Charles A.; Kramm, Christof M.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Rettie, Allan E.; Hanenberg, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    CYP4B1 belongs to the cytochrome P450 family 4, one of the oldest P450 families whose members have been highly conserved throughout evolution. The CYP4 monooxygenases typically oxidize fatty acids to both inactive and active lipid mediators, although the endogenous ligand(s) is largely unknown. During evolution, at the transition of great apes to humanoids, the CYP4B1 protein acquired a serine instead of a proline at the canonical position 427 in the meander region. Although this alteration impairs P450 function related to the processing of naturally occurring lung toxins, a study in transgenic mice suggested that an additional serine insertion at position 207 in human CYP4B1 can rescue the enzyme stability and activity. Here, we report that the genomic insertion of a CAG triplet at the intron 5–exon 6 boundary in human CYP4B1 introduced an additional splice acceptor site in frame. During evolution, this change occurred presumably at the stage of Hominoidae and leads to two major isoforms of the CYP4B1 enzymes of humans and great apes, either with or without a serine 207 insertion (insSer207). We further demonstrated that the CYP4B1 enzyme with insSer207 is the dominant isoform (76%) in humans. Importantly, this amino acid insertion did not affect the 4-ipomeanol metabolizing activities or stabilities of the native rabbit or human CYP4B1 enzymes, when introduced as transgenes in human primary cells and cell lines. In our 3D modeling, this functional neutrality of insSer207 is compatible with its predicted location on the exterior surface of CYP4B1 in a flexible side chain. Therefore, the Ser207 insertion does not rescue the P450 functional activity of human CYP4B1 that has been lost during evolution. PMID:26355749

  2. Identification of Core Alpha 1,3-Fucosyltransferase Gene From Silkworm: An Insect Popularly Used to Express Mammalian Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Minagawa, Sachi; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Nakaso, Yuzuru; Tomita, Masahiro; Takahisa, Manabu; Yasuda, Hideyo

    2015-01-01

    Silkworm has great potential as production system of recombinant mammalian proteins. When the protein products are used for medical purpose, it is required to reduce the risk of an allergy, the content of core alpha 1,3-fucosyl residue attached to the N-glycan of proteins, for example. We isolated the gene of an enzyme responsible for the transfer of core alpha 1,3-fucosyl residue, core alpha 1,3-fucosyltransferase (Fuc-T C3), from silkworm. A candidate cDNA for silkworm Fuc-T C3 was isolated as a homolog of the fruit fly enzyme gene fucTA. The gene was located on chromosome 7 of the silkworm genome and was composed of seven exons, which spanned approximately 10 kb on the genome. The coding region of the gene was 1,350 bp and encoded a 450-amino acid protein with a molecular mass of 52.2 kDa. Deduced amino acid sequence of the coding region showed one transmembrane domain in its N-terminal and typical motifs common to fucosyltransferases including Fuc-T C3s of other organisms in its C-terminal. The extract of CHO cells transfected with the cDNA showed Fuc-T C3 activity using GDP-fucose and DABS-GnGn peptide as substrates. These results showed this cDNA clone actually encodes silkworm Fuc-T C3. PMID:26223947

  3. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. PMID:26405031

  4. Performance of scientific computing platforms running MCNP4B

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, H.E.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1997-11-01

    A performance study has been made for the MCNP4B Monte Carlo radiation transport code on a wide variety of scientific computing platforms ranging from personal computers to Cray mainframes. We present the timing study results using MCNP4B and its new test set and libraries. This timing study is unlike other timing studies because of its widespread reproducibility, its direct comparability to the predecessor study in 1993, and its focus upon a nuclear engineering code. Our results, derived from using the new 29-problem test set for MCNP4B, (1) use a highly versatile and readily available physics code; (2) show that timing studies are very problem dependent; (3) present the results as raw data allowing comparisons of performance to other computing platforms not included in this study to those platforms that were included; (4) are reproducible; and (5) provide a measure of improvement in performance with the MCNP code due to advancements in software and hardware over the past 4 years. In the 1993 predecessor study using MCNP4A, the performances were based on a 25 problem test set. We present our data based on MCNP4B`s new 29 problem test set which cover 97% of all the FORTRAN physics code lines in MCNP4B. Like the previous study the new test problems and the test data library are available from the Radiation Shielding and Information Computational Center (RSICC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Our results are reproducible because anyone with the same workstation, compiler, and operating system can duplicate the results presented here. The computing platforms included in this study are the Sun Sparc2, Sun Sparc5, Cray YMP 8/128, HP C180,SGI origin 2000, DBC 3000/600, DBC AiphaStation 500(300 MHz), IBM RS/6000-590, HP /9000-735, Micron Milienia Pro 200 MHz PC, and the Cray T94/128.

  5. CHMP4B, a Novel Gene for Autosomal Dominant Cataracts Linked to Chromosome 20q

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Alan ; Bennett, Thomas M. ; Knopf, Harry L. S. ; Yamada, Koki ; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro ; Niikawa, Norio ; Shim, Soomin ; Hanson, Phyllis I. 

    2007-01-01

    Cataracts are a clinically diverse and genetically heterogeneous disorder of the crystalline lens and a leading cause of visual impairment. Here we report linkage of autosomal dominant “progressive childhood posterior subcapsular” cataracts segregating in a white family to short tandem repeat (STR) markers D20S847 (LOD score [Z] 5.50 at recombination fraction [θ] 0.0) and D20S195 (Z=3.65 at θ=0.0) on 20q, and identify a refined disease interval (rs2057262–(3.8 Mb)–rs1291139) by use of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Mutation profiling of positional-candidate genes detected a heterozygous transversion (c.386A→T) in exon 3 of the gene for chromatin modifying protein-4B (CHMP4B) that was predicted to result in the nonconservative substitution of a valine residue for a phylogenetically conserved aspartic acid residue at codon 129 (p.D129V). In addition, we have detected a heterozygous transition (c.481G→A) in exon 3 of CHMP4B cosegregating with autosomal dominant posterior polar cataracts in a Japanese family that was predicted to result in the missense substitution of lysine for a conserved glutamic acid residue at codon 161 (p.E161K). Transfection studies of cultured cells revealed that a truncated form of recombinant D129V-CHMP4B had a different subcellular distribution than wild type and an increased capacity to inhibit release of virus-like particles from the cell surface, consistent with deleterious gain-of-function effects. These data provide the first evidence that CHMP4B, which encodes a key component of the endosome sorting complex required for the transport-III (ESCRT-III) system of mammalian cells, plays a vital role in the maintenance of lens transparency. PMID:17701905

  6. Decorin Core Protein (Decoron) Shape Complements Collagen Fibril Surface Structure and Mediates Its Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Eid, Aya; Antipova, Olga; Bella, Jordi; Scott, John E.

    2010-02-11

    Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM). With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e{sub 1} bands). This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  7. Inhibition of HCV replication by humanized-single domain transbodies to NS4B.

    PubMed

    Glab-Ampai, Kittirat; Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Chulanetra, Monrat; Thanongsaksrikul, Jeeraphong; Thueng-In, Kanyarat; Srimanote, Potjanee; Tongtawe, Pongsri; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2016-08-01

    NS4B of hepatitis C virus (HCV) initiates membrane web formation, binds RNA and other HCV proteins for viral replication complex (RC) formation, hydrolyses NTP, and inhibits innate anti-viral immunity. Thus, NS4B is an attractive target of a novel anti-HCV agent. In this study, humanized-nanobodies (VHs/VHHs) that bound to recombinant NS4B were produced by means of phage display technology. The nanobodies were linked molecularly to a cell penetrating peptide, penetratin (PEN), for making them cell penetrable (become transbodies). Human hepatic (Huh7) cells transfected with HCV JFH1-RNA that were treated with transbodies from four Escherichia coli clones (PEN-VHH7, PEN-VHH9, PEN-VH33, and PEN-VH43) had significant reduction of HCV RNA amounts in their culture fluids and intracellularly when compared to the transfected cells treated with control transbody and medium alone. The results were supported by the HCV foci assay. The transbody treated-transfected cells also had upregulation of the studied innate cytokine genes, IRF3, IFNβ and IL-28b. The transbodies have high potential for testing further as a novel anti-HCV agent, either alone, adjunct of existing anti-HCV agents/remedies, or in combination with their cognates specific to other HCV enzymes/proteins. PMID:27240954

  8. Conformational Changes in the Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Are Consistent with a Role for Allostery in Virus Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Packianathan, Charles; Katen, Sarah P.; Dann, III, Charles E.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2010-01-12

    In infected cells, virus components must be organized at the right place and time to ensure assembly of infectious virions. From a different perspective, assembly must be prevented until all components are available. Hypothetically, this can be achieved by allosterically controlling assembly. Consistent with this hypothesis, here we show that the structure of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein dimer, which can spontaneously self-assemble, is incompatible with capsid assembly. Systematic differences between core protein dimer and capsid conformations demonstrate linkage between the intradimer interface and interdimer contact surface. These structures also provide explanations for the capsid-dimer selectivity of some antibodies and the activities of assembly effectors. Solution studies suggest that the assembly-inactive state is more accurately an ensemble of conformations. Simulations show that allostery supports controlled assembly and results in capsids that are resistant to dissociation. We propose that allostery, as demonstrated in HBV, is common to most self-assembling viruses.

  9. Structural transformation of the amyloidogenic core region of TDP-43 protein initiates its aggregation and cytoplasmic inclusion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei-Lei; Che, Mei-Xia; Zhao, Jian; Zhou, Chen-Jie; Xie, Mu-Yun; Li, Hai-Yin; He, Jian-Hua; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2013-07-01

    TDP-43 (TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa) is a major deposited protein in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia with ubiquitin. A great number of genetic mutations identified in the flexible C-terminal region are associated with disease pathologies. We investigated the molecular determinants of TDP-43 aggregation and its underlying mechanisms. We identified a hydrophobic patch (residues 318-343) as the amyloidogenic core essential for TDP-43 aggregation. Biophysical studies demonstrated that the homologous peptide formed a helix-turn-helix structure in solution, whereas it underwent structural transformation from an α-helix to a β-sheet during aggregation. Mutation or deletion of this core region significantly reduced the aggregation and cytoplasmic inclusions of full-length TDP-43 (or TDP-35 fragment) in cells. Thus, structural transformation of the amyloidogenic core initiates the aggregation and cytoplasmic inclusion formation of TDP-43. This particular core region provides a potential therapeutic target to design small-molecule compounds for mitigating TDP-43 proteinopathies. PMID:23689371

  10. Intrinsic hepatocyte dedifferentiation is accompanied by upregulation of mesenchymal markers, protein sialylation and core alpha 1,6 linked fucosylation.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Anand; Comunale, Mary Ann; Rawat, Siddhartha; Casciano, Jessica C; Lamontagne, Jason; Herrera, Harmin; Ramanathan, Aarti; Betesh, Lucy; Wang, Mengjun; Norton, Pamela; Steel, Laura F; Bouchard, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in N-linked glycosylation have long been associated with cancer but for the most part, the reasons why have remained poorly understood. Here we show that increased core fucosylation is associated with de-differentiation of primary hepatocytes and with the appearance of markers indicative of a transition of cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal state. This increase in core fucosylation was associated with increased levels of two enzymes involved in α-1,6 linked fucosylation, GDP-mannose 4, 6-dehydratase (Gmds) and to a lesser extent fucosyltransferase 8 (Fut8). In addition, the activation of cancer-associated cellular signaling pathways in primary rat hepatocytes can increase core fucosylation and induce additional glycoform alterations on hepatocyte proteins. Specifically, we show that increased levels of protein sialylation and α-1,6-linked core fucosylation are observed following activation of the β-catenin pathway. Activation of the Akt signaling pathway or induction of hypoxia also results in increased levels of fucosylation and sialylation. We believe that this knowledge will help in the better understanding of the genetic factors associated with altered glycosylation and may allow for the development of more clinically relevant biomarkers. PMID:27328854

  11. Intrinsic hepatocyte dedifferentiation is accompanied by upregulation of mesenchymal markers, protein sialylation and core alpha 1,6 linked fucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anand; Comunale, Mary Ann; Rawat, Siddhartha; Casciano, Jessica C.; Lamontagne, Jason; Herrera, Harmin; Ramanathan, Aarti; Betesh, Lucy; Wang, Mengjun; Norton, Pamela; Steel, Laura F.; Bouchard, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in N-linked glycosylation have long been associated with cancer but for the most part, the reasons why have remained poorly understood. Here we show that increased core fucosylation is associated with de-differentiation of primary hepatocytes and with the appearance of markers indicative of a transition of cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal state. This increase in core fucosylation was associated with increased levels of two enzymes involved in α-1,6 linked fucosylation, GDP-mannose 4, 6-dehydratase (Gmds) and to a lesser extent fucosyltransferase 8 (Fut8). In addition, the activation of cancer-associated cellular signaling pathways in primary rat hepatocytes can increase core fucosylation and induce additional glycoform alterations on hepatocyte proteins. Specifically, we show that increased levels of protein sialylation and α-1,6-linked core fucosylation are observed following activation of the β-catenin pathway. Activation of the Akt signaling pathway or induction of hypoxia also results in increased levels of fucosylation and sialylation. We believe that this knowledge will help in the better understanding of the genetic factors associated with altered glycosylation and may allow for the development of more clinically relevant biomarkers. PMID:27328854

  12. HCV core and NS3 proteins mediate toll like receptor induced innate immune response in corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmy, Ayilam Ramachandran; Malathi, Jambulingam; Madhavan, Hajib Naraharirao

    2014-11-01

    Direct association of dry eye syndrome and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a well established fact. In this context, the current study examines the in vitro corneal inflammatory response with respect to HCV core and NS3 antigens. Toll like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors which can mediate innate immune response. In the present study, corneal epithelial cells responded to HCV core and NS3 proteins by secreting pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-8, IL-6 and TNF-α via TLR1, TLR2 and TLR6 mediated innate immune response. MyD88/NF-kB signalling was involved in pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Corneal epithelium synthesised nitric oxide (NO) via iNOS during HCV core and NS3 exposure. On later stages of inflammation, cells underwent apoptosis which lead to cell death. SiRNA mediated silencing of TLR1, TLR2 and TLR6 resulted in a significant down regulation of IL-8 and NO. In conclusion, this study indicates that HCV core and NS3 proteins are capable of inducing immune response in corneal epithelium which can potentiate the pathology of HCV associated dry eye condition. Blocking specific TLR response can have therapeutic application in controlling the inflammatory response associated with this dry eye condition. PMID:25280963

  13. Co-incubation with core proteins of HBV and HCV leads to modulation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Amogh; Samrat, Subodh K; Agrawal, Babita; Tyrrell, D Lorne J; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis B and C (HBV and HCV) are hepatotropic viruses in humans with approximately 350 and 170 million chronic carriers respectively. Since both viruses have similar modes of transmission, many people are co-infected. Co-infection is common in intravenous drug users, HIV-positive individuals, and transplant recipients. Compared to mono-infected patients, co-infected patients exhibit exacerbated liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver failure. Some of the pathogenic effects may be attributed in part to the structural core proteins of both viruses-ones that have displayed immunomodulatory properties. Yet, the effects of their combined interaction on the human immune system remain a mystery. We aimed to elucidate the combined effects of HBV and HCV core proteins on human dendritic cells' (DCs) ability to present antigens and stimulate antigen-specific T-cells. We observed that when DCs, differentiated from human peripheral blood monocytes, were co-incubated with both core proteins, IL-10 production was dramatically enhanced, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12 production was significantly reduced, and HLA-DR expression was downregulated. This instant functional and phenotypic modulation of DCs induced by a combination of HBV and HCV core proteins can allow them to behave like tolerizing DCs, inefficiently presenting antigens to CD4+ T-cells and even suppressing induction of the cellular immune response. These results reveal an important mechanism by which HBV and HCV synergistically induce immune tolerance early in infection that may be instrumental in establishing chronic, persistent infections. PMID:25148301

  14. Crystallization of the avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA

    SciTech Connect

    Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Fox, Gavin C.; Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier; Raaij, Mark J. van

    2007-05-01

    The avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA has been crystallized in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2°. A complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution and analyzed. The avian reovirus protein σA plays a dual role: it is a structural protein forming part of the transcriptionally active core, but it has also been implicated in the resistance of the virus to interferon by strongly binding double-stranded RNA and thus inhibiting the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase. The σA protein has been crystallized from solutions containing ammonium sulfate at pH values around 6. Crystals belonging to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2° were grown and a complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. The self-rotation function suggests that σA may form symmetric arrangements in the crystals.

  15. Suitability of magnetic single- and multi-core nanoparticles to detect protein binding with dynamic magnetic measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmer, Hilke; Dieckhoff, Jan; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the binding of biotinylated proteins to various streptavidin functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with different dynamic magnetic measurement techniques to examine their potential for homogeneous bioassays. As particle systems, single-core nanoparticles with a nominal core diameter of 30 nm as well as multi-core nanoparticles with hydrodynamic sizes varying between nominally 60 nm and 100 nm were chosen. As experimental techniques, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry (MRX), complex ac susceptibility (ACS) and measurements of the phase lag between rotating field and sample magnetization are applied. MRX measurements are only suited for the detection of small analytes if the multivalency of functionalized nanoparticles and analytes causes cross-linking, thus forming larger aggregates. ACS measurements showed for all nanoparticle systems a shift of the imaginary part's maximum towards small frequencies. In rotating field measurements only the single-core nanoparticle systems with dominating Brownian mechanism exhibit an increase of the phase lag upon binding in the investigated frequency range. The coexistence of Brownian and Néel relaxation processes can cause a more complex phase lag change behavior, as demonstrated for multi-core nanoparticle systems.

  16. Structure is three to ten times more conserved than sequence--a study of structural response in protein cores.

    PubMed

    Illergård, Kristoffer; Ardell, David H; Elofsson, Arne

    2009-11-15

    Protein structures change during evolution in response to mutations. Here, we analyze the mapping between sequence and structure in a set of structurally aligned protein domains. To avoid artifacts, we restricted our attention only to the core components of these structures. We found that on average, using different measures of structural change, protein cores evolve linearly with evolutionary distance (amino acid substitutions per site). This is true irrespective of which measure of structural change we used, whether RMSD or discrete structural descriptors for secondary structure, accessibility, or contacts. This linear response allows us to quantify the claim that structure is more conserved than sequence. Using structural alphabets of similar cardinality to the sequence alphabet, structural cores evolve three to ten times slower than sequences. Although we observed an average linear response, we found a wide variance. Different domain families varied fivefold in structural response to evolution. An attempt to categorically analyze this variance among subgroups by structural and functional category revealed only one statistically significant trend. This trend can be explained by the fact that beta-sheets change faster than alpha-helices, most likely due to that they are shorter and that change occurs at the ends of the secondary structure elements. PMID:19507241

  17. Expression of Phosphodiesterase 4B cAMP-Specific Gene in Subjects With Cryptorchidism and Down's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salemi, Michele; Condorelli, Rosita A; La Vignera, Sandro; Castiglione, Roberto; Salluzzo, Maria Grazia; Bonaccorso, Carmela M; Vinci, Mirella; Bosco, Paolo; Romano, Carmelo; Campagna, Cristina; Romano, Corrado; Calogero, Aldo E

    2016-05-01

    Cryptorchidism represents a risk factor for infertility and germ cell testicular neoplasia. An increased rate of cryptorchidism has been reported in subjects with Down's syndrome. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are important messengers that regulate and mediate a number of cellular responses to extracellular signals, such as neurotransmitters and hormones. PDE4B, cAMP-specific (PDE4B) gene which maps to chromosome 1p31.3 appears to be involved in schizophrenia, chronic psychiatric illness, learning, memory, and mood disturbances. Expression of PDE4 enzymes have been studied in testes of cryptorchid rats. Expression of PDE4B protein examination showed marked degenerative changes in the epithelial lining of the seminiferous tubules. These findings led us to evaluate PDE4 mRNA expression in leukocytes of peripheral blood of five men with DS and cryptorchidism and eleven subjects with DS without cryptorchidism compared with healthy men (controls) by quantitative Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR). This study showed that the PDE4B gene was downexpressed in men with DS and cryptorchidism compared to normal controls and DS without cryptorchidism. A lower expression of the PDE4B gene may be involved in the neurological abnormalities in subjects with Down's syndrome. Moreover, PDE4B gene may be involved in the testicular abnormalities of men with DS and cryptorchidism. PMID:25546171

  18. MMPs are less efficient than ADAMTS5 in cleaving aggrecan core protein.

    PubMed

    Durigova, Michaela; Nagase, Hideaki; Mort, John S; Roughley, Peter J

    2011-03-01

    Aggrecan degradation in articular cartilage occurs predominantly through proteolysis and has been attributed to the action of members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) families. Both families of enzymes cleave aggrecan at specific sites within the aggrecan core protein. One cleavage site within the interglobular domain (IGD), between Glu(373-374)Ala and five additional sites in the chondroitin sulfate-2 (CS-2) region of aggrecan were characterized as "aggrecanase" (ADAMTS) cleavage sites, while cleavage between Ser(341-342)Phe within the IGD of bovine aggrecan is attributed to MMP action. The objective of this study was to assess the cleavage efficiency of MMPs relative to ADAMTS and their contribution to aggrecan proteolysis in vitro. The analysis of aggrecan IGD degradation in bovine articular cartilage explants treated with catabolic cytokines over a 19-day period showed that MMP-mediated degradation of aggrecan within the IGD can only be observed following day 12 of culture. This delay is associated with the lack of activation of proMMPs during the first 12 days of culture. Analysis of MMP1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13 and ADAMTS5 efficiencies at cleaving within the aggrecan IGD and CS-2 region in vitro was carried out by the digestion of bovine aggrecan with the various enzymes and Western blot analysis using aggrecan anti-G1 and anti-G3 antibodies. Of these MMPs, MMP12 was the most efficient at cleaving within the aggrecan IGD. In addition to cleavage in the IGD, MMP, 3, 7, 8 and 12 were also able to degrade the aggrecan CS-2 region. MMP3 and MMP12 were able to degrade aggrecan at the very C-terminus of the CS-2 region, cleaving the Glu(2047-2048)Ala bond which was previously shown to be cleaved by ADAMTS5. However, in comparison to ADAMTS5, MMP3 was about 100 times and 10 times less efficient at cleaving within the aggrecan IGD and CS-2 regions, respectively. Collectively, our results

  19. Development of fluorescent substrates and assays for the key autophagy-related cysteine protease enzyme, ATG4B.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh G; Honson, Nicolette S; Arns, Steven; Davis, Tara L; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Kovacic, Suzana; Kumar, Nag S; Pfeifer, Tom A; Young, Robert N

    2014-04-01

    The cysteine protease ATG4B plays a role in key steps of the autophagy process and is of interest as a potential therapeutic target. At an early step, ATG4B cleaves proLC3 isoforms to form LC3-I for subsequent lipidation to form LC3-II and autophagosome membrane insertion. ATG4B also cleaves phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) from LC3-II to regenerate LC3-I, enabling its recycling for further membrane biogenesis. Here, we report several novel assays for monitoring the enzymatic activity of ATG4B. An assay based on mass spectrometric analysis and quantification of cleavage of the substrate protein LC3-B was developed and, while useful for mechanistic studies, was not suitable for high throughput screening (HTS). A doubly fluorescent fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) ligand YFP-LC3B-EmGFP (FRET-LC3) was constructed and shown to be an excellent substrate for ATG4B with rates of cleavage similar to that for LC3B itself. A HTS assay to identify candidate inhibitors of ATG4B utilizing FRET-LC3 as a substrate was developed and validated with a satisfactory Z' factor and high signal-to-noise ratio suitable for screening small molecule libraries. Pilot screens of the 1,280-member library of pharmacologically active compounds (LOPAC(™)) and a 3,481-member library of known drugs (KD2) gave hit rates of 0.6% and 0.5% respectively, and subsequent titrations confirmed ATG4B inhibitory activity for three compounds, both in the FRET and mass spectrometry assays. The FRET- and mass spectrometry-based assays we have developed will allow for both HTS for inhibitors of ATG4B and mechanistic approaches to study inhibition of a major component of the autophagy pathway. PMID:24735444

  20. The role of tumor suppressor p15Ink4b in the regulation of hematopoietic progenitor cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Humeniuk, R; Rosu-Myles, M; Fares, J; Koller, R; Bies, J; Wolff, L

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene p15Ink4b (CDKN2B) is a frequent event in blood disorders like acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. The molecular function of p15Ink4b in hematopoietic differentiation still remains to be elucidated. Our previous study demonstrated that loss of p15Ink4b in mice results in skewing of the differentiation pattern of the common myeloid progenitor towards the myeloid lineage. Here, we investigated a function of p15Ink4b tumor suppressor gene in driving erythroid lineage commitment in hematopoietic progenitors. It was found that p15Ink4b is expressed more highly in committed megakaryocyte–erythroid progenitors than granulocyte–macrophage progenitors. More importantly, mice lacking p15Ink4b have lower numbers of primitive red cell progenitors and a severely impaired response to 5-fluorouracil- and phenylhydrazine-induced hematopoietic stress. Introduction of p15Ink4b into multipotential progenitors produced changes at the molecular level, including activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase\\extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/ERK) signaling, increase GATA-1, erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) and decrease Pu1, GATA-2 expression. These changes rendered cells more permissive to erythroid commitment and less permissive to myeloid commitment, as demonstrated by an increase in early burst-forming unit-erythroid formation with concomitant decrease in myeloid colonies. Our results indicate that p15Ink4b functions in hematopoiesis, by maintaining proper lineage commitment of progenitors and assisting in rapid red blood cells replenishment following stress. PMID:23359317

  1. Chaperone heat shock protein 70 in nucleus accumbens core: a novel biological target of behavioural sensitization to morphine in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Ting; Qin, Wang-Jun; Liu, Qing; Li, Yu-Ling; Liang, Hui; Chen, Feng; Lawrence, Andrew J; Zhang, Xiang-Lin; Liang, Jian-Hui

    2014-03-01

    Drug addiction is a major public health issue, yet the underlying adaptation of neural networks by drugs of abuse is not fully understood. We have previously linked chaperone heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) to drug-induced adaptations. Focusing on the NAc core and shell, the present study aims to provide further findings for our understanding of the relation between behavioural sensitization to morphine and Hsp70 at transcriptional and functional levels in rats. Firstly, we delineated the characteristics of behavioural sensitization induced by a single morphine exposure (1-10 mg/kg, s.c.). Secondly, Hsp70 protein expression in the NAc core was time- and dose-relatedly induced during the development of behavioural sensitization to a single morphine exposure in rats, and Pearson analysis indicated a positive correlation between behavioural sensitization and Hsp70 expression in NAc core. Thirdly, at the transcriptional level, intra-NAc core injection of the specific heat shock factor-I (HSF-I) inhibitor N-Formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidine-γ-butyrolactam (KNK437) suppressed Hsp70 expression and the development of behavioural sensitization, while the HSF-I specific inducer geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) promoted both of them. Interestingly, intra-NAc shell injection of KNK437 or GGA did not affect the development of behavioural sensitization. Finally, both the functional inhibition of Hsp70 ATPase activity by methylene blue (MB), and the antagonism of Hsp70 substrate binding site (SBD) activity by pifithrin-μ (PES) impaired the development of behavioural sensitization when they were microinjected into the NAc core. Taken together, the critical involvement of chaperone Hsp70 in behavioural sensitization to morphine identifies a biological target for long-lasting adaptations with relevance to addiction. PMID:24280010

  2. Cleavage of the dengue virus polyprotein at the NS3/NS4A and NS4B/NS5 junctions is mediated by viral protease NS2B-NS3, whereas NS4A/NS4B may be processed by a cellular protease.

    PubMed Central

    Cahour, A; Falgout, B; Lai, C J

    1992-01-01

    The cleavage mechanism utilized for processing of the NS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5 domain of the dengue virus polyprotein was studied by using the vaccinia virus expression system. Recombinant vaccinia viruses vNS2B-NS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5, vNS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5, vNS4A-NS4B-NS5, and vNS4B-NS5 were constructed. These recombinants were used to infect cells, and the labeled lysates were analyzed by immunoprecipitation. Recombinant vNS2B-NS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5 expressed the authentic NS3 and NS5 proteins, but the other recombinants produced uncleaved polyproteins. These findings indicate that NS2B is required for processing of the downstream nonstructural proteins, including the NS3/NS4A and NS4B/NS5 junctions, both of which contain a dibasic amino acid sequence preceding the cleavage site. The flavivirus NS4A/NS4B cleavage site follows a long hydrophobic sequence. The polyprotein NS4A-NS4B-NS5 was cleaved at the NS4A/NS4B junction in the absence of other dengue virus functions. One interpretation for this finding is that NS4A/NS4B cleavage is mediated by a host protease, presumably a signal peptidase. Although vNS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5 expressed only the polyprotein, earlier results demonstrated that cleavage at the NS4A/NS4B junction occurred when an analogous recombinant, vNS3-NS4A-84%NS4B, was expressed. Thus, it appears that uncleaved NS3 plus NS5 inhibit NS4A/NS4B cleavage presumably because the putative signal sequence is not accessible for recognition by the responsible protease. Finally, recombinants that expressed an uncleaved NS4B-NS5 polyprotein, such as vNS4A-NS4B-NS5 or vNS4B-NS5, produced NS5 when complemented with vNS2B-30%NS3 or with vNS2B plus v30%NS3. These results indicate that cleavage at the NS4B/NS5 junction can be mediated by NS2B and NS3 in trans. Images PMID:1531368

  3. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to escape from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Juri; Shim, Joo Hee; Tiwari, Indira; Jang, Kyung Lib

    2016-09-28

    The E6-associated protein (E6AP) is a ubiquitin ligase that mediates ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Given the role of HCV core protein as a major component of the viral nucleocapsid, as well as a multifunctional protein involved in viral pathogenesis and hepatocarcinogenesis, HCV has likely evolved a strategy to counteract the host anti-viral defense mechanism of E6AP and maximize its potential to produce infectious virus particles. In the present study, we found that HCV core protein derived from either ectopic expression or HCV infection inhibits E6AP expression via promoter hypermethylation in human hepatocytes. As a result, the potential of E6AP to ubiquitinate and degrade HCV core protein through the ubiquitin-proteasome system was severely impaired, which in turn led to stimulation of virus propagation. The effects of HCV core protein were almost completely abolished when the E6AP level was restored by ectopic expression of E6AP, treatment with a universal DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, 5-Aza-2'dC, or knock-down of DNMT1. In conclusion, HCV core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to protect itself from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation and stimulate virus propagation, providing a potential target for the development of anti-viral drugs against HCV. PMID:27317649

  4. The Replacement of 10 Non-Conserved Residues in the Core Protein of JFH-1 Hepatitis C Virus Improves Its Assembly and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Loïc; Blanchard, Emmanuelle; Boyer, Audrey; Desvignes, Virginie; Gaillard, Julien; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Roingeard, Philippe; Hourioux, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembly is still poorly understood. It is thought that trafficking of the HCV core protein to the lipid droplet (LD) surface is essential for its multimerization and association with newly synthesized HCV RNA to form the viral nucleocapsid. We carried out a mapping analysis of several complete HCV genomes of all genotypes, and found that the genotype 2 JFH-1 core protein contained 10 residues different from those of other genotypes. The replacement of these 10 residues of the JFH-1 strain sequence with the most conserved residues deduced from sequence alignments greatly increased virus production. Confocal microscopy of the modified JFH-1 strain in cell culture showed that the mutated JFH-1 core protein, C10M, was present mostly at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, but not at the surface of the LDs, even though its trafficking to these organelles was possible. The non-structural 5A protein of HCV was also redirected to ER membranes and colocalized with the C10M core protein. Using a Semliki forest virus vector to overproduce core protein, we demonstrated that the C10M core protein was able to form HCV-like particles, unlike the native JFH-1 core protein. Thus, the substitution of a few selected residues in the JFH-1 core protein modified the subcellular distribution and assembly properties of the protein. These findings suggest that the early steps of HCV assembly occur at the ER membrane rather than at the LD surface. The C10M-JFH-1 strain will be a valuable tool for further studies of HCV morphogenesis. PMID:26339783

  5. Long noncoding RNA, polycomb, and the ghosts haunting INK4b-ARF-INK4a expression.

    PubMed

    Aguilo, Francesca; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Walsh, Martin J

    2011-08-15

    Polycomb group proteins (PcG) function as transcriptional repressors of gene expression. The important role of PcG in mediating repression of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, by directly binding to the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcript antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL), was recently shown. INK4b-ARF-INK4a encodes 3 tumor-suppressor proteins, p15(INK4b), p14(ARF), and p16(INK4a), and its transcription is a key requirement for replicative or oncogene-induced senescence and constitutes an important barrier for tumor growth. ANRIL gene is transcribed in the antisense orientation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster, and different single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to several diseases. Although lncRNA-mediated regulation of INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene is not restricted to ANRIL, both polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) and -2 (PRC2) interact with ANRIL to form heterochromatin surrounding the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, leading to its repression. This mechanism would provide an increased advantage for bypassing senescence, sustaining the requirements for the proliferation of stem and/or progenitor cell populations or inappropriately leading to oncogenesis through the aberrant saturation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus by PcG complexes. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the underlying epigenetic mechanisms that link PcG function with ANRIL, which impose gene silencing to control cellular homeostasis as well as cancer development. PMID:21828241

  6. Long Noncoding RNA, Polycomb, and the Ghosts Haunting INK4b-ARF-INK4a Expression

    PubMed Central

    Aguilo, Francesca; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Walsh, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group proteins (PcG) function as transcriptional repressors of gene expression. The important role of PcG in mediating repression of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, by directly binding to the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcript antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL), was recently shown. INK4b-ARF-INK4a encodes 3 tumor-suppressor proteins, p15INK4b, p14ARF, and p16INK4a, and its transcription is a key requirement for replicative or oncogene-induced senescence and constitutes an important barrier for tumor growth. ANRIL gene is transcribed in the antisense orientation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster, and different single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to several diseases. Although lncRNA-mediated regulation of INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene is not restricted to ANRIL, both polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) and -2 (PRC2) interact with ANRIL to form heterochromatin surrounding the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, leading to its repression. This mechanism would provide an increased advantage for bypassing senescence, sustaining the requirements for the proliferation of stem and/or progenitor cell populations or inappropriately leading to oncogenesis through the aberrant saturation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus by PcG complexes. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the underlying epigenetic mechanisms that link PcG function with ANRIL, which impose gene silencing to control cellular homeostasis as well as cancer development. PMID:21828241

  7. Hepatitis C virus core protein enhances hepatocellular carcinoma cells to be susceptible to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus through down-regulation of HDAC4.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong; Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Min, Do Sik; Myung, Heejoon; Oh, Sangtaek; Kaewpiboon, Chutima; Kraemer, Olive H; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2016-06-01

    Since hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is known to possess potential oncogenic activity, we explored whether oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) could efficiently induce cytolysis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells stably expressing HCV core protein (Hep3B-Core). We found that Hep3B-Core cells were more susceptible to VSV as compared to control (Hep3B-Vec) cells owing to core-mediated inactivation of STAT1 and STAT2 proteins. Core expression induced lower phosphorylation levels of type I IFN signaling proteins such as Tyk2 and Jak1, and a reduced response to exogenous IFN-α, which resulted in susceptibility to VSV. Furthermore, as STAT1 acetylation by switching phosphorylation regulated its activity, the role of STAT1 acetylation in susceptibility of Hep3B-Core cells to VSV was investigated. Treatment with trichostatin A, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC), increased STAT1 acetylation but blocked IFN-α-induced phosphorylation of STAT1, leading to increase of susceptibility to VSV. Interestingly, the core protein decreased HDCA4 transcript levels, leading to down-regulation of HDAC4 protein. However, ectopic expression of HDAC4 conversely enforced phosphorylation of STAT1 and hindered VSV replication, indicating that core-mediated reduction of HDAC4 provides a suitable intracellular circumstance for VSV replication. Collectively, we suggest that VSV treatment will be a useful therapeutic strategy for HCV-infected hepatocellular carcinoma cells because HCV core protein suppresses the anti-viral threshold by down-regulation of the STAT1-HDAC4 signaling axis. PMID:27150631

  8. AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP signalling via phosphorylation-induced activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B

    PubMed Central

    Johanns, M.; Lai, Y.-C.; Hsu, M.-F.; Jacobs, R.; Vertommen, D.; Van Sande, J.; Dumont, J. E.; Woods, A.; Carling, D.; Hue, L.; Viollet, B.; Foretz, M; Rider, M H

    2016-01-01

    Biguanides such as metformin have previously been shown to antagonize hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase by AMP. Here we show that incubation of hepatocytes with the small-molecule AMPK activator 991 decreases glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity and downstream PKA target phosphorylation. Moreover, incubation of hepatocytes with 991 increases the Vmax of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) without affecting intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations. The effects of 991 to decrease glucagon-stimulated cAMP concentrations and activate PDE4B are lost in hepatocytes deleted for both catalytic subunits of AMPK. PDE4B is phosphorylated by AMPK at three sites, and by site-directed mutagenesis, Ser304 phosphorylation is important for activation. In conclusion, we provide a new mechanism by which AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon signalling via phosphorylation-induced PDE4B activation. PMID:26952277

  9. Molecular characterization of Indian isolate of peanut mottle virus and immunodiagnosis using bacterial expressed core capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Soumya, K; Yogita, M; Prasanthi, Y; Anitha, K; Kishor, P B Kavi; Jain, R K; Mandal, Bikash

    2014-01-01

    Peanut mottle virus (PeMoV), a seed borne potyvirus was recorded in India in 1978, however the virus was not characterized at molecular level. In the present study, an isolate of PeMoV infecting peanut in southern India was characterized based on host reactions and coat protein (CP) gene sequence, which revealed that the Indian isolate was very close to a peanut isolate reported from Israel and distinct from pea isolate reported from USA. The core region of CP gene that contained majority of the predicted epitopes was successfully expressed (1.75 mg/l) in Escherichia coli as a 22 kDa protein. A high titer polyclonal antibody (PAb) to the expressed core CP was produced, which efficiently detected PeMoV. The antiserum was useful in specific detection of PeMoV as it showed negligible cross reactivity with the other potyviruses e.g., peanut stripe virus, potato virus Y, papaya ringspot virus and onion yellow dwarf virus. The PAb was validated in ELISA using 1,169 field and greenhouse samples of peanut which showed 1.85-26.3 % incidence of PeMoV in peanut seed multiplication field during 2011-2012. This is the first report of immunodiagnosis of PeMoV with a PAb to recombinant core CP of PeMoV. PMID:25674600

  10. A single aromatic core mutation converts a designed “primitive” protein from halophile to mesophile folding

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Liam M; Tenorio, Connie A; Kumru, Ozan S; Middaugh, C Russell; Blaber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The halophile environment has a number of compelling aspects with regard to the origin of structured polypeptides (i.e., proteogenesis) and, instead of a curious niche that living systems adapted into, the halophile environment is emerging as a candidate “cradle” for proteogenesis. In this viewpoint, a subsequent halophile-to-mesophile transition was a key step in early evolution. Several lines of evidence indicate that aromatic amino acids were a late addition to the codon table and not part of the original “prebiotic” set comprising the earliest polypeptides. We test the hypothesis that the availability of aromatic amino acids could facilitate a halophile-to-mesophile transition by hydrophobic core-packing enhancement. The effects of aromatic amino acid substitutions were evaluated in the core of a “primitive” designed protein enriched for the 10 prebiotic amino acids (A,D,E,G,I,L,P,S,T,V)—having an exclusively prebiotic core and requiring halophilic conditions for folding. The results indicate that a single aromatic amino acid substitution is capable of eliminating the requirement of halophile conditions for folding of a “primitive” polypeptide. Thus, the availability of aromatic amino acids could have facilitated a critical halophile-to-mesophile protein folding adaptation—identifying a selective advantage for the incorporation of aromatic amino acids into the codon table. PMID:25297559

  11. CD4 T helper type 1 and regulatory T cells induced against the same epitopes on the core protein in hepatitis C virus-infected persons.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Angus J; Duffy, Margaret; Brady, Miriam T; McKiernan, Susan; Hall, William; Hegarty, John; Curry, Michael; Mills, Kingston H G

    2002-03-15

    The factors that determine persistence or clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are poorly understood. The CD4 T cell responses to the HCV core protein were examined in a cohort of women infected with a single genotype of HCV. CD4 T cells from HCV-infected patients secreted interferon (IFN)-gamma in response to peptides from 4 immunodominant regions of the core protein, and these responses were stronger in persistently infected women. Interleukin (IL)-10 was also produced by CD4 T cells from HCV-infected subjects in response to the same core peptides. Furthermore, HCV core-specific CD4 T cell clones secreted either IFN-gamma or IL-10 but not IL-4. These findings demonstrate that T helper type 1 and regulatory T cells are induced against the same epitopes on the core protein during HCV infection. PMID:11920289

  12. LAPTM4B is associated with poor prognosis in NSCLC and promotes the NRF2-mediated stress response pathway in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Maki, Yuho; Fujimoto, Junya; Lang, Wenhua; Xu, Li; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Kadara, Humam

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that lysosomal protein transmembrane 4 beta (LAPTM4B) is elevated in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) and in the surrounding premalignant airway field of cancerization. In the present study, we sought to begin to understand the relevance of LAPTM4B expression and signaling to NSCLC pathogenesis. In situ hybridization analysis of LAPTM4B transcript in tissue microarrays comprised of 368 NSCLCs demonstrated that LAPTM4B expression was significantly increased in smoker compared to non-smoker lung adenocarcinoma tumors (P < 0.001) and was significantly associated with poor overall survival (P < 0.05) in adenocarcinoma patients. Knockdown of LAPTM4B expression inhibited cell growth, induced cellular apoptosis and decreased cellular autophagy in serum starved lung cancer cells. Expression profiling coupled with pathways analysis revealed decreased activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NRF2) stress response pathway following LAPTM4B knockdown. Further analysis demonstrated that LAPTM4B augmented the expression and nuclear translocation of the NRF2 transcription factor following serum deprivation as well as increased the expression of NRF2 target genes such as heme oxygenase 1/HMOX1). Our study points to the relevance of LAPTM4B expression to NSCLC pathogenesis as well as to the probable role of LAPTM4B/NRF2 signaling in promoting lung cancer cell survival. PMID:26343532

  13. LAPTM4B is associated with poor prognosis in NSCLC and promotes the NRF2-mediated stress response pathway in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Yuho; Fujimoto, Junya; Lang, Wenhua; Xu, Li; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Kadara, Humam

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that lysosomal protein transmembrane 4 beta (LAPTM4B) is elevated in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) and in the surrounding premalignant airway field of cancerization. In the present study, we sought to begin to understand the relevance of LAPTM4B expression and signaling to NSCLC pathogenesis. In situ hybridization analysis of LAPTM4B transcript in tissue microarrays comprised of 368 NSCLCs demonstrated that LAPTM4B expression was significantly increased in smoker compared to non-smoker lung adenocarcinoma tumors (P < 0.001) and was significantly associated with poor overall survival (P < 0.05) in adenocarcinoma patients. Knockdown of LAPTM4B expression inhibited cell growth, induced cellular apoptosis and decreased cellular autophagy in serum starved lung cancer cells. Expression profiling coupled with pathways analysis revealed decreased activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NRF2) stress response pathway following LAPTM4B knockdown. Further analysis demonstrated that LAPTM4B augmented the expression and nuclear translocation of the NRF2 transcription factor following serum deprivation as well as increased the expression of NRF2 target genes such as heme oxygenase 1/HMOX1). Our study points to the relevance of LAPTM4B expression to NSCLC pathogenesis as well as to the probable role of LAPTM4B/NRF2 signaling in promoting lung cancer cell survival. PMID:26343532

  14. PDE4B as a microglia target to reduce neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Pearse, Damien D; Hughes, Zoë A

    2016-10-01

    The importance of microglia in immune homeostasis within the brain is undisputed. Their role in a diversity of neurological and psychiatric diseases as well as CNS injury is the subject of much investigation. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is a critical regulator of microglia homeostasis; as the predominant negative modulator of cyclic AMP signaling within microglia, phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) represents a promising target for modulating immune function. PDE4 expression is regulated by inflammation, and in turn, PDE4 inhibition can alter microglia reactivity. As the prototypic PDE4 inhibitor, rolipram, was tested clinically in the 1980s, drug discovery and clinical development of PDE4 inhibitors have been severely hampered by tolerability issues involving nausea and emesis. The two PDE4 inhibitors approved for peripheral inflammatory disorders (roflumilast and apremilast) lack brain penetration and are dose-limited by side effects making them unsuitable for modulating microglial function. Subtype selective inhibitors targeting PDE4B are of high interest given the critical role PDE4B plays in immune function versus the association of PDE4D with nausea and emesis. The challenges and requirements for successful development of a novel brain-penetrant PDE4B inhibitor are discussed in the context of early clinical development strategies. Furthermore, the challenges of monitoring the state of microglia in vivo are highlighted, including a description of the currently available tools and their limitations. Continued drug discovery efforts to identify safe and well-tolerated, brain-penetrant PDE4 inhibitors are a reflection of the confidence in the rationale for modulation of this target to produce meaningful therapeutic benefit in a wide range of neurological conditions and injury. GLIA 2016;64:1698-1709. PMID:27038323

  15. Highly potent HCV NS4B inhibitors with activity against multiple genotypes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Barton; Cai, Ruby; Delaney, William; Du, Zhimin; Ji, Mingzhe; Jin, Haolun; Lee, Johnny; Li, Jiayao; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Mish, Michael; Pyun, Hyung-Jung; Saugier, Joe; Tirunagari, Neeraj; Wang, Jianhong; Yang, Huiling; Wu, Qiaoyin; Sheng, Chris; Zonte, Catalin

    2014-03-13

    The exploration of novel inhibitors of the HCV NS4B protein that are based on a 2-oxadiazoloquinoline scaffold is described. Optimization to incorporate activity across genotypes led to a potent new series with broad activity, of which inhibitor 1 displayed the following EC50 values: 1a, 0.08 nM; 1b, 0.10 nM; 2a, 3 nM; 2b, 0.6 nM, 3a, 3.7 nM; 4a, 0.9 nM; 6a, 3.1 nM. PMID:24512292

  16. The TOM core complex: the general protein import pore of the outer membrane of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ahting, U; Thun, C; Hegerl, R; Typke, D; Nargang, F E; Neupert, W; Nussberger, S

    1999-11-29

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria is mediated by the multicomponent transmembrane TOM complex. We have isolated the TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptors Tom70 and Tom20 from the isolated TOM holo complex by treatment with the detergent dodecyl maltoside. It consists of Tom40, Tom22, and the small Tom components, Tom6 and Tom7. This core complex was also purified directly from mitochondria after solubilization with dodecyl maltoside. The TOM core complex has the characteristics of the general insertion pore; it contains high-conductance channels and binds preprotein in a targeting sequence-dependent manner. It forms a double ring structure that, in contrast to the holo complex, lacks the third density seen in the latter particles. Three-dimensional reconstruction by electron tomography exhibits two open pores traversing the complex with a diameter of approximately 2.1 nm and a height of approximately 7 nm. Tom40 is the key structural element of the TOM core complex. PMID:10579717

  17. Suppression of grp78 core promoter element-mediated stress induction by the dbpA and dbpB (YB-1) cold shock domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Li, W W; Hsiung, Y; Wong, V; Galvin, K; Zhou, Y; Shi, Y; Lee, A S

    1997-01-01

    The highly conserved grp78 core promoter element plays an important role in the induction of grp78 under diverse stress signals. Previous studies have established a functional region in the 3' half of the core (stress-inducible change region [SICR]) which exhibits stress-inducible changes in stressed nuclei. The human transcription factor YY1 is shown to bind the SICR and transactivate the core element under stress conditions. Here we report that expression library screening with the core element has identified two new core binding proteins, YB-1 and dbpA. Both proteins belong to the Y-box family of proteins characterized by an evolutionarily conserved DNA binding motif, the cold shock domain (CSD). In contrast to YY1, which binds only double-stranded SICR, the Y-box/CSD proteins much prefer the lower strand of the SICR. The Y-box proteins can repress the inducibility of the grp78 core element mediated by treatment of cells with A23187, thapsigargin, and tunicamycin. In gel shift assays, YY1 binding to the core element is inhibited by either YB-1 or dbpA. A yeast interaction trap screen using LexA-YY1 as a bait and a HeLa cell cDNA-acid patch fusion library identified YB-1 as a YY1-interacting protein. In cotransfection experiments, the Y-box proteins antagonize the YY1-mediated enhancement of transcription directed by the grp78 core in stressed cells. Thus, the CSD proteins may be part of the stress signal transduction mechanism in the mammalian system. PMID:8972186

  18. The Bisphenol A analogue Bisphenol S binds to K-Ras4B--implications for 'BPA-free' plastics.

    PubMed

    Schöpel, Miriam; Herrmann, Christian; Scherkenbeck, Jürgen; Stoll, Raphael

    2016-02-01

    K-Ras4B is a small GTPase that belongs to the Ras superfamily of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. GTPases function as molecular switches in cells and are key players in intracellular signalling. Ras has been identified as an oncogene and is mutated in more than 20% of human cancers. Here, we report that Bisphenol S binds into a binding pocket of K-Ras4B previously identified for various low molecular weight compounds. Our results advocate for more comprehensive safety studies on the toxicity of Bisphenol S, as it is frequently used for Bisphenol A-free food containers. PMID:26867649

  19. Alcohol induced hepatic degeneration in a hepatitis C virus core protein transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong-Hyung; Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Sung, Soo-Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a major public health issue. It is prevalent in most countries. HCV infection frequently begins without clinical symptoms, before progressing to persistent viremia, chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the majority of patients (70% to 80%). Alcohol is an independent cofactor that accelerates the development of HCC in chronic hepatitis C patients. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate ethanol-induced hepatic changes in HCV core-Tg mice and mutant core Tg mice. Wild type (NTG), core wild-Tg mice (TG-K), mutant core 116-Tg mice (TG-116) and mutant core 99-Tg mice (TG-99) were used in this investigation. All groups were given drinking water with 10% ethanol and 5% sucrose for 13 weeks. To observe liver morphological changes, we performed histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Histopathologically, NTG, TG-K and TG-116 mice showed moderate centrilobular necrosis, while severe centrilobular necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation were observed in TG-99 mice with increasing lymphocyte infiltration and piecemeal necrosis. In all groups, a small amount of collagen fiber was found, principally in portal areas. None of the mice were found to have myofibroblasts based on immunohistochemical staining specific for α-SMA. CYP2E1-positive cells were clearly detected in the centrilobular area in all groups. In the TG-99 mice, we also observed cells positive for CK8/18, TGF-β1 and phosphorylated (p)-Smad2/3 and p21 around the necrotic hepatocytes in the centrilobular area (p < 0.01). Based on our data, alcohol intake induced piecemeal necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation in the TG-99 mice. These phenomena involved activation of the TGF-β1/p-Smad2/3/p21 signaling pathway in hepatocytes. Data from this study will be useful for elucidating the association between alcohol intake and HCV infection. PMID:24608925

  20. On the mechanism of multiple lysine methylation by the human mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1) core complex.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anamika; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Vought, Valarie E; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2009-09-01

    Transcription in eukaryotic genomes depends on enzymes that regulate the degree of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methylation. The mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1) is a member of the SET1 family of H3K4 methyltransferases and is frequently rearranged in acute leukemias. Despite sequence comparisons that predict that SET1 family enzymes should only monomethylate their substrates, mono-, di-, and trimethylation of H3K4 has been attributed to SET1 family complexes in vivo and in vitro. To better understand this paradox, we have biochemically reconstituted and characterized a five-component 200-kDa MLL1 core complex containing human MLL1, WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30. We demonstrate that the isolated MLL1 SET domain is a slow monomethyltransferase and that tyrosine 3942 of MLL1 prevents di- and trimethylation of H3K4. In contrast, a complex containing the MLL1 SET domain, WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30, displays a marked approximately 600-fold increase in enzymatic activity but only to the dimethyl form of H3K4. Single turnover kinetic experiments reveal that the reaction leading to H3K4 dimethylation involves the transient accumulation of a monomethylated species, suggesting that the MLL1 core complex uses a non-processive mechanism to catalyze multiple lysine methylation. We have also discovered that the non-SET domain components of the MLL1 core complex possess a previously unrecognized methyltransferase activity that catalyzes H3K4 dimethylation within the MLL1 core complex. Our results suggest that the mechanism of multiple lysine methylation by the MLL1 core complex involves the sequential addition of two methyl groups at two distinct active sites within the complex. PMID:19556245

  1. Hepatitis C virus genotype 1: how genetic variability of the core protein affects the response to pegylated-interferon and ribavirin therapy.

    PubMed

    Alhamlan, F S; Al-Ahdal, M N; Khalaf, N Z; Abdo, A A; Sanai, F M; Al-Ashgar, H I; Elhefnawi, M; Zaid, A; Al-Qahtani, A A

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus subgenotypes 1a and 1b are found worldwide and cause 60% of all hepatitis C cases. It has been reported recently that viral genetic variations have a critical impact on the patient treatment outcome. In particular, polymorphisms of the HCV core protein have been linked to poor treatment response. However, most of these studies were conducted on Asian populations, Japanese in particular who are infected with HCV subgenotype 1b. Hence, we aimed in this study to examine the core protein polymorphisms in Saudi patients who are infected with chronic HCV genotype 1 (1a and 1b subtypes) and its association with treatment outcome. Direct sequencing of full-length core protein and data mining analyses were utilized. Results have shown that the response to treatment is dependent on subgenotypes. Indeed, HCV-1b showed different point mutations that are associated with treatment outcome where the point mutations at positions 70 (Arg(70) Gln) and 75 (Thr(75) Ala) in HCV-1b are significantly associated with PEG-IFN/RBV treatment response. In contrast, HCV-1a showed no significant association between core protein mutations and response to treatment. In addition, analyses of HCV-1a core protein sequences revealed a highly conserved region especially in the responder group. This study provides a new insight in the genetic variability of full-length core protein in HCV genotype 1 in Saudi infected patients. PMID:24166351

  2. Localization of Core Planar Cell Polarity Proteins, PRICKLEs, in Ameloblasts of Rat Incisors: Possible Regulation of Enamel Rod Decussation

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Sumio; Kawamoto, Tadafumi

    2015-01-01

    To confirm the possible involvement of planar cell polarity proteins in odontogenesis, one group of core proteins, PRICKLE1, PRICKLE2, PRICKLE3, and PRICKLE4, was examined in enamel epithelial cells and ameloblasts by immunofluorescence microscopy. PRICKLE1 and PRICKLE2 showed similar localization in the proliferation and secretory zones of the incisor. Immunoreactive dots and short rods in ameloblasts and stratum intermedium cells were evident in the proliferation to differentiation zone, but in the secretion zone, cytoplasmic dots decreased and the distal terminal web was positive for PRICKLE1 and PRICKLE2. PRICKLE3 and PRICKLE4 showed cytoplasmic labeling in ameloblasts and other enamel epithelial cells. Double labeling of PRICKLE2 with VANGL1, which is another planar cell polarity protein, showed partial co-localization. To examine the transport route of PRICKLE proteins, PRICKLE1 localization was examined after injection of a microtubule-disrupting reagent, colchicine, and was compared with CX43, which is a membrane protein transported as vesicles via microtubules. The results confirmed the retention of immunoreactive dots for PRICKLE1 in the cytoplasm of secretory ameloblasts of colchicine-injected animals, but fewer dots were observed in control animals. These results suggest that PRICKLE1 and PRICKLE2 are transported as vesicles to the junctional area, and are involved in pattern formation of distal junctional complexes and terminal webs of ameloblasts, further implying a role in the formed enamel rod arrangement. PMID:26175546

  3. Design of a bifunctional fusion protein for ovarian cancer drug delivery: single-chain anti-CA125 core-streptavidin fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Welson Wen-Shang; Das, Dipankar; McQuarrie, Stephen A; Suresh, Mavanur R

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a universal ovarian cancer cell targeting vehicle that can deliver biotinylated therapeutic drugs. A single-chain antibody variable domain (scFv) that recognizes the CA125 antigen of ovarian cancer cells was fused with a core-streptavidin domain (core-streptavidin-VL-VH and VL-VH-core-streptavidin orientations) using recombinant DNA technology and then expressed in Escherichia coli using the T7 expression system. The bifunctional fusion protein (bfFp) was expressed in a shaker flask culture, extracted from the periplasmic soluble protein, and affinity purified using an IMAC column. The two distinct activities (biotin binding and anti-CA125) of the bfFp were demonstrated using ELISA, Western blot and confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). The ELISA method utilized human NIH OVCAR-3 cells along with biotinylated bovine serum albumin (B-BSA) or biotinylated liposomes, whereas, the Western blot involved probing with B-BSA. The CLSM study has shown specificity in binding to the OVCAR-3 cell-line. ELISA and Western blot studies have confirmed the bifunctional activity and specificity. In the presence of bfFp, there was enhanced binding of biotinylated antigen and liposome to OVCAR-3 cells. In contrast, the control EMT6 cells, which do not express the CA125 antigen, showed minimal binding of the bfFp. Consequently, bfFp based targeting of biotinylated therapeutic drugs, proteins, liposomes, or nanoparticles could be an alternative, convenient method to deliver effective therapy to ovarian cancer patients. Peritoneal infusion of the bfFp-therapeutic complex could also be effective in locally targeting the most common site of metastatic spread. PMID:17257818

  4. Genome sequence and description of the heavy metal tolerant bacterium Lysinibacillus sphaericus strain OT4b.31

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Montenegro, Tito David; Dussán, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus strain OT4b.31 is a native Colombian strain having no larvicidal activity against Culex quinquefasciatus and is widely applied in the bioremediation of heavy-metal polluted environments. Strain OT4b.31 was placed between DNA homology groups III and IV. By gap-filling and alignment steps, we propose a 4,096,672 bp chromosomal scaffold. The whole genome (consisting of 4,856,302 bp long, 94 contigs and 4,846 predicted protein-coding sequences) revealed differences in comparison to the L. sphaericus C3-41 genome, such as syntenial relationships, prophages and putative mosquitocidal toxins. Sphaericolysin B354, the coleopteran toxin Sip1A and heavy metal resistance clusters from nik, ars, czc, cop, chr, czr and cad operons were identified. Lysinibacillus sphaericus OT4b.31 has applications not only in bioremediation efforts, but also in the biological control of agricultural pests. PMID:24501644

  5. Preparation of Core-Shell Hybrid Materials by Producing a Protein Corona Around Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Weidner, A; Gräfe, C; von der Lühe, M; Remmer, H; Clement, J H; Eberbeck, D; Ludwig, F; Müller, R; Schacher, F H; Dutz, S

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles experience increasing interest for a variety of medical and pharmaceutical applications. When exposing nanomaterials, e.g., magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNP), to human blood, a protein corona consisting of various components is formed immediately. The composition of the corona as well as its amount bound to the particle surface is dependent on different factors, e.g., particle size and surface charge. The actual composition of the formed protein corona might be of major importance for cellular uptake of magnetic nanoparticles. The aim of the present study was to analyze the formation of the protein corona during in vitro serum incubation in dependency of incubation time and temperature. For this, MNP with different shells were incubated in fetal calf serum (FCS, serving as protein source) within a water bath for a defined time and at a defined temperature. Before and after incubation the particles were characterized by a variety of methods. It was found that immediately (seconds) after contact of MNP and FCS, a protein corona is formed on the surface of MNP. This formation led to an increase of particle size and a slight agglomeration of the particles, which was relatively constant during the first minutes of incubation. A longer incubation (from hours to days) resulted in a stronger agglomeration of the FCS incubated MNP. Quantitative analysis (gel electrophoresis) of serum-incubated particles revealed a relatively constant amount of bound proteins during the first minutes of serum incubation. After a longer incubation (>20 min), a considerably higher amount of surface proteins was determined for incubation temperatures below 40 °C. For incubation temperatures above 50 °C, the influence of time was less significant which might be attributed to denaturation of proteins during incubation. Overall, analysis of the molecular weight distribution of proteins found in the corona revealed a clear influence of incubation time and temperature on

  6. Preparation of Core-Shell Hybrid Materials by Producing a Protein Corona Around Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, A.; Gräfe, C.; von der Lühe, M.; Remmer, H.; Clement, J. H.; Eberbeck, D.; Ludwig, F.; Müller, R.; Schacher, F. H.; Dutz, S.

    2015-07-01

    Nanoparticles experience increasing interest for a variety of medical and pharmaceutical applications. When exposing nanomaterials, e.g., magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNP), to human blood, a protein corona consisting of various components is formed immediately. The composition of the corona as well as its amount bound to the particle surface is dependent on different factors, e.g., particle size and surface charge. The actual composition of the formed protein corona might be of major importance for cellular uptake of magnetic nanoparticles. The aim of the present study was to analyze the formation of the protein corona during in vitro serum incubation in dependency of incubation time and temperature. For this, MNP with different shells were incubated in fetal calf serum (FCS, serving as protein source) within a water bath for a defined time and at a defined temperature. Before and after incubation the particles were characterized by a variety of methods. It was found that immediately (seconds) after contact of MNP and FCS, a protein corona is formed on the surface of MNP. This formation led to an increase of particle size and a slight agglomeration of the particles, which was relatively constant during the first minutes of incubation. A longer incubation (from hours to days) resulted in a stronger agglomeration of the FCS incubated MNP. Quantitative analysis (gel electrophoresis) of serum-incubated particles revealed a relatively constant amount of bound proteins during the first minutes of serum incubation. After a longer incubation (>20 min), a considerably higher amount of surface proteins was determined for incubation temperatures below 40 °C. For incubation temperatures above 50 °C, the influence of time was less significant which might be attributed to denaturation of proteins during incubation. Overall, analysis of the molecular weight distribution of proteins found in the corona revealed a clear influence of incubation time and temperature on corona

  7. Nitric Oxide Mediates Biofilm Formation and Symbiosis in Silicibacter sp. Strain TrichCH4B

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Minxi; Smith, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important signaling role in all domains of life. Many bacteria contain a heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) protein that selectively binds NO. These H-NOX proteins often act as sensors that regulate histidine kinase (HK) activity, forming part of a bacterial two-component signaling system that also involves one or more response regulators. In several organisms, NO binding to the H-NOX protein governs bacterial biofilm formation; however, the source of NO exposure for these bacteria is unknown. In mammals, NO is generated by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and signals through binding the H-NOX domain of soluble guanylate cyclase. Recently, several bacterial NOS proteins have also been reported, but the corresponding bacteria do not also encode an H-NOX protein. Here, we report the first characterization of a bacterium that encodes both a NOS and H-NOX, thus resembling the mammalian system capable of both synthesizing and sensing NO. We characterized the NO signaling pathway of the marine alphaproteobacterium Silicibacter sp. strain TrichCH4B, determining that the NOS is activated by an algal symbiont, Trichodesmium erythraeum. NO signaling through a histidine kinase-response regulator two-component signaling pathway results in increased concentrations of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate, a key bacterial second messenger molecule that controls cellular adhesion and biofilm formation. Silicibacter sp. TrichCH4B biofilm formation, activated by T. erythraeum, may be an important mechanism for symbiosis between the two organisms, revealing that NO plays a previously unknown key role in bacterial communication and symbiosis. PMID:25944856

  8. Production of unstable proteins through the formation of stable core complexes

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Nicolas; Eiler, Sylvia; Pradeau-Aubreton, Karine; Maillot, Benoit; Stricher, François; Ruff, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purification of proteins that participate in large transient complexes is impeded by low amounts, heterogeneity, instability and poor solubility. To circumvent these difficulties we set up a methodology that enables the production of stable complexes for structural and functional studies. This procedure is benchmarked and applied to two challenging protein families: the human steroid nuclear receptors (SNR) and the HIV-1 pre-integration complex. In the context of transcriptional regulation studies, we produce and characterize the ligand-binding domains of the glucocorticoid nuclear receptor and the oestrogen receptor beta in complex with a TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor 2) domain containing the three SNR-binding motifs. In the context of retroviral integration, we demonstrate the stabilization of the HIV-1 integrase by formation of complexes with partner proteins and DNA. This procedure provides a powerful research tool for structural and functional studies of proteins participating in non-covalent macromolecular complexes. PMID:26983699

  9. Production of unstable proteins through the formation of stable core complexes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Nicolas; Eiler, Sylvia; Pradeau-Aubreton, Karine; Maillot, Benoit; Stricher, François; Ruff, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purification of proteins that participate in large transient complexes is impeded by low amounts, heterogeneity, instability and poor solubility. To circumvent these difficulties we set up a methodology that enables the production of stable complexes for structural and functional studies. This procedure is benchmarked and applied to two challenging protein families: the human steroid nuclear receptors (SNR) and the HIV-1 pre-integration complex. In the context of transcriptional regulation studies, we produce and characterize the ligand-binding domains of the glucocorticoid nuclear receptor and the oestrogen receptor beta in complex with a TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor 2) domain containing the three SNR-binding motifs. In the context of retroviral integration, we demonstrate the stabilization of the HIV-1 integrase by formation of complexes with partner proteins and DNA. This procedure provides a powerful research tool for structural and functional studies of proteins participating in non-covalent macromolecular complexes. PMID:26983699

  10. Insight into the Unfolding Properties of Chd64, a Small, Single Domain Protein with a Globular Core and Disordered Tails

    PubMed Central

    Dobryszycki, Piotr; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Dadlez, Michał; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Two major lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH), govern insect development and growth. While the mode of action of 20E is well understood, some understanding of JH-dependent signalling has been attained only in the past few years, and the crosstalk of the two hormonal pathways remains unknown. Two proteins, the calponin-like Chd64 and immunophilin FKBP39 proteins, have recently been found to play pivotal roles in the formation of dynamic, multiprotein complex that cross-links these two signalling pathways. However, the molecular mechanism of the interaction remains unexplored. The aim of this work was to determine structural elements of Chd64 to provide an understanding of molecular basis of multiple interactions. We analysed Chd64 in two unrelated insect species, Drosophila melanogaster (DmChd64) and Tribolium castaneum (TcChd64). Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS), we showed that both Chd64 proteins have disordered tails that outflank the globular core. The folds of the globular cores of both Chd64 resemble the calponin homology (CH) domain previously resolved by crystallography. Monitoring the unfolding of DmChd64 and TcChd64 by far-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) revealed a highly complex process. Chd64 unfolds and forms of a molten globule (MG)—like intermediate state. Furthermore, our data indicate that in some conditions, Chd64 may exists in discrete structural forms, indicating that the protein is pliable and capable of easily acquiring different conformations. The plasticity of Chd64 and the existence of terminal intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) may be crucial for multiple interactions with many partners. PMID:26325194

  11. The Interdomain Linker Region of HIV-1 Capsid Protein is a Critical Determinant of Proper Core Assembly and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiyang; Ablan, Sherimay; Derebail, Suchitra; Hercík, Kamil; Soheilian, Ferri; Thomas, James A.; Tang, Shixing; Hewlett, Indira; Nagashima, Kunio; Gorelick, Robert J.; Freed, Eric O.; Levin, Judith G.

    2011-01-01

    The HIV-1 capsid protein consists of two independently folded domains connected by a flexible peptide linker (residues 146–150), the function of which remains to be defined. To investigate the role of this region in virus replication, we made alanine or leucine substitutions in each linker residue and two flanking residues. Three classes of mutants were identified: (i) S146A and T148A behave like wild type (WT); (ii) Y145A, I150A, and L151A are noninfectious, assemble unstable cores with aberrant morphology, and synthesize almost no viral DNA; and (iii) P147L and S149A display a poorly infectious, attenuated phenotype. Infectivity of P147L and S149A is rescued specifically by pseudotyping with vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein. Moreover, despite having unstable cores, these mutants assemble WT-like structures and synthesize viral DNA, although less efficiently than WT. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the linker region is essential for proper assembly and stability of cores and efficient replication. PMID:22036671

  12. SECONDARY ECLIPSE PHOTOMETRY OF WASP-4b WITH WARM SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Beerer, Ingrid M.; Knutson, Heather A.; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Deming, Drake; Langton, Jonathan; Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.

    2011-01-20

    We present photometry of the giant extrasolar planet WASP-4b at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m taken with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of Spitzer's extended warm mission. We find secondary eclipse depths of 0.319% {+-} 0.031% and 0.343% {+-} 0.027% for the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands, respectively, and show model emission spectra and pressure-temperature profiles for the planetary atmosphere. These eclipse depths are well fit by model emission spectra with water and other molecules in absorption, similar to those used for TrES-3 and HD 189733b. Depending on our choice of model, these results indicate that this planet has either a weak dayside temperature inversion or no inversion at all. The absence of a strong thermal inversion on this highly irradiated planet is contrary to the idea that highly irradiated planets are expected to have inversions, perhaps due the presence of an unknown absorber in the upper atmosphere. This result might be explained by the modestly enhanced activity level of WASP-4b's G7V host star, which could increase the amount of UV flux received by the planet, therefore reducing the abundance of the unknown stratospheric absorber in the planetary atmosphere as suggested in Knutson et al. We also find no evidence for an offset in the timing of the secondary eclipse and place a 2{sigma} upper limit on |ecos {omega}| of 0.0024, which constrains the range of tidal heating models that could explain this planet's inflated radius.

  13. Pokemon siRNA Delivery Mediated by RGD-Modified HBV Core Protein Suppressed the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Liu, Xiaoping; Jia, Jianbo; Wu, Jinsheng; Wu, Ning; Chen, Jun; Fang, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly human malignant tumor that is among the most common cancers in the world, especially in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been well established as a high risk factor for hepatic malignance. Studies have shown that Pokemon is a master oncogene for HCC growth, suggesting it as an ideal therapeutic target. However, efficient delivery system is still lacking for Pokemon targeting treatment. In this study, we used core proteins of HBV, which is modified with RGD peptides, to construct a biomimetic vector for the delivery of Pokemon siRNAs (namely, RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA). Quantitative PCR and Western blot assays revealed that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA possessed the highest efficiency of Pokemon suppression in HCC cells. In vitro experiments further indicated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon-siRNA exerted a higher tumor suppressor activity on HCC cell lines, evidenced by reduced proliferation and attenuated invasiveness, than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Finally, animal studies demonstrated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA suppressed the growth of HCC xenografts in mice by a greater extent than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Based on the above results, Pokemon siRNA delivery mediated by RGD-modified HBV core protein was shown to be an effective strategy of HCC gene therapy. PMID:26356810

  14. Annealing prion protein amyloid fibrils at high temperature results in extension of a proteinase K-resistant core.

    PubMed

    Bocharova, Olga V; Makarava, Natallia; Breydo, Leonid; Anderson, Maighdlin; Salnikov, Vadim V; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2006-01-27

    Amyloids are highly ordered, rigid beta-sheet-rich structures that appear to have minimal dynamic flexibility in individual polypeptide chains. Here, we demonstrate that substantial conformational rearrangements occur within mature amyloid fibrils produced from full-length mammalian prion protein. The rearrangement results in a substantial extension of a proteinase K-resistant core and is accompanied by an increase in the beta-sheet-rich conformation. The conformational rearrangement was induced in the presence of low concentrations of Triton X-100 either by brief exposure to 80 degrees C or, with less efficacy, by prolonged incubation at 37 degrees C at pH 7.5 and is referred to here as "annealing." Upon annealing, amyloid fibrils acquired a proteinase K-resistant core identical to that found in bovine spongiform encephalopathy-specific scrapie-associated prion protein. Annealing was also observed when amyloid fibrils were exposed to high temperatures in the absence of detergent but in the presence of brain homogenate. These findings suggest that the amyloid fibrils exist in two conformationally distinct states that are separated by a high energy barrier and that yet unknown cellular cofactors may facilitate transition of the fibrils into thermodynamically more stable state. Our studies provide new insight into the complex behavior of prion polymerization and highlight the annealing process, a previously unknown step in the evolution of amyloid structures. PMID:16314415

  15. Possible regulatory function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ty1 retrotransposon core protein.

    PubMed

    Roth, J F; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J; Martin-Rendon, E

    2000-07-01

    The yeast Ty1 retrotransposon encodes proteins and RNA that assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) as part of the life cycle of the retro-element. The Tya protein, which is equivalent to the retroviral Gag, is the major structural component of these particles. In this work, we demonstrate that Tya proteins fulfil other functions apart from their structural role. We show that Tya interacts in vitro with the Ty1 RNA domain required for RNA packaging, suggesting that this RNA-protein interaction may direct the packaging process. Furthermore, the overexpression of both Tya proteins, i.e. p1, the primary translation product, and p2, the mature form, increases endogenous Ty1 RNA levels in trans without increasing translation significantly. These observations suggest that Tya may exert a regulatory function during transposition. Interestingly, however, only p2, the mature form of Tya, trans-activates transposition of a marked genomic Ty element. This confirms that processing is required for transposition. PMID:10870103

  16. Antibiotic Resistance, Core-Genome and Protein Expression in IncHI1 Plasmids in Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kubasova, Tereza; Cejkova, Darina; Matiasovicova, Jitka; Sekelova, Zuzana; Polansky, Ondrej; Medvecky, Matej; Rychlik, Ivan; Juricova, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Conjugative plasmids from the IncHI1 incompatibility group play an important role in transferring antibiotic resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium. However, knowledge of their genome structure or gene expression is limited. In this study, we determined the complete nucleotide sequences of four IncHI1 plasmids transferring resistance to antibiotics by two different next generation sequencing protocols and protein expression by mass spectrometry. Sequence data including additional 11 IncHI1 plasmids from GenBank were used for the definition of the IncHI1 plasmid core-genome and pan-genome. The core-genome consisted of approximately 123 kbp and 122 genes while the total pan-genome represented approximately 600 kbp. When the core-genome sequences were used for multiple alignments, the 15 tested IncHI1 plasmids were separated into two main lineages. GC content in core-genome genes was around 46% and 50% in accessory genome genes. A multidrug resistance region present in all 4 sequenced plasmids extended over 20 kbp and, except for tet(B), the genes responsible for antibiotic resistance were those with the highest GC content. IncHI1 plasmids therefore represent replicons that evolved in low GC content bacteria. From their original host, they spread to Salmonella and during this spread these plasmids acquired multiple accessory genes including those coding for antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-resistance genes belonged to genes with the highest level of expression and were constitutively expressed even in the absence of antibiotics. This is the likely mechanism that facilitates host cell survival when antibiotics suddenly emerge in the environment. PMID:27189997

  17. Human X-linked Intellectual Disability Factor CUL4B Is Required for Post-meiotic Sperm Development and Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yu; Yu, Chih-Hsiang; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Rung; Wu, June-Tai; Lin, Ying-Hung; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Wu, Jui-Ching; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that an E3-ubiquitin ligase associated with human X-linked intellectual disability, CUL4B, plays a crucial role in post-meiotic sperm development. Initially, Cul4bΔ/Y male mice were found to be sterile and exhibited a progressive loss in germ cells, thereby leading to oligoasthenospermia. Adult Cul4b mutant epididymides also contained very low numbers of mature spermatozoa, and these spermatazoa exhibited pronounced morphological abnormalities. In post-meiotic spermatids, CUL4B was dynamically expressed and mitosis of spermatogonia and meiosis of spermatocytes both appeared unaffected. However, the spermatids exhibited significantly higher levels of apoptosis during spermiogenesis, particularly during the acrosome phase through the cap phase. Comparative proteomic analyses identified a large-scale shift between wild-type and Cul4b mutant testes during early post-meiotic sperm development. Ultrastructural pathology studies further detected aberrant acrosomes in spermatids and nuclear morphology. The protein levels of both canonical and non-canonical histones were also affected in an early spermatid stage in the absence of Cul4b. Thus, X-linked CUL4B appears to play a critical role in acrosomal formation, nuclear condensation, and in regulating histone dynamics during haploid male germ cell differentiation in relation to male fertility in mice. Thus, it is possible that CUL4B-selective substrates are required for post-meiotic sperm morphogenesis. PMID:26832838

  18. Site-specific glycoproteomics confirms that protein structure dictates formation of N-glycan type, core fucosylation and branching.

    PubMed

    Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Packer, Nicolle H

    2012-11-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the individualized and highly reproducible N-glycan repertoires on each protein glycosylation site modulate function. Relationships between protein structures and the resulting N-glycoforms have previously been observed, but remain to be quantitatively confirmed and examined in detail to define the responsible mechanisms in the conserved mammalian glycosylation machinery. Here, we investigate this relationship by manually extracting and analyzing quantitative and qualitative site-specific glycoprofiling data from 117 research papers. Specifically, N-glycan structural motifs were correlated with the structure of the protein carriers, focusing on the solvent accessibility of the individual glycosylation sites and the physicochemical properties of the surrounding polypeptide chains. In total, 474 glycosylation sites from 169 mammalian N-glycoproteins originating from different tissues/body fluids were investigated. It was confirmed statistically that the N-glycan type, degree of core fucosylation and branching are strongly influenced by the glycosylation site accessibility. For these three N-glycan features, glycosylation sites carrying highly processed glycans were significantly more solvent-accessible than those carrying less processed counterparts. The glycosylation site accessibilities could be linked to molecular signatures at the primary and secondary protein levels, most notably to the glycoprotein size and the proportion of glycosylation sites located in accessible β-turns. In addition, the subcellular location of the glycoproteins influenced the formation of the N-glycan structures. These data confirm that protein structures dictate site-specific formation of several features of N-glycan structures by affecting the biosynthetic pathway. Mammals have, as such, evolved mechanisms enabling proteins to influence the N-glycans they present to the extracellular environment. PMID:22798492

  19. A Combined Genetic-Proteomic Approach Identifies Residues within Dengue Virus NS4B Critical for Interaction with NS3 and Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Fischl, Wolfgang; Scaturro, Pietro; Cortese, Mirko; Kallis, Stephanie; Bartenschlager, Marie; Fischer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease worldwide. Approved vaccines are not available, and targets suitable for the development of antiviral drugs are lacking. One possible drug target is nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B), because it is absolutely required for virus replication; however, its exact role in the DENV replication cycle is largely unknown. With the aim of mapping NS4B determinants critical for DENV replication, we performed a reverse genetic screening of 33 NS4B mutants in the context of an infectious DENV genome. While the majority of these mutations were lethal, for several of them, we were able to select for second-site pseudoreversions, most often residing in NS4B and restoring replication competence. To identify all viral NS4B interaction partners, we engineered a fully viable DENV genome encoding an affinity-tagged NS4B. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the NS4B complex isolated from infected cells identified the NS3 protease/helicase as a major interaction partner of NS4B. By combining the genetic complementation map of NS4B with a replication-independent expression system, we identified the NS4B cytosolic loop—more precisely, amino acid residue Q134—as a critical determinant for NS4B-NS3 interaction. An alanine substitution at this site completely abrogated the interaction and DENV RNA replication, and both were restored by pseudoreversions A69S and A137V. This strict correlation between the degree of NS4B-NS3 interaction and DENV replication provides strong evidence that this viral protein complex plays a pivotal role during the DENV replication cycle, hence representing a promising target for novel antiviral strategies. IMPORTANCE With no approved therapy or vaccine against dengue virus infection, the viral nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B) represents a possible drug target, because it is indispensable for virus replication. However, little is known about its precise structure and

  20. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Stone, Amy E L; Mitchell, Angela; Brownell, Jessica; Miklin, Daniel J; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Polyak, Stephen J; Gale, Michael J; Rosen, Hugo R

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRR). PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN) production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL) IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core) is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV. PMID:24788809

  1. Chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay for monitoring hepatitis C virus core protein during interferon-alpha2b and ribavirin therapy in patients with genotype 1 and high viral loads.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Masaru; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Tamori, Akihiro; Kohmoto, Modoka; Habu, Daiki; Sakaguchi, Hiroki; Takeda, Tadashi; Kawada, Norifumi; Seki, Shuichi; Shiomi, Susumu

    2005-09-01

    This study evaluated an updated chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) for hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein for monitoring viral kinetics during treatment with interferon (IFN)-alpha and ribavirin. Using the CLEIA, serum levels of HCV core protein were measured in 17 patients with genotype 1 and high baseline viral loads during the first 4 weeks of combination therapy. HCV RNA was measured by the Amplicor Monitor test for comparison. At the start of therapy, the median HCV level (interquartile range) was 700 (540-940) kIU/ml of viral RNA and 11,310 (5,528-14,238) fmol/L of core protein. HCV RNA was above the upper limit of the linear range of the Amplicor Monitor test in 13 of the 17 patients, while the core protein level was within the linear range of the CLEIA in all patients. During therapy, the proportion of patients with HCV levels below the cutoff values at each time point was less with the Amplicor Monitor test than with CLEIA. Serum HCV core protein level decreased rapidly during the first 24 hr of therapy and more slowly thereafter, with median exponential decays of 1.08 and 0.046 log10/day, respectively. In the second phase, between day 1 and 28, the median decrease in HCV core protein level was higher in four patients with sustained virologic response (0.13 log10/day) than in 13 patients with no response (0.028 log10/day, P = 0.042). The wide linear range of the HCV core protein assay is appropriate for measuring viral loads during therapy with IFN-alpha and ribavirin. PMID:16032731

  2. IFT81, encoding an IFT-B core protein, as a very rare cause of a ciliopathy phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Isabelle; Halbritter, Jan; Porath, Jonathan D; Gérard, Xavier; Braun, Daniela A; Gee, Heon Yung; Fathy, Hanan M; Saunier, Sophie; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Thomas, Sophie; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Boddaert, Nathalie; Taschner, Michael; Schueler, Markus; Lorentzen, Esben; Lifton, Richard P; Lawson, Jennifer A; Garfa-Traore, Meriem; Otto, Edgar A; Bastin, Philippe; Caillaud, Catherine; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    Background Bidirectional intraflagellar transport (IFT) consists of two major protein complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B. In contrast to the IFT-B complex, all components of IFT-A have recently been linked to human ciliopathies when defective. We therefore hypothesised that mutations in additional IFT-B encoding genes can be found in patients with multisystemic ciliopathies. Methods We screened 1628 individuals with reno-ocular ciliopathies by targeted next-generation sequencing of ciliary candidate genes, including all IFT-B encoding genes. Results Consequently, we identified a homozygous mutation in IFT81 affecting an obligatory donor splice site in an individual with nephronophthisis and polydactyly. Further, we detected a loss-of-stop mutation with extension of the deduced protein by 10 amino acids in an individual with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-1. This proband presented with retinal dystrophy and brain lesions including cerebellar atrophy, a phenotype to which the IFT81 variant might contribute. Cultured fibroblasts of this latter affected individual showed a significant decrease in ciliated cell abundance compared with controls and increased expression of the transcription factor GLI2 suggesting deranged sonic hedgehog signalling. Conclusions This work describes identification of mutations of IFT81 in individuals with symptoms consistent with the clinical spectrum of ciliopathies. It might represent the rare case of a core IFT-B complex protein found associated with human disease. Our data further suggest that defects in the IFT-B core are an exceedingly rare finding, probably due to its indispensable role for ciliary assembly in development. PMID:26275418

  3. The Contribution of Missense Mutations in Core and Rim Residues of Protein–Protein Interfaces to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    David, Alessia; Sternberg, Michael J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations at protein–protein interaction sites, called interfaces, are important contributors to human disease. Interfaces are non-uniform surface areas characterized by two main regions, “core” and “rim”, which differ in terms of evolutionary conservation and physicochemical properties. Moreover, within interfaces, only a small subset of residues (“hot spots”) is crucial for the binding free energy of the protein–protein complex. We performed a large-scale structural analysis of human single amino acid variations (SAVs) and demonstrated that disease-causing mutations are preferentially located within the interface core, as opposed to the rim (p < 0.01). In contrast, the interface rim is significantly enriched in polymorphisms, similar to the remaining non-interacting surface. Energetic hot spots tend to be enriched in disease-causing mutations compared to non-hot spots (p = 0.05), regardless of their occurrence in core or rim residues. For individual amino acids, the frequency of substitution into a polymorphism or disease-causing mutation differed to other amino acids and was related to its structural location, as was the type of physicochemical change introduced by the SAV. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the different distribution and properties of disease-causing SAVs and polymorphisms within different structural regions and in relation to the energetic contribution of amino acid in protein–protein interfaces, thus highlighting the importance of a structural system biology approach for predicting the effect of SAVs. PMID:26173036

  4. Inhibition of the HCV core protein on the immune response to HBV surface antigen and on HBV gene expression and replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenbo; Wu, Chunchen; Deng, Wanyu; Pei, Rongjun; Wang, Yun; Cao, Liang; Qin, Bo; Lu, Mengji; Chen, Xinwen

    2012-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is a multifunctional protein that can interfere with the induction of an immune response. It has been reported that the HCV core protein inhibits HBV replication in vitro. In this study, we test the effect of the HCV core gene on the priming of the immune response to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and on the replication of HBV in vivo. Our results showed that the full-length HCV core gene inhibits the induction of an immune response to the heterogeneous antigen, HBsAg, at the site of inoculation when HCV core (pC191) and HBsAg (pHBsAg) expression plasmids are co-administered as DNA vaccines into BALB/c mice. The observed interference effect of the HCV core occurs in the priming stage and is limited to the DNA form of the HBsAg antigen, but not to the protein form. The HCV core reduces the protective effect of the HBsAg when the HBsAg and the HCV core are co-administered as vaccines in an HBV hydrodynamic mouse model because the HCV core induces immune tolerance to the heterogeneous HBsAg DNA antigen. These results suggest that HCV core may play an important role in viral persistence by the attenuation of host immune responses to different antigens. We further tested whether the HCV core interfered with the priming of the immune response in hepatocytes via the hydrodynamic co-injection of an HBV replication-competent plasmid and an HCV core plasmid. The HCV core inhibited HBV replication and antigen expression in both BALB/c (H-2d) and C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice, the mouse models of acute and chronic hepatitis B virus infections. Thus, the HCV core inhibits the induction of a specific immune response to an HBsAg DNA vaccine. However, HCV C also interferes with HBV gene expression and replication in vivo, as observed in patients with coinfection. PMID:23024803

  5. SLC27A4 regulate ATG4B activity and control reactions to chemotherapeutics-induced autophagy in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shifei; Su, Jie; Qian, Hui; Guo, Tao

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved self-digestion process to promote cell survival in response to nutrient starvation and other metabolic stresses in eukaryotic cells. Dysregulation of this system is linked with numerous human diseases, including cancers. ATG4B, a cysteine protease required for autophagy, cleaves the C-terminal amino acid of ATG8 family proteins to reveal a C-terminal glycine which is necessary for ATG8 proteins conjugation to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and insertion to autophagosome precursor membranes. However, the mechanism governing the protein stability of ATG4B in human cancer cells is not fully understood. In this study, tandem affinity purification/mass spectrometry (TAP/MS) were applied to the investigation of the interaction between ATG4B and potential candidate proteins. Then, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and GST-pull down assays indicated that the candidate protein-SLC27A4 directly interacts with ATG4B in lung cancer cell lines. Intriguingly, we also found that ATG4B protein expression was increased in parallel with SLC27A4 in lung cancer cell lines as well as lung tumor tissues. However, relevant functional research of SLC27A4 in autophagy or oncotherapy has not been investigated before. In this study, we hypothesized that SLC27A4 might act as a mediator of ATG4B, in some respects, through the protein binding directly. Further, we found that the high expression level of SLC7A4 increased the ATG4B stability and was conducive to rapid reaction to everolimus (RAD001)-induced autophagy in human lung cancer cells. As expected, the results showed that SLC27A4 could help to maintain the protein stability and intracellular concentration of ATG4B, thereby triggering rapid autophagy through releasing ATG4B to cytoplasm under conditions of reduced nutrient availability or during stress of chemotherapy in lung cancer cells. Reduced SLC27A4 by si-RNA also showed the enhanced therapeutic efficiency of everolimus, doxorubicin, and cisplatin in

  6. An Internal Standard-Assisted Synthesis and Degradation Proteomic Approach Reveals the Potential Linkage between VPS4B Depletion and Activation of Fatty Acid β-Oxidation in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhongping; Thomas, Stefani N.; Wan, Yunhu; Lin, H. Helen; Ann, David K.; Yang, Austin J.

    2013-01-01

    The endosomal/lysosomal system, in particular the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs), plays an essential role in regulating the trafficking and destination of endocytosed receptors and their associated signaling molecules. Recently, we have shown that dysfunction and down-regulation of vacuolar protein sorting 4B (VPS4B), an ESCRT-III associated protein, under hypoxic conditions can lead to the abnormal accumulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and aberrant EGFR signaling in breast cancer. However, the pathophysiological consequences of VPS4B dysfunction remain largely elusive. In this study, we used an internal standard-assisted synthesis and degradation mass spectrometry (iSDMS) method, which permits the direct measurement of protein synthesis, degradation and protein dynamic expression, to address the effects of VPS4B dysfunction in altering EGF-mediated protein expression. Our initial results indicate that VPS4B down-regulation decreases the expression of many proteins involved in glycolytic pathways, while increased the expression of proteins with roles in mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation were up-regulated in VPS4B-depleted cells. This observation is also consistent with our previous finding that hypoxia can induce VPS4B down-regulated, suggesting that the adoption of fatty acid β-oxidation could potentially serve as an alternative energy source and survival mechanism for breast cancer cells in response to hypoxia-mediated VPS4B dysfunction. PMID:23431444

  7. SCN4B-Encoded Sodium Channel β4 Subunit in Congenital Long-QT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Kaku, Toshihiko; Tester, David J.; Iturralde-Torres, Pedro; Itty, Ajit; Ye, Bin; Valdivia, Carmen; Ueda, Kazuo; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Tusié-Luna, Maria Teresa; Makielski, Jonathan C.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) is potentially lethal secondary to malignant ventricular arrhythmias and is caused predominantly by mutations in genes that encode cardiac ion channels. Nearly 25% of patients remain without a genetic diagnosis, and genes that encode cardiac channel regulatory proteins represent attractive candidates. Voltage-gated sodium channels have a pore-forming α-subunit associated with 1 or more auxiliary β-subunits. Four different β-subunits have been described. All are detectable in cardiac tissue, but none have yet been linked to any heritable arrhythmia syndrome. Methods and Results We present a case of a 21-month-old Mexican-mestizo female with intermittent 2:1 atrioventricular block and a corrected QT interval of 712 ms. Comprehensive open reading frame/splice mutational analysis of the 9 established LQTS-susceptibility genes proved negative, and complete mutational analysis of the 4 Navβ-subunits revealed a L179F (C535T) missense mutation in SCN4B that cosegregated properly throughout a 3-generation pedigree and was absent in 800 reference alleles. After this discovery, SCN4B was analyzed in 262 genotype-negative LQTS patients (96% white), but no further mutations were found. L179F was engineered by site-directed mutagenesis and heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells that contained the stably expressed SCN5A-encoded sodium channel α-subunit (hNaV1.5). Compared with the wild-type, L179F-β4 caused an 8-fold (compared with SCN5A alone) and 3-fold (compared with SCN5A + WT-β4) increase in late sodium current consistent with the molecular/electrophysiological phenotype previously shown for LQTS-associated mutations. Conclusions We provide the seminal report of SCN4B-encoded Navβ4 as a novel LQT3-susceptibility gene. PMID:17592081

  8. Inhibitory effect of miR-125b on hepatitis C virus core protein-induced TLR2/MyD88 signaling in THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Cheng; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Jie, Sheng-Hua; Tong, Qiao-Xia; Lu, Meng-Ji; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of miR-125b in regulating monocyte immune responses induced by hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. METHODS: Monocytic THP-1 cells were treated with various concentrations of recombinant HCV core protein, and cytokines and miR-125b expression in these cells were analyzed. The requirement of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) or MyD88 gene for HCV core protein-induced immune responses was determined by the transfection of THP-1 cells with gene knockdown vectors expressing either TLR2 siRNA or MyD88 siRNA. The effect of miR-125b overexpression on TLR2/MyD88 signaling was examined by transfecting THP-1 cells with miR-125b mimic RNA oligos. RESULTS: In response to HCV core protein stimulation, cytokine production was up-regulated and miR-125b expression was down-regulated in THP-1 cells. The modulatory effect of HCV core protein on cellular events was dose-dependent and required functional TLR2 or MyD88 gene. Forced miR-125b expression abolished the HCV core protein-induced enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 expression by 66%, 54%, and 66%, respectively (P < 0.001), by inhibiting MyD88-mediated signaling, including phosphorylation of NF-κBp65, ERK, and P38. CONCLUSION: The inverse correlation between miR-125b and cytokine expression after HCV core challenge suggests that miR-125b may negatively regulate HCV-induced immune responses by targeting TLR2/MyD88 signaling in monocytes. PMID:27158204

  9. Muted protein is involved in the targeting of CD63 to large dense-core vesicles of chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Zhenhua, Hao; Wei, Li

    2016-08-01

    Large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) are characterized as a class of lysosome-related organelles (LROs), which undergo regulated release and play important roles in development, metabolism and homeostasis. The Muted protein is a subunit of the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1), which functions in the biogenesis of lysosomes and LROs. CD63 is a membrane component of lysosomes and LROs. Whether and how CD63 is sorted into LDCVs is largely unknown. In this study, we aim to identify the localization of CD63 in chromaffin cells by colocalization, living cell imaging and cell fractionation. We found that a proportion of CD63-YFP colocalized with NPY-dsRed labeled LDCVs. By sucrose density gradient fractionation, a proportion of CD63 was found to be highly enriched in LDCVs fractions. The Muted mutant mouse is a model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS). We also found that the level of CD63 was significantly decreased in Muted-deficient adrenal glands, suggesting that the Muted protein is important for the steady-state level of CD63. Our results suggest that CD63 is a membrane component of LDCVs and the stability of CD63 is dependent on the Muted protein, which provides a clue to the pathogenesis of LRO defects in HPS. PMID:27531610

  10. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetti, Angelita; Fabbretti, Attilio; Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue.

  11. Tandem Fusion of Hepatitis B Core Antigen Allows Assembly of Virus-Like Particles in Bacteria and Plants with Enhanced Capacity to Accommodate Foreign Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Peyret, Hadrien; Gehin, Annick; Thuenemann, Eva C.; Blond, Donatienne; El Turabi, Aadil; Beales, Lucy; Clarke, Dean; Gilbert, Robert J. C.; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Stuart, David I.; Holmes, Kris; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Whelan, Mike; Rosenberg, William; Lomonossoff, George P.; Rowlands, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The core protein of the hepatitis B virus, HBcAg, assembles into highly immunogenic virus-like particles (HBc VLPs) when expressed in a variety of heterologous systems. Specifically, the major insertion region (MIR) on the HBcAg protein allows the insertion of foreign sequences, which are then exposed on the tips of surface spike structures on the outside of the assembled particle. Here, we present a novel strategy which aids the display of whole proteins on the surface of HBc particles. This strategy, named tandem core, is based on the production of the HBcAg dimer as a single polypeptide chain by tandem fusion of two HBcAg open reading frames. This allows the insertion of large heterologous sequences in only one of the two MIRs in each spike, without compromising VLP formation. We present the use of tandem core technology in both plant and bacterial expression systems. The results show that tandem core particles can be produced with unmodified MIRs, or with one MIR in each tandem dimer modified to contain the entire sequence of GFP or of a camelid nanobody. Both inserted proteins are correctly folded and the nanobody fused to the surface of the tandem core particle (which we name tandibody) retains the ability to bind to its cognate antigen. This technology paves the way for the display of natively folded proteins on the surface of HBc particles either through direct fusion or through non-covalent attachment via a nanobody. PMID:25830365

  12. Electron photon verification calculations using MCNP4B

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Adams, K.J.

    1998-07-01

    MCNP4B was released in February 1997 with significant enhancements to electron/photon transport methods. These enhancements have been verified against a wide range of published electron/photon experiments, spanning high energy bremsstrahlung production to electron transmission and reflection. Three sets of bremsstrahlung experiments were simulated. The first verification calculations for bremsstrahlung production used the experimental results in Faddegon for 15 MeV electrons incident on lead, aluminum, and beryllium targets. The calculated integrated bremsstrahlung yields, the bremsstrahlung energy spectra, and the mean energy of the bremsstrahlung beam were compared with experiment. The impact of several MCNP tally options and physics parameters was explored in detail. The second was the experiment of O`Dell which measured the bremsstrahlung spectra from 10 and 20.9 MeV electrons incident on a gold/tungsten target. The final set was a comparison of relative experimental spectra with calculated results for 9.66 MeV electrons incident on tungsten based on the experiment of Starfelt and Koch. The transmission experiments of Ebert were also studied, including comparisons of transmission coefficients for 10.2 MeV electrons incident on carbon, silver, and uranium foils. The agreement between experiment and simulation was usually within two standard deviations of the experimental and calculational errors.

  13. Intracellular membrane association of the N-terminal domain of classical swine fever virus NS4B determines viral genome replication and virulence.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomokazu; Ruggli, Nicolas; Nagashima, Naofumi; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Igarashi, Manabu; Mine, Junki; Hofmann, Martin A; Liniger, Matthias; Summerfield, Artur; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease in pigs that can range from a severe haemorrhagic fever to a nearly unapparent disease, depending on the virulence of the virus strain. Little is known about the viral molecular determinants of CSFV virulence. The nonstructural protein NS4B is essential for viral replication. However, the roles of CSFV NS4B in viral genome replication and pathogenesis have not yet been elucidated. NS4B of the GPE-  vaccine strain and of the highly virulent Eystrup strain differ by a total of seven amino acid residues, two of which are located in the predicted trans-membrane domains of NS4B and were described previously to relate to virulence, and five residues clustering in the N-terminal part. In the present study, we examined the potential role of these five amino acids in modulating genome replication and determining pathogenicity in pigs. A chimeric low virulent GPE- -derived virus carrying the complete Eystrup NS4B showed enhanced pathogenicity in pigs. The in vitro replication efficiency of the NS4B chimeric GPE-  replicon was significantly higher than that of the replicon carrying only the two Eystrup-specific amino acids in NS4B. In silico and in vitro data suggest that the N-terminal part of NS4B forms an amphipathic α-helix structure. The N-terminal NS4B with these five amino acid residues is associated with the intracellular membranes. Taken together, this is the first gain-of-function study showing that the N-terminal domain of NS4B can determine CSFV genome replication in cell culture and viral pathogenicity in pigs. PMID:26018962

  14. IL-10 plays a central regulatory role in the cytokines induced by hepatitis C virus core protein and polyinosinic acid:polycytodylic acid.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaoli; Wang, Zhaoxia; Zhai, Naicui; Zhang, Qianqian; Song, Hongxiao; Zhang, Yujiao; Li, Tianyang; Li, Haijun; Su, Lishan; Niu, Junqi; Tu, Zhengkun

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can cause persistent infection and chronic liver disease, and viral factors are involved in HCV persistence. HCV core protein, a highly conserved viral protein, not only elicits an immunoresponse, but it also regulates it. In addition, HCV core protein interacts with toll-like receptors (TLRs) on monocytes, inducing them to produce cytokines. Polyinosinic acid:polycytodylic acid (polyI:C) is a synthetic analogue of double-stranded RNA that binds to TLR3 and can induce secretion of type I IFN from monocytes. Cytokine response against HCV is likely to affect the natural course of infection as well as HCV persistence. However, possible effects of cytokines induced by HCV core protein and polyI:C remain to be investigated. In this study, we isolated CD14(+) monocytes from healthy donors, cultured them in the presence of HCV core protein and/or polyI:C, and characterized the induced cytokines, phenotypes and mechanisms. We demonstrated that HCV core protein- and polyI:C-stimulated CD14(+) monocytes secreted tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-10, and type I interferon (IFN). Importantly, TNF-α and IL-1β regulated the secretion of IL-10, which then influenced the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) and subsequently the production of type I IFN. Interestingly, type I IFN also regulated the production of IL-10, which in turn inhibited the nuclear factor (NF)-κB subunit, reducing TNF-α and IL-1β levels. Therefore, IL-10 appears to play a central role in regulating the production of cytokines induced by HCV core protein and polyI:C. PMID:27337528

  15. Fe3O4@B-MCM-41: A new magnetically recoverable nanostructured catalyst for the synthesis of polyhydroquinolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi-Alibeik, Mohammad; Rezaeipoor-Anari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Boron modified MCM-41 with magnetite core (Fe3O4@B-MCM-41) as a new magnetically recoverable heterogeneous catalyst was prepared and characterized by SEM, TEM, BET, XRD, VSM and FT-IR techniques. The catalytic activity of Fe3O4@B-MCM-41 was investigated in the four-component reaction of aldehyde, dimedone, active methylene compounds and ammonium acetate for the synthesis of polyhydroquinolines. According to optimization and characterization results the catalyst with Si:B:Fe3O4 mole composition of 40:4:1 has the best activity. The catalyst could be recovered easily by external magnet and has excellent reusability many times without significant decrease of activity.

  16. Control of protein adsorption onto core-shell tubular and vesicular structures of diphenylalanine/parylene.

    PubMed

    Demirel, Gökhan; Malvadkar, Niranjan; Demirel, Melik C

    2010-02-01

    The self-assembly of peptides, specifically dipeptides, offers numerous advantages for biological applications. We describe an easy, versatile method of fabricating different types of zwitterionic Phe-Phe dipeptide structures (i.e., tubes and vesicles) through solvent-mediated assembly. The stability of the dipeptide structures is increased by thin polymer coatings of poly(chloro-p-xylylene), a PPX film. We also investigated protein adsorption onto PPX-coated peptide tubes and vesicles by varying the thickness of the polymer film. PMID:20000323

  17. Identification of Chromatin Remodeling Genes Arid4a and Arid4b as Leukemia Suppressor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mei-Yi; Eldin, Karen W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Leukemia evolves through a multistep process from premalignancy to malignancy. Epigenetic alterations, including histone modifications, have been proposed to play an important role in tumorigenesis. The involvement of two chromatin remodeling genes, retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (Rbbp1/Arid4a) and Rbbp1-like 1 (Rbbp1l1/Arid4b), in leukemogenesis was not characterized. Methods The leukemic phenotype of mice deficient for Arid4a with or without haploinsufficiency for Arid4b was investigated by serially monitoring complete blood counts together with microscopic histologic analysis and flow cytometric analysis of bone marrow and spleen from the Arid4a−/− mice or Arid4a−/−Arid4b+/− mice. Regulation in bone marrow cells of downstream genes important for normal hematopoiesis was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Genotypic effects on histone modifications were examined by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Young (2–5 months old) Arid4a-deficient mice had ineffective blood cell production in all hematopoietic lineages. Beyond 5 months of age, the Arid4a−/− mice manifested monocytosis, accompanied by severe anemia and thrombocytopenia. These sick Arid4a−/− mice showed bone marrow failure with myelofibrosis associated with splenomegaly and hepatomegaly. Five of 42 Arid4a−/− mice and 10 of 12 Arid4a−/−Arid4b+/− mice progressed to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and had rapid further increases of leukocyte counts. Expression of Hox genes (Hoxb3, Hoxb5, Hoxb6, and Hoxb8) was decreased in Arid4a-deficient bone marrow cells with or without Arid4b haploinsufficiency, and FoxP3 expression was reduced in Arid4a−/−Arid4b+/− bone marrow. Increases of histone trimethylation of H3K4, H3K9, and H4K20 (fold increases in trimethylation = 32, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 27 to 32; 45, 95% CI = 41 to 49; and 2.2, 95% CI = 1.7 to 2.7, respectively) were

  18. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in the Core Protein of West Nile Virus Increases Resistance to Acidotropic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; de Oya, Nereida Jiménez; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Shi, Pei-Yong; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a worldwide distributed mosquito-borne flavivirus that naturally cycles between birds and mosquitoes, although it can infect multiple vertebrate hosts including horses and humans. This virus is responsible for recurrent epidemics of febrile illness and encephalitis, and has recently become a global concern. WNV requires to transit through intracellular acidic compartments at two different steps to complete its infectious cycle. These include fusion between the viral envelope and the membrane of endosomes during viral entry, and virus maturation in the trans-Golgi network. In this study, we followed a genetic approach to study the connections between viral components and acidic pH. A WNV mutant with increased resistance to the acidotropic compound NH4Cl, which blocks organelle acidification and inhibits WNV infection, was selected. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that this mutant displayed a single amino acid substitution (Lys 3 to Glu) on the highly basic internal capsid or core (C) protein. The functional role of this replacement was confirmed by its introduction into a WNV infectious clone. This single amino acid substitution also increased resistance to other acidification inhibitor (concanamycin A) and induced a reduction of the neurovirulence in mice. Interestingly, a naturally occurring accompanying mutation found on prM protein abolished the resistant phenotype, supporting the idea of a genetic crosstalk between the internal C protein and the external glycoproteins of the virion. The findings here reported unveil a non-previously assessed connection between the C viral protein and the acidic pH necessary for entry and proper exit of flaviviruses. PMID:23874963

  19. Subunit Protein Vaccine Delivery System for Tuberculosis Based on Hepatitis B Virus Core VLP (HBc-VLP) Particles.

    PubMed

    Dhanasooraj, Dhananjayan; Kumar, R Ajay; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of modern medicine, tuberculosis (TB), caused by the pathogenic bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains one of the deadliest diseases. This bacterium can lay dormant in individuals and get activated when immunity goes down and has also shown considerable prowess in mutating into drug resistant forms. The global emergence of such drug resistant Mtb and the lack of efficacy of Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available so far, have resulted in a situation which cries out for a safe and effective tuberculosis vaccine.Number of different strategies has been used for developing new anti-TB vaccines and several protective antigens have been identified so far. One strategy, the use of protein subunits, has the potential to develop into a powerful tuberculosis vaccine, not only because of its efficacy and safety, but also because they are economical. The proper delivery of protein subunit vaccines with adjuvants or novel delivery systems is necessary for inducing protective immune responses. The available adjuvants or delivery systems are inadequate for generating such a response. In the present method, we have constructed a vaccine delivery system for tuberculosis based on Virus-Like Particles (VLPs). Hepatitis B Virus core antigen gene was recombinantly modified using Overlap Extension PCR (OEPCR). The final construct was designed to express HBc-VLP carrying external antigen (fusion VLP). Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen CFP-10 was used for the construction of fusion VLP. The recombinant gene for the construct was cloned into a pET expression system and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) and induced with IPTG to express the protein. The fusion protein was purified using the Histidine tag and allowed to form VLPs. The preformed VLPs were purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The VLPs were characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). PMID:27076312

  20. Role of Decorin Core Protein in Collagen Organisation in Congenital Stromal Corneal Dystrophy (CSCD)

    PubMed Central

    Kamma-Lorger, Christina S.; Pinali, Christian; Martínez, Juan Carlos; Harris, Jon; Young, Robert D.; Bredrup, Cecilie; Crosas, Eva; Malfois, Marc; Rødahl, Eyvind

    2016-01-01

    The role of Decorin in organising the extracellular matrix was examined in normal human corneas and in corneas from patients with Congenital Stromal Corneal Dystrophy (CSCD). In CSCD, corneal clouding occurs due to a truncating mutation (c.967delT) in the decorin (DCN) gene. Normal human Decorin protein and the truncated one were reconstructed in silico using homology modelling techniques to explore structural changes in the diseased protein. Corneal CSCD specimens were also examined using 3-D electron tomography and Small Angle X-ray diffraction (SAXS), to image the collagen-proteoglycan arrangement and to quantify fibrillar diameters, respectively. Homology modelling showed that truncated Decorin had a different spatial geometry to the normal one, with the truncation removing a major part of the site that interacts with collagen, compromising its ability to bind effectively. Electron tomography showed regions of abnormal stroma, where collagen fibrils came together to form thicker fibrillar structures, showing that Decorin plays a key role in the maintenance of the order in the normal corneal extracellular matrix. Average diameter of individual fibrils throughout the thickness of the cornea however remained normal. PMID:26828927

  1. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  2. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  3. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  4. Identification and targeting of an interaction between a tyrosine motif within hepatitis C virus core protein and AP2M1 essential for viral assembly.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Gregory; Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Ziv-Av, Amotz; Gerber, Doron; Jacob, Yves; Einav, Shirit

    2012-01-01

    Novel therapies are urgently needed against hepatitis C virus infection (HCV), a major global health problem. The current model of infectious virus production suggests that HCV virions are assembled on or near the surface of lipid droplets, acquire their envelope at the ER, and egress through the secretory pathway. The mechanisms of HCV assembly and particularly the role of viral-host protein-protein interactions in mediating this process are, however, poorly understood. We identified a conserved heretofore unrecognized YXXΦ motif (Φ is a bulky hydrophobic residue) within the core protein. This motif is homologous to sorting signals within host cargo proteins known to mediate binding of AP2M1, the μ subunit of clathrin adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2), and intracellular trafficking. Using microfluidics affinity analysis, protein-fragment complementation assays, and co-immunoprecipitations in infected cells, we show that this motif mediates core binding to AP2M1. YXXΦ mutations, silencing AP2M1 expression or overexpressing a dominant negative AP2M1 mutant had no effect on HCV RNA replication, however, they dramatically inhibited intra- and extracellular infectivity, consistent with a defect in viral assembly. Quantitative confocal immunofluorescence analysis revealed that core's YXXΦ motif mediates recruitment of AP2M1 to lipid droplets and that the observed defect in HCV assembly following disruption of core-AP2M1 binding correlates with accumulation of core on lipid droplets, reduced core colocalization with E2 and reduced core localization to trans-Golgi network (TGN), the presumed site of viral particles maturation. Furthermore, AAK1 and GAK, serine/threonine kinases known to stimulate binding of AP2M1 to host cargo proteins, regulate core-AP2M1 binding and are essential for HCV assembly. Last, approved anti-cancer drugs that inhibit AAK1 or GAK not only disrupt core-AP2M1 binding, but also significantly inhibit HCV assembly and infectious virus production

  5. Genetically Programmable Thermoresponsive Plasmonic Gold/Silk-Elastin Protein Core/Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The design and development of future molecular photonic/electronic systems pose the challenge of integrating functional molecular building blocks in a controlled, tunable, and reproducible manner. The modular nature and fidelity of the biosynthesis method provides a unique chemistry approach to one-pot synthesis of environmental factor-responsive chimeric proteins capable of energy conversion between the desired forms. In this work, facile tuning of dynamic thermal response in plasmonic nanoparticles was facilitated by genetic engineering of the structure, size, and self-assembly of the shell silk-elastin-like protein polymers (SELPs). Recombinant DNA techniques were implemented to synthesize a new family of SELPs, S4E8Gs, with amino acid repeats of [(GVGVP)4(GGGVP)(GVGVP)3(GAGAGS)4] and tunable molecular weight. The temperature-reversible conformational switching between the hydrophilic random coils and the hydrophobic β-turns in the elastin blocks were programmed to between 50 and 60 °C by site-specific glycine mutation, as confirmed by variable-temperature proton NMR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, to trigger the nanoparticle aggregation. The dynamic self-aggregation/disaggregation of the Au-SELPs nanoparticles was regulated in size and pattern by the β-sheet-forming, thermally stable silk blocks, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The thermally reversible, shell dimension dependent, interparticle plasmon coupling was investigated by both variable-temperature UV–vis spectroscopy and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based simulations. Good agreement between the calculated and measured spectra sheds light on design and synthesis of responsive plasmonic nanostructures by independently tuning the refractive index and size of the SELPs through genetic engineering. PMID:24712906

  6. Genetically programmable thermoresponsive plasmonic gold/silk-elastin protein core/shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yinan; Xia, Xiaoxia; Wang, Ming; Wang, Qianrui; An, Bo; Tao, Hu; Xu, Qiaobing; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L

    2014-04-22

    The design and development of future molecular photonic/electronic systems pose the challenge of integrating functional molecular building blocks in a controlled, tunable, and reproducible manner. The modular nature and fidelity of the biosynthesis method provides a unique chemistry approach to one-pot synthesis of environmental factor-responsive chimeric proteins capable of energy conversion between the desired forms. In this work, facile tuning of dynamic thermal response in plasmonic nanoparticles was facilitated by genetic engineering of the structure, size, and self-assembly of the shell silk-elastin-like protein polymers (SELPs). Recombinant DNA techniques were implemented to synthesize a new family of SELPs, S4E8Gs, with amino acid repeats of [(GVGVP)4(GGGVP)(GVGVP)3(GAGAGS)4] and tunable molecular weight. The temperature-reversible conformational switching between the hydrophilic random coils and the hydrophobic β-turns in the elastin blocks were programmed to between 50 and 60 °C by site-specific glycine mutation, as confirmed by variable-temperature proton NMR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, to trigger the nanoparticle aggregation. The dynamic self-aggregation/disaggregation of the Au-SELPs nanoparticles was regulated in size and pattern by the β-sheet-forming, thermally stable silk blocks, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The thermally reversible, shell dimension dependent, interparticle plasmon coupling was investigated by both variable-temperature UV-vis spectroscopy and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based simulations. Good agreement between the calculated and measured spectra sheds light on design and synthesis of responsive plasmonic nanostructures by independently tuning the refractive index and size of the SELPs through genetic engineering. PMID:24712906

  7. Down-regulation of HSP40 gene family following OCT4B1 suppression in human tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Mohammad Reza; Asadi, MalekHosein; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossin; Ahmadi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The OCT4B1, as one of OCT4 variants, is expressed in cancer cell lines and tissues more than other variants and plays an important role in apoptosis and stress (heat shock protein) pathways. The present study was designed to determine the effects of OCT4B1 silencing on expressional profile of HSP40 gene family expression in three different human tumor cell lines. Materials and Methods: The OCT4B1 expression was suppressed by specific siRNA transfection in AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma), 5637 (bladder tumor) and U-87MG (brain tumor) cell lines employing Lipofectamine reagent. Real-time PCR array technique was employed for RNA qualification. The fold changes were calculated using RT2 Profiler PCR array data analysis software version 3.5. Results: Our results indicated that fifteen genes (from 36 studied genes) were down-regulated and two genes (DNAJC11 and DNAJC5B) were up-regulated in all three studied tumor cell lines by approximately more than two folds. The result of other studied genes (19 genes) showed different expressional pattern (up or down-expression) based on tumor cell lines. Conclusion: According to the findings of the present study, we may suggest that there is a direct correlation between OCT4B1 expression in tumor cell lines (and tissues) and HSP40 family gene expressions to escape from apoptosis and cancer expansion. PMID:27081464

  8. Difference in fibril core stability between two tau four-repeat domain proteins: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gayathri; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2013-12-10

    One of the signatures of Alzheimer's disease and tauopathies is fibrillization of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The purpose of this study was to compare the high-resolution structure of fibrils formed by two different tau four-repeat domain constructs, tau4RD and tauK18, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry as a tool. While the two fibrils are found to be constructed on similar structural principles, the tauK18 fibril has a slightly more stable core. This difference in fibril core stability appears to be reflective of the mechanistic differences in the aggregation pathways of the two proteins. PMID:24256615

  9. Different intracellular distribution of avian reovirus core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Lostale-Seijo, Irene; Martinez-Costas, Jose; Benavente, Javier

    2012-10-25

    A comparative analysis of the intracellular distribution of avian reovirus (ARV) core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin revealed that, whereas the viral protein accumulates in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of avian cells, most sigmaA concentrates in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells in tight association with the insoluble nuclear matrix fraction. Our results further showed that sigmaA becomes arrested in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells via association with mammalian cell-specific factors and that this association prevents nucleolar targeting. Inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity, but not of RNA polymerase I activity, in infected mammalian cells induces nucleus-to-cytoplasm sigmaA translocation through a CRM1- and RanGTP-dependent mechanism, yet a heterokaryon assay suggests that sigmaA does not shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. The scarcity of sigmaA in cytoplasmic viral factories of infected mammalian cells could be one of the factors contributing to limited ARV replication in mammalian cells.

  10. Mutations in CSPP1, Encoding a Core Centrosomal Protein, Cause a Range of Ciliopathy Phenotypes in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Ranad; Shamseldin, Hanan E.; Loucks, Catrina M.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Ansari, Shinu; Ibrahim Khalil, Mohamed; Al-Yacoub, Nadya; Davis, Erica E.; Mola, Natalie A.; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Herridge, Warren; Chudley, Albert E.; Chodirker, Bernard N.; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Majewski, Jacek; Katsanis, Nicholas; Poizat, Coralie; Johnson, Colin A.; Parboosingh, Jillian; Boycott, Kym M.; Innes, A. Micheil; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2014-01-01

    Ciliopathies are characterized by a pattern of multisystem involvement that is consistent with the developmental role of the primary cilium. Within this biological module, mutations in genes that encode components of the cilium and its anchoring structure, the basal body, are the major contributors to both disease causality and modification. However, despite rapid advances in this field, the majority of the genes that drive ciliopathies and the mechanisms that govern the pronounced phenotypic variability of this group of disorders remain poorly understood. Here, we show that mutations in CSPP1, which encodes a core centrosomal protein, are disease causing on the basis of the independent identification of two homozygous truncating mutations in three consanguineous families (one Arab and two Hutterite) affected by variable ciliopathy phenotypes ranging from Joubert syndrome to the more severe Meckel-Gruber syndrome with perinatal lethality and occipital encephalocele. Consistent with the recently described role of CSPP1 in ciliogenesis, we show that mutant fibroblasts from one affected individual have severely impaired ciliogenesis with concomitant defects in sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling. Our results expand the list of centrosomal proteins implicated in human ciliopathies. PMID:24360803

  11. Age-related decrease in the activity of UDP-xylose:core protein xylosyltransferase in rat costal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B; Gressner, A M; Nevo, Z; Greiling, H

    1982-06-01

    The activity of UDP-xylose:core protein xylosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.26) in costal cartilage of young rats (3 months) and old rats (36 months) was measured. The enzyme activity in cartilage of young rats (mean +/- S.D.) is 3370 +/- 1440 Bq h-1 mg-1 DNA, which is about three times higher than that determined in cartilage of old rats (1090 +/- 520 Bq h-1 mg-1 protein). The amount of galactosamine-containing proteoglycosaminoglycans that are extractable with 4 M guanidinium chloride from cartilage is significantly higher in young rats (29.1 +/- 4.8 nmol GalN per mg cartilage wet weight) than in old animals (5.8 +/- 3.0 nmol GalN per mg cartilage wet weight). Thus, if xylosyltransferase activity is referred to the amount of galactosamine-containing proteoglycans in cartilage, nearly identical values are obtained (young rats, 80 +/- 30 Bq h-1 mumol-1 GalN; old rats, 85 +/- 35 Bq h-1 mumol-1 GalN). The results support the assumption that the synthesis of proteochondroitin sulfate is diminished in costal cartilage of old rats by a mechanism involving a reduced activity of xylosyltransferase. PMID:7109714

  12. Endothelial reticulon-4B (Nogo-B) regulates ICAM-1-mediated leukocyte transmigration and acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Annarita; Manes, Thomas D; Davalos, Alberto; Wright, Paulette L; Sessa, William C

    2011-02-17

    The reticulon (Rtn) family of proteins are localized primarily to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of most cells. The Rtn-4 family, (aka Nogo) consists of 3 splice variants of a common gene called Rtn-4A, Rtn-4B, and Rtn-4C. Recently, we identified the Rtn-4B (Nogo-B) protein in endothelial and smooth muscle cells of the vessel wall, and showed that Nogo-B is a regulator of cell migration in vitro and vascular remodeling and angiogenesis in vivo. However, the role of Nogo-B in inflammation is still largely unknown. In the present study, we use 2 models of inflammation to show that endothelial Nogo-B regulates leukocyte transmigration and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)-dependent signaling. Mice lacking Nogo-A/B have a marked reduction in neutrophil and monocyte recruitment to sites of inflammation, while Nogo-A/B(-/-) mice engrafted with wild-type (WT) bone marrow still exhibit impaired inflammation compared with WT mice engrafted with Nogo-A/B(-/-) bone marrow, arguing for a critical role of host Nogo in this response. Using human leukocytes and endothelial cells, we show mechanistically that the silencing of Nogo-B with small interfering RNA (siRNA) impairs the transmigration of neutrophils and reduces ICAM-1-stimulated phosphorylation of vascular endothelial-cell cadherin (VE-cadherin). Our results reveal a novel role of endothelial Nogo-B in basic immune functions and provide a key link in the molecular network governing endothelial-cell regulation of diapedesis. PMID:21183689

  13. Coevolved Mutations Reveal Distinct Architectures for Two Core Proteins in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Rasool, Shafqat; Khan, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Switching of bacterial flagellar rotation is caused by large domain movements of the FliG protein triggered by binding of the signal protein CheY to FliM. FliG and FliM form adjacent multi-subunit arrays within the basal body C-ring. The movements alter the interaction of the FliG C-terminal (FliGC) “torque” helix with the stator complexes. Atomic models based on the Salmonella entrovar C-ring electron microscopy reconstruction have implications for switching, but lack consensus on the relative locations of the FliG armadillo (ARM) domains (amino-terminal (FliGN), middle (FliGM) and FliGC) as well as changes during chemotaxis. The generality of the Salmonella model is challenged by the variation in motor morphology and response between species. We studied coevolved residue mutations to determine the unifying elements of switch architecture. Residue interactions, measured by their coevolution, were formalized as a network, guided by structural data. Our measurements reveal a common design with dedicated switch and motor modules. The FliM middle domain (FliMM) has extensive connectivity most simply explained by conserved intra and inter-subunit contacts. In contrast, FliG has patchy, complex architecture. Conserved structural motifs form interacting nodes in the coevolution network that wire FliMM to the FliGC C-terminal, four-helix motor module (C3-6). FliG C3-6 coevolution is organized around the torque helix, differently from other ARM domains. The nodes form separated, surface-proximal patches that are targeted by deleterious mutations as in other allosteric systems. The dominant node is formed by the EHPQ motif at the FliMMFliGM contact interface and adjacent helix residues at a central location within FliGM. The node interacts with nodes in the N-terminal FliGc α-helix triad (ARM-C) and FliGN. ARM-C, separated from C3-6 by the MFVF motif, has poor intra-network connectivity consistent with its variable orientation revealed by structural data. ARM-C could

  14. Magnitude and range of the RKKy interaction in SmRh4B4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terris, B. D.; Gray, K. E.; Dunlap, B. D.

    1985-04-01

    The superconductive and magnetic transition temperatures taken together are shown to provide a unique probe which separately determines both the magnitude and range of the RKKY interaction in the RERh4B4 magnetic-superconductors (RE = Er, Sm). Experimentally, an unexpected peak is found in the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature of SmRh4B4 vs. electron mean free path, while for ErRh4B4 the ferromagnetic ordering temperature decreases monotonically. These qualitative features, as well as the quanitative differences between SmRh4B4 and ErRh4B4, are in excellent agreement with calculations using a mean free path dependent RKKY interaction.

  15. Protein import channel of the outer mitochondrial membrane: a highly stable Tom40-Tom22 core structure differentially interacts with preproteins, small tom proteins, and import receptors.

    PubMed

    Meisinger, C; Ryan, M T; Hill, K; Model, K; Lim, J H; Sickmann, A; Müller, H; Meyer, H E; Wagner, R; Pfanner, N

    2001-04-01

    The preprotein translocase of the yeast mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM) consists of the initial import receptors Tom70 and Tom20 and a approximately 400-kDa (400 K) general import pore (GIP) complex that includes the central receptor Tom22, the channel Tom40, and the three small Tom proteins Tom7, Tom6, and Tom5. We report that the GIP complex is a highly stable complex with an unusual resistance to urea and alkaline pH. Under mild conditions for mitochondrial lysis, the receptor Tom20, but not Tom70, is quantitatively associated with the GIP complex, forming a 500K to 600K TOM complex. A preprotein, stably arrested in the GIP complex, is released by urea but not high salt, indicating that ionic interactions are not essential for keeping the preprotein in the GIP complex. Under more stringent detergent conditions, however, Tom20 and all three small Tom proteins are released, while the preprotein remains in the GIP complex. Moreover, purified outer membrane vesicles devoid of translocase components of the intermembrane space and inner membrane efficiently accumulate the preprotein in the GIP complex. Together, Tom40 and Tom22 thus represent the functional core unit that stably holds accumulated preproteins. The GIP complex isolated from outer membranes exhibits characteristic TOM channel activity with two coupled conductance states, each corresponding to the activity of purified Tom40, suggesting that the complex contains two simultaneously active and coupled channel pores. PMID:11259583

  16. The internal organization of mycobacterial partition assembly: does the DNA wrap a protein core?

    PubMed

    Qian, Shuo; Dean, Rebecca; Urban, Volker S; Chaudhuri, Barnali N

    2012-01-01

    Before cell division in many bacteria, the ParBs spread on a large segment of DNA encompassing the origin-proximal parS site(s) to form the partition assembly that participates in chromosome segregation. Little is known about the structural organization of chromosomal partition assembly. We report solution X-ray and neutron scattering data characterizing the size parameters and internal organization of a nucleoprotein assembly formed by the mycobacterial chromosomal ParB and a 120-meric DNA containing a parS-encompassing region from the mycobacterial genome. The cross-sectional radii of gyration and linear mass density describing the rod-like ParB-DNA assembly were determined from solution scattering. A "DNA outside, protein inside" mode of partition assembly organization consistent with the neutron scattering hydrogen/deuterium contrast variation data is discussed. In this organization, the high scattering DNA is positioned towards the outer region of the partition assembly. The new results presented here provide a basis for understanding how ParBs organize the parS-proximal chromosome, thus setting the stage for further interactions with the DNA condensins, the origin tethering factors and the ParA. PMID:23285150

  17. The SNARE protein vti1a functions in dense-core vesicle biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Alexander M; Kurps, Julia; de Wit, Heidi; Schöning, Susanne; Toft-Bertelsen, Trine L; Lauks, Juliane; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Weiss, Annita N; Schulz, Alexander; Fischer von Mollard, Gabriele; Verhage, Matthijs; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2014-01-01

    The SNARE protein vti1a is proposed to drive fusion of intracellular organelles, but recent data also implicated vti1a in exocytosis. Here we show that vti1a is absent from mature secretory vesicles in adrenal chromaffin cells, but localizes to a compartment near the trans-Golgi network, partially overlapping with syntaxin-6. Exocytosis is impaired in vti1a null cells, partly due to fewer Ca2+-channels at the plasma membrane, partly due to fewer vesicles of reduced size and synaptobrevin-2 content. In contrast, release kinetics and Ca2+-sensitivity remain unchanged, indicating that the final fusion reaction leading to transmitter release is unperturbed. Additional deletion of the closest related SNARE, vti1b, does not exacerbate the vti1a phenotype, and vti1b null cells show no secretion defects, indicating that vti1b does not participate in exocytosis. Long-term re-expression of vti1a (days) was necessary for restoration of secretory capacity, whereas strong short-term expression (hours) was ineffective, consistent with vti1a involvement in an upstream step related to vesicle generation, rather than in fusion. We conclude that vti1a functions in vesicle generation and Ca2+-channel trafficking, but is dispensable for transmitter release. PMID:24902738

  18. Cross-talk between PKA-Cβ and p65 mediates synergistic induction of PDE4B by roflumilast and NTHi

    PubMed Central

    Susuki-Miyata, Seiko; Miyata, Masanori; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Xu, Haidong; Kai, Hirofumi; Yan, Chen; Li, Jian-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) plays a key role in regulating inflammation. Roflumilast, a phosphodiesterase (PDE)4-selective inhibitor, has recently been approved for treating severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with exacerbation. However, there is also clinical evidence suggesting the development of tachyphylaxis or tolerance on repeated dosing of roflumilast and the possible contribution of PDE4B up-regulation, which could be counterproductive for suppressing inflammation. Thus, understanding how PDE4B is up-regulated in the context of the complex pathogenesis and medications of COPD may help improve the efficacy and possibly ameliorate the tolerance of roflumilast. Here we show that roflumilast synergizes with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a major bacterial cause of COPD exacerbation, to up-regulate PDE4B2 expression in human airway epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Up-regulated PDE4B2 contributes to the induction of certain important chemokines in both enzymatic activity-dependent and activity-independent manners. We also found that protein kinase A catalytic subunit β (PKA-Cβ) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 subunit were required for the synergistic induction of PDE4B2. PKA-Cβ phosphorylates p65 in a cAMP-dependent manner. Moreover, Ser276 of p65 is critical for mediating the PKA-Cβ–induced p65 phosphorylation and the synergistic induction of PDE4B2. Collectively, our data unveil a previously unidentified mechanism underlying synergistic up-regulation of PDE4B2 via a cross-talk between PKA-Cβ and p65 and may help develop new therapeutic strategies to improve the efficacy of PDE4 inhibitor. PMID:25831493

  19. Core-shell molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles with assistant recognition polymer chains for effective recognition and enrichment of natural low-abundance protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dejing; Yang, Qian; Jin, Susu; Song, Yingying; Gao, Junfei; Wang, Ying; Mi, Huaifeng

    2014-02-01

    Core-shell molecular imprinting of nanomaterials overcomes difficulties with template transfer and achieves higher binding capacities for macromolecular imprinting, which are more important to the imprinting of natural low-abundance proteins from cell extracts. In the present study, a novel strategy of preparing core-shell nanostructured molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was developed that combined the core-shell approach with assistant recognition polymer chains (ARPCs). Vinyl-modified silica nanoparticles were used as support and ARPCs were used as additional functional monomers. Immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was chosen as the model protein. The cloned template protein BiP was selectively assembled with ARPCs from their library, which contained numerous limited-length polymer chains with randomly distributed recognition and immobilization sites. The resulting complex was copolymerized onto the surface of vinyl-modified silica nanoparticles under low concentrations of the monomers. After template removal, core-shell-structured nanoparticles with a thin imprinted polymer layer were produced. The particles demonstrated considerably high adsorption capacity, fast adsorption kinetics and selective binding affinities toward the template BiP. Furthermore, the synthesized MIP nanoparticles successfully isolated cloned protein BiP from protein mixtures and highly enriched BiP from an ER extract containing thousands of kinds of proteins. The enrichment reached 115-fold and the binding capacity was 5.4 μg g(-1), which were higher than those achieved by using traditional MIP microspheres. The advantageous properties of MIP nanoparticles hold promise for further practical applications in biology, such as protein analysis and purification. PMID:24140608

  20. Loss of INPP4B causes a DNA repair defect through loss of BRCA1, ATM and ATR and can be targeted with PARP inhibitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Ip, Laura R H; Poulogiannis, George; Viciano, Felipe Cia; Sasaki, Junko; Kofuji, Satoshi; Spanswick, Victoria J; Hochhauser, Daniel; Hartley, John A; Sasaki, Takehiko; Gewinner, Christina A

    2015-04-30

    Treatment options for ovarian cancer patients remain limited and overall survival is less than 50% despite recent clinical advances. The lipid phosphatase inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) has been described as a tumor suppressor in the PI3K/Akt pathway with loss of expression found most pronounced in breast, ovarian cancer and melanoma. Using microarray technology we identified a DNA repair defect in INPP4B-deficient cells, which we further characterized by comet assays and quantification of γH2AX, RAD51 and 53BP1 foci formation. INPP4B loss resulted in significantly increased sensitivity towards PARP inhibition, comparable to loss of BRCA1 in two- and three-dimensional in vitro models, as well as in in vivo xenograft models. Mechanistically, we discovered that INPP4B forms a protein complex with the key players of DNA repair, ATR and BRCA1, in GST pulldown and 293T overexpression assays, and INPP4B loss affects BRCA1, ATM and ATR protein stability resulting in the observed DNA repair defect. Given that INPP4B loss has been found in 40% of ovarian cancer patients, this study provides the rationale for establishing INPP4B as a biomarker of PARP inhibitor response, and consequently offers novel therapeutic options for a significant subset of patients. Loss of the tumor suppressor inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) results in a DNA repair defect due to concomitant loss of BRCA1, ATR and ATM and can be therapeutically targeted with PARP inhibitors. PMID:25868852

  1. Assignment of the gene for the core protein II (UQCRC2) subunit of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc[sub 1] complex to human chromosome 16p12

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.M.V. Kingston General Hospital ); Ozawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi ); Rozen, R. Montreal Children's Hospital )

    1993-11-01

    The mammalian cytochrome be[sub 1] complex (complex III) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain catalyzes electron transfer from ubiquinol to cytochrome c. The complex consists of 10-11 subunits: Core proteins I and II, cytochromes b and c[sub 1], the Rieske iron-sulfur protein, the ubiquinone-binding protein, the hinge protein, and 3-4 subunits of low molecular weight. Cytochrome b is encoded by the mitochondrial genome; the other subunits are encoded by nuclear genes. Both the human cytochrome c[sub 1] and the human ubiquinone-binding protein subunits have been assigned to chromosome 8 by somatic cell hybrid mapping. In this study, the authors used in situ hybridization to map core protein II. In situ hybridization to BrdU-synchronized peripheral blood lymphocytes was performed using the method of Harper and Saunders. Chromosomes were stained with a modified fluorescence, 0.25% Wright's stain procedure. The positions of silver grains directly over or touching well-banded metaphase chromosomes were mapped to an ISCN idiogram. The analysis of the distribution of 200 silver grams following in situ hybridization revealed a significant clustering of grains in the p12 region of chromosome 16. The assignment of the core II subunit to human chromosome 16p12 confirms that it is encoded by the nuclear, rather than the mitochondrial, genome. The identification of a single strong hybridization signal is indicative of one locus with no pseudogenes. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Accumulation of p21 proteins at DNA damage sites independent of p53 and core NHEJ factors following irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} p21 accumulated rapidly at laser-irradiated sites via its C-terminal region. {yields} p21 colocalized with the DSB marker {gamma}-H2AX and the DSB sensor Ku80. {yields} Accumulation of p21 is dependent on PCNA, but not p53 and the NHEJ core factors. {yields} Accumulation activity of p21 was conserved among human and animal cells. {yields} p21 is a useful tool as a detection marker of DNA damaged sites. -- Abstract: The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21 plays key roles in p53-dependent DNA-damage responses, i.e., cell cycle checkpoints, senescence, or apoptosis. p21 might also play a role in DNA repair. p21 foci arise at heavy-ion-irradiated DNA-double-strand break (DSB) sites, which are mainly repaired by nonhomologous DNA-end-joining (NHEJ). However, no mechanisms of p21 accumulation at double-strand break (DSB) sites have been clarified in detail. Recent works indicate that Ku70 and Ku80 are essential for the accumulation of other NHEJ core factors, e.g., DNA-PKcs, XRCC4 and XLF, and other DNA damage response factors, e.g., BRCA1. Here, we show that p21 foci arise at laser-irradiated sites in cells from various tissues from various species. The accumulation of EGFP-p21 was detected in not only normal cells, but also transformed or cancer cells. Our results also showed that EGFP-p21 accumulated rapidly at irradiated sites, and colocalized with the DSB marker {gamma}-H2AX and with the DSB sensor protein Ku80. On the other hand, the accumulation occurred in Ku70-, Ku80-, or DNA-PKcs-deficient cell lines and in human papillomavirus 18-positive cells, whereas the p21 mutant without the PCNA-binding region (EGFP-p21(1-146)) failed to accumulate at the irradiated sites. These findings suggest that the accumulation of p21, but not functional p53 and the NHEJ core factors, is dependent on PCNA. These findings also suggest that the accumulation activity of p21 at DNA damaged sites is conserved among human and animal cells, and p21 is a useful

  3. Seed protein percentage and mineral concentration variability and correlation with other seed quality traits in the U.S. Peanut mini-core collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein percentage and mineral concentrations were determined for 95 accessions of the U. S. peanut mini-core collection by nitrogen analysis and inductively coupled plasma – optical emission spectrometry, respectively, using material collected over two field seasons. Significant variability in the ...

  4. Androgen Receptor Coactivator ARID4B Is Required for the Function of Sertoli Cells in Spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ray-Chang; Zeng, Yang; Pan, I-Wen; Wu, Mei-Yi

    2015-09-01

    Defects in spermatogenesis, a process that produces spermatozoa inside seminiferous tubules of the testis, result in male infertility. Spermatogenic progression is highly dependent on a microenvironment provided by Sertoli cells, the only somatic cells and epithelium of seminiferous tubules. However, genes that regulate such an important activity of Sertoli cells are poorly understood. Here, we found that AT-rich interactive domain 4B (ARID4B), is essential for the function of Sertoli cells to regulate spermatogenesis. Specifically, we generated Sertoli cell-specific Arid4b knockout (Arid4bSCKO) mice, and showed that the Arid4bSCKO male mice were completely infertile with impaired testis development and significantly reduced testis size. Importantly, severe structural defects accompanied by loss of germ cells and Sertoli cell-only phenotype were found in many seminiferous tubules of the Arid4bSCKO testes. In addition, maturation of Sertoli cells was significantly delayed in the Arid4bSCKO mice, associated with delayed onset of spermatogenesis. Spermatogenic progression was also defective, showing an arrest at the round spermatid stage in the Arid4bSCKO testes. Interestingly, we showed that ARID4B functions as a "coactivator" of androgen receptor and is required for optimal transcriptional activation of reproductive homeobox 5, an androgen receptor target gene specifically expressed in Sertoli cells and critical for spermatogenesis. Together, our study identified ARID4B to be a key regulator of Sertoli cell function important for male germ cell development. PMID:26258622

  5. The Structural Basis of Oncogenic Mutations G12, G13 and Q61 in Small GTPase K-Ras4B.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoyong; Jang, Hyunbum; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Ras mediates cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Mutations in K-Ras4B are predominant at residues G12, G13 and Q61. Even though all impair GAP-assisted GTP → GDP hydrolysis, the mutation frequencies of K-Ras4B in human cancers vary. Here we aim to figure out their mechanisms and differential oncogenicity. In total, we performed 6.4 μs molecular dynamics simulations on the wild-type K-Ras4B (K-Ras4B(WT)-GTP/GDP) catalytic domain, the K-Ras4B(WT)-GTP-GAP complex, and the mutants (K-Ras4B(G12C/G12D/G12V)-GTP/GDP, K-Ras4B(G13D)-GTP/GDP, K-Ras4B(Q61H)-GTP/GDP) and their complexes with GAP. In addition, we simulated 'exchanged' nucleotide states. These comprehensive simulations reveal that in solution K-Ras4B(WT)-GTP exists in two, active and inactive, conformations. Oncogenic mutations differentially elicit an inactive-to-active conformational transition in K-Ras4B-GTP; in K-Ras4B(G12C/G12D)-GDP they expose the bound nucleotide which facilitates the GDP-to-GTP exchange. These mechanisms may help elucidate the differential mutational statistics in K-Ras4B-driven cancers. Exchanged nucleotide simulations reveal that the conformational transition is more accessible in the GTP-to-GDP than in the GDP-to-GTP exchange. Importantly, GAP not only donates its R789 arginine finger, but stabilizes the catalytically-competent conformation and pre-organizes catalytic residue Q61; mutations disturb the R789/Q61 organization, impairing GAP-mediated GTP hydrolysis. Together, our simulations help provide a mechanistic explanation of key mutational events in one of the most oncogenic proteins in cancer. PMID:26902995

  6. Optimized human CYP4B1 in combination with the alkylator prodrug 4-ipomeanol serves as a novel suicide gene system for adoptive T-cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Roellecke, K; Virts, E L; Einholz, R; Edson, K Z; Altvater, B; Rossig, C; von Laer, D; Scheckenbach, K; Wagenmann, M; Reinhardt, D; Kramm, C M; Rettie, A E; Wiek, C; Hanenberg, H

    2016-07-01

    Engineering autologous or allogeneic T cells to express a suicide gene can control potential toxicity in adoptive T-cell therapies. We recently reported the development of a novel human suicide gene system that is based on an orphan human cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP4B1, and the naturally occurring alkylator prodrug 4-ipomeanol. The goal of this study was to systematically develop a clinically applicable self-inactivating lentiviral vector for efficient co-expression of CYP4B1 as an ER-located protein with two distinct types of cell surface proteins, either MACS selection genes for donor lymphocyte infusions after allogeneic stem cell transplantation or chimeric antigen receptors for retargeting primary T cells. The U3 region of the myeloproliferative sarcoma virus in combination with the T2A site was found to drive high-level expression of our CYP4B1 mutant with truncated CD34 or CD271 as MACS suitable selection markers. This lentiviral vector backbone was also well suited for co-expression of CYP4B1 with a codon-optimized CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) construct. Finally, 4-ipomeanol efficiently induced apoptosis in primary T cells that co-express mutant CYP4B1 and the divergently located MACS selection and CAR genes. In conclusion, we here developed a clinically suited lentiviral vector that supports high-level co-expression of cell surface proteins with a potent novel human suicide gene. PMID:27092941

  7. Recombinant HCV core protein and the secretion of associated cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ) in immunized mice.

    PubMed

    Torbati, Elham; Ghassab, Romina Karimzadeh; Davachi, Navid Dadashpour

    2013-12-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of acute and chronic hepatitis which is a disorder with a high worldwide prevalence. HCV core protein was considered as immunogenic counterpart of the HCV vaccine and it is an ideal candidate for HCV vaccine. Since cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-Gamma are responsible for the prevention of viral infection, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of HCV core protein as a vaccine. Ten BALB/c mice were immunized with HCV core protein and after 42 days the splenocytes were isolated and the IL-6 and INF-gamma secretion were measured using ELISpot technique, at the same time TNF-alpha was determined by ELISA in the sera. The MTT assay was done to assess the viability of the cultured splenocytes. For evaluating the humoral immune response against the recombinant HCV core protein the DOT Blot test was used. Data was compared using one-way ANOVA test and significant results were considered at p < 0.05. In the present study the IL-6, INF-gamma and TNF-alpha levels were dramatically higher in the immunized mice compared to the control group (respectively, 22.9 +/- 1.26; 18.53 +/- 3.87; 53.96 +/- 4.54 and p < 0.05). The immunized mice with recombinant HCV core protein showed higher amount of IL-6, INF-gamma and TNF-alpha in the current study. Since the level of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma is high in patients with acute HCV infection, thus a vaccine which could stimulate the secretion of these cytokines in advance may have a preventive role. PMID:24517026

  8. Preparation of factor VII concentrate using CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B immunoaffinity chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi Hosseini, Kamran; Nasiri, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Factor VII concentrates are used in patients with congenital or acquired factor VII deficiency or treatment of hemophilia patients with inhibitors. In this research, immunoaffinity chromatography was used to purify factor VII from prothrombin complex (Prothrombin- Proconvertin-Stuart Factor-Antihemophilic Factor B or PPSB) which contains coagulation factors II, VII, IX and X. The aim of this study was to improve purity, safety and tolerability as a highly purified factor VII concentrate. Methods: PPSB was prepared using DEAE-Sephadex and was used as the starting material for purification of coagulation factor VII. Prothrombin complex was treated by solvent/detergent at 24°C for 6 h with constant stirring. The mixture of PPSB in the PBS buffer was filtered and then chromatographed using CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B coupled with specific antibody. Factors II, IX, VII, X and VIIa were assayed on the fractions. Fractions of 48-50 were pooled and lyophilized as a factor VII concentrate. Agarose gel electrophoresis was performed and Tween 80 was measured in the factor VII concentrate. Results: Specific activity of factor VII concentrate increased from 0.16 to 55.6 with a purificationfold of 347.5 and the amount of activated factor VII (FVIIa) was found higher than PPSB (4.4-fold). Results of electrophoresis on agarose gel indicated higher purity of Factor VII compared to PPSB; these finding revealed that factor VII migrated as alpha-2 proteins. In order to improve viral safety, solvent-detergent treatment was applied prior to further purification and nearly complete elimination of tween 80 (2 μg/ml). Conclusion: It was concluded that immuonoaffinity chromatography using CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B can be a suitable choice for large-scale production of factor VII concentrate with higher purity, safety and activated factor VII. PMID:26034723

  9. Detection of hepatitis C virus core protein in serum by atomic force microscopy combined with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yuri D; Kaysheva, Anna L; Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Pleshakova, Tatyana O; Krohin, Nikolay V; Izotov, Alexander A; Shumov, Ivan D; Uchaikin, Vasiliy F; Konev, Vladimir A; Ziborov, Vadim S; Archakov, Alexander I

    2015-01-01

    A method for detection and identification of core antigen of hepatitis C virus (HCVcoreAg)-containing particles in the serum was proposed, with due account taken of the interactions of proteotypic peptides with Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) ions. The method is based on a combination of reversible biospecific atomic force microscopy (AFM)-fishing and mass spectrometry (MS). AFM-fishing enables concentration, detection, and counting of protein complexes captured on the AFM chip surface, with their subsequent MS identification. Biospecific AFM-fishing of HCVcoreAg-containing particles from serum samples was carried out using AFM chips with immobilized antibodies against HCVcoreAg (HCVcoreAgim). Formation of complexes between anti-HCVcoreAgim and HCVcoreAg-containing particles on the AFM chip surface during the fishing process was demonstrated. These complexes were registered and counted by AFM. Further MS analysis allowed reliable identification of HCVcoreAg within the complexes formed on the AFM chip surface. It was shown that MS data processing, with account taken of the interactions between HCVcoreAg peptides and Na(+), K(+) cations, and Cl(-) anions, allows an increase in the number of peptides identified. PMID:25759582

  10. BPO4@B2O3 and (BPO4@B2O3):Eu3+: The novel single-emitting-component phosphors for near UV-white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiyu; Liu, Wei; Jiang, Yu; Cao, Lixin; Su, Ge; Gao, Rongjie

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays much effort has been devoted to exploring novel luminescent materials with low-cost, high stability and excellent luminescent properties. In this paper, a new kind of luminescent material BPO4@B2O3 was prepared by using a facile method. The as-obtained samples contain numerous BPO4 nanoparticles enclosed by amorphous and crystalline B2O3 homogeneously, which exhibits a broad emission band ranging from 380 to 700 nm under near-UV irradiation. More importantly, it is worth noting that the BPO4@B2O3 phosphor exhibits the excellent thermal quenching property, which endows it with a promising prospect as phosphors for high power white LEDs. To further promote its application as white light phosphors, Eu3+ ions were doped into the BPO4@B2O3 samples and prepared the (BPO4@B2O3):Eu3+ phosphors with chromaticity coordinates (0.3022, 0.3122). The corresponding packaging of LEDs indicates that both BPO4@B2O3 and (BPO4@B2O3):Eu3+ can be considered as the promising phosphors for WLEDs.

  11. Structural basis for the design of selective phosphodiesterase 4B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fox, David; Burgin, Alex B; Gurney, Mark E

    2014-03-01

    Phosphodiesterase-4B (PDE4B) regulates the pro-inflammatory Toll Receptor -Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα) pathway in monocytes, macrophages and microglial cells. As such, it is an important, although under-exploited molecular target for anti-inflammatory drugs. This is due in part to the difficulty of developing selective PDE4B inhibitors as the amino acid sequence of the PDE4 active site is identical in all PDE4 subtypes (PDE4A-D). We show that highly selective PDE4B inhibitors can be designed by exploiting sequence differences outside the active site. Specifically, PDE4B selectivity can be achieved by capture of a C-terminal regulatory helix, now termed CR3 (Control Region 3), across the active site in a conformation that closes access by cAMP. PDE4B selectivity is driven by a single amino acid polymorphism in CR3 (Leu674 in PDE4B1 versus Gln594 in PDE4D). The reciprocal mutations in PDE4B and PDE4D cause a 70-80 fold shift in selectivity. Our structural studies show that CR3 is flexible and can adopt multiple orientations and multiple registries in the closed conformation. The new co-crystal structure with bound ligand provides a guide map for the design of PDE4B selective anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:24361374

  12. Effects of hepatitis C virus on suppressor of cytokine signaling mRNA levels: comparison between different genotypes and core protein sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Stéphanie; Clément, Sophie; Guilloux, Kévin; Conzelmann, Stéphanie; Penin, François; Negro, Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Glucose metabolism disturbances, including insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, are frequent and important cofactors of hepatitis C. Increasing epidemiological and experimental data suggest that all major genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV), albeit to a different extent, cause insulin resistance. The HCV core protein has been shown to be sufficient to impair insulin signaling in vitro through several post-receptorial mechanisms, mostly via the activation of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family members and the consequent decrease of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). The levels of IRS-1 and SOCS were investigated upon expression of the core protein of HCV genotypes 1-4. Furthermore, the core protein sequences were analyzed to identify the amino acid residues responsible for IRS-1 decrease, with particular regard to SOCS mRNA deregulation. The results suggest that the activation of SOCS family members is a general mechanism associated with the common HCV genotypes. A rare genotype 1b variant, however, failed to activate any of the SOCS tested: this allowed to analyze in detail the distinct amino acid sequences responsible for SOCS deregulation. By combining approaches using intergenotypic chimeras and site-directed mutagenesis, genetic evidence was provided in favor of a role of amino acids 49 and 131 of the HCV core-encoding sequence in mediating SOCS transactivation. PMID:21503913

  13. HCV core protein-induced upregulation of microRNA-196a promotes aberrant proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Li, Guangming; Yue, Zhanyi; Li, Chengzhong

    2016-06-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is critical in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Investigations on HCC have previously focused on microRNAs, a class of small non‑coding RNAs, which are crucial in cancer development and progression. The present study aimed to investigate whether microRNA (miR)‑196a is aberrantly regulated by the HCV core protein, and whether miR‑196a is involved in the regulation of the aberrant proliferation of HCV‑HCC cells. In the study, miRNA expression was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. An Ad‑HCV core adenovirus was constructed and cell proliferation was measured using a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and a cell cycle assay following infection. The results of the present study demonstrated that the HCV core protein increased the expression of miR‑196a, and that overexpression of miR‑196a in the HepG2 and Huh‑7 HCC cell lines promoted cell proliferation by inducing the G1‑S transition. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) was directly regulated by miR‑196a, and was essential in mediating the biological effects of miR‑196a in HCC. The overexpression of FOXO1 markedly reversed the effect of miR‑196a in HCC cell proliferation. Taken together, the data obtained in the present study provided compelling evidence that elevated expression levels of miR‑196a by the HCV core protein can function as an onco‑microRNA during HCV‑induced cell proliferation by downregulating the expression of FOXO1, indicating a potential novel therapeutic target for HCV-related HCC. PMID:27108614

  14. Identification of residues in the hepatitis C virus core protein that are critical for capsid assembly in a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Klein, Kevin C; Dellos, Sheri R; Lingappa, Jaisri R

    2005-06-01

    Significant advances have been made in understanding hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication through development of replicon systems. However, neither replicon systems nor standard cell culture systems support significant assembly of HCV capsids, leaving a large gap in our knowledge of HCV virion formation. Recently, we established a cell-free system in which over 60% of full-length HCV core protein synthesized de novo in cell extracts assembles into HCV capsids by biochemical and morphological criteria. Here we used mutational analysis to identify residues in HCV core that are important for capsid assembly in this highly reproducible cell-free system. We found that basic residues present in two clusters within the N-terminal 68 amino acids of HCV core played a critical role, while the uncharged linker domain between them was not. Furthermore, the aspartate at position 111, the region spanning amino acids 82 to 102, and three serines that are thought to be sites of phosphorylation do not appear to be critical for HCV capsid formation in this system. Mutation of prolines important for targeting of core to lipid droplets also failed to alter HCV capsid assembly in the cell-free system. In addition, wild-type HCV core did not rescue assembly-defective mutants. These data constitute the first systematic and quantitative analysis of the roles of specific residues and domains of HCV core in capsid formation. PMID:15890921

  15. Detailed characterization of a purified type 4 phosphodiesterase, HSPDE4B2B: differentiation of high- and low-affinity (R)-rolipram binding.

    PubMed

    Rocque, W J; Holmes, W D; Patel, I R; Dougherty, R W; Ittoop, O; Overton, L; Hoffman, C R; Wisely, G B; Willard, D H; Luther, M A

    1997-03-01

    We have overexpressed in a baculovirus expression system, and purified to > 95% homogeneity, milligram quantities of a human recombinant rolipram-sensitive cAMP phosphodiesterase, HSPDE4B2B (amino acid residues 81-564). The protein expression levels were approximately 8 mg of HSPDE4B2B (81-564) per liter of Sf9 cells. The Km of the purified enzyme for cAMP was 4 microM and the Ki for the Type 4 phosphodiesterase-specific inhibitor (R)-rolipram was 0.6 microM. The specific activity of the purified protein was 40 mumol/min/mg protein. A nonequilibrium filter binding assay revealed a high-affinity (R)-rolipram binding site on the purified enzyme with a Kd of 1.5 nM and a stoichiometry of 0.05-0.3 mol of (R)-rolipram per mol of HSPDE4B2B (81-564). Equilibrium dialysis experiments revealed a single binding constant of 140 nM with a stoichiometry of 0.75 mol of (R)-rolipram per mol of HSPDE4B2B (81-564). Size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments suggest that the protein exists in multiple association states larger than a monomer. Proteolysis experiments revealed a 43-kDa fragment that contained catalytic and rolipram-inhibitable activities, but the fragment showed no high-affinity (R)-rolipram binding. Based on the proteolytic cleavage studies a 43-kDa protein was constructed, expressed, and purified. This protein, HSPDE4B2B (152-528), had Km and Vmax similar to those of the HSPDE4B2B (81-564) protein, but did not exhibit high-affinity (R)-rolipram binding. The protein did show low-affinity (R)-rolipram binding using the equilibrium binding assay. These results show that a low-affinity binding site for (R)-rolipram is solely contained within the catalytic domain of HSPDE4B2B, whereas high-affinity (R)-rolipram binding requires residues within the catalytic domain and residues flanking N- and/or C-terminal to the catalytic region. PMID:9056484

  16. A conserved arginine-containing motif crucial for the assembly and enzymatic activity of the mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 core complex.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anamika; Vought, Valarie E; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2008-11-21

    The mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1) belongs to the SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferases. Recent studies indicate that the catalytic subunits of SET1 family members are regulated by interaction with a conserved core group of proteins that include the WD repeat protein-5 (WDR5), retinoblastoma-binding protein-5 (RbBP5), and the absent small homeotic-2-like protein (Ash2L). It has been suggested that WDR5 functions to bridge the interactions between the catalytic and regulatory subunits of SET1 family complexes. However, the molecular details of these interactions are unknown. To gain insight into the interactions among these proteins, we have determined the biophysical basis for the interaction between the human WDR5 and MLL1. Our studies reveal that WDR5 preferentially recognizes a previously unidentified and conserved arginine-containing motif, called the "Win" or WDR5 interaction motif, which is located in the N-SET region of MLL1 and other SET1 family members. Surprisingly, our structural and functional studies show that WDR5 recognizes arginine 3765 of the MLL1 Win motif using the same arginine binding pocket on WDR5 that was previously shown to bind histone H3. We demonstrate that WDR5's recognition of arginine 3765 of MLL1 is essential for the assembly and enzymatic activity of the MLL1 core complex in vitro. PMID:18829457

  17. Crystal Structure of the Core Region of Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein Reveals the Mechanism for Ribonucleoprotein Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Sun, Yuna; Ma, Chao; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liu, Pi; Shen, Shu; Li, Baobin; Lin, Jianping; Deng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses, which belong to the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infect mammals, including humans, causing either hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in humans with high mortality. Hantavirus encodes a nucleocapsid protein (NP) to encapsidate the genome and form a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) together with viral polymerase. Here, we report the crystal structure of the core domains of NP (NPcore) encoded by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV), which are two representative members that cause HCPS in the New World. The constructs of SNV and ANDV NPcore exclude the N- and C-terminal portions of full polypeptide to obtain stable proteins for crystallographic study. The structure features an N lobe and a C lobe to clamp RNA-binding crevice and exhibits two protruding extensions in both lobes. The positively charged residues located in the RNA-binding crevice play a key role in RNA binding and virus replication. We further demonstrated that the C-terminal helix and the linker region connecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain and NPcore are essential for hantavirus NP oligomerization through contacts made with two adjacent protomers. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) visualization of native RNPs extracted from the virions revealed that a monomer-sized NP-RNA complex is the building block of viral RNP. This work provides insight into the formation of hantavirus RNP and provides an understanding of the evolutionary connections that exist among bunyaviruses. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses are distributed across a wide and increasing range of host reservoirs throughout the world. In particular, hantaviruses can be transmitted via aerosols of rodent excreta to humans or from human to human and cause HFRS and HCPS, with mortalities of 15% and 50%, respectively. Hantavirus is therefore listed as a category C pathogen. Hantavirus encodes an NP that plays essential roles both in RNP formation and

  18. Standard Neutron, Photon, and Electron Data Libraries for MCNP4B.

    1997-04-01

    Version 00 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. DLC-189/MCNPXS is for use with Version 4B and later of the MCNP transport code. This data library provides a comprehensive set of cross sections for a wide range of radiation transport applications using the Monte Carlo code package CCC-660/MCNP4B.

  19. Histone demethylase KDM4B regulates otic vesicle invagination via epigenetic control of Dlx3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Rosa A.; Buzzi, Ailín L.; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, the inner ear arises from the otic placode, a thickened swathe of ectoderm that invaginates to form the otic vesicle. We report that histone demethylase KDM4B is dynamically expressed during early stages of chick inner ear formation. A loss of KDM4B results in defective invagination and striking morphological changes in the otic epithelium, characterized by abnormal localization of adhesion and cytoskeletal molecules and reduced expression of several inner ear markers, including Dlx3. In vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals direct and dynamic occupancy of KDM4B and its target, H3K9me3, at regulatory regions of the Dlx3 locus. Accordingly, coelectroporations of DLX3 or KDM4B encoding constructs, but not a catalytically dead mutant of KDM4B, rescue the ear invagination phenotype caused by KDM4B knockdown. Moreover, a loss of DLX3 phenocopies a loss of KDM4B. Collectively, our findings suggest that KDM4B play a critical role during inner ear invagination via modulating histone methylation of the direct target Dlx3. PMID:26598618

  20. Histone demethylase KDM4B regulates otic vesicle invagination via epigenetic control of Dlx3 expression.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Rosa A; Buzzi, Ailín L; Bronner, Marianne E; Strobl-Mazzulla, Pablo H

    2015-11-23

    In vertebrates, the inner ear arises from the otic placode, a thickened swathe of ectoderm that invaginates to form the otic vesicle. We report that histone demethylase KDM4B is dynamically expressed during early stages of chick inner ear formation. A loss of KDM4B results in defective invagination and striking morphological changes in the otic epithelium, characterized by abnormal localization of adhesion and cytoskeletal molecules and reduced expression of several inner ear markers, including Dlx3. In vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals direct and dynamic occupancy of KDM4B and its target, H3K9me3, at regulatory regions of the Dlx3 locus. Accordingly, coelectroporations of DLX3 or KDM4B encoding constructs, but not a catalytically dead mutant of KDM4B, rescue the ear invagination phenotype caused by KDM4B knockdown. Moreover, a loss of DLX3 phenocopies a loss of KDM4B. Collectively, our findings suggest that KDM4B play a critical role during inner ear invagination via modulating histone methylation of the direct target Dlx3. PMID:26598618

  1. TAF4b Regulates Oocyte-Specific Genes Essential for Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Grive, Kathryn J.; Gustafson, Eric A.; Seymour, Kimberly A.; Baddoo, Melody; Schorl, Christoph; Golnoski, Kayla; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Brodsky, Alexander S.; Freiman, Richard N.

    2016-01-01

    TAF4b is a gonadal-enriched subunit of the general transcription factor TFIID that is implicated in promoting healthy ovarian aging and female fertility in mice and humans. To further explore the potential mechanism of TAF4b in promoting ovarian follicle development, we analyzed global gene expression at multiple time points in the human fetal ovary. This computational analysis revealed coordinate expression of human TAF4B and critical regulators and effectors of meiosis I including SYCP3, YBX2, STAG3, and DAZL. To address the functional relevance of this analysis, we turned to the embryonic Taf4b-deficient mouse ovary where, for the first time, we demonstrate, severe deficits in prophase I progression as well as asynapsis in Taf4b-deficient oocytes. Accordingly, TAF4b occupies the proximal promoters of many essential meiosis and oogenesis regulators, including Stra8, Dazl, Figla, and Nobox, and is required for their proper expression. These data reveal a novel TAF4b function in regulating a meiotic gene expression program in early mouse oogenesis, and support the existence of a highly conserved TAF4b-dependent gene regulatory network promoting early oocyte development in both mice and women. PMID:27341508

  2. 75 FR 18509 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Guidance on Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... 21, 2008 (73 FR 9575), FDA made available a guidance on the Q4B process entitled ``Q4B Evaluation and.... In the Federal Register of August 14, 2009 (74 FR 41143), FDA published a notice announcing the... Evaluation and Recommendation of Pharmacopoeial Texts for Use in the International Conference...

  3. Association of CHMP4B and Autophagy with Micronuclei: Implications for Cataract Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sagona, Antonia P.; Nezis, Ioannis P.; Stenmark, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a mechanism of cellular self-degradation that is very important for cellular homeostasis and differentiation. Components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery are required for endosomal sorting and also for autophagy and the completion of cytokinesis. Here we show that the ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4B not only localizes to normal cytokinetic bridges but also to chromosome bridges and micronuclei, the latter surrounded by lysosomes and autophagosomes. Moreover, CHMP4B can be co-immunoprecipitated with chromatin. Interestingly, a CHMP4B mutation associated with autosomal dominant posterior polar cataract abolishes the ability of CHMP4B to localize to micronuclei. We propose that CHMP4B, through its association with chromatin, may participate in the autophagolysosomal degradation of micronuclei and other extranuclear chromatin. This may have implications for DNA degradation during lens cell differentiation, thus potentially protecting lens cells from cataract development. PMID:24741567

  4. Smaller tumor size is associated with poor survival in T4b colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ben; Feng, Yang; Mo, Shao-Bo; Cai, San-Jun; Huang, Li-Yong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To hypothesize that in patients with colon cancer showing heavy intestinal wall invasion without distant metastasis (T4bN0-2M0), small tumor size would correlate with more aggressive tumor behaviors and therefore poorer cancer-specific survival (CSS). METHODS: We analyzed T4bN0-2M0 colon cancer patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. A preliminary analysis of T4bN0-2M0 colon cancer patients at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center is also presented. RESULTS: A total of 1734 T4bN0-2M0 colon cancer patients from the SEER database were included. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed decreasing CSS with decreasing tumor size (P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed a significant association between poorer CSS with smaller tumor size in T4bN0 patients (P = 0.024), and a trend of association in T4bN1 (P = 0.182) and T4bN2 patients (P = 0.191). Multivariate analysis identified tumor size as an independent prognostic factor for CSS in T4bN0-2M0 patients (P = 0.024). Preliminary analysis of Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center samples suggested the 5-year CSS was 50.0%, 72.9% and 77.1% in patients with tumors ≤ 4.0 cm, 4.0-7.0 cm and ≥ 7.0 cm. CONCLUSION: Smaller tumor size is associated with poorer CSS in the T4bN0-2M0 subset of colon cancer, particularly in the T4bN0M0 subgroup. PMID:27547015

  5. Protein-Assisted Assembly of Modular 3D Plasmonic Raspberry-like Core/Satellite Nanoclusters: Correlation of Structure and Optical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Höller, Roland P. M.; Dulle, Martin; Thomä, Sabrina; Mayer, Martin; Steiner, Anja Maria; Förster, Stephan; Fery, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present a bottom-up assembly route for a large-scale organization of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) into three-dimensional (3D) modular assemblies with core/satellite structure. The protein-assisted assembly of small spherical gold or silver NPs with a hydrophilic protein shell (as satellites) onto larger metal NPs (as cores) offers high modularity in sizes and composition at high satellite coverage (close to the jamming limit). The resulting dispersions of metal/metal nanoclusters exhibit high colloidal stability and therefore allow for high concentrations and a precise characterization of the nanocluster architecture in dispersion by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Strong near-field coupling between the building blocks results in distinct regimes of dominant satellite-to-satellite and core-to-satellite coupling. High robustness against satellite disorder was proved by UV/vis diffuse reflectance (integrating sphere) measurements. Generalized multiparticle Mie theory (GMMT) simulations were employed to describe the electromagnetic coupling within the nanoclusters. The close correlation of structure and optical property allows for the rational design of core/satellite nanoclusters with tailored plasmonics and well-defined near-field enhancement, with perspectives for applications such as surface-enhanced spectroscopies. PMID:26982386

  6. Protein-Assisted Assembly of Modular 3D Plasmonic Raspberry-like Core/Satellite Nanoclusters: Correlation of Structure and Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Höller, Roland P M; Dulle, Martin; Thomä, Sabrina; Mayer, Martin; Steiner, Anja Maria; Förster, Stephan; Fery, Andreas; Kuttner, Christian; Chanana, Munish

    2016-06-28

    We present a bottom-up assembly route for a large-scale organization of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) into three-dimensional (3D) modular assemblies with core/satellite structure. The protein-assisted assembly of small spherical gold or silver NPs with a hydrophilic protein shell (as satellites) onto larger metal NPs (as cores) offers high modularity in sizes and composition at high satellite coverage (close to the jamming limit). The resulting dispersions of metal/metal nanoclusters exhibit high colloidal stability and therefore allow for high concentrations and a precise characterization of the nanocluster architecture in dispersion by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Strong near-field coupling between the building blocks results in distinct regimes of dominant satellite-to-satellite and core-to-satellite coupling. High robustness against satellite disorder was proved by UV/vis diffuse reflectance (integrating sphere) measurements. Generalized multiparticle Mie theory (GMMT) simulations were employed to describe the electromagnetic coupling within the nanoclusters. The close correlation of structure and optical property allows for the rational design of core/satellite nanoclusters with tailored plasmonics and well-defined near-field enhancement, with perspectives for applications such as surface-enhanced spectroscopies. PMID:26982386

  7. Identification and characterization of a double-stranded RNA- reovirus temperature-sensitive mutant defective in minor core protein mu2.

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, K M

    1996-01-01

    A newly identified temperature-sensitive mutant whose defect was mapped to the reovirus M1 gene (minor core protein mu2) was studied to better understand the functions of this virion protein. Sequence determination of the Ml gene of this mutant (tsH11.2) revealed a predicted methionine-to-threonine alteration at amino acid 399 and a change from proline to histidine at amino acid 414. The mutant made normal amounts of single-stranded RNA, both in in vitro transcriptase assays and in infected cells, and normal amounts of progeny viral protein at early times in a restrictive infection. However, tsH11.2 produced neither detectable progeny protein nor double-stranded RNA at late times in a restrictive infection. These studies indicate that mu2 plays a role in the conversion of reovirus mRNA to progeny double-stranded RNA. PMID:8676444

  8. Isolation and characterization of ryudocan and syndecan heparan sulfate proteoglycans, core proteins, and cDNAs from a rat endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Shworak, N W; Kojima, T; Rosenberg, R D

    1993-03-01

    We have isolated heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) from cloned rat microvascular endothelial cells using a combination of ion-exchange chromatography, affinity fractionation with antithrombin III (AT III), and gel filtration in denaturing solvents. The anticoagulantly active heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGact) which bind tightly to AT III bear mainly anticoagulantly active heparan sulfate (HSact) whereas the anticoagulantly inactive heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGinact) possess mainly anticoagulantly inactive heparan sulfate (HSinact). The core proteins of HSPGact and HSPGinact were isolated by treatment with Flavobacterium heparitinase and purification by ion-exchange chromatography. SDS-PAGE showed that both sets of core proteins exhibited three major components with M(r) of 25-, 30-, and 50-kD, respectively. Peptide mapping revealed that HSPGact and HSPGinact possess extremely similar core proteins. The primary sequences of internal peptides obtained from HSPGinact core proteins and the NH2-terminal sequence analyses of the 25-kD component from the HSPGinact core proteins demonstrate that the 30-kD component is a previously unidentified species--designated as ryudocan--with the 25-kD component representing a proteolytic degradation product; while the 50-kD component is the rat homolog of syndecan [Saunders S, Jalkanen M, O'Farrell S, Bernfield M: J Cell Biol 1989; 108:1547-1556]. Specific oligonucleotide probes were obtained for ryudocan and syndecan by PCR, and the corresponding cDNAs were isolated from a RFP-EC library. The cDNAs encode type I integral membrane proteins of 202 and 313 amino acids, respectively, which have homologous transmembrane and intracellular domains but very distinct extracellular regions. In particular, ryudocan exhibits only 3 potential glycosaminoglycan (GAG) attachment sites within the extracellular region while syndecan has 5 GAG attachment sites within the same domain. The levels of ryudocan and syndecan mRNA were

  9. Interaction of glucose oxidase with alkyl-substituted Sepharose 4B.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Saman; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen

    2003-09-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOD) is often used in immobilized forms for determination of glucose. To examine the possibility of its adsorption by hydrophobic interactions, palmityl-substituted Sepharose 4B (Sepharoselipid) was employed as an adsorptive matrix. Various conditions were used in tests to improve the limited immobilization of the enzyme observed under normal (native) conditions, including use of high concentrations of denaturing agents. Of the denaturants used, only the cationic detergent dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide was effective in denaturing the protein and exposing its hydrophobic sites for interaction with alkyl residues on the support. This, followed by the process of renaturation, provided catalytically active immobilized preparations. The apoenzyme, prepared by treatment of the holoenzyme with acidified (NH4)2SO4 or thermal denaturation, was totally immobilized on the support. Furthermore, it was shown that either flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) or the alkyl residues, not both, may interact with the nucleotide site at any given time. Results are discussed in terms of high rigidity of GOD molecule and limited exposure of hydrophobic sites in its native structure. The observations are in accord with suggestions in the literature that the FAD pocket is a very narrow channel of hydrophobic properties, adapted to accept its natural coenzyme. PMID:14512636

  10. Core-Shell Soy Protein-Soy Polysaccharide Complex (Nano)particles as Carriers for Improved Stability and Sustained Release of Curcumin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei-Ping; Ou, Shi-Yi; Tang, Chuan-He

    2016-06-22

    Using soy protein isolate (SPI) and soy-soluble polysaccharides (SSPS) as polymer matrixes, this study reported a novel process to fabricate unique core-shell complex (nano)particles to perform as carriers for curcumin (a typical poorly soluble bioactive). In the process, curcumin-SPI nanocomplexes were first formed at pH 7.0 and then coated by SSPS. At this pH, the core-shell complex was formed in a way the SPI nanoparticles might be incorporated into the interior of SSPS molecules without distinctly affecting the size and morphology of particles. The core-shell structure was distinctly changed by adjusting pH from 7.0 to 4.0. At pH 4.0, SSPS was strongly bound to the surface of highly aggregated SPI nanoparticles, and as a consequence, much larger complexes were formed. The bioaccessibility of curcumin in the SPI-curcumin complexes was unaffected by the SSPS coating. However, the core-shell complex formation greatly improved the thermal stability and controlled release properties of encapsulated curcumin. The improvement was much better at pH 4.0 than that at pH 7.0. All of the freeze-dried core-shell complex preparations exhibited good redispersion behavior. The findings provide a simple approach to fabricate food-grade delivery systems for improved water dispersion, heat stability, and even controlled release of poorly soluble bioactives. PMID:27243766

  11. The Effect of Lipopolysaccharide Core Oligosaccharide Size on the Electrostatic Binding of Antimicrobial Proteins to Models of the Gram Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Luke A; Ciesielski, Filip; Skoda, Maximilian W A; Paracini, Nicolò; Holt, Stephen A; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-04-12

    Understanding the electrostatic interactions between bacterial membranes and exogenous proteins is crucial to designing effective antimicrobial agents against Gram-negative bacteria. Here we study, using neutron reflecometry under multiple isotopic contrast conditions, the role of the uncharged sugar groups in the outer core region of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in protecting the phosphate-rich inner core region from electrostatic interactions with antimicrobial proteins. Models of the asymmetric Gram negative outer membrane on silicon were prepared with phopshatidylcholine (PC) in the inner leaflet (closest to the silicon), whereas rough LPS was used to form the outer leaflet (facing the bulk solution). We show how salt concentration can be used to reversibly alter the binding affinity of a protein antibiotic colicin N (ColN) to the anionic LPS confirming that the interaction is electrostatic in nature. By examining the interaction of ColN with two rough LPS types with different-sized core oligosaccharide regions we demonstrate the role of uncharged sugars in blocking short-range electrostatic interactions between the cationic antibiotics and the vulnerable anionic phosphate groups. PMID:27003358

  12. The Effect of Lipopolysaccharide Core Oligosaccharide Size on the Electrostatic Binding of Antimicrobial Proteins to Models of the Gram Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the electrostatic interactions between bacterial membranes and exogenous proteins is crucial to designing effective antimicrobial agents against Gram-negative bacteria. Here we study, using neutron reflecometry under multiple isotopic contrast conditions, the role of the uncharged sugar groups in the outer core region of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in protecting the phosphate-rich inner core region from electrostatic interactions with antimicrobial proteins. Models of the asymmetric Gram negative outer membrane on silicon were prepared with phopshatidylcholine (PC) in the inner leaflet (closest to the silicon), whereas rough LPS was used to form the outer leaflet (facing the bulk solution). We show how salt concentration can be used to reversibly alter the binding affinity of a protein antibiotic colicin N (ColN) to the anionic LPS confirming that the interaction is electrostatic in nature. By examining the interaction of ColN with two rough LPS types with different-sized core oligosaccharide regions we demonstrate the role of uncharged sugars in blocking short-range electrostatic interactions between the cationic antibiotics and the vulnerable anionic phosphate groups. PMID:27003358

  13. A Panel of Recombinant Mucins Carrying a Repertoire of Sialylated O-Glycans Based on Different Core Chains for Studies of Glycan Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Reeja Maria; Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Jining; Karlsson, Niclas G; Holgersson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Sialylated glycans serve as key elements of receptors for many viruses, bacteria, and bacterial toxins. The microbial recognition and their binding specificity can be affected by the linkage of the terminal sugar residue, types of underlying sugar chains, and the nature of the entire glycoconjugate. Owing to the pathobiological significance of sialylated glycans, we have engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to secrete mucin-type immunoglobulin-fused proteins carrying terminal α2,3- or α2,6-linked sialic acid on defined O-glycan core saccharide chains. Besides stably expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/mouse immunoglobulin G2b cDNA (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), CHO cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding glycosyltransferases to synthesize core 2 (GCNT1), core 3 (B3GNT6), core 4 (GCNT1 and B3GNT6), or extended core 1 (B3GNT3) chains with or without the type 1 chain-encoding enzyme B3GALT5 and ST6GAL1. Western blot and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of core 1, 2, 3, 4, and extended core 1 chains carrying either type 1 (Galb3GlcNAc) or type 2 (Galb4GlcNAc) outer chains with or without α2,6-linked sialic acids. This panel of recombinant mucins carrying a repertoire of sialylated O-glycans will be important tools in studies aiming at determining the fine O-glycan binding specificity of sialic acid-specific microbial adhesins and mammalian lectins. PMID:26274979

  14. A Panel of Recombinant Mucins Carrying a Repertoire of Sialylated O-Glycans Based on Different Core Chains for Studies of Glycan Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Maria Cherian, Reeja; Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Jining; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Holgersson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Sialylated glycans serve as key elements of receptors for many viruses, bacteria, and bacterial toxins. The microbial recognition and their binding specificity can be affected by the linkage of the terminal sugar residue, types of underlying sugar chains, and the nature of the entire glycoconjugate. Owing to the pathobiological significance of sialylated glycans, we have engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to secrete mucin-type immunoglobulin-fused proteins carrying terminal α2,3- or α2,6-linked sialic acid on defined O-glycan core saccharide chains. Besides stably expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/mouse immunoglobulin G2b cDNA (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), CHO cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding glycosyltransferases to synthesize core 2 (GCNT1), core 3 (B3GNT6), core 4 (GCNT1 and B3GNT6), or extended core 1 (B3GNT3) chains with or without the type 1 chain-encoding enzyme B3GALT5 and ST6GAL1. Western blot and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of core 1, 2, 3, 4, and extended core 1 chains carrying either type 1 (Galβ3GlcNAc) or type 2 (Galβ4GlcNAc) outer chains with or without α2,6-linked sialic acids. This panel of recombinant mucins carrying a repertoire of sialylated O-glycans will be important tools in studies aiming at determining the fine O-glycan binding specificity of sialic acid-specific microbial adhesins and mammalian lectins. PMID:26274979

  15. Tumor suppressor ASXL1 is essential for the activation of INK4B expression in response to oncogene activity and anti-proliferative signals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xudong; Bekker-Jensen, Ida Holst; Christensen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Kasper Dindler; Sidoli, Simone; Qi, Yan; Kong, Yu; Wang, Xi; Cui, Yajuan; Xiao, Zhijian; Xu, Guogang; Williams, Kristine; Rappsilber, Juri; Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Winther, Ole; Jensen, Ole N; Helin, Kristian

    2015-11-01

    ASXL1 mutations are frequently found in hematological tumors, and loss of Asxl1 promotes myeloid transformation in mice. Here we present data supporting a role for an ASXL1-BAP1 complex in the deubiquitylation of mono-ubiquitylated lysine 119 on Histone H2A (H2AK119ub1) in vivo. The Polycomb group proteins control the expression of the INK4B-ARF-INK4A locus during normal development, in part through catalyzing mono-ubiquitylation of H2AK119. Since the activation of the locus INK4B-ARF-INK4A plays a fail-safe mechanism protecting against tumorigenesis, we investigated whether ASXL1-dependent H2A deubiquitylation plays a role in its activation. Interestingly, we found that ASXL1 is specifically required for the increased expression of p15(INK4B) in response to both oncogenic signaling and extrinsic anti-proliferative signals. Since we found that ASXL1 and BAP1 both are enriched at the INK4B locus, our results suggest that activation of the INK4B locus requires ASXL1/BAP1-mediated deubiquitylation of H2AK119ub1. Consistently, our results show that ASXL1 mutations are associated with lower expression levels of p15(INK4B) and a proliferative advantage of hematopoietic progenitors in primary bone marrow cells, and that depletion of ASXL1 in multiple cell lines results in resistance to growth inhibitory signals. Taken together, this study links ASXL1-mediated H2A deubiquitylation and transcriptional activation of INK4B expression to its tumor suppressor functions. PMID:26470845

  16. Downregulation of miRNA-30c and miR-203a is associated with hepatitis C virus core protein-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in normal hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dongjing; Wu, Jilin; Liu, Meizhou; Yin, Hui; He, Jiantai; Zhang, Bo

    2015-09-04

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) Core protein has been demonstrated to induce epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and is associated with cancer progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, how the Core protein regulates EMT is still unclear. In this study, HCV Core protein was overexpressed by an adenovirus. The protein levels of EMT markers were measured by Western blot. The xenograft animal model was established by inoculation of HepG2 cells. Results showed that ectopic expression of HCV core protein induced EMT in L02 hepatocytes and HepG2 tumor cells by upregulating vimentin, Sanl1, and Snal2 expression and downregulating E-cadherin expression. Moreover, Core protein downregulated miR-30c and miR-203a levels in L02 and HepG2 cells, but artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a reversed Core protein-induced EMT. Further analysis showed that ectopic expression of HCV core protein stimulated cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and increased cell migration, whereas artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a significantly reversed the role of Core protein in these cell functions in L02 and HepG2 cells. In the HepG2 xenograft tumor models, artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a inhibited EMT and tumor growth. Moreover, L02 cells overexpressing Core protein can form tumors in nude mice. In HCC patients, HCV infection significantly shortened patients' survival time, and loss of miR-30c and miR-203 expression correlated with poor survival. In conclusion, HCV core protein downregulates miR-30c and miR-203a expression, which results in activation of EMT in normal hepatocytes and HCC tumor cells. The Core protein-activated-EMT is involved in the carcinogenesis and progression of HCC. Loss of miR-30c and miR-203a expression is a marker for the poor prognosis of HCC. - Highlights: • HCV core protein downregulates miR-30c and miR-203a expression. • Downregulation of miR-30c and miR-203a activates EMT. • Activated-EMT is involved in the

  17. Homozygous deletion of the CYP21A-TNXA-RP2-C4B gene region conferring C4B deficiency associated with recurrent respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Jaatinen, T; Ruuskanen, O; Truedsson, L; Lokki, M L

    1999-08-01

    The central class III region of the human major histocompatibility complex contains highly polymorphic genes that are associated with immune disorders and may serve as susceptibility factors for viral infections. Many HLA haplotype specific rearrangements, duplications, conversions and deletions, occur frequently in the C4 gene region. Genetic deficiencies of complement components are associated with recurrent occurrence of bacterial infections. We have studied the complement profile and the class III genes 5'-RP1-C4A-CYP21A-TNXA-RP2-C4B-CYP21B-TNXB -3' in a 4-year-old Caucasian patient. He has suffered from several pneumonias caused by respiratory viruses, eight acute otitis media, prolonged respiratory infections and urinary tract infection. Complement C4 was constantly low, but the other complement components, from C1 to C9, C1INH, factor B and properdin, were within normal limits. Immunological evaluation gave normal lymphocyte numbers and functions with the exception of subnormal T cell response to pokeweed mitogen. Molecular studies of the C4 gene region in the patient revealed homozygous deletion of CYP21A-TNXA-RP2-C4B generating total deficiency of C4B and the flanking 5' region up to C4A, and in the father a missing CYP21A gene. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the relationship between C4B deficiency and susceptibility to infections. PMID:10439316

  18. Modeling of two-phase flow instabilities during startup transients utilizing RAMONA-4B methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Paniagua, J.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Prasad, V.

    1996-10-01

    RAMONA-4B code is currently under development for simulating thermal hydraulic instabilities that can occur in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). As one of the missions of RAMONA-4B is to simulate SBWR startup transients, where geysering or condensation-induced instability may be encountered, the code needs to be assessed for this application. This paper outlines the results of the assessments of the current version of RAMONA-4B and the modifications necessary for simulating the geysering or condensation-induced instability. The test selected for assessment are the geysering tests performed by Prof Aritomi (1993).

  19. Electrostatic Architecture of the Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISAV) Core Fusion Protein Illustrates a Carboxyl-Carboxylate pH Sensor*

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jonathan D.; Soto-Montoya, Hazel; Korpela, Markus K.; Lee, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Segment 5, ORF 1 of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) genome, encodes for the ISAV F protein, which is responsible for viral-host endosomal membrane fusion during a productive ISAV infection. The entry machinery of ISAV is composed of a complex of the ISAV F and ISAV hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins in an unknown stoichiometry prior to receptor engagement by ISAV HE. Following binding of the receptor to ISAV HE, dissociation of the ISAV F protein from HE, and subsequent endocytosis, the ISAV F protein resolves into a fusion-competent oligomeric state. Here, we present a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the fusion core of the ISAV F protein determined at low pH. This structure has allowed us to unambiguously demonstrate that the ISAV entry machinery exhibits typical class I viral fusion protein architecture. Furthermore, we have determined stabilizing factors that accommodate the pH-dependent mode of ISAV transmission, and our structure has allowed the identification of a central coil that is conserved across numerous and varied post-fusion viral glycoprotein structures. We then discuss a mechanistic model of ISAV fusion that parallels the paramyxoviral class I fusion strategy wherein attachment and fusion are relegated to separate proteins in a similar fashion to ISAV fusion. PMID:26082488

  20. Limited overlapping roles of P15INK4b and P18INK4c cell cycle inhibitors in proliferation and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Latres, Esther; Malumbres, Marcos; Sotillo, Rocío; Martín, Javier; Ortega, Sagrario; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Flores, Juana María; Cordón-Cardo, Carlos; Barbacid, Mariano

    2000-01-01

    Entry of quiescent cells into the cell cycle is driven by the cyclin D-dependent kinases Cdk4 and Cdk6. These kinases are negatively regulated by the INK4 cell cycle inhibitors. We report the generation of mice defective in P15INK4b and P18INK4c. Ablation of these genes, either alone or in combination, does not abrogate cell contact inhibition or senescence of mouse embryo fibroblasts in culture. However, loss of P15INK4b, but not of P18INK4c, confers proliferative advantage to these cells and makes them more sensitive to transformation by H-ras oncogenes. In vivo, ablation of P15INK4b and P18INK4c genes results in lymphoproliferative disorders and tumor formation. Mice lacking P18INK4c have deregulated epithelial cell growth leading to the formation of cysts, mostly in the cortical region of the kidneys and the mammary epithelium. Loss of both P15INK4b and P18INK4c does not result in significantly distinct phenotypic manifestations except for the appearance of cysts in additional tissues. These results indicate that P15INK4b and P18IKN4c are tumor suppressor proteins that act in different cellular lineages and/or pathways with limited compensatory roles. PMID:10880462

  1. CD4+ primary T cells expressing HCV-core protein upregulate Foxp3 and IL-10, suppressing CD4 and CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Ponce, Cecilia; Dominguez-Villar, Margarita; Aguado, Enrique; Garcia-Cozar, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive T cell responses are critical for controlling HCV infection. While there is clinical evidence of a relevant role for regulatory T cells in chronic HCV-infected patients, based on their increased number and function; mechanisms underlying such a phenomena are still poorly understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that proteins from Hepatitis C virus can suppress host immune responses. We and others have shown that HCV is present in CD4+ lymphocytes from chronically infected patients and that HCV-core protein induces a state of unresponsiveness in the CD4+ tumor cell line Jurkat. Here we show that CD4+ primary T cells lentivirally transduced with HCV-core, not only acquire an anergic phenotype but also inhibit IL-2 production and proliferation of bystander CD4+ or CD8+ T cells in response to anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 stimulation. Core-transduced CD4+ T cells show a phenotype characterized by an increased basal secretion of the regulatory cytokine IL-10, a decreased IFN-γ production upon stimulation, as well as expression of regulatory T cell markers, CTLA-4, and Foxp3. A significant induction of CD4+CD25+CD127(low)PD-1(high)TIM-3(high) regulatory T cells with an exhausted phenotype was also observed. Moreover, CCR7 expression decreased in HCV-core expressing CD4+ T cells explaining their sequestration in inflamed tissues such as the infected liver. This work provides a new perspective on de novo generation of regulatory CD4+ T cells in the periphery, induced by the expression of a single viral protein. PMID:24465502

  2. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  3. The Cry4B toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis kills Permethrin-resistant Anopheles gambiae, the principal vector of malaria.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Griko, Natalya B; Bulla, Lee A

    2013-04-01

    Resurgence of malaria has been attributed, in part, to the development of resistance by Anopheles gambiae, a principal vector of the disease, to various insecticidal compounds such as Permethrin. Permethrin, a neurotoxicant, is widely used to impregnate mosquito nets. An alternative strategy to control mosquitoes is the use of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) because there is no observable resistance in the field to the bacterium. Bti kills mosquitoes by targeting cadherin molecules residing in the midgut epithelium of larvae of the insect. Cry proteins (Cry4A, Cry4B, Cry10A and Cry11A) produced by the bacterium during the sporulation phase of its life cycle bind to the cadherin molecules, which serve as receptors for the proteins. These Cry proteins have variable specificity to a variety of mosquitoes, including Culex and Aedes as well as Anopheles. Importantly, selective mosquitocidal action is occasioned by binding of the respective Cry toxins to cadherins distinctive to individual mosquito species. Differential fractionation of the four Cry proteins from a novel Bti isolate (M1) and cloning and expression of their genes in Escherichia coli revealed that Cry4B is the only Cry protein that exerts insecticidal action against An. gambiae. Indeed, it does so against a Permethrin-resistant strain of the mosquito. The other three Cry proteins are ineffective. Multiple sequence alignments of the four Cry proteins revealed a divergent sequence motif in the Cry4B toxin, which most likely determines binding of the toxin to its cognate receptor, BT-R3, in An. gambiae and to its specific toxicity. A model showing Cry4B toxin binding to BT-R3 is presented. PMID:23760000

  4. Immunochemical studies of Shigella flexneri 2a and 6, and Shigella dysenteriae type 1 O-specific polysaccharide-core fragments and their protein conjugates as vaccine candidates

    PubMed Central

    Kubler-Kielb, Joanna; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Mocca, Christopher; Pozsgay, Vince; Coxon, Bruce; Robbins, John B.; Schneerson, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    There is no licensed vaccine for the prevention of shigellosis. Our approach to the development of Shigella vaccine is based on inducing serum IgG antibodies to the O-specific polysaccharide (O-SP) domain of their lipopolysaccharides (LPS). We have shown that low molecular mass O-SP-core (O-SPC) fragments isolated from Shigella sonnei LPS conjugated to proteins induced significantly higher antibody levels in mice than the full length O-SP conjugates. This finding is now extended to the O-SPC of S. flexneri 2a and 6, and S. dysenteriae type 1. The structures of O-SPC, containing core plus 1–4 O-SP repeat units (RU), were analyzed by NMR and mass spectroscopy. The first RUs attached to the cores of S. flexneri 2a and 6 LPS were different from the following RUs in their O-acetylation and/or glucosylation. Conjugates of core plus more than 1 RUs were necessary to induce LPS antibodies in mice. The resulting antibody levels were comparable to those induced by the full length O-SP conjugates. In S. dysenteriae type 1, the first RU was identical to the following RUs, with the exception that the GlcNAc was bound to the core in the β-configuration, while in all other RUs the GlcNAc was present in the α-configuration. In spite of this difference, conjugates of S. dysenteriae type 1 core with 1, 2, or 3 RUs induced LPS antibodies in mice with levels statistically higher than those of the full size O-SP conjugates. O-SPC conjugates are easy to prepare, characterize, and standardize, and their clinical evaluation is planned. PMID:20542498

  5. Amino acid substitution in the core protein has no impact on relapse in hepatitis C genotype 1 patients treated with peginterferon and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuko; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Oze, Tsugiko; Yakushijin, Takayuki; Mochizuki, Kiyoshi; Fukuda, Kazuto; Mita, Eiji; Haruna, Yoshimichi; Inoue, Atsuo; Imai, Yasuharu; Hosui, Atsushi; Miyagi, Takuya; Yoshida, Yuichi; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Kiso, Shinichi; Kanto, Tatsuya; Kasahara, Akinori; Takehara, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Norio

    2011-03-01

    Previous reports demonstrated that amino acid (aa) substitutions in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein are predictors of non-virological responses to pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) and ribavirin combination therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of core aa substitutions on viral kinetics during the treatment and relapse after the treatment. The 187 patients with HCV genotype 1 enrolled in this study were categorized into four groups according to core aa substitution patterns: double-wild group (n=92), Arg70/Leu91; 70-mutant group (n=42), Gln70/Leu91; 91-mutant group (n=31), Arg70/Met91; and double-mutant group (n=22), Gln70/Met91. The relationship between the core aa substitutions and the virological response was examined. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that substitution at aa 70 was significantly associated with a poor virological response during the first 12 weeks (decline of <1 log from baseline at week 4, <2 log at week 12), and substitution at aa 91 was significantly associated with detectable HCV RNA at week 24. With respect to relapse, only the ribavirin exposure (odds ratio (OR), 0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.60-0.98) and HCV RNA disappearance between weeks 13 and 24 (OR, 23.69; 95% CI, 5.44-103.08) were associated independently with relapse, with no correlation being found with the core aa substitutions and relapse. In conclusion, the results showed that core aa substitutions can be strong predictive factors at pretreatment of the non-response, but not for relapse, for virological responders with HCV RNA disappearance during treatment. PMID:21264862

  6. Four-Component Bicyclization Approaches to Skeletally Diverse Pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A novel four-component bicyclization strategy has been established, allowing a flexible and practical approach to 37 examples of multicyclic pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridines from low-cost and readily accessible arylglyoxals, pyrazol-5-amines, aromatic amines, 4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2H-pyran-2-one, and cyclohexane-1,3-diones. The polysubstituted cyclopenta[d]pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridines were stereoselectively synthesized through a microwave-assisted special [3+2+1]/[3+2] bicyclization with good control of the spatial configuration of exocyclic double bonds. The novel [3+2+1]/[2+2+1] bicyclization resulted in 17 examples of unreported pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyrrolo[4,3,2-de]quinolones. Reasonable mechanisms for forming two new types of multicyclic pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridines are also proposed. PMID:25338160

  7. Molecular cloning and expression of two distinct cDNA-encoding heparan sulfate proteoglycan core proteins from a rat endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Kojima, T; Shworak, N W; Rosenberg, R D

    1992-03-01

    The cloned rat fat pad endothelial cell (RFP-EC) line synthesizes anticoagulantly active heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGact) and anticoagulantly inactive heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGinact), both of which exhibit 25-, 30-, and 50-kDa core proteins of extremely similar structure. The primary sequences of internal peptides obtained from HSPGinact core proteins and the NH2-terminal sequence analyses of the 25-kDa component from the HSPGinact core proteins demonstrate that the 30-kDa component is a previously unidentified species, designated as ryudocan, with the 25-kDa component representing a proteolytic degradation product, while the 50-kDa component is the rat homolog of syndecan (Saunders, S. Jalkanen, M., O'Farrell, S., and Bernfield, M. (1989) J. Cell Biol. 108, 1547-1556). Specific oligonucleotide probes were obtained for ryudocan and syndecan by polymerase chain reaction, and the corresponding cDNAs were isolated from a RFP-EC library. The cDNAs encode type I integral membrane proteins of 202 and 313 amino acids, respectively, which have homologous transmembrane and intracellular domains but very distinct extracellular regions. In particular, ryudocan exhibits only three potential glycosaminoglycan attachment sites within the extracellular region while syndecan has five glycosaminoglycan attachment sites within the same domain. Both species are expressed in RFP-EC lines, primary rat aortic smooth muscle cells and primary rat skin fibroblast cells. The levels of ryudocan and syndecan mRNA were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in primary microvascular endothelial cells and closely associated non-endothelial cells isolated by cell sorting. Ryudocan and syndecan mRNAs were abundantly expressed in both populations representing about 0.1-0.5% of mRNA. PMID:1537865

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Against a Virion Core Protein of Orf Virus Strain NA1/11 As Potential Diagnostic Tool for Orf Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jiafeng; Hao, Wenbo; Peng, Yongzheng; Li, Hong; Li, Wei; Li, Ming; Luo, Shuhong

    2015-08-01

    Orf is caused by the orf virus (ORFV) and is a non-systemic, widespread disease afflicting sheep, goats, wild ruminants, and humans. Recent outbreaks in sheep and goats in Jilin and other northern Chinese provinces raise concerns about orf control in China. Thirty-five hybridoma clones were constructed from splenocytes of BALB/c mice immunized with natural orf virus protein. These hybridomas were used to produce antibodies targeting ORFV proteins. Immunological characterization of these monoclonal antibodies (MAb) showed that the 5F2D8 hybridoma line produced MAb that can recognize the 100, 70, and 20 kDa bands from total viral lysate. This hybridoma was further characterized by immunoprecipitation and peptide sequencing. The results indicate that 5F2D8 specifically recognizes orf virus encoded protein ORFV086, a late expression virion core protein that plays important roles in progeny virus particle assembly, morphogenesis, and maturity. Further experiments demonstrate that this MAb did not react with other viral proteins of ORFV orthopoxviruses, but reacted strongly to different field isolates of orf viruses from China. Additionally, this anti-ORFV086 MAb possesses ORFV neutralizing capability. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis determined that ORFV086 of NA1/11, clustered together with NZ2 and IA82, is highly conserved and has structural similarities with the Vaccinia virus core protein P4a. As such, this MAb has great potential as a diagnostic tool for orf viruses, in the further exploration of orf pathogenesis, and in disease control and prevention. PMID:26301926

  9. 16 CFR 1508.5 - Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b). 1508.5 Section 1508.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1508.5 Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b). (a) Construct a...

  10. TAF4b is required for mouse spermatogonial stem cell development

    PubMed Central

    Lovasco, Lindsay A.; Gustafson, Eric A.; Seymour, Kimberly A.; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Freiman, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term mammalian spermatogenesis requires proper development of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) that replenish the testis with germ cell progenitors during adult life. TAF4b is a gonadal-enriched component of the general transcription factor complex, TFIID, which is required for the maintenance of spermatogenesis in the mouse. Successful germ cell transplantation assays into adult TAF4b-deficient host testes suggested that TAF4b performs an essential germ cell autonomous function in SSC establishment and/or maintenance. To elucidate the SSC function of TAF4b, we characterized the initial gonocyte pool and rounds of spermatogenic differentiation in the context of the Taf4b-deficient mouse testis. Here we demonstrate a significant reduction in the late embryonic gonocyte pool and a deficient expansion of this pool soon after birth. Resulting from this reduction of germ cell progenitors is a developmental delay in meiosis initiation, as compared to age-matched controls. While GFRα1+ spermatogonia are appropriately present as Asingle and Apaired in wild type testes, TAF4b-deficient testes display an increased proportion of long and clustered chains of GFRα1+ cells. In the absence of TAF4b, seminiferous tubules in the adult testis either lack germ cells altogether or are found to have missing generations of spermatogenic progenitor cells. Together these data indicate that TAF4b-deficient spermatogenic progenitor cells display a tendency for differentiation at the expense of self-renewal and a renewing pool of SSCs fail to establish during the critical window of SSC development. PMID:25727968

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: XO-4b 3yr observations with DEMONEX (Villanueva+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, S. Jr; Eastman, J. D.; Gaudi, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    New observations of XO-4b were made using DEdicated MONitor of EXotransits (DEMONEX). DEMONEX monitored bright stars hosting known transiting planets over a 3yr period from 2008 to 2011 in order to provide a homogeneous data set of precise relative photometry for over 40 transiting systems. There are 20 nights of data from 2008 November to 2010 May taken during primary transits of XO-4b. All observations were made in the Sloan z band. (1 data file).

  12. RDR-4B doppler weather radar with forward looking wind shear detection capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasley, Steven S.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: Bendix/King atmospheric transport and dispersion (ATAD) position; RDR-4A technical baseline; RTA-4A characteristics; RDR-4 antenna characteristics; modification of RDR-4A to RDR-4B; RDR-4A functional block diagram; RDR-4B characteristics; development/test plan; CV-580 testing capability; CV-580 test results; Continental A300 test configuration; Continental Data Recording Program operational considerations; Continental A300 test results; and display considerations.

  13. Isolation and characterization of a Xenopus laevis C protein cDNA: structure and expression of a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein core protein.

    PubMed Central

    Preugschat, F; Wold, B

    1988-01-01

    The C proteins are major components of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes in nuclei of vertebrate cells. To begin to describe their structure, expression, and function we isolated and determined the DNA sequence of Xenopus laevis C protein cDNA clones. The protein predicted from the DNA sequence has a molecular mass of 30,916 kDa and is very similar to its human counterpart. Although mammalian genomes contain many copies of C protein sequence, the Xenopus genome contains few copies. When C protein RNA was synthesized in vitro and microinjected into stage-VI Xenopus oocytes, newly synthesized C proteins were efficiently localized in the nucleus. In vitro rabbit reticulocyte lysate and in vivo Xenopus oocyte translation systems both produce from a single mRNA two discrete polypeptide species that accumulate in a ratio similar to that of mammalian C1 and C2 proteins in vivo. Images PMID:2904678

  14. Characterization of the human CD4 gene promoter: transcription from the CD4 gene core promoter is tissue-specific and is activated by Ets proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, P; Giovane, A; Wasylyk, B; Klatzmann, D

    1993-01-01

    We analyzed the 5' transcription control sequences of the human CD4 gene. We located the transcription initiation site and showed that the CD4 core promoter (positions -40 to +16) lacks a classical "TATA" or initiator positioning consensus sequence but directs precise and efficient transcription when coupled to the ubiquitously active simian virus 40 enhancer. The transcriptional activity of the CD4 gene promoter correlated with CD4 expression in various cell types. Interestingly, the CD4 core promoter also displayed a tissue-specific transcriptional activity. Within this fragment, three nucleic acid sequences are completely conserved in the murine CD4 gene. One of these sequences contains a perfect ETS consensus sequence. Another ETS consensus sequence is located 1060 nt upstream. Electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays showed that the core promoter ETS motif binds an Ets-related protein specifically expressed at high levels in CD4+ cells. Moreover, in CD4- cells, overexpression of Ets-1 or Ets-2 efficiently and specifically activated transcription from the CD4 promoter and core promoter. These data indicate that Ets transcription factors play a central role in controlling CD4 gene expression, by binding to both a classical remote site and an unusual proximal activator sequence. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8356078

  15. Surface protein imprinted core-shell particles for high selective lysozyme recognition prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinran; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Yu; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Jianxi; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-12-24

    A novel kind of lysozyme (Lys) surface imprinted core-shell particles was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) strategy. With controllable polymer shell chain length, such particles showed obviously improved selectivity for protein recognition. After the RAFT initial agent and template protein was absorbed on silica particles, the prepolymerization solution, with methacrylic acid and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate as the monomers, and N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) as the cross-linker, was mixed with the silica particles, and the polymerization was performed at 40 °C in aqueous phase through the oxidation-reduction initiation. Ater polymerization, with the template protein removal and destroying dithioester groups with hexylamine, the surface Lyz imprinted particles were obtained with controllable polymer chain length. The binding capacity of the Lys imprinted particles could reach 5.6 mg protein/g material, with the imprinting factor (IF) as 3.7, whereas the IF of the control material prepared without RAFT strategy was only 1.6. The absorption equilibrium could be achieved within 60 min. Moreover, Lys could be selectively recognized by the imprinted particles from both a four-proteins mixture and egg white sample. All these results demonstrated that these particles prepared by RAFT strategy are promising to achieve the protein recognition with high selectivity. PMID:25434676

  16. Biodegradation of Green HE4B: Co-substrate effect, biotransformation enzymes and metabolite toxicity analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalme, S D; Jadhav, S U; Parshetti, G K; Govindwar, S P

    2010-06-01

    A high exhaust reactive dye, Green HE4B (GHE4B) was 98% degraded in nutrient medium by Pseudomonas desmolyticum NCIM 2112 (pd2112) within 72 h at static condition. Decolorization time in synthetic 10 g/l molasses. Addition of 5 g/l peptone to NaCl medium had reduced decolorization time from 108 to 72 h. Beef extract do not contribute more to the inducing effect of peptone, however it is a good co-substrate in sucrose or urea containing NaCl medium. Intracellular lignin peroxidase (Lip), laccase and tyrosinase activities were induced by 150, 355 and 212%, respectively till maximum dye removal took place. Aminopyrine N-demethylase (AND) and dichlorophenol indophenol reductase (DCIP-reductase) activities in pd2112 were induced by 130 and 20%, respectively at 72 h of incubation during GHE4B decolorization. By high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, 4-hydroxybenzene sulfonic acid and 4-amino, 6-hydroxynaphthalene 2-sulfonic acids were identified as metabolites formed during 24-72 h incubation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis supports the formation of these aromatic amines. pd2112, aerobically degraded GHE4B metabolites (formed at static condition) showing stationary phase of 6 days. There was no germination inhibition of Sorghum bicolor and Triticum aestivum by GHE4B metabolites at 3,000 ppm concentration however untreated dye showed germination inhibition at the same concentration. GHE4B metabolites did not show any microbial toxicity at 10,000 ppm concentration. PMID:23100822

  17. The Crystal Structure of the Core Domain of a Cellulose Induced Protein (Cip1) from Hypocrea jecorina, at 1.5 Å Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Frida; Karkehabadi, Saeid; Hansson, Henrik; Goedegebuur, Frits; Wallace, Louise; Mitchinson, Colin; Piens, Kathleen; Stals, Ingeborg; Sandgren, Mats

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to characterise the whole transcriptome of the fungus Hypocrea jecorina, cDNA clones of this fungus were identified that encode for previously unknown proteins that are likely to function in biomass degradation. One of these newly identified proteins, found to be co-regulated with the major H. jecorina cellulases, is a protein that was denoted Cellulose induced protein 1 (Cip1). This protein consists of a glycoside hydrolase family 1 carbohydrate binding module connected via a linker region to a domain with yet unknown function. After cloning and expression of Cip1 in H. jecorina, the protein was purified and biochemically characterised with the aim of determining a potential enzymatic activity for the novel protein. No hydrolytic activity against any of the tested plant cell wall components was found. The proteolytic core domain of Cip1 was then crystallised, and the three-dimensional structure of this was determined to 1.5 Å resolution utilising sulphur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing (sulphor-SAD). A calcium ion binding site was identified in a sequence conserved region of Cip1 and is also seen in other proteins with the same general fold as Cip1, such as many carbohydrate binding modules. The presence of this ion was found to have a structural role. The Cip1 structure was analysed and a structural homology search was performed to identify structurally related proteins. The two published structures with highest overall structural similarity to Cip1 found were two poly-lyases: CsGL, a glucuronan lyase from H. jecorina and vAL-1, an alginate lyase from the Chlorella virus. This indicates that Cip1 may be a lyase. However, initial trials did not detect significant lyase activity for Cip1. Cip1 is the first structure to be solved of the 23 currently known Cip1 sequential homologs (with a sequence identity cut-off of 25%), including both bacterial and fungal members. PMID:24039705

  18. Flaviviral NS4b, chameleon and jack‐in‐the‐box roles in viral replication and pathogenesis, and a molecular target for antiviral intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zmurko, Joanna; Dallmeier, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dengue virus and other flaviviruses such as the yellow fever, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis viruses are emerging vector‐borne human pathogens that affect annually more than 100 million individuals and that may cause debilitating and potentially fatal hemorrhagic and encephalitic diseases. Currently, there are no specific antiviral drugs for the treatment of flavivirus‐associated disease. A better understanding of the flavivirus–host interactions during the different events of the flaviviral life cycle may be essential when developing novel antiviral strategies. The flaviviral non‐structural protein 4b (NS4b) appears to play an important role in flaviviral replication by facilitating the formation of the viral replication complexes and in counteracting innate immune responses such as the following: (i) type I IFN signaling; (ii) RNA interference; (iii) formation of stress granules; and (iv) the unfolded protein response. Intriguingly, NS4b has recently been shown to constitute an excellent target for the selective inhibition of flavivirus replication. We here review the current knowledge on NS4b. © 2015 The Authors. Reviews in Medical Virology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25828437

  19. Loss-of-function of OsSTN8 suppresses the photosystem II core protein phosphorylation and interferes with the photosystem II repair mechanism in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Nath, Krishna; Poudyal, Roshan Sharma; Eom, Joon-Seob; Park, Yu Shin; Zulfugarov, Ismayil S; Mishra, Sujata R; Tovuu, Altanzaya; Ryoo, Nayeoon; Yoon, Ho-Sung; Nam, Hong Gil; An, Gynheung; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Lee, Choon-Hwan

    2013-11-01

    STN8 kinase is involved in photosystem II (PSII) core protein phosphorylation (PCPP). To examine the role of PCPP in PSII repair during high light (HL) illumination, we characterized a T-DNA insertional knockout mutant of the rice (Oryza sativa) STN8 gene. In this osstn8 mutant, PCPP was significantly suppressed, and the grana were thin and elongated. Upon HL illumination, PSII was strongly inactivated in the mutants, but the D1 protein was degraded more slowly than in wild-type, and mobilization of the PSII supercomplexes from the grana to the stromal lamellae for repair was also suppressed. In addition, higher accumulation of reactive oxygen species and preferential oxidation of PSII reaction center core proteins in thylakoid membranes were observed in the mutants during HL illumination. Taken together, our current data show that the absence of STN8 is sufficient to abolish PCPP in osstn8 mutants and to produce all of the phenotypes observed in the double mutant of Arabidopsis, indicating the essential role of STN8-mediated PCPP in PSII repair. PMID:24103067

  20. Clusters of isoleucine, leucine, and valine side chains define cores of stability in high-energy states of globular proteins: Sequence determinants of structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Kathuria, Sagar V; Chan, Yvonne H; Nobrega, R Paul; Özen, Ayşegül; Matthews, C Robert

    2016-03-01

    Measurements of protection against exchange of main chain amide hydrogens (NH) with solvent hydrogens in globular proteins have provided remarkable insights into the structures of rare high-energy states that populate their folding free-energy surfaces. Lacking, however, has been a unifying theory that rationalizes these high-energy states in terms of the structures and sequences of their resident proteins. The Branched Aliphatic Side Chain (BASiC) hypothesis has been developed to explain the observed patterns of protection in a pair of TIM barrel proteins. This hypothesis supposes that the side chains of isoleucine, leucine, and valine (ILV) residues often form large hydrophobic clusters that very effectively impede the penetration of water to their underlying hydrogen bond networks and, thereby, enhance the protection against solvent exchange. The linkage between the secondary and tertiary structures enables these ILV clusters to serve as cores of stability in high-energy partially folded states. Statistically significant correlations between the locations of large ILV clusters in native conformations and strong protection against exchange for a variety of motifs reported in the literature support the generality of the BASiC hypothesis. The results also illustrate the necessity to elaborate this simple hypothesis to account for the roles of adjacent hydrocarbon moieties in defining stability cores of partially folded states along folding reaction coordinates. PMID:26660714

  1. Alphavirus capsid proteins self-assemble into core-like particles in insect cells: A promising platform for nanoparticle vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Hikke, Mia C; Geertsema, Corinne; Wu, Vincen; Metz, Stefan W; van Lent, Jan W; Vlak, Just M; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2016-02-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes arthritic diseases in humans, whereas the aquatic salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is associated with high mortality in aquaculture of salmon and trout. Using modern biotechnological approaches, promising vaccine candidates based upon highly immunogenic, enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs) have been developed. However, the eVLP structure (core, lipid membrane, surface glycoproteins) is more complex than that of non-enveloped, protein-only VLPs, which are structurally and morphologically 'simple'. In order to develop an alternative to alphavirus eVLPs, in this paper we engineered recombinant baculovirus vectors to produce high levels of alphavirus core-like particles (CLPs) in insect cells by expression of the CHIKV and SAV capsid proteins. The CLPs localize in dense nuclear bodies within the infected cell nucleus and are purified through a rapid and scalable protocol involving cell lysis, sonication and low-speed centrifugation steps. Furthermore, an immunogenic epitope from the alphavirus E2 glycoprotein can be successfully fused to the N-terminus of the capsid protein without disrupting the CLP self-assembling properties. We propose that immunogenic epitope-tagged alphavirus CLPs produced in insect cells present a simple and perhaps more stable alternative to alphavirus eVLPs. PMID:26287127

  2. The hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-mediated lipid mobilization and enhances the ATGL interaction with comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58) and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F; Roddy, Thomas P; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-12-26

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL(-/-) mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs. PMID:25381252

  3. The Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Inhibits Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL)-mediated Lipid Mobilization and Enhances the ATGL Interaction with Comparative Gene Identification 58 (CGI-58) and Lipid Droplets*

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S.; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V.; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F.; Roddy, Thomas P.; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL−/− mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs. PMID:25381252

  4. Promoter activity and regulation of the corneal CYP4B1 gene by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Mastyugin, Vladimir; Mezentsev, Alexandre; Zhang, Wen-Xiang; Ashkar, Silvia; Dunn, Michael W; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal

    2004-04-15

    Hypoxic injury to the ocular surface provokes an inflammatory response that is mediated, in part, by corneal epithelial-derived 12-hydroxyeicosanoids. Recent studies indicate that a cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenase, identified as CYP4B1, is involved in the production of these eicosanoids which exhibit potent inflammatory and angiogenic properties. We have isolated and cloned a corneal epithelial CYP4B1 full-length cDNA and demonstrated that the CYP4B1 mRNA is induced by hypoxia in vitro and in vivo. To further understand the molecular regulation that underlies the synthesis of these potent inflammatory eicosanoids in response to hypoxic injury, we isolated and cloned the CYP4B1 promoter region. GenomeWalker libraries constructed from rabbit corneal epithelial genomic DNA were used as templates for primary and nested PCR amplifications with gene- and adaptor-specific primers. A 3.41-kb DNA fragment of the 5'-flanking region of the CYP4B1 promoter was isolated, cloned, sequenced, and analyzed by computer software for the presence of known cis-acting elements. Analysis of the promoter sequence revealed the presence of consensus DNA binding sequences for factors known to activate gene transcription in response to hypoxia including HIF-1, NFkappaB, and AP-1. Transient transfection of luciferase reporter (pGL3-Basic) vectors containing different lengths of the CYP4B1 promoter fragment demonstrated hypoxia-induced transcription in rabbit corneal epithelial (RCE) cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed a marked induction of nuclear binding activity for the labeled HIF-1 probe from the CYP4B1 promoter in nuclear extracts of cells exposed to hypoxia. This binding activity was due to sequence-specific binding to the HIF-1 oligonucleotide probe as shown by competition with excess unlabeled probe for the HIF-1 but not with unlabeled NFkappaB probe. The nuclear binding activity of AP-1 and NFkappaB probes from the CYP4B1 promoter was also enhanced in

  5. SWI/SNF mediates polycomb eviction and epigenetic reprogramming of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus.

    PubMed

    Kia, Sima Kheradmand; Gorski, Marcin M; Giannakopoulos, Stavros; Verrijzer, C Peter

    2008-05-01

    Stable silencing of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a tumor suppressor locus occurs in a variety of human cancers, including malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRTs). MRTs are extremely aggressive cancers caused by the loss of the hSNF5 subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. We found previously that, in MRT cells, hSNF5 is required for p16(INK4a) induction, mitotic checkpoint activation, and cellular senescence. Here, we investigated how the balance between Polycomb group (PcG) silencing and SWI/SNF activation affects epigenetic control of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus in MRT cells. hSNF5 reexpression in MRT cells caused SWI/SNF recruitment and activation of p15(INK4b) and p16(INK4a), but not of p14(ARF). Gene activation by hSNF5 is strictly dependent on the SWI/SNF motor subunit BRG1. SWI/SNF mediates eviction of the PRC1 and PRC2 PcG silencers and extensive chromatin reprogramming. Concomitant with PcG complex removal, the mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) protein is recruited and active histone marks supplant repressive ones. Strikingly, loss of PcG complexes is accompanied by DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B dissociation and reduced DNA methylation. Thus, various chromatin states can be modulated by SWI/SNF action. Collectively, these findings emphasize the close interconnectivity and dynamics of diverse chromatin modifications in cancer and gene control. PMID:18332116

  6. Amyloid Core Formed of Full-Length Recombinant Mouse Prion Protein Involves Sequence 127–143 but Not Sequence 107–126

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Biswanath; Lee, Chung-Yu; Lin, Chen; Chen, Eric H.-L.; Huang, Chao-Li; Yang, Chien-Chih; Chen, Rita P.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    The principal event underlying the development of prion disease is the conversion of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) into its disease-causing isoform, PrPSc. This conversion is associated with a marked change in secondary structure from predominantly α-helical to a high β-sheet content, ultimately leading to the formation of aggregates consisting of ordered fibrillar assemblies referred to as amyloid. In vitro, recombinant prion proteins and short prion peptides from various species have been shown to form amyloid under various conditions and it has been proposed that, theoretically, any protein and peptide could form amyloid under appropriate conditions. To identify the peptide segment involved in the amyloid core formed from recombinant full-length mouse prion protein mPrP(23–230), we carried out seed-induced amyloid formation from recombinant prion protein in the presence of seeds generated from the short prion peptides mPrP(107–143), mPrP(107–126), and mPrP(127–143). Our results showed that the amyloid fibrils formed from mPrP(107–143) and mPrP(127–143), but not those formed from mPrP(107–126), were able to seed the amyloidogenesis of mPrP(23–230), showing that the segment residing in sequence 127–143 was used to form the amyloid core in the fibrillization of mPrP(23–230). PMID:23844138

  7. Cancer-preventive peptide lunasin from Solanum nigrum L. inhibits acetylation of core histones H3 and H4 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Jeong, Hyung Jin; Park, Jae Ho; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Jeong Rak; Lee, Hee Kyeong; Chung, Gyu Young; Choi, Jeong Doo; de Lumen, Ben O

    2007-12-26

    Lunasin, a unique 43 amino acid, 4.8 kDa cancer-chemopreventive peptide initially reported in soybean and now found in barley and wheat, has been shown to be cancer-chemopreventive in mammalian cells and in a skin cancer mouse model against oncogenes and chemical carcinogens. To identify bioactive components in traditional herbal medicines and in search for new sources of lunasin, we report here the properties of lunasin from Solanum nigrum L. (SNL), a plant indigenous to northeast Asia. Lunasin was screened in the crude extracts of five varieties of the medicinal plants of Solanaceae origin and seven other major herbal plants. An in vitro digestion stability assay for measuring bioavailability was carried out on SNL crude protein and autoclaved SNL using pepsin and pancreatin. A nonradioactive histone acetyltransferase (HAT) assay and HAT activity colorimetric assay were used to measure the inhibition of core histone acetylation. The inhibitory effect of lunasin on the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) was determined by immunoblotting against phospho-Rb. Lunasin isolated from autoclaved SNL inhibited core histone H3 and H4 acetylation, the activities of the HATs, and the phosphorylation of the Rb protein. Lunasin in the crude protein and in the autoclaved crude protein was very stable to pepsin and pancreatin in vitro digestion, while the synthetic pure lunasin was digested at 2 min after the reaction. We conclude that lunasin is a bioactive and bioavailable component in SNL and that consumption of SNL may play an important role in cancer prevention. PMID:18038993

  8. Protein architecture and core residues in unwound α-helices provide insights to the transport function of plant AtCHX17.

    PubMed

    Czerny, Daniel D; Padmanaban, Senthilkumar; Anishkin, Andriy; Venema, Kees; Riaz, Zoya; Sze, Heven

    2016-09-01

    Using Arabidopsis thaliana AtCHX17 as an example, we combine structural modeling and mutagenesis to provide insights on its protein architecture and transport function which is poorly characterized. This approach is based on the observation that protein structures are significantly more conserved in evolution than linear sequences, and mechanistic similarities among diverse transporters are emerging. Two homology models of AtCHX17 were obtained that show a protein fold similar to known structures of bacterial Na(+)/H(+) antiporters, EcNhaA and TtNapA. The distinct secondary and tertiary structure models highlighted residues at positions potentially important for CHX17 activity. Mutagenesis showed that asparagine-N200 and aspartate-D201 inside transmembrane5 (TM5), and lysine-K355 inside TM10 are critical for AtCHX17 activity. We reveal previously unrecognized threonine-T170 and lysine-K383 as key residues at unwound regions in the middle of TM4 and TM11 α-helices, respectively. Mutation of glutamate-E111 located near the membrane surface inhibited AtCHX17 activity, suggesting a role in pH sensing. The long carboxylic tail of unknown purpose has an alternating β-sheet and α-helix secondary structure that is conserved in prokaryote universal stress proteins. These results support the overall architecture of AtCHX17 and identify D201, N200 and novel residues T170 and K383 at the functional core which likely participates in ion recognition, coordination and/or translocation, similar to characterized cation/H(+) exchangers. The core of AtCHX17 models according to EcNhaA and TtNapA templates faces inward and outward, respectively, which may reflect two conformational states of the alternating access transport mode for proteins belonging to the plant CHX family. PMID:27179641

  9. On the Mechanism of Multiple Lysine Methylation by the Human Mixed Lineage Leukemia Protein-1 (MLL1) Core Complex*♦

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anamika; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Vought, Valarie E.; Cosgrove, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription in eukaryotic genomes depends on enzymes that regulate the degree of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methylation. The mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1) is a member of the SET1 family of H3K4 methyltransferases and is frequently rearranged in acute leukemias. Despite sequence comparisons that predict that SET1 family enzymes should only monomethylate their substrates, mono-, di-, and trimethylation of H3K4 has been attributed to SET1 family complexes in vivo and in vitro. To better understand this paradox, we have biochemically reconstituted and characterized a five-component 200-kDa MLL1 core complex containing human MLL1, WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30. We demonstrate that the isolated MLL1 SET domain is a slow monomethyltransferase and that tyrosine 3942 of MLL1 prevents di- and trimethylation of H3K4. In contrast, a complex containing the MLL1 SET domain, WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30, displays a marked ∼600-fold increase in enzymatic activity but only to the dimethyl form of H3K4. Single turnover kinetic experiments reveal that the reaction leading to H3K4 dimethylation involves the transient accumulation of a monomethylated species, suggesting that the MLL1 core complex uses a non-processive mechanism to catalyze multiple lysine methylation. We have also discovered that the non-SET domain components of the MLL1 core complex possess a previously unrecognized methyltransferase activity that catalyzes H3K4 dimethylation within the MLL1 core complex. Our results suggest that the mechanism of multiple lysine methylation by the MLL1 core complex involves the sequential addition of two methyl groups at two distinct active sites within the complex. PMID:19556245

  10. Selective enrichment of metal-binding proteins based on magnetic core/shell microspheres functionalized with metal cations.

    PubMed

    Fang, Caiyun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Lu, Haojie

    2015-06-21

    Metal binding proteins play many important roles in a broad range of biological processes. Characterization of metal binding proteins is important for understanding their structure and biological functions, thus leading to a clear understanding of metal associated diseases. The present study is the first to investigate the effectiveness of magnetic microspheres functionalized with metal cations (Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Fe(3+)) as the absorbent matrix in IMAC technology to enrich metal containing/binding proteins. The putative metal binding proteins in rat liver were then globally characterized by using this strategy which is very easy to handle and can capture a number of metal binding proteins effectively. In total, 185 putative metal binding proteins were identified from rat liver including some known less abundant and membrane-bound metal binding proteins such as Plcg1, Acsl5, etc. The identified proteins are involved in many important processes including binding, catalytic activity, translation elongation factor activity, electron carrier activity, and so on. PMID:25913209

  11. Studies on the characterization of the linkage-region between polysaccharide chain and core protein in bovine corneal proteokeratan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Keller, R; Stein, T; Stuhlsatz, H W; Greiling, H; Ohst, E; Müller, E; Scharf, H D

    1981-03-01

    1) A new method of enrichment of the linkage-region in corneal proteokeratan sulfate is described, which consists of desulfation of peptidokeratan sulfate, followed by chromatography on Con A-Sepharose 4B and enzymatic degradation with beta-D galactosidase and beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase. 2) After permethylation, hydrolysis, reduction with sodium borohydrid and acetylation gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses were performed. The followings products could be detected as their peracetates: 2,3,4-tri-O-methylfucitol; 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-methylmannitol; 3,4,6-tri-O-methylmannitol; 2,4-di-O-methylmannitol; 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-methylgalactitol; 2,4,6-tri-O-methylgalactitol; 2,4-di-O-methylgalactitol. 3) The results point to the presence of a branched linkage region in the proteokeratan sulfate molecule with one mannose as the branching point and two mannose residues as the starting point of two disaccharide chains. PMID:6453074

  12. The trappin gene family: proteins defined by an N-terminal transglutaminase substrate domain and a C-terminal four-disulphide core.

    PubMed Central

    Schalkwijk, J; Wiedow, O; Hirose, S

    1999-01-01

    Recently, several new genes have been discovered in various species which are homologous to the well-characterized human epithelial proteinase inhibitor elafin/SKALP (skin-derived anti-leukoproteinase). Because of the high degree of conservation and the similarities in genomic organization, we propose that these genes belong to a novel gene family. At the protein level, the family members are defined by: (1) an N-terminal domain consisting of a variable number of repeats with the consensus sequence Gly-Gln-Asp-Pro-Val-Lys that can act as an anchoring motif by transglutaminase cross-linking, and (2) a C-terminal four-disulphide core or whey acidic protein (WAP) domain, which harbours a functional motif involved in binding of proteinases and possibly other proteins. We have proposed the name trappin gene family as a unifying nomenclature for this group of proteins (trappin is an acronym for TRansglutaminase substrate and wAP domain containing ProteIN, and refers to its functional property of 'getting trapped' in tissues by covalent cross-linking). Analysis of the trappin family members shows extensive diversification in bovidae and suidae, whereas the number of primate trappins is probably limited. Recent biochemical and cell biological data on the human trappin family member elafin/SKALP suggest that this molecule is induced in epidermis by cellular stress. We hypothesize that trappins play an important role in the regulation of inflammation and in protection against tissue damage in stratified epithelia. PMID:10359639

  13. A truncated fragment of Ov-ASP-1 consisting of the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain maintains adjuvanticity as the full-length protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Yang, Yi; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Weilai; Yu, Hong; Du, Lanying; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-04-15

    The Onchocerca volvulus activation-associated secreted protein-1 (Ov-ASP-1) has good adjuvanticity for a variety of antigens and vaccines, probably due to its ability activate antigen-processing cells (APCs). However, the functional domain of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant is not clearly defined. Based on the structural prediction of this protein family, we constructed a 16-kDa recombinant protein of Ov-ASP-1 that contains only the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain (residues 10-153), designated ASPPR. We found that ASPPR exhibits adjuvanticity similar to that of the full-length Ov-ASP-1 (residues 10-220) for various antigens, including ovalbumin (OVA), HBsAg protein antigen, and the HIV peptide 5 (Pep5) antigen, but it is more suitable for vaccine design in ASPPR-antigen fusion proteins, and more stable in PBS than Ov-ASP-1 stored at -70 °C. These results suggest that ASPPR might be the functional region of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant, and therefore could be developed as an adjuvant for human use. PMID:25736195

  14. Competitive binding of viral E2 protein and mammalian core-binding factor to transcriptional control sequences of human papillomavirus type 8 and bovine papillomavirus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, H M; Steger, G; Pfister, H

    1997-01-01

    The promoter P7535 of human papillomavirus type 8 and the promoter P7185 of bovine papillomavirus type 1 are negatively regulated by viral E2 proteins via the promoter proximal binding sites P2 and BS1, respectively. Mutations of these E2 binding sites can reduce basal promoter activity. This suggests binding of a transcription-stimulating factor and may indicate that repression by E2 is due to competitive binding of viral and cellular proteins. A computer search revealed putative binding sites for core-binding factor (CBF; also referred to as PEA2, PEBP2, or AML), overlapping with P2 and BS1. Binding of recombinant CBF proteins to these sites was confirmed by band shift analysis. Competition of CBF and E2 protein for DNA binding was shown for both human papillomavirus type 8 and bovine papillomavirus type 1. The importance of CBF-E2 competition in E2-mediated repression could be demonstrated by comparing the E2 effect on P7185 activity in two cell lines containing different amounts of endogenous CBF. In cells with large amounts of CBF, E2 repressed P7185 wild-type constructs to the basal promoter activity of a mutant (50%) that could not bind this protein any more. In contrast, in a cell line containing small amounts of CBF, the promoter activities of constructs with wild-type and mutated CBF binding sites hardly differed and specific repression by E2 was not detectable. PMID:9311900

  15. (4B-3H) NADH-H2O exchange reaction of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Guillory, R.J.

    1985-06-14

    The purified mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase enzyme has been shown to catalyze a rapid (4B-/sup 3/H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange reaction. When the enzyme is subjected to a single freeze-thaw cycle there is a complete loss of NADH dehydrogenation without a measurable decrease in the (4B-/sup 3/H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange. Complete loss of the (4B-/sup 3/H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange follows brief exposure to ultraviolet photoirradiation. The differential sensitivity of the water exchange reaction and the dehydrogenase activity suggests a direct involvement of the enzymes flavin cofactor in the catalysis of the (4B-/sup 3/H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange. Arylazido-beta-alanyl NAD+ (A3'-0-(3-(N-4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)amino) propionyl)NAD+) is shown to be a potent photodependent inhibitor of the (4B-3H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange activity following photoirradiation with visible light. This is consistent with the observed photodependent inhibition of the dehydrogenase activity by this photoprobe.

  16. High-Pressure Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Ce4B14O27

    PubMed Central

    Hinteregger, Ernst; Perfler, Lukas; Huppertz, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Ce4B14O27 was synthesized under conditions of 2.6 GPa and 750 °C in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus. The crystal structure was determined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, collected at room temperature, revealing that Ce4B14O27 is isotypic to La4B14O27. Ce4B14O27 crystallizes monoclinically with four formula units in the space group C2/c (No. 15) and the lattice parameters a = 1117.8(2), b = 640.9(2), c = 2531.7(5) pm, and β = 100.2(1)°. The three-dimensional boron-oxygen framework consists of [BO4]5– tetrahedra and trigonal-planar [BO3]3– groups. The structure contains two crystallographically different cerium ions. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy was performed on single crystals of Ce4B14O27. PMID:25995523

  17. Discover natural compounds as potential phosphodiesterase-4B inhibitors via computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Nan; Liu, Wen; Li, Jianzong; Feng, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyun; Wu, Chuanfang; Bao, Jinku

    2016-05-01

    cAMP, intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate, is a ubiquitous second messenger that plays a key role in many physiological processes. PDE4B which can reduce the cAMP level by hydrolyzing cAMP to 5'-AMP has become a therapeutic target for the treatment of human diseases such as respiratory disorders, inflammation diseases, neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, the use of currently available PDE4B inhibitors is restricted due to serious side effects caused by targeting PDE4D. Hence, we are attempting to find out subfamily-selective PDE4B inhibitors from natural products, using computer-aided approaches such as virtual screening, docking, and molecular dynamics simulation. Finally, four potential PDE4B-selective inhibitors (ZINC67912770, ZINC67912780, ZINC72320169, and ZINC28882432) were found. Compared to the reference drug (roflumilast), they scored better during the virtual screening process. Binding free energy for them was -317.51, -239.44, -215.52, and -165.77 kJ/mol, better than -129.05 kJ/mol of roflumilast. The pharmacophore model of the four candidate inhibitors comprised six features, including one hydrogen bond donor, four hydrogen bond acceptors, and one aromatic ring feature. It is expected that our study will pave the way for the design of potent PDE4B-selective inhibitors of new drugs to treat a wide variety of diseases such as asthma, COPD, psoriasis, depression, etc. PMID:26159554

  18. Proteins of the exocytotic core complex mediate platelet alpha-granule secretion. Roles of vesicle-associated membrane protein, SNAP-23, and syntaxin 4.

    PubMed

    Flaumenhaft, R; Croce, K; Chen, E; Furie, B; Furie, B C

    1999-01-22

    To understand the molecular basis of granule release from platelets, we examined the role of vesicle-associated membrane protein, SNAP-23, and syntaxin 4 in alpha-granule secretion. A vesicle-associated membrane protein, SNAP-23, and syntaxin 4 were detected in platelet lysate. These proteins form a SDS-resistant complex that disassembles upon platelet activation. To determine whether these proteins are involved in alpha-granule secretion, we developed a streptolysin O-permeabilized platelet model of alpha-granule secretion. Streptolysin O-permeabilized platelets released alpha-granules, as measured by surface expression of P-selectin, in response to Ca2+ up to 120 min after permeabilization. Incubation of streptolysin O-permeabilized platelets with an antibody directed against vesicle-associated membrane protein completely inhibited Ca2+-induced alpha-granule release. Tetanus toxin cleaved platelet vesicle-associated membrane protein and inhibited Ca2+-induced alpha-granule secretion from streptolysin O-permeabilized platelets. An antibody to syntaxin 4 also inhibited Ca2+-induced alpha-granule release by approximately 75% in this system. These results show that vesicle-associated membrane protein, SNAP-23, and syntaxin 4 form a heterotrimeric complex in platelets that disassembles with activation and demonstrate that alpha-granule release is dependent on vesicle SNAP receptor-target SNAP receptor (vSNARE-tSNARE) interactions. PMID:9891020

  19. A bacterial glycan core linked to surface (S)-layer proteins modulates host immunity through Th17 suppression

    PubMed Central

    Settem, Rajendra P.; Honma, Kiyonobu; Nakajima, Takuma; Phansopa, Chatchawal; Roy, Sumita; Stafford, Graham P.; Sharma, Ashu

    2014-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a pathogen implicated in periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the tooth supporting tissues often leading to tooth loss. This key periodontal pathogen is decorated with a unique glycan core O-glycosidically linked to the bacterium’s proteinacious surface(S)-layer lattice and other glycoproteins. Herein we show that the terminal motif of this glycan core acts to modulate dendritic cell effector functions to suppress Th17 responses. In contrast to the wild-type bacterial strain, infection with a mutant strain lacking the complete S-layer glycan core induced robust Th17 and reduced periodontal bone loss in mice. Our findings demonstrate that surface glycosylation of this pathogen acts to ensure its persistence in the host by suppressing Th17 responses. In addition our data suggest that the bacterium then induces the TLR2-Th2 inflammatory axis that has previously shown to cause bone destruction. Our study provides a biological basis for pathogenesis and opens opportunities in exploiting bacterial glycans as therapeutic targets against periodontitis and a range of other infectious diseases. PMID:22968422

  20. The C Terminus of the Core β-Ladder Domain in Japanese Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Is Flexible for Accommodation of Heterologous Epitope Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Li-Chen; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lee, Hwei-Jen; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NS1 is the only nonstructural protein that enters the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where NS1 is glycosylated, forms a dimer, and is subsequently secreted during flavivirus replication as dimers or hexamers, which appear to be highly immunogenic to the infected host, as protective immunity can be elicited against homologous flavivirus infections. Here, by using a trans-complementation assay, we identified the C-terminal end of NS1 derived from Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which was more flexible than other regions in terms of housing foreign epitopes without a significant impact on virus replication. This mapped flexible region is located in the conserved tip of the core β-ladder domain of the multimeric NS1 structure and is also known to contain certain linear epitopes, readily triggering specific antibody responses from the host. Despite becoming attenuated, recombinant JEV with insertion of a neutralizing epitope derived from enterovirus 71 (EV71) into the C-terminal end of NS1 not only could be normally released from infected cells, but also induced dual protective immunity for the host to counteract lethal challenge with either JEV or EV71 in neonatal mice. These results indicated that the secreted multimeric NS1 of flaviviruses may serve as a natural protein carrier to render epitopes of interest more immunogenic in the C terminus of the core β-ladder domain. IMPORTANCE The positive-sense RNA genomes of mosquito-borne flaviviruses appear to be flexible in terms of accommodating extra insertions of short heterologous antigens into their virus genes. Here, we illustrate that the newly identified C terminus of the core β-ladder domain in NS1 could be readily inserted into entities such as EV71 epitopes, and the resulting NS1-epitope fusion proteins appeared to maintain normal virus replication, secretion ability, and multimeric formation from infected cells. Nonetheless, such an insertion attenuated the recombinant JEV in mice

  1. Peptidergic Cell-Specific Synaptotagmins in Drosophila: Localization to Dense-Core Granules and Regulation by the bHLH Protein DIMMED

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dongkook; Li, Peiyao; Dani, Adish

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are packaged in large dense-core secretory vesicles, which mediate regulated secretion by exocytosis. In a variety of tissues, the regulated release of neurotransmitters and hormones is dependent on calcium levels and controlled by vesicle-associated synaptotagmin (SYT) proteins. Drosophila express seven SYT isoforms, of which two (SYT-α and SYT-β) were previously found to be enriched in neuroendocrine cells. Here we show that SYT-α and SYT-β tissue expression patterns are similar, though not identical. Furthermore, both display significant overlap with the bHLH transcription factor DIMM, a known neuroendocrine (NE) regulator. RNAi-mediated knockdown indicates that both SYT-α and SYT-β functions are essential in identified NE cells as these manipulations phenocopy loss-of-function states for the indicated peptide hormones. In Drosophila cell culture, both SYT-α and neuropeptide cargo form DIMM-dependent fluorescent puncta that are coassociated by super-resolution microscopy. DIMM is required to maintain SYT-α and SYT-β protein levels in DIMM-expressing cells in vivo. In neurons normally lacking all three proteins (DIMM−/SYT-α−/SYT-β−), DIMM misexpression conferred accumulation of endogenous SYT-α and SYT-β proteins. Furthermore transgenic SYT-α does not appreciably accumulate in nonpeptidergic neurons in vivo but does so if DIMM is comisexpressed. Among Drosophila syt genes, only syt-α and syt-β RNA levels are upregulated by DIMM overexpression. Together, these data suggest that SYT-α and SYT-β are important for NE cell physiology, that one or both are integral membrane components of the large dense-core vesicles, and that they are closely regulated by DIMM at a post-transcriptional level. PMID:25253864

  2. Evaluation of a new wide-pore superficially porous material with carbon core and nanodiamond-polymer shell for the separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Jensen, David S; Zukowski, Janusz; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-10-01

    In this study, reversed phase liquid chromatographic columns packed with superficially porous material made of a carbon core and nanodiamond-polymer shell were evaluated for the analytical characterization of proteins. The emphasis was put on the impact of pore size on the kinetic performance when analyzing large molecules. Three different types of columns possessing an average pore size of 120, 180, and 250Å were thus evaluated. As expected, the peak capacities were improved with the 180 and above all the 250Å pore size, while the kinetic performance achieved with the 120Å were systematically lower. It was also shown that a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) concentration of 0.3-0.5% was required when analyzing proteins, to achieve suitable peak shapes (limited broadening and tailing) with this material. Elevated temperature (>60°C) is mandatory when analyzing proteins with silica-based stationary phases, but this was not the case with this particular column made with a carbon core and nanodiamond-polymer shell, since the peak capacities were not improved at high temperature. However, there was a need to increase mobile phase temperature in the range 70-90°C when analyzing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), to limit adsorption that often occur in RPLC with this specific class of biomolecules. Finally, the FLARE(®) wide-pore column was applied to real life samples of native, oxidative stressed and reduced therapeutic proteins as well as reduced, digested mAbs and antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), to highlight the possibilities offered by this column technology. PMID:26456222

  3. Stem cells with FGF4-bFGF fused gene enhances the expression of bFGF and improves myocardial repair in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang-Qi; Chen, Liang-Long Fan, Lin; Fang, Jun; Chen, Zhao-Yang; Li, Wei-Wei

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • BFGF exists only in the cytoplasm of live cells. • BFGF cannot be secreted into the extracellular space to promote cell growth. • We combine the secretion-promoting signal peptide of FGF4. • We successfully modified BMSCs with the fused genes of FGF4-bFGF. • We promoted the therapeutic effects of transplanted BMSCs in myocardial infarction. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the modification of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) with the fused FGF4 (fibroblast growth factor 4)-bFGF (basic fibroblast growth factor) gene could improve the expression and secretion of BFGF, and increase the efficacies in repairing infarcted myocardium. We used In-Fusion technique to construct recombinant lentiviral vectors containing the individual gene of bFGF, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), or genes of FGF4-bFGF and EGFP, and then transfected these lentiviruses into rat BMSCs. We conducted an in vitro experiment to compare the secretion of bFGF in BMSCs infected by these lentiviruses and also examined their therapeutic effects in the treatment of myocardial infraction in a rodent study. Sixty rats were tested in the following five conditions: Group-SHAM received only sham operation as controls; Group-AMI received only injection of placebo PBS buffer; Group-BMSC, Group-bFGF and Group-FGF4-bFGF received implantation of BMSCs with empty lentivirus, bFGF lentivirus, and FGF4-bFGF lentivirus, respectively. Our results found out that the transplanted FGF4-bFGF BMSCs had the highest survival rate, and also the highest myocardial expression of bFGF and microvascular density as evidenced by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. As compared to other groups, the Group-FGF4-BFGF rats had the lowest myocardial fibrotic fraction, and the highest left ventricular ejection fraction. These results suggest that the modification of BMSCs with the FGF4-bFGF fused gene can not only increase the expression of

  4. Wetting of microstructured alumina fabricated by epitaxial growth of Al4B2O9 whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifeng; Feng, Jicai; Chen, Zhe; Song, Xiaoguo; Cao, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Topographical microstructures were fabricated on alumina by epitaxial growth of Al4B2O9 whiskers in air. The products were characterized via scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The whiskers were found to grow along the [0 0 1] crystallographic direction, and the lattice mismatch between Al2O3 and Al4B2O9 was determined to be 0.03%. The wetting of the Al4B2O9-whisker-coated surfaces by Ag-36.7Cu-8.0Ti at.% alloy was studied. The time needed to reach the equilibrium stage reduced as the temperature increased, and the final contact angle for liquid alloy on the rough surface was 27° at 880 °C. The wetting dynamics of the whiskers coated surfaces was investigated. After wetting, a whisker-interconnected region was formed between alumina and the alloy.

  5. Dual delivery of active antibactericidal agents and bone morphogenetic protein at sustainable high concentrations using biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yung-Hen; Lin, Chang-Tun; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chou, Ying-Chao; Liu, Shih-Jung; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers for sustainable delivery of antibiotics (vancomycin and ceftazidime) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) via electrospinning. To prepare the biodegradable sheath-core nanofibers, we first prepared solutions of poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide, vancomycin, and ceftazidime in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered solution. The poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide/antibiotics and rhBMP-2 solutions were then fed into two different capillary tubes controlled by two independent pumps for coaxial electrospinning. The electrospun nanofiber morphology was observed under a scanning electron microscope. We further characterized the in vitro antibiotic release from the nanofibers via high-performance liquid chromatography and that of rhBMP-2 via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and alkaline phosphatase activity. We showed that the biodegradable coaxially electrospun nanofibers could release high vancomycin/ceftazidime concentrations (well above the minimum inhibition concentration [MIC]90) and rhBMP-2 for >4 weeks. These experimental results demonstrate that novel biodegradable nanofibers can be constructed with various pharmaceuticals and proteins for long-term drug deliveries. PMID:27574423

  6. Dual delivery of active antibactericidal agents and bone morphogenetic protein at sustainable high concentrations using biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Hen; Lin, Chang-Tun; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chou, Ying-Chao; Liu, Shih-Jung; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers for sustainable delivery of antibiotics (vancomycin and ceftazidime) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) via electrospinning. To prepare the biodegradable sheath-core nanofibers, we first prepared solutions of poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide, vancomycin, and ceftazidime in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered solution. The poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide/antibiotics and rhBMP-2 solutions were then fed into two different capillary tubes controlled by two independent pumps for coaxial electrospinning. The electrospun nanofiber morphology was observed under a scanning electron microscope. We further characterized the in vitro antibiotic release from the nanofibers via high-performance liquid chromatography and that of rhBMP-2 via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and alkaline phosphatase activity. We showed that the biodegradable coaxially electrospun nanofibers could release high vancomycin/ceftazidime concentrations (well above the minimum inhibition concentration [MIC]90) and rhBMP-2 for >4 weeks. These experimental results demonstrate that novel biodegradable nanofibers can be constructed with various pharmaceuticals and proteins for long-term drug deliveries. PMID:27574423

  7. Time-resolved quantitative proteomics implicates the core snRNP protein SmB together with SMN in neural trafficking.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Alan R; Bales, Alexandra; James, John; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Sleeman, Judith E

    2014-02-15

    The biogenesis of splicing snRNPs (small nuclear ribonucleoproteins) is a complex process, beginning and ending in the nucleus of the cell but including key stages that take place in the cytoplasm. In particular, the SMN (survival motor neuron) protein complex is required for addition of the core Sm proteins to the snRNP. Insufficiency of SMN results in the inherited neurodegenerative condition, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Details of the physical organization of the cytoplasmic stages of snRNP biogenesis are unknown. Here, we use time-resolved quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that associate preferentially with either newly assembled or mature splicing snRNPs. We identified highly mobile SmB protein-trafficking vesicles in neural cells, which are dependent on the cellular levels of SMN and SmB for their morphology and mobility. We propose that these represent a family of related vesicles, some of which play a role in snRNP biogenesis and some that might play more diverse roles in cellular RNA metabolism. PMID:24357717

  8. Preliminary results of 3D dose calculations with MCNP-4B code from a SPECT image.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Gual, M; Lima, F F; Sospedra Alfonso, R; González González, J; Calderón Marín, C

    2004-01-01

    Interface software was developed to generate the input file to run Monte Carlo MCNP-4B code from medical image in Interfile format version 3.3. The software was tested using a spherical phantom of tomography slides with known cumulated activity distribution in Interfile format generated with IMAGAMMA medical image processing system. The 3D dose calculation obtained with Monte Carlo MCNP-4B code was compared with the voxel S factor method. The results show a relative error between both methods less than 1 %. PMID:15625058

  9. Loftin Collection: Vought F4U-4B 'Corsair' Navy fighter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1951-01-01

    The Vought F4U-4B 'Corsair' Navy fighter. See also figures 3 and 17 of volume 4. This photograph is dated 7/18/51. The Vought F4U-4B was usually seen in a combat role, but as the NACA tail band suggests, this Corsair was used for research. The test work undertaken by this F4U included control rate investigation. Langley was the second research facility to use this Corsair. It came to Langley in 1950, from the Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Maryland.

  10. Venlafaxine increases cell proliferation and regulates DISC1, PDE4B and NMDA receptor 2B expression in the hippocampus in chronic mild stress mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Xiaobai; Li, Min; Ren, Jintao; Yun, Ke; An, Yan; Lin, Lei; Zhang, Hailong

    2015-05-15

    Recent evidence has identified disrupted in schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) as an important genetic risk factor for the development of many psychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorders. In addition, studies using animal models have demonstrated that chronic stress affects hippocampal structure and function. However, the functional effects of chronic stress on DISC1 remain unknown. Using a chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm, we investigated the effects of CMS on depressive-like behaviors, hippocampal cell proliferation, and hippocampal protein expression of DISC1, phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor 2B subunit (NMDA receptor 2B), which may be involved in the regulation of DISC1 and neurogenesis. We also examined the effects and possible mechanisms of the antidepressant venlafaxine in CMS mice. CMS increased the expression of DISC1 and PDE4B. Chronic treatment with venlafaxine blocked the increases in these proteins, and also reversed the CMS-induced decrease in neurogenesis and NMDA receptor 2B protein in the hippocampus. These results suggest that DISC1 may play an important role in the etiology of depression and in the action of antidepressants. PMID:25769842

  11. Signature amino acids enable the archaeal L7Ae box C/D RNP core protein to recognize and bind the K-loop RNA motif

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Zhang, Xinxin; Qu, Guosheng; Biswas, Shyamasri; Suryadi, Jimmy; Brown, Bernard A.; Maxwell, E. Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD protein homologs are members of the L7Ae/15.5kD protein family that characteristically recognize K-turn motifs found in both archaeal and eukaryotic RNAs. In Archaea, the L7Ae protein uniquely binds the K-loop motif found in box C/D and H/ACA sRNAs, whereas the eukaryotic 15.5kD homolog is unable to recognize this variant K-turn RNA. Comparative sequence and structural analyses, coupled with amino acid replacement experiments, have demonstrated that five amino acids enable the archaeal L7Ae core protein to recognize and bind the K-loop motif. These signature residues are highly conserved in the archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD homologs, but differ between the two domains of life. Interestingly, loss of K-loop binding by archaeal L7Ae does not disrupt C′/D′ RNP formation or RNA-guided nucleotide modification. L7Ae is still incorporated into the C′/D′ RNP despite its inability to bind the K-loop, thus indicating the importance of protein–protein interactions for RNP assembly and function. Finally, these five signature amino acids are distinct for each of the L7Ae/L30 family members, suggesting an evolutionary continuum of these RNA-binding proteins for recognition of the various K-turn motifs contained in their cognate RNAs. PMID:19926724

  12. Oct4B, CD90, and CD73 are upregulated in bladder tissue following electro-resection of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Takumi; Tonooka, Akiko; Okuno, Yumiko; Hattori-Kato, Mami; Mikami, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We tested the hypothesis that stimulation by electro-resection of bladder tissue induces stem cells in the tissue repair process. Materials & Methods: After primary transurethral resection of a bladder tumor and surrounding tissue (TUR-Bt), second TUR-Bt was performed. Tissues excised by second TUR-Bt were immunohistochemically stained for Oct4, a marker of pluripotency, and for CD90 and CD73, markers of mesenchymal stromal cells, when no bladder tumor cells remained. Results and Conclusions: Oct4B protein was sporadically stained in the cytoplasm of interstitial cells in four out of eight cases. CD90 and CD73 are upregulated in interstitial and vascular endothelial cells without CD45 expression. Mesenchymal stromal cells, but not pluripotent stem cells, may be mainly involved in bladder tissue repair. PMID:27397997

  13. Perlwapin, an abalone nacre protein with three four-disulfide core (whey acidic protein) domains, inhibits the growth of calcium carbonate crystals.

    PubMed

    Treccani, Laura; Mann, Karlheinz; Heinemann, Fabian; Fritz, Monika

    2006-10-01

    We have isolated a new protein from the nacreous layer of the shell of the sea snail Haliotis laevigata (abalone). Amino acid sequence analysis showed the protein to consist of 134 amino acids and to contain three sequence repeats of approximately 40 amino acids which were very similar to the well-known whey acidic protein domains of other proteins. The new protein was therefore named perlwapin. In addition to the major sequence, we identified several minor variants. Atomic force microscopy was used to explore the interaction of perlwapin with calcite crystals. Monomolecular layers of calcite crystals dissolve very slowly in deionized water and recrystallize in supersaturated calcium carbonate solution. When perlwapin was dissolved in the supersaturated calcium carbonate solution, growth of the crystal was inhibited immediately. Perlwapin molecules bound tightly to distinct step edges, preventing the crystal layers from growing. Using lower concentrations of perlwapin in a saturated calcium carbonate solution, we could distinguish native, active perlwapin molecules from denaturated ones. These observations showed that perlwapin can act as a growth inhibitor for calcium carbonate crystals in saturated calcium carbonate solution. The function of perlwapin in nacre growth may be to inhibit the growth of certain crystallographic planes in the mineral phase of the polymer/mineral composite nacre. PMID:16861275

  14. Perlwapin, an Abalone Nacre Protein with Three Four-Disulfide Core (Whey Acidic Protein) Domains, Inhibits the Growth of Calcium Carbonate Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Treccani, Laura; Mann, Karlheinz; Heinemann, Fabian; Fritz, Monika

    2006-01-01

    We have isolated a new protein from the nacreous layer of the shell of the sea snail Haliotis laevigata (abalone). Amino acid sequence analysis showed the protein to consist of 134 amino acids and to contain three sequence repeats of ∼40 amino acids which were very similar to the well-known whey acidic protein domains of other proteins. The new protein was therefore named perlwapin. In addition to the major sequence, we identified several minor variants. Atomic force microscopy was used to explore the interaction of perlwapin with calcite crystals. Monomolecular layers of calcite crystals dissolve very slowly in deionized water and recrystallize in supersaturated calcium carbonate solution. When perlwapin was dissolved in the supersaturated calcium carbonate solution, growth of the crystal was inhibited immediately. Perlwapin molecules bound tightly to distinct step edges, preventing the crystal layers from growing. Using lower concentrations of perlwapin in a saturated calcium carbonate solution, we could distinguish native, active perlwapin molecules from denaturated ones. These observations showed that perlwapin can act as a growth inhibitor for calcium carbonate crystals in saturated calcium carbonate solution. The function of perlwapin in nacre growth may be to inhibit the growth of certain crystallographic planes in the mineral phase of the polymer/mineral composite nacre. PMID:16861275

  15. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redoxmore » system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.« less

  16. Evidence for Posttranslational Protein Flavinylation in the Syphilis Spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and Biochemical Insights from the Catalytic Core of a Periplasmic Flavin-Trafficking Protein

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg2+-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg2+ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm. PMID:25944861

  17. Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Down-Regulates p21Waf1/Cip1 and Inhibits Curcumin-Induced Apoptosis through MicroRNA-345 Targeting in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shiu, Tzu-Yue; Huang, Shih-Ming; Shih, Yu-Lueng; Chu, Heng-Cheng; Chang, Wei-Kuo; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been reported to regulate cellular microRNAs. The HCV core protein is considered to be a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma, but HCV core-modulated cellular microRNAs are unknown. The HCV core protein regulates p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. However, the mechanism of HCV core-associated p21Waf1/Cip1 regulation remains to be further clarified. Therefore, we attempted to determine whether HCV core-modulated cellular microRNAs play an important role in regulating p21Waf1/Cip1 expression in human hepatoma cells. Methods Cellular microRNA profiling was investigated in core-overexpressing hepatoma cells using TaqMan low density array. Array data were further confirmed by TaqMan real-time qPCR for single microRNA in core-overexpressing and full-length HCV replicon-expressing cells. The target gene of microRNA was examined by reporter assay. The gene expression was determined by real-time qPCR and Western blotting. Apoptosis was examined by annexin V-FITC apoptosis assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by propidium iodide staining. Cell proliferation was analyzed by MTT assay. Results HCV core protein up- or down-regulated some cellular microRNAs in Huh7 cells. HCV core-induced microRNA-345 suppressed p21Waf1/Cip1 gene expression through targeting its 3′ untranslated region in human hepatoma cells. Moreover, the core protein inhibited curcumin-induced apoptosis through p21Waf1/Cip1-targeting microRNA-345 in Huh7 cells. Conclusion and Significance HCV core protein enhances the expression of microRNA-345 which then down-regulates p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. It is the first time that HCV core protein has ever been shown to suppress p21Waf1/Cip1 gene expression through miR-345 targeting. PMID:23577194

  18. Tricritical behavior in the ferromagnetic superconductor ErRh/sub 4/B/sub 4/

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G.W.; Kalia, R.K.; Hinks, D.G.; Behroozi, F.; Tachiki, M.

    1985-08-01

    A new tricritical point on the phase boundary between the superconducting vortex phase and the normal paramagnetic phase of ErRh/sub 4/B/sub 4/ is presented. The microscopic origin of the tricritical point and the expected tricritical behavior are briefly discussed.

  19. 20. FOUR 4B17Gs BEING CONVERTED TO F9Cs. Photographic copy of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. FOUR 4B-17Gs BEING CONVERTED TO F-9Cs. Photographic copy of historic photograph. Jan.-June 1947 OAMA (original print located at Ogden Air Logistics Center, Hill Air Force Base, Utah). Photographer unknown. - Hill Field, Airplane Repair Hangars No. 1-No. 4, 5875 Southgate Avenue, Layton, Davis County, UT

  20. 16 CFR 1508.5 - Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b). 1508.5 Section 1508.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1508.5 Component spacing test method...

  1. 49 CFR 178.55 - Specification 4B240ET welded or brazed cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4B240ET welded or brazed cylinders. 178.55 Section 178.55 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for...

  2. Sensitive protein detection using an optical fibre long period grating sensor anchored with silica core gold shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, L.; Hernandez, F. U.; Korposh, S.; Clark, M.; Morgan, S.; James, S.; Tatam, R. P.

    2014-05-01

    An optical fibre long period grating (LPG), modified with a coating of silica gold (SiO2:Au) core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) deposited using the layer-by-layer (LbL) method, was employed for the development of a bio-sensor. The SiO2:Au NPs were electrostatically assembled onto the LPG with the aid of a poly(hydrochloride ammonium) (PAH) polycation layer. The LPG sensor operates at the phase matching turning point to provide the highest sensitivity. The SiO2:Au NPs were modified with biotin, which was used as a ligand for streptavidin (SV) detection. The sensing mechanism is based on the measurement of the refractive index change induced by the binding of the SV to the biotin. The lowest detected concentration of SV was 19 nM using an LPG modified with a 3 layer (PAH/SiO2:Au) thin film.

  3. The Structural Basis of Oncogenic Mutations G12, G13 and Q61 in Small GTPase K-Ras4B

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shaoyong; Jang, Hyunbum; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Ras mediates cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Mutations in K-Ras4B are predominant at residues G12, G13 and Q61. Even though all impair GAP-assisted GTP → GDP hydrolysis, the mutation frequencies of K-Ras4B in human cancers vary. Here we aim to figure out their mechanisms and differential oncogenicity. In total, we performed 6.4 μs molecular dynamics simulations on the wild-type K-Ras4B (K-Ras4BWT-GTP/GDP) catalytic domain, the K-Ras4BWT-GTP–GAP complex, and the mutants (K-Ras4BG12C/G12D/G12V-GTP/GDP, K-Ras4BG13D-GTP/GDP, K-Ras4BQ61H-GTP/GDP) and their complexes with GAP. In addition, we simulated ‘exchanged’ nucleotide states. These comprehensive simulations reveal that in solution K-Ras4BWT-GTP exists in two, active and inactive, conformations. Oncogenic mutations differentially elicit an inactive-to-active conformational transition in K-Ras4B-GTP; in K-Ras4BG12C/G12D-GDP they expose the bound nucleotide which facilitates the GDP-to-GTP exchange. These mechanisms may help elucidate the differential mutational statistics in K-Ras4B-driven cancers. Exchanged nucleotide simulations reveal that the conformational transition is more accessible in the GTP-to-GDP than in the GDP-to-GTP exchange. Importantly, GAP not only donates its R789 arginine finger, but stabilizes the catalytically-competent conformation and pre-organizes catalytic residue Q61; mutations disturb the R789/Q61 organization, impairing GAP-mediated GTP hydrolysis. Together, our simulations help provide a mechanistic explanation of key mutational events in one of the most oncogenic proteins in cancer. PMID:26902995

  4. PrionW: a server to identify proteins containing glutamine/asparagine rich prion-like domains and their amyloid cores

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Rafael; Conchillo-Sole, Oscar; Iglesias, Valentin; Illa, Ricard; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Sabate, Raimon; Daura, Xavier; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Prions are a particular type of amyloids with the ability to self-perpetuate and propagate in vivo. Prion-like conversion underlies important biological processes but is also connected to human disease. Yeast prions are the best understood transmissible amyloids. In these proteins, prion formation from an initially soluble state involves a structural conversion, driven, in many cases, by specific domains enriched in glutamine/asparagine (Q/N) residues. Importantly, domains sharing this compositional bias are also present in the proteomes of higher organisms, thus suggesting that prion-like conversion might be an evolutionary conserved mechanism. We have recently shown that the identification and evaluation of the potency of amyloid nucleating sequences in putative prion domains allows discrimination of genuine prions. PrionW is a web application that exploits this principle to scan sequences in order to identify proteins containing Q/N enriched prion-like domains (PrLDs) in large datasets. When used to scan the complete yeast proteome, PrionW identifies previously experimentally validated prions with high accuracy. Users can analyze up to 10 000 sequences at a time, PrLD-containing proteins are identified and their putative PrLDs and amyloid nucleating cores visualized and scored. The output files can be downloaded for further analysis. PrionW server can be accessed at http://bioinf.uab.cat/prionw/. PMID:25977297

  5. Dynamic behavior of Arabidopsis eIF4A-III, putative core protein of exon junction complex: fast relocation to nucleolus and splicing speckles under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Koroleva, O A; Calder, G; Pendle, A F; Kim, S H; Lewandowska, D; Simpson, C G; Jones, I M; Brown, J W S; Shaw, P J

    2009-05-01

    Here, we identify the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of the mammalian DEAD box helicase, eIF4A-III, the putative anchor protein of exon junction complex (EJC) on mRNA. Arabidopsis eIF4A-III interacts with an ortholog of the core EJC component, ALY/Ref, and colocalizes with other EJC components, such as Mago, Y14, and RNPS1, suggesting a similar function in EJC assembly to animal eIF4A-III. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-eIF4A-III fusion protein showed localization to several subnuclear domains: to the nucleoplasm during normal growth and to the nucleolus and splicing speckles in response to hypoxia. Treatment with the respiratory inhibitor sodium azide produced an identical response to the hypoxia stress. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 led to accumulation of GFP-eIF4A-III mainly in the nucleolus, suggesting that transition of eIF4A-III between subnuclear domains and/or accumulation in nuclear speckles is controlled by proteolysis-labile factors. As revealed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis, the nucleoplasmic fraction was highly mobile, while the speckles were the least mobile fractions, and the nucleolar fraction had an intermediate mobility. Sequestration of eIF4A-III into nuclear pools with different mobility is likely to reflect the transcriptional and mRNA processing state of the cell. PMID:19435936

  6. A REDD1/TXNIP pro-oxidant complex regulates ATG4B activity to control stress-induced autophagy and sustain exercise capacity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shuxi; Dennis, Michael; Song, Xiufeng; Vadysirisack, Douangsone D.; Salunke, Devika; Nash, Zachary; Yang, Zhifen; Liesa, Marc; Yoshioka, Jun; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Shirihai, Orian S.; Lee, Richard T.; Reed, John C.; Ellisen, Leif W.

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy (autophagy) is a critical cellular stress response; however, the signal transduction pathways controlling autophagy induction in response to stress are poorly understood. Here we reveal a new mechanism of autophagy control whose deregulation disrupts mitochondrial integrity and energy homeostasis in vivo. Stress conditions including hypoxia and exercise induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) through upregulation of a protein complex involving REDD1, an mTORC1 inhibitor and the pro-oxidant protein TXNIP. Decreased ROS in cells and tissues lacking either REDD1 or TXNIP increases catalytic activity of the redox-sensitive ATG4B cysteine endopeptidase, leading to enhanced LC3B delipidation and failed autophagy. Conversely, REDD1/TXNIP complex expression is sufficient to induce ROS, suppress ATG4B activity and activate autophagy. In Redd1−/− mice, deregulated ATG4B activity and disabled autophagic flux cause accumulation of defective mitochondria, leading to impaired oxidative phosphorylation, muscle ATP depletion and poor exercise capacity. Thus, ROS regulation through REDD1/TXNIP is physiological rheostat controlling stress-induced autophagy. PMID:25916556

  7. Algal lectin binding to core (α1-6) fucosylated N-glycans: structural basis for specificity and production of recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Antônia S F; Serna, Sonia; Beloqui, Ana; Arda, Ana; Sampaio, Alexandre H; Walcher, Janika; Ott, Dimitri; Unverzagt, Carlo; Reichardt, Niels-Christian; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus; Nascimento, Kyria S; Imberty, Anne; Cavada, Benildo S; Varrot, Annabelle

    2015-06-01

    We determined the specificity of BTL, a lectin from the red marine alga Bryothamnion triquetrum, toward fucosylated oligosaccharides. BTL showed a strict specificity for the core α1,6-fucosylation, which is an important marker for cancerogenesis and quality control of therapeutical antibodies. The double fucosylation α1,6 and α1,3 was also recognized, but the binding was totally abolished in the sole presence of the α1,3-fucosylation. A more detailed analysis of the specificity of BTL showed a preference for bi- and tri-antennary nonbisected N-glycans. Sialylation or fucosylation at the nonreducing end of N-glycans did not affect the recognition by the lectin. BTL displayed a strong affinity for a core α1,6-fucosylated octasaccharide with a Kd of 12 μM by titration microcalorimetry. The structural characterization of the interaction between BTL and the octasaccharide was obtained by STD-NMR. It demonstrated an extended epitope for recognition that includes the fucose residue, the distal GlcNAc and one mannose residue. Recombinant rBTL was obtained in Escherichia coli and characterized. Its binding properties for carbohydrates were studied using hemagglutination tests and glycan array analysis. rBTL was able to agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes with strong hemagglutination activity only after treatment with papain and trypsin, indicating that its ligands were not directly accessible at the cell surface. The hemagglutinating properties of rBTL confirm the correct folding and functional state of the protein. The results show BTL as a potent candidate for cancer diagnosis and as a reagent for the preparation and quality control of antibodies lacking core α1,6-fucosylated N-glycans. PMID:25573275

  8. Structural origins of high apparent dielectric constants experienced by ionizable groups in the hydrophobic core of a protein

    PubMed Central

    Chimenti, Michael S.; Castaneda, Carlos A.; Majumdar, Ananya; Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, E.

    2012-01-01

    The side chains of Lys-66, Asp-66, and Glu-66 in staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) are fully buried and surrounded mainly by hydrophobic matter, save for internal water molecules associated with carboxylic oxygen atoms. These ionizable side chains titrate with pKa values of 5.7, 8.8 and 8.9, respectively. To reproduce these pKa values with continuum electrostatics calculations the protein has to be treated with high dielectric constants. We have examined structural origins of these high apparent dielectric constants by using NMR spectroscopy to characterize the structural response to the ionization of these internal side chains. Substitution of Val-66 with Lys-66 and Asp-66 led to increased conformational fluctuations in the microenvironments surrounding these groups, even under conditions of pH where Lys-66 and Asp-66 are neutral. When Lys-66, Asp-66 and Glu-66 are charged the proteins remain almost fully folded but resonances for a few backbone amides adjacent to the internal ionizable residues are broadened. This suggests that the ionization of the internal groups promotes a local increase in dynamics on the intermediate timescale, consistent with either partial unfolding or increased backbone fluctuations in helix-1 near residue 66, or, less likely, with increased fluctuations of the charges side chains at position 66. These experiments confirm that the high apparent dielectric constants reported by the internal Lys-66, Asp-66 and Glu-66 reflect localized changes in conformational fluctuations without incurring detectable, global structural reorganization. To improve structure-based pKa calculations in proteins this coupling between ionization of internal groups and local changes in conformational fluctuations will have to be treated explicitly. PMID:21059359

  9. [Immunogenicity and heterologous protection in mice with a recombinant adenoviral-based vaccine carrying a hepatitis C virus truncated NS3 and core fusion protein].

    PubMed

    Guan, Jie; Deng, Yao; Chen, Hong; Yang, Yang; Wen, Bo; Tan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    To develop a safe and broad-spectrum effective hepatitis C virus (HCV) T cell vaccine,we constructed the recombinant adenovirus-based vaccine that carried the hepatitis C virus truncated NS3 and core fusion proteins. The expression of the fusion antigen was confirmed by in vitro immunofluorescence and western blotting assays. Our results indicated that this vaccine not only stimulated antigen-specific antibody responses,but also activated strong NS3-specific T cell immune responses. NS3-specific IFN-γ+ and TNF-α+ CD4+ T cell subsets were also detected by a intracellular cytokine secretion assay. In a surrogate challenge assay based on a recombinant heterologous HCV (JFH1,2a) vaccinia virus,the recombinant adenovirus-based vaccine was capable of eliciting effective levels of cross-protection. These findings have im- portant implications for the study of HCV immune protection and the future development of a novel vaccine. PMID:25997323

  10. Vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin-2 is associated with dense core secretory granules in PC12 neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Papini, E; Rossetto, O; Cutler, D F

    1995-01-20

    The presence and intracellular distribution of vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 (VAMP-1) and VAMP-2 were investigated in the PC12 neuroendocrine cell line using isotype-specific polyclonal antibodies. VAMP-2 was detected in the total membrane fraction, while VAMP-1 was undetectable. Subcellular fractionation demonstrates that a substantial amount of the VAMP-2 (24-36%) is associated with dense core, catecholamine-containing granules (DCGs). This was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. The L chain of tetanus neurotoxin, known to inhibit granule mediated secretion in permeabilized PC12 cells, as well as botulinum neurotoxins F and G, effectively cleaved DCG-associated VAMP-2. These data demonstrate that VAMP-2 is present on the secretory granules of PC12 cells. PMID:7836399

  11. An intrinsically disordered region of methyl-CpG binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) recruits the histone deacetylase core of the NuRD complex

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Megha A.; Webb, Heather D.; Sinanan, Leander M.; Scarsdale, J. Neel; Walavalkar, Ninad M.; Ginder, Gordon D.; Williams, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The MBD2-NuRD (Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase) complex is an epigenetic reader of DNA methylation that regulates genes involved in normal development and neoplastic diseases. To delineate the architecture and functional interactions of the MBD2-NuRD complex, we previously solved the structures of MBD2 bound to methylated DNA and a coiled-coil interaction between MBD2 and p66α that recruits the CHD4 nucleosome remodeling protein to the complex. The work presented here identifies novel structural and functional features of a previously uncharacterized domain of MBD2 (MBD2IDR). Biophysical analyses show that the MBD2IDR is an intrinsically disordered region (IDR). However, despite this inherent disorder, MBD2IDR increases the overall binding affinity of MBD2 for methylated DNA. MBD2IDR also recruits the histone deacetylase core components (RbAp48, HDAC2 and MTA2) of NuRD through a critical contact region requiring two contiguous amino acid residues, Arg286 and Leu287. Mutating these residues abrogates interaction of MBD2 with the histone deacetylase core and impairs the ability of MBD2 to repress the methylated tumor suppressor gene PRSS8 in MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells. These findings expand our knowledge of the multi-dimensional interactions of the MBD2-NuRD complex that govern its function. PMID:25753662

  12. Structural Study of the HD-PTP Bro1 Domain in a Complex with the Core Region of STAM2, a Subunit of ESCRT-0

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juhyeon; Oh, Kyoung-Jin; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Bo Yeon; Choi, Joon Sig; Ku, Bonsu; Kim, Seung Jun

    2016-01-01

    EGFR is a key player in cell proliferation and survival signaling, and its sorting into MVBs for eventual lysosomal degradation is controlled by the coordination of multiple ESCRT complexes on the endosomal membrane. HD-PTP is a cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphatase, and is associated with EGFR trafficking by interacting with the ESCRT-0 protein STAM2 and the ESCRT-III protein CHMP4B via its N-terminal Bro1 domain. Intriguingly, the homologous domain of two other human Bro1 domain-containing proteins, Alix and Brox, binds CHMP4B but not STAM2, despite their high structural similarity. To elucidate this binding specificity, we determined the complex structure of the HD-PTP Bro1 domain bound to the STAM2 core region. STAM2 binds to the hydrophobic concave pocket of the HD-PTP Bro1 domain, as CHMP4B does to the pocket of Alix, Brox, or HD-PTP but in the opposite direction. Critically, Thr145 of HD-PTP, corresponding to Lys151 of Alix and Arg145 of Brox, is revealed to be a determinant residue enabling this protein to bind STAM2, as the Alix- or Brox-mimicking mutations of this residue blocks the intermolecular interaction. This work therefore provides the structural basis for how HD-PTP recognizes the ESCRT-0 component to control EGFR sorting. PMID:26866605

  13. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  14. The basic domain/leucine zipper protein hXBP-1 preferentially binds to and transactivates CRE-like sequences containing an ACGT core.

    PubMed Central

    Clauss, I M; Chu, M; Zhao, J L; Glimcher, L H

    1996-01-01

    The transcription factor hXBP-1 belongs to the family of basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) proteins and interacts with the cAMP responsive element (CRE) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II A alpha, DR alpha and DP beta genes. However, the developmental expression of hXBP-1 as revealed by in situ hybridization in mouse embryos, has suggested that it interacts with the promoter of additional genes. To identify other potential target genes of this factor, we performed binding site selection experiments with recombinant hXBP-1 protein. The results indicated that hXBP-1 binds preferably to the CRE-like element GAT-GACGTG(T/G)NNN(A/T)T, wherein the core sequence ACGT is highly conserved, and that it also binds to some TPA response elements (TRE). hXBP-1 can transactivate multimers of the target sequences to which it binds in COS cells, and the level of transactivation directly correlates with the extent of binding as observed in gel retardation experiments. One target sequence that is strongly bound by hXBP-1 is the 21 bp repeat in the HTLV-1 LTR, and we demonstrate here that hXBP-1 can transactivate the HTLV-1 LTR. Further, the transactivation domain of hXBP-1 encompasses a large C-terminal region of the protein, containing domains rich in glutamine, serine and threonine, and proline and glutamine residues, as shown in transient transfection experiments using hXBP-1-GAL4 fusion proteins and a reporter gene under the control of GAL4-binding sites. PMID:8657566

  15. Variability within a pea core collection of LEAM and HSP22, two mitochondrial seed proteins involved in stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Payet, Nicole; Lalanne, David; Neveu, Martine; Tolleter, Dimitri; Burstin, Judith; Macherel, David

    2015-07-01

    LEAM, a late embryogenesis abundant protein, and HSP22, a small heat shock protein, were shown to accumulate in the mitochondria during pea (Pisum sativum L.) seed development, where they are expected to contribute to desiccation tolerance. Here, their expression was examined in seeds of 89 pea genotypes by Western blot analysis. All genotypes expressed LEAM and HSP22 in similar amounts. In contrast with HSP22, LEAM displayed different isoforms according to apparent molecular mass. Each of the 89 genotypes harboured a single LEAM isoform. Genomic and RT-PCR analysis revealed four LEAM genes differing by a small variable indel in the coding region. These variations were consistent with the apparent molecular mass of each isoform. Indels, which occurred in repeated domains, did not alter the main properties of LEAM. Structural modelling indicated that the class A α-helix structure, which allows interactions with the mitochondrial inner membrane in the dry state, was preserved in all isoforms, suggesting functionality is maintained. The overall results point out the essential character of LEAM and HSP22 in pea seeds. LEAM variability is discussed in terms of pea breeding history as well as LEA gene evolution mechanisms. PMID:25367071

  16. Androgen regulation of CYP4B1 responsible for mutagenic activation of bladder carcinogens in the rat bladder: detection of CYP4B1 mRNA by competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, S; Yoneda, Y; Sugimoto, T; Ikemoto, S; Hiroi, T; Yamamoto, K; Nakatani, T; Funae, Y

    2001-05-26

    Significant sex differences exist among cases of bladder cancer in humans as well as in experimental animals such as rats. Aromatic amines such as benzidine and 2-naphthylamine are known to induce bladder cancer. These carcinogenic amines are activated to genotoxic substances by cytochrome P 450 CYP4B1, which is present in bladder mucosa. In this study, regulation of CYP4B1 was investigated to elucidate sex difference in bladder carcinogenesis. Competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate the expression of rat CYP4B1 mRNA occurring in small amounts of tissue such as bladder tissue. Expression of CYP4B1 in the bladder of male rats increased with development but not in that of female rats. Moreover, mature male rats exhibited higher expression of CYP4B1 in the bladder than did mature female rats. Castration of male rats decreased CYP4B1 levels and treatment with testosterone led to a partial recovery of CYP4B1 levels. These results indicate that CYP4B1 levels in the rat bladder are partly regulated by androgens. Furthermore, the present findings suggest that the sex difference observed in bladder carcinogenesis was due to sex-different expression of CYP4B1 in bladder tissue. PMID:11311483

  17. Encoded library technology screening of hepatitis C virus NS4B yields a small-molecule compound series with in vitro replicon activity.

    PubMed

    Arico-Muendel, Christopher; Zhu, Zhengrong; Dickson, Hamilton; Parks, Derek; Keicher, Jesse; Deng, Jianghe; Aquilani, Leah; Coppo, Frank; Graybill, Todd; Lind, Kenneth; Peat, Andrew; Thomson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To identify novel antivirals to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B protein, we utilized encoded library technology (ELT), which enables purified proteins not amenable to standard biochemical screening methods to be tested against large combinatorial libraries in a short period of time. We tested NS4B against several DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries (DEL) and identified a single DEL feature that was subsequently progressed to off-DNA synthesis. The most active of the initial synthesized compounds had 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 50 to 130 nM in a NS4B radioligand binding assay and 300 to 500 nM in an HCV replicon assay. Chemical optimization yielded compounds with potencies as low as 20 nM in an HCV genotype 1b replicon assay, 500 nM against genotype 1a, and 5 μM against genotype 2a. Through testing against other genotypes and genotype 2a-1b chimeric replicons and from resistance passage using the genotype 1b replicon, we confirmed that these compounds were acting on the proposed first transmembrane region of NS4B. A single sequence change (F98L) was identified as responsible for resistance, and it was thought to largely explain the relative lack of potency of this series against genotype 2a. Unlike other published series that appear to interact with this region, we did not observe sensitivity to amino acid substitutions at positions 94 and 105. The discovery of this novel compound series highlights ELT as a valuable approach for identifying direct-acting antivirals to nonenzymatic targets. PMID:25824229

  18. Evidence for variation in the optimal translation initiation complex: plant eIF4B, eIF4F, and eIF(iso)4F differentially promote translation of mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Mayberry, Laura K; Allen, M Leah; Dennis, Michael D; Browning, Karen S

    2009-08-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4B is known to interact with multiple initiation factors, mRNA, rRNA, and poly(A) binding protein (PABP). To gain a better understanding of the function of eIF4B, the two isoforms from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were expressed and analyzed using biophysical and biochemical methods. Plant eIF4B was found by ultracentrifugation and light scattering analysis to most likely be a monomer with an extended structure. An extended structure would facilitate the multiple interactions of eIF4B with mRNA as well as other initiation factors (eIF4A, eIF4G, PABP, and eIF3). Eight mRNAs, barley (Hordeum vulgare) alpha-amylase mRNA, rabbit beta-hemoglobin mRNA, Arabidopsis heat shock protein 21 (HSP21) mRNA, oat (Avena sativa) globulin, wheat (Triticum aestivum) germin, maize (Zea mays) alcohol dehydrogenase, satellite tobacco necrosis virus RNA, and alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) 4, were used in wheat germ in vitro translation assays to measure their dependence on eIF4B and eIF4F isoforms. The two Arabidopsis eIF4B isoforms, as well as native and recombinant wheat eIF4B, showed similar responses in the translation assay. AMV RNA 4 and Arabidopsis HSP21 showed only a slight dependence on the presence of eIF4B isoforms, whereas rabbit beta-hemoglobin mRNA and wheat germin mRNA showed modest dependence. Barley alpha-amylase, oat globulin, and satellite tobacco necrosis virus RNA displayed the strongest dependence on eIF4B. These results suggest that eIF4B has some effects on mRNA discrimination during initiation of translation. Barley alpha-amylase, oat globulin, and rabbit beta-hemoglobin mRNA showed the highest activity with eIF4F, whereas Arabidopsis HSP21 and AMV RNA 4 used both eIF4F and eIF(iso)4F equally well. These results suggest that differential or optimal translation of mRNAs may require initiation complexes composed of specific isoforms of initiation factor gene products. Thus, individual mRNAs or classes of mRNAs may respond to the

  19. Optical and Near-UV Observations of the Transiting Extrasolar Planet TrES-4b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Carter-Thaxton; Turner, J.; Carleton, T.; Crawford, B.; Guvenen, B.; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Small, L.; Towner, A. P.; Walker-LaFollette, A.; Henz, T.

    2013-01-01

    Using the Steward Observatory 61” Kuiper Telescope, The University of Arizona Astronomy Club conducted photometric observations of the transiting extrasolar planet TrES-4b as part of the Exoplanet Observation Project. Observations were made in the Bessell U, Harris B, and Harris R filters. Initial observations were made in 2009, with follow up observations in 2011. Basic data reduction and photometry was done using IRAF and determination of transit parameters was done using Transit Analysis Package (TAP) and JKTEBOP transit modeling code. We present an updated planetary mass, radius, density, surface gravity, Safronov number, equilibrium temperature, orbital distance, and orbital inclination for TrES-4b. In addition, we also searched for asymmetries between the near-UV and optical light curves. This project, started in spring 2009, has introduced many undergraduate students to research and given them valuable experience with data reduction and observation techniques.

  20. NIRF, a Novel Ubiquitin Ligase, Inhibits Hepatitis B Virus Replication Through Effect on HBV Core Protein and H3 Histones.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guanhua; Hu, Bin; Zhou, Danlin; Xuan, Yanyan; Bai, Lu; Duan, Changzhu

    2015-05-01

    Np95/ICBP90-like RING finger protein (NIRF), a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase, has been shown to interact with HBc and promote its degradation. This study investigated the effects of NIRF on replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the mechanisms. We have shown that NIRF inhibits replication of HBV DNA and secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg in HepG2 cells transfected with pAAV-HBV1.3. NIRF also inhibits the replication and secretion of HBV in a mouse model that expressed HBV. NIRF reduces acetylation of HBV cccDNA-bound H3 histones. These results showed that NIRF is involved in the HBV replication cycle not only through direct interaction with HBc but also reduces acetylation of HBV cccDNA-bound H3 histones. PMID:25664994

  1. Serovar 4b complex predominates among Listeria monocytogenes isolates from imported aquatic products in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianshun; Chen, Qiaomiao; Jiang, Jianjun; Hu, Hongxia; Ye, Jiangbo; Fang, Weihuan

    2010-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, the causative organism of listeriosis, is primarily transmitted to humans through contaminated food. In this study, we examined 1275 batches of aquatic products imported from 29 countries and found that 36 batches from 8 countries were contaminated by Listeria (2.8%), with L. monocytogenes accounting for 2.6% (33/1275) and L. innocua for 0.2% (3/1275). Of the 23 selected L. monocytogenes isolates (from the 33 identified), 15 (65.2%) were of serovar 4b complex (4b, 4d, or 4e), three (13.0%) of 1/2a or 3a, four (17.4%) of 1/2b or 3b, and one (4.4%) of 1/2c or 3c. Notably, four of the 23 isolates belonged to epidemic clone I (ECI) and another four were associated with epidemic clone II (ECII), two highly clonal 4b clusters responsible for most of the documented listeriosis outbreaks. In the multilocus sequence typing scheme based on the concatenated genes gyrB-dapE-hisJ-sigB-ribC-purM-betL-gap-tuf, serovar 4b complex isolates from imported aquatic products exhibited significant genetic diversity. While the four ECI isolates were genetically related to those from Chinese diseased animals, both lacking one proline-rich repeat of ActA, the four ECII isolates were located between 1/2b or 3b strains. As the L. monocytogenes isolates from imported aquatic products possessed a nearly complete set of major infection-related genes, they demonstrated virulence potential in mouse model. PMID:19735205

  2. Ga4B2O9: an efficient borate photocatalyst for overall water splitting without cocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangjia; Jing, Yan; Ju, Jing; Yang, Dingfeng; Yang, Jia; Gao, Wenliang; Cong, Rihong; Yang, Tao

    2015-03-16

    Borates are well-known candidates for optical materials, but their potentials in photocatalysis are rarely studied. Ga(3+)-containing oxides or sulfides are good candidates for photocatalysis applications because the unoccupied 4s orbitals of Ga usually contribute to the bottom of the conducting band. It is therefore anticipated that Ga4B2O9 might be a promising photocatalyst because of its high Ga/B ratio and three-dimensional network. Various synthetic methods, including hydrothermal (HY), sol-gel (SG), and high-temperature solid-state reaction (HTSSR), were employed to prepare crystalline Ga4B2O9. The so-obtained HY-Ga4B2O9 are micrometer single crystals but do not show any UV-light activity unless modified by Pt loading. The problem is the fast recombination of photoexcitons. Interestingly, the samples obtained by SG and HTSSR methods both possess a fine micromorphology composed of well-crystalline nanometer strips. Therefore, the excited e(-) and h(+) can move to the surface easily. Both samples exhibit excellent intrinsic UV-light activities for pure water splitting without the assistance of any cocatalyst (47 and 118 μmol/h/g for H2 evolution and 22 and 58 μmol/h/g for O2 evolution, respectively), while there is no detectable activity for P25 (nanoparticles of TiO2 with a specific surface area of 69 m(2)/g) under the same conditions. PMID:25714488

  3. HATS-4b: A dense hot Jupiter transiting a super metal-rich G star

    SciTech Connect

    Jordán, Andrés; Brahm, Rafael; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; De Val Borro, M.; Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Ciceri, S.; Csák, B.; Henning, T.; Sato, B.; Buchhave, L.; and others

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-4b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V = 13.46 mag G star. HATS-4b has a period of P ≈ 2.5167 days, mass of M{sub p} ≈ 1.32 M {sub Jup}, radius of R{sub p} ≈ 1.02 R {sub Jup}, and density of ρ {sub p} = 1.55 ± 0.16 g cm{sup –3} ≈1.24 ρ{sub Jup}. The host star has a mass of 1.00 M {sub ☉}, a radius of 0.92 R {sub ☉}, and a very high metallicity [Fe/H]=0.43 ± 0.08. HATS-4b is among the densest known planets with masses between 1 and 2 M {sub J} and is thus likely to have a significant content of heavy elements of the order of 75 M {sub ⊕}. In this paper we present the data reduction, radial velocity measurements, and stellar classification techniques adopted by the HATSouth survey for the CORALIE spectrograph. We also detail a technique for simultaneously estimating vsin i and macroturbulence using high resolution spectra.

  4. DISTRIBUTION OF CH{sub 3}OH IN NGC 1333 IRAS4B

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Sakai, Takeshi

    2012-07-20

    Distribution of the CH{sub 3}OH (J{sub K} = 2{sub K}-1{sub K}, 96.7 GHz) emission has been investigated toward NGC 1333 IRAS4B, a low-mass Class 0 protostar which harbors a hot corino, with Nobeyama Millimeter Array. The CH{sub 3}OH emission is found to be prominent in the shocked region caused by an impact of the molecular outflow from the protostars. The direction of the outflow which is responsible for the shock seems to be opposite to that of a compact outflow known previously in the CO (J = 2-1), HCN (J = 1-0), H{sub 2}CO (3{sub 12}-2{sub 11}), and CH{sub 3}OH (J{sub K} = 7{sub K}-6{sub K}) emissions, whereas it is the same as that of the faint second outflow found in the H{sub 2}CO emission. This double outflow structure can be interpreted most naturally by the existence of more than two protostars in IRAS4B. On the other hand, a centrally condensed component associated apparently with IRAS4B cannot be recognized in our CH{sub 3}OH observation. Our observation suggests that, in this source, the CH{sub 3}OH (J{sub K} 2{sub K}-1{sub K}) emission preferentially traces the shocked regions rather than the hot corino around the protostar.

  5. Virus-like particles of hepatitis B virus core protein containing five mimotopes of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) protect chickens against IBDV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-shan; Ouyang, Wei; Liu, Xiao-juan; He, Kong-wang; Yu, Sheng-qing; Zhang, Hai-bin; Fan, Hong-jie; Lu, Cheng-ping

    2012-03-01

    Current infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) vaccines suffer from maternal antibody interference and mimotope vaccines might be an alternative. Previously we demonstrated an IBDV VP2 five-mimotope polypeptide, 5EPIS, elicited protective immunity in chickens. In the current study, the 5epis gene was inserted into a plasmid carrying human hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) gene at its major immunodominant region site. The recombinant gene was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli to produce chimeric protein HBc-5EPIS which self-assembles to virus-like particles (VLP). Two-week old specific-pathogen-free chickens were immunized intramuscularly with HBc-5EPIS VLP or 5EPIS polypeptide without adjuvant (50 μg/injection) on day 0, 7, 14 and 21. Anti-5EPIS antibody was first detected on day 7 and day 21 in HBc-5EPIS and 5EPIS groups, respectively; on day 28, anti-5EPIS titers reached 12,800 or 1600 by ELISA, and 3200 or 800 by virus neutralization assay in HBc-5EPIS and 5EPIS groups, respectively. No anti-5EPIS antibody was detected in the buffer control group throughout the experiment. Challenge on day 28 with a virulent IBDV strain (GX8/99) resulted in 100%, 40.0% and 26.7% survival for chickens immunized with HBc-5EPIS, 5EPIS and buffer, respectively. These data suggest epitope presentation on chimeric VLP is a promising approach for improving mimotope vaccines for IBDV. PMID:22285269

  6. MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein of the macrolide transporter MacAB-TolC, binds lipopolysaccharide core specifically and with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuo; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2013-11-01

    The Escherichia coli MacAB-TolC transporter has been implicated in efflux of macrolide antibiotics and secretion of enterotoxin STII. In this study, we found that purified MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, contains one tightly bound rough core lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) molecule per MacA molecule. R-LPS was bound specifically to MacA protein with affinity exceeding that of polymyxin B. Sequence analyses showed that MacA contains two high-density clusters of positively charged amino acid residues located in the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain and the periplasmic C-terminal domain. Substitutions in the C-terminal cluster reducing the positive-charge density completely abolished binding of R-LPS. At the same time, these substitutions significantly reduced the functionality of MacA in the protection of E. coli against macrolides in vivo and in the in vitro MacB ATPase stimulation assays. Taken together, our results suggest that R-LPS or a similar glycolipid is a physiological substrate of MacAB-TolC. PMID:23974027

  7. INPP4B overexpression is associated with poor clinical outcome and therapy resistance in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dzneladze, I; He, R; Woolley, J F; Son, M H; Sharobim, M H; Greenberg, S A; Gabra, M; Langlois, C; Rashid, A; Hakem, A; Ibrahimova, N; Arruda, A; Löwenberg, B; Valk, P J M; Minden, M D; Salmena, L

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase, type-II (INPP4B) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We observed that AML patients with high levels of INPP4B (INPP4B(high)) had poor response to induction therapy, shorter event-free survival and shorter overall survival. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that INPP4B(high) was an independent predictor of poor prognosis, significantly improving current predictive models, where it outperformed conventional biomarkers including FLT3-ITD and NPM1. Furthermore, INPP4B(high) effectively segregated relative risk in AML patients with normal cytogenetics. The role of INPP4B on the biology of leukemic cells was assessed in vitro. Overexpression of INPP4B in AML cell lines enhanced colony formation potential, recapitulated the chemotherapy resistance observed in AML patients and promoted proliferation in a phosphatase-dependent, and Akt-independent manner. These findings reveal that INPP4B(high) has an unexpected role consistent with oncogenesis in AML, in contrast to its previously reported tumor-suppressive role in epithelial cancers. Overall, we propose that INPP4B is a novel prognostic biomarker in AML that has potential to be translated into clinical practice both as a disease marker and therapeutic target. PMID:25736236

  8. The N-terminal half of the connexin protein contains the core elements of the pore and voltage gates

    PubMed Central

    Kronengold, Jack; Srinivas, Miduturu; Verselis, Vytas K.

    2013-01-01

    Connexins form channels with large aqueous pores that mediate fluxes of inorganic ions and biological signaling molecules. Studies aimed at identifying the connexin pore now include a crystal structure that provides details of putative pore-lining residues that need to be verified using independent biophysical approaches. Here we extended our initial cysteine-scanning studies of the TM1/E1 region of Cx46 hemichannels to include TM2 and TM3 transmembrane segments. No evidence of reactivity was observed in either TM2 or TM3 probed with small or large thiol-modifying reagents. Several identified pore residues in E1 of Cx46 have been verified in different Cx isoforms. Use of variety of thiol reagents indicates that the connexin hemichannel pore is large and flexible enough, at least in the extracellular part of the pore funnel, to accommodate uncommonly large side chains. We also find that that gating characteristics are largely determined by the same domains that constitute the pore. These data indicate that biophysical and structural studies are converging towards a view that the N-terminal half of the Cx protein contains the principal components of the pore and gating elements, with NT, TM1 and E1 forming the pore funnel. PMID:22825713

  9. Two Distinct Binding Modes Define the Interaction of Brox with the C-Terminal Tails of CHMP5 and CHMP4B

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Ruiling; Dussupt, Vincent; Jiang, Jiansheng; Sette, Paola; Rudd, Victoria; Chuenchor, Watchalee; Bello, Nana F.; Bouamr, Fadila; Xiao, Tsan Sam

    2012-05-21

    Interactions of the CHMP protein carboxyl terminal tails with effector proteins play important roles in retroviral budding, cytokinesis, and multivesicular body biogenesis. Here we demonstrate that hydrophobic residues at the CHMP4B C-terminal amphipathic {alpha} helix bind a concave surface of Brox, a mammalian paralog of Alix. Unexpectedly, CHMP5 was also found to bind Brox and specifically recruit endogenous Brox to detergent-resistant membrane fractions through its C-terminal 20 residues. Instead of an {alpha} helix, the CHMP5 C-terminal tail adopts a tandem {beta}-hairpin structure that binds Brox at the same site as CHMP4B. Additional Brox:CHMP5 interface is furnished by a unique CHMP5 hydrophobic pocket engaging the Brox residue Y348 that is not conserved among the Bro1 domains. Our studies thus unveil a {beta}-hairpin conformation of the CHMP5 protein C-terminal tail, and provide insights into the overlapping but distinct binding profiles of ESCRT-III and the Bro1 domain proteins.

  10. Expression and Characterization of an Ice Binding Protein from a Bacterium Isolated at a Depth of 3,519 Meters in the Vostok Ice Core, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christner, B. C.; Achberger, A.; Brox, T. I.; Skidmore, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The cryopreservation of microorganisms in ancient glacial ice is possible if lethal levels of macromolecular damage are not incurred and cellular integrity is not compromised via intracellular ice formation or recrystallization. There are numerous examples of cold-adapted species that prevent or limit ice crystal growth by producing ice-binding proteins (IBP). Previously, a bacterium (isolate 3519-10; Flavobacteriaceae family) recovered from a depth of 3,519 meters below the surface in the Vostok ice core was shown to produce and secrete an IBP that inhibits the recrystallization of ice. To explore the phenotypic advantage that IBPs confer to ice-entrapped cells, experiments were designed to examine the expression of 3519-10's IBP gene and protein at different temperatures, assess the effect of the IBP on bacterial viability in ice, and determine how the IBP influences the physical structure of the ice. Total RNA isolated from aerobic cultures grown at temperatures between 4C to 25C and analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR indicated constitutive expression of the IBP gene. Additionally, SDS-PAGE analysis of 3519-10's extracellular proteins revealed a polypeptide corresponding to the predicted size of the 54 kDa IBP at all temperatures tested. The total extracellular protein fraction was subsequently used in assays with Escherichia coli to examine the effect of the IBP on bacterial survival in warm ice (-5C) and after freeze-thaw cycling. In the presence of 100 μg mL-1 of extracellular protein from 3519-10, the survival of E. coli was increased by greater than 100-fold; however, the survival of E. coli suspensions containing the same concentration of bovine serum albumin was not significantly different than controls (p<0.05). Microscopic analysis of ice formed in the presence of the IBP indicated that in a mm^2 field of view, there were 5 times as many crystals as in ice formed in the presence of washed 3519-10 cells and non-IBP producing bacteria, and 10 times as

  11. INPP4B is upregulated and functions as an oncogenic driver through SGK3 in a subset of melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Wilmott, James S.; Guo, Xiang Yun; Yan, Xu Guang; Wang, Chun Yan; Liu, Xiao Ying; Jin, Lei; Tseng, Hsin-Yi; Liu, Tao; Croft, Amanda; Hondermarck, Hubert; Scolyer, Richard A.; Jiang, Chen Chen; Zhang, Xu Dong

    2015-01-01

    Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) negatively regulates PI3K/Akt signalling and has a tumour suppressive role in some types of cancers. However, we have found that it is upregulated in a subset of melanomas. Here we report that INPP4B can function as an oncogenic driver through activation of serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 3 (SGK3) in melanoma. While INPP4B knockdown inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and retarded melanoma xenograft growth, overexpression of INPP4B enhanced melanoma cell and melanocyte proliferation and triggered anchorage-independent growth of melanocytes. Noticeably, INPP4B-mediated melanoma cell proliferation was not related to activation of Akt, but was mediated by SGK3. Upregulation of INPP4B in melanoma cells was associated with loss of miRNA (miR)-494 and/or miR-599 due to gene copy number reduction. Indeed, overexpression of miR-494 or miR-599 downregulated INPP4B, reduced SGK3 activation, and inhibited melanoma cell proliferation, whereas introduction of anti-miR-494 or anti-miR-599 upregulated INPP4B, enhanced SGK3 activation, and promoted melanoma cell proliferation. Collectively, these results identify upregulation of INPP4B as an oncogenic mechanism through activation of SGK3 in a subset of melanomas, with implications for targeting INPP4B and restoring miR-494 and miR-599 as novel approaches in the treatment of melanomas with high INPP4B expression. PMID:26573229

  12. Recruitment of PLANT U-BOX13 and the PI4Kβ1/β2 phosphatidylinositol-4 kinases by the small GTPase RabA4B plays important roles during salicylic acid-mediated plant defense signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Antignani, Vincenzo; Klocko, Amy L; Bak, Gwangbae; Chandrasekaran, Suma D; Dunivin, Taylor; Nielsen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Protection against microbial pathogens involves the activation of cellular immune responses in eukaryotes, and this cellular immunity likely involves changes in subcellular membrane trafficking. In eukaryotes, members of the Rab GTPase family of small monomeric regulatory GTPases play prominent roles in the regulation of membrane trafficking. We previously showed that RabA4B is recruited to vesicles that emerge from trans-Golgi network (TGN) compartments and regulates polarized membrane trafficking in plant cells. As part of this regulation, RabA4B recruits the closely related phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI4K) PI4Kβ1 and PI4Kβ2 lipid kinases. Here, we identify a second Arabidopsis thaliana RabA4B-interacting protein, PLANT U-BOX13 (PUB13), which has recently been identified to play important roles in salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defense signaling. We show that PUB13 interacts with RabA4B through N-terminal domains and with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI-4P) through a C-terminal armadillo domain. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a functional fluorescent PUB13 fusion protein (YFP-PUB13) localizes to TGN and Golgi compartments and that PUB13, PI4Kβ1, and PI4Kβ2 are negative regulators of SA-mediated induction of pathogenesis-related gene expression. Taken together, these results highlight a role for RabA4B and PI-4P in SA-dependent defense responses. PMID:25634989

  13. Comparative Analysis of the 15.5kD Box C/D snoRNP Core Protein in the Primitive Eukaryote Giardia lamblia Reveals Unique Structural and Functional Features

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Shyamasri; Buhrman, Greg; Gagnon, Keith; Mattos, Carla; Brown, II, Bernard A.; Maxwell, E. Stuart

    2012-07-11

    Box C/D ribonucleoproteins (RNP) guide the 2'-O-methylation of targeted nucleotides in archaeal and eukaryotic rRNAs. The archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD box C/D RNP core protein homologues initiate RNP assembly by recognizing kink-turn (K-turn) motifs. The crystal structure of the 15.5kD core protein from the primitive eukaryote Giardia lamblia is described here to a resolution of 1.8 {angstrom}. The Giardia 15.5kD protein exhibits the typical {alpha}-{beta}-{alpha} sandwich fold exhibited by both archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD proteins. Characteristic of eukaryotic homologues, the Giardia 15.5kD protein binds the K-turn motif but not the variant K-loop motif. The highly conserved residues of loop 9, critical for RNA binding, also exhibit conformations similar to those of the human 15.5kD protein when bound to the K-turn motif. However, comparative sequence analysis indicated a distinct evolutionary position between Archaea and Eukarya. Indeed, assessment of the Giardia 15.5kD protein in denaturing experiments demonstrated an intermediate stability in protein structure when compared with that of the eukaryotic mouse 15.5kD and archaeal Methanocaldococcus jannaschii L7Ae proteins. Most notable was the ability of the Giardia 15.5kD protein to assemble in vitro a catalytically active chimeric box C/D RNP utilizing the archaeal M. jannaschii Nop56/58 and fibrillarin core proteins. In contrast, a catalytically competent chimeric RNP could not be assembled using the mouse 15.5kD protein. Collectively, these analyses suggest that the G. lamblia 15.5kD protein occupies a unique position in the evolution of this box C/D RNP core protein retaining structural and functional features characteristic of both archaeal L7Ae and higher eukaryotic 15.5kD homologues.

  14. Identification of the gC1qR sites for the HIV-1 viral envelope protein gp41 and the HCV core protein: Implications in viral-specific pathogenesis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pednekar, Lina; Valentino, Alisa; Ji, Yan; Tumma, Nithin; Valentino, Christopher; Kadoor, Adarsh; Hosszu, Kinga K.; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Kew, Richard R.; Kishore, Uday; Peerschke, Ellinor I.B.; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence accumulated over the past 20 years supports the concept that gC1qR is a major pathogen-associated pattern recognition receptor (PRR). This conclusion is based on the fact that, a wide range of bacterial and viral ligands are able to exploit gC1qR to either suppress the host’s immune response and thus enhance their survival, or to gain access into cells to initiate disease. Of the extensive array of viral ligands that have affinity for gC1qR, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41, and the core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) are of major interest as they are known to contribute to the high morbidity and mortality caused by these pathogens. While the HCV core protein binds gC1qR and suppresses T cell proliferation resulting in a significantly diminished immune response, the gp41 employs gC1qR to induce the surface expression of the NK cell ligand, NKp44L, on uninfected CD4+ T cells, thereby rendering them susceptible to autologous destruction by NKp44 receptor expressing NK cells. Because of the potential for the design of peptide-based or antibody-based therapeutic options, the present studies were undertaken to define the gC1qR interaction sites for these pathogen-associated molecular ligands. Employing a solid phase microplate-binding assay, we examined the binding of each viral ligand to wild type gC1qR and 11 gC1qR deletion mutants. The results obtained from these studies have identified two major HCV core protein sites on a domain of gC1qR comprising of residues 144–148 and 196–202. Domain 196–202 in turn, is located in the last half of the larger gC1qR segment encoded by exons IV–VI (residues 159–282), which was proposed previously to contain the site for HCV core protein. The major gC1qR site for gp41 on the other hand, was found to be in a highly conserved region encoded by exon IV and comprises of residues 174–180. Interestingly, gC1qR residues 174–180 also constitute the cell surface-binding site for soluble

  15. Identification of the gC1qR sites for the HIV-1 viral envelope protein gp41 and the HCV core protein: Implications in viral-specific pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Pednekar, Lina; Valentino, Alisa; Ji, Yan; Tumma, Nithin; Valentino, Christopher; Kadoor, Adarsh; Hosszu, Kinga K; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Kew, Richard R; Kishore, Uday; Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2016-06-01

    A substantial body of evidence accumulated over the past 20 years supports the concept that gC1qR is a major pathogen-associated pattern recognition receptor (PRR). This conclusion is based on the fact that, a wide range of bacterial and viral ligands are able to exploit gC1qR to either suppress the host's immune response and thus enhance their survival, or to gain access into cells to initiate disease. Of the extensive array of viral ligands that have affinity for gC1qR, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41, and the core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) are of major interest as they are known to contribute to the high morbidity and mortality caused by these pathogens. While the HCV core protein binds gC1qR and suppresses T cell proliferation resulting in a significantly diminished immune response, the gp41 employs gC1qR to induce the surface expression of the NK cell ligand, NKp44L, on uninfected CD4(+) T cells, thereby rendering them susceptible to autologous destruction by NKp44 receptor expressing NK cells. Because of the potential for the design of peptide-based or antibody-based therapeutic options, the present studies were undertaken to define the gC1qR interaction sites for these pathogen-associated molecular ligands. Employing a solid phase microplate-binding assay, we examined the binding of each viral ligand to wild type gC1qR and 11 gC1qR deletion mutants. The results obtained from these studies have identified two major HCV core protein sites on a domain of gC1qR comprising of residues 144-148 and 196-202. Domain 196-202 in turn, is located in the last half of the larger gC1qR segment encoded by exons IV-VI (residues 159-282), which was proposed previously to contain the site for HCV core protein. The major gC1qR site for gp41 on the other hand, was found to be in a highly conserved region encoded by exon IV and comprises of residues 174-180. Interestingly, gC1qR residues 174-180 also constitute the cell surface-binding site for soluble gC1qR (sgC1q

  16. 75 FR 41871 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Draft Guidance on Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Register of February 21, 2008 (73 FR 9575). Once finalized, the annex will provide guidance to assist... Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of Pharmacopoeial Texts for Use in the International Conference on... availability of a draft guidance entitled ``Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of Pharmacopoeial Texts for...

  17. Population Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Serotype 4b Isolates from Sporadic Human Listeriosis in the United States, 2003-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes can cause severe foodborne disease (listeriosis). Serotype 4b strains have resulted in numerous outbreaks, repeatedly involving three epidemic clones (ECI, ECII, and ECIa). Little is known about population structure of L. monocytogenes serotype 4b from sporadic listeriosis, ev...

  18. 3 CFR - Presidential Determination Pursuant to Section 1245(d)(4)(B) and (C) of the National Defense...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...(d)(4)(B) and (C) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 Presidential... for Fiscal Year 2012 Memorandum for the Secretary of State the Secretary of the Treasury the Secretary... 1245(d)(4)(B) and (C) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012, Public Law...

  19. The coiled-coil domain of the Nop56/58 core protein is dispensable for sRNP assembly but is critical for archaeal box C/D sRNP-guided nucleotide methylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxin; Champion, Erica A.; Tran, Elizabeth J.; Brown, Bernard A.; Baserga, Susan J.; Maxwell, E. Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Archaeal box C/D sRNAs guide the methylation of specific nucleotides in archaeal ribosomal and tRNAs. Three Methanocaldococcus jannaschii sRNP core proteins (ribosomal protein L7, Nop56/58, and fibrillarin) bind the box C/D sRNAs to assemble the sRNP complex, and these core proteins are essential for nucleotide methylation. A distinguishing feature of the Nop56/58 core protein is the coiled-coil domain, established by α-helices 4 and 5, that facilitates Nop56/58 self-dimerization in vitro. The function of this coiled-coil domain has been assessed for box C/D sRNP assembly, sRNP structure, and sRNP-guided nucleotide methylation by mutating or deleting this protein domain. Protein pull-down experiments demonstrated that Nop56/58 self-dimerization and Nop56/58 dimerization with the core protein fibrillarin are mutually exclusive protein:protein interactions. Disruption of Nop56/58 homodimerization by alteration of specific amino acids or deletion of the entire coiled-coil domain had no obvious effect upon core protein binding and sRNP assembly. Site-directed mutation of the Nop56/58 homodimerization domain also had no apparent effect upon either box C/D RNP- or C′/D′ RNP-guided nucleotide modification. However, deletion of this domain disrupted guided methylation from both RNP complexes. Nuclease probing of the sRNP assembled with Nop56/58 proteins mutated in the coiled-coil domain indicated that while functional complexes were assembled, box C/D and C′/D′ RNPs were altered in structure. Collectively, these experiments revealed that the self-dimerization of the Nop56/58 coiled-coil domain is not required for assembly of a functional sRNP, but the coiled-coil domain is important for the establishment of wild-type box C/D and C′/D′ RNP structure essential for nucleotide methylation. PMID:16601205

  20. New AP4B1 mutation in an African-American child associated with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhane, Dronacharya

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of intellectual disability (ID) varies from 1–3%. Genetic causes of ID are being increasingly recognized. Although multiple mutations have been identified as a cause of syndromic ID, the genetic etiology of non-syndromic ID is poorly understood. However, more than 100 loci have been mapped that are associated with non-syndromic ID. There have been a couple of reports of AP4B1 gene mutation causing severe intellectual disability, absent speech, shy character, stereotypic laughter, muscular hypotonia that progressed to spastic paraplegia, microcephaly, foot deformity, decreased muscle mass of the lower limbs, inability to walk, and growth retardation. They had structural brain abnormalities and seizures. The reported cases were from Arab families where consanguineous marriage is common. We encountered an African-American child who presented first at the age of 24 mo with language difficulties and was subsequently found to have moderate to severe intellectual disability by standardized tests. Shortly, he started to have seizures and problems with ambulation. Although he was hypotonic at the time of presentation, legs slowly became spastic at the age of 4 yr. After a thorough work up, he was found to have heterozygous mutation in the AP4B1 gene along with another missense mutation in the same gene. There has been no report of mutation in this gene in the North American population. Although AP4B1 typically is said to be an autosomal recessive disease-causing gene, our case is different in the sense that there are two mutations in the same gene one of which has never been reported before and co-exists with a known disease causing mutation. Yet, the phenotype of the case closely resembles those published previously.

  1. Management and Reconstruction in the Breast Cancer Patient With a Fungating T4b Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Daniali, Lily N.; Rezzadeh, Kameron S.; Lee, Edward S.; Keith, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: A subset of women with locally advanced breast cancer presented with fungating tumor mass eroding and infiltrating the surrounding breast skin (T4b breast cancers). These patients often have chronic pain, large open wounds, frequent infections, malodorous drainage, social isolation, and general debilitation that present enormous therapeutic challenges. Because of the advanced nature of the disease, palliation, while minimizing recovery time and maximizing quality of life, is essential. Methods: From 2009 to 2014, a total of 12 consecutive patients underwent resection of fungating T4b breast tumors and subsequent chest wall reconstruction. Demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical data were collected retrospectively. Results: Fifty percent of women had distant metastases at the time of reconstruction, and 17% of women presented to the emergency department in a hemodynamically unstable condition in either hemorrhagic shock or septic shock, necessitating del