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Sample records for 4d cardiac micro-ct

  1. Comparison of 4D-microSPECT and microCT for murine cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Befera, Nicholas T.; Badea, Cristian T.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to compare a new generation of four-dimensional (4D) microSPECT with microCT for quantitative in vivo assessment of murine cardiac function. Procedures 4D isotropic cardiac images were acquired from normal C57BL/6 mice with either microSPECT at 350-micron resolution (n=6) or microCT at 88-micron resolution (n=6). One additional mouse with myocardial infarction (MI) was scanned with both modalities. Prior to imaging, mice were injected with either 99mTc -tetrofosmin for microSPECT, or a liposomal blood pool contrast agent for microCT. Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) was performed using Vitrea (Vital Images) software, to derive global and regional function. Results Measures of global LV function between microSPECT and microCT groups were comparable (e.g. ejection fraction=71±6%-microSPECT and 68±4%-microCT). Regional functional indices (wall motion, wall thickening, regional ejection fraction) were also similar for the two modalities. In the mouse with MI, microSPECT identified a large perfusion defect that was not evident with microCT. Conclusions Despite lower spatial resolution, microSPECT was comparable to microCT in the quantitative evaluation of cardiac function. MicroSPECT offers an advantage over microCT in the ability to evaluate myocardial perfusion radiotracer distribution and function simultaneously. MicroSPECT should be considered as an alternative to microCT and MR for preclinical cardiac imaging in the mouse. PMID:24037175

  2. Registration-based segmentation of murine 4D cardiac micro-CT data using symmetric normalization

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Darin; Badea, Alexandra; Liu, Yilin; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2013-01-01

    Micro-CT can play an important role in preclinical studies of cardiovascular disease because of its high spatial and temporal resolution. Quantitative analysis of 4D cardiac images requires segmentation of the cardiac chambers at each time point, an extremely time consuming process if done manually. To improve throughput this study proposes a pipeline for registration-based segmentation and functional analysis of 4D cardiac micro-CT data in the mouse. Following optimization and validation using simulations, the pipeline was applied to in vivo cardiac micro-CT data corresponding to 10 cardiac phases acquired in C57BL/6 mice (n = 5). After edge-preserving smoothing with a novel adaptation of 4D bilateral filtration, one phase within each cardiac sequence was manually segmented. Deformable registration was used to propagate these labels to all other cardiac phases for segmentation. The volumes of each cardiac chamber were calculated and used to derive stroke volume, ejection fraction, cardiac output, and cardiac index. Dice coefficients and volume accuracies were used to compare manual segmentations of two additional phases with their corresponding propagated labels. Both measures were, on average, >0.90 for the left ventricle and >0.80 for the myocardium, the right ventricle, and the right atrium, consistent with trends in inter- and intra-segmenter variability. Segmentation of the left atrium was less reliable. On average, the functional metrics of interest were underestimated by 6.76% or more due to systematic label propagation errors around atrioventricular valves; however, execution of the pipeline was 80% faster than performing analogous manual segmentation of each phase. PMID:22971564

  3. 4D micro-CT for cardiac and perfusion applications with view under sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, Cristian T.; Johnston, Samuel M.; Qi, Yi; Johnson, G. Allan

    2011-06-01

    Micro-CT is commonly used in preclinical studies to provide anatomical information. There is growing interest in obtaining functional measurements from 4D micro-CT. We report here strategies for 4D micro-CT with a focus on two applications: (i) cardiac imaging based on retrospective gating and (ii) pulmonary perfusion using multiple contrast injections/rotations paradigm. A dual source micro-CT system is used for image acquisition with a sampling rate of 20 projections per second. The cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. Fast scanning of free breathing mice is achieved using retrospective gating. The ECG and respiratory signals are used to sort projections into ten cardiac phases. The pulmonary perfusion protocol uses a conventional contrast agent (Isovue 370) delivered by a micro-injector in four injections separated by 2 min intervals to allow for clearance. Each injection is synchronized with the rotation of the animal, and each of the four rotations is started with an angular offset of 22.5 from the starting angle of the previous rotation. Both cardiac and perfusion protocols result in an irregular angular distribution of projections that causes significant streaking artifacts in reconstructions when using traditional filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms. The reconstruction involves the use of the point spread function of the micro-CT system for each time point, and the analysis of the distribution of the reconstructed data in the Fourier domain. This enables us to correct for angular inconsistencies via deconvolution and identify regions where data is missing. The missing regions are filled with data from a high quality but temporally averaged prior image reconstructed with all available projections. Simulations indicate that deconvolution successfully removes the streaking artifacts while preserving temporal information. 4D cardiac micro-CT in a mouse was performed with adequate image quality at isotropic

  4. Assessing Cardiac Injury in Mice With Dual Energy-MicroCT, 4D-MicroCT, and MicroSPECT Imaging After Partial Heart Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Min, Hooney; Befera, Nicholas; Clark, Darin; Qi, Yi; Das, Shiva; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.; Kirsch, David G.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a mouse model of cardiac injury after partial heart irradiation (PHI) and to test whether dual energy (DE)-microCT and 4-dimensional (4D)-microCT can be used to assess cardiac injury after PHI to complement myocardial perfusion imaging using micro-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods and Materials: To study cardiac injury from tangent field irradiation in mice, we used a small-field biological irradiator to deliver a single dose of 12 Gy x-rays to approximately one-third of the left ventricle (LV) of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} and Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, where 1 or both alleles of p53 are deleted in endothelial cells. Four and 8 weeks after irradiation, mice were injected with gold and iodinated nanoparticle-based contrast agents, and imaged with DE-microCT and 4D-microCT to evaluate myocardial vascular permeability and cardiac function, respectively. Additionally, the same mice were imaged with microSPECT to assess myocardial perfusion. Results: After PHI with tangent fields, DE-microCT scans showed a time-dependent increase in accumulation of gold nanoparticles (AuNp) in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice. In Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, extravasation of AuNp was observed within the irradiated LV, whereas in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} mice, AuNp were restricted to blood vessels. In addition, data from DE-microCT and microSPECT showed a linear correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.97) between the fraction of the LV that accumulated AuNp and the fraction of LV with a perfusion defect. Furthermore, 4D-microCT scans demonstrated that PHI caused a markedly decreased ejection fraction, and higher end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, to develop in Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, which were associated with compensatory cardiac hypertrophy of the heart that was not irradiated. Conclusions: Our results show that DE-microCT and 4D-microCT with nanoparticle-based contrast agents are novel imaging approaches

  5. A registration based approach for 4D cardiac micro-CT using combined prospective and retrospective gating

    PubMed Central

    Badea, Cristian T.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Fox, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in murine cardiac studies with three-dimensional cone beam micro-computed tomography (CT) have used either prospective or retrospective gating technique. While prospective gating ensures the best image quality and the highest resolution, it involves longer sampling times and higher radiation dose. Sampling is faster and the radiation dose can be reduced with retrospective gating but the image quality is affected by the limited number of projections with an irregular angular distribution which complicate the reconstruction process, causing significant streaking artifacts. This work involves both prospective and retrospective gating in sampling. Deformable registration is used between a high quality image set acquired with prospective gating with the multiple data sets during the cardiac cycle obtained using retrospective gating. Tests were conducted on a four-dimensional (4D) cardiac mouse phantom and after optimization, the method was applied to in vivo cardiac micro-CT data. Results indicate that, by using our method, the sampling time can be reduced by a factor of 2.5 and the radiation dose can be reduced 35% compared to the prospective sampling while the image quality can be maintained. In conclusion, we proposed a novel solution to 4D cine cardiac micro-CT based on a combined prospective with retrospective gating in sampling and deformable registration post reconstruction that mixed the advantages of both strategies. PMID:18491508

  6. 4D micro-CT using fast prospective gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaolian; Johnston, Samuel M.; Qi, Yi; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2012-01-01

    Micro-CT is currently used in preclinical studies to provide anatomical information. But, there is also significant interest in using this technology to obtain functional information. We report here a new sampling strategy for 4D micro-CT for functional cardiac and pulmonary imaging. Rapid scanning of free-breathing mice is achieved with fast prospective gating (FPG) implemented on a field programmable gate array. The method entails on-the-fly computation of delays from the R peaks of the ECG signals or the peaks of the respiratory signals for the triggering pulses. Projection images are acquired for all cardiac or respiratory phases at each angle before rotating to the next angle. FPG can deliver the faster scan time of retrospective gating (RG) with the regular angular distribution of conventional prospective gating for cardiac or respiratory gating. Simultaneous cardio-respiratory gating is also possible with FPG in a hybrid retrospective/prospective approach. We have performed phantom experiments to validate the new sampling protocol and compared the results from FPG and RG in cardiac imaging of a mouse. Additionally, we have evaluated the utility of incorporating respiratory information in 4D cardiac micro-CT studies with FPG. A dual-source micro-CT system was used for image acquisition with pulsed x-ray exposures (80 kVp, 100 mA, 10 ms). The cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent containing 123 mg I ml-1 delivered via a tail vein catheter in a dose of 0.01 ml g-1 body weight. The phantom experiment demonstrates that FPG can distinguish the successive phases of phantom motion with minimal motion blur, and the animal study demonstrates that respiratory FPG can distinguish inspiration and expiration. 4D cardiac micro-CT imaging with FPG provides image quality superior to RG at an isotropic voxel size of 88 µm and 10 ms temporal resolution. The acquisition time for either sampling approach is less than 5 min. The

  7. CARDIAC MICRO-CT FOR MORPHOLOGICAL AND FUNCTIONAL PHENOTYPING OF MLP NULL MICE

    PubMed Central

    Badea, Cristian T; Hedlund, Laurence W.; Boslego Mackel, Julie F.; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE Investigate the use of micro-CT for morphological and functional phenotyping of MLP null mice and compare micro-CT with M-mode echocardiography. MATERIAL AND METHODS MLP null mice and controls were imaged using both micro-CT and M-mode echocardiography. For Micro-CT imaging, we used a custom built scanner. Following a single intravenous injection of a blood pool contrast agent (Fenestra™ VC) and using a cardio-respiratory gating, we acquired eight phases of the cardiac cycle (every 15 ms) and reconstructed 3D datasets with 94 micron isotropic resolution. Wall thickness and volumetric measurements of left ventricle were performed and cardiac function was estimated. RESULTS Micro-CT and M mode echocardiography showed both morphological and functional aspects that separate MLP null mice from controls. End Diastolic and Systolic Volumes were increased significantly 3 and 5 fold respectively in the MLP null versus controls. Ejection Fraction was reduced by an average of 32% in MLP null mice. The data analysis shows that two imaging modalities provided different results partly due to the difference in anesthesia regimes. Other sources of errors for micro-CT are also analyzed. CONCLUSION Micro-CT can provide the 4D data (3D isotropic volumes over time) required for morphological and functional phenotyping in mice. PMID:17711781

  8. A multi-resolution approach to retrospectively-gated cardiac micro-CT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. P.; Johnson, G. A.; Badea, C. T.

    2014-03-01

    In preclinical research, micro-CT is commonly used to provide anatomical information; however, there is significant interest in using this technology to obtain functional information in cardiac studies. The fastest acquisition in 4D cardiac micro-CT imaging is achieved via retrospective gating, resulting in irregular angular projections after binning the projections into phases of the cardiac cycle. Under these conditions, analytical reconstruction algorithms, such as filtered back projection, suffer from streaking artifacts. Here, we propose a novel, multi-resolution, iterative reconstruction algorithm inspired by robust principal component analysis which prevents the introduction of streaking artifacts, while attempting to recover the highest temporal resolution supported by the projection data. The algorithm achieves these results through a unique combination of the split Bregman method and joint bilateral filtration. We illustrate the algorithm's performance using a contrast-enhanced, 2D slice through the MOBY mouse phantom and realistic projection acquisition and reconstruction parameters. Our results indicate that the algorithm is robust to under sampling levels of only 34 projections per cardiac phase and, therefore, has high potential in reducing both acquisition times and radiation dose. Another potential advantage of the multi-resolution scheme is the natural division of the reconstruction problem into a large number of independent sub-problems which can be solved in parallel. In future work, we will investigate the performance of this algorithm with retrospectively-gated, cardiac micro-CT data.

  9. Left Ventricle Volume Measurements in Cardiac Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Badea, Cristian T.; Wetzel, Arthur W.; Mistry, Nilesh; Pomerantz, Stuart; Nave, Demian; Johnson, G. Allan

    2008-01-01

    Micro-CT based cardiac function estimation in small animals requires measurement of left ventricle (LV) volume at multiple time points during the cardiac cycle. Measurement accuracy depends on the image resolution, its signal and noise properties, and the analysis procedure. This work compares the accuracy of the Otsu thresholding and a region sampled binary mixture approach, for live mouse LV volume measurement using 100 micron resolution datasets. We evaluate both analysis methods after varying the volume of injected contrast agent and the number of projections used for CT reconstruction with a goal of permitting reduced levels of both x-ray and contrast agent doses. PMID:18243656

  10. 4D micro-CT-based perfusion imaging in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Johnston, S. M.; Lin, M.; Hedlund, L. W.; Johnson, G. A.

    2009-02-01

    Quantitative in-vivo imaging of lung perfusion in rodents can provide critical information for preclinical studies. However, the combined challenges of high temporal and spatial resolution have made routine quantitative perfusion imaging difficult in rodents. We have recently developed a dual tube/detector micro-CT scanner that is well suited to capture first-pass kinetics of a bolus of contrast agent used to compute perfusion information. Our approach is based on the paradigm that the same time density curves can be reproduced in a number of consecutive, small (i.e. 50μL) injections of iodinated contrast agent at a series of different angles. This reproducibility is ensured by the high-level integration of the imaging components of our system, with a micro-injector, a mechanical ventilator, and monitoring applications. Sampling is controlled through a biological pulse sequence implemented in LabVIEW. Image reconstruction is based on a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique implemented on a GPU. The capabilities of 4D micro-CT imaging are demonstrated in studies on lung perfusion in rats. We report 4D micro-CT imaging in the rat lung with a heartbeat temporal resolution of 140 ms and reconstructed voxels of 88 μm. The approach can be readily extended to a wide range of important preclinical models, such as tumor perfusion and angiogenesis, and renal function.

  11. Fast X-ray micro-CT for real-time 4D observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, H.; Yoshida, K.; Tsuji, T.; Koyama, T.; Tsusaka, Y.; Kagoshima, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Fast X-ray computed tomography (CT) system with sub-second order measurement for single CT acquisition has been developed. The system, consisting of a high-speed sample rotation stage and a high-speed X-ray camera, is constructed at synchrotron radiation beamline in order to utilize fully intense X-rays. A time-resolving CT movie (i.e. 4D CT) can be available by operating the fast CT system continuously. Real-time observation of water absorbing process of super-absorbent polymer (SAP) has been successfully performed with the 4D CT operation.

  12. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  13. Prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice using carbon nanotube field emission x-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Guohua; Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source technology has recently been investigated for diagnostic imaging applications because of its attractive characteristics including electronic programmability, fast switching, distributed source, and multiplexing. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the potential of this technology for high-resolution prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging. Methods: A dynamic cone-beam micro-CT scanner was constructed using a rotating gantry, a stationary mouse bed, a flat-panel detector, and a sealed CNT based microfocus x-ray source. The compact single-beam CNT x-ray source was operated at 50 KVp and 2 mA anode current with 100 {mu}mx100 {mu}m effective focal spot size. Using an intravenously administered iodinated blood-pool contrast agent, prospective cardiac and respiratory-gated micro-CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained from ten anesthetized free-breathing mice in their natural position. Four-dimensional cardiac images were also obtained by gating the image acquisition to different phases in the cardiac cycle. Results: High-resolution CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained at 15 ms temporal resolution and 6.2 lp/mm spatial resolution at 10% of system MTF. The images were reconstructed at 76 {mu}m isotropic voxel size. The data acquisition time for two cardiac phases was 44{+-}9 min. The CT values observed within the ventricles and the ventricle wall were 455{+-}49 and 120{+-}48 HU, respectively. The entrance dose for the acquisition of a single phase of the cardiac cycle was 0.10 Gy. Conclusions: A high-resolution dynamic micro-CT scanner was developed from a compact CNT microfocus x-ray source and its feasibility for prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice under their natural position was demonstrated.

  14. Complete valvular heart apparatus model from 4D cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Grbic, Sasa; Ionasec, Razvan; Vitanovski, Dime; Voigt, Ingmar; Wang, Yang; Georgescu, Bogdan; Navab, Nassir; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-07-01

    The cardiac valvular apparatus, composed of the aortic, mitral, pulmonary and tricuspid valves, is an essential part of the anatomical, functional and hemodynamic characteristics of the heart and the cardiovascular system as a whole. Valvular heart diseases often involve multiple dysfunctions and require joint assessment and therapy of the valves. In this paper, we propose a complete and modular patient-specific model of the cardiac valvular apparatus estimated from 4D cardiac CT data. A new constrained Multi-linear Shape Model (cMSM), conditioned by anatomical measurements, is introduced to represent the complex spatio-temporal variation of the heart valves. The cMSM is exploited within a learning-based framework to efficiently estimate the patient-specific valve parameters from cine images. Experiments on 64 4D cardiac CT studies demonstrate the performance and clinical potential of the proposed method. Our method enables automatic quantitative evaluation of the complete valvular apparatus based on non-invasive imaging techniques. In conjunction with existent patient-specific chamber models, the presented valvular model enables personalized computation modeling and realistic simulation of the entire cardiac system.

  15. Assessment of dedicated low-dose cardiac micro-CT reconstruction algorithms using the left ventricular volume of small rodents as a performance measure

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Joscha; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Phase-correlated microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) imaging plays an important role in the assessment of mouse models of cardiovascular diseases and the determination of functional parameters as the left ventricular volume. As the current gold standard, the phase-correlated Feldkamp reconstruction (PCF), shows poor performance in case of low dose scans, more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to enable low-dose imaging. In this study, the authors focus on the McKinnon-Bates (MKB) algorithm, the low dose phase-correlated (LDPC) reconstruction, and the high-dimensional total variation minimization reconstruction (HDTV) and investigate their potential to accurately determine the left ventricular volume at different dose levels from 50 to 500 mGy. The results were verified in phantom studies of a five-dimensional (5D) mathematical mouse phantom. Methods: Micro-CT data of eight mice, each administered with an x-ray dose of 500 mGy, were acquired, retrospectively gated for cardiac and respiratory motion and reconstructed using PCF, MKB, LDPC, and HDTV. Dose levels down to 50 mGy were simulated by using only a fraction of the projections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was evaluated as a measure of image quality. Left ventricular volume was determined using different segmentation algorithms (Otsu, level sets, region growing). Forward projections of the 5D mouse phantom were performed to simulate a micro-CT scan. The simulated data were processed the same way as the real mouse data sets. Results: Compared to the conventional PCF reconstruction, the MKB, LDPC, and HDTV algorithm yield images of increased quality in terms of CNR. While the MKB reconstruction only provides small improvements, a significant increase of the CNR is observed in LDPC and HDTV reconstructions. The phantom studies demonstrate that left ventricular volumes can be determined accurately at 500 mGy. For lower dose levels which were simulated for real mouse data sets, the

  16. Imaging of cardiac perfusion of free-breathing small animals using dynamic phase-correlated micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Sawall, Stefan; Kuntz, Jan; Socher, Michaela; Knaup, Michael; Hess, Andreas; Bartling, Soenke; Kachelriess, Marc

    2012-12-15

    Purpose:Mouse models of cardiac diseases have proven to be a valuable tool in preclinical research. The high cardiac and respiratory rates of free breathing mice prohibit conventional in vivo cardiac perfusion studies using computed tomography even if gating methods are applied. This makes a sacrification of the animals unavoidable and only allows for the application of ex vivo methods. Methods: To overcome this issue the authors propose a low dose scan protocol and an associated reconstruction algorithm that allows for in vivo imaging of cardiac perfusion and associated processes that are retrospectively synchronized to the respiratory and cardiac motion of the animal. The scan protocol consists of repetitive injections of contrast media within several consecutive scans while the ECG, respiratory motion, and timestamp of contrast injection are recorded and synchronized to the acquired projections. The iterative reconstruction algorithm employs a six-dimensional edge-preserving filter to provide low-noise, motion artifact-free images of the animal examined using the authors' low dose scan protocol. Results: The reconstructions obtained show that the complete temporal bolus evolution can be visualized and quantified in any desired combination of cardiac and respiratory phase including reperfusion phases. The proposed reconstruction method thereby keeps the administered radiation dose at a minimum and thus reduces metabolic inference to the animal allowing for longitudinal studies. Conclusions: The authors' low dose scan protocol and phase-correlated dynamic reconstruction algorithm allow for an easy and effective way to visualize phase-correlated perfusion processes in routine laboratory studies using free-breathing mice.

  17. Live 4D optical coherence tomography for early embryonic mouse cardiac phenotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Andrew L.; Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-03-01

    Studying embryonic mouse development is important for our understanding of normal human embryogenesis and the underlying causes of congenital defects. Our research focuses on imaging early development in the mouse embryo to specifically understand cardiovascular development using optical coherence tomography (OCT). We have previously developed imaging approaches that combine static embryo culture, OCT imaging and advanced image processing to visualize the whole live mouse embryos and obtain 4D (3D+time) cardiodynamic datasets with cellular resolution. Here, we present the study of using 4D OCT for dynamic imaging of early embryonic heart in live mouse embryos to assess mutant cardiac phenotypes during development, including a cardiac looping defect. Our results indicate that the live 4D OCT imaging approach is an efficient phenotyping tool that can reveal structural and functional cardiac defects at very early stages. Further studies integrating live embryonic cardiodynamic phenotyping with molecular and genetic approaches in mouse mutants will help to elucidate the underlying signaling defects.

  18. Robust segmentation of 4D cardiac MRI-tagged images via spatio-temporal propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Zhen; Huang, Xiaolei; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Axel, Leon

    2005-04-01

    In this paper we present a robust method for segmenting and tracking cardiac contours and tags in 4D cardiac MRI tagged images via spatio-temporal propagation. Our method is based on two main techniques: the Metamorphs Segmentation for robust boundary estimation, and the tunable Gabor filter bank for tagging lines enhancement, removal and myocardium tracking. We have developed a prototype system based on the integration of these two techniques, and achieved efficient, robust segmentation and tracking with minimal human interaction.

  19. Targeted disruption of the heat shock protein 20–phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) interaction protects against pathological cardiac remodelling in a mouse model of hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Tamara P.; Hortigon-Vinagre, Maria P.; Findlay, Jane E.; Elliott, Christina; Currie, Susan; Baillie, George S.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylated heat shock protein 20 (HSP20) is cardioprotective. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) and a mouse model of pressure overload mediated hypertrophy, we show that peptide disruption of the HSP20–phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) complex results in attenuation of action potential prolongation and protection against adverse cardiac remodelling. The later was evidenced by improved contractility, decreased heart weight to body weight ratio, and reduced interstitial and perivascular fibrosis. This study demonstrates that disruption of the specific HSP20–PDE4D interaction leads to attenuation of pathological cardiac remodelling. PMID:25426411

  20. Motion-compensated fully 4D reconstruction of gated cardiac sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravier, Erwan; Yang, Yongyi

    2005-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the benefits of a spatio-temporal approach for reconstruction of cardiac image sequences. We introduce a temporal prior based on motion-compensation to enforce temporal correlations along the curved trajectories that follow the cardiac motion. The image frames in a sequence are reconstructed simultaneously through maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. We evaluated the performance of our algorithm using the 4D gated mathematical cardiac-torso (gMCAT) D1.01 phantom to simulate gated SPECT perfusion imaging with Tc-99m-sestamibi. Our experimental results show that the proposed approach could significantly improve the accuracy of reconstructed images without causing cross-frame blurring that may arise form the cardiac motion.

  1. Interactive volume rendering of multimodality 4D cardiac data with the use of consumer graphics hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, Frank; Strengert, Magnus; Iserhardt-Bauer, Sabine; Aladl, Usaf E.; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2003-05-01

    Interactive multimodality 4D volume rendering of cardiac images is challenging due to several factors. Animated rendering of fused volumes with multiple lookup tables (LUT) and interactive adjustments of relative volume positions and orientations must be performed in real time. In addition it is difficult to visualize the myocardium separated from the surrounding tissue on some modalities, such as MRI. In this work we propose to use software techniques combined with hardware capabilities of modern consumer video cards for real-time visualization of time-varying multimodality fused cardiac volumes for diagnostic purposes.

  2. Constrain static target kinetic iterative image reconstruction for 4D cardiac CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, Adam M.; La Riviere, Patrick J.

    2011-03-01

    Iterative image reconstruction offers improved signal to noise properties for CT imaging. A primary challenge with iterative methods is the substantial computation time. This computation time is even more prohibitive in 4D imaging applications, such as cardiac gated or dynamic acquisition sequences. In this work, we propose only updating the time-varying elements of a 4D image sequence while constraining the static elements to be fixed or slowly varying in time. We test the method with simulations of 4D acquisitions based on measured cardiac patient data from a) a retrospective cardiac-gated CT acquisition and b) a dynamic perfusion CT acquisition. We target the kinetic elements with one of two methods: 1) position a circular ROI on the heart, assuming area outside ROI is essentially static throughout imaging time; and 2) select varying elements from the coefficient of variation image formed from fast analytic reconstruction of all time frames. Targeted kinetic elements are updated with each iteration, while static elements remain fixed at initial image values formed from the reconstruction of data from all time frames. Results confirm that the computation time is proportional to the number of targeted elements; our simulations suggest that <30% of elements need to be updated in each frame leading to >3 times reductions in reconstruction time. The images reconstructed with the proposed method have matched mean square error with full 4D reconstruction. The proposed method is amenable to most optimization algorithms and offers the potential for significant computation improvements, which could be traded off for more sophisticated system models or penalty terms.

  3. Dynamic real-time 4D cardiac MDCT image display using GPU-accelerated volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Eagleson, Roy; Peters, Terry M

    2009-09-01

    Intraoperative cardiac monitoring, accurate preoperative diagnosis, and surgical planning are important components of minimally-invasive cardiac therapy. Retrospective, electrocardiographically (ECG) gated, multidetector computed tomographical (MDCT), four-dimensional (3D + time), real-time, cardiac image visualization is an important tool for the surgeon in such procedure, particularly if the dynamic volumetric image can be registered to, and fused with the actual patient anatomy. The addition of stereoscopic imaging provides a more intuitive environment by adding binocular vision and depth cues to structures within the beating heart. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a comprehensive stereoscopic 4D cardiac image visualization and manipulation platform, based on the opacity density radiation model, which exploits the power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) in the rendering pipeline. In addition, we present a new algorithm to synchronize the phases of the dynamic heart to clinical ECG signals, and to calculate and compensate for latencies in the visualization pipeline. A dynamic multiresolution display is implemented to enable the interactive selection and emphasis of volume of interest (VOI) within the entire contextual cardiac volume and to enhance performance, and a novel color and opacity adjustment algorithm is designed to increase the uniformity of the rendered multiresolution image of heart. Our system provides a visualization environment superior to noninteractive software-based implementations, but with a rendering speed that is comparable to traditional, but inferior quality, volume rendering approaches based on texture mapping. This retrospective ECG-gated dynamic cardiac display system can provide real-time feedback regarding the suspected pathology, function, and structural defects, as well as anatomical information such as chamber volume and morphology.

  4. Fully 4D motion-compensated reconstruction of cardiac SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravier, Erwan; Yang, Yongyi; King, Michael A.; Jin, Mingwu

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the benefits of a spatiotemporal approach for reconstruction of image sequences. In the proposed approach, we introduce a temporal prior in the form of motion compensation to account for the statistical correlations among the frames in a sequence, and reconstruct all the frames collectively as a single function of space and time. The reconstruction algorithm is derived based on the maximum a posteriori estimate, for which the one-step late expectation-maximization algorithm is used. We demonstrated the method in our experiments using simulated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cardiac perfusion images. The four-dimensional (4D) gated mathematical cardiac-torso phantom was used for simulation of gated SPECT perfusion imaging with Tc-99m-sestamibi. In addition to bias-variance analysis and time activity curves, we also used a channelized Hotelling observer to evaluate the detectability of perfusion defects in the reconstructed images. Our experimental results demonstrated that the incorporation of temporal regularization into image reconstruction could significantly improve the accuracy of cardiac images without causing any significant cross-frame blurring that may arise from the cardiac motion. This could lead to not only improved detection of perfusion defects, but also improved reconstruction of the heart wall which is important for functional assessment of the myocardium. This work was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health under grant no HL65425.

  5. Improved image quality and computation reduction in 4-D reconstruction of cardiac-gated SPECT images.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, M V; King, M A; Wernick, M N; Byrne, C L; Soares, E J; Pretorius, P H

    2000-05-01

    Spatiotemporal reconstruction of cardiac-gated SPECT images permits us to obtain valuable information related to cardiac function. However, the task of reconstructing this four-dimensional (4-D) data set is computation intensive. Typically, these studies are reconstructed frame-by-frame: a nonoptimal approach because temporal correlations in the signal are not accounted for. In this work, we show that the compression and signal decorrelation properties of the Karhunen-Loève (KL) transform may be used to greatly simplify the spatiotemporal reconstruction problem. The gated projections are first KL transformed in the temporal direction. This results in a sequence of KL-transformed projection images for which the signal components are uncorrelated along the time axis. As a result, the 4-D reconstruction task is simplified to a series of three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions in the KL domain. The reconstructed KL components are subsequently inverse KL transformed to obtain the entire spatiotemporal reconstruction set. Our simulation and clinical results indicate that KL processing provides image sequences that are less noisy than are conventional frame-by-frame reconstructions. Additionally, by discarding high-order KL components that are dominated by noise, we can achieve savings in computation time because fewer reconstructions are needed in comparison to conventional frame-by-frame reconstructions.

  6. Cardiac C-arm CT: 4D non-model based heart motion estimation and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prümmer, M.; Fahrig, R.; Wigström, L.; Boese, J.; Lauritsch, G.; Strobel, N.; Hornegger, J.

    2007-03-01

    The combination of real-time fluoroscopy and 3D cardiac imaging on the same C-arm system is a promising technique that might improve therapy planning, guiding, and monitoring in the interventional suite. In principal, to reconstruct a 3D image of the beating heart at a particular cardiac phase, a complete set of X-ray projection data representing that phase is required. One approximate approach is the retrospectively ECG-gated FDK reconstruction (RG-FDK). From the acquired data set of N s multiple C-arm sweeps, those projection images which are acquired closest in time to the desired cardiac phase are retrospectively selected. However, this approach uses only 1/ N s of the obtained data. Our goal is to utilize data from other cardiac phases as well. In order to minimize blurring and motion artifacts, cardiac motion has to be compensated for, which can be achieved using a temporally dependent spatial 3D warping of the filtered-backprojections. In this work we investigate the computation of the 4D heart motion based on prior reconstructions of several cardiac phases using RG-FDK. A 4D motion estimation framework is presented using standard fast non-rigid registration. A smooth 4D motion vector field (MVF) represents the relative deformation compared to a reference cardiac phase. A 4D deformation regridding by adaptive supersampling allows selecting any reference phase independently of the set of phases used in the RG-FDK for a motion corrected reconstruction. Initial promising results from in vivo experiments are shown. The subjects individual 4D cardiac MVF could be computed from only three RG-FDK image volumes. In addition, all acquired projection data were motion corrected and subsequently used for image reconstruction to improve the signal-to-noise ratio compared to RG-FDK.

  7. Micro-CT imaging of Randall's plaques.

    PubMed

    Williams, James C; Lingeman, James E; Coe, Fredric L; Worcester, Elaine M; Evan, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Micro-computed tomographic imaging (micro-CT) provides unprecedented information on stone structure and mineral composition. High-resolution micro-CT even allows visualization of the lumens of tubule and/or vessels within Randall's plaque, on stones or in papillary biopsies, thus giving a non-destructive way to study these sites of stone adhesion. This paper also shows an example of a stone growing on a different anchoring mechanism: a mineral plug within the lumen of a Bellini duct (BD plug). Micro-CT shows striking structural differences between stones that have grown on Randall's plaque and those that have grown on BD plugs. Thus, Randall's plaque can be distinguished by micro-CT, and this non-destructive method shows great promise in helping to elucidate the different mechanisms by which small stones are retained in the kidney during the development of nephrolithiasis. PMID:25096802

  8. Micro-CT of rodents: state-of-the-art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Clark, D. P.; Badea, C. T.

    2014-01-01

    Micron-scale computed tomography (micro-CT) is an essential tool for phenotyping and for elucidating diseases and their therapies. This work is focused on preclinical micro-CT imaging, reviewing relevant principles, technologies, and applications. Commonly, micro-CT provides high-resolution anatomic information, either on its own or in conjunction with lower-resolution functional imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). More recently, however, advanced applications of micro-CT produce functional information by translating clinical applications to model systems (e.g. measuring cardiac functional metrics) and by pioneering new ones (e.g. measuring tumor vascular permeability with nanoparticle contrast agents). The primary limitations of micro-CT imaging are the associated radiation dose and relatively poor soft tissue contrast. We review several image reconstruction strategies based on iterative, statistical, and gradient sparsity regularization, demonstrating that high image quality is achievable with low radiation dose given ever more powerful computational resources. We also review two contrast mechanisms under intense development. The first is spectral contrast for quantitative material discrimination in combination with passive or actively targeted nanoparticle contrast agents. The second is phase contrast which measures refraction in biological tissues for improved contrast and potentially reduced radiation dose relative to standard absorption imaging. These technological advancements promise to develop micro-CT into a commonplace, functional and even molecular imaging modality. PMID:24974176

  9. Assessment of Left Ventricular Function in Cardiac MSCT Imaging by a 4D Hierarchical Surface-Volume Matching Process

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Antoine; Boulmier, Dominique; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Le Breton, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) scanners offer new perspectives for cardiac kinetics evaluation with 4D dynamic sequences of high contrast and spatiotemporal resolutions. A new method is proposed for cardiac motion extraction in multislice CT. Based on a 4D hierarchical surface-volume matching process, it provides the detection of the heart left cavities along the acquired sequence and the estimation of their 3D surface velocity fields. A Markov random field model is defined to find, according to topological descriptors, the best correspondences between a 3D mesh describing the left endocardium at one time and the 3D acquired volume at the following time. The global optimization of the correspondences is realized with a multiresolution process. Results obtained on simulated and real data show the capabilities to extract clinically relevant global and local motion parameters and highlight new perspectives in cardiac computed tomography imaging. PMID:23165027

  10. Non-rigid dual respiratory and cardiac motion correction methods after, during, and before image reconstruction for 4D cardiac PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tao; Wang, Jizhe; Fung, George; Tsui, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory motion (RM) and cardiac motion (CM) degrade the quality and resolution in cardiac PET scans. We have developed non-rigid motion estimation methods to estimate both RM and CM based on 4D cardiac gated PET data alone, and compensate the dual respiratory and cardiac (R&C) motions after (MCAR), during (MCDR), and before (MCBR) image reconstruction. In all three R&C motion correction methods, attenuation-activity mismatch effect was modeled by using transformed attenuation maps using the estimated RM. The difference of using activity preserving and non-activity preserving models in R&C correction was also studied. Realistic Monte Carlo simulated 4D cardiac PET data using the 4D XCAT phantom and accurate models of the scanner design parameters and performance characteristics at different noise levels were employed as the known truth and for method development and evaluation. Results from the simulation study suggested that all three dual R&C motion correction methods provide substantial improvement in the quality of 4D cardiac gated PET images as compared with no motion correction. Specifically, the MCDR method yields the best performance for all different noise levels compared with the MCAR and MCBR methods. While MCBR reduces computational time dramatically but the resultant 4D cardiac gated PET images has overall inferior image quality when compared to that from the MCAR and MCDR approaches in the ‘almost’ noise free case. Also, the MCBR method has better noise handling properties when compared with MCAR and provides better quantitative results in high noise cases. When the goal is to reduce scan time or patient radiation dose, MCDR and MCBR provide a good compromise between image quality and computational times.

  11. Non-rigid dual respiratory and cardiac motion correction methods after, during, and before image reconstruction for 4D cardiac PET.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tao; Wang, Jizhe; Fung, George; Tsui, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory motion (RM) and cardiac motion (CM) degrade the quality and resolution in cardiac PET scans. We have developed non-rigid motion estimation methods to estimate both RM and CM based on 4D cardiac gated PET data alone, and compensate the dual respiratory and cardiac (R&C) motions after (MCAR), during (MCDR), and before (MCBR) image reconstruction. In all three R&C motion correction methods, attenuation-activity mismatch effect was modeled by using transformed attenuation maps using the estimated RM. The difference of using activity preserving and non-activity preserving models in R&C correction was also studied. Realistic Monte Carlo simulated 4D cardiac PET data using the 4D XCAT phantom and accurate models of the scanner design parameters and performance characteristics at different noise levels were employed as the known truth and for method development and evaluation. Results from the simulation study suggested that all three dual R&C motion correction methods provide substantial improvement in the quality of 4D cardiac gated PET images as compared with no motion correction. Specifically, the MCDR method yields the best performance for all different noise levels compared with the MCAR and MCBR methods. While MCBR reduces computational time dramatically but the resultant 4D cardiac gated PET images has overall inferior image quality when compared to that from the MCAR and MCDR approaches in the 'almost' noise free case. Also, the MCBR method has better noise handling properties when compared with MCAR and provides better quantitative results in high noise cases. When the goal is to reduce scan time or patient radiation dose, MCDR and MCBR provide a good compromise between image quality and computational times.

  12. 3D inters-subject cardiac registration using 4D information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Alfredo; Fritscher, Karl D.; Trieb, Thomas; Schubert, Rainer; Mattes, Julian

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present a new approach for the registration of cardiac 4D image sequences of different subjects, where we assume that a temporal association between the sequences is given. Moreover, we allow for one (or two) selected pair(s) of associated points in time of both sequences, which we call the bridging points in time, the use of additional information such as the semi-automatic segmentation of the investigated structure. We establish the 3D inter-subject registration for all other pairs of points in time exploiting (1) the inter-subject registration for the bridging pair of points in time, (2) the intra-subject motion calculation in both sequences with respect to the bridging pair, and (3) the concatenation of the obtained transformations. We formulate a cost functional integrating the similarity measures comparing the images of the bridging pair(s) of points in time and of the current pair of points in time, respectively. We evaluated our algorithm on 8 healthy volunteers leading to 28 inter-subject combinations and we analyze the behaviour for different parameter settings weighting differently the involved pairs of points in time. The approach based on the bridging pairs outperforms a direct 3D registration of corresponding points in time, in particular in the right ventricle we gain up to 33% in registration accuracy. Starting with a cost functional taking into account the similarity at the first bridging point in time, the results improve stepwise by integrating, firstly, information from the current pair of points in time and secondly, from a second bridging point in time. Our results also show a steep rise of the importance of regularization on the registration accuracy when registering the current point in time with our procedure (17% gain in accuracy) with respect to a direct registration in the bridging point (less than 1%). However, regularization during intra-sequence registration had only minor effects on the accuracy of our registration

  13. Joint multi-object registration and segmentation of left and right cardiac ventricles in 4D cine MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Kepp, Timo; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac function based on cine MRI requires the segmentation of cardiac structures in the images, but the problem of automatic cardiac segmentation is still open, due to the imaging characteristics of cardiac MR images and the anatomical variability of the heart. In this paper, we present a variational framework for joint segmentation and registration of multiple structures of the heart. To enable the simultaneous segmentation and registration of multiple objects, a shape prior term is introduced into a region competition approach for multi-object level set segmentation. The proposed algorithm is applied for simultaneous segmentation of the myocardium as well as the left and right ventricular blood pool in short axis cine MRI images. Two experiments are performed: first, intra-patient 4D segmentation with a given initial segmentation for one time-point in a 4D sequence, and second, a multi-atlas segmentation strategy is applied to unseen patient data. Evaluation of segmentation accuracy is done by overlap coefficients and surface distances. An evaluation based on clinical 4D cine MRI images of 25 patients shows the benefit of the combined approach compared to sole registration and sole segmentation.

  14. ECG and Navigator-Free 4D Whole-Heart Coronary MRA for Simultaneous Visualization of Cardiac Anatomy and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jianing; Sharif, Behzad; Fan, Zhaoyang; Bi, Xiaoming; Arsanjani, Reza; Berman, Daniel S.; Li, Debiao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a cardiac and respiratory self-gated 4D coronary MRA technique for simultaneous cardiac anatomy and function visualization. Methods A contrast-enhanced, ungated spoiled gradient echo sequence with self-gating (SG) and 3DPR trajectory was used for image acquisition. Data was retrospectively binned into different cardiac and respiratory phases based on information extracted from SG projections using principal component analysis. Each cardiac phase was reconstructed using a respiratory motion-corrected self-calibrating SENSE framework, and those belong to the quiescent period were retrospectively combined for coronary visualization. Healthy volunteer studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the SG method, the accuracy of the left ventricle (LV) function parameters and the quality of coronary artery visualization. Results SG performed reliably for all subjects including one with poor ECG. The LV function parameters showed excellent agreement with those from a conventional cine protocol. For coronary imaging, the proposed method yielded comparable apparent SNR and coronary sharpness and lower apparent CNR on three subjects compared with an ECG and navigator-gated Cartesian protocol and an ECG-gated, respiratory motion-corrected 3DPR protocol. Conclusion A fully self-gated 4D whole-heart imaging technique was developed, potentially allowing cardiac anatomy and function assessment from a single measurement. PMID:25216287

  15. Real-time dynamic display of registered 4D cardiac MR and ultrasound images using a GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Huang, X.; Eagleson, R.; Guiraudon, G.; Peters, T. M.

    2007-03-01

    In minimally invasive image-guided surgical interventions, different imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and real-time three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US), can provide complementary, multi-spectral image information. Multimodality dynamic image registration is a well-established approach that permits real-time diagnostic information to be enhanced by placing lower-quality real-time images within a high quality anatomical context. For the guidance of cardiac procedures, it would be valuable to register dynamic MRI or CT with intraoperative US. However, in practice, either the high computational cost prohibits such real-time visualization of volumetric multimodal images in a real-world medical environment, or else the resulting image quality is not satisfactory for accurate guidance during the intervention. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) provide the programmability, parallelism and increased computational precision to begin to address this problem. In this work, we first outline our research on dynamic 3D cardiac MR and US image acquisition, real-time dual-modality registration and US tracking. Then we describe image processing and optimization techniques for 4D (3D + time) cardiac image real-time rendering. We also present our multimodality 4D medical image visualization engine, which directly runs on a GPU in real-time by exploiting the advantages of the graphics hardware. In addition, techniques such as multiple transfer functions for different imaging modalities, dynamic texture binding, advanced texture sampling and multimodality image compositing are employed to facilitate the real-time display and manipulation of the registered dual-modality dynamic 3D MR and US cardiac datasets.

  16. Development of a Carbon Nanotube-Based Micro-CT and its Applications in Preclinical Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burk, Laurel May

    Due to the dependence of researchers on mouse models for the study of human disease, diagnostic tools available in the clinic must be modified for use on these much smaller subjects. In addition to high spatial resolution, cardiac and lung imaging of mice presents extreme temporal challenges, and physiological gating methods must be developed in order to image these organs without motion blur. Commercially available micro-CT imaging devices are equipped with conventional thermionic x-ray sources and have a limited temporal response and are not ideal for in vivo small animal studies. Recent development of a field-emission x-ray source with carbon nanotube (CNT) cathode in our lab presented the opportunity to create a micro-CT device well-suited for in vivo lung and cardiac imaging of murine models for human disease. The goal of this thesis work was to present such a device, to develop and refine protocols which allow high resolution in vivo imaging of free-breathing mice, and to demonstrate the use of this new imaging tool for the study many different disease models. In Chapter 1, I provide background information about x-rays, CT imaging, and small animal micro-CT. In Chapter 2, CNT-based x-ray sources are explained, and details of a micro-focus x-ray tube specialized for micro-CT imaging are presented. In Chapter 3, the first and second generation CNT micro-CT devices are characterized, and successful respiratory- and cardiac-gated live animal imaging on normal, wild-type mice is achieved. In Chapter 4, respiratory-gated imaging of mouse disease models is demonstrated, limitations to the method are discussed, and a new contactless respiration sensor is presented which addresses many of these limitations. In Chapter 5, cardiac-gated imaging of disease models is demonstrated, including studies of aortic calcification, left ventricular hypertrophy, and myocardial infarction. In Chapter 6, several methods for image and system improvement are explored, and radiation

  17. Pathological calcifications studied with micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Stuart R.; Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Brooks, Ellen R.; Langman, Craig B.; Pachman, Lauren M.

    2004-10-01

    The microstructure of pathological biomineral deposits has received relatively little attention, perhaps, in part because of the difficulty preparing samples for microscopy. MicroCT avoids these difficulties, and laboratory microCT results are reviewed for aortic valve calcification (human as well as a rabbit model), for human renal calculi (stones) and for calcinoses formed in juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). In calcified aortic valves of rabbits, numerical analysis of the data shows statistically significant correlation with diet. In a large kidney stone the pattern of mineralization is clearly revealed and may provide a temporal blueprint for stone growth. In JDM calcified deposits, very different microstructures are observed and may be related to processes unique to this disease.

  18. Medipix-based Spectral Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; He, Peng; Bennett, James; Amir, Raja; Dobbs, Bruce; Mou, Xuanqin; Wei, Biao; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Since Hounsfield's Nobel Prize winning breakthrough decades ago, X-ray CT has been widely applied in the clinical and preclinical applications - producing a huge number of tomographic gray-scale images. However, these images are often insufficient to distinguish crucial differences needed for diagnosis. They have poor soft tissue contrast due to inherent photon-count issues, involving high radiation dose. By physics, the X-ray spectrum is polychromatic, and it is now feasible to obtain multi-energy, spectral, or true-color, CT images. Such spectral images promise powerful new diagnostic information. The emerging Medipix technology promises energy-sensitive, high-resolution, accurate and rapid X-ray detection. In this paper, we will review the recent progress of Medipix-based spectral micro-CT with the emphasis on the results obtained by our team. It includes the state- of-the-art Medipix detector, the system and method of a commercial MARS (Medipix All Resolution System) spectral micro-CT, and the design and color diffusion of a hybrid spectral micro-CT. PMID:24194631

  19. Toward time resolved 4D cardiac CT imaging with patient dose reduction: estimating the global heart motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Segars, W. Paul; Fung, George S. K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2006-03-01

    Coronary artery imaging with multi-slice helical computed tomography is a promising noninvasive imaging technique. The current major issues include the insufficient temporal resolution and large patient dose. We propose an image reconstruction method which provides a solution to both of the problems. The method uses an iterative approach repeating the following four steps until the difference between the two projection data sets falls below a certain criteria in step-4: 1) estimating or updating the cardiac motion vectors, 2) reconstructing the time-resolved 4D dynamic volume images using the motion vectors, 3) calculating the projection data from the current 4D images, 4) comparing them with the measured ones. In this study, we obtain the first estimate of the motion vector. We use the 4D NCAT phantom, a realistic computer model for the human anatomy and cardiac motions, to generate the dynamic fan-beam projection data sets as well to provide a known truth for the motion. Then, the halfscan reconstruction with the sliding time-window technique is used to generate cine images: f(t, r r). Here, we use one heart beat for each position r so that the time information is retained. Next, the magnitude of the first derivative of f(t, r r) with respect to time, i.e., |df/dt|, is calculated and summed over a region-of-interest (ROI), which is called the mean-absolute difference (MAD). The initial estimation of the vector field are obtained using MAD for each ROI. Results of the preliminary study are presented.

  20. Temporal and spectral imaging with micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Samuel M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Micro-CT is widely used for small animal imaging in preclinical studies of cardiopulmonary disease, but further development is needed to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and material contrast. We present a technique for visualizing the changing distribution of iodine in the cardiac cycle with dual source micro-CT. Methods: The approach entails a retrospectively gated dual energy scan with optimized filters and voltages, and a series of computational operations to reconstruct the data. Projection interpolation and five-dimensional bilateral filtration (three spatial dimensions + time + energy) are used to reduce noise and artifacts associated with retrospective gating. We reconstruct separate volumes corresponding to different cardiac phases and apply a linear transformation to decompose these volumes into components representing concentrations of water and iodine. Since the resulting material images are still compromised by noise, we improve their quality in an iterative process that minimizes the discrepancy between the original acquired projections and the projections predicted by the reconstructed volumes. The values in the voxels of each of the reconstructed volumes represent the coefficients of linear combinations of basis functions over time and energy. We have implemented the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with CUDA. We tested the utility of the technique in simulations and applied the technique in an in vivo scan of a C57BL/6 mouse injected with blood pool contrast agent at a dose of 0.01 ml/g body weight. Postreconstruction, at each cardiac phase in the iodine images, we segmented the left ventricle and computed its volume. Using the maximum and minimum volumes in the left ventricle, we calculated the stroke volume, the ejection fraction, and the cardiac output. Results: Our proposed method produces five-dimensional volumetric images that distinguish different materials at different points in time, and

  1. Temporal and spectral imaging with micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Samuel M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Micro-CT is widely used for small animal imaging in preclinical studies of cardiopulmonary disease, but further development is needed to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and material contrast. We present a technique for visualizing the changing distribution of iodine in the cardiac cycle with dual source micro-CT. Methods: The approach entails a retrospectively gated dual energy scan with optimized filters and voltages, and a series of computational operations to reconstruct the data. Projection interpolation and five-dimensional bilateral filtration (three spatial dimensions + time + energy) are used to reduce noise and artifacts associated with retrospective gating. We reconstruct separate volumes corresponding to different cardiac phases and apply a linear transformation to decompose these volumes into components representing concentrations of water and iodine. Since the resulting material images are still compromised by noise, we improve their quality in an iterative process that minimizes the discrepancy between the original acquired projections and the projections predicted by the reconstructed volumes. The values in the voxels of each of the reconstructed volumes represent the coefficients of linear combinations of basis functions over time and energy. We have implemented the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with CUDA. We tested the utility of the technique in simulations and applied the technique in an in vivo scan of a C57BL/6 mouse injected with blood pool contrast agent at a dose of 0.01 ml/g body weight. Postreconstruction, at each cardiac phase in the iodine images, we segmented the left ventricle and computed its volume. Using the maximum and minimum volumes in the left ventricle, we calculated the stroke volume, the ejection fraction, and the cardiac output. Results: Our proposed method produces five-dimensional volumetric images that distinguish different materials at different points in time, and

  2. Clinical micro-CT for dental imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Cho, Min Kook; Shon, Cheol-Soon; Cho, Bong Hae; Kim, Chang Hyuk; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2009-02-01

    We exploit the development of a clinical computed microtomography (micro-CT) system for dental imaging. While the conventional dental CT simply serves implant treatment, the clinical dental micro-CT may provide clinicians with a histologic evaluation. To investigate the feasibility of the realization of a dental micro-CT, we have constructed an experimental test system which mainly consists of a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder, and a flat-panel detector. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array coupled to a CsI:Tl scintillator. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the detector was measured as a function of magnification based on the measured modulation-transfer function (MTF) and noise-power spectrum (NPS). The best MTF and DQE performances were achieved at the magnification factor of 3. Similar tendency of the spatial resolving power in tomography was also observed with a wire phantom having a 25 μm diameter. From the investigation of tomographs reconstructed from a humanoid skull phantom, the application of magnification in the system largely reduced both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for a fixed dose at the entrance surface of the detector, 1.2 mGy, while this setup increased the dose at the object plane from 4.7 mGy to 19.1 mGy for the magnification factor from 2 to 4, respectively. Although the quantum mottles at the high magnification factor tackled the practical use in the clinic, the information contained in the magnified CT images was quite promising.

  3. Spectral optimization for micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hupfer, Martin; Nowak, Tristan; Brauweiler, Robert; Eisa, Fabian; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize micro-CT protocols with respect to x-ray spectra and thereby reduce radiation dose at unimpaired image quality. Methods: Simulations were performed to assess image contrast, noise, and radiation dose for different imaging tasks. The figure of merit used to determine the optimal spectrum was the dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD). Both optimal photon energy and tube voltage were considered. Three different types of filtration were investigated for polychromatic x-ray spectra: 0.5 mm Al, 3.0 mm Al, and 0.2 mm Cu. Phantoms consisted of water cylinders of 20, 32, and 50 mm in diameter with a central insert of 9 mm which was filled with different contrast materials: an iodine-based contrast medium (CM) to mimic contrast-enhanced (CE) imaging, hydroxyapatite to mimic bone structures, and water with reduced density to mimic soft tissue contrast. Validation measurements were conducted on a commercially available micro-CT scanner using phantoms consisting of water-equivalent plastics. Measurements on a mouse cadaver were performed to assess potential artifacts like beam hardening and to further validate simulation results. Results: The optimal photon energy for CE imaging was found at 34 keV. For bone imaging, optimal energies were 17, 20, and 23 keV for the 20, 32, and 50 mm phantom, respectively. For density differences, optimal energies varied between 18 and 50 keV for the 20 and 50 mm phantom, respectively. For the 32 mm phantom and density differences, CNRD was found to be constant within 2.5% for the energy range of 21-60 keV. For polychromatic spectra and CMs, optimal settings were 50 kV with 0.2 mm Cu filtration, allowing for a dose reduction of 58% compared to the optimal setting for 0.5 mm Al filtration. For bone imaging, optimal tube voltages were below 35 kV. For soft tissue imaging, optimal tube settings strongly depended on phantom size. For 20 mm, low voltages were preferred. For 32 mm, CNRD was found to be almost independent of

  4. Classification of microcalcifications using micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmermans, Frederik; Jansen, Bart; Willekens, Inneke; Van de Casteele, Elke; Deklerck, Rudi; Schelkens, Peter; De Mey, Johan

    2013-09-01

    Microcalcifications are tiny spots of calcium deposit that often occur in female breasts. Microcalcifications are common in healthy woman, but they often are an early sign of breast cancer. On a mammogram; the current standard of care for breast screening; calcifications appear as tiny white dots. They may occur scattered throughout the breast or grouped in clusters. Radiologists determine the suspiciousness based upon several factors, including position, frequency, grouping, evolution compared to prior studies and shape. In this paper, we study micro-CT images of biopsy samples containing microcalcifications. The scanner delivers 3D images with a voxel size of 8.66 μm, i.e. ca. 8 times the spatial resolution of a contemporary digital mammogram. We propose an automated binary classification method of the samples, based upon shape analysis of the microcalcifications. The study is performed on a set of 50 benign and 50 malign samples preserved in paraffin. The ground truth of the classification is based upon anapathological investigation of the paraffin blocks. The results show a sensitivity, i.e. the percentage of correctly classified malign samples, of up to 98% with a specificity of 40%.

  5. Cardiac function and perfusion dynamics measured on a beat-by-beat basis in the live mouse using ultra-fast 4D optoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Steven J.; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The fast heart rate (~7 Hz) of the mouse makes cardiac imaging and functional analysis difficult when studying mouse models of cardiovascular disease, and cannot be done truly in real-time and 3D using established imaging modalities. Optoacoustic imaging, on the other hand, provides ultra-fast imaging at up to 50 volumetric frames per second, allowing for acquisition of several frames per mouse cardiac cycle. In this study, we combined a recently-developed 3D optoacoustic imaging array with novel analytical techniques to assess cardiac function and perfusion dynamics of the mouse heart at high, 4D spatiotemporal resolution. In brief, the heart of an anesthetized mouse was imaged over a series of multiple volumetric frames. In another experiment, an intravenous bolus of indocyanine green (ICG) was injected and its distribution was subsequently imaged in the heart. Unique temporal features of the cardiac cycle and ICG distribution profiles were used to segment the heart from background and to assess cardiac function. The 3D nature of the experimental data allowed for determination of cardiac volumes at ~7-8 frames per mouse cardiac cycle, providing important cardiac function parameters (e.g., stroke volume, ejection fraction) on a beat-by-beat basis, which has been previously unachieved by any other cardiac imaging modality. Furthermore, ICG distribution dynamics allowed for the determination of pulmonary transit time and thus additional quantitative measures of cardiovascular function. This work demonstrates the potential for optoacoustic cardiac imaging and is expected to have a major contribution toward future preclinical studies of animal models of cardiovascular health and disease.

  6. Image reconstruction for hybrid true-color micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Bennett, James; He, Peng; Zainon, Rafidah; Doesburg, Robert; Opie, Alex; Walsh, Mike; Shen, Haiou; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Mou, Xuanqin; Wang, Ge

    2012-06-01

    X-ray micro-CT is an important imaging tool for biomedical researchers. Our group has recently proposed a hybrid "true-color" micro-CT system to improve contrast resolution with lower system cost and radiation dose. The system incorporates an energy-resolved photon-counting true-color detector into a conventional micro-CT configuration, and can be used for material decomposition. In this paper, we demonstrate an interior color-CT image reconstruction algorithm developed for this hybrid true-color micro-CT system. A compressive sensing-based statistical interior tomography method is employed to reconstruct each channel in the local spectral imaging chain, where the reconstructed global gray-scale image from the conventional imaging chain served as the initial guess. Principal component analysis was used to map the spectral reconstructions into the color space. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by numerical simulations, physical phantom experiments, and animal studies. The results confirm the merits of the proposed algorithm, and demonstrate the feasibility of the hybrid true-color micro-CT system. Additionally, a "color diffusion" phenomenon was observed whereby high-quality true-color images are produced not only inside the region of interest, but also in neighboring regions. It appears harnessing that this phenomenon could potentially reduce the color detector size for a given ROI, further reducing system cost and radiation dose.

  7. Delayed Contrast Enhancement Imaging of a Murine Model for Ischemia Reperfusion with Carbon Nanotube Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Burk, Laurel M.; Wang, Ko-Han; Wait, John Matthew; Kang, Eunice; Willis, Monte; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z.

    2015-01-01

    We aim to demonstrate the application of free-breathing prospectively gated carbon nanotube (CNT) micro-CT by evaluating a myocardial infarction model with a delayed contrast enhancement technique. Evaluation of murine cardiac models using micro-CT imaging has historically been limited by extreme imaging requirements. Newly-developed CNT-based x-ray sources offer precise temporal resolution, allowing elimination of physiological motion through prospective gating. Using free-breathing, cardiac-gated CNT micro-CT, a myocardial infarction model can be studied non-invasively and with high resolution. Myocardial infarction was induced in eight male C57BL/6 mice aged 8–12 weeks. The ischemia reperfusion model was achieved by surgically occluding the LAD artery for 30 minutes followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Tail vein catheters were placed for contrast administration. Iohexol 300mgI/mL was administered followed by images obtained in diastole. Iodinated lipid blood pool contrast agent was then administered, followed with images at systole and diastole. Respiratory and cardiac signals were monitored externally and used to gate the scans of free-breathing subjects. Seven control animals were scanned using the same imaging protocol. After imaging, the heart was harvested, cut into 1mm slices and stained with TTC. Post-processing analysis was performed using ITK-Snap and MATLAB. All animals demonstrated obvious delayed contrast enhancement in the left ventricular wall following the Iohexol injection. The blood pool contrast agent revealed significant changes in cardiac function quantified by 3-D volume ejection fractions. All subjects demonstrated areas of myocardial infarct in the LAD distribution on both TTC staining and micro-CT imaging. The CNT micro-CT system aids straightforward, free-breathing, prospectively-gated 3-D murine cardiac imaging. Delayed contrast enhancement allows identification of infarcted myocardium after a myocardial ischemic event. We demonstrate

  8. Delayed contrast enhancement imaging of a murine model for ischemia reperfusion with carbon nanotube micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Burk, Laurel M; Wang, Ko-Han; Wait, John Matthew; Kang, Eunice; Willis, Monte; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z

    2015-01-01

    We aim to demonstrate the application of free-breathing prospectively gated carbon nanotube (CNT) micro-CT by evaluating a myocardial infarction model with a delayed contrast enhancement technique. Evaluation of murine cardiac models using micro-CT imaging has historically been limited by extreme imaging requirements. Newly-developed CNT-based x-ray sources offer precise temporal resolution, allowing elimination of physiological motion through prospective gating. Using free-breathing, cardiac-gated CNT micro-CT, a myocardial infarction model can be studied non-invasively and with high resolution. Myocardial infarction was induced in eight male C57BL/6 mice aged 8-12 weeks. The ischemia reperfusion model was achieved by surgically occluding the LAD artery for 30 minutes followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Tail vein catheters were placed for contrast administration. Iohexol 300 mgI/mL was administered followed by images obtained in diastole. Iodinated lipid blood pool contrast agent was then administered, followed with images at systole and diastole. Respiratory and cardiac signals were monitored externally and used to gate the scans of free-breathing subjects. Seven control animals were scanned using the same imaging protocol. After imaging, the heart was harvested, cut into 1mm slices and stained with TTC. Post-processing analysis was performed using ITK-Snap and MATLAB. All animals demonstrated obvious delayed contrast enhancement in the left ventricular wall following the Iohexol injection. The blood pool contrast agent revealed significant changes in cardiac function quantified by 3-D volume ejection fractions. All subjects demonstrated areas of myocardial infarct in the LAD distribution on both TTC staining and micro-CT imaging. The CNT micro-CT system aids straightforward, free-breathing, prospectively-gated 3-D murine cardiac imaging. Delayed contrast enhancement allows identification of infarcted myocardium after a myocardial ischemic event. We demonstrate

  9. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J.

    2008-09-15

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

  10. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T; Miller, H William; Volkert, Wynn A; Hoffman, Timothy J

    2008-09-01

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm A1 filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm3 CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0 +/- 5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0 +/- 6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0 +/- 4.0 mGy and 97.0 +/- 5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0 +/- 5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

  11. Interior micro-CT with an offset detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Kriti Sen; Gong, Hao; Ghasemalizadeh, Omid; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The size of field-of-view (FOV) of a microcomputed tomography (CT) system can be increased by offsetting the detector. The increased FOV is beneficial in many applications. All prior investigations, however, have been focused to the case in which the increased FOV after offset-detector acquisition can cover the transaxial extent of an object fully. Here, the authors studied a new problem where the FOV of a micro-CT system, although increased after offset-detector acquisition, still covers an interior region-of-interest (ROI) within the object. Methods: An interior-ROI-oriented micro-CT scan with an offset detector poses a difficult reconstruction problem, which is caused by both detector offset and projection truncation. Using the projection completion techniques, the authors first extended three previous reconstruction methods from offset-detector micro-CT to offset-detector interior micro-CT. The authors then proposed a novel method which combines two of the extended methods using a frequency split technique. The authors tested the four methods with phantom simulations at 9.4%, 18.8%, 28.2%, and 37.6% detector offset. The authors also applied these methods to physical phantom datasets acquired at the same amounts of detector offset from a customized micro-CT system. Results: When the detector offset was small, all reconstruction methods showed good image quality. At large detector offset, the three extended methods gave either visible shading artifacts or high deviation of pixel value, while the authors’ proposed method demonstrated no visible artifacts and minimal deviation of pixel value in both the numerical simulations and physical experiments. Conclusions: For an interior micro-CT with an offset detector, the three extended reconstruction methods can perform well at a small detector offset but show strong artifacts at a large detector offset. When the detector offset is large, the authors’ proposed reconstruction method can outperform the three

  12. Compressive sampling based interior reconstruction for dynamic carbon nanotube micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hengyong; Cao, Guohua; Burk, Laurel; Lee, Yueh; Lu, Jianping; Santago, Pete; Zhou, Otto; Wang, Ge

    2009-01-01

    In the computed tomography (CT) field, one recent invention is the so-called carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray technology. On the other hand, compressive sampling (CS) based interior tomography is a new innovation. Combining the strengths of these two novel subjects, we apply the interior tomography technique to local mouse cardiac imaging using respiration and cardiac gating with a CNT based micro-CT scanner. The major features of our method are: (1) it does not need exact prior knowledge inside an ROI; and (2) two orthogonal scout projections are employed to regularize the reconstruction. Both numerical simulations and in vivo mouse studies are performed to demonstrate the feasibility of our methodology. PMID:19923686

  13. Scout-view assisted interior micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Sen Sharma, Kriti; Holzner, Christian; Vasilescu, Dragoş M; Jin, Xin; Narayanan, Shree; Agah, Masoud; Hoffman, Eric A; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2013-06-21

    Micro computed tomography (micro-CT) is a widely-used imaging technique. A challenge of micro-CT is to quantitatively reconstruct a sample larger than the field-of-view (FOV) of the detector. This scenario is characterized by truncated projections and associated image artifacts. However, for such truncated scans, a low resolution scout scan with an increased FOV is frequently acquired so as to position the sample properly. This study shows that the otherwise discarded scout scans can provide sufficient additional information to uniquely and stably reconstruct the interior region of interest. Two interior reconstruction methods are designed to utilize the multi-resolution data without significant computational overhead. While most previous studies used numerically truncated global projections as interior data, this study uses truly hybrid scans where global and interior scans were carried out at different resolutions. Additionally, owing to the lack of standard interior micro-CT phantoms, we designed and fabricated novel interior micro-CT phantoms for this study to provide means of validation for our algorithms. Finally, two characteristic samples from separate studies were scanned to show the effect of our reconstructions. The presented methods show significant improvements over existing reconstruction algorithms.

  14. Scout-view Assisted Interior Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Sen Sharma, Kriti; Holzner, Christian; Vasilescu, Dragoş M.; Jin, Xin; Narayanan, Shree; Agah, Masoud; Hoffman, Eric A.; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Micro computed tomography (micro-CT) is a widely-used imaging technique. A challenge of micro-CT is to quantitatively reconstruct a sample larger than the field-of-view (FOV) of the detector. This scenario is characterized by truncated projections and associated image artifacts. However, for such truncated scans, a low resolution scout scan with an increased FOV is frequently acquired so as to position the sample properly. This study shows that the otherwise discarded scout scans can provide sufficient additional information to uniquely and stably reconstruct the interior region of interest. Two interior reconstruction methods are designed to utilize the multi-resolution data without a significant computational overhead. While most previous studies used numerically truncated global projections as interior data, this study uses truly hybrid scans where global and interior scans were carried out at different resolutions. Additionally, owing to the lack of standard interior micro-CT phantoms, we designed and fabricated novel interior micro-CT phantoms for this study to provide means of validation for our algorithms. Finally, two characteristic samples from separate studies were scanned to show the effect of our reconstructions. The presented methods show significant improvements over existing reconstruction algorithms. PMID:23732478

  15. Algorithm-enabled low-dose micro-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao; Bian, Junguo; Eaker, Diane R; Kline, Timothy L; Sidky, Emil Y; Ritman, Erik L; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-03-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is an important tool in biomedical research and preclinical applications that can provide visual inspection of and quantitative information about imaged small animals and biological samples such as vasculature specimens. Currently, micro-CT imaging uses projection data acquired at a large number (300-1000) of views, which can limit system throughput and potentially degrade image quality due to radiation-induced deformation or damage to the small animal or specimen. In this work, we have investigated low-dose micro-CT and its application to specimen imaging from substantially reduced projection data by using a recently developed algorithm, referred to as the adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) algorithm, which reconstructs an image through minimizing the image total-variation and enforcing data constraints. To validate and evaluate the performance of the ASD-POCS algorithm, we carried out quantitative evaluation studies in a number of tasks of practical interest in imaging of specimens of real animal organs. The results show that the ASD-POCS algorithm can yield images with quality comparable to that obtained with existing algorithms, while using one-sixth to one quarter of the 361-view data currently used in typical micro-CT specimen imaging.

  16. Methods of in-vivo mouse lung micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recheis, Wolfgang A.; Nixon, Earl; Thiesse, Jacqueline; McLennan, Geoffrey; Ross, Alan; Hoffman, Eric

    2005-04-01

    Micro-CT will have a profound influence on the accumulation of anatomical and physiological phenotypic changes in natural and transgenetic mouse models. Longitudinal studies will be greatly facilitated, allowing for a more complete and accurate description of events if in-vivo studies are accomplished. The purpose of the ongoing project is to establish a feasible and reproducible setup for in-vivo mouse lung micro-computed tomography (μCT). We seek to use in-vivo respiratory-gated μCT to follow mouse models of lung disease with subsequent recovery of the mouse. Methodologies for optimizing scanning parameters and gating for the in-vivo mouse lung are presented. A Scireq flexiVent ventilated the gas-anesthetized mice at 60 breaths/minute, 30 cm H20 PEEP, 30 ml/kg tidal volume and provided a respiratory signal to gate a Skyscan 1076 μCT. Physiologic monitoring allowed the control of vital functions and quality of anesthesia, e.g. via ECG monitoring. In contrary to longer exposure times with ex-vivo scans, scan times for in-vivo were reduced using 35μm pixel size, 158ms exposure time and 18μm pixel size, 316ms exposure time to reduce motion artifacts. Gating via spontaneous breathing was also tested. Optimal contrast resolution was achieved at 50kVp, 200μA, applying an aluminum filter (0.5mm). There were minimal non-cardiac related motion artifacts. Both 35μm and 1μm voxel size images were suitable for evaluation of the airway lumen and parenchymal density. Total scan times were 30 and 65 minutes respectively. The mice recovered following scanning protocols. In-vivo lung scanning with recovery of the mouse delivered reasonable image quality for longitudinal studies, e.g. mouse asthma models. After examining 10 mice, we conclude μCT is a feasible tool evaluating mouse models of lung pathology in longitudinal studies with increasing anatomic detail available for evaluation as one moves from in-vivo to ex-vivo studies. Further developments include automated

  17. Automatic segmentation of 4D cardiac MR images for extraction of ventricular chambers using a spatio-temporal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atehortúa, Angélica; Zuluaga, Maria A.; Ourselin, Sébastien; Giraldo, Diana; Romero, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    An accurate ventricular function quantification is important to support evaluation, diagnosis and prognosis of several cardiac pathologies. However, expert heart delineation, specifically for the right ventricle, is a time consuming task with high inter-and-intra observer variability. A fully automatic 3D+time heart segmentation framework is herein proposed for short-axis-cardiac MRI sequences. This approach estimates the heart using exclusively information from the sequence itself without tuning any parameters. The proposed framework uses a coarse-to-fine approach, which starts by localizing the heart via spatio-temporal analysis, followed by a segmentation of the basal heart that is then propagated to the apex by using a non-rigid-registration strategy. The obtained volume is then refined by estimating the ventricular muscle by locally searching a prior endocardium- pericardium intensity pattern. The proposed framework was applied to 48 patients datasets supplied by the organizers of the MICCAI 2012 Right Ventricle segmentation challenge. Results show the robustness, efficiency and competitiveness of the proposed method both in terms of accuracy and computational load.

  18. Four-dimensional cardiac reconstruction from rotational x-ray sequences: first results for 4D coronary angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansis, Eberhard; Schomberg, Hermann; Erhard, Klaus; Dössel, Olaf; Grass, Michael

    2009-02-01

    The tomographic reconstruction of the beating heart requires dedicated methods. One possibility is gated reconstruction, where only data corresponding to a certain motion state are incorporated. Another one is motioncompensated reconstruction with a pre-computed motion vector field, which requires a preceding estimation of the motion. Here, results of a new approach are presented: simultaneous reconstruction of a three-dimensional object and its motion over time, yielding a fully four-dimensional representation. The object motion is modeled by a time-dependent elastic transformation. The reconstruction is carried out with an iterative gradient-descent algorithm which simultaneously optimizes the three-dimensional image and the motion parameters. The method was tested on a simulated rotational X-ray acquisition of a dynamic coronary artery phantom, acquired on a C-arm system with a slowly rotating C-arm. Accurate reconstruction of both absorption coefficient and motion could be achieved. First results from experiments on clinical rotational X-ray coronary angiography data are shown. The resulting reconstructions enable the analysis of both static properties, such as vessel geometry and cross-sectional areas, and dynamic properties, like magnitude, speed, and synchrony of motion during the cardiac cycle.

  19. A model for clubfoot based on micro-CT data.

    PubMed

    Windisch, Gunther; Salaberger, Dietmar; Rosmarin, Walter; Kastner, Johann; Exner, Gerhard Ulrich; Haldi-Brändle, Verena; Anderhuber, Friedrich

    2007-06-01

    The pathological anatomy of idiopathic clubfoot has been investigated for more than 180 years using anatomy, computed tomography (CT), histology and microscopy. Seven idiopathic clubfeet and two normal feet of aborted fetuses were dissected in the present study, with special emphasis on the shape of the cartilage and bones. A three-dimensional (3D) micro-CT system, which generates a series of X-ray attenuation measurements, was used to produce computed reconstructed 3D data sets of each of the separated bones. Based on the micro-CT data scans a high-definition 3D colour printing system was used to make a four times enlarged clubfoot model, precisely presenting all the bony malformations. This model reflects the complexity of the anatomy of this disease and is designed to be used in the workshops of orthopaedic surgeons and physiotherapists, for training in new surgical and manipulation techniques.

  20. Newt limb regeneration studied with synchrotron micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Stuart R.; Ignatiev, Konstantin I.; Simon, Hans-Georg; De Carlo, Francesco

    2004-10-01

    Newts are the most developed vertebrates which retain the ability as adults to regenerate missing limbs; they are, therefore, of great interest in terms understanding how such regeneration could be triggered in mammals. In this study, synchrotron microCT was used to study bone microstructure in control forelimbs and in forelimbs regenerated for periods from 37 to 85 days. The bone microstructure in newts has been largely neglected, and interesting patterns within the original bone and in the regenerating arm and hand are described. Periosteal bone formation in the regenerating arm and finger bones, delayed ossification of carpal (but not metacarpal) bones and the complex microstructure of the original carpal bones are areas where microCT reveals detail of particular interest.

  1. Photo-consistency registration of a 4D cardiac motion model to endoscopic video for image guidance of robotic coronary artery bypass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figl, Michael; Rueckert, Daniel; Edwards, Eddie

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the work described in this paper is registration of a 4D preoperative motion model of the heart to the video view of the patient through the intraoperative endoscope. The heart motion is cyclical and can be modelled using multiple reconstructions of cardiac gated coronary CT. We propose the use of photoconsistency between the two views through the da Vinci endoscope to align to the preoperative heart surface model from CT. The temporal alignment from the video to the CT model could in principle be obtained from the ECG signal. We propose averaging of the photoconsistency over the cardiac cycle to improve the registration compared to a single view. Though there is considerable motion of the heart, after correct temporal alignment we suggest that the remaining motion should be close to rigid. Results are presented for simulated renderings and for real video of a beating heart phantom. We found much smoother sections at the minimum when using multiple phases for the registration, furthermore convergence was found to be better when more phases are used.

  2. Acoustic emissions in rock deformation experiments under micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Goodfellow, Sebastian D.; Moulas, Evangelos; Di Toro, Giulio; Young, Paul; Grasselli, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The study of acoustic emissions (AE) generated by rocks undergoing deformation has become, in the last decades, one of the most powerful tools for boosting our understanding of the mechanisms which are responsible for rock failures. AE are elastic waves emitted by the local failure of micro- or milli-metric portions of the tested specimen. At the same time, X-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) has become an affordable, reliable and powerful tool for imaging the internal structure of rock samples. In particular, micro-CT coupled with a deformation apparatus offers the unique opportunity for observing, without perturbing, the sample while the deformation and the formation of internal structures, such as shear bands, is ongoing. Here we present some preliminary results gathered with an innovative apparatus formed by the X-ray transparent pressure vessel called ERDμ equipped with AE sensors, an AE acquisition system and a micro-CT apparatus available at the University of Toronto. The experiment was performed on a 12 mm diameter 36 mm long porous glass sample which was cut on a 60 deg inclined plane (i.e. saw-cut sample). Etna basaltic sand with size ~1 mm was placed between the two inclined faces forming an inclined fault zone with ~2 mm thickness. The sample assembly was jacketed with a polyefin shrink tube and two AE sensors were glued onto the glass samples above and below the fault zone. The sample was then enclosed in the pressure vessel and confined with compressed air up to 3 MPa. A third AE sensor was placed outside the vessel. The sample was saturated with water and AE were generated by varying the fluid and confining pressure or the vertical force, causing deformations concentrated in the fault zone. Mechanical data and AE traces were collected throughout the entire experiment which lasted ~24 hours. At the same time multiple micro-CT 3D datasets and 2D movie-radiographies were collected, allowing the 3D reconstruction of the deformed sample at

  3. Trabecular scaffolds created using micro CT guided fused deposition modeling

    PubMed Central

    Tellis, B.C.; Szivek, J.A.; Bliss, C.L.; Margolis, D.S.; Vaidyanathan, R.K.; Calvert, P.

    2009-01-01

    Free form fabrication and high resolution imaging techniques enable the creation of biomimetic tissue engineering scaffolds. A 3D CAD model of canine trabecular bone was produced via micro CT and exported to a fused deposition modeler, to produce polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) trabeculated scaffolds and four other scaffold groups of varying pore structures. The five scaffold groups were divided into subgroups (n=6) and compression tested at two load rates (49 N/s and 294 N/s). Two groups were soaked in a 25 °C saline solution for 7 days before compression testing. Micro CT was used to compare porosity, connectivity density, and trabecular separation of each scaffold type to a canine trabecular bone sample. At 49 N/s the dry trabecular scaffolds had a compressive stiffness of 4.94±1.19 MPa, similar to the simple linear small pore scaffolds and significantly more stiff (p<0.05) than either of the complex interconnected pore scaffolds. At 294 N/s, the compressive stiffness values for all five groups roughly doubled. Soaking in saline had an insignificant effect on stiffness. The trabecular scaffolds matched bone samples in porosity; however, achieving physiologic connectivity density and trabecular separation will require further refining of scaffold processing. PMID:21461176

  4. Exploring miniature insect brains using micro-CT scanning techniques.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dylan B; Bernhardt, Galina; Raine, Nigel E; Abel, Richard L; Sykes, Dan; Ahmed, Farah; Pedroso, Inti; Gill, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to explore soft tissue structures in detail is important in understanding animal physiology and how this determines features such as movement, behaviour and the impact of trauma on regular function. Here we use advances in micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) technology to explore the brain of an important insect pollinator and model organism, the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris). Here we present a method for accurate imaging and exploration of insect brains that keeps brain tissue free from trauma and in its natural stereo-geometry, and showcase our 3D reconstructions and analyses of 19 individual brains at high resolution. Development of this protocol allows relatively rapid and cost effective brain reconstructions, making it an accessible methodology to the wider scientific community. The protocol describes the necessary steps for sample preparation, tissue staining, micro-CT scanning and 3D reconstruction, followed by a method for image analysis using the freeware SPIERS. These image analysis methods describe how to virtually extract key composite structures from the insect brain, and we demonstrate the application and precision of this method by calculating structural volumes and investigating the allometric relationships between bumblebee brain structures. PMID:26908205

  5. Dental imaging using laminar optical tomography and micro CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Feixiao; Ozturk, Mehmet S.; Intes, Xavier; Kotha, Shiva

    2014-02-01

    Dental lesions located in the pulp are quite difficult to identify based on anatomical contrast, and, hence, to diagnose using traditional imaging methods such as dental CT. However, such lesions could lead to functional and/or molecular optical contrast. Herein, we report on the preliminary investigation of using Laminar Optical Tomography (LOT) to image the pulp and root canals in teeth. LOT is a non-contact, high resolution, molecular and functional mesoscopic optical imaging modality. To investigate the potential of LOT for dental imaging, we injected an optical dye into ex vivo teeth samples and imaged them using LOT and micro-CT simultaneously. A rigid image registration between the LOT and micro-CT reconstruction was obtained, validating the potential of LOT to image molecular optical contrast deep in the teeth with accuracy, non-invasively. We demonstrate that LOT can retrieve the 3D bio-distribution of molecular probes at depths up to 2mm with a resolution of several hundred microns in teeth.

  6. Exploring miniature insect brains using micro-CT scanning techniques.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dylan B; Bernhardt, Galina; Raine, Nigel E; Abel, Richard L; Sykes, Dan; Ahmed, Farah; Pedroso, Inti; Gill, Richard J

    2016-02-24

    The capacity to explore soft tissue structures in detail is important in understanding animal physiology and how this determines features such as movement, behaviour and the impact of trauma on regular function. Here we use advances in micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) technology to explore the brain of an important insect pollinator and model organism, the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris). Here we present a method for accurate imaging and exploration of insect brains that keeps brain tissue free from trauma and in its natural stereo-geometry, and showcase our 3D reconstructions and analyses of 19 individual brains at high resolution. Development of this protocol allows relatively rapid and cost effective brain reconstructions, making it an accessible methodology to the wider scientific community. The protocol describes the necessary steps for sample preparation, tissue staining, micro-CT scanning and 3D reconstruction, followed by a method for image analysis using the freeware SPIERS. These image analysis methods describe how to virtually extract key composite structures from the insect brain, and we demonstrate the application and precision of this method by calculating structural volumes and investigating the allometric relationships between bumblebee brain structures.

  7. Exploring miniature insect brains using micro-CT scanning techniques

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Dylan B.; Bernhardt, Galina; Raine, Nigel E.; Abel, Richard L.; Sykes, Dan; Ahmed, Farah; Pedroso, Inti; Gill, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to explore soft tissue structures in detail is important in understanding animal physiology and how this determines features such as movement, behaviour and the impact of trauma on regular function. Here we use advances in micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) technology to explore the brain of an important insect pollinator and model organism, the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris). Here we present a method for accurate imaging and exploration of insect brains that keeps brain tissue free from trauma and in its natural stereo-geometry, and showcase our 3D reconstructions and analyses of 19 individual brains at high resolution. Development of this protocol allows relatively rapid and cost effective brain reconstructions, making it an accessible methodology to the wider scientific community. The protocol describes the necessary steps for sample preparation, tissue staining, micro-CT scanning and 3D reconstruction, followed by a method for image analysis using the freeware SPIERS. These image analysis methods describe how to virtually extract key composite structures from the insect brain, and we demonstrate the application and precision of this method by calculating structural volumes and investigating the allometric relationships between bumblebee brain structures. PMID:26908205

  8. XRF microCT study of space objects at SSRL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatyev, Konstantin; Huwig, Kathy; Harvey, Ralph; Ishii, Hope; Bradley, John; Luening, Katharina; Brennan, Sean; Pianetta, Piero

    2006-08-01

    Study of the composition and 3D chemical distribution of the particles that come from space are of great interest since they can provide information about the early stages and evolution of the solar system. The size of these samples varies with the smallest ones in the micron and even sub-micron range. X-ray fluorescence microCT (computed tomography) with focused X-ray beam can be successfully used to study these kinds of samples. This is especially important when sectioning is not feasible, or it is undesirable either due to the risk of contamination, as is the case with comet particles recently collected by the NASA Stardust mission, or the requirement for further analysis by different characterization techniques. X-ray fluorescence microCT measurements on several space samples were performed at the beamline 6-2 using the existing microprobe setup. Two mirror optical system is used for beam focusing with an additional set of KB mirrors located in the hutch near the sample to focus the beam further down to 2x4 microns. Incident X-ray energy is selected with a monochromator in the range of 5 to 20 keV. Fluorescence data was collected with Si(Li) fluorescence detector and PIN diode was used to collect attenuation data that provides additional information for fluorescence tomography reconstruction. The results of the measurements of two micrometeorites with sizes of approximately 100 microns, are presented.

  9. Computerized methodology for micro-CT and histological data inflation using an IVUS based translation map.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Lambros S; Rigas, George A; Sakellarios, Antonis I; Exarchos, Themis P; Siogkas, Panagiotis K; Naka, Katerina K; Panetta, Daniele; Pelosi, Gualtiero; Vozzi, Federico; Michalis, Lampros K; Parodi, Oberdan; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2015-10-01

    A framework for the inflation of micro-CT and histology data using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images, is presented. The proposed methodology consists of three steps. In the first step the micro-CT/histological images are manually co-registered with IVUS by experts using fiducial points as landmarks. In the second step the lumen of both the micro-CT/histological images and IVUS images are automatically segmented. Finally, in the third step the micro-CT/histological images are inflated by applying a transformation method on each image. The transformation method is based on the IVUS and micro-CT/histological contour difference. In order to validate the proposed image inflation methodology, plaque areas in the inflated micro-CT and histological images are compared with the ones in the IVUS images. The proposed methodology for inflating micro-CT/histological images increases the sensitivity of plaque area matching between the inflated and the IVUS images (7% and 22% in histological and micro-CT images, respectively). PMID:25771781

  10. Visualization and quantitative analysis of lung microstructure using micro CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Matsui, Eisuke; Ohamatsu, Hironobu; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2004-04-01

    Micro CT system is developed for lung function analysis at a high resolution of the micrometer order (up to 5 μm in spatial resolution). This system reveals the lung distal structures such as interlobular septa, terminal bronchiole, respiratory bronchiole, alveolar duct, and alveolus. In order to visualize lung 3-D microstructures using micro CT images and to analyze them, this research presents a computerized approach. In this approach, the following things are performed: (1) extracting lung distal structures from micro CT images, (2) visualizing extracted lung microstructure in three dimensions, and (3) visualizing inside of lung distal area in three dimensions with fly-through. This approach is applied for to micro CT images of human lung tissue specimens that were obtained by surgical excision and were kept in the state of the inflated fixed lung. And this research succeeded in visualization of lung microstructures using micro CT images to reveal the lung distal structures from bronchiole up to alveolus.

  11. Visualization and quantitative analysis of lung microstructure using micro CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Fujii, Masashi; Nakaya, Yoshihiro; Matsui, Eisuke; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2005-04-01

    Micro CT system is developed for lung function analysis at a high resolution of the micrometer order (up to 5μm in spatial resolution). This system reveals the lung distal structures such as interlobular septa, terminal bronchiole, respiratory bronchiole, alveolar duct, and alveolus. In order to visualize lung 3-D microstructures using micro CT images and to analyze them, this research presents a computerized approach. This approach is applied for to micro CT images of human lung tissue specimens that were obtained by surgical excision and were kept in the state of the inflated fixed lung. This report states a wall area such as bronchus wall and alveolus wall about the extraction technique by using the surface thinning process to analyze the lung microstructures from micro CT images measured by the new-model micro CT system.

  12. Laboratory 3D Micro-XRF/Micro-CT Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruyndonckx, P.; Sasov, A.; Liu, X.

    2011-09-01

    A prototype micro-XRF laboratory system based on pinhole imaging was developed to produce 3D elemental maps. The fluorescence x-rays are detected by a deep-depleted CCD camera operating in photon-counting mode. A charge-clustering algorithm, together with dynamically adjusted exposure times, ensures a correct energy measurement. The XRF component has a spatial resolution of 70 μm and an energy resolution of 180 eV at 6.4 keV. The system is augmented by a micro-CT imaging modality. This is used for attenuation correction of the XRF images and to co-register features in the 3D XRF images with morphological structures visible in the volumetric CT images of the object.

  13. Preliminary Experimental Results from a MARS Micro-CT System

    PubMed Central

    He, Peng; Yu, Hengyong; Thayer, Patrick; Jin, Xin; Xu, Qiong; Bennett, James; Tappenden, Rachael; Wei, Biao; Goldstein, Aaron; Renaud, Peter; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The Medipix All Resolution System (MARS) system is a commercial spectral/multi-energy micro-CT scanner designed and assembled by the MARS Bioimaging, Ltd. in New Zealand. This system utilizes the state-of-the-art Medipix photon-counting, energy-discriminating detector technology developed by a collaboration based at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). In this paper, we report our preliminary experimental results using this system, including geometrical alignment, photon energy characterization, protocol optimization, and spectral image reconstruction. We produced our scan datasets with a multi-material phantom, and then applied ordered subset-simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OS-SART) to reconstruct images in different energy ranges and principal component analysis (PCA) to evaluate spectral deviation between the energy ranges. PMID:22635175

  14. Lung imaging in rodents using dual energy micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Guo, X.; Clark, D.; Johnston, S. M.; Marshall, C.; Piantadosi, C.

    2012-03-01

    Dual energy CT imaging is expected to play a major role in the diagnostic arena as it provides material decomposition on an elemental basis. The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of dual energy micro-CT for the estimation of vascular, tissue, and air fractions in rodent lungs using a post-reconstruction three-material decomposition method. We have tested our method using both simulations and experimental work. Using simulations, we have estimated the accuracy limits of the decomposition for realistic micro-CT noise levels. Next, we performed experiments involving ex vivo lung imaging in which intact lungs were carefully removed from the thorax, were injected with an iodine-based contrast agent and inflated with air at different volume levels. Finally, we performed in vivo imaging studies in (n=5) C57BL/6 mice using fast prospective respiratory gating in endinspiration and end-expiration for three different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Prior to imaging, mice were injected with a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. The mean accuracy values were for Air (95.5%), Blood (96%), and Tissue (92.4%). The absolute accuracy in determining all fraction materials was 94.6%. The minimum difference that we could detect in material fractions was 15%. As expected, an increase in PEEP levels for the living mouse resulted in statistically significant increases in air fractions at end-expiration, but no significant changes in end-inspiration. Our method has applicability in preclinical pulmonary studies where various physiological changes can occur as a result of genetic changes, lung disease, or drug effects.

  15. Cryostatic micro-CT imaging of transient processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Blank, Basil; Ritman, Erik L.

    2002-01-01

    A double walled copper vessel, 32 cc in volume, was fabricated for micro-CT scanning tissue specimens maintained at cryogenic temperature. The space between the two nested vessels was evacuated and in two opposing sides of the vessel the copper has been replaced by beryllium foil. Nitrogen gas, boiling off liquid nitrogen, is injected continuously into the top of the chamber during the scanning process. Just prior to venting from the vessel the gas is heated and directed through a narrow gap over the outside of the beryllium windows so as to maintain the beryllium windows frost free. A temperature detector within the chamber is used to control the rate of inflow of the nitrogen gas. The frozen specimen is attached to a small horizontal platform on top of a vertical stainless steel pin which exits the base of the vessel through a closely fitting hole and is attached to the computer-controlled rotating stage under the vessel. The vessel and rotation-stage assembly is mounted on a computer-controlled horizontal translation stage which can move the specimen out of the x- ray beam, from time to time, for x-ray beam calibration purposes. The purpose of this arrangement is to permit scanning of specimens that: 1) either cannot be fixed (e.g., with formalin) because of biomolecular analyses which are incompatible with prior fixation, or 2) are snap-frozen during a transient process, such as the accumulation and/or washout of radiopaque indicators distributed in microvascular or extravascular compartments, which lasts only seconds and hence is too fast for normal micro-CT methods to capture.

  16. MicroCT vs. Hg porosimetry: microporosity in commercial stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusi, N.; Martinez-Martinez, J.; Barberini, V.; Galimberti, L.

    2009-04-01

    have been cut and scanned by means of a X ray microCT system before and after mercury saturation with Hg porosimeter. The microCT system used is a BIR Actis 130/150 with nominal resolution of 5 micron; for our samples resolution is of 25 microns. Generator and detector are fixed, while the sample rotates; the scanning plane is horizontal. Samples reduce the X rays energy passing through, as a function of its density and atomic number. X rays are then collected on a detector, which converts them into light radiations; a digital camera collects light radiations in raw data and send them to the computer, where they are processed as black/white images. The Hg porosimeter used is a Pascal 140/240 Thermo Fisher. Samples were first degassed and then intruded by Hg. Apparent density, bulk density, porosity and open pore size distribution (pore diameter between 3.7 and 58000 nm) of each sample have been computed using the PASCAL (Pressurization with Automatic Speed-up by Continuous Adjustametnt Logic) method and the Washburn equation; this equation assumes: cylindrical pores, a contact angle between mercury and sample of 140°, a surface tension of mercury vacuum of 0,480 N/m and mercury density equal to 13.5 g/cm³. MicroCT images and porosity data from Hg porosimeter have been compared by several authors both for rocks (Klobes et alii, 1997) and for artificial materials with medical applications (Lin-Gibson et alii, 2007) In samples with no density/composition differences microCT images are homogeneous and gives no information on the internal structure of the sample. This is the case of massive samples (such as BA, BT, GM and TB) and of samples without any significant density differences between clasts and matrix (A and BS) or rock and veins (RC). MicroCT images of the same sample after mercury saturation offer a detailed map of microporosity of the rock, due to the high density contrast between mercury (13.6 g/cm3) and the rock (2.71 g/cm3 for calcite and 2.86 g/cm3 for

  17. MicroCT vs. Hg porosimetry: microporosity in commercial stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusi, N.; Martinez-Martinez, J.; Barberini, V.; Galimberti, L.

    2009-04-01

    have been cut and scanned by means of a X ray microCT system before and after mercury saturation with Hg porosimeter. The microCT system used is a BIR Actis 130/150 with nominal resolution of 5 micron; for our samples resolution is of 25 microns. Generator and detector are fixed, while the sample rotates; the scanning plane is horizontal. Samples reduce the X rays energy passing through, as a function of its density and atomic number. X rays are then collected on a detector, which converts them into light radiations; a digital camera collects light radiations in raw data and send them to the computer, where they are processed as black/white images. The Hg porosimeter used is a Pascal 140/240 Thermo Fisher. Samples were first degassed and then intruded by Hg. Apparent density, bulk density, porosity and open pore size distribution (pore diameter between 3.7 and 58000 nm) of each sample have been computed using the PASCAL (Pressurization with Automatic Speed-up by Continuous Adjustametnt Logic) method and the Washburn equation; this equation assumes: cylindrical pores, a contact angle between mercury and sample of 140°, a surface tension of mercury vacuum of 0,480 N/m and mercury density equal to 13.5 g/cm³. MicroCT images and porosity data from Hg porosimeter have been compared by several authors both for rocks (Klobes et alii, 1997) and for artificial materials with medical applications (Lin-Gibson et alii, 2007) In samples with no density/composition differences microCT images are homogeneous and gives no information on the internal structure of the sample. This is the case of massive samples (such as BA, BT, GM and TB) and of samples without any significant density differences between clasts and matrix (A and BS) or rock and veins (RC). MicroCT images of the same sample after mercury saturation offer a detailed map of microporosity of the rock, due to the high density contrast between mercury (13.6 g/cm3) and the rock (2.71 g/cm3 for calcite and 2.86 g/cm3 for

  18. In Vivo Small Animal Imaging using Micro-CT and Digital Subtraction Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Badea, C.T.; Drangova, M.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Johnson, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Small animal imaging has a critical role in phenotyping, drug discovery, and in providing a basic understanding of mechanisms of disease. Translating imaging methods from humans to small animals is not an easy task. The purpose of this work is to review in vivo X-ray based small animal imaging, with a focus on in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). We present the principles, technologies, image quality parameters and types of applications. We show that both methods can be used not only to provide morphological, but also functional information, such as cardiac function estimation or perfusion. Compared to other modalities, x-ray based imaging is usually regarded as being able to provide higher throughput at lower cost and adequate resolution. The limitations are usually associated with the relatively poor contrast mechanisms and potential radiation damage due to ionizing radiation, although the use of contrast agents and careful design of studies can address these limitations. We hope that the information will effectively address how x-ray based imaging can be exploited for successful in vivo preclinical imaging. PMID:18758005

  19. MicroCT: Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI

    SciTech Connect

    Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

    2011-09-22

    This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to production work - for R and D there are two other semi-automated methods as given in [4, 5].

  20. MicroCT: Semi-Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI

    SciTech Connect

    Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

    2011-09-22

    This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to R and D work - for production applications, use [4].

  1. Automatic quantification of neo-vasculature from micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallya, Yogish; Narayanan, A. K.; Zagorchev, Lyubomir

    2009-02-01

    Angiogenesis is the process of formation of new blood vessels as outgrowths of pre-existing ones. It occurs naturally during development, tissue repair, and abnormally in pathologic diseases such as cancer. It is associated with proliferation of blood vessels/tubular sprouts that penetrate deep into tissues to supply nutrients and remove waste products. The process starts with migration of endothelial cells. As the cells move towards the target area they form small tubular sprouts recruited from the parent vessel. The sprouts grow in length due to migration, proliferation, and recruitment of new endothelial cells and the process continues until the target area becomes fully vascular. Accurate quantification of sprout formation is very important for evaluation of treatments for ischemia as well as angiogenesis inhibitors and plays a key role in the battle against cancer. This paper presents a technique for automatic quantification of newly formed blood vessels from Micro-CT volumes of tumor samples. A semiautomatic technique based on interpolation of Bezier curves was used to segment out the cancerous growths. Small vessels as determined by their diameter within the segmented tumors were enhanced and quantified with a multi-scale 3-D line detection filter. The same technique can be easily extended for quantification of tubular structures in other 3-D medical imaging modalities. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  2. Determining chemical composition of materials through micro-CT images.

    PubMed

    Jussiani, Eduardo Inocente; Dos Reis, Paulo José; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    2016-10-01

    X-ray microtomography is a 3D non-destructive method which, through digital images, enables a view of the internal structure of samples. Recently, researchers have been extensively performing various methods in the attempt to determine the chemical composition of materials. This paper brings further insight into this matter and proposes a new experimental method for determining the internal chemical composition of samples. Using a set of standard samples, calibration curves can be created that allow to relate the average gray scale of a sample obtained through microtomographic images to the value of ρZeff(m). In this model, ρZeff(m) is the parameter that chemically characterizes a material. The exponent m is obtained by the average value obtained with standard samples, which were titanium dioxide (TiO2), calcium chloride (CaCl2), calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), and calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2). For the samples scanning process, a Bruker SkyScan 1172 microCT was used for testing rocks, nylon, graphite, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and aluminum samples. The experimental results achieved by this method were consistent with the theoretical values. PMID:27451140

  3. Geometric calibration of a micro-CT system and performance for insect imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhanli; Gui, Jianbao; Zou, Jing; Rong, Junyan; Zhang, Qiyang; Zheng, Hairong; Xia, Dan

    2011-07-01

    Micro-CT with a high spatial resolution in combination with computer-based-reconstruction techniques is considered a powerful tool for morphological study of insects. The quality of CT images crucially depends on the precise knowledge of the scan geometry of the micro-CT system. In this paper, we have proposed a method to calculate the deviation of rotating axis for compensating deficiency of existing methods. A practical application of this geometric calibration method of the micro-CT system for insect imaging is presented. We have performed the computer-simulation study and experimental study with our prototype micro-CT system. The results demonstrate that the proposed technique is accurate and robust. In addition, we have evaluated the imaging characteristics of the detector in terms of modulation-transfer function (MTF). Finally, insect imaging performance and image reconstruction from data acquired with different energies are presented.

  4. Dual-energy micro-CT imaging of pulmonary airway obstruction: correlation with micro-SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Befera, N.; Clark, D.; Qi, Y.; Johnson, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    To match recent clinical dual energy (DE) CT studies focusing on the lung, similar developments for DE micro-CT of the rodent lung are required. Our group has been actively engaged in designing pulmonary gating techniques for micro- CT, and has also introduced the first DE micro-CT imaging method of the rodent lung. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DE micro-CT imaging for the evaluation of airway obstruction in mice, and to compare the method with micro single photon emission computed tomography (micro-SPECT) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA). The results suggest that the induced pulmonary airway obstruction causes either atelectasis, or air-trapping similar to asthma or chronic bronchitis. Atelectasis could only be detected at early time points in DE micro-CT images, and is associated with a large increase in blood fraction and decrease in air fraction. Air trapping had an opposite effect with larger air fraction and decreased blood fraction shown by DE micro-CT. The decrease in perfusion to the hypoventilated lung (hypoxic vasoconstriction) is also seen in micro-SPECT. The proposed DE micro-CT technique for imaging localized airway obstruction performed well in our evaluation, and provides a higher resolution compared to micro-SPECT. Both DE micro-CT and micro-SPECT provide critical, quantitative lung biomarkers for image-based anatomical and functional information in the small animal. The methods are readily linked to clinical methods allowing direct comparison of preclinical and clinical results.

  5. 4-D OCT in Developmental Cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    Although strong evidence exists to suggest that altered cardiac function can lead to CHDs, few studies have investigated the influential role of cardiac function and biophysical forces on the development of the cardiovascular system due to a lack of proper in vivo imaging tools. 4-D imaging is needed to decipher the complex spatial and temporal patterns of biomechanical forces acting upon the heart. Numerous solutions over the past several years have demonstrated 4-D OCT imaging of the developing cardiovascular system. This chapter will focus on these solutions and explain their context in the evolution of 4-D OCT imaging. The first sections describe the relevant techniques (prospective gating, direct 4-D imaging, retrospective gating), while later sections focus on 4-D Doppler imaging and measurements of force implementing 4-D OCT Doppler. Finally, the techniques are summarized, and some possible future directions are discussed.

  6. Implementation and assessment of an animal management system for small-animal micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, David W.; Detombe, Sarah A.; Chiodo, Chris; Fricke, Stanley T.; Drangova, Maria

    2011-03-01

    Advances in laboratory imaging systems for CT, SPECT, MRI, and PET facilitate routine micro-imaging during pre-clinical investigations. Challenges still arise when dealing with immune-compromised animals, biohazardous agents, and multi-modality imaging. These challenges can be overcome with an appropriate animal management system (AMS), with the capability for supporting and monitoring a rat or mouse during micro-imaging. We report the implementation and assessment of a new AMS system for mice (PRA-3000 / AHS-2750, ASI Instruments, Warren MI), designed to be compatible with a commercial micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging system (eXplore speCZT, GE Healthcare, London ON). The AMS was assessed under the following criteria: 1) compatibility with the imaging system (i.e. artifact generation, geometric dimensions); 2) compatibility with live animals (i.e. positioning, temperature regulation, anesthetic supply); 3) monitoring capabilities (i.e. rectal temperature, respiratory and cardiac monitoring); 4) stability of co-registration; and 5) containment. Micro-CT scans performed using a standardized live-animal protocol (90 kVp, 40 mA, 900 views, 16 ms per view) exhibited low noise (+/-19 HU) and acceptable artifact from high-density components within the AMS (e.g. ECG pad contacts). Live mice were imaged repeatedly (with removal and replacement of the AMS) and spatial registration was found to be stable to within +/-0.07 mm. All animals tolerated enclosure within the AMS for extended periods (i.e. > one hour) without distress, based on continuous recordings of rectal temperature, ECG waveform and respiratory rate. A sealed AMS system extends the capability of a conventional micro-imaging system to include immune-compromised and biosafety level 2 mouse-imaging protocols.

  7. Optimization of microCT data processing for modelling of dental structures in orthodontic studies.

    PubMed

    Viecilli, R; Katona, T; Roberts, W

    2007-08-01

    Dental studies evaluating microCT output often examine resolution as a parameter that affects the data, but many other factors can influence image quality. The objective of this paper is to present the issues involved with the optimization of microCT data acquisition and processing for two biomechanical animal models. The first model evaluates surface and volumetric changes in root structure after in vitro fatigue loading of dog incisors. The second evaluates the in vivo morphometric bone and tooth responses to application of orthodontic force in inbred and transgenic mice. This type of data required specific magnification and noise control microCT settings to segment and render objects with acceptable definition. The proposed procedures enabled high definition rendering of changes in tooth and bone morphology in orthodontic studies. They also allowed for the construction of solid models for finite element analyses. PMID:17671859

  8. The development and validation of micro-CT of large deep frozen specimens.

    PubMed

    Kampschulte, Marian; Erdmann, Georg; Sender, Jonas; Martels, Gunhild; Böcker, Wolfgang; ElKhassawna, Thaqif; Heiß, Christian; Langheinrich, Alexanders Claus; Roeb, Elke; Roderfeld, Martin; Krombach, Gabriele Anja

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive freeze/thaw cycles lead to a progressive loss of structural and molecular integrity in deep frozen specimens. The aim of this study was to evaluate a micro-CT stage, which maintains the cryoconservation of large specimens throughout micro-CT imaging. Deep frozen ovine vertebral segments (-20 °C) were fixed in a micro-CT stage made of expanded polystyrene and cooled with dry ice (0 g, 60 g and 120 g). The temperature inside the stage was measured half-hourly over a time span of three hours with subsequent measurement of surface temperature. The method was validated in a series of 30 deep frozen vertebral specimens and in liver tissue after repetitive micro-CT scanning. Isolation without cooling resulted in defrosting. Cooling with 60 g of dry ice led to a temperature rise inside the stage (max. 5.1 °C) and on the specimen surfaces (max. -3 °C). Cooling with 120 g of dry ice resulted in a significant (p < 0.001) and sufficient lowering of the temperature inside the stage (max. -14 °C) and on the surface of the specimens (max. -13.9 °C). The surface temperature during the subsequent micro-CT validation study did not exceed -16 °C (processing time 1 h 45 min). The resolution was 33 μm isotropic voxel side length, enabling a binarization of bone microstructures. Temperature can reliably be maintained below -10 °C during a micro-CT scan by applying the described technique. The resulting spatial resolution and image quality permits a binarization of bone microstructure. PMID:25639882

  9. The development and validation of micro-CT of large deep frozen specimens.

    PubMed

    Kampschulte, Marian; Erdmann, Georg; Sender, Jonas; Martels, Gunhild; Böcker, Wolfgang; ElKhassawna, Thaqif; Heiß, Christian; Langheinrich, Alexanders Claus; Roeb, Elke; Roderfeld, Martin; Krombach, Gabriele Anja

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive freeze/thaw cycles lead to a progressive loss of structural and molecular integrity in deep frozen specimens. The aim of this study was to evaluate a micro-CT stage, which maintains the cryoconservation of large specimens throughout micro-CT imaging. Deep frozen ovine vertebral segments (-20 °C) were fixed in a micro-CT stage made of expanded polystyrene and cooled with dry ice (0 g, 60 g and 120 g). The temperature inside the stage was measured half-hourly over a time span of three hours with subsequent measurement of surface temperature. The method was validated in a series of 30 deep frozen vertebral specimens and in liver tissue after repetitive micro-CT scanning. Isolation without cooling resulted in defrosting. Cooling with 60 g of dry ice led to a temperature rise inside the stage (max. 5.1 °C) and on the specimen surfaces (max. -3 °C). Cooling with 120 g of dry ice resulted in a significant (p < 0.001) and sufficient lowering of the temperature inside the stage (max. -14 °C) and on the surface of the specimens (max. -13.9 °C). The surface temperature during the subsequent micro-CT validation study did not exceed -16 °C (processing time 1 h 45 min). The resolution was 33 μm isotropic voxel side length, enabling a binarization of bone microstructures. Temperature can reliably be maintained below -10 °C during a micro-CT scan by applying the described technique. The resulting spatial resolution and image quality permits a binarization of bone microstructure.

  10. Quantifying lung morphology with respiratory-gated micro-CT in a murine model of emphysema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, N. L.; Martin, E. L.; Lewis, J. F.; Veldhuizen, R. A. W.; Holdsworth, D. W.; Drangova, M.

    2009-04-01

    Non-invasive micro-CT imaging techniques have been developed to investigate lung structure in free-breathing rodents. In this study, we investigate the utility of retrospectively respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging in an emphysema model to determine if anatomical changes could be observed in the image-derived quantitative analysis at two respiratory phases. The emphysema model chosen was a well-characterized, genetically altered model (TIMP-3 knockout mice) that exhibits a homogeneous phenotype. Micro-CT scans of the free-breathing, anaesthetized mice were obtained in 50 s and retrospectively respiratory sorted and reconstructed, providing 3D images representing peak inspiration and end expiration with 0.15 mm isotropic voxel spacing. Anatomical measurements included the volume and CT density of the lungs and the volume of the major airways, along with the diameters of the trachea, left bronchus and right bronchus. From these measurements, functional parameters such as functional residual capacity and tidal volume were calculated. Significant differences between the wild-type and TIMP-3 knockout groups were observed for measurements of CT density over the entire lung, indicating increased air content in the lungs of TIMP-3 knockout mice. These results demonstrate retrospective respiratory-gated micro-CT, providing images at multiple respiratory phases that can be analyzed quantitatively to investigate anatomical changes in murine models of emphysema.

  11. Direct micro-CT observation confirms the induction of embolism upon xylem cutting under tension

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used two different Synchrotron-based micro-CT facilities (SLS: Swiss Light Source, Villigen, Switzerland, and ALS: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA USA) to test the excision artifact described by Wheeler et al. (2013). Specifically, we examined the impact of cutting xylem under tension and und...

  12. Novel approach for quantification of porosity for biomaterial implants using microcomputed tomography (microCT).

    PubMed

    Hiu-Yan, Yeung; Ling, Qin; Kwong-Man, Lee; Ming, Zhang; Kwok-Sui, Leung; Chun-yiu, Cheng Jack

    2005-11-01

    Porous bioceramics have been widely investigated in orthopaedic tissue engineering. Attention has been given to manufacturing of a porous bioceramic that mimics the trabecular bone structure for proper bone regeneration. With the advance of biomedical imaging through microcomputed tomography (microCT), this study attempted to quantify the pore structure of different bioceramics. Two bioceramic blocks (BSC and ChronOS) were synthesized by two methods. The specification claimed the porosity of the bioceramic ranged from 40% to 70%. Six blocks of each bioceramic were evaluated by conventional water immersion method and microCT. The pore size and connectivity were evaluated with standardized protocols. By the water immersion method, the porosity of BSC and ChronOS was 60.4% and 74.7%, respectively. The three-dimensional results of microCT showed that BSC porosity was 26.2% and ChronOS was 60.0%. The pore connectivity was evaluated to be 2.6 for BSC and 39.7 for ChronOS. ChronOS had functional pores with 200 microm to 400 microm in diameter (87.8%+/-0.5%), which is significantly more than 52.8%+/-11.5% of pores in BSC (p<0.05). Providing information on the functional pores objectively, the microCT evaluation serves as a good standard for specification of the bioceramic-related implants.

  13. A hybrid registration-based method for whole-body micro-CT mice images.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaochao; Gao, Xueyuan; Xu, Xianhui; Zhu, Shouping; Liang, Jimin

    2016-07-01

    The widespread use of whole-body small animal in vivo imaging in preclinical research has proposed the new demands on imaging processing and analysis. Micro-CT provides detailed anatomical structural information for continuous detection and different individual comparison, but the body deformation happened during different data acquisition needs sophisticated registration. In this paper, we propose a hybrid method for registering micro-CT mice images, which combines the strengths of point-based and intensity-based registration methods. Point-based non-rigid method using thin-plate spline robust point matching algorithm is utilized to acquire a coarse registration. And then intensity-based non-rigid method using normalized mutual information, Halton sampling and adaptive stochastic gradient descent optimization is used to acquire precise registration. Two accuracy metrics, Dice coefficient and average surface distance are used to do the quantitative evaluation. With the intra- and intersubject micro-CT mice images registration assessment, the hybrid method has been proven capable of excellent performance on micro-CT mice images registration.

  14. In vivo small animal micro-CT using nanoparticle contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Jeffrey R.; West, Jennifer L.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most valuable modalities for in vivo imaging because it is fast, high-resolution, cost-effective, and non-invasive. Moreover, CT is heavily used not only in the clinic (for both diagnostics and treatment planning) but also in preclinical research as micro-CT. Although CT is inherently effective for lung and bone imaging, soft tissue imaging requires the use of contrast agents. For small animal micro-CT, nanoparticle contrast agents are used in order to avoid rapid renal clearance. A variety of nanoparticles have been used for micro-CT imaging, but the majority of research has focused on the use of iodine-containing nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles. Both nanoparticle types can act as highly effective blood pool contrast agents or can be targeted using a wide variety of targeting mechanisms. CT imaging can be further enhanced by adding spectral capabilities to separate multiple co-injected nanoparticles in vivo. Spectral CT, using both energy-integrating and energy-resolving detectors, has been used with multiple contrast agents to enable functional and molecular imaging. This review focuses on new developments for in vivo small animal micro-CT using novel nanoparticle probes applied in preclinical research. PMID:26581654

  15. Dual energy micro CT SkyScan 1173 for the characterization of urinary stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitri, L. A.; Asyana, V.; Ridwan, T.; Anwary, F.; Soekersi, H.; Latief, F. D. E.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of the composition of urinary stones is an essential part to determine suitable treatments for patients. The aim of this research is to characterize the urinary stones by using dual energy micro CT SkyScan 11173. This technique combines high-energy and low- energy scanning during a single acquisition. Six human urinary stones were scanned in vitro using 80 kV and 120 kV micro CT SkyScan 1173. Projected images were produced by micro CT SkyScan 1173 and then reconstructed using NRecon (in-house software from SkyScan) to obtain a complete 3D image. The urinary stone images were analysed using CT analyser to obtain information of internal structure and Hounsfield Unit (HU) values to determine the information regarding the composition of the urinary stones, respectively. HU values obtained from some regions of interest in the same slice are compared to a reference HU. The analysis shows information of the composition of the six scanned stones obtained. The six stones consist of stone number 1 (calcium+cystine), number 2 (calcium+struvite), number 3 (calcium+cystine+struvite), number 4 (calcium), number 5 (calcium+cystine+struvite), and number 6 (calcium+uric acid). This shows that dual energy micro CT SkyScan 1173 was able to characterize the composition of the urinary stone.

  16. Investigation of pathogen infiltration into produce using Xradia Bio MicroCT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The internalization of human pathogens into plant tissues has received significant attention. Human pathogens can infiltrate plant tissue through stomata, cut edges, wounds on produce, or the plant vascular system. The nondestructive X-ray computed microtomography (MicroCT) technique is an X-ra...

  17. Method for correction of rotation errors in Micro-CT System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jintao; Hu, Xiaodong; Zou, Jing; Zhao, Gengyan; Lv, Hanyu; Xu, Linyan; Xu, Ying; Hu, Xiaotang

    2016-04-01

    In Micro-CT (Computed Tomography) system, a series of projection data of sample are collected by the detector as the precision stage rotates step by step. However, the accuracy of projection images is limited by rotation errors during the acquisition process. Therefore, evaluating the performance of precision rotary stage and developing corresponding compensation method are necessary in Micro-CT system. In this paper, a metered system is designed which is composed of four precision capacitive sensors, a precision machined steel cylinder and four flexible hinges. Based on the metered system, a method to calibrate and correct the errors when the precision stage turns is proposed. Firstly, the theoretical analysis is proposed and the imperfect situations are considered. And then, the method has been applied to correct experimental data taken from a microscope type of Micro-CT system. Successful results are shown through evaluating MTF (Modulation Transfer Function) of Micro-CT system. Lastly, a sample of tungsten wire is scanned and the reconstructed images are compared before and after using the calibrated method.

  18. Ionization chamber volume determination and quality assurance using micro-CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNiven, Andrea L.; Umoh, Joseph; Kron, Tomas; Holdsworth, David W.; Battista, Jerry J.

    2008-09-01

    Ion chamber dosimetry requires a high degree of precision, at all steps within the dosimetric process, in order to ensure accurate dose measurements. This work presents a novel technique for ion chamber volume determination and quality assurance, using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Four nominally identical Exradin A1SL chambers (0.056 cm3) (Standard Imaging, WI, USA) were imaged using a micro-CT system (GE Locus, GE Healthcare, London, Ontario) and irradiated in a 6 MV x-ray reference field. Air volumes were calculated from the CT datasets using 3D analysis software (Microview 2.1.1, General Electric Healthcare, London, Ontario). Differences in the volumes of each chamber determined using micro-CT images agreed with differences in the ionization response within 1% for each chamber. Calibration coefficients were then compared through cross-calibration with a calibrated ion chamber and from the CT-measured volumes. The average ratio of these values was found to be 0.958 ± 0.009 indicating good correlation. The results demonstrate the promise of using micro-CT imaging for the absolute volumetric characterization of ion chambers. The images have the potential to be an important clinical tool for quality assurance of ion chamber construction and integrity after routine clinical usage.

  19. Dosimetry concepts for scanner quality assurance and tissue dose assessment in micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hupfer, Martin; Kolditz, Daniel; Nowak, Tristan; Eisa, Fabian; Brauweiler, Robert; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: At present, no established methods exist for dosimetry in micro computed tomography (micro-CT). The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate practical concepts for both dosimetric scanner quality assurance and tissue dose assessment for micro-CT. Methods: The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was adapted to micro-CT and measurements of the CTDI both free in air and in the center of cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms of 20 and 32 mm diameter were performed in a 6 month interval with a 100 mm pencil ionization chamber calibrated for low tube voltages. For tissue dose assessment, z-profile measurements using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) were performed and both profile and CTDI measurements were compared to Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to validate an existing MC tool for use in micro-CT. The consistency of MC calculations and TLD measurements was further investigated in two mice cadavers. Results: CTDI was found to be a reproducible quantity for constancy tests on the micro-CT system under study, showing a linear dependence on tube voltage and being by definition proportional to mAs setting and z-collimation. The CTDI measured free in air showed larger systematic deviations after the 6 month interval compared to the CTDI measured in PMMA phantoms. MC calculations were found to match CTDI measurements within 3% when using x-ray spectra measured at our micro-CT installation and better than 10% when using x-ray spectra calculated from semi-empirical models. Visual inspection revealed good agreement for all z-profiles. The consistency of MC calculations and TLD measurements in mice was found to be better than 10% with a mean deviation of 4.5%. Conclusions: Our results show the CTDI implemented for micro-CT to be a promising candidate for dosimetric quality assurance measurements as it linearly reflects changes in tube voltage, mAs setting, and collimation used during the scan, encouraging further studies on a variety of

  20. Micro-CT molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis using a magnetite nano-cluster probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Li, Jing; Zhang, Chunfu; Xu, Lisa X

    2013-06-01

    Due to its high resolution, micro-CT is desirable for molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis. However, the sensitivity of micro-CT to contrast agents is relatively low. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop high micro-CT sensitive molecular imaging probes for direct visualization and dynamic monitoring of tumor angiogenesis. To this end, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides conjugated magnetite nano clusters (RGD-MNCs) were developed by assembling individual magnetite nano particles into clusters with amphiphilic (maleimide) methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic acid) ((Mal)mPEG-PLA) copolymer and subsequently encoding RGD peptides onto the clusters for specific targeting alpha(v)beta3 integrin. The hydrodynamic size of RGD-MNCs was about 85 nm. To test its specificity, alpha(v)beta3 positive cells (H1299) were incubated with magnetite nano clusters (MNCs), RGD-MNCs or RGD-MNCs competition with free RGD peptides. Prussian Blue staining and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) measurements indicated that the cell uptake of RGD-MNCs was significantly more than that of MNCs, which could be inhibited by free RGD peptides. For detection of tumor angiogenesis, mice bearing H1299 tumors were injected intravenously with RGD-MNCs at the dose of 400 micro mol Fe/kg. Tumor angiogenic hot spots as well as individual angiogenic vessels could be clearly manifested by micro-CT imaging 12 h post injection, which was dynamically monitored with the extension of probe circulation time. Subsequent histological studies of tumor tissues verified that RGD-MNCs registered tumor angiogenic vessels. Our study demonstrated that RGD-MNC probes fabricated in this study could be used to effectively target alpha(v)beta3 integrin. Using high resolution micro-CT in combination with the probes, tumor angiogenesis could be studied dynamically.

  1. Traceable micro-CT scaling accuracy phantom for applications requiring exact measurement of distances or volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Waring, C.S.; Bax, J.S.; Samarabandu, A.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Fenster, A.; Lacefield, J.C.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Volumetric x-ray microcomputed tomography (CT) can be employed in a variety of quantitative research applications such as image-guided interventions or characterization of medical devices. To ensure the highest geometric fidelity of images for these applications, a phantom and image processing algorithm have been developed to calibrate the scaling accuracy of micro-CT scanners to a traceable standard and provide corrections to image voxel sizing. Methods: The calibration phantom contains six borosilicate beads whose separations have been measured to a traceable standard. An image processing algorithm compares the known separations of the beads to their separations in micro-CT images. A least-squares solution is used to determine linear scaling correction factors along each of the three scanner axes to minimize errors in the bead separations within the images by correcting the image voxel size. The correction factors were applied to images of a similar phantom with beads at different positions to evaluate the ability of the correction factors to reduce errors at points independent of the fiducial locations in the calibration phantom. The calibration phantom was used to evaluate the scaling accuracy of five different micro-CT scanners representing four different scanner models. Results: In two of the five scanners evaluated, the correction factors significantly reduced the mean error in bead separations in the images from 0.17% to 0.05% and from 0.37% to 0.07% of the actual bead separations, respectively. Scanners yielding similar voxel sizes possessed comparable geometric errors after correction using the phantom. Conclusions: Although the magnitude of the corrections is small, such corrections can be important for demanding micro-CT applications. Even if no voxel size correction is required, the phantom provides an easily implemented method to verify the geometric fidelity of micro-CT scanners to a traceable standard of measurement.

  2. Hybrid spectral micro-CT: system design, implementation, and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Bennett, James R; Opie, Alex M T; Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Walsh, Michael; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Cao, Guohua; Mohs, Aaron; Wang, Ge

    2014-02-01

    Spectral CT has proven an important development in biomedical imaging, and there have been several publications in the past years demonstrating its merits in pre-clinical and clinical applications. In 2012, Xu reported that near-term implementation of spectral micro-CT could be enhanced by a hybrid architecture: a narrow-beam spectral “interior” imaging chain integrated with a traditional wide-beam “global” imaging chain. This hybrid integration coupled with compressive sensing (CS)-based interior tomography demonstrated promising results for improved contrast resolution, and decreased system cost and radiation dose. The motivation for the current study is implementation and evaluation of the hybrid architecture with a first-of-its-kind hybrid spectral micro-CT system. Preliminary results confirm improvements in both contrast and spatial resolution. This technology is shown to merit further investigation and potential application in future spectral CT scanner design.

  3. Micro-CT of Carotid Arteries: A Tool for Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Andreas; Wenke, Ruediger; Roemer, Frank W.; Lynch, John A.; Gatzka, Christian; Priebe, Markus; Guermazi, Ali; Grigorian, Mikayel; Heller, Martin; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan

    2004-11-15

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a high-resolution, nondestructive tool for two- and three-dimensional imaging and quantification. The ability of this technique to assess atherosclerosis of the carotid artery was evaluated in three human cadaver samples based on the original axial acquisitions, multiplanar reconstructions and volume rendering techniques. Quantitative analysis included the calculation of: (1) the original lumen perimeter, original lumen area, plaque area, residual lumen area, calcified area and gross sectional area reduction of the vascular lumen from two-dimensional slices; (2) the total tissue volume, soft tissue volume and calcified tissue volume from the three-dimensional data set. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential of micro-CT as a supplementary method for the two- and three-dimensional ex vivo evaluation of carotid atherosclerosis.

  4. Processing of microCT implant-bone systems images using Fuzzy Mathematical Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, A.; Colabella, L.; Omar, S.; Ballarre, J.; Pastore, J.

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between a metallic implant and the existing bone in a surgical permanent prosthesis is of great importance since the fixation and osseointegration of the system leads to the failure or success of the surgery. Micro Computed Tomography is a technique that helps to visualize the structure of the bone. In this study, the microCT is used to analyze implant-bone systems images. However, one of the problems presented in the reconstruction of these images is the effect of the iron based implants, with a halo or fluorescence scattering distorting the micro CT image and leading to bad 3D reconstructions. In this work we introduce an automatic method for eliminate the effect of AISI 316L iron materials in the implant-bone system based on the application of Compensatory Fuzzy Mathematical Morphology for future investigate about the structural and mechanical properties of bone and cancellous materials.

  5. Scanning multiple samples simultaneously in tube-based microCT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, S. R.; Rajamannan, N. M.; Spelsberg, T. C.; Malayannan, S.; Riaz, R.; Polavarapu, M.; Hsu, E. L.; Hsu, W., K.; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Ming

    2010-09-01

    The world-wide explosion of commercial microComputed Tomography (microCT) system emplacement has led to dayin, day-out access to laboratory scanners. Most biologically-oriented microCT facilities must characterize large numbers of samples rapidly at moderate spatial resolution (e.g., 10-20 μm isotropic volume elements, voxels). Scanning multiple specimens simultaneously is one efficient solution. Sample positioning is critical if the region of interest of each specimen is to be imaged without increasing the number of slices recorded (i.e., data acquisition and reconstruction times). Three very different, multiple sample data acquisitions are reported: mouse heart tissue calcification, rat spinal fusion and mouse tibial bone cancer models

  6. Increased Echogenicity and Radiodense Foci on Echocardiogram and MicroCT in Murine Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Nancy D.; Gu, Yusu; Chao, Chieh-Ju; Peterson, Kirk L.; Knowlton, Kirk U.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To address the question as to whether echocardiographic and/or microcomputed tomography (microCT) analysis can be utilized to assess the extent of Coxsackie B virus (CVB) induced myocarditis in the absence of left ventricular dysfunction in the mouse. Background Viral myocarditis is a significant clinical problem with associated inflammation of the myocardium and myocardial injury. Murine models of myocarditis are commonly used to study the pathophysiology of the disease, but methods for imaging the mouse myocardium have been limited to echocardiographic assessment of ventricular dysfunction and, to a lesser extent, MRI imaging. Methods Using a murine model of myocarditis, we used both echocardiography and microCT to assess the extent of myocardial involvement in murine myocarditis using both wild-type mice and CVB cleavage-resistant dystrophin knock-in mice. Results Areas of increased echogenicity were only observed in the myocardium of Coxsackie B virus infected mice. These echocardiographic abnormalities correlated with the extent of von Kossa staining (a marker of membrane permeability), inflammation, and fibrosis. Given that calcium phosphate uptake as imaged by von Kossa staining might also be visualized using microCT, we utilized microCT imaging which allowed for high-resolution, 3-dimensional images of radiodensities that likely represent calcium phosphate uptake. As with echocardiography, only mice infected with Coxsackie B virus displayed abnormal accumulation of calcium within individual myocytes indicating increased membrane permeability only upon exposure to virus. Conclusions These studies demonstrate new, quantitative, and semi-quantitative imaging approaches for the assessment of myocardial involvement in the setting of viral myocarditis in the commonly utilized mouse model of viral myocarditis. PMID:27486657

  7. Recent Progress Validating the HADES Model of LLNL's HEAF MicroCT Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    White, W. T.; Bond, K. C.; Lennox, K. P.; Aufderheide, M. B.; Seetho, I. M.; Roberson, G. P.

    2014-07-17

    This report compares recent HADES calculations of x-ray linear attenuation coefficients to previous MicroCT measurements made at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s High Energy Applications Facility (HEAF). The chief objective is to investigate what impact recent changes in HADES modeling have on validation results. We find that these changes have no obvious effect on the overall accuracy of the model. Detailed comparisons between recent and previous results are presented.

  8. A method to quantify and visualize femoral head intraosseous arteries by micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xing; Shi, Xiaotian; Ouyang, Jun; Xu, Dachuan; Zhao, Dewei

    2016-08-01

    We describe a technique for perfusing a barium sulphate suspension into the intraosseous artery. Following the perfusion of abarium sulphate suspension into 14 fresh lower limbs of Chinese cadavers, micro-CT scanning was applied to digitize, quantify and visualize the intraosseous arteries in the human femoral heads. Then, the femoral heads were removed and subjected to micro-CT scanning. The data were imported into the amira and mimics programs to reconstruct and quantify the intraosseous arteries. The femoral head intraosseous artery lengths, areas, volumes, and femoral head bone volumes were quantified. The artery densities and artery ratios were calculated and analysed with independent-samples t-tests. The intraosseous vasculature volume renderings were displayed as screenshots and videos made with amira. Many intraosseous artery study technologies were compared. The barium sulphate suspension was milky white in colour. The perfusion of the barium sulphate suspension followed by micro-CT scanning provided a good representation of the intraosseous artery. The femoral head intraosseous artery lengths, areas and volumes, and the femoral head bone volumes were displayed as the X¯±S . No differences were observed between the left and right femoral head intraosseous arteries in terms of the artery densities or artery ratios. The volume renderings and 3-D orthogonal projections displayed the overall distributions of the intraosseous arteries. The videos clearly demonstrated the entry sites of the nutrition-carrying arteries, their courses and branches, and the intraosseous arterial anastomoses. Our technique is the simplest and least time-consuming method of producing accurate vascular three-dimensional reconstructions. The perfusion of a barium sulphate suspension into intraosseous arteries combined with micro-CT scanning can deliver high-resolution 3-D digitized data and images of intraosseous arteries. This technique does not require bone decalcification or bone

  9. Dual energy micro-CT imaging of radiation-induced vascular changes in primary mouse sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Moding, Everett J.; Clark, Darin P.; Qi, Yi; Li, Yifan; Ma, Yan; Ghaghada, Ketan; Johnson, G. Allan; Kirsch, David G.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy on primary tumor vasculature using dual energy (DE) micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods and Materials The Cre-loxP system was used to generate primary sarcomas with mutant Kras and p53. Unirradiated tumors were compared to tumors irradiated with 20 Gy. A long-circulating PEGylated liposomal-iodinated contrast agent was administered one day after treatment, and mice were imaged immediately after injection (day 1) and three days later (day 4) using DE micro-CT. CT-derived tumor sizes were used to assess tumor growth. After DE decomposition, iodine maps were used to assess tumor fractional blood volume (FBV) at day 1 and tumor vascular permeability at day 4. For comparison, tumor vascularity and vascular permeability were also evaluated histologically using CD31 immunofluorescence and fluorescently-labeled dextrans. Results Radiation treatment significantly decreased tumor growth (P<0.05). There was a positive correlation between CT-measurement of tumor FBV and extravasated iodine with microvascular density (MVD) (R2=0.53) and dextran accumulation (R2=0.63), respectively. Despite no change in MVD measured by histology, tumor FBV significantly increased after irradiation as measured by DE micro-CT (0.070 vs. 0.091, P<0.05). Both dextran and liposomal-iodine accumulation in tumors increased significantly after irradiation with dextran fractional area increasing 4.2-fold and liposomal-iodine concentration increasing 3.0-fold. Conclusions DE micro-CT is an effective tool for non-invasive assessment of vascular changes in primary tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability increased after a single therapeutic dose of radiation treatment. PMID:23122984

  10. Single energy micro CT SkyScan 1173 for the characterization of urinary stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitri, L. A.; Asyana, V.; Ridwan, T.; Anwary, F.; Soekersi, H.; Latief, F. D. E.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-08-01

    A urinary stone is a solid piece of material produced from crystallization of excreted substances in the urine. Knowledge of the composition of urinary stones is essential to determine the suitable treatment for the patient. The aim of this research was to characterize urinary stones using single energy micro CT SkyScan 1173. Six human urinary stones were scanned in vitro using 80 kV in micro CT SkyScan 1173. The produced projection, images, were reconstructed using NRecon (in-house software from SkyScan). The images of urinary stones were analyzed using CT Analyser (CT An) to obtain information of the internal structure and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) value to determine the information regarding the composition of the urinary stones, respectively. The average HU values from certain region of interests in the same slice were compared with spectral curves of known materials from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). From the analysis, the composition of the six scanned stones were obtained. Two stones are composed of cystine, two are composed of struvite, two other stones are composed of struvite+cystine. In conclusion, the single energy micro CT with 80 kV can be used identifying cystine and struvite urinary stone.

  11. Interpreting pathologies in extant and extinct archosaurs using micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Garwood, Russell J.; Lowe, Tristan; Withers, Philip J.; Manning, Phillip L.

    2015-01-01

    Palaeopathology offers unique insight to the healing strategies of extinct organisms, permitting questions concerning bone physiology to be answered in greater depth. Unfortunately, most palaeopathological studies are confined to external morphological interpretations due to the destructive nature of traditional methods of study. This limits the degree of reliable diagnosis and interpretation possible. X-ray MicroTomography (micro-CT, XMT) provides a non-destructive means of analysing the internal three-dimensional structure of pathologies in both extant and extinct individuals, at higher resolutions than possible with medical scanners. In this study, we present external and internal descriptions of pathologies in extant and extinct archosaurs using XMT. This work demonstrates that the combination of external/internal diagnosis that X-ray microtomography facilitates is crucial when differentiating between pathological conditions. Furthermore, we show that the use of comparative species, both through direct analysis and from the literature, provides key information for diagnosing between vertebrate groups in the typical pathological conditions and physiological processes. Micro-CT imaging, combined with comparative observations of extant species, provides more detailed and reliable interpretation of palaeopathologies. Micro-CT is an increasingly accessible tool, which will provide key insights for correctly interpreting vertebrate pathologies in the future. PMID:26246971

  12. Adaptive region of interest method for analytical micro-CT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanneng; Xu, Xiaochun; Bi, Kun; Zeng, Shaoqun; Liu, Qian; Chen, Shangbin

    2011-01-01

    The real-time imaging is important in automatic successive inspection with micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT). Generally, the size of the detector is chosen according to the most probable size of the measured object to acquire all the projection data. Given enough imaging area and imaging resolution of X-ray detector, the detector is larger than specimen projection area, which results in redundant data in the Sinogram. The process of real-time micro-CT is computation-intensive because of the large amounts of source and destination data. The speed of the reconstruction algorithm can't always meet the requirements of real-time applications. A preprocessing method called adaptive region of interest (AROI), which detects the object's boundaries automatically to focus the active Sinogram regions, is introduced into the analytical reconstruction algorithm in this paper. The AROI method reduces the volume of the reconstructing data and thus directly accelerates the reconstruction process. It has been further shown that image quality is not compromised when applying AROI, while the reconstruction speed is increased as the square of the ratio of the sizes of the detector and the specimen slice. In practice, the conch reconstruction experiment indicated that the process is accelerated by 5.2 times with AROI and the imaging quality is not degraded. Therefore, the AROI method improves the speed of analytical micro-CT reconstruction significantly.

  13. The impact of spectral filtration on image quality in micro-CT system.

    PubMed

    Ren, Liqiang; Ghani, Muhammad U; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin; Chen, Yong; Yang, Kai; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the impact of spectral filtration on image quality in a microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) system. A mouse phantom comprising 11rods for modeling lung, muscle, adipose, and bones was scanned with 17 s and 2min, respectively. The current (μA) for each scan was adjusted to achieve identical entrance exposure to the phantom, providing a baseline for image quality evaluation. For each region of interest (ROI) within specific composition, CT number variations, noise levels, and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were evaluated from the reconstructed images. CT number variations and CNRs for bone with high density, muscle, and adipose were compared with theoretical predictions. The results show that the impact of spectral filtration on image quality indicators, such as CNR in a micro-CT system, is significantly associated with tissue characteristics. The findings may provide useful references for optimizing the scanning parameters of general micro-CT systems in future imaging applications. PMID:26894340

  14. First small-animal in-vivo phase-contrast micro-CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauwels, B.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Liu, X.; Tapfer, A.; Velroyen, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Sasov, A.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a compact grating-based in-vivo phase-contrast micro-CT system with a rotating gantry. The 50 W microfocus x-ray source operates with 20 to 50 kV peak energy. The length of the rotating interferometer is around 47 cm. Pixel size in the object is 30 micron; the field of view is approx. 35 mm in diameter, suited to image a mouse. The interferometer consists of three gratings: an absorption grating close to the x-ray source, a phase grating to introduce a π/2 phase shift and an absorption analyzer grating positioned at the first fractional Talbot distance. Numerous drives and actuators are used to provide angular and linear grating alignment, phase stepping and object/gantry precision positioning. Phantom studies were conducted to investigate performance, accuracy and stability of the scanner. In particular, the influences of gantry rotation and of temperature fluctuations on the interferometric image acquisition were characterized. Also dose measurements were performed. The first imaging results obtained with the system show the complementary nature of phase-contrast micro-CT images with respect to absorption-based micro-CT. Future improvements, necessary to optimize the scanner for in-vivo small-animal CT scanning on a regular and easy-to-use basis, are also discussed.

  15. Adaptive region of interest method for analytical micro-CT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanneng; Xu, Xiaochun; Bi, Kun; Zeng, Shaoqun; Liu, Qian; Chen, Shangbin

    2011-01-01

    The real-time imaging is important in automatic successive inspection with micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT). Generally, the size of the detector is chosen according to the most probable size of the measured object to acquire all the projection data. Given enough imaging area and imaging resolution of X-ray detector, the detector is larger than specimen projection area, which results in redundant data in the Sinogram. The process of real-time micro-CT is computation-intensive because of the large amounts of source and destination data. The speed of the reconstruction algorithm can't always meet the requirements of real-time applications. A preprocessing method called adaptive region of interest (AROI), which detects the object's boundaries automatically to focus the active Sinogram regions, is introduced into the analytical reconstruction algorithm in this paper. The AROI method reduces the volume of the reconstructing data and thus directly accelerates the reconstruction process. It has been further shown that image quality is not compromised when applying AROI, while the reconstruction speed is increased as the square of the ratio of the sizes of the detector and the specimen slice. In practice, the conch reconstruction experiment indicated that the process is accelerated by 5.2 times with AROI and the imaging quality is not degraded. Therefore, the AROI method improves the speed of analytical micro-CT reconstruction significantly. PMID:21422587

  16. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  17. Local variations in bone mineral density: a comparison of OCT versus x-ray micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Stevens-Smith, Jenna; Scutt, Andrew; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2008-02-01

    We describe variations in the degree of mineralisation within the subchondral bone plate of the equine metacarpophalangeal joint. A comparison of Optical Coherence Tomography, Micro CT, and SEM techniques was performed. These data are compared between sites on a healthy sample and at points on an osteoarthritically degenerated sample. No significant correlation was found between the optical scattering coefficient and the micro-CT derived BMD for comparisons between different sites on the bone surface. Also OCT demonstrated a larger regional variation in scattering coefficient than did micro CT for bone mineral density. This suggests that the optical scattering coefficient of bone is not related solely to the volume-density of calcium-phosphate. Patches of lower optical scattering coefficient were found in the bone structure that was related to the osteoarthritic lesion area on the overlying cartilage. Areas of microcracking, as revealed by both SEM and micro CT produced distinctive granularity in the OCT images. In further experiments, OCT was compared with micro CT and mechanical strength testing (3-point bending) in a small animal model of cardiovascular disease (cholesterol overload in mice). In the cardiovascular diseased mice, micro-CT of the trabecular bone did not demonstrate a significant change in trabecular bone mineral density before and after administration of the high cholesterol diet. However mechanical testing demonstrated a decrease in mechanical strength and OCT demonstrated a corresponding statistically significant decrease in optical scattering of the bone.

  18. Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand; Ranouil, Julien; Morgand, Loïc; Raguin, Olivier; Walker, Paul; Brunotte, François

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 ± 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 ± 2.1 and 110.7 ± 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 ± 4.6 and 203.6 ± 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse

  19. Phosphodiesterase4D (PDE4D)--A risk factor for atrial fibrillation and stroke?

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Carina; Yasmeen, Saiqa; Iversen, Helle K; Kruuse, Christina

    2015-12-15

    Mutations in the gene encoding phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) enzyme are associated with ischemic stroke; however the functional implications of such mutations are not well understood. PDE4D is part of a complex protein family modulating intracellular signalling by cyclic nucleotides. The PDE4 family includes subtypes A-D, all of which show unique intracellular, cellular and tissue distribution. PDE4D is the major subtype expressed in human atrial myocytes and involved in the pathophysiology of arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation. The PDE4D enzyme hydrolyses cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Though diverging results are reported, several population based studies describe association of various PDE4D single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with cardio-embolic stroke in particular. Functionally, a down regulation of PDE4D variants has been reported in stroke patients. The anti-inflammatory and vasodilator properties of PDE4 inhibitors make them suitable for treatment of stroke and cardiovascular disease. PDE4D has recently been suggested as factor in atrial fibrillation. This review summarizes the possible function of PDE4D in the brain, heart, and vasculature. Further, association of the described SNPs, in particular, with cardioembolic stroke, is reviewed. Current findings on the PDE4D mutations suggest functionality involves an increased cardiac risk factor as well as augmented risk of atrial fibrillation. PMID:26671126

  20. 4D Electron Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-06-01

    Electron tomography provides three-dimensional (3D) imaging of noncrystalline and crystalline equilibrium structures, as well as elemental volume composition, of materials and biological specimens, including those of viruses and cells. We report the development of 4D electron tomography by integrating the fourth dimension (time resolution) with the 3D spatial resolution obtained from a complete tilt series of 2D projections of an object. The different time frames of tomograms constitute a movie of the object in motion, thus enabling studies of nonequilibrium structures and transient processes. The method was demonstrated using carbon nanotubes of a bracelet-like ring structure for which 4D tomograms display different modes of motion, such as breathing and wiggling, with resonance frequencies up to 30 megahertz. Applications can now make use of the full space-time range with the nanometer-femtosecond resolution of ultrafast electron tomography.

  1. X-ray microCT study of pyramids of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Stock, S R; Nagaraja, S; Barss, J; Dahl, T; Veis, A

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports results of a novel approach, X-ray microCT, for quantifying stereom structures applied to ossicles of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus. MicroCT, a high resolution variant of medical CT (computed tomography), allows noninvasive mapping of microstructure in 3-D with spatial resolution approaching that of optical microscopy. An intact pyramid (two demipyramids, tooth epiphyses, and one tooth) was reconstructed with 17 microm isotropic voxels (volume elements); two individual demipyramids and a pair of epiphyses were studied with 9-13 microm isotropic voxels. The cross-sectional maps of a linear attenuation coefficient produced by the reconstruction algorithm showed that the structure of the ossicles was quite heterogeneous on the scale of tens to hundreds of micrometers. Variations in magnesium content and in minor elemental constitutents could not account for the observed heterogeneities. Spatial resolution was insufficient to resolve the individual elements of the stereom, but the observed values of the linear attenuation coefficient (for the 26 keV effective X-ray energy, a maximum of 7.4 cm(-1) and a minimum of approximately 2 cm(-1) away from obvious voids) could be interpreted in terms of fractions of voxels occupied by mineral (high magnesium calcite). The average volume fraction of mineral determined for a transverse slice of the demipyramid near where it joins an epiphysis was 0.46; for a slice 3.3 mm adoral it was 0.70. Local volume fractions of mineral approached 1, and, away from resolvable voids, considerable portions of the demipyramids had volume fractions of calcite at or below approximately 0.33. MicroCT imaging of a demipyramid before and after infiltration with a high absorptivity fluid (sodium polytungstate) confirmed the determination of the volume fractions of minerals. PMID:12576016

  2. High-resolution 3D micro-CT imaging of breast microcalcifications: a preliminary analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Detection of microcalcifications on mammograms indicates the presence of breast lesion, and the shapes of the microcalcifications as seen by conventional mammography correlates with the probability of malignancy. This preliminary study evaluated the 3D shape of breast microcalcifications using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and compared the findings with those obtained using anatomopathological analysis. Methods The study analyzed breast biopsy samples from 11 women with findings of suspicious microcalcifications on routine mammograms. The samples were imaged using a micro-CT (SkyScan 1076) at a resolution of 35 μm. Images were reconstructed using filtered back-projection and analyzed in 3D using surface rendering. The samples were subsequently analyzed by the pathology service. Reconstructed 3D images were compared with the corresponding histological slices. Results Anatomopathological analysis showed that 5 of 11 patients had ductal breast carcinoma in situ. One patient was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma. Individual object analysis was performed on 597 microcalcifications. Malignant microcalcifications tended to be thinner and to have a smaller volume and surface area, while their surface area-to-volume ratio was greater than that of benign microcalcifications. The structure model index values were the same for malignant and benign microcalcifications. Conclusions This is the first study to use micro-CT for quantitative 3D analysis of microcalcifications. This high-resolution imaging technique will be valuable for gaining a greater understanding of the morphologic characteristics of malignant and benign microcalcifications. The presence of many small microcalcifications can be an indication of malignancy. For the larger microcalcifications, 3D parameters confirmed the more irregular shape of malignant microcalcifications. PMID:24393444

  3. The Use of Micro-CT with Image Segmentation to Quantify Leakage in Dental Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Carola A.; Lan, Caixia; Escobar-Sanabria, David; Li, Yuping; Rudney, Joel; Aparicio, Conrado; Fok, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a method for quantifying leakage in composite resin restorations after curing, using non-destructive X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and image segmentation. Methods Class-I cavity preparations were made in 20 human third molars, which were divided into 2 groups. Group I was restored with Z100 and Group II with Filtek LS. Micro-CT scans were taken for both groups before and after they were submerged in silver nitrate solution (AgNO3 50%) to reveal any interfacial gap and leakage at the tooth restoration interface. Image segmentation was carried out by first performing image correlation to align the before- and after-treatment images and then by image subtraction to isolate the silver nitrate penetrant for precise volume calculation. Two-tailed Student’s t-test was used to analyze the results, with the level of significance set at p<0.05. Results All samples from Group I showed silver nitrate penetration with a mean volume of 1.3 ± 0.7 mm3. In Group II, only 2 out of the 10 restorations displayed infiltration along the interface, giving a mean volume of 0.3 ± 0.3 mm3. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The infiltration showed non-uniform patterns within the interface. Significance We have developed a method to quantify the volume of leakage using non-destructive micro-CT, silver nitrate infiltration and image segmentation. Our results confirmed that substantial leakage could occur in composite restorations that have imperfections in the adhesive layer or interfacial debonding through polymerization shrinkage. For the restorative systems investigated in this study, this occurred mostly at the interface between the adhesive system and the tooth structure. PMID:25649496

  4. Stress and strain distribution in demineralized enamel: A micro-CT based finite element study.

    PubMed

    Neves, Aline Almeida; Coutinho, Eduardo; Alves, Haimon Diniz Lopes; de Assis, Joaquim Teixeira

    2015-10-01

    Physiological oral mechanical forces may play a role on the progression of enamel carious lesions to cavitation. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe, by 3D finite element analysis, stress, and strain patterns in sound and carious enamel after a simulated occlusal load. Micro-CT based models were created and meshed with tetrahedral elements (based on an extracted third molar), namely: a sound (ST) and a carious tooth (CT). For the CT, enamel material properties were assigned according to the micro-CT gray values. Below the threshold corresponding to the enamel lesion (2.5 g/cm(3) ) lower and isotropic elastic modulus was assigned (E = 18 GPa against E1  = 80 GPa, E2  = E3  = 20 GPa for sound enamel). Both models were imported into a FE solver where boundary conditions were assigned and a pressure load (500 MPa) was applied at the occlusal surface. A linear static analysis was performed, considering anisotropy in sound enamel. ST showed a more efficient transfer of maximum principal stress from enamel to the dentin layer, while for the CT, enamel layer was subjected to higher and concentrated loads. Maximum principal strain distributions were seen at the carious enamel surface, especially at the central fossa, correlating to the enamel cavity seen at the original micro-CT model. It is possible to conclude that demineralized enamel compromises appropriate stress transfer from enamel to dentin, contributing to the odds of fracture and cavitation. Enamel fracture over a dentin lesion may happen as one of the normal pathways to caries progression and may act as a confounding factor during clinical diagnostic decisions. PMID:26240030

  5. Micro-CT features of intermediate gunshot wounds covered by textiles.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, Chiara; Fais, Paolo; Pelletti, Guido; Viero, Alessia; Miotto, Diego; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Viel, Guido; Montisci, Massimo; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2016-09-01

    The analysis of gunshot residue (GSR) on the clothing and the underlying skin of the victim may play an important role in the reconstruction of the shooting incident. The aim of the present study was to test micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for the analysis of firearm wounds experimentally produced on human skin covered by textiles. Firing trials were performed on 60 sections of human calves enveloped by a single layer of fabric (cotton or jeans or leather or nylon) and 15 controls consisting of bare calves. Experimental firings were conducted in a ballistic laboratory at three different muzzle-to-target distances (5, 15, and 30 cm), using a .32 ACP pistol (Beretta Mod. 81) loaded with full-jacketed bullets coming from the same production lot (7.65 × 17 mm, Browning SR). The visual inspection revealed the classic pattern of GSR distribution on the fabrics and the skin of control samples, while only a dark ring around the entrance lesion was identified on the skin beneath the fabrics. Micro-CT analysis showed the presence of radiopaque material on all entrance wounds, with a statistically significant difference between cases and controls. No differences were found among specimens covered by fabrics, with regard to the firing distance and the type of clothing. No GSR-like deposits were detected in exit wounds. Our results suggest that micro-CT analysis may be a useful screening tool for differentiating entry from exit gunshot wounds when the covering textiles are contaminated, damaged, or missing. PMID:27325255

  6. Stress and strain distribution in demineralized enamel: A micro-CT based finite element study.

    PubMed

    Neves, Aline Almeida; Coutinho, Eduardo; Alves, Haimon Diniz Lopes; de Assis, Joaquim Teixeira

    2015-10-01

    Physiological oral mechanical forces may play a role on the progression of enamel carious lesions to cavitation. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe, by 3D finite element analysis, stress, and strain patterns in sound and carious enamel after a simulated occlusal load. Micro-CT based models were created and meshed with tetrahedral elements (based on an extracted third molar), namely: a sound (ST) and a carious tooth (CT). For the CT, enamel material properties were assigned according to the micro-CT gray values. Below the threshold corresponding to the enamel lesion (2.5 g/cm(3) ) lower and isotropic elastic modulus was assigned (E = 18 GPa against E1  = 80 GPa, E2  = E3  = 20 GPa for sound enamel). Both models were imported into a FE solver where boundary conditions were assigned and a pressure load (500 MPa) was applied at the occlusal surface. A linear static analysis was performed, considering anisotropy in sound enamel. ST showed a more efficient transfer of maximum principal stress from enamel to the dentin layer, while for the CT, enamel layer was subjected to higher and concentrated loads. Maximum principal strain distributions were seen at the carious enamel surface, especially at the central fossa, correlating to the enamel cavity seen at the original micro-CT model. It is possible to conclude that demineralized enamel compromises appropriate stress transfer from enamel to dentin, contributing to the odds of fracture and cavitation. Enamel fracture over a dentin lesion may happen as one of the normal pathways to caries progression and may act as a confounding factor during clinical diagnostic decisions.

  7. Accuracy of cancellous bone volume fraction measured by micro-CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Ding, M; Odgaard, A; Hvid, I

    1999-03-01

    Volume fraction, the single most important parameter in describing trabecular microstructure, can easily be calculated from three-dimensional reconstructions of micro-CT images. This study sought to quantify the accuracy of this measurement. One hundred and sixty human cancellous bone specimens which covered a large range of volume fraction (9.8-39.8%) were produced. The specimens were micro-CT scanned, and the volume fraction based on Archimedes' principle was determined as a reference. After scanning, all micro-CT data were segmented using individual thresholds determined by the scanner supplied algorithm (method I). A significant deviation of volume fraction from method I was found: both the y-intercept and the slope of the regression line were significantly different from those of the Archimedes-based volume fraction (p < 0.001). New individual thresholds were determined based on a calibration of volume fraction to the Archimedes-based volume fractions (method II). The mean thresholds of the two methods were applied to segment 20 randomly selected specimens. The results showed that volume fraction using the mean threshold of method I was underestimated by 4% (p = 0.001), whereas the mean threshold of method II yielded accurate values. The precision of the measurement was excellent. Our data show that care must be taken when applying thresholds in generating 3-D data, and that a fixed threshold may be used to obtain reliable volume fraction data. This fixed threshold may be determined from the Archimedes-based volume fraction of a subgroup of specimens. The threshold may vary between different materials, and so it should be determined whenever a study series is performed. PMID:10093033

  8. Ultrafast laser-based micro-CT system for small-animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Nees, John; Chen, Liming; Toth, R.; Hou, Bixue; Kincaid, Russell E., Jr.; Coman, Ioana L.; Lipson, Edward D.; Mourou, Gerard

    2004-05-01

    We investigated ultrafast laser-based x-ray (ULX) source as an attractive alternative to a microfocal x-ray tube used in micro-CT systems. The laser pulse duration was in the 30 fs-200 fs range, the repetition rate in the 10 Hz - 1 kHz range. A number of solid targets including Ge, Mo, Rh, Ag, Sn, Ba, La, Nd with matching filters was used. We optimized conditions for x-rays generation and measured: x-ray spectra, conversion efficiency (from laser light to x-rays), x-ray fluence, effective x-ray focal spot size and spatial resolution, contrast resolution and radiation dose. Good quality projection images of small animals in single-and dual-energy mode were obtained. ULX generates narrow x-ray spectra that consist mainly of characteristic lines that can be easily tailored (by changing laser beam target) to the imaging task, (e.g. to maximize contrast while minimizing radiation dose). X-ray fluence can exceed fluence produced by conventional microfocal tube with 10 μm focal-spot hence allowing for faster scans with very high spatial resolution. Changing the laser target, and thus matching the characteristic emission lines with the investigated animal's thickness and composition, can be done quickly and easily. Using narrow emission lines for imaging, instead of broad bremsstrahlung, offers superior dose utilization and limits beam-hardening effects. Employing two narrow emission lines-above and below the absorption edge of a contrast agent-in quick succession allows dual-energy-subtraction micro-CT for imaging with a contrast medium. Dual-energy-subtraction is not practical with a microfocal tube. Compact, robust, ultrafast lasers are commercially available, and their characteristics are rapidly improving. We plan to construct a prototype in vivo ultrafast laser-based micro-CT system.

  9. Micro-CT features of intermediate gunshot wounds covered by textiles.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, Chiara; Fais, Paolo; Pelletti, Guido; Viero, Alessia; Miotto, Diego; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Viel, Guido; Montisci, Massimo; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2016-09-01

    The analysis of gunshot residue (GSR) on the clothing and the underlying skin of the victim may play an important role in the reconstruction of the shooting incident. The aim of the present study was to test micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for the analysis of firearm wounds experimentally produced on human skin covered by textiles. Firing trials were performed on 60 sections of human calves enveloped by a single layer of fabric (cotton or jeans or leather or nylon) and 15 controls consisting of bare calves. Experimental firings were conducted in a ballistic laboratory at three different muzzle-to-target distances (5, 15, and 30 cm), using a .32 ACP pistol (Beretta Mod. 81) loaded with full-jacketed bullets coming from the same production lot (7.65 × 17 mm, Browning SR). The visual inspection revealed the classic pattern of GSR distribution on the fabrics and the skin of control samples, while only a dark ring around the entrance lesion was identified on the skin beneath the fabrics. Micro-CT analysis showed the presence of radiopaque material on all entrance wounds, with a statistically significant difference between cases and controls. No differences were found among specimens covered by fabrics, with regard to the firing distance and the type of clothing. No GSR-like deposits were detected in exit wounds. Our results suggest that micro-CT analysis may be a useful screening tool for differentiating entry from exit gunshot wounds when the covering textiles are contaminated, damaged, or missing.

  10. Micro-CT Analysis of Radiation-Induced Osteopenia and Bone Hypovascularization in Rat.

    PubMed

    Michel, Guillaume; Blery, Pauline; Pilet, Paul; Guicheux, Jérôme; Weiss, Pierre; Malard, Olivier; Espitalier, Florent

    2015-07-01

    Treatment of carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract often requires external radiation therapy. However, radiation affects all the components of bone, with different degrees of sensitivity, and may produce severe side effects such as mandibular osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Intraosseous vascularization is thought to be decreased after irradiation, but its impact on total bone volume is still controversial. The aim of this study was to compare intraosseous vascularization, cortical bone thickness, and total bone volume in a rat model of ORN versus nonirradiated rats, using a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis after intracardiac injection of a contrast agent. The study was performed on 8-week-old Lewis 1A rats (n = 14). Eleven rats underwent external irradiation on the hind limbs by a single 80-Gy dose. Three rats did not receive irradiation and served as controls for statistical analysis. Eight weeks after the external irradiation, all the animals received a barium sulfate intracardiac injection under general anesthesia. All samples were analyzed with the micro-computed tomography system at a resolution of 5.5 μm. The images were later processed to create 3D reconstructions and study vascularization, bone volume, and cortical thickness. Data from irradiated and nonirradiated rats were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. No animal died after irradiation. Nineteen irradiated tibias and six nonirradiated tibias were included for micro-CT analysis. The vessel percentage was significantly lower in irradiated bones (p = 0.0001). The distance between the vessels, a marker of vascular destruction, was higher after irradiation (p = 0.001). The vessels were also more altered distally after irradiation (p = 0.028). Cortical thickness was severely decreased after irradiation, sometimes even reduced to zero. Both trabecular and cortical structures were destroyed after irradiation, with wide bone gaps. Finally, both total bone volume (p = 0.0001) and cortical

  11. 4D flow imaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran; Allen, Bradley D.; Garcia, Julio; Jarvis, Kelly B.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important tool for the clinical evaluation of patients with cardiovascular disease. Since its introduction in the late 1980s, 2-dimensional phase contrast MRI (2D PC-MRI) has become a routine part of standard-of-care cardiac MRI for the assessment of regional blood flow in the heart and great vessels. More recently, time-resolved PC-MRI with velocity encoding along all three flow directions and three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage (also termed ‘4D flow MRI’) has been developed and applied for the evaluation of cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the human body. 4D flow MRI allows for the comprehensive evaluation of complex blood flow patterns by 3D blood flow visualization and flexible retrospective quantification of flow parameters. Recent technical developments, including the utilization of advanced parallel imaging techniques such as k-t GRAPPA, have resulted in reasonable overall scan times, e.g., 8-12 minutes for 4D flow MRI of the aorta and 10-20 minutes for whole heart coverage. As a result, the application of 4D flow MRI in a clinical setting has become more feasible, as documented by an increased number of recent reports on the utility of the technique for the assessment of cardiac and vascular hemodynamics in patient studies. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential of 4D flow MRI to provide an improved assessment of hemodynamics which might aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to describe the methods used for 4D flow MRI acquisition, post-processing and data analysis. In addition, the article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D flow MRI and includes a review of applications in the heart, thoracic aorta and hepatic system. PMID:24834414

  12. Microstructure Characterization by Means of X-ray Micro-CT and Nanoindentation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajczakowska, Magdalena; Stefaniuk, Damian; Łydżba, Dariusz

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an example of the material microstructure characterization with the use of X-ray micro-CT and nanoindentation measurements. Firstly, the current scope of application of the aforementioned techniques is provided within different fields of science. Then, background of each of the methods is presented. The methodology of X-ray micro-CT is described with the emphasis on the Beer's law formulation. In addition, the basics of the nanoindentation technique are outlined and major formulas for the hardness and Young's modulus calculation are given. Finally, example results for a concrete sample are presented. The microstructure of the selected material is firstly characterized in terms of geometry using the results from the microtomograhy measurements, e.g., porosity and attenuation profiles, pore and aggregate size distribution, shape factor of pores, etc. Next, the results of the nanoindentation tests are provided, namely the hardness and Young's modulus versus the height of the sample. The influence of the number of tests and statistical analysis on the final results is underlined.

  13. In vivo micro-CT analysis of bone remodeling in a rat calvarial defect model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umoh, Joseph U.; Sampaio, Arthur V.; Welch, Ian; Pitelka, Vasek; Goldberg, Harvey A.; Underhill, T. Michael; Holdsworth, David W.

    2009-04-01

    The rodent calvarial defect model is commonly used to investigate bone regeneration and wound healing. This study presents a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) methodology for measuring the bone mineral content (BMC) in a rat calvarial defect and validates it by estimating its precision error. Two defect models were implemented. A single 6 mm diameter defect was created in 20 rats, which were imaged in vivo for longitudinal experiments. Three 5 mm diameter defects were created in three additional rats, which were repeatedly imaged ex vivo to determine precision. Four control rats and four rats treated with bone morphogenetic protein were imaged at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks post-surgery. Scan parameters were 80 kVp, 0.45 mA and 180 mAs. Images were reconstructed with an isotropic resolution of 45 µm. At 6 weeks, the BMC in control animals (4.37 ± 0.66 mg) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that in treated rats (11.29 ± 1.01 mg). Linear regression between the BMC and bone fractional area, from 20 rats, showed a strong correlation (r2 = 0.70, p < 0.0001), indicating that the BMC can be used, in place of previous destructive analysis techniques, to characterize bone growth. The high precision (2.5%) of the micro-CT methodology indicates its utility in detecting small BMC changes in animals.

  14. First X-ray Fluorescence MicroCT Results from Micrometeorites at SSRL

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatyev, Konstantin; Luening, Katharina; Brennan, Sean; Pianetta, Piero; Huwig, Kathy; Harvey, Ralph; Ishii, Hope; Bradley, John

    2007-01-19

    X-ray fluorescence microCT (computed tomography) is a novel technique that allows non-destructive determination of the 3D distribution of chemical elements inside a sample. This is especially important in samples for which sectioning is undesirable either due to the risk of contamination or the requirement for further analysis by different characterization techniques. Developments made by third generation synchrotron facilities and laboratory X-ray focusing systems have made these kinds of measurements more attractive by significantly reducing scan times and beam size. First results from the x-ray fluorescence microCT experiments performed at SSRL beamline 6-2 are reported here. Beamline 6-2 is a 54 pole wiggler that uses a two mirror optical system for focusing the x-rays onto a virtual source slit which is then reimaged with a set of KB mirrors to a (2 x 4) {mu}m2 beam spot. An energy dispersive fluorescence detector is located in plane at 90 degrees to the incident beam to reduce the scattering contribution. A PIN diode located behind the sample simultaneously measures the x-ray attenuation in the sample. Several porous micrometeorite samples were measured and the reconstructed element density distribution including self-absorption correction is presented. Ultimately, this system will be used to analyze particles from the coma of comet Wild-2 and fresh interstellar dust particles both of which were collected during the NASA Stardust mission.

  15. First X-ray Fluorescence MicroCT Results from Micrometeorites at SSRL

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatyev, K; Huwig, K; Harvey, R; Ishii, H; Bradley, J; Luening, K; Brennan, S; Pianetta, P

    2006-08-23

    X-ray fluorescence microCT (computed tomography) is a novel technique that allows non-destructive determination of the 3D distribution of chemical elements inside a sample. This is especially important in samples for which sectioning is undesirable either due to the risk of contamination or the requirement for further analysis by different characterization techniques. Developments made by third generation synchrotron facilities and laboratory X-ray focusing systems have made these kinds of measurements more attractive by significantly reducing scan times and beam size. First results from the x-ray fluorescence microCT experiments performed at SSRL beamline 6-2 are reported here. Beamline 6-2 is a 54 pole wiggler that uses a two mirror optical system for focusing the x-rays onto a virtual source slit which is then reimaged with a set of KB mirrors to a (2 x 4) {micro}{sup 2} beam spot. An energy dispersive fluorescence detector is located in plane at 90 degrees to the incident beam to reduce the scattering contribution. A PIN diode located behind the sample simultaneously measures the x-ray attenuation in the sample. Several porous micrometeorite samples were measured and the reconstructed element density distribution including self-absorption correction is presented. Ultimately, this system will be used to analyze particles from the coma of comet Wild-2 and fresh interstellar dust particles both of which were collected during the NASA Stardust mission.

  16. Submicrometer structure of sea urchin tooth via remote synchrotron microCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Stuart R.; Rack, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Remote electron microscopy sessions are featured at a number of imaging centers. Similarly, many synchrotron light sources offer routine "mail-in" crystallography and powder diffractometry. At imaging beam lines, small numbers of (preliminary) scans are sometimes performed by staff, in the absence of the investigator, to demonstrate feasibility of the proposed study or as an industrial service. In the 1990s, one of us (SRS) participated in processing experiments where samples were couriered between Georgia Tech and SSRL and synchrotron microCT followed the spatial distribution of densification. Here, the authors report results of remote microCT experiments, i.e., where the investigator who knows the sample interacts via the web with the beam line scientist operating the apparatus and provides real-time feedback on where to scan based upon radiographs and on the most recent reconstructions. Local tomography imaged sea urchin teeth with 350 nm isotropic volume element (voxel) at beam line ID-19, ESRF. Sea urchin teeth form by growing parallel plates of high Mg calcite, each of which is 2-5 μm away from its neighbors, and very high Mg calcite columns later link the plates. The remote imaging session focused on tooth positions where the columns were just forming, and column shapes and dimensions were measured, something which has previously only been done with destructive sample preparation and scanning electron microscopy. The experiments were successful despite a separation of 4,400 miles and seven time zones.

  17. Bone Micro-CT Assessments in an Orchidectomised Rat Model Supplemented with Eurycoma longifolia

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Rosmaliza; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that Eurycoma longifolia, a herbal plant, may have the potential to treat osteoporosis in elderly male. This study aimed to determine the effects of Eurycoma longifolia supplementation on the trabecular bone microarchitecture of orchidectomised rats (androgen-deficient osteoporosis model). Forty-eight-aged (10–12 months old) Sprague Dawley rats were divided into six groups of sham-operated (SHAM), orchidectomised control (ORX), orchidectomised + 7 mg/rat testosterone enanthate (TEN) and orchidectomised + Eurycoma longifolia 30 mg/kg (EL30), orchidectomised + Eurycoma longifolia 60 mg/kg (EL60), orchidectomised + Eurycoma longifolia 90 mg/kg (EL90). Rats were euthanized following six weeks of treatment. The left femora were used to measure the trabecular bone microarchitecture using micro-CT. Orchidectomy significantly decreased connectivity density, trabecular bone volume, and trabecular number compared to the SHAM group. Testosterone replacement reversed all the orchidectomy-induced changes in the micro-CT parameters. EL at 30 and 60 mg/kg rat worsened the trabecular bone connectivity density and trabecular separation parameters of orchidectomised rats. EL at 90 mg/kg rat preserved the bone volume. High dose of EL (90 mg/kg) may have potential in preserving the bone microarchitecture of orchidectomised rats, but lower doses may further worsen the osteoporotic changes. PMID:22952556

  18. Robust separation of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues in micro-CT of mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bibo; Xie, Shuisheng; Berryman, Darlene; List, Ed; Liu, Jundong

    2013-01-01

    One of the common practices in obesity and diabetes studies is to measure the volumes and weights of various adipose tissues, among which, visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) play critical yet different physiological roles in mouse aging. In this paper, a robust two-stage VAT/SAT separation framework for micro-CT mouse data is proposed. The first stage is to distinguish adipose from other tissue types, including background, soft tissue and bone, through a robust mixture of Gaussian model. Spatial recognition relevant to anatomical locations is carried out in the second step to determine whether the adipose is visceral or subcutaneous. We tackle this problem through a novel approach that relies on evolving the abdominal muscular wall to keep VAT/SAT separated. The VAT region of interest (ROI) is also automatically set up through an atlas based skeleton matching procedure. The results of our method are compared with VAT/SAT delineations by human experts, and a high classification accuracy is demonstrated on eight micro-CT mouse volume sets.

  19. A preliminary study on a dual-modality OPT/micro-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yujie; Di, Dong; Shi, Liangliang; Wang, Jun; Hui, Hui; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a mesoscopic scale optical imaging technique for specimens between 1mm and 10mm. Although OPT is widely used for in vivo and ex vivo imaging, its applications in high intensity tissues such as bone and thick samples are limited due to the strong absorption of the light. In contrast, X-ray micro-CT is suitable for high intensity tissue imaging but its contrast of soft tissue is poor. Therefore, imaging tools with both strong penetration and high contrast are in great demand. To address this issue, we develop a dual-modality system integrating both OPT and micro-CT. In this paper, this dual-modality system is applied to dynamic imaging of a clearing process of a mouse paw. The clearing process is essential in OPT when imaging thick or intensity tissues since it can make high intensity tissues optically transparent. In our experiment, we scan the mouse paw with our system - before, during and after optical clearing. Each time we scan CT first and then the OPT. After acquisition, 3-dimentional volumes of OPT and CT are reconstructed separately. Then we use a rigid image registration algorithm to register these volumes. Finally, the volumes are merged together. The experimental results show our bimodal system performs better than single OPT or CT system when processing tissues with both high intensity and soft parts.

  20. Optimizing synchrotron microCT for high-throughput phenotyping of zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rivière, Patrick J.; Clark, Darin; Rojek, Alexandra; Vargas, Phillip; Xiao, Xianghui; DeCarlo, Francesco; Kindlmann, Gordon; Cheng, Keith

    2010-09-01

    We are creating a state-of-the-art 2D and 3D imaging atlas of zebrafish development. The atlas employs both 2D histology slides and 3D benchtop and synchrotron micro CT results. Through this atlas, we expect to document normal and abnormal organogenesis, to reveal new levels of structural detail, and to advance image informatics as a form of systems biology. The zebrafish has become a widely used model organism in biological and biomedical research for studies of vertebrate development and gene function. In this work, we will report on efforts to optimize synchrotron microCT imaging parameters for zebrafish at crucial developmental stages. The aim of these studies is to establish protocols for high-throughput phenotyping of normal, mutant and diseased zebrafish. We have developed staining and embedding protocols using different heavy metal stains (osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate) and different embedding media (Embed 812 and glycol methacrylate). We have explored the use of edge subtraction and multi-energy techniques for contrast enhancement and we have examined the use of different sample-detector distances with unstained samples to explore and optimize phase-contrast enhancement effects. We will report principally on our efforts to optimize energy choice for single- and multi-energy studies as well as our efforts to optimize the degree of phase contrast enhancement.

  1. Micro-CT scouting for transmission electron microscopy of human tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Morales, A G; Stempinski, E S; Xiao, X; Patel, A; Panna, A; Olivier, K N; McShane, P J; Robinson, C; George, A J; Donahue, D R; Chen, P; Wen, H

    2016-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides sub-nanometre-scale details in volumetric samples. Samples such as pathology tissue specimens are often stained with a metal element to enhance contrast, which makes them opaque to optical microscopes. As a result, it can be a lengthy procedure to find the region of interest inside a sample through sectioning. We describe micro-CT scouting for TEM that allows noninvasive identification of regions of interest within a block sample to guide the sectioning step. In a tissue pathology study, a bench-top micro-CT scanner with 10 μm resolution was used to determine the location of patches of the mucous membrane in osmium-stained human nasal scraping samples. Once the regions of interest were located, the sample block was sectioned to expose that location, followed by ultra-thin sectioning and TEM to inspect the internal structure of the cilia of the membrane epithelial cells with nanometre resolution. This method substantially reduced the time and labour of the search process from typically 20 sections for light microscopy to three sections with no added sample preparation. PMID:26854176

  2. First X-ray Fluorescence MicroCT Results from Micrometeorites at SSRL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatyev, Konstantin; Huwig, Kathy; Harvey, Ralph; Ishii, Hope; Bradley, John; Luening, Katharina; Brennan, Sean; Pianetta, Piero

    2007-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence microCT (computed tomography) is a novel technique that allows non-destructive determination of the 3D distribution of chemical elements inside a sample. This is especially important in samples for which sectioning is undesirable either due to the risk of contamination or the requirement for further analysis by different characterization techniques. Developments made by third generation synchrotron facilities and laboratory X-ray focusing systems have made these kinds of measurements more attractive by significantly reducing scan times and beam size. First results from the x-ray fluorescence microCT experiments performed at SSRL beamline 6-2 are reported here. Beamline 6-2 is a 54 pole wiggler that uses a two mirror optical system for focusing the x-rays onto a virtual source slit which is then reimaged with a set of KB mirrors to a (2 × 4) μm2 beam spot. An energy dispersive fluorescence detector is located in plane at 90 degrees to the incident beam to reduce the scattering contribution. A PIN diode located behind the sample simultaneously measures the x-ray attenuation in the sample. Several porous micrometeorite samples were measured and the reconstructed element density distribution including self-absorption correction is presented. Ultimately, this system will be used to analyze particles from the coma of comet Wild-2 and fresh interstellar dust particles both of which were collected during the NASA Stardust mission.

  3. Angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves evaluated objectively using MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-kui; Wang, Ya-xian; Xue, Cheng-bin; Li, Zhen-mei-yu; Huang, Jing; Zhao, Ya-hong; Yang, Yu-min; Gu, Xiao-song

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in regenerative medicine generally, as well as in the specific field of nerve regeneration. However, no convenient and objective method for evaluating the angiogenesis of tissue-engineered nerves has been reported. In this study, tissue-engineered nerves were constructed in vitro using Schwann cells differentiated from rat skin-derived precursors as supporting cells and chitosan nerve conduits combined with silk fibroin fibers as scaffolds to bridge 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats. Four weeks after surgery, three-dimensional blood vessel reconstructions were made through MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning, and parameter analysis of the tissue-engineered nerves was performed. New blood vessels grew into the tissue-engineered nerves from three main directions: the proximal end, the distal end, and the middle. The parameter analysis of the three-dimensional blood vessel images yielded several parameters, including the number, diameter, connection, and spatial distribution of blood vessels. The new blood vessels were mainly capillaries and microvessels, with diameters ranging from 9 to 301 μm. The blood vessels with diameters from 27 to 155 μm accounted for 82.84% of the new vessels. The microvessels in the tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo were relatively well-identified using the MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning method, which allows the evaluation and comparison of differences and changes of angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo. PMID:26981108

  4. Ex vivo micro-CT imaging of murine brain models using non-ionic iodinated contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Bautista, N.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Murrieta-Rodríguez, T.; Manjarrez-Marmolejo, J.; Franco-Pérez, J.; Calvillo-Velasco, M. E.

    2014-11-01

    Preclinical investigation of brain tumors is frequently carried out by means of intracranial implantation of brain tumor xenografts or allografts, with subsequent analysis of tumor growth using conventional histopathology. However, very little has been reported on the use contrast-enhanced techniques in micro-CT imaging for the study of malignant brain tumors in small animal models. The aim of this study has been to test a protocol for ex vivo imaging of murine brain models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) after treatment with non-ionic iodinated solution, using an in-house developed laboratory micro-CT. We have found that the best compromise between acquisition time and image quality is obtained using a 50 kVp, 0.5 mAs, 1° angular step on a 360 degree orbit acquisition protocol, with 70 μm reconstructed voxel size using the Feldkamp algorithm. With this parameters up to 4 murine brains can be scanned in tandem in less than 15 minutes. Image segmentation and analysis of three sample brains allowed identifying tumor volumes as small as 0.4 mm3.

  5. In Vivo MicroCT Monitoring of Osteomyelitis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Stadelmann, Vincent A.; Potapova, Inga; Camenisch, Karin; Nehrbass, Dirk; Richards, R. Geoff; Moriarty, T. Fintan

    2015-01-01

    Infection associated with orthopedic implants often results in bone loss and requires surgical removal of the implant. The aim of this study was to evaluate morphological changes of bone adjacent to a bacteria-colonized implant, with the aim of identifying temporal patterns that are characteristic of infection. In an in vivo study with rats, bone changes were assessed using in vivo microCT at 7 time points during a one-month postoperative period. The rats received either a sterile or Staphylococcus aureus-colonized polyetheretherketone screw in the tibia. Bone-implant contact, bone fraction, and bone changes (quiescent, resorbed, and new bone) were calculated from consecutive scans and validated against histomorphometry. The screw pullout strength was estimated from FE models and the results were validated against mechanical testing. In the sterile group, bone-implant contact, bone fraction, and mechanical fixation increased steadily until day 14 and then plateaued. In the infected group, they decreased rapidly. Bone formation was reduced while resorption was increased, with maximum effects observed within 6 days. In summary, the model presented is capable of evaluating the patterns of bone changes due to implant-related infections. The combined use of longitudinal in vivo microCT imaging and image-based finite element analysis provides characteristic signs of infection within 6 days. PMID:26064928

  6. Prospective respiratory-gated micro-CT of free breathing rodents.

    PubMed

    Ford, Nancy L; Nikolov, Hristo N; Norley, Chris J D; Thornton, Michael M; Foster, Paula J; Drangova, Maria; Holdsworth, David W

    2005-09-01

    Microcomputed tomography (Micro-CT) has the potential to noninvasively image the structure of organs in rodent models with high spatial resolution and relatively short image acquisition times. However, motion artifacts associated with the normal respiratory motion of the animal may arise when imaging the abdomen or thorax. To reduce these artifacts and the accompanying loss of spatial resolution, we propose a prospective respiratory gating technique for use with anaesthetized, free-breathing rodents. A custom-made bed with an embedded pressure chamber was connected to a pressure transducer. Anaesthetized animals were placed in the prone position on the bed with their abdomens located over the chamber. During inspiration, the motion of the diaphragm caused an increase in the chamber pressure, which was converted into a voltage signal by the transducer. An output voltage was used to trigger image acquisition at any desired time point in the respiratory cycle. Digital radiographic images were acquired of anaesthetized, free-breathing rats with a digital radiographic system to correlate the respiratory wave form with respiration-induced organ motion. The respiratory wave form was monitored and recorded simultaneously with the x-ray radiation pulses, and an imaging window was defined, beginning at end expiration. Phantom experiments were performed to verify that the respiratory gating apparatus was triggering the micro-CT system. Attached to the distensible phantom were 100 microm diameter copper wires and the measured full width at half maximum was used to assess differences in image quality between respiratory-gated and ungated imaging protocols. This experiment allowed us to quantify the improvement in the spatial resolution, and the reduction of motion artifacts caused by moving structures, in the images resulting from respiratory-gated image acquisitions. The measured wire diameters were 0.135 mm for the stationary phantom image, 0.137 mm for the image gated at end

  7. An Indirect Method to Measure Abutment Screw Preload: A Pilot Study Based on Micro-CT Scanning.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Carlos Eduardo E; Griggs, Jason Alan; Duan, Yuanyuan; Mushashe, Amanda M; Nolasco, Gisele Maria Correr; Borges, Ana Flávia Sanches; Rubo, José Henrique

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to measure the preload in different implant platform geometries based on micro-CT images. External hexagon (EH) implants and Morse Tapered (MT) implants (n=5) were used for the preload measurement. The abutment screws were scanned in micro-CT to obtain their virtual models, which were used to record their initial length. The abutments were screwed on the implant with a 20 Ncm torque and the set composed by implant, abutment screw and abutment were taken to the micro-CT scanner to obtain virtual slices of the specimens. These slices allowed the measurement of screw lengths after torque application and based on the screw elongation. Preload values were calculated using the Hooke's Law. The preloads of both groups were compared by independent t-test. Removal torque of each specimen was recorded. To evaluate the accuracy of the micro-CT technique, three rods with known lengths were scanned and the length of their virtual model was measured and compared with the original length. One rod was scanned four times to evaluate the measuring method variation. There was no difference between groups for preload (EH = 461.6 N and MT = 477.4 N), but the EH group showed higher removal torque values (13.8 ± 4.7 against 8.2 ± 3.6 N cm for MT group). The micro-CT technique showed a variability of 0.053% and repeatability showed an error of 0.23 to 0.28%. Within the limitations of this study, there was no difference between external hexagon and Morse taper for preload. The method using micro-CT may be considered for preload calculation.

  8. Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han

    2012-05-10

    The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

  9. Image-Guided Radiotherapy Using a Modified Industrial Micro-CT for Preclinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Manuela C.; Fleckenstein, Jens; Kirschner, Stefanie; Hartmann, Linda; Wenz, Frederik; Brockmann, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective Although radiotherapy is a key component of cancer treatment, its implementation into pre-clinical in vivo models with relatively small target volumes is frequently omitted either due to technical complexity or expected side effects hampering long-term observational studies. We here demonstrate how an affordable industrial micro-CT can be converted into a small animal IGRT device at very low costs. We also demonstrate the proof of principle for the case of partial brain irradiation of mice carrying orthotopic glioblastoma implants. Methods/Materials A commercially available micro-CT originally designed for non-destructive material analysis was used. It consists of a CNC manipulator, a transmission X-ray tube (10–160 kV) and a flat-panel detector, which was used together with custom-made steel collimators (1–5 mm aperture size). For radiation field characterization, an ionization chamber, water-equivalent slab phantoms and radiochromic films were used. A treatment planning tool was implemented using a C++ application. For proof of principle, NOD/SCID/γc−/− mice were orthotopically implanted with U87MG high-grade glioma cells and irradiated using the novel setup. Results The overall symmetry of the radiation field at 150 kV was 1.04±0.02%. The flatness was 4.99±0.63% and the penumbra widths were between 0.14 mm and 0.51 mm. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) ranged from 1.97 to 9.99 mm depending on the collimator aperture size. The dose depth curve along the central axis followed a typical shape of keV photons. Dose rates measured were 10.7 mGy/s in 1 mm and 7.6 mGy/s in 5 mm depth (5 mm collimator aperture size). Treatment of mice with a single dose of 10 Gy was tolerated well and resulted in central tumor necrosis consistent with therapeutic efficacy. Conclusion A conventional industrial micro-CT can be easily modified to allow effective small animal IGRT even of critical target volumes such as the brain. PMID:25993010

  10. SU-E-I-85: Absorbed Dose Estimation for a Commercially Available MicroCT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y; Ren, L; Liu, H; Yang, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the simulated absorbed dose delivered for a typical scan from a commercially available microCT scanner in order to aid in the dose estimation. Methods: The simulations were conducted using the Geant4 Monte Carlo Toolkit (version 10) with the standard electromagnetic classes. The Quantum FX microCT scanner (PerkinElmer, Waltham, MA) was modeled incorporating the energy fluence and angular distributions of generated photons, spatial dimensions of nominal source-to-object and source-to-detector distances. The energy distribution was measured using a spectrometer (X-123CdTe, Amptek Inc., Bedford, USA) with a 300 angular spread from the source for the 90 kVp X-ray beams with no additional filtration. The nominal distances from the source to object consisted of three setups: 154.0 mm, 104.0 mm, and 51.96 mm. Our simulations recorded the dose absorbed in a cylindrical phantom of PMMA with a fixed length of 2 cm and varying radii (10, 20, 30 and 40 mm) using 100 million incident photons. The averaged absorbed dose in the object was then quantified for all setups. An exposure measurement of 417 mR was taken using a Radcal 9095 system utilizing 10×9–180 ion chamber with the given technique of 90 kVp, 63 μA, and 12 s. The exposure rate was also simulated with same setup to calculate the conversion factor of the beam current and the number of incident photons. Results: For a typical cone-beam scan with non-filtered 90kVp, the dose coefficients (the absorbed dose per mAs) were 2.614, 2.549 and 2.467 μGy/mAs under source to object distance of 104 mm for the object diameters of 10 mm, 20 mm and 30 mm, respectively. Conclusion: A look-up table was developed where an investigator can estimate the delivered dose using this particular microCT given the scanning protocol (kVp and mAs) as well as the size of the scanned object.

  11. Visualization of 3D osteon morphology by synchrotron radiation micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, D M L; Erickson, B; Peele, A G; Hannah, K; Thomas, C D L; Clement, J G

    2011-01-01

    Cortical bone histology has been the subject of scientific inquiry since the advent of the earliest microscopes. Histology – literally the study of tissue – is a field nearly synonymous with 2D thin sections. That said, progressive developments in high-resolution X-ray imaging are enabling 3D visualization to reach ever smaller structures. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), employing conventional X-ray sources, has become the gold standard for 3D analysis of trabecular bone and is capable of detecting the structure of vascular (osteonal) porosity in cortical bone. To date, however, direct 3D visualization of secondary osteons has eluded micro-CT based upon absorption-derived contrast. Synchrotron radiation micro-CT, through greater image quality, resolution and alternative contrast mechanisms (e.g. phase contrast), holds great potential for non-destructive 3D visualization of secondary osteons. Our objective was to demonstrate this potential and to discuss areas of bone research that can be advanced through the application of this approach. We imaged human mid-femoral cortical bone specimens derived from a 20-year-old male (Melbourne Femur Collection) at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron (Chicago, IL, USA) using the 2BM beam line. A 60-mm distance between the target and the detector was employed to enhance visualization of internal structures through propagation phase contrast. Scan times were 1 h and images were acquired with 1.4-μm nominal isotropic resolution. Computer-aided manual segmentation and volumetric 3D rendering were employed to visualize secondary osteons and porous structures, respectively. Osteonal borders were evident via two contrast mechanisms. First, relatively new (hypomineralized) osteons were evident due to differences in X-ray attenuation relative to the surrounding bone. Second, osteon boundaries (cement lines) were delineated by phase contrast. Phase contrast also enabled the detection of soft tissue remnants within the

  12. Implementation and commissioning of an integrated micro-CT/RT system with computerized independent jaw collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Michael D.; Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Jung, Jongho A.; Holdsworth, David W.; Drangova, Maria; Chen, Jeff; Wong, Eugene

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To design, construct, and commission a set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system to perform conformal image-guided small animal radiotherapy.Methods: The authors designed and evaluated a system of custom-built motorized orthogonal jaws, which allows the delivery of off-axis rectangular fields on a GE eXplore CT 120 preclinical imaging system. The jaws in the x direction are independently driven, while the y-direction jaws are symmetric. All motors have backup encoders, verifying jaw positions. Mechanical performance of the jaws was characterized. Square beam profiles ranging from 2 × 2 to 60 × 60 mm{sup 2} were measured using EBT2 film in the center of a 70 × 70 × 22 mm{sup 3} solid water block. Similarly, absolute depth dose was measured in a solid water and EBT2 film stack 50 × 50 × 50 mm{sup 3}. A calibrated Farmer ion chamber in a 70 × 70 × 20 mm{sup 3} solid water block was used to measure the output of three field sizes: 50 × 50, 40 × 40, and 30 × 30 mm{sup 2}. Elliptical target plans were delivered to films to assess overall system performance. Respiratory-gated treatment was implemented on the system and initially proved using a simple sinusoidal motion phantom. All films were scanned on a flatbed scanner (Epson 1000XL) and converted to dose using a fitted calibration curve. A Monte Carlo beam model of the micro-CT with the jaws has been created using BEAMnrc for comparison with the measurements. An example image-guided partial lung irradiation in a rat is demonstrated.Results: The averaged random error of positioning each jaw is less than 0.1 mm. Relative output factors measured with the ion chamber agree with Monte Carlo simulations within 2%. Beam profiles and absolute depth dose curves measured from the films agree with simulations within measurement uncertainty. Respiratory-gated treatments applied to a phantom moving with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 5 mm showed improved beam penumbra (80%–20%) from 3.9 to

  13. High Resolution X-Ray Micro-CT of Ultra-Thin Wall Space Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, R. W.; Bowman, Randy R.; Bonacuse, Peter; Martin, Richard E.; Locci, I. E.; Kelley, M.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution micro-CT system has been assembled and is being used to provide optimal characterization for ultra-thin wall space components. The Glenn Research Center NDE Sciences Team, using this CT system, has assumed the role of inspection vendor for the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) project at NASA. This article will discuss many aspects of the development of the CT scanning for this type of component, including CT system overview; inspection requirements; process development, software utilized and developed to visualize, process, and analyze results; calibration sample development; results on actual samples; correlation with optical/SEM characterization; CT modeling; and development of automatic flaw recognition software. Keywords: Nondestructive Evaluation, NDE, Computed Tomography, Imaging, X-ray, Metallic Components, Thin Wall Inspection

  14. Energy-discriminative performance of a spectral micro-CT system.

    PubMed

    He, Peng; Yu, Hengyong; Bennett, James; Ronaldson, Paul; Zainon, Rafidah; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phil; Wei, Biao; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were performed to evaluate the energy-discriminative performance of a spectral (multi-energy) micro-CT system. The system, designed by MARS (Medipix All Resolution System) Bio-Imaging Ltd. (Christchurch, New Zealand), employs a photon-counting energy-discriminative detector technology developed by CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). We used the K-edge attenuation characteristics of some known materials to calibrate the detector's photon energy discrimination. For tomographic analysis, we used the compressed sensing (CS) based ordered-subset simultaneous algebraic reconstruction techniques (OS-SART) to reconstruct sample images, which is effective to reduce noise and suppress artifacts. Unlike conventional CT, the principal component analysis (PCA) method can be applied to extract and quantify additional attenuation information from a spectral CT dataset. Our results show that the spectral CT has a good energy-discriminative performance and provides more attenuation information than the conventional CT. PMID:24004864

  15. First 3D reconstruction of the rhizocephalan root system using MicroCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noever, Christoph; Keiler, Jonas; Glenner, Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Parasitic barnacles (Cirripedia: Rhizocephala) are highly specialized parasites of crustaceans. Instead of an alimentary tract for feeding they utilize a system of roots, which infiltrates the body of their hosts to absorb nutrients. Using X-ray micro computer tomography (MicroCT) and computer-aided 3D-reconstruction, we document the spatial organization of this root system, the interna, inside the intact host and also demonstrate its use for morphological examinations of the parasites reproductive part, the externa. This is the first 3D visualization of the unique root system of the Rhizocephala in situ, showing how it is related to the inner organs of the host. We investigated the interna from different parasitic barnacles of the family Peltogastridae, which are parasitic on anomuran crustaceans. Rhizocephalan parasites of pagurid hermit crabs and lithodid crabs were analysed in this study.

  16. Percolating length scales from topological persistence analysis of micro-CT images of porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, Vanessa; Saadatfar, Mohammad; Delgado-Friedrichs, Olaf; Sheppard, Adrian P.

    2016-01-01

    Topological persistence is a powerful and general technique for characterizing the geometry and topology of data. Its theoretical foundations are over 15 years old and efficient computational algorithms are now available for the analysis of large digital images. We explain here how quantities derived from topological persistence relate to other measurements on porous materials such as grain and pore-size distributions, connectivity numbers, and the critical radius of a percolating sphere. The connections between percolation and topological persistence are explored in detail using data obtained from micro-CT images of spherical bead packings, unconsolidated sand packing, a variety of sandstones, and a limestone. We demonstrate how persistence information can be used to estimate the percolating sphere radius and to characterize the connectivity of the percolating cluster.

  17. Geometric Parameters Estimation and Calibration in Cone-Beam Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jintao; Hu, Xiaodong; Zou, Jing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2015-01-01

    The quality of Computed Tomography (CT) images crucially depends on the precise knowledge of the scanner geometry. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate and calibrate the misalignments before image acquisition. In this paper, a Two-Piece-Ball (TPB) phantom is used to estimate a set of parameters that describe the geometry of a cone-beam CT system. Only multiple projections of the TPB phantom at one position are required, which can avoid the rotation errors when acquiring multi-angle projections. Also, a corresponding algorithm is derived. The performance of the method is evaluated through simulation and experimental data. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is valid and easy to implement. Furthermore, the experimental results from the Micro-CT system demonstrate the ability to reduce artifacts and improve image quality through geometric parameter calibration. PMID:26371008

  18. Direct microCT imaging of non-mineralized connective tissues at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Naveh, Gili R S; Brumfeld, Vlad; Dean, Mason; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The 3D imaging of soft tissues in their native state is challenging, especially when high resolution is required. An X-ray-based microCT is, to date, the best choice for high resolution 3D imaging of soft tissues. However, since X-ray attenuation of soft tissues is very low, contrasting enhancement using different staining materials is needed. The staining procedure, which also usually involves tissue fixation, causes unwanted and to some extent unknown tissue alterations. Here, we demonstrate that a method that enables 3D imaging of soft tissues without fixing and staining using an X-ray-based bench-top microCT can be applied to a variety of different tissues. With the sample mounted in a custom-made loading device inside a humidity chamber, we obtained soft tissue contrast and generated 3D images of fresh, soft tissues with a resolution of 1 micron voxel size. We identified three critical conditions which make it possible to image soft tissues: humidified environment, mechanical stabilization of the sample and phase enhancement. We demonstrate the capability of the technique using different specimens: an intervertebral disc, the non-mineralized growth plate, stingray tessellated radials (calcified cartilage) and the collagenous network of the periodontal ligament. Since the scanned specimen is fresh an interesting advantage of this technique is the ability to scan a specimen under load and track the changes of the different structures. This method offers a unique opportunity for obtaining valuable insights into 3D structure-function relationships of soft tissues.

  19. Estimation of skull table thickness with clinical CT and validation with microCT.

    PubMed

    Lillie, Elizabeth M; Urban, Jillian E; Weaver, Ashley A; Powers, Alexander K; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Brain injuries resulting from motor vehicle crashes (MVC) are extremely common yet the details of the mechanism of injury remain to be well characterized. Skull deformation is believed to be a contributing factor to some types of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Understanding biomechanical contributors to skull deformation would provide further insight into the mechanism of head injury resulting from blunt trauma. In particular, skull thickness is thought be a very important factor governing deformation of the skull and its propensity for fracture. Current computed tomography (CT) technology is limited in its ability to accurately measure cortical thickness using standard techniques. A method to evaluate cortical thickness using cortical density measured from CT data has been developed previously. This effort validates this technique for measurement of skull table thickness in clinical head CT scans using two postmortem human specimens. Bone samples were harvested from the skulls of two cadavers and scanned with microCT to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated cortical thickness measured from clinical CT. Clinical scans were collected at 0.488 and 0.625 mm in plane resolution with 0.625 mm thickness. The overall cortical thickness error was determined to be 0.078 ± 0.58 mm for cortical samples thinner than 4 mm. It was determined that 91.3% of these differences fell within the scanner resolution. Color maps of clinical CT thickness estimations are comparable to color maps of microCT thickness measurements, indicating good quantitative agreement. These data confirm that the cortical density algorithm successfully estimates skull table thickness from clinical CT scans. The application of this technique to clinical CT scans enables evaluation of cortical thickness in population-based studies.

  20. Free-space fluorescence tomography with adaptive sampling based on anatomical information from microCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Badea, Cristian T.; Hood, Greg; Wetzel, Arthur W.; Stiles, Joel R.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2010-02-01

    Image reconstruction is one of the main challenges for fluorescence tomography. For in vivo experiments on small animals, in particular, the inhomogeneous optical properties and irregular surface of the animal make free-space image reconstruction challenging because of the difficulties in accurately modeling the forward problem and the finite dynamic range of the photodetector. These two factors are fundamentally limited by the currently available forward models and photonic technologies. Nonetheless, both limitations can be significantly eased using a signal processing approach. We have recently constructed a free-space panoramic fluorescence diffuse optical tomography system to take advantage of co-registered microCT data acquired from the same animal. In this article, we present a data processing strategy that adaptively selects the optical sampling points in the raw 2-D fluorescent CCD images. Specifically, the general sampling area and sampling density are initially specified to create a set of potential sampling points sufficient to cover the region of interest. Based on 3-D anatomical information from the microCT and the fluorescent CCD images, data points are excluded from the set when they are located in an area where either the forward model is known to be problematic (e.g., large wrinkles on the skin) or where the signal is unreliable (e.g., saturated or low signal-to-noise ratio). Parallel Monte Carlo software was implemented to compute the sensitivity function for image reconstruction. Animal experiments were conducted on a mouse cadaver with an artificial fluorescent inclusion. Compared to our previous results using a finite element method, the newly developed parallel Monte Carlo software and the adaptive sampling strategy produced favorable reconstruction results.

  1. Intramyocardial capillary blood volume estimated by whole-body CT: validation by micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yue; Beighley, Patricia E.; Eaker, Diane R.; Zamir, Mair; Ritman, Erik L.

    2008-03-01

    Fast CT has shown that myocardial perfusion (F) is related to myocardial intramuscular blood volume (Bv) as Bv=A*F+B*F 1/2 where A,B are constant coefficients. The goal of this study was to estimate the range of diameters of the vessels that are represented by the A*F term. Pigs were placed in an Electron Beam CT (EBCT) scanner for a perfusion CT scan sequence over 40 seconds after an IV contrast agent injection. Intramyocardial blood volume (Bv) and flow (F) were calculated in a region of the myocardium perfused by the LAD. Coefficients A and B were estimated over the range of F=1-5ml/g/min. After the CT scan, the LAD was injected with Microfil (R) contrast agent following which the myocardium was scanned by micro-CT at 20μm, 4μm and 2.5 μm cubic voxel resolutions. The Bv of the intramyocardial vessels was calculated for diameter ranges d=0-5, 5-10, 10-15, 15-20μm, etc. EBCT-derived data were presented so that it could be directly compared the micro-CT data. The results indicated that the blood in vessels less than 10μm in lumen diameter occupied 0.27-0.42 of total intravascular blood volume, which is in good agreement with EBCT-based values 0.28-0.48 (R2 =0.96). We conclude that whole-body CT image data obtained during the passage of a bolus of IV contrast agent can provide a measure of the intramyocardial intracapillary blood volume.

  2. MicroCT and optical coherence tomography imagistic assessment of the dental roots adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Nica, Luminita; Manescu, Adrian; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2015-03-01

    Several obturation methods are available today to study the 3D filling of the root canal. There are also several methods capable to evaluate the ability to seal apically the root canals. However, the common methods of investigation are invasive; they also lead to the destruction of the samples. If the sectioning differs slightly from the desired area, the investigation is non-conclusive regarding the micro-leakages. Also, although the use of Cone-Beam Micro Computer Tomography (CBCT) appears to be most promising for endodontic purposes, its effective radiation doses are higher than with conventional intra-oral and panoramic imaging. In contrast, enface (ef) Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) proves to be efficient for the investigation of material defects of dental restorations, dental materials, and micro-leakage at the interfaces, where the penetration depth depends on the material. Therefore, ef OCT has been proposed in our studies as a potential tool for in vivo endodontic imaging. Twenty five recently extracted human maxillary molars were selected for the study for caries or periodontal reasons. The pulp chambers were completely opened, the dental pulp was removed, and the root canals were shaped. Silver nanoparticles were used in half of the samples in order to increase the scattering of the adhesive material in comparison with the dental roots walls. The sample teeth were then probed using Time Domain (TD) OCT working at 1300 nm. A synchrotron radiation X-Ray microCT experiment was also performed. The imagistic results pointed out the efficiency of the silver nanoparticle layer used in order to increase the scattering of the root canal adhesive scattering for the OCT non-invasive investigation. MicroCT allowed for obtaining qualitative data related to the depth penetration of the root canal adhesive into the dentin walls.

  3. Image quality assessment of a pre-clinical flat-panel volumetric micro-CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Louise Y.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W.

    2006-03-01

    Small animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. Current micro-CT systems are capable of achieving spatial resolution on the order of 10 μm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. However, the speed of data acquisition of these systems is relatively slow, when compared with clinical CT systems. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging has proven to be a powerful tool clinically in detecting and diagnosing cancer, stroke, pulmonary and ischemic heart diseases. In order to perform this technique in mice and rats, quantitative CT images must be acquired at a rate of at least 1 Hz. Recently, a research pre-clinical CT scanner (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare) has been designed specifically for dynamic perfusion imaging in small animals. Using an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector and a clinical slip-ring gantry, this system is capable of acquiring volumetric image data at a rate of 1 Hz, with in-plane resolution of 150 μm, while covering the entire thoracic region of a mouse or whole organs of a rat. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the principal imaging performance of the micro-CT system, in terms of spatial resolution, image uniformity, linearity, dose and voxel noise for the feasibility of imaging mice and rats. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.7 line pairs per mm and noise of 42 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 seconds at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  4. MicroCT with energy-resolved photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Meier, D; Mikkelsen, S; Maehlum, G E; Wagenaar, D J; Tsui, BMW; Patt, B E; Frey, E C

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to investigate the benefits that could be realistically achieved on a microCT imaging system with an energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray detector. To this end, we built and evaluated a prototype microCT system based on such a detector. The detector is based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) radiation sensors and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readouts. Each detector pixel can simultaneously count x-ray photons above six energy thresholds, providing the capability for energy-selective x-ray imaging. We tested the spectroscopic performance of the system using polychromatic x-ray radiation and various filtering materials with Kabsorption edges. Tomographic images were then acquired of a cylindrical PMMA phantom containing holes filled with various materials. Results were also compared with those acquired using an intensity-integrating x-ray detector and single-energy (i.e. non-energy-selective) CT. This paper describes the functionality and performance of the system, and presents preliminary spectroscopic and tomographic results. The spectroscopic experiments showed that the energy-resolved photon-counting detector was capable of measuring energy spectra from polychromatic sources like a standard x-ray tube, and resolving absorption edges present in the energy range used for imaging. However, the spectral quality was degraded by spectral distortions resulting from degrading factors, including finite energy resolution and charge sharing. We developed a simple charge-sharing model to reproduce these distortions. The tomographic experiments showed that the availability of multiple energy thresholds in the photon-counting detector allowed us to simultaneously measure target-to-background contrasts in different energy ranges. Compared with single-energy CT with an integrating detector, this feature was especially useful to improve differentiation of materials with different attenuation coefficient energy dependences. PMID:21464527

  5. Direct microCT imaging of non-mineralized connective tissues at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Naveh, Gili R S; Brumfeld, Vlad; Dean, Mason; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The 3D imaging of soft tissues in their native state is challenging, especially when high resolution is required. An X-ray-based microCT is, to date, the best choice for high resolution 3D imaging of soft tissues. However, since X-ray attenuation of soft tissues is very low, contrasting enhancement using different staining materials is needed. The staining procedure, which also usually involves tissue fixation, causes unwanted and to some extent unknown tissue alterations. Here, we demonstrate that a method that enables 3D imaging of soft tissues without fixing and staining using an X-ray-based bench-top microCT can be applied to a variety of different tissues. With the sample mounted in a custom-made loading device inside a humidity chamber, we obtained soft tissue contrast and generated 3D images of fresh, soft tissues with a resolution of 1 micron voxel size. We identified three critical conditions which make it possible to image soft tissues: humidified environment, mechanical stabilization of the sample and phase enhancement. We demonstrate the capability of the technique using different specimens: an intervertebral disc, the non-mineralized growth plate, stingray tessellated radials (calcified cartilage) and the collagenous network of the periodontal ligament. Since the scanned specimen is fresh an interesting advantage of this technique is the ability to scan a specimen under load and track the changes of the different structures. This method offers a unique opportunity for obtaining valuable insights into 3D structure-function relationships of soft tissues. PMID:24437605

  6. Micro-CT studies on 3-D bioactive glass-ceramic scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Renghini, Chiara; Komlev, Vladimir; Fiori, Fabrizio; Verné, Enrica; Baino, Francesco; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. For this purpose, a glass belonging to the system SiO2-P2O5-CaO-MgO-Na2O-K2O (CEL2) was used. The sponge-replication method was adopted to prepare the scaffolds; specifically, a polymeric skeleton was impregnated with a slurry containing CEL2 powder, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a binding agent and distilled water. The impregnated sponge was then thermally treated to remove the polymeric phase and to sinter the inorganic one. The obtained scaffolds possessed an open and interconnected porosity, analogous to cancellous bone texture, and with a mechanical strength above 2 MPa. Moreover, the scaffolds underwent partial bioresorption due to ion-leaching phenomena. This feature was investigated by X-ray computed microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Micro-CT is a three-dimensional (3-D) radiographic imaging technique, able to achieve a spatial resolution close to 1 microm(3). The use of synchrotron radiation allows the selected photon energy to be tuned to optimize the contrast among the different phases in the investigated samples. The 3-D scaffolds were soaked in a simulated body fluid (SBF) to study the formation of hydroxyapatite microcrystals on the scaffold struts and on the internal pore walls. The 3-D scaffolds were also soaked in a buffer solution (Tris-HCl) for different times to assess the scaffold bioresorption according to the ISO standard. A gradual resorption of the pores walls was observed during the soakings both in SBF and in Tris-HCl.

  7. Modulation transfer function determination using the edge technique for cone-beam micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Junyan; Liu, Wenlei; Gao, Peng; Liao, Qimei; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    Evaluating spatial resolution is an essential work for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) manufacturers, prototype designers or equipment users. To investigate the cross-sectional spatial resolution for different transaxial slices with CBCT, the slanted edge technique with a 3D slanted edge phantom are proposed and implemented on a prototype cone-beam micro-CT. Three transaxial slices with different cone angles are under investigation. An over-sampled edge response function (ERF) is firstly generated from the intensity of the slightly tiled air to plastic edge in each row of the transaxial reconstruction image. Then the oversampled ESF is binned and smoothed. The derivative of the binned and smoothed ERF gives the line spread function (LSF). At last the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) is calculated by taking the modulus of the Fourier transform of the LSF. The spatial resolution is quantified with the spatial frequencies at 10% MTF level and full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) value. The spatial frequencies at 10% of MTFs are 3.1+/-0.08mm-1, 3.0+/-0.05mm-1, and 3.2+/-0.04mm-1 for the three transaxial slices at cone angles of 3.8°, 0°, and -3.8° respectively. The corresponding FWHMs are 252.8μm, 261.7μm and 253.6μm. Results indicate that cross-sectional spatial resolution has no much differences when transaxial slices being 3.8° away from z=0 plane for the prototype conebeam micro-CT.

  8. Micro-CT imaging: Developing criteria for examining fetal skeletons in regulatory developmental toxicology studies - A workshop report.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Howard M; Makris, Susan L; Alsaid, Hasan; Bermudez, Oscar; Beyer, Bruce K; Chen, Antong; Chen, Connie L; Chen, Zhou; Chmielewski, Gary; DeLise, Anthony M; de Schaepdrijver, Luc; Dogdas, Belma; French, Julian; Harrouk, Wafa; Helfgott, Jonathan; Henkelman, R Mark; Hesterman, Jacob; Hew, Kok-Wah; Hoberman, Alan; Lo, Cecilia W; McDougal, Andrew; Minck, Daniel R; Scott, Lelia; Stewart, Jane; Sutherland, Vicki; Tatiparthi, Arun K; Winkelmann, Christopher T; Wise, L David; Wood, Sandra L; Ying, Xiaoyou

    2016-06-01

    During the past two decades the use and refinements of imaging modalities have markedly increased making it possible to image embryos and fetuses used in pivotal nonclinical studies submitted to regulatory agencies. Implementing these technologies into the Good Laboratory Practice environment requires rigorous testing, validation, and documentation to ensure the reproducibility of data. A workshop on current practices and regulatory requirements was held with the goal of defining minimal criteria for the proper implementation of these technologies and subsequent submission to regulatory agencies. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is especially well suited for high-throughput evaluations, and is gaining popularity to evaluate fetal skeletons to assess the potential developmental toxicity of test agents. This workshop was convened to help scientists in the developmental toxicology field understand and apply micro-CT technology to nonclinical toxicology studies and facilitate the regulatory acceptance of imaging data. Presentations and workshop discussions covered: (1) principles of micro-CT fetal imaging; (2) concordance of findings with conventional skeletal evaluations; and (3) regulatory requirements for validating the system. Establishing these requirements for micro-CT examination can provide a path forward for laboratories considering implementing this technology and provide regulatory agencies with a basis to consider the acceptability of data generated via this technology. PMID:26930635

  9. Contrast Enhancement of MicroCT Scans to Aid 3D Modelling of Carbon Fibre Fabric Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djukic, Luke P.; Pearce, Garth M.; Herszberg, Israel; Bannister, Michael K.; Mollenhauer, David H.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a methodology for volume capture and rendering of plain weave and multi-layer fabric meso-architectures within a consolidated, cured laminate. Micro X-ray Computed Tomography (MicroCT) is an excellent tool for the non-destructive visualisation of material microstructures however the contrast between tows and resin is poor for carbon fibre composites. Firstly, this paper demonstrates techniques to improve the contrast of the microCT images by introducing higher density materials such as gold, iodine and glass into the fabric. Two approaches were demonstrated to be effective for enhancing the differentiation between the tows in the reconstructed microCT visualisations. Secondly, a method of generating three-dimensional volume models of woven composites using microCT scan data is discussed. The process of generating a model is explained from initial manufacture with the aid of an example plain weave fabric. These methods are to be used in the finite element modelling of three-dimensional fabric preforms in future work.

  10. Using Micro-CT Derived Bone Microarchitecture to Analyze Bone Stiffness - A Case Study on Osteoporosis Rat Bone.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuchin; Adeeb, Samer; Doschak, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) images can be used to quantitatively represent bone geometry through a range of computed attenuation-based parameters. Nonetheless, those parameters remain indirect indices of bone microarchitectural strength and require further computational tools to interpret bone structural stiffness and potential for mechanical failure. Finite element analysis (FEA) can be applied to measure trabecular bone stiffness and potentially predict the location of structural failure in preclinical animal models of osteoporosis, although that procedure from image segmentation of Micro-CT derived bone geometry to FEA is often challenging and computationally expensive, resulting in failure of the model to build. Notably, the selection of resolution and threshold for bone segmentation are key steps that greatly affect computational complexity and validity. In the following study, we evaluated an approach whereby Micro-CT derived grayscale attenuation and segmentation data guided the selection of trabecular bone for analysis by FEA. We further correlated those FEA results to both two- and three-dimensional bone microarchitecture from sham and ovariectomized (OVX) rats (n = 10/group). A virtual cylinder of vertebral trabecular bone 40% in length from the caudal side was selected for FEA, because Micro-CT based image analysis indicated the largest differences in microarchitecture between the two groups resided there. Bone stiffness was calculated using FEA and statistically correlated with the three-dimensional values of bone volume/tissue volume, bone mineral density, fractal dimension, trabecular separation, and trabecular bone pattern factor. Our method simplified the process for the assessment of trabecular bone stiffness by FEA from Micro-CT images and highlighted the importance of bone microarchitecture in conferring significantly increased bone quality capable of resisting failure due to increased mechanical loading. PMID:26042089

  11. Synchrotron-based Micro-CT Imaging of the Human Lung Acinus

    PubMed Central

    Litzlbauer, Horst Detlef; Korbel, Kathrin; Kline, Timothy L.; Jorgensen, Steven M.; Eaker, Diane R.; Bohle, Rainer M.; Ritman, Erik L.; Langheinrich, Alexander C.

    2012-01-01

    Structural data about the human lung fine structure are mainly based on stereological methods applied to serial sections. As these methods utilize 2D images, which are often not contiguous, they suffer from inaccuracies which are overcome by analysis of 3D micro-CT images of the never-sectioned specimen. The purpose of our study was to generate a complete data set of the intact 3-dimensional architecture of the human acinus using high-resolution synchrotron-based micro-CT (synMCT). A human lung was inflation-fixed by formaldehyde ventilation and then scanned in a 64-slice CT over its apex to base extent. Lung samples (8-mm diameter, 10-mm height, n = 12) were punched out, stained with osmium tetroxide, and scanned using synMCT at (4μm)3 voxel size. The lung functional unit (acinus, n = 8) was segmented from the 3D tomographic image using an automated tree-analysis software program. Morphometric data of the lung were analyzed by ANOVA. Intraacinar airways branching occurred over 11 generations. The mean acinar volume was 131.3 ± 29.2 mm3 (range 92.5 – 171.3 mm3) and the mean acinar surface was calculated with 1012 ± 26 cm2. The airway internal diameter (starting from the bronchiolus terminalis) decreases distally from 0.66 ± 0.04 mm to 0.34 ± 0.06 mm (p < 0.001) and remains constant after the 7th generation (p < 0.5). The length of each generation ranges between 0.52 – 0.93 mm and did not show significant differences between the second and 11th generation. The branching angle between daughter branches varies between 113–134° without significant differences between the generations (p < 0.3). This study demonstrates the feasibility of quantitating the 3D structure of the human acinus at the spatial resolution readily achievable using synMCT. PMID:20687188

  12. Micro-CT Pore Scale Study Of Flow In Porous Media: Effect Of Voxel Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, S.; Gray, F.; Crawshaw, J.; Boek, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the last few years, pore scale studies have become the key to understanding the complex fluid flow processes in the fields of groundwater remediation, hydrocarbon recovery and environmental issues related to carbon storage and capture. A pore scale study is often comprised of two key procedures: 3D pore scale imaging and numerical modelling techniques. The essence of a pore scale study is to test the physics implemented in a model of complicated fluid flow processes at one scale (microscopic) and then apply the model to solve the problems associated with water resources and oil recovery at other scales (macroscopic and field). However, the process of up-scaling from the pore scale to the macroscopic scale has encountered many challenges due to both pore scale imaging and modelling techniques. Due to the technical limitations in the imaging method, there is always a compromise between the spatial (voxel) resolution and the physical volume of the sample (field of view, FOV) to be scanned by the imaging methods, specifically X-ray micro-CT (XMT) in our case In this study, a careful analysis was done to understand the effect of voxel size, using XMT to image the 3D pore space of a variety of porous media from sandstones to carbonates scanned at different voxel resolution (4.5 μm, 6.2 μm, 8.3 μm and 10.2 μm) but keeping the scanned FOV constant for all the samples. We systematically segment the micro-CT images into three phases, the macro-pore phase, an intermediate phase (unresolved micro-pores + grains) and the grain phase and then study the effect of voxel size on the structure of the macro-pore and the intermediate phases and the fluid flow properties using lattice-Boltzmann (LB) and pore network (PN) modelling methods. We have also applied a numerical coarsening algorithm (up-scale method) to reduce the computational power and time required to accurately predict the flow properties using the LB and PN method.

  13. Nondestructive Analysis of Astromaterials by Micro-CT and Micro-XRF Analysis for PET Examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Righter, K.; Allen, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    An integral part of any sample return mission is the initial description and classification of returned samples by the preliminary examination team (PET). The goal of the PET is to characterize and classify returned samples and make this information available to the larger research community who then conduct more in-depth studies on the samples. The PET tries to minimize the impact their work has on the sample suite, which has in the past limited the PET work to largely visual, nonquantitative measurements (e.g., optical microscopy). More modern techniques can also be utilized by a PET to nondestructively characterize astromaterials in much more rigorous way. Here we discuss our recent investigations into the applications of micro-CT and micro-XRF analyses with Apollo samples and ANSMET meteorites and assess the usefulness of these techniques in future PET. Results: The application of micro computerized tomography (micro-CT) to astromaterials is not a new concept. The technique involves scanning samples with high-energy x-rays and constructing 3-dimensional images of the density of materials within the sample. The technique can routinely measure large samples (up to approx. 2700 cu cm) with a small individual voxel size (approx. 30 cu m), and has the sensitivity to distinguish the major rock forming minerals and identify clast populations within brecciated samples. We have recently run a test sample of a terrestrial breccia with a carbonate matrix and multiple igneous clast lithologies. The test results are promising and we will soon analyze a approx. 600 g piece of Apollo sample 14321 to map out the clast population within the sample. Benchtop micro x-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) instruments can rapidly scan large areas (approx. 100 sq cm) with a small pixel size (approx. 25 microns) and measure the (semi) quantitative composition of largely unprepared surfaces for all elements between Be and U, often with sensitivity on the order of a approx. 100 ppm. Our recent

  14. Synchrotron-Based Micro-CT Imaging of the Human Lung Acinus

    SciTech Connect

    Litzlbauer, H.; Korbel, K; Kline, T; Jorgensen, S; Eaker, D; Bohle, R; Ritman, E; Langheinrich, A

    2010-01-01

    Structural data about the human lung fine structure are mainly based on stereological methods applied to serial sections. As these methods utilize 2D images, which are often not contiguous, they suffer from inaccuracies which are overcome by analysis of 3D micro-CT images of the never-sectioned specimen. The purpose of our study was to generate a complete data set of the intact three-dimensional architecture of the human acinus using high-resolution synchrotron-based micro-CT (synMCT). A human lung was inflation-fixed by formaldehyde ventilation and then scanned in a 64-slice CT over its apex to base extent. Lung samples (8-mm diameter, 10-mm height, N = 12) were punched out, stained with osmium tetroxide, and scanned using synMCT at (4 {micro}m){sup 3} voxel size. The lung functional unit (acinus, N = 8) was segmented from the 3D tomographic image using an automated tree-analysis software program. Morphometric data of the lung were analyzed by ANOVA. Intra-acinar airways branching occurred over 11 generations. The mean acinar volume was 131.3 {+-} 29.2 mm{sup 3} (range, 92.5-171.3 mm{sup 3}) and the mean acinar surface was calculated with 1012 {+-} 26 cm{sup 2}. The airway internal diameter (starting from the bronchiolus terminalis) decreases distally from 0.66 {+-} 0.04 mm to 0.34 {+-} 0.06 mm (P < 0.001) and remains constant after the seventh generation (P < 0.5). The length of each generation ranges between 0.52 and 0.93 mm and did not show significant differences between the second and eleventh generation. The branching angle between daughter branches varies between 113-degree and 134-degree without significant differences between the generations (P < 0.3). This study demonstrates the feasibility of quantitating the 3D structure of the human acinus at the spatial resolution readily achievable using synMCT.

  15. Five-dimensional motion compensation for respiratory and cardiac motion with cone-beam CT of the thorax region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauppe, Sebastian; Hahn, Andreas; Brehm, Marcus; Paysan, Pascal; Seghers, Dieter; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We propose an adapted method of our previously published five-dimensional (5D) motion compensation (MoCo) algorithm1, developed for micro-CT imaging of small animals, to provide for the first time motion artifact-free 5D cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from a conventional flat detector-based CBCT scan of clinical patients. Image quality of retrospectively respiratory- and cardiac-gated volumes from flat detector CBCT scans is deteriorated by severe sparse projection artifacts. These artifacts further complicate motion estimation, as it is required for MoCo image reconstruction. For high quality 5D CBCT images at the same x-ray dose and the same number of projections as todays 3D CBCT we developed a double MoCo approach based on motion vector fields (MVFs) for respiratory and cardiac motion. In a first step our already published four-dimensional (4D) artifact-specific cyclic motion-compensation (acMoCo) approach is applied to compensate for the respiratory patient motion. With this information a cyclic phase-gated deformable heart registration algorithm is applied to the respiratory motion-compensated 4D CBCT data, thus resulting in cardiac MVFs. We apply these MVFs on double-gated images and thereby respiratory and cardiac motion-compensated 5D CBCT images are obtained. Our 5D MoCo approach processing patient data acquired with the TrueBeam 4D CBCT system (Varian Medical Systems). Our double MoCo approach turned out to be very efficient and removed nearly all streak artifacts due to making use of 100% of the projection data for each reconstructed frame. The 5D MoCo patient data show fine details and no motion blurring, even in regions close to the heart where motion is fastest.

  16. Taxonomy and nomenclature of some mainland SE-Asian Coeliccia species (Odonata, Platycnemididae) using micro-CT analysis.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, Philip O M; Uhl, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The taxonomic status of some mainland Southeast Asian Coeliccia species is evaluated. The following synonymies are presented: C. acco is a junior synonym of C. pyriformis; C. tomokunii that of C. scutellum; C.onoi that of C. cyanomelas. C. scutellum hainanense is promoted to species level, C. hainanense. Redescriptions of the holotype of C. pyriformis and of the lectotypes of C. scutellum and C. hainanense are presented with illustrations. The male genital ligulae were examined by means of non-destructive X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and subsequent 3D-reconstruction. The advantage of virtual types generated by micro-CT analysis, particularly for the examination of internal structures, is discussed. PMID:26701563

  17. When a 520 million-year-old Chengjiang fossil meets a modern micro-CT – a case study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Scholtz, Gerhard; Hou, Xianguang

    2015-01-01

    The 520 million-year-old Chengjiang biota of China (UNESCO World Heritage) presents the earliest known evidence of the so-called Cambrian Explosion. Studies, however, have mainly been limited to the information exposed on the surface of the slabs. Thus far, structures preserved inside the slabs were accessed by careful removal of the matrix, in many cases with the unfortunate sacrifice of some “less important” structures, which destroys elements of exceptionally preserved specimens. Here, we show for the first time that microtomography (micro-CT) can reveal structures situated inside a Chengjiang fossil slab without causing any damage. In the present study a trilobitomorph arthropod (Xandarella spectaculum) can be reliably identified only with the application of micro-CT. We propose that this technique is an important tool for studying three-dimensionally preserved Chengjiang fossils and, most likely, also those from other biota with a comparable type of preservation, specifically similar iron concentrations. PMID:26238773

  18. When a 520 million-year-old Chengjiang fossil meets a modern micro-CT--a case study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Scholtz, Gerhard; Hou, Xianguang

    2015-01-01

    The 520 million-year-old Chengjiang biota of China (UNESCO World Heritage) presents the earliest known evidence of the so-called Cambrian Explosion. Studies, however, have mainly been limited to the information exposed on the surface of the slabs. Thus far, structures preserved inside the slabs were accessed by careful removal of the matrix, in many cases with the unfortunate sacrifice of some "less important" structures, which destroys elements of exceptionally preserved specimens. Here, we show for the first time that microtomography (micro-CT) can reveal structures situated inside a Chengjiang fossil slab without causing any damage. In the present study a trilobitomorph arthropod (Xandarella spectaculum) can be reliably identified only with the application of micro-CT. We propose that this technique is an important tool for studying three-dimensionally preserved Chengjiang fossils and, most likely, also those from other biota with a comparable type of preservation, specifically similar iron concentrations. PMID:26238773

  19. When a 520 million-year-old Chengjiang fossil meets a modern micro-CT - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Scholtz, Gerhard; Hou, Xianguang

    2015-08-01

    The 520 million-year-old Chengjiang biota of China (UNESCO World Heritage) presents the earliest known evidence of the so-called Cambrian Explosion. Studies, however, have mainly been limited to the information exposed on the surface of the slabs. Thus far, structures preserved inside the slabs were accessed by careful removal of the matrix, in many cases with the unfortunate sacrifice of some “less important” structures, which destroys elements of exceptionally preserved specimens. Here, we show for the first time that microtomography (micro-CT) can reveal structures situated inside a Chengjiang fossil slab without causing any damage. In the present study a trilobitomorph arthropod (Xandarella spectaculum) can be reliably identified only with the application of micro-CT. We propose that this technique is an important tool for studying three-dimensionally preserved Chengjiang fossils and, most likely, also those from other biota with a comparable type of preservation, specifically similar iron concentrations.

  20. GPU-based iterative reconstruction with total variation minimization for micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, S. M.; Johnson, G. A.; Badea, C. T.

    2010-04-01

    Dynamic imaging with micro-CT often produces poorly-distributed sets of projections, and reconstructions of this data with filtered backprojection algorithms (FBP) may be affected by artifacts. Iterative reconstruction algorithms and total variation (TV) denoising are promising alternatives to FBP, but may require running times that are frustratingly long. This obstacle can be overcome by implementing reconstruction algorithms on graphics processing units (GPU). This paper presents an implementation of a family of iterative reconstruction algorithms with TV denoising on a GPU, and a series of tests to optimize and compare the ability of different algorithms to reduce artifacts. The mathematical and computational details of the implementation are explored. The performance, measured by the accuracy of the reconstruction versus the running time, is assessed in simulations with a virtual phantom and in an in vivo scan of a mouse. We conclude that the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique with TV minimization (SART-TV) is a time-effective reconstruction algorithm for producing reconstructions with fewer artifacts than FBP.

  1. Active investigation of material damage under load using micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navalgund, Megha; Zunjarrao, Suraj; Mishra, Debasish; Manoharan, V.

    2015-03-01

    Due the growth of composite materials across multiple industries such as Aviation, Wind there is an increasing need to not just standardize and improve manufacturing processes but also to design these materials for the specific applications. One of the things that this translates to is understanding how failure initiates and grows in these materials and at what loads, especially around internal flaws such as voids or features such as ply drops. Traditional methods of investigating internal damage such as CT lack the resolution to resolve ply level damage in composites. Interrupted testing with layer removal can be used to investigate internal damage using microscopy; however this is a destructive method. Advanced techniques such as such as DIC are useful for in-situ damage detection, however are limited to surface information and would not enable interrogating the volume. Computed tomography has become a state of the art technique for metrology and complete volumetric investigation especially for metallic components. However, its application to the composite world is still nascent. This paper demonstrates micro-CT's capability as a gauge to quantitatively estimate the extent of damage & understand the propagation of damage in PMC composites while the component is under stress.

  2. Micro-CT analysis of myocardial blood supply in young and adult rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Heather M.; Beighley, Patricia E.; Eaker, Diane R.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2009-02-01

    This study addresses whether the vasculature grows in proportion to the myocardium as the rat heart develops. The volume of myocardium and coronary vessels were estimated from micro-CT images of the hearts injected with Microfil(R) contrast agent. Young (n=5) and adult (n=5) hearts were scanned, resulting in 3D images comprised of 20μm on-a-side cubic voxels. The myocardial muscle and vessel lumen volumes were measured for all vessels 40 to 320μm in diameter by an erosion and dilation method applied to the binary images in which the contrast in the vessels were assigned "1" and all non-opacified entities were assigned "0". The average total muscle volume increases by 50%, 129.4 to 237.4mm3, from young to adult rats, while the luminal volume increases by 10%, 16.6 to 18.6mm3. The vessel volume is 12% of the total muscle volume in young and 8% in adults. For a given vessel volume, the muscle volume in the young is 82% of the muscle volume in adults. We conclude that as the heart matures, the myocardium grows more rapidly than the vasculature. This may result in greater angles of separation between vessel branches, and the increase in myocardial coronary volume. The ratio suggests either higher blood flow velocity or a lower metabolic rate in adults.

  3. Micro-CT Imaging of Rat Bone and Lumber Vertebra using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio; Akatsuka, Takao; Yuasa, Tetsyua; Takeda, Tohoru; Tromba, Giuliana; Gigante, Giovanni E.

    2009-03-01

    Micro-tomographic imaging with a spatial resolution on the micrometer scale offers owes a high potential to perform certain types of measurements that were not feasible with other techniques or conventional laboratory methods. The synchrotron X-ray source gives substantial advantages because of its high brilliance and continuous X-ray spectrum. Based on this, visualized the microstructure of rat bone and lumber vertebra was visualized using 20, 25 and 30 keV synchrotron X-rays. We utilized the data which was acquired at different energies for multi-model imaging and to estimate the Ca/P ratio. Up to now there has been no research carried out using these images for the estimation of the calcium content, with synchrotron X-rays. The results are based on the analysis of images and gray values obtained at different energies. We introduce this new method in order to measure the calcium content by means of high resolution synchrotron micro-CT.

  4. MicroCT Analysis of Micro-Nano Titanium Implant Surface on the Osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Ban, Jaesam; Kang, Seongsoo; Kim, Jihyun; Lee, Kwangmin; Hyunpil, Lim; Vang, Mongsook; Yang, Hongso; Oh, Gyejeong; Kim, Hyunseung; Hwang, Gabwoon; Jung, Yongho; Lee, Kyungku; Park, Sangwon; Yunl, Kwidug

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the effects of micro-nano titanium implant surface on the osseointegration. A total of 36 screw-shaped implants were used. The implant surfaces were classified into 3 groups (n = 12): machined surface (M group), nanosurface which is nanotube formation on the machined surface (MA group) and nano-micro surface which is nanotube formation on the RBM surface (RA group). Anodic oxidation was performed at a 20 V for 10 min with 1 M H3PO4 and 1.5 wt% HF solutions. The implants were installed on the humerus on 6 beagles. After 4 and 12 weeks, the morphometric analysis with micro CT (skyscan 1172, SKYSCAN, Antwerpen, Belgium) was done. The data were statistically analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Bone mineral density and bone volume were significantly increased depending on time. RA group showed the highest bone mineral density and bone volume at 4 weeks and 12 weeks significantly. It indicated that nano-micro titanium implant surface showed faster and more mature osseointegration.

  5. Contrast Agents for Quantitative MicroCT of Lung Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Kush; Giddabasappa, Anand; Li, Danan; Olson, Peter; Simmons, Brett; Shojaei, Farbod; Arsdale, Todd Van; Christensen, James; Jackson-Fisher, Amy; Wong, Anthony; Lappin, Patrick B; Eswaraka, Jeetendra

    2013-01-01

    The identification and quantitative evaluation of lung tumors in mouse models is challenging and an unmet need in preclinical arena. In this study, we developed a noninvasive contrast-enhanced microCT (μCT) method to longitudinally evaluate and quantitate lung tumors in mice. Commercially available μCT contrast agents were compared to determine the optimal agent for visualization of thoracic blood vessels and lung tumors in naïve mice and in non-small-cell lung cancer models. Compared with the saline control, iopamidol and iodinated lipid agents provided only marginal increases in contrast resolution. The inorganic nanoparticulate agent provided the best contrast and visualization of thoracic vascular structures; the density contrast was highest at 15 min after injection and was stable for more than 4 h. Differential contrast of the tumors, vascular structures, and thoracic air space by the nanoparticulate agent enabled identification of tumor margins and accurate quantification. μCT data correlated closely with traditional histologic measurements (Pearson correlation coefficient, 0.995). Treatment of ELM4–ALK mice with crizotinib yielded 65% reduction in tumor size and thus demonstrated the utility of quantitative μCT in longitudinal preclinical trials. Overall and among the 3 agents we tested, the inorganic nanoparticulate product was the best commercially available contrast agent for visualization of thoracic blood vessels and lung tumors. Contrast-enhanced μCT imaging is an excellent noninvasive method for longitudinal evaluation during preclinical lung tumor studies. PMID:24326223

  6. Micro-CT evaluation of the marginal fit of CAD/CAM all ceramic crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenes, Christian

    Objectives: Evaluate the marginal fit of CAD/CAM all ceramic crowns made from lithium disilicate and zirconia using two different fabrication protocols (model and model-less). METHODS: Forty anterior all ceramic restorations (20 lithium disilicate, 20 zirconia) were fabricated using a CEREC Bluecam scanner. Two different fabrication methods were used: a full digital approach and a printed model. Completed crowns were cemented and marginal gap was evaluated using Micro-CT. Each specimen was analyzed in sagittal and trans-axial orientations, allowing a 360° evaluation of the vertical and horizontal fit. RESULTS: Vertical measurements in the lingual, distal and mesial views had and estimated marginal gap from 101.9 to 133.9 microns for E-max crowns and 126.4 to 165.4 microns for zirconia. No significant differences were found between model and model-less techniques. CONCLUSION: Lithium disilicate restorations exhibited a more accurate and consistent marginal adaptation when compared to zirconia crowns. No statistically significant differences were observed when comparing model or model-less approaches.

  7. Direct composite fillings: an optical coherence tomography and microCT investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Borlea, Mugurel V.; Manescu, Adrian; Duma, Virgil F.; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2015-03-01

    The treatment of carious lesions requires removal of affected dental tissue thus creating cavities that are to be filled with dedicated materials. There are several methods known which are used to assess the quality of direct dental restorations, but most of them are invasive. Optical tomographic techniques are of particular importance in the medical imaging field, because these techniques can provide non-invasive diagnostic images. Using an en-face version of OCT, we have recently demonstrated real time thorough evaluation of quality of dental fillings. The major aim of this study was to analyses the optical performance of adhesives modified with zirconia particles in different concentrations in order to improve the contrast of OCT imaging of the interface between the tooth structure, adhesive and composite resin. The OCT investigations were validated by micro CT using synchrotron radiation. The OCT Swept Source is a valuable investigation tool for the clinical evaluation of class II direct composite restorations. The unmodified adhesive layer shows poor contrast on regular OCT investigations. Adding zirconia particles to the adhesive layer provides a better scattering which allows a better characterization and quantification of direct restorations.

  8. Pore-Scale X-ray Micro-CT Imaging and Analysis of Oil Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saif, T.

    2015-12-01

    The pore structure and the connectivity of the pore space during the pyrolysis of oil shales are important characteristics which determine hydrocarbon flow behaviour and ultimate recovery. We study the effect of temperature on the evolution of pore space and subsequent permeability on five oil shale samples: (1) Vernal Utah United States, (2) El Lajjun Al Karak Jordan, (3) Gladstone Queensland Australia (4) Fushun China and (5) Kimmerdige United Kingdom. Oil Shale cores of 5mm in diameter were pyrolized at 300, 400 and 500 °C. 3D imaging of 5mm diameter core samples was performed at 1μm voxel resolution using X-ray micro computed tomography (CT) and the evolution of the pore structures were characterized. The experimental results indicate that the thermal decomposition of kerogen at high temperatures is a major factor causing micro-scale changes in the internal structure of oil shales. At the early stage of pyrolysis, micron-scale heterogeneous pores were formed and with a further increase in temperature, the pores expanded and became interconnected by fractures. Permeability for each oil shale sample at each temperature was computed by simulation directly on the image voxels and by pore network extraction and simulation. Future work will investigate different samples and pursue insitu micro-CT imaging of oil shale pyrolysis to characterize the time evolution of the pore space.

  9. Checking collagen preservation in archaeological bone by non-destructive studies (Micro-CT and IBA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, L.; Cuif, J.-P.; Pichon, L.; Vaubaillon, S.; Dambricourt Malassé, A.; Abel, R. L.

    2012-02-01

    The material to be studied is a piece of human skull discovered (1999) in Pleistocene sediments from the Orsang river (Gujarat state, India). From anatomical view point, this skull is highly composite: modern Homo sapiens characters are associated to undoubtedly more ancient features. Absolute dating by 14C is critical to understand this discovery. Prior to dating measurements, non-destructive studies have been carried out. Micro-CT reconstruction (X-ray microtomography) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) have been undertaken to check the structural preservation of the fossil and the collagen preservation. PIXE elemental map was used to select well-preserved bone area. RBS/EBS and NRA were used for light element quantification, in particular C, N and O contents. We also demonstrate that the PIXE-RBS/EBS combination is a effective tool for the whole characterization of archaeological and recent bones by analysing in one experiment both mineral and organic fractions. We have shown that the archaeological bone, a fragment of the potentially oldest modern Indian, is enough preserved for radiocarbon dating. We propose that Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) using 3 MeV protons could be a good non destructive alternative to conventional CHN method using Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen analyzer for measuring C and N before 14C dating.

  10. Computational Aerodynamic Analysis of a Micro-CT Based Bio-Realistic Fruit Fly Wing.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Joshua; Doig, Graham; Tsafnat, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic features of a bio-realistic 3D fruit fly wing in steady state (snapshot) flight conditions were analyzed numerically. The wing geometry was created from high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) of the fruit fly Drosophila virilis. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of the wing were conducted at ultra-low Reynolds numbers ranging from 71 to 200, and at angles of attack ranging from -10° to +30°. It was found that in the 3D bio-realistic model, the corrugations of the wing created localized circulation regions in the flow field, most notably at higher angles of attack near the wing tip. Analyses of a simplified flat wing geometry showed higher lift to drag performance values for any given angle of attack at these Reynolds numbers, though very similar performance is noted at -10°. Results have indicated that the simplified flat wing can successfully be used to approximate high-level properties such as aerodynamic coefficients and overall performance trends as well as large flow-field structures. However, local pressure peaks and near-wing flow features induced by the corrugations are unable to be replicated by the simple wing. We therefore recommend that accurate 3D bio-realistic geometries be used when modelling insect wings where such information is useful. PMID:25954946

  11. Computational Aerodynamic Analysis of a Micro-CT Based Bio-Realistic Fruit Fly Wing.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Joshua; Doig, Graham; Tsafnat, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic features of a bio-realistic 3D fruit fly wing in steady state (snapshot) flight conditions were analyzed numerically. The wing geometry was created from high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) of the fruit fly Drosophila virilis. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of the wing were conducted at ultra-low Reynolds numbers ranging from 71 to 200, and at angles of attack ranging from -10° to +30°. It was found that in the 3D bio-realistic model, the corrugations of the wing created localized circulation regions in the flow field, most notably at higher angles of attack near the wing tip. Analyses of a simplified flat wing geometry showed higher lift to drag performance values for any given angle of attack at these Reynolds numbers, though very similar performance is noted at -10°. Results have indicated that the simplified flat wing can successfully be used to approximate high-level properties such as aerodynamic coefficients and overall performance trends as well as large flow-field structures. However, local pressure peaks and near-wing flow features induced by the corrugations are unable to be replicated by the simple wing. We therefore recommend that accurate 3D bio-realistic geometries be used when modelling insect wings where such information is useful.

  12. Imaging protoporphyrin IX fluorescence with a time-domain FMT/microCT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Frederic; Kepshire, Dax; O'Hara, Julia A.; Dehghani, Hamid; Srinivasan, Subha; Mincu, N.; Hutchins, M.; Khayat, M.; Pogue, B. W.

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) has the potential to become a powerful quantitative research tool for pre-clinical applications such as evaluating the efficacy of experimental drugs. In this paper, we show how a time-domain FMT/microCT instrument can in principle be used to monitor volumetric fluorescence intensity over time for low fluorophore concentration levels. The experimental results we present relate to Protoporphyrin IX which has a quantum efficiency as much as two orders of magnitude lower compared to more conventional extrinsic dyes used for molecular imaging (e.g., Alexa Fluor dyes, Cyanine dyes). Our results highlight the high sensitivity of the single photon counting technology on which the optical system we have built is based. In conjunction with this system we have developed a diffuse optical fluorescence reconstruction technique that is robust and shown here to perform adequately even in cases when the contribution of noise to the data is important. Related to this, we show that the regularization scheme we have developed is reliable even for low fluorophore concentration values and that no adjustment of the regularization parameter needs to be made for different levels of noise. This generic reconstruction approach insures that images reconstructed from data sets acquired at different times and for different fluorescence levels can be compared on an equal footing.

  13. Ultrafast micro-CT for in vivo small animal imaging and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasov, Alexander

    2004-10-01

    A new, ultra-fast microCT instrument with scanning+reconstruction cycle under 50 seconds for full 3D-volume has been created. The scanner based on the scanning geometry with static object and rotation of source-camera pair(s), which allows using it for industrial applications as well as for low-dose in-vivo imaging of small laboratory animals where rotation of the object is not acceptable. Acquisition part contains two pairs of x-ray sources and cameras for data collection from complementary directions simultaneously. Reconstruction engine (cone-beam reconstruction by modified Feldkamp algotithm) includes 1, 2 or 4 dual Intel-Xeon computers working in parallel under control of the host PC through local network. The instrument specifications are following: voxel size is 48 or 96 um for corresponding 1024x1024x1024 or 512x512x512 reconstruction array; scanning time with parallel reconstruction is 50 seconds for 96um resolution. X-ray sources peak energy can be adjusted in the range of 20-65kV. Typical scanning dose is 0.4Gy. The scanner itself is a compact desktop instrument, which contains all x-ray parts and necessary shielding for safe operations in the normal laboratory environments.

  14. Computational Aerodynamic Analysis of a Micro-CT Based Bio-Realistic Fruit Fly Wing

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Joshua; Doig, Graham; Tsafnat, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic features of a bio-realistic 3D fruit fly wing in steady state (snapshot) flight conditions were analyzed numerically. The wing geometry was created from high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) of the fruit fly Drosophila virilis. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of the wing were conducted at ultra-low Reynolds numbers ranging from 71 to 200, and at angles of attack ranging from -10° to +30°. It was found that in the 3D bio-realistc model, the corrugations of the wing created localized circulation regions in the flow field, most notably at higher angles of attack near the wing tip. Analyses of a simplified flat wing geometry showed higher lift to drag performance values for any given angle of attack at these Reynolds numbers, though very similar performance is noted at -10°. Results have indicated that the simplified flat wing can successfully be used to approximate high-level properties such as aerodynamic coefficients and overall performance trends as well as large flow-field structures. However, local pressure peaks and near-wing flow features induced by the corrugations are unable to be replicated by the simple wing. We therefore recommend that accurate 3D bio-realistic geometries be used when modelling insect wings where such information is useful. PMID:25954946

  15. Scanning electron microscope and micro-CT evaluation of cranial sutures in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter J; Netherway, David J; David, David J; Self, Peter

    2006-09-01

    Current knowledge of suture biology has been ascertained as a result of morphological studies of normal cranial sutures (and rarely those undergoing craniosynostosis). These were initially undertaken often using histological investigations, or more recently using CT scans, as investigative tools, but have often used animal models. However, recent technological advances have provided the potential to refine our understanding of the ultrastructure by the use of new advanced scanning technology, which offers the possibility of more detailed resolution. Our aim was to undertake detailed scans of normal, fusing and fused sutures from patients with craniosynosotosis affecting different sutures, to study the detailed structure at different stages of the fusion process using a modern micro-CT scanner and a microanalytical scanning electron microscope. We wished to include in our study all the human sutures because previous studies have mostly been undertaken using the sagittal suture. Ten sutures from seven patients have revealed a complex ultra-structural arrangement. The different patterns of bone ridging seen on the ectocranial and endocranial surfaces of the fused sagittal suture were not repeated on closer inspection of either fused coronal or lambdoid sutures. Elemental analysis confirmed that the amount of calcium increased and the amount of carbon decreased as sampled areas moved away from the suture margin. We conclude that scanning allowed detailed assessment and revealed the complex arrangement of the structure of the human cranial sutures and those undergoing the process of craniosynostosis, with some differences in final structure depending on the affected suture.

  16. Development of a Beam Hardening Correction Method for a microCT Scanner Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Kikushima, J.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.

    2010-12-07

    The radiographic projections acquired with a microCT were simulated and then corrected for beam hardening effects using the linearized signal to equivalent thickness (LSET) method. This procedure requires a calibration signal for each pixel obtained from a set of images with filters of increasing thickness. The projections are corrected by converting the signal to an equivalent thickness using interpolation over the calibration images. The method was validated using simulated projections of different phantoms. Two calibration sets were simulated using aluminum and water filters of thicknesses ranging from 0 to 5 mm and from 0 to 50 mm, respectively. A simulation of the phantoms' projections using a monoenergetic beam was also obtained to establish the relative intensity on the tomographic images when no cupping artifacts are present. Comparison between corrected and uncorrected tomographic images shows that the LSET method effectively corrects the cupping artifact. Streaking artifacts correction with the LSET method shows better results than with the traditional water correction method. Results are independent of the two calibration materials used.

  17. Development of a Beam Hardening Correction Method for a microCT Scanner Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikushima, J.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.

    2010-12-01

    The radiographic projections acquired with a microCT were simulated and then corrected for beam hardening effects using the linearized signal to equivalent thickness (LSET) method. This procedure requires a calibration signal for each pixel obtained from a set of images with filters of increasing thickness. The projections are corrected by converting the signal to an equivalent thickness using interpolation over the calibration images. The method was validated using simulated projections of different phantoms. Two calibration sets were simulated using aluminum and water filters of thicknesses ranging from 0 to 5 mm and from 0 to 50 mm, respectively. A simulation of the phantoms' projections using a monoenergetic beam was also obtained to establish the relative intensity on the tomographic images when no cupping artifacts are present. Comparison between corrected and uncorrected tomographic images shows that the LSET method effectively corrects the cupping artifact. Streaking artifacts correction with the LSET method shows better results than with the traditional water correction method. Results are independent of the two calibration materials used.

  18. Magnitude and effects of X-ray scatter of a cone-beam micro-CT for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y. C.; Jan, M. L.; Chen, K. W.; Cheng, Y. D.; Chuang, K. S.; Fu, Y. K.

    2006-12-01

    We have developed a micro-CT system to provide high-resolution and anatomic information to combine with a microPET ® R4 system. This study was to evaluate the magnitude and effects of scatter for low kVp X-ray in this cone-beam micro-CT system. Slit collimators were used to simulate fan-beam micro-CT for comparison. The magnitudes of X-ray scatter were measured using the beam-stop method and were estimated by polynomial-fitting extrapolation to 0 mm size of stoppers. The scatter-to-primary ratio at center of the cone-beam system were 45% and 20% for rat and mouse phantoms, respectively, and were reduced to 5.86% and 4.2% in fan-beam geometric setup. The effects of X-ray scatter on image uniformity and contrast ratio were evaluated also. The uniformity response was examined by the profile of the reconstructed image. The degrees of "cupping" in the fan-beam and cone-beam conditions were 1.75% and 3.81%, respectively, in rat phantom. A contrast phantom consisting of four inserts with physical densities similar to that of acrylic was used for measuring the effect of X-ray scatter on image contrast. Contrast ratios of the inserts and acrylic in cone-beam setup degraded 36.9% in average compared with fan-beam setup. A tumor-bearing mouse was scanned by the micro-CT system. The tumor-to-background contrast ratios were measured to be 0.331 and 0.249, respectively, with fan-beam and cone-beam setups.

  19. Micro-CT scan reveals an unexpected high-volume and interconnected pore network in a Cretaceous Sanagasta dinosaur eggshell.

    PubMed

    Hechenleitner, E Martín; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Foley, Matthew; Fiorelli, Lucas E; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    The Cretaceous Sanagasta neosauropod nesting site (La Rioja, Argentina) was the first confirmed instance of extinct dinosaurs using geothermal-generated heat to incubate their eggs. The nesting strategy and hydrothermal activities at this site led to the conclusion that the surprisingly 7 mm thick-shelled eggs were adapted to harsh hydrothermal microenvironments. We used micro-CT scans in this study to obtain the first three-dimensional microcharacterization of these eggshells. Micro-CT-based analyses provide a robust assessment of gas conductance in fossil dinosaur eggshells with complex pore canal systems, allowing calculation, for the first time, of the shell conductance through its thickness. This novel approach suggests that the shell conductance could have risen during incubation to seven times more than previously estimated as the eggshell erodes. In addition, micro-CT observations reveal that the constant widening and branching of pore canals form a complex funnel-like pore canal system. Furthermore, the high density of pore canals and the presence of a lateral canal network in the shell reduce the risks of pore obstruction during the extended incubation of these eggs in a relatively highly humid and muddy nesting environment. PMID:27009182

  20. X-ray microtomography (micro-CT): a reference technology for high-resolution quantification of xylem embolism in trees.

    PubMed

    Cochard, H; Delzon, S; Badel, E

    2015-01-01

    As current methods for measuring xylem embolism in trees are indirect and prone to artefacts, there is an ongoing controversy over the capacity of trees to resist or recover from embolism. The debate will not end until we get direct visualization of the vessel content. Here, we propose desktop X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) as a reference direct technique to quantify xylem embolism and thus validate more widespread measurements based upon either hydraulic or acoustic methods. We used desktop micro-CT to measure embolism levels in dehydrated or centrifuged shoots of laurel - a long-vesseled species thought to display daily cycles of embolism formation and refilling. Our direct observations demonstrate that this Mediterranean species is highly resistant to embolism and is not vulnerable to drought-induced embolism in a normal range of xylem tensions. We therefore recommend that embolism studies in long-vesseled species should be validated by direct methods such as micro-CT to clear up any misunderstandings on their physiology.

  1. Micro-CT image-derived metrics quantify arterial wall distensibility reduction in a rat model of pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Roger H.; Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2000-04-01

    We developed methods to quantify arterial structural and mechanical properties in excised rat lungs and applied them to investigate the distensibility decrease accompanying chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Lungs of control and hypertensive (three weeks 11% O2) animals were excised and a contrast agent introduced before micro-CT imaging with a special purpose scanner. For each lung, four 3D image data sets were obtained, each at a different intra-arterial contrast agent pressure. Vessel segment diameters and lengths were measured at all levels in the arterial tree hierarchy, and these data used to generate features sensitive to distensibility changes. Results indicate that measurements obtained from 3D micro-CT images can be used to quantify vessel biomechanical properties in this rat model of pulmonary hypertension and that distensibility is reduced by exposure to chronic hypoxia. Mechanical properties can be assessed in a localized fashion and quantified in a spatially-resolved way or as a single parameter describing the tree as a whole. Micro-CT is a nondestructive way to rapidly assess structural and mechanical properties of arteries in small animal organs maintained in a physiological state. Quantitative features measured by this method may provide valuable insights into the mechanisms causing the elevated pressures in pulmonary hypertension of differing etiologies and should become increasingly valuable tools in the study of complex phenotypes in small-animal models of important diseases such as hypertension.

  2. Three-dimensional analysis of mesiobuccal root canal of Japanese maxillary first molar using Micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masashi; Ide, Yoshinobu; Matsunaga, Satoru; Kato, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kan-Ichi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to three-dimensionally observe the morphological characteristics of mesiobuccal root canals of Japanese maxillary first molars using microcomputed tomography (Micro-CT) and classify root canal variations. This study used 90 maxillary first molars. Three-dimensional reconstruction was performed using data obtained by Micro-CT, and cross-sections of the root canals were observed. Moreover, the root canal morphology was classified by the configuration and root canal diameter, and was evaluated for occurrence using the classification by Weine et al. (1969) as a reference. Overall, single root canals were observed in 44.4%, incomplete separation root canals in 22.3%, and completely separate root canals (upper and lower separation root canals) in 33.3%. Mesiobuccal root canals often had intricate configurations, and accessory root canals (lateral canals and apical ramifications) were observed in most of the mesiobuccal root canals (76.7%), irrespective of whether there were ramifications of the main root canals. While there were no marked differences in the incidence of root canal ramifications between this study and earlier reports, the incidence of accessory root canals was higher in this study. This result may be explained by the far more superior visualization ability of Micro-CT than conventional methods, which allowed the detection of microscopic apical ramifications previously difficult to observe. PMID:21701120

  3. Evaluation of Mucociliary Clearance by Three Dimension Micro-CT-SPECT in Guinea Pig: Role of Bitter Taste Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Jose Luis; Ortiz, Amparo; Milara, Javier; Armengot, Miguel; Sanz, Celia; Compañ, Desamparados; Morcillo, Esteban; Cortijo, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Different image techniques have been used to analyze mucociliary clearance (MCC) in humans, but current small animal MCC analysis using in vivo imaging has not been well defined. Bitter taste receptor (T2R) agonists increase ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and cause bronchodilation but their effects in vivo are not well understood. This work analyzes in vivo nasal and bronchial MCC in guinea pig animals using three dimension (3D) micro-CT-SPECT images and evaluates the effect of T2R agonists. Intranasal macroaggreggates of albumin-Technetium 99 metastable (MAA-Tc99m) and lung nebulized Tc99m albumin nanocolloids were used to analyze the effect of T2R agonists on nasal and bronchial MCC respectively, using 3D micro-CT-SPECT in guinea pig. MAA-Tc99m showed a nasal mucociliary transport rate of 0.36 mm/min that was increased in presence of T2R agonist to 0.66 mm/min. Tc99m albumin nanocolloids were homogeneously distributed in the lung of guinea pig and cleared with time-dependence through the bronchi and trachea of guinea pig. T2R agonist increased bronchial MCC of Tc99m albumin nanocolloids. T2R agonists increased CBF in human nasal ciliated cells in vitro and induced bronchodilation in human bronchi ex vivo. In summary, T2R agonists increase MCC in vivo as assessed by 3D micro-CT-SPECT analysis. PMID:27723827

  4. Wavelet based characterization of ex vivo vertebral trabecular bone structure with 3T MRI compared to microCT

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, R; Carballido-Gamio, J; Burghardt, A; Haase, S; Sedat, J W; Moss, W C; Majumdar, S

    2005-04-11

    Trabecular bone structure and bone density contribute to the strength of bone and are important in the study of osteoporosis. Wavelets are a powerful tool to characterize and quantify texture in an image. In this study the thickness of trabecular bone was analyzed in 8 cylindrical cores of the vertebral spine. Images were obtained from 3 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and micro-computed tomography ({micro}CT). Results from the wavelet based analysis of trabecular bone were compared with standard two-dimensional structural parameters (analogous to bone histomorphometry) obtained using mean intercept length (MR images) and direct 3D distance transformation methods ({micro}CT images). Additionally, the bone volume fraction was determined from MR images. We conclude that the wavelet based analyses delivers comparable results to the established MR histomorphometric measurements. The average deviation in trabecular thickness was less than one pixel size between the wavelet and the standard approach for both MR and {micro}CT analysis. Since the wavelet based method is less sensitive to image noise, we see an advantage of wavelet analysis of trabecular bone for MR imaging when going to higher resolution.

  5. Low-Dose Micro-CT Imaging for Vascular Segmentation and Analysis Using Sparse-View Acquisitions

    PubMed Central

    Vandeghinste, Bert; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Vanhove, Chris; Staelens, Steven; Van Holen, Roel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether reliable and accurate 3D geometrical models of the murine aortic arch can be constructed from sparse-view data in vivo micro-CT acquisitions. This would considerably reduce acquisition time and X-ray dose. In vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT datasets were reconstructed using a conventional filtered back projection algorithm (FDK), the image space reconstruction algorithm (ISRA) and total variation regularized ISRA (ISRA-TV). The reconstructed images were then semi-automatically segmented. Segmentations of high- and low-dose protocols were compared and evaluated based on voxel classification, 3D model diameters and centerline differences. FDK reconstruction does not lead to accurate segmentation in the case of low-view acquisitions. ISRA manages accurate segmentation with 1024 or more projection views. ISRA-TV needs a minimum of 256 views. These results indicate that accurate vascular models can be obtained from micro-CT scans with 8 times less X-ray dose and acquisition time, as long as regularized iterative reconstruction is used. PMID:23840893

  6. A registration-based segmentation method with application to adiposity analysis of mice microCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Bing; Joshi, Anand; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Longo, Valter D.; Conti, Peter S.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2014-04-01

    Obesity is a global health problem, particularly in the U.S. where one third of adults are obese. A reliable and accurate method of quantifying obesity is necessary. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) are two measures of obesity that reflect different associated health risks, but accurate measurements in humans or rodent models are difficult. In this paper we present an automatic, registration-based segmentation method for mouse adiposity studies using microCT images. We co-register the subject CT image and a mouse CT atlas. Our method is based on surface matching of the microCT image and an atlas. Surface-based elastic volume warping is used to match the internal anatomy. We acquired a whole body scan of a C57BL6/J mouse injected with contrast agent using microCT and created a whole body mouse atlas by manually delineate the boundaries of the mouse and major organs. For method verification we scanned a C57BL6/J mouse from the base of the skull to the distal tibia. We registered the obtained mouse CT image to our atlas. Preliminary results show that we can warp the atlas image to match the posture and shape of the subject CT image, which has significant differences from the atlas. We plan to use this software tool in longitudinal obesity studies using mouse models.

  7. In vivo micro-CT imaging of untreated and irradiated orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts in mice: capabilities, limitations and a comparison with bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Stefanie; Felix, Manuela C; Hartmann, Linda; Bierbaum, Miriam; Maros, Máté E; Kerl, Hans U; Wenz, Frederik; Glatting, Gerhard; Kramer, Martin; Giordano, Frank A; Brockmann, Marc A

    2015-04-01

    Small animal imaging is of increasing relevance in biomedical research. Studies systematically assessing the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced in vivo micro-CT of orthotopic glioma xenografts in mice do not exist. NOD/SCID/γc(-/-) mice (n = 27) underwent intracerebral implantation of 2.5 × 10(6) GFP-Luciferase-transduced U87MG cells. Mice underwent bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to detect tumor growth and afterwards repeated contrast-enhanced (300 µl Iomeprol i.v.) micro-CT imaging (80 kV, 75 µAs, 360° rotation, 1,000 projections, 33 s scan time, resolution 40 × 40 × 53 µm, 0.5 Gy/scan). Presence of tumors, tumor diameter and tumor volume in micro-CT were rated by two independent readers. Results were compared with histological analyses. Six mice with tumors confirmed by micro-CT received fractionated irradiation (3 × 5 Gy every other day) using the micro-CT (5 mm pencil beam geometry). Repeated micro-CT scans were tolerated well. Tumor engraftment rate was 74 % (n = 20). In micro-CT, mean tumor volume was 30 ± 33 mm(3), and the smallest detectable tumor measured 360 × 620 µm. The inter-rater agreement (n = 51 micro-CT scans) for the item tumor yes/no was excellent (Spearman-Rho = 0.862, p < 0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of micro-CT were 0.95 and 0.71, respectively (PPV = 0.91, NPV = 0.83). BLI on day 21 after tumor implantation had a sensitivity and specificity of 0.90 and 1.0, respectively (PPV = 1.0, NPV = 0.5). Maximum tumor diameter and volume in micro-CT and histology correlated excellently (tumor diameter: 0.929, p < 0.001; tumor volume: 0.969, p < 0.001, n = 17). Irradiated animals showed a large central tumor necrosis. Longitudinal contrast enhanced micro-CT imaging of brain tumor growth in live mice is feasible at high sensitivity levels and with excellent inter-rater agreement and allows visualization of radiation effects.

  8. A correlative method for imaging identical regions of samples by micro-CT, light microscopy, and electron microscopy: imaging adipose tissue in a model system.

    PubMed

    Sengle, Gerhard; Tufa, Sara F; Sakai, Lynn Y; Zulliger, Martin A; Keene, Douglas R

    2013-04-01

    We present a method in which a precise region of interest within an intact organism is spatially mapped in three dimensions by non-invasive micro-computed X-ray tomography (micro-CT), then further evaluated by light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tissues are prepared as if for TEM including osmium fixation, which imparts soft tissue contrast in the micro-CT due to its strong X-ray attenuation. This method may therefore be applied to embedded, archived TEM samples. Upon selection of a two-dimensional (2-D) projection from a region of interest (ROI) within the three-dimensional volume, the epoxy-embedded sample is oriented for microtomy so that the sectioning plane is aligned with the micro-CT projection. Registration is verified by overlaying LM images with 2-D micro-CT projections. Structures that are poorly resolved in the micro-CT may be evaluated at TEM resolution by observing the next serial ultrathin section, thereby accessing the same ROI by all three imaging techniques. We compare white adipose tissue within the forelimbs of mice harboring a lipid-altering mutation with their littermate controls. We demonstrate that individual osmium-stained lipid droplets as small as 15 µm and separated by as little as 35 µm may be discerned as separate entities in the micro-CT, validating this to be a high-resolution, non-destructive technique for evaluation of fat content.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of the dose from imaging with GE eXplore 120 micro-CT using GATE

    SciTech Connect

    Bretin, Florian; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Plenevaux, Alain; Seret, Alain

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Small animals are increasingly used as translational models in preclinical imaging studies involving microCT, during which the subjects can be exposed to large amounts of radiation. While the radiation levels are generally sublethal, studies have shown that low-level radiation can change physiological parameters in mice. In order to rule out any influence of radiation on the outcome of such experiments, or resulting deterministic effects in the subjects, the levels of radiation involved need to be addressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the radiation dose delivered by the GE eXplore 120 microCT non-invasively using Monte Carlo simulations in GATE and to compare results to previously obtained experimental values. Methods: Tungsten X-ray spectra were simulated at 70, 80, and 97 kVp using an analytical tool and their half-value layers were simulated for spectra validation against experimentally measured values of the physical X-ray tube. A Monte Carlo model of the microCT system was set up and four protocols that are regularly applied to live animal scanning were implemented. The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) inside a PMMA phantom was derived and multiple field of view acquisitions were simulated using the PMMA phantom, a representative mouse and rat. Results: Simulated half-value layers agreed with experimentally obtained results within a 7% error window. The CTDI ranged from 20 to 56 mGy and closely matched experimental values. Derived organ doses in mice reached 459 mGy in bones and up to 200 mGy in soft tissue organs using the highest energy protocol. Dose levels in rats were lower due to the increased mass of the animal compared to mice. The uncertainty of all dose simulations was below 14%. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations proved a valuable tool to investigate the 3D dose distribution in animals from microCT. Small animals, especially mice (due to their small volume), receive large amounts of radiation from the GE eXplore 120

  10. The application of micro-CT in monitoring bone alterations in tail-suspended rats in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Hui-Qin; Sun, Lian-Wen; Huang, Yun-Fei; Wang, Ying; McClean, Colin J.; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2014-06-01

    Osteopenia is a pathological process that affects human skeletal health not only on earth but also in long-time spaceflight. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a nondestructive method for assessing both bone quantity and bone quality. To investigate the characteristics of micro-CT on evaluating the microgravity-induced osteopenia (e.g. early detection time and the sensitive parameters), the bone loss process of tail-suspended rats was monitored by micro-CT in this study. 8-Week-old female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into two groups: tail suspension (TS) and control (CON). Volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and microstructure of the femur and tibia were evaluated in vivo by micro-CT at 0, 7, 14, 22 days. Biomechanical properties of the femur and tibia were determined by three-point bending test. The ash weight of bone was also investigated. The results showed that (1) bone loss in the proximal tibia appeared earlier than in the distal femur. (2) On day 7, the percent bone volume (BV/TV) of the tibia 15.44% decreased significantly, and the trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) 30.29% increased significantly in TS group, both of which were detected earlier than other parameters. (3) Biomechanical properties (e.g. femur, -22.4% maximum load and -23.75% Young’s modulus vs. CON) and ash weight of the femur and tibia decreased significantly in the TS group in comparison to CON group. (4) vBMD of the femur and tibia were clearly related to bone ash and dry weight (r = 0.75-0.87, p < 0.05). (5) BV/TV of both femur and tibia were clearly related to maximum load and Young’s modulus (r = 0.66-0.87, p < 0.05). Similarly, trabecular vBMD and BV/TV of the femur and tibia were clearly related to Young’s modulus (r = 0.73-0.89, p < 0.05). These indicated that BV/TV and Tb.Sp were more sensitive than other parameters for evaluating bone loss induced by tail suspension, moreover, trabecular vBMD and other parameters might be used to evaluate bone strength. Therefore

  11. A correlative approach for combining microCT, light and transmission electron microscopy in a single 3D scenario

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In biomedical research, a huge variety of different techniques is currently available for the structural examination of small specimens, including conventional light microscopy (LM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), microscopic X-ray computed tomography (microCT), and many others. Since every imaging method is physically limited by certain parameters, a correlative use of complementary methods often yields a significant broader range of information. Here we demonstrate the advantages of the correlative use of microCT, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy for the analysis of small biological samples. Results We used a small juvenile bivalve mollusc (Mytilus galloprovincialis, approximately 0.8 mm length) to demonstrate the workflow of a correlative examination by microCT, LM serial section analysis, and TEM-re-sectioning. Initially these three datasets were analyzed separately, and subsequently they were fused in one 3D scene. This workflow is very straightforward. The specimen was processed as usual for transmission electron microscopy including post-fixation in osmium tetroxide and embedding in epoxy resin. Subsequently it was imaged with microCT. Post-fixation in osmium tetroxide yielded sufficient X-ray contrast for microCT imaging, since the X-ray absorption of epoxy resin is low. Thereafter, the same specimen was serially sectioned for LM investigation. The serial section images were aligned and specific organ systems were reconstructed based on manual segmentation and surface rendering. According to the region of interest (ROI), specific LM sections were detached from the slides, re-mounted on resin blocks and re-sectioned (ultrathin) for TEM. For analysis, image data from the three different modalities was co-registered into a single 3D scene using the software AMIRA®. We were able to register both the LM section series volume and TEM slices neatly to the microCT dataset, with

  12. 3D image analysis of plants using electron tomography and micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2014-11-01

    help to promote MT bundling. Cell plate attachment to the parental wall leads to the fusion of the newly formed middle lamellae in the cell plate to the middle lamella of parental cell wall, and a three-way junction is created. Air space develops from the three-way junction. To determine 3D arrangement of cells and air spaces, we used X-ray micro-CT at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. Using micro-CT available in BL20XU (8 keV, 0.2 µm/pixel), we were able to elucidate ∼90% of the cortical cell outlines in the hypocotyl-radicle axis of arabidopsis seeds [4] and to analyze cell geometrical properties. As the strength of the system X-ray is too strong for seed survival, we used another beam line BL20B2 (10-15 keV, 2.4-2.7 µm/pixel) to examine air space development during seed imbibition [4,5]. Using this system, we were able to detect air space development at the early imbibition stages of seeds without causing damage during seed germination. AcknowledgmentThe author would like to thank Dr. Ichirou Karahara (Univ. Toyama), Dr. L. Andrew Staehelin (Univ. Colorado), Ms. Naoko Kajimura, Dr. Akio Takaoka (Osaka Univ.), Dr. Kazuyo Misaki, Dr. Shigenobu Yonemura (RIKEN CDB), Dr. Kazuyoshi Murata (NIP), Dr. Kentaro Uesugi, Dr. Akihisa Takeuchi, Dr. Yoshio Suzuki (JASRI), Dr. Miyuki Takeuchi, Dr. Daisuke Tamaoki, Dr. Daisuke Yamauchi, and Ms. Aki Fukuda (Univ. Hyogo) for their collaborations in the work presented here. PMID:25359847

  13. Automated pipeline for anatomical phenotyping of mouse embryos using micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael D; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Lerch, Jason P; Henkelman, R Mark

    2014-06-01

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) plans to phenotype 20,000 single-gene knockout mice to gain an insight into gene function. Approximately 30% of these knockout mouse lines will be embryonic or perinatal lethal. The IMPC has selected three-dimensional (3D) imaging to phenotype these mouse lines at relevant stages of embryonic development in an attempt to discover the cause of lethality using detailed anatomical information. Rate of throughput is paramount as IMPC production centers have been given the ambitious task of completing this phenotyping project by 2021. Sifting through the wealth of data within high-resolution 3D mouse embryo data sets by trained human experts is infeasible at this scale. Here, we present a phenotyping pipeline that identifies statistically significant anatomical differences in the knockout, in comparison with the wild type, through a computer-automated image registration algorithm. This phenotyping pipeline consists of three analyses (intensity, deformation, and atlas based) that can detect missing anatomical structures and differences in volume of whole organs as well as on the voxel level. This phenotyping pipeline was applied to micro-CT images of two perinatal lethal mouse lines: a hypomorphic mutation of the Tcf21 gene (Tcf21-hypo) and a knockout of the Satb2 gene. With the proposed pipeline we were able to identify the majority of morphological phenotypes previously published for both the Tcf21-hypo and Satb2 mutant mouse embryos in addition to novel phenotypes. This phenotyping pipeline is an unbiased, automated method that highlights only those structural abnormalities that survive statistical scrutiny and illustrates them in a straightforward fashion.

  14. Enamel pearls in permanent dentition: case report and micro-CT evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Versiani, MA; Cristescu, RC; Pécora, JD; de Sousa-Neto, MD

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the frequency, position, number and morphology of enamel pearls (EPs) using micro-CT (µCT) and to report a case of an EP mimicking an endodontic–periodontic lesion. Methods: Cone beam CT (CBCT) was performed in a patient to evaluate a radio-opaque nodule observed on the left maxillary first molar during the radiographic examination. Additionally, 23 EPs were evaluated regarding frequency, position, number and morphology by means of µCT. The results were statistically compared using the Student’s t-test for independent samples. Results: 1 pearl was presented in 13 specimens, while 5 specimens presented 2 pearls. The most frequent location of the EPs was the furcation between the disto-buccal and the palatal roots of the maxillary molars. Overall, the mean major diameter, volume and surface area were 1.98 ± 0.85 mm, 1.76 ± 1.36 mm3 and 11.40 ± 7.59 mm2, respectively, with no statistical difference between maxillary second and third molars (p > 0.05). In the case report, CBCT revealed an EP between the disto-buccal and the palatal roots of the maxillary first left molar associated with advanced localized periodontitis. The tooth was referred for extraction. Conclusions: EPs, located generally in the furcation area, were observed in 0.74% of the sample. The majority was an enamel–dentin pearl type and no difference was found in maxillary second and third molars regarding diameter, volume and surface area of the pearls. In this report, the EP mimicked an endodontic–periodontic lesion and was a secondary aetiological factor in the periodontal breakdown. PMID:23520396

  15. Micro-CT Imaging of Denatured Chitin by Silver to Explore Honey Bee and Insect Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Butzloff, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chitin and cuticle coatings are important to the environmental and immune defense of honey bees and insect pollinators. Pesticides or environmental effects may target the biochemistry of insect chitin and cuticle coating. Denaturing of chitin involves a combination of deacetylation, intercalation, oxidation, Schweiger-peeling, and the formation of amine hydrochloride salt. The term “denatured chitin” calls attention to structural and property changes to the internal membranes and external carapace of organisms so that some properties affecting biological activities are diminished. Methodology/Principal Findings A case study was performed on honey bees using silver staining and microscopic computer-tomographic x-ray radiography (micro-CT). Silver nitrate formed counter-ion complexes with labile ammonium cations and reacted with amine hydrochloride. Silver was concentrated in the peritrophic membrane, on the abdomen, in the glossa, at intersegmental joints (tarsi), at wing attachments, and in tracheal air sacs. Imaged mono-esters and fatty acids from cuticle coating on external surfaces were apparently reduced by an alcohol pretreatment. Conclusions/Significance The technique provides 3-dimensional and sectional images of individual honey bees consistent with the chemistries of silver reaction and complex formation with denatured chitin. Environmental exposures and influences such as gaseous nitric oxide intercalant, trace oxidants such as ozone gas, oligosachharide salt conversion, exposure to acid rain, and chemical or biochemical denaturing by pesticides may be studied using this technique. Peritrophic membranes, which protect against food abrasion, microorganisms, and permit efficient digestion, were imaged. Apparent surface damage to the corneal lenses of compound eyes by dilute acid exposure consistent with chitin amine hydrochloride formation was imaged. The technique can contribute to existing insect pathology research, and may provide an

  16. Micro CT imaging assessment for spatial distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in an ex vivo thrombolysis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu-Sheng; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Tu, Shu-Ju

    2012-03-01

    In recent nanotechnology development, iron-based magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used in several investigations on biomedical research for small animal experiments. Their important applications include targeted drug delivery for therapeutic purpose, contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging, and hyperthermia treatment for tumors. These MNPs can be guided by an external magnetic field due to their physical characteristics of superparamagnetism. In a recent report, authors indicated that covalently bound recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) to MNP (MNPrtPA) with preserved enzyme activity may be guided by a bar magnet and induce target thrombolysis in an embolic model in rats. Delivery of rtPA by binding the thrombolytic drug to MNPs will improve the possibility of the drug to be delivered under magnetic guidance and retained in a local targeted area in the circulation system. In this work, an ex vivo intravascular thrombolysis model was developed to study the impact of external magnetic field on the penetration of MNP-rtPA in the blood clot samples. The samples were then scanned by a micro CT system for quantification. Images of MNPs show strong contrast with their surrounding blood clot materials. The optimum drug loading was found when 0.5 mg/ml rtPA is conjugated with 10 mg SiO2-MNP where 98% drug was attached to the carrier with full retention of its thrombolytic activity. Effective thrombolysis with tPA bound to SiO2-MNP under magnetic guidance was demonstrated in our ex vivo model where substantial reduction in time for blood clot lysis was observed compared with control groups without magnetic field application.

  17. Small airway obstruction in COPD: new insights based on micro-CT imaging and MRI imaging.

    PubMed

    Hogg, James C; McDonough, John E; Suzuki, Masaru

    2013-05-01

    The increase in total cross-sectional area in the distal airways of the human lung enhances the mixing of each tidal breath with end-expiratory gas volume by slowing bulk flow and increasing gas diffusion. However, this transition also favors the deposition of airborne particulates in this region because they diffuse 600 times slower than gases. Furthermore, the persistent deposition of toxic airborne particulates stimulates a chronic inflammatory immune cell infiltration and tissue repair and remodeling process that increases the resistance in airways <2 mm in diameter four to 40-fold in COPD. This increase was originally attributed to lumen narrowing because it increases resistance in proportion to the change in lumen radius raised to the fourth power. In contrast, removal of one-half the number of tubes arranged in parallel is required to double their resistance, and approximately 90% need to be removed to explain the increase in resistance measured in COPD. However, recent reexamination of this problem based on micro-CT imaging indicates that terminal bronchioles are both narrowed and reduced to 10% of the control values in the centrilobular and 25% in the panlobular emphysematous phenotype of very severe (GOLD [Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease] grade IV) COPD. These new data indicate that both narrowing and reduction in numbers of terminal bronchioles contribute to the rapid decline in FEV₁ that leads to severe airway obstruction in COPD. Moreover, the observation that terminal bronchiolar loss precedes the onset of emphysematous destruction suggests this destruction begins in the very early stages of COPD. PMID:23648907

  18. Enamel and dentin mineralization in familial hypophosphatemic rickets: a micro-CT study

    PubMed Central

    Costa, F W G; Soares, E C S; Williams, J R; Fonteles, C S R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to analyse the mineralization pattern of enamel and dentin in patients affected by X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR) using micro-CT (µCT), and to associate enamel and dentin mineralization in primary and permanent teeth with tooth position, gender and the presence/absence of this disease. Methods: 19 teeth were collected from 5 individuals from the same family, 1 non-affected by XLHR and 4 affected by XLHR. Gender, age, tooth position (anterior/posterior) and tooth type (deciduous/permanent) were recorded for each patient. Following collection, teeth were placed in 0.1% thymol solution until µCT scan. Projection images were reconstructed and analysed. A plot profile describing the greyscale distance relationship in µCT images was achieved through a line bisecting each tooth in a region with the presence of enamel and dentin. The enamel and dentin mineralization densities were measured and compared. Univariate ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used for all comparisons. Results: Teeth of all affected patients presented dentin with a different mineralization pattern compared with the teeth of healthy patients with dentin defects observed next to the pulp chambers. Highly significant differences were found for gray values between anterior and posterior teeth (p < 0.05), affected and non-affected (p < 0.05), as well as when position and disease status were considered (p < 0.05). Conclusions: In conclusion, the mineralization patterns of dentin differed when comparing teeth from patients with and without FHR, mainly next to pulp chambers where areas with porosity and consequently lower mineral density and dentin defects were found. PMID:25651274

  19. Characterization of operating parameters of an in vivo micro CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Ren, Liqiang; Yang, Kai; Chen, Wei R.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the operating parameters of an in-vivo micro CT system. In-plane spatial resolution, noise, geometric accuracy, CT number uniformity and linearity, and phase effects were evaluated using various phantoms. The system employs a flat panel detector with a 127 μm pixel pitch, and a micro focus x-ray tube with a focal spot size ranging from 5-30 μm. The system accommodates three magnification sets of 1.72, 2.54 and 5.10. The in-plane cutoff frequencies (10% MTF) ranged from 2.31 lp/mm (60 mm FOV, M=1.72, 2×2 binning) to 13 lp/mm (10 mm FOV, M=5.10, 1×1 binning). The results were qualitatively validated by a resolution bar pattern phantom and the smallest visible lines were in 30-40 μm range. Noise power spectrum (NPS) curves revealed that the noise peaks exponentially increased as the geometric magnification (M) increased. True in-plane pixel spacing and slice thickness were within 2% of the system's specifications. The CT numbers in cone beam modality are greatly affected by scattering and thus they do not remain the same in the three magnifications. A high linear relationship (R2 > 0.999) was found between the measured CT numbers and Hydroxyapatite (HA) loadings of the rods of a water filled mouse phantom. Projection images of a laser cut acrylic edge acquired at a small focal spot size of 5 μm with 1.5 fps revealed that noticeable phase effects occur at M=5.10 in the form of overshooting at the boundary of air and acrylic. In order to make the CT numbers consistent across all the scan settings, scatter correction methods may be a valuable improvement for this system.

  20. HECTOR: A 240kV micro-CT setup optimized for research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masschaele, Bert; Dierick, Manuel; Van Loo, Denis; Boone, Matthieu N.; Brabant, Loes; Pauwels, Elin; Cnudde, Veerle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2013-10-01

    X-ray micro-CT has become a very powerful and common tool for non-destructive three-dimensional (3D) visualization and analysis of objects. Many systems are commercially available, but they are typically limited in terms of operational freedom both from a mechanical point of view as well as for acquisition routines. HECTOR is the latest system developed by the Ghent University Centre for X-ray Tomography (http://www.ugct.ugent.be) in collaboration with X-Ray Engineering (XRE bvba, Ghent, Belgium). It consists of a mechanical setup with nine motorized axes and a modular acquisition software package and combines a microfocus directional target X-ray source up to 240 kV with a large flat-panel detector. Provisions are made to install a line-detector for a maximal operational range. The system can accommodate samples up to 80 kg, 1 m long and 80 cm in diameter while it is also suited for high resolution (down to 4 μm) tomography. The bi-directional detector tiling is suited for large samples while the variable source-detector distance optimizes the signal to noise ratio (SNR) for every type of sample, even with peripheral equipment such as compression stages or climate chambers. The large vertical travel of 1 m can be used for helical scanning and a vertical detector rotation axis allows laminography experiments. The setup is installed in a large concrete bunker to allow accommodation of peripheral equipment such as pumps, chillers, etc., which can be integrated in the modular acquisition software to obtain a maximal correlation between the environmental control and the CT data taken. The acquisition software does not only allow good coupling with the peripheral equipment but its scripting feature is also particularly interesting for testing new and exotic acquisition routines.

  1. Contrast agent comparison for three-dimensional micro-CT angiography: A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Kingston, Mitchell J; Perriman, Diana M; Neeman, Teresa; Smith, Paul N; Webb, Alexandra L

    2016-07-01

    Barium sulfate and lead oxide contrast media are frequently used for cadaver-based angiography studies. These contrast media have not previously been compared to determine which is optimal for the visualisation and measurement of blood vessels. In this study, the lower limb vessels of 16 embalmed Wistar rats, and four sets of cannulae of known diameter, were injected with one of three different contrast agents (barium sulfate and resin, barium sulfate and gelatin, and lead oxide combined with milk powder). All were then scanned using micro-computed tomography (CT) angiography and 3-D reconstructions generated. The number of branching generations of the rat lower limb vessels were counted and compared between the contrast agents using ANOVA. The diameter of the contrast-filled cannulae, were measured and used to calculate the accuracy of the measurements by comparing the bias and variance of the estimates. Intra- and inter-observer reliability were calculated using intra-class correlation coefficients. There was no significant difference (mean difference [MD] 0.05; MD 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.83 to 0.93) between the number of branching generations for barium sulfate-resin and lead oxide-milk powder. Barium sulfate-resin demonstrated less bias and less variance of the estimates (MD 0.03; standard deviation [SD] 1.96 mm) compared to lead oxide-milk powder (MD 0.11; SD 1.96 mm) for measurements of contrast-filled cannulae scanned at high resolution. Barium sulfate-resin proved to be more accurate than lead oxide-milk powder for high resolution micro-CT scans and is preferred due to its non-toxicity. This technique could be applied to any embalmed specimen model. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27075920

  2. Pore-scale simulation of carbonate dissolution in micro-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira Nunes, J. P.; Blunt, M. J.; Bijeljic, B.

    2016-02-01

    We present a particle-based method to simulate carbonate dissolution at the pore scale directly on the voxels of three-dimensional micro-CT images. The flow field is computed on the images by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Rock-fluid interaction is modeled using a three-step approach: solute advection, diffusion, and reaction. Advection is simulated with a semianalytical pore-scale streamline tracing algorithm, diffusion by random walk is superimposed, while the reaction rate is defined by the flux of particles through the pore-solid interface. We derive a relationship between the local particle flux and the independently measured batch calcite dissolution rate. We validate our method against a dynamic imaging experiment where a Ketton oolite is imaged during CO2-saturated brine injection at reservoir conditions. The image-calculated increases in porosity and permeability are predicted accurately, and the spatial distribution of the dissolution front is correctly replicated. The experiments and simulations are performed at a high flow rate, in the uniform dissolution regime - Pe ≫ 1 and PeDa ≪ 1—thus extending the reaction throughout the sample. Transport is advection dominated, and dissolution is limited to regions with significant inflow of solute. We show that the sample-averaged reaction rate is 1 order of magnitude lower than that measured in batch reactors. This decrease is the result of restrictions imposed on the flux of solute to the solid surface by the heterogeneous flow field, at the millimeter scale.

  3. Non-destructive evaluation of an internal adaptation of resin composite restoration with swept-source optical coherence tomography and micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung-Hoon; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji; Park, Sung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and micro-CT can be useful non-destructive methods for evaluating internal adaptation. There is no comparative study evaluating the two methods in the assessment of internal adaptation in composite restoration. The purpose of this study was to compare internal adaptation measurements of SS-OCT and micro-CT. Two cylindrical cavities were created on the labial surface of twelve bovine incisors. The 24 cavities were randomly assigned to four groups of dentin adhesives: (1) three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive, (2) two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive, (3) two-step self-etch adhesive, and (4) one-step self-etch adhesive. After application, the cavities were filled with resin composite. All restorations underwent a thermocycling challenge, and then, eight SS-OCT images were taken using a Santec OCT-2000™ (Santec Co., Komaki, Japan). The internal adaptation was also evaluated using micro-CT (Skyscan, Aartselaar, Belgium). The image analysis was used to calculate the percentage of defective spot (%DS) and compare the results. The groups were compared using one-way ANOVA with Duncan analysis at the 95% significance level. The SS-OCT and micro-CT measurements were compared with a paired t-test, and the relationship was analyzed using a Pearson correlation test at the 95% significance level. The %DS results showed that Group 3≤Group 4micro-CT images. The %DSs on micro-CT were lower than SS-OCT (p<0.05) and the Pearson correlation coefficient between SS-OCT and micro-CT was r=0.787 (p<0.05).

  4. Micro CT Analysis of Spine Architecture in a Mouse Model of Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chan; Chen, Brian P.; Sullivan, Michael B.; Hui, Jasmine; Ouellet, Jean A.; Henderson, Janet E.; Saran, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Mice homozygous for targeted deletion of the gene encoding fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3−/−) develop kyphoscoliosis by 2 months of age. The first objective of this study was to use high resolution X-ray to characterize curve progression in vivo and micro CT to quantify spine architecture ex vivo in FGFR3−/− mice. The second objective was to determine if slow release of the bone anabolic peptide parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP-1-34) from a pellet placed adjacent to the thoracic spine could inhibit progressive kyphoscoliosis. Materials and methods: Pellets loaded with placebo or PTHrP-1-34 were implanted adjacent to the thoracic spine of 1-month-old FGFR3−/− mice obtained from in house breeding. X rays were captured at monthly intervals up to 4 months to quantify curve progression using the Cobb method. High resolution post-mortem scans of FGFR3−/− and FGFR3+/+ spines, from C5/6 to L4/5, were captured to evaluate the 3D structure, rotation, and micro-architecture of the affected vertebrae. Un-decalcified and decalcified histology were performed on the apical and adjacent vertebrae of FGFR3−/− spines, and the corresponding vertebrae from FGFR3+/+ spines. Results: The mean Cobb angle was significantly greater at all ages in FGFR3−/− mice compared with wild type mice and appeared to stabilize around skeletal maturity at 4 months. 3D reconstructions of the thoracic spine of 4-month-old FGFR3−/− mice treated with PTHrP-1-34 revealed correction of left/right asymmetry, vertebral rotation, and lateral displacement compared with mice treated with placebo. Histologic analysis of the apical vertebrae confirmed correction of the asymmetry in PTHrP-1-34 treated mice, in the absence of any change in bone volume, and a significant reduction in the wedging of intervertebral disks (IVD) seen in placebo treated mice. Conclusion: Local treatment of the thoracic spine of juvenile FGFR3−/− mice with a bone anabolic

  5. Conversion of a Micro-CT Scanned Rock Fracture Into a Useful Model

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant; Smith, Duane

    2009-01-01

    is currently available from micro-CT scanning equipment can compound this problem. This study evaluates several methods of obtaining rational CFD meshes from a complex physical geometry, and discusses the benefits and disadvantages of the different procedures as they pertain to flow through a natural fracture in rock.

  6. Self-calibration of a cone-beam micro-CT system

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, V.; Chityala, R. N.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Ionita, C. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2009-01-15

    Use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is becoming more frequent. For proper reconstruction, the geometry of the CBCT systems must be known. While the system can be designed to reduce errors in the geometry, calibration measurements must still be performed and corrections applied. Investigators have proposed techniques using calibration objects for system calibration. In this study, the authors present methods to calibrate a rotary-stage CB micro-CT (CB{mu}CT) system using only the images acquired of the object to be reconstructed, i.e., without the use of calibration objects. Projection images are acquired using a CB{mu}CT system constructed in the authors' laboratories. Dark- and flat-field corrections are performed. Exposure variations are detected and quantified using analysis of image regions with an unobstructed view of the x-ray source. Translations that occur during the acquisition in the horizontal direction are detected, quantified, and corrected based on sinogram analysis. The axis of rotation is determined using registration of antiposed projection images. These techniques were evaluated using data obtained with calibration objects and phantoms. The physical geometric axis of rotation is determined and aligned with the rotational axis (assumed to be the center of the detector plane) used in the reconstruction process. The parameters describing this axis agree to within 0.1 mm and 0.3 deg with those determined using other techniques. Blurring due to residual calibration errors has a point-spread function in the reconstructed planes with a full-width-at-half-maximum of less than 125 {mu}m in a tangential direction and essentially zero in the radial direction for the rotating object. The authors have used this approach on over 100 acquisitions over the past 2 years and have regularly obtained high-quality reconstructions, i.e., without artifacts and no detectable blurring of the reconstructed objects. This self-calibrating approach not only obviates

  7. Rotational micro-CT using a clinical C-arm angiography gantry

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, V.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Ionita, C. N.; Keleshis, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2008-10-15

    Rotational angiography (RA) gantries are used routinely to acquire sequences of projection images of patients from which 3D renderings of vascular structures are generated using Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction algorithms. However, these systems have limited resolution (<4 lp/mm). Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) systems have better resolution (>10 lp/mm) but to date have relied either on rotating object imaging or small bore geometry for small animal imaging, and thus are not used for clinical imaging. The authors report here the development and use of a 3D rotational micro-angiography (RMA) system created by mounting a micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) [35 {mu}m pixel, resolution >10 lp/mm, field of view (FOV)=3.6 cm] on a standard clinical FPD-based RA gantry (Infinix, Model RTP12303J-G9E, Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tustin, CA). RA image sequences are obtained using the MAF and reconstructed. To eliminate artifacts due to image truncation, lower-dose (compared to MAF acquisition) full-FOV (FFOV) FPD RA sequences (194 {mu}m pixel, FOV=20 cm) were also obtained to complete the missing data. The RA gantry was calibrated using a helical bead phantom. To ensure high-quality high-resolution reconstruction, the high-resolution images from the MAF were aligned spatially with the lower-dose FPD images, and the pixel values in the FPD image data were scaled to match those of the MAF. Images of a rabbit with a coronary stent placed in an artery in the Circle of Willis were obtained and reconstructed. The MAF images appear well aligned with the FPD images (average correlation coefficient before and after alignment: 0.65 and 0.97, respectively) Greater details without any visible truncation artifacts are seen in 3D RMA (MAF-FPD) images than in those of the FPD alone. The FWHM of line profiles of stent struts (100 {mu}m diameter) are approximately 192{+-}21 and 313{+-}38 {mu}m for the 3D RMA and FPD data, respectively. In addition, for the dual-acquisition 3D RMA

  8. Carbon nanotube based respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of a murine model of lung tumors with optical imaging correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heathcote, Samuel; Wang, Ko-han; Kim, William Y.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2011-03-01

    Current optical imaging techniques can successfully measure tumor load in murine models of lung carcinoma but lack structural detail. We demonstrate that respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of such models gives information about structure and correlates with tumor load measurements by optical methods. Four mice with multifocal, Kras-induced tumors expressing firefly luciferase were imaged against four controls using both optical imaging and respiratory gated micro-CT. CT images of anesthetized animals were acquired with a custom CNT-based system using 30 ms x-ray pulses during peak inspiration; respiration motion was tracked with a pressure sensor beneath each animal's abdomen. Optical imaging based on the Luc+ signal correlating with tumor load was performed on a Xenogen IVIS Kinetix. Micro-CT images were post-processed using Osirix, measuring lung volume with region growing. Diameters of the largest three tumors were measured. Relationships between tumor size, lung volumes, and optical signal were compared. CT images and optical signals were obtained for all animals at two time points. In all lobes of the Kras+ mice in all images, tumors were visible; the smallest to be readily identified measured approximately 300 microns diameter. CT-derived tumor volumes and optical signals related linearly, with r=0.94 for all animals. When derived for only tumor bearing animals, r=0.3. The trend of each individual animal's optical signal tracked correctly based on the CT volumes. Interestingly, lung volumes also correlated positively with optical imaging data and tumor volume burden, suggesting active remodeling.

  9. MicroCT and microMRI imaging of a prenatal mouse model of increased brain size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Elisabeth K. N.; Stock, Stuart R.; Taketo, Makoto M.; Chenn, Anjen; Ravosa, Matthew J.

    2008-08-01

    There are surprisingly few experimental models of neural growth and cranial integration. This and the dearth of information regarding fetal brain development detract from a mechanistic understanding of cranial integration and its relevance to the patterning of skull form, specifically the role of encephalization on basicranial flexion. To address this shortcoming, our research uses transgenic mice expressing a stabilized form of β-catenin to isolate the effects of relative brain size on craniofacial development. These mice develop highly enlarged brains due to an increase in neural precursors, and differences between transgenic and wild-type mice are predicted to result solely from variation in brain size. Comparisons of wild-type and transgenic mice at several prenatal ages were performed using microCT (Scanco Medical MicroCT 40) and microMRI (Avance 600 WB MR spectrometer). Statistical analyses show that the larger brain of the transgenic mice is associated with a larger neurocranium and an altered basicranial morphology. However, body size and postcranial ossification do not seem to be affected by the transgene. Comparisons of the rate of postcranial and cranial ossification using microCT also point to an unexpected effect of neural growth on skull development: increased fetal encephalization may result in a compensatory decrease in the level of cranial ossification. Therefore, if other life history factors are held constant, the ontogeny of a metabolically costly structure such as a brain may occur at the expense of other cranial structures. These analyses indicate the benefits of a multifactorial approach to cranial integration using a mouse model.

  10. Internal morphology of the nonsyndromic prematurely fused sagittal suture in the human skull--A preliminary micro-CT study.

    PubMed

    Nowaczewska, W; Ziółkowski, G; Dybała, B

    2015-10-01

    Although nonsyndromic craniosynostosis (NSC) of the sagittal suture is a well-known type of craniosynostosis, little is currently known about the internal morphology of this prematurely fused suture in modern humans. Recently, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has been applied as a new tool for the quantitative evaluation of cranial suture morphology. However, so far there are only a small number of reports concerning studies of the internal morphology of prematurely fused sagittal suture in humans using micro-CT. The primary aim of this study was to examine the internal morphology of a completely obliterated sagittal suture in NSC. Two modern human skulls were used in this study: a skull of a child (aged 10 ± 2.5 years) displaying NSC of the sagittal suture and a skull of an adult showing non-prematurely completely obliterated sagittal suture. Quantitative variables of the sagittal sutures were assessed using method proposed by the authors. Porosity, and relative thickness of three bone layers in two examined skulls (inner cortical, diploë and outer cortical) were analysed using micro-CT in three equal sections of the sagittal suture. In the case of the prematurely fused suture, there were statistically significant differences mainly in the mean values of the porosity, thickness and relative thickness of the diploë between the anterior part and the two other parts (central and posterior) of this suture. Significant differences were also observed in some of the analysed variables between the sections of the sagittal suture of the skull with NSC and the normal skull. PMID:26122169

  11. A 3D Level Sets Method for Segmenting the Mouse Spleen and Follicles in Volumetric microCT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Jeffery R; Aykac, Deniz; Wall, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    We present a semi-automatic, 3D approach for segmenting the mouse spleen, and its interior follicles, in volumetric microCT imagery. Based upon previous 2D level sets work, we develop a fully 3D implementation and provide the corresponding finite difference formulas. We incorporate statistical and proximity weighting schemes to improve segmentation performance. We also note an issue with the original algorithm and propose a solution that proves beneficial in our experiments. Experimental results are provided for artificial and real data.

  12. Postcranial skeletal pneumaticity: a case study in the use of quantitative microCT to assess vertebral structure in birds.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, R J; Hernandez, E; O'Connor, P M

    2007-07-01

    Limb elements in birds have been characterized as exhibiting a reduction in trabecular bone, thinner cortices and decreased bending strength when pneumatized, yet it is unclear if these characteristics generalize to the axial skeleton. Thin section techniques, the traditional gold standard for bone structure studies, have most commonly been applied to the study of avian bone. This destructive technique, however, makes it subsequently impossible to use the same samples in experimental testing systems that allow researchers to correlate structure with the mechanical properties of the bone. Micro-computed tomography (microCT), a non-destructive X-ray imaging technique, can be used to assess the effect of pneumatization on vertebral cortical and trabecular bone through virtual extraction and structural quantification of each tissue type. We conducted a preliminary investigation of the application of microCT methods to the study of cortical and trabecular bone structure in a small sample of pneumatic and apneumatic thoracic vertebrae. The sample consisted of two similar-sized anatids, Aix sponsa (n = 7) and Oxyura jamaicensis (n = 5). Volumes of interest were created that contoured (outlined) the boundaries of the ventral cortical bone shell, the trabecular compartment and the whole centrum (cortical bone + trabecular bone), and allowed independent structural analysis of each volume of interest. Results indicated that bone volume fraction of the whole centrum was significantly higher in the apneumatic O. jamaicensis than in the pneumatized A. sponsa (A. sponsa = 36%, O. jamaicensis = 48%, P < 0.05). In contrast, trabecular bone volume fraction was similar between the two species. The ventral cortical bone shell was approximately 23% thinner (P < 0.05) in A. sponsa (0.133 mm) compared with apneumatic O. jamaicensis (0.172 mm). This case study demonstrates that microCT is a powerful non-destructive imaging technique that may be applied to the three-dimensional study of

  13. Applying microCT and 3D visualization to Jurassic silicified conifer seed cones: A virtual advantage over thin-sectioning1

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Carole T.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: As an alternative to conventional thin-sectioning, which destroys fossil material, high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (also called microtomography or microCT) integrated with scientific visualization, three-dimensional (3D) image segmentation, size analysis, and computer animation is explored as a nondestructive method of imaging the internal anatomy of 150-million-year-old conifer seed cones from the Late Jurassic Morrison Formation, USA, and of recent and other fossil cones. • Methods: MicroCT was carried out on cones using a General Electric phoenix v|tome|x s 240D, and resulting projections were processed with visualization software to produce image stacks of serial single sections for two-dimensional (2D) visualization, 3D segmented reconstructions with targeted structures in color, and computer animations. • Results: If preserved in differing densities, microCT produced images of internal fossil tissues that showed important characters such as seed phyllotaxy or number of seeds per cone scale. Color segmentation of deeply embedded seeds highlighted the arrangement of seeds in spirals. MicroCT of recent cones was even more effective. • Conclusions: This is the first paper on microCT integrated with 3D segmentation and computer animation applied to silicified seed cones, which resulted in excellent 2D serial sections and segmented 3D reconstructions, revealing features requisite to cone identification and understanding of strobilus construction. PMID:25202495

  14. Volume of sealer in the apical region of teeth filled by different techniques: a micro-CT analysis.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Vanessa Lessa; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Cruz Filho, Antônio Miranda da; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Silva, Ricardo Gariba

    2016-01-01

    The volume of sealer in the apical 1 mm of teeth filled using different techniques was evaluated by micro-commuted tomography (micro-CT). Sixty-four maxillary central incisors were prepared using NiTi rotary instruments. Teeth were randomly distributed into four groups according to root canal sealers (AH Plus, Endofill, Sealapex, and Sealer 26) and subdivided into two subgroups according to the filling techniques (active and passive lateral condensation; n = 8 each). Subsequently, teeth were examined using the 1174 SkyScan micro-CT device. Images were reconstructed using the NRecon software, and the sealer volume (mm3) in the apical region was analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Student-Newman-Keuls test (α = 0.05). The lowest volume of sealer was observed in teeth filled with Sealapex (0.100 ± 0.009) and Endofill (0.103 ± 0.010). The highest volume was observed in teeth filled with AH Plus (0.112 ± 0.008) and Sealer 26 (0.109 ± 0.018) (p > 0.05). Regarding the filling technique, a lower sealer volume was observed using the active lateral condensation technique compared with that using the passive lateral condensation technique (0.100 ± 0.010 vs. 0.111 ± 0.012) (p < 0.05). Therefore, the lowest volume of sealer was observed in teeth filled with Sealapex and Endofill using the active lateral condensation technique. PMID:27050936

  15. Airway segmentation and analysis for the study of mouse models of lung disease using micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaechevarria, X.; Pérez-Martín, D.; Ceresa, M.; de Biurrun, G.; Blanco, D.; Montuenga, L. M.; van Ginneken, B.; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, C.; Muñoz-Barrutia, A.

    2009-11-01

    Animal models of lung disease are gaining importance in understanding the underlying mechanisms of diseases such as emphysema and lung cancer. Micro-CT allows in vivo imaging of these models, thus permitting the study of the progression of the disease or the effect of therapeutic drugs in longitudinal studies. Automated analysis of micro-CT images can be helpful to understand the physiology of diseased lungs, especially when combined with measurements of respiratory system input impedance. In this work, we present a fast and robust murine airway segmentation and reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm is based on a propagating fast marching wavefront that, as it grows, divides the tree into segments. We devised a number of specific rules to guarantee that the front propagates only inside the airways and to avoid leaking into the parenchyma. The algorithm was tested on normal mice, a mouse model of chronic inflammation and a mouse model of emphysema. A comparison with manual segmentations of two independent observers shows that the specificity and sensitivity values of our method are comparable to the inter-observer variability, and radius measurements of the mainstem bronchi reveal significant differences between healthy and diseased mice. Combining measurements of the automatically segmented airways with the parameters of the constant phase model provides extra information on how disease affects lung function.

  16. Modeling and Reconstruction of Micro-structured 3D Chitosan/Gelatin Porous Scaffolds Using Micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Haibo; Li, Dichen; He, Jiankang; Liu, Yaxiong; Lian, Qin; Zhao, Jinna

    2008-09-01

    Three dimensional (3D) channel networks are the key to promise the uniform distribution of nutrients inside 3D hepatic tissue engineering scaffolds and prompt elimination of metabolic products out of the scaffolds. 3D chitosan/gelatin porous scaffolds with predefined internal channels were fabricated and a combination of light microscope, laser confocal microscopy and micro-CT were employed to characterize the structure of porous scaffolds. In order to evaluate the flow field distribution inside the micro-structured 3D scaffolds, a computer reconstructing method based on Micro-CT was proposed. According to this evaluating method, a contrast between 3D porous scaffolds with and without predefined internal channels was also performed to assess scaffolds' fluid characters. Results showed that the internal channel of the 3D scaffolds formed the 3D fluid channel network; the uniformity of flow field distribution of the scaffolds fabricated in this paper was better than the simple porous scaffold without micro-fluid channels.

  17. Investigation of signal thresholding to reduce the effects of instrument noise of an EMCCD based micro-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorsak, Alexander R.; Bysani Krishnakumar, Sumukh; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2016-03-01

    This project investigated the signal thresholding effectiveness at reducing the instrument noise of an electron multiplying charged coupled device (EMCCD) based micro-CT system at low x-ray exposure levels. Scans of a mouse spine and an iodine phantom were taken using an EMCCD detector coupled with a micro-CT system. An iodine filter of 4 mg/cm2 area density was placed in the beam. The output signal was thresholded using some multiple of the inherent background noise. For each threshold, 100, 200, and 300 frames were summed for each projection to evaluate the effect on the reconstructed image. The projection images from the scans were compared using line profiles and their SNR. Our results indicate that, as the threshold was increased, the line profiles of the projection images showed less statistical variation, but also lower signal levels, so that the SNR of the projection images decreased as the threshold increased. When the line profile of a projection image obtained using a signal threshold is compared with one obtained using energy integrating mode, the profile obtained using thresholding had less variation than that obtained using energy integration, which indicates less instrument noise. The SNR at the edges of the scan object is higher in the thresholded images when compared with the energy integrated projection images. We conclude that thresholding the output signal from an EMCCD detector at low x-ray exposure levels is an effective method to reduce the instrument noise of an EMCCD detector.

  18. Sensory epithelia of the fish inner ear in 3D: studied with high-resolution contrast enhanced microCT

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction While a number of studies have illustrated and analyzed 3D models of inner ears in higher vertebrates, inner ears in fishes have rarely been investigated in 3D, especially with regard to the sensory epithelia of the end organs, the maculae. It has been suggested that the 3D curvature of these maculae may also play an important role in hearing abilities in fishes. We therefore set out to develop a fast and reliable approach for detailed 3D visualization of whole inner ears as well as maculae. Results High-resolution microCT imaging of black mollies Poecilia sp. (Poeciliidae, Teleostei) and Steatocranus tinanti (Cichlidae, Teleostei) stained with phosphotungstic acid (PTA) resulted in good tissue contrast, enabling us to perform a reliable 3D reconstruction of all three sensory maculae of the inner ears. Comparison with maculae that have been 3D reconstructed based on histological serial sections and phalloidin-stained maculae showed high congruence in overall shape of the maculae studied here. Conclusions PTA staining and subsequent high-resolution contrast enhanced microCT imaging is a powerful method to obtain 3D models of fish inner ears and maculae in a fast and more reliable manner. Future studies investigating functional morphology, phylogenetic potential of inner ear features, or evolution of hearing and inner ear specialization in fishes may benefit from the use of 3D models of inner ears and maculae. PMID:24160754

  19. From the sample preparation to the volume rendering images of small animals: A step by step example of a procedure to carry out the micro-CT study of the leafhopper insect Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advances in micro-CT, digital computed tomography (CT) scan uses X-rays to make detailed pictures of structures inside of the body. Combining micro-CT with Digital Video Library systems, and linking this to Big Data, will change the way researchers, entomologist, and the public search and use anato...

  20. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott; Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W.; Sloan, Andrew

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A

  1. Modelling capillary trapping using finite-volume simulation of two-phase flow directly on micro-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeini, Ali Q.; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2015-09-01

    We study capillary trapping in porous media using direct pore-scale simulation of two-phase flow on micro-CT images of a Berea sandstone and a sandpack. The trapped non-wetting phase saturations are predicted by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using a volume-of-fluid based finite-volume framework to simulate primary drainage followed by water injection. Using these simulations, we analyse the effects of initial non-wetting-phase saturation, capillary number and flow direction on the residual saturation. The predictions from our numerical method are in agreement with published experimental measurements of capillary trapping curves. This shows that our direct simulation method can be used to elucidate the effect of pore structure and flow pattern of capillary trapping and provides a platform to study the physics of multiphase flow at the pore scale.

  2. Nondestructive Analysis of Apollo Samples by Micro-CT and Micro-XRF Analysis: A PET Style Examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, Ryan A.

    2014-01-01

    An integral part of any sample return mission is the initial description and classification of returned samples by the preliminary examination team (PET). The goal of a PET is to characterize and classify the returned samples, making this information available to the general research community who can then conduct more in-depth studies on the samples. A PET strives to minimize the impact their work has on the sample suite, which often limits the PET work to largely visual measurements and observations like optical microscopy. More modern techniques can also be utilized by future PET to nondestructively characterize astromaterials in a more rigorous way. Here we present our recent analyses of Apollo samples 14321 and 14305 by micro-CT and micro-XRF (respectively), assess the potential for discovery of "new" Apollo samples for scientific study, and evaluate the usefulness of these techniques in future PET efforts.

  3. Evaluating the dose effects of a longitudinal micro-CT study on pulmonary tissue in C57BL/6 mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detombe, Sarah A.; Dunmore-Buyze, Joy; Petrov, Ivailo E.; Drangova, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Background: Micro-computed tomography offers numerous advantages for small animal imaging, including the ability to monitor the same animals throughout a longitudinal study. However, concerns are often raised regarding the effects of x-ray dose accumulated over the course of the experiment. In this study, we scan C57BL/6 mice multiple times per week for six weeks, to determine the effect of the cumulative dose on pulmonary tissue at the end of the study. Methods/Results: C57BL/6 male mice were split into two groups (irradiated group=10, control group=10). The irradiated group was scanned (80kVp/50mA) each week for 6 weeks; the weekly scan session had three scans. This resulted in a weekly dose of 0.84 Gy, and a total study dose of 5.04 Gy. The control group was scanned on the final week. Scans from weeks 1 and 6 were reconstructed and analyzed: overall, there was no significant difference in lung volume or lung density between the control group and the irradiated group. Similarly, there were no significant differences between the week 1 and week 6 scans in the irradiated group. Histological samples taken from excised lung tissue also showed no evidence of inflammation or fibrosis in the irradiated group. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that a 5 Gy x-ray dose accumulated over six weeks during a longitudinal micro-CT study has no significant effects on the pulmonary tissue of C57BL/6 mice. As a result, the many advantages of micro- CT imaging, including rapid acquisition of high-resolution, isotropic images in free-breathing mice, can be taken advantage of in longitudinal studies without concern for negative dose-related effects.

  4. Evaluation of the marginal fit of full ceramic crowns by the microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) technique

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Necla; Ozturk, Atiye Nilgun; Malkoc, Meral Arslan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the marginal gap (MG) and absolute marginal discrepancy (MD) of full ceramic crowns with two finish line designs, shoulder and chamfer, using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) before and after cementation. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were divided into two groups based on the finish line design: Group I: 90° shoulder and Group II: 135° chamfer. The specimens were further grouped based on the type of full ceramic crown they received: Group A: Feldspathic Cerec inLab ceramic system, Group B: Cerec inLab aluminum oxide ceramic system and Group C: Lithium disilicate press ceramic system. Before cementation, five crowns from each group were scanned using micro-CT in two sections, sagittal and coronal, to determine the MG and MD values for four regions of the crown (sagittal buccal, sagittal lingual, coronal mesial and coronal distal). After cementation and thermal cycling, the scanning was repeated. Measurements were obtained from 10 points for each region, 80 points totally, to evaluate the MG and MD values. Files were processed using NRecon and CTAn software. Results were statistically analyzed using one- and two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (P = 0.05). Results: Full ceramic systems showed clinically acceptable marginal adaptation values. The Feldspathic Cerec inLab ceramic system generally presented the lowest variance, except in the MG values of the coronal mesial region. The MG and MD values of all ceramics increased significantly after cementation, except in the shoulder preparation design (sagittal buccal region) for MG and in the chamfer preparation design (sagittal lingual region) for MD values. Conclusions: Full-ceramic crowns showed clinically acceptable marginal adaptation values. The Feldspathic Cerec inLab ceramic system (Vitablocs Mark II) generally presented the lowest variance when compared with the other ceramics, except for the MG values on the mesial surface of the coronal section

  5. Histological and Micro-CT Evidence of Stigmatic Rostellum Receptivity Promoting Auto-Pollination in the Madagascan Orchid Bulbophyllum bicoloratum

    PubMed Central

    Gamisch, Alexander; Staedler, Yannick M.; Schönenberger, Jürg; Fischer, Gunter A.; Comes, Hans Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background The rostellum, a projecting part of the gynostemium in orchid flowers, separates the anther(s) from the stigma and thus commonly prevents auto-pollination. Nonetheless, as a modified (usually distal) portion of the median stigma lobe, the rostellum has been frequently invoked of having re-gained a stigmatic function in rare cases of orchid auto-pollination. Here it is shown that a newly discovered selfing variant of Madagascan Bulbophyllumbicoloratum has evolved a modified rostellum allowing the penetration of pollen tubes from in situ pollinia. Methods Gynostemium micro-morphology and anatomy of selfing and outcrossing variants of B. bicoloratum was studied by using light and scanning electron microscopy and histological sections. Pollen tube growth in the selfing variant was further observed via X-ray computed microtomography (micro-CT), providing 3D reconstructions of floral tissues at a micron scale. Findings Selfing variants possess a suberect (‘displaced’) rostellum rather than the conventional, erect type. Very early in anthesis, the pollinia of selfers are released from the anther and slide down onto the suberect rostellum, where pollen tube growth preferentially occurs through the non-vascularized, i.e. rear (adaxial) and (semi-) lateral parts. This penetrated tissue is comprised of a thin layer of elongate and loosely arranged cells, embedded in stigmatic exudates, as also observed in the stigmatic cavity of both selfing and outcrossing variants. Conclusions Our results provide the first solid evidence of a stigmatic function for the rostellum in orchid flowers, thereby demonstrating for the first time the feasibility of the micro-CT technique for accurately visualizing pollen tube growth in flowering plants. Rostellum receptivity in B. bicoloratum probably uniquely evolved as an adaptation for reproductive assurance from an outcrossing ancestor possessing an erect (non-receptive) rostellum. These findings open up new avenues in the

  6. Local plate/rod descriptors of 3D trabecular bone micro-CT images from medial axis topologic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peyrin, Francoise; Attali, Dominique; Chappard, Christine; Benhamou, Claude Laurent

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: Trabecular bone microarchitecture is made of a complex network of plate and rod structures evolving with age and disease. The purpose of this article is to propose a new 3D local analysis method for the quantitative assessment of parameters related to the geometry of trabecular bone microarchitecture. Methods: The method is based on the topologic classification of the medial axis of the 3D image into branches, rods, and plates. Thanks to the reversibility of the medial axis, the classification is next extended to the whole 3D image. Finally, the percentages of rods and plates as well as their mean thicknesses are calculated. The method was applied both to simulated test images and 3D micro-CT images of human trabecular bone. Results: The classification of simulated phantoms made of plates and rods shows that the maximum error in the quantitative percentages of plate and rods is less than 6% and smaller than with the structure model index (SMI). Micro-CT images of human femoral bone taken in osteoporosis and early or advanced osteoarthritis were analyzed. Despite the large physiological variability, the present method avoids the underestimation of rods observed with other local methods. The relative percentages of rods and plates were not significantly different between osteoarthritis and osteoporotic groups, whereas their absolute percentages were in relation to an increase of rod and plate thicknesses in advanced osteoarthritis with also higher relative and absolute number of nodes. Conclusions: The proposed method is model-independent, robust to surface irregularities, and enables geometrical characterization of not only skeletal structures but entire 3D images. Its application provided more accurate results than the standard SMI on simple simulated phantoms, but the discrepancy observed on the advanced osteoarthritis group raises questions that will require further investigations. The systematic use of such a local method in the characterization of

  7. In vivo characterization of tumor vasculature using iodine and gold nanoparticles and dual energy micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Darin P.; Ghaghada, Ketan; Moding, Everett J.; Kirsch, David G.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2013-03-01

    Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability are well established indicators of tumor angiogenesis and important predictors in cancer diagnosis, planning and treatment. In this work, we establish a novel preclinical imaging protocol which allows quantitative measurement of both metrics simultaneously. First, gold nanoparticles are injected and allowed to extravasate into the tumor, and then liposomal iodine nanoparticles are injected. Combining a previously optimized dual energy micro-CT scan using high-flux polychromatic x-ray sources (energies: 40 kVp, 80 kVp) with a novel post-reconstruction spectral filtration scheme, we are able to decompose the results into 3D iodine and gold maps, allowing simultaneous measurement of extravasated gold and intravascular iodine concentrations. Using a digital resolution phantom, the mean limits of detectability (mean CNR = 5) for each element are determined to be 2.3 mg mL-1 (18 mM) for iodine and 1.0 mg mL-1 (5.1 mM) for gold, well within the observed in vivo concentrations of each element (I: 0-24 mg mL-1, Au: 0-9 mg mL-1) and a factor of 10 improvement over the limits without post-reconstruction spectral filtration. Using a calibration phantom, these limits are validated and an optimal sensitivity matrix for performing decomposition using our micro-CT system is derived. Finally, using a primary mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma, we demonstrate the in vivo application of the protocol to measure fractional blood volume and vascular permeability over the course of five days of active tumor growth.

  8. Volume shrinkage of bone, brain and muscle tissue in sample preparation for micro-CT and light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM).

    PubMed

    Buytaert, Jan; Goyens, Jana; De Greef, Daniel; Aerts, Peter; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-08-01

    Two methods are especially suited for tomographic imaging with histological detail of macroscopic samples that consist of multiple tissue types (bone, muscle, nerve or fat): Light sheet (based) fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Micro-CT requires staining with heavy chemical elements (and thus fixation and sometimes dehydration) in order to make soft tissue imageable when measured alongside denser structures. LSMF requires fixation, decalcification, dehydration, clearing and staining with a fluorescent dye. The specimen preparation of both imaging methods is prone to shrinkage, which is often not mentioned, let alone quantified. In this paper the presence and degree of shrinkage are quantitatively identified for the selected preparation methods/stains. LSFM delivers a volume shrinkage of 17% for bone, 56% for muscle and 62% for brain tissue. The three most popular micro-CT stains (phosphotungstic acid, iodine with potassium iodide, and iodine in absolute ethanol) deliver a volume shrinkage ranging from 10 to 56% for muscle and 27-66% for brain, while bone does not shrink in micro-CT preparation. PMID:24963987

  9. Longitudinal in vivo evaluation of bone regeneration by combined measurement of multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienemann, Philipp S.; Metzger, Stéphanie; Kiveliö, Anna-Sofia; Blanc, Alain; Papageorgiou, Panagiota; Astolfo, Alberto; Pinzer, Bernd R.; Cinelli, Paolo; Weber, Franz E.; Schibli, Roger; Béhé, Martin; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decades, great strides were made in the development of novel implants for the treatment of bone defects. The increasing versatility and complexity of these implant designs request for concurrent advances in means to assess in vivo the course of induced bone formation in preclinical models. Since its discovery, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has excelled as powerful high-resolution technique for non-invasive assessment of newly formed bone tissue. However, micro-CT fails to provide spatiotemporal information on biological processes ongoing during bone regeneration. Conversely, due to the versatile applicability and cost-effectiveness, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) would be an ideal technique for assessing such biological processes with high sensitivity and for nuclear imaging comparably high resolution (<1 mm). Herein, we employ modular designed poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels that release bone morphogenetic protein to guide the healing of critical sized calvarial bone defects. By combined in vivo longitudinal multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT evaluations we determine the spatiotemporal course of bone formation and remodeling within this synthetic hydrogel implant. End point evaluations by high resolution micro-CT and histological evaluation confirm the value of this approach to follow and optimize bone-inducing biomaterials.

  10. Longitudinal in vivo evaluation of bone regeneration by combined measurement of multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lienemann, Philipp S.; Metzger, Stéphanie; Kiveliö, Anna-Sofia; Blanc, Alain; Papageorgiou, Panagiota; Astolfo, Alberto; Pinzer, Bernd R.; Cinelli, Paolo; Weber, Franz E.; Schibli, Roger; Béhé, Martin; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, great strides were made in the development of novel implants for the treatment of bone defects. The increasing versatility and complexity of these implant designs request for concurrent advances in means to assess in vivo the course of induced bone formation in preclinical models. Since its discovery, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has excelled as powerful high-resolution technique for non-invasive assessment of newly formed bone tissue. However, micro-CT fails to provide spatiotemporal information on biological processes ongoing during bone regeneration. Conversely, due to the versatile applicability and cost-effectiveness, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) would be an ideal technique for assessing such biological processes with high sensitivity and for nuclear imaging comparably high resolution (<1 mm). Herein, we employ modular designed poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels that release bone morphogenetic protein to guide the healing of critical sized calvarial bone defects. By combined in vivo longitudinal multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT evaluations we determine the spatiotemporal course of bone formation and remodeling within this synthetic hydrogel implant. End point evaluations by high resolution micro-CT and histological evaluation confirm the value of this approach to follow and optimize bone-inducing biomaterials. PMID:25989250

  11. SU-E-I-84: Accuracy Comparison of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using In-Air Micro-CT Image Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y; Fullerton, G; Goins, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor volume is considered as a better predictor for therapy response monitoring and tumor staging over Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. In this study, the accuracy of subcutaneous rodent tumor volumes using preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and ultrasound (US) equipment and with an external caliper was compared using in-air micro-CT image volume of excised tumors determined as reference tumor volume in our prior study. Methods: MR, US and micro-CT images of subcutaneous SCC4 head and neck tumor xenografts were acquired 4, 6, 9, 11 and 13 days after tumor cell inoculation. Before MR and US scans, caliper measurements were made. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging and ex vivo caliper measurements were performed. Tumor volumes were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three image modalities and caliper, and compared with reference tumor volume by linear regression analysis as well as Bland-Altman plots. A one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test was also performed to compare volumes among caliper measurements. Results: The correlation coefficients (R2) of the regression lines for tumor volumes measured by the three imaging modalities and caliper were 0.9939, 0.9669, 0.9806, 0.9274, 0.9619 and 0.9819 for MRI, US and micro-CT, caliperbeforeMRI, caliperbeforeUS and ex vivo caliper respectively. In Bland-Altman plots, the average of tumor volume difference from reference tumor volume (bias) was significant for caliper and micro- CT, but not for MRI and US. Comparison of caliper measurements showed a significant difference (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Using the in-air micro-CT image volume, tumor volume measured by MRI was the most accurate among the three imaging modalities. In vivo caliper volume measurements showed unreliability while ex

  12. In Vivo Quantitative Assessment of Myocardial Structure, Function, Perfusion and Viability Using Cardiac Micro-computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    van Deel, Elza; Ridwan, Yanto; van Vliet, J. Nicole; Belenkov, Sasha; Essers, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The use of Micro-Computed Tomography (MicroCT) for in vivo studies of small animals as models of human disease has risen tremendously due to the fact that MicroCT provides quantitative high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) anatomical data non-destructively and longitudinally. Most importantly, with the development of a novel preclinical iodinated contrast agent called eXIA160, functional and metabolic assessment of the heart became possible. However, prior to the advent of commercial MicroCT scanners equipped with X-ray flat-panel detector technology and easy-to-use cardio-respiratory gating, preclinical studies of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in small animals required a MicroCT technologist with advanced skills, and thus were impractical for widespread implementation. The goal of this work is to provide a practical guide to the use of the high-speed Quantum FX MicroCT system for comprehensive determination of myocardial global and regional function along with assessment of myocardial perfusion, metabolism and viability in healthy mice and in a cardiac ischemia mouse model induced by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). PMID:26967592

  13. In Vivo Quantitative Assessment of Myocardial Structure, Function, Perfusion and Viability Using Cardiac Micro-computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    van Deel, Elza; Ridwan, Yanto; van Vliet, J Nicole; Belenkov, Sasha; Essers, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The use of Micro-Computed Tomography (MicroCT) for in vivo studies of small animals as models of human disease has risen tremendously due to the fact that MicroCT provides quantitative high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) anatomical data non-destructively and longitudinally. Most importantly, with the development of a novel preclinical iodinated contrast agent called eXIA160, functional and metabolic assessment of the heart became possible. However, prior to the advent of commercial MicroCT scanners equipped with X-ray flat-panel detector technology and easy-to-use cardio-respiratory gating, preclinical studies of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in small animals required a MicroCT technologist with advanced skills, and thus were impractical for widespread implementation. The goal of this work is to provide a practical guide to the use of the high-speed Quantum FX MicroCT system for comprehensive determination of myocardial global and regional function along with assessment of myocardial perfusion, metabolism and viability in healthy mice and in a cardiac ischemia mouse model induced by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). PMID:26967592

  14. Identification of New Lithic Clasts in Lunar Breccia 14305 by Micro-CT and Micro-XRF Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, Ryan A.; Carpenter, Paul K.; Jolliff, Bradley L.

    2014-01-01

    From 1969 to 1972, Apollo astronauts collected 382 kg of rocks, soils, and core samples from six locations on the surface of the Moon. The samples were initially characterized, largely by binocular examination, in a custom-built facility at Johnson Space Center (JSC), and the samples have been curated at JSC ever since. Despite over 40 years of study, demand for samples remains high (500 subsamples per year are allocated to scientists around the world), particularly for plutonic (e.g., anorthosites, norites, etc.) and evolved (e.g., granites, KREEP basalts) lithologies. The reason for the prolonged interest is that as new scientists and new techniques examine the samples, our understanding of how the Moon, Earth, and other inner Solar System bodies formed and evolved continues to grow. Scientists continually clamor for new samples to test their emerging hypotheses. Although all of the large Apollo samples that are igneous rocks have been classified, many Apollo samples are complex polymict breccias that have previously yielded large (cm-sized) igneous clasts. In this work we present the initial efforts to use the non-destructive techniques of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and micro x-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) to identify large lithic clasts in Apollo 14 polymict breccia sample 14305. The sample in this study is 14305,483, a 150 g slab of regolith breccia 14305 measuring 10x6x2 cm (Figure 1a). The sample was scanned at the University of Texas High-Resolution X-ray CT Facility on an Xradia MicroXCT scanner. Two adjacent overlapping volumes were acquired at 49.2 micrometer resolution and stitched together, resulting in 1766 slices. Each volume was acquired at 100 kV accelerating voltage and 98 mA beam current with a 1 mm CaF2 filter, with 2161 views gathered over 360deg at 3 seconds acquisition time per view. Micro-XRF analyses were done at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri on an EDAX Orbis PC micro-XRF instrument. Multiple scans were made at 40 k

  15. A Preliminary Study on Sinus Fungus Ball with MicroCT and X-Ray Fluorescence Technique

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zidong; Zhang, Kai; Huang, Wanxia; Yuan, Qingxi

    2016-01-01

    Background Sinus fungus ball, an accumulation of fungal dense concretions, is a common disease in practice, and might cause fatal complications or lead to death once converted into invasive type. Early preoperative diagnosis of this disease can lead to appropriate treatment for patients and prevent multiple surgical procedures. Up to now, the diagnostic criteria of sinus fungus ball have been defined and computed tomography (CT) scan was considered as a valuable preoperative diagnostic tool. However, the sensitivity of clinical CT is only about 62%. Thus, investigating the factors which influence sensitivity is necessary for clinical CT to be a more valuable preoperative diagnosis tool. Furthermore, CT scan usually presents micro-calcifications or spots with metallic density in sinus fungus ball. Previous literatures show that there are some metallic elements such as calcium and zinc in fungus ball, and they concluded that endodontic treatment has a strong correlation with the development of maxillary sinus fungus ball and zinc ion was an exogenous risk factor. But the pathogenesis of sinus fungus ball still remains unclear because fungus ball can also develop in other non-maxillary sinuses or the maxillary sinus without root canal treatment. Is zinc ion the endogenous factor? Study on this point might be also helpful for investigating the pathogenesis of sinus fungus ball. In this paper, we tried to investigate the factors which influence the sensitivity of clinical CT by imaging sinus fungus ball with microCT. The origin of zinc ion was also studied through elements test for different fungal ball samples using x-ray fluorescence technique. Methods Specimens including fungal ball material and sinus mucosa from patients confirmed by pathological findings were extracted after surgery. All fungal ball specimens came from sphenoid sinus, ethmoidal sinus and maxillary sinus with or without previous endodontic treatment respectively. All of them were imaged by microCT

  16. The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pyka, Grzegorz; Kerckhofs, Greet

    2014-01-15

    In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: • We examine influence of the image resolution

  17. Concentration-dependent specimen shrinkage in iodine-enhanced microCT

    PubMed Central

    Vickerton, Paula; Jarvis, Jonathan; Jeffery, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Iodine potassium iodide (I2KI) solution can be employed as a contrast agent for the visualisation of soft tissue structures in micro-computed tomography studies. This technique provides high resolution images of soft tissue non-destructively but initial studies suggest that the stain can cause substantial specimen shrinkage. The degree of specimen shrinkage, and potential deformation, is an important consideration when using the data for morphological studies. Here we quantify the macroscopic volume changes in mouse skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and cerebellum as a result of immersion in the common fixatives 10% phosphate-buffered formal saline, 70% ethanol and 3% glutaraldehyde, compared with I2KI staining solution at concentrations of 2, 6, 10 and 20%. Immersion in the I2KI solution resulted in dramatic changes of tissue volume, which were far larger than the shrinkage from formalin fixation alone. The degree of macroscopic change was most dependent upon the I2KI concentration, with severe shrinkage of 70% seen in solutions of 20% I2KI after 14 days' incubation. When using this technique care needs to be taken to use the lowest concentration that will give adequate contrast to minimise artefacts due to shrinkage. PMID:23721431

  18. Variation in osteocyte lacunar morphology and density in the human femur - a synchrotron radiation micro-CT study

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Yasmin; Thomas, C David L.; Clement, John G; Peele, Andrew G; Hannah, Kevin; Cooper, David M.L.

    2013-04-09

    In recent years there has been growing interest in the spatial properties of osteocytes (including density and morphology) and how these potentially relate to adaptation, disease and aging. This interest has, in part, arisen from the availability of increasingly high-resolution 3D imaging modalities such as synchrotron radiation (SR) micro-CT. As resolution increases, field of view generally decreases. Thus, while increasingly detailed spatial information is obtained, it is unclear how representative this information is of the skeleton or even the isolated bone. The purpose of this research was to describe the variation in osteocyte lacunar density, morphology and orientation within the femur from a healthy young male human. Multiple anterior, posterior, medial and lateral blocks (2 mm × 2 mm) were prepared from the proximal femoral shaft and SR micro-CT imaged at the Advanced Photon Source. Average lacunar densities (± standard deviation) from the anterior, posterior, medial and lateral regions were 27,169 ± 1935, 26,3643 ± 1262, 37,521 ± 6416 and 33,972 ± 2513 lacunae per mm3 of bone tissue, respectively. These values were significantly different between the medial and both the anterior and posterior regions (p < 0.05). The density of the combined anterior and posterior regions was also significantly lower (p = 0.001) than the density of the combined medial and lateral regions. Although no difference was found in predominant orientation, shape differences were found; with the combined anterior and posterior regions having more elongated (p = 0.004) and flattened (p = 0.045) lacunae, than those of the medial and lateral regions. This study reveals variation in osteocyte lacunar density and morphology within the cross-section of a single bone and that this variation can be considerable (up to 30% difference in density between regions). The underlying functional significance of the observed variation in lacunar density likely relates to localized

  19. High Resolution Imaging of Murine Myocardial Infarction With Delayed Enhancement and Cine Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Badea, Cristian; Hedlund, Laurence W; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Sosnovik, David E.; Johnson, G Allan; Weissleder, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of delayed enhancement µCT imaging to quantify myocardial infarct size in experimental mouse models. Methods and Results A total of 20 mice were imaged 5 or 35 days after surgical ligation of the left coronary artery, or sham surgery (n=6–7 per group). We utilized a prototype εCT which covers a 3D volume with an isotropic spatial resolution of 100 µm. A series of image acquisitions were started after a 200 µL bolus of a high molecular weight blood pool CT agent to outline the ventricles. CT imaging was continuously performed over 60 minutes, while an intravenous constant infusion with iopamidol 370 was started at a dosage of 1 mL/h. Thirty minutes after the initiation of this infusion, signal intensity in Hounsfild Units was significantly higher in the infarct than in the remote, uninjured myocardium. Cardiac morphology and motion was visualized with excellent contrast and in fine detail. In vivo CT determination of infarct extension and transmurality was in good agreement with ex vivo staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (5 days post MI: r2= 0.86, p < 0.01; 35 days post MI r2=0.92, p < 0.01). In addition, we detected significant left ventricular remodeling consisting of left ventricular dilation and decreased ejection fraction. Conclusion 3D cine µCT reliably and rapidly quantifies infarct size and assesses murine anatomy and physiology after coronary ligation, despite the small size and the fast movement of the mouse heart. This efficient imaging tool is a valuable addition to the current phenotyping armamentarium and will allow rapid testing of novel drugs and cell based interventions in murine models. PMID:17322414

  20. 4D embryonic cardiography using gated optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, M. W.; Rothenberg, F.; Roy, D.; Nikolski, V. P.; Hu, Z.; Watanabe, M.; Wilson, D. L.; Efimov, I. R.; Rollins, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of very early embryonic heart structure and function has technical limitations of spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed a gated technique using optical coherence tomography (OCT) that can rapidly image beating embryonic hearts in four-dimensions (4D), at high spatial resolution (10-15 μm), and with a depth penetration of 1.5 - 2.0 mm that is suitable for the study of early embryonic hearts. We acquired data from paced, excised, embryonic chicken and mouse hearts using gated sampling and employed image processing techniques to visualize the hearts in 4D and measure physiologic parameters such as cardiac volume, ejection fraction, and wall thickness. This technique is being developed to longitudinally investigate the physiology of intact embryonic hearts and events that lead to congenital heart defects.

  1. Micro-CT evaluation of in vivo osteogenesis at implants processed by wire-type electric discharge machining.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Koichi; Kataoka, Yu; Ohtsuka, Fukunaga; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Titanium surfaces processed by wire-type electric discharge machining (EDM) are microfabricated surfaces with an irregular morphology, and they exhibited excellent in vitro bone biocompatibility. In this study, the efficiency of in vivo osteogenesis on EDM surfaces was investigated by surgically placing screw-shaped EDM-processed and machined-surface implants into the femurs of four Japanese white rabbits. The volume and process of new bone formation were evaluated by an X-ray micro-CT scanner, coupled with histopathological observations at 1, 2, and 4 weeks post-implantation. Before surgical implantation, the surface topography and contact angle of each implant surface were examined. Bone formation increased over time on both implant surfaces, with both implant types yielding statistically equivalent bone volume at 4 weeks post-implementation. However, at 1 week post-implantation, amount of new bone at EDM-processed implant was markedly greater than that at machined-surface implant. Moreover, new bone appeared to initiate directly from the EDM surfaces, while new bone appeared to generate from pre-existing host bone to the machined surfaces. Thus, EDM seemed to be a promising method for surface modification of titanium implants to support enhanced osteogenesis.

  2. Volume of myocardium perfused by coronary artery branches as estimated from 3D micro-CT images of rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Patricia E.; Naessens, Lauren C.; Seaman, Catherine A.; Reyes, Denise A.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2000-04-01

    Average myocardial perfusion is remarkably consistent throughout the heart wall under resting conditions and the velocity of blood flow is fairly reproducible from artery to artery. Based on these observations, and the fact that flow through an artery is the product of arterial cross-sectional area and blood flow velocity, we would expect the volume of myocardium perfused to be proportional to the cross-sectional area of the coronary artery perfusing that volume of myocardium. This relationship has been confirmed by others in pigs, dogs and humans. To test the body size-dependence of this relationship we used the hearts from rats, 3 through 25 weeks of age. The coronary arteries were infused with radiopaque microfil polymer and the hearts scanned in a micro- CT scanner. Using these 3D images we measured the volume of myocardium and the arterial cross-sectional area of the artery that perfused that volume of myocardium. The average constant of proportionality was found to be 0.15 +/- 0.08 cm3/mm2. Our data showed no statistically different estimates of the constant of proportionality in the rat hearts of different ages nor between the left and right coronary arteries. This constant is smaller than that observed in large animals and humans, but this difference is consistent with the body mass-dependence on metabolic rate.

  3. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the odontophoral cartilages of Caenogastropoda (Mollusca: Gastropoda) using micro-CT: Morphology and phylogenetic significance.

    PubMed

    Golding, Rosemary E; Ponder, Winston F; Byrne, Maria

    2009-05-01

    Odontophoral cartilages are located in the molluscan buccal mass and support the movement of the radula during feeding. The structural diversity of odontophoral cartilages is currently known only from limited taxa, but this information is important for interpreting phylogeny and for understanding the biomechanical operation of the buccal mass. Caenogastropods exhibit a wide variety of feeding strategies, but there is little comparative information on cartilage morphology within this group. The morphology of caenogastropod odontophoral cartilages is currently known only from dissection and histology, although preliminary results suggest that they may be structurally diverse. A comparative morphological survey of 18 caenogastropods and three noncaenogastropods has been conducted, sampling most major caenogastropod superfamilies. Three-dimensional models of the odontophoral cartilages were generated using X-ray microscopy (micro-CT) and reconstruction by image segmentation. Considerable morphological diversity of the odontophoral cartilages was found within Caenogastropoda, including the presence of thin cartilaginous appendages, asymmetrically overlapping cartilages, and reflexed cartilage margins. Many basal caenogastropod taxa possess previously unidentified cartilaginous support structures below the radula (subradular cartilages), which may be homologous to the dorsal cartilages of other gastropods. As subradular cartilages were absent in carnivorous caenogastropods, adaptation to trophic specialization is likely. However, incongruence with specific feeding strategies or body size suggests that the morphology of odontophoral cartilages is constrained by phylogeny, representing a new source of morphological characters to improve the phylogenetic resolution of this group.

  4. Impact of micronutrients supplementation on bone repair around implants: microCT and counter-torque analysis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Suzana Peres; Casarin, Renato Correa; Ribeiro, Fernanda Vieira; Cirano, Fabiano Ribeiro; Rovaris, Karla; Haiter, Francisco; Casati, Marcio Zaffalon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of natural substances and micronutritional approaches has been suggested as a therapeutic alternative to benefit the bone healing associated with no side effects. Nevertheless, the influence of micronutritional interventions with therapeutic proprieties on the bone repair has yet to be intensely evaluated, and no evidence is available exploring the impact of micronutrient supplementation on the peri-implant bone healing. Objective This study investigated the effect of micronutrients supplementation on the bone repair around implants. Material and Methods One screw-shaped titanium implant was inserted in each tibia of each rat, which were assigned to: daily administration, for 30 d, of the placebo solution (Placebo group-n:18) or micronutrients supplementation (Micronutrients group-n:18), based on calcium, magnesium, zinc, and vitamin D3 intake. After, the animals were sacrificed. One of the implants was removed by applying a counter-torque force to evaluate the force to rupture the bone-implant interface. The other implant was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (CT) examination to determine the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and the bone volume (BV/TV). Results No statistically significant differences were observed between the groups for both counter-torque values and microCT parameters (p>0.05). Conclusion Within the limits of this study, micronutrients supplementation did not provide additional benefits to the bone healing around dental implants. PMID:27008256

  5. Micro-CT Imaging Reveals Mekk3 Heterozygosity Prevents Cerebral Cavernous Malformations in Ccm2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaesung P; Foley, Matthew; Zhou, Zinan; Wong, Weng-Yew; Gokoolparsadh, Naveena; Arthur, J Simon C; Li, Dean Y; Zheng, Xiangjian

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in CCM1 (aka KRIT1), CCM2, or CCM3 (aka PDCD10) gene cause cerebral cavernous malformation in humans. Mouse models of CCM disease have been established by deleting Ccm genes in postnatal animals. These mouse models provide invaluable tools to investigate molecular mechanism and therapeutic approaches for CCM disease. However, the full value of these animal models is limited by the lack of an accurate and quantitative method to assess lesion burden and progression. In the present study we have established a refined and detailed contrast enhanced X-ray micro-CT method to measure CCM lesion burden in mouse brains. As this study utilized a voxel dimension of 9.5μm (leading to a minimum feature size of approximately 25μm), it is therefore sufficient to measure CCM lesion volume and number globally and accurately, and provide high-resolution 3-D mapping of CCM lesions in mouse brains. Using this method, we found loss of Ccm1 or Ccm2 in neonatal endothelium confers CCM lesions in the mouse hindbrain with similar total volume and number. This quantitative approach also demonstrated a rescue of CCM lesions with simultaneous deletion of one allele of Mekk3. This method would enhance the value of the established mouse models to study the molecular basis and potential therapies for CCM and other cerebrovascular diseases.

  6. Micro-CT Imaging Reveals Mekk3 Heterozygosity Prevents Cerebral Cavernous Malformations in Ccm2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaesung P.; Foley, Matthew; Zhou, Zinan; Wong, Weng-Yew; Gokoolparsadh, Naveena; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Li, Dean Y.; Zheng, Xiangjian

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in CCM1 (aka KRIT1), CCM2, or CCM3 (aka PDCD10) gene cause cerebral cavernous malformation in humans. Mouse models of CCM disease have been established by deleting Ccm genes in postnatal animals. These mouse models provide invaluable tools to investigate molecular mechanism and therapeutic approaches for CCM disease. However, the full value of these animal models is limited by the lack of an accurate and quantitative method to assess lesion burden and progression. In the present study we have established a refined and detailed contrast enhanced X-ray micro-CT method to measure CCM lesion burden in mouse brains. As this study utilized a voxel dimension of 9.5μm (leading to a minimum feature size of approximately 25μm), it is therefore sufficient to measure CCM lesion volume and number globally and accurately, and provide high-resolution 3-D mapping of CCM lesions in mouse brains. Using this method, we found loss of Ccm1 or Ccm2 in neonatal endothelium confers CCM lesions in the mouse hindbrain with similar total volume and number. This quantitative approach also demonstrated a rescue of CCM lesions with simultaneous deletion of one allele of Mekk3. This method would enhance the value of the established mouse models to study the molecular basis and potential therapies for CCM and other cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:27513872

  7. Details of human middle ear morphology based on micro-CT imaging of phosphotungstic acid stained samples.

    PubMed

    De Greef, Daniel; Buytaert, Jan A N; Aerts, Johan R M; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Dierick, Manuel; Dirckx, Joris

    2015-09-01

    A multitude of morphological aspects of the human middle ear (ME) were studied qualitatively and/or quantitatively through the postprocessing and interpretation of micro-CT (micro X-ray computed tomography) data of six human temporal bones. The samples were scanned after phosphotungstic acid staining to enhance soft-tissue contrast. The influence of this staining on ME ossicle configuration was shown to be insignificant. Through postprocessing, the image data were converted into surface models, after which the approaches diverged depending on the topics of interest. The studied topics were: the ME ligaments; morphometric and mechanical parameters of the ossicles relating to inertia and the ossicular lever arm ratio; the morphology of the distal incus; the contact surface areas of the tympanic membrane (TM) and of the stapes footplate; and the thickness of the TM, round window of the cochlea, ossicle joint spaces, and stapedial annular ligament. Some of the resulting insights are relevant in ongoing discussions concerning ME morphology and mechanical functions, while other results provide quantitative data to add to existing data. All findings are discussed in the light of other published data and many are relevant for the construction of mechanical finite element simulations of the ME.

  8. Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on mandibular condyle growth in rats analyzed with micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kyozo; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Horinuki, Eri; Arai, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a bite-jumping appliance combined with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation on the mandibular condyle of growing rats using micro CT (mCT) and histological examinations. Twelve Wistar rats were divided into three groups of four individuals each: Group 1 was an untreated control group, Group 2 received bite-jumping appliances, and Group 3 received bite-jumping appliances and LIPUS stimulation (15 min/day, 2 weeks) to the temporomandibular region. We measured the length and three-dimensional bone volume of each rat's mandibular condyle using mCT. The condylar cartilage was observed after the rats had been sacrificed. There was no significant difference in condylar sagittal width among the groups. The bite-jumping appliance combined with LIPUS stimulation increased the condylar major axis, mandibular sagittal length and condylar bone volume to a greater degree than use of the bite-jumping appliance alone. Histological examination demonstrated hypertrophy of the condylar cartilage layers, the fibrous layer and hypertrophic cell layer of the rats treated with bite-jumping appliances combined with LIPUS stimulation in comparison to rats treated with bite-jumping appliances alone. (J Oral Sci 58, 415-422, 2016). PMID:27665982

  9. Tooth fracture risk analysis based on a new finite element dental structure models using micro-CT data.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Fan, W; Mishra, S; El-Atem, A; Schuetz, M A; Xiao, Y

    2012-10-01

    The finite element (FE) analysis is an effective method to study the strength and predict the fracture risk of endodontically-treated teeth. This paper presents a rapid method developed to generate a comprehensive tooth FE model using data retrieved from micro-computed tomography (μCT). With this method, the inhomogeneity of material properties of teeth was included into the model without dividing the tooth model into different regions. The material properties of the tooth were assumed to be related to the mineral density. The fracture risk at different tooth portions was assessed for root canal treatments. The micro-CT images of a tooth were processed by a Matlab software programme and the CT numbers were retrieved. The tooth contours were obtained with thresholding segmentation using Amira. The inner and outer surfaces of the tooth were imported into Solidworks and a three-dimensional (3D) tooth model was constructed. An assembly of the tooth model with the periodontal ligament (PDL) layer and surrounding bone was imported into ABAQUS. The material properties of the tooth were calculated from the retrieved CT numbers via ABAQUS user's subroutines. Three root canal geometries (original and two enlargements) were investigated. The proposed method in this study can generate detailed 3D finite element models of a tooth with different root canal enlargements and filling materials, and would be very useful for the assessment of the fracture risk at different tooth portions after root canal treatments.

  10. Automated detection of retinal cell nuclei in 3D micro-CT images of zebrafish using support vector machine classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yifu; Tavolara, Thomas; Cheng, Keith

    2016-03-01

    Our group is developing a method to examine biological specimens in cellular detail using synchrotron microCT. The method can acquire 3D images of tissue at micrometer-scale resolutions, allowing for individual cell types to be visualized in the context of the entire specimen. For model organism research, this tool will enable the rapid characterization of tissue architecture and cellular morphology from every organ system. This characterization is critical for proposed and ongoing "phenome" projects that aim to phenotype whole-organism mutants and diseased tissues from different organisms including humans. With the envisioned collection of hundreds to thousands of images for a phenome project, it is important to develop quantitative image analysis tools for the automated scoring of organism phenotypes across organ systems. Here we present a first step towards that goal, demonstrating the use of support vector machines (SVM) in detecting retinal cell nuclei in 3D images of wild-type zebrafish. In addition, we apply the SVM classifier on a mutant zebrafish to examine whether SVMs can be used to capture phenotypic differences in these images. The longterm goal of this work is to allow cellular and tissue morphology to be characterized quantitatively for many organ systems, at the level of the whole-organism.

  11. Permeability estimation of porous media by using an improved capillary bundle model based on micro-CT derived pore geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lanlan; Liu, Yu; Teng, Ying; Zhao, Jiafei; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Mingjun; Song, Yongchen

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a permeability estimation method for porous media. This method is based on an improved capillary bundle model by introducing some pore geometries. We firstly carried out micro-CT scans to extract the 3D digital model of porous media. Then we applied a maximum ball extraction method to the digital model to obtain the topological and geometrical pore parameters such as the pore radius, the throat radius and length and the average coordination number. We also applied a random walker method to calculate the tortuosity factors of porous media. We improved the capillary bundle model by introducing the pore geometries and tortuosity factors. Finally, we calculated the absolute permeabilities of four kinds of porous media formed of glass beads and compared the results with experiments and several other models to verify the improved model. We found that the calculated permeabilities using this improved capillary bundle model show better agreement with the measured permeabilities than the other methods.

  12. Micro-CT Characterization on the Meso-Structure of Three-Dimensional Full Five-Directional Braided Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya, Jixuan; Liu, Zhenguo; Wang, Yuanhang

    2016-09-01

    The meso-structure is important in predicting mechanical properties of the three-dimensional (3D) braided composite. In this paper, the internal structure and porosity of three-dimensional full five-directional (3DF5D) braided composite is characterized at mesoscopic scale (the scale of the yarns) using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) non-destructively. Glass fiber yarns as tracer are added into the sample made of carbon fiber to enhance the contrast in the sectional images. The model of tracer yarns is established with 3D reconstruction method to analyze the cross-section and path of yarns. The porosities are reconstructed and characterized in the end. The results demonstrate that the cross sections of braiding yarns and axial yarns change with the regions and the heights in one pitch of 3DF5D braided composites. The path of braiding yarns are various in the different regions while the axial yarns are always straight. Helical indentations appear on the surfaces of the axial yarns because of the squeeze from braiding yarns. Moreover, the porosities in different shapes and sizes are almost located in the matrix and between the yarns.

  13. Sulfate attack monitored by microCT and EDXRD: Influence of cement type, water-to-cement ratio, and aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, N.N.; Jupe, A.C.; Stock, S.R.; Wilkinson, A.P.; Lee, P.L.; Kurtis, K.E. . E-mail: kkurtis@ce.gatech.edu

    2006-01-15

    X-ray microtomography (microCT) and spatially resolved energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) were used in combination to non-destructively monitor the physical and chemical manifestations of damage in Portland cement paste samples subjected to severe sodium sulfate attack. Additional measurements of expansion and compressive strength were made on complementary mortar and cement paste specimens. Specifically, the influences of cement type (ASTM Types I and V), water-to-cement ratio (0.485 and 0.435), and the presence of aggregate on the rate and forms of damage were examined. As expected, Type V cement samples exhibited less cracking and expansion than the Type I cement samples. EDXRD indicated an anticorrelation between ettringite and gypsum in the near-surface region for Type V samples, which may be associated with crack formation. An unanticipated result for Type I cement pastes was that cracking was apparent at earlier exposure times and progressed more rapidly for samples with w/c of 0.435, than for those with w/c of 0.485. Possible mechanisms for this behavior are proposed. The presence of aggregate particles resulted in a more rapid rate of cracking, as compared to the corresponding cement paste sample.

  14. Micro-CT evaluation of in vivo osteogenesis at implants processed by wire-type electric discharge machining.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Koichi; Kataoka, Yu; Ohtsuka, Fukunaga; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Titanium surfaces processed by wire-type electric discharge machining (EDM) are microfabricated surfaces with an irregular morphology, and they exhibited excellent in vitro bone biocompatibility. In this study, the efficiency of in vivo osteogenesis on EDM surfaces was investigated by surgically placing screw-shaped EDM-processed and machined-surface implants into the femurs of four Japanese white rabbits. The volume and process of new bone formation were evaluated by an X-ray micro-CT scanner, coupled with histopathological observations at 1, 2, and 4 weeks post-implantation. Before surgical implantation, the surface topography and contact angle of each implant surface were examined. Bone formation increased over time on both implant surfaces, with both implant types yielding statistically equivalent bone volume at 4 weeks post-implementation. However, at 1 week post-implantation, amount of new bone at EDM-processed implant was markedly greater than that at machined-surface implant. Moreover, new bone appeared to initiate directly from the EDM surfaces, while new bone appeared to generate from pre-existing host bone to the machined surfaces. Thus, EDM seemed to be a promising method for surface modification of titanium implants to support enhanced osteogenesis. PMID:22673455

  15. High-resolution three-dimensional visualization of the rat spinal cord microvasculature by synchrotron radiation micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jianzhong; Cao, Yong; Wu, Tianding; Li, Dongzhe; Lu, Hongbin

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Understanding the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of the spinal cord microvasculature has been limited by the lack of an effective high-resolution imaging technique. In this study, synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography (SRµCT), a novel imaging technique based on absorption imaging, was evaluated with regard to the detection of the 3D morphology of the rat spinal cord microvasculature. Methods: Ten Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this ex vivo study. After contrast agent perfusion, their spinal cords were isolated and scanned using conventional x-rays, conventional micro-CT (CµCT), and SRµCT. Results: Based on contrast agent perfusion, the microvasculature of the rat spinal cord was clearly visualized for the first time ex vivo in 3D by means of SRµCT scanning. Compared to conventional imaging techniques, SRµCT achieved higher resolution 3D vascular imaging, with the smallest vessel that could be distinguished approximately 7.4 μm in diameter. Additionally, a 3D pseudocolored image of the spinal cord microvasculature was generated in a single session of SRµCT imaging, which was conducive to detailed observation of the vessel morphology. Conclusions: The results of this study indicated that SRµCT scanning could provide higher resolution images of the vascular network of the spinal cord. This modality also has the potential to serve as a powerful imaging tool for the investigation of morphology changes in the 3D angioarchitecture of the neurovasculature in preclinical research.

  16. Influence of internal fixator flexibility on murine fracture healing as characterized by mechanical testing and microCT imaging.

    PubMed

    Steck, Roland; Ueno, Masaki; Gregory, Laura; Rijken, Noortje; Wullschleger, Martin E; Itoman, Moritoshi; Schuetz, Michael A

    2011-08-01

    Mechanically well-defined stabilization systems have only recently become available, providing standardized conditions for studying the role of the mechanical environment on mouse bone fracture healing. The aim of this study was to characterize the time course of strength recovery and callus development of mouse femoral osteotomies stabilized with either low or high flexibility (in bending and torsion) internal fixation plates. Animals were euthanized and femora excised at 14, 21, and 28 days post-osteotomy for microCT analysis and torsional strength testing. While a larger mineralized callus was observed in osteotomies under more flexible conditions at all time points, the earlier bridging of the mineralized callus under less flexible conditions by 1 week resulted in an earlier recovery of torsional strength in mice stabilized with low flexibility fixation. Ultimate torque values for these bones were significantly higher at 14 and 21 days post-osteotomy compared to bones with the more flexible stabilization. Our study confirms the high reproducibility of the results that are achieved with this new implant system, therefore making it ideal for studying the influence of the mechanical environment on murine fracture healing under highly standardized conditions.

  17. Imaging the Aqueous Humor Outflow Pathway in Human Eyes by Three-dimensional Micro-computed Tomography (3D micro-CT)

    SciTech Connect

    C Hann; M Bentley; A Vercnocke; E Ritman; M Fautsch

    2011-12-31

    The site of outflow resistance leading to elevated intraocular pressure in primary open-angle glaucoma is believed to be located in the region of Schlemm's canal inner wall endothelium, its basement membrane and the adjacent juxtacanalicular tissue. Evidence also suggests collector channels and intrascleral vessels may have a role in intraocular pressure in both normal and glaucoma eyes. Traditional imaging modalities limit the ability to view both proximal and distal portions of the trabecular outflow pathway as a single unit. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of three-dimensional micro-computed tomography (3D micro-CT) as a potential method to view the trabecular outflow pathway. Two normal human eyes were used: one immersion fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and one with anterior chamber perfusion at 10 mmHg followed by perfusion fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde/2% glutaraldehyde. Both eyes were postfixed in 1% osmium tetroxide and scanned with 3D micro-CT at 2 {mu}m or 5 {mu}m voxel resolution. In the immersion fixed eye, 24 collector channels were identified with an average orifice size of 27.5 {+-} 5 {mu}m. In comparison, the perfusion fixed eye had 29 collector channels with a mean orifice size of 40.5 {+-} 13 {mu}m. Collector channels were not evenly dispersed around the circumference of the eye. There was no significant difference in the length of Schlemm's canal in the immersed versus the perfused eye (33.2 versus 35.1 mm). Structures, locations and size measurements identified by 3D micro-CT were confirmed by correlative light microscopy. These findings confirm 3D micro-CT can be used effectively for the non-invasive examination of the trabecular meshwork, Schlemm's canal, collector channels and intrascleral vasculature that comprise the distal outflow pathway. This imaging modality will be useful for non-invasive study of the role of the trabecular outflow pathway as a whole unit.

  18. Comparative study on measured variables and sensitivity to bone microstructural changes induced by weightlessness between in vivo and ex vivo micro-CT scans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lian Wen; Wang, Chao; Pu, Fang; Li, De Yu; Niu, Hai Jun; Fan, Yu Bo

    2011-01-01

    Depending on the experimental design, micro-CT can be used to examine bones either in vivo or ex vivo (excised fresh or formalin-fixed). In this study we investigated if differences exist in the variables measured by micro-CT between in vivo and ex vivo scans and which kind of scan is more sensitive to the changes of bone microstructure induced by simulated weightlessness. Rat tail suspension was used to simulate the weightless condition. The same bone from either normal or tail-suspended rats was scanned by micro-CT both in vivo and ex vivo (fresh and fixed by formalin). Then, bone mineral density (BMD) and microstructural characteristics were analyzed. The results showed that no significant differences existed in the microstructural parameters of trabecular bone among in vivo, fresh, and formalin-fixed bone scans from both femurs and tibias, although BMD exhibited differences. On the other hand, most parameters of the tail-suspended rats measured by micro-CT deteriorated compared with controls. Ex vivo scanning appeared to be more sensitive to bone microstructural changes induced by tail suspension than in vivo scanning. In general, the results indicate that values obtained in vivo and ex vivo (fresh and fixed) are comparable, thus allowing for meaningful comparison of experimental results from different studies irrespective of the type of scans. In addition, this study suggests that it is better to use ex vivo scanning when evaluating bone microstructure under weightlessness. However, researchers can select any type of scan depending upon the objective and the demands of the experiment.

  19. Synchrotron X-ray Studies of the Keel of the Short-Spined Sea Urchin Lytechinus variegatus: Absorption Microtomography (microCT) and Small Beam Diffraction Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, S. R.; Barss, J.; Dahl, T.; Veis, A.; Almer, J. D.; De Carlo, F.

    2003-05-01

    In sea urchin teeth, the keel plays an important structural role, and this paper reports results of microstructural characterization of the keel of Lytechinus variegatus using two noninvasive synchrotron x-ray techniques: x-ray absorption microtomography (microCT) and x-ray diffraction mapping. MicroCT with 14 keV x-rays mapped the spatial distribution of mineral at the 1.3 microm level in a millimeter-sized fragment of a mature portion of the keel. Two rows of low absorption channels (i.e., primary channels) slightly less than 10 microm in diameter were found running linearly from the flange to the base of the keel and parallel to its sides. The primary channels paralleled the oral edge of the keel, and the microCT slices revealed a planar secondary channel leading from each primary channel to the side of the keel. The primary and secondary channels were more or less coplanar and may correspond to the soft tissue between plates of the carinar process. Transmission x-ray diffraction with 80.8 keV x-rays and a 0.1 mm beam mapped the distribution of calcite crystal orientations and the composition Ca(1-x)Mg(x)CO(3) of the calcite. Unlike the variable Mg concentration and highly curved prisms found in the keel of Paracentrotus lividus, a constant Mg content (x = 0.13) and relatively little prism curvature was found in the keel of Lytechinus variegatus.

  20. Studying the morphology of lyophilized protein solids using X-ray micro-CT: effect of post-freeze annealing and controlled nucleation.

    PubMed

    Izutsu, Ken-ichi; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Yomota, Chikako; Goda, Yukihiro; Okuda, Haruhiro

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how different techniques used during the freezing step of lyophilization affect morphology of the dried protein solids. Aqueous solutions containing recombinant human albumin, trehalose, and sodium phosphate buffer were dried after their freezing by shelf-ramp cooling, immersion in liquid nitrogen, or controlled ice nucleation. Some shelf-frozen solutions were heat treated (annealed) before the vacuum drying. We used three-dimensional (3D) X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study the morphology of solids. The X-ray micro-CT images of the lyophilized microporous solids showed traces of varied size and structure ice crystals that were comparable to corresponding SEM images. A post-freeze heat treatment and a controlled nucleation both induced larger ice crystal ghosts in the solids. The variations in the structure of walls surrounding ice crystals, formed by the different freezing procedures, should affect the water vapor transition during the primary and secondary drying. Some solids also showed higher-density layer in the upper surface. Overall, the simple sample preparation procedures and the ample morphological information make the X-ray micro-CT appropriate for analyzing lyophilized pharmaceuticals.

  1. Advances in 4D radiation therapy for managing respiration: part I - 4D imaging.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Geoffrey D; Rosu, Mihaela

    2012-12-01

    Techniques for managing respiration during imaging and planning of radiation therapy are reviewed, concentrating on free-breathing (4D) approaches. First, we focus on detailing the historical development and basic operational principles of currently-available "first generation" 4D imaging modalities: 4D computed tomography, 4D cone beam computed tomography, 4D magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D positron emission tomography. Features and limitations of these first generation systems are described, including necessity of breathing surrogates for 4D image reconstruction, assumptions made in acquisition and reconstruction about the breathing pattern, and commonly-observed artifacts. Both established and developmental methods to deal with these limitations are detailed. Finally, strategies to construct 4D targets and images and, alternatively, to compress 4D information into static targets and images for radiation therapy planning are described.

  2. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part I – 4D Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Rosu, Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    Techniques for managing respiration during imaging and planning of radiation therapy are reviewed, concentrating on free-breathing (4D) approaches. First, we focus on detailing the historical development and basic operational principles of currently-available “first generation” 4D imaging modalities: 4D computed tomography, 4D cone beam computed tomography, 4D magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D positron emission tomography. Features and limitations of these first generation systems are described, including necessity of breathing surrogates for 4D image reconstruction, assumptions made in acquisition and reconstruction about the breathing pattern, and commonly-observed artifacts. Both established and developmental methods to deal with these limitations are detailed. Finally, strategies to construct 4D targets and images and, alternatively, to compress 4D information into static targets and images for radiation therapy planning are described. PMID:22784929

  3. Three-Dimensional Quantification of Calcium Salt-Composite Resorption (CSC) In Vitro by Micro-computed Tomography (Micro-CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, T.; Dai, X. Y.; Mielke, G.; Vogt, S.; Buechner, H.; Schantz, J. T.; Harder, Y.; Machens, H. G.; Morlock, M. M.; Schilling, A. F.

    2014-04-01

    The commonly applied cell-based, two-dimensional (2D) in vitro resorption assays for biomaterials are limited in a variety of cases, including high initial roughness of material surface, uncontrollable solubilization (or resorption) of the entire material surface, or complex three-dimensional (3D) structure of the bioactive material itself. All these make the accurate assessment and successful selection of the optimal bone substitute material difficult. In vivo, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has been widely applied for the analysis of bone physiology and pathology, as well as for the 3D analysis of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. In this study, we show that micro-CT can also be applied for the in vitro analysis of osteoclast-mediated resorption of biomaterials. For our experiments, we chose a calcium salt-composite (composite of calcium sulphate (CSC), calcium carbonate, glycerin-1,2,3-tripalmiate), which evades common 2D in vitro resorption analysis as a result of its high surface roughness and material composition. Human osteoclasts were differentiated from precursor cells on the surface of the material for 28 days. Cells were analyzed for expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), multinuclearity, and size. Volumetric analysis of resorption was performed by micro-CT. Multinucleated osteoclasts developed on the surface of the material. TRAP5b expression of the cells on CSC was comparable with TRAP5b expression of cells cultivated on dentin for the first 3 weeks of culture. At day 28, TRAP5b expression, cell number, and size of the TRAP+ cells were reduced on the CSC when compared with cells on dentin. Volumetric anaylsis by micro-CT showed a strong cellular effect on resorption of CSC. We consider micro-CT to be a promising technique for 3D quantification of cell-based resorption that will allow the study of cellular resorption of materials in vitro, which were up to now confined to animal experimental analysis.

  4. Fault-related structural permeability: Qualitative insights of the damage-zone from micro-CT analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomila, Rodrigo; Arancibia, Gloria; Nehler, Mathias; Bracke, Rolf; Stöckhert, Ferdinand

    2016-04-01

    Fault zones and their related structural permeability play a leading role in the migration of fluids through the continental crust. A first approximation to understanding the structural permeability conditions, and the estimation of its hydraulic properties (i.e. palaeopermeability and fracture porosity conditions) of the fault-related fracture mesh is the 2D analysis of its veinlets, usually made in thin-section. Those estimations are based in the geometrical parameters of the veinlets, such as average fracture density, length and aperture, which can be statistically modelled assuming penny-shaped fractures of constant radius and aperture within an anisotropic fracture system. Thus, this model is related to fracture connectivity, its length and to the cube of the fracture apertures. In this way, the estimated values presents their own inaccuracies owing to the method used. Therefore, the study of the real spatial distribution of the veinlets of the fault-related fracture mesh (3D), feasible with the use of micro-CT analyses, is a first order factor to unravel both, the real structural permeability conditions of a fault-zone, together with the validation of previous estimations made in 2D analyses in thin-sections. This early contribution shows the preliminary results of a fault-related fracture mesh and its 3D spatial distribution in the damage zone of the Jorgillo Fault (JF), an ancient subvertical left-lateral strike-slip fault exposed in the Atacama Fault System in northern Chile. The JF is a ca. 20 km long NNW-striking strike-slip fault with sinistral displacement of ca. 4 km. The methodology consisted of the drilling of vertically oriented plugs of 5 mm in diameter located at different distances from the JF core - damage zone boundary. Each specimen was, then, scanned with an x-ray micro-CT scanner (ProCon X-Ray CTalpha) in order to assess the fracture mesh. X-rays were generated in a transmission target x-ray tube with acceleration voltages ranging from 90

  5. Integration of comprehensive 3D microCT and signaling analysis reveals differential regulatory mechanisms of craniofacial bone development.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thach-Vu; Iwata, Junichi; Ho, Hoang Anh; Grimes, Weston C; Park, Shery; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A; Chai, Yang

    2015-04-15

    Growth factor signaling regulates tissue-tissue interactions to control organogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Specifically, transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling plays a crucial role in the development of cranial neural crest (CNC) cell-derived bone, and loss of Tgfbr2 in CNC cells results in craniofacial skeletal malformations. Our recent studies indicate that non-canonical TGFβ signaling is activated whereas canonical TGFβ signaling is compromised in the absence of Tgfbr2 (in Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice). A haploinsufficiency of Tgfbr1 (aka Alk5) (Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre;Alk5(fl/+)) largely rescues craniofacial deformities in Tgfbr2 mutant mice by reducing ectopic non-canonical TGFβ signaling. However, the relative involvement of canonical and non-canonical TGFβ signaling in regulating specific craniofacial bone formation remains unclear. We compared the size and volume of CNC-derived craniofacial bones (frontal bone, premaxilla, maxilla, palatine bone, and mandible) from E18.5 control, Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre, and Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre;Alk5(fl/+)mice. By analyzing three dimensional (3D) micro-computed tomography (microCT) images, we found that different craniofacial bones were restored to different degrees in Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre;Alk5(fl/+) mice. Our study provides comprehensive information on anatomical landmarks and the size and volume of each craniofacial bone, as well as insights into the extent that canonical and non-canonical TGFβ signaling cascades contribute to the formation of each CNC-derived bone. Our data will serve as an important resource for developmental biologists who are interested in craniofacial morphogenesis.

  6. A Combined Micro-CT Imaging/Microfluidic Approach for Understating Methane Recovery in Coal Seam Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Armstrong, R. T.; Gerami, A.; Lamei Ramandi, H.; Ebrahimi Warkiani, M.

    2015-12-01

    Coal seam methane is a form of natural gas stored in coal beds and is one of the most important unconventional resources of energy. The flow and transport in coal beds occur in a well-developed system of natural fractures that are also known as cleats. We use micro-Computed Tomography (CT) imaging at both dry and wet conditions to resolve the cleats below the resolution of the image. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) is used for calibration of micro-CT data. Using soft lithography technique, the cleat system is duplicated on a silicon mould. We fabricate a microfluidic chip using Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to study both imbibition and drainage in generated coal structures for understating gas and water transport in coal seam reservoirs. First, we use simple patterns observed on coal images to analyse the effects of wettability, cleat size and distribution on flow behaviour. Then, we study transport in a coal by injecting both distilled water and decane with a rate of 1 microliter/ min into the fabricated cleat structure (Figure 1), initially saturated with air. We repeat the experiment for different contact angles by plasma treating the microfluidic chip, and results show significant effects of wettability on the displacement efficiency. The breakthrough time in the imbibition setup is significantly longer than in the drainage. Using rapid video capturing, and high resolution microscopy, we measure the saturation of displacing fluid with respect to time. By measuring gas and liquid recovery in the outlet at different saturation, we predict relative permeability of coal. This work has important applications for optimising gas recovery and our results can serve as a benchmark in the verification of multiphase numerical models used in coal seam gas industry.

  7. Numerical simulation of airflow and microparticle deposition in a synchrotron micro-CT-based pulmonary acinus model.

    PubMed

    Sera, Toshihiro; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto; Yokota, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    The acinus consists of complex, branched alveolar ducts and numerous surrounding alveoli, and so in this study, we hypothesized that the particle deposition can be much influenced by the complex acinar geometry, and simulated the airflow and particle deposition (density = 1.0 g/cm(3), diameter = 1 and 3 μm) numerically in a pulmonary acinar model based on synchrotron micro-CT of the mammalian lung. We assumed that the fluid-structure interaction was neglected and that alveolar flow was induced by the expansion and contraction of the acinar model with the volume changing sinusoidally with time as the moving boundary conditions. The alveolar flow was dominated by radial flows, and a weak recirculating flow was observed at the proximal side of alveoli during the entire respiratory cycle, despite the maximum Reynolds number at the inlet being 0.029. Under zero gravity, the particle deposition rate after single breathing was less than 0.01, although the particles were transported deeply into the acinus after inspiration. Under a gravitational field, the deposition rate and map were influenced strongly by gravity orientation. In the case of a particle diameter of 1 μm, the rate increased dramatically and mostly non-deposited particles remained in the model, indicating that the rate would increase further after repeated breathing. At a particle diameter of 3 μm, the rate was 1.0 and all particles were deposited during single breathing. Our results show that the particle deposition rate in realistic pulmonary acinar model is higher than in an idealized model.

  8. High resolution micro-CT of low attenuating organic materials using large area photon-counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpová, I.; Vavřík, D.; Fíla, T.; Koudelka, P.; Jandejsek, I.; Jakůbek, J.; Kytýř, D.; Zlámal, P.; Vopálenský, M.; Gantar, A.

    2016-02-01

    To overcome certain limitations of contemporary materials used for bone tissue engineering, such as inflammatory response after implantation, a whole new class of materials based on polysaccharide compounds is being developed. Here, nanoparticulate bioactive glass reinforced gelan-gum (GG-BAG) has recently been proposed for the production of bone scaffolds. This material offers promising biocompatibility properties, including bioactivity and biodegradability, with the possibility of producing scaffolds with directly controlled microgeometry. However, to utilize such a scaffold with application-optimized properties, large sets of complex numerical simulations using the real microgeometry of the material have to be carried out during the development process. Because the GG-BAG is a material with intrinsically very low attenuation to X-rays, its radiographical imaging, including tomographical scanning and reconstructions, with resolution required by numerical simulations might be a very challenging task. In this paper, we present a study on X-ray imaging of GG-BAG samples. High-resolution volumetric images of investigated specimens were generated on the basis of micro-CT measurements using a large area flat-panel detector and a large area photon-counting detector. The photon-counting detector was composed of a 010× 1 matrix of Timepix edgeless silicon pixelated detectors with tiling based on overlaying rows (i.e. assembled so that no gap is present between individual rows of detectors). We compare the results from both detectors with the scanning electron microscopy on selected slices in transversal plane. It has been shown that the photon counting detector can provide approx. 3× better resolution of the details in low-attenuating materials than the integrating flat panel detectors. We demonstrate that employment of a large area photon counting detector is a good choice for imaging of low attenuating materials with the resolution sufficient for numerical simulations.

  9. Contrast-enhanced microCT (EPIC-µCT) ex vivo applied to the mouse and human jaw joint

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, L; Lin, A S; Langenbach, G E J; Koolstra, J H; Guldberg, R E; Everts, V

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is susceptive to the development of osteoarthritis (OA). More detailed knowledge of its development is essential to improve our insight into TMJ-OA. It is imperative to have a standardized reliable three-dimensional (3D) imaging method that allows for detailed assessment of both bone and cartilage in healthy and diseased joints. We aimed to determine the applicability of a contrast-enhanced microCT (µCT) technique for ex vivo research of mouse and human TMJs. Methods: Equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent via µCT (EPIC-µCT) was previously applied for cartilage assessment in the knee joint. The method was ex vivo, applied to the mouse TMJ and adapted for the human TMJ. Results: EPIC-µCT (30-min immersion time) was applied to mouse mandibular condyles, and 3D imaging revealed an average cartilage thickness of 110 ± 16 µm. These measurements via EPIC-µCT were similar to the histomorphometric measures (113 ± 19 µm). For human healthy OA-affected TMJ samples, the protocol was adjusted to an immersion time of 1 h. 3D imaging revealed a significant thicker cartilage layer in joints with early signs of OA compared with healthy joints (414.2 ± 122.6 and 239.7 ± 50.5 µm, respectively). A subsequent significant thinner layer was found in human joints with late signs of OA (197.4 ± 159.7 µm). Conclusions: The EPIC-µCT technique is effective for the ex vivo assessment of 3D cartilage morphology in the mouse as well as human TMJ and allows bone–cartilage interaction research in TMJ-OA. PMID:24353248

  10. Effects of growth hormone and ultrasound on mandibular growth in rats: MicroCT and toxicity analyses.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; El-Kadi, Ayman O; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2013-09-01

    It has been shown by previous studies that mandibular growth can be enhanced by the systemic administration of recombinant growth hormone (rGH) and/or local application of therapeutic low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS). The purpose of this study was to determine if local injection of rGH and application of LIPUS to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) would synergistically enhance mandibular growth. In an animal study, the effect of rGH, LIPUS, and combination of rGH and LIPUS on male Sprague-Dawley rats was observed. Mandibular growth was evaluated by measuring total hemimandibular and condylar bone volume and bone surface area as well as condylar bone mineral density (BMD) after 21 days on dissected rats' mandibles using micro-computed tomography (MicroCT). The expression of c-jun mRNA extracted from the liver of each of these rats was also quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction to evaluate possible systemic effect of local rGH administration. Significant growth stimulation was observed in the mandibular and condylar bone of the animals treated with rGH, LIPUS, and rGH/LIPUS combined when compared with the control group. Bone volume, surface area, condylar bone mineral density, and c-jun expression were also compared between the treatment groups and the control in the liver. The results suggest that mandibular growth may be enhanced by injection of rGH or LIPUS application. The current study although showed synergetic effect of rGH and LIPUS application in increasing mandibular condylar head length, there was no significant changes in mandibular bone volume using both treatments together when compared to the two individual treatments. Moreover, combined rGH and LIPUS decreased condylar bone mineral density than each treatment separately. Future research could be directed to investigate the effects of different rGH doses and/or different LIPUS exposures parameters on lower jaw growth.

  11. 4D XCAT phantom for multimodality imaging research

    SciTech Connect

    Segars, W. P.; Sturgeon, G.; Mendonca, S.; Grimes, Jason; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The authors develop the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. Methods: Highly detailed whole-body anatomies for the adult male and female were defined in the XCAT using nonuniform rational B-spline (NURBS) and subdivision surfaces based on segmentation of the Visible Male and Female anatomical datasets from the National Library of Medicine as well as patient datasets. Using the flexibility of these surfaces, the Visible Human anatomies were transformed to match body measurements and organ volumes for a 50th percentile (height and weight) male and female. The desired body measurements for the models were obtained using the PEOPLESIZE program that contains anthropometric dimensions categorized from 1st to the 99th percentile for US adults. The desired organ volumes were determined from ICRP Publication 89 [ICRP, ''Basic anatomical and physiological data for use in radiological protection: reference values,'' ICRP Publication 89 (International Commission on Radiological Protection, New York, NY, 2002)]. The male and female anatomies serve as standard templates upon which anatomical variations may be modeled in the XCAT through user-defined parameters. Parametrized models for the cardiac and respiratory motions were also incorporated into the XCAT based on high-resolution cardiac- and respiratory-gated multislice CT data. To demonstrate the usefulness of the phantom, the authors show example simulation studies in PET, SPECT, and CT using publicly available simulation packages. Results: As demonstrated in the pilot studies, the 4D XCAT (which includes thousands of anatomical structures) can produce realistic imaging data when combined with accurate models of the imaging process. With the flexibility of the NURBS surface primitives, any number of different anatomies, cardiac or respiratory motions or patterns, and spatial resolutions can be simulated to perform imaging research. Conclusions: With the ability to produce

  12. 4D XCAT phantom for multimodality imaging research

    PubMed Central

    Segars, W. P.; Sturgeon, G.; Mendonca, S.; Grimes, Jason; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The authors develop the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. Methods: Highly detailed whole-body anatomies for the adult male and female were defined in the XCAT using nonuniform rational B-spline (NURBS) and subdivision surfaces based on segmentation of the Visible Male and Female anatomical datasets from the National Library of Medicine as well as patient datasets. Using the flexibility of these surfaces, the Visible Human anatomies were transformed to match body measurements and organ volumes for a 50th percentile (height and weight) male and female. The desired body measurements for the models were obtained using the PEOPLESIZE program that contains anthropometric dimensions categorized from 1st to the 99th percentile for US adults. The desired organ volumes were determined from ICRP Publication 89 [ICRP, ‘‘Basic anatomical and physiological data for use in radiological protection: reference values,” ICRP Publication 89 (International Commission on Radiological Protection, New York, NY, 2002)]. The male and female anatomies serve as standard templates upon which anatomical variations may be modeled in the XCAT through user-defined parameters. Parametrized models for the cardiac and respiratory motions were also incorporated into the XCAT based on high-resolution cardiac- and respiratory-gated multislice CT data. To demonstrate the usefulness of the phantom, the authors show example simulation studies in PET, SPECT, and CT using publicly available simulation packages. Results: As demonstrated in the pilot studies, the 4D XCAT (which includes thousands of anatomical structures) can produce realistic imaging data when combined with accurate models of the imaging process. With the flexibility of the NURBS surface primitives, any number of different anatomies, cardiac or respiratory motions or patterns, and spatial resolutions can be simulated to perform imaging research. Conclusions: With the ability to produce

  13. 4D-Flow validation, numerical and experimental framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, Kurt; Liu, Haining; Canton, Gador; Aliseda, Alberto; Yuan, Chun

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a group of assessment metrics of new 4D MRI flow sequences, an imaging modality that allows for visualization of three-dimensional pulsatile flow in the cardiovascular anatomy through time-resolved three-dimensional blood velocity measurements from cardiac-cycle synchronized MRI acquisition. This is a promising tool for clinical assessment but lacks a robust validation framework. First, 4D-MRI flow in a subject's stenotic carotid bifurcation is compared with a patient-specific CFD model using two different boundary condition methods. Second, Particle Image Velocimetry in a patient-specific phantom is used as a benchmark to compare the 4D-MRI in vivo measurements and CFD simulations under the same conditions. Comparison of estimated and measureable flow parameters such as wall shear stress, fluctuating velocity rms, Lagrangian particle residence time, will be discussed, with justification for their biomechanics relevance and the insights they can provide on the pathophysiology of arterial disease: atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. Lastly, the framework is applied to a new sequence to provide a quantitative assessment. A parametric analysis on the carotid bifurcation pulsatile flow conditions will be presented and an accuracy assessment provided.

  14. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory 4D Database

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-02

    4D is an integrated development platform - a single product comprised of the components you need to create and distribute professional applications. You get a graphical design environment, SQL database, a programming language, integrated PHP execution, HTTP server, application server, executable generator, and much more. 4D offers multi-platform development and deployment, meaning whatever you create on a Mac can be used on Windows, and vice-versa. Beyond productive development, 4D is renowned for its great flexibility in maintenance and modification of existing applications, and its extreme ease of implementation in its numerous deployment options. Your professional application can be put into production more quickly, at a lower cost, and will always be instantly scalable. 4D makes it easy, whether you're looking to create a classic desktop application, a client-server system, a distributed solution for Web or mobile clients - or all of the above!

  16. Helical 4D CT and Comparison with Cine 4D CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tinsu

    4D CT was one of the most important developments in radiation oncology in the last decade. Its early development in single slice CT and commercialization in multi-slice CT has radically changed our practice in radiation treatment of lung cancer, and has enabled the stereotactic radiosurgery of early stage lung cancer. In this chapter, we will document the history of 4D CT development, detail the data sufficiency condition governing the 4D CT data collection; present the design of the commercial helical 4D CTs from Philips and Siemens; compare the differences between the helical 4D CT and the GE cine 4D CT in data acquisition, slice thickness, acquisition time and work flow; review the respiratory monitoring devices; and understand the causes of image artifacts in 4D CT.

  17. Imaging of pore networks and related interfaces in soil systems by using high resolution X-ray micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacher, Gerhard; Eickhorst, Thilo; Schmidt, Hannes; Halisch, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Today's high-resolution X-ray CT with its powerful tubes and great detail detectability lends itself naturally to geological and pedological applications. Those include the non-destructive interior examination and textural analysis of rock and soil samples and their permeability and porosity - to name only a few. Especially spatial distribution and geometry of pores, mineral phases and fractures are important for the evaluation of hydrologic and aeration properties in soils as well as for root development in the soil matrix. The possibility to visualize a whole soil aggregate or root tissue in a non-destructive way is undoubtedly the most valuable feature of this type of analysis and is a new area for routine application of high resolution X-ray micro-CT. The paper outlines recent developments in hard- and software requirements for high resolution CT. It highlights several pedological applications which were performed with the phoenix nanotom m, the first 180 kV nanofocus CT system tailored specifically for extremely high-resolution scans of variable sized samples with voxel-resolutions down to < 300 nm. In addition very good contrast resolution can be obtained as well which is necessary to distinguish biogenic material in soil aggregates amongst others. We will address visualization and quantification of porous networks in 3D in different environmental samples ranging from clastic sedimentary rock to soil cores and individual soil aggregates. As several processes and habitat functions are related to various pore sizes imaging of the intact soil matrix will be presented on different scales of interest - from the mm-scale representing the connectivity of macro-pores down to the micro-scale representing the space of microbial habitats. Therefore, soils were impregnated with resin and scanned via X-ray CT. Scans at higher resolution were obtained from sub-volumes cut from the entire resin impregnated block and from crop roots surrounded by rhizosphere soil. Within the

  18. New insights to ecology, ontogeny and teratology of Larger Benthic Foraminifera by biometrics based on microCT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briguglio, A.; Fabienke, W.; Wolfgring, E.; Ferrández Cañadell, C.; Hohenegger, J.

    2012-04-01

    The main function of tests in Larger Benthic Foraminifera (LBF) is to provide their endosymbiotic algae with enough light to obtain net photosynthetic rates and to create sufficient accommodation space. To study the relation between these two factors and to understand how the cell reacts to growth and to the environment, the newly developed technique of X-ray micro-Computer-Tomography (microCT) allows measurement of all characters of complex tests without destruction. Growth studies on 48 specimens of living and fossil species have been performed. The volumes of the lumina have been calculated as well as further 2-dimensional parameters related to volumes as chamber height, chamber width and septal distance. The volumes of chamber lumina represent cell growth in their sequence, thus demonstrating interruptions, increase/decrease or oscillations in growth rates caused by external factors affecting growth during life time (e.g. seasons). Correlations between volumes and the one-dimensional parameters have been calculated to check the form of relationship. According to our results, some parameters seem to oscillate exactly as the volume (therefore accommodating it), while others seem to oscillate constantly around a given growth function. Concerning the palaeobiology, beside the study of specimens with 'normal' growth, thus not drastically affected by external factors, some interesting morphologies have been investigated. Pluriembryonal apparati as well as secondary equatorial layers have been segmented, extracted and quantified in almost 15 specimens of Cycloclypeus carpenteri, 8 twin specimens of nummulitids tests have been also investigated to show where and how the fusion starts and volumetric quantifications of each single spiral in multispiral grown test of some large Eocene Nummulitids has also been calculated to show in which way and when (ontogenetically) a new spiral starts. The combination of all measurements allows interpretation of different biological

  19. From histology to micro-CT: Measuring and modeling resorption cavities and their relation to bone competence

    PubMed Central

    Vanderoost, Jef; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2014-01-01

    The process of bone remodelling plays an essential role in the emergence and maintenance of bone geometry and its internal structure. Osteoclasts are one of the three main bone cell types that play a crucial role in the bone remodelling cycle. At the microstructural level, osteoclasts create bone deficits by eroding resorption cavities. Understanding how these cavities impair the mechanical quality of the bone is not only relevant in quantifying the impact of resorption cavities in healthy bone and normal aging, but maybe even more so in quantifying their role in metabolic bone diseases. Metabolic bone diseases and their treatment are both known to affect the bone remodelling cycle; hence, the bone mechanical competence can and will be affected. However, the current knowledge of the precise dimensions of these cavities and their effect on bone competence is rather limited. This is not surprising considering the difficulties in deriving three-dimensional (3D) properties from two-dimensional (2D) histological sections. The measurement difficulties are reflected in the evaluation of how resorption cavities affect bone competence. Although detailed 3D models are generally being used to quantify the mechanical impact of the cavities, the representation of the cavities themselves has basically been limited to simplified shapes and averaged cavity properties. Qualitatively, these models indicate that cavity size and location are important, and that the effect of cavities is larger than can be expected from simple bone loss. In summary, the dimensions of osteoclast resorption cavities were until recently estimated from 2D measures; hence, a careful interpretation of resorption cavity dimensions is necessary. More effort needs to go into correctly quantifying resorption cavities using modern 3D imaging techniques like micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and synchrotron radiation CT. Osteoclast resorption cavities affect bone competence. The structure-function relationships

  20. Pilot study for compact microbeam radiation therapy using a carbon nanotube field emission micro-CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Hadsell, Mike Cao, Guohua; Zhang, Jian; Burk, Laurel; Schreiber, Torsten; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Schreiber, Eric; Chang, Sha

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is defined as the use of parallel, microplanar x-ray beams with an energy spectrum between 50 and 300 keV for cancer treatment and brain radiosurgery. Up until now, the possibilities of MRT have mainly been studied using synchrotron sources due to their high flux (100s Gy/s) and approximately parallel x-ray paths. The authors have proposed a compact x-ray based MRT system capable of delivering MRT dose distributions at a high dose rate. This system would employ carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission technology to create an x-ray source array that surrounds the target of irradiation. Using such a geometry, multiple collimators would shape the irradiation from this array into multiple microbeams that would then overlap or interlace in the target region. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of attaining a high dose rate and parallel microbeam beams using such a system. Methods: The microbeam dose distribution was generated by our CNT micro-CT scanner (100μm focal spot) and a custom-made microbeam collimator. An alignment assembly was fabricated and attached to the scanner in order to collimate and superimpose beams coming from different gantry positions. The MRT dose distribution was measured using two orthogonal radiochromic films embedded inside a cylindrical phantom. This target was irradiated with microbeams incident from 44 different gantry angles to simulate an array of x-ray sources as in the proposed compact CNT-based MRT system. Finally, phantom translation in a direction perpendicular to the microplanar beams was used to simulate the use of multiple parallel microbeams. Results: Microbeams delivered from 44 gantry angles were superimposed to form a single microbeam dose distribution in the phantom with a FWHM of 300μm (calculated value was 290 μm). Also, during the multiple beam simulation, a peak to valley dose ratio of ∼10 was found when the phantom translation distance was roughly 4x the beam width

  1. Performance evaluation of the General Electric eXplore CT 120 micro-CT using the vmCT phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, M. A.; Warnock, G.; Plenevaux, A.; Choquet, P.; Constantinesco, A.; Salmon, E.; Luxen, A.; Seret, A.

    2011-08-01

    The eXplore CT 120 is the latest generation micro-CT from General Electric. It is equipped with a high-power tube and a flat-panel detector. It allows high resolution and high contrast fast CT scanning of small animals. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the eXplore CT 120 with that of the eXplore Ultra, its predecessor for which the methodology using the vmCT phantom has already been described [1].The phantom was imaged using typical a rat (fast scan or F) or mouse (in vivo bone scan or H) scanning protocols. With the slanted edge method, a 10% modulation transfer function (MTF) was observed at 4.4 (F) and 3.9-4.4 (H) mm-1 corresponding to 114 μm resolution. A fairly larger MTF was obtained by the coil method with the MTF for the thinnest coil (3.3 mm-1) equal to 0.32 (F) and 0.34 (H). The geometric accuracy was better than 0.3%. There was a highly linear (R2>0.999) relationship between measured and expected CT numbers for both the CT number accuracy and linearity sections of the phantom. A cupping effect was clearly seen on the uniform slices and the uniformity-to-noise ratio ranged from 0.52 (F) to 0.89 (H). The air CT number depended on the amount of polycarbonate surrounding the area where it was measured; a difference as high as approximately 200 HU was observed. This hindered the calibration of this scanner in HU. This is likely due to the absence of corrections for beam hardening and scatter in the reconstruction software. However in view of the high linearity of the system, the implementation of these corrections would allow a good quality calibration of the scanner in HU. In conclusion, the eXplore CT 120 achieved a better spatial resolution than the eXplore Ultra (based on previously reported specifications) and future software developments will include beam hardening and scatter corrections that will make the new generation CT scanner even more promising.

  2. Application of Micro-Computed Tomography with Iodine Staining to Cardiac Imaging, Segmentation and Computational Model Development

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidi, OV; Nikolaidou, T; Zhao, J; Smaill, BH; Gilbert, SH; Holden, AV; Lowe, T; Withers, PJ; Jarvis, JC; Stephenson, RS; Hart, G; Hancox, JC; Boyett, MR; Zhang, H

    2012-01-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has been widely used to generate high-resolution 3D tissue images from small animals non-destructively, especially for mineralized skeletal tissues. However, its application to the analysis of soft cardiovascular tissues has been limited by poor inter-tissue contrast. Recent ex vivo studies have shown that contrast between muscular and connective tissue in micro-CT images can be enhanced by staining with iodine. In the present study, we apply this novel technique for imaging of cardiovascular structures in canine hearts. We optimize the method to obtain high resolution X-ray micro-CT images of the canine atria and its distinctive regions - including the Bachmann’s bundle, atrioventricular node, pulmonary arteries and veins - with clear inter-tissue contrast. The imaging results are used to reconstruct and segment the detailed 3D geometry of the atria. Structure tensor analysis shows that the arrangement of atrial fibres can also be characterised using the enhanced micro-CT images, as iodine preferentially accumulates within the muscular fibres rather than in connective tissues. This novel technique can be particularly useful in non-destructive imaging of 3D cardiac architectures from large animals and humans, due to the combination of relatively high speed (~1 hour/scan of a large canine heart) and high voxel resolution (36 μm) provided. In summary, contrast micro-CT facilitates fast and non-destructive imaging and segmenting of detailed 3D cardiovascular geometries, as well as measuring fibre orientation, which are crucial in constructing biophysically detailed computational cardiac models. PMID:22829390

  3. Three-dimensional parametric mapping in quantitative micro-CT imaging of post-surgery femoral head-neck samples: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Panetta, Daniele; De Paola, Gaia; Tripodi, Maria; Citarelli, Carmine; Dell’Osso, Giacomo; Lazzerini, Ilaria; Salvadori, Piero Antonio; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis and pathological increased occurrence of fractures are an important public health problem. They may affect patients’ quality of life and even increase mortality of osteoporotic patients, and consequently represent a heavy economic burden for national healthcare systems. The adoption of simple and inexpensive methods for mass screening of population at risk may be the key for an effective prevention. The current clinical standards of diagnosing osteoporosis and assessing the risk of an osteoporotic bone fracture include dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) for the measurement of bone mineral density (BMD). Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a tomographic imaging technique with very high resolution allowing direct quantification of cancellous bone microarchitecture. The Authors performed micro-CT analysis of the femoral heads harvested from 8 patients who have undergone surgery for hip replacement for primary and secondary degenerative disease to identify possible new morphometric parameters based on the analysis of the distribution of intra-subject microarchitectural parameters through the creation of parametric images. Our results show that the micro-architectural metrics commonly used may not be sufficient for the realistic assessment of bone microarchitecture of the femoral head in patients with hip osteoarthritis. The innovative micro-CT approach considers the entire femoral head in its physiological shape with all its components like cartilage, cortical layer and trabecular region. The future use of these methods for a more detailed study of the reaction of trabecular bone for the internal fixation or prostheses would be desirable. PMID:26811703

  4. Three-dimensional parametric mapping in quantitative micro-CT imaging of post-surgery femoral head-neck samples: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Panetta, Daniele; De Paola, Gaia; Tripodi, Maria; Citarelli, Carmine; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Lazzerini, Ilaria; Salvadori, Piero Antonio; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis and pathological increased occurrence of fractures are an important public health problem. They may affect patients' quality of life and even increase mortality of osteoporotic patients, and consequently represent a heavy economic burden for national healthcare systems. The adoption of simple and inexpensive methods for mass screening of population at risk may be the key for an effective prevention. The current clinical standards of diagnosing osteoporosis and assessing the risk of an osteoporotic bone fracture include dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) for the measurement of bone mineral density (BMD). Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a tomographic imaging technique with very high resolution allowing direct quantification of cancellous bone microarchitecture. The Authors performed micro-CT analysis of the femoral heads harvested from 8 patients who have undergone surgery for hip replacement for primary and secondary degenerative disease to identify possible new morphometric parameters based on the analysis of the distribution of intra-subject microarchitectural parameters through the creation of parametric images. Our results show that the micro-architectural metrics commonly used may not be sufficient for the realistic assessment of bone microarchitecture of the femoral head in patients with hip osteoarthritis. The innovative micro-CT approach considers the entire femoral head in its physiological shape with all its components like cartilage, cortical layer and trabecular region. The future use of these methods for a more detailed study of the reaction of trabecular bone for the internal fixation or prostheses would be desirable. PMID:26811703

  5. Three dimensional imaging of porosity and tracer concentration distributions in a dolostone sample during diffusion experiments using X-ray micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Agbogun, H M D; Al, Tom A; Hussein, Esam M A

    2013-02-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) techniques for measuring the three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of diffusion-accessible porosity (φ(d)) and temporal tracer-concentrations (C(t)) within a dolostone sample subjected to solute diffusion are developed and tested in this work. The φ(d) and C(t) measurements are based on spatially resolved changes in X-ray attenuation coefficients in sequentially acquired 3-D micro-CT datasets using two (calibration and relative) analytical approaches. The measured changes in X-ray attenuation coefficient values are a function of the mass of X-ray absorbing potassium-iodide tracer present in voxels. Mean φ(d) values of 3.8% and 6.5% were obtained with the calibration and the relative approaches, respectively. The detection limits for φ(d) measurements at individual voxel locations are 20% and 36% with the calibration and the relative methods, respectively. The detection limit for C(t) are 0.12 M and 0.22 M with the calibration and the relative approaches, respectively. Results from the calibration method are affected by a beam-hardening artifact and although results from the relative approach are not affected by the artifact, they are subject to high detection limits. This work presents a quantitative assessment of micro-CT data for studies of solute transport. Despite limitations in precision and accuracy, the method provides quantitative 3-D distributions of φ(d) and C(t) that reflect solute diffusion in heterogeneous porous geologic media. PMID:23298531

  6. Three dimensional imaging of porosity and tracer concentration distributions in a dolostone sample during diffusion experiments using X-ray micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Agbogun, H M D; Al, Tom A; Hussein, Esam M A

    2013-02-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) techniques for measuring the three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of diffusion-accessible porosity (φ(d)) and temporal tracer-concentrations (C(t)) within a dolostone sample subjected to solute diffusion are developed and tested in this work. The φ(d) and C(t) measurements are based on spatially resolved changes in X-ray attenuation coefficients in sequentially acquired 3-D micro-CT datasets using two (calibration and relative) analytical approaches. The measured changes in X-ray attenuation coefficient values are a function of the mass of X-ray absorbing potassium-iodide tracer present in voxels. Mean φ(d) values of 3.8% and 6.5% were obtained with the calibration and the relative approaches, respectively. The detection limits for φ(d) measurements at individual voxel locations are 20% and 36% with the calibration and the relative methods, respectively. The detection limit for C(t) are 0.12 M and 0.22 M with the calibration and the relative approaches, respectively. Results from the calibration method are affected by a beam-hardening artifact and although results from the relative approach are not affected by the artifact, they are subject to high detection limits. This work presents a quantitative assessment of micro-CT data for studies of solute transport. Despite limitations in precision and accuracy, the method provides quantitative 3-D distributions of φ(d) and C(t) that reflect solute diffusion in heterogeneous porous geologic media.

  7. Design and characterization of a multi-beam micro-CT scanner based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Rui

    In this dissertation, I will present the results for my Ph.D. research for the past five years. My project mainly focuses on advanced imaging applications with a multi-beam x-ray source array based on carbon nanotube field emission technology. In the past few years, research in carbon nanotubes gradually changed from the raw material science to its application. Field emission x-ray application is one of the hottest research areas for carbon nanotube. Compared to traditional thermionic x-ray sources, the carbon nanotube field emission x-ray source has some natural advantages over traditional thermionic x-ray sources such as instantaneous x-ray generation, programmability and miniaturization. For the past few years, the research and development of carbon nanotube field emission x-ray has shifted from single x-ray beam applications to spatially distributed multi-beam x-ray sources. Previously in Zhou group, we have already built a gated micro-CT system with single beam micro-focus x-ray tube for higher spatial and temporal resolution as required in live animal imaging and a multi-beam tomosynthesis system targeting for faster and more stable breast imaging. Now my project mainly focused on the design, characterization and optimization of a multi-beam micro-CT imaging system. With the increase of gantry rotation speed approaching the mechanical limit, it is getting more and more difficult to further speed up the CT scanning. My new system promises a potential solution for the problem, and it serves as a great test platform for truly stationary micro-CT geometry. The potential capabilities it showed during the characterization and imaging measurements was promising. The dissertation is composed of five chapters. In Chapter 1, I will generally review the physics principles of x-ray generation and interaction with matter. Then the discovery of carbon nanotube and its great potential to serve as an excellent field emission electron source will be introduced in the second

  8. Shadow-driven 4D haptic visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Hanson, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Just as we can work with two-dimensional floor plans to communicate 3D architectural design, we can exploit reduced-dimension shadows to manipulate the higher-dimensional objects generating the shadows. In particular, by taking advantage of physically reactive 3D shadow-space controllers, we can transform the task of interacting with 4D objects to a new level of physical reality. We begin with a teaching tool that uses 2D knot diagrams to manipulate the geometry of 3D mathematical knots via their projections; our unique 2D haptic interface allows the user to become familiar with sketching, editing, exploration, and manipulation of 3D knots rendered as projected imageson a 2D shadow space. By combining graphics and collision-sensing haptics, we can enhance the 2D shadow-driven editing protocol to successfully leverage 2D pen-and-paper or blackboard skills. Building on the reduced-dimension 2D editing tool for manipulating 3D shapes, we develop the natural analogy to produce a reduced-dimension 3D tool for manipulating 4D shapes. By physically modeling the correct properties of 4D surfaces, their bending forces, and their collisions in the 3D haptic controller interface, we can support full-featured physical exploration of 4D mathematical objects in a manner that is otherwise far beyond the experience accessible to human beings. As far as we are aware, this paper reports the first interactive system with force-feedback that provides "4D haptic visualization" permitting the user to model and interact with 4D cloth-like objects.

  9. 4D Confocal Imaging of Yeast Organelles.

    PubMed

    Day, Kasey J; Papanikou, Effrosyni; Glick, Benjamin S

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are well suited to visualizing organelles by 4D confocal microscopy. Typically, one or more cellular compartments are labeled with a fluorescent protein or dye, and a stack of confocal sections spanning the entire cell volume is captured every few seconds. Under appropriate conditions, organelle dynamics can be observed for many minutes with only limited photobleaching. Images are captured at a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio and are subsequently processed to generate movies that can be analyzed and quantified. Here, we describe methods for acquiring and processing 4D data using conventional scanning confocal microscopy. PMID:27631997

  10. The scientific value of 4D visualizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minster, J.; Olsen, K.; Day, S.; Moore, R.; Jordan, T. H.; Maechling, P.; Chourasia, A.

    2006-12-01

    Significant scientific insights derive from viewing measured, or calculated three-dimensional, time-dependent -- that is four-dimensional-- fields. This issue cuts across all disciplines of Earth Sciences. Addressing it calls for close collaborations between "domain" scientists and "IT" visualization specialists. Techniques to display such 4D fields in a intuitive way are a major challenge, especially when the relevant variables to be displayed are not scalars but tensors. This talk will illustrate some attempts to deal with this challenge, using seismic wave fields as specific objects to display. We will highlight how 4D displays can help address very difficult issues of significant scientific import.

  11. Myocardial motion and function assessment using 4D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Peng-Cheng; Robinson, Glynn P.; Duncan, James S.

    1994-09-01

    This paper describes efforts aimed at more objectively and accurately quantifying the local, regional and global function of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart from 4D image data. Using our shape-based image analysis methods, point-wise myocardial motion vector fields between successive image frames through the entire cardiac cycle will be computed. Quantitative LV motion, thickening, and strain measurements will then be established from the point correspondence maps. In the paper, we will also briefly describe an in vivo experimental model which uses implanted imaging-opaque markers to validate the results of our image analysis methods. Finally, initial experimental results using image sequences from two different modalities will be presented.

  12. Application of X-ray micro-CT for micro-structural characterization of APCVD deposited SiC coatings on graphite conduit.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, A K; Sarkar, P S; Singh, B; Kashyap, Y S; Rao, P T; Sinha, A

    2016-02-01

    SiC coatings are commonly used as oxidation protective materials in high-temperature applications. The operational performance of the coating depends on its microstructure and uniformity. This study explores the feasibility of applying tabletop X-ray micro-CT for the micro-structural characterization of SiC coating. The coating is deposited over the internal surface of pipe structured graphite fuel tube, which is a prototype of potential components of compact high-temperature reactor (CHTR). The coating is deposited using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) and properties such as morphology, porosity, thickness variation are evaluated. Micro-structural differences in the coating caused by substrate distance from precursor inlet in a CVD reactor are also studied. The study finds micro-CT a potential tool for characterization of SiC coating during its future course of engineering. We show that depletion of reactants at larger distances causes development of larger pores in the coating, which affects its morphology, density and thickness.

  13. Application of X-ray micro-CT for micro-structural characterization of APCVD deposited SiC coatings on graphite conduit.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, A K; Sarkar, P S; Singh, B; Kashyap, Y S; Rao, P T; Sinha, A

    2016-02-01

    SiC coatings are commonly used as oxidation protective materials in high-temperature applications. The operational performance of the coating depends on its microstructure and uniformity. This study explores the feasibility of applying tabletop X-ray micro-CT for the micro-structural characterization of SiC coating. The coating is deposited over the internal surface of pipe structured graphite fuel tube, which is a prototype of potential components of compact high-temperature reactor (CHTR). The coating is deposited using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) and properties such as morphology, porosity, thickness variation are evaluated. Micro-structural differences in the coating caused by substrate distance from precursor inlet in a CVD reactor are also studied. The study finds micro-CT a potential tool for characterization of SiC coating during its future course of engineering. We show that depletion of reactants at larger distances causes development of larger pores in the coating, which affects its morphology, density and thickness. PMID:26722834

  14. Micro-CT Analysis of Bone Healing in Rabbit Calvarial Critical-Sized Defects with Solid Bioactive Glass, Tricalcium Phosphate Granules or Autogenous Bone

    PubMed Central

    Karhula, Sakari S.; Haapea, Marianne; Kauppinen, Sami; Finnilä, Mikko; Saarakkala, Simo; Serlo, Willy; Sándor, George K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of the present study was to evaluate bone healing in rabbit critical-sized calvarial defects using two different synthetic scaffold materials, solid biodegradable bioactive glass and tricalcium phosphate granules alongside solid and particulated autogenous bone grafts. Material and Methods Bilateral full thickness critical-sized calvarial defects were created in 15 New Zealand white adult male rabbits. Ten defects were filled with solid scaffolds made of bioactive glass or with porous tricalcium phosphate granules. The healing of the biomaterial-filled defects was compared at the 6 week time point to the healing of autologous bone grafted defects filled with a solid cranial bone block in 5 defects and with particulated bone combined with fibrin glue in 10 defects. In 5 animals one defect was left unfilled as a negative control. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) was used to analyze healing of the defects. Results Micro-CT analysis revealed that defects filled with tricalcium phosphate granules showed new bone formation in the order of 3.89 (SD 1.17)% whereas defects treated with solid bioactive glass scaffolds showed 0.21 (SD 0.16)%, new bone formation. In the empty negative control defects there was an average new bone formation of 21.8 (SD 23.7)%. Conclusions According to findings in this study, tricalcium phosphate granules have osteogenic potential superior to bioactive glass, though both particulated bone with fibrin glue and solid bone block were superior defect filling materials. PMID:27489608

  15. Statistical Analysis of Yarn Feature Parameters in C/Epoxy Plain-Weave Composite Using Micro CT with High-Resolution Lens-Coupled Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Zhong-wei

    2016-08-01

    C/Epoxy plain-weave composite is difficult to clear imaging in Micro CT with flat panel detector due to the similar atomic numbers of component materials. To solve this problem, a new Micro CT equipment with high-resolution lens-coupled detector is used to reconstruct 3D images of C/Epoxy. Slice data correction with ellipse projection is used to acquire real yarn normal cross-section information. A reference period method suitable for plain-weave composite is then detailed to evaluate statistical properties of yarn feature parameters. In the process of determination of real extreme slices, dislocation phenomenon existed in the laminated composite is discovered. Several possible reasons caused this phenomenon are discussed. Systematic trends, standard deviations and correlation lengths of stochastic deviations with original and corrected data are evaluated respectively by the application of reference period method. The statistical results show that mean out-of-plane yarn waviness, semi-axes, cross-section area and aspect ratio exhibit periodic characteristics, and the maximum effect of slice data correction on all statistical properties of feature parameters is twist angle.

  16. Evaluation of reparative dentin formation of ProRoot MTA, Biodentine and BioAggregate using micro-CT and immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jia; Song, Young-Sang; Min, Kyung-San; Kim, Sun-Hun; Koh, Jeong-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of two new calcium silicate-based pulp-capping materials (Biodentine and BioAggregate) to induce healing in a rat pulp injury model and to compare them with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Materials and Methods Eighteen rats were anesthetized, cavities were prepared and the pulp was capped with either of ProRoot MTA, Biodentine, or BioAggregate. The specimens were scanned using a high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) system and were prepared and evaluated histologically and immunohistochemically using dentin sialoprotein (DSP). Results On micro-CT analysis, the ProRoot MTA and Biodentine groups showed significantly thicker hard tissue formation (p < 0.05). On H&E staining, ProRoot MTA showed complete dentin bridge formation with normal pulpal histology. In the Biodentine and BioAggregate groups, a thick, homogeneous hard tissue barrier was observed. The ProRoot MTA specimens showed strong immunopositive reaction for DSP. Conclusions Our results suggest that calcium silicate-based pulp-capping materials induce favorable effects on reparative processes during vital pulp therapy and that both Biodentine and BioAggregate could be considered as alternatives to ProRoot MTA. PMID:26877988

  17. Direct simulations of two-phase flow on micro-CT images of porous media and upscaling of pore-scale forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeini, Ali Q.; Blunt, Martin J.; Bijeljic, Branko

    2014-12-01

    Pore-scale forces have a significant effect on the macroscopic behaviour of multiphase flow through porous media. This paper studies the effect of these forces using a new volume-of-fluid based finite volume method developed for simulating two-phase flow directly on micro-CT images of porous media. An analytical analysis of the relationship between the pore-scale forces and the Darcy-scale pressure drops is presented. We use this analysis to propose unambiguous definitions of Darcy-scale viscous pressure drops as the rate of energy dissipation per unit flow rate of each phase, and then use them to obtain the relative permeability curves. We show that this definition is consistent with conventional laboratory/field measurements by comparing our predictions with experimental relative permeability. We present single and two-phase flow simulations for primary oil injection followed by water injection on a sandpack and a Berea sandstone. The two-phase flow simulations are presented at different capillary numbers which cover the transition from capillary fingering at low capillary numbers to a more viscous fingering displacement pattern at higher capillary numbers, and the effect of capillary number on the relative permeability curves is investigated. Overall, this paper presents a new finite volume-based methodology for the detailed analysis of two-phase flow directly on micro-CT images of porous media and upscaling of the results to the Darcy scale.

  18. Assessing the three-dimensional collagen network in soft tissues using contrast agents and high resolution micro-CT: Application to porcine iliac veins.

    PubMed

    Nierenberger, Mathieu; Rémond, Yves; Ahzi, Saïd; Choquet, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The assessment of the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibers inside vessel walls constitutes one of the bases for building structural models for the description of the mechanical behavior of these tissues. Multiphoton microscopy allows for such observations, but is limited to volumes of around a thousand of microns. In the present work, we propose to observe the collagenous network of vascular tissues using micro-CT. To get a contrast, three staining solutions (phosphotungstic acid, phosphomolybdic acid and iodine potassium iodide) were tested. Two of these stains were showed to lead to similar results and to a satisfactory contrast within the tissue. A detailed observation of a small porcine iliac vein sample allowed assessing the collagen fibers orientations within the medial and adventitial layers of the vein. The vasa vasorum network, which is present inside the adventitia of the vein, was also observed. Finally, the demonstrated micro-CT staining technique for the three-dimensional observation of thin soft tissues samples, like vein walls, contributes to the assessment of their structure at different scales while keeping a global overview of the tissue. PMID:26033495

  19. Reduced dental calcium expression and dental mass in chronic sleep deprived rats: Combined EDS, TOF-SIMS, and micro-CT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yi-Jie; Huang, Yung-Kai; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Pai, Man-Hui; Lee, Ai-Wei; Mai, Fu-Der; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Teeth are the hardest tissue in the body. The growth of teeth is closely regulated by circadian rhythmicity. Considering that sleep deprivation (SD) is a severe condition that disrupts normal circadian rhythmicity, this study was conducted to determine whether calcium expression (the major element participating in teeth constitution), and dental mass would be significantly impaired following SD. Adolescent rats subjected to 3 weeks of SD were processed for energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses. The EDS and TOF-SIMS results indicated that high calcium intensity was detected in both the upper and lower incisors of untreated rats. Micro-CT analysis corresponded closely with spectral data in which an enhanced dental mass was calculated in intact animals. However, following SD, both calcium expression and the dental mass were remarkably decreased to nearly half those of the untreated values. Because SD plays a detrimental role in impairing dental structure, establishing satisfactory sleep behavior would therefore serve as a crucial strategy for preventing or improving prevalent dental dysfunctions.

  20. Hemodynamic Changes Caused by Flow Diverters in Rabbit Aneurysm Models: Comparison of Virtual and Realistic FD Deployments Based on Micro-CT Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinyu; Deng, Benqiang; Fang, Yibin; Yu, Ying; Cheng, Jiyong; Wang, Shengzhang; Wang, Kuizhong; Liu, Jian-Min; Huang, Qinghai

    2013-01-01

    Adjusting hemodynamics via flow diverter (FD) implantation is emerging as a novel method of treating cerebral aneurysms. However, most previous FD-related hemodynamic studies were based on virtual FD deployment, which may produce different hemodynamic outcomes than realistic (in vivo) FD deployment. We compared hemodynamics between virtual FD and realistic FD deployments in rabbit aneurysm models using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. FDs were implanted for aneurysms in 14 rabbits. Vascular models based on rabbit-specific angiograms were reconstructed for CFD studies. Real FD configurations were reconstructed based on micro-CT scans after sacrifice, while virtual FD configurations were constructed with SolidWorks software. Hemodynamic parameters before and after FD deployment were analyzed. According to the metal coverage (MC) of implanted FDs calculated based on micro-CT reconstruction, 14 rabbits were divided into two groups (A, MC >35%; B, MC <35%). Normalized mean wall shear stress (WSS), relative residence time (RRT), inflow velocity, and inflow volume in Group A were significantly different (P<0.05) from virtual FD deployment, but pressure was not (P>0.05). The normalized mean WSS in Group A after realistic FD implantation was significantly lower than that of Group B. All parameters in Group B exhibited no significant difference between realistic and virtual FDs. This study confirmed MC-correlated differences in hemodynamic parameters between realistic and virtual FD deployment.

  1. Fundamentals and recent advances in X-ray micro computed tomography (microCT) applied on thermal-fluid dynamics and multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well-known technique nowadays, since its first practical application by Sir. G. Hounsfield (Nobel price for medicine 1979) has continually benefited from optimising improvements, especially in medical applications. Indeed, also application of CT in various engineering research fields provides fundamental informations on a wide range of applications, considering that the technique is not destructive, allowing 3D visualization without perturbation of the analysed material. Nowadays, it is technologically possible to design and realize an equipment that achieve a micrometric resolution and even improve the sensibility in revealing differences in materials having very radiotransparency, allowing i.e. to distinguish between different fluids (with different density) or states of matter (like with two-phase flows). At the University of Bergamo, a prototype of an X-ray microCT system was developed since 2008, so being fully operative from 2012, with specific customizations for investigations in thermal-fluid dynamics and multiphase flow researches. A technical session held at the UIT International Conference in L'Aquila (Italy), at which this paper is referring, has presented some microCT fundamentals, to allow the audience to gain basics to follow the “fil-rouge” that links all the instrumentation developments, till the recent applications. Hereinafter are reported some applications currently developed at Bergamo University at the X-ray computed micro-tomography laboratory.

  2. Constrained reconstructions for 4D intervention guidance.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, J; Flach, B; Kueres, R; Semmler, W; Kachelriess, M; Bartling, S

    2013-05-21

    Image-guided interventions are an increasingly important part of clinical minimally invasive procedures. However, up to now they cannot be performed under 4D (3D + time) guidance due to the exceedingly high x-ray dose. In this work we investigate the applicability of compressed sensing reconstructions for highly undersampled CT datasets combined with the incorporation of prior images in order to yield low dose 4D intervention guidance. We present a new reconstruction scheme prior image dynamic interventional CT (PrIDICT) that accounts for specific image features in intervention guidance and compare it to PICCS and ASD-POCS. The optimal parameters for the dose per projection and the numbers of projections per reconstruction are determined in phantom simulations and measurements. In vivo experiments in six pigs are performed in a cone-beam CT; measured doses are compared to current gold-standard intervention guidance represented by a clinical fluoroscopy system. Phantom studies show maximum image quality for identical overall doses in the range of 14 to 21 projections per reconstruction. In vivo studies reveal that interventional materials can be followed in 4D visualization and that PrIDICT, compared to PICCS and ASD-POCS, shows superior reconstruction results and fewer artifacts in the periphery with dose in the order of biplane fluoroscopy. These results suggest that 4D intervention guidance can be realized with today's flat detector and gantry systems using the herein presented reconstruction scheme.

  3. 4D-Var Developement at GMAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelc, Joanna S.; Todling, Ricardo; Akkraoui, Amal El

    2014-01-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Offce (GMAO) is currently using an IAU-based 3D-Var data assimilation system. GMAO has been experimenting with a 3D-Var-hybrid version of its data assimilation system (DAS) for over a year now, which will soon become operational and it will rapidly progress toward a 4D-EnVar. Concurrently, the machinery to exercise traditional 4DVar is in place and it is desirable to have a comparison of the traditional 4D approach with the other available options, and evaluate their performance in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) DAS. This work will also explore the possibility for constructing a reduced order model (ROM) to make traditional 4D-Var computationally attractive for increasing model resolutions. Part of the research on ROM will be to search for a suitably acceptable space to carry on the corresponding reduction. This poster illustrates how the IAU-based 4D-Var assimilation compares with our currently used IAU-based 3D-Var.

  4. Constrained reconstructions for 4D intervention guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, J.; Flach, B.; Kueres, R.; Semmler, W.; Kachelrieß, M.; Bartling, S.

    2013-05-01

    Image-guided interventions are an increasingly important part of clinical minimally invasive procedures. However, up to now they cannot be performed under 4D (3D + time) guidance due to the exceedingly high x-ray dose. In this work we investigate the applicability of compressed sensing reconstructions for highly undersampled CT datasets combined with the incorporation of prior images in order to yield low dose 4D intervention guidance. We present a new reconstruction scheme prior image dynamic interventional CT (PrIDICT) that accounts for specific image features in intervention guidance and compare it to PICCS and ASD-POCS. The optimal parameters for the dose per projection and the numbers of projections per reconstruction are determined in phantom simulations and measurements. In vivo experiments in six pigs are performed in a cone-beam CT; measured doses are compared to current gold-standard intervention guidance represented by a clinical fluoroscopy system. Phantom studies show maximum image quality for identical overall doses in the range of 14 to 21 projections per reconstruction. In vivo studies reveal that interventional materials can be followed in 4D visualization and that PrIDICT, compared to PICCS and ASD-POCS, shows superior reconstruction results and fewer artifacts in the periphery with dose in the order of biplane fluoroscopy. These results suggest that 4D intervention guidance can be realized with today’s flat detector and gantry systems using the herein presented reconstruction scheme.

  5. Geostatistical analysis of 3D microCT images of porous media for stochastic upscaling of spatially variable reactive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The 3D imaging of porous media through micro tomography allows the characterization of porous space and mineral abundances with unprecedented resolution. Such images can be used to perform computational determination of permeability and to obtain a realistic measure of the mineral surfaces exposed to fluid flow and thus to chemical interactions. However, the volume of the plugs that can be analysed with such detail is in the order of 1 cm3, so that their representativity at a larger scale, i.e. as needed for reactive transport modelling at Darcy scale, is questionable at best. In fact, the fine scale heterogeneity (from plug to plug at few cm distance within the same core) would originate substantially different readings of the investigated properties. Therefore, a comprehensive approach including the spatial variability and heterogeneity at the micro- and plug scale needs to be adopted to gain full advantage from the high resolution images in view of the upscaling to Darcy scale. In the framework of the collaborative project H2STORE, micro-CT imaging of different core samples from potential H2-storage sites has been performed by partners at TU Clausthal and Jena University before and after treatment with H2/CO2 mixtures in pressurized autoclaves. We present here the workflow which has been implemented to extract the relevant features from the available data concerning the heterogeneity of the medium at the microscopic and plug scale and to correlate the observed chemical reactions and changes in the porous structure with the geometrical features of the medium. First, a multivariate indicator-based geostatistical model for the microscopic structure of the plugs has been built and fitted to the available images. This involved the implementation of exploratory analysis algorithms such as experimental indicator variograms and cross-variograms. The implemented methods are able to efficiently deal with images in the order of 10003 voxels making use of parallelization

  6. Qualitative grading of aortic regurgitation: a pilot study comparing CMR 4D flow and echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Chelu, Raluca G; van den Bosch, Annemien E; van Kranenburg, Matthijs; Hsiao, Albert; van den Hoven, Allard T; Ouhlous, Mohamed; Budde, Ricardo P J; Beniest, Kirsten M; Swart, Laurens E; Coenen, Adriaan; Lubbers, Marisa M; Wielopolski, Piotr A; Vasanawala, Shreyas S; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Nieman, Koen

    2016-02-01

    Over the past 10 years there has been intense research in the development of volumetric visualization of intracardiac flow by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR).This volumetric time resolved technique called CMR 4D flow imaging has several advantages over standard CMR. It offers anatomical, functional and flow information in a single free-breathing, ten-minute acquisition. However, the data obtained is large and its processing requires dedicated software. We evaluated a cloud-based application package that combines volumetric data correction and visualization of CMR 4D flow data, and assessed its accuracy for the detection and grading of aortic valve regurgitation using transthoracic echocardiography as reference. Between June 2014 and January 2015, patients planned for clinical CMR were consecutively approached to undergo the supplementary CMR 4D flow acquisition. Fifty four patients(median age 39 years, 32 males) were included. Detection and grading of the aortic valve regurgitation using CMR4D flow imaging were evaluated against transthoracic echocardiography. The agreement between 4D flow CMR and transthoracic echocardiography for grading of aortic valve regurgitation was good (j = 0.73). To identify relevant,more than mild aortic valve regurgitation, CMR 4D flow imaging had a sensitivity of 100 % and specificity of 98 %. Aortic regurgitation can be well visualized, in a similar manner as transthoracic echocardiography, when using CMR 4D flow imaging. PMID:26498478

  7. Interactive animation of 4D performance capture.

    PubMed

    Casas, Dan; Tejera, Margara; Guillemaut, Jean-Yves; Hilton, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    A 4D parametric motion graph representation is presented for interactive animation from actor performance capture in a multiple camera studio. The representation is based on a 4D model database of temporally aligned mesh sequence reconstructions for multiple motions. High-level movement controls such as speed and direction are achieved by blending multiple mesh sequences of related motions. A real-time mesh sequence blending approach is introduced, which combines the realistic deformation of previous nonlinear solutions with efficient online computation. Transitions between different parametric motion spaces are evaluated in real time based on surface shape and motion similarity. Four-dimensional parametric motion graphs allow real-time interactive character animation while preserving the natural dynamics of the captured performance.

  8. Nondipole Effects in Xe 4d Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmers, O; Guillemin, R; Wolska, A; Lindle, D W; Rolles, D; Cheng, K T; Johnson, W R; Zhou, H L; Manson, S T

    2004-07-14

    We measured the nondipole parameters for the spin-orbit doublets Xe 4d{sub 5/2} and Xe 4d{sub 3/2} over a photon-energy range from 100 eV to 250 eV at beamline 8.0.1.3 of the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Significant nondipole effects are found at relatively low energies as a result of Cooper minima in dipole channels and interchannel coupling in quadrupole channels. Most importantly, sharp disagreement between experiment and theory, when otherwise excellent agreement was expected, has provided the first evidence of satellite two-electron quadrupole photoionization transitions, along with their crucial importance for a quantitatively accurate theory.

  9. Interactive animation of 4D performance capture.

    PubMed

    Casas, Dan; Tejera, Margara; Guillemaut, Jean-Yves; Hilton, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    A 4D parametric motion graph representation is presented for interactive animation from actor performance capture in a multiple camera studio. The representation is based on a 4D model database of temporally aligned mesh sequence reconstructions for multiple motions. High-level movement controls such as speed and direction are achieved by blending multiple mesh sequences of related motions. A real-time mesh sequence blending approach is introduced, which combines the realistic deformation of previous nonlinear solutions with efficient online computation. Transitions between different parametric motion spaces are evaluated in real time based on surface shape and motion similarity. Four-dimensional parametric motion graphs allow real-time interactive character animation while preserving the natural dynamics of the captured performance. PMID:23492379

  10. Abdominal and pancreatic motion correlation using 4D CT, 4D transponders, and a gating belt.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Ricardo; Zou, Wei; Plastaras, John P; Metz, James M; Teo, Boon-Keng; Kassaee, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    The correlation between the pancreatic and external abdominal motion due to respiration was investigated on two patients. These studies utilized four dimensional computer tomography (4D CT), a four dimensional (4D) electromagnetic transponder system, and a gating belt system. One 4D CT study was performed during simulation to quantify the pancreatic motion using computer tomography images at eight breathing phases. The motion under free breathing and breath-hold were analyzed for the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system during treatment. A linear curve was fitted for all data sets and correlation factors were evaluated between the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system data. The 4D CT study demonstrated a modest correlation between the external marker and the pancreatic motion with R-square values larger than 0.8 for the inferior-superior (inf-sup). Then, the relative pressure from the belt gating system correlated well with the 4D electromagnetic transponder system's motion in the anterior-posterior (ant-post) and the inf-post directions. These directions have a correlation value of -0.93 and 0.76, while the lateral only had a 0.03 correlation coefficient. Based on our limited study, external surrogates can be used as predictors of the pancreatic motion in the inf-sup and the ant-post directions. Although there is a low correlation on the lateral direction, its motion is significantly shorter. In conclusion, an appropriate treatment delivery can be used for pancreatic cancer when an internal tracking system, such as the 4D electromagnetic transponder system, is unavailable. PMID:23652242

  11. Abdominal and pancreatic motion correlation using 4D CT, 4D transponders, and a gating belt.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Ricardo; Zou, Wei; Plastaras, John P; Metz, James M; Teo, Boon-Keng; Kassaee, Alireza

    2013-05-06

    The correlation between the pancreatic and external abdominal motion due to respiration was investigated on two patients. These studies utilized four dimensional computer tomography (4D CT), a four dimensional (4D) electromagnetic transponder system, and a gating belt system. One 4D CT study was performed during simulation to quantify the pancreatic motion using computer tomography images at eight breathing phases. The motion under free breathing and breath-hold were analyzed for the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system during treatment. A linear curve was fitted for all data sets and correlation factors were evaluated between the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system data. The 4D CT study demonstrated a modest correlation between the external marker and the pancreatic motion with R-square values larger than 0.8 for the inferior-superior (inf-sup). Then, the relative pressure from the belt gating system correlated well with the 4D electromagnetic transponder system's motion in the anterior-posterior (ant-post) and the inf-post directions. These directions have a correlation value of -0.93 and 0.76, while the lateral only had a 0.03 correlation coefficient. Based on our limited study, external surrogates can be used as predictors of the pancreatic motion in the inf-sup and the ant-post directions. Although there is a low correlation on the lateral direction, its motion is significantly shorter. In conclusion, an appropriate treatment delivery can be used for pancreatic cancer when an internal tracking system, such as the 4D electromagnetic transponder system, is unavailable.

  12. In-vivo x-ray micro-imaging and micro-CT with the Medipix2 semiconductor detector at UniAndes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caicedo, I.; Avila, C.; Gomez, B.; Bula, C.; Roa, C.; Sanabria, J.

    2012-02-01

    This poster contains the procedure to obtain micro-CTs and to image moving samples using the Medipix2 detector, with its corresponding results. The high granularity of the detector makes it suitable for micro-CT. We used commercial software (Octopus) to do the 3D reconstruction of the samples in the first place, and we worked on modifying free reconstruction software afterwards. Medipix has a very fast response ( ~ hundreds of nanoseconds) and high sensibility. These features allow obtaining nearly in-vivo high resolution (55m * 55m) images. We used an exposure time of 0.1 s for each frame, and the resulting images were animated. The High Energy Physics Group at UniAndes is a member of the Medipix3 collaboration. Its research activities are focused on developing set-ups for biomedical applications and particle tracking using the Medipix2 and Timepix detectors, and assessing the feasibility of the Medipix3 detector for future applications.

  13. Computer modelling integrated with micro-CT and material testing provides additional insight to evaluate bone treatments: Application to a beta-glycan derived whey protein mice model.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, D; Tu, P T; Dickinson, M; Watson, M; Blais, A; Das, R; Cornish, J; Fernandez, J

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a whey protein diet on computationally predicted mechanical strength of murine bones in both trabecular and cortical regions of the femur. There was no significant influence on mechanical strength in cortical bone observed with increasing whey protein treatment, consistent with cortical tissue mineral density (TMD) and bone volume changes observed. Trabecular bone showed a significant decline in strength with increasing whey protein treatment when nanoindentation derived Young׳s moduli were used in the model. When microindentation, micro-CT phantom density or normalised Young׳s moduli were included in the model a non-significant decline in strength was exhibited. These results for trabecular bone were consistent with both trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) and micro-CT indices obtained independently. The secondary aim of this study was to characterise the influence of different sources of Young׳s moduli on computational prediction. This study aimed to quantify the predicted mechanical strength in 3D from these sources and evaluate if trends and conclusions remained consistent. For cortical bone, predicted mechanical strength behaviour was consistent across all sources of Young׳s moduli. There was no difference in treatment trend observed when Young׳s moduli were normalised. In contrast, trabecular strength due to whey protein treatment significantly reduced when material properties from nanoindentation were introduced. Other material property sources were not significant but emphasised the strength trend over normalised material properties. This shows strength at the trabecular level was attributed to both changes in bone architecture and material properties.

  14. Inflammatory focal bone destruction in femoral heads with end-stage haemophilic arthropathy: a study on clinic samples with micro-CT and histological analyses

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, S.; LU, C.; YING, J.; WANG, P.; XU, T.; CHEN, D.; JIN, H.; TONG, P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Focal bone destruction has a high prevalence in haemophilic arthropathy (HA) affected joints, but the mechanism remains unclear. Aim We undertook this study on clinic samples to explore the focal bone destruction in femoral heads suffered with end-stage HA. Methods Twenty-one femoral heads from HA patients and 19 femoral heads from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were scanned by micro-CT. Histological analysis, including TRAP staining of subchondral bone were performed to evaluate the bone destruction and osteoclasts activity. RANKL, OPG as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β in subchondral bone were detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) method. Results Severe focal lesion was observed in all the HA and RA femoral heads by micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The mean percentage of lesion volume to total volume of the femoral heads from HA patients was significantly higher than those from RA patients. There was no significant difference in osteoclasts numbers in subchondral bone between HA and RA groups. By IHC analysis, high expression of RANKL, TNF-α, IL-1β and low expression of OPG and RANK were observed in subchondral bone, and there were no significant differences in the expression of RANKL, OPG, RANK, TNF-α and IL-1β in femoral heads derived from HA and RA patients. Conclusion Our findings demonstrated the focal bone destruction coupled with inflammatory osteoclastogenesis at subchondral bone in femoral heads from patients with end-stage HA, and that was similar to the changes in the femoral heads of RA patients. PMID:26388304

  15. Eupolybothrus cavernicolus Komerički & Stoev sp. n. (Chilopoda: Lithobiomorpha: Lithobiidae): the first eukaryotic species description combining transcriptomic, DNA barcoding and micro-CT imaging data.

    PubMed

    Stoev, Pavel; Komerički, Ana; Akkari, Nesrine; Liu, Shanlin; Zhou, Xin; Weigand, Alexander M; Hostens, Jeroen; Hunter, Christopher I; Edmunds, Scott C; Porco, David; Zapparoli, Marzio; Georgiev, Teodor; Mietchen, Daniel; Roberts, David; Faulwetter, Sarah; Smith, Vincent; Penev, Lyubomir

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how a classical taxonomic description of a new species can be enhanced by applying new generation molecular methods, and novel computing and imaging technologies. A cave-dwelling centipede, Eupolybothrus cavernicolus Komerički & Stoev sp. n. (Chilopoda: Lithobiomorpha: Lithobiidae), found in a remote karst region in Knin, Croatia, is the first eukaryotic species for which, in addition to the traditional morphological description, we provide a fully sequenced transcriptome, a DNA barcode, detailed anatomical X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) scans, and a movie of the living specimen to document important traits of its ex-situ behaviour. By employing micro-CT scanning in a new species for the first time, we create a high-resolution morphological and anatomical dataset that allows virtual reconstructions of the specimen and subsequent interactive manipulation to test the recently introduced 'cybertype' notion. In addition, the transcriptome was recorded with a total of 67,785 scaffolds, having an average length of 812 bp and N50 of 1,448 bp (see GigaDB). Subsequent annotation of 22,866 scaffolds was conducted by tracing homologs against current available databases, including Nr, SwissProt and COG. This pilot project illustrates a workflow of producing, storing, publishing and disseminating large data sets associated with a description of a new taxon. All data have been deposited in publicly accessible repositories, such as GigaScience GigaDB, NCBI, BOLD, Morphbank and Morphosource, and the respective open licenses used ensure their accessibility and re-usability. PMID:24723752

  16. Micro-CT analysis and mechanical properties of Ti spherical and polyhedral void composites made with saccharose as a space holder material

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowicz, J.; Adamek, G.; Pałka, K.; Andrzejewski, D.

    2015-02-15

    The paper describes the formation, morphology and mechanical properties of Ti void composites. The Ti void composites were made using 100 and 325 mesh Ti powder for solid scaffold formation. The spherical and polyhedral voids (pores) were formed using saccharose particles (table sugar) of different shapes. The Ti void composite morphology was investigated by microcomputed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. The Ti void composites of designed porosity of 50–70% were made. Compression test was applied for mechanical properties estimation. It has been found, that Ti void composites made from 100 mesh Ti and those having spherical pores have a higher strength and elastic modulus, i.e. for the designed porosity of 50% for 100 and 325 mesh Ti void composites, a compressive strength was 32.32 and 20.13 MPa, respectively. It has been shown that this is related to better sintering of the 100 mesh Ti powders compared with the 325 mesh Ti powders. A correlation between microcomputed tomography data and mechanical properties has also been shown. The Ti void composites, made with the use of saccharose as a space holder, described in this work should be a promising material for biomedical applications, where interconnected pores and good mechanical properties are required. - Highlights: • Ti scaffolds of the porosity of 50–70% were made. • Saccharose particles as space holder were applied. • The voids in the scaffolds were designed with spherical and polyhedral shape. • The scaffold structure was investigated by SEM and micro-CT. • Micro-CT data and mechanical properties of the Ti scaffold have been correlated.

  17. 4D motion animation of coronary arteries from rotational angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, Wolfgang; Rohkohl, Christopher; Schuldhaus, Dominik; Prümmer, Marcus; Lauritsch, Günter; Hornegger, Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Time-resolved 3-D imaging of the heart is a major research topic in the medical imaging community. Recent advances in the interventional cardiac 3-D imaging from rotational angiography (C-arm CT) are now also making 4-D imaging feasible during procedures in the catheter laboratory. State-of-the-art reconstruction algorithms try to estimate the cardiac motion and utilize the motion field to enhance the reconstruction of a stable cardiac phase (diastole). The available data offers a handful of opportunities during interventional procedures, e.g. the ECG-synchronized dynamic roadmapping or the computation and analysis of functional parameters. In this paper we will demonstrate that the motion vector field (MVF) that is output by motion compensated image reconstruction algorithms is in general not directly usable for animation and motion analysis. Dependent on the algorithm different defects are investigated. A primary issue is that the MVF needs to be inverted, i.e. the wrong direction of motion is provided. A second major issue is the non-periodicity of cardiac motion. In algorithms which compute a non-periodic motion field from a single rotation the in depth motion information along viewing direction is missing, since this cannot be measured in the projections. As a result, while the MVF improves reconstruction quality, it is insufficient for motion animation and analysis. We propose an algorithm to solve both problems, i.e. inversion and missing in-depth information in a unified framework. A periodic version of the MVF is approximated. The task is formulated as a linear optimization problem where a parametric smooth motion model based on B-splines is estimated from the MVF. It is shown that the problem can be solved using a sparse QR factorization within a clinical feasible time of less than one minute. In a phantom experiment using the publicly available CAVAREV platform, the average quality of a non-periodic animation could be increased by 39% by applying the

  18. Active origami by 4D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Qi; Dunn, Conner K.; Qi, H. Jerry; Dunn, Martin L.

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in three dimensional (3D) printing technology that allow multiple materials to be printed within each layer enable the creation of materials and components with precisely controlled heterogeneous microstructures. In addition, active materials, such as shape memory polymers, can be printed to create an active microstructure within a solid. These active materials can subsequently be activated in a controlled manner to change the shape or configuration of the solid in response to an environmental stimulus. This has been termed 4D printing, with the 4th dimension being the time-dependent shape change after the printing. In this paper, we advance the 4D printing concept to the design and fabrication of active origami, where a flat sheet automatically folds into a complicated 3D component. Here we print active composites with shape memory polymer fibers precisely printed in an elastomeric matrix and use them as intelligent active hinges to enable origami folding patterns. We develop a theoretical model to provide guidance in selecting design parameters such as fiber dimensions, hinge length, and programming strains and temperature. Using the model, we design and fabricate several active origami components that assemble from flat polymer sheets, including a box, a pyramid, and two origami airplanes. In addition, we directly print a 3D box with active composite hinges and program it to assume a temporary flat shape that subsequently recovers to the 3D box shape on demand.

  19. Population of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Segars, W. P.; Bond, Jason; Frush, Jack; Hon, Sylvia; Eckersley, Chris; Samei, E.; Williams, Cameron H.; Frush, D.; Feng Jianqiao; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The authors previously developed the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. The XCAT consisted of highly detailed whole-body models for the standard male and female adult, including the cardiac and respiratory motions. In this work, the authors extend the XCAT beyond these reference anatomies by developing a series of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research, the first library of 4D computational phantoms. Methods: The initial anatomy of each phantom was based on chest-abdomen-pelvis computed tomography data from normal patients obtained from the Duke University database. The major organs and structures for each phantom were segmented from the corresponding data and defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the head, arms, and legs using the original XCAT adult male and female anatomies. The structures were scaled to best match the age and anatomy of the patient. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from the template XCAT phantom (male or female) to the target patient model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. Each new phantom was refined by checking for anatomical accuracy via inspection of the models. Results: Using these methods, the authors created a series of computerized phantoms with thousands of anatomical structures and modeling cardiac and respiratory motions. The database consists of 58 (35 male and 23 female) anatomically variable phantoms in total. Like the original XCAT, these phantoms can be combined with existing simulation packages to simulate realistic imaging data. Each new phantom contains parameterized models for the anatomy and the cardiac and respiratory motions and can, therefore, serve

  20. Advances in 4D radiation therapy for managing respiration: part II - 4D treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2012-12-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle - an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems.

  1. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part II – 4D Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle – an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems. PMID:22796324

  2. ICT4D: A Computer Science Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutinen, Erkki; Tedre, Matti

    The term ICT4D refers to the opportunities of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) as an agent of development. Research in that field is often focused on evaluating the feasibility of existing technologies, mostly of Western or Far East Asian origin, in the context of developing regions. A computer science perspective is complementary to that agenda. The computer science perspective focuses on exploring the resources, or inputs, of a particular context and on basing the design of a technical intervention on the available resources, so that the output makes a difference in the development context. The modus operandi of computer science, construction, interacts with evaluation and exploration practices. An analysis of a contextualized information technology curriculum of Tumaini University in southern Tanzania shows the potential of the computer science perspective for designing meaningful information and communication technology for a developing region.

  3. 4D Clinical Imaging for Dynamic CAD

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    A basic 4D imaging system to capture the jaw motion has been developed that produces high resolution 3D surface data. Fluorescent microspheres are brushed onto the areas of the upper and the lower arches to be imaged, producing a high-contrast random optical pattern. A hand-held imaging device operated at about 10 cm from the mouth captures time-based perspective images of the fluorescent areas. Each set of images, containing both upper and the lower arch data, is converted to a 3d point mesh using photogrammetry, thereby providing an instantaneous relative jaw position. Eight 3d positions per second are captured. Using one of the 3d frames as a reference, incremental transforms are derived to express the free body motion of the mandible. Conventional 3d models of the dentition are directly registered to the reference frame, allowing them to be animated using the derived transforms. PMID:24082882

  4. Soft Route to 4D Tomography.

    PubMed

    Taillandier-Thomas, Thibault; Roux, Stéphane; Hild, François

    2016-07-01

    Based on the assumption that the time evolution of a sample observed by computed tomography requires many less parameters than the definition of the microstructure itself, it is proposed to reconstruct these changes based on the initial state (using computed tomography) and very few radiographs acquired at fixed intervals of time. This Letter presents a proof of concept that for a fatigue cracked sample its kinematics can be tracked from no more than two radiographs in situations where a complete 3D view would require several hundreds of radiographs. This 2 order of magnitude gain opens the way to a "computed" 4D tomography, which complements the recent progress achieved in fast or ultrafast computed tomography, which is based on beam brightness, detector sensitivity, and signal acquisition technologies.

  5. Soft Route to 4D Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillandier-Thomas, Thibault; Roux, Stéphane; Hild, François

    2016-07-01

    Based on the assumption that the time evolution of a sample observed by computed tomography requires many less parameters than the definition of the microstructure itself, it is proposed to reconstruct these changes based on the initial state (using computed tomography) and very few radiographs acquired at fixed intervals of time. This Letter presents a proof of concept that for a fatigue cracked sample its kinematics can be tracked from no more than two radiographs in situations where a complete 3D view would require several hundreds of radiographs. This 2 order of magnitude gain opens the way to a "computed" 4D tomography, which complements the recent progress achieved in fast or ultrafast computed tomography, which is based on beam brightness, detector sensitivity, and signal acquisition technologies.

  6. Opening the Black Box of ICT4D: Advancing Our Understanding of ICT4D Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sung Jin

    2013-01-01

    The term, Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D), pertains to programs or projects that strategically use ICTs (e.g. mobile phones, computers, and the internet) as a means toward the socio-economic betterment for the poor in developing contexts. Gaining the political and financial support of the international community…

  7. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  8. 4-D ultrafast shear-wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Provost, Jean; Deffieux, Thomas; Papadacci, Clément; Imbault, Marion; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-06-01

    Over the last ten years, shear wave elastography (SWE) has seen considerable development and is now routinely used in clinics to provide mechanical characterization of tissues to improve diagnosis. The most advanced technique relies on the use of an ultrafast scanner to generate and image shear waves in real time in a 2-D plane at several thousands of frames per second. We have recently introduced 3-D ultrafast ultrasound imaging to acquire with matrix probes the 3-D propagation of shear waves generated by a dedicated radiation pressure transducer in a single acquisition. In this study, we demonstrate 3-D SWE based on ultrafast volumetric imaging in a clinically applicable configuration. A 32 × 32 matrix phased array driven by a customized, programmable, 1024-channel ultrasound system was designed to perform 4-D shear-wave imaging. A matrix phased array was used to generate and control in 3-D the shear waves inside the medium using the acoustic radiation force. The same matrix array was used with 3-D coherent plane wave compounding to perform high-quality ultrafast imaging of the shear wave propagation. Volumetric ultrafast acquisitions were then beamformed in 3-D using a delay-and-sum algorithm. 3-D volumetric maps of the shear modulus were reconstructed using a time-of-flight algorithm based on local multiscale cross-correlation of shear wave profiles in the three main directions using directional filters. Results are first presented in an isotropic homogeneous and elastic breast phantom. Then, a full 3-D stiffness reconstruction of the breast was performed in vivo on healthy volunteers. This new full 3-D ultrafast ultrasound system paves the way toward real-time 3-D SWE. PMID:26067040

  9. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  10. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2005-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2005-04-01 2005-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  11. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2000-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2000-04-01 2000-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a) Each application for an order under section 304(d)...

  12. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  13. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  14. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  15. 76 FR 55814 - 2,4-D; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 2,4-D; Pesticide Tolerances AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This regulation establishes tolerances for residues of 2,4-D in or on teff, bran... 180.142 be amended by establishing a tolerance for residues of the herbicide 2,4-D...

  16. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  17. Beam hardening and smoothing correction effects on performance of micro-ct SkyScan 1173 for imaging low contrast density materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sriwayu, Wa Ode; Haryanto, Freddy; Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Latief, Fourier Dzar Eljabbar

    2015-04-16

    We have designed and fabricated phantom mimicking breast cancer composition known as a region that has low contrast density. The used compositions are a microcalcifications, fatty tissues and tumor mass by using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, C{sub 27}H{sub 46}O, and hard nylon materials. Besides, phantom also has a part to calculate low cost criteria /CNR (Contrast to Noise Ratio). Uniformity will be measured at water distillation medium located in a part of phantom scale contrast. Phantom will be imaged by using micro ct-sky scan 1173 high energy type, and then also can be quantified CT number to examine SkyScan 1173 performance in imaging low contrast density materials. Evaluation of CT number is done at technique configuration parameter using voltage of 30 kV, exposure 0.160 mAs, and camera resolution 560x560 pixel, the effect of image quality to reconstruction process is evaluated by varying image processing parameters in the form of beam hardening corrections with amount of 25%, 66% and100% with each smoothing level S10,S2 and S7. To obtain the better high quality image, the adjustment of beam hardening correction should be 66% and smoothing level reach maximal value at level 10.

  18. Automatic classification of squamosal abnormality in micro-CT images for the evaluation of rabbit fetal skull defects using active shape models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Antong; Dogdas, Belma; Mehta, Saurin; Bagchi, Ansuman; Wise, L. David; Winkelmann, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    High-throughput micro-CT imaging has been used in our laboratory to evaluate fetal skeletal morphology in developmental toxicology studies. Currently, the volume-rendered skeletal images are visually inspected and observed abnormalities are reported for compounds in development. To improve the efficiency and reduce human error of the evaluation, we implemented a framework to automate the evaluation process. The framework starts by dividing the skull into regions of interest and then measuring various geometrical characteristics. Normal/abnormal classification on the bone segments is performed based on identifying statistical outliers. In pilot experiments using rabbit fetal skulls, the majority of the skeletal abnormalities can be detected successfully in this manner. However, there are shape-based abnormalities that are relatively subtle and thereby difficult to identify using the geometrical features. To address this problem, we introduced a model-based approach and applied this strategy on the squamosal bone. We will provide details on this active shape model (ASM) strategy for the identification of squamosal abnormalities and show that this method improved the sensitivity of detecting squamosal-related abnormalities from 0.48 to 0.92.

  19. ProTaper and WaveOne systems three-dimensional comparison of device parameters after the shaping technique. A micro-CT study on simulated root canals

    PubMed Central

    Dioguardi, Mario; Troiano, Giuseppe; Laino, Luigi; Russo, Lucio Lo; Giannatempo, Giovanni; Lauritano, Floriana; Cicciù, Marco; Muzio, Lorenzo Lo

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to highlights possible differences in the volume of shaping and canal surface area after the using of common endodontic devices ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems. Methods: Forty ISO 15, 0.02 taper, S-shaped endo-training Blocks (Dentsply, Maillefer) were assigned in two groups (n = 20 for each group). For each block the initial working length (WL) was evaluated with a 10 K-files (Dentsply Maillefer), so the glide path was created with PathFile 1, 2 and 3 (Dentsply Maillefer) at the WL. After that, simulated canals in the group 1 were shaped with S1, S2, F1 and F2 at WL; while in group 2 it was used single-file WaveOne primary in reciprocating motion. After shaping, the resin blocks were analysed with Skyscan 1172 scanner (Skyscan, Kontich, Belgium) and then volumetrically at a source voltage of 65 kV and a source current of 153 uA. Results: No statistically differences (P > 0.05) have been found in terms of volume and surface area after the use of ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems. Conclusions: Although, results from micro-CT analysis revealed that Wave One result in a decrease of volume and surface area of shaping than ProTaper Universal, differences are not statistically significant. PMID:26770376

  20. Beam hardening and smoothing correction effects on performance of micro-ct SkyScan 1173 for imaging low contrast density materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriwayu, Wa Ode; Haryanto, Freddy; Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Latief, Fourier Dzar Eljabbar

    2015-04-01

    We have designed and fabricated phantom mimicking breast cancer composition known as a region that has low contrast density. The used compositions are a microcalcifications, fatty tissues and tumor mass by using Al2O3, C27H46O, and hard nylon materials. Besides, phantom also has a part to calculate low cost criteria /CNR (Contrast to Noise Ratio). Uniformity will be measured at water distillation medium located in a part of phantom scale contrast. Phantom will be imaged by using micro ct-sky scan 1173 high energy type, and then also can be quantified CT number to examine SkyScan 1173 performance in imaging low contrast density materials. Evaluation of CT number is done at technique configuration parameter using voltage of 30 kV, exposure 0.160 mAs, and camera resolution 560x560 pixel, the effect of image quality to reconstruction process is evaluated by varying image processing parameters in the form of beam hardening corrections with amount of 25%, 66% and100% with each smoothing level S10,S2 and S7. To obtain the better high quality image, the adjustment of beam hardening correction should be 66% and smoothing level reach maximal value at level 10.

  1. Micro-CT observations of the 3D distribution of calcium oxalate crystals in cotyledons during maturation and germination in Lotus miyakojimae seeds.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Hayami, Masato; Takeuchi, Miyuki; Karahara, Ichirou; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Terada, Yasuko; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takano, Hidekazu; Kagoshima, Yasushi; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2013-06-01

    The cotyledon of legume seeds is a storage organ that provides nutrients for seed germination and seedling growth. The spatial and temporal control of the degradation processes within cotyledons has not been elucidated. Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals, a common calcium deposit in plants, have often been reported to be present in legume seeds. In this study, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) was employed at the SPring-8 facility to examine the three-dimensional distribution of crystals inside cotyledons during seed maturation and germination of Lotus miyakojimae (previously Lotus japonicus accession Miyakojima MG-20). Using this technique, we could detect the outline of the embryo, void spaces in seeds and the cotyledon venation pattern. We found several sites that strongly inhibited X-ray transmission within the cotyledons. Light and polarizing microscopy confirmed that these areas corresponded to CaOx crystals. Three-dimensional observations of dry seeds indicated that the CaOx crystals in the L. miyakojimae cotyledons were distributed along lateral veins; however, their distribution was limited to the abaxial side of the procambium. The CaOx crystals appeared at stage II (seed-filling stage) of seed development, and their number increased in dry seeds. The number of crystals in cotyledons was high during germination, suggesting that CaOx crystals are not degraded for their calcium supply. Evidence for the conservation of CaOx crystals in cotyledons during the L. miyakojimae germination process was also supported by the biochemical measurement of oxalic acid levels.

  2. Utilizing time-lapse micro-CT-correlated bisphosphonate binding kinetics and soft tissue-derived input functions to differentiate site-specific changes in bone metabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tower, R J; Campbell, G M; Müller, M; Glüer, C C; Tiwari, S

    2015-05-01

    The turnover of bone is a tightly regulated process between bone formation and resorption to ensure skeletal homeostasis. This process differs between bone types, with trabecular bone often associated with higher turnover than cortical bone. Analyses of bone by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) reveal changes in structure and mineral content, but are limited in the study of metabolic activity at a single time point, while analyses of serum markers can reveal changes in bone metabolism, but cannot delineate the origin of any aberrant findings. To obtain a site-specific assessment of bone metabolic status, bisphosphonate binding kinetics were utilized. Using a fluorescently-labeled bisphosphonate, we show that early binding kinetics monitored in vivo using fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) can monitor changes in bone metabolism in response to bone loss, stimulated by ovariectomy (OVX), or bone gain, resulting from treatment with the anabolic bone agent parathyroid hormone (PTH), and is capable of distinguishing different, metabolically distinct skeletal sites. Using time-lapse micro-CT, longitudinal bone turnover was quantified. The spine showed a significantly greater percent resorbing volume and surface in response to OVX, while mice treated with PTH showed significantly greater resorbing volume per bone surface in the spine and significantly greater forming surfaces in the knee. Correlation studies between binding kinetics and micro-CT suggest that forming surfaces, as assessed by time-lapse micro-CT, are preferentially reflected in the rate constant values while forming and resorbing bone volumes primarily affect plateau values. Additionally, we developed a blood pool correction method which now allows for quantitative multi-compartment analyses to be conducted using FMT. These results further expand our understanding of bisphosphonate binding and the use of bisphosphonate binding kinetics as a tool to monitor site-specific changes in bone metabolism in

  3. Development of a model of the coronary arterial tree for the 4D XCAT phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, George S. K.; Segars, W. Paul; Gullberg, Grant T.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2011-09-01

    A detailed three-dimensional (3D) model of the coronary artery tree with cardiac motion has great potential for applications in a wide variety of medical imaging research areas. In this work, we first developed a computer-generated 3D model of the coronary arterial tree for the heart in the extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom, thereby creating a realistic computer model of the human anatomy. The coronary arterial tree model was based on two datasets: (1) a gated cardiac dual-source computed tomography (CT) angiographic dataset obtained from a normal human subject and (2) statistical morphometric data of porcine hearts. The initial proximal segments of the vasculature and the anatomical details of the boundaries of the ventricles were defined by segmenting the CT data. An iterative rule-based generation method was developed and applied to extend the coronary arterial tree beyond the initial proximal segments. The algorithm was governed by three factors: (1) statistical morphometric measurements of the connectivity, lengths and diameters of the arterial segments; (2) avoidance forces from other vessel segments and the boundaries of the myocardium, and (3) optimality principles which minimize the drag force at the bifurcations of the generated tree. Using this algorithm, the 3D computational model of the largest six orders of the coronary arterial tree was generated, which spread across the myocardium of the left and right ventricles. The 3D coronary arterial tree model was then extended to 4D to simulate different cardiac phases by deforming the original 3D model according to the motion vector map of the 4D cardiac model of the XCAT phantom at the corresponding phases. As a result, a detailed and realistic 4D model of the coronary arterial tree was developed for the XCAT phantom by imposing constraints of anatomical and physiological characteristics of the coronary vasculature. This new 4D coronary artery tree model provides a unique simulation tool that can be

  4. 4D subject-specific inverse modeling of the chick embryonic heart outflow tract hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Goenezen, Sevan; Chivukula, Venkat Keshav; Midgett, Madeline; Phan, Ly; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Blood flow plays a critical role in regulating embryonic cardiac growth and development, with altered flow leading to congenital heart disease. Progress in the field, however, is hindered by a lack of quantification of hemodynamic conditions in the developing heart. In this study, we present a methodology to quantify blood flow dynamics in the embryonic heart using subject-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. While the methodology is general, we focused on a model of the chick embryonic heart outflow tract (OFT), which distally connects the heart to the arterial system, and is the region of origin of many congenital cardiac defects. Using structural and Doppler velocity data collected from optical coherence tomography, we generated 4D ([Formula: see text]) embryo-specific CFD models of the heart OFT. To replicate the blood flow dynamics over time during the cardiac cycle, we developed an iterative inverse-method optimization algorithm, which determines the CFD model boundary conditions such that differences between computed velocities and measured velocities at one point within the OFT lumen are minimized. Results from our developed CFD model agree with previously measured hemodynamics in the OFT. Further, computed velocities and measured velocities differ by [Formula: see text]15 % at locations that were not used in the optimization, validating the model. The presented methodology can be used in quantifications of embryonic cardiac hemodynamics under normal and altered blood flow conditions, enabling an in-depth quantitative study of how blood flow influences cardiac development.

  5. 4D electron microscopy: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2012-10-16

    achievable with short intense pulses containing a large number of electrons, however, are limited to tens of nanometers and nanoseconds, respectively. This is because Coulomb repulsion is significant in such a pulse, and the electrons spread in space and time, thus limiting the beam coherence. It is therefore not possible to image the ultrafast elementary dynamics of complex transformations. The challenge was to retain the high spatial resolution of a conventional TEM while simultaneously enabling the temporal resolution required to visualize atomic-scale motions. In this Account, we discuss the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) and summarize techniques and applications that illustrate the power of the approach. In UEM, images are obtained either stroboscopically with coherent single-electron packets or with a single electron bunch. Coulomb repulsion is absent under the single-electron condition, thus permitting imaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy, all with high spatiotemporal resolution, the atomic scale (sub-nanometer and femtosecond). The time resolution is limited only by the laser pulse duration and energy carried by the electron packets; the CCD camera has no bearing on the temporal resolution. In the regime of single pulses of electrons, the temporal resolution of picoseconds can be attained when hundreds of electrons are in the bunch. The applications given here are selected to highlight phenomena of different length and time scales, from atomic motions during structural dynamics to phase transitions and nanomechanical oscillations. We conclude with a brief discussion of emerging methods, which include scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM) with convergent beams, and time-resolved imaging of biological structures at ambient conditions with environmental cells.

  6. Motion4D-library extended

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    The new version of the Motion4D-library now also includes the integration of a Sachs basis and the Jacobi equation to determine gravitational lensing of pointlike sources for arbitrary spacetimes.New version program summaryProgram title: Motion4D-libraryCatalogue identifier: AEEX_v3_0Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEX_v3_0.htmlProgram obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. IrelandLicensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.htmlNo. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 219 441No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6 968 223Distribution format: tar.gzProgramming language: C++Computer: All platforms with a C++ compilerOperating system: Linux, WindowsRAM: 61 MbytesClassification: 1.5External routines: Gnu Scientic Library (GSL) (http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/)Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEEX_v2_0Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 703Does the new version supersede the previous version?: YesNature of problem: Solve geodesic equation, parallel and Fermi-Walker transport in four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetimes. Determine gravitational lensing by integration of Jacobi equation and parallel transport of Sachs basis.Solution method: Integration of ordinary differential equations.Reasons for new version: The main novelty of the current version is the extension to integrate the Jacobi equation and the parallel transport of the Sachs basis along null geodesics. In combination, the change of the cross section of a light bundle and thus the gravitational lensing effect of a spacetime can be determined. Furthermore, we have implemented several new metrics.Summary of revisions: The main novelty of the current version is the integration of the Jacobi equation and the parallel transport of the Sachs basis along null geodesics. The corresponding set of equations readd2xμdλ2=-Γρ

  7. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coronary artery disease - cardiac rehab; Angina - cardiac rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab ... have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery ...

  8. Correlative 3D-imaging of Pipistrellus penis micromorphology: Validating quantitative microCT images with undecalcified serial ground section histomorphology.

    PubMed

    Herdina, Anna Nele; Plenk, Hanns; Benda, Petr; Lina, Peter H C; Herzig-Straschil, Barbara; Hilgers, Helge; Metscher, Brian D

    2015-06-01

    Detailed knowledge of histomorphology is a prerequisite for the understanding of function, variation, and development. In bats, as in other mammals, penis and baculum morphology are important in species discrimination and phylogenetic studies. In this study, nondestructive 3D-microtomographic (microCT, µCT) images of bacula and iodine-stained penes of Pipistrellus pipistrellus were correlated with light microscopic images from undecalcified surface-stained ground sections of three of these penes of P. pipistrellus (1 juvenile). The results were then compared with µCT-images of bacula of P. pygmaeus, P. hanaki, and P. nathusii. The Y-shaped baculum in all studied Pipistrellus species has a proximal base with two club-shaped branches, a long slender shaft, and a forked distal tip. The branches contain a medullary cavity of variable size, which tapers into a central canal of variable length in the proximal baculum shaft. Both are surrounded by a lamellar and a woven bone layer and contain fatty marrow and blood vessels. The distal shaft consists of woven bone only, without a vascular canal. The proximal ends of the branches are connected with the tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa via entheses. In the penis shaft, the corpus spongiosum-surrounded urethra lies in a ventral grove of the corpora cavernosa, and continues in the glans under the baculum. The glans penis predominantly comprises an enlarged corpus spongiosum, which surrounds urethra and baculum. In the 12 studied juvenile and subadult P. pipistrellus specimens the proximal branches of the baculum were shorter and without marrow cavity, while shaft and distal tip appeared already fully developed. The present combination with light microscopic images from one species enabled a more reliable interpretation of histomorphological structures in the µCT-images from all four Pipistrellus species. PMID:25703625

  9. Iodine-enhanced micro-CT imaging: methodological refinements for the study of the soft-tissue anatomy of post-embryonic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Gignac, Paul M; Kley, Nathan J

    2014-05-01

    The now widespread use of non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and micro-CT (µCT) has greatly augmented our ability to comprehensively detail and quantify the internal hard-tissue anatomy of vertebrates. However, the utility of X-ray imaging for gaining similar insights into vertebrate soft-tissue anatomy has yet to be fully realized due to the naturally low X-ray absorption of non-mineralized tissues. In this study, we show how a wide diversity of soft-tissue structures within the vertebrate head-including muscles, glands, fat deposits, perichondria, dural venous sinuses, white and gray matter of the brain, as well as cranial nerves and associated ganglia-can be rapidly visualized in their natural relationships with extraordinary levels of detail using iodine-enhanced (i-e) µCT imaging. To date, Lugol's iodine solution (I2 KI) has been used as a contrast agent for µCT imaging of small invertebrates, vertebrate embryos, and certain isolated parts of larger, post-embryonic vertebrates. These previous studies have all yielded promising results, but visualization of soft tissues in smaller invertebrate and embryonic vertebrate specimens has generally been more complete than that for larger, post-embryonic vertebrates. Our research builds on these previous studies by using high-energy µCT together with more highly concentrated I2 KI solutions and longer staining times to optimize the imaging and differentiation of soft tissues within the heads of post-embryonic archosaurs (Alligator mississippiensis and Dromaius novaehollandiae). We systematically quantify the intensities of tissue staining, demonstrate the range of anatomical structures that can be visualized, and generate a partial three-dimensional reconstruction of alligator cephalic soft-tissue anatomy.

  10. Correlative 3D-imaging of Pipistrellus penis micromorphology: Validating quantitative microCT images with undecalcified serial ground section histomorphology.

    PubMed

    Herdina, Anna Nele; Plenk, Hanns; Benda, Petr; Lina, Peter H C; Herzig-Straschil, Barbara; Hilgers, Helge; Metscher, Brian D

    2015-06-01

    Detailed knowledge of histomorphology is a prerequisite for the understanding of function, variation, and development. In bats, as in other mammals, penis and baculum morphology are important in species discrimination and phylogenetic studies. In this study, nondestructive 3D-microtomographic (microCT, µCT) images of bacula and iodine-stained penes of Pipistrellus pipistrellus were correlated with light microscopic images from undecalcified surface-stained ground sections of three of these penes of P. pipistrellus (1 juvenile). The results were then compared with µCT-images of bacula of P. pygmaeus, P. hanaki, and P. nathusii. The Y-shaped baculum in all studied Pipistrellus species has a proximal base with two club-shaped branches, a long slender shaft, and a forked distal tip. The branches contain a medullary cavity of variable size, which tapers into a central canal of variable length in the proximal baculum shaft. Both are surrounded by a lamellar and a woven bone layer and contain fatty marrow and blood vessels. The distal shaft consists of woven bone only, without a vascular canal. The proximal ends of the branches are connected with the tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa via entheses. In the penis shaft, the corpus spongiosum-surrounded urethra lies in a ventral grove of the corpora cavernosa, and continues in the glans under the baculum. The glans penis predominantly comprises an enlarged corpus spongiosum, which surrounds urethra and baculum. In the 12 studied juvenile and subadult P. pipistrellus specimens the proximal branches of the baculum were shorter and without marrow cavity, while shaft and distal tip appeared already fully developed. The present combination with light microscopic images from one species enabled a more reliable interpretation of histomorphological structures in the µCT-images from all four Pipistrellus species.

  11. Combined two-photon laser-scanning microscopy and spectral microCT X-ray imaging to characterize the cellular signature and evolution of microstroke foci.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, F; Debarbieux, F; Kronland-Martinet, Carine; Cojocaru, G R; Popa-Wagner, A

    2012-01-01

    Occlusive brain ischemia and micro-strokes are the most frequent brain pathologies, particularly in older patients and a major cause of dementia. Currently, we are missing appropriate methodology to study micro-strokes in experimental animals. In vivo two-photon laser-scanning microscopy (2P-LSM) and transgenic mouse models expressing cell type specific reporters have been used to examine ischemia-related insults, e.g. perturbations of neuronal process morphology and local blood flow in the MCAO - middle cerebral artery occlusion-model. Glia and pericytes can be visualized by selective fluorescent protein expression, e.g. astrocytes by their cyan-fluorescent ECFP, pericytes by red-fluorescent tdtomato and microglia by green fluorescent EGFP expression. In these mice, the breakdown of the blood brain barrier and the immediate as well as long-term cellular responses can be monitored. A new prototype of microCT incorporating a fast X-ray XPAD3 camera has been recently set up to allow cerebral angiography at high sampling rate. Preliminary data indicate that it is useful to monitor blood perfusion disturbance (i.e. lateralization) in the brain of tumor-bearing mice following retro-orbital injection of iodinated contrast agent. We expect this technology to be adequate to assess in real time the impact of acute stroke models on brain blood perfusion. By localizing perfusion anomalies, we will evaluate the extent of non-perfused areas and correlate these observations with subsequent behavioral deficits, and with local changes in myelin content in white matter tracks. The spectral properties of the XPAD3 detector moreover allow for the simultaneous identification and localization of several contrast agents opening the way to whole body multicolor imaging of vessels and inflammatory cells in the context of microstrokes.

  12. Reviewing the morphology of the jaw-closing musculature in squirrels, rats, and guinea pigs with contrast-enhanced microCT.

    PubMed

    Cox, Philip G; Jeffery, Nathan

    2011-06-01

    Rodents are defined by their unique masticatory apparatus and are frequently separated into three nonmonophyletic groups--sciuromorphs, hystricomorphs, and myomorphs--based on the morphology of their masticatory muscles. Despite several comprehensive dissections in previous work, inconsistencies persist as to the exact morphology of the rodent jaw-closing musculature, particularly, the masseter. Here, we review the literature and document for the first time the muscle architecture noninvasively and in 3D by using iodine-enhanced microCT. Observations and measurements were recorded with reference to images of three individuals, each belonging to one of the three muscle morphotypes (squirrel, guinea pig, and rat). Results revealed an enlarged superficial masseter muscle in the guinea pig compared with the rat and squirrel, but a reduced deep masseter (possibly indicating reduced efficiency at the incisors). The deep masseter had expanded forward to take an origin on the rostrum and was also separated into anterior and posterior parts in the rat and squirrel. The zygomaticomandibularis muscle was split into anterior and posterior parts in all the three specimens by the masseteric nerve, and in the rat and guinea pig had an additional rostral expansion through the infraorbital foramen. The temporalis muscle was found to be considerably larger in the rat, and its separation into anterior and posterior parts was only evident in the rat and squirrel. The pterygoid muscles were broadly similar in all three specimens, although the internal pterygoid was somewhat enlarged in the guinea pig implying greater lateral movement of the mandible during chewing in this species. PMID:21538924

  13. 3D mapping of water in oolithic limestone at atmospheric and vacuum saturation using X-ray micro-CT differential imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, M.A.; De Kock, T.; Bultreys, T.; De Schutter, G.; Vontobel, P.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Cnudde, V.

    2014-11-15

    Determining the distribution of fluids in porous sedimentary rocks is of great importance in many geological fields. However, this is not straightforward, especially in the case of complex sedimentary rocks like limestone, where a multidisciplinary approach is often needed to capture its broad, multimodal pore size distribution and complex pore geometries. This paper focuses on the porosity and fluid distribution in two varieties of Massangis limestone, a widely used natural building stone from the southeast part of the Paris basin (France). The Massangis limestone shows locally varying post-depositional alterations, resulting in different types of pore networks and very different water distributions within the limestone. Traditional techniques for characterizing the porosity and pore size distribution are compared with state-of-the-art neutron radiography and X-ray computed microtomography to visualize the distribution of water inside the limestone at different imbibition conditions. X-ray computed microtomography images have the great advantage to non-destructively visualize and analyze the pore space inside of a rock, but are often limited to the larger macropores in the rock due to resolution limitations. In this paper, differential imaging is successfully applied to the X-ray computed microtomography images to obtain sub-resolution information about fluid occupancy and to map the fluid distribution in three dimensions inside the scanned limestone samples. The detailed study of the pore space with differential imaging allows understanding the difference in the water uptake behavior of the limestone, a primary factor that affects the weathering of the rock. - Highlights: • The water distribution in a limestone was visualized in 3D with micro-CT. • Differential imaging allowed to map both macro and microporous zones in the rock. • The 3D study of the pore space clarified the difference in water uptake behavior. • Trapped air is visualized in the moldic

  14. Investigation of noise and contrast sensitivity of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) based cone beam micro-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bysani Krishnakumar, Sumukh; Podgorsak, Alexander R.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Jain, Amit; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2016-03-01

    A small animal micro-CT system was built using an EMCCD detectors having complex pre-digitization amplification technology, high-resolution, high-sensitivity and low-noise. Noise in CBCT reconstructed images when using predigitization amplification behaves differently than commonly used detectors and warrants a detailed investigation. In this study, noise power and contrast sensitivity were estimated for the newly built system. Noise analysis was performed by scanning a water phantom. Tube voltage was lowered to minimum delivered by the tube (20 kVp and 0.5 mA) and detector gain was varied. Contrast sensitivity was analyzed by using a phantom containing different iodine contrast solutions (20% to 70%) filled in six different tubes. First, we scanned the phantom using various x-ray exposures at 40 kVp while changing the gain to maintain the background air value of the projection images constant. Next, the exposure was varied while the detector gain was maintained constant. Radial NPS plots show that noise power level increases as gain increases. Contrast sensitivity was analyzed by calculating ratio of signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for increased gain with those of low constant gain at each exposure. The SNR value at low constant gain was always lower than SNR of high detector gain at all x-ray settings and iodine contrast. The largest increase of SNR approached 1.3 for low contrast feature for an iodine concentration of 20%. Despite an increase in noise level as gain increases, the SNR improvement shows that signal level also increases because of the unique on-chip gain of the detector.

  15. 3D micro-CT analysis of void formations and push-out bonding strength of resin cements used for fiber post cementation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the void parameters within the resin cements used for fiber post cementation by micro-CT (µCT) and regional push-out bonding strength. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-one, single and round shaped roots were enlarged with a low-speed drill following by endodontic treatment. The roots were divided into three groups (n=7) and fiber posts were cemented with Maxcem Elite, Multilink N and Superbond C&B resin cements. Specimens were scanned using µCT scanner at resolution of 13.7 µm. The number, area, and volume of voids between dentin and post were evaluated. A method of analysis based on the post segmentation was used, and coronal, middle and apical thirds considered separately. After the µCT analysis, roots were embedded in epoxy resin and sectioned into 2 mm thick slices (63 sections in total). Push-out testing was performed with universal testing device at 0.5 mm/min cross-head speed. Data were analyzed with Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U tests (α=.05). RESULTS Overall, significant differences between the resin cements and the post level were observed in the void number, area, and volume (P<.05). Super-Bond C&B showed the most void formation (44.86 ± 22.71). Multilink N showed the least void surface (3.51 ± 2.24 mm2) and volume (0.01 ± 0.01 mm3). Regional push-out bond strength of the cements was not different (P>.05). CONCLUSION µCT proved to be a powerful non-destructive 3D analysis tool for visualizing the void parameters. Multilink N had the lowest void parameters. When efficiency of all cements was evaluated, direct relationship between the post region and push-out bonding strength was not observed. PMID:27141253

  16. The 4D-TECS integration for NASA TSRV airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminer, I.; Oshaughnessy, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    The integration of the Total Energy Control System (TECS) concept with 4D navigation is described. This integration was made to increase the operational capacity of modern aircraft and encourage incorporation of this increased capability with the evolving National Airspace System (NAS). Described herein is: 4D smoothing, the basic concepts of TECS, the spoiler integration concept, an algorithm for nulling out time error, speed and altitude profile modes, manual spoiler implementation, 4D logic, and the results of linear and nonlinear analysis.

  17. Killing Weeds with 2,4-D. Extension Bulletin 389.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Oliver C.

    Discussed is the use of the herbicide 2,4-D. Though written for farmers and agricultural workers, the pamphlet considers turf weed control and use of 2,4-D near ornamental plants. Aspects of the use of this herbicide covered are: (1) the common forms of 2,4-D; (2) plant responses and tolerances to the herbicide; (3) dilution and concentration of…

  18. Pros and cons for C4d as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Danielle; Colvin, Robert B; Daha, Mohamed R; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Haas, Mark; Nickeleit, Volker; Salmon, Jane E; Sis, Banu; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Bruijn, Jan A; Bajema, Ingeborg M

    2012-04-01

    The introduction of C4d in daily clinical practice in the late nineties aroused an ever-increasing interest in the role of antibody-mediated mechanisms in allograft rejection. As a marker of classical complement activation, C4d made it possible to visualize the direct link between anti-donor antibodies and tissue injury at sites of antibody binding in a graft. With the expanding use of C4d worldwide several limitations of C4d were identified. For instance, in ABO-incompatible transplantations C4d is present in the majority of grafts but this seems to point at 'graft accommodation' rather than antibody-mediated rejection. C4d is now increasingly recognized as a potential biomarker in other fields where antibodies can cause tissue damage, such as systemic autoimmune diseases and pregnancy. In all these fields, C4d holds promise to detect patients at risk for the consequences of antibody-mediated disease. Moreover, the emergence of new therapeutics that block complement activation makes C4d a marker with potential to identify patients who may possibly benefit from these drugs. This review provides an overview of the past, present, and future perspectives of C4d as a biomarker, focusing on its use in solid organ transplantation and discussing its possible new roles in autoimmunity and pregnancy. PMID:22297669

  19. Development of 4D mathematical observer models for the task-based evaluation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Frey, Eric C.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents two 4D mathematical observer models for the detection of motion defects in 4D gated medical images. Their performance was compared with results from human observers in detecting a regional motion abnormality in simulated 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT images. The first 4D mathematical observer model extends the conventional channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) based on a set of 2D spatial channels and the second is a proposed model that uses a set of 4D space-time channels. Simulated projection data were generated using the 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom with 16 gates/cardiac cycle. The activity distribution modelled uptake of 99mTc MIBI with normal perfusion and a regional wall motion defect. An analytical projector was used in the simulation and the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used in image reconstruction followed by spatial and temporal low-pass filtering with various cut-off frequencies. Then, we extracted 2D image slices from each time frame and reorganized them into a set of cine images. For the first model, we applied 2D spatial channels to the cine images and generated a set of feature vectors that were stacked for the images from different slices of the heart. The process was repeated for each of the 1,024 noise realizations, and CHO and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis methodologies were applied to the ensemble of the feature vectors to compute areas under the ROC curves (AUCs). For the second model, a set of 4D space-time channels was developed and applied to the sets of cine images to produce space-time feature vectors to which the CHO methodology was applied. The AUC values of the second model showed better agreement (Spearman’s rank correlation (SRC) coefficient = 0.8) to human observer results than those from the first model (SRC coefficient = 0.4). The agreement with human observers indicates the proposed 4D mathematical observer model provides a good predictor of the

  20. Development of 4D mathematical observer models for the task-based evaluation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Frey, Eric C; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents two 4D mathematical observer models for the detection of motion defects in 4D gated medical images. Their performance was compared with results from human observers in detecting a regional motion abnormality in simulated 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT images. The first 4D mathematical observer model extends the conventional channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) based on a set of 2D spatial channels and the second is a proposed model that uses a set of 4D space-time channels. Simulated projection data were generated using the 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom with 16 gates/cardiac cycle. The activity distribution modelled uptake of (99m)Tc MIBI with normal perfusion and a regional wall motion defect. An analytical projector was used in the simulation and the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used in image reconstruction followed by spatial and temporal low-pass filtering with various cut-off frequencies. Then, we extracted 2D image slices from each time frame and reorganized them into a set of cine images. For the first model, we applied 2D spatial channels to the cine images and generated a set of feature vectors that were stacked for the images from different slices of the heart. The process was repeated for each of the 1,024 noise realizations, and CHO and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis methodologies were applied to the ensemble of the feature vectors to compute areas under the ROC curves (AUCs). For the second model, a set of 4D space-time channels was developed and applied to the sets of cine images to produce space-time feature vectors to which the CHO methodology was applied. The AUC values of the second model showed better agreement (Spearman's rank correlation (SRC) coefficient = 0.8) to human observer results than those from the first model (SRC coefficient = 0.4). The agreement with human observers indicates the proposed 4D mathematical observer model provides a good predictor of the

  1. Phosphodiesterase 4D Inhibitors Limit Prostate Cancer Growth Potential

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Ginny L.; Hammer, Kimberly D.P.; Domenech, Maribella; Frantskevich, Katsiaryna; Malinowski, Rita L.; Bushman, Wade; Beebe, David J.; Marker, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) has recently been implicated as a proliferation-promoting factor in prostate cancer and is over-expressed in human prostate carcinoma. However, the effects of PDE4D inhibition using pharmacological inhibitors have not been examined in prostate cancer. These studies examined the effects of selective PDE4D inhibitors, NVP-ABE171 and cilomilast, as anti-prostate cancer therapies in both in vitro and in vivo models. The effects of PDE4D inhibitors on pathways that are critical in prostate cancer and/or downstream of cyclic AMP (cAMP) were examined. Both NVP-ABE171 and cilomilast decreased cell growth. In vitro, PDE4D inhibitors lead to decreased signaling of the sonic hedgehog (SHH), Androgen Receptor (AR), and MAPK pathways, but growth inhibition was best correlated to the sonic hedgehog pathway. PDE4D inhibition also reduced proliferation of epithelial cells induced by paracrine signaling from co-cultured stromal cells that had activated hedgehog signaling. In addition, PDE4D inhibitors decreased the weight of the prostate in wild-type mice. Prostate cancer xenografts grown in nude mice that were treated with cilomilast or NVP-ABE171 had decreased wet weight and increased apoptosis compared to vehicle treated controls. These studies suggest the pharmacological inhibition of PDE4D using small molecule inhibitors is an effective option for prostate cancer therapy. Implications PDE4D inhibitors decrease the growth of prostate cancer cells in vivo and in vitro, and PDE4D inhibition has therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. PMID:25149359

  2. 4D Printing with Mechanically Robust, Thermally Actuating Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bakarich, Shannon E; Gorkin, Robert; in het Panhuis, Marc; Spinks, Geoffrey M

    2015-06-01

    A smart valve is created by 4D printing of hydrogels that are both mechanically robust and thermally actuating. The printed hydrogels are made up of an interpenetrating network of alginate and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). 4D structures are created by printing the "dynamic" hydrogel ink alongside other static materials. PMID:25864515

  3. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  4. 4D Printing with Mechanically Robust, Thermally Actuating Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bakarich, Shannon E; Gorkin, Robert; in het Panhuis, Marc; Spinks, Geoffrey M

    2015-06-01

    A smart valve is created by 4D printing of hydrogels that are both mechanically robust and thermally actuating. The printed hydrogels are made up of an interpenetrating network of alginate and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). 4D structures are created by printing the "dynamic" hydrogel ink alongside other static materials.

  5. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  6. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  7. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  8. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  9. Estimation of regional myocardial mass at risk based on distal arterial lumen volume and length using 3D micro-CT images

    PubMed Central

    Le, Huy; Wong, Jerry T.; Molloi, Sabee

    2008-01-01

    The determination of regional myocardial mass at risk distal to a coronary occlusion provides valuable prognostic information for a patient with coronary artery disease. The coronary arterial system follows a design rule which allows for the use of arterial branch length and lumen volume to estimate regional myocardial mass at risk. Image processing techniques, such as segmentation, skeletonization, and arterial network tracking, are presented for extracting anatomical details of the coronary arterial system using micro-computed tomography (CT). Moreover, a method of assigning tissue voxels to their corresponding arterial branches is presented to determine the dependent myocardial region. The proposed micro-CT technique was utilized to investigate the relationship between the sum of the distal coronary arterial branch lengths and volumes to the dependent regional myocardial mass using a polymer cast of a porcine heart. The correlations of the logarithm of the total distal arterial lengths (L) to the logarithm of the regional myocardial mass (M) for the left anterior descending (LAD), left circumflex (LCX) and right coronary (RCA) arteries were log(L) = 0.73log(M)+ 0.09 (R= 0.78), log(L) = 0.82log(M)+ 0.05 (R= 0.77), and log(L) = 0.85log(M)+ 0.05 (R= 0.87)s, respectively. The correlation of the logarithm of the total distal arterial lumen volumes (V) to the logarithm of the regional myocardial mass for the LAD, LCX and RCA were log(V) = 0.93log(M)− 1.65 (R= 0.81), log(V) = 1.02log(M) −1.79 (R= 0.78), and log(V) = 1.17log(M)− 2.10 (R= 0.82), respectively. These morphological relations did not change appreciably for diameter truncations of 600 to 1400 µm. The results indicate that the image processing procedures successfully extracted information from a large 3D dataset of the coronary arterial tree to provide prognostic indications in the form of arterial tree parameters and anatomical area at risk. PMID:18595659

  10. Longitudinal micro-CT provides biomarkers of lung disease that can be used to assess the effect of therapy in preclinical mouse models, and reveal compensatory changes in lung volume.

    PubMed

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Poelmans, Jennifer; De Langhe, Ellen; Hillen, Amy; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lories, Rik J

    2016-01-01

    In vivo lung micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is being increasingly embraced in pulmonary research because it provides longitudinal information on dynamic disease processes in a field in which ex vivo assessment of experimental disease models is still the gold standard. To optimize the quantitative monitoring of progression and therapy of lung diseases, we evaluated longitudinal changes in four different micro-CT-derived biomarkers [aerated lung volume, lung tissue (including lesions) volume, total lung volume and mean lung density], describing normal development, lung infections, inflammation, fibrosis and therapy. Free-breathing mice underwent micro-CT before and repeatedly after induction of lung disease (bleomycin-induced fibrosis, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis) and therapy (imatinib). The four lung biomarkers were quantified. After the last time point, we performed pulmonary function tests and isolated the lungs for histology. None of the biomarkers remained stable during longitudinal follow-up of adult healthy mouse lungs, implying that biomarkers should be compared with age-matched controls upon intervention. Early inflammation and progressive fibrosis led to a substantial increase in total lung volume, which affects the interpretation of aerated lung volume, tissue volume and mean lung density measures. Upon treatment of fibrotic lung disease, the improvement in aerated lung volume and function was not accompanied by a normalization of the increased total lung volume. Significantly enlarged lungs were also present in models of rapidly and slowly progressing lung infections. The data suggest that total lung volume changes could partly reflect a compensatory mechanism that occurs during disease progression in mice. Our findings underscore the importance of quantifying total lung volume in addition to aerated lung or lesion volumes to accurately document growth and potential compensatory mechanisms in mouse models of lung

  11. Longitudinal micro-CT provides biomarkers of lung disease that can be used to assess the effect of therapy in preclinical mouse models, and reveal compensatory changes in lung volume

    PubMed Central

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Poelmans, Jennifer; De Langhe, Ellen; Hillen, Amy; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lories, Rik J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vivo lung micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is being increasingly embraced in pulmonary research because it provides longitudinal information on dynamic disease processes in a field in which ex vivo assessment of experimental disease models is still the gold standard. To optimize the quantitative monitoring of progression and therapy of lung diseases, we evaluated longitudinal changes in four different micro-CT-derived biomarkers [aerated lung volume, lung tissue (including lesions) volume, total lung volume and mean lung density], describing normal development, lung infections, inflammation, fibrosis and therapy. Free-breathing mice underwent micro-CT before and repeatedly after induction of lung disease (bleomycin-induced fibrosis, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis) and therapy (imatinib). The four lung biomarkers were quantified. After the last time point, we performed pulmonary function tests and isolated the lungs for histology. None of the biomarkers remained stable during longitudinal follow-up of adult healthy mouse lungs, implying that biomarkers should be compared with age-matched controls upon intervention. Early inflammation and progressive fibrosis led to a substantial increase in total lung volume, which affects the interpretation of aerated lung volume, tissue volume and mean lung density measures. Upon treatment of fibrotic lung disease, the improvement in aerated lung volume and function was not accompanied by a normalization of the increased total lung volume. Significantly enlarged lungs were also present in models of rapidly and slowly progressing lung infections. The data suggest that total lung volume changes could partly reflect a compensatory mechanism that occurs during disease progression in mice. Our findings underscore the importance of quantifying total lung volume in addition to aerated lung or lesion volumes to accurately document growth and potential compensatory mechanisms in mouse models of

  12. Longitudinal micro-CT provides biomarkers of lung disease that can be used to assess the effect of therapy in preclinical mouse models, and reveal compensatory changes in lung volume.

    PubMed

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Poelmans, Jennifer; De Langhe, Ellen; Hillen, Amy; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lories, Rik J

    2016-01-01

    In vivo lung micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is being increasingly embraced in pulmonary research because it provides longitudinal information on dynamic disease processes in a field in which ex vivo assessment of experimental disease models is still the gold standard. To optimize the quantitative monitoring of progression and therapy of lung diseases, we evaluated longitudinal changes in four different micro-CT-derived biomarkers [aerated lung volume, lung tissue (including lesions) volume, total lung volume and mean lung density], describing normal development, lung infections, inflammation, fibrosis and therapy. Free-breathing mice underwent micro-CT before and repeatedly after induction of lung disease (bleomycin-induced fibrosis, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis) and therapy (imatinib). The four lung biomarkers were quantified. After the last time point, we performed pulmonary function tests and isolated the lungs for histology. None of the biomarkers remained stable during longitudinal follow-up of adult healthy mouse lungs, implying that biomarkers should be compared with age-matched controls upon intervention. Early inflammation and progressive fibrosis led to a substantial increase in total lung volume, which affects the interpretation of aerated lung volume, tissue volume and mean lung density measures. Upon treatment of fibrotic lung disease, the improvement in aerated lung volume and function was not accompanied by a normalization of the increased total lung volume. Significantly enlarged lungs were also present in models of rapidly and slowly progressing lung infections. The data suggest that total lung volume changes could partly reflect a compensatory mechanism that occurs during disease progression in mice. Our findings underscore the importance of quantifying total lung volume in addition to aerated lung or lesion volumes to accurately document growth and potential compensatory mechanisms in mouse models of lung

  13. Coupling multiscale X-ray physics and micromechanics for bone tissue composition and elasticity determination from micro-CT data, by example of femora from OVX and sham rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasslinger, Patricia; Vass, Viktoria; Dejaco, Alexander; Blanchard, Romane; Örlygsson, Gissur; Gargiulo, Paolo; Hellmich, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Due to its high resolution, micro-CT (Computed Tomograph) scanning is the key to assess bone quality of sham and OVX (ovariectomized) rats. Combination of basic X-ray physics, such as the energy- and chemistry-dependence of attenuation coefficients, with results from ashing tests on rat bones, delivers mineral, organic, and water volume fractions within the voxels. Additional use of a microelastic model for bone provides voxel-specific elastic properties. The new method delivers realistic bone mass densities, and reveals that OVX protocols may indeed induce some bone mass loss, while the average composition of the bone tissue remains largely unaltered.

  14. 4D-fingerprints, universal QSAR and QSPR descriptors.

    PubMed

    Senese, Craig L; Duca, J; Pan, D; Hopfinger, A J; Tseng, Y J

    2004-01-01

    An elusive goal in the field of chemoinformatics and molecular modeling has been the generation of a set of descriptors that, once calculated for a molecule, may be used in a wide variety of applications. Since such universal descriptors are generated free from external constraints, they are inherently independent of the data set in which they are employed. The realization of a set of universal descriptors would significantly streamline such chemoinformatics tasks as virtual high-throughout screening (VHTS) and toxicity profiling. The current study reports the derivation and validation of a potential set of universal descriptors, referred to as the 4D-fingerprints. The 4D-fingerprints are derived from the 4D-molecular similarity analysis. To evaluate the applicability of the 4D-fingerprints as universal descriptors, they are used to generate descriptive QSAR models for 5 independent training sets. Each of the training sets has been analyzed previously by several varying QSAR methods, and the results of the models generated using the 4D-fingerprints are compared to the results of the previous QSAR analyses. It was found that the models generated using the 4D-fingerprints are comparable in quality, based on statistical measures of fit and test set prediction, to the previously reported models for the other QSAR methods. This finding is particularly significant considering the 4D-fingerprints are generated independent of external constraints such as alignment, while the QSAR methods used for comparison all require an alignment analysis.

  15. Learning distance function for regression-based 4D pulmonary trunk model reconstruction estimated from sparse MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanovski, Dime; Tsymbal, Alexey; Ionasec, Razvan; Georgescu, Bogdan; Zhou, Shaohua K.; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2011-03-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is the most common birth defect and a frequent cause of death for children. Tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) is the most often occurring CHD which affects in particular the pulmonary valve and trunk. Emerging interventional methods enable percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, which constitute an alternative to open heart surgery. While minimal invasive methods become common practice, imaging and non-invasive assessment tools become crucial components in the clinical setting. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) are techniques with complementary properties and ability to acquire multiple non-invasive and accurate scans required for advance evaluation and therapy planning. In contrary to CT which covers the full 4D information over the cardiac cycle, cMRI often acquires partial information, for example only one 3D scan of the whole heart in the end-diastolic phase and two 2D planes (long and short axes) over the whole cardiac cycle. The data acquired in this way is called sparse cMRI. In this paper, we propose a regression-based approach for the reconstruction of the full 4D pulmonary trunk model from sparse MRI. The reconstruction approach is based on learning a distance function between the sparse MRI which needs to be completed and the 4D CT data with the full information used as the training set. The distance is based on the intrinsic Random Forest similarity which is learnt for the corresponding regression problem of predicting coordinates of unseen mesh points. Extensive experiments performed on 80 cardiac CT and MR sequences demonstrated the average speed of 10 seconds and accuracy of 0.1053mm mean absolute error for the proposed approach. Using the case retrieval workflow and local nearest neighbour regression with the learnt distance function appears to be competitive with respect to "black box" regression with immediate prediction of coordinates, while providing transparency to the

  16. A CaMKII/PDE4D negative feedback regulates cAMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mika, Delphine; Richter, Wito; Conti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    cAMP production and protein kinase A (PKA) are the most widely studied steps in β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) signaling in the heart; however, the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is also activated in response to βAR stimulation and is involved in the regulation of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. Its activity and expression are increased during cardiac hypertrophy, in heart failure, and under conditions that promote arrhythmias both in animal models and in the human heart, underscoring the clinical relevance of CaMKII in cardiac pathophysiology. Both CaMKII and PKA phosphorylate a number of protein targets critical for Ca2+ handling and contraction with similar, but not always identical, functional consequences. How these two pathways communicate with each other remains incompletely understood, however. To maintain homeostasis, cyclic nucleotide levels are regulated by phosphodiesterases (PDEs), with PDE4s predominantly responsible for cAMP degradation in the rodent heart. Here we have reassessed the interaction between cAMP/PKA and Ca2+/CaMKII signaling. We demonstrate that CaMKII activity constrains basal and βAR-activated cAMP levels. Moreover, we show that these effects are mediated, at least in part, by CaMKII regulation of PDE4D. This regulation establishes a negative feedback loop necessary to maintain cAMP/CaMKII homeostasis, revealing a previously unidentified function for PDE4D as a critical integrator of cAMP/PKA and Ca2+/CaMKII signaling. PMID:25646485

  17. C4d staining as immunohistochemical marker in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis of an inflammatory myopathy is often established based on basic histologic studies. Additional immunohistochemical studies are sometimes required to support the diagnosis and the classification of inflammatory myopathies. Staining for major histocompatibility complex 1 (MHC1) often shows increased sarcolemmal labeling in inflammatory myopathies. Endomysial capillary staining C5b-9 (membrane attack complex) is a feature that is reported as frequently associated with dermatomyositis. Immunohistochemical staining for C4d is widely used for various applications including the assessment of antibody-mediated rejection after solid organ transplantation. In the context of dermatomyositis, C4d staining has been described in skin biopsies but not in muscle biopsies. A total of 32 muscle biopsy specimens were examined. The hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides were reviewed, and immunohistochemical studies for MHC1, C5b-9, and C4d were conducted. The staining observed for C5b-9 and C4d was compared. Overall, the staining pattern for C4d mirrored the one observed for C5b-9 in the examined muscle biopsy specimens. There was high and statistically significant (P<0.0001) correlation between the staining seen with these 2 antibodies. Both antibodies labeled the cytoplasm of degenerating necrotic myofibers. In addition, both antibodies showed distinct endomysial capillary labeling in a subset of dermatomyositis. Areas with perifascicular atrophy often exhibited the most prominent vascular labeling for C4d and C5b-9. In conclusion, C4d and C5b-9 show similar expression patterns in muscle biopsies of patients with inflammatory myopathies and both highlight the presence of vascular labeling associated with dermatomyositis. C4d antibodies are widely used and may offer an alternative for C5b-9 staining.

  18. Substitutional 4d and 5d impurities in graphene.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2016-08-21

    We describe the structural and electronic properties of graphene doped with substitutional impurities of 4d and 5d transition metals. The adsorption energies and distances for 4d and 5d metals in graphene show similar trends for the later groups in the periodic table, which are also well-known characteristics of 3d elements. However, along earlier groups the 4d impurities in graphene show very similar adsorption energies, distances and magnetic moments to the 5d ones, which can be related to the influence of the 4d and 5d lanthanide contraction. Surprisingly, within the manganese group, the total magnetic moment of 3 μB for manganese is reduced to 1 μB for technetium and rhenium. We find that compared with 3d elements, the larger size of the 4d and 5d elements causes a high degree of hybridization with the neighbouring carbon atoms, reducing spin splitting in the d levels. It seems that the magnetic adjustment of graphene could be significantly different if 4d or 5d impurities are used instead of 3d impurities.

  19. Substitutional 4d and 5d impurities in graphene.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2016-08-21

    We describe the structural and electronic properties of graphene doped with substitutional impurities of 4d and 5d transition metals. The adsorption energies and distances for 4d and 5d metals in graphene show similar trends for the later groups in the periodic table, which are also well-known characteristics of 3d elements. However, along earlier groups the 4d impurities in graphene show very similar adsorption energies, distances and magnetic moments to the 5d ones, which can be related to the influence of the 4d and 5d lanthanide contraction. Surprisingly, within the manganese group, the total magnetic moment of 3 μB for manganese is reduced to 1 μB for technetium and rhenium. We find that compared with 3d elements, the larger size of the 4d and 5d elements causes a high degree of hybridization with the neighbouring carbon atoms, reducing spin splitting in the d levels. It seems that the magnetic adjustment of graphene could be significantly different if 4d or 5d impurities are used instead of 3d impurities. PMID:27439363

  20. Model-driven physiological assessment of the mitral valve from 4D TEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Ingmar; Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Georgescu, Bogdan; Houle, Helene; Huber, Martin; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2009-02-01

    Disorders of the mitral valve are second most frequent, cumulating 14 percent of total number of deaths caused by Valvular Heart Disease each year in the United States and require elaborate clinical management. Visual and quantitative evaluation of the valve is an important step in the clinical workflow according to experts as knowledge about mitral morphology and dynamics is crucial for interventional planning. Traditionally this involves examination and metric analysis of 2D images comprising potential errors being intrinsic to the method. Recent commercial solutions are limited to specific anatomic components, pathologies and a single phase of cardiac 4D acquisitions only. This paper introduces a novel approach for morphological and functional quantification of the mitral valve based on a 4D model estimated from ultrasound data. A physiological model of the mitral valve, covering the complete anatomy and eventual shape variations, is generated utilizing parametric spline surfaces constrained by topological and geometrical prior knowledge. The 4D model's parameters are estimated for each patient using the latest discriminative learning and incremental searching techniques. Precise evaluation of the anatomy using model-based dynamic measurements and advanced visualization are enabled through the proposed approach in a reliable, repeatable and reproducible manner. The efficiency and accuracy of the method is demonstrated through experiments and an initial validation based on clinical research results. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time such a patient specific 4D mitral valve model is proposed, covering all of the relevant anatomies and enabling to model the common pathologies at once.

  1. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  2. Robust spatio-temporal registration of 4D cardiac ultrasound sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersvendsen, Jørn; Toews, Matthew; Danudibroto, Adriyana; Wells, William M.; Urheim, Stig; Estépar, Raúl San José; Samset, Eigil

    2016-04-01

    Registration of multiple 3D ultrasound sectors in order to provide an extended field of view is important for the appreciation of larger anatomical structures at high spatial and temporal resolution. In this paper, we present a method for fully automatic spatio-temporal registration between two partially overlapping 3D ultrasound sequences. The temporal alignment is solved by aligning the normalized cross correlation-over-time curves of the sequences. For the spatial alignment, corresponding 3D Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features are extracted from all frames of both sequences independently of the temporal alignment. A rigid transform is then calculated by least squares minimization in combination with random sample consensus. The method is applied to 16 echocardiographic sequences of the left and right ventricles and evaluated against manually annotated temporal events and spatial anatomical landmarks. The mean distances between manually identified landmarks in the left and right ventricles after automatic registration were (mean+/-SD) 4.3+/-1.2 mm compared to a reference error of 2.8 +/- 0.6 mm with manual registration. For the temporal alignment, the absolute errors in valvular event times were 14.4 +/- 11.6 ms for Aortic Valve (AV) opening, 18.6 +/- 16.0 ms for AV closing, and 34.6 +/- 26.4 ms for mitral valve opening, compared to a mean inter-frame time of 29 ms.

  3. Semaphorin 4D Promotes Skeletal Metastasis in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Hua; Buhamrah, Asma; Schneider, Abraham; Lin, Yi-Ling; Zhou, Hua; Bugshan, Amr; Basile, John R

    2016-01-01

    Bone density is controlled by interactions between osteoclasts, which resorb bone, and osteoblasts, which deposit it. The semaphorins and their receptors, the plexins, originally shown to function in the immune system and to provide chemotactic cues for axon guidance, are now known to play a role in this process as well. Emerging data have identified Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) as a product of osteoclasts acting through its receptor Plexin-B1 on osteoblasts to inhibit their function, tipping the balance of bone homeostasis in favor of resorption. Breast cancers and other epithelial malignancies overexpress Sema4D, so we theorized that tumor cells could be exploiting this pathway to establish lytic skeletal metastases. Here, we use measurements of osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function in vitro and a mouse model of skeletal metastasis to demonstrate that both soluble Sema4D and protein produced by the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 inhibits differentiation of MC3T3 cells, an osteoblast cell line, and their ability to form mineralized tissues, while Sema4D-mediated induction of IL-8 and LIX/CXCL5, the murine homologue of IL-8, increases osteoclast numbers and activity. We also observe a decrease in the number of bone metastases in mice injected with MDA-MB-231 cells when Sema4D is silenced by RNA interference. These results are significant because treatments directed at suppression of skeletal metastases in bone-homing malignancies usually work by arresting bone remodeling, potentially leading to skeletal fragility, a significant problem in patient management. Targeting Sema4D in these cancers would not affect bone remodeling and therefore could elicit an improved therapeutic result without the debilitating side effects.

  4. Soil matrix and macropore biodegradation of 2,4-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pivetz, B.E.; Steenhuis, T.S.

    1995-07-01

    Preferential flow of pesticides in macropores can lead to decreased travel times through the vadose zone and increased groundwater contamination. Macropores, however, may present a favorable environment for biodegradation because of greater oxygen, nutrient, and substrate supply, and higher microbial populations in earthworm burrows, compared to the soil matrix. The biodegradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was measured in macropores and soil matrix of packed soil columns (7.0-cm diam., 10-cm length) and undisturbed cores contained as well-defined artificial macropore and the undisturbed cores contained earthworm-burrow macropores. A 50 {mu}g/L 2,4-D solution was continuously applied to the unsaturated soil surface and breakthrough curves (BTCs) indicating pesticide loss in the effluent were obtained from the soil matrix and macropore flow paths. Biodegradation rates were calculated separately for each flow path by comparing the BTCs to BTCs representing abiotic conditions, and dividing the 2,4-D loss by the travel time through each flow path. The biodegradation rates increased with time in both flow paths, and the final biodegradation rate in the macropore region surpassed that of the matrix, presumably because of increased microbial populations in the macropore. Complete loss of the 2,4-D in both flow paths was observed after continuous application of 2,4-D for 400 h, with maximum column-averaged 2,4-D loss rates of 0.879 {mu}g/(L h) in the matrix and 1.073 {mu}g/(L h) in the macropore. Biodegradation of 2,4-D was also observed in the macropore and matrix regions of the undisturbed soil cores. 19 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Semaphorin 4D Promotes Skeletal Metastasis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Hua; Buhamrah, Asma; Schneider, Abraham; Lin, Yi-Ling; Zhou, Hua; Bugshan, Amr; Basile, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Bone density is controlled by interactions between osteoclasts, which resorb bone, and osteoblasts, which deposit it. The semaphorins and their receptors, the plexins, originally shown to function in the immune system and to provide chemotactic cues for axon guidance, are now known to play a role in this process as well. Emerging data have identified Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) as a product of osteoclasts acting through its receptor Plexin-B1 on osteoblasts to inhibit their function, tipping the balance of bone homeostasis in favor of resorption. Breast cancers and other epithelial malignancies overexpress Sema4D, so we theorized that tumor cells could be exploiting this pathway to establish lytic skeletal metastases. Here, we use measurements of osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function in vitro and a mouse model of skeletal metastasis to demonstrate that both soluble Sema4D and protein produced by the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 inhibits differentiation of MC3T3 cells, an osteoblast cell line, and their ability to form mineralized tissues, while Sema4D-mediated induction of IL-8 and LIX/CXCL5, the murine homologue of IL-8, increases osteoclast numbers and activity. We also observe a decrease in the number of bone metastases in mice injected with MDA-MB-231 cells when Sema4D is silenced by RNA interference. These results are significant because treatments directed at suppression of skeletal metastases in bone-homing malignancies usually work by arresting bone remodeling, potentially leading to skeletal fragility, a significant problem in patient management. Targeting Sema4D in these cancers would not affect bone remodeling and therefore could elicit an improved therapeutic result without the debilitating side effects. PMID:26910109

  6. A set of 4D pediatric XCAT reference phantoms for multimodality research

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Hannah Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Samei, E.; Segars, W. P.; Minhas, Anum; Frush, D.; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The authors previously developed an adult population of 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms for multimodality imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a reference set of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms consisting of male and female anatomies at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years. These models will serve as the foundation from which the authors will create a vast population of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric CT imaging protocols. Methods: Each phantom was based on a unique set of CT data from a normal patient obtained from the Duke University database. The datasets were selected to best match the reference values for height and weight for the different ages and genders according to ICRP Publication 89. The major organs and structures were segmented from the CT data and used to create an initial pediatric model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. The CT data covered the entire torso and part of the head. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the top of the head and the arms and legs using scaled versions of the XCAT adult models or additional models created from cadaver data. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from a template XCAT phantom (male or female 50th percentile adult) to the target pediatric model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. The masses of the organs in each phantom were matched to the reference values given in ICRP Publication 89. The new reference models were checked for anatomical accuracy via visual inspection. Results: The authors created a set of ten pediatric reference phantoms that have the same level of detail and functionality as the original XCAT phantom adults. Each consists of thousands of anatomical structures and includes parameterized models

  7. A set of 4D pediatric XCAT reference phantoms for multimodality research

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Hannah; Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Minhas, Anum; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.; Frush, D.; Samei, E.; Segars, W. P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously developed an adult population of 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms for multimodality imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a reference set of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms consisting of male and female anatomies at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years. These models will serve as the foundation from which the authors will create a vast population of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric CT imaging protocols. Methods: Each phantom was based on a unique set of CT data from a normal patient obtained from the Duke University database. The datasets were selected to best match the reference values for height and weight for the different ages and genders according to ICRP Publication 89. The major organs and structures were segmented from the CT data and used to create an initial pediatric model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. The CT data covered the entire torso and part of the head. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the top of the head and the arms and legs using scaled versions of the XCAT adult models or additional models created from cadaver data. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from a template XCAT phantom (male or female 50th percentile adult) to the target pediatric model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. The masses of the organs in each phantom were matched to the reference values given in ICRP Publication 89. The new reference models were checked for anatomical accuracy via visual inspection. Results: The authors created a set of ten pediatric reference phantoms that have the same level of detail and functionality as the original XCAT phantom adults. Each consists of thousands of anatomical structures and includes parameterized models

  8. 4D numerical observer for lesion detection in respiratory-gated PET

    PubMed Central

    Lorsakul, Auranuch; Li, Quanzheng; Trott, Cathryn M.; Hoog, Christopher; Petibon, Yoann; Ouyang, Jinsong; Laine, Andrew F.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-gated positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography protocols reduce lesion smearing and improve lesion detection through a synchronized acquisition of emission data. However, an objective assessment of image quality of the improvement gained from respiratory-gated PET is mainly limited to a three-dimensional (3D) approach. This work proposes a 4D numerical observer that incorporates both spatial and temporal informations for detection tasks in pulmonary oncology. Methods: The authors propose a 4D numerical observer constructed with a 3D channelized Hotelling observer for the spatial domain followed by a Hotelling observer for the temporal domain. Realistic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose activity distributions were simulated using a 4D extended cardiac torso anthropomorphic phantom including 12 spherical lesions at different anatomical locations (lower, upper, anterior, and posterior) within the lungs. Simulated data based on Monte Carlo simulation were obtained using geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE). Fifty noise realizations of six respiratory-gated PET frames were simulated by GATE using a model of the Siemens Biograph mMR scanner geometry. PET sinograms of the thorax background and pulmonary lesions that were simulated separately were merged to generate different conditions of the lesions to the background (e.g., lesion contrast and motion). A conventional ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction (5 iterations and 6 subsets) was used to obtain: (1) gated, (2) nongated, and (3) motion-corrected image volumes (a total of 3200 subimage volumes: 2400 gated, 400 nongated, and 400 motion-corrected). Lesion-detection signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were measured in different lesion-to-background contrast levels (3.5, 8.0, 9.0, and 20.0), lesion diameters (10.0, 13.0, and 16.0 mm), and respiratory motion displacements (17.6–31.3 mm). The proposed 4D numerical observer applied on multiple-gated images was

  9. 4D numerical observer for lesion detection in respiratory-gated PET

    SciTech Connect

    Lorsakul, Auranuch; Li, Quanzheng; Ouyang, Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges; Trott, Cathryn M.; Hoog, Christopher; Petibon, Yoann; Laine, Andrew F.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Respiratory-gated positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography protocols reduce lesion smearing and improve lesion detection through a synchronized acquisition of emission data. However, an objective assessment of image quality of the improvement gained from respiratory-gated PET is mainly limited to a three-dimensional (3D) approach. This work proposes a 4D numerical observer that incorporates both spatial and temporal informations for detection tasks in pulmonary oncology. Methods: The authors propose a 4D numerical observer constructed with a 3D channelized Hotelling observer for the spatial domain followed by a Hotelling observer for the temporal domain. Realistic {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose activity distributions were simulated using a 4D extended cardiac torso anthropomorphic phantom including 12 spherical lesions at different anatomical locations (lower, upper, anterior, and posterior) within the lungs. Simulated data based on Monte Carlo simulation were obtained using GEANT4 application for tomographic emission (GATE). Fifty noise realizations of six respiratory-gated PET frames were simulated by GATE using a model of the Siemens Biograph mMR scanner geometry. PET sinograms of the thorax background and pulmonary lesions that were simulated separately were merged to generate different conditions of the lesions to the background (e.g., lesion contrast and motion). A conventional ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction (5 iterations and 6 subsets) was used to obtain: (1) gated, (2) nongated, and (3) motion-corrected image volumes (a total of 3200 subimage volumes: 2400 gated, 400 nongated, and 400 motion-corrected). Lesion-detection signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were measured in different lesion-to-background contrast levels (3.5, 8.0, 9.0, and 20.0), lesion diameters (10.0, 13.0, and 16.0 mm), and respiratory motion displacements (17.6–31.3 mm). The proposed 4D numerical observer applied on multiple-gated images was

  10. Motion artifacts occurring at the lung/diaphragm interface using 4D CT attenuation correction of 4D PET scans.

    PubMed

    Killoran, Joseph H; Gerbaudo, Victor H; Mamede, Marcelo; Ionascu, Dan; Park, Sang-June; Berbeco, Ross

    2011-11-15

    For PET/CT, fast CT acquisition time can lead to errors in attenuation correction, particularly at the lung/diaphragm interface. Gated 4D PET can reduce motion artifacts, though residual artifacts may persist depending on the CT dataset used for attenuation correction. We performed phantom studies to evaluate 4D PET images of targets near a density interface using three different methods for attenuation correction: a single 3D CT (3D CTAC), an averaged 4D CT (CINE CTAC), and a fully phase matched 4D CT (4D CTAC). A phantom was designed with two density regions corresponding to diaphragm and lung. An 8 mL sphere phantom loaded with 18F-FDG was used to represent a lung tumor and background FDG included at an 8:1 ratio. Motion patterns of sin(x) and sin4(x) were used for dynamic studies. Image data was acquired using a GE Discovery DVCT-PET/CT scanner. Attenuation correction methods were compared based on normalized recovery coefficient (NRC), as well as a novel quantity "fixed activity volume" (FAV) introduced in our report. Image metrics were compared to those determined from a 3D PET scan with no motion present (3D STATIC). Values of FAV and NRC showed significant variation over the motion cycle when corrected by 3D CTAC images. 4D CTAC- and CINE CTAC-corrected PET images reduced these motion artifacts. The amount of artifact reduction is greater when the target is surrounded by lower density material and when motion was based on sin4(x). 4D CTAC reduced artifacts more than CINE CTAC for most scenarios. For a target surrounded by water equivalent material, there was no advantage to 4D CTAC over CINE CTAC when using the sin(x) motion pattern. Attenuation correction using both 4D CTAC or CINE CTAC can reduce motion artifacts in regions that include a tissue interface such as the lung/diaphragm border. 4D CTAC is more effective than CINE CTAC at reducing artifacts in some, but not all, scenarios.

  11. 4-D reconstruction for dynamic fluorescence diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Bin; Luo, Jianwen; Bai, Jing

    2012-11-01

    Dynamic fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is important for the research of drug delivery, medical diagnosis and treatment. Conventionally, dynamic tomographic images are reconstructed frame by frame, independently. This approach fails to account for the temporal correlations in measurement data. Ideally, the entire image sequence should be considered as a whole and a four-dimensional (4-D) reconstruction should be performed. However, the fully 4-D reconstruction is computationally intensive. In this paper, we propose a new 4-D reconstruction approach for dynamic FDOT, which is achieved by applying a temporal Karhunen-Loève (KL) transformation to the imaging equation. By taking advantage of the decorrelation and compression properties of the KL transformation, the complex 4-D optical reconstruction problem is greatly simplified. To evaluate the performance of the method, simulation, phantom, and in vivo experiments (N=7) are performed on a hybrid FDOT/x-ray computed tomography imaging system. The experimental results indicate that the reconstruction images obtained by the KL method provide good reconstruction quality. Additionally, by discarding high-order KL components, the computation time involved with fully 4-D reconstruction can be greatly reduced in contrast to the conventional frame-by-frame reconstruction.

  12. New C4D Sensor with a Simulated Inductor

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Yingchao; Ji, Haifeng; Yang, Shijie; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing

    2016-01-01

    A new capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C4D) sensor with an improved simulated inductor is developed in this work. The improved simulated inductor is designed on the basis of the Riordan-type floating simulated inductor. With the improved simulated inductor, the negative influence of the coupling capacitances is overcome and the conductivity measurement is implemented by the series resonance principle. The conductivity measurement experiments are carried out in three pipes with different inner diameters of 3.0 mm, 4.6 mm and 6.4 mm, respectively. The experimental results show that the designs of the new C4D sensor and the improved simulated inductor are successful. The maximum relative error of the conductivity measurement is less than 5%. Compared with the C4D sensors using practical inductors, the measurement accuracy of the new C4D sensor is comparable. The research results also indicate that the adjustability of a simulated inductor can reduce the requirement for the AC source and guarantee the interchangeableness. Meanwhile, it is recommended that making the potential of one terminal of a simulated inductor stable is beneficial to the running stability. Furthermore, this work indirectly verifies the possibility and feasibility of the miniaturization of the C4D sensor by using the simulated inductor technique and lays a good foundation for future research work. PMID:26828493

  13. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: A digital phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Bernatowicz, K. Knopf, A.; Lomax, A.; Keall, P.; Kipritidis, J.; Mishra, P.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CT can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Methods: Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) “conventional” 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) “beam paused” 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) “respiratory-gated” 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm{sup 3} spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates. Results

  14. A 4D Hyperspherical Interpretation of q-Space

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinbor, A. Pasha; Chung, Moo K.; Wu, Yu-Chien; Alexander, Andrew L.; Bendlin, Barbara B.

    2014-01-01

    3D q-space can be viewed as the surface of a 4D hypersphere. In this paper, we seek to develop a 4D hyperspherical interpretation of q-space by projecting it onto a hypersphere and subsequently modeling the q-space signal via 4D hyperspherical harmonics (HSH). Using this orthonormal basis, we analytically derive several quantitative indices and numerically estimate the diffusion ODF. Importantly, we derive the integral transform describing the relationship between the diffusion signal and propagator on a hypersphere. We also show that the HSH basis expends less fitting parameters than other well-established methods to achieve comparable signal and better ODF reconstructions. All in all, this work provides a new way of looking at q-space. PMID:24505799

  15. Relative charge transfer cross section from Rb (4d)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, M. H.; Camp, H. A.; Trachy, M. L.; Fléchard, X.; Gearba, M. A.; Nguyen, H.; Brédy, R.; Lundeen, S. R.; Depaola, B. D.

    2005-08-01

    Relative charge transfer cross section measurements for the excited state Rb(4d) with 7keV Na+ is reported. The specific channels reported are Na++Rb(4d5/2)→Na(nl)+Rb+ , where the dominant transfer cross sections channels were nl=3d and 4s . Using a combination of a magneto-optical trap and recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (MOTRIMS methodology), the cross sections were measured relative to the previously studied Na++Rb(5s,5p) systems at the same collision energy.

  16. Relative charge transfer cross section from Rb(4d)

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, M.H.; Camp, H.A.; Trachy, M.L.; De Paola, B.D.; Flechard, X.; Gearba, M.A.; Nguyen, H.; Bredy, R.; Lundeen, S.R.

    2005-08-15

    Relative charge transfer cross section measurements for the excited state Rb(4d) with 7 keV Na{sup +} is reported. The specific channels reported are Na{sup +}+Rb(4d{sub 5/2}){yields}Na(nl)+Rb{sup +}, where the dominant transfer cross sections channels were nl=3d and 4s. Using a combination of a magneto-optical trap and recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (MOTRIMS methodology), the cross sections were measured relative to the previously studied Na{sup +}+Rb(5s,5p) systems at the same collision energy.

  17. The 4-D approach to visual control of autonomous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1994-01-01

    Development of a 4-D approach to dynamic machine vision is described. Core elements of this method are spatio-temporal models oriented towards objects and laws of perspective projection in a foward mode. Integration of multi-sensory measurement data was achieved through spatio-temporal models as invariants for object recognition. Situation assessment and long term predictions were allowed through maintenance of a symbolic 4-D image of processes involving objects. Behavioral capabilities were easily realized by state feedback and feed-foward control.

  18. Emerging Applications of Abdominal 4D Flow MRI

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Alzate, Alejandro; Francois, Christopher J.; Wieben, Oliver; Reeder, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Comprehensive assessment of abdominal hemodynamics is crucial for many clinical diagnoses but is challenged by a tremendous complexity of anatomy, normal physiology, and a wide variety of pathologic abnormalities. This article introduces 4D flow MRI as a powerful technique for noninvasive assessment of the hemodynamics of abdominal vascular territories. CONCLUSION Four-dimensional flow MRI provides clinicians with a more extensive and straightforward approach to evaluate disorders that affect blood flow in the abdomen. This review presents a series of clinical cases to illustrate the utility of 4D flow MRI in the comprehensive assessment of the abdominal circulation. PMID:27187681

  19. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2,4 - Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid ( 2,4 - D ) ; CASRN 94 - 75 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Asses

  20. Enterococcus faecalis promotes osteoclastogenesis and semaphorin 4D expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Deng, Zuhui; Seneviratne, Chaminda J; Cheung, Gary S P; Jin, Lijian; Zhao, Baohong; Zhang, Chengfei

    2015-10-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is considered a major bacterial pathogen implicated in endodontic infections and contributes considerably to periapical periodontitis. This study aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms by which E. faecalis accounts for the bone destruction in periapical periodontitis in vitro. Osteoclast precursor RAW264.7 cells were treated with E. faecalis ATCC 29212 and a wild strain of E. faecalis derived clinically from an infected root canal. The results showed that, to some extent, E. faecalis induced the RAW264.7 cells to form tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated osteoclast-like cells. This pathogen markedly stimulated RAW264.7 cells to express semaphorin 4D (Sema4D), which inhibits bone formation. Once RAW264.7 cells were primed by low-dose receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL), E. faecalis could significantly increase the production of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells and up-regulate the expression of osteoclast-specific markers, including NFATc1, TRAP and cathepsin K. Both p38 and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathways were activated by E. faecalis in RANKL-primed RAW264.7 cells, and meanwhile the expression of Sema4D was highly increased. In conclusion, E. faecalis may greatly contribute to the bone resorption in periapical periodontitis by promoting RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis and expression of Sema4D through activation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathways.

  1. 4D flow mri post-processing strategies for neuropathologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrauben, Eric Mathew

    4D flow MRI allows for the measurement of a dynamic 3D velocity vector field. Blood flow velocities in large vascular territories can be qualitatively visualized with the added benefit of quantitative probing. Within cranial pathologies theorized to have vascular-based contributions or effects, 4D flow MRI provides a unique platform for comprehensive assessment of hemodynamic parameters. Targeted blood flow derived measurements, such as flow rate, pulsatility, retrograde flow, or wall shear stress may provide insight into the onset or characterization of more complex neuropathologies. Therefore, the thorough assessment of each parameter within the context of a given disease has important medical implications. Not surprisingly, the last decade has seen rapid growth in the use of 4D flow MRI. Data acquisition sequences are available to researchers on all major scanner platforms. However, the use has been limited mostly to small research trials. One major reason that has hindered the more widespread use and application in larger clinical trials is the complexity of the post-processing tasks and the lack of adequate tools for these tasks. Post-processing of 4D flow MRI must be semi-automated, fast, user-independent, robust, and reliably consistent for use in a clinical setting, within large patient studies, or across a multicenter trial. Development of proper post-processing methods coupled with systematic investigation in normal and patient populations pushes 4D flow MRI closer to clinical realization while elucidating potential underlying neuropathological origins. Within this framework, the work in this thesis assesses venous flow reproducibility and internal consistency in a healthy population. A preliminary analysis of venous flow parameters in healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients is performed in a large study employing 4D flow MRI. These studies are performed in the context of the chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency hypothesis. Additionally, a

  2. 4D MR imaging using robust internal respiratory signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, CheukKai; Wen, Zhifei; Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, R. H. N.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Beddar, Sam

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using internal respiratory (IR) surrogates to sort four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance (MR) images. The 4D MR images were constructed by acquiring fast 2D cine MR images sequentially, with each slice scanned for more than one breathing cycle. The 4D volume was then sorted retrospectively using the IR signal. In this study, we propose to use multiple low-frequency components in the Fourier space as well as the anterior body boundary as potential IR surrogates. From these potential IR surrogates, we used a clustering algorithm to identify those that best represented the respiratory pattern to derive the IR signal. A study with healthy volunteers was performed to assess the feasibility of the proposed IR signal. We compared this proposed IR signal with the respiratory signal obtained using respiratory bellows. Overall, 99% of the IR signals matched the bellows signals. The average difference between the end inspiration times in the IR signal and bellows signal was 0.18 s in this cohort of matching signals. For the acquired images corresponding to the other 1% of non-matching signal pairs, the respiratory motion shown in the images was coherent with the respiratory phases determined by the IR signal, but not the bellows signal. This suggested that the IR signal determined by the proposed method could potentially correct the faulty bellows signal. The sorted 4D images showed minimal mismatched artefacts and potential clinical applicability. The proposed IR signal therefore provides a feasible alternative to effectively sort MR images in 4D.

  3. Using 4D Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Validate Computational Fluid Dynamics: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Biglino, Giovanni; Cosentino, Daria; Steeden, Jennifer A.; De Nova, Lorenzo; Castelli, Matteo; Ntsinjana, Hopewell; Pennati, Giancarlo; Taylor, Andrew M.; Schievano, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can have a complementary predictive role alongside the exquisite visualization capabilities of 4D cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. In order to exploit these capabilities (e.g., for decision-making), it is necessary to validate computational models against real world data. In this study, we sought to acquire 4D CMR flow data in a controllable, experimental setup and use these data to validate a corresponding computational model. We applied this paradigm to a case of congenital heart disease, namely, transposition of the great arteries (TGA) repaired with arterial switch operation. For this purpose, a mock circulatory loop compatible with the CMR environment was constructed and two detailed aortic 3D models (i.e., one TGA case and one normal aortic anatomy) were tested under realistic hemodynamic conditions, acquiring 4D CMR flow. The same 3D domains were used for multi-scale CFD simulations, whereby the remainder of the mock circulatory system was appropriately summarized with a lumped parameter network. Boundary conditions of the simulations mirrored those measured in vitro. Results showed a very good quantitative agreement between experimental and computational models in terms of pressure (overall maximum % error = 4.4% aortic pressure in the control anatomy) and flow distribution data (overall maximum % error = 3.6% at the subclavian artery outlet of the TGA model). Very good qualitative agreement could also be appreciated in terms of streamlines, throughout the cardiac cycle. Additionally, velocity vectors in the ascending aorta revealed less symmetrical flow in the TGA model, which also exhibited higher wall shear stress in the anterior ascending aorta. PMID:26697416

  4. Comprehensive 4D velocity mapping of the heart and great vessels by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is able to measure all three directional components of the velocities of blood flow relative to the three spatial dimensions and the time course of the heart cycle. In this article, methods used for the acquisition, visualization, and quantification of such datasets are reviewed and illustrated. Methods Currently, the acquisition of 3D cine (4D) phase contrast velocity data, synchronized relative to both cardiac and respiratory movements takes about ten minutes or more, even when using parallel imaging and optimized pulse sequence design. The large resulting datasets need appropriate post processing for the visualization of multidirectional flow, for example as vector fields, pathlines or streamlines, or for retrospective volumetric quantification. Applications Multidirectional velocity acquisitions have provided 3D visualization of large scale flow features of the healthy heart and great vessels, and have shown altered patterns of flow in abnormal chambers and vessels. Clinically relevant examples include retrograde streams in atheromatous descending aortas as potential thrombo-embolic pathways in patients with cryptogenic stroke and marked variations of flow visualized in common aortic pathologies. Compared to standard clinical tools, 4D velocity mapping offers the potential for retrospective quantification of flow and other hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions Multidirectional, 3D cine velocity acquisitions are contributing to the understanding of normal and pathologically altered blood flow features. Although more rapid and user-friendly strategies for acquisition and analysis may be needed before 4D velocity acquisitions come to be adopted in routine clinical CMR, their capacity to measure multidirectional flows throughout a study volume has contributed novel insights into cardiovascular fluid dynamics in health and disease. PMID:21235751

  5. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  6. SU-E-J-192: Verification of 4D-MRI Internal Target Volume Using Cine MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lafata, K; Czito, B; Palta, M; Bashir, M; Yin, F; Cai, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of 4D-MRI in determining the Internal Target Volume (ITV) used in radiation oncology treatment planning of liver cancers. Cine MRI is used as the standard baseline in establishing the feasibility and accuracy of 4D-MRI tumor motion within the liver. Methods: IRB approval was obtained for this retrospective study. Analysis was performed on MR images from four patients receiving external beam radiation therapy for liver cancer at our institution. Eligible patients received both Cine and 4D-MRI scans before treatment. Cine images were acquired sagittally in real time at a slice bisecting the tumor, while 4D images were acquired volumetrically. Cine MR DICOM headers were manipulated such that each respiratory frame was assigned a unique slice location. This approach permitted the treatment planning system (Eclipse, Varian Medical Systems) to recognize a complete respiratory cycle as a “volume”, where the gross tumor was contoured temporally. Software was developed to calculate the union of all frame contours in the structure set, resulting in the corresponding plane of the ITV projecting through the middle of the tumor, defined as the Internal Target Area (ITA). This was repeated for 4D-MRI, at the corresponding slice location, allowing a direct comparison of ITAs obtained from each modality. Results: Four patients have been analyzed. ITAs contoured from 4D-MRI correlate with contours from Cine MRI. The mean error of 4D values relative to Cine values is 7.67 +/− 2.55 %. No single ITA contoured from 4D-MRI demonstrated more than 10.5 % error compared to its Cine MRI counterpart. Conclusion: Motion management is a significant aspect of treatment planning within dynamic environments such as the liver, where diaphragmatic and cardiac activity influence plan accuracy. This small pilot study suggests that 4D-MRI based ITA measurements agree with Cine MRI based measurements, an important step towards clinical implementation. NIH 1R21

  7. Micro-CT and histological analysis of Ti6Al7Nb custom made implants with hydroxyapatite and SiO2-TiO2 coatings in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    ARMENCEA, GABRIEL; BERCE, CRISTIAN; ROTARU, HORATIU; BRAN, SIMION; LEORDEAN, DAN; COADA, CAMELIA; TODEA, MILICA; JULA, CAMELIA AUGUSTA; GHEBAN, DAN; BACIUT, GRIGORE; BACIUT, MIHAELA; CAMPIAN, RADU SEPTIMIU

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim Bone defect reconstruction in the maxillofacial area comes as a necessity after traumatic, oncological or congenital pathology. Custom made implant manufacturing, such as selective laser melting (SLM), is very helpful when bone reconstruction is needed. In the present study we assessed the osseointegration of custom made implants made of Ti6Al7Nb with two different coatings: SiO2-TiO2 and hydroxyapatite, by comparing the bone mineral density (BMD) measured on micro-CT and the histological mineralized bone surrounding the implants. Methods Custom made – cylindrical type – implants were produced by selective laser melting, coated with SiO2-TiO2 and hydroxyapatite and implanted in the rabbit femur. The animals (divided into 3 groups) were sacrificed at 1, 3 and 6 months and the implants were removed together with the surrounding bone. Bone mineral density and histological examination of the bone-implant surface was performed for each group. Results BMD and histological examination of the samples determined the quantity of mineralized bone at the implant site, showing a good percentage of mineralized bone for the coated implants at 1, 3 and 6 months. The measurements for the implants without coating showed a significant lower quantity of mineralized bone at 3 months compared with the implants with coating, and a good quantity of mineralized bone at 6 months, showing a process of demineralization followed by remineralization in the last month. The measurements of BMD showed similar results with the histological examination. Conclusions The use of micro-CT and the measurement of BMD are a reliable, minimally invasive and a quick method of osseointegration assessment. PMID:26609278

  8. The Use of Light/Chemically Hardened Polymethylmethacrylate, Polyhydroxylethylmethacrylate, and Calcium Hydroxide Graft Material in Combination With Polyanhydride Around Implants and Extraction Sockets in Minipigs: Part II: Histologic and Micro-CT Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Ghattas, Mazen; Dangaria, Smit J.; Abdallah, Rima; Morgan, Elise F.; Diekwisch, Thomas G.H.; Ashman, Arthur; Van Dyke, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background This report is the second part of the previously published study on the impact of light/chemical hardening technology and a newly formulated composite graft material for crestal augmentation during immediate implant placement. Methods A total of 48 implants were placed into the sockets of the mesial roots of freshly extracted mandibular premolar teeth in three minipigs. Crestal areas and intrabony spaces were randomly augmented with light-hardened graft materials including a composite graft consisting of polymethylmethacrylate, polyhydroxylethylmethacrylate, and calcium hydroxide (PPCH) plus polyanhydride (PA); PPCH graft; and PA graft, or left untreated. Distal sockets not receiving implants and the sockets of first molars (n = 60) were randomly treated with one of the graft materials or left empty. In addition, two molar sockets were treated with the original PPCH graft material. Quantitative microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) was used to assess alveolar bone structure and tissue compositions. Histologic evaluations included descriptive histology to assess the peri-implant wound healing, as well as histomorphometric measurements to determine bone-to-implant contact (BIC). Results Both trabecular and cortical bone measurements by micro-CT did not reveal any significant differences among the groups. Sites augmented with PPCH+PA resulted in significantly greater BIC surface than PPCH alone and no-graft-treated implants (P <0.05) histologically. Stained ground sections showed complete bone formation between bone and implant surface in the PPCH+PA group, whereas sites without augmentation showed large gaps between bone and implant surfaces, indicating a slower bone apposition and less BIC surface compared to all other groups. Similar to implant sections, all materials showed positive outcome on trabecular and cortical bone formation in extraction sockets with an intact crestal cortical bone. Conclusion Histologic evaluations supported the previous findings

  9. Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) using image-based respiratory surrogate: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing; Chang, Zheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Paul Segars, William; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in radiation therapy to assess patient-specific breathing motion for determining individual safety margins. However, it has two major drawbacks: low soft-tissue contrast and an excessive imaging dose to the patient. This research aimed to develop a clinically feasible four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) technique to overcome these limitations. Methods: The proposed 4D-MRI technique was achieved by continuously acquiring axial images throughout the breathing cycle using fast 2D cine-MR imaging, and then retrospectively sorting the images by respiratory phase. The key component of the technique was the use of body area (BA) of the axial MR images as an internal respiratory surrogate to extract the breathing signal. The validation of the BA surrogate was performed using 4D-CT images of 12 cancer patients by comparing the respiratory phases determined using the BA method to those determined clinically using the Real-time position management (RPM) system. The feasibility of the 4D-MRI technique was tested on a dynamic motion phantom, the 4D extended Cardiac Torso (XCAT) digital phantom, and two healthy human subjects. Results: Respiratory phases determined from the BA matched closely to those determined from the RPM: mean (±SD) difference in phase: −3.9% (±6.4%); mean (±SD) absolute difference in phase: 10.40% (±3.3%); mean (±SD) correlation coefficient: 0.93 (±0.04). In the motion phantom study, 4D-MRI clearly showed the sinusoidal motion of the phantom; image artifacts observed were minimal to none. Motion trajectories measured from 4D-MRI and 2D cine-MRI (used as a reference) matched excellently: the mean (±SD) absolute difference in motion amplitude: −0.3 (±0.5) mm. In the 4D-XCAT phantom study, the simulated “4D-MRI” images showed good consistency with the original 4D-XCAT phantom images. The motion trajectory of the hypothesized “tumor” matched

  10. Impact of incorporating visual biofeedback in 4D MRI.

    PubMed

    To, David T; Kim, Joshua P; Price, Ryan G; Chetty, Indrin J; Glide-Hurst, Carri K

    2016-05-08

    Precise radiation therapy (RT) for abdominal lesions is complicated by respiratory motion and suboptimal soft tissue contrast in 4D CT. 4D MRI offers improved con-trast although long scan times and irregular breathing patterns can be limiting. To address this, visual biofeedback (VBF) was introduced into 4D MRI. Ten volunteers were consented to an IRB-approved protocol. Prospective respiratory-triggered, T2-weighted, coronal 4D MRIs were acquired on an open 1.0T MR-SIM. VBF was integrated using an MR-compatible interactive breath-hold control system. Subjects visually monitored their breathing patterns to stay within predetermined tolerances. 4D MRIs were acquired with and without VBF for 2- and 8-phase acquisitions. Normalized respiratory waveforms were evaluated for scan time, duty cycle (programmed/acquisition time), breathing period, and breathing regularity (end-inhale coefficient of variation, EI-COV). Three reviewers performed image quality assessment to compare artifacts with and without VBF. Respiration-induced liver motion was calculated via centroid difference analysis of end-exhale (EE) and EI liver contours. Incorporating VBF reduced 2-phase acquisition time (4.7 ± 1.0 and 5.4 ± 1.5 min with and without VBF, respectively) while reducing EI-COV by 43.8% ± 16.6%. For 8-phase acquisitions, VBF reduced acquisition time by 1.9 ± 1.6 min and EI-COVs by 38.8% ± 25.7% despite breathing rate remaining similar (11.1 ± 3.8 breaths/min with vs. 10.5 ± 2.9 without). Using VBF yielded higher duty cycles than unguided free breathing (34.4% ± 5.8% vs. 28.1% ± 6.6%, respectively). Image grading showed that out of 40 paired evaluations, 20 cases had equivalent and 17 had improved image quality scores with VBF, particularly for mid-exhale and EI. Increased liver excursion was observed with VBF, where superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right EE-EI displacements were 14.1± 5.8, 4.9 ± 2.1, and 1.5 ± 1.0 mm, respectively, with VBF compared to 11.9

  11. Cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shanewise, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a proven, accepted mode of therapy for selected patients with end-stage heart failure, but the inadequate number of suitable donor hearts available ultimately limits its application. This chapter reviews adult cardiac transplantation, with an emphasis on the anesthetic considerations of the heart transplant operation itself.

  12. Exome sequencing identifies PDE4D mutations in acrodysostosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hane; Graham, John M; Rimoin, David L; Lachman, Ralph S; Krejci, Pavel; Tompson, Stuart W; Nelson, Stanley F; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H

    2012-04-01

    Acrodysostosis is a dominantly-inherited, multisystem disorder characterized by skeletal, endocrine, and neurological abnormalities. To identify the molecular basis of acrodysostosis, we performed exome sequencing on five genetically independent cases. Three different missense mutations in PDE4D, which encodes cyclic AMP (cAMP)-specific phosphodiesterase 4D, were found to be heterozygous in three of the cases. Two of the mutations were demonstrated to have occurred de novo, providing strong genetic evidence of causation. Two additional cases were heterozygous for de novo missense mutations in PRKAR1A, which encodes the cAMP-dependent regulatory subunit of protein kinase A and which has been recently reported to be the cause of a form of acrodysostosis resistant to multiple hormones. These findings demonstrate that acrodysostosis is genetically heterogeneous and underscore the exquisite sensitivity of many tissues to alterations in cAMP homeostasis. PMID:22464252

  13. Intelligent Vehicle Systems: A 4D/RCS Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, Raj

    2007-04-01

    This book presents new research on autonomous mobility capabilities and shows how technological advances can be anticipated in the coming two decades. An in-depth description is presented on the theoretical foundations and engineering approaches that enable these capabilities. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the 4D/RCS reference model architecture and design methodology that has proven successful in guiding the development of autonomous mobility systems. Chapters 2 through 7 provide more detailed descriptions of research that has been conducted and algorithms that have been developed to implement the various aspects of the 4D/RCS reference model architecture and design methodology. Chapters 8 and 9 discuss applications, performance measures, and standards. Chapter 10 provides a history of Army and DARPA research in autonomous ground mobility. Chapter 11 provides a perspective on the potential future developments in autonomous mobility.

  14. Brain tissue segmentation in 4D CT using voxel classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boom, R.; Oei, M. T. H.; Lafebre, S.; Oostveen, L. J.; Meijer, F. J. A.; Steens, S. C. A.; Prokop, M.; van Ginneken, B.; Manniesing, R.

    2012-02-01

    A method is proposed to segment anatomical regions of the brain from 4D computer tomography (CT) patient data. The method consists of a three step voxel classification scheme, each step focusing on structures that are increasingly difficult to segment. The first step classifies air and bone, the second step classifies vessels and the third step classifies white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid. As features the time averaged intensity value and the temporal intensity change value were used. In each step, a k-Nearest-Neighbor classifier was used to classify the voxels. Training data was obtained by placing regions of interest in reconstructed 3D image data. The method has been applied to ten 4D CT cerebral patient data. A leave-one-out experiment showed consistent and accurate segmentation results.

  15. 4D flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Bissell, Malenka; Barker, Alex J; Bolger, Ann F; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Ebbers, Tino; Francios, Christopher J; Frydrychowicz, Alex; Geiger, Julia; Giese, Daniel; Hope, Michael D; Kilner, Philip J; Kozerke, Sebastian; Myerson, Saul; Neubauer, Stefan; Wieben, Oliver; Markl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile blood flow through the cavities of the heart and great vessels is time-varying and multidirectional. Access to all regions, phases and directions of cardiovascular flows has formerly been limited. Four-dimensional (4D) flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has enabled more comprehensive access to such flows, with typical spatial resolution of 1.5×1.5×1.5 - 3×3×3 mm(3), typical temporal resolution of 30-40 ms, and acquisition times in the order of 5 to 25 min. This consensus paper is the work of physicists, physicians and biomedical engineers, active in the development and implementation of 4D Flow CMR, who have repeatedly met to share experience and ideas. The paper aims to assist understanding of acquisition and analysis methods, and their potential clinical applications with a focus on the heart and greater vessels. We describe that 4D Flow CMR can be clinically advantageous because placement of a single acquisition volume is straightforward and enables flow through any plane across it to be calculated retrospectively and with good accuracy. We also specify research and development goals that have yet to be satisfactorily achieved. Derived flow parameters, generally needing further development or validation for clinical use, include measurements of wall shear stress, pressure difference, turbulent kinetic energy, and intracardiac flow components. The dependence of measurement accuracy on acquisition parameters is considered, as are the uses of different visualization strategies for appropriate representation of time-varying multidirectional flow fields. Finally, we offer suggestions for more consistent, user-friendly implementation of 4D Flow CMR acquisition and data handling with a view to multicenter studies and more widespread adoption of the approach in routine clinical investigations. PMID:26257141

  16. Phosphodiesterase 4D gene polymorphisms in sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chen-Yu; Tai, Shu-Yu; Wang, Ling-Feng; Hsi, Edward; Chang, Ning-Chia; Wang, Hsun-Mo; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Ho, Kuen-Yao

    2016-09-01

    The phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) gene has been reported as a risk gene for ischemic stroke. The vascular factors are between the hypothesized etiologies of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), and this genetic effect might be attributed for its role in SSNHL. We hypothesized that genetic variants of the PDE4D gene are associated with susceptibility to SSNHL. We conducted a case-control study with 362 SSNHL cases and 209 controls. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected. The genotypes were determined using TaqMan technology. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was tested for each SNP, and genetic effects were evaluated according to three inheritance modes. We carried out sex-specific analysis to analyze the overall data. All three SNPs were in HWE. When subjects were stratified by sex, the genetic effect was only evident in females but not in males. The TT genotype of rs702553 exhibited an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 3.83 (95 % confidence interval = 1.46-11.18) (p = 0.006) in female SSNHL. The TT genotype of SNP rs702553 was associated with female SSNHL under the recessive model (p = 0.004, OR 3.70). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, TT genotype of rs702553 was significantly associated with female SSNHL (p = 0.0043, OR 3.70). These results suggest that PDE4D gene polymorphisms influence the susceptibility for the development of SSNHL in the southern Taiwanese female population.

  17. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  18. A 4D Hyperspherical Interpretation of q-Space

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinbor, A. Pasha; Chung, Moo K.; Wu, Yu-Chien; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Alexander, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    3D q-space can be viewed as the surface of a 4D hypersphere. In this paper, we seek to develop a 4D hyperspherical interpretation of q-space by projecting it onto a hypersphere and subsequently modeling the q-space signal via 4D hyperspherical harmonics (HSH). Using this orthonormal basis, we derive several well-established q-space indices and numerically estimate the diffusion orientation distribution function (dODF). We also derive the integral transform describing the relationship between the diffusion signal and propagator on a hypersphere. Most importantly, we will demonstrate that for hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI) acquisitions low order linear expansion of the HSH basis is sufficient to characterize diffusion in neural tissue. In fact, the HSH basis achieves comparable signal and better dODF reconstructions than other well-established methods, such as Bessel Fourier orientation reconstruction (BFOR), using fewer fitting parameters. All in all, this work provides a new way of looking at q-space. PMID:25624043

  19. A technique for estimating 4D-CBCT using prior knowledge and limited-angle projections

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, You; Yin, Fang-Fang; Ren, Lei; Segars, W. Paul

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a technique to estimate onboard 4D-CBCT using prior information and limited-angle projections for potential 4D target verification of lung radiotherapy.Methods: Each phase of onboard 4D-CBCT is considered as a deformation from one selected phase (prior volume) of the planning 4D-CT. The deformation field maps (DFMs) are solved using a motion modeling and free-form deformation (MM-FD) technique. In the MM-FD technique, the DFMs are estimated using a motion model which is extracted from planning 4D-CT based on principal component analysis (PCA). The motion model parameters are optimized by matching the digitally reconstructed radiographs of the deformed volumes to the limited-angle onboard projections (data fidelity constraint). Afterward, the estimated DFMs are fine-tuned using a FD model based on data fidelity constraint and deformation energy minimization. The 4D digital extended-cardiac-torso phantom was used to evaluate the MM-FD technique. A lung patient with a 30 mm diameter lesion was simulated with various anatomical and respirational changes from planning 4D-CT to onboard volume, including changes of respiration amplitude, lesion size and lesion average-position, and phase shift between lesion and body respiratory cycle. The lesions were contoured in both the estimated and “ground-truth” onboard 4D-CBCT for comparison. 3D volume percentage-difference (VPD) and center-of-mass shift (COMS) were calculated to evaluate the estimation accuracy of three techniques: MM-FD, MM-only, and FD-only. Different onboard projection acquisition scenarios and projection noise levels were simulated to investigate their effects on the estimation accuracy.Results: For all simulated patient and projection acquisition scenarios, the mean VPD (±S.D.)/COMS (±S.D.) between lesions in prior images and “ground-truth” onboard images were 136.11% (±42.76%)/15.5 mm (±3.9 mm). Using orthogonal-view 15°-each scan angle, the mean VPD/COMS between the lesion

  20. 4D Proton treatment planning strategy for mobile lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Yixiu; Zhang Xiaodong; Chang, Joe Y.; Wang He; Wei Xiong; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Balter, Peter A.; Liu, Helen; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei . E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate strategies for designing compensator-based 3D proton treatment plans for mobile lung tumors using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional CT sets for 10 lung cancer patients were used in this study. The internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) was obtained by combining the tumor volumes at different phases of the respiratory cycle. For each patient, we evaluated four planning strategies based on the following dose calculations: (1) the average (AVE) CT; (2) the free-breathing (FB) CT; (3) the maximum intensity projection (MIP) CT; and (4) the AVE CT in which the CT voxel values inside the IGTV were replaced by a constant density (AVE{sub R}IGTV). For each strategy, the resulting cumulative dose distribution in a respiratory cycle was determined using a deformable image registration method. Results: There were dosimetric differences between the apparent dose distribution, calculated on a single CT dataset, and the motion-corrected 4D dose distribution, calculated by combining dose distributions delivered to each phase of the 4DCT. The AVE{sub R}IGTV plan using a 1-cm smearing parameter had the best overall target coverage and critical structure sparing. The MIP plan approach resulted in an unnecessarily large treatment volume. The AVE and FB plans using 1-cm smearing did not provide adequate 4D target coverage in all patients. By using a larger smearing value, adequate 4D target coverage could be achieved; however, critical organ doses were increased. Conclusion: The AVE{sub R}IGTV approach is an effective strategy for designing proton treatment plans for mobile lung tumors.

  1. Localization of 4D gravity on pure geometrical thick branes

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa-Cendejas, Nandinii; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo

    2006-04-15

    We consider the generation of thick brane configurations in a pure geometric Weyl integrable 5D spacetime which constitutes a non-Riemannian generalization of Kaluza-Klein (KK) theory. In this framework, we show how 4D gravity can be localized on a scalar thick brane which does not necessarily respect reflection symmetry, generalizing in this way several previous models based on the Randall-Sundrum (RS) system and avoiding both, the restriction to orbifold geometries and the introduction of the branes in the action by hand. We first obtain a thick brane solution that preserves 4D Poincare invariance and breaks Z{sub 2}-symmetry along the extra dimension which, indeed, can be either compact or extended, and supplements brane solutions previously found by other authors. In the noncompact case, this field configuration represents a thick brane with positive energy density centered at y=c{sub 2}, whereas pairs of thick branes arise in the compact case. Remarkably, the Weylian scalar curvature is nonsingular along the fifth dimension in the noncompact case, in contraposition to the RS thin brane system. We also recast the wave equations of the transverse traceless modes of the linear fluctuations of the classical background into a Schroedinger's equation form with a volcano potential of finite bottom in both the compact and the extended cases. We solve Schroedinger equation for the massless zero mode m{sup 2}=0 and obtain a single bound wave function which represents a stable 4D graviton. We also get a continuum gapless spectrum of KK states with m{sup 2}>0 that are suppressed at y=c{sub 2} and turn asymptotically into plane waves.

  2. Phase and amplitude binning for 4D-CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelnour, A. F.; Nehmeh, S. A.; Pan, T.; Humm, J. L.; Vernon, P.; Schöder, H.; Rosenzweig, K. E.; Mageras, G. S.; Yorke, E.; Larson, S. M.; Erdi, Y. E.

    2007-07-01

    We compare the consistency and accuracy of two image binning approaches used in 4D-CT imaging. One approach, phase binning (PB), assigns each breathing cycle 2π rad, within which the images are grouped. In amplitude binning (AB), the images are assigned bins according to the breathing signal's full amplitude. To quantitate both approaches we used a NEMA NU2-2001 IEC phantom oscillating in the axial direction and at random frequencies and amplitudes, approximately simulating a patient's breathing. 4D-CT images were obtained using a four-slice GE Lightspeed CT scanner operating in cine mode. We define consistency error as a measure of ability to correctly bin over repeated cycles in the same field of view. Average consistency error μe ± σe in PB ranged from 18% ± 20% to 30% ± 35%, while in AB the error ranged from 11% ± 14% to 20% ± 24%. In PB nearly all bins contained sphere slices. AB was more accurate, revealing empty bins where no sphere slices existed. As a proof of principle, we present examples of two non-small cell lung carcinoma patients' 4D-CT lung images binned by both approaches. While AB can lead to gaps in the coronal images, depending on the patient's breathing pattern, PB exhibits no gaps but suffers visible artifacts due to misbinning, yielding images that cover a relatively large amplitude range. AB was more consistent, though often resulted in gaps when no data existed due to patients' breathing pattern. We conclude AB is more accurate than PB. This has important consequences to treatment planning and diagnosis.

  3. Non-spherical particle generation from 4D optofluidic fabrication.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Kevin S; Chung, Aram J

    2016-08-01

    Particles with non-spherical shapes can exhibit properties which are not available from spherical shaped particles. Complex shaped particles can provide unique benefits for areas such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, structural materials, and self-assembly building blocks. Current methods of creating complex shaped particles such as 3D printing, photolithography, and imprint lithography are limited by either slow speeds, shape limitations, or expensive processes. Previously, we presented a novel microfluidic flow lithography fabrication scheme combined with fluid inertia called optofluidic fabrication for the creation of complex shaped three-dimensional (3D) particles. This process was able to address the aforementioned limits and overcome two-dimensional shape limitations faced by traditional flow lithography methods; however, all of the created 3D particle shapes displayed top-down symmetry. Here, by introducing the time dimension into our existing optofluidic fabrication process, we break this top-down symmetry, generating fully asymmetric 3D particles where we termed the process: four-dimensional (4D) optofluidic fabrication. This 4D optofluidic fabrication is comprised of three sequential procedures. First, density mismatched precursor fluids flow past pillars within fluidic channels to manipulate the flow cross sections via fluid inertia. Next, the time dimension is incorporated by stopping the flow and allowing the denser fluids to settle by gravity to create asymmetric flow cross sections. Finally, the fluids are exposed to patterned ultraviolet (UV) light in order to polymerize fully asymmetric 3D-shaped particles. By varying inertial flow shaping, gravity-induced flow shaping, and UV light patterns, 4D optofluidic fabrication can create an infinite set of complex shaped asymmetric particles. PMID:27092661

  4. Non-spherical particle generation from 4D optofluidic fabrication.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Kevin S; Chung, Aram J

    2016-08-01

    Particles with non-spherical shapes can exhibit properties which are not available from spherical shaped particles. Complex shaped particles can provide unique benefits for areas such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, structural materials, and self-assembly building blocks. Current methods of creating complex shaped particles such as 3D printing, photolithography, and imprint lithography are limited by either slow speeds, shape limitations, or expensive processes. Previously, we presented a novel microfluidic flow lithography fabrication scheme combined with fluid inertia called optofluidic fabrication for the creation of complex shaped three-dimensional (3D) particles. This process was able to address the aforementioned limits and overcome two-dimensional shape limitations faced by traditional flow lithography methods; however, all of the created 3D particle shapes displayed top-down symmetry. Here, by introducing the time dimension into our existing optofluidic fabrication process, we break this top-down symmetry, generating fully asymmetric 3D particles where we termed the process: four-dimensional (4D) optofluidic fabrication. This 4D optofluidic fabrication is comprised of three sequential procedures. First, density mismatched precursor fluids flow past pillars within fluidic channels to manipulate the flow cross sections via fluid inertia. Next, the time dimension is incorporated by stopping the flow and allowing the denser fluids to settle by gravity to create asymmetric flow cross sections. Finally, the fluids are exposed to patterned ultraviolet (UV) light in order to polymerize fully asymmetric 3D-shaped particles. By varying inertial flow shaping, gravity-induced flow shaping, and UV light patterns, 4D optofluidic fabrication can create an infinite set of complex shaped asymmetric particles.

  5. Founding Gravitation in 4D Euclidean Space-Time Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Franz-Guenter

    2010-11-24

    The Euclidean interpretation of special relativity which has been suggested by the author is a formulation of special relativity in ordinary 4D Euclidean space-time geometry. The natural and geometrically intuitive generalization of this view involves variations of the speed of light (depending on location and direction) and a Euclidean principle of general covariance. In this article, a gravitation model by Jan Broekaert, which implements a view of relativity theory in the spirit of Lorentz and Poincare, is reconstructed and shown to fulfill the principles of the Euclidean approach after an appropriate reinterpretation.

  6. CMT4D (NDRG1 mutation): genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Emilie; Mathis, Stéphane; Magdelaine, Corinne; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Magy, Laurent; Funalot, Benoît; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2013-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a heterogeneous condition with a large number of clinical, electrophysiological and pathological phenotypes. More than 40 genes are involved. We report a child of gypsy origin with an autosomal recessive demyelinating phenotype. Clinical data, familial history, and electrophysiological studies were in favor of a CMT4 sub-type. The characteristic N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) mutation responsible for this CMT4D phenotype was confirmed: p.R148X. The exact molecular function of the NDRG1 protein has yet to be elucidated.

  7. Multicolor 4D Fluorescence Microscopy using Ultrathin Bessel Light Sheets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Teng; Lau, Sze Cheung; Wang, Ying; Su, Yumian; Wang, Hao; Cheng, Aifang; Herrup, Karl; Ip, Nancy Y; Du, Shengwang; Loy, M M T

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple and efficient method for producing ultrathin Bessel ('non-diffracting') light sheets of any color using a line-shaped beam and an annulus filter. With this robust and cost-effective technology, we obtained two-color, 3D images of biological samples with lateral/axial resolution of 250 nm/400 nm, and high-speed, 4D volume imaging of 20 μm sized live sample at 1 Hz temporal resolution. PMID:27189786

  8. Oblique sounding using the DPS-4D stations in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosna, Zbysek; Kouba, Daniel; Koucka Knizova, Petra; Arikan, Feza; Arikan, Orhan; Gok, Gokhan; Rejfek, Lubos

    2016-07-01

    The DPS-4D Digisondes are capable of detection of echoes from neighbouring European stations. Currently, a campaign with high-temporal resolution of 5 min is being run. Further, ionograms from regular vertical sounding with 15 min resolution provide us with oblique reflections together with vertical reflections. We analyzed profiles of electron concentration and basic ionospheric parameters derived from the ionograms. We compared results derived from reflections from the ionosphere above the stations (vertical sounding) with information derived from oblique reflections between the stations. This study is supported by the Joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR 14/001 projects.

  9. Lagrangian constraints and renormalization of 4D gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, I. Y.

    2015-04-01

    It has been proposed in [21] that 4D Einstein gravity becomes effectively reduced to 3D after solving the Lagrangian analogues of the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints of the Hamiltonian quantization. The analysis in [21] was carried out at the classical/operator level. We review the proposal and make a transition to the path integral account. We then set the stage for explicitly carrying out the two-loop renormalization procedure of the resulting 3D action. We also address a potentially subtle issue in the gravity context concerning whether renormalizability does not depend on the background around which the original action is expanded.

  10. Multicolor 4D Fluorescence Microscopy using Ultrathin Bessel Light Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Teng; Lau, Sze Cheung; Wang, Ying; Su, Yumian; Wang, Hao; Cheng, Aifang; Herrup, Karl; Ip, Nancy Y.; Du, Shengwang; Loy, M. M. T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple and efficient method for producing ultrathin Bessel (‘non-diffracting’) light sheets of any color using a line-shaped beam and an annulus filter. With this robust and cost-effective technology, we obtained two-color, 3D images of biological samples with lateral/axial resolution of 250 nm/400 nm, and high-speed, 4D volume imaging of 20 μm sized live sample at 1 Hz temporal resolution. PMID:27189786

  11. All the supersymmetric configurations of N=4, d=4 supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellorín, Jorge; Ortín, Tomás

    2005-10-01

    All the supersymmetric configurations of pure, ungauged, N=4, d=4 supergravity are classified in a formalism that keeps manifest the S and T dualities of the theory. We also find simple equations that need to be satisfied by the configurations to be classical solutions of the theory. While the solutions associated to null Killing vectors were essentially classified by Tod (a classification that we refine), we find new configurations and solutions associated to timelike Killing vectors that do not satisfy Tod's rigidity hypothesis (hence, they have a nontrivial U(1) connection) and whose supersymmetry projector is associated to 1-dimensional objects (strings), although they have a trivial axion field.

  12. Actively triggered 4d cone-beam CT acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Martin F.; Wisotzky, Eric; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: 4d cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are usually reconstructed by extracting the motion information from the 2d projections or an external surrogate signal, and binning the individual projections into multiple respiratory phases. In this “after-the-fact” binning approach, however, projections are unevenly distributed over respiratory phases resulting in inefficient utilization of imaging dose. To avoid excess dose in certain respiratory phases, and poor image quality due to a lack of projections in others, the authors have developed a novel 4d CBCT acquisition framework which actively triggers 2d projections based on the forward-predicted position of the tumor.Methods: The forward-prediction of the tumor position was independently established using either (i) an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system based on implanted EM-transponders which act as a surrogate for the tumor position, or (ii) an external motion sensor measuring the chest-wall displacement and correlating this external motion to the phase-shifted diaphragm motion derived from the acquired images. In order to avoid EM-induced artifacts in the imaging detector, the authors devised a simple but effective “Faraday” shielding cage. The authors demonstrated the feasibility of their acquisition strategy by scanning an anthropomorphic lung phantom moving on 1d or 2d sinusoidal trajectories.Results: With both tumor position devices, the authors were able to acquire 4d CBCTs free of motion blurring. For scans based on the EM tracking system, reconstruction artifacts stemming from the presence of the EM-array and the EM-transponders were greatly reduced using newly developed correction algorithms. By tuning the imaging frequency independently for each respiratory phase prior to acquisition, it was possible to harmonize the number of projections over respiratory phases. Depending on the breathing period (3.5 or 5 s) and the gantry rotation time (4 or 5 min), between ∼90 and 145

  13. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heartbeats ( arrhythmias ) ... due to medicine) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  14. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  15. Functional organization of the human 4D Nucleome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiming; Chen, Jie; Muir, Lindsey A.; Ronquist, Scott; Meixner, Walter; Ljungman, Mats; Ried, Thomas; Smale, Stephen; Rajapakse, Indika

    2015-01-01

    The 4D organization of the interphase nucleus, or the 4D Nucleome (4DN), reflects a dynamical interaction between 3D genome structure and function and its relationship to phenotype. We present initial analyses of the human 4DN, capturing genome-wide structure using chromosome conformation capture and 3D imaging, and function using RNA-sequencing. We introduce a quantitative index that measures underlying topological stability of a genomic region. Our results show that structural features of genomic regions correlate with function with surprising persistence over time. Furthermore, constructing genome-wide gene-level contact maps aided in identifying gene pairs with high potential for coregulation and colocalization in a manner consistent with expression via transcription factories. We additionally use 2D phase planes to visualize patterns in 4DN data. Finally, we evaluated gene pairs within a circadian gene module using 3D imaging, and found periodicity in the movement of clock circadian regulator and period circadian clock 2 relative to each other that followed a circadian rhythm and entrained with their expression. PMID:26080430

  16. Atlas construction for dynamic (4D) PET using diffeomorphic transformations.

    PubMed

    Bieth, Marie; Lombaert, Hervé; Reader, Andrew J; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2013-01-01

    A novel dynamic (4D) PET to PET image registration procedure is proposed and applied to multiple PET scans acquired with the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT), the highest resolution human brain PET scanner available in the world. By extending the recent diffeomorphic log-demons (DLD) method and applying it to multiple dynamic [11C]raclopride scans from the HRRT, an important step towards construction of a PET atlas of unprecedented quality for [11C]raclopride imaging of the human brain has been achieved. Accounting for the temporal dimension in PET data improves registration accuracy when compared to registration of 3D to 3D time-averaged PET images. The DLD approach was chosen for its ease in providing both an intensity and shape template, through iterative sequential pair-wise registrations with fast convergence. The proposed method is applicable to any PET radiotracer, providing 4D atlases with useful applications in high accuracy PET data simulations and automated PET image analysis. PMID:24579121

  17. 488-4D ASH LANDFILL CLOSURE CAP HELP MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.

    2014-11-17

    At the request of Area Completion Projects (ACP) in support of the 488-4D Landfill closure, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) modeling of the planned 488-4D Ash Landfill closure cap to ensure that the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) limit of no more than 12 inches of head on top of the barrier layer (saturated hydraulic conductivity of no more than 1.0E-05 cm/s) in association with a 25-year, 24-hour storm event is not projected to be exceeded. Based upon Weber 1998 a 25-year, 24-hour storm event at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is 6.1 inches. The results of the HELP modeling indicate that the greatest peak daily head on top of the barrier layer (i.e. geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) or high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane) for any of the runs made was 0.079 inches associated with a peak daily precipitation of 6.16 inches. This is well below the SCDHEC limit of 12 inches.

  18. 4D Dynamic Required Navigation Performance Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkelsztein, Daniel M.; Sturdy, James L.; Alaverdi, Omeed; Hochwarth, Joachim K.

    2011-01-01

    New advanced four dimensional trajectory (4DT) procedures under consideration for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) require an aircraft to precisely navigate relative to a moving reference such as another aircraft. Examples are Self-Separation for enroute operations and Interval Management for in-trail and merging operations. The current construct of Required Navigation Performance (RNP), defined for fixed-reference-frame navigation, is not sufficiently specified to be applicable to defining performance levels of such air-to-air procedures. An extension of RNP to air-to-air navigation would enable these advanced procedures to be implemented with a specified level of performance. The objective of this research effort was to propose new 4D Dynamic RNP constructs that account for the dynamic spatial and temporal nature of Interval Management and Self-Separation, develop mathematical models of the Dynamic RNP constructs, "Required Self-Separation Performance" and "Required Interval Management Performance," and to analyze the performance characteristics of these air-to-air procedures using the newly developed models. This final report summarizes the activities led by Raytheon, in collaboration with GE Aviation and SAIC, and presents the results from this research effort to expand the RNP concept to a dynamic 4D frame of reference.

  19. 4D Light Field Imaging System Using Programmable Aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsam

    2012-01-01

    Complete depth information can be extracted from analyzing all angles of light rays emanated from a source. However, this angular information is lost in a typical 2D imaging system. In order to record this information, a standard stereo imaging system uses two cameras to obtain information from two view angles. Sometimes, more cameras are used to obtain information from more angles. However, a 4D light field imaging technique can achieve this multiple-camera effect through a single-lens camera. Two methods are available for this: one using a microlens array, and the other using a moving aperture. The moving-aperture method can obtain more complete stereo information. The existing literature suggests a modified liquid crystal panel [LC (liquid crystal) panel, similar to ones commonly used in the display industry] to achieve a moving aperture. However, LC panels cannot withstand harsh environments and are not qualified for spaceflight. In this regard, different hardware is proposed for the moving aperture. A digital micromirror device (DMD) will replace the liquid crystal. This will be qualified for harsh environments for the 4D light field imaging. This will enable an imager to record near-complete stereo information. The approach to building a proof-ofconcept is using existing, or slightly modified, off-the-shelf components. An SLR (single-lens reflex) lens system, which typically has a large aperture for fast imaging, will be modified. The lens system will be arranged so that DMD can be integrated. The shape of aperture will be programmed for single-viewpoint imaging, multiple-viewpoint imaging, and coded aperture imaging. The novelty lies in using a DMD instead of a LC panel to move the apertures for 4D light field imaging. The DMD uses reflecting mirrors, so any light transmission lost (which would be expected from the LC panel) will be minimal. Also, the MEMS-based DMD can withstand higher temperature and pressure fluctuation than a LC panel can. Robotics need

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Vortical Blood Flow in the Thoracic Aorta Using 4D Phase Contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    von Spiczak, Jochen; Crelier, Gerard; Giese, Daniel; Kozerke, Sebastian; Maintz, David; Bunck, Alexander Christian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Phase contrast MRI allows for the examination of complex hemodynamics in the heart and adjacent great vessels. Vortex flow patterns seem to play an important role in certain vascular pathologies. We propose two- and three-dimensional metrics for the objective quantification of aortic vortex blood flow in 4D phase contrast MRI. Materials and Methods For two-dimensional vorticity assessment, a standardized set of 6 regions-of-interest (ROIs) was defined throughout the course of the aorta. For each ROI, a heatmap of time-resolved vorticity values ω→=∇v→ was computed. Evolution of minimum, maximum, and average values as well as opposing rotational flow components were analyzed. For three-dimensional analysis, vortex core detection was implemented combining the predictor-corrector method with λ2 correction. Strength, elongation, and radial expansion of the detected vortex core were recorded over time. All methods were applied to 4D flow MRI datasets of 9 healthy subjects, 2 patients with mildly dilated aorta, and 1 patient with aortic aneurysm. Results Vorticity quantification in the 6 standardized ROIs enabled the description of physiological vortex flow in the healthy aorta. Helical flow developed early in the ascending aorta (absolute vorticity = 166.4±86.4 s-1 at 12% of cardiac cycle) followed by maximum values in mid-systole in the aortic arch (240.1±45.2 s-1 at 16%). Strength, elongation, and radial expansion of 3D vortex cores escalated in early systole, reaching a peak in mid systole (strength = 241.2±30.7 s-1 at 17%, elongation = 65.1±34.6 mm at 18%, expansion = 80.1±48.8 mm2 at 20%), before all three parameters similarly decreased to overall low values in diastole. Flow patterns were considerably altered in patient data: Vortex flow developed late in mid/end-systole close to the aortic bulb and no physiological helix was found in the aortic arch. Conclusions We have introduced objective measures for quantification of vortical flow in

  1. Semaphorin 4D Contributes to Rheumatoid Arthritis by Inducing Inflammatory Cytokine Production: Pathogenic and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yuji; Kang, Sujin; Ebina, Kousuke; Shi, Kenrin; Nojima, Satoshi; Kimura, Tetsuya; Ito, Daisuke; Morimoto, Keiko; Nishide, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Takashi; Hirano, Toru; Shima, Yoshihito; Narazaki, Masashi; Tsuboi, Hideki; Saeki, Yukihiko; Tomita, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Toshio; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D)/CD100 has pleiotropic roles in immune activation, angiogenesis, bone metabolism, and neural development. We undertook this study to investigate the role of Sema4D in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Soluble Sema4D (sSema4D) levels in serum and synovial fluid were analyzed by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. Cell surface expression and transcripts of Sema4D were analyzed in peripheral blood cells from RA patients, and immunohistochemical staining of Sema4D was performed in RA synovium. Generation of sSema4D was evaluated in an ADAMTS‐4–treated monocytic cell line (THP‐1 cells). The efficacy of anti‐Sema4D antibody was evaluated in mice with collagen‐induced arthritis (CIA). Results Levels of sSema4D were elevated in both serum and synovial fluid from RA patients, and disease activity markers were correlated with serum sSema4D levels. Sema4D‐expressing cells also accumulated in RA synovium. Cell surface levels of Sema4D on CD3+ and CD14+ cells from RA patients were reduced, although levels of Sema4D transcripts were unchanged. In addition, ADAMTS‐4 cleaved cell surface Sema4D to generate sSema4D in THP‐1 cells. Soluble Sema4D induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin‐6 (IL‐6) production from CD14+ monocytes. IL‐6 and TNFα induced ADAMTS‐4 expression in synovial cells. Treatment with an anti‐Sema4D antibody suppressed arthritis and reduced proinflammatory cytokine production in CIA. Conclusion A positive feedback loop involving sSema4D/IL‐6 and TNFα/ADAMTS‐4 may contribute to the pathogenesis of RA. The inhibition of arthritis by anti‐Sema4D antibody suggests that Sema4D represents a potential therapeutic target for RA. PMID:25707877

  2. Task-based evaluation of a 4D MAP-RBI-EM image reconstruction method for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT using a human observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lautamäki, Riikka; Bengel, Frank M.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new 4D image reconstruction method for improved 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT using a task-based human observer study. We used a realistic 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that models cardiac beating motion. Half of the population was normal; the other half had a regional hypokinetic wall motion abnormality. Noise-free and noisy projection data with 16 gates/cardiac cycle were generated using an analytical projector that included the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter (ADS), and were reconstructed using the 3D FBP without and 3D OS-EM with ADS corrections followed by different cut-off frequencies of a 4D linear post-filter. A 4D iterative maximum a posteriori rescaled-block (MAP-RBI)-EM image reconstruction method with ADS corrections was also used to reconstruct the projection data using various values of the weighting factor for its prior. The trade-offs between bias and noise were represented by the normalized mean squared error (NMSE) and averaged normalized standard deviation (NSDav), respectively. They were used to select reasonable ranges of the reconstructed images for use in a human observer study. The observers were trained with the simulated cine images and were instructed to rate their confidence on the absence or presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. We then applied receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) index. The results showed that significant differences in detection performance among the different NMSE-NSDav combinations were found and the optimal trade-off from optimized reconstruction parameters corresponded to a maximum AUC value. The 4D MAP-RBI-EM with ADS correction, which had the best trade-off among the tested reconstruction methods, also had the highest AUC value, resulting in significantly better human observer detection performance when detecting regional myocardial wall motion

  3. Task-based evaluation of a 4D MAP-RBI-EM image reconstruction method for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT using a human observer study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lautamäki, Riikka; Bengel, Frank M; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new 4D image reconstruction method for improved 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT using a task-based human observer study. We used a realistic 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that models cardiac beating motion. Half of the population was normal; the other half had a regional hypokinetic wall motion abnormality. Noise-free and noisy projection data with 16 gates/cardiac cycle were generated using an analytical projector that included the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter (ADS), and were reconstructed using the 3D FBP without and 3D OS-EM with ADS corrections followed by different cut-off frequencies of a 4D linear post-filter. A 4D iterative maximum a posteriori rescaled-block (MAP-RBI)-EM image reconstruction method with ADS corrections was also used to reconstruct the projection data using various values of the weighting factor for its prior. The trade-offs between bias and noise were represented by the normalized mean squared error (NMSE) and averaged normalized standard deviation (NSDav), respectively. They were used to select reasonable ranges of the reconstructed images for use in a human observer study. The observers were trained with the simulated cine images and were instructed to rate their confidence on the absence or presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. We then applied receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) index. The results showed that significant differences in detection performance among the different NMSE-NSDav combinations were found and the optimal trade-off from optimized reconstruction parameters corresponded to a maximum AUC value. The 4D MAP-RBI-EM with ADS correction, which had the best trade-off among the tested reconstruction methods, also had the highest AUC value, resulting in significantly better human observer detection performance when detecting regional myocardial wall motion

  4. Task-Based Evaluation of a 4D MAP-RBI-EM Image Reconstruction Method for Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT using a Human Observer Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lautamäki, Riikka; Bengel, Frank M.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new 4D image reconstruction method for improved 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT using a task-based human observer study. We used a realistic 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that models cardiac beating motion. Half of the population was normal; the other half had a regional hypokinetic wall motion abnormality. Noise-free and noisy projection data with 16 gates/cardiac cycle were generated using an analytical projector that included the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter (ADS), and were reconstructed using the 3D FBP without and 3D OS-EM with ADS corrections followed by different cut-off frequencies of a 4D linear post-filter. A 4D iterative maximum a posteriori rescaled-block (MAP-RBI)-EM image reconstruction method with ADS corrections was also used to reconstruct the projection data using various values of the weighting factor for its prior. The trade-offs between bias and noise were represented by the normalized mean squared error (NMSE) and averaged normalized standard deviation (NSDav), respectively. They were used to select reasonable ranges of the reconstructed images for use in a human observer study. The observers were trained with the simulated cine images and were instructed to rate their confidence on the absence or presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. We then applied receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) index. The results showed that significant differences in detection performance among the different NMSE-NSDav combinations were found and the optimal trade-off from optimized reconstruction parameters corresponded to a maximum AUC value. The 4D MAP-RBI-EM with ADS correction, which had the best trade-off among the tested reconstruction methods, also had the highest AUC value, resulting in significantly better human observer detection performance when detecting regional myocardial wall motion

  5. Mapping motion from 4D-MRI to 3D-CT for use in 4D dose calculations: A technical feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Boye, Dirk; Lomax, Tony; Knopf, Antje

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Target sites affected by organ motion require a time resolved (4D) dose calculation. Typical 4D dose calculations use 4D-CT as a basis. Unfortunately, 4D-CT images have the disadvantage of being a 'snap-shot' of the motion during acquisition and of assuming regularity of breathing. In addition, 4D-CT acquisitions involve a substantial additional dose burden to the patient making many, repeated 4D-CT acquisitions undesirable. Here the authors test the feasibility of an alternative approach to generate patient specific 4D-CT data sets. Methods: In this approach motion information is extracted from 4D-MRI. Simulated 4D-CT data sets [which the authors call 4D-CT(MRI)] are created by warping extracted deformation fields to a static 3D-CT data set. The employment of 4D-MRI sequences for this has the advantage that no assumptions on breathing regularity are made, irregularities in breathing can be studied and, if necessary, many repeat imaging studies (and consequently simulated 4D-CT data sets) can be performed on patients and/or volunteers. The accuracy of 4