Science.gov

Sample records for 4d dynamical systems

  1. Understanding the Dynamics of the Coupled Ring Current Radiation Belt System Using 4D VERB Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.; Drozdov, A.; Orlova, K.; Spasojevic, M.

    2014-12-01

    Predicting and understanding the non-linear response of different electron populations in the inner magnetosphere, including ring current and higher energy radiation belts, has been a grand challenge since the beginning of the space age. During this past decade, there have been a number of long-term simulations that used lower energy boundary condition observations around geosynchronous orbit. In this study, we set up observations at around 15 RE and study how the combined convective-diffusive transport can result in the acceleration of keV to relativistic and ultra-relativistic energies. We show that while lower energy radial transport is dominated by the convection, higher energy transport is dominated by the diffusive radial transport. MLT dependent diffusion confidents allow us to study how difference in wave properties at different MLT can influence the dynamics of the particles. Inclusion of adiabatic changes also allows us to study the radial transport that results from pitch-angle scattering and adiabatic changes. We also show that there exists an intermediate range of energies for electrons for which both processes work simultaneously. We show the comparison of the 4D VERB simulations with the Van Allen Probes measurements.

  2. Comparison of two respiration monitoring systems for 4D imaging with a Siemens CT using a new dynamic breathing phantom.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, A C; Runz, A; Echner, G; Sroka-Perez, G; Karger, C P

    2012-05-07

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) requires breathing information from the patient, and for this, several systems are available. Testing of these systems, under realistic conditions, requires a phantom with a moving target and an expandable outer contour. An anthropomorphic phantom was developed to simulate patient breathing as well as lung tumor motion. Using the phantom, an optical camera system (GateCT) and a pressure sensor (AZ-733V) were simultaneously operated, and 4D-CTs were reconstructed with a Siemens CT using the provided local-amplitude-based sorting algorithm. The comparison of the tumor trajectories of both systems revealed discrepancies up to 9.7 mm. Breathing signal differences, such as baseline drift, temporal resolution and noise level were shown not to be the reason for this. Instead, the variability of the sampling interval and the accuracy of the sampling rate value written on the header of the GateCT-signal file were identified as the cause. Interpolation to regular sampling intervals and correction of the sampling rate to the actual value removed the observed discrepancies. Consistently, the introduction of sampling interval variability and inaccurate sampling rate values into the header of the AZ-733V file distorted the tumor trajectory for this system. These results underline the importance of testing new equipment thoroughly, especially if components of different manufacturers are combined.

  3. 4D chromatin dynamics in cycling cells

    PubMed Central

    Strickfaden, Hilmar; Zunhammer, Andreas; van Koningsbruggen, Silvana; Köhler, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    This live cell study of chromatin dynamics in four dimensions (space and time) in cycling human cells provides direct evidence for three hypotheses first proposed by Theodor Boveri in seminal studies of fixed blastomeres from Parascaris equorum embryos: (I) Chromosome territory (CT) arrangements are stably maintained during interphase. (II) Chromosome proximity patterns change profoundly during prometaphase. (III) Similar CT proximity patterns in pairs of daughter nuclei reflect symmetrical chromosomal movements during anaphase and telophase, but differ substantially from the arrangement in mother cell nucleus. Hypothesis I could be confirmed for the majority of interphase cells. A minority, however, showed complex, rotational movements of CT assemblies with large-scale changes of CT proximity patterns, while radial nuclear arrangements were maintained. A new model of chromatin dynamics is proposed. It suggests that long-range DNA-DNA interactions in cell nuclei may depend on a combination of rotational CT movements and locally constrained chromatin movements. PMID:21327076

  4. 4D Dynamic Required Navigation Performance Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkelsztein, Daniel M.; Sturdy, James L.; Alaverdi, Omeed; Hochwarth, Joachim K.

    2011-01-01

    New advanced four dimensional trajectory (4DT) procedures under consideration for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) require an aircraft to precisely navigate relative to a moving reference such as another aircraft. Examples are Self-Separation for enroute operations and Interval Management for in-trail and merging operations. The current construct of Required Navigation Performance (RNP), defined for fixed-reference-frame navigation, is not sufficiently specified to be applicable to defining performance levels of such air-to-air procedures. An extension of RNP to air-to-air navigation would enable these advanced procedures to be implemented with a specified level of performance. The objective of this research effort was to propose new 4D Dynamic RNP constructs that account for the dynamic spatial and temporal nature of Interval Management and Self-Separation, develop mathematical models of the Dynamic RNP constructs, "Required Self-Separation Performance" and "Required Interval Management Performance," and to analyze the performance characteristics of these air-to-air procedures using the newly developed models. This final report summarizes the activities led by Raytheon, in collaboration with GE Aviation and SAIC, and presents the results from this research effort to expand the RNP concept to a dynamic 4D frame of reference.

  5. 4D Dynamic RNP Annual Interim Report-Year 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkelsztein, Daniel M.; Sturdy, James L.; Alaverdi, Omeed; Chung, William W.; Salvano, Daniel; Klooster, Joel; Hochwarth, Joachim K.

    2010-01-01

    This Annual Interim Report summarizes the activities led by Raytheon, in collaboration with GE Aviation and SAIC, and presents the results obtained during the first year of this research effort to expand the RNP concept to 4 dimensions relative to a dynamic frame of reference. Joint Program Development Office (JPDO)Concepts of Operations for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) considers 4 Dimension Trajectory (4DT) procedures a key enabler to Trajectory Based Operations (TBO). The JPDO defines 4DT as a precise description of an aircraft path in space and time . While NextGen assumes that this path is defined within an Earth-reference frame, many 4DT procedure implementations will require an aircraft to precisely navigate relative to a moving reference such as another aircraft to form aggregate flows or a weather cell to allow for flows to shift. Current methods of implementing routes and flight paths rely on aircraft meeting a Required Navigation Performance (RNP) specification and being equipped with a monitoring and alerting capability to annunciate when the aircraft system is unable to meet the performance specification required for the operation. Since all aircraft today operate within the NAS relative to fixed reference points, the current RNP definition is deemed satisfactory. However, it is not well understood how the current RNP construct will support NextGen 4DT procedures where aircraft operate relative to each other or to other dynamic frames of reference. The objective of this research effort is to analyze candidate 4DT procedures from both an Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP) and aircraft perspective, to identify their specific navigational requirements, assess the shortcomings of the current RNP construct to meet these requirements, to propose an extended 4 Dimensional Dynamic RNP (4D Dynamic RNP) construct that accounts for the dynamic spatial and temporal nature of the selected 4DT procedures, and finally, to design an

  6. IMRT treatment planning on 4D geometries for the era of dynamic MLC tracking.

    PubMed

    Suh, Yelin; Murray, Walter; Keall, Paul J

    2014-12-01

    The problem addressed here was to obtain optimal and deliverable dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf sequences from four-dimensional (4D) geometries for dynamic MLC tracking delivery. The envisaged scenario was where respiratory phase and position information of the target was available during treatment, from which the optimal treatment plan could be further adapted in real time. A tool for 4D treatment plan optimization was developed that integrates a commercially available treatment planning system and a general-purpose optimization system. The 4D planning method was applied to the 4D computed tomography planning scans of three lung cancer patients. The optimization variables were MLC leaf positions as a function of monitor units and respiratory phase. The objective function was the deformable dose-summed 4D treatment plan score. MLC leaf motion was constrained by the maximum leaf velocity between control points in terms of monitor units for tumor motion parallel to the leaf travel direction and between phases for tumor motion parallel to the leaf travel direction. For comparison and a starting point for the 4D optimization, three-dimensional (3D) optimization was performed on each of the phases. The output of the 4D IMRT planning process is a leaf sequence which is a function of both monitor unit and phase, which can be delivered to a patient whose breathing may vary between the imaging and treatment sessions. The 4D treatment plan score improved during 4D optimization by 34%, 4%, and 50% for Patients A, B, and C, respectively, indicating 4D optimization generated a better 4D treatment plan than the deformable sum of individually optimized phase plans. The dose-volume histograms for each phase remained similar, indicating robustness of the 4D treatment plan to respiratory variations expected during treatment delivery. In summary, 4D optimization for respiratory phase-dependent treatment planning with dynamic MLC motion tracking improved the 4D treatment plan

  7. 4D simulation of explosive eruption dynamics at Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Augusto; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Menconi, Gianluca; De'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Cavazzoni, Carlo; Erbacci, Giovanni; Baxter, Peter J.

    2007-02-01

    We applied a new simulation model, based on multiphase transport laws, to describe the 4D (3D spatial coordinates plus time) dynamics of explosive eruptions. Numerical experiments, carried out on a parallel supercomputer, describe the collapse of the volcanic eruption column and the propagation of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), for selected medium scale (sub-Plinian) eruptive scenarios at Vesuvius, Italy. Simulations provide crucial insights into the effects of the generation mechanism of the flows - partial collapse vs boiling-over - on their evolution and hazard potential, the unstable dynamics of the fountain, and the influence of Mount Somma on the propagation of PDCs into the circum-Vesuvian area, one of the world's most hazardous volcanic settings. Results also show that it is possible to characterize the volcanic column behavior in terms of percentage of the mass of pyroclasts collapsed to the ground and how this parameter strongly influences the dynamics and hazard of the associated PDCs.

  8. 4D Simulation of Explosive Eruption Dynamics at Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, A.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Menconi, G.; de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Cavazzoni, C.; Erbacci, G.; Baxter, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    We applied, using a supercomputer, a new simulation model based on fundamental transport laws to describe the 4D (3D spatial co-ordinates plus time) multiphase flow dynamics of explosive eruptions. The model solves the fundamental transport equations for a multiphase mixture formed by a continuous multi-component gas phase and n solid particulate phases representative of magma fragments (such as ash, crystals, and lapilli). Numerical simulations describe the collapse of the volcanic eruption column and the propagation of pyroclastic density currents, for selected medium scale (sub-Plinian) eruptive scenarios at Vesuvius, Italy. The study shows that 4D multiphase numerical models can illuminate the non-intuitive and internal dynamics of explosive eruptions that cannot otherwise be studied by direct observation or using previous models. In particular, simulations provide crucial insights into the effects of the generation mechanism of the flows - partial collapse vs boiling-over - on their hazard potential, the complex dynamics of the collapsing column, and the influence of Mount Somma on the propagation of PDCs into the circum-Vesuvian area, one of the world's most hazardous volcanic settings.

  9. Atlas construction for dynamic (4D) PET using diffeomorphic transformations.

    PubMed

    Bieth, Marie; Lombaert, Hervé; Reader, Andrew J; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2013-01-01

    A novel dynamic (4D) PET to PET image registration procedure is proposed and applied to multiple PET scans acquired with the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT), the highest resolution human brain PET scanner available in the world. By extending the recent diffeomorphic log-demons (DLD) method and applying it to multiple dynamic [11C]raclopride scans from the HRRT, an important step towards construction of a PET atlas of unprecedented quality for [11C]raclopride imaging of the human brain has been achieved. Accounting for the temporal dimension in PET data improves registration accuracy when compared to registration of 3D to 3D time-averaged PET images. The DLD approach was chosen for its ease in providing both an intensity and shape template, through iterative sequential pair-wise registrations with fast convergence. The proposed method is applicable to any PET radiotracer, providing 4D atlases with useful applications in high accuracy PET data simulations and automated PET image analysis.

  10. The 4-D approach to visual control of autonomous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1994-01-01

    Development of a 4-D approach to dynamic machine vision is described. Core elements of this method are spatio-temporal models oriented towards objects and laws of perspective projection in a foward mode. Integration of multi-sensory measurement data was achieved through spatio-temporal models as invariants for object recognition. Situation assessment and long term predictions were allowed through maintenance of a symbolic 4-D image of processes involving objects. Behavioral capabilities were easily realized by state feedback and feed-foward control.

  11. 4D measurement system for automatic location of anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Sitnik, Robert; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Rapp, Walter; Kowalski, Marcin; Haex, Bart; Mooshake, Sven

    2006-04-01

    Orthopedics and neurosciences are fields of medicine where the analysis of objective movement parameters is extremely important for clinical diagnosis. Moreover, as there are significant differences between static and dynamic parameters, there is a strong need of analyzing the anatomical structures under functional conditions. In clinical gait analysis the benefits of kinematical methods are undoubted. In this paper we present a 4D (3D + time) measurement system capable of automatic location of selected anatomical structures by locating and tracing the structures' position and orientation in time. The presented system is designed to help a general practitioner in diagnosing selected lower limbs' dysfunctions (e.g. knee injuries) and also determine if a patient should be directed for further examination (e.g. x-ray or MRI). The measurement system components are hardware and software. For the hardware part we adapt the laser triangulation method. In this way we can evaluate functional and dynamic movements in a contact-free, non-invasive way, without the use of potentially harmful radiation. Furthermore, opposite to marker-based video-tracking systems, no preparation time is required. The software part consists of a data acquisition module, an image processing and point clouds (point cloud, set of points described by coordinates (x, y, z)) calculation module, a preliminary processing module, a feature-searching module and an external biomechanical module. The paper briefly presents the modules mentioned above with the focus on the feature-searching module. Also we present some measurement and analysis results. These include: parameters maps, landmarks trajectories in time sequence and animation of a simplified model of lower limbs.

  12. 3D and 4D atlas system of living human body structure.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, N; Takatsu, A; Hattori, A; Ezumi, T; Oda, S; Yanai, T; Tominaga, H

    1998-01-01

    A reference system for accessing anatomical information from a complete 3D structure of the whole body "living human", including 4D cardiac dynamics, was reconstructed with 3D and 4D data sets obtained from normal volunteers. With this system, we were able to produce a human atlas in which sectional images can be accessed from any part of the human body interactively by real-time image generation.

  13. Intelligent Vehicle Systems: A 4D/RCS Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, Raj

    2007-04-01

    This book presents new research on autonomous mobility capabilities and shows how technological advances can be anticipated in the coming two decades. An in-depth description is presented on the theoretical foundations and engineering approaches that enable these capabilities. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the 4D/RCS reference model architecture and design methodology that has proven successful in guiding the development of autonomous mobility systems. Chapters 2 through 7 provide more detailed descriptions of research that has been conducted and algorithms that have been developed to implement the various aspects of the 4D/RCS reference model architecture and design methodology. Chapters 8 and 9 discuss applications, performance measures, and standards. Chapter 10 provides a history of Army and DARPA research in autonomous ground mobility. Chapter 11 provides a perspective on the potential future developments in autonomous mobility.

  14. 4D Light Field Imaging System Using Programmable Aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsam

    2012-01-01

    Complete depth information can be extracted from analyzing all angles of light rays emanated from a source. However, this angular information is lost in a typical 2D imaging system. In order to record this information, a standard stereo imaging system uses two cameras to obtain information from two view angles. Sometimes, more cameras are used to obtain information from more angles. However, a 4D light field imaging technique can achieve this multiple-camera effect through a single-lens camera. Two methods are available for this: one using a microlens array, and the other using a moving aperture. The moving-aperture method can obtain more complete stereo information. The existing literature suggests a modified liquid crystal panel [LC (liquid crystal) panel, similar to ones commonly used in the display industry] to achieve a moving aperture. However, LC panels cannot withstand harsh environments and are not qualified for spaceflight. In this regard, different hardware is proposed for the moving aperture. A digital micromirror device (DMD) will replace the liquid crystal. This will be qualified for harsh environments for the 4D light field imaging. This will enable an imager to record near-complete stereo information. The approach to building a proof-ofconcept is using existing, or slightly modified, off-the-shelf components. An SLR (single-lens reflex) lens system, which typically has a large aperture for fast imaging, will be modified. The lens system will be arranged so that DMD can be integrated. The shape of aperture will be programmed for single-viewpoint imaging, multiple-viewpoint imaging, and coded aperture imaging. The novelty lies in using a DMD instead of a LC panel to move the apertures for 4D light field imaging. The DMD uses reflecting mirrors, so any light transmission lost (which would be expected from the LC panel) will be minimal. Also, the MEMS-based DMD can withstand higher temperature and pressure fluctuation than a LC panel can. Robotics need

  15. Dynamical D4-D8 and D3-D7 branes in supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, Pierre; Sasaki, Misao; Uzawa, Kunihito

    2009-07-15

    We present a class of dynamical solutions for intersecting D4-D8 and D3-D7 brane systems in ten-dimensional type IIA and IIB supergravity. We discuss if these solutions can be recovered in lower-dimensional effective theories for the warped compactification of a general p-brane system. It is found that an effective p+1-dimensional description is not possible in general due to the entanglement of the transverse coordinates and the p+1-dimensional coordinates in the metric components. For the D4-D8 brane system, the dynamical solutions reduces to a static warped AdS{sub 6}xS{sup 4} geometry in a certain spacetime region. For the D3-D7 brane system, we find a dynamical solution whose metric form is similar to that of a D3-brane solution. The main difference is the existence of a nontrivial dilaton configuration in the D3-D7 solution. Then we discuss cosmology of these solutions. We find that they behave like a Kasner-type cosmological solution at {tau}{yields}{infinity}, while it reduces to a warped static solution at {tau}{yields}0, where {tau} is the cosmic time.

  16. SU-E-T-790: Validation of 4D Measurement-Guided Dose Reconstruction (MGDR) with OCTAVIUS 4D System

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V; Leung, R; Wong, M; Law, G; Lee, K; Tung, S; Chan, M; Blanck, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To validate the MGDR of OCTAVIUS 4D system (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for quality assurance (QA) of volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). Methods: 4D-MGDR measurements were divided into two parts: 1) square fields from 2×2 to 25×25 cm{sup 2} at 0°, 10° and 45° gantry, and 2) 8 VMAT plans (5 nasopharyngeal and 3 prostate) collapsed to gantry 40° in QA mode in Monaco v5.0 (Elekta, CMS, Maryland Heights, MO) were delivered on the OCTAVIUS 4D phantom with the OCTAVIUS 1500 detector plane perpendicular to either the incident beam to obtain the reconstructed dose (OCTA4D) or the 0° gantry axis to obtain the raw doses (OCTA3D) in Verisoft 6.1 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany). Raw measurements of OCTA3D were limited to < 45° gantry to avoid >0.5% variation of detector angular response with respect to 0° gantry as determined previously. Reconstructed OCTA4D and raw OCTA3D doses for all plans were compared at the same detector plane using γ criteria of 2% (local dose)/2mm and 3%/3mm criteria. Results: At gantry 0° and 10°, the γ results for all OCTA4D on detector plane coinciding with OCTA3D were over 90% at 2%/2mm except for the largest field (25×25 cm{sup 2} ) showing >88%. For square field at 45° gantry, γ passing rate is > 90% for fields smaller than 15x 15cm2 but < 80% for field size of 20 x20 cm{sup 2} upward. For VMAT, γ results showed 94% and 99% passing rate at 2%/2mm and 3%/3mm, respectively. Conclusion: OCTAVIUS 4D system has compromised accuracy in reconstructing dose away from the central beam axis, possibly due to the off-axis softening correction and errors of the percent depth dose data necessary as input for MGDR. Good results in VMAT delivery suggested that the system is relatively reliable for VMAT with small segments.

  17. 4D rotational x-ray imaging of wrist joint dynamic motion

    SciTech Connect

    Carelsen, Bart; Bakker, Niels H.; Strackee, Simon D.; Boon, Sjirk N.; Maas, Mario; Sabczynski, Joerg; Grimbergen, Cornelis A.; Streekstra, Geert J.

    2005-09-15

    Current methods for imaging joint motion are limited to either two-dimensional (2D) video fluoroscopy, or to animated motions from a series of static three-dimensional (3D) images. 3D movement patterns can be detected from biplane fluoroscopy images matched with computed tomography images. This involves several x-ray modalities and sophisticated 2D to 3D matching for the complex wrist joint. We present a method for the acquisition of dynamic 3D images of a moving joint. In our method a 3D-rotational x-ray (3D-RX) system is used to image a cyclically moving joint. The cyclic motion is synchronized to the x-ray acquisition to yield multiple sets of projection images, which are reconstructed to a series of time resolved 3D images, i.e., four-dimensional rotational x ray (4D-RX). To investigate the obtained image quality parameters the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function (PSF) via the edge spread function and the contrast to noise ratio between air and phantom were determined on reconstructions of a bullet and rod phantom, using 4D-RX as well as stationary 3D-RX images. The CNR in volume reconstructions based on 251 projection images in the static situation and on 41 and 34 projection images of a moving phantom were 6.9, 3.0, and 2.9, respectively. The average FWHM of the PSF of these same images was, respectively, 1.1, 1.7, and 2.2 mm orthogonal to the motion and parallel to direction of motion 0.6, 0.7, and 1.0 mm. The main deterioration of 4D-RX images compared to 3D-RX images is due to the low number of projection images used and not to the motion of the object. Using 41 projection images seems the best setting for the current system. Experiments on a postmortem wrist show the feasibility of the method for imaging 3D dynamic joint motion. We expect that 4D-RX will pave the way to improved assessment of joint disorders by detection of 3D dynamic motion patterns in joints.

  18. Evaluation of a novel 4D in vivo dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Cherpak, A.; Ding, W.; Hallil, A.; Cygler, J. E.

    2009-05-15

    A prototype of a new 4D in vivo dosimetry system capable of simultaneous real-time position monitoring and dose measurement has been developed. The radiation positioning system (RADPOS) is controlled by a computer and combines two technologies: MOSFET radiation detector coupled with an electromagnetic positioning device. Special software has been developed that allows sampling position and dose either manually or automatically in user-defined time intervals. Preliminary tests of the new device include a dosimetric evaluation of the detector in {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, and 18 MV beams and measurements of spatial position stability and accuracy. In addition, the effect of metals and other materials on the performance of the positioning system has been investigated. Results show that the RADPOS system can measure in-air dose profiles that agree, on average, within 3%-5% of diode measurements for the energies tested. The response of the detector is isotropic within 1.6% (1 SD) with a maximum deviation of {+-}4.0% over 360 deg. The maximum variation in the calibration coefficient over field sizes from 6x6 to 25x25 cm{sup 2} was 2.3% for RADPOS probe with the high sensitivity MOSFET and 4.6% for the probe with the standard sensitivity MOSFET. Of the materials tested, only aluminum, lead, and brass caused shifts in the RADPOS read position. The magnitude of the shift varied between materials and size of the material sample. Nonmagnetic stainless steel (Grade 304) caused a distortion of less than 2 mm when placed within 10 mm of the detector; therefore, it can provide a reasonable alternative to other metals if required. The results of the preliminary tests indicate that the device can be used for in vivo dosimetry in {sup 60}Co and high-energy beams from linear accelerators.

  19. Dynamically accumulated dose and 4D accumulated dose for moving tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Li Heng; Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Xiaoqiang; Liu Wei; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between dynamically accumulated dose (dynamic dose) and 4D accumulated dose (4D dose) for irradiation of moving tumors, and to quantify the dose uncertainty induced by tumor motion. Methods: The authors established that regardless of treatment modality and delivery properties, the dynamic dose will converge to the 4D dose, instead of the 3D static dose, after multiple deliveries. The bounds of dynamic dose, or the maximum estimation error using 4D or static dose, were established for the 4D and static doses, respectively. Numerical simulations were performed (1) to prove the principle that for each phase, after multiple deliveries, the average number of deliveries for any given time converges to the total number of fractions (K) over the number of phases (N); (2) to investigate the dose difference between the 4D and dynamic doses as a function of the number of deliveries for deliveries of a 'pulsed beam'; and (3) to investigate the dose difference between 4D dose and dynamic doses as a function of delivery time for deliveries of a 'continuous beam.' A Poisson model was developed to estimate the mean dose error as a function of number of deliveries or delivered time for both pulsed beam and continuous beam. Results: The numerical simulations confirmed that the number of deliveries for each phase converges to K/N, assuming a random starting phase. Simulations for the pulsed beam and continuous beam also suggested that the dose error is a strong function of the number of deliveries and/or total deliver time and could be a function of the breathing cycle, depending on the mode of delivery. The Poisson model agrees well with the simulation. Conclusions: Dynamically accumulated dose will converge to the 4D accumulated dose after multiple deliveries, regardless of treatment modality. Bounds of the dynamic dose could be determined using quantities derived from 4D doses, and the mean dose difference

  20. 4D tumor centroid tracking using orthogonal 2D dynamic MRI: Implications for radiotherapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tryggestad, Erik; Flammang, Aaron; Shea, Steven M.; Hales, Russell; Herman, Joseph; Lee, Junghoon; McNutt, Todd; Roland, Teboh; Wong, John

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Current pretreatment, 4D imaging techniques are suboptimal in that they sample breathing motion over a very limited “snapshot” in time. Heretofore, long-duration, 4D motion characterization for radiotherapy planning, margin optimization, and validation have been impractical for safety reasons, requiring invasive markers imaged under x-ray fluoroscopy. To characterize 3D tumor motion and associated variability over durations more consistent with treatments, the authors have developed a practical dynamic MRI (dMRI) technique employing two orthogonal planes acquired in a continuous, interleaved fashion.Methods: 2D balanced steady-state free precession MRI was acquired continuously over 9–14 min at approximately 4 Hz in three healthy volunteers using a commercial 1.5 T system; alternating orthogonal imaging planes (sagittal, coronal, sagittal, etc.) were employed. The 2D in-plane pixel resolution was 2 × 2 mm{sup 2} with a 5 mm slice profile. Simultaneous with image acquisition, the authors monitored a 1D surrogate respiratory signal using a device available with the MRI system. 2D template matching-based anatomic feature registration, or tracking, was performed independently in each orientation. 4D feature tracking at the raw frame rate was derived using spline interpolation.Results: Tracking vascular features in the lung for two volunteers and pancreatic features in one volunteer, the authors have successfully demonstrated this method. Registration error, defined here as the difference between the sagittal and coronal tracking result in the SI direction, ranged from 0.7 to 1.6 mm (1σ) which was less than the acquired image resolution. Although the healthy volunteers were instructed to relax and breathe normally, significantly variable respiration was observed. To demonstrate potential applications of this technique, the authors subsequently explored the intrafraction stability of hypothetical tumoral internal target volumes and 3D spatial probability

  1. Using 4D Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Validate Computational Fluid Dynamics: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Biglino, Giovanni; Cosentino, Daria; Steeden, Jennifer A; De Nova, Lorenzo; Castelli, Matteo; Ntsinjana, Hopewell; Pennati, Giancarlo; Taylor, Andrew M; Schievano, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can have a complementary predictive role alongside the exquisite visualization capabilities of 4D cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. In order to exploit these capabilities (e.g., for decision-making), it is necessary to validate computational models against real world data. In this study, we sought to acquire 4D CMR flow data in a controllable, experimental setup and use these data to validate a corresponding computational model. We applied this paradigm to a case of congenital heart disease, namely, transposition of the great arteries (TGA) repaired with arterial switch operation. For this purpose, a mock circulatory loop compatible with the CMR environment was constructed and two detailed aortic 3D models (i.e., one TGA case and one normal aortic anatomy) were tested under realistic hemodynamic conditions, acquiring 4D CMR flow. The same 3D domains were used for multi-scale CFD simulations, whereby the remainder of the mock circulatory system was appropriately summarized with a lumped parameter network. Boundary conditions of the simulations mirrored those measured in vitro. Results showed a very good quantitative agreement between experimental and computational models in terms of pressure (overall maximum % error = 4.4% aortic pressure in the control anatomy) and flow distribution data (overall maximum % error = 3.6% at the subclavian artery outlet of the TGA model). Very good qualitative agreement could also be appreciated in terms of streamlines, throughout the cardiac cycle. Additionally, velocity vectors in the ascending aorta revealed less symmetrical flow in the TGA model, which also exhibited higher wall shear stress in the anterior ascending aorta.

  2. Using 4D Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Validate Computational Fluid Dynamics: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Biglino, Giovanni; Cosentino, Daria; Steeden, Jennifer A.; De Nova, Lorenzo; Castelli, Matteo; Ntsinjana, Hopewell; Pennati, Giancarlo; Taylor, Andrew M.; Schievano, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can have a complementary predictive role alongside the exquisite visualization capabilities of 4D cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. In order to exploit these capabilities (e.g., for decision-making), it is necessary to validate computational models against real world data. In this study, we sought to acquire 4D CMR flow data in a controllable, experimental setup and use these data to validate a corresponding computational model. We applied this paradigm to a case of congenital heart disease, namely, transposition of the great arteries (TGA) repaired with arterial switch operation. For this purpose, a mock circulatory loop compatible with the CMR environment was constructed and two detailed aortic 3D models (i.e., one TGA case and one normal aortic anatomy) were tested under realistic hemodynamic conditions, acquiring 4D CMR flow. The same 3D domains were used for multi-scale CFD simulations, whereby the remainder of the mock circulatory system was appropriately summarized with a lumped parameter network. Boundary conditions of the simulations mirrored those measured in vitro. Results showed a very good quantitative agreement between experimental and computational models in terms of pressure (overall maximum % error = 4.4% aortic pressure in the control anatomy) and flow distribution data (overall maximum % error = 3.6% at the subclavian artery outlet of the TGA model). Very good qualitative agreement could also be appreciated in terms of streamlines, throughout the cardiac cycle. Additionally, velocity vectors in the ascending aorta revealed less symmetrical flow in the TGA model, which also exhibited higher wall shear stress in the anterior ascending aorta. PMID:26697416

  3. Analysis and dynamic 3D visualization of cerebral blood flow combining 3D and 4D MR image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkert, Nils Daniel; Säring, Dennis; Fiehler, Jens; Illies, Till; Möller, Dietmar; Handels, Heinz

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we present a method for the dynamic visualization of cerebral blood flow. Spatio-temporal 4D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) image datasets and 3D MRA datasets with high spatial resolution were acquired for the analysis of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). One of the main tasks is the combination of the information of the 3D and 4D MRA image sequences. Initially, in the 3D MRA dataset the vessel system is segmented and a 3D surface model is generated. Then, temporal intensity curves are analyzed voxelwise in the 4D MRA image sequences. A curve fitting of the temporal intensity curves to a patient individual reference curve is used to extract the bolus arrival times in the 4D MRA sequences. After non-linear registration of both MRA datasets the extracted hemodynamic information is transferred to the surface model where the time points of inflow can be visualized color coded dynamically over time. The dynamic visualizations computed using the curve fitting method for the estimation of the bolus arrival times were rated superior compared to those computed using conventional approaches for bolus arrival time estimation. In summary the procedure suggested allows a dynamic visualization of the individual hemodynamic situation and better understanding during the visual evaluation of cerebral vascular diseases.

  4. SU-E-T-202: Comparison of 4D-Measurement-Guided Dose Reconstructions (MGDR) with COMPASS and OCTAVIUS 4D System

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, R; Wong, M; Lee, V; Law, G; Lee, K; Tung, S; Chan, M; Blanck, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To cross-validate the MGDR of COMPASS (IBA dosimetry, GmbH, Germany) and OCTAVIUS 4D system (PTW, Freiburg, Germany). Methods: Volumetric-modulated arc plans (5 head-and-neck and 3 prostate) collapsed to 40° gantry on the OCTAVIUS 4D phantom in QA mode on Monaco v5.0 (Elekta, CMS, Maryland Heights, MO) were delivered on a Elekta Agility linac. This study was divided into two parts: (1) error-free measurements by gantry-mounted EvolutionXX 2D array were reconstructed in COMPASS (IBA dosimetry, GmbH, Germany), and by OCTAVIUS 1500 array in Versoft v6.1 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) to obtain the 3D doses (COM4D and OCTA4D). COM4D and OCTA4D were compared to the raw measurement (OCTA3D) at the same detector plane for which OCTAVIUS 1500 was perpendicular to 0° gantry axis while the plans were delivered at gantry 40°; (2) beam steering errors of energy (Hump=-2%) and symmetry (2T=+2%) were introduced during the delivery of 5 plans to compare the MGDR doses COM4D-Hump (COM4D-2T), OCTA4D-Hump (OCTA4D-2T), with raw doses OCTA3D-Hump (OCTA3D-2T) and with OCTA3D to assess the error reconstruction and detection ability of MGDR tools. All comparisons used Υ-criteria of 2%(local dose)/2mm and 3%/3mm. Results: Averaged Υ passing rates were 85% and 96% for COM4D,and 94% and 99% for OCTA4D at 2%/2mm and 3%/3mm criteria respectively. For error reconstruction, COM4D-Hump (COM4D-2T) showed 81% (93%) at 2%/2mm and 94% (98%) at 3%/3mm, while OCTA4D-Hump (OCTA4D-2T) showed 96% (96%) at 2%/2mm and 99% (99%) at 3%/3mm. For error detection, OCTA3D doses were compared to COM4D-Hump (COM4D-2T) showing Υ passing rates of 93% (93%) at 2%/2mm and 98% (98%), and to OCTA4D-Hump (OCTA4D -2T) showing 94% (99%) at 2%/2mm and 81% (96%) at 3%/3mm, respectively. Conclusion: OCTAVIUS MGDR showed better agreement to raw measurements in both error- and error-free comparisons. COMPASS MGDR deviated from the raw measurements possibly owing to beam modeling uncertainty.

  5. Constructing 4D infant cortical surface atlases based on dynamic developmental trajectories of the cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Shi, Feng; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Cortical surface atlases play an increasingly important role for analysis, visualization, and comparison of results across different neuroimaging studies. As the first two years of life is the most dynamic period of postnatal structural and functional development of the highly-folded cerebral cortex, longitudinal (4D) cortical surface atlases for the infant brains during this period is highly desired yet still lacking for early brain development studies. In this paper, we construct the first longitudinal (4D) cortical surface atlases for the dynamic developing infant cortical structures at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months of age, based on 202 serial MRI scans from 35 healthy infants. To ensure longitudinal consistency and unbiasedness of the 4D infant cortical surface atlases, we first compute the within-subject mean cortical folding geometries by groupwise registration of longitudinal surfaces of each infant. Then we establish intersubject cortical correspondences by groupwise registration of the within-subject mean cortical folding geometries of all infants. More importantly, for the first time, we further parcellate the 4D infant surface atlases into developmentally and functionally distinctive regions based solely on the dynamic developmental trajectories of the cortical thickness, by using the spectral clustering method. Specifically, to deal with the problem that each infant has different number of scans, we first compute the within-subject affinity matrix of vertices' cortical thickness trajectories of each infant, and then we use the averaged affinity matrix of all infants for parcellation. Our constructed 4D infant cortical surface atlases with developmental trajectories based parcellation will greatly facilitate the surface-based analysis of dynamic brain development in infants.

  6. The epidemic dynamics of hepatitis C virus subtypes 4a and 4d in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A.; Baele, Guy; Khalaf , Nisreen; Suchard, Marc A.; Al-Anazi, Mashael R.; Abdo, Ayman A.; Sanai, Faisal M.; Al-Ashgar, Hamad I.; Khan, Mohammed Q.; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N.; Lemey, Philippe; Vrancken, Bram

    2017-01-01

    The relatedness between viral variants sampled at different locations through time can provide information pertinent to public health that cannot readily be obtained through standard surveillance methods. Here, we use virus genetic data to identify the transmission dynamics that drive the hepatitis C virus subtypes 4a (HCV4a) and 4d (HCV4d) epidemics in Saudi Arabia. We use a comprehensive dataset of newly generated and publicly available sequence data to infer the HCV4a and HCV4d evolutionary histories in a Bayesian statistical framework. We also introduce a novel analytical method for an objective assessment of the migration intensity between locations. We find that international host mobility patterns dominate over within country spread in shaping the Saudi Arabia HCV4a epidemic, while this may be different for the HCV4d epidemic. This indicates that the subtypes 4a and 4d burden can be most effectively reduced by combining the prioritized screening and treatment of Egyptian immigrants with domestic prevention campaigns. Our results highlight that the joint investigation of evolutionary and epidemiological processes can provide valuable public health information, even in the absence of extensive metadata information. PMID:28322313

  7. Imaging rotational dynamics of nanoparticles in liquid by 4D electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xuewen; Chen, Bin; Tang, Jau; Hassan, Mohammed Th.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2017-02-01

    In real time and space, four-dimensional electron microscopy (4D EM) has enabled observation of transient structures and morphologies of inorganic and organic materials. We have extended 4D EM to include liquid cells without the time resolution being limited by the response of the detector. Our approach permits the imaging of the motion and morphological dynamics of a single, same particle on nanometer and ultrashort time scales. As a first application, we studied the rotational dynamics of gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution. A full transition from the conventional diffusive rotation to superdiffusive rotation and further to a ballistic rotation was observed with increasing asymmetry of the nanoparticle morphology. We explored the underlying physics both experimentally and theoretically according to the morphological asymmetry of the nanoparticles.

  8. 4D light-field sensing system for people counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangqi; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Yunlong; Sun, Zhenan

    2016-03-01

    Counting the number of people is still an important task in social security applications, and a few methods based on video surveillance have been proposed in recent years. In this paper, we design a novel optical sensing system to directly acquire the depth map of the scene from one light-field camera. The light-field sensing system can count the number of people crossing the passageway, and record the direction and intensity of rays at a snapshot without any assistant light devices. Depth maps are extracted from the raw light-ray sensing data. Our smart sensing system is equipped with a passive imaging sensor, which is able to naturally discern the depth difference between the head and shoulders for each person. Then a human model is built. Through detecting the human model from light-field images, the number of people passing the scene can be counted rapidly. We verify the feasibility of the sensing system as well as the accuracy by capturing real-world scenes passing single and multiple people under natural illumination.

  9. Development and applications of 4-D ultrasound (dynamic 3-D) in neurosonology.

    PubMed

    Delcker, A; Schürks, M; Polz, H

    1999-10-01

    The development and application of color-coded data in three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction or four-dimensional (4-D) imaging (equal to dynamic 3-D) are demonstrated. In 4-D imaging, electrocardiography-triggered data acquisition of consecutive phases during the heart cycle are stored to form a multiphase 3-D data set. The option of color-coded data gives a new insight into such hemodynamic information. In the past, 3-D reconstructions were simple unicolor images, as in power mode, and the color-coded hemodynamic information was lost. These new options are presented here, along with color-coded data in examples of angiographically controlled pathologic results in extracranial and intracranial vessels.

  10. A Fast 4-D TEM System for UXO Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    eliminates the need to transport all gear back and forth between the field site and the hotel . At Aberdeen, the only piece of gear we transported back to...the hotel after work was the NT-32II transceiver. We had a problem with getting our GPS system operational and lost a few hours while we troubleshot...Orleans Mariott : U.S. Dept. of Defense. 9. Carlson, N.E., and Kenneth L. Zonge. The utility of horizontal component measurements in random-walk TEM

  11. Teaching Tip: Managing Software Engineering Student Teams Using Pellerin's 4-D System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doman, Marguerite; Besmer, Andrew; Olsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of Pellerin's Four Dimension Leadership System (4-D) as a way to manage teams in a classroom setting. Over a 5-year period, we used a modified version of the 4-D model to manage teams within a senior level Software Engineering capstone course. We found that this approach for team management in a classroom…

  12. Selective 4D modelling framework for spatial-temporal land information management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doulamis, Anastasios; Soile, Sofia; Doulamis, Nikolaos; Chrisouli, Christina; Grammalidis, Nikos; Dimitropoulos, Kosmas; Manesis, Charalambos; Potsiou, Chryssy; Ioannidis, Charalabos

    2015-06-01

    This paper introduces a predictive (selective) 4D modelling framework where only the spatial 3D differences are modelled at the forthcoming time instances, while regions of no significant spatial-temporal alterations remain intact. To accomplish this, initially spatial-temporal analysis is applied between 3D digital models captured at different time instances. So, the creation of dynamic change history maps is made. Change history maps indicate spatial probabilities of regions needed further 3D modelling at forthcoming instances. Thus, change history maps are good examples for a predictive assessment, that is, to localize surfaces within the objects where a high accuracy reconstruction process needs to be activated at the forthcoming time instances. The proposed 4D Land Information Management System (LIMS) is implemented using open interoperable standards based on the CityGML framework. CityGML allows the description of the semantic metadata information and the rights of the land resources. Visualization aspects are also supported to allow easy manipulation, interaction and representation of the 4D LIMS digital parcels and the respective semantic information. The open source 3DCityDB incorporating a PostgreSQL geo-database is used to manage and manipulate 3D data and their semantics. An application is made to detect the change through time of a 3D block of plots in an urban area of Athens, Greece. Starting with an accurate 3D model of the buildings in 1983, a change history map is created using automated dense image matching on aerial photos of 2010. For both time instances meshes are created and through their comparison the changes are detected.

  13. 4D maximum a posteriori reconstruction in dynamic SPECT using a compartmental model-based prior.

    PubMed

    Kadrmas, D J; Gullberg, G T

    2001-05-01

    A 4D ordered-subsets maximum a posteriori (OSMAP) algorithm for dynamic SPECT is described which uses a temporal prior that constrains each voxel's behaviour in time to conform to a compartmental model. No a priori limitations on kinetic parameters are applied; rather, the parameter estimates evolve as the algorithm iterates to a solution. The estimated parameters and time-activity curves are used within the reconstruction algorithm to model changes in the activity distribution as the camera rotates, avoiding artefacts due to inconsistencies of data between projection views. This potentially allows for fewer, longer-duration scans to be used and may have implications for noise reduction. The algorithm was evaluated qualitatively using dynamic 99mTc-teboroxime SPECT scans in two patients, and quantitatively using a series of simulated phantom experiments. The OSMAP algorithm resulted in images with better myocardial uniformity and definition, gave time-activity curves with reduced noise variations, and provided wash-in parameter estimates with better accuracy and lower statistical uncertainty than those obtained from conventional ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) processing followed by compartmental modelling. The new algorithm effectively removed the bias in k21 estimates due to inconsistent projections for sampling schedules as slow as 60 s per timeframe, but no improvement in wash-out parameter estimates was observed in this work. The proposed dynamic OSMAP algorithm provides a flexible framework which may benefit a variety of dynamic tomographic imaging applications.

  14. 4D optical coherence tomography of aortic valve dynamics in a murine mouse model ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Christian; Jannasch, Anett; Faak, Saskia; Waldow, Thomas; Koch, Edmund

    2015-07-01

    The heart and its mechanical components, especially the heart valves and leaflets, are under enormous strain during lifetime. Like all highly stressed materials, also these biological components undergo fatigue and signs of wear, which impinge upon cardiac output and in the end on health and living comfort of affected patients. Thereby pathophysiological changes of the aortic valve leading to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS) as most frequent heart valve disease in humans are of particular interest. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behavior during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug-based options of prevention or therapy. ApoE-/- mice as established model of AVS versus wildtype mice were introduced in an ex vivo artificially stimulated heart model. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behavior of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. OCT and high-speed video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution represent promising tools for the investigation of dynamic behavior and their changes in calcific aortic stenosis disease models in mice.

  15. Dynamics of chemical bonding mapped by energy-resolved 4D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Fabrizio; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2009-07-10

    Chemical bonding dynamics are fundamental to the understanding of properties and behavior of materials and molecules. Here, we demonstrate the potential of time-resolved, femtosecond electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for mapping electronic structural changes in the course of nuclear motions. For graphite, it is found that changes of milli-electron volts in the energy range of up to 50 electron volts reveal the compression and expansion of layers on the subpicometer scale (for surface and bulk atoms). These nonequilibrium structural features are correlated with the direction of change from sp2 [two-dimensional (2D) graphene] to sp3 (3D-diamond) electronic hybridization, and the results are compared with theoretical charge-density calculations. The reported femtosecond time resolution of four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy represents an advance of 10 orders of magnitude over that of conventional EELS methods.

  16. A practical introduction to the hemodynamic analysis of the cardiovascular system with 4D Flow MRI.

    PubMed

    Pineda Zapata, J A; Delgado de Bedout, J A; Rascovsky Ramírez, S; Bustamante, C; Mesa, S; Calvo Betancur, V D

    2014-01-01

    The 4D Flow MRI technique provides a three-dimensional representation of blood flow over time, making it possible to evaluate the hemodynamics of the cardiovascular system both qualitatively and quantitatively. In this article, we describe the application of the 4D Flow technique in a 3T scanner; in addition to the technical parameters, we discuss the advantages and limitations of the technique and its possible clinical applications. We used 4D Flow MRI to study different body areas (chest, abdomen, neck, and head) in 10 volunteers. We obtained 3D representations of the patterns of flow and quantitative hemodynamic measurements. The technique makes it possible to evaluate the pattern of blood flow in large and midsize vessels without the need for exogenous contrast agents.

  17. Evaluation of the Elekta Symmetry ™ 4D IGRT system by using a moving lung phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hun-Joo; Kim, Shin-Wook; Kay, Chul Seung; Seo, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Gi-Woong; Kang, Ki-Mun; Jang, Hong Seok; Kang, Young-nam

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: 4D cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a beneficial tool for the treatment of movable tumors because it can help us to understand where the tumors are actually located and it has a precise treatment plan. However, general CBCT images have a limitation in that they cannot perfectly perform a sophisticated registration. On the other hand, the Symmetry TM 4D image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system of Elekta offers a 4D CBCT registration option. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of Symmetry TM . Method and Materials: Planning CT images of the CIRS moving lung phantom were acquired 4D multi-detector CT (MDCT), and the images were sorted as 10 phases from 0% phase to 90% phase. The thickness of the CT images was 1 mm. Acquired MDCT images were transferred to the contouring software, and a virtual target was generated. A one-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plan was performed by using the treatment planning system on the virtual target. Finally, the movement of the phantom was verified by using the XVI Symmetry TM system. Results: The physical movement of the CIRS moving lung phantom was ±10.0 mm in the superiorinferior direction, ±1.0 mm in the lateral direction, and ±2.5 mm in the anterior-posterior direction. The movement of the phantom was measured from the 4D MDCT registration as ±10.2 mm in the superior-inferior direction, ±0.9 mm in the lateral direction, and ±2.45 mm in the anterior-posterior direction. The movement of the phantom was measured from the SymmetryTM registration as ±10.1 mm in the superior-inferior direction, ±0.9 mm in the lateral direction, and ±2.4 mm in the anterior-posterior direction. Conclusion: We confirmed that 4D CBCT is a beneficial tool for the treatment of movable tumors, and that the 4D registration of SymmetryTM can increase the precision of the registration when a movable tumor is the target of radiation treatment.

  18. Erythrocyte C3d and C4d for Monitoring Disease Activity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Amy H.; Navratil, Jeannine S.; Ruffing, Margie J.; Liu, Chau-Ching; Hawkins, Douglas; McKinnon, Kathleen M.; Danchenko, Natalya; Ahearn, Joseph M.; Manzi, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Objective Disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is typically monitored by measuring serum C3 and C4. However, these proteins have limited utility as lupus biomarkers, because they are substrates rather than products of complement activation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of measuring the erythrocyte-bound complement activation products, erythrocyte-bound C3d (E-C3d) and E-C4d, compared with that of serum C3 and C4 for monitoring disease activity in patients with SLE. Methods The levels of E-C3d and E-C4d were measured by flow cytometry in 157 patients with SLE, 290 patients with other diseases, and 256 healthy individuals. The patients with SLE were followed up longitudinally. Disease activity was measured at each visit, using the validated Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) and the Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus: National Assessment (SELENA) version of the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Results At baseline, patients with SLE had higher median levels of E-C3d and E-C4d (P < 0.0001) in addition to higher within-patient and between-patient variability in both E-C3d and E-C4d when compared with the 2 non-SLE groups. In a longitudinal analysis of patients with SLE, E-C3d, E-C4d, serum C3, and anti–double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies were each significantly associated with the SLAM and SELENA–SLEDAI. In a multivariable analysis, E-C4d remained significantly associated with these SLE activity measures after adjusting for serum C3, C4, and anti-dsDNA antibodies; however, E-C3d was associated with the SLAM but not with the SELENA–SLEDAI. Conclusion Determining the levels of the erythrocyte-bound complement activation products, especially E-C4d, is an informative measure of SLE disease activity as compared with assessing serum C4 levels and should be considered for monitoring disease activity in patients with SLE. PMID:20187154

  19. Radiolucent 4D Ultrasound Imaging: System Design and Application to Radiotherapy Guidance.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Hristov, Dimitre

    2016-04-27

    Four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound (US) is an attractive modality for image guidance due to its real-time, non-ionizing, volumetric imaging capability with high soft tissue contrast. However, existing 4D US imaging systems contain large volumes of metal which interfere with diagnostic and therapeutic ionizing radiation in procedures such as CT imaging and radiation therapy. This study aimed to design and characterize a novel 4D Radiolucent Remotely-Actuated UltraSound Scanning (RRUSS) device that overcomes this limitation. In a phantom, we evaluated the imaging performance of the RRUSS device including frame rate, resolution, spatial integrity, and motion tracking accuracy. To evaluate compatibility with radiation therapy workflow, we evaluated device-induced CT imaging artifacts, US tracking performance during beam delivery, and device compatibility with commercial radiotherapy planning software. The RRUSS device produced 4D volumes at 0.1-3.0 Hz with 60⁰ lateral field of view (FOV), 50⁰ maximum elevational FOV, and 200 mm maximum depth. Imaging resolution (-3 dB point spread width) was 1.2-7.9 mm at depths up to 100 mm and motion tracking accuracy was ≤0.3±0.5 mm. No significant effect of the RRUSS device on CT image integrity was found, and RRUSS device performance was not affected by radiotherapy beam exposure. Agreement within ±3.0% / 2.0 mm was achieved between computed and measured radiotherapy dose delivered directly through the RRUSS device at 6 MV and 15 MV. In-vivo liver, kidney, and prostate images were successfully acquired. Our investigations suggest that a RRUSS device can offer non-interfering 4D guidance for radiation therapy and other diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

  20. Radiolucent 4D Ultrasound Imaging: System Design and Application to Radiotherapy Guidance.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Hristov, Dimitre

    2016-10-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound (US) is an attractive modality for image guidance due to its real-time, non-ionizing, volumetric imaging capability with high soft tissue contrast. However, existing 4D US imaging systems contain large volumes of metal which interfere with diagnostic and therapeutic ionizing radiation in procedures such as CT imaging and radiation therapy. This study aimed to design and characterize a novel 4D Radiolucent Remotely-Actuated UltraSound Scanning (RRUSS) device that overcomes this limitation. In a phantom, we evaluated the imaging performance of the RRUSS device including frame rate, resolution, spatial integrity, and motion tracking accuracy. To evaluate compatibility with radiation therapy workflow, we evaluated device-induced CT imaging artifacts, US tracking performance during beam delivery, and device compatibility with commercial radiotherapy planning software. The RRUSS device produced 4D volumes at 0.1-3.0 Hz with 60° lateral field of view (FOV), 50° maximum elevational FOV, and 200 mm maximum depth. Imaging resolution (-3 dB point spread width) was 1.2-7.9 mm at depths up to 100 mm and motion tracking accuracy was ≤ 0.3±0.5 mm. No significant effect of the RRUSS device on CT image integrity was found, and RRUSS device performance was not affected by radiotherapy beam exposure. Agreement within ±3.0% / 2.0 mm was achieved between computed and measured radiotherapy dose delivered directly through the RRUSS device at 6 MV and 15 MV. In vivo liver, kidney, and prostate images were successfully acquired. Our investigations suggest that a RRUSS device can offer non-interfering 4D guidance for radiation therapy and other diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

  1. Orbital-selective singlet dimer formation and suppression of double exchange in 4d and 5d systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, Sergey; Cao, Gang; Khomskii, Daniel

    One of the main mechanisms of ferromagnetic ordering in conducting materials is the double exchange (DE). It is usually supposed in DE model that the Hund's coupling JH is much larger than electron hopping t; in this case one stabilizes the state with maximum spin per pair of ions, which finally leads to ferromagnetism in bulk systems. We show that in the dimerized 4 d / 5 d transition metal oxides for which JH is reduced and t is in contrast enhanced, another situation is possible, when formation of the spin-singlets on delocalized orbitals is more favorable. This leads to suppression of the DE and to a strong decrease of the total spin. The model calculations using the dynamical mean-field theory show that this effect survives even in the extended systems, not only for dimers. Such a situation is realized, e.g., in Y5Mo2O12, CrO2 under pressure and in many other 4 d / 5 d based materials. Another mechanism, which may suppress DE and which is also typical for 4 d / 5 d compounds is the spin-orbit coupling (SOC). We show on the example of Ba5AlIr2O11, that in this system it is the combination of molecular-orbital formation and SOC that strongly decreases magnetic moment on Ir. Civil Research and Development Foundation via FSCX-14-61025-0.

  2. 4D PET iterative deconvolution with spatiotemporal regularization for quantitative dynamic PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Reilhac, Anthonin; Charil, Arnaud; Wimberley, Catriona; Angelis, Georgios; Hamze, Hasar; Callaghan, Paul; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boisson, Frederic; Ryder, Will; Meikle, Steven R; Gregoire, Marie-Claude

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative measurements in dynamic PET imaging are usually limited by the poor counting statistics particularly in short dynamic frames and by the low spatial resolution of the detection system, resulting in partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we present a fast and easy to implement method for the restoration of dynamic PET images that have suffered from both PVE and noise degradation. It is based on a weighted least squares iterative deconvolution approach of the dynamic PET image with spatial and temporal regularization. Using simulated dynamic [(11)C] Raclopride PET data with controlled biological variations in the striata between scans, we showed that the restoration method provides images which exhibit less noise and better contrast between emitting structures than the original images. In addition, the method is able to recover the true time activity curve in the striata region with an error below 3% while it was underestimated by more than 20% without correction. As a result, the method improves the accuracy and reduces the variability of the kinetic parameter estimates calculated from the corrected images. More importantly it increases the accuracy (from less than 66% to more than 95%) of measured biological variations as well as their statistical detectivity.

  3. Semantic World Modelling and Data Management in a 4d Forest Simulation and Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roßmann, J.; Hoppen, M.; Bücken, A.

    2013-08-01

    Various types of 3D simulation applications benefit from realistic forest models. They range from flight simulators for entertainment to harvester simulators for training and tree growth simulations for research and planning. Our 4D forest simulation and information system integrates the necessary methods for data extraction, modelling and management. Using modern methods of semantic world modelling, tree data can efficiently be extracted from remote sensing data. The derived forest models contain position, height, crown volume, type and diameter of each tree. This data is modelled using GML-based data models to assure compatibility and exchangeability. A flexible approach for database synchronization is used to manage the data and provide caching, persistence, a central communication hub for change distribution, and a versioning mechanism. Combining various simulation techniques and data versioning, the 4D forest simulation and information system can provide applications with "both directions" of the fourth dimension. Our paper outlines the current state, new developments, and integration of tree extraction, data modelling, and data management. It also shows several applications realized with the system.

  4. Further Insights in the Binding Mode of Selective Inhibitors to Human PDE4D Enzyme Combining Docking and Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    D'Ursi, Pasqualina; Guariento, Sara; Trombetti, Gabriele; Orro, Alessandro; Cichero, Elena; Milanesi, Luciano; Bruno, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer′s disease has recently emerged as a possible field of application for PDE4D inhibitors (PDE4DIs). The great structure similarity among the various PDE4 isoforms and, furthermore, the lack of the full length crystal structure of the enzyme, impaired the rational design of new selective PDE4DIs. In this paper, with the aim of exploring new insights into the PDE4D binding, we tackled the problem by performing a computational study based on docking simulations combined with molecular dynamics (D‐MD). Our work uniquely identified the binding mode and the key residues involved in the interaction with a number of in‐house catechol iminoether derivatives, acting as PDE4DIs. Moreover, the new binding mode was tested using a series of analogues previously reported by us and it was used to confirm their key structural features to allow PDE4D inhibition. The binding model disclosed within the current computational study may prove to be useful to further advance the design and synthesis of novel, more potent and selective, PDE4D inhibitors. PMID:27546041

  5. Quasi-4D laser diagnostics using an acousto-optic deflector scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Pareja, Jhon; Becker, Lukas; Heddrich, Wolfgang; Dreizler, Andreas; Böhm, Benjamin

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a novel scanning system for laser diagnostics was developed and characterized. The system is based on the acousto-optic deflection of a high-speed pulsed laser. Results showed that quasi-volumetric laser illumination with high precision and accuracy can be achieved with a simplified and flexible optical setup. The feasibility of the method for performing high-speed quasi-4D laser diagnostics was demonstrated by the tomographic visualization of a lifted turbulent jet flame using Mie-scattering and multi-plane particle image velocimetry measurements of a turbulent non-reactive mixing case. Three-dimensional flame and flow structures can be detected and tracked with this new scanning system.

  6. Development of 4D jaw movement visualization system for dental diagnosis support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yoshimitsu; Terajima, Masahiko; Nakasima, Akihiko

    2004-10-01

    A person with an asymmetric morphology of maxillofacial skeleton reportedly possesses an asymmetric jaw function and the risk to express temporomandibular disorder is high. A comprehensive analysis from the point of view of both the morphology and the function such as maxillofacial or temporomandibular joint morphology, dental occlusion, and features of mandibular movement pathways is essential. In this study, the 4D jaw movement visualization system was developed to visually understand the characteristic jaw movement, 3D maxillofacial skeleton structure, and the alignment of the upper and lower teeth of a patient. For this purpose, the 3D reconstructed images of the cranial and mandibular bones, obtained by computed tomography, were measured using a non-contact 3D measuring device, and the obtained morphological images of teeth model were integrated and activated on the 6 DOF jaw movement data. This system was experimentally applied and visualized in a jaw deformity patient and its usability as a clinical diagnostic support system was verified.

  7. 4D-Imaging of the Lung: Reproducibility of Lesion Size and Displacement on Helical CT, MRI, and Cone Beam CT in a Ventilated Ex Vivo System

    SciTech Connect

    Biederer, Juergen Dinkel, Julien; Remmert, Gregor; Jetter, Siri; Nill, Simeon; Moser, Torsten; Bendl, Rolf; Thierfelder, Carsten; Fabel, Michael; Oelfke, Uwe; Bock, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Bolte, Hendrik; Welzel, Thomas; Hoffmann, Beata; Hartmann, Guenter; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen; Heller, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional (4D) imaging is a key to motion-adapted radiotherapy of lung tumors. We evaluated in a ventilated ex vivo system how size and displacement of artificial pulmonary nodules are reproduced with helical 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and linac-integrated cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Four porcine lungs with 18 agarose nodules (mean diameters 1.3-1.9 cm), were ventilated inside a chest phantom at 8/min and subject to 4D-CT (collimation 24 x 1.2 mm, pitch 0.1, slice/increment 24x10{sup 2}/1.5/0.8 mm, pitch 0.1, temporal resolution 0.5 s), 4D-MRI (echo-shared dynamic three-dimensional-flash; repetition/echo time 2.13/0.72 ms, voxel size 2.7 x 2.7 x 4.0 mm, temporal resolution 1.4 s) and linac-integrated 4D-CBCT (720 projections, 3-min rotation, temporal resolution {approx}1 s). Static CT without respiration served as control. Three observers recorded lesion size (RECIST-diameters x/y/z) and axial displacement. Interobserver- and interphase-variation coefficients (IO/IP VC) of measurements indicated reproducibility. Results: Mean x/y/z lesion diameters in cm were equal on static and dynamic CT (1.88/1.87; 1.30/1.39; 1.71/1.73; p > 0.05), but appeared larger on MRI and CBCT (2.06/1.95 [p < 0.05 vs. CT]; 1.47/1.28 [MRI vs. CT/CBCT p < 0.05]; 1.86/1.83 [CT vs. CBCT p < 0.05]). Interobserver-VC for lesion sizes were 2.54-4.47% (CT), 2.29-4.48% (4D-CT); 5.44-6.22% (MRI) and 4.86-6.97% (CBCT). Interphase-VC for lesion sizes ranged from 2.28% (4D-CT) to 10.0% (CBCT). Mean displacement in cm decreased from static CT (1.65) to 4D-CT (1.40), CBCT (1.23) and MRI (1.16). Conclusions: Lesion sizes are exactly reproduced with 4D-CT but overestimated on 4D-MRI and CBCT with a larger variability due to limited temporal and spatial resolution. All 4D-modalities underestimate lesion displacement.

  8. Dynamic Multiscale Boundary Conditions for 4D CT Images of Healthy and Emphysematous Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Carson, James P.; Thomas, Mathew; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2013-06-14

    Changes in the shape of the lung during breathing determine the movement of airways and alveoli, and thus impact airflow dynamics. Modeling airflow dynamics in health and disease is a key goal for predictive multiscale models of respiration. Past efforts to model changes in lung shape during breathing have measured shape at multiple breath-holds. However, breath-holds do not capture hysteretic differences between inspiration and expiration resulting from the additional energy required for inspiration. Alternatively, imaging dynamically – without breath-holds – allows measurement of hysteretic differences. In this study, we acquire multiple micro-CT images per breath (4DCT) in live rats, and from these images we develop, for the first time, dynamic volume maps. These maps show changes in local volume across the entire lung throughout the breathing cycle and accurately predict the global pressure-volume (PV) hysteresis.

  9. Designing S-Box Based on 4D-4Wing Hyperchaotic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Faiz ul; Liu, Guangjie

    2017-03-01

    S-box plays an imperative role in designing a cryptographically strong block cipher. Designing S-box based on chaos has attracted lots of attentions because of its distinct characteristics relevant to cryptography. In this paper, a 4D-4wing hyperchaotic system is investigated. Its sophisticated nonlinear behaviors are used to generate two pseudorandom 8-bit integer sequences, which further drive iterative two-position swap on the identical map on GF(28). According to the indicator of typical evaluation criteria including nonlinearity, differential uniformity, strict avalanche criterion, output bits independence criterion and bijective property, the preferred S-box is obtained from all those batch-generated ones. The comparison with the state-of-the-art chaos-based schemes shows that the obtained S-box achieves better cryptographical performance.

  10. Technical evaluation of different respiratory monitoring systems used for 4D CT acquisition under free breathing.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Christian; Reiner, Michael; Belka, Claus; Walter, Franziska; Söhn, Matthias

    2015-03-08

    Respiratory monitoring systems are required to supply CT scanners with information on the patient's breathing during the acquisition of a respiration-correlated computer tomography (RCCT), also referred to as 4D CT. The information a respiratory monitoring system has to provide to the CT scanner depends on the specific scanner. The purpose of this study is to compare two different respiratory monitoring systems (Anzai Respiratory Gating System; C-RAD Sentinel) with respect to their applicability in combination with an Aquilion Large Bore CT scanner from Toshiba. The scanner used in our clinic does not make use of the full time dependent breathing signal, but only single trigger pulses indicating the beginning of a new breathing cycle. Hence the attached respiratory monitoring system is expected to deliver accurate online trigger pulse for each breathing cycle. The accuracy of the trigger pulses sent to the CT scanner has to be ensured by the selected respiratory monitoring system. Since a trigger pulse (output signal) of a respiratory monitoring system is a function of the measured breathing signal (input signal), the typical clinical range of the input signal is estimated for both examined respiratory monitoring systems. Both systems are analyzed based on the following parameters: time resolution, signal amplitude, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), signal linearity, trigger compatibility, and clinical examples. The Anzai system shows a better SNR (≥ 28 dB) than the Sentinel system (≥ 14.6 dB). In terms of compatibility with the cycle-based image sorting algorithm of the Toshiba CT scanner, the Anzai system benefits from the possibility to generate cycle-based triggers, whereas the Sentinel system is only able to generate amplitude-based triggers. In clinical practice, the combination of a Toshiba CT scanner and the Anzai system will provide better results due to the compatibility of the image sorting and trigger release methods.

  11. Real-time dynamic display of registered 4D cardiac MR and ultrasound images using a GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Huang, X.; Eagleson, R.; Guiraudon, G.; Peters, T. M.

    2007-03-01

    In minimally invasive image-guided surgical interventions, different imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and real-time three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US), can provide complementary, multi-spectral image information. Multimodality dynamic image registration is a well-established approach that permits real-time diagnostic information to be enhanced by placing lower-quality real-time images within a high quality anatomical context. For the guidance of cardiac procedures, it would be valuable to register dynamic MRI or CT with intraoperative US. However, in practice, either the high computational cost prohibits such real-time visualization of volumetric multimodal images in a real-world medical environment, or else the resulting image quality is not satisfactory for accurate guidance during the intervention. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) provide the programmability, parallelism and increased computational precision to begin to address this problem. In this work, we first outline our research on dynamic 3D cardiac MR and US image acquisition, real-time dual-modality registration and US tracking. Then we describe image processing and optimization techniques for 4D (3D + time) cardiac image real-time rendering. We also present our multimodality 4D medical image visualization engine, which directly runs on a GPU in real-time by exploiting the advantages of the graphics hardware. In addition, techniques such as multiple transfer functions for different imaging modalities, dynamic texture binding, advanced texture sampling and multimodality image compositing are employed to facilitate the real-time display and manipulation of the registered dual-modality dynamic 3D MR and US cardiac datasets.

  12. A novel non-registration based segmentation approach of 4D dynamic upper airway MR images: minimally interactive fuzzy connectedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Sin, Sanghun; Wagshul, Mark E.; Arens, Raanan

    2014-03-01

    There are several disease conditions that lead to upper airway restrictive disorders. In the study of these conditions, it is important to take into account the dynamic nature of the upper airway. Currently, dynamic MRI is the modality of choice for studying these diseases. Unfortunately, the contrast resolution obtainable in the images poses many challenges for an effective segmentation of the upper airway structures. No viable methods have been developed to date to solve this problem. In this paper, we demonstrate the adaptation of the iterative relative fuzzy connectedness (IRFC) algorithm for this application as a potential practical tool. After preprocessing to correct for background image non-uniformities and the non-standardness of MRI intensities, seeds are specified for the airway and its crucial background tissue components in only the 3D image corresponding to the first time instance of the 4D volume. Subsequently the process runs without human interaction and completes segmenting the whole 4D volume in 10 sec. Our evaluations indicate that the segmentations are of very good quality achieving true positive and false positive volume fractions and boundary distance with respect to reference manual segmentations of about 93%, 0.1%, and 0.5 mm, respectively.

  13. Long-term stability assessment of a 4D tumor tracking system integrated into a gimbaled linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Mami; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Yokota, Kenji; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-09-08

    We assessed long-term stability of tracking accuracy using the Vero4DRT system. This metric was observed between September 2012 and March 2015. A programmable respiratory motion phantom, designed to move phantoms synchronously with respiratory surrogates, was used. The infrared (IR) markers moved in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction as respiratory surrogates, while a cube phantom with a steel ball at the center, representing the tumor, and with radiopaque markers around it moved in the superior-inferior (SI) direction with one-dimensional (1D) sinusoidal patterns. A correlation model between the tumor and IR marker motion (4D model) was created from the training data obtained for 20 s just before beam delivery. The irradiation field was set to 3 × 3 cm2 and 300 monitor units (MUs) of desired MV X-ray beam were delivered. The gantry and ring angles were set to 0° and 45°, respectively. During beam delivery, the system recorded approximately 60 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. We analyzed: 1) the predictive accuracy of the 4D model (EP), defined as the difference between the detected and predicted target positions during 4D model creation, and 2) the tracking accuracy (ET), defined as the difference between the center of the steel ball and the MV X-ray field on the EPID image. The median values of mean plus two standard deviations (SDs) for EP were 0.06, 0.35, and 0.06 mm in the left-right (LR), SI, and AP directions, respectively. The mean values of maximum deviation for ET were 0.38, 0.49, and 0.53 mm and the coefficients of variance (CV) were 0.16, 0.10, and 0.05 in lateral, longitudinal, and 2D directions, respectively. Consequently, the IR Tracking accuracy was consistent over a period of two years. Our proposed method assessed the overall tracking accuracy readily using real-time EPID images, and proved to be a useful QA tool for dynamic tumor tracking with the Vero4DRT system.

  14. IASI hyperspectral radiances in the NCMRWF 4D-VAR assimilation system: OSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Priti; Indira Rani, S.; Mallick, Swapan; Srinivas, D.; George, John P.; Dasgupta, Munmun

    2016-04-01

    Accuracy of global NWP depends more on the contribution of satellite data than the surface based observations. This is achieved through the better usage of satellite data within the data assimilation system. Efforts are going on at NCMRWF to add more and more satellite data in the assimilation system both from Indian and international satellites in geostationary and polar orbits. Impact of the new dataset is assessed through Observation System Experiments (OSEs), through which the impact of the data is evaluated comparing the forecast output with that of a control run. This paper discusses one such OSEs with Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) onboard MetOp-A and B. IASI is the main payload instrument for the purpose of supporting NWP. IASI provides information on the vertical structure of the atmospheric temperature and humidity with an accuracy of 1K and a vertical resolution of 1 km, which is necessary to improve NWP. IASI measures the radiance emitted from the Earth in 8641 channels, covering the spectral interval 645-2760 cm-1. The high volume data resulting from IASI presents many challenges, particularly in the area of assimilation. Out of these 8641 channels, 314 channels are selected depending on the relevance of information in each channel to assimilate in the NCMRWF 4D-VAR assimilation system. Studies show that the use of IASI data in NWP accounts for 40% of the impact of all satellite observations in the NWP forecasts, especially microwave and hyperspectral infrared sounding techniques are found to give the largest impacts

  15. Determination of maximum leaf velocity and acceleration of a dynamic multileaf collimator: implications for 4D radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wijesooriya, K; Bartee, C; Siebers, J V; Vedam, S S; Keall, P J

    2005-04-01

    The dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) can be used for four-dimensional (4D), or tumor tracking radiotherapy. However, the leaf velocity and acceleration limitations become a crucial factor as the MLC leaves need to respond in near real time to the incoming respiration signal. The aims of this paper are to measure maximum leaf velocity, acceleration, and deceleration to obtain the mechanical response times for the MLC, and determine whether the MLC is suitable for 4D radiotherapy. MLC leaf sequence files, requiring the leaves to reach maximum acceleration and velocity during motion, were written. The leaf positions were recorded every 50 ms, from which the maximum leaf velocity, acceleration, and deceleration were derived. The dependence on the velocity and acceleration of the following variables were studied: leaf banks, inner and outer leaves, MLC-MLC variations, gravity, friction, and the stability of measurements over time. Measurement results show that the two leaf banks of a MLC behave similarly, while the inner and outer leaves have significantly different maximum leaf velocities. The MLC-MLC variations and the dependence of gravity on maximum leaf velocity are statistically significant. The average maximum leaf velocity at the isocenter plane of the MLC ranged from 3.3 to 3.9 cm/s. The acceleration and deceleration at the isocenter plane of the MLC ranged from 50 to 69 cm/s2 and 46 to 52 cm/s2, respectively. Interleaf friction had a negligible effect on the results, and the MLC parameters remained stable with time. Equations of motion were derived to determine the ability of the MLC response to fluoroscopymeasured diaphragm motion. Given the present MLC mechanical characteristics, 4D radiotherapy is feasible for up to 97% of respiratory motion. For the largest respiratory motion velocities observed, beam delivery should be temporarily stopped (beam hold).

  16. Determination of maximum leaf velocity and acceleration of a dynamic multileaf collimator: Implications for 4D radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesooriya, K.; Bartee, C.; Siebers, J.V.; Vedam, S.S.; Keall, P.J.

    2005-04-01

    The dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) can be used for four-dimensional (4D), or tumor tracking radiotherapy. However, the leaf velocity and acceleration limitations become a crucial factor as the MLC leaves need to respond in near real time to the incoming respiration signal. The aims of this paper are to measure maximum leaf velocity, acceleration, and deceleration to obtain the mechanical response times for the MLC, and determine whether the MLC is suitable for 4D radiotherapy. MLC leaf sequence files, requiring the leaves to reach maximum acceleration and velocity during motion, were written. The leaf positions were recorded every 50 ms, from which the maximum leaf velocity, acceleration, and deceleration were derived. The dependence on the velocity and acceleration of the following variables were studied: leaf banks, inner and outer leaves, MLC-MLC variations, gravity, friction, and the stability of measurements over time. Measurement results show that the two leaf banks of a MLC behave similarly, while the inner and outer leaves have significantly different maximum leaf velocities. The MLC-MLC variations and the dependence of gravity on maximum leaf velocity are statistically significant. The average maximum leaf velocity at the isocenter plane of the MLC ranged from 3.3 to 3.9 cm/s. The acceleration and deceleration at the isocenter plane of the MLC ranged from 50 to 69 cm/s{sup 2} and 46 to 52 cm/s{sup 2}, respectively. Interleaf friction had a negligible effect on the results, and the MLC parameters remained stable with time. Equations of motion were derived to determine the ability of the MLC response to fluoroscopy-measured diaphragm motion. Given the present MLC mechanical characteristics, 4D radiotherapy is feasible for up to 97% of respiratory motion. For the largest respiratory motion velocities observed, beam delivery should be temporarily stopped (beam hold)

  17. Relation of platelet C4d with all-cause mortality and ischemic stroke in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kao, Amy H; McBurney, Christine A; Sattar, Abdus; Lertratanakul, Apinya; Wilson, Nicole L; Rutman, Sarah; Paul, Barbara; Navratil, Jeannine S; Scioscia, Andrea; Ahearn, Joseph M; Manzi, Susan

    2014-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease associated with significant morbidity, including premature cardiovascular disease, and mortality. Platelets bearing complement protein C4d (P-C4d) were initially determined to be specific for diagnosis of SLE and were later found to be associated with acute ischemic stroke in non-SLE patients. P-C4d may identify a subset of SLE patients with a worse clinical prognosis. This study investigated the associations of P-C4d with all-cause mortality and vascular events in a lupus cohort. A cohort of 356 consecutive patients with SLE was followed from 2001 to 2009. Primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were vascular events (myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft, percutaneous coronary transluminal angioplasty, ischemic stroke, venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism, or other thrombosis). P-C4d was measured at study baseline. Seventy SLE patients (19.7%) had P-C4d. Mean follow-up was 4.7 years. All-cause mortality was 4%. P-C4d was associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 7.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.14-26.45, p = 0.002) after adjusting for age, ethnicity, sex, cancer, and anticoagulant use. Vascular event rate was 21.6%. Patients with positive P-C4d were more likely to have had vascular events compared to those with negative P-C4d (35.7 vs. 18.2%, p = 0.001). Specifically, P-C4d was associated with ischemic stroke (odds ratio 4.54, 95% CI 1.63-12.69, p = 0.004) after adjusting for age, ethnicity, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Platelet-C4d is associated with all-cause mortality and stroke in SLE patients. P-C4d may be a prognostic biomarker as well as a pathogenic clue that links platelets, complement activation, and thrombosis.

  18. 4d electron Ruthenate systems: their unique and new magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungran; Shin, Yeongjae; Anwar, M. S.; Sugimoto, Yusuke; Lee, Mincheol; Kang, Sungjin; Yonezawa, Shingo; Maeno, Yoshiteru; Noh, Taewon

    The Ruddlesden-Popper series (PR) of Srn+1RunO3n+1 has attract much interest of their unique physical properties. Among them, SrRuO3 (n = ∞) (SRO) is the only ferromagnetic metallic oxide especially in Ru 4d transition metal oxides. Bulk SRO has orthorhombic structure showing the Curie temperature (TC) ~ 160 K. It is well known that RuO6 octahedral distortion plays critical roles in its mangetic properties. In film systems, such RuO6 octahedra can be easily controlled by strain-engineering. In this talk, with high quality SRO films fully strained (-1.7%-1%) using various substrates, we systematically studied their structural changes and associated magnetic properties. Compared to theoretical predictions, the structural changes can be explained, while the magnetic property changes cannot be understood. Surprisingly, when SRO113 is grown on its PR series of Sr2RuO4 (n=1) (SRO214) single crystal, the exact substrate of SRO214 magnetization results in strongly enhanced magnetization (M > 3 μB/Ru, TC ~ 160 K), which has never found SRO113 (001) since the low-spin configuration of SRO113 prevent M never exceed 2 μB/Ru. The mystery of M in SRO113 (especially SRO113/SRO214) will be further discussed.

  19. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-03: Sorting 2D Dynamic MR Images Using Internal Respiratory Signal for 4D MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Z; Hui, C; Beddar, S; Stemkens, B; Tijssen, R; Berg, C van den

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel algorithm to extract internal respiratory signal (IRS) for sorting dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) images in order to achieve four-dimensional (4D) MR imaging. Methods: Dynamic MR images were obtained with the balanced steady state free precession by acquiring each two-dimensional sagittal slice repeatedly for more than one breathing cycle. To generate a robust IRS, we used 5 different representative internal respiratory surrogates in both the image space (body area) and the Fourier space (the first two low-frequency phase components in the anterior-posterior direction, and the first two low-frequency phase components in the superior-inferior direction). A clustering algorithm was then used to search for a group of similar individual internal signals, which was then used to formulate the final IRS. A phantom study and a volunteer study were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of this algorithm. The IRS was compared to the signal from the respiratory bellows. Results: The IRS computed by our algorithm matched well with the bellows signal in both the phantom and the volunteer studies. On average, the normalized cross correlation between the IRS and the bellows signal was 0.97 in the phantom study and 0.87 in the volunteer study, respectively. The average difference between the end inspiration times in the IRS and bellows signal was 0.18 s in the phantom study and 0.14 s in the volunteer study, respectively. 4D images sorted based on the IRS showed minimal mismatched artifacts, and the motion of the anatomy was coherent with the respiratory phases. Conclusion: A novel algorithm was developed to generate IRS from dynamic MR images to achieve 4D MR imaging. The performance of the IRS was comparable to that of the bellows signal. It can be easily implemented into the clinic and potentially could replace the use of external respiratory surrogates. This research was partially funded by the the Center for Radiation Oncology Research from

  20. Dynamic reservoir characterization using 4D multicomponent seismic data and rock physics modeling at Delhi Field, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal Meneses, Carla C.

    Pore pressure and CO2 saturation changes are important to detect and quantify for maximizing oil recovery in Delhi Field. Delhi Field is a enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project with active monitoring by 4D multicomponent seismic technologies. Dynamic rock physics modeling integrates the rich dataset of core, well logs, petrographic thin sections and facies providing a link between reservoir and elastic properties. The dynamic modeling in this high porosity sandstone reservoir shows that P-wave velocity is more sensitive to CO2 saturation while S-wave velocity is more sensitive to pore pressure changes. I use PP and PS seismic data to jointly invert for Vp=Vs ratio and acoustic impedance. This technique has the advantage of adding more information to the non-unique inversion problem. Combining the inversion results from the monitor surveys of June 2010 and August 2011 provides acoustic impedance and Vp=Vs percentage differences. The time-lapse inverted response enables dynamic characterization of the reservoir by fitting the predicted dynamic models (calibrated at the wells). Dynamic reservoir characterization adds value in this stratigraphic complex reservoir. The results indicate that reservoir heterogeneities and pore pressure gradients control the CO2 flow within the Paluxy reservoir. Injectors 148-2 and 140-1 showed CO2 is moving downdip following a distributary channel induced by differential pressure from an updip injector or a barrier caused by a heterogeneity in the reservoir. CO2 anomalies located above the Paluxy injector 148-2 indicates that CO2 is moving from the Paluxy up into the Tuscaloosa Formation. My work demonstrates that reservoir monitoring is necessary for reservoir management at Delhi Field.

  1. 4-D photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  2. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  3. Development of Dynamic Spatial Video Camera (DSVC) for 4D observation, analysis and modeling of human body locomotion.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Otake, Yoshito

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an imaging system for free and quantitative observation of human locomotion in a time-spatial domain by way of real time imaging. The system is equipped with 60 computer controlled video cameras to film human locomotion from all angles simultaneously. Images are installed into the main graphic workstation and translated into a 2D image matrix. Observation of the subject from optional directions is able to be performed by selecting the view point from the optimum image sequence in this image matrix. This system also possesses a function to reconstruct 4D models of the subject's moving human body by using 60 images taken from all directions at one particular time. And this system also has the capability to visualize inner structures such as the skeletal or muscular systems of the subject by compositing computer graphics reconstructed from the MRI data set. We are planning to apply this imaging system to clinical observation in the area of orthopedics, rehabilitation and sports science.

  4. Coupled 4D-variational physical and biological data assimilation in the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H.; Edwards, C. A.; Moore, A. M.; Fiechter, J.

    2012-12-01

    Coupled physical and biological data assimilation is performed within the California Current System using a 3-dimensional coupled physical-biological model using the four-dimensional variational (4DVar) method and assuming Gaussian and lognormal error distributions for physical and biological variables, respectively. Errors are assumed to be independent, yet variables are coupled by assimilation through adjoint model dynamics. Using a nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model coupled to an ocean circulation model (the Regional Ocean Modeling System), the coupled data assimilation procedure is evaluated in a twin experiment setting and compared to two related experiments, assimilating physical data only and biological data only. Independent assimilation of physical (biological) data reduces the root-mean-squared error of physical (biological) state variables by more than 56% (46%) on average. However, the improvement in biological (physical) state variables is less than 7% (12%). In contrast, coupled data assimilation shows improvement in both physical and biological components by 57% and 52%, respectively, illustrating the superior performance of the coupled assimilation approach.

  5. Comparison of 4D Phase-Contrast MRI Flow Measurements to Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Cerebrospinal Fluid Motion in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Yiallourou, Theresia I.; Kröger, Jan Robert; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Maintz, David

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in the cervical spinal subarachnoid space (SSS) have been thought to be important to help diagnose and assess craniospinal disorders such as Chiari I malformation (CM). In this study we obtained time-resolved three directional velocity encoded phase-contrast MRI (4D PC MRI) in three healthy volunteers and four CM patients and compared the 4D PC MRI measurements to subject-specific 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The CFD simulations considered the geometry to be rigid-walled and did not include small anatomical structures such as nerve roots, denticulate ligaments and arachnoid trabeculae. Results were compared at nine axial planes along the cervical SSS in terms of peak CSF velocities in both the cranial and caudal direction and visual interpretation of thru-plane velocity profiles. 4D PC MRI peak CSF velocities were consistently greater than the CFD peak velocities and these differences were more pronounced in CM patients than in healthy subjects. In the upper cervical SSS of CM patients the 4D PC MRI quantified stronger fluid jets than the CFD. Visual interpretation of the 4D PC MRI thru-plane velocity profiles showed greater pulsatile movement of CSF in the anterior SSS in comparison to the posterior and reduction in local CSF velocities near nerve roots. CFD velocity profiles were relatively uniform around the spinal cord for all subjects. This study represents the first comparison of 4D PC MRI measurements to CFD of CSF flow in the cervical SSS. The results highlight the utility of 4D PC MRI for evaluation of complex CSF dynamics and the need for improvement of CFD methodology. Future studies are needed to investigate whether integration of fine anatomical structures and gross motion of the brain and/or spinal cord into the computational model will lead to a better agreement between the two techniques. PMID:23284970

  6. An historical analysis of the California Current circulation using ROMS 4D-Var: System configuration and diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu, Emilie; Moore, Andrew M.; Edwards, Christopher A.; Fiechter, Jérôme; Drake, Patrick; Crawford, William J.; Jacox, Michael G.; Nuss, Emma

    2016-03-01

    The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation tool has been used to compute two sequences of circulation analyses for the U.S. west coast. One sequence of analyses spans the period 1980-2010 and is subject to surface forcing derived from relatively low resolution atmospheric products from the Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform wind product (CCMP) and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis project. The second sequence spans the shorter period 1999-2012 and is subject to forcing derived from a high resolution product from the Naval Research Laboratory Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS). The two analysis periods are divided into eight day windows, and all available satellite observations of sea surface temperature and sea surface height, as well as in situhydrographic profiles are assimilated into ROMS using 4D-Var. The performance of the system is monitored in terms of the cost function and the statistics of the innovations, and the impact of data assimilated on the circulation is assessed by comparing the posterior circulation estimates with the prior circulation and the circulation from a run of the model without data assimilation, with particular emphasis on eddy kinetic energy. This is part I of a two part series, and the circulation variability of the 4D-Var analyses will be documented in part II.

  7. Accuracy of 4D Flow Measurement of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in the Cervical Spine: An In Vitro Verification Against Numerical Simulation.

    PubMed

    Heidari Pahlavian, Soroush; Bunck, Alexander C; Thyagaraj, Suraj; Giese, Daniel; Loth, Francis; Hedderich, Dennis M; Kröger, Jan Robert; Martin, Bryn A

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow are thought to play an important role in pathophysiology of various craniospinal disorders such as hydrocephalus and Chiari malformation. Three directional phase contrast MRI (4D Flow) has been proposed as one method for quantification of the CSF dynamics in healthy and disease states, but prior to further implementation of this technique, its accuracy in measuring CSF velocity magnitude and distribution must be evaluated. In this study, an MR-compatible experimental platform was developed based on an anatomically detailed 3D printed model of the cervical subarachnoid space and subject specific flow boundary conditions. Accuracy of 4D Flow measurements was assessed by comparison of CSF velocities obtained within the in vitro model with the numerically predicted velocities calculated from a spatially averaged computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model based on the same geometry and flow boundary conditions. Good agreement was observed between CFD and 4D Flow in terms of spatial distribution and peak magnitude of through-plane velocities with an average difference of 7.5 and 10.6% for peak systolic and diastolic velocities, respectively. Regression analysis showed lower accuracy of 4D Flow measurement at the timeframes corresponding to low CSF flow rate and poor correlation between CFD and 4D Flow in-plane velocities.

  8. A study on quantitative analysis of field size and dose by using gating system in 4D conformal radiation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Youn-Sang; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Kim, Chang-Bok; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag

    2012-10-01

    This study evaluated the gating-based 4-D conformal radiation therapy (4D-CT) treatment planning by a comparison with the common 3-D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CT) treatment planning and examined the change in treatment field size and dose to the tumors and adjacent normal tissues because an unnecessary dose is also included in the 3-D treatment planning for the radiation treatment of tumors in the chest and abdomen. The 3D-CT and gating-based 4D-CT images were obtained from patients who had undergone radiation treatment for chest and abdomen tumors in the oncology department. After establishing a treatment plan, the CT treatment and planning system were used to measure the change in field size for analysis. A dose volume histogram (DVH) was used to calculate the appropriate dose to planning target volume (PTV) tumors and adjacent normal tissue. The difference in the treatment volume of the chest was 0.6 and 0.83 cm on the X- and Y-axis, respectively, for the gross tumor volume (GTV). Accordingly, the values in the 4D-CT treatment planning were smaller and the dose was more concentrated by 2.7% and 0.9% on the GTV and clinical target volume (CTV), respectively. The normal tissues in the surrounding normal tissues were reduced by 3.0%, 7.2%, 0.4%, 1.7%, 2.6% and 0.2% in the bronchus, chest wall, esophagus, heart, lung and spinal cord, respectively. The difference in the treatment volume of the abdomen was 0.72 cm on the X-axis and 0.51 cm on the Y-axis for the GTV; and 1.06 cm on the X-axis and 1.85 cm on the Y-axis for the PTV. Therefore, the values in the 4D-CT treatment planning were smaller. The dose was concentrated by 6.8% and 4.3% on the GTV and PTV, respectively, whereas the adjacent normal tissues in the cord, Lt. kidney, Rt. kidney, small bowels and whole liver were reduced by 3.2%, 4.2%, 1.5%, 6.2% and 12.7%, respectively. The treatment field size was smaller in volume in the case of the 4D-CT treatment planning. In the DVH, the 4D-CT treatment

  9. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, S. R.; Nyflot, M. J.; Herrmann, C.; Groh, C. M.; Meyer, J.; Wollenweber, S. D.; Stearns, C. W.; Kinahan, P. E.; Sandison, G. A.

    2015-05-01

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10-20%, treatment planning errors were 5-10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5-30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5-10% in PET/CT imaging, <5% in treatment planning, and <2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and RT

  10. A 4D-Ensemble-Variational System for Data Assimilation and Ensemble Initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Neill; Clayton, Adam; Jardak, Mohamed; Lee, Eunjoo; Jermey, Peter; Lorenc, Andrew; Piccolo, Chiara; Pring, Stephen; Wlasak, Marek; Barker, Dale; Inverarity, Gordon; Swinbank, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The Met Office has been developing a four-dimensional ensemble variational (4DEnVar) data assimilation system over the past four years. The 4DEnVar system is intended both as data assimilation system in its own right and also an improved means of initializing the Met Office Global and Regional Ensemble Prediction System (MOGREPS). The global MOGREPS ensemble has been initialized by running an ensemble of 4DEnVars (En-4DEnVar). The scalability and maintainability of ensemble data assimilation methods make them increasingly attractive, and 4DEnVar may be adopted in the context of the Met Office's LFRic project to redevelop the technical infrastructure to enable its Unified Model (MetUM) to be run efficiently on massively parallel supercomputers. This presentation will report on the results of the 4DEnVar development project, including experiments that have been run using ensemble sizes of up to 200 members.

  11. Impact of AIRS radiance in the NCUM 4D-VAR assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Desamsetti; Indira Rani, S.; Mallick, Swapan; George, John P.; Sharma, Priti

    2016-04-01

    The hyperspectral radiances from Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), on board NASA-AQUA satellite, have been processed through the Observation Processing System (OPS) and assimilated in the Variational Assimilation (VAR) System of NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM). Numerical experiments are conducted in order to study the impact of the AIRS radiance in the NCUM analysis and forecast system. NCMRWF receives AIRS radiance from EUMETCAST through MOSDAC. AIRS is a grating spectrometer having 2378 channels covering the thermal infrared spectrum between 3 and 15 μm. Out of 2378 channels, 324 channels are selected for assimilation according to the peaking of weighting function and meteorological importance. According to the surface type and day-night conditions, some of the channels are not assimilated in the VAR. Observation Simulation Experiments (OSEs) are conducted for a period of 15 days to see the impact of AIRS radiances in NCUM. Statistical parameters like bias and RMSE are calculated to see the real impact of AIRS radiances in the assimilation system. Assimilation of AIRS in the NCUM system reduced the bias and RMSE in the radiances from instruments onboard other satellites. The impact of AIRS is clearly seen in the hyperspectral radiances like IASI and CrIS and also in infrared (HIRS) and microwave (AMSU, ATMS, etc.) sensors.

  12. Abdominal 4D Flow MR Imaging in a Breath Hold: Combination of Spiral Sampling and Dynamic Compressed Sensing for Highly Accelerated Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Knight-Greenfield, Ashley; Jajamovich, Guido; Besa, Cecilia; Cui, Yong; Stalder, Aurélien; Markl, Michael; Taouli, Bachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a highly accelerated phase-contrast cardiac-gated volume flow measurement (four-dimensional [4D] flow) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique based on spiral sampling and dynamic compressed sensing and to compare this technique with established phase-contrast imaging techniques for the quantification of blood flow in abdominal vessels. Materials and Methods This single-center prospective study was compliant with HIPAA and approved by the institutional review board. Ten subjects (nine men, one woman; mean age, 51 years; age range, 30–70 years) were enrolled. Seven patients had liver disease. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Two 4D flow acquisitions were performed in each subject, one with use of Cartesian sampling with respiratory tracking and the other with use of spiral sampling and a breath hold. Cartesian two-dimensional (2D) cine phase-contrast images were also acquired in the portal vein. Two observers independently assessed vessel conspicuity on phase-contrast three-dimensional angiograms. Quantitative flow parameters were measured by two independent observers in major abdominal vessels. Intertechnique concordance was quantified by using Bland-Altman and logistic regression analyses. Results There was moderate to substantial agreement in vessel conspicuity between 4D flow acquisitions in arteries and veins (κ = 0.71 and 0.61, respectively, for observer 1; κ = 0.71 and 0.44 for observer 2), whereas more artifacts were observed with spiral 4D flow (κ = 0.30 and 0.20). Quantitative measurements in abdominal vessels showed good equivalence between spiral and Cartesian 4D flow techniques (lower bound of the 95% confidence interval: 63%, 77%, 60%, and 64% for flow, area, average velocity, and peak velocity, respectively). For portal venous flow, spiral 4D flow was in better agreement with 2D cine phase-contrast flow (95% limits of agreement: −8.8 and 9.3 mL/sec, respectively) than was Cartesian 4D flow (95

  13. 4D modelling of the Alto Tiberina Fault system (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Donatis, Mauro; Susini, Sara; Mirabella, Francesco; Lupattelli, Andrea; Barchi, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    The Alto Tiberina Fault (ATF) in the Northern Apennines of Italy is a low-angle normal fault dipping to the East and accommodating up to 10 km of extension. The fault is ~70 km long and is the detachment for the SW-dipping Gubbio normal fault. The ATF fault system has been dramatically exhumed and the ATF footwall has evolved in a horst bounded to the east by ATF synthetic faults and to the west by the Corciano west-dipping normal fault. The fault has been widely studied over the last years in order to understand its mechanical behaviour, its present-day deformation rate and its seismological role. By using a wide data-set including subsurface data (seismic reflection profiles and boreholes) and surface geological data (new maps of the CARG project of Italy), we have reconstructed the 3D geometry of both the fault and of the main lithostratigraphic boundaries at the fault hanging-wall and foot-wall. The CARG map data were integrated by local observations and mapping using mobile GIS software (BeeGIS) and Android app (Geopaparazzi). Surface data were combined with seismic reflection profiles and wells interpretation and other data from available literature. The large amount of information were combined in MOVE software (Midland Valley Exploration ltd). Our reconstruction allows to i) build up a three-dimensional geological model of the subsurface including the main faults and lithostratigraphic boundaries; ii) identify a set of east-west trending faults the role of which was previously underestimated; iii) test a 3D-restoration of extension for the visualization of the time evolution and for the validation of the structural reconstruction. The restored structures are the main normal faults in the region. The sequential restoration was performed by taking into account the timing of deformation as derived from the literature. The model was sequentially restored according to the following chronological order from the latest to the oldest: 1a) last deformational event

  14. Development and Application of a Suite of 4-D Virtual Breast Phantoms for Optimization and Evaluation of Breast Imaging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuan; Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Dobbins, James T.; Segars, William P.

    2014-01-01

    Mammography is currently the most widely utilized tool for detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. However, in women with dense breast tissue, tissue overlap may obscure lesions. Digital breast tomosynthesis can reduce tissue overlap. Furthermore, imaging with contrast enhancement can provide additional functional information about lesions, such as morphology and kinetics, which in turn may improve lesion identification and characterization. The performance of these imaging techniques is strongly dependent on the structural composition of the breast, which varies significantly among patients. Therefore, imaging system and imaging technique optimization should take patient variability into consideration. Furthermore, optimization of imaging techniques that employ contrast agents should include the temporally varying breast composition with respect to the contrast agent uptake kinetics. To these ends, we have developed a suite of 4-D virtual breast phantoms, which are incorporated with the kinetics of contrast agent propagation in different tissues and can realistically model normal breast parenchyma as well as benign and malignant lesions. This development presents a new approach in performing simulation studies using truly anthropomorphic models. To demonstrate the utility of the proposed 4-D phantoms, we present a simplified example study to compare the performance of 14 imaging paradigms qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:24691118

  15. On the dynamical nature of the active center in a single-site photocatalyst visualized by 4D ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Su, Zixue; Thomas, John Meurig; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the dynamical nature of the catalytic active site embedded in complex systems at the atomic level is critical to developing efficient photocatalytic materials. Here, we report, using 4D ultrafast electron microscopy, the spatiotemporal behaviors of titanium and oxygen in a titanosilicate catalytic material. The observed changes in Bragg diffraction intensity with time at the specific lattice planes, and with a tilted geometry, provide the relaxation pathway: the Ti4+=O2− double bond transformation to a Ti3+−O1− single bond via the individual atomic displacements of the titanium and the apical oxygen. The dilation of the double bond is up to 0.8 Å and occurs on the femtosecond time scale. These findings suggest the direct catalytic involvement of the Ti3+−O1− local structure, the significance of nonthermal processes at the reactive site, and the efficient photo-induced electron transfer that plays a pivotal role in many photocatalytic reactions. PMID:26729878

  16. Three-channel dynamic photometric stereo: a new method for 4D surface reconstruction and volume recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Walter; Schulze, Wolfram; Wetter, Thomas; Chen, Chi-Hsien

    2008-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) body surface reconstruction is an important field in health care. A popular method for this purpose is laser scanning. However, using Photometric Stereo (PS) to record lumbar lordosis and the surface contour of the back poses a viable alternative due to its lower costs and higher flexibility compared to laser techniques and other methods of three-dimensional body surface reconstruction. In this work, we extended the traditional PS method and proposed a new method for obtaining surface and volume data of a moving object. The principle of traditional Photometric Stereo uses at least three images of a static object taken under different light sources to obtain 3D information of the object. Instead of using normal light, the light sources in the proposed method consist of the RGB-Color-Model's three colors: red, green and blue. A series of pictures taken with a video camera can now be separated into the different color channels. Each set of the three images can then be used to calculate the surface normals as a traditional PS. This method waives the requirement that the object imaged must be kept still as in almost all the other body surface reconstruction methods. By putting two cameras opposite to a moving object and lighting the object with the colored light, the time-varying surface (4D) data can easily be calculated. The obtained information can be used in many medical fields such as rehabilitation, diabetes screening or orthopedics.

  17. Direct observation of martensitic phase-transformation dynamics in iron by 4D single-pulse electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Soon; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Baskin, J Spencer; Barwick, Brett; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2009-11-01

    The in situ martensitic phase transformation of iron, a complex solid-state transition involving collective atomic displacement and interface movement, is studied in real time by means of four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy. The iron nanofilm specimen is heated at a maximum rate of approximately 10(11) K/s by a single heating pulse, and the evolution of the phase transformation from body-centered cubic to face-centered cubic crystal structure is followed by means of single-pulse, selected-area diffraction and real-space imaging. Two distinct components are revealed in the evolution of the crystal structure. The first, on the nanosecond time scale, is a direct martensitic transformation, which proceeds in regions heated into the temperature range of stability of the fcc phase, 1185-1667 K. The second, on the microsecond time scale, represents an indirect process for the hottest central zone of laser heating, where the temperature is initially above 1667 K and cooling is the rate-determining step. The mechanism of the direct transformation involves two steps, that of (barrier-crossing) nucleation on the reported nanosecond time scale, followed by a rapid grain growth typically in approximately 100 ps for 10 nm crystallites.

  18. A 4D-Var inversion system based on the icosahedral grid model (NICAM-TM 4D-Var v1.0) - Part 1: Offline forward and adjoint transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Yosuke; Tomita, Hirofumi; Satoh, Masaki; Imasu, Ryoichi; Sawa, Yousuke; Tsuboi, Kazuhiro; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Machida, Toshinobu; Sasakawa, Motoki; Belan, Boris; Saigusa, Nobuko

    2017-03-01

    A four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) method is a popular algorithm for inverting atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements. In order to meet the computationally intense 4D-Var iterative calculation, offline forward and adjoint transport models are developed based on the Nonhydrostatic ICosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM). By introducing flexibility into the temporal resolution of the input meteorological data, the forward model developed in this study is not only computationally efficient, it is also found to nearly match the transport performance of the online model. In a transport simulation of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), the data-thinning error (error resulting from reduction in the time resolution of the meteorological data used to drive the offline transport model) is minimized by employing high temporal resolution data of the vertical diffusion coefficient; with a low 6-hourly temporal resolution, significant concentration biases near the surface are introduced. The new adjoint model can be run in discrete or continuous adjoint mode for the advection process. The discrete adjoint is characterized by perfect adjoint relationship with the forward model that switches off the flux limiter, while the continuous adjoint is characterized by an imperfect but reasonable adjoint relationship with its corresponding forward model. In the latter case, both the forward and adjoint models use the flux limiter to ensure the monotonicity of tracer concentrations and sensitivities. Trajectory analysis for high CO2 concentration events are performed to test adjoint sensitivities. We also demonstrate the potential usefulness of our adjoint model for diagnosing tracer transport. Both the offline forward and adjoint models have computational efficiency about 10 times higher than the online model. A description of our new 4D-Var system that includes an optimization method, along with its application in an atmospheric CO2 inversion and the effects of using either the

  19. A theoretical CMS-X α treatment of CH 3I photoionization dynamics: outer valence shell and iodine 4d levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powis, Ivan

    1995-12-01

    Continuum multiple scattering (CMS-X α) calculations are used to investigate methyl iodide photoionization dynamics. The validity of atomic versus molecular models of behaviour for the localised iodine 4d and 5p (lone pair) electrons, where conflicting experimental interpretations have been offered, is examined. A good account of all the available experimental data is obtained. While the calculations provide some limited support for an atomic-like description of the iodine 4d -1 phenomenological cross-section, the atomic picture has little validity for the 5p -1 ionization. Variations in both cross-section and β parameter which were previously ascribed to the Cooper minimum are identified to be more likely a core-valence shell interaction, opening above the 4d -1 threshold. The other valence shell channels are similarly affected. Significant l-wave mixing, induced by the molecular anisotropy, is found to result in the creation of mixed parity final states, contrary to the atomic model. In these circumstances odd and even harmonic components can interfere to create orientation (odd harmonic terms) in the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD). Molecule frame PADs are calculated and compared to experimental data for the ionization of oriented molecules, confirming an intuitive expectation of asymmetric electron emission from an asymmetric molecule. The CH 3 group therefore acts as a non-negligible perturbation, even on quite localised iodine 5p electrons, and the molecular environment is a paramount factor.

  20. 4D map of the Kilauea summit shallow magmatic system constrained by InSAR time series and geometry-free inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, G.; Shirzaei, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Kilauea volcano, Hawaii Island, is one of the most active volcanoes worldwide. Its complex system, including magma reservoirs and rift zones, provides a unique opportunity to investigate the dynamics of magma transport and supply. The models explaining the system are yet limited to the first order analytical solutions with fixed geometry. To obtain a 4D map of the volume changes at the Kilauea summit magmatic system (KSMS), we implement a novel geometry-free time-dependent inverse modeling scheme, using a distribution of point center of dilatations (PCDs). The model is constrained using high resolution surface deformation data, which are obtained through InSAR time series analysis of well populated SAR data sets acquired at two overlapping tracks of Envisat satellite during 2003 and 2011. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the 4D maps of volume change identifies five major active reservoir beneath Kilauea caldera. The southern caldera reservoir (SCR) gains volume slowly till 2006 before its rapid inflation during 2006 - mid-2007, followed by deflation until the start of re-inflation in mid-2010. Other reservoirs show episodic temporal correlation and anti-correlation with SCR. We found that the top-down relation between reservoirs at the Kilauea summit is not necessarily valid at all time scales. Identifying statistically significant PCDs through Chi-square test, we develop and apply a boundary element modeling scheme to solve for the volume change time series and complex geometry of the summit magmatic system. Availability of such models allows realistic estimates of volume change and associated seismic hazard and enhance the forecast models.

  1. The effect of resolution on viscous dissipation measured with 4D flow MRI in patients with Fontan circulation: Evaluation using computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cibis, Merih; Jarvis, Kelly; Markl, Michael; Rose, Michael; Rigsby, Cynthia; Barker, Alex J.; Wentzel, Jolanda J.

    2016-01-01

    Viscous dissipation inside Fontan circulation, a parameter associated with the exercise intolerance of Fontan patients, can be derived from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or 4D flow MRI velocities. However, the impact of spatial resolution and measurement noise on the estimation of viscous dissipation is unclear. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of these parameters on viscous dissipation calculation. Six Fontan patients underwent whole heart 4D flow MRI. Subject-specific CFD simulations were performed. The CFD velocities were down-sampled to isotropic spatial resolutions of 0.5 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm and to MRI resolution. Viscous dissipation was compared between (1) high resolution CFD velocities, (2) CFD velocities down-sampled to MRI resolution, (3) down-sampled CFD velocities with MRI mimicked noise levels, and (4) in-vivo 4D flow MRI velocities. Relative viscous dissipation between subjects was also calculated. 4D flow MRI velocities (15.6±3.8 cm/s) were higher, although not significantly different than CFD velocities (13.8±4.7 cm/s, p=0.16), down-sampled CFD velocities (12.3±4.4 cm/s, p=0.06) and the down-sampled CFD velocities with noise (13.2±4.2 cm/s, p=0.06). CFD-based viscous dissipation (0.81±0.55 mW) was significantly higher than those based on down-sampled CFD (0.25±0.19 mW, p=0.03), down-sampled CFD with noise (0.49±0.26 mW, p=0.03) and 4D flow MRI (0.56±0.28 mW, p=0.06). Nevertheless, relative viscous dissipation between different subjects was maintained irrespective of resolution and noise, suggesting that comparison of viscous dissipation between patients is still possible. PMID:26298492

  2. 320-Row Detector Dynamic 4D-CTA for the Assessment of Brain and Spinal Cord Vascular Shunting Malformations. A Technical Note.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Federico; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    Shunting vascular malformations of the brain and spinal cord are traditionally studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA), the current gold standard imaging method routinely used because of its favourable combination in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. Because DSA is relatively expensive, time-consuming and carries a risk of silent embolic events and a small risk of transient or permanent neurologic deterioration, a non-invasive alternative angiographic method is of interest. New 320 row-detector CT scanners allow volumetric imaging of the whole brain with temporal resolution up to ≌ 3 Hz. Those characteristics make computed tomography angiography (CTA) an affordable imaging method to study the haemodynamics of the whole brain and can also be applied to the study of limited portions of the spinal cord. The aim of this paper is to make a brief summary of our experience in studying shunting vascular malformation of the brain and spinal cord using dynamic 4D-CTA, explaining the technical details of the studies performed at our institution, and the state-of-the-art major advantages and drawbacks of this new technique. We found that dynamic 4D-CTA is able to depict the main architectural characteristics of previously untreated vascular shunting malformations both in brain and spinal cord (i.e. their main arterial feeders and draining veins) allowing their correct diagnosis and exhaustive classification, limiting the use of DSA for therapeutic purposes.

  3. Perfusion-weighted imaging and dynamic 4D angiograms for the estimation of collateral blood flow in lacunar infarction.

    PubMed

    Förster, Alex; Mürle, Bettina; Böhme, Johannes; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Kerl, Hans U; Wenz, Holger; Groden, Christoph

    2016-10-01

    Although lacunar infarction accounts for approximately 25% of ischemic strokes, collateral blood flow through anastomoses is not well evaluated in lacunar infarction. In 111 lacunar infarction patients, we analyzed diffusion-weighted images, perfusion-weighted images, and blood flow on dynamic four-dimensional angiograms generated by use of Signal Processing In NMR-Software. Blood flow was classified as absent (type 1), from periphery to center (type 2), from center to periphery (type 3), and combination of type 2 and 3 (type 4). On diffusion-weighted images, lacunar infarction was found in the basal ganglia (11.7%), internal capsule (24.3%), corona radiata (30.6%), thalamus (24.3%), and brainstem (9.0%). In 58 (52.2%) patients, perfusion-weighted image showed a circumscribed hypoperfusion, in one (0.9%) a circumscribed hyperperfusion, whereas the remainder was normal. In 36 (62.1%) patients, a larger perfusion deficit (>7 mm) was observed. In these, blood flow was classified type 1 in four (11.1%), 2 in 17 (47.2%), 3 in 9 (25.0%), and 4 in six (16.7%) patients. Patients with lacunar infarction in the posterior circulation more often demonstrated blood flow type 2 and less often type 3 (p = 0.01). Detailed examination and graduation of blood flow in lacunar infarction by use of dynamic four-dimensional angiograms is feasible and may serve for a better characterization of this stroke subtype.

  4. Fluid mechanics of human fetal right ventricles from image-based computational fluid dynamics using 4D clinical ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Wiputra, Hadi; Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Heng, Joel Jia Wei; Guo, Lan; Soomar, Sanah Merchant; Leo, Hwa Liang; Biwas, Arijit; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-12-01

    There are 0.6-1.9% of US children who were born with congenital heart malformations. Clinical and animal studies suggest that abnormal blood flow forces might play a role in causing these malformation, highlighting the importance of understanding the fetal cardiovascular fluid mechanics. We performed computational fluid dynamics simulations of the right ventricles, based on four-dimensional ultrasound scans of three 20-wk-old normal human fetuses, to characterize their flow and energy dynamics. Peak intraventricular pressure gradients were found to be 0.2-0.9 mmHg during systole, and 0.1-0.2 mmHg during diastole. Diastolic wall shear stresses were found to be around 1 Pa, which could elevate to 2-4 Pa during systole in the outflow tract. Fetal right ventricles have complex flow patterns featuring two interacting diastolic vortex rings, formed during diastolic E wave and A wave. These rings persisted through the end of systole and elevated wall shear stresses in their proximity. They were observed to conserve ∼25.0% of peak diastolic kinetic energy to be carried over into the subsequent systole. However, this carried-over kinetic energy did not significantly alter the work done by the heart for ejection. Thus, while diastolic vortexes played a significant role in determining spatial patterns and magnitudes of diastolic wall shear stresses, they did not have significant influence on systolic ejection. Our results can serve as a baseline for future comparison with diseased hearts.

  5. Unfolded equations for current interactions of 4d massless fields as a free system in mixed dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfond, O. A.; Vasiliev, M. A.

    2015-03-15

    Interactions of massless fields of all spins in four dimensions with currents of any spin are shown to result from a solution of the linear problem that describes a gluing between a rank-one (massless) system and a rank-two (current) system in the unfolded dynamics approach. Since the rank-two system is dual to a free rank-one higher-dimensional system that effectively describes conformal fields in six space-time dimensions, the constructed system can be interpreted as describing a mixture between linear conformal fields in four and six dimensions. An interpretation of the obtained results in the spirit of the AdS/CFT correspondence is discussed.

  6. SU-E-T-648: Quality Assurance Using the RADPOS System for 4D Radiotherapy with CyberKnife

    SciTech Connect

    Marants, R; Vandervoort, E; Cygler, J E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery system uses Synchrony respiratory motion compensation, which requires independent performance verification. In this work, the RADPOS 4D dosimetry system’s motion measurements are compared with internal fiducial position measurements. In addition, RADPOS measurements are compared with Synchrony’s predictive correlation model, which is based on internal fiducial and external LED marker position measurements. Methods: A treatment plan was created for a lung insert containing fiducials, RADPOS detector, and Solid Water tumor phantom. Two Quasar Respiratory Motion Phantoms (Q1 and Q2) and two RADPOS detectors (R1 and R2) were used: Q1 simulated lung motion with a lung insert moving in the superior/inferior direction, while Q2 simulated chest motion with a chest platform moving in the anterior/posterior direction. Before treatment, R1 was secured inside of the tumor phantom within Q1, while LED markers and R2 were positioned on the chest platform of Q2. Two treatment delivery cases were studied: isocentric plan (I) and non-isocentric patient plan (P). Four motion cases were studied: no motion (0), sinusoidal and in-phase (1), sinusoidal and out-of-phase (2), patient waveform and out-of-phase (3). A coordinate alignment algorithm was implemented, allowing RADPOS and model position data to be compared within the fiducial coordinate system. Results: The standard deviation of the differences between RADPOS and fiducial position measurements was below 0.6 mm for all experimental cases. The standard deviation of the differences between RADPOS and model position data was 1.0, 1.5, and 1.6 mm along the primary direction of motion for case I1, I2, and P3, respectively. Conclusion: Our work demonstrates that RADPOS is a useful tool for independent quality assurance of CyberKnife treatment with Synchrony respiratory compensation. RADPOS and fiducial position measurement closely match, and RADPOS confirms the effectiveness of Cyber

  7. SU-D-207-03: Development of 4D-CBCT Imaging System with Dual Source KV X-Ray Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, M; Ishihara, Y; Matsuo, Y; Ueki, N; Iizuka, Y; Mizowaki, T; Hiraoka, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purposes of this work are to develop 4D-CBCT imaging system with orthogonal dual source kV X-ray tubes, and to determine the imaging doses from 4D-CBCT scans. Methods: Dual source kV X-ray tubes were used for the 4D-CBCT imaging. The maximum CBCT field of view was 200 mm in diameter and 150 mm in length, and the imaging parameters were 110 kV, 160 mA and 5 ms. The rotational angle was 105°, the rotational speed of the gantry was 1.5°/s, the gantry rotation time was 70 s, and the image acquisition interval was 0.3°. The observed amplitude of infrared marker motion during respiration was used to sort each image into eight respiratory phase bins. The EGSnrc/BEAMnrc and EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc packages were used to simulate kV X-ray dose distributions of 4D-CBCT imaging. The kV X-ray dose distributions were calculated for 9 lung cancer patients based on the planning CT images with dose calculation grid size of 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 mm. The dose covering a 2-cc volume of skin (D2cc), defined as the inner 5 mm of the skin surface with the exception of bone structure, was assessed. Results: A moving object was well identified on 4D-CBCT images in a phantom study. Given a gantry rotational angle of 105° and the configuration of kV X-ray imaging subsystems, both kV X-ray fields overlapped at a part of skin surface. The D2cc for the 4D-CBCT scans was in the range 73.8–105.4 mGy. Linear correlation coefficient between the 1000 minus averaged SSD during CBCT scanning and D2cc was −0.65 (with a slope of −0.17) for the 4D-CBCT scans. Conclusion: We have developed 4D-CBCT imaging system with dual source kV X-ray tubes. The total imaging dose with 4D-CBCT scans was up to 105.4 mGy.

  8. Biomimetic 4D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydney Gladman, A.; Matsumoto, Elisabetta A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mahadevan, L.; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-04-01

    Shape-morphing systems can be found in many areas, including smart textiles, autonomous robotics, biomedical devices, drug delivery and tissue engineering. The natural analogues of such systems are exemplified by nastic plant motions, where a variety of organs such as tendrils, bracts, leaves and flowers respond to environmental stimuli (such as humidity, light or touch) by varying internal turgor, which leads to dynamic conformations governed by the tissue composition and microstructural anisotropy of cell walls. Inspired by these botanical systems, we printed composite hydrogel architectures that are encoded with localized, anisotropic swelling behaviour controlled by the alignment of cellulose fibrils along prescribed four-dimensional printing pathways. When combined with a minimal theoretical framework that allows us to solve the inverse problem of designing the alignment patterns for prescribed target shapes, we can programmably fabricate plant-inspired architectures that change shape on immersion in water, yielding complex three-dimensional morphologies.

  9. Biomimetic 4D printing.

    PubMed

    Gladman, A Sydney; Matsumoto, Elisabetta A; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Mahadevan, L; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Shape-morphing systems can be found in many areas, including smart textiles, autonomous robotics, biomedical devices, drug delivery and tissue engineering. The natural analogues of such systems are exemplified by nastic plant motions, where a variety of organs such as tendrils, bracts, leaves and flowers respond to environmental stimuli (such as humidity, light or touch) by varying internal turgor, which leads to dynamic conformations governed by the tissue composition and microstructural anisotropy of cell walls. Inspired by these botanical systems, we printed composite hydrogel architectures that are encoded with localized, anisotropic swelling behaviour controlled by the alignment of cellulose fibrils along prescribed four-dimensional printing pathways. When combined with a minimal theoretical framework that allows us to solve the inverse problem of designing the alignment patterns for prescribed target shapes, we can programmably fabricate plant-inspired architectures that change shape on immersion in water, yielding complex three-dimensional morphologies.

  10. Advances in 4D radiation therapy for managing respiration: part I - 4D imaging.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Geoffrey D; Rosu, Mihaela

    2012-12-01

    Techniques for managing respiration during imaging and planning of radiation therapy are reviewed, concentrating on free-breathing (4D) approaches. First, we focus on detailing the historical development and basic operational principles of currently-available "first generation" 4D imaging modalities: 4D computed tomography, 4D cone beam computed tomography, 4D magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D positron emission tomography. Features and limitations of these first generation systems are described, including necessity of breathing surrogates for 4D image reconstruction, assumptions made in acquisition and reconstruction about the breathing pattern, and commonly-observed artifacts. Both established and developmental methods to deal with these limitations are detailed. Finally, strategies to construct 4D targets and images and, alternatively, to compress 4D information into static targets and images for radiation therapy planning are described.

  11. 4D human body posture estimation based on a motion capture system and a multi-rigid link model.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoya; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Ozaki, Wataru; Yamamoto, Tomohisa; Nomura, Taishin

    2012-01-01

    Human motion analysis in various fields such as neurophysiology, clinical medicine, and sports sciences utilizes a multi-rigid link model of a human body for considering kinetics by solving inverse dynamics of a motion, in which a motion capture system with reflective markers are often used to measure the motion, and then the obtained motion are mapped onto the multi-rigid link model. However, algorithms for such a mapping from spatio-temporal positions of the markers to the corresponding posture of the model are not always fully disclosed. Moreover, a common difficulty for such algorithms is an error caused by displacements of the markers attached on the body surface, referred to as the skin motion error. In this study, we developed a simple algorithm that maps positions of the markers to the corresponding posture of a rigid link model, and examined accuracy of the algorithm by evaluating quantitatively differences between the measured and the estimated posture. We also analyzed the skin motion error. It is shown that magnitude of the error was determined not only by the amplitude of the skin motion, but also by the direction of the marker displacement relative to the frame of reference attached to each segment of the body.

  12. 4-D OCT in Developmental Cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    Although strong evidence exists to suggest that altered cardiac function can lead to CHDs, few studies have investigated the influential role of cardiac function and biophysical forces on the development of the cardiovascular system due to a lack of proper in vivo imaging tools. 4-D imaging is needed to decipher the complex spatial and temporal patterns of biomechanical forces acting upon the heart. Numerous solutions over the past several years have demonstrated 4-D OCT imaging of the developing cardiovascular system. This chapter will focus on these solutions and explain their context in the evolution of 4-D OCT imaging. The first sections describe the relevant techniques (prospective gating, direct 4-D imaging, retrospective gating), while later sections focus on 4-D Doppler imaging and measurements of force implementing 4-D OCT Doppler. Finally, the techniques are summarized, and some possible future directions are discussed.

  13. Cardiac function and perfusion dynamics measured on a beat-by-beat basis in the live mouse using ultra-fast 4D optoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Steven J.; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The fast heart rate (~7 Hz) of the mouse makes cardiac imaging and functional analysis difficult when studying mouse models of cardiovascular disease, and cannot be done truly in real-time and 3D using established imaging modalities. Optoacoustic imaging, on the other hand, provides ultra-fast imaging at up to 50 volumetric frames per second, allowing for acquisition of several frames per mouse cardiac cycle. In this study, we combined a recently-developed 3D optoacoustic imaging array with novel analytical techniques to assess cardiac function and perfusion dynamics of the mouse heart at high, 4D spatiotemporal resolution. In brief, the heart of an anesthetized mouse was imaged over a series of multiple volumetric frames. In another experiment, an intravenous bolus of indocyanine green (ICG) was injected and its distribution was subsequently imaged in the heart. Unique temporal features of the cardiac cycle and ICG distribution profiles were used to segment the heart from background and to assess cardiac function. The 3D nature of the experimental data allowed for determination of cardiac volumes at ~7-8 frames per mouse cardiac cycle, providing important cardiac function parameters (e.g., stroke volume, ejection fraction) on a beat-by-beat basis, which has been previously unachieved by any other cardiac imaging modality. Furthermore, ICG distribution dynamics allowed for the determination of pulmonary transit time and thus additional quantitative measures of cardiovascular function. This work demonstrates the potential for optoacoustic cardiac imaging and is expected to have a major contribution toward future preclinical studies of animal models of cardiovascular health and disease.

  14. Intracardiac Vortex Dynamics by High-Frame-Rate Doppler Vortography-In Vivo Comparison With Vector Flow Mapping and 4-D Flow MRI.

    PubMed

    Faurie, Julia; Baudet, Mathilde; Assi, Kondo Claude; Auger, Dominique; Gilbert, Guillaume; Tournoux, Francois; Garcia, Damien

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that intracardiac vortex flow imaging could be of clinical interest to early diagnose the diastolic heart function. Doppler vortography has been introduced as a simple color Doppler method to detect and quantify intraventricular vortices. This method is able to locate a vortex core based on the recognition of an antisymmetric pattern in the Doppler velocity field. Because the heart is a fast-moving organ, high frame rates are needed to decipher the whole blood vortex dynamics during diastole. In this paper, we adapted the vortography method to high-frame-rate echocardiography using circular waves. Time-resolved Doppler vortography was first validated in vitro in an ideal forced vortex. We observed a strong correlation between the core vorticity determined by high-frame-rate vortography and the ground-truth vorticity. Vortography was also tested in vivo in ten healthy volunteers using high-frame-rate duplex ultrasonography. The main vortex that forms during left ventricular filling was tracked during two-three successive cardiac cycles, and its core vorticity was determined at a sampling rate up to 80 duplex images per heartbeat. Three echocardiographic apical views were evaluated. Vortography-derived vorticities were compared with those returned by the 2-D vector flow mapping approach. Comparison with 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging was also performed in four of the ten volunteers. Strong intermethod agreements were observed when determining the peak vorticity during early filling. It is concluded that high-frame-rate Doppler vortography can accurately investigate the diastolic vortex dynamics.

  15. A Javascript library that uses Windows Script Host (WSH) to analyze prostate motion data fragmented across a multitude of Excel files by the Calypso 4D Localization System.

    PubMed

    Vali, Faisal S; Hsi, Alex; Cho, Paul; Parsai, Homayon; Garver, Elizabeth; Garza, Richard

    2008-11-06

    The Calypso 4D Localization System records prostate motion continuously during radiation treatment. It stores the data across thousands of Excel files. We developed Javascript (JScript) libraries for Windows Script Host (WSH) that use ActiveX Data Objects, OLE Automation and SQL to statistically analyze the data and display the results as a comprehensible Excel table. We then leveraged these libraries in other research to perform vector math on data spread across multiple access databases.

  16. Comparison of the Pharmacological Profiles of Selective PDE4B and PDE4D Inhibitors in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chong; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Han-Ting; Gurney, Mark E.; O’Donnell, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Inhibition of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-specific phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) has been proposed as a potential treatment for a series of neuropsychological conditions such as depression, anxiety and memory loss. However, the specific involvement of each of the PDE4 subtypes (PDE4A, 4B and 4C) in different categories of behavior has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we compared the possible pharmacological effects of PDE4B and PDE4D selective inhibitors, A-33 and D159687, in mediating neurological function in mice. Both compounds were equally potent in stimulating cAMP signaling in the mouse hippocampal cell line HT-22 leading to an increase in CREB phosphorylation. In contrast, A-33 and D159687 displayed distinct neuropharmacological effects in mouse behavioral tests. A-33 has an antidepressant-like profile as indicated by reduced immobility time in the forced swim and tail suspension tasks, as well as reduced latency to feed in the novelty suppressed feeding test. D159687, on the other hand, had a procognitive profile as it improved memory in the novel object recognition test but had no antidepressant or anxiolytic benefit. The present data suggests that inhibitors targeting specific subtypes of PDE4 may exhibit differential pharmacological effects and aid a more efficient pharmacotherapy towards neuropsychological conditions. PMID:28054669

  17. Joint CO2 state and flux estimation with the 4D-Var system EURAD-IM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimpt, Johannes; Elbern, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric CO2 inversion studies seek to improve CO2 surface-atmosphere fluxes with the usage of adjoint transport models and CO2 concentration measurements. Terrestrial CO2 fluxes -anthropogenic emissions, photosynthesis, and respiration- bear large spatial and temporal variability and are highly uncertain. Additionally to the high uncertainty of the three CO2 fluxes itself, regional inversion studies suffer from uncertainty of the boundary layer height and atmospheric transport especially during night, leading to uncertainty of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios during sunrise. This study assesses the potential of the 4-dimensional variational (4D-Var) method to estimate CO2 fluxes and atmospheric CO2 concentrations jointly at each grid cell on a regional scale. Identical twin experiments are executed with the nested EURopean Air pollution Dispersion-Inverse Model (EURAD-IM) with 5 km resolution in Central Europe with synthetic half hourly measurements from eleven concentration towers. The assimilation window is chosen to start from sunrise for 12 hours. We find that joint estimation of CO2 fluxes and initial states requires a more careful balance of the background error covariance matrices but enables a more detailed analysis of atmospheric CO2 and the surface-atmosphere fluxes.

  18. Feasibility of quantitative lung perfusion by 4D CT imaging by a new dynamic-scanning protocol in an animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Abtin, Fereidoun G.; Brown, Matt; McNitt-Gray, Mike

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to test a new dynamic Perfusion-CT imaging protocol in an animal model and investigate the feasibility of quantifying perfusion of lung parenchyma to perform functional analysis from 4D CT image data. A novel perfusion-CT protocol was designed with 25 scanning time points: the first at baseline and 24 scans after a bolus injection of contrast material. Post-contrast CT scanning images were acquired with a high sampling rate before the first blood recirculation and then a relatively low sampling rate until 10 minutes after administrating contrast agent. Lower radiation techniques were used to keep the radiation dose to an acceptable level. 2 Yorkshire swine with pulmonary emboli underwent this perfusion- CT protocol at suspended end inspiration. The software tools were designed to measure the quantitative perfusion parameters (perfusion, permeability, relative blood volume, blood flow, wash-in & wash-out enhancement) of voxel or interesting area of lung. The perfusion values were calculated for further lung functional analysis and presented visually as contrast enhancement maps for the volume being examined. The results show increased CT temporal sampling rate provides the feasibility of quantifying lung function and evaluating the pulmonary emboli. Differences between areas with known perfusion defects and those without perfusion defects were observed. In conclusion, the techniques to calculate the lung perfusion on animal model have potential application in human lung functional analysis such as evaluation of functional effects of pulmonary embolism. With further study, these techniques might be applicable in human lung parenchyma characterization and possibly for lung nodule characterization.

  19. 4D volcano gravimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Gottsmann, J.; Carbone, D.; Fernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent gravimetric measurements can detect subsurface processes long before magma flow leads to earthquakes or other eruption precursors. The ability of gravity measurements to detect subsurface mass flow is greatly enhanced if gravity measurements are analyzed and modeled with ground-deformation data. Obtaining the maximum information from microgravity studies requires careful evaluation of the layout of network benchmarks, the gravity environmental signal, and the coupling between gravity changes and crustal deformation. When changes in the system under study are fast (hours to weeks), as in hydrothermal systems and restless volcanoes, continuous gravity observations at selected sites can help to capture many details of the dynamics of the intrusive sources. Despite the instrumental effects, mainly caused by atmospheric temperature, results from monitoring at Mt. Etna volcano show that continuous measurements are a powerful tool for monitoring and studying volcanoes.Several analytical and numerical mathematical models can beused to fit gravity and deformation data. Analytical models offer a closed-form description of the volcanic source. In principle, this allows one to readily infer the relative importance of the source parameters. In active volcanic sites such as Long Valley caldera (California, U.S.A.) and Campi Flegrei (Italy), careful use of analytical models and high-quality data sets has produced good results. However, the simplifications that make analytical models tractable might result in misleading volcanological inter-pretations, particularly when the real crust surrounding the source is far from the homogeneous/ isotropic assumption. Using numerical models allows consideration of more realistic descriptions of the sources and of the crust where they are located (e.g., vertical and lateral mechanical discontinuities, complex source geometries, and topography). Applications at Teide volcano (Tenerife) and Campi Flegrei demonstrate the

  20. SU-F-303-02: Achieving 4D MRI in Regular Breathing Cycle with Extended Acquisition Time of Dynamic MR Images

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, C; Beddar, S; Wen, Z; Stemkens, B; Tijssen, R; Berg, C van den

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a technique to obtain four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance (MR) images that are more representative of a patient’s typical breathing cycle by utilizing an extended acquisition time while minimizing the image artifacts. Methods: The 4D MR data were acquired with the balanced steady state free precession in two-dimensional sagittal plane of view. Each slice was acquired repeatedly for about 15 s, thereby obtaining multiple images at each of the 10 phases in the respiratory cycle. This improves the probability that at least one of the images were acquired at the desired phase during a regular breathing cycle. To create optimal 4D MR images, an iterative approach was used to identify the set of images that yielded the highest slice-to-slice similarity. To assess the effectiveness of the approach, the data set was truncated into periods of 7 s (50 time points), 11 s (75 time points) and the full 15 s (100 time points). The 4D MR images were then sorted with data of the three different acquisition periods for comparison. Results: In general, the 4D MR images sorted using data from longer acquisition periods showed less mismatched artifacts. In addition, the normalized cross correlation (NCC) between slices of a 4D volume increases with increased acquisition period. The average NCC was 0.791 from the 7 s period, 0.794 from the 11 s period and 0.796 from the 15 s period. Conclusion: Our preliminary study showed that extending the acquisition time with the proposed sorting technique can improve image quality and reduce artifact presence in the 4D MR images. Data acquisition over two breathing cycles is a good trade-off between artifact reduction and scan time. This research was partially funded by the the Center for Radiation Oncology Research from UT MD Anderson Cancer Center.

  1. Intra-vascular blood velocity and volumetric flow rate calculated from dynamic 4D CT angiography using a time of flight technique.

    PubMed

    Barfett, Joseph John; Velauthapillai, Nivethan; Fierstra, Jorn; Crawley, Adrian; Coolens, Catherine; Crean, Andrew; Jaskolka, Jeff; Dufort, Paul; Krings, Timo; Mikulis, David

    2014-10-01

    We examine a time of flight (TOF) approach for the analysis of contrast enhanced 4D volumetric CT angiography scans to derive and display blood velocity in arteries. Software was written to divide blood vessels into a series of cross sections and to track contrast bolus TOF along the central vessel axis, which was defined by a user, from 4D CT source data. Time density curves at each vessel cross section were fit with quadratic, Gaussian, and gamma variate functions to determine bolus time to peak (TTP). A straight line was used to plot TTP versus vessel path length for all three functions and the slope used to calculate intraluminal velocity. Software was validated in a simulated square channel and non-pulsatile flow phantom prior to the calculation of blood velocity in the major cerebral arteries of 8 normal patients. The TOF algorithm correctly calculates intra-luminal fluid velocity in eight flow conditions of the CT flow phantom where quadratic functions were used. Across all conditions, in phantoms and in vivo, the success of calculations depended strongly on having a sufficiently long path length to make measurements and avoiding venous contamination. Total blood flow into the brain was approximately 17 % of a normal 5 L cardiac output. The technique was explored in vivo in a patient with subclavian steal syndrome, in the pulmonary arteries and in the iliac artery from clinical 4D CT source data. Intravascular blood velocity and flow may be calculated from 4D CT angiography using a TOF approach.

  2. A Weak Constraint 4D-Var Assimilation System for the Navy Coastal Model Using the Representer Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    SUBJECT TERMS variation data assimilation, representer methods, weak constraints, navy coastal ocean model, MODAS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a...and synthetic observations generated by the modular ocean data assimilation system ( MODAS ) Fox et al. 2002, as well as with real observations...15.4.1 MODASData MODAS generates synthetic vertical profiles of temperature and salinity in the two following steps: first, a subsurface

  3. System development for unrestrictive view and 4D shape acquisition in abdominal cavity operation using virtual space.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has been used for various areas of abdominal cavity. However, the laparoscope has limitation of its field of view and mobility. Our aim is to develop a new video camera system that acquires multiple viewpoints in the abdominal cavity. We designed a camera array that consisted of eight small camera modules. The camera array can change its shape so that it can be inserted into the abdominal cavity through trocar. Surgeon can change the viewpoint by switching camera output without physically moving the camera. Using eight camera's images, we also tried to reconstruct 3D textured shape of the surgery field.

  4. Basic EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) Technology Advancement for C3 Systems. Volume 4D. Modeling Crosstalk in Balanced Twisted Pairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    z 0 n APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED En -- DTIC ROME AIR DEVELOPMENT CENTER D T EC Air Force Systems Command ELECTE LAJ Griffiss...Air Force Base, NY 13441 MAY 15 1985 *B C=.OJ - . j I .. =41.’- This report has been reviewed by the RADC Public Affairs Office (PA) and is releasable...the 2nx2n chain parameter matrix of the line. S is now competely characterized by For no " eletric insulation and perfect conductors, the n x n are i

  5. Assimilation of Meteosat radiance data within the 4D-Var system at ECMWF: Data quality monitoring, bias correction and single-cycle experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Rosemary; Köpken, Christina; Kelly, Graeme; Thépaut, Jean-Noël; Saunders, Roger

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes the direct assimilation of water vapour (WV) clear-sky radiance (CSR) data from geostationary satellites within the context of the ECMWF four-dimensional variational assimilation (4D-Var) system. The assimilation of Meteosat-7 WV CSR data became operational on 9 April 2002. As 4D-Var includes a time dimension, the high temporal resolution of the geostationary radiance data can be exploited to provide information not only on the upper-tropospheric humidity but also on the upper-tropospheric wind field. The data assimilated have a spatial resolution of approximately 80 km and a time resolution of 1 hour. Extensive pre-operational monitoring of the CSR data has been carried out, showing a systematic warm bias of approximately 2-3 K in the Meteosat WV CSR data compared to radiances simulated from model first-guess fields. The systematic biases between the brightness temperatures derived from the model and the observations are investigated and compared to other satellite radiance data. For assimilation purposes this is accounted for by using a bias correction based on a statistical regression. The monitoring also shows contamination of certain time slots caused by intruding solar stray light and a certain degree of residual cloud contamination present in the CSR. Data quality control is introduced to exclude affected data. Initial single-cycle 3D-Var with first guess at appropriate time and 4D-Var experiments demonstrate both the direct and indirect effects of the Meteosat WV CSR data on the model fields, particularly of humidity and wind. The operational implementation of the assimilation of the Meteosat WV CSR data, including results from pre-operational experiments and forecast impacts, is discussed in a companion paper.

  6. 4D seismic study of active gas seepage systems on the Vestnesa Ridge, offshore W-Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünz, Stefan; Plaza-Faverola, Andreia; Hurter, Sandra; Mienert, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Active gas venting occurs on the Vestnesa Ridge, an elongated sediment drift north of the Molloy Transform and just east of the Molloy Ridge, one of the shortest segments of the slow spreading North-Atlantic Ridge system. The crest of the Vestnesa Ridge at water depth between 1200-1300 m is pierced with fluid-flow features. Seafloor pockmarks vary in size up to 1 km in diameter. High-resolution P-Cable 3D seismic data acquired in 2012 show vertical focused fluid flow features beneath the seafloor pockmarks. These co-called chimneys extend down to the free-gas zone underneath a bottom-simulating reflection. Here, they link up with small fault systems that might provide pathways to the deeper subsurface. The chimney features show a high variability in their acoustic characteristics with alternating blanked or masked zones and high-amplitude anomalies scattered through the whole vertical extent of the chimneys. The amplitude anomalies indicate high-impedance contrasts due to the likely presence of gas or a high-velocity material like gas hydrates or carbonates. We re-acquired the 3D seismic survey in 2013 for time-lapse seismic studies in order to better understand the origin of the amplitude anomalies and in order to track potentially migrating gas fronts up along the chimney structure. Here, we will present the preliminary results of this time-lapse analysis, which will allow us to better understand gas migration and seafloor plumbing systems in continental margins. This work is part of CAGE - Centre of Excellence for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate. Details on the CAGE research plan and organization can be found on www.cage.uit.no to foster opportunities for cross-disciplinary collaboration. Based in Tromsø, at the world's northernmost University, CAGE establishes the intellectual and infrastructure resources for studying the amount of methane hydrate and magnitude of methane release in Arctic Ocean environments on time scales from the Neogene to the

  7. Your fate is in your hands? Handedness, digit ratio (2D:4D), and selection to a national talent development system.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joseph; Kungl, Ann-Marie; Pabst, Jan; Strauß, Bernd; Büsch, Dirk; Schorer, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade a small evidence base has highlighted the potential importance of seemingly innocuous variables related to one's hands, such as hand dominance and the relative length of the second and fourth digits (2D:4D ratio), to success in sport. This study compared 2D:4D digit ratio and handedness among handball players selected to advance in a national talent development system with those not selected. Participants included 480 youth handball players (240 females and 240 males) being considered as part of the talent selection programme for the German Youth National team. Hand dominance and digit ratio were compared to age-matched control data using standard t-tests. There was a greater proportion of left-handers compared to the normal population in males but not in females. There was also a lower digit ratio in both females and males. However, there were no differences between those selected for the next stage of talent development and those not selected on either handedness or digit ratio. These results add support for general effects for both digit ratio and handedness in elite handball; however, these factors seem inadequate to explain talent selection decisions at this level.

  8. GL4D: a GPU-based architecture for interactive 4D visualization.

    PubMed

    Chu, Alan; Fu, Chi-Wing; Hanson, Andrew J; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes GL4D, an interactive system for visualizing 2-manifolds and 3-manifolds embedded in four Euclidean dimensions and illuminated by 4D light sources. It is a tetrahedron-based rendering pipeline that projects geometry into volume images, an exact parallel to the conventional triangle-based rendering pipeline for 3D graphics. Novel features include GPU-based algorithms for real-time 4D occlusion handling and transparency compositing; we thus enable a previously impossible level of quality and interactivity for exploring lit 4D objects. The 4D tetrahedrons are stored in GPU memory as vertex buffer objects, and the vertex shader is used to perform per-vertex 4D modelview transformations and 4D-to-3D projection. The geometry shader extension is utilized to slice the projected tetrahedrons and rasterize the slices into individual 2D layers of voxel fragments. Finally, the fragment shader performs per-voxel operations such as lighting and alpha blending with previously computed layers. We account for 4D voxel occlusion along the 4D-to-3D projection ray by supporting a multi-pass back-to-front fragment composition along the projection ray; to accomplish this, we exploit a new adaptation of the dual depth peeling technique to produce correct volume image data and to simultaneously render the resulting volume data using 3D transfer functions into the final 2D image. Previous CPU implementations of the rendering of 4D-embedded 3-manifolds could not perform either the 4D depth-buffered projection or manipulation of the volume-rendered image in real-time; in particular, the dual depth peeling algorithm is a novel GPU-based solution to the real-time 4D depth-buffering problem. GL4D is implemented as an integrated OpenGL-style API library, so that the underlying shader operations are as transparent as possible to the user.

  9. Poster — Thur Eve — 23: Dose and Position Quality Assurance using the RADPOS System for 4D Radiotherapy with CyberKnife

    SciTech Connect

    Marants, R; Vandervoort, E; Cygler, J E

    2014-08-15

    Introduction: RADPOS 4D dosimetry system consists of a microMOSFET dosimeter combined with an electromagnetic positioning sensor, which allows for performing real-time dose and position measurements simultaneously. In this report the use of RADPOS as an independent quality assurance (QA) tool during CyberKnife 4D radiotherapy treatment is described. In addition to RADPOS, GAFCHROMIC® films were used for simultaneous dose measurement. Methods: RADPOS and films were calibrated in a Solid Water® phantom at 1.5 cm depth, SAD= 80 cm, using 60 mm cone. CT based treatment plan was created for a Solid Water® breast phantom containing metal fiducials and RADPOS probe. Dose calculations were performed using iPlan pencil beam algorithm. Before the treatment delivery, GAFCHROMIC® film was inserted inside the breast phantom, next to the RADPOS probe. Then the phantom was positioned on the chest platform of the QUASAR, to which Synchrony LED optical markers were also attached. Position logging began for RADPOS and the Synchrony tracking system, the QUASAR motion was initiated and the treatment was delivered. Results: RADPOS position measurements very closely matched the LED marker positions recorded by the Synchrony camera tracking system. The RADPOS measured dose was 2.5% higher than the average film measured dose, which is within the experimental uncertainties. Treatment plan calculated dose was 4.1 and 1.6% lower than measured by RADPOS and film, respectively. This is most likely due to the inferior nature of the dose calculation algorithm. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that RADPOS system is a useful tool for independent QA of CyberKnife treatments.

  10. 4D phase-contrast flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance: comprehensive quantification and visualization of flow dynamics in atrial septal defect and partial anomalous pulmonary venous return.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Israel; Simpson, John; Schaeffter, Tobias; Beerbaum, Philipp

    2010-11-01

    The case of an 8-year-old girl with atrial septal defect and associated anomalous pulmonary venous return is presented to illustrate the advantages of four dimensional flow (4D flow) over the current two dimensional flow (2D flow) in terms of time efficiency, easy planning, accurate and individual quantification of the blood sources contributing to the left-to-right shunting from one single acquisition, internal validation of flow measurement accuracy, possibility of reanalysis without rescanning in case of unexpected findings during the postprocessing, and comprehensive understanding of flow insight by use of particle tracing visualization.

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory 4D Database

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-02

    4D is an integrated development platform - a single product comprised of the components you need to create and distribute professional applications. You get a graphical design environment, SQL database, a programming language, integrated PHP execution, HTTP server, application server, executable generator, and much more. 4D offers multi-platform development and deployment, meaning whatever you create on a Mac can be used on Windows, and vice-versa. Beyond productive development, 4D is renowned for its great flexibility in maintenance and modification of existing applications, and its extreme ease of implementation in its numerous deployment options. Your professional application can be put into production more quickly, at a lower cost, and will always be instantly scalable. 4D makes it easy, whether you're looking to create a classic desktop application, a client-server system, a distributed solution for Web or mobile clients - or all of the above!

  12. Dynamic Interactive Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabry, Khaled; Barker, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses the notions of interactivity and dynamicity of learning systems in relation to information technologies and design principles that can contribute to interactive and dynamic learning. It explores the concept of dynamic interactive learning systems based on the emerging generation of information as part of a…

  13. Experimental determination of the navigation error of the 4-D navigation, guidance, and control systems on the NASA B-737 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Navigation error data from these flights are presented in a format utilizing three independent axes - horizontal, vertical, and time. The navigation position estimate error term and the autopilot flight technical error term are combined to form the total navigation error in each axis. This method of error presentation allows comparisons to be made between other 2-, 3-, or 4-D navigation systems and allows experimental or theoretical determination of the navigation error terms. Position estimate error data are presented with the navigation system position estimate based on dual DME radio updates that are smoothed with inertial velocities, dual DME radio updates that are smoothed with true airspeed and magnetic heading, and inertial velocity updates only. The normal mode of navigation with dual DME updates that are smoothed with inertial velocities resulted in a mean error of 390 m with a standard deviation of 150 m in the horizontal axis; a mean error of 1.5 m low with a standard deviation of less than 11 m in the vertical axis; and a mean error as low as 252 m with a standard deviation of 123 m in the time axis.

  14. Coupled nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongyan

    In this dissertation, we study coupled nonlinear dynamical systems that exhibit new types of complex behavior. We numerically and analytically examine a variety of dynamical models, ranging from systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE) with novel elements of feedback to systems of partial differential equations (PDE) that model chemical pattern formation. Chaos, dynamical uncertainty, synchronization, and spatiotemporal pattern formation constitute the primary topics of the dissertation. Following the introduction in Chapter 1, we study chaos and dynamical uncertainty in Chapter 2 with coupled Lorenz systems and demonstrate the existence of extreme complexity in high-dimensional ODE systems. In Chapter 3, we demonstrate that chaos synchronization can be achieved by mutual and multiplicative coupling of dynamical systems. Chapter 4 and 5 focus on pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems, and we investigate segregation and integration behavior of populations in competitive and cooperative environments, respectively.

  15. 4D flow imaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran; Allen, Bradley D.; Garcia, Julio; Jarvis, Kelly B.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important tool for the clinical evaluation of patients with cardiovascular disease. Since its introduction in the late 1980s, 2-dimensional phase contrast MRI (2D PC-MRI) has become a routine part of standard-of-care cardiac MRI for the assessment of regional blood flow in the heart and great vessels. More recently, time-resolved PC-MRI with velocity encoding along all three flow directions and three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage (also termed ‘4D flow MRI’) has been developed and applied for the evaluation of cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the human body. 4D flow MRI allows for the comprehensive evaluation of complex blood flow patterns by 3D blood flow visualization and flexible retrospective quantification of flow parameters. Recent technical developments, including the utilization of advanced parallel imaging techniques such as k-t GRAPPA, have resulted in reasonable overall scan times, e.g., 8-12 minutes for 4D flow MRI of the aorta and 10-20 minutes for whole heart coverage. As a result, the application of 4D flow MRI in a clinical setting has become more feasible, as documented by an increased number of recent reports on the utility of the technique for the assessment of cardiac and vascular hemodynamics in patient studies. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential of 4D flow MRI to provide an improved assessment of hemodynamics which might aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to describe the methods used for 4D flow MRI acquisition, post-processing and data analysis. In addition, the article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D flow MRI and includes a review of applications in the heart, thoracic aorta and hepatic system. PMID:24834414

  16. Systems With Emergent Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Ian

    2002-09-01

    Evolutionary biologists often reject deterministic models of evolutionary processes because they equate `deterministic' with `goal-seeking', and have learned the hard way not to trust goal-seeking explanations of evolutionary adaptations. On the other hand, the general theory of dynamical systems potentially has much to offer for evolutionary biology— for example, as a resolution of the conflict between gradualism and punctuated equilibrium. The concept of a system with emergent dynamics retains the deterministic nature of dynamical systems, while eliminating any goal-seeking interpretation. Define an emergent property of a complex system to be a property whose computation from the entity-level rules of the system is intractable (in some reasonable sense). Say that a dynamical system has emergent dynamics if the computation of trajectories is intractable. Then systems with emergent dynamics are deterministic but not goal-seeking. As such, they offer a sensible way to use dynamical systems as models for evolutionary processes in biology, and in other areas. We discuss these issues and examine a few simple aspects of emergence in dynamical systems.

  17. Extensible Systems Dynamics Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    pedigree information across communities-of-interest and across network boundaries. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ptolemy II, Systems Dynamics, PMESII, National...3 4.2 ADAPT THE PTOLEMY II FRAMEWORK TO ENSURE A WELL-SUITED MODELING...report of activities in the Extensible Systems Dynamics Framework project performed by the Ptolemy Project, University of California, Berkeley for

  18. Mobility and efficacy of 2,4-D herbicide from slow-release delivery systems based on organo-zeolite and organo-bentonite complexes.

    PubMed

    Shirvani, Mehran; Farajollahi, Edris; Bakhtiari, Somayeh; Ogunseitan, Oladele A

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to develop slow-release formulations (SRFs) of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) using zeolite and bentonite minerals modified with cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) surfactant. Adsorption-desorption, greenhouse bioassay and column experiments were carried out to assess the potential of the SRFs to control weeds while reducing the herbicide leaching losses to deep layers of soil. The results showed that only 6.5 mmol 2,4-D kg(-1) was retained by Na-bent, and the herbicide was not adsorbed by Na-zeol at all. The surface modification with CTMA surfactant, however, improved the 2,4-D adsorption capacity of the zeolite and bentonite up to 207.5 and 415.8 mmol kg(-1), respectively. The synthesized organo-minerals slowly released the retained 2,4-D discharging 22 to 64% of the adsorbed 2,4-D to the solution phase within 7 days. The SRFs significantly (P = 0.05) reduced the herbicide mobility within the soil columns keeping a great portion of the herbicide active ingredient in the upper 5 cm soil layer. The SRFs were significantly (P = 0.05) as effective as the free technical herbicide in weed control without harming the ryegrass as the main plant. Therefore, the synthesized SRFs could be considered as useful tools for weed control in sustainable agriculture.

  19. Use of INSAT-3D sounder and imager radiances in the 4D-VAR data assimilation system and its implications in the analyses and forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indira Rani, S.; Taylor, Ruth; George, John P.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2016-05-01

    INSAT-3D, the first Indian geostationary satellite with sounding capability, provides valuable information over India and the surrounding oceanic regions which are pivotal to Numerical Weather Prediction. In collaboration with UK Met Office, NCMRWF developed the assimilation capability of INSAT-3D Clear Sky Brightness Temperature (CSBT), both from the sounder and imager, in the 4D-Var assimilation system being used at NCMRWF. Out of the 18 sounder channels, radiances from 9 channels are selected for assimilation depending on relevance of the information in each channel. The first three high peaking channels, the CO2 absorption channels and the three water vapor channels (channel no. 10, 11, and 12) are assimilated both over land and Ocean, whereas the window channels (channel no. 6, 7, and 8) are assimilated only over the Ocean. Measured satellite radiances are compared with that from short range forecasts to monitor the data quality. This is based on the assumption that the observed satellite radiances are free from calibration errors and the short range forecast provided by NWP model is free from systematic errors. Innovations (Observation - Forecast) before and after the bias correction are indicative of how well the bias correction works. Since the biases vary with air-masses, time, scan angle and also due to instrument degradation, an accurate bias correction algorithm for the assimilation of INSAT-3D sounder radiance is important. This paper discusses the bias correction methods and other quality controls used for the selected INSAT-3D sounder channels and the impact of bias corrected radiance in the data assimilation system particularly over India and surrounding oceanic regions.

  20. Dynamics of multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberson, Robert E.; Schwertassek, Richard

    The fundamental mathematical principles of multibody-system dynamics and their implementation in numerical simulations are examined in a rigorous introduction for design engineers. Chapters are devoted to the history of rotational dynamics; typical spacecraft, vehicle, and robotics applications; terminology and notation; the kinematics of a rigid body (location and orientation, velocity, and the kinematical equations of motion); the dynamics of a rigid body; multibody formalisms, kinematics, and dynamics; the linearized equations for multibody systems; and computer simulation techniques. Diagrams, drawings, and a glossary of symbols are provided.

  1. 4D-Var Developement at GMAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelc, Joanna S.; Todling, Ricardo; Akkraoui, Amal El

    2014-01-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Offce (GMAO) is currently using an IAU-based 3D-Var data assimilation system. GMAO has been experimenting with a 3D-Var-hybrid version of its data assimilation system (DAS) for over a year now, which will soon become operational and it will rapidly progress toward a 4D-EnVar. Concurrently, the machinery to exercise traditional 4DVar is in place and it is desirable to have a comparison of the traditional 4D approach with the other available options, and evaluate their performance in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) DAS. This work will also explore the possibility for constructing a reduced order model (ROM) to make traditional 4D-Var computationally attractive for increasing model resolutions. Part of the research on ROM will be to search for a suitably acceptable space to carry on the corresponding reduction. This poster illustrates how the IAU-based 4D-Var assimilation compares with our currently used IAU-based 3D-Var.

  2. Shadow-driven 4D haptic visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Hanson, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Just as we can work with two-dimensional floor plans to communicate 3D architectural design, we can exploit reduced-dimension shadows to manipulate the higher-dimensional objects generating the shadows. In particular, by taking advantage of physically reactive 3D shadow-space controllers, we can transform the task of interacting with 4D objects to a new level of physical reality. We begin with a teaching tool that uses 2D knot diagrams to manipulate the geometry of 3D mathematical knots via their projections; our unique 2D haptic interface allows the user to become familiar with sketching, editing, exploration, and manipulation of 3D knots rendered as projected imageson a 2D shadow space. By combining graphics and collision-sensing haptics, we can enhance the 2D shadow-driven editing protocol to successfully leverage 2D pen-and-paper or blackboard skills. Building on the reduced-dimension 2D editing tool for manipulating 3D shapes, we develop the natural analogy to produce a reduced-dimension 3D tool for manipulating 4D shapes. By physically modeling the correct properties of 4D surfaces, their bending forces, and their collisions in the 3D haptic controller interface, we can support full-featured physical exploration of 4D mathematical objects in a manner that is otherwise far beyond the experience accessible to human beings. As far as we are aware, this paper reports the first interactive system with force-feedback that provides "4D haptic visualization" permitting the user to model and interact with 4D cloth-like objects.

  3. 4D Printing with Mechanically Robust, Thermally Actuating Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bakarich, Shannon E; Gorkin, Robert; in het Panhuis, Marc; Spinks, Geoffrey M

    2015-06-01

    A smart valve is created by 4D printing of hydrogels that are both mechanically robust and thermally actuating. The printed hydrogels are made up of an interpenetrating network of alginate and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). 4D structures are created by printing the "dynamic" hydrogel ink alongside other static materials.

  4. Interactive animation of 4D performance capture.

    PubMed

    Casas, Dan; Tejera, Margara; Guillemaut, Jean-Yves; Hilton, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    A 4D parametric motion graph representation is presented for interactive animation from actor performance capture in a multiple camera studio. The representation is based on a 4D model database of temporally aligned mesh sequence reconstructions for multiple motions. High-level movement controls such as speed and direction are achieved by blending multiple mesh sequences of related motions. A real-time mesh sequence blending approach is introduced, which combines the realistic deformation of previous nonlinear solutions with efficient online computation. Transitions between different parametric motion spaces are evaluated in real time based on surface shape and motion similarity. Four-dimensional parametric motion graphs allow real-time interactive character animation while preserving the natural dynamics of the captured performance.

  5. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  6. Dynamics of collisionless systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The three dimensional dynamics of rotating stellar systems were studied. A comparison of various mathematical models of flat galaxies is presented. The effects of self-gravity upon a flat galaxy undergoing a tidal encounter with another galaxy were investigated.

  7. Comparison between the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) and 4D-Var in atmospheric CO2 flux inversion with the Goddard Earth Observing System-Chem model and the observation impact diagnostics from the LETKF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junjie; Bowman, Kevin W.; Lee, Meemong

    2016-11-01

    Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and 4D-Variational (4D-Var) are two advanced data assimilation methods that are the basis of numerical weather prediction and have been extensively used in trace gas assimilation and inverse modeling. In this study, we compare 4D-Var and the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF), one type of EnKF, in estimating CO2 fluxes with both simulated and real satellite data from Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) and propose a method to calculate flux changes and flux error reductions from assimilating each observation within the LETKF. The results show that the mean posterior flux accuracy across 11 land regions defined by the Atmospheric Tracer Transport Model Intercomparison Project is comparable between 4D-Var and the LETKF, as shown in the Observing System Simulation Experiment, but the differences between the LETKF and 4D-Var are relatively larger over data sparse regions. We show that this is most likely due to the fact that the observations from a much broader region have impact on flux estimation in 4D-Var than in the LETKF. As a result, the posterior fluxes from 4D-Var are more consistent with the atmospheric CO2 growth rate. We find that the inversion results are less dependent on inversion methods with the increase of observations. With real GOSAT observations, we show that the posterior flux changes in 2011 relative to 2010 are more consistent between these two methods than the absolute estimates.

  8. First Steps Toward Ultrasound-Based Motion Compensation for Imaging and Therapy: Calibration with an Optical System and 4D PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Schwaab, Julia; Kurz, Christopher; Sarti, Cristina; Bongers, André; Schoenahl, Frédéric; Bert, Christoph; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia; Jenne, Jürgen Walter

    2015-01-01

    Target motion, particularly in the abdomen, due to respiration or patient movement is still a challenge in many diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Hence, methods to detect and compensate this motion are required. Diagnostic ultrasound (US) represents a non-invasive and dose-free alternative to fluoroscopy, providing more information about internal target motion than respiration belt or optical tracking. The goal of this project is to develop an US-based motion tracking for real-time motion correction in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging, notably in 4D positron emission tomography (PET). In this work, a workflow is established to enable the transformation of US tracking data to the coordinates of the treatment delivery or imaging system – even if the US probe is moving due to respiration. It is shown that the US tracking signal is equally adequate for 4D PET image reconstruction as the clinically used respiration belt and provides additional opportunities in this concern. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the US probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality. The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for US tracking-based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation. Eventually, we show in vitro that an US-based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US transducer is feasible. PMID:26649277

  9. First Steps Toward Ultrasound-Based Motion Compensation for Imaging and Therapy: Calibration with an Optical System and 4D PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Schwaab, Julia; Kurz, Christopher; Sarti, Cristina; Bongers, André; Schoenahl, Frédéric; Bert, Christoph; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia; Jenne, Jürgen Walter

    2015-01-01

    Target motion, particularly in the abdomen, due to respiration or patient movement is still a challenge in many diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Hence, methods to detect and compensate this motion are required. Diagnostic ultrasound (US) represents a non-invasive and dose-free alternative to fluoroscopy, providing more information about internal target motion than respiration belt or optical tracking. The goal of this project is to develop an US-based motion tracking for real-time motion correction in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging, notably in 4D positron emission tomography (PET). In this work, a workflow is established to enable the transformation of US tracking data to the coordinates of the treatment delivery or imaging system - even if the US probe is moving due to respiration. It is shown that the US tracking signal is equally adequate for 4D PET image reconstruction as the clinically used respiration belt and provides additional opportunities in this concern. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the US probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality. The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for US tracking-based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation. Eventually, we show in vitro that an US-based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US transducer is feasible.

  10. Semipredictable dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    A new class of deterministic dynamical systems, termed semipredictable dynamical systems, is presented. The spatiotemporal evolution of these systems have both predictable and unpredictable traits, as found in natural complex systems. We prove a general result: The dynamics of any deterministic nonlinear cellular automaton (CA) with p possible dynamical states can be decomposed at each instant of time in a superposition of N layers involving p0, p1, …, pN - 1 dynamical states each, where the pk ∈ N , k ∈ [ 0 , N - 1 ] are divisors of p. If the divisors coincide with the prime factors of p this decomposition is unique. Conversely, we also prove that N CA working on symbols p0, p1, …, pN - 1 can be composed to create a graded CA rule with N different layers. We then show that, even when the full spatiotemporal evolution can be unpredictable, certain traits (layers) can exactly be predicted. We present explicit examples of such systems involving compositions of Wolfram's 256 elementary CA and a more complex CA rule acting on a neighborhood of two sites and 12 symbols and whose rule table corresponds to the smallest Moufang loop M12(S3, 2).

  11. Dynamic system classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumpe, Daniel; Greiner, Maksim; Müller, Ewald; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic differential equations describe well many physical, biological, and sociological systems, despite the simplification often made in their derivation. Here the usage of simple stochastic differential equations to characterize and classify complex dynamical systems is proposed within a Bayesian framework. To this end, we develop a dynamic system classifier (DSC). The DSC first abstracts training data of a system in terms of time-dependent coefficients of the descriptive stochastic differential equation. Thereby the DSC identifies unique correlation structures within the training data. For definiteness we restrict the presentation of the DSC to oscillation processes with a time-dependent frequency ω (t ) and damping factor γ (t ) . Although real systems might be more complex, this simple oscillator captures many characteristic features. The ω and γ time lines represent the abstract system characterization and permit the construction of efficient signal classifiers. Numerical experiments show that such classifiers perform well even in the low signal-to-noise regime.

  12. Dynamic system classifier.

    PubMed

    Pumpe, Daniel; Greiner, Maksim; Müller, Ewald; Enßlin, Torsten A

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic differential equations describe well many physical, biological, and sociological systems, despite the simplification often made in their derivation. Here the usage of simple stochastic differential equations to characterize and classify complex dynamical systems is proposed within a Bayesian framework. To this end, we develop a dynamic system classifier (DSC). The DSC first abstracts training data of a system in terms of time-dependent coefficients of the descriptive stochastic differential equation. Thereby the DSC identifies unique correlation structures within the training data. For definiteness we restrict the presentation of the DSC to oscillation processes with a time-dependent frequency ω(t) and damping factor γ(t). Although real systems might be more complex, this simple oscillator captures many characteristic features. The ω and γ time lines represent the abstract system characterization and permit the construction of efficient signal classifiers. Numerical experiments show that such classifiers perform well even in the low signal-to-noise regime.

  13. Respiratory gating and 4-D tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Tiezhi

    2004-12-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a new intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery process developed at the University of Wisconsin and TomoTherapy Inc. Tomotherapy may be of advantage in lung cancer treatment due to its rotational delivery mode. As with conventional IMRT delivery, however, intrafraction respiratory motion during a tomotherapy treatment causes unnecessary radiation to the healthy tissue. Possible solutions to these problems associated with intrafraction motion have been studied in this thesis. A spirometer is useful for monitoring breathing because of its direct correlation with lung volume changes. However, its inherent drift prevents its application in long-term breathing monitoring. With calibration and stabilization algorithms, a spirometer is able to provide accurate, long-term lung volume change measurements. Such a spirometer system is most suited for deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) treatments. An improved laser-spirometer combined system has also been developed for target tracking in 4-D treatment. Spirometer signals are used to calibrate the displacement measurements into lung volume changes, thereby eliminating scaling errors from daily setup variations. The laser displacement signals may also be used to correct spirometer drifts during operation. A new 4-D treatment technique has been developed to account for intrafraction motion in treatment planning. The patient's breathing and the beam delivery are synchronized, and the target motion/deformation is incorporated into treatment plan optimization. Results show that this new 4D treatment technique significantly reduces motion effects and provides improved patient tolerance.

  14. Pregnancy monitoring in dogs and cats using 3D and 4D ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, T B; Drews, B; Kurz, J; Hermes, R; Yang, S; Göritz, F

    2009-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D)/four-dimensional (4D) volume ultrasound is an established method in human medicine that offers various options for analysing and presenting ultrasound volume data. However, the successful application of the different 3D/4D imaging modalities in pregnant dogs and cats has not yet been reported in the literature. The main reasons for this are: (1) the high costs of 3D/4D ultrasound systems, (2) operation difficulties due to high breathing frequency in non-sedated animals and (3) the missing specific knowledge in veterinary medicine concerning how to perform high-quality volume scans. Automatically acquired ultrasound volume data sets were generated with two different ultrasound systems: the portable Voluson i and the stationary Voluson Expert 730. Different 3D/4D imaging modalities were tested in regard of their practicability in pregnancy monitoring in dogs and cats. Nine different volume imaging modalities were applied using the saved files. For the presentation of the static 3D volume data sets, we used the multiplanar, niche, surface, transparency, glass body, inversion, volume calculation and tomographic ultrasound imaging modes. For the dynamic 4D data, the surface and glass body modes were applied. By changing the human standard settings to the requirements of small animal anatomy, it was found that 3D/4D ultrasound has great potential for the characterization of pregnancy in queens and bitches. The 3D/4D technology offered advanced information about pregnancy status and birth prediction and improved the diagnostic confidence. By using standardized examination protocols, 3D/4D ultrasound will allow a reduction in examination time by generating even more relevant information. These benefits, combined with possible future cost reduction of commercial ultrasound systems, might lead to frequent utilization in routine pregnancy diagnostic and birth management in small animal practice.

  15. Advances in 4D radiation therapy for managing respiration: part II - 4D treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2012-12-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle - an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems.

  16. Dynamics insulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. E. W.; Hepler, W. A.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced dynamic insulation systems were analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. A particular performance measure is proposed in order to characterize various insulations in a unique manner. This measure is related to a base quantity, the refrigeration power ratio. The latter is the minimum refrigeration power, for a particular dynamic insulation limit, to the actual reliquefaction power associated with cryoliquid boiloff. This ratio serves as reference quantity which is approximately constant for a specific ductless insulation at a chosen normal boiling point. Each real container with support structure, vent tube, and other transverse components requires a larger refrigeration power. The ratio of the actual experimental power to the theoretical value of the support-less system is a suitable measure of the entire insulation performance as far as parasitic heat leakage is concerned. The present characterization is illustrated using simple thermodynamic system examples including experiments with liquid nitrogen. Numerical values are presented and a comparison with liquid helium is given.

  17. Exploration of 4D MRI blood flow using stylistic visualization.

    PubMed

    van Pelt, Roy; Oliván Bescós, Javier; Breeuwer, Marcel; Clough, Rachel E; Gröller, M Eduard; ter Haar Romenij, Bart; Vilanova, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Insight into the dynamics of blood-flow considerably improves the understanding of the complex cardiovascular system and its pathologies. Advances in MRI technology enable acquisition of 4D blood-flow data, providing quantitative blood-flow velocities over time. The currently typical slice-by-slice analysis requires a full mental reconstruction of the unsteady blood-flow field, which is a tedious and highly challenging task, even for skilled physicians. We endeavor to alleviate this task by means of comprehensive visualization and interaction techniques. In this paper we present a framework for pre-clinical cardiovascular research, providing tools to both interactively explore the 4D blood-flow data and depict the essential blood-flow characteristics. The framework encompasses a variety of visualization styles, comprising illustrative techniques as well as improved methods from the established field of flow visualization. Each of the incorporated styles, including exploded planar reformats, flow-direction highlights, and arrow-trails, locally captures the blood-flow dynamics and may be initiated by an interactively probed vessel cross-section. Additionally, we present the results of an evaluation with domain experts, measuring the value of each of the visualization styles and related rendering parameters.

  18. Experimental validation of a 4D elastic registration algorithm.

    PubMed

    Leung, Corina; Hashtrudi-Zaad, Keyvan; Foroughi, Pezhman; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive validation study of an elastic registration algorithm for dynamic 3D ultrasound images (also known as a 4D image). The registration algorithm uses attribute vectors from both a fixed and previous moving images to perform feature-based alignment of a series of images. The 4D method reduces computational requirements and increases the effective search space for the location of corresponding features, resulting in enhanced registration speed when compared to a static 3D registration technique. Experimental analysis revealed up to 32% improvement in speed when using the 4D method, which makes the algorithm attractive for real-time applications.

  19. 4D-var assimilation of CRISTA-NF H2O and MLS retrievals with the high resolution SACADA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasradze, Ketevan; Elbern, Hendrik; Schwinger, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    SACADA is a 4-dimensional variational assimilation system for trace gas observations. A novel global chemistry transport model with its adjoint version is the kernel of this system. Since the German Weather Service global forecast model (GME) is used as an online meteorological driver, the icosahedral grid structure and the horizontal transport are adopted from GME. Recently the horizontal and vertical scheme resolution of the model grid was refined: The distance of the horizontal grid points was reduced to about 150 km and vertical separation between grid levels is now less then 1 km below 22 km altitude. In order to better describe chemical processes in the lower stratosphere/upper troposphere (UT/LS) the chemistry module was extended and revised. All this modifications were done in order to draw full advantage from high resolution limb sounding instruments, like CRISTA-NF (Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere - New Frontiers). As a case study, assimilation of MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) data with diagnosis of observation and background error statistics in observation space for H2O was performed. Relative humidity is used to filter observations and the background field. It is shown that the H2O analysis significantly improves compared to the ECMWF operational analisys. Additionally, data from the CRISTA-NF instrument, which has been operated on board the Russian high altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysica, was assimilated. These CRISTA-NF observations have been taken during the AMMA (African Mansoon Measurements Analysis) Campaign in summer 2006 by ICG I (Institute of Chemistry and Dynamics of the Geosphere, Research Centre Jülich). A basic finding is that the H2O-analysis based on the additional CRISTA data in the UT/LS region improves with the SACADA high resolution configuration.

  20. 4D electron microscopy: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2012-10-16

    achievable with short intense pulses containing a large number of electrons, however, are limited to tens of nanometers and nanoseconds, respectively. This is because Coulomb repulsion is significant in such a pulse, and the electrons spread in space and time, thus limiting the beam coherence. It is therefore not possible to image the ultrafast elementary dynamics of complex transformations. The challenge was to retain the high spatial resolution of a conventional TEM while simultaneously enabling the temporal resolution required to visualize atomic-scale motions. In this Account, we discuss the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) and summarize techniques and applications that illustrate the power of the approach. In UEM, images are obtained either stroboscopically with coherent single-electron packets or with a single electron bunch. Coulomb repulsion is absent under the single-electron condition, thus permitting imaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy, all with high spatiotemporal resolution, the atomic scale (sub-nanometer and femtosecond). The time resolution is limited only by the laser pulse duration and energy carried by the electron packets; the CCD camera has no bearing on the temporal resolution. In the regime of single pulses of electrons, the temporal resolution of picoseconds can be attained when hundreds of electrons are in the bunch. The applications given here are selected to highlight phenomena of different length and time scales, from atomic motions during structural dynamics to phase transitions and nanomechanical oscillations. We conclude with a brief discussion of emerging methods, which include scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM) with convergent beams, and time-resolved imaging of biological structures at ambient conditions with environmental cells.

  1. Dynamics for flexible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraco, A.; Cuny, B.; Ishiomin, G.

    Analytical techniques for dynamic modeling of mechanical systems with deformable members are developed and demonstrated. Formulations for the rigid member and the flexible member are derived; the position of an arbitrary point is defined; and the construction of the complete model from these components is explained. Numerical results for the case of a planar four-bar parallelogram rotating about a fixed axis located in the same plane are presented in graphs and discussed.

  2. Solar System Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    2002-01-01

    In these 18 years, the research has touched every major dynamical problem in the solar system, including: the effect of chaotic zones on the distribution of asteroids, the delivery of meteorites along chaotic pathways, the chaotic motion of Pluto, the chaotic motion of the outer planets and that of the whole solar system, the delivery of short period comets from the Kuiper belt, the tidal evolution of the Uranian arid Galilean satellites, the chaotic tumbling of Hyperion and other irregular satellites, the large chaotic variations of the obliquity of Mars, the evolution of the Earth-Moon system, and the resonant core- mantle dynamics of Earth and Venus. It has introduced new analytical and numerical tools that are in widespread use. Today, nearly every long-term integration of our solar system, its subsystems, and other solar systems uses algorithms that was invented. This research has all been primarily Supported by this sequence of PGG NASA grants. During this period published major investigations of tidal evolution of the Earth-Moon system and of the passage of the Earth and Venus through non-linear core-mantle resonances were completed. It has published a major innovation in symplectic algorithms: the symplectic corrector. A paper was completed on non-perturbative hydrostatic equilibrium.

  3. Development and evaluation of a high-resolution reanalysis of the East Australian Current region using the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS 3.4) and Incremental Strong-Constraint 4-Dimensional Variational (IS4D-Var) data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, Colette; Powell, Brian; Roughan, Moninya; Oke, Peter

    2016-10-01

    As with other Western Boundary Currents globally, the East Australian Current (EAC) is highly variable making it a challenge to model and predict. For the EAC region, we combine a high-resolution state-of-the-art numerical ocean model with a variety of traditional and newly available observations using an advanced variational data assimilation scheme. The numerical model is configured using the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS 3.4) and takes boundary forcing from the BlueLink ReANalysis (BRAN3). For the data assimilation, we use an Incremental Strong-Constraint 4-Dimensional Variational (IS4D-Var) scheme, which uses the model dynamics to perturb the initial conditions, atmospheric forcing, and boundary conditions, such that the modelled ocean state better fits and is in balance with the observations. This paper describes the data assimilative model configuration that achieves a significant reduction of the difference between the modelled solution and the observations to give a dynamically consistent "best estimate" of the ocean state over a 2-year period. The reanalysis is shown to represent both assimilated and non-assimilated observations well. It achieves mean spatially averaged root mean squared (rms) residuals with the observations of 7.6 cm for sea surface height (SSH) and 0.4 °C for sea surface temperature (SST) over the assimilation period. The time-mean rms residual for subsurface temperature measured by Argo floats is a maximum of 0.9 °C between water depths of 100 and 300 m and smaller throughout the rest of the water column. Velocities at several offshore and continental shelf moorings are well represented in the reanalysis with complex correlations between 0.8 and 1 for all observations in the upper 500 m. Surface radial velocities from a high-frequency radar array are assimilated and the reanalysis provides surface velocity estimates with complex correlations with observed velocities of 0.8-1 across the radar footprint. A comparison with

  4. Chaos in a 4D dissipative nonlinear fermionic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogmus, Fatma

    2015-12-01

    Gursey Model is the only possible 4D conformally invariant pure fermionic model with a nonlinear self-coupled spinor term. It has been assumed to be similar to the Heisenberg's nonlinear generalization of Dirac's equation, as a possible basis for a unitary description of elementary particles. Gursey Model admits particle-like solutions for the derived classical field equations and these solutions are instantonic in character. In this paper, the dynamical nature of damped and forced Gursey Nonlinear Differential Equations System (GNDES) are studied in order to get more information on spinor type instantons. Bifurcation and chaos in the system are observed by constructing the bifurcation diagrams and Poincaré sections. Lyapunov exponent and power spectrum graphs of GNDES are also constructed to characterize the chaotic behavior.

  5. Data Systems Dynamic Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouff, Christopher; Clark, Melana; Davenport, Bill; Message, Philip

    1993-01-01

    The Data System Dynamic Simulator (DSDS) is a discrete event simulation tool. It was developed for NASA for the specific purpose of evaluating candidate architectures for data systems of the Space Station era. DSDS provides three methods for meeting this requirement. First, the user has access to a library of standard pre-programmed elements. These elements represent tailorable components of NASA data systems and can be connected in any logical manner. Secondly, DSDS supports the development of additional elements. This allows the more sophisticated DSDS user the option of extending the standard element set. Thirdly, DSDS supports the use of data streams simulation. Data streams is the name given to a technique that ignores packet boundaries, but is sensitive to rate changes. Because rate changes are rare compared to packet arrivals in a typical NASA data system, data stream simulations require a fraction of the CPU run time. Additionally, the data stream technique is considerably more accurate than another commonly-used optimization technique.

  6. Dynamic Modeling of ALS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of dynamic modeling and simulation of Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems is to help design them. Static steady state systems analysis provides basic information and is necessary to guide dynamic modeling, but static analysis is not sufficient to design and compare systems. ALS systems must respond to external input variations and internal off-nominal behavior. Buffer sizing, resupply scheduling, failure response, and control system design are aspects of dynamic system design. We develop two dynamic mass flow models and use them in simulations to evaluate systems issues, optimize designs, and make system design trades. One model is of nitrogen leakage in the space station, the other is of a waste processor failure in a regenerative life support system. Most systems analyses are concerned with optimizing the cost/benefit of a system at its nominal steady-state operating point. ALS analysis must go beyond the static steady state to include dynamic system design. All life support systems exhibit behavior that varies over time. ALS systems must respond to equipment operating cycles, repair schedules, and occasional off-nominal behavior or malfunctions. Biological components, such as bioreactors, composters, and food plant growth chambers, usually have operating cycles or other complex time behavior. Buffer sizes, material stocks, and resupply rates determine dynamic system behavior and directly affect system mass and cost. Dynamic simulation is needed to avoid the extremes of costly over-design of buffers and material reserves or system failure due to insufficient buffers and lack of stored material.

  7. Association of TLR4 (D299G, T399I), TLR9 -1486T>C, TIRAP S180L and TNF-α promoter (-1031, -863, -857) polymorphisms with risk for systemic lupus erythematosus among South Indians.

    PubMed

    Rupasree, Y; Naushad, S M; Rajasekhar, L; Uma, A; Kutala, V K

    2015-01-01

    The rationale of this case-control study was to explore the association of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) D299G, TLR4 T399I, TLR9 -1486 T>C, TIR-domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) S180 L and tumor necrosis-α (TNF-α) promoter polymorphisms with susceptibility and phenotypic heterogeneity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). PCR-RFLP, real-time PCR was used for the genetic analysis and expression studies and ELISA was used for the determination of specific autoantibodies. TLR4 D299G was associated with the risk for SLE (OR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.08-2.28), while the TNF-α (-1031, -863, -857) CCC haplotype conferred protection. TLR4 and TIRAP polymorphisms were associated with reduced expression of HLA-DR. The presence of TLR4 and TLR9 polymorphisms increases the MHC2TA expression, while TIRAP polymorphism was associated with reduced expression. TLR4 D299 G showed an inverse association with pulmonary hypertension. TLR 4 T399I and TLR9 -1486 T>C showed a positive association with seizures and photosensitivity, respectively. TIRAP S180 L showed a positive association with alopecia and malar rashes, while an inverse association with psychosis was observed. TLR4 T399I (r = 0.14, p = 0.05) and TIRAP S180 L (r = 0.15, p = 0.03) showed a positive association with anti-Ro antibodies. On the other hand, TLR9 -1486 T>C showed an inverse association with anti-La antibodies (r = -0.20, p = 0.006). To conclude, TLR4 D299G increases the risk for SLE, while TNF-α CCC haplotype reduces the risk for SLE. All these polymorphisms contribute toward phenotypic heterogeneity. TLR4 T399I, TLR9 -1486 T>C and TIRAP S180 L influence specific autoantibody production in SLE.

  8. Optimized PET imaging for 4D treatment planning in radiotherapy: the virtual 4D PET strategy.

    PubMed

    Gianoli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Fontana, Giulia; Giri, Maria G; Grigolato, Daniela; Ferdeghini, Marco; Cavedon, Carlo; Baroni, Guido

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the performance of a novel strategy, referred to as "virtual 4D PET", aiming at the optimization of hybrid 4D CT-PET scan for radiotherapy treatment planning. The virtual 4D PET strategy applies 4D CT motion modeling to avoid time-resolved PET image acquisition. This leads to a reduction of radioactive tracer administered to the patient and to a total acquisition time comparable to free-breathing PET studies. The proposed method exploits a motion model derived from 4D CT, which is applied to the free-breathing PET to recover respiratory motion and motion blur. The free-breathing PET is warped according to the motion model, in order to generate the virtual 4D PET. The virtual 4D PET strategy was tested on images obtained from a 4D computational anthropomorphic phantom. The performance was compared to conventional motion compensated 4D PET. Tests were also carried out on clinical 4D CT-PET scans coming from seven lung and liver cancer patients. The virtual 4D PET strategy was able to recover lesion motion, with comparable performance with respect to the motion compensated 4D PET. The compensation of the activity blurring due to motion was successfully achieved in terms of spill out removal. Specific limitations were highlighted in terms of partial volume compensation. Results on clinical 4D CT-PET scans confirmed the efficacy in 4D PET count statistics optimization, as equal to the free-breathing PET, and recovery of lesion motion. Compared to conventional motion compensation strategies that explicitly require 4D PET imaging, the virtual 4D PET strategy reduces clinical workload and computational costs, resulting in significant advantages for radiotherapy treatment planning.

  9. Dynamics robustness of cascading systems.

    PubMed

    Young, Jonathan T; Hatakeyama, Tetsuhiro S; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-03-01

    A most important property of biochemical systems is robustness. Static robustness, e.g., homeostasis, is the insensitivity of a state against perturbations, whereas dynamics robustness, e.g., homeorhesis, is the insensitivity of a dynamic process. In contrast to the extensively studied static robustness, dynamics robustness, i.e., how a system creates an invariant temporal profile against perturbations, is little explored despite transient dynamics being crucial for cellular fates and are reported to be robust experimentally. For example, the duration of a stimulus elicits different phenotypic responses, and signaling networks process and encode temporal information. Hence, robustness in time courses will be necessary for functional biochemical networks. Based on dynamical systems theory, we uncovered a general mechanism to achieve dynamics robustness. Using a three-stage linear signaling cascade as an example, we found that the temporal profiles and response duration post-stimulus is robust to perturbations against certain parameters. Then analyzing the linearized model, we elucidated the criteria of when signaling cascades will display dynamics robustness. We found that changes in the upstream modules are masked in the cascade, and that the response duration is mainly controlled by the rate-limiting module and organization of the cascade's kinetics. Specifically, we found two necessary conditions for dynamics robustness in signaling cascades: 1) Constraint on the rate-limiting process: The phosphatase activity in the perturbed module is not the slowest. 2) Constraints on the initial conditions: The kinase activity needs to be fast enough such that each module is saturated even with fast phosphatase activity and upstream changes are attenuated. We discussed the relevance of such robustness to several biological examples and the validity of the above conditions therein. Given the applicability of dynamics robustness to a variety of systems, it will provide a

  10. Dynamics robustness of cascading systems

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-01-01

    A most important property of biochemical systems is robustness. Static robustness, e.g., homeostasis, is the insensitivity of a state against perturbations, whereas dynamics robustness, e.g., homeorhesis, is the insensitivity of a dynamic process. In contrast to the extensively studied static robustness, dynamics robustness, i.e., how a system creates an invariant temporal profile against perturbations, is little explored despite transient dynamics being crucial for cellular fates and are reported to be robust experimentally. For example, the duration of a stimulus elicits different phenotypic responses, and signaling networks process and encode temporal information. Hence, robustness in time courses will be necessary for functional biochemical networks. Based on dynamical systems theory, we uncovered a general mechanism to achieve dynamics robustness. Using a three-stage linear signaling cascade as an example, we found that the temporal profiles and response duration post-stimulus is robust to perturbations against certain parameters. Then analyzing the linearized model, we elucidated the criteria of when signaling cascades will display dynamics robustness. We found that changes in the upstream modules are masked in the cascade, and that the response duration is mainly controlled by the rate-limiting module and organization of the cascade’s kinetics. Specifically, we found two necessary conditions for dynamics robustness in signaling cascades: 1) Constraint on the rate-limiting process: The phosphatase activity in the perturbed module is not the slowest. 2) Constraints on the initial conditions: The kinase activity needs to be fast enough such that each module is saturated even with fast phosphatase activity and upstream changes are attenuated. We discussed the relevance of such robustness to several biological examples and the validity of the above conditions therein. Given the applicability of dynamics robustness to a variety of systems, it will provide a

  11. Semaphorin 4D Promotes Skeletal Metastasis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Hua; Buhamrah, Asma; Schneider, Abraham; Lin, Yi-Ling; Zhou, Hua; Bugshan, Amr; Basile, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Bone density is controlled by interactions between osteoclasts, which resorb bone, and osteoblasts, which deposit it. The semaphorins and their receptors, the plexins, originally shown to function in the immune system and to provide chemotactic cues for axon guidance, are now known to play a role in this process as well. Emerging data have identified Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) as a product of osteoclasts acting through its receptor Plexin-B1 on osteoblasts to inhibit their function, tipping the balance of bone homeostasis in favor of resorption. Breast cancers and other epithelial malignancies overexpress Sema4D, so we theorized that tumor cells could be exploiting this pathway to establish lytic skeletal metastases. Here, we use measurements of osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function in vitro and a mouse model of skeletal metastasis to demonstrate that both soluble Sema4D and protein produced by the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 inhibits differentiation of MC3T3 cells, an osteoblast cell line, and their ability to form mineralized tissues, while Sema4D-mediated induction of IL-8 and LIX/CXCL5, the murine homologue of IL-8, increases osteoclast numbers and activity. We also observe a decrease in the number of bone metastases in mice injected with MDA-MB-231 cells when Sema4D is silenced by RNA interference. These results are significant because treatments directed at suppression of skeletal metastases in bone-homing malignancies usually work by arresting bone remodeling, potentially leading to skeletal fragility, a significant problem in patient management. Targeting Sema4D in these cancers would not affect bone remodeling and therefore could elicit an improved therapeutic result without the debilitating side effects. PMID:26910109

  12. Semaphorin 4D Promotes Skeletal Metastasis in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Hua; Buhamrah, Asma; Schneider, Abraham; Lin, Yi-Ling; Zhou, Hua; Bugshan, Amr; Basile, John R

    2016-01-01

    Bone density is controlled by interactions between osteoclasts, which resorb bone, and osteoblasts, which deposit it. The semaphorins and their receptors, the plexins, originally shown to function in the immune system and to provide chemotactic cues for axon guidance, are now known to play a role in this process as well. Emerging data have identified Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) as a product of osteoclasts acting through its receptor Plexin-B1 on osteoblasts to inhibit their function, tipping the balance of bone homeostasis in favor of resorption. Breast cancers and other epithelial malignancies overexpress Sema4D, so we theorized that tumor cells could be exploiting this pathway to establish lytic skeletal metastases. Here, we use measurements of osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function in vitro and a mouse model of skeletal metastasis to demonstrate that both soluble Sema4D and protein produced by the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 inhibits differentiation of MC3T3 cells, an osteoblast cell line, and their ability to form mineralized tissues, while Sema4D-mediated induction of IL-8 and LIX/CXCL5, the murine homologue of IL-8, increases osteoclast numbers and activity. We also observe a decrease in the number of bone metastases in mice injected with MDA-MB-231 cells when Sema4D is silenced by RNA interference. These results are significant because treatments directed at suppression of skeletal metastases in bone-homing malignancies usually work by arresting bone remodeling, potentially leading to skeletal fragility, a significant problem in patient management. Targeting Sema4D in these cancers would not affect bone remodeling and therefore could elicit an improved therapeutic result without the debilitating side effects.

  13. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rather than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.

  14. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    DOE PAGES

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; ...

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rathermore » than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.« less

  15. Systoles in discrete dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sara; Grácio, Clara; Ramos, Carlos Correia

    2013-01-01

    The fruitful relationship between Geometry and Graph Theory has been explored by several authors benefiting also the Theory of discrete dynamical systems seen as Markov chains in graphs. In this work we will further explore the relation between these areas, giving a geometrical interpretation of notions from dynamical systems. In particular, we relate the topological entropy with the systole, here defined in the context of discrete dynamical systems. We show that for continuous interval maps the systole is trivial; however, for the class of interval maps with one discontinuity point the systole acquires relevance from the point of view of the dynamical behavior. Moreover, we define the geodesic length spectrum associated to a Markov interval map and we compute the referred spectrum in several examples.

  16. Solar System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Carl D.; Dermott, Stanley F.

    2000-02-01

    Preface; 1. Structure of the solar system; 2. The two-body problem; 3. The restricted three-body problem; 4. Tides, rotation and shape; 5. Spin-orbit coupling; 6. The disturbing function; 7. Secular perturbations; 8. Resonant perturbations; 9. Chaos and long-term evolution; 10. Planetary rings; Appendix A. Solar system data; Appendix B. Expansion of the disturbing function; Index.

  17. Unusual molecular material formed through irreversible transformation and revealed by 4D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Renske M; Tissot, Antoine; Hauser, Andreas; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2013-05-28

    Four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy (EM) uniquely combines the high spatial resolution to pinpoint individual nano-objects, with the high temporal resolution necessary to address the dynamics of their laser-induced transformation. Here, using 4D-EM, we demonstrate the in situ irreversible transformation of individual nanoparticles of the molecular framework Fe(pyrazine)Pt(CN)4. The newly formed material exhibits an unusually large negative thermal expansion (i.e. contraction), which is revealed by time-resolved imaging and diffraction. Negative thermal expansion is a unique property exhibited by only few materials. Here we show that the increased flexibility of the metal-cyanide framework after the removal of the bridging pyrazine ligands is responsible for the negative thermal expansion behavior of the new material. This in situ visualization of single nanostructures during reactions should be extendable to other classes of reactive systems.

  18. Solar system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    1987-01-01

    The rotational dynamics of irregularly shaped satellites and the origin of Kirkwood Gaps are discussed. The chaotic tumbling of Hyperion and the anomalously low eccentricity of Deimos are examined. The Digital Orrery is used to explore the phase space of the ellipic restricted three body problem near the principal commensurabilities (2/1, 5/2, 3/1, and 3/2). The results for the 3/1 commensurability are in close agreement with those found earlier with the algebraic mapping method. Large chaotic zones are associated with the 3/1, 2/1 and 5/2 resonances, where there are gaps in the distribution of asteroids. The region near the 3/2 resonance, where the Hilda group of asteroids is located, is largely devoid of chaotic behavior. Thus, there is a qualitative agreement between the character of the motion and the distribution of asteroids.

  19. Self-Supervised Dynamical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2003-01-01

    Some progress has been made in a continuing effort to develop mathematical models of the behaviors of multi-agent systems known in biology, economics, and sociology (e.g., systems ranging from single or a few biomolecules to many interacting higher organisms). Living systems can be characterized by nonlinear evolution of probability distributions over different possible choices of the next steps in their motions. One of the main challenges in mathematical modeling of living systems is to distinguish between random walks of purely physical origin (for instance, Brownian motions) and those of biological origin. Following a line of reasoning from prior research, it has been assumed, in the present development, that a biological random walk can be represented by a nonlinear mathematical model that represents coupled mental and motor dynamics incorporating the psychological concept of reflection or self-image. The nonlinear dynamics impart the lifelike ability to behave in ways and to exhibit patterns that depart from thermodynamic equilibrium. Reflection or self-image has traditionally been recognized as a basic element of intelligence. The nonlinear mathematical models of the present development are denoted self-supervised dynamical systems. They include (1) equations of classical dynamics, including random components caused by uncertainties in initial conditions and by Langevin forces, coupled with (2) the corresponding Liouville or Fokker-Planck equations that describe the evolutions of probability densities that represent the uncertainties. The coupling is effected by fictitious information-based forces, denoted supervising forces, composed of probability densities and functionals thereof. The equations of classical mechanics represent motor dynamics that is, dynamics in the traditional sense, signifying Newton s equations of motion. The evolution of the probability densities represents mental dynamics or self-image. Then the interaction between the physical and

  20. Chaotic transport in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Stephen

    The subject of chaotic transport in dynamical systems is examined from the viewpoint of problems of phase space transport. The examples considered include uniform elliptical vortices in external linear time-dependent velocity fields; capture and passage through resonance in celestial mechanics; bubble dynamics in straining flows; and photodissociation of molecules. The discussion covers transport in two-dimensional maps; convective mixing and transport problems in fluid mechanics; transport in quasi-periodically forced systems; Markov models; and transport in k-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian systems.

  1. Dynamically reconfigurable photovoltaic system

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2016-12-27

    A PV system composed of sub-arrays, each having a group of PV cells that are electrically connected to each other. A power management circuit for each sub-array has a communications interface and serves to connect or disconnect the sub-array to a programmable power grid. The power grid has bus rows and bus columns. A bus management circuit is positioned at a respective junction of a bus column and a bus row and is programmable through its communication interface to connect or disconnect a power path in the grid. As a result, selected sub-arrays are connected by selected power paths to be in parallel so as to produce a low system voltage, and, alternately in series so as to produce a high system voltage that is greater than the low voltage by at least a factor of ten.

  2. Dynamically reconfigurable photovoltaic system

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2016-05-31

    A PV system composed of sub-arrays, each having a group of PV cells that are electrically connected to each other. A power management circuit for each sub-array has a communications interface and serves to connect or disconnect the sub-array to a programmable power grid. The power grid has bus rows and bus columns. A bus management circuit is positioned at a respective junction of a bus column and a bus row and is programmable through its communication interface to connect or disconnect a power path in the grid. As a result, selected sub-arrays are connected by selected power paths to be in parallel so as to produce a low system voltage, and, alternately in series so as to produce a high system voltage that is greater than the low voltage by at least a factor of ten.

  3. Constraint elimination in dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, R. P.; Likins, P. W.

    1989-01-01

    Large space structures (LSSs) and other dynamical systems of current interest are often extremely complex assemblies of rigid and flexible bodies subjected to kinematical constraints. A formulation is presented for the governing equations of constrained multibody systems via the application of singular value decomposition (SVD). The resulting equations of motion are shown to be of minimum dimension.

  4. Managing Complex Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, John C.; Webster, Robert L.; Curry, Jeanie A.; Hammond, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    Management commonly engages in a variety of research designed to provide insight into the motivation and relationships of individuals, departments, organizations, etc. This paper demonstrates how the application of concepts associated with the analysis of complex systems applied to such data sets can yield enhanced insights for managerial action.

  5. SU-C-9A-06: The Impact of CT Image Used for Attenuation Correction in 4D-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Y; Bowsher, J; Yan, S; Cai, J; Das, S; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the appropriateness of using 3D non-gated CT image for attenuation correction (AC) in a 4D-PET (gated PET) imaging protocol used in radiotherapy treatment planning simulation. Methods: The 4D-PET imaging protocol in a Siemens PET/CT simulator (Biograph mCT, Siemens Medical Solutions, Hoffman Estates, IL) was evaluated. CIRS Dynamic Thorax Phantom (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA) with a moving glass sphere (8 mL) in the middle of its thorax portion was used in the experiments. The glass was filled with {sup 18}F-FDG and was in a longitudinal motion derived from a real patient breathing pattern. Varian RPM system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was used for respiratory gating. Both phase-gating and amplitude-gating methods were tested. The clinical imaging protocol was modified to use three different CT images for AC in 4D-PET reconstruction: first is to use a single-phase CT image to mimic actual clinical protocol (single-CT-PET); second is to use the average intensity projection CT (AveIP-CT) derived from 4D-CT scanning (AveIP-CT-PET); third is to use 4D-CT image to do the phase-matched AC (phase-matching- PET). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) and volume of the moving target (glass sphere) with threshold of 40% SUVmax were calculated for comparison between 4D-PET images derived with different AC methods. Results: The SUVmax varied 7.3%±6.9% over the breathing cycle in single-CT-PET, compared to 2.5%±2.8% in AveIP-CT-PET and 1.3%±1.2% in phasematching PET. The SUVmax in single-CT-PET differed by up to 15% from those in phase-matching-PET. The target volumes measured from single- CT-PET images also presented variations up to 10% among different phases of 4D PET in both phase-gating and amplitude-gating experiments. Conclusion: Attenuation correction using non-gated CT in 4D-PET imaging is not optimal process for quantitative analysis. Clinical 4D-PET imaging protocols should consider phase-matched 4D-CT image if available to achieve better accuracy.

  6. 4D flow mri post-processing strategies for neuropathologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrauben, Eric Mathew

    4D flow MRI allows for the measurement of a dynamic 3D velocity vector field. Blood flow velocities in large vascular territories can be qualitatively visualized with the added benefit of quantitative probing. Within cranial pathologies theorized to have vascular-based contributions or effects, 4D flow MRI provides a unique platform for comprehensive assessment of hemodynamic parameters. Targeted blood flow derived measurements, such as flow rate, pulsatility, retrograde flow, or wall shear stress may provide insight into the onset or characterization of more complex neuropathologies. Therefore, the thorough assessment of each parameter within the context of a given disease has important medical implications. Not surprisingly, the last decade has seen rapid growth in the use of 4D flow MRI. Data acquisition sequences are available to researchers on all major scanner platforms. However, the use has been limited mostly to small research trials. One major reason that has hindered the more widespread use and application in larger clinical trials is the complexity of the post-processing tasks and the lack of adequate tools for these tasks. Post-processing of 4D flow MRI must be semi-automated, fast, user-independent, robust, and reliably consistent for use in a clinical setting, within large patient studies, or across a multicenter trial. Development of proper post-processing methods coupled with systematic investigation in normal and patient populations pushes 4D flow MRI closer to clinical realization while elucidating potential underlying neuropathological origins. Within this framework, the work in this thesis assesses venous flow reproducibility and internal consistency in a healthy population. A preliminary analysis of venous flow parameters in healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients is performed in a large study employing 4D flow MRI. These studies are performed in the context of the chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency hypothesis. Additionally, a

  7. Experimenting with the GMAO 4D Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todling, R.; El Akkraoui, A.; Errico, R. M.; Guo, J.; Kim, J.; Kliest, D.; Parrish, D. F.; Suarez, M.; Trayanov, A.; Tremolet, Yannick; Whitaker, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) has been working to promote its prototype four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) system to a version that can be exercised at operationally desirable configurations. Beyond a general circulation model (GeM) and an analysis system, traditional 4DV AR requires availability of tangent linear (TL) and adjoint (AD) models of the corresponding GeM. The GMAO prototype 4DVAR uses the finite-volume-based GEOS GeM and the Grid-point Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system for the first two, and TL and AD models derived ITom an early version of the finite-volume hydrodynamics that is scientifically equivalent to the present GEOS nonlinear GeM but computationally rather outdated. Specifically, the TL and AD models hydrodynamics uses a simple (I-dimensional) latitudinal MPI domain decomposition, which has consequent low scalability and prevents the prototype 4DV AR ITom being used in realistic applications. In the near future, GMAO will be upgrading its operational GEOS GCM (and assimilation system) to use a cubed-sphere-based hydrodynamics. This versions of the dynamics scales to thousands of processes and has led to a decision to re-derive the TL and AD models for this more modern dynamics, thus taking advantage of a two-dimensional MPI decomposition and improved scalability properties. With the aid of the Transformation of Algorithms in FORTRAN (l'AF) automatic adjoint generation tool and some hand-coding, a version of the cubed-sphere-based TL and AD models, with a simplified vertical diffusion scheme, is now available, enabling multiple configurations of standard implementations of 4DV AR in GEOS. Concurrent to this development, collaboration with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) has allowed GMAO to implement a hybrid-ensemble capability within the GEOS data assimilation system. Both 3Dand 4D-ensemble capabilities are presently available thus allowing

  8. Tax and Semaphorin 4D Released from Lymphocytes Infected with Human Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 and Their Effect on Neurite Growth.

    PubMed

    Quintremil, Sebastián; Alberti, Carolina; Rivera, Matías; Medina, Fernando; Puente, Javier; Cartier, Luis; Ramírez, Eugenio; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Valenzuela, M Antonieta

    2016-01-01

    Human lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus causing HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a neurodegenerative central nervous system (CNS) axonopathy. This virus mainly infects CD4(+) T lymphocytes without evidence of neuronal infection. Viral Tax, secreted from infected lymphocytes infiltrated in the CNS, is proposed to alter intracellular pathways related to axonal cytoskeleton dynamics, producing neurological damage. Previous reports showed a higher proteolytic release of soluble Semaphorin 4D (sSEMA-4D) from CD4(+) T cells infected with HTLV-1. Soluble SEMA-4D binds to its receptor Plexin-B1, activating axonal growth collapse pathways in the CNS. In the current study, an increase was found in both SEMA-4D in CD4(+) T cells and sSEMA-4D released to the culture medium of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HAM/TSP patients compared to asymptomatic carriers and healthy donors. After a 16-h culture, infected PBMCs showed significantly higher levels of CRMP-2 phosphorylated at Ser(522). The effect was blocked either with anti-Tax or anti-SEMA-4D antibodies. The interaction of Tax and sSEMA-4D was found in secreted medium of PBMCs in patients, which might be associated with a leading role of Tax with the SEMA-4D-Plexin-B1 signaling pathway. In infected PBMCs, the migratory response after transwell assay showed that sSEMA-4D responding cells were CD4(+)Tax(+) T cells with a high CRMP-2 pSer(522) content. In the present study, the participation of Tax-sSEMA-4D in the reduction in neurite growth in PC12 cells produced by MT2 (HTLV-1-infected cell line) culture medium was observed. These results lead to the participation of plexins in the reported effects of infected lymphocytes on neuronal cells.

  9. 4D MRI for the Localization of Parathyroid Adenoma: A Novel Method in Evolution.

    PubMed

    Merchavy, Shlomo; Luckman, Judith; Guindy, Michal; Segev, Yoram; Khafif, Avi

    2016-03-01

    The sestamibi scan (MIBI) and ultrasound (US) are used for preoperative localization of parathyroid adenoma (PTA), with sensitivity as high as 90%. We developed 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D MRI) as a novel tool for identifying PTAs. Eleven patients with PTA were enrolled. 4D MRI from the mandible to the aortic arch was used. Optimization of the timing of image acquisition was obtained by changing dynamic and static sequences. PTAs were identified in all except 1 patient. In 9 patients, there was a complete match between the 4D MRI and the US and MIBI, as well as with the operative finding. In 1 patient, the adenoma was correctly localized by 4D MRI, in contrast to the US and MIBI scan. The sensitivity of the 4D MRI was 90% and after optimization, 100%. Specificity was 100%. We concluded that 4D MRI is a reliable technique for identification of PTAs, although more studies are needed.

  10. Waddington, Dynamic Systems, and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Tronick, Ed; Hunter, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Waddington coined the term “epigenetic” to attempt to explain the complex, dynamic interactions between the developmental environment and the genome that led to the production of phenotype. Waddington's thoughts on the importance of both adaptability and canalization of phenotypic development are worth recalling as well, as they emphasize the available range for epigenetic action and the importance of environmental feedback (or lack thereof) in the development of complex traits. We suggest that a dynamic systems view fits well with Waddington's conception of epigenetics in the developmental context, as well as shedding light on the study of the molecular epigenetic effects of the environment on brain and behavior. Further, the dynamic systems view emphasizes the importance of the multi-directional interchange between the organism, the genome and various aspects of the environment to the ultimate phenotype. PMID:27375447

  11. Dynamics of Variable Mass Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, Fidelis O.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the effects of mass loss on the attitude behavior of spinning bodies in flight. The principal goal is to determine whether there are circumstances under which the motion of variable mass systems can become unstable in the sense that their transverse angular velocities become unbounded. Obviously, results from a study of this kind would find immediate application in the aerospace field. The first part of this study features a complete and mathematically rigorous derivation of a set of equations that govern both the translational and rotational motions of general variable mass systems. The remainder of the study is then devoted to the application of the equations obtained to a systematic investigation of the effect of various mass loss scenarios on the dynamics of increasingly complex models of variable mass systems. It is found that mass loss can have a major impact on the dynamics of mechanical systems, including a possible change in the systems stability picture. Factors such as nozzle geometry, combustion chamber geometry, propellant's initial shape, size and relative mass, and propellant location can all have important influences on the system's dynamic behavior. The relative importance of these parameters on-system motion are quantified in a way that is useful for design purposes.

  12. Elastica as a dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Larry; Chhabra, Robin; Śniatycki, Jędrzej

    2016-12-01

    The elastica is a curve in R3 that is stationary under variations of the integral of the square of the curvature. Elastica is viewed as a dynamical system that arises from the second order calculus of variations, and its quantization is discussed.

  13. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  14. Dynamics of immune system vulnerabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, Sean P.

    The adaptive immune system can be viewed as a complex system, which adapts, over time, to reflect the history of infections experienced by the organism. Understanding its operation requires viewing it in terms of tradeoffs under constraints and evolutionary history. It typically displays "robust, yet fragile" behavior, meaning common tasks are robust to small changes but novel threats or changes in environment can have dire consequences. In this dissertation we use mechanistic models to study several biological processes: the immune response, the homeostasis of cells in the lymphatic system, and the process that normally prevents autoreactive cells from entering the lymphatic system. Using these models we then study the effects of these processes interacting. We show that the mechanisms that regulate the numbers of cells in the immune system, in conjunction with the immune response, can act to suppress autoreactive cells from proliferating, thus showing quantitatively how pathogenic infections can suppress autoimmune disease. We also show that over long periods of time this same effect can thin the repertoire of cells that defend against novel threats, leading to an age correlated vulnerability. This vulnerability is shown to be a consequence of system dynamics, not due to degradation of immune system components with age. Finally, modeling a specific tolerance mechanism that normally prevents autoimmune disease, in conjunction with models of the immune response and homeostasis we look at the consequences of the immune system mistakenly incorporating pathogenic molecules into its tolerizing mechanisms. The signature of this dynamic matches closely that of the dengue virus system.

  15. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  16. Vehicle systems: coupled and interactive dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantsevich, Vladimir V.

    2014-11-01

    This article formulates a new direction in vehicle dynamics, described as coupled and interactive vehicle system dynamics. Formalised procedures and analysis of case studies are presented. An analytical consideration, which explains the physics of coupled system dynamics and its consequences for dynamics of a vehicle, is given for several sets of systems including: (i) driveline and suspension of a 6×6 truck, (ii) a brake mechanism and a limited slip differential of a drive axle and (iii) a 4×4 vehicle steering system and driveline system. The article introduces a formal procedure to turn coupled system dynamics into interactive dynamics of systems. A new research direction in interactive dynamics of an active steering and a hybrid-electric power transmitting unit is presented and analysed to control power distribution between the drive axles of a 4×4 vehicle. A control strategy integrates energy efficiency and lateral dynamics by decoupling dynamics of the two systems thus forming their interactive dynamics.

  17. SU-E-J-192: Verification of 4D-MRI Internal Target Volume Using Cine MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lafata, K; Czito, B; Palta, M; Bashir, M; Yin, F; Cai, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of 4D-MRI in determining the Internal Target Volume (ITV) used in radiation oncology treatment planning of liver cancers. Cine MRI is used as the standard baseline in establishing the feasibility and accuracy of 4D-MRI tumor motion within the liver. Methods: IRB approval was obtained for this retrospective study. Analysis was performed on MR images from four patients receiving external beam radiation therapy for liver cancer at our institution. Eligible patients received both Cine and 4D-MRI scans before treatment. Cine images were acquired sagittally in real time at a slice bisecting the tumor, while 4D images were acquired volumetrically. Cine MR DICOM headers were manipulated such that each respiratory frame was assigned a unique slice location. This approach permitted the treatment planning system (Eclipse, Varian Medical Systems) to recognize a complete respiratory cycle as a “volume”, where the gross tumor was contoured temporally. Software was developed to calculate the union of all frame contours in the structure set, resulting in the corresponding plane of the ITV projecting through the middle of the tumor, defined as the Internal Target Area (ITA). This was repeated for 4D-MRI, at the corresponding slice location, allowing a direct comparison of ITAs obtained from each modality. Results: Four patients have been analyzed. ITAs contoured from 4D-MRI correlate with contours from Cine MRI. The mean error of 4D values relative to Cine values is 7.67 +/− 2.55 %. No single ITA contoured from 4D-MRI demonstrated more than 10.5 % error compared to its Cine MRI counterpart. Conclusion: Motion management is a significant aspect of treatment planning within dynamic environments such as the liver, where diaphragmatic and cardiac activity influence plan accuracy. This small pilot study suggests that 4D-MRI based ITA measurements agree with Cine MRI based measurements, an important step towards clinical implementation. NIH 1R21

  18. 4D Imaging of Protein Aggregation in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaganovich, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    proteins that are not ubiquitinated are diverted to the IPOD, where they are actively aggregated in a protective compartment. Up until this point, the methodological paradigm of live-cell fluorescence microscopy has largely been to label proteins and track their locations in the cell at specific time-points and usually in two dimensions. As new technologies have begun to grant experimenters unprecedented access to the submicron scale in living cells, the dynamic architecture of the cytosol has come into view as a challenging new frontier for experimental characterization. We present a method for rapidly monitoring the 3D spatial distributions of multiple fluorescently labeled proteins in the yeast cytosol over time. 3D timelapse (4D imaging) is not merely a technical challenge; rather, it also facilitates a dramatic shift in the conceptual framework used to analyze cellular structure. We utilize a cytosolic folding sensor protein in live yeast to visualize distinct fates for misfolded proteins in cellular aggregation quality control, using rapid 4D fluorescent imaging. The temperature sensitive mutant of the Ubc9 protein10-12 (Ubc9ts) is extremely effective both as a sensor of cellular proteostasis, and a physiological model for tracking aggregation quality control. As with most ts proteins, Ubc9ts is fully folded and functional at permissive temperatures due to active cellular chaperones. Above 30 °C, or when the cell faces misfolding stress, Ubc9ts misfolds and follows the fate of a native globular protein that has been misfolded due to mutation, heat denaturation, or oxidative damage. By fusing it to GFP or other fluorophores, it can be tracked in 3D as it forms Stress Foci, or is directed to JUNQ or IPOD. PMID:23608881

  19. Hidden attractors in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Jafari, Sajad; Kapitaniak, Tomasz; Kuznetsov, Nikolay V.; Leonov, Gennady A.; Prasad, Awadhesh

    2016-06-01

    Complex dynamical systems, ranging from the climate, ecosystems to financial markets and engineering applications typically have many coexisting attractors. This property of the system is called multistability. The final state, i.e., the attractor on which the multistable system evolves strongly depends on the initial conditions. Additionally, such systems are very sensitive towards noise and system parameters so a sudden shift to a contrasting regime may occur. To understand the dynamics of these systems one has to identify all possible attractors and their basins of attraction. Recently, it has been shown that multistability is connected with the occurrence of unpredictable attractors which have been called hidden attractors. The basins of attraction of the hidden attractors do not touch unstable fixed points (if exists) and are located far away from such points. Numerical localization of the hidden attractors is not straightforward since there are no transient processes leading to them from the neighborhoods of unstable fixed points and one has to use the special analytical-numerical procedures. From the viewpoint of applications, the identification of hidden attractors is the major issue. The knowledge about the emergence and properties of hidden attractors can increase the likelihood that the system will remain on the most desirable attractor and reduce the risk of the sudden jump to undesired behavior. We review the most representative examples of hidden attractors, discuss their theoretical properties and experimental observations. We also describe numerical methods which allow identification of the hidden attractors.

  20. Real-time 4D ultrasound mosaicing and visualization.

    PubMed

    Brattain, Laura J; Howe, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    Intra-cardiac 3D ultrasound imaging has enabled new minimally invasive procedures. Its narrow field of view, however, limits its efficacy in guiding beating heart procedures where geometrically complex and spatially extended moving anatomic structures are often involved. In this paper, we present a system that performs electrocardiograph gated 4D mosaicing and visualization of 3DUS volumes. Real-time operation is enabled by GPU implementation. The method is validated on phantom and porcine heart data.

  1. Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) using image-based respiratory surrogate: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing; Chang, Zheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Paul Segars, William; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in radiation therapy to assess patient-specific breathing motion for determining individual safety margins. However, it has two major drawbacks: low soft-tissue contrast and an excessive imaging dose to the patient. This research aimed to develop a clinically feasible four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) technique to overcome these limitations. Methods: The proposed 4D-MRI technique was achieved by continuously acquiring axial images throughout the breathing cycle using fast 2D cine-MR imaging, and then retrospectively sorting the images by respiratory phase. The key component of the technique was the use of body area (BA) of the axial MR images as an internal respiratory surrogate to extract the breathing signal. The validation of the BA surrogate was performed using 4D-CT images of 12 cancer patients by comparing the respiratory phases determined using the BA method to those determined clinically using the Real-time position management (RPM) system. The feasibility of the 4D-MRI technique was tested on a dynamic motion phantom, the 4D extended Cardiac Torso (XCAT) digital phantom, and two healthy human subjects. Results: Respiratory phases determined from the BA matched closely to those determined from the RPM: mean (±SD) difference in phase: −3.9% (±6.4%); mean (±SD) absolute difference in phase: 10.40% (±3.3%); mean (±SD) correlation coefficient: 0.93 (±0.04). In the motion phantom study, 4D-MRI clearly showed the sinusoidal motion of the phantom; image artifacts observed were minimal to none. Motion trajectories measured from 4D-MRI and 2D cine-MRI (used as a reference) matched excellently: the mean (±SD) absolute difference in motion amplitude: −0.3 (±0.5) mm. In the 4D-XCAT phantom study, the simulated “4D-MRI” images showed good consistency with the original 4D-XCAT phantom images. The motion trajectory of the hypothesized “tumor” matched

  2. Dynamical Systems and Motion Vision.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    TASK Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AREA I WORK UNIT NUMBERS 545 Technology Square . Cambridge, MA 02139 C\\ II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME ANO0 ADDRESS...INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I.Memo No. 1037 April, 1988 Dynamical Systems and Motion Vision Joachim Heel Abstract: In this... Artificial Intelligence L3 Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Support for the Laboratory’s [1 Artificial Intelligence Research is

  3. Active origami by 4D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Qi; Dunn, Conner K.; Qi, H. Jerry; Dunn, Martin L.

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in three dimensional (3D) printing technology that allow multiple materials to be printed within each layer enable the creation of materials and components with precisely controlled heterogeneous microstructures. In addition, active materials, such as shape memory polymers, can be printed to create an active microstructure within a solid. These active materials can subsequently be activated in a controlled manner to change the shape or configuration of the solid in response to an environmental stimulus. This has been termed 4D printing, with the 4th dimension being the time-dependent shape change after the printing. In this paper, we advance the 4D printing concept to the design and fabrication of active origami, where a flat sheet automatically folds into a complicated 3D component. Here we print active composites with shape memory polymer fibers precisely printed in an elastomeric matrix and use them as intelligent active hinges to enable origami folding patterns. We develop a theoretical model to provide guidance in selecting design parameters such as fiber dimensions, hinge length, and programming strains and temperature. Using the model, we design and fabricate several active origami components that assemble from flat polymer sheets, including a box, a pyramid, and two origami airplanes. In addition, we directly print a 3D box with active composite hinges and program it to assume a temporary flat shape that subsequently recovers to the 3D box shape on demand.

  4. 4d Spectra from BPS Quiver Dualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espahbodi, Sam

    We attack the question of BPS occupancy in a wide class of 4d N = 2 quantum field theories. We first review the Seiberg-Witten approach to finding the low energy Wilsonian effective action actions of such theories. In particular, we analyze the case of Gaiotto theories, which provide a large number of non-trivial examples in a unified framework. We then turn to understanding the massive BPS spectrum of such theories, and in particular their relation to BPS quivers. We present a purely 4d characterization of BPS quivers, and explain how a quiver's representation theory encodes the solution to the BPS occupancy problem. Next, we derive a so called mutation method, based on exploiting quiver dualities, to solve the quiver's representation theory. This method makes previously intractable calculations nearly trivial in many examples. As a particular highlight, we apply our methods to understand strongly coupled chambers in ADE SYM gauge theories with matter. Following this, we turn to the general story of quivers for theories of the Gaiotto class. We present a geometric approach to attaining quivers for the rank 2 theories, leading to a very elegant solution which includes a specification of quiver superpotentials. Finally, we solve these theories by an unrelated method based on gauging flavor symmetries in their various dual weakly coupled Lagrangian descriptions. After seeing that this method agrees in the rank 2 case, we will apply our new approach to the case of rank n.

  5. SU-E-J-31: Monitor Interfractional Variation of Tumor Respiratory Motion Using 4D KV Conebeam Computed Tomography for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, A; Prior, P; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4DCT has been widely used to generate internal tumor volume (ITV) for a lung tumor for treatment planning. However, lung tumors may show different respiratory motion on the treatment day. The purpose of this study is to evaluate 4D KV conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) for monitoring tumor interfractional motion variation between simulation and each fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods: 4D KV CBCT was acquired with the Elekta XVI system. The accuracy of 4D KV CBCT for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was tested with a dynamic thorax motion phantom (CIRS, Virginia) with a linear amplitude of 2 cm. In addition, an adult anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson, Rando) with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters embedded at the center and periphery of a slab of solid water was used to measure the dose of 4D KV CBCT and to compare it with the dose with 3D KV CBCT. The image registration was performed by aligning\\ each phase images of 4D KV CBCT to the planning images and the final couch shifts were calculated as a mean of all these individual shifts along each direction.A workflow was established based on these quality assurance tests for lung cancer patients. Results: 4D KV CBCT does not increase imaging dose in comparison to 3D KV CBCT. Acquisition of 4D KV CBCT is 4 minutes as compared to 2 minutes for 3D KV CBCT. Most of patients showed a small daily variation of tumor respiratory motion about 2 mm. However, some patients may have more than 5 mm variations of tumor respiratory motion. Conclusion: The radiation dose does not increase with 4D KV CBCT. 4D KV CBCT is a useful tool for monitoring interfractional variations of tumor respiratory motion before SBRT of lung cancer patients.

  6. 32 CFR 1630.43 - Class 4-D: Minister of religion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Class 4-D: Minister of religion. 1630.43 Section 1630.43 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.43 Class 4-D: Minister of religion. In accord with part 1645 of this chapter any registrant shall be placed in Class 4-D...

  7. 32 CFR 1630.43 - Class 4-D: Minister of religion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Class 4-D: Minister of religion. 1630.43 Section 1630.43 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.43 Class 4-D: Minister of religion. In accord with part 1645 of this chapter any registrant shall be placed in Class 4-D...

  8. 32 CFR 1630.43 - Class 4-D: Minister of religion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Class 4-D: Minister of religion. 1630.43 Section 1630.43 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.43 Class 4-D: Minister of religion. In accord with part 1645 of this chapter any registrant shall be placed in Class 4-D...

  9. 32 CFR 1630.43 - Class 4-D: Minister of religion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Class 4-D: Minister of religion. 1630.43 Section 1630.43 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.43 Class 4-D: Minister of religion. In accord with part 1645 of this chapter any registrant shall be placed in Class 4-D...

  10. Dynamically controlled crystal growth system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Terry L. (Inventor); Kim, Larry J. (Inventor); Harrington, Michael (Inventor); DeLucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Crystal growth can be initiated and controlled by dynamically controlled vapor diffusion or temperature change. In one aspect, the present invention uses a precisely controlled vapor diffusion approach to monitor and control protein crystal growth. The system utilizes a humidity sensor and various interfaces under computer control to effect virtually any evaporation rate from a number of different growth solutions simultaneously by means of an evaporative gas flow. A static laser light scattering sensor can be used to detect aggregation events and trigger a change in the evaporation rate for a growth solution. A control/follower configuration can be used to actively monitor one chamber and accurately control replicate chambers relative to the control chamber. In a second aspect, the invention exploits the varying solubility of proteins versus temperature to control the growth of protein crystals. This system contains miniature thermoelectric devices under microcomputer control that change temperature as needed to grow crystals of a given protein. Complex temperature ramps are possible using this approach. A static laser light scattering probe also can be used in this system as a non-invasive probe for detection of aggregation events. The automated dynamic control system provides systematic and predictable responses with regard to crystal size. These systems can be used for microgravity crystallization projects, for example in a space shuttle, and for crystallization work under terrestial conditions. The present invention is particularly useful for macromolecular crystallization, e.g. for proteins, polypeptides, nucleic acids, viruses and virus particles.

  11. Dynamic security assessment processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei

    The architecture of dynamic security assessment processing system (DSAPS) is proposed to address online dynamic security assessment (DSA) with focus of the dissertation on low-probability, high-consequence events. DSAPS upgrades current online DSA functions and adds new functions to fit into the modern power grid. Trajectory sensitivity analysis is introduced and its applications in power system are reviewed. An index is presented to assess transient voltage dips quantitatively using trajectory sensitivities. Then the framework of anticipatory computing system (ACS) for cascading defense is presented as an important function of DSAPS. ACS addresses various security problems and the uncertainties in cascading outages. Corrective control design is automated to mitigate the system stress in cascading progressions. The corrective controls introduced in the dissertation include corrective security constrained optimal power flow, a two-stage load control for severe under-frequency conditions, and transient stability constrained optimal power flow for cascading outages. With state-of-the-art computing facilities to perform high-speed extended-term time-domain simulation and optimization for large-scale systems, DSAPS/ACS efficiently addresses online DSA for low-probability, high-consequence events, which are not addressed by today's industrial practice. Human interference is reduced in the computationally burdensome analysis.

  12. Network dynamics and systems biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrell, Johannes A.

    The physics of complex systems has grown considerably as a field in recent decades, largely due to improved computational technology and increased availability of systems level data. One area in which physics is of growing relevance is molecular biology. A new field, systems biology, investigates features of biological systems as a whole, a strategy of particular importance for understanding emergent properties that result from a complex network of interactions. Due to the complicated nature of the systems under study, the physics of complex systems has a significant role to play in elucidating the collective behavior. In this dissertation, we explore three problems in the physics of complex systems, motivated in part by systems biology. The first of these concerns the applicability of Boolean models as an approximation of continuous systems. Studies of gene regulatory networks have employed both continuous and Boolean models to analyze the system dynamics, and the two have been found produce similar results in the cases analyzed. We ask whether or not Boolean models can generically reproduce the qualitative attractor dynamics of networks of continuously valued elements. Using a combination of analytical techniques and numerical simulations, we find that continuous networks exhibit two effects---an asymmetry between on and off states, and a decaying memory of events in each element's inputs---that are absent from synchronously updated Boolean models. We show that in simple loops these effects produce exactly the attractors that one would predict with an analysis of the stability of Boolean attractors, but in slightly more complicated topologies, they can destabilize solutions that are stable in the Boolean approximation, and can stabilize new attractors. Second, we investigate ensembles of large, random networks. Of particular interest is the transition between ordered and disordered dynamics, which is well characterized in Boolean systems. Networks at the

  13. Statistical Mechanics of Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, H.; Hata, H.; Horita, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    A statistical-mechanical formalism of chaos based on the geometry of invariant sets in phase space is discussed to show that chaotic dynamical systems can be treated by a formalism analogous to that of thermodynamic systems if one takes a relevant coarse-grained quantity, but their statistical laws are quite different from those of thermodynamic systems. This is a generalization of statistical mechanics for dealing with dissipative and hamiltonian (i.e., conservative) dynamical systems of a few degrees of freedom. Thus the sum of the local expansion rate of nearby orbits along relevant orbit over a long but finite time has been introduced in order to describe and characterize (1) a drastic change of the structure of a chaotic attractor at a bifurcation and anomalous phenomena associated, (2) a critical scaling of chaos in the neighborhood of a critical point for the bifurcation to a nonexotic state, and a self-similar temporal structure of a critical orbit on the critical 2^∞ attractor an the critical golden tori without mixing, (3) the critical KAM torus, diffusion and repeated sticking of a chaotic orbit to a critical torus in hamiltonian systems. Here a q-phase transition, analogous to the ferromagnetic phase transition, plays an important role. They are illustrated numerically and theoretically by treating the driven damped pendulum, the driven Duffing equation, the Henon map, and the dissipative and conservative standard maps. This description of chaos breaks the time-reversal symmetry of hamiltonian dynamical laws analogously to statistical mechanics of irreversible processes. The broken time-reversal symmetry is brought about by orbital instability of chaos.

  14. Survivability of Deterministic Dynamical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hellmann, Frank; Schultz, Paul; Grabow, Carsten; Heitzig, Jobst; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The notion of a part of phase space containing desired (or allowed) states of a dynamical system is important in a wide range of complex systems research. It has been called the safe operating space, the viability kernel or the sunny region. In this paper we define the notion of survivability: Given a random initial condition, what is the likelihood that the transient behaviour of a deterministic system does not leave a region of desirable states. We demonstrate the utility of this novel stability measure by considering models from climate science, neuronal networks and power grids. We also show that a semi-analytic lower bound for the survivability of linear systems allows a numerically very efficient survivability analysis in realistic models of power grids. Our numerical and semi-analytic work underlines that the type of stability measured by survivability is not captured by common asymptotic stability measures. PMID:27405955

  15. A Workstation for Interactive Display and Quantitative Analysis of 3-D and 4-D Biomedical Images

    PubMed Central

    Robb, R.A.; Heffeman, P.B.; Camp, J.J.; Hanson, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    The capability to extract objective and quantitatively accurate information from 3-D radiographic biomedical images has not kept pace with the capabilities to produce the images themselves. This is rather an ironic paradox, since on the one hand the new 3-D and 4-D imaging capabilities promise significant potential for providing greater specificity and sensitivity (i.e., precise objective discrimination and accurate quantitative measurement of body tissue characteristics and function) in clinical diagnostic and basic investigative imaging procedures than ever possible before, but on the other hand, the momentous advances in computer and associated electronic imaging technology which have made these 3-D imaging capabilities possible have not been concomitantly developed for full exploitation of these capabilities. Therefore, we have developed a powerful new microcomputer-based system which permits detailed investigations and evaluation of 3-D and 4-D (dynamic 3-D) biomedical images. The system comprises a special workstation to which all the information in a large 3-D image data base is accessible for rapid display, manipulation, and measurement. The system provides important capabilities for simultaneously representing and analyzing both structural and functional data and their relationships in various organs of the body. This paper provides a detailed description of this system, as well as some of the rationale, background, theoretical concepts, and practical considerations related to system implementation. ImagesFigure 5Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16

  16. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  17. Improved Respiratory Navigator Gating for Thoracic 4D flow MRI

    PubMed Central

    van Ooij, Pim; Semaan, Edouard; Schnell, Susanne; Giri, Shivraman; Stankovic, Zoran; Carr, James; Barker, Alex J.; Markl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Thoracic and abdominal 4D flow MRI is typically acquired in combination with navigator respiration control which can result in highly variable scan efficiency (Seff) and thus total scan time due to inter-individual variability in breathing patterns. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of an improved respiratory control strategy based on diaphragm navigator gating with fixed Seff, respiratory driven phase encoding, and a navigator training phase. Methods 4D flow MRI of the thoracic aorta was performed in 10 healthy subjects at 1.5T and 3T systems for the in-vivo assessment of aortic time-resolved 3D blood flow velocities. For each subject, four 4D flow scans (1: conventional navigator gating, 2–4: new implementation with fixed Seff =60%, 80% and 100%) were acquired. Data analysis included semi-quantitative evaluation of image quality of the 4D flow magnitude images (image quality grading on a four point scale), 3D segmentation of the thoracic aorta, and voxel-by-voxel comparisons of systolic 3D flow velocity vector fields between scans. Results Conventional navigator gating resulted in variable Seff = 74±13% (range = 56% – 100%) due to inter-individual variability of respiration patterns. For scans 2–4, the the new navigator implementation was able to achieve predictable total scan times with stable Seff, only depending on heart rate. Semi- and fully quantitative analysis of image quality in 4D flow magnitude images was similar for the new navigator scheme compared to conventional navigator gating. For aortic systolic 3D velocities, good agreement was found between all new navigator settings (scan 2–4) with the conventional navigator gating (scan 1) with best performance for Seff = 80% (mean difference = −0.01; limits od agreement = 0.23, Pearson’s ρ=0.89, p <0.001). No significant differences for image quality or 3D systolic velocities were found for 1.5T compared to 3T. Conclusions The findings of this study demonstrate the

  18. 4D CT sorting based on patient internal anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Cerviño, Laura I.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-08-01

    Respiratory motion during free-breathing computed tomography (CT) scan may cause significant errors in target definition for tumors in the thorax and upper abdomen. A four-dimensional (4D) CT technique has been widely used for treatment simulation of thoracic and abdominal cancer radiotherapy. The current 4D CT techniques require retrospective sorting of the reconstructed CT slices oversampled at the same couch position. Most sorting methods depend on external surrogates of respiratory motion recorded by extra instruments. However, respiratory signals obtained from these external surrogates may not always accurately represent the internal target motion, especially when irregular breathing patterns occur. We have proposed a new sorting method based on multiple internal anatomical features for multi-slice CT scan acquired in the cine mode. Four features are analyzed in this study, including the air content, lung area, lung density and body area. We use a measure called spatial coherence to select the optimal internal feature at each couch position and to generate the respiratory signals for 4D CT sorting. The proposed method has been evaluated for ten cancer patients (eight with thoracic cancer and two with abdominal cancer). For nine patients, the respiratory signals generated from the combined internal features are well correlated to those from external surrogates recorded by the real-time position management (RPM) system (average correlation: 0.95 ± 0.02), which is better than any individual internal measures at 95% confidence level. For these nine patients, the 4D CT images sorted by the combined internal features are almost identical to those sorted by the RPM signal. For one patient with an irregular breathing pattern, the respiratory signals given by the combined internal features do not correlate well with those from RPM (correlation: 0.68 ± 0.42). In this case, the 4D CT image sorted by our method presents fewer artifacts than that from the RPM signal. Our

  19. Noise in Nonlinear Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Frank; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2009-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Introduction to volume three; 1. The effects of coloured quadratic noise on a turbulent transition in liquid He II J. T. Tough; 2. Electrohydrodynamic instability of nematic liquid crystals: growth process and influence of noise S. Kai; 3. Suppression of electrohydrodynamic instabilities by external noise Helmut R. Brand; 4. Coloured noise in dye laser fluctuations R. Roy, A. W. Yu and S. Zhu; 5. Noisy dynamics in optically bistable systems E. Arimondo, D. Hennequin and P. Glorieux; 6. Use of an electronic model as a guideline in experiments on transient optical bistability W. Lange; 7. Computer experiments in nonlinear stochastic physics Riccardo Mannella; 8. Analogue simulations of stochastic processes by means of minimum component electronic devices Leone Fronzoni; 9. Analogue techniques for the study of problems in stochastic nonlinear dynamics P. V. E. McClintock and Frank Moss; Index.

  20. Soft Route to 4D Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillandier-Thomas, Thibault; Roux, Stéphane; Hild, François

    2016-07-01

    Based on the assumption that the time evolution of a sample observed by computed tomography requires many less parameters than the definition of the microstructure itself, it is proposed to reconstruct these changes based on the initial state (using computed tomography) and very few radiographs acquired at fixed intervals of time. This Letter presents a proof of concept that for a fatigue cracked sample its kinematics can be tracked from no more than two radiographs in situations where a complete 3D view would require several hundreds of radiographs. This 2 order of magnitude gain opens the way to a "computed" 4D tomography, which complements the recent progress achieved in fast or ultrafast computed tomography, which is based on beam brightness, detector sensitivity, and signal acquisition technologies.

  1. Controlled Source 4D Seismic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Morency, C.; Tromp, J.

    2009-12-01

    Earth's material properties may change after significant tectonic events, e.g., volcanic eruptions, earthquake ruptures, landslides, and hydrocarbon migration. While many studies focus on how to interpret observations in terms of changes in wavespeeds and attenuation, the oil industry is more interested in how we can identify and locate such temporal changes using seismic waves generated by controlled sources. 4D seismic analysis is indeed an important tool to monitor fluid movement in hydrocarbon reservoirs during production, improving fields management. Classic 4D seismic imaging involves comparing images obtained from two subsequent seismic surveys. Differences between the two images tell us where temporal changes occurred. However, when the temporal changes are small, it may be quite hard to reliably identify and characterize the differences between the two images. We propose to back-project residual seismograms between two subsequent surveys using adjoint methods, which results in images highlighting temporal changes. We use the SEG/EAGE salt dome model to illustrate our approach. In two subsequent surveys, the wavespeeds and density within a target region are changed, mimicking possible fluid migration. Due to changes in material properties induced by fluid migration, seismograms recorded in the two surveys differ. By back propagating these residuals, the adjoint images identify the location of the affected region. An important issue involves the nature of model. For instance, are we characterizing only changes in wavespeed, or do we also consider density and attenuation? How many model parameters characterize the model, e.g., is our model isotropic or anisotropic? Is acoustic wave propagation accurate enough or do we need to consider elastic or poroelastic effects? We will investigate how imaging strategies based upon acoustic, elastic and poroelastic simulations affect our imaging capabilities.

  2. Multi-particle dynamical systems and polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, Maria V.; Kudryashov, Nikolai A.

    2016-05-01

    Polynomial dynamical systems describing interacting particles in the plane are studied. A method replacing integration of a polynomial multi-particle dynamical system by finding polynomial solutions of partial differential equations is introduced. The method enables one to integrate a wide class of polynomial multi-particle dynamical systems. The general solutions of certain dynamical systems related to linear second-order partial differential equations are found. As a by-product of our results, new families of orthogonal polynomials are derived.

  3. Dynamic information theory and information description of dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiusan

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we develop dynamic statistical information theory established by the author. Starting from the ideas that the state variable evolution equations of stochastic dynamic systems, classical and quantum nonequilibrium statistical physical systems and special electromagnetic field systems can be regarded as their information symbol evolution equations and the definitions of dynamic information and dynamic entropy, we derive the evolution equations of dynamic information and dynamic entropy that describe the evolution laws of dynamic information. These four kinds of evolution equations are of the same mathematical type. They show in unison when information transmits in coordinate space outside the systems that the time rate of change of dynamic information densities originates from their drift, diffusion and dissipation in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes, and that the time rate of change of dynamic entropy densities is caused by their drift, diffusion and production in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes. When space noise can be neglected, an information wave will appear. If we only consider the information change inside the systems, dynamic information evolution equations reduce to information equations corresponding to the dynamic equations which describe evolution laws of the above dynamic systems. This reveals that the evolution laws of respective dynamic systems can be described by information equations in a unified fashion. Hence, the evolution processes of these dynamic systems can be abstracted as the evolution processes of information. Furthermore, we present the formulas for information flow, information dissipation rate, and entropy production rate. We prove that the information production probably emerges in a dynamic system with internal attractive interaction between the elements, and derive a formula for this information

  4. Motion4D-library extended

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    The new version of the Motion4D-library now also includes the integration of a Sachs basis and the Jacobi equation to determine gravitational lensing of pointlike sources for arbitrary spacetimes.New version program summaryProgram title: Motion4D-libraryCatalogue identifier: AEEX_v3_0Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEX_v3_0.htmlProgram obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. IrelandLicensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.htmlNo. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 219 441No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6 968 223Distribution format: tar.gzProgramming language: C++Computer: All platforms with a C++ compilerOperating system: Linux, WindowsRAM: 61 MbytesClassification: 1.5External routines: Gnu Scientic Library (GSL) (http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/)Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEEX_v2_0Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 703Does the new version supersede the previous version?: YesNature of problem: Solve geodesic equation, parallel and Fermi-Walker transport in four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetimes. Determine gravitational lensing by integration of Jacobi equation and parallel transport of Sachs basis.Solution method: Integration of ordinary differential equations.Reasons for new version: The main novelty of the current version is the extension to integrate the Jacobi equation and the parallel transport of the Sachs basis along null geodesics. In combination, the change of the cross section of a light bundle and thus the gravitational lensing effect of a spacetime can be determined. Furthermore, we have implemented several new metrics.Summary of revisions: The main novelty of the current version is the integration of the Jacobi equation and the parallel transport of the Sachs basis along null geodesics. The corresponding set of equations readd2xμdλ2=-Γρ

  5. Dynamical habitability of planetary systems.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Rudolf; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Bois, Eric; Schwarz, Richard; Funk, Barbara; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Eiroa, Carlos; Fridlund, Malcolm; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Lammer, Helmut; Léger, Alain; Liseau, René; Lunine, Jonathan; Paresce, Francesco; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Röttgering, Huub; Selsis, Frank; Schneider, Jean; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    The problem of the stability of planetary systems, a question that concerns only multiplanetary systems that host at least two planets, is discussed. The problem of mean motion resonances is addressed prior to discussion of the dynamical structure of the more than 350 known planets. The difference with regard to our own Solar System with eight planets on low eccentricity is evident in that 60% of the known extrasolar planets have orbits with eccentricity e > 0.2. We theoretically highlight the studies concerning possible terrestrial planets in systems with a Jupiter-like planet. We emphasize that an orbit of a particular nature only will keep a planet within the habitable zone around a host star with respect to the semimajor axis and its eccentricity. In addition, some results are given for individual systems (e.g., Gl777A) with regard to the stability of orbits within habitable zones. We also review what is known about the orbits of planets in double-star systems around only one component (e.g., gamma Cephei) and around both stars (e.g., eclipsing binaries).

  6. Application of adaptive kinetic modelling for bias propagation reduction in direct 4D image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kotasidis, F A; Matthews, J C; Reader, A J; Angelis, G I; Zaidi, H

    2014-10-21

    Parametric imaging in thoracic and abdominal PET can provide additional parameters more relevant to the pathophysiology of the system under study. However, dynamic data in the body are noisy due to the limiting counting statistics leading to suboptimal kinetic parameter estimates. Direct 4D image reconstruction algorithms can potentially improve kinetic parameter precision and accuracy in dynamic PET body imaging. However, construction of a common kinetic model is not always feasible and in contrast to post-reconstruction kinetic analysis, errors in poorly modelled regions may spatially propagate to regions which are well modelled. To reduce error propagation from erroneous model fits, we implement and evaluate a new approach to direct parameter estimation by incorporating a recently proposed kinetic modelling strategy within a direct 4D image reconstruction framework. The algorithm uses a secondary more general model to allow a less constrained model fit in regions where the kinetic model does not accurately describe the underlying kinetics. A portion of the residuals then is adaptively included back into the image whilst preserving the primary model characteristics in other well modelled regions using a penalty term that trades off the models. Using fully 4D simulations based on dynamic [(15)O]H2O datasets, we demonstrate reduction in propagation-related bias for all kinetic parameters. Under noisy conditions, reductions in bias due to propagation are obtained at the cost of increased noise, which in turn results in increased bias and variance of the kinetic parameters. This trade-off reflects the challenge of separating the residuals arising from poor kinetic modelling fits from the residuals arising purely from noise. Nonetheless, the overall root mean square error is reduced in most regions and parameters. Using the adaptive 4D image reconstruction improved model fits can be obtained in poorly modelled regions, leading to reduced errors potentially propagating

  7. Dynamical Systems++ for a Theory of Biological System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-12-01

    Biological dynamical systems can autonomously change their rule governing the dynamics. To deal with the change in their rule, possible approaches to extend dynamical-systems theory are discussed: They include chaotic itinerancy in high-dimensional dynamical systems, discreteness-induced switches of states, and interference between slow and fast modes. Applications of these concepts to cell differentiation, adaptation, and memory are briefly reviewed, while biological evolution is discussed as selection of dynamical systems by dynamical systems. Finally, necessity of mathematical framework to deal with self-referential dynamics for the rule formation is stressed.

  8. 4D dose simulation in volumetric arc therapy: Accuracy and affecting parameters.

    PubMed

    Sothmann, Thilo; Gauer, Tobias; Werner, René

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy of lung and liver lesions has changed from normofractioned 3D-CRT to stereotactic treatment in a single or few fractions, often employing volumetric arc therapy (VMAT)-based techniques. Potential unintended interference of respiratory target motion and dynamically changing beam parameters during VMAT dose delivery motivates establishing 4D quality assurance (4D QA) procedures to assess appropriateness of generated VMAT treatment plans when taking into account patient-specific motion characteristics. Current approaches are motion phantom-based 4D QA and image-based 4D VMAT dose simulation. Whereas phantom-based 4D QA is usually restricted to a small number of measurements, the computational approaches allow simulating many motion scenarios. However, 4D VMAT dose simulation depends on various input parameters, influencing estimated doses along with mitigating simulation reliability. Thus, aiming at routine use of simulation-based 4D VMAT QA, the impact of such parameters as well as the overall accuracy of the 4D VMAT dose simulation has to be studied in detail-which is the topic of the present work. In detail, we introduce the principles of 4D VMAT dose simulation, identify influencing parameters and assess their impact on 4D dose simulation accuracy by comparison of simulated motion-affected dose distributions to corresponding dosimetric motion phantom measurements. Exploiting an ITV-based treatment planning approach, VMAT treatment plans were generated for a motion phantom and different motion scenarios (sinusoidal motion of different period/direction; regular/irregular motion). 4D VMAT dose simulation results and dose measurements were compared by local 3% / 3 mm γ-evaluation, with the measured dose distributions serving as ground truth. Overall γ-passing rates of simulations and dynamic measurements ranged from 97% to 100% (mean across all motion scenarios: 98% ± 1%); corresponding values for comparison of different day repeat measurements were

  9. 4D dose simulation in volumetric arc therapy: Accuracy and affecting parameters

    PubMed Central

    Werner, René

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy of lung and liver lesions has changed from normofractioned 3D-CRT to stereotactic treatment in a single or few fractions, often employing volumetric arc therapy (VMAT)-based techniques. Potential unintended interference of respiratory target motion and dynamically changing beam parameters during VMAT dose delivery motivates establishing 4D quality assurance (4D QA) procedures to assess appropriateness of generated VMAT treatment plans when taking into account patient-specific motion characteristics. Current approaches are motion phantom-based 4D QA and image-based 4D VMAT dose simulation. Whereas phantom-based 4D QA is usually restricted to a small number of measurements, the computational approaches allow simulating many motion scenarios. However, 4D VMAT dose simulation depends on various input parameters, influencing estimated doses along with mitigating simulation reliability. Thus, aiming at routine use of simulation-based 4D VMAT QA, the impact of such parameters as well as the overall accuracy of the 4D VMAT dose simulation has to be studied in detail–which is the topic of the present work. In detail, we introduce the principles of 4D VMAT dose simulation, identify influencing parameters and assess their impact on 4D dose simulation accuracy by comparison of simulated motion-affected dose distributions to corresponding dosimetric motion phantom measurements. Exploiting an ITV-based treatment planning approach, VMAT treatment plans were generated for a motion phantom and different motion scenarios (sinusoidal motion of different period/direction; regular/irregular motion). 4D VMAT dose simulation results and dose measurements were compared by local 3% / 3 mm γ-evaluation, with the measured dose distributions serving as ground truth. Overall γ-passing rates of simulations and dynamic measurements ranged from 97% to 100% (mean across all motion scenarios: 98% ± 1%); corresponding values for comparison of different day repeat measurements were

  10. Opening the Black Box of ICT4D: Advancing Our Understanding of ICT4D Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sung Jin

    2013-01-01

    The term, Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D), pertains to programs or projects that strategically use ICTs (e.g. mobile phones, computers, and the internet) as a means toward the socio-economic betterment for the poor in developing contexts. Gaining the political and financial support of the international community…

  11. Singularity perturbed zero dynamics of nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isidori, A.; Sastry, S. S.; Kokotovic, P. V.; Byrnes, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    Stability properties of zero dynamics are among the crucial input-output properties of both linear and nonlinear systems. Unstable, or 'nonminimum phase', zero dynamics are a major obstacle to input-output linearization and high-gain designs. An analysis of the effects of regular perturbations in system equations on zero dynamics shows that whenever a perturbation decreases the system's relative degree, it manifests itself as a singular perturbation of zero dynamics. Conditions are given under which the zero dynamics evolve in two timescales characteristic of a standard singular perturbation form that allows a separate analysis of slow and fast parts of the zero dynamics.

  12. Spatial Operator Algebra for multibody system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Jain, A.; Kreutz-Delgado, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Spatial Operator Algebra framework for the dynamics of general multibody systems is described. The use of a spatial operator-based methodology permits the formulation of the dynamical equations of motion of multibody systems in a concise and systematic way. The dynamical equations of progressively more complex grid multibody systems are developed in an evolutionary manner beginning with a serial chain system, followed by a tree topology system and finally, systems with arbitrary closed loops. Operator factorizations and identities are used to develop novel recursive algorithms for the forward dynamics of systems with closed loops. Extensions required to deal with flexible elements are also discussed.

  13. Spatiotemporal directional analysis of 4D echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini-Casadevall, Elsa D.; Laine, Andrew F.; Takuma, Shin; Homma, Shunichi

    2000-12-01

    Speckle noise corrupts ultrasonic data by introducing sharp changes in an echocardiographic image intensity profile, while attenuation alters the intensity of equally significant cardiac structures. These properties introduce inhomogeneity in the spatial domain and suggests that measures based on phase information rather than intensity are more appropriate for denoising and cardiac border detection. The present analysis method relies on the expansion of temporal ultrasonic volume data on complex exponential wavelet-like basis functions called Brushlets. These basis functions decompose a signal into distinct patterns of oriented textures. Projected coefficients are associated with distinct 'brush strokes' of a particular size and orientation. 4D overcomplete brushlet analysis is applied to temporal echocardiographic values. We show that adding the time dimension in the analysis dramatically improves the quality and robustness of the method without adding complexity in the design of a segmentation tool. We have investigated mathematical and empirical methods for identifying the most 'efficient' brush stroke sizes and orientations for decomposition and reconstruction on both phantom and clinical data. In order to determine the 'best tiling' or equivalently, the 'best brushlet basis', we use an entorpy-based information cost metric function. Quantitative validation and clinical applications of this new spatio-temporal analysis tool are reported for balloon phantoms and clinical data sets.

  14. Dynamical Localization in Molecular Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidi

    In the first four chapters of this thesis we concentrate on the Davydov model which describes the vibrational energy quanta of Amide I bonds (C=O bonds on the alpha -helix) coupled to the acoustic phonon modes of the alpha-helix backbone in the form of a Frohlich Hamiltonian. Following a brief introduction in chapter one, in chapter two we formulate the dynamics of vibrational quanta at finite temperature by using coherent state products. The fluctuation-dissipation relation is derived. At zero temperature, in the continuum limit, we recover the original results of Davydov. We also achieve good agreement with numerical simulations. In chapter three, the net contraction of the lattice is calculated exactly at any temperature, and its relation to the so -call "topological stability" of the Davydov soliton is discussed. In the second section of the chapter three we calculate the overtone spectra of crystalline acetanilide (according to some opinions ACN provides experimental evidence for the existence of Davydov solitons). Good agreement with experimental data has been obtained. In chapter four we study the self-trapped vibrational excitations by the Quantum Monte Carlo technique. For a single excitation, the temperature dependence of different physical observables is calculated. The quasi-particle which resembles the Davydov soliton has been found to be fairly narrow using the most commonly used data for the alpha -helix; at temperatures above a few Kelvin, the quasi-particle reaches its smallest limit (extends over three sites), which implies diffusive motion of the small polaron-like quasi-particle at high temperatures. For the multi-excitation case, bound pairs and clusters of excitations are found at low temperatures; they gradually dissociate when the temperature of the system is increased as calculated from the density-density correlation function. In the last chapter of this thesis, we study a more general model of dynamical local modes in molecular systems

  15. Interactive 4D Visualization of Sediment Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkiewicz, T.; Englert, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal sediment transport models simulate the effects that waves, currents, and tides have on near-shore bathymetry and features such as beaches and barrier islands. Understanding these dynamic processes is integral to the study of coastline stability, beach erosion, and environmental contamination. Furthermore, analyzing the results of these simulations is a critical task in the design, placement, and engineering of coastal structures such as seawalls, jetties, support pilings for wind turbines, etc. Despite the importance of these models, there is a lack of available visualization software that allows users to explore and perform analysis on these datasets in an intuitive and effective manner. Existing visualization interfaces for these datasets often present only one variable at a time, using two dimensional plan or cross-sectional views. These visual restrictions limit the ability to observe the contents in the proper overall context, both in spatial and multi-dimensional terms. To improve upon these limitations, we use 3D rendering and particle system based illustration techniques to show water column/flow data across all depths simultaneously. We can also encode multiple variables across different perceptual channels (color, texture, motion, etc.) to enrich surfaces with multi-dimensional information. Interactive tools are provided, which can be used to explore the dataset and find regions-of-interest for further investigation. Our visualization package provides an intuitive 4D (3D, time-varying) visualization of sediment transport model output. In addition, we are also integrating real world observations with the simulated data to support analysis of the impact from major sediment transport events. In particular, we have been focusing on the effects of Superstorm Sandy on the Redbird Artificial Reef Site, offshore of Delaware Bay. Based on our pre- and post-storm high-resolution sonar surveys, there has significant scour and bedform migration around the

  16. Dynamical Signatures of Living Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the main challenges in modeling living systems is to distinguish a random walk of physical origin (for instance, Brownian motions) from those of biological origin and that will constitute the starting point of the proposed approach. As conjectured, the biological random walk must be nonlinear. Indeed, any stochastic Markov process can be described by linear Fokker-Planck equation (or its discretized version), only that type of process has been observed in the inanimate world. However, all such processes always converge to a stable (ergodic or periodic) state, i.e., to the states of a lower complexity and high entropy. At the same time, the evolution of living systems directed toward a higher level of complexity if complexity is associated with a number of structural variations. The simplest way to mimic such a tendency is to incorporate a nonlinearity into the random walk; then the probability evolution will attain the features of diffusion equation: the formation and dissipation of shock waves initiated by small shallow wave disturbances. As a result, the evolution never "dies:" it produces new different configurations which are accompanied by an increase or decrease of entropy (the decrease takes place during formation of shock waves, the increase-during their dissipation). In other words, the evolution can be directed "against the second law of thermodynamics" by forming patterns outside of equilibrium in the probability space. Due to that, a specie is not locked up in a certain pattern of behavior: it still can perform a variety of motions, and only the statistics of these motions is constrained by this pattern. It should be emphasized that such a "twist" is based upon the concept of reflection, i.e., the existence of the self-image (adopted from psychology). The model consists of a generator of stochastic processes which represents the motor dynamics in the form of nonlinear random walks, and a simulator of the nonlinear version of the diffusion

  17. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  18. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  19. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2000-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2000-04-01 2000-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a) Each application for an order under section 304(d)...

  20. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2005-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2005-04-01 2005-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  1. Actively triggered 4d cone-beam CT acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Martin F.; Wisotzky, Eric; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: 4d cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are usually reconstructed by extracting the motion information from the 2d projections or an external surrogate signal, and binning the individual projections into multiple respiratory phases. In this “after-the-fact” binning approach, however, projections are unevenly distributed over respiratory phases resulting in inefficient utilization of imaging dose. To avoid excess dose in certain respiratory phases, and poor image quality due to a lack of projections in others, the authors have developed a novel 4d CBCT acquisition framework which actively triggers 2d projections based on the forward-predicted position of the tumor.Methods: The forward-prediction of the tumor position was independently established using either (i) an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system based on implanted EM-transponders which act as a surrogate for the tumor position, or (ii) an external motion sensor measuring the chest-wall displacement and correlating this external motion to the phase-shifted diaphragm motion derived from the acquired images. In order to avoid EM-induced artifacts in the imaging detector, the authors devised a simple but effective “Faraday” shielding cage. The authors demonstrated the feasibility of their acquisition strategy by scanning an anthropomorphic lung phantom moving on 1d or 2d sinusoidal trajectories.Results: With both tumor position devices, the authors were able to acquire 4d CBCTs free of motion blurring. For scans based on the EM tracking system, reconstruction artifacts stemming from the presence of the EM-array and the EM-transponders were greatly reduced using newly developed correction algorithms. By tuning the imaging frequency independently for each respiratory phase prior to acquisition, it was possible to harmonize the number of projections over respiratory phases. Depending on the breathing period (3.5 or 5 s) and the gantry rotation time (4 or 5 min), between ∼90 and 145

  2. SU-E-T-464: Implementation and Validation of 4D Acuros XB Dose Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S; Yuen, C; Huang, V; Milette, M; Teke, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this abstract we implement and validate a 4D VMAT Acuros XB dose calculation using Gafchromic film. Special attention is paid to the physical material assignment in the CT dataset and to reported dose to water and dose to medium. Methods: A QUASAR phantom with a 3 cm sinusoidal tumor motion and 5 second period was scanned using 4D computed tomography. A CT was also obtained of the static QUASAR phantom with the tumor at the central position. A VMAT plan was created on the average CT dataset and was delivered on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. The trajectory log file from this treatment was acquired and used to create 10 VMAT subplans (one for each portion of the breathing cycle). Motion for each subplan was simulated by moving the beam isocentre in the superior/inferior direction in the Treatment Planning System on the static CT scan. The 10 plans were calculated (both dose to medium and dose to water) and summed for 1) the original HU values from the static CT scan and 2) the correct physical material assignment in the CT dataset. To acquire a breathing phase synchronized film measurements the trajectory log was used to create a VMAT delivery plan which includes dynamic couch motion using the Developer Mode. Three different treatment start phases were investigated (mid inhalation, full inhalation and full exhalation). Results: For each scenario the coronal dose distributions were measured using Gafchromic film and compared to the corresponding calculation with Film QA Pro Software using a Gamma test with a 3%/3mm distance to agreement criteria. Good agreement was found between calculation and measurement. No statistically significant difference in agreement was found between calculations to original HU values vs calculations to over-written (material-assigned) HU values. Conclusion: The investigated 4D dose calculation method agrees well with measurement.

  3. Geometric validation of self-gating k-space-sorted 4D-MRI vs 4D-CT using a respiratory motion phantom

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yong; Fan, Zhaoyang; Yang, Wensha; Pang, Jianing; Deng, Zixin; McKenzie, Elizabeth; Tuli, Richard; Wallace, Robert; Li, Debiao; Fraass, Benedick

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: MRI is increasingly being used for radiotherapy planning, simulation, and in-treatment-room motion monitoring. To provide more detailed temporal and spatial MR data for these tasks, we have recently developed a novel self-gated (SG) MRI technique with advantage of k-space phase sorting, high isotropic spatial resolution, and high temporal resolution. The current work describes the validation of this 4D-MRI technique using a MRI- and CT-compatible respiratory motion phantom and comparison to 4D-CT. Methods: The 4D-MRI sequence is based on a spoiled gradient echo-based 3D projection reconstruction sequence with self-gating for 4D-MRI at 3 T. Respiratory phase is resolved by using SG k-space lines as the motion surrogate. 4D-MRI images are reconstructed into ten temporal bins with spatial resolution 1.56 × 1.56 × 1.56 mm3. A MRI-CT compatible phantom was designed to validate the performance of the 4D-MRI sequence and 4D-CT imaging. A spherical target (diameter 23 mm, volume 6.37 ml) filled with high-concentration gadolinium (Gd) gel is embedded into a plastic box (35 × 40 × 63 mm3) and stabilized with low-concentration Gd gel. The phantom, driven by an air pump, is able to produce human-type breathing patterns between 4 and 30 respiratory cycles/min. 4D-CT of the phantom has been acquired in cine mode, and reconstructed into ten phases with slice thickness 1.25 mm. The 4D images sets were imported into a treatment planning software for target contouring. The geometrical accuracy of the 4D MRI and CT images has been quantified using target volume, flattening, and eccentricity. The target motion was measured by tracking the centroids of the spheres in each individual phase. Motion ground-truth was obtained from input signals and real-time video recordings. Results: The dynamic phantom has been operated in four respiratory rate (RR) settings, 6, 10, 15, and 20/min, and was scanned with 4D-MRI and 4D-CT. 4D-CT images have target-stretching, partial

  4. Geometric validation of self-gating k-space-sorted 4D-MRI vs 4D-CT using a respiratory motion phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yong Yang, Wensha; McKenzie, Elizabeth; Tuli, Richard; Wallace, Robert; Fraass, Benedick; Fan, Zhaoyang; Pang, Jianing; Deng, Zixin; Li, Debiao

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: MRI is increasingly being used for radiotherapy planning, simulation, and in-treatment-room motion monitoring. To provide more detailed temporal and spatial MR data for these tasks, we have recently developed a novel self-gated (SG) MRI technique with advantage of k-space phase sorting, high isotropic spatial resolution, and high temporal resolution. The current work describes the validation of this 4D-MRI technique using a MRI- and CT-compatible respiratory motion phantom and comparison to 4D-CT. Methods: The 4D-MRI sequence is based on a spoiled gradient echo-based 3D projection reconstruction sequence with self-gating for 4D-MRI at 3 T. Respiratory phase is resolved by using SG k-space lines as the motion surrogate. 4D-MRI images are reconstructed into ten temporal bins with spatial resolution 1.56 × 1.56 × 1.56 mm{sup 3}. A MRI-CT compatible phantom was designed to validate the performance of the 4D-MRI sequence and 4D-CT imaging. A spherical target (diameter 23 mm, volume 6.37 ml) filled with high-concentration gadolinium (Gd) gel is embedded into a plastic box (35 × 40 × 63 mm{sup 3}) and stabilized with low-concentration Gd gel. The phantom, driven by an air pump, is able to produce human-type breathing patterns between 4 and 30 respiratory cycles/min. 4D-CT of the phantom has been acquired in cine mode, and reconstructed into ten phases with slice thickness 1.25 mm. The 4D images sets were imported into a treatment planning software for target contouring. The geometrical accuracy of the 4D MRI and CT images has been quantified using target volume, flattening, and eccentricity. The target motion was measured by tracking the centroids of the spheres in each individual phase. Motion ground-truth was obtained from input signals and real-time video recordings. Results: The dynamic phantom has been operated in four respiratory rate (RR) settings, 6, 10, 15, and 20/min, and was scanned with 4D-MRI and 4D-CT. 4D-CT images have target

  5. Stability of Dynamical Systems with Discontinuous Motions:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Anthony N.; Hou, Ling

    In this paper we present a stability theory for discontinuous dynamical systems (DDS): continuous-time systems whose motions are not necessarily continuous with respect to time. We show that this theory is not only applicable in the analysis of DDS, but also in the analysis of continuous dynamical systems (continuous-time systems whose motions are continuous with respect to time), discrete-time dynamical systems (systems whose motions are defined at discrete points in time) and hybrid dynamical systems (HDS) (systems whose descriptions involve simultaneously continuous-time and discrete-time). We show that the stability results for DDS are in general less conservative than the corresponding well-known classical Lyapunov results for continuous dynamical systems and discrete-time dynamical systems. Although the DDS stability results are applicable to general dynamical systems defined on metric spaces (divorced from any kind of description by differential equations, or any other kinds of equations), we confine ourselves to finite-dimensional dynamical systems defined by ordinary differential equations and difference equations, to make this paper as widely accessible as possible. We present only sample results, namely, results for uniform asymptotic stability in the large.

  6. Complex Dynamical Behavior in Hybrid Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-29

    multiple mode switching and other high-level supervisory control architectures, give rise to complicated hybrid dynamical systems with behaviors... switching and other high-level supervisory control architectures, give rise to complicated hybrid dynamical systems with behaviors that can be difficult...Teel, ``Analytical and numerical Lyapunov functions for SISO linear control systems with first-order reset elements”, International Journal of

  7. Mitotic activation of the DISC1-inducible cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase-4D9 (PDE4D9), through multi-site phosphorylation, influences cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Catherine L; Lee, Louisa C Y; Hill, Elaine V; Henderson, David J P; Anthony, Diana F; Houslay, Daniel M; Yalla, Krishna C; Cairns, Lynne S; Dunlop, Allan J; Baillie, George S; Huston, Elaine; Houslay, Miles D

    2014-09-01

    In Rat-1 cells, the dramatic decrease in the levels of both intracellular cyclic 3'5' adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP; cAMP) and in the activity of cAMP-activated protein kinase A (PKA) observed in mitosis was paralleled by a profound increase in cAMP hydrolyzing phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) activity. The decrease in PKA activity, which occurs during mitosis, was attributable to PDE4 activation as the PDE4 selective inhibitor, rolipram, but not the phosphodiesterase-3 (PDE3) inhibitor, cilostamide, specifically ablated this cell cycle-dependent effect. PDE4 inhibition caused Rat-1 cells to move from S phase into G2/M more rapidly, to transit through G2/M more quickly and to remain in G1 for a longer period. Inhibition of PDE3 elicited no observable effects on cell cycle dynamics. Selective immunopurification of each of the four PDE4 sub-families identified PDE4D as being selectively activated in mitosis. Subsequent analysis uncovered PDE4D9, an isoform whose expression can be regulated by Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1)/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) complex, as the sole PDE4 species activated during mitosis in Rat-1 cells. PDE4D9 becomes activated in mitosis through dual phosphorylation at Ser585 and Ser245, involving the combined action of ERK and an unidentified 'switch' kinase that has previously been shown to be activated by H2O2. Additionally, in mitosis, PDE4D9 also becomes phosphorylated at Ser67 and Ser81, through the action of MK2 (MAPKAPK2) and AMP kinase (AMPK), respectively. The multisite phosphorylation of PDE4D9 by all four of these protein kinases leads to decreased mobility (band-shift) of PDE4D9 on SDS-PAGE. PDE4D9 is predominantly concentrated in the perinuclear region of Rat-1 cells but with a fraction distributed asymmetrically at the cell margins. Our investigations demonstrate that the diminished levels of cAMP and PKA activity that characterise mitosis are due to enhanced cAMP degradation by PDE4D9. PDE4D9, was found to

  8. 4D micro-CT using fast prospective gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaolian; Johnston, Samuel M.; Qi, Yi; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2012-01-01

    Micro-CT is currently used in preclinical studies to provide anatomical information. But, there is also significant interest in using this technology to obtain functional information. We report here a new sampling strategy for 4D micro-CT for functional cardiac and pulmonary imaging. Rapid scanning of free-breathing mice is achieved with fast prospective gating (FPG) implemented on a field programmable gate array. The method entails on-the-fly computation of delays from the R peaks of the ECG signals or the peaks of the respiratory signals for the triggering pulses. Projection images are acquired for all cardiac or respiratory phases at each angle before rotating to the next angle. FPG can deliver the faster scan time of retrospective gating (RG) with the regular angular distribution of conventional prospective gating for cardiac or respiratory gating. Simultaneous cardio-respiratory gating is also possible with FPG in a hybrid retrospective/prospective approach. We have performed phantom experiments to validate the new sampling protocol and compared the results from FPG and RG in cardiac imaging of a mouse. Additionally, we have evaluated the utility of incorporating respiratory information in 4D cardiac micro-CT studies with FPG. A dual-source micro-CT system was used for image acquisition with pulsed x-ray exposures (80 kVp, 100 mA, 10 ms). The cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent containing 123 mg I ml-1 delivered via a tail vein catheter in a dose of 0.01 ml g-1 body weight. The phantom experiment demonstrates that FPG can distinguish the successive phases of phantom motion with minimal motion blur, and the animal study demonstrates that respiratory FPG can distinguish inspiration and expiration. 4D cardiac micro-CT imaging with FPG provides image quality superior to RG at an isotropic voxel size of 88 µm and 10 ms temporal resolution. The acquisition time for either sampling approach is less than 5 min. The

  9. 4D micro-CT using fast prospective gating.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaolian; Johnston, Samuel M; Qi, Yi; Johnson, G Allan; Badea, Cristian T

    2012-01-07

    Micro-CT is currently used in preclinical studies to provide anatomical information. But, there is also significant interest in using this technology to obtain functional information. We report here a new sampling strategy for 4D micro-CT for functional cardiac and pulmonary imaging. Rapid scanning of free-breathing mice is achieved with fast prospective gating (FPG) implemented on a field programmable gate array. The method entails on-the-fly computation of delays from the R peaks of the ECG signals or the peaks of the respiratory signals for the triggering pulses. Projection images are acquired for all cardiac or respiratory phases at each angle before rotating to the next angle. FPG can deliver the faster scan time of retrospective gating (RG) with the regular angular distribution of conventional prospective gating for cardiac or respiratory gating. Simultaneous cardio-respiratory gating is also possible with FPG in a hybrid retrospective/prospective approach. We have performed phantom experiments to validate the new sampling protocol and compared the results from FPG and RG in cardiac imaging of a mouse. Additionally, we have evaluated the utility of incorporating respiratory information in 4D cardiac micro-CT studies with FPG. A dual-source micro-CT system was used for image acquisition with pulsed x-ray exposures (80 kVp, 100 mA, 10 ms). The cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent containing 123 mg I ml(-1) delivered via a tail vein catheter in a dose of 0.01 ml g(-1) body weight. The phantom experiment demonstrates that FPG can distinguish the successive phases of phantom motion with minimal motion blur, and the animal study demonstrates that respiratory FPG can distinguish inspiration and expiration. 4D cardiac micro-CT imaging with FPG provides image quality superior to RG at an isotropic voxel size of 88 μm and 10 ms temporal resolution. The acquisition time for either sampling approach is less than 5 min. The

  10. Realistic CT simulation using the 4D XCAT phantom.

    PubMed

    Segars, W P; Mahesh, M; Beck, T J; Frey, E C; Tsui, B M W

    2008-08-01

    The authors develop a unique CT simulation tool based on the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom, a whole-body computer model of the human anatomy and physiology based on NURBS surfaces. Unlike current phantoms in CT based on simple mathematical primitives, the 4D XCAT provides an accurate representation of the complex human anatomy and has the advantage, due to its design, that its organ shapes can be changed to realistically model anatomical variations and patient motion. A disadvantage to the NURBS basis of the XCAT, however, is that the mathematical complexity of the surfaces makes the calculation of line integrals through the phantom difficult. They have to be calculated using iterative procedures; therefore, the calculation of CT projections is much slower than for simpler mathematical phantoms. To overcome this limitation, the authors used efficient ray tracing techniques from computer graphics, to develop a fast analytic projection algorithm to accurately calculate CT projections directly from the surface definition of the XCAT phantom given parameters defining the CT scanner and geometry. Using this tool, realistic high-resolution 3D and 4D projection images can be simulated and reconstructed from the XCAT within a reasonable amount of time. In comparison with other simulators with geometrically defined organs, the XCAT-based algorithm was found to be only three times slower in generating a projection data set of the same anatomical structures using a single 3.2 GHz processor. To overcome this decrease in speed would, therefore, only require running the projection algorithm in parallel over three processors. With the ever decreasing cost of computers and the rise of faster processors and multi-processor systems and clusters, this slowdown is basically inconsequential, especially given the vast improvement the XCAT offers in terms of realism and the ability to generate 3D and 4D data from anatomically diverse patients. As such, the authors conclude

  11. Comparing Dislodgeable 2,4-D Residues across Athletic Field Turfgrass Species and Time

    PubMed Central

    Brosnan, James T.; Breeden, Gregory K.

    2016-01-01

    2,4-dimethylamine salt (2,4-D) is an herbicide commonly applied on athletic fields for broadleaf weed control that can dislodge from treated turfgrass. Dislodge potential is affected by numerous factors, including turfgrass canopy conditions. Building on previous research confirming herbicide-turfgrass dynamics can vary widely between species, field research was initiated in 2014 and 2015 in Raleigh, NC, USA to quantify dislodgeable 2,4-D residues from dormant hybrid bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L. x C. transvaalensis) and hybrid bermudagrass overseeded with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), which are common athletic field playing surfaces in subtropical climates. Additionally, dislodgeable 2,4-D was compared at AM (7:00 eastern standard time) and PM (14:00) sample timings within a day. Samples collected from perennial ryegrass consistently resulted in greater 2,4-D dislodgment immediately after application (9.4 to 9.9% of applied) compared to dormant hybrid bermudagrass (2.3 to 2.9%), as well as at all AM compared to PM timings from 1 to 3 d after treatment (DAT; 0.4 to 6.3% compared to 0.1 to 0.8%). Dislodgeable 2,4-D did not differ across turfgrass species at PM sample collections, with ≤ 0.1% of the 2,4-D applied dislodged from 1 to 6 DAT, and 2,4-D detection did not occur at 12 and 24 DAT. In conclusion, dislodgeable 2,4-D from treated turfgrass can vary between species and over short time-scales within a day. This information should be taken into account in human exposure risk assessments, as well as by turfgrass managers and athletic field event coordinators to minimize 2,4-D exposure. PMID:27936174

  12. Single timepoint models of dynamic systems

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, K.; Itani, S.; Fitzgerald, J.; Schoeberl, B.; Nolan, G. P.; Tomlin, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Many interesting studies aimed at elucidating the connectivity structure of biomolecular pathways make use of abundance measurements, and employ statistical and information theoretic approaches to assess connectivities. These studies often do not address the effects of the dynamics of the underlying biological system, yet dynamics give rise to impactful issues such as timepoint selection and its effect on structure recovery. In this work, we study conditions for reliable retrieval of the connectivity structure of a dynamic system, and the impact of dynamics on structure-learning efforts. We encounter an unexpected problem not previously described in elucidating connectivity structure from dynamic systems, show how this confounds structure learning of the system and discuss possible approaches to overcome the confounding effect. Finally, we test our hypotheses on an accurate dynamic model of the IGF signalling pathway. We use two structure-learning methods at four time points to contrast the performance and robustness of those methods in terms of recovering correct connectivity. PMID:24511382

  13. Systems-Dynamic Analysis for Neighborhood Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systems-dynamic analysis (or system dynamics (SD)) helps planners identify interrelated impacts of transportation and land-use policies on neighborhood-scale economic outcomes for households and businesses, among other applications. This form of analysis can show benefits and tr...

  14. Nonlinear Dynamics of Parametrically Excited Gyroscopic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Namachchivaya. N.S.

    2001-06-01

    The primary objective of this project is to determine how some of the powerful geometric methods of dynamical systems can be applied to study nonlinear gyroscopic systems. We proposed to develop techniques to predict local and global behavior and instability mechanisms and to analyze the interactions between noise, stability, and nonlinearities inherent in gyroscopic systems. In order to obtain these results we use the method of normal forms, global bifurcation techniques, and various other dynamical systems tools.

  15. Identification of dynamic systems, theory and formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, R. E.; Iliff, K. W.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of estimating parameters of dynamic systems is addressed in order to present the theoretical basis of system identification and parameter estimation in a manner that is complete and rigorous, yet understandable with minimal prerequisites. Maximum likelihood and related estimators are highlighted. The approach used requires familiarity with calculus, linear algebra, and probability, but does not require knowledge of stochastic processes or functional analysis. The treatment emphasizes unification of the various areas in estimation in dynamic systems is treated as a direct outgrowth of the static system theory. Topics covered include basic concepts and definitions; numerical optimization methods; probability; statistical estimators; estimation in static systems; stochastic processes; state estimation in dynamic systems; output error, filter error, and equation error methods of parameter estimation in dynamic systems, and the accuracy of the estimates.

  16. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a) Each application for an order under section 304(d)...

  17. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a) Each application for an order under section 304(d)...

  18. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a) Each application for an order under section 304(d)...

  19. Killing Weeds with 2,4-D. Extension Bulletin 389.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Oliver C.

    Discussed is the use of the herbicide 2,4-D. Though written for farmers and agricultural workers, the pamphlet considers turf weed control and use of 2,4-D near ornamental plants. Aspects of the use of this herbicide covered are: (1) the common forms of 2,4-D; (2) plant responses and tolerances to the herbicide; (3) dilution and concentration of…

  20. 3D and 4D Seismic Imaging in the Oilfield; the state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strudley, A.

    2005-05-01

    Seismic imaging in the oilfield context has seen enormous changes over the last 20 years driven by a combination of improved subsurface illumination (2D to 3D), increased computational power and improved physical understanding. Today Kirchhoff Pre-stack migration (in time or depth) is the norm with anisotropic parameterisation and finite difference methods being increasingly employed. In the production context Time-Lapse (4D) Seismic is of growing importance as a tool for monitoring reservoir changes to facilitate increased productivity and recovery. In this paper we present an overview of state of the art technology in 3D and 4D seismic and look at future trends. Pre-stack Kirchhoff migration in time or depth is the imaging tool of choice for the majority of contemporary 3D datasets. Recent developments in 3D pre-stack imaging have been focussed around finite difference solutions to the acoustic wave equation, the so-called Wave Equation Migration methods (WEM). Application of finite difference solutions to imaging is certainly not new, however 3D pre-stack migration using these schemes is a relatively recent development driven by the need for imaging complex geologic structures such as sub salt, and facilitated by increased computational resources. Finally there are a class of imaging methods referred to as beam migration. These methods may be based on either the wave equation or rays, but all operate on a localised (in space and direction) part of the wavefield. These methods offer a bridge between the computational efficiency of Kirchhoff schemes and the improved image quality of WEM methods. Just as 3D seismic has had a radical impact on the quality of the static model of the reservoir, 4D seismic is having a dramatic impact on the dynamic model. Repeat shooting of seismic surveys after a period of production (typically one to several years) reveals changes in pressure and saturation through changes in the seismic response. The growth in interest in 4D seismic

  1. 4D GPR Experiments--Towards the Virtual Lysimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasmueck, M.; Viggiano, D. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Drasdis, J. B.; Kruse, S. E.; Or, D.

    2006-05-01

    data shows the shape and size of the imaged wet-bulb closely match the modeling and excavation results. Wetting front propagation was on the order of 0.2-0.5 m/hr. GPR detected retained water 17 hr after completion of the infiltration. In addition to pattern detection, attempts for establishing mass balance are underway. In summary, preliminary results from controlled field experiments show the 4D GPR method has the precision, resolution, and repeatability required for non-invasive detection of water-flow patterns and dynamics in the vadose zone, hence could potentially serve as a virtual lysimeter.

  2. 4D fast tracking for experiments at high luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, N.; Cardini, A.; Calabrese, R.; Fiorini, M.; Luppi, E.; Marconi, U.; Petruzzo, M.

    2016-11-01

    The full exploitation of the physics potential of the high luminosity LHC is a big challenge that requires new instrumentation and innovative solutions. We present here a conceptual design and simulation studies of a fast timing pixel detector with embedded real-time tracking capabilities. The system is conceived to operate at 40 MHz event rate and to reconstruct tracks in real-time, using precise space and time 4D information of the hit, for fast trigger decisions. This work is part of an R&D project aimed at building an innovative tracking detector with superior time (10 ps) and position (10 μm) resolutions to be used in very harsh radiation environments, for the ultimate flavour physics experiment at the high luminosity phase of the LHC.

  3. Information Processing Capacity of Dynamical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dambre, Joni; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Massar, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Many dynamical systems, both natural and artificial, are stimulated by time dependent external signals, somehow processing the information contained therein. We demonstrate how to quantify the different modes in which information can be processed by such systems and combine them to define the computational capacity of a dynamical system. This is bounded by the number of linearly independent state variables of the dynamical system, equaling it if the system obeys the fading memory condition. It can be interpreted as the total number of linearly independent functions of its stimuli the system can compute. Our theory combines concepts from machine learning (reservoir computing), system modeling, stochastic processes, and functional analysis. We illustrate our theory by numerical simulations for the logistic map, a recurrent neural network, and a two-dimensional reaction diffusion system, uncovering universal trade-offs between the non-linearity of the computation and the system's short-term memory. PMID:22816038

  4. Entropy of 4D extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Clifford V.; Khuri, Ramzi R.; Myers, Robert C.

    1996-02-01

    We derive the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula for four-dimensional Reissner-Nordström extremal black holes in type II string theory. The derivation is performed in two separate (T-dual) weak coupling pictures. One uses a type IIB bound state problem of D5- and D1-branes, while the other uses a bound state problem of D0- and D4-branes with macroscopic fundamental type IIA strings. In both cases, the D-brane systems are also bound to a Kaluza-Klein monopole, which then yields the four-dimensional black hole at strong coupling.

  5. Parallel Wavefront Analysis for a 4D Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti R.

    2011-01-01

    This software provides a programming interface for automating data collection with a PhaseCam interferometer from 4D Technology, and distributing the image-processing algorithm across a cluster of general-purpose computers. Multiple instances of 4Sight (4D Technology s proprietary software) run on a networked cluster of computers. Each connects to a single server (the controller) and waits for instructions. The controller directs the interferometer to several images, then assigns each image to a different computer for processing. When the image processing is finished, the server directs one of the computers to collate and combine the processed images, saving the resulting measurement in a file on a disk. The available software captures approximately 100 images and analyzes them immediately. This software separates the capture and analysis processes, so that analysis can be done at a different time and faster by running the algorithm in parallel across several processors. The PhaseCam family of interferometers can measure an optical system in milliseconds, but it takes many seconds to process the data so that it is usable. In characterizing an adaptive optics system, like the next generation of astronomical observatories, thousands of measurements are required, and the processing time quickly becomes excessive. A programming interface distributes data processing for a PhaseCam interferometer across a Windows computing cluster. A scriptable controller program coordinates data acquisition from the interferometer, storage on networked hard disks, and parallel processing. Idle time of the interferometer is minimized. This architecture is implemented in Python and JavaScript, and may be altered to fit a customer s needs.

  6. Session 6: Dynamic Modeling and Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey; Chapman, Jeffryes; May, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    These presentations cover some of the ongoing work in dynamic modeling and dynamic systems analysis. The first presentation discusses dynamic systems analysis and how to integrate dynamic performance information into the systems analysis. The ability to evaluate the dynamic performance of an engine design may allow tradeoffs between the dynamic performance and operability of a design resulting in a more efficient engine design. The second presentation discusses the Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS). T-MATS is a Simulation system with a library containing the basic building blocks that can be used to create dynamic Thermodynamic Systems. Some of the key features include Turbo machinery components, such as turbines, compressors, etc., and basic control system blocks. T-MAT is written in the Matlab-Simulink environment and is open source software. The third presentation focuses on getting additional performance from the engine by allowing the limit regulators only to be active when a limit is danger of being violated. Typical aircraft engine control architecture is based on MINMAX scheme, which is designed to keep engine operating within prescribed mechanical/operational safety limits. Using a conditionally active min-max limit regulator scheme, additional performance can be gained by disabling non-relevant limit regulators

  7. Dynamical Evolution of Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardt, H.

    2016-11-01

    Dynamical simulations have become a powerful tool to study the evolution of star clusters due to hardware and software progresses in recent years. Here, I review the state of the art of N-body and other simulation techniques and show what we have learned from these simulations about the dynamical evolution of star clusters. Special attention is given to the results on the lifetimes of star clusters as a function of their environment, the internal changes of the mass functions, the influence of primordial gas expulsion on the ratio of first to second generation stars in globular clusters, and the possible presence of intermediate-mass black holes in star clusters.

  8. Planning 4D intensity-modulated arc therapy for tumor tracking with a multileaf collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ying; Betzel, Gregory T.; Yang, Xiaocheng; Gui, Minzhi; Parke, William C.; Yi, Byongyong; Yu, Cedric X.

    2017-02-01

    This study introduces a practical four-dimensional (4D) planning scheme of IMAT using 4D computed tomography (4D CT) for planning tumor tracking with dynamic multileaf beam collimation. We assume that patients can breathe regularly, i.e. the same way as during 4D CT with an unchanged period and amplitude, and that the start of 4D-IMAT delivery can be synchronized with a designated respiratory phase. Each control point of the IMAT-delivery process can be associated with an image set of 4D CT at a specified respiratory phase. Target is contoured at each respiratory phase without a motion-induced margin. A 3D-IMAT plan is first optimized on a reference-phase image set of 4D CT. Then, based on the projections of the planning target volume in the beam’s eye view at different respiratory phases, a 4D-IMAT plan is generated by transforming the segments of the optimized 3D plan by using a direct aperture deformation method. Compensation for both translational and deformable tumor motion is accomplished, and the smooth delivery of the transformed plan is ensured by forcing connectivity between adjacent angles (control points). It is envisioned that the resultant plans can be delivered accurately using the dose rate regulated tracking method which handles breathing irregularities (Yi et al 2008 Med. Phys. 35 3955–62).This planning process is straightforward and only adds a small step to current clinical 3D planning practice. Our 4D planning scheme was tested on three cases to evaluate dosimetric benefits. The created 4D-IMAT plans showed similar dose distributions as compared with the 3D-IMAT plans on a single static phase, indicating that our method is capable of eliminating the dosimetric effects of breathing induced target motion. Compared to the 3D-IMAT plans with large treatment margins encompassing respiratory motion, our 4D-IMAT plans reduced radiation doses to surrounding normal organs and tissues.

  9. SIAM conference on applications of dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    A conference (Oct.15--19, 1992, Snowbird, Utah; sponsored by SIAM (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) Activity Group on Dynamical Systems) was held that highlighted recent developments in applied dynamical systems. The main lectures and minisymposia covered theory about chaotic motion, applications in high energy physics and heart fibrillations, turbulent motion, Henon map and attractor, integrable problems in classical physics, pattern formation in chemical reactions, etc. The conference fostered an exchange between mathematicians working on theoretical issues of modern dynamical systems and applied scientists. This two-part document contains abstracts, conference program, and an author index.

  10. q-entropy for symbolic dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Pesin, Yakov

    2015-12-01

    For symbolic dynamical systems we use the Carathéodory construction as described in (Pesin 1997 Dimension Theory in Dynamical Systems, ConTemporary Views and Applications (Chicago: University of Chicago Press)) to introduce the notions of q-topological and q-metric entropies. We describe some basic properties of these entropies and in particular, discuss relations between q-metric entropy and local metric entropy. Both q-topological and q-metric entropies are new invariants respectively under homeomorphisms and metric isomorphisms of dynamical systems.

  11. Seed conformal blocks in 4D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverri, Alejandro Castedo; Elkhidir, Emtinan; Karateev, Denis; Serone, Marco

    2016-02-01

    We compute in closed analytical form the minimal set of "seed" conformal blocks associated to the exchange of generic mixed symmetry spinor/tensor operators in an arbitrary representation ( ℓ, overline{ℓ} ) of the Lorentz group in four dimensional conformal field theories. These blocks arise from 4-point functions involving two scalars, one (0, | ℓ - overline{7ell;} |) and one (| ℓ - overline{ℓ} |, 0) spinors or tensors. We directly solve the set of Casimir equations, that can elegantly be written in a compact form for any ( ℓ, overline{ℓ} ), by using an educated ansatz and reducing the problem to an algebraic linear system. Various details on the form of the ansatz have been deduced by using the so called shadow formalism. The complexity of the conformal blocks depends on the value of p = | ℓ - overline{ℓ} | and grows with p, in analogy to what happens to scalar conformal blocks in d even space-time dimensions as d increases. These results open the way to bootstrap 4-point functions involving arbitrary spinor/tensor operators in four dimensional conformal field theories.

  12. Dynamical systems, attractors, and neural circuits

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Biology is the study of dynamical systems. Yet most of us working in biology have limited pedagogical training in the theory of dynamical systems, an unfortunate historical fact that can be remedied for future generations of life scientists. In my particular field of systems neuroscience, neural circuits are rife with nonlinearities at all levels of description, rendering simple methodologies and our own intuition unreliable. Therefore, our ideas are likely to be wrong unless informed by good models. These models should be based on the mathematical theories of dynamical systems since functioning neurons are dynamic—they change their membrane potential and firing rates with time. Thus, selecting the appropriate type of dynamical system upon which to base a model is an important first step in the modeling process. This step all too easily goes awry, in part because there are many frameworks to choose from, in part because the sparsely sampled data can be consistent with a variety of dynamical processes, and in part because each modeler has a preferred modeling approach that is difficult to move away from. This brief review summarizes some of the main dynamical paradigms that can arise in neural circuits, with comments on what they can achieve computationally and what signatures might reveal their presence within empirical data. I provide examples of different dynamical systems using simple circuits of two or three cells, emphasizing that any one connectivity pattern is compatible with multiple, diverse functions. PMID:27408709

  13. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  14. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  15. Modeling the dynamical systems on experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Natalie B.; Anishchenko, Vadim S.

    1996-06-01

    An attempt is made in the work to create qualitative models of some real biological systems, i.e., isolated frog's heart, a human's heart and a blood circulation system of a white rat. Sampled one-dimensional realizations of these systems were taken as the initial data. Correlation dimensions were calculated to evaluate the embedding dimensions of the systems' attractors. The result of the work are the systems of ordinary differential equations which approximately describe the dynamics of the systems under investigation.

  16. An updated version of the Motion4D-library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas; Grave, Frank

    2010-03-01

    We present an updated version of the Motion4D-library that can be used for the newly developed GeodesicViewer application. New version program summaryProgram title: Motion4D-library Catalogue identifier: AEEX_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEX_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 153 757 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5 178 439 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: All platforms with a C++ compiler Operating system: Linux, Unix, Windows RAM: 31 MBytes Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEEX_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 2355 Classification: 1.5 External routines: Gnu Scientific Library (GSL) ( http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/) Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Solve geodesic equation, parallel and Fermi-Walker transport in four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetimes. Solution method: Integration of ordinary differential equations. Reasons for new version: To be applicable for the GeodesicViewer (accepted for publication in Comput. Phys. Comm. (COMPHY) 3941, doi:10.1016/j.cpc.2009.10.010 [program AEFP_v1_0]), there were several minor adjustments to be done. Summary of revisions:Calculation of embedding diagrams are improved. Physical units can be used for some metrics. Tests for the constraint equation within the metric classes are slightly modified. New metrics: AlcubierreWarp, GoedelScaled, GoedelScaledCart, Kasner. Running time: The test runs provided with the distribution require only a few seconds to run.

  17. The controlled system fundamentals of system dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Everdeen, J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is an introduction to the control of turbines for engineers. The paper examines the turbine parameters and control characteristics which determine the dynamic performance of the turbine and speed control combination. A hydromechanical governor is used as an example of the speed control. No mathematics are used; the class uses common engineering concepts.

  18. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1984-01-01

    Tethered satellite system (TSS) dynamics were studied. The dynamic response of the TSS during the entire stationkeeping phase for the first electrodynamic mission was investigated. An out of plane swing amplitude and the tether's bowing were observed. The dynamics of the slack tether was studied and computer code, SLACK2, was improved both in capabilities and computational speed. Speed hazard related to tether breakage or plasma contactor failure was examined. Preliminary values of the potential difference after the failure and of the drop of the electric field along the tether axis have been computed. The update of the satellite rotational dynamics model is initiated.

  19. Dynamics of baroclinic wave systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcilon, Albert; Weng, Hengyi

    1989-01-01

    The research carried out in the past year dealt with nonlinear baroclinic wave dynamics. The model consisted of an Eady baroclinic basic state and uneven Elkman dissipation at the top and bottom boundaries with/without slopes. The method of solution used a truncated spectral expansion with three zonal waves and one or two meridional modes. Numerical experiments were performed on synoptic scale waves or planetary scale waves with/without wave-wave interaction.

  20. Model Verification of Mixed Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evensen, D. A.; Chrostowski, J. D.; Hasselman, T. K.

    1982-01-01

    MOVER uses experimental data to verify mathematical models of "mixed" dynamic systems. The term "mixed" refers to interactive mechanical, hydraulic, electrical, and other components. Program compares analytical transfer functions with experiment.

  1. [Free hand acquisition, reconstruction and visualization of 3D and 4D ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sakas, G; Walter, S; Grimm, M; Richtscheid, M

    2000-03-01

    3D Ultrasound will find in the next years a wide popularity under the medical imaging applications. The method expands the well-known sonography on the third dimension, therefore it becomes possible to generate spatial 3D views of internal organs. It is further possible to display static (3D) as well as dynamic organs (4D, e.g. pulsating heart). The clarity of the three-dimensional presentation supports very effectively the navigation. In this article we review the upgrading of conventional ultrasound devices on 3D and 4D capabilities, as well as the display of the datasets by corresponding visualisation and filtering approaches.

  2. Dynamic Impregnator Reactor System (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    IBRF poster developed for the IBRF showcase. Describes the multifarious system designed for complex feedstock impregnation and processing. IBRF feedstock system has several unit operations combined into one robust system that provides for flexible and staged process configurations, such as spraying, soaking, low-severity pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, concentration/evaporation, and distillation.

  3. Digital simulation of stiff linear dynamic systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. D.; Walsh, J. R., Jr.; Kerr, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A method is derived for digital computer simulation of linear time-invariant systems when the insignificant eigenvalues involved in such systems are eliminated by an ALSAP root removal technique. The method is applied to a thirteenth-order dynamic system representing a passive RLC network.

  4. Infrared PINEM developed by diffraction in 4D UEM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haihua; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2016-02-23

    The development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) has enabled not only observations of the ultrafast dynamics of photon-matter interactions at the atomic scale with ultrafast resolution in image, diffraction, and energy space, but photon-electron interactions in the field of nanoplasmonics and nanophotonics also have been captured by the related technique of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) in image and energy space. Here we report a further extension in the ongoing development of PINEM using a focused, nanometer-scale, electron beam in diffraction space for measurements of infrared-light-induced PINEM. The energy resolution in diffraction mode is unprecedented, reaching 0.63 eV under the 200-keV electron beam illumination, and separated peaks of the PINEM electron-energy spectrum induced by infrared light of wavelength 1,038 nm (photon energy 1.2 eV) have been well resolved for the first time, to our knowledge. In a comparison with excitation by green (519-nm) pulses, similar first-order PINEM peak amplitudes were obtained for optical fluence differing by a factor of more than 60 at the interface of copper metal and vacuum. Under high fluence, the nonlinear regime of IR PINEM was observed, and its spatial dependence was studied. In combination with PINEM temporal gating and low-fluence infrared excitation, the PINEM diffraction method paves the way for studies of structural dynamics in reciprocal space and energy space with high temporal resolution.

  5. Infrared PINEM developed by diffraction in 4D UEM

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haihua; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2016-01-01

    The development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) has enabled not only observations of the ultrafast dynamics of photon–matter interactions at the atomic scale with ultrafast resolution in image, diffraction, and energy space, but photon–electron interactions in the field of nanoplasmonics and nanophotonics also have been captured by the related technique of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) in image and energy space. Here we report a further extension in the ongoing development of PINEM using a focused, nanometer-scale, electron beam in diffraction space for measurements of infrared-light-induced PINEM. The energy resolution in diffraction mode is unprecedented, reaching 0.63 eV under the 200-keV electron beam illumination, and separated peaks of the PINEM electron-energy spectrum induced by infrared light of wavelength 1,038 nm (photon energy 1.2 eV) have been well resolved for the first time, to our knowledge. In a comparison with excitation by green (519-nm) pulses, similar first-order PINEM peak amplitudes were obtained for optical fluence differing by a factor of more than 60 at the interface of copper metal and vacuum. Under high fluence, the nonlinear regime of IR PINEM was observed, and its spatial dependence was studied. In combination with PINEM temporal gating and low-fluence infrared excitation, the PINEM diffraction method paves the way for studies of structural dynamics in reciprocal space and energy space with high temporal resolution. PMID:26848135

  6. Dynamics and kinematics of simple neural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovich, M. |; Selverston, A.; Rubchinsky, L.; Huerta, R.

    1996-09-01

    The dynamics of simple neural systems is of interest to both biologists and physicists. One of the possible roles of such systems is the production of rhythmic patterns, and their alterations (modification of behavior, processing of sensory information, adaptation, control). In this paper, the neural systems are considered as a subject of modeling by the dynamical systems approach. In particular, we analyze how a stable, ordinary behavior of a small neural system can be described by simple finite automata models, and how more complicated dynamical systems modeling can be used. The approach is illustrated by biological and numerical examples: experiments with and numerical simulations of the stomatogastric central pattern generators network of the California spiny lobster. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Application of dynamical systems theory to nonlinear aircraft dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culick, Fred E. C.; Jahnke, Craig C.

    1988-01-01

    Dynamical systems theory has been used to study nonlinear aircraft dynamics. A six degree of freedom model that neglects gravity has been analyzed. The aerodynamic model, supplied by NASA, is for a generic swept wing fighter and includes nonlinearities as functions of the angle of attack. A continuation method was used to calculate the steady states of the aircraft, and bifurcations of these steady states, as functions of the control deflections. Bifurcations were used to predict jump phenomena and the onset of periodic motion for roll coupling instabilities and high angle of attack maneuvers. The predictions were verified with numerical simulations.

  8. Detecting Recurrence Domains of Dynamical Systems by Symbolic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graben, Peter beim; Hutt, Axel

    2013-04-01

    We propose an algorithm for the detection of recurrence domains of complex dynamical systems from time series. Our approach exploits the characteristic checkerboard texture of recurrence domains exhibited in recurrence plots. In phase space, recurrence plots yield intersecting balls around sampling points that could be merged into cells of a phase space partition. We construct this partition by a rewriting grammar applied to the symbolic dynamics of time indices. A maximum entropy principle defines the optimal size of intersecting balls. The final application to high-dimensional brain signals yields an optimal symbolic recurrence plot revealing functional components of the signal.

  9. Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy and C4d deposition; correlation and its implication.

    PubMed

    Rath, Ashutosh; Tewari, Rohit; Mendonca, Satish; Badwal, Sonia; Nijhawan, Vijay Shrawan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is well known to be the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis throughout the world. The histopathological changes are wide and varied as brought out by the various classification systems like the Haas and Oxford systems. C4d is a well-known biomarker of the complement cascade and has recently been implicated in certain native renal diseases. We attempted to characterize C4d deposition in IgAN and correlate this with histopathology by the Oxford classification system. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study included renal biopsies of 15 cases of IgAN diagnosed on histopathology and immunofluorescence over a period of 2 years. Demographic parameters of age and sex were reviewed. The Oxford classification system was applied to score the cases and immunohistochemistry for C4d was done on all cases to characterize staining pattern and intensity and was correlated with Oxford classification. Results: On histological examination, the cases showed various combinations of lesions ranging from M0E0S0T0 to M1E1S1T1. C4d deposition was found to be occurring mainly in mesangial location (12/15 cases, 80%). Forty percent cases showed C4d deposition in the glomerular capillary walls in a segmental fashion and 26.67% showed global pattern. Other patterns of deposition were arteriolar (53.33%), in peritubular capillaries (26.67%) and in tubular epithelium (20%). Conclusion: On comparing the various patterns of deposition of C4d with the four variables of the Oxford classification system, we found that segmental and global deposition of C4d correlated best with endocapillary proliferation.

  10. Visco-elastic Dynamics of an Active Polar Dynamic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleiner, Harald; Svensek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    2015-03-01

    We study the dynamics of systems with a polar dynamic preferred direction that are embedded in visco-elastic media. Examples include the pattern-forming growth of bacteria and molecular motors. Because the ordered state only exists dynamically, but not statically, the macroscopic variable of choice is the velocity of the active units. The passive visco-elastic medium is described by a relaxing strain tensor. We derive the macroscopic equations for such a system and discuss novel static, reversible and irreversible cross-couplings connected to this two-fluid (two-velocity) system. The dynamics is rather different compared to the case of passive, static polar order. In particular, we find a complicated normal mode structure that reflects the broken time-reversal symmetry due to the non-equilibrium situation, anisotropy of first sound and a possible second sound excitation due to the active velocity, and various manifestations of the visco-elastic relaxation. We discuss critically the role of the so-called active term in the stress tensor as well as the thermodynamically correct description of the hydrodynamic transport velocities.

  11. Model systems for single molecule polymer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Latinwo, Folarin; Schroeder, Charles M

    2011-01-01

    Double stranded DNA (dsDNA) has long served as a model system for single molecule polymer dynamics. However, dsDNA is a semiflexible polymer, and the structural rigidity of the DNA double helix gives rise to local molecular properties and chain dynamics that differ from flexible chains, including synthetic organic polymers. Recently, we developed single stranded DNA (ssDNA) as a new model system for single molecule studies of flexible polymer chains. In this work, we discuss model polymer systems in the context of "ideal" and "real" chain behavior considering thermal blobs, tension blobs, hydrodynamic drag and force-extension relations. In addition, we present monomer aspect ratio as a key parameter describing chain conformation and dynamics, and we derive dynamical scaling relations in terms of this molecular-level parameter. We show that asymmetric Kuhn segments can suppress monomer-monomer interactions, thereby altering global chain dynamics. Finally, we discuss ssDNA in the context of a new model system for single molecule polymer dynamics. Overall, we anticipate that future single polymer studies of flexible chains will reveal new insight into the dynamic behavior of "real" polymers, which will highlight the importance of molecular individualism and the prevalence of non-linear phenomena.

  12. Model systems for single molecule polymer dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Latinwo, Folarin

    2012-01-01

    Double stranded DNA (dsDNA) has long served as a model system for single molecule polymer dynamics. However, dsDNA is a semiflexible polymer, and the structural rigidity of the DNA double helix gives rise to local molecular properties and chain dynamics that differ from flexible chains, including synthetic organic polymers. Recently, we developed single stranded DNA (ssDNA) as a new model system for single molecule studies of flexible polymer chains. In this work, we discuss model polymer systems in the context of “ideal” and “real” chain behavior considering thermal blobs, tension blobs, hydrodynamic drag and force–extension relations. In addition, we present monomer aspect ratio as a key parameter describing chain conformation and dynamics, and we derive dynamical scaling relations in terms of this molecular-level parameter. We show that asymmetric Kuhn segments can suppress monomer–monomer interactions, thereby altering global chain dynamics. Finally, we discuss ssDNA in the context of a new model system for single molecule polymer dynamics. Overall, we anticipate that future single polymer studies of flexible chains will reveal new insight into the dynamic behavior of “real” polymers, which will highlight the importance of molecular individualism and the prevalence of non-linear phenomena. PMID:22956980

  13. Dynamics and controls in maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-09-01

    The dynamic response of magnetically levitated (maglev) ground transportation systems has important consequences for safety and ride quality, guideway design, and system costs. Ride quality is determined by vehicle response and by environmental factors such as humidity and noise. The dynamic response of the vehicles is the key element in determining ride quality, and vehicle stability is an important safety-related element. To design a proper guideway that provides acceptable ride quality in the stable region, vehicle dynamics must be understood. Furthermore the trade-off between guideway smoothness and the levitation and control systems must be considered if maglev systems are to be economically feasible. The link between the guideway and the other maglev components is vehicle dynamics. For a commercial maglev system, vehicle dynamics must be analyzed and tested in detail. In this study, the role of dynamics and controls in maglev vehicle/guideway interactions is discussed, and the literature on modeling the dynamic interactions of vehicle/guideway and suspension controls for ground vehicles is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on modeling vehicle/guideway interactions and response characteristics of maglev systems for a multicar, multiload vehicle traveling on a single- or doublespan flexible guideway, including coupling effects of vehicle/guideway, comparison of concentrated and distributed loads, and ride comfort. Different control-law designs are introduced into vehicle suspensions when a simple two-degree-of-freedom vehicle model is applied. Active and semiactive control designs for primary and secondary suspensions do improve the response of vehicle and provide acceptable ride comfort. Finally, future research associated with dynamics and controls of vehicle/guideway systems is identified.

  14. Dynamic modeling of solar dynamic components and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Korakianitis, T.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this grant was to support NASA in modeling efforts to predict the transient dynamic and thermodynamic response of the space station solar dynamic power generation system. In order to meet the initial schedule requirement of providing results in time to support installation of the system as part of the initial phase of space station, early efforts were executed with alacrity and often in parallel. Initially, methods to predict the transient response of a Rankine as well as a Brayton cycle were developed. Review of preliminary design concepts led NASA to select a regenerative gas-turbine cycle using a helium-xenon mixture as the working fluid and, from that point forward, the modeling effort focused exclusively on that system. Although initial project planning called for a three year period of performance, revised NASA schedules moved system installation to later and later phases of station deployment. Eventually, NASA selected to halt development of the solar dynamic power generation system for space station and to reduce support for this project to two-thirds of the original level.

  15. Dynamic Modeling of Solar Dynamic Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Korakianitis, T.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to support NASA in modeling efforts to predict the transient dynamic and thermodynamic response of the space station solar dynamic power generation system. In order to meet the initial schedule requirement of providing results in time to support installation of the system as part of the initial phase of space station, early efforts were executed with alacrity and often in parallel. Initially, methods to predict the transient response of a Rankine as well as a Brayton cycle were developed. Review of preliminary design concepts led NASA to select a regenerative gas-turbine cycle using a helium-xenon mixture as the working fluid and, from that point forward, the modeling effort focused exclusively on that system. Although initial project planning called for a three year period of performance, revised NASA schedules moved system installation to later and later phases of station deployment. Eventually, NASA selected to halt development of the solar dynamic power generation system for space station and to reduce support for this project to two-thirds of the original level.

  16. 4D scattering amplitudes and asymptotic symmetries from 2D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; de la Fuente, Anton; Sundrum, Raman

    2017-01-01

    We reformulate the scattering amplitudes of 4D flat space gauge theory and gravity in the language of a 2D CFT on the celestial sphere. The resulting CFT structure exhibits an OPE constructed from 4D collinear singularities, as well as infinite-dimensional Kac-Moody and Virasoro algebras encoding the asymptotic symmetries of 4D flat space. We derive these results by recasting 4D dynamics in terms of a convenient foliation of flat space into 3D Euclidean AdS and Lorentzian dS geometries. Tree-level scattering amplitudes take the form of Witten diagrams for a continuum of (A)dS modes, which are in turn equivalent to CFT correlators via the (A)dS/CFT dictionary. The Ward identities for the 2D conserved currents are dual to 4D soft theorems, while the bulk-boundary propagators of massless (A)dS modes are superpositions of the leading and subleading Weinberg soft factors of gauge theory and gravity. In general, the massless (A)dS modes are 3D Chern-Simons gauge fields describing the soft, single helicity sectors of 4D gauge theory and gravity. Consistent with the topological nature of Chern-Simons theory, Aharonov-Bohm effects record the "tracks" of hard particles in the soft radiation, leading to a simple characterization of gauge and gravitational memories. Soft particle exchanges between hard processes define the Kac-Moody level and Virasoro central charge, which are thereby related to the 4D gauge coupling and gravitational strength in units of an infrared cutoff. Finally, we discuss a toy model for black hole horizons via a restriction to the Rindler region.

  17. Dynamic control of the space tethered system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malashin, A. A.; Smirnov, N. N.; Bryukvina, O. Yu.; Dyakov, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the problem of simultaneous dynamical stabilization and suppression of transverse and longitudinal vibrations of the space tethered system deployed along a certain trajectory. The dynamics of the system is described by a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for the longitudinal and transverse waves and we consider a non-classical version of the problem with one moving boundary. We formulate a mathematical model and perform the analytic and numerical analysis of the boundary control problem based on the Lyapunov method. A scheme of the deployment mechanism is suggested. It includes a control torque and transverse displacement of the boundary and ensures stable deployment of the whole system.

  18. Coupled dynamics analysis of wind energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative description of all key elements of a complete wind energy system computer analysis code is presented. The analysis system addresses the coupled dynamics characteristics of wind energy systems, including the interactions of the rotor, tower, nacelle, power train, control system, and electrical network. The coupled dynamics are analyzed in both the frequency and time domain to provide the basic motions and loads data required for design, performance verification and operations analysis activities. Elements of the coupled analysis code were used to design and analyze candidate rotor articulation concepts. Fundamental results and conclusions derived from these studies are presented.

  19. Live 4D optical coherence tomography for early embryonic mouse cardiac phenotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Andrew L.; Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-03-01

    Studying embryonic mouse development is important for our understanding of normal human embryogenesis and the underlying causes of congenital defects. Our research focuses on imaging early development in the mouse embryo to specifically understand cardiovascular development using optical coherence tomography (OCT). We have previously developed imaging approaches that combine static embryo culture, OCT imaging and advanced image processing to visualize the whole live mouse embryos and obtain 4D (3D+time) cardiodynamic datasets with cellular resolution. Here, we present the study of using 4D OCT for dynamic imaging of early embryonic heart in live mouse embryos to assess mutant cardiac phenotypes during development, including a cardiac looping defect. Our results indicate that the live 4D OCT imaging approach is an efficient phenotyping tool that can reveal structural and functional cardiac defects at very early stages. Further studies integrating live embryonic cardiodynamic phenotyping with molecular and genetic approaches in mouse mutants will help to elucidate the underlying signaling defects.

  20. Research on new dynamic torque calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Zhong Yu; Yin, Xiao

    2016-06-01

    Dynamic torque calibration method based on rotating table and interferometric system is studied in this paper. A load mass with certain moment of inertia are screwed on the top of torque transducer, the dynamic torque is realized by load object are traceable to angular acceleration and moment of inertia of the object by M (t)=I θ ¨(t) , where I is the total moment of inertia acting on the sensing element of the torque transducer and θ ¨ is the time and spatial-dependent angular acceleration of the load object which is directly measured by a laser interferometer. This paper will introduce a dynamic torque calibration system developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses servomotor to generate dynamic torque in the range from 0.1Nm to 200Nm, and heterodyne laser interferometers cooperated with column grating are used for angular acceleration measurement. An airbearing system is developed to increase the performance of the dynamic turque calibration system. This paper introduce the setup of the dynamic torque calibration system.

  1. Digit ratio (2D:4D), lateral preferences, and performance in fencing.

    PubMed

    Voracek, Martin; Reimer, Barbara; Ertl, Clara; Dressler, Stefan G

    2006-10-01

    The second to fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) is a sexually dimorphic trait (men tend to have lower values than women) and a likely biomarker for the organizational (permanent) effects of prenatal androgens on the human brain and body. Prenatal testosterone, as reflected by 2D:4D, has many extragenital effects, including its relevance for the formation of an efficient cardiovascular system. Previous research, reviewed here, has therefore investigated possible associations of 2D:4D with sport performance. Several studies found more masculinized digit ratio patterns (low 2D:4D values or a negative right-minus-left difference in 2D:4D) to be related to high performance in running, soccer, and skiing. The present research tested this hypothesis in a sample of 54 tournament fencers, predominantly from Austria. For men, negative right-left differences in 2D:4D corresponded significantly to better current as well as highest national fencing rankings, independent of training intensity and fencing experience. The mean 2D:4D values of these fencers were significantly lower and the proportion of left-handers was elevated relative to the local general population. For the right hand, the ratio was somewhat lower in male sabre fencers than in male epée and foil fencers combined and significantly lower in left-handed compared to right-handed fencers. Although nonsignificant due to low statistical power, effect sizes suggested that crossed versus congruent hand-eye and hand-foot preferences might also be related to fencing performance. The present findings add to the evidence that 2D:4D might be a performance indicator for men across a variety of sports.

  2. Smart dynamic system design: an integrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Mike J.; Skelton, Robert T.

    1994-05-01

    A dynamic system with satisfactory performance generally consists of a mechanical system (the plant) and a controller that drives the mechanical system to meet certain performance requirements. Traditionally the control engineer designs the controller only after the plant design is completed. This two-step approach to plant and controller design does not provide the best system design because the dynamics of the plant and the dynamics of the controller often oppose each other. This paper presents an application of the iterative system equivalent optimal mix algorithm to perform a smart design of a nine-member truss substructure and its accompanying controller. The objective of the design algorithm is to reduce the amount of energy used by the controller to maintain control performance, subject to the structure design constraints. Two unique features of the algorithm are that each iteration of the design problem is stated as a convex quadratic programming problem, and the control effort monotonically converges to its final value.

  3. Dynamics of Multibody Systems Near Lagrangian Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Brian

    This thesis examines the dynamics of a physically connected multi-spacecraft system in the vicinity of the Lagrangian points of a Circular Restricted Three-Body System. The spacecraft system is arranged in a wheel-spoke configuration with smaller and less massive satellites connected to a central hub using truss/beams or tether connectors. The kinematics of the system is first defined, and the kinetic, gravitational potential energy and elastic potential energy of the system are derived. The Assumed Modes Method is used to discretize the continuous variables of the system, and a general set of ordinary differential equations describing the dynamics of the connectors and the central hub are obtained using the Lagrangian method. The flexible body dynamics of the tethered and truss connected systems are examined using numerical simulations. The results show that these systems experienced only small elastic deflections when they are naturally librating or rotating at moderate angular velocities, and these deflections have relatively small effect on the attitude dynamics of the systems. Based on these results, it is determined that the connectors can be modeled as rigid when only the attitude dynamics of the system is of interest. The equations of motion of rigid satellites stationed at the Lagrangian points are linearized, and the stability conditions of the satellite are obtained from the linear equations. The required conditions are shown to be similar to those of geocentric satellites. Study of the linear equations also revealed the resonant conditions of rigid Lagrangian point satellites, when a librational natural frequency of the satellite matches the frequency of its station-keeping orbit leading to large attitude motions. For tethered satellites, the linear analysis shows that the tethers are in stable equilibrium when they lie along a line joining the two primary celestial bodies of the Three-Body System. Numerical simulations are used to study the long term

  4. Direct Measurement of Core-Level Relaxation Dynamics on a Surface-Adsorbate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miaja-Avila, L.; Saathoff, G.; Mathias, S.; Yin, J.; La-O-Vorakiat, C.; Bauer, M.; Aeschlimann, M.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.

    2008-07-01

    The coupling between electronic states in a surface-adsorbate system is fundamental to the understanding of many surface interactions. In this Letter, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the lifetime of core-excited states of an atom adsorbed onto a surface. By comparing laser-assisted photoemission from a substrate with a delayed Auger decay process from an adsorbate, we measure the lifetime of the 4d-1 core level of xenon on Pt(111) to be 7.1±1.1fs. This result opens up time-domain measurements of surface dynamics where energy-resolved measurements may provide incomplete information.

  5. CAVAREV—an open platform for evaluating 3D and 4D cardiac vasculature reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Lauritsch, Günter; Keil, Andreas; Hornegger, Joachim

    2010-05-01

    The 3D reconstruction of cardiac vasculature, e.g. the coronary arteries, using C-arm CT (rotational angiography) is an active and challenging field of research. There are numerous publications on different reconstruction techniques. However, there is still a lack of comparability of achieved results for several reasons: foremost, datasets used in publications are not open to public and thus experiments are not reproducible by other researchers. Further, the results highly depend on the vasculature motion, i.e. cardiac and breathing motion patterns which are also not comparable across publications. We aim to close this gap by providing an open platform, called Cavarev (CArdiac VAsculature Reconstruction EValuation). It features two simulated dynamic projection datasets based on the 4D XCAT phantom with contrasted coronary arteries which was derived from patient data. In the first dataset, the vasculature undergoes a continuous periodic motion. The second dataset contains aperiodic heart motion by including additional breathing motion. The geometry calibration and acquisition protocol were obtained from a real-world C-arm system. For qualitative evaluation of the reconstruction results, the correlation of the morphology is used. Two segmentation-based quality measures are introduced which allow us to assess the 3D and 4D reconstruction quality. They are based on the spatial overlap of the vasculature reconstruction with the ground truth. The measures enable a comprehensive analysis and comparison of reconstruction results independent from the utilized reconstruction algorithm. An online platform (www.cavarev.com) is provided where the datasets can be downloaded, researchers can manage and publish algorithm results and download a reference C++ and Matlab implementation.

  6. Fast X-ray micro-CT for real-time 4D observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, H.; Yoshida, K.; Tsuji, T.; Koyama, T.; Tsusaka, Y.; Kagoshima, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Fast X-ray computed tomography (CT) system with sub-second order measurement for single CT acquisition has been developed. The system, consisting of a high-speed sample rotation stage and a high-speed X-ray camera, is constructed at synchrotron radiation beamline in order to utilize fully intense X-rays. A time-resolving CT movie (i.e. 4D CT) can be available by operating the fast CT system continuously. Real-time observation of water absorbing process of super-absorbent polymer (SAP) has been successfully performed with the 4D CT operation.

  7. "4D Biology for health and disease" workshop report.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Jan-Pieter; Apweiler, Rolf; Balling, Rudi; Bertero, Michela G; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Chayen, Naomi E; Chène, Patrick; Corthals, Gary L; Dyląg, Tomasz; Förster, Friedrich; Heck, Albert J R; Henderson, Peter J F; Herwig, Ralf; Jehenson, Philippe; Kokalj, Sasa Jenko; Laue, Ernest; Legrain, Pierre; Martens, Lennart; Migliorini, Cristiano; Musacchio, Andrea; Podobnik, Marjetka; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Schreiber, Gideon; Sixma, Titia K; Smit, August B; Stuart, David; Svergun, Dmitri I; Taussig, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    The "4D Biology Workshop for Health and Disease", held on 16-17th of March 2010 in Brussels, aimed at finding the best organising principles for large-scale proteomics, interactomics and structural genomics/biology initiatives, and setting the vision for future high-throughput research and large-scale data gathering in biological and medical science. Major conclusions of the workshop include the following. (i) Development of new technologies and approaches to data analysis is crucial. Biophysical methods should be developed that span a broad range of time/spatial resolution and characterise structures and kinetics of interactions. Mathematics, physics, computational and engineering tools need to be used more in biology and new tools need to be developed. (ii) Database efforts need to focus on improved definitions of ontologies and standards so that system-scale data and associated metadata can be understood and shared efficiently. (iii) Research infrastructures should play a key role in fostering multidisciplinary research, maximising knowledge exchange between disciplines and facilitating access to diverse technologies. (iv) Understanding disease on a molecular level is crucial. System approaches may represent a new paradigm in the search for biomarkers and new targets in human disease. (v) Appropriate education and training should be provided to help efficient exchange of knowledge between theoreticians, experimental biologists and clinicians. These conclusions provide a strong basis for creating major possibilities in advancing research and clinical applications towards personalised medicine.

  8. Similarity Metrics for Closed Loop Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.; Yang, Lee C.; Bedrossian, Naz; Hall, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent and in what ways can two closed-loop dynamic systems be said to be "similar?" This question arises in a wide range of dynamic systems modeling and control system design applications. For example, bounds on error models are fundamental to the controller optimization with modern control design methods. Metrics such as the structured singular value are direct measures of the degree to which properties such as stability or performance are maintained in the presence of specified uncertainties or variations in the plant model. Similarly, controls-related areas such as system identification, model reduction, and experimental model validation employ measures of similarity between multiple realizations of a dynamic system. Each area has its tools and approaches, with each tool more or less suited for one application or the other. Similarity in the context of closed-loop model validation via flight test is subtly different from error measures in the typical controls oriented application. Whereas similarity in a robust control context relates to plant variation and the attendant affect on stability and performance, in this context similarity metrics are sought that assess the relevance of a dynamic system test for the purpose of validating the stability and performance of a "similar" dynamic system. Similarity in the context of system identification is much more relevant than are robust control analogies in that errors between one dynamic system (the test article) and another (the nominal "design" model) are sought for the purpose of bounding the validity of a model for control design and analysis. Yet system identification typically involves open-loop plant models which are independent of the control system (with the exception of limited developments in closed-loop system identification which is nonetheless focused on obtaining open-loop plant models from closed-loop data). Moreover the objectives of system identification are not the same as a flight test and

  9. Solar dynamic space power system heat rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. W.; Gustafson, E.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1986-01-01

    A radiator system concept is described that meets the heat rejection requirements of the NASA Space Station solar dynamic power modules. The heat pipe radiator is a high-reliability, high-performance approach that is capable of erection in space and is maintainable on orbit. Results are present of trade studies that compare the radiator system area and weight estimates for candidate advanced high performance heat pipes. The results indicate the advantages of the dual-slot heat pipe radiator for high temperature applications as well as its weight-reduction potential over the range of temperatures to be encountered in the solar dynamic heat rejection systems.

  10. Information, Consistent Estimation and Dynamic System Identification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    Data fnfetd) --t 90gg- I .No-ýnber 1976 Report ESL-R-718 INFORMATION, CONSISTENT ESTIMATION AND DYNAMIC SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION by Yoram Bara W This report...8217 • L .. +• " -’ .... .. .... .. .. ’• ’• "- ’"l ’"ll ~ll~ 2 l 1NFURMAT10N~, CUNSISTENT LST1IMATION JaN DYiNAMIC SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION byI Yoramn...one? 1. particular problem of considerable practical significance is that qI -3-3 of dynamic system identification . The situation described above, and

  11. Phase control of intermittency in dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Samuel; Mariño, Inés P; Salvadori, Francesco; Meucci, Riccardo; Sanjuán, Miguel A F; Arecchi, F T

    2006-07-01

    We present a nonfeedback method to tame or enhance crisis-induced intermittency in dynamical systems. By adding a small harmonic perturbation to a parameter of the system, the intermittent behavior can be suppressed or enhanced depending on the value of the phase difference between the main driving and the perturbation. The validity of the method is shown both in the model and in an experiment with a CO2 laser. An analysis of this scheme applied to the quadratic map near crisis illustrates the role of phase control in nonlinear dynamical systems.

  12. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  13. Multiprocessor Adaptive Control Of A Dynamic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Hyland, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Architecture for fully autonomous digital electronic control system developed for use in identification and adaptive control of dynamic system. Architecture modular and hierarchical. Combines relatively simple, standardized processing units into complex parallel-processing subsystems. Although architecture based on neural-network concept, processing units themselves not neural networks; processing units implemented by programming of currently available microprocessors.

  14. Dynamics, stability, and control of maglev systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S. S.; Rote, D. M.; Coffey, H. T.

    The dynamic response of maglev systems is important in several respects: Safety and ride quality, guideway design, and system costs. The dynamic response of vehicles is the key element in the determination of ride quality, and vehicle stability is one of the important elements relative to safety. To design a proper guideway that provides acceptable ride quality in the stable region, the vehicle dynamics must be understood. The trade-off between guideway smoothness and the levitation and control systems must be considered if maglev systems are to be economically feasible. This paper is a summary of our previous work on dynamics, stability, and control of maglev systems. First of all, the importance of dynamics of vehicle/guideway of maglev systems is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the modeling vehicle/guideway interactions of maglev systems with a multicar, or multiload vehicle traversing on a single or double-span flexible guideway. Coupled effects of vehicle/guideway interactions in wide range of vehicle speeds with various vehicle and guideway parameters for maglev systems are investigated. Secondly, the alternative control designs of maglev vehicle suspension systems are investigated in this study to achieve safe, stable operation and acceptable ride comfort requires some form of vehicle motion control. Active and semi-active control law designs are introduced into primary and secondary suspensions of maglev vehicles. Finally, this paper discusses the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  15. Dynamic Systems Modeling in Educational System Design & Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groff, Jennifer Sterling

    2013-01-01

    Over the last several hundred years, local and national educational systems have evolved from relatively simple systems to incredibly complex, interdependent, policy-laden structures, to which many question their value, effectiveness, and direction they are headed. System Dynamics is a field of analysis used to guide policy and system design in…

  16. Rotor/bearing system dynamic stiffness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Sweep perturbation testing as used in Modal Analysis when applied to a rotating machine has to take into consideration the machine dynamic state of equilibrium at its operational rotative speed. This stands in contrasts to a static equilibrium of nonrotating structures. The rotational energy has a significant influence on rotor dynamic characteristics. The best perturbing input for rotating machines is a forward or reverse rotating, circular force applied directly to the shaft. Determination of Dynamic Stiffness Characteristics of the rotor bearing system by nonsynchronous perturbation of a symmetric rotating shaft supported in one relatively rigid and one oil lubricated bearing.

  17. Solar dynamic power system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallin, Wayne E.; Friefeld, Jerry M.

    1988-01-01

    The solar dynamic power system design and analysis study compared Brayton, alkali-metal Rankine, and free-piston Stirling cycles with silicon planar and GaAs concentrator photovoltaic power systems for application to missions beyond the Phase 2 Space Station level of technology for all power systems. Conceptual designs for Brayton and Stirling power systems were developed for 35 kWe and 7 kWe power levels. All power systems were designed for 7-year end-of-life conditions in low Earth orbit. LiF was selected for thermal energy storage for the solar dynamic systems. Results indicate that the Stirling cycle systems have the highest performance (lowest weight and area) followed by the Brayton cycle, with photovoltaic systems considerably lower in performance. For example, based on the performance assumptions used, the planar silicon power system weight was 55 to 75 percent higher than for the Stirling system. A technology program was developed to address areas wherein significant performance improvements could be realized relative to the current state-of-the-art as represented by Space Station. In addition, a preliminary evaluation of hardenability potential found that solar dynamic systems can be hardened beyond the hardness inherent in the conceptual designs of this study.

  18. Terminal Dynamics Approach to Discrete Event Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail; Meyers, Ronald

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses a mathematical formalism for simulation of discrete event dynamic (DED)-a special type of 'man-made' systems to serve specific purposes of information processing. The main objective of this work is to demonstrate that the mathematical formalism for DED can be based upon a terminal model of Newtonian dynamics which allows one to relax Lipschitz conditions at some discrete points.!.

  19. Substitutional 4d and 5d impurities in graphene.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2016-08-21

    We describe the structural and electronic properties of graphene doped with substitutional impurities of 4d and 5d transition metals. The adsorption energies and distances for 4d and 5d metals in graphene show similar trends for the later groups in the periodic table, which are also well-known characteristics of 3d elements. However, along earlier groups the 4d impurities in graphene show very similar adsorption energies, distances and magnetic moments to the 5d ones, which can be related to the influence of the 4d and 5d lanthanide contraction. Surprisingly, within the manganese group, the total magnetic moment of 3 μB for manganese is reduced to 1 μB for technetium and rhenium. We find that compared with 3d elements, the larger size of the 4d and 5d elements causes a high degree of hybridization with the neighbouring carbon atoms, reducing spin splitting in the d levels. It seems that the magnetic adjustment of graphene could be significantly different if 4d or 5d impurities are used instead of 3d impurities.

  20. Doppler optical cardiogram gated 2D color flow imaging at 1000 fps and 4D in vivo visualization of embryonic heart at 45 fps on a swept source OCT system.

    PubMed

    Mariampillai, Adrian; Standish, Beau A; Munce, Nigel R; Randall, Cristina; Liu, George; Jiang, James Y; Cable, Alex E; Vitkin, I A; Yang, Victor X D

    2007-02-19

    We report a Doppler optical cardiogram gating technique for increasing the effective frame rate of Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) when imaging periodic motion as found in the cardiovascular system of embryos. This was accomplished with a Thorlabs swept-source DOCT system that simultaneously acquired and displayed structural and Doppler images at 12 frames per second (fps). The gating technique allowed for ultra-high speed visualization of the blood flow pattern in the developing hearts of African clawed frog embryos (Xenopus laevis) at up to 1000 fps. In addition, four-dimensional (three spatial dimensions + temporal) Doppler imaging at 45 fps was demonstrated using this gating technique, producing detailed visualization of the complex cardiac motion and hemodynamics in a beating heart.

  1. Doppler optical cardiogram gated 2D color flow imaging at 1000 fps and 4D in vivo visualization of embryonic heart at 45 fps on a swept source OCT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariampillai, Adrian; Standish, Beau A.; Munce, Nigel R.; Randall, Cristina; Liu, George; Jiang, James Y.; Cable, Alex E.; Vitkin, I. A.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2007-02-01

    We report a Doppler optical cardiogram gating technique for increasing the effective frame rate of Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) when imaging periodic motion as found in the cardiovascular system of embryos. This was accomplished with a Thorlabs swept-source DOCT system that simultaneously acquired and displayed structural and Doppler images at 12 frames per second (fps). The gating technique allowed for ultra-high speed visualization of the blood flow pattern in the developing hearts of African clawed frog embryos (Xenopus laevis) at up to 1000 fps. In addition, four-dimensional (three spatial dimensions + temporal) Doppler imaging at 45 fps was demonstrated using this gating technique, producing detailed visualization of the complex cardiac motion and hemodynamics in a beating heart.

  2. On the extraction of wind information from the assimilation of ozone profiles in Météo France 4D-Var operational NWP suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semane, N.; Peuch, V.-H.; Pradier, S.; Desroziers, G.; El Amraoui, L.; Brousseau, P.; Massart, S.; Chapnik, B.; Peuch, A.

    2008-08-01

    By applying four-dimensional variational data-assimilation (4D-Var) to a combined ozone and dynamics Numerical Weather Prediction model (NWP), ozone observations generate wind increments through the ozone-dynamics coupling. The dynamical impact of Aura/MLS satellite ozone profiles is investigated using Météo France operational ARPEGE NWP 4D-Var assimilation system for a period of 3 months. A data-assimilation procedure has been designed and run on 6-h windows. The procedure includes: (1) 4D-Var assimilating both ozone and operational NWP standard observations, (2) ARPEGE transporting ozone as a passive-tracer, (3) MOCAGE, the Météo France chemistry and transport model re-initializing the ARPEGE ozone background at the beginning time of the assimilation window. The Degrees of Freedom for Signal diagnostics show that the MLS data covering the 68.1 31.6 hPa vertical pressure range are the most informative and their information content is nearly of the same order as tropospheric humidity-sensitive radiances. Furthermore, with the help of error variance reduction diagnostics, the ozone contribution to the reduction of the horizontal divergence background-error variance is shown to be better than tropospheric humidity-sensitive radiances. Moreover, by using observation minus forecast statistics, it is found that the ozone assimilation reduces the wind bias in the lower stratosphere.

  3. On the extraction of wind information from the assimilation of ozone profiles in Météo-France 4-D-Var operational NWP suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semane, N.; Peuch, V.-H.; Pradier, S.; Desroziers, G.; El Amraoui, L.; Brousseau, P.; Massart, S.; Chapnik, B.; Peuch, A.

    2009-07-01

    By applying four-dimensional variational data-assimilation (4-D-Var) to a combined ozone and dynamics Numerical Weather Prediction model (NWP), ozone observations generate wind increments through the ozone-dynamics coupling. The dynamical impact of Aura/MLS satellite ozone profiles is investigated using Météo-France operational ARPEGE NWP 4-D-Var assimilation system for a period of 3 months. A data-assimilation procedure has been designed and run on 6-h windows. The procedure includes: (1) 4-D-Var assimilating both ozone and operational NWP standard observations, (2) ARPEGE transporting ozone as a passive-tracer, (3) MOCAGE, the Météo-France chemistry and transport model re-initializing the ARPEGE ozone background at the beginning time of the assimilation window. Using observation minus forecast statistics, it is found that the ozone assimilation reduces the wind bias in the lower stratosphere. Moreover, the Degrees of Freedom for Signal diagnostics show that the MLS data covering the 68.1-31.6 hPa vertical pressure range are the most informative and their information content is nearly of the same order as tropospheric humidity-sensitive radiances. Furthermore, with the help of error variance reduction diagnostics, the ozone contribution to the reduction of the horizontal divergence background-error variance is shown to be better than tropospheric humidity-sensitive radiances.

  4. TH-A-9A-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - 4D IMRT Planning Using Highly- Parallelizable Particle Swarm Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Modiri, A; Gu, X; Sawant, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We present a particle swarm optimization (PSO)-based 4D IMRT planning technique designed for dynamic MLC tracking delivery to lung tumors. The key idea is to utilize the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom rather than a constraint in order to achieve improved sparing of organs at risk (OARs). Methods: The target and normal structures were manually contoured on each of the ten phases of a 4DCT scan acquired from a lung SBRT patient who exhibited 1.5cm tumor motion despite the use of abdominal compression. Corresponding ten IMRT plans were generated using the Eclipse treatment planning system. These plans served as initial guess solutions for the PSO algorithm. Fluence weights were optimized over the entire solution space i.e., 10 phases × 12 beams × 166 control points. The size of the solution space motivated our choice of PSO, which is a highly parallelizable stochastic global optimization technique that is well-suited for such large problems. A summed fluence map was created using an in-house B-spline deformable image registration. Each plan was compared with a corresponding, internal target volume (ITV)-based IMRT plan. Results: The PSO 4D IMRT plan yielded comparable PTV coverage and significantly higher dose—sparing for parallel and serial OARs compared to the ITV-based plan. The dose-sparing achieved via PSO-4DIMRT was: lung Dmean = 28%; lung V20 = 90%; spinal cord Dmax = 23%; esophagus Dmax = 31%; heart Dmax = 51%; heart Dmean = 64%. Conclusion: Truly 4D IMRT that uses the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom can achieve significant dose sparing of serial and parallel OARs. Given the large solution space, PSO represents an attractive, parallelizable tool to achieve globally optimal solutions for such problems. This work was supported through funding from the National Institutes of Health and Varian Medical Systems. Amit Sawant has research funding from Varian Medical Systems, VisionRT Ltd. and Elekta.

  5. Modeling the dynamical systems on experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, N.B.; Anishchenko, V.S.

    1996-06-01

    An attempt is made in the work to create qualitative models of some real biological systems, i.e., isolated frog{close_quote}s heart, a human{close_quote}s heart and a blood circulation system of a white rat. Sampled one-dimensional realizations of these systems were taken as the initial data. Correlation dimensions were calculated to evaluate the embedding dimensions of the systems{close_quote} attractors. The result of the work are the systems of ordinary differential equations which approximately describe the dynamics of the systems under investigation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Parallel Infrastructure Modeling and Inversion Module for E4D

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-09

    Electrical resistivity tomography ERT is a method of imaging the electrical conductivity of the subsurface. Electrical conductivity is a useful metric for understanding the subsurface because it is governed by geomechanical and geochemical properties that drive subsurface systems. ERT works by injecting current into the subsurface across a pair of electrodes, and measuring the corresponding electrical potential response across another pair of electrodes. Many such measurements are strategically taken across an array of electrodes to produce an ERT data set. These data are then processed through a computationally demanding process known as inversion to produce an image of the subsurface conductivity structure that gave rise to the measurements. Data can be inverted to provide 2D images, 3D images, or in the case of time-lapse 3D imaging, 4D images. ERT is generally not well suited for environments with buried electrically conductive infrastructure such as pipes, tanks, or well casings, because these features tend to dominate and degrade ERT images. This reduces or eliminates the utility of ERT imaging where it would otherwise be highly useful for, for example, imaging fluid migration from leaking pipes, imaging soil contamination beneath leaking subusurface tanks, and monitoring contaminant migration in locations with dense network of metal cased monitoring wells. The location and dimension of buried metallic infrastructure is often known. If so, then the effects of the infrastructure can be explicitly modeled within the ERT imaging algorithm, and thereby removed from the corresponding ERT image. However,there are a number of obstacles limiting this application. 1) Metallic infrastructure cannot be accurately modeled with standard codes because of the large contrast in conductivity between the metal and host material. 2) Modeling infrastructure in true dimension requires the computational mesh to be highly refined near the metal inclusions, which increases

  7. Adaptive synchronization and anticipatory dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying-Jen; Chen, Chun-Chung; Lai, Pik-Yin; Chan, C. K.

    2015-09-01

    Many biological systems can sense periodical variations in a stimulus input and produce well-timed, anticipatory responses after the input is removed. Such systems show memory effects for retaining timing information in the stimulus and cannot be understood from traditional synchronization consideration of passive oscillatory systems. To understand this anticipatory phenomena, we consider oscillators built from excitable systems with the addition of an adaptive dynamics. With such systems, well-timed post-stimulus responses similar to those from experiments can be obtained. Furthermore, a well-known model of working memory is shown to possess similar anticipatory dynamics when the adaptive mechanism is identified with synaptic facilitation. The last finding suggests that this type of oscillator can be common in neuronal systems with plasticity.

  8. Energy efficiency of a dynamic glazing system

    SciTech Connect

    Lollini, R.; Danza, L.; Meroni, I.

    2010-04-15

    The reduction of air-conditioning energy consumptions is one of the main indicators to act on when improving the energy efficiency in buildings. In the case of advanced technological buildings, a meaningful contribution to the thermal loads and the energy consumptions reduction could depend on the correct configuration and management of the envelope systems. In recent years, the architectural trend toward highly transparent all-glass buildings presents a unique challenge and opportunity to advance the market for emerging, smart, dynamic window and dimmable daylighting control technologies (). A prototype dynamic glazing system was developed and tested at ITC-CNR; it is aimed at actively responding to the external environmental loads. Both an experimental campaign and analyses by theoretical models were carried out, aimed at evaluating the possible configurations depending on different weather conditions in several possible places. Therefore, the analytical models of the building-plant system were defined by using a dynamic energy simulation software (EnergyPlus). The variables that determine the system performance, also influenced by the boundary conditions, were analysed, such as U- and g-value; they concern both the morphology of the envelope system, such as dimensions, shading and glazing type, gap airflow thickness, in-gap airflow rate, and management, in terms of control algorithm parameters tuning fan and shading systems, as a function of the weather conditions. The configuration able to provide the best performances was finally identified by also assessing such performances, integrating the dynamic system in several building types and under different weather conditions. The dynamic envelope system prototype has become a commercial product with some applications in facade systems, curtain walls and windows. The paper describes the methodological approach to prototype development and the main results obtained, including simulations of possible applications on

  9. Stirling Engine Dynamic System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakis, Christopher G.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermo-Mechanical systems branch at the Glenn Research Center focuses a large amount time on Stirling engines. These engines will be used on missions where solar power is inefficient, especially in deep space. I work with Tim Regan and Ed Lewandowski who are currently developing and validating a mathematical model for the Stirling engines. This model incorporates all aspects of the system including, mechanical, electrical and thermodynamic components. Modeling is done through Simplorer, a program capable of running simulations of the model. Once created and then proven to be accurate, a model is used for developing new ideas for engine design. My largest specific project involves varying key parameters in the model and quantifying the results. This can all be done relatively trouble-free with the help of Simplorer. Once the model is complete, Simplorer will do all the necessary calculations. The more complicated part of this project is determining which parameters to vary. Finding key parameters depends on the potential for a value to be independently altered in the design. For example, a change in one dimension may lead to a proportional change to the rest of the model, and no real progress is made. Also, the ability for a changed value to have a substantial impact on the outputs of the system is important. Results will be condensed into graphs and tables with the purpose of better communication and understanding of the data. With the changing of these parameters, a more optimal design can be created without having to purchase or build any models. Also, hours and hours of results can be simulated in minutes. In the long run, using mathematical models can save time and money. Along with this project, I have many other smaller assignments throughout the summer. My main goal is to assist in the processes of model development, validation and testing.

  10. Supervised Learning for Dynamical System Learning

    PubMed Central

    Hefny, Ahmed; Downey, Carlton; Gordon, Geoffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently there has been substantial interest in spectral methods for learning dynamical systems. These methods are popular since they often offer a good tradeoff between computational and statistical efficiency. Unfortunately, they can be difficult to use and extend in practice: e.g., they can make it difficult to incorporate prior information such as sparsity or structure. To address this problem, we present a new view of dynamical system learning: we show how to learn dynamical systems by solving a sequence of ordinary supervised learning problems, thereby allowing users to incorporate prior knowledge via standard techniques such as L1 regularization. Many existing spectral methods are special cases of this new framework, using linear regression as the supervised learner. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our framework by showing examples where nonlinear regression or lasso let us learn better state representations than plain linear regression does; the correctness of these instances follows directly from our general analysis. PMID:28066133

  11. Integrated dynamics modeling for supercavitating vehicle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seonhong; Kim, Nakwan

    2015-06-01

    We have performed integrated dynamics modeling for a supercavitating vehicle. A 6-DOF equation of motion was constructed by defining the forces and moments acting on the supercavitating body surface that contacted water. The wetted area was obtained by calculating the cavity size and axis. Cavity dynamics were determined to obtain the cavity profile for calculating the wetted area. Subsequently, the forces and moments acting on each wetted part-the cavitator, fins, and vehicle body-were obtained by physical modeling. The planing force-the interaction force between the vehicle transom and cavity wall-was calculated using the apparent mass of the immersed vehicle transom. We integrated each model and constructed an equation of motion for the supercavitating system. We performed numerical simulations using the integrated dynamics model to analyze the characteristics of the supercavitating system and validate the modeling completeness. Our research enables the design of high-quality controllers and optimal supercavitating systems.

  12. Nondeterministic dynamics of a mechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalai, Robert; Jeffrey, Mike R.

    2014-08-01

    A mechanical system is presented exhibiting a nondeterministic singularity, that is, a point in an otherwise deterministic system where forward time trajectories become nonunique. A Coulomb friction force applies linear and angular forces to a wheel mounted on a turntable. In certain configurations, the friction force is not uniquely determined. When the dynamics evolves past the singularity and the mechanism slips, the future state becomes uncertain up to a set of possible values. For certain parameters, the system repeatedly returns to the singularity, giving recurrent yet unpredictable behavior that constitutes nondeterministic chaotic dynamics. The robustness of the phenomenon is such that we expect it to persist with more sophisticated friction models, manifesting as extreme sensitivity to initial conditions, and complex global dynamics attributable to a local loss of determinism in the limit of discontinuous friction.

  13. Oscillator strengths and branching fractions of 4d75p-4d75s Rh II transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazza, Safa

    2017-01-01

    This work reports semi-empirical determination of oscillator strengths, transition probabilities and branching fractions for Rh II 4d75p-4d75s transitions in a wide wavelength range. The angular coefficients of the transition matrix, beforehand obtained in pure SL coupling with help of Racah algebra are transformed into intermediate coupling using eigenvector amplitudes of these two configuration levels determined for this purpose; The transition integral was treated as free parameter in the least squares fit to experimental oscillator strength (gf) values found in literature. The extracted value: <4d75s|r1|4d75p> =2.7426 ± 0.0007 is slightly smaller than that computed by means of ab-initio method. Subsequently to oscillator strength evaluations, transition probabilities and branching fractions were deduced and compared to those obtained experimentally or through another approach like pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock model including core-polarization effects.

  14. Uncertain dynamical systems: A differential game approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutman, S.

    1976-01-01

    A class of dynamical systems in a conflict situation is formulated and discussed, and the formulation is applied to the study of an important class of systems in the presence of uncertainty. The uncertainty is deterministic and the only assumption is that its value belongs to a known compact set. Asymptotic stability is fully discussed with application to variable structure and model reference control systems.

  15. PREFACE: Complex Dynamics in Spatially Extended Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Bohr, Tomas; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Leth Christiansen, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Self-organization, or the spontaneous emergence of patterns and structures under far-from-equilibrium conditions, turbulence, and related nonlinear dynamic phenomena in spatially extended systems have developed into one of the most exciting topics of modern science. Phenomena of this type arise in a wide variety of different fields, ranging from the development of chemical and biological patterns in reaction-diffusion systems over vortex formation in connection with chemical, optical, hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic turbulence to technical applications in connection with liquid crystal displays or pulse compression in optical communication systems. Lasers often show interesting patterns produced by self-focusing and other nonlinear phenomena, diffusion limited aggregation is known to generate fractal-like structures, and amazing struc- tures also arise in bacterial growth processes or when a droplet of an oil suspension of finely divided magnetic particles is subject to a magnetic field perpendicular to the surface of the cell in which it is contained. In September 1995 the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen was the venue of an International Conference on Complex Dynamics in Spatially Extended Systems. Organizers of the conference were the three Danish centers for nonlinear dynamics: The Center for Chaos and Turbulence Studies (CATS), located at the Niels Bohr Institute; the Center for Modeling, Nonlinear Dynamics and Irreversible Thermodynamics (MIDIT), located at the Technical University of Denmark, and the Center for Nonlinear Dynamics in Continuum Systems, located at the Risø National Laboratories. In the spirit of the successful NATO Advanced Research Workshops on Spatiotemporal Patterns in Nonequilibrium Systems of which the last was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1993, the conference aimed at stimulating new ideas and providing a forum for the exchange of knowledge between leading practitioners of the field. With its 50 invited speakers and more than

  16. Nonlinear Dynamics, Chaotic and Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infeld, E.; Zelazny, R.; Galkowski, A.

    2011-04-01

    Part I. Dynamic Systems Bifurcation Theory and Chaos: 1. Chaos in random dynamical systems V. M. Gunldach; 2. Controlling chaos using embedded unstable periodic orbits: the problem of optimal periodic orbits B. R. Hunt and E. Ott; 3. Chaotic tracer dynamics in open hydrodynamical flows G. Karolyi, A. Pentek, T. Tel and Z. Toroczkai; 4. Homoclinic chaos L. P. Shilnikov; Part II. Spatially Extended Systems: 5. Hydrodynamics of relativistic probability flows I. Bialynicki-Birula; 6. Waves in ionic reaction-diffusion-migration systems P. Hasal, V. Nevoral, I. Schreiber, H. Sevcikova, D. Snita, and M. Marek; 7. Anomalous scaling in turbulence: a field theoretical approach V. Lvov and I. Procaccia; 8. Abelian sandpile cellular automata M. Markosova; 9. Transport in an incompletely chaotic magnetic field F. Spineanu; Part III. Dynamical Chaos Quantum Physics and Foundations Of Statistical Mechanics: 10. Non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and ergodic theory L. A. Bunimovich; 11. Pseudochaos in statistical physics B. Chirikov; 12. Foundations of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics J. P. Dougherty; 13. Thermomechanical particle simulations W. G. Hoover, H. A. Posch, C. H. Dellago, O. Kum, C. G. Hoover, A. J. De Groot and B. L. Holian; 14. Quantum dynamics on a Markov background and irreversibility B. Pavlov; 15. Time chaos and the laws of nature I. Prigogine and D. J. Driebe; 16. Evolutionary Q and cognitive systems: dynamic entropies and predictability of evolutionary processes W. Ebeling; 17. Spatiotemporal chaos information processing in neural networks H. Szu; 18. Phase transitions and learning in neural networks C. Van den Broeck; 19. Synthesis of chaos A. Vanecek and S. Celikovsky; 20. Computational complexity of continuous problems H. Wozniakowski; Part IV. Complex Systems As An Interface Between Natural Sciences and Environmental Social and Economic Sciences: 21. Stochastic differential geometry in finance studies V. G. Makhankov; Part V. Conference Banquet

  17. Quantum Simulation for Open-System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; de Oliveira, Marcos Cesar; Berry, Dominic; Sanders, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Simulations are essential for predicting and explaining properties of physical and mathematical systems yet so far have been restricted to classical and closed quantum systems. Although forays have been made into open-system quantum simulation, the strict algorithmic aspect has not been explored yet is necessary to account fully for resource consumption to deliver bounded-error answers to computational questions. An open-system quantum simulator would encompass classical and closed-system simulation and also solve outstanding problems concerning, e.g. dynamical phase transitions in non-equilibrium systems, establishing long-range order via dissipation, verifying the simulatability of open-system dynamics on a quantum Turing machine. We construct an efficient autonomous algorithm for designing an efficient quantum circuit to simulate many-body open-system dynamics described by a local Hamiltonian plus decoherence due to separate baths for each particle. The execution time and number of gates for the quantum simulator both scale polynomially with the system size. DSW funded by USARO. MCO funded by AITF and Brazilian agencies CNPq and FAPESP through Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia-Informacao Quantica (INCT-IQ). DWB funded by ARC Future Fellowship (FT100100761). BCS funded by AITF, CIFAR, NSERC and USARO.

  18. Exploring the functional diversity of the supraglacial environment: Microbial degradation of the pesticide 2,4-D on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stibal, M.; Bælum, J.; Holben, W. E.; Jacobsen, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    The surface of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) harbours a diverse community of heterotrophic microorganisms. Organic compounds of anthropogenic origin, including pesticides, are deposited on the GrIS; however, the fate of these compounds in the ice is currently unknown. In this study we determine the potential of the microbial community from the surface of the GrIS to mineralise the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). It is one of the most easily degraded compounds among the phenoxyacetic acid pesticides, and the ability to mineralise 2,4-D has been found to be widespread in microbial communities around the globe. Functional genes involved in the degradation pathway have also been characterised. Thus, 2,4-D represents a very suitable model compound to use in order to gain an insight into pollutant degradation dynamics in the rapidly changing Arctic region. We collected surface ice cores on the GrIS and incubated them for up to 529 days in microcosms simulating in situ conditions. We measured mineralisation of side-chain- and ring-labelled 14C-2,4-D in the samples and performed quantitative PCR targeting the tfdA gene, encoding an enzyme catalysing the first step in the degradation pathway of 2,4-D, in the DNA extracted from the ice after the experiments. We show that the microbial community on the surface of the GrIS is of low diversity, but contains microbes capable of degrading 2,4-D. The low diversity of the community and the similarity of the detected clones to those from other icy environment clones suggest that the bacterial community on the GrIS is selected from a pool of propagules deposited on the surface of the ice sheet, based on the level of adaptation to the conditions in the surface ice. The 2,4-D degraders are likely present in very low numbers, and they can mineralise 2,4-D at a rate of up to 1 nmol per m2 per day, equivalent to ~26 ng C m-2 d-1. We contend that the surface of the GrIS should not be considered to be a mere reservoir of

  19. Connecting micro dynamics and population distributions in system dynamics models.

    PubMed

    Fallah-Fini, Saeideh; Rahmandad, Hazhir; Chen, Hsin-Jen; Xue, Hong; Wang, Youfa

    2013-01-01

    Researchers use system dynamics models to capture the mean behavior of groups of indistinguishable population elements (e.g., people) aggregated in stock variables. Yet, many modeling problems require capturing the heterogeneity across elements with respect to some attribute(s) (e.g., body weight). This paper presents a new method to connect the micro-level dynamics associated with elements in a population with the macro-level population distribution along an attribute of interest without the need to explicitly model every element. We apply the proposed method to model the distribution of Body Mass Index and its changes over time in a sample population of American women obtained from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Comparing the results with those obtained from an individual-based model that captures the same phenomena shows that our proposed method delivers accurate results with less computation than the individual-based model.

  20. Connecting micro dynamics and population distributions in system dynamics models

    PubMed Central

    Rahmandad, Hazhir; Chen, Hsin-Jen; Xue, Hong; Wang, Youfa

    2014-01-01

    Researchers use system dynamics models to capture the mean behavior of groups of indistinguishable population elements (e.g., people) aggregated in stock variables. Yet, many modeling problems require capturing the heterogeneity across elements with respect to some attribute(s) (e.g., body weight). This paper presents a new method to connect the micro-level dynamics associated with elements in a population with the macro-level population distribution along an attribute of interest without the need to explicitly model every element. We apply the proposed method to model the distribution of Body Mass Index and its changes over time in a sample population of American women obtained from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Comparing the results with those obtained from an individual-based model that captures the same phenomena shows that our proposed method delivers accurate results with less computation than the individual-based model. PMID:25620842

  1. Global dynamic modeling of a transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Qian, W.

    1993-01-01

    The work performed on global dynamic simulation and noise correlation of gear transmission systems at the University of Akron is outlined. The objective is to develop a comprehensive procedure to simulate the dynamics of the gear transmission system coupled with the effects of gear box vibrations. The developed numerical model is benchmarked with results from experimental tests at NASA Lewis Research Center. The modal synthesis approach is used to develop the global transient vibration analysis procedure used in the model. Modal dynamic characteristics of the rotor-gear-bearing system are calculated by the matrix transfer method while those of the gear box are evaluated by the finite element method (NASTRAN). A three-dimensional, axial-lateral coupled bearing model is used to couple the rotor vibrations with the gear box motion. The vibrations between the individual rotor systems are coupled through the nonlinear gear mesh interactions. The global equations of motion are solved in modal coordinates and the transient vibration of the system is evaluated by a variable time-stepping integration scheme. The relationship between housing vibration and resulting noise of the gear transmission system is generated by linear transfer functions using experimental data. A nonlinear relationship of the noise components to the fundamental mesh frequency is developed using the hypercoherence function. The numerically simulated vibrations and predicted noise of the gear transmission system are compared with the experimental results from the gear noise test rig at NASA Lewis Research Center. Results of the comparison indicate that the global dynamic model developed can accurately simulate the dynamics of a gear transmission system.

  2. Very Large System Dynamics Models - Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Leonard Malczynski

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides lessons learned from developing several large system dynamics (SD) models. System dynamics modeling practice emphasize the need to keep models small so that they are manageable and understandable. This practice is generally reasonable and prudent; however, there are times that large SD models are necessary. This paper outlines two large SD projects that were done at two Department of Energy National Laboratories, the Idaho National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes the models and then discusses some of the valuable lessons learned during these two modeling efforts.

  3. Approximation of Dynamical System's Separatrix Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoretto, Roberto; Chaudhuri, Sanjay; De Rossi, Alessandra; Menduni, Eleonora; Moretti, Francesca; Rodi, Maria Caterina; Venturino, Ezio

    2011-09-01

    In dynamical systems saddle points partition the domain into basins of attractions of the remaining locally stable equilibria. This problem is rather common especially in population dynamics models, like prey-predator or competition systems. In this paper we construct programs for the detection of points lying on the separatrix curve, i.e. the curve which partitions the domain. Finally, an efficient algorithm, which is based on the Partition of Unity method with local approximants given by Wendland's functions, is used for reconstructing the separatrix curve.

  4. Soil matrix and macropore biodegradation of 2,4-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pivetz, B.E.; Steenhuis, T.S.

    1995-07-01

    Preferential flow of pesticides in macropores can lead to decreased travel times through the vadose zone and increased groundwater contamination. Macropores, however, may present a favorable environment for biodegradation because of greater oxygen, nutrient, and substrate supply, and higher microbial populations in earthworm burrows, compared to the soil matrix. The biodegradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was measured in macropores and soil matrix of packed soil columns (7.0-cm diam., 10-cm length) and undisturbed cores contained as well-defined artificial macropore and the undisturbed cores contained earthworm-burrow macropores. A 50 {mu}g/L 2,4-D solution was continuously applied to the unsaturated soil surface and breakthrough curves (BTCs) indicating pesticide loss in the effluent were obtained from the soil matrix and macropore flow paths. Biodegradation rates were calculated separately for each flow path by comparing the BTCs to BTCs representing abiotic conditions, and dividing the 2,4-D loss by the travel time through each flow path. The biodegradation rates increased with time in both flow paths, and the final biodegradation rate in the macropore region surpassed that of the matrix, presumably because of increased microbial populations in the macropore. Complete loss of the 2,4-D in both flow paths was observed after continuous application of 2,4-D for 400 h, with maximum column-averaged 2,4-D loss rates of 0.879 {mu}g/(L h) in the matrix and 1.073 {mu}g/(L h) in the macropore. Biodegradation of 2,4-D was also observed in the macropore and matrix regions of the undisturbed soil cores. 19 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Dynamics of biosonar systems in Horseshoe bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R.

    2015-12-01

    Horseshoe bats have an active ultrasonic sonar system that allows the animals to navigate and hunt prey in structure-rich natural environments. The physical components of this biosonar system contain an unusual dynamics that could play a key role in achieving the animals' superior sensory performance. Horseshoe bat biosonar employs elaborate baffle shapes to diffract the outgoing and incoming ultrasonic wave packets; ultrasound is radiated from nostrils that are surrounded by noseleaves and received by large outer ears. Noseleaves and pinnae can be actuated while ultrasonic diffraction takes place. On the emission side, two noseleaf parts, the anterior leaf and the sella, have been shown to be in motion in synchrony with sound emission. On the reception side, the pinnae have been shown to change their shapes by up to 20% of their total length within ˜100 milliseconds. Due to these shape changes, diffraction of the incoming and outgoing waves is turned into a dynamic physical process. The dynamics of the diffraction process results in likewise dynamic device characteristics. If this additional dynamic dimension was found to enhance the encoding of sensory information substantially, horseshoe bat biosonar could be a model for the use of dynamic physical processes in sensing technology.

  6. Constraint Embedding Technique for Multibody System Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Simon S.; Cheng, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    Multibody dynamics play a critical role in simulation testbeds for space missions. There has been a considerable interest in the development of efficient computational algorithms for solving the dynamics of multibody systems. Mass matrix factorization and inversion techniques and the O(N) class of forward dynamics algorithms developed using a spatial operator algebra stand out as important breakthrough on this front. Techniques such as these provide the efficient algorithms and methods for the application and implementation of such multibody dynamics models. However, these methods are limited only to tree-topology multibody systems. Closed-chain topology systems require different techniques that are not as efficient or as broad as those for tree-topology systems. The closed-chain forward dynamics approach consists of treating the closed-chain topology as a tree-topology system subject to additional closure constraints. The resulting forward dynamics solution consists of: (a) ignoring the closure constraints and using the O(N) algorithm to solve for the free unconstrained accelerations for the system; (b) using the tree-topology solution to compute a correction force to enforce the closure constraints; and (c) correcting the unconstrained accelerations with correction accelerations resulting from the correction forces. This constraint-embedding technique shows how to use direct embedding to eliminate local closure-loops in the system and effectively convert the system back to a tree-topology system. At this point, standard tree-topology techniques can be brought to bear on the problem. The approach uses a spatial operator algebra approach to formulating the equations of motion. The operators are block-partitioned around the local body subgroups to convert them into aggregate bodies. Mass matrix operator factorization and inversion techniques are applied to the reformulated tree-topology system. Thus in essence, the new technique allows conversion of a system with

  7. Chaotic dynamics of controlled electric power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. N.; Trosko, I. U.

    2016-12-01

    The conditions for appearance of chaotic dynamics of electromagnetic and electromechanical processes in energy systems described by the Park-Gorev bilinear differential equations with account for lags of coordinates and restrictions on control have been formulated. On the basis of classical equations, the parameters of synchronous generators and power lines, at which the chaotic dynamics of energy systems appears, have been found. The qualitative and quantitative characteristics of chaotic processes in energy associations of two types, based on the Hopf theorem, and methods of nonstationary linearization and decompositions are given. The properties of spectral characteristics of chaotic processes have been investigated, and the qualitative similarity of bilinear equations of power systems and Lorentz equations have been found. These results can be used for modernization of the systems of control of energy objects. The qualitative and quantitative characteristics for power energy systems as objects of control and for some laws of control with the feedback have been established.

  8. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1985-01-01

    A progress report is presented that deals with three major topics related to Tethered Satellite System Dynamics. The SAO rotational dynamics computer code was updated. The program is now suitable to deal with inclined orbits. The output has been also modified in order to show the satellite Euler angles referred to the rotating orbital frame. The three-dimensional high resolution computer program SLACK3 was developed. The code simulates the three-dimensional dynamics of a tether going slack taking into account the effect produced by boom rotations. Preliminary simulations on the three-dimensional dynamics of a recoiling slack tether are shown in this report. A program to evaluate the electric potential around a severed tether is immersed in a plasma. The potential is computed on a three-dimensional grid axially symmetric with respect to the tether longitudinal axis. The electric potential variations due to the plasma are presently under investigation.

  9. Microfluidic systems for single DNA dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Danielle J.; Brockman, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microfluidics have enabled the molecular-level study of polymer dynamics using single DNA chains. Single polymer studies based on fluorescence microscopy allow for the direct observation of non-equilibrium polymer conformations and dynamical phenomena such as diffusion, relaxation, and molecular stretching pathways in flow. Microfluidic devices have enabled the precise control of model flow fields to study the non-equilibrium dynamics of soft materials, with device geometries including curved channels, cross-slots, and microfabricated obstacles and structures. This review explores recent microfluidic systems that have advanced the study of single polymer dynamics, while identifying new directions in the field that will further elucidate the relationship between polymer microstructure and bulk rheological properties. PMID:23139700

  10. Innovations in dynamic test restraint systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuld, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Recent launch system development programs have led to a new generation of large scale dynamic tests. The variety of test scenarios share one common requirement: restrain and capture massive high velocity flight hardware with no structural damage. The Space Systems Lab of McDonnell Douglas developed a remarkably simple and cost effective approach to such testing using ripstitch energy absorbers adapted from the sport of technical rockclimbing. The proven system reliability of the capture system concept has led to a wide variety of applications in test system design and in aerospace hardware design.

  11. Cardea: Dynamic Access Control in Distributed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepro, Rebekah

    2004-01-01

    Modern authorization systems span domains of administration, rely on many different authentication sources, and manage complex attributes as part of the authorization process. This . paper presents Cardea, a distributed system that facilitates dynamic access control, as a valuable piece of an inter-operable authorization framework. First, the authorization model employed in Cardea and its functionality goals are examined. Next, critical features of the system architecture and its handling of the authorization process are then examined. Then the S A M L and XACML standards, as incorporated into the system, are analyzed. Finally, the future directions of this project are outlined and connection points with general components of an authorization system are highlighted.

  12. Operationalizing sustainability in urban coastal systems: a system dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Mavrommati, Georgia; Bithas, Kostas; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2013-12-15

    We propose a system dynamics approach for Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD) in urban coastal systems. A systematic analysis based on theoretical considerations, policy analysis and experts' knowledge is followed in order to define the concept of ESD. The principles underlying ESD feed the development of a System Dynamics Model (SDM) that connects the pollutant loads produced by urban systems' socioeconomic activities with the ecological condition of the coastal ecosystem that it is delineated in operational terms through key biological elements defined by the EU Water Framework Directive. The receiving waters of the Athens Metropolitan area, which bears the elements of typical high population density Mediterranean coastal city but which currently has also new dynamics induced by the ongoing financial crisis, are used as an experimental system for testing a system dynamics approach to apply the concept of ESD. Systems' thinking is employed to represent the complex relationships among the components of the system. Interconnections and dependencies that determine the potentials for achieving ESD are revealed. The proposed system dynamics analysis can facilitate decision makers to define paths of development that comply with the principles of ESD.

  13. Toward variational assimilation of SARAL/Altika altimeter data in a North Atlantic circulation model at eddy-permitting resolution: assessment of a NEMO-based 4D-VAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouttier, Pierre-Antoine; Brankart, Jean-Michel; Candille, Guillem; Vidard, Arthur; Blayo, Eric; Verron, Jacques; Brasseur, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    In this project, the response of a variational data assimilation system based on NEMO and its linear tangent and adjoint model is investigated using a 4DVAR algorithm into a North-Atlantic model at eddy-permitting resolution. The assimilated data consist of Jason-2 and SARAL/AltiKA dataset collected during the 2013-2014 period. The main objective is to explore the robustness of the 4DVAR algorithm in the context of a realistic turbulent oceanic circulation at mid-latitude constrained by multi-satellite altimetry missions. This work relies on two previous studies. First, a study with similar objectives was performed based on academic double-gyre turbulent model and synthetic SARAL/AltiKA data, using the same DA experimental framework. Its main goal was to investigate the impact of turbulence on variational DA methods performance. The comparison with this previous work will bring to light the methodological and physical issues encountered by variational DA algorithms in a realistic context at similar, eddy-permitting spatial resolution. We also have demonstrated how a dataset mimicking future SWOT observations improves 4DVAR incremental performances at eddy-permitting resolution. Then, in the context of the OSTST and FP7 SANGOMA projects, an ensemble DA experiment based on the same model and observational datasets has been realized (see poster by Brasseur et al.). This work offers the opportunity to compare efficiency, pros and cons of both DA methods in the context of KA-band altimetric data, at spatial resolution commonly used today for research and operational applications. In this poster we will present the validation plan proposed to evaluate the skill of variational experiment vs. ensemble assimilation experiments covering the same period using independent observations (e.g. from Cryosat-2 mission).

  14. Solar dynamic power systems for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, Thomas B.; Nall, Marsha M.; Seidel, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The Parabolic Offset Linearly Actuated Reflector (POLAR) solar dynamic module was selected as the baseline design for a solar dynamic power system aboard the space station. The POLAR concept was chosen over other candidate designs after extensive trade studies. The primary advantages of the POLAR concept are the low mass moment of inertia of the module about the transverse boom and the compactness of the stowed module which enables packaging of two complete modules in the Shuttle orbiter payload bay. The fine pointing control system required for the solar dynamic module has been studied and initial results indicate that if disturbances from the station are allowed to back drive the rotary alpha joint, pointing errors caused by transient loads on the space station can be minimized. This would allow pointing controls to operate in bandwidths near system structural frequencies. The incorporation of the fine pointing control system into the solar dynamic module is fairly straightforward for the three strut concentrator support structure. However, results of structural analyses indicate that this three strut support is not optimum. Incorporation of a vernier pointing system into the proposed six strut support structure is being studied.

  15. Dynamical system approach to scalar-vector-tensor cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffarnejad, H.; Yaraie, E.

    2017-04-01

    Using scalar-vector-tensor Brans Dicke (VBD) gravity (Ghaffarnejad in Gen Relativ Gravit 40:2229, 2008; Gen Relativ Gravit 41:2941, 2009) in presence of self interaction BD potential V(φ ) and perfect fluid matter field action we solve corresponding field equations via dynamical system approach for flat Friedmann Robertson Walker metric (FRW). We obtained three type critical points for Λ CDM vacuum de Sitter era where stability of our solutions are depended to choose particular values of BD parameter ω . One of these fixed points is supported by a constant potential which is stable for ω <0 and behaves as saddle (quasi stable) for ω ≥ 0. Two other ones are supported by a linear potential V(φ )˜ φ which one of them is stable for ω =0.27647. For a fixed value of ω there is at least 2 out of 3 critical points reaching to a unique critical point. Namely for ω =-0.16856(-0.56038) the second (third) critical point become unique with the first critical point. In dust and radiation eras we obtained one critical point which never become unique fixed point. In the latter case coordinates of fixed points are also depended to ω . To determine stability of our solutions we calculate eigenvalues of Jacobi matrix of 4D phase space dynamical field equations for de Sitter, dust and radiation eras. We should point also potentials which support dust and radiation eras must be similar to V(φ )˜ φ ^{-1/2} and V(φ )˜ φ ^{-1} respectively. In short our study predicts that radiation and dust eras of our VBD-FRW cosmology transmit to stable de Sitter state via non-constant potential (effective variable cosmological parameter) by choosing ω =0.27647.

  16. True 4D Image Denoising on the GPU.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Anders; Andersson, Mats; Knutsson, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The use of image denoising techniques is an important part of many medical imaging applications. One common application is to improve the image quality of low-dose (noisy) computed tomography (CT) data. While 3D image denoising previously has been applied to several volumes independently, there has not been much work done on true 4D image denoising, where the algorithm considers several volumes at the same time. The problem with 4D image denoising, compared to 2D and 3D denoising, is that the computational complexity increases exponentially. In this paper we describe a novel algorithm for true 4D image denoising, based on local adaptive filtering, and how to implement it on the graphics processing unit (GPU). The algorithm was applied to a 4D CT heart dataset of the resolution 512  × 512  × 445  × 20. The result is that the GPU can complete the denoising in about 25 minutes if spatial filtering is used and in about 8 minutes if FFT-based filtering is used. The CPU implementation requires several days of processing time for spatial filtering and about 50 minutes for FFT-based filtering. The short processing time increases the clinical value of true 4D image denoising significantly.

  17. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in tethered satellite system dynamics research is reported. A retrieval rate control law with no angular feedback to investigate the system's dynamic response was studied. The initial conditions for the computer code which simulates the satellite's rotational dynamics were extended to a generic orbit. The model of the satellite thrusters was modified to simulate a pulsed thrust, by making the SKYHOOK integrator suitable for dealing with delta functions without loosing computational efficiency. Tether breaks were simulated with the high resolution computer code SLACK3. Shuttle's maneuvers were tested. The electric potential around a severed conductive tether with insulator, in the case of a tether breakage at 20 km from the Shuttle, was computed. The electrodynamic hazards due to the breakage of the TSS electrodynamic tether in a plasma are evaluated.

  18. SU-E-J-241: Creation of Ventilation CT From Daily 4D CTs Or 4D Conebeam CTs Acquired During IGRT for Thoracic Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, A; Ahunbay, E; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to create ventilation CTs from daily 4D CTs or 4D KV conebeam CTs (4DCBCT) acquired during image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for thoracic tumors, and to explore the potential for using the ventilation CTs as a means for early detection of lung injury during radiation treatment. Methods: 4DCT acquired using an in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) and 4DCBCT acquired using the X-ray Volume Imaging (XVI) system (Infinity, Elekta) for representative lung cancer patients were analyzed. These 4D data sets were sorted into 10 phase images. A newly-available deformable image registration tool (ADMIRE, Elekta) is used to deform the phase images at the end of exhale (EE) to the phase images at the end of inhale (EI). The lung volumes at EI and EE were carefully contoured using an intensity-based auto-contour tool and then manually edited. The ventilation images were calculated from the variations of CT numbers of those voxels masked by the lung contour at EI between the registered phase images. The deformable image registration is also performed between the daily 4D images and planning 4DCT, and the resulting deformable field vector (DFV) is used to deform the planning doses to the daily images by an in-house Matlab program. Results: The ventilation images were successfully created. The tide volumes calculated using the ventilation images agree with those measured through volume difference of contours at EE and EI, indicating the accuracy of ventilation images. The association between the delivered doses and the change of lung ventilation from the daily ventilation CTs is identified. Conclusions: A method to create the ventilation CT using daily 4DCTs or 4D KV conebeam CTs was developed and demonstrated.

  19. Graph-based retrospective 4D image construction from free-breathing MRI slice acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Mong, Andrew; Campbell, Robert M.

    2014-03-01

    4D or dynamic imaging of the thorax has many potential applications [1, 2]. CT and MRI offer sufficient speed to acquire motion information via 4D imaging. However they have different constraints and requirements. For both modalities both prospective and retrospective respiratory gating and tracking techniques have been developed [3, 4]. For pediatric imaging, x-ray radiation becomes a primary concern and MRI remains as the de facto choice. The pediatric subjects we deal with often suffer from extreme malformations of their chest wall, diaphragm, and/or spine, as such patient cooperation needed by some of the gating and tracking techniques are difficult to realize without causing patient discomfort. Moreover, we are interested in the mechanical function of their thorax in its natural form in tidal breathing. Therefore free-breathing MRI acquisition is the ideal modality of imaging for these patients. In our set up, for each coronal (or sagittal) slice position, slice images are acquired at a rate of about 200-300 ms/slice over several natural breathing cycles. This produces typically several thousands of slices which contain both the anatomic and dynamic information. However, it is not trivial to form a consistent and well defined 4D volume from these data. In this paper, we present a novel graph-based combinatorial optimization solution for constructing the best possible 4D scene from such data entirely in the digital domain. Our proposed method is purely image-based and does not need breath holding or any external surrogates or instruments to record respiratory motion or tidal volume. Both adult and children patients' data are used to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the reconstructed 4D scenes are smooth and consistent spatially and temporally, agreeing with known shape and motion of the lungs.

  20. Topic: Catchment system dynamics: Processes and feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesstra, Saskia

    2015-04-01

    In this meeting we can talk about my main expertise: the focus of my research ocus revolves around understanding catchment system dynamics in a holistic way by incorporating both processes on hillslopes as well as in the river channel. Process knowledge enables explanation of the impact of natural and human drivers on the catchment systems and which consequences these drivers have for water and sediment connectivity. Improved understanding of the catchment sediment and water dynamics will empower sustainable land and river management and mitigate soil threats like erosion and off-side water and sediment accumulation with the help of nature's forces. To be able to understand the system dynamics of a catchment, you need to study the catchment system in a holistic way. In many studies only the hillslopes or even plots are studied; or only the channel. However, these systems are connected and should be evaluated together. When studying a catchment system any intervention to the system will create both on- as well as off sites effects, which should especially be taken into account when transferring science into policy regulations or management decisions.

  1. Controlling Complex Systems and Developing Dynamic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avizienis, Audrius Victor

    In complex systems, control and understanding become intertwined. Following Ilya Prigogine, we define complex systems as having control parameters which mediate transitions between distinct modes of dynamical behavior. From this perspective, determining the nature of control parameters and demonstrating the associated dynamical phase transitions are practically equivalent and fundamental to engaging with complexity. In the first part of this work, a control parameter is determined for a non-equilibrium electrochemical system by studying a transition in the morphology of structures produced by an electroless deposition reaction. Specifically, changing the size of copper posts used as the substrate for growing metallic silver structures by the reduction of Ag+ from solution under diffusion-limited reaction conditions causes a dynamical phase transition in the crystal growth process. For Cu posts with edge lengths on the order of one micron, local forces promoting anisotropic growth predominate, and the reaction produces interconnected networks of Ag nanowires. As the post size is increased above 10 microns, the local interfacial growth reaction dynamics couple with the macroscopic diffusion field, leading to spatially propagating instabilities in the electrochemical potential which induce periodic branching during crystal growth, producing dendritic deposits. This result is interesting both as an example of control and understanding in a complex system, and as a useful combination of top-down lithography with bottom-up electrochemical self-assembly. The second part of this work focuses on the technological development of devices fabricated using this non-equilibrium electrochemical process, towards a goal of integrating a complex network as a dynamic functional component in a neuromorphic computing device. Self-assembled networks of silver nanowires were reacted with sulfur to produce interfacial "atomic switches": silver-silver sulfide junctions, which exhibit

  2. A dynamically reconfigurable data stream processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Nogiec, J.M.; Trombly-Freytag, K.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes a component-based framework for data stream processing that allows for configuration, tailoring, and runtime system reconfiguration. The system's architecture is based on a pipes and filters pattern, where data is passed through routes between components. A network of pipes and filters can be dynamically reconfigured in response to a preplanned sequence of processing steps, operator intervention, or a change in one or more data streams. This framework provides several mechanisms supporting dynamic reconfiguration and can be used to build static data stream processing applications such as monitoring or data acquisition systems, as well as self-adjusting systems that can adapt their processing algorithm, presentation layer, or data persistency layer in response to changes in input data streams.

  3. Design tools for complex dynamic security systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Rigdon, James Brian; Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Laguna, Glenn A.; Robinett, Rush D. III; Groom, Kenneth Neal; Wilson, David Gerald; Bickerstaff, Robert J.; Harrington, John J.

    2007-01-01

    The development of tools for complex dynamic security systems is not a straight forward engineering task but, rather, a scientific task where discovery of new scientific principles and math is necessary. For years, scientists have observed complex behavior but have had difficulty understanding it. Prominent examples include: insect colony organization, the stock market, molecular interactions, fractals, and emergent behavior. Engineering such systems will be an even greater challenge. This report explores four tools for engineered complex dynamic security systems: Partially Observable Markov Decision Process, Percolation Theory, Graph Theory, and Exergy/Entropy Theory. Additionally, enabling hardware technology for next generation security systems are described: a 100 node wireless sensor network, unmanned ground vehicle and unmanned aerial vehicle.

  4. Collisional and Dynamical Evolution of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, Stuart J.

    2004-01-01

    Senior Scientst S. J. Weidenschilling presents his final administrative report in the research program entitled "Collisional and Dynamical Evolution of Planetary Systems," on which he was the Principal Investigator. This research program produced the following publications: 1) "Jumping Jupiters" in binary star systems. F. Marzari, S. J. Weidenschilling, M. Barbieri and V. Granata. Astrophys. J., in press, 2005; 2) Formation of the cores of the outer planets. To appear in "The Outer Planets" (R. Kallenbach, ED), ISSI Conference Proceedings (Space Sci. Rev.), in press, 2005; 3) Accretion dynamics and timescales: Relation to chondrites. S. J. Weidenschilling and J. Cuzzi. In Meteorites and the Early Solar System LI (D. Lauretta et al., Eds.), Univ. of Arizona Press, 2005; 4) Asteroidal heating and thermal stratification of the asteroid belt. A. Ghosh, S. J.Weidenschilling, H. Y. McSween, Jr. and A. Rubin. In Meteorites and the Early Solar System I1 (D. Lauretta et al., Eds.), Univ. of Arizona Press, 2005.

  5. Prevention of alveolar bone loss in an osteoporotic animal model via interference of semaphorin 4d.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Wei, L; Miron, R J; Zhang, Q; Bian, Z

    2014-11-01

    Semaphorin 4d (Sema4d) has been proposed as a novel target gene for the treatment of osteoporosis. Recently, we fabricated a site-specific bone-targeting system from polymeric nanoparticles that demonstrates an ability to prevent bone loss in an osteoporotic model by interfering with Sema4d gene expression using small interference RNA (siRNA) molecules. The aim of the present investigation was to determine the effects of this targeting system on the periodontium, an area of high bone turnover. We demonstrated, by single photon emission computed tomography, that intravenous injection of this molecule in ovariectomized Balb/C mice is able to target alveolar bone peaking 4 hr post-injection. We then compared, by histological analysis, the bone volume/total volume (BV/TV), alveolar bone height loss, immunohistochemical expression of Sema4d, and total number of osteoclasts in mandibular alveolar bone. Four treatment modalities were compared as follows: (1) sham-operated, (2) OVX-operated, (3) OVX+estrogen replacement therapy, and (4) OVX+siRNA-Sema4d animals. The results from the present study demonstrate that an osteoporotic condition significantly increases alveolar bone height loss, and that the therapeutic effects via bone-targeting systems featuring interference of Sema4d are able to partly counteract alveolar bone loss caused by osteoporosis. While the future therapeutic demand for the large number of patients suffering from osteoporosis faces many challenges, we demonstrate within the present study an effective drug-delivery moiety with anabolic effects on the bone remodeling cycle able to locate and target alveolar bone regeneration.

  6. Induced topological pressure for topological dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Zhitao; Chen, Ercai

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, inspired by the article [J. Jaerisch et al., Stochastics Dyn. 14, 1350016, pp. 1-30 (2014)], we introduce the induced topological pressure for a topological dynamical system. In particular, we prove a variational principle for the induced topological pressure.

  7. Partial dynamical symmetry in a fermion system

    PubMed

    Escher; Leviatan

    2000-02-28

    The relevance of the partial dynamical symmetry concept for an interacting fermion system is demonstrated. Hamiltonians with partial SU(3) symmetry are presented in the framework of the symplectic shell model of nuclei and shown to be closely related to the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction. Implications are discussed for the deformed light nucleus 20Ne.

  8. Language Teacher Cognitions: Complex Dynamic Systems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feryok, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Language teacher cognition research is a growing field. In recent years several features of language teacher cognitions have been noted: they can be complex, ranging over a number of different subjects; they can be dynamic, changing over time and under different influences; and they can be systems, forming unified and cohesive personal or…

  9. A system dynamics model for communications networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awcock, A. J.; King, T. E. G.

    1985-09-01

    An abstract model of a communications network in system dynamics terminology is developed as implementation of this model by a FORTRAN program package developed at RSRE is discussed. The result of this work is a high-level simulation package in which the performance of adaptive routing algorithms and other network controls may be assessed for a network of arbitrary topology.

  10. Detection of abrupt changes in dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willsky, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the basic ideas associated with the detection of abrupt changes in dynamic systems are presented. Multiple filter-based techniques and residual-based method and the multiple model and generalized likelihood ratio methods are considered. Issues such as the effect of unknown onset time on algorithm complexity and structure and robustness to model uncertainty are discussed.

  11. Final Report Computational Analysis of Dynamical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenheimer, John

    2012-05-08

    This is the final report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-93ER25164, initiated in 1993. This grant supported research of John Guckenheimer on computational analysis of dynamical systems. During that period, seventeen individuals received PhD degrees under the supervision of Guckenheimer and over fifty publications related to the grant were produced. This document contains copies of these publications.

  12. Allowing for model error in strong constraint 4D-Var

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Katherine; Lawless, Amos; Fowler, Alison

    2016-04-01

    Four dimensional variational data assimilation (4D-Var) can be used to obtain the best estimate of the initial conditions of an environmental forecasting model, namely the analysis. In practice, when the forecasting model contains errors, the analysis from the 4D-Var algorithm will be degraded to allow for errors later in the forecast window. This work focusses on improving the analysis at the initial time by allowing for the fact that the model contains error, within the context of strong constraint 4D-Var. The 4D-Var method developed acknowledges the presence of random error in the model at each time step by replacing the observation error covariance matrix with an error covariance matrix that includes both observation error and model error statistics. It is shown that this new matrix represents the correct error statistics of the innovations in the presence of model error. A method for estimating this matrix using innovation statistics, without requiring prior knowledge of the model error statistics, is presented. The method is demonstrated numerically using a non-linear chaotic system with erroneous parameter values. We show that that the new method works to reduce the analysis error covariance when compared with a standard strong constraint 4D-Var scheme. We discuss the fact that an improved analysis will not necessarily provide a better forecast.

  13. 4D MR and attenuation map generation in PET/MR imaging using 4D PET derived deformation matrices: a feasibility study for lung cancer applications.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Hadi; Schmidt, Holger; Kuestner, Thomas; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-10-13

    Respiratory motion may reduce accuracy in fusion of functional and anatomical images using combined Positron emission tomography / Magnetic resonance (PET/MR) systems. Methodologies for the correction of respiratory motion in PET acquisitions using such systems are mostly based on the use of respiratory synchronized MR acquisitions to derive motion fields. Existing approaches based on tagging acquisitions may introduce artifacts in the MR images, while motion model approaches require the acquisition of training datasets. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility of generating 4D MR images and associated attenuation maps (AMs) from a single static MR image combined with motion fields obtained from simultaneously acquired 4D non-attenuation corrected (NAC) PET images.

  14. Motion management with phase-adapted 4D-optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohadani, Omid; Seco, Joao; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Cancer treatment with ionizing radiation is often compromised by organ motion, in particular for lung cases. Motion uncertainties can significantly degrade an otherwise optimized treatment plan. We present a spatiotemporal optimization method, which takes into account all phases of breathing via the corresponding 4D-CTs and provides a 4D-optimal plan that can be delivered throughout all breathing phases. Monte Carlo dose calculations are employed to warrant for highest dosimetric accuracy, as pertinent to study motion effects in lung. We demonstrate the performance of this optimization method with clinical lung cancer cases and compare the outcomes to conventional gating techniques. We report significant improvements in target coverage and in healthy tissue sparing at a comparable computational expense. Furthermore, we show that the phase-adapted 4D-optimized plans are robust against irregular breathing, as opposed to gating. This technique has the potential to yield a higher delivery efficiency and a decisively shorter delivery time.

  15. Automated Design of Complex Dynamic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Michiel; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Bienstman, Peter; Dambre, Joni

    2014-01-01

    Several fields of study are concerned with uniting the concept of computation with that of the design of physical systems. For example, a recent trend in robotics is to design robots in such a way that they require a minimal control effort. Another example is found in the domain of photonics, where recent efforts try to benefit directly from the complex nonlinear dynamics to achieve more efficient signal processing. The underlying goal of these and similar research efforts is to internalize a large part of the necessary computations within the physical system itself by exploiting its inherent non-linear dynamics. This, however, often requires the optimization of large numbers of system parameters, related to both the system's structure as well as its material properties. In addition, many of these parameters are subject to fabrication variability or to variations through time. In this paper we apply a machine learning algorithm to optimize physical dynamic systems. We show that such algorithms, which are normally applied on abstract computational entities, can be extended to the field of differential equations and used to optimize an associated set of parameters which determine their behavior. We show that machine learning training methodologies are highly useful in designing robust systems, and we provide a set of both simple and complex examples using models of physical dynamical systems. Interestingly, the derived optimization method is intimately related to direct collocation a method known in the field of optimal control. Our work suggests that the application domains of both machine learning and optimal control have a largely unexplored overlapping area which envelopes a novel design methodology of smart and highly complex physical systems. PMID:24497969

  16. Earth and ocean dynamics satellites and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is presented of the present state of satellite and ground systems making observations of the dynamics of the solid earth and the oceans. Emphasis is placed on applications of space technology for practical use. Topics discussed include: satellite missions and results over the last two decades in the areas of earth gravity field, polar motions, earth tides, magnetic anomalies, and satellite-to-satellite tracking; laser ranging systems; development of the Very Long Baseline Interferometer; and Skylab radar altimeter data applications.

  17. Coherence and chaos in extended dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.R.

    1994-12-31

    Coherence, chaos, and pattern formation are characteristic elements of the nonequilibrium statistical mechanics controlling mesoscopic order and disorder in many-degree-of-freedom nonlinear dynamical systems. Competing length scales and/or time scales are the underlying microscopic driving forces for many of these aspects of ``complexity.`` We illustrate the basic concepts with some model examples of classical and quantum, ordered and disordered, nonlinear systems.

  18. Time Delay Systems with Distribution Dependent Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-10

    sensitivity function for general nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in a Banach space. Here we only show the construction of the abstract...shear: A nonlinear stick-slip formulation. CRSC-TR06-07, February, 2006; Differential Equations and Nonlinear Mechanics. Banks, H.T. and H.K. Nguyen (to...dependent dynamical system (in this case a 6 complicated system of partial differential equations ) for which the distribution PL must be estimated in some

  19. Nonlinear dynamic macromodeling techniques for audio systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogrodzki, Jan; Bieńkowski, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    This paper develops a modelling method and a models identification technique for the nonlinear dynamic audio systems. Identification is performed by means of a behavioral approach based on a polynomial approximation. This approach makes use of Discrete Fourier Transform and Harmonic Balance Method. A model of an audio system is first created and identified and then it is simulated in real time using an algorithm of low computational complexity. The algorithm consists in real time emulation of the system response rather than in simulation of the system itself. The proposed software is written in Python language using object oriented programming techniques. The code is optimized for a multithreads environment.

  20. Stability precision dynamic testing system on artillery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyan; Li, Bo

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic feature of Weapon equipments is one of important performance index for evaluating the performance of the whole weapon system. The construction of target range in our country in fire control dynamic testing is relatively backward; therefore, it has greatly influenced the evaluation on the fire control system. In order to solve this problem, it's urgent to develop a new testing instrument so as to adjust to the armament research process and promote weapon system working more efficiently and thereby meeting the needs of modernization in national defense. This paper proposes a new measure which is used to test the stability precision of the fire control system, and it is installed on the moving base. Using the method, we develop a testing system which can test the stability precision of the fire control system and achieve a high precision results after testing. The innovation of the system is we can receive the image not only by CCD, but our eyes. It also adopts digital image-forming and image processing technique for real-time measurement and storing of the target information; it simultaneously adopts the method adjusting the platform and the corresponding fixture mounted on a sample to measure the stable precision and the precision of corner of stabilizator. In this paper, we make a description on the construction of the system and the idea of the designing of the optical system. Finally, we introduce the actual application of the system and testing results.

  1. 3D/4D sonography - any safety problem.

    PubMed

    Pooh, Ritsuko K; Maeda, Kazuo; Kurjak, Asim; Sen, Cihat; Ebrashy, Alaa; Adra, Abdallah; Dayyabu, Aliyu Labaran; Wataganara, Tuangsit; de Sá, Renato Augusto Moreira; Stanojevic, Milan

    2016-03-01

    Gray-scale image data are processed in 3D ultrasound by repeated scans of multiple planes within a few seconds to achieve one surface rendering image and three perpendicular plane images. The 4D image is achieved by repeating 3D images in short intervals, i.e. 3D and 4D ultrasound are based on simple B-mode images. During 3D/4D acquisition, a fetus in utero is exposed by ultrasound beam for only a few seconds, and it is as short as real-time B-mode scanning. Therefore, simple 3D imaging is as safe as a simple B-mode scan. The 4D ultrasound is also as safe as a simple B-mode scan, but the ultrasound exposure should be shorter than 30 min. The thermal index (TI) and mechanical index (MI) should both be lower than 1.0, and the ultrasound study is regulated by the Doppler ultrasound if it is combined with simple 3D or 4D ultrasound. Recently, some articles have reported the functional changes of animal fetal brain neuronal cells and liver cell apoptosis with Doppler ultrasound. We discuss cell apoptosis by ultrasound in this report. Diagnostic ultrasound safety is achieved by controlling the output pulse and continuous ultrasound waves using thermal and mechanical indices, which should be <1.0 in abdominal and transvaginal scan, pulsed Doppler, as well as 3D and 4D ultrasound. The lowest spatial peak temporal average (SPTA) intensity of the ultrasound to suppress cultured cell growth is 240 mW/cm2, below which no ultrasound effect has been reported. An ultrasound user must be trained to recognize the ultrasound bioeffects; thermal and mechanical indices, and how to reduce these when they are higher than 1.0 on the monitor display; and guide the proper use of the ultrasound under the ALARA principle, because the user is responsible for ensuring ultrasound safety.

  2. 4D ultrasound imaging - ethically justifiable in India?

    PubMed

    Indiran, Venkatraman

    2017-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound (real-time volume sonography), which has been used in the West since the last decade for the determination of gender as well as for bonding and entertainment of the parents, has become widely available in India in this decade. Here, I would like to discuss the ethical issues associated with 4D ultrasonography in India. These are self-referral, the use of the technology for non-medical indications, a higher possibility of the disclosure of the foetus' gender and safety concerns.

  3. Emerging Applications of Abdominal 4D Flow MRI

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Alzate, Alejandro; Francois, Christopher J.; Wieben, Oliver; Reeder, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Comprehensive assessment of abdominal hemodynamics is crucial for many clinical diagnoses but is challenged by a tremendous complexity of anatomy, normal physiology, and a wide variety of pathologic abnormalities. This article introduces 4D flow MRI as a powerful technique for noninvasive assessment of the hemodynamics of abdominal vascular territories. CONCLUSION Four-dimensional flow MRI provides clinicians with a more extensive and straightforward approach to evaluate disorders that affect blood flow in the abdomen. This review presents a series of clinical cases to illustrate the utility of 4D flow MRI in the comprehensive assessment of the abdominal circulation. PMID:27187681

  4. A Fast 4-D TEM System for UXO Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-30

    to store gear near the field site. This eliminates the need to transport all gear back and forth between the field site and the hotel . At Aberdeen...CHARACTERIZATION Zonge Engineering, Final Report (revised) July 2003 Page 44 back to the hotel after work was the NT-32II transceiver. We had a problem with...Countermine Forum. 2001. New Orleans Mariott : U.S. Dept. of Defense. 16. Carlson, N.E., and Kenneth L. Zponge. The utility of horizontal component

  5. On sequential dynamical systems and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C.L.; Mortveit, H.S.; Reidys, C.M.

    1999-06-01

    The generic structure of computer simulations motivates a new class of discrete dynamical systems that captures this structure in a mathematically precise way. This class of systems consists of (1) a loopfree graph {Upsilon} with vertex set {l_brace}1,2,{hor_ellipsis},n{r_brace} where each vertex has a binary state, (2) a vertex labeled set of functions (F{sub i,{Upsilon}}:F{sub 2}{sup n} {r_arrow} F{sub 2}{sup n}){sub i} and (3) a permutation {pi} {element_of} S{sub n}. The function F{sub i,{Upsilon}} updates the state of vertex i as a function of the states of vertex i and its {Upsilon}-neighbors and leaves the states of all other vertices fixed. The permutation {pi} represents the update ordering, i.e., the order in which the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} are applied. By composing the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} in the order given by {pi} one obtains the dynamical system (equation given in paper) which the authors refer to as a sequential dynamical system, or SDS for short. The authors will present bounds for the number of functionally different systems and for the number of nonisomorphic digraphs {Gamma}[F{sub {Upsilon}},{pi}] that can be obtained by varying the update order and applications of these to specific graphs and graph classes. This will be done using both combinatorial/algebraic techniques and probabilistic techniques. Finally the authors give results on dynamical system properties for some special systems.

  6. Automated reverse engineering of nonlinear dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Bongard, Josh; Lipson, Hod

    2007-06-12

    Complex nonlinear dynamics arise in many fields of science and engineering, but uncovering the underlying differential equations directly from observations poses a challenging task. The ability to symbolically model complex networked systems is key to understanding them, an open problem in many disciplines. Here we introduce for the first time a method that can automatically generate symbolic equations for a nonlinear coupled dynamical system directly from time series data. This method is applicable to any system that can be described using sets of ordinary nonlinear differential equations, and assumes that the (possibly noisy) time series of all variables are observable. Previous automated symbolic modeling approaches of coupled physical systems produced linear models or required a nonlinear model to be provided manually. The advance presented here is made possible by allowing the method to model each (possibly coupled) variable separately, intelligently perturbing and destabilizing the system to extract its less observable characteristics, and automatically simplifying the equations during modeling. We demonstrate this method on four simulated and two real systems spanning mechanics, ecology, and systems biology. Unlike numerical models, symbolic models have explanatory value, suggesting that automated "reverse engineering" approaches for model-free symbolic nonlinear system identification may play an increasing role in our ability to understand progressively more complex systems in the future.

  7. Nonlinear dynamical system approaches towards neural prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Torikai, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Sho

    2011-04-19

    An asynchronous discrete-state spiking neurons is a wired system of shift registers that can mimic nonlinear dynamics of an ODE-based neuron model. The control parameter of the neuron is the wiring pattern among the registers and thus they are suitable for on-chip learning. In this paper an asynchronous discrete-state spiking neuron is introduced and its typical nonlinear phenomena are demonstrated. Also, a learning algorithm for a set of neurons is presented and it is demonstrated that the algorithm enables the set of neurons to reconstruct nonlinear dynamics of another set of neurons with unknown parameter values. The learning function is validated by FPGA experiments.

  8. A dose error evaluation study for 4D dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milz, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.; Ullrich, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that respiration induced motion is not negligible for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. The intrafractional breathing induced motion influences the delivered dose distribution on the underlying patient geometry such as the lung or the abdomen. If a static geometry is used, a planning process for these indications does not represent the entire dynamic process. The quality of a full 4D dose calculation approach depends on the dose coordinate transformation process between deformable geometries. This article provides an evaluation study that introduces an advanced method to verify the quality of numerical dose transformation generated by four different algorithms. The used transformation metric value is based on the deviation of the dose mass histogram (DMH) and the mean dose throughout dose transformation. The study compares the results of four algorithms. In general, two elementary approaches are used: dose mapping and energy transformation. Dose interpolation (DIM) and an advanced concept, so called divergent dose mapping model (dDMM), are used for dose mapping. The algorithms are compared to the basic energy transformation model (bETM) and the energy mass congruent mapping (EMCM). For evaluation 900 small sample regions of interest (ROI) are generated inside an exemplary lung geometry (4DCT). A homogeneous fluence distribution is assumed for dose calculation inside the ROIs. The dose transformations are performed with the four different algorithms. The study investigates the DMH-metric and the mean dose metric for different scenarios (voxel sizes: 8 mm, 4 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm 9 different breathing phases). dDMM achieves the best transformation accuracy in all measured test cases with 3-5% lower errors than the other models. The results of dDMM are reasonable and most efficient in this study, although the model is simple and easy to implement. The EMCM model also achieved suitable results, but the approach requires a more complex

  9. Predicting lower mantle heterogeneity from 4-D Earth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, Nicolas; Williams, Simon; Müller, Dietmar; Gurnis, Michael; Bower, Dan J.

    2016-04-01

    basal layer ˜ 4% denser than ambient mantle. Increasing convective vigour (Ra ≈ 5 x 108) or decreasing the density of the basal layer decreases both the accuracy and sensitivity of the predicted lower mantle structure. References: D. J. Bower, M. Gurnis, N. Flament, Assimilating lithosphere and slab history in 4-D Earth models. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 238, 8-22 (2015). V. Lekic, S. Cottaar, A. Dziewonski, B. Romanowicz, Cluster analysis of global lower mantle tomography: A new class of structure and implications for chemical heterogeneity. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 357, 68-77 (2012).

  10. 4D motion animation of coronary arteries from rotational angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, Wolfgang; Rohkohl, Christopher; Schuldhaus, Dominik; Prümmer, Marcus; Lauritsch, Günter; Hornegger, Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Time-resolved 3-D imaging of the heart is a major research topic in the medical imaging community. Recent advances in the interventional cardiac 3-D imaging from rotational angiography (C-arm CT) are now also making 4-D imaging feasible during procedures in the catheter laboratory. State-of-the-art reconstruction algorithms try to estimate the cardiac motion and utilize the motion field to enhance the reconstruction of a stable cardiac phase (diastole). The available data offers a handful of opportunities during interventional procedures, e.g. the ECG-synchronized dynamic roadmapping or the computation and analysis of functional parameters. In this paper we will demonstrate that the motion vector field (MVF) that is output by motion compensated image reconstruction algorithms is in general not directly usable for animation and motion analysis. Dependent on the algorithm different defects are investigated. A primary issue is that the MVF needs to be inverted, i.e. the wrong direction of motion is provided. A second major issue is the non-periodicity of cardiac motion. In algorithms which compute a non-periodic motion field from a single rotation the in depth motion information along viewing direction is missing, since this cannot be measured in the projections. As a result, while the MVF improves reconstruction quality, it is insufficient for motion animation and analysis. We propose an algorithm to solve both problems, i.e. inversion and missing in-depth information in a unified framework. A periodic version of the MVF is approximated. The task is formulated as a linear optimization problem where a parametric smooth motion model based on B-splines is estimated from the MVF. It is shown that the problem can be solved using a sparse QR factorization within a clinical feasible time of less than one minute. In a phantom experiment using the publicly available CAVAREV platform, the average quality of a non-periodic animation could be increased by 39% by applying the

  11. Fast interactive exploration of 4D MRI flow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennemuth, A.; Friman, O.; Schumann, C.; Bock, J.; Drexl, J.; Huellebrand, M.; Markl, M.; Peitgen, H.-O.

    2011-03-01

    1- or 2-directional MRI blood flow mapping sequences are an integral part of standard MR protocols for diagnosis and therapy control in heart diseases. Recent progress in rapid MRI has made it possible to acquire volumetric, 3-directional cine images in reasonable scan time. In addition to flow and velocity measurements relative to arbitrarily oriented image planes, the analysis of 3-dimensional trajectories enables the visualization of flow patterns, local features of flow trajectories or possible paths into specific regions. The anatomical and functional information allows for advanced hemodynamic analysis in different application areas like stroke risk assessment, congenital and acquired heart disease, aneurysms or abdominal collaterals and cranial blood flow. The complexity of the 4D MRI flow datasets and the flow related image analysis tasks makes the development of fast comprehensive data exploration software for advanced flow analysis a challenging task. Most existing tools address only individual aspects of the analysis pipeline such as pre-processing, quantification or visualization, or are difficult to use for clinicians. The goal of the presented work is to provide a software solution that supports the whole image analysis pipeline and enables data exploration with fast intuitive interaction and visualization methods. The implemented methods facilitate the segmentation and inspection of different vascular systems. Arbitrary 2- or 3-dimensional regions for quantitative analysis and particle tracing can be defined interactively. Synchronized views of animated 3D path lines, 2D velocity or flow overlays and flow curves offer a detailed insight into local hemodynamics. The application of the analysis pipeline is shown for 6 cases from clinical practice, illustrating the usefulness for different clinical questions. Initial user tests show that the software is intuitive to learn and even inexperienced users achieve good results within reasonable processing

  12. Keystroke Dynamics-Based Credential Hardening Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlow, Nick; Cukic, Bojan

    abstract Keystroke dynamics are becoming a well-known method for strengthening username- and password-based credential sets. The familiarity and ease of use of these traditional authentication schemes combined with the increased trustworthiness associated with biometrics makes them prime candidates for application in many web-based scenarios. Our keystroke dynamics system uses Breiman’s random forests algorithm to classify keystroke input sequences as genuine or imposter. The system is capable of operating at various points on a traditional ROC curve depending on application-specific security needs. As a username/password authentication scheme, our approach decreases the system penetration rate associated with compromised passwords up to 99.15%. Beyond presenting results demonstrating the credential hardening effect of our scheme, we look into the notion that a user’s familiarity to components of a credential set can non-trivially impact error rates.

  13. Stability threshold approach for complex dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinshov, Vladimir V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A new measure to characterize the stability of complex dynamical systems against large perturbations is suggested, the stability threshold (ST). It quantifies the magnitude of the weakest perturbation capable of disrupting the system and switch it to an undesired dynamical regime. In the phase space, the ST corresponds to the ‘thinnest site’ of the attraction basin and therefore indicates the most ‘dangerous’ direction of perturbations. We introduce a computational algorithm for quantification of the ST and demonstrate that the suggested approach is effective and provides important insights. The generality of the obtained results defines their vast potential for application in such fields as engineering, neuroscience, power grids, Earth science and many others where the robustness of complex systems is studied.

  14. Dynamic graph system for a semantic database

    DOEpatents

    Mizell, David

    2015-01-27

    A method and system in a computer system for dynamically providing a graphical representation of a data store of entries via a matrix interface is disclosed. A dynamic graph system provides a matrix interface that exposes to an application program a graphical representation of data stored in a data store such as a semantic database storing triples. To the application program, the matrix interface represents the graph as a sparse adjacency matrix that is stored in compressed form. Each entry of the data store is considered to represent a link between nodes of the graph. Each entry has a first field and a second field identifying the nodes connected by the link and a third field with a value for the link that connects the identified nodes. The first, second, and third fields represent the rows, column, and elements of the adjacency matrix.

  15. Dynamic graph system for a semantic database

    SciTech Connect

    Mizell, David

    2016-04-12

    A method and system in a computer system for dynamically providing a graphical representation of a data store of entries via a matrix interface is disclosed. A dynamic graph system provides a matrix interface that exposes to an application program a graphical representation of data stored in a data store such as a semantic database storing triples. To the application program, the matrix interface represents the graph as a sparse adjacency matrix that is stored in compressed form. Each entry of the data store is considered to represent a link between nodes of the graph. Each entry has a first field and a second field identifying the nodes connected by the link and a third field with a value for the link that connects the identified nodes. The first, second, and third fields represent the rows, column, and elements of the adjacency matrix.

  16. A robotic approach to 4D real-time tumor tracking for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzurovic, I.; Huang, K.; Yu, Y.; Podder, T. K.

    2011-03-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions induce displacement and deformation of the tumor volumes in various internal organs. To accommodate this undesired movement and other errors, physicians incorporate a large margin around the tumor to delineate the planning target volume, so that the clinical target volume receives the prescribed radiation dose under any scenario. Consequently, a large volume of healthy tissue is irradiated and sometimes it is difficult to spare critical organs adjacent to the tumor. In this study we have proposed a novel approach to the 4D active tracking and dynamic delivery incorporating the tumor motion prediction technique. This method has been applied to the two commercially available robotic treatment couches. The proposed algorithm can predict the tumor position and the robotic systems are able to continuously track the tumor during radiation dose delivery. Therefore a precise dose is given to a moving target while the dose to the nearby critical organs is reduced to improve the patient treatment outcome. The efficacy of the proposed method has been investigated by extensive computer simulation. The tumor tracking method is simulated for two couches: HexaPOD robotic couch and ELEKTA Precise Table. The comparison results have been presented in this paper. In order to assess the clinical significance, dosimetric effects of the proposed method have been analyzed.

  17. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  18. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  19. The dynamical crossover in attractive colloidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Mallamace, Domenico; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2013-12-07

    We study the dynamical arrest in an adhesive hard-sphere colloidal system. We examine a micellar suspension of the Pluronic-L64 surfactant in the temperature (T) and volume fraction (ϕ) phase diagram. According to mode-coupling theory (MCT), this system is characterized by a cusp-like singularity and two glassy phases: an attractive glass (AG) phase and a repulsive glass (RG) phase. The T − ϕ phase diagram of this system as confirmed by a previous series of scattering data also exhibits a Percolation Threshold (PT) line, a reentrant behavior (AG-liquid-RG), and a glass-to-glass transition. The AG phase can be generated out of the liquid phase by using T and ϕ as control parameters. We utilize viscosity and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. NMR data confirm all the characteristic properties of the colloidal system phase diagram and give evidence of the onset of a fractal-like percolating structure at a precise threshold. The MCT scaling laws used to study the shear viscosity as a function of ϕ and T show in both cases a fragile-to-strong liquid glass-forming dynamic crossover (FSC) located near the percolation threshold where the clustering process is fully developed. These results suggest a larger thermodynamic generality for this phenomenon, which is usually studied only as a function of the temperature. We also find that the critical values of the control parameters, coincident with the PT line, define the locus of the FSC. In the region between the FSC and the glass transition lines the system dynamics are dominated by clustering effects. We thus demonstrate that it is possible, using the conceptual framework provided by extended mode-coupling theory, to describe the way a system approaches dynamic arrest, taking into account both cage and hopping effects.

  20. Overcoming Dynamic Disturbances in Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eric W.; Dente, Gregory C.; Lyon, Richard G.; Chesters, Dennis; Gong, Qian

    2000-01-01

    We develop and discuss a methodology with the potential to yield a significant reduction in complexity, cost, and risk of space-borne optical systems in the presence of dynamic disturbances. More robust systems almost certainly will be a result as well. Many future space-based and ground-based optical systems will employ optical control systems to enhance imaging performance. The goal of the optical control subsystem is to determine the wavefront aberrations and remove them. Ideally reducing an aberrated image of the object under investigation to a sufficiently clear (usually diffraction-limited) image. Control will likely be distributed over several elements. These elements may include telescope primary segments, telescope secondary, telescope tertiary, deformable mirror(s), fine steering mirror(s), etc. The last two elements, in particular, may have to provide dynamic control. These control subsystems may become elaborate indeed. But robust system performance will require evaluation of the image quality over a substantial range and in a dynamic environment. Candidate systems for improvement in the Earth Sciences Enterprise could include next generation Landsat systems or atmospheric sensors for dynamic imaging of individual, severe storms. The technology developed here could have a substantial impact on the development of new systems in the Space Science Enterprise; such as the Next Generation Space Telescope(NGST) and its follow-on the Next NGST. Large Interferometric Systems of non-zero field, such as Planet Finder and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure, could benefit. These systems most likely will contain large, flexible optomechanical structures subject to dynamic disturbance. Furthermore, large systems for high resolution imaging of planets or the sun from space may also benefit. Tactical and Strategic Defense systems will need to image very small targets as well and could benefit from the technology developed here. We discuss a novel

  1. Overcoming Dynamic Disturbances in Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eric W.; Dente, Gregory C.; Lyon, Richard G.; Chesters, Dennis; Gong, Qian

    2000-01-01

    We develop and discuss a methodology with the potential to yield a significant reduction in complexity, cost, and risk of space-borne optical systems in the presence of dynamic disturbances. More robust systems almost certainly will be a result as well. Many future space-based and ground-based optical systems will employ optical control systems to enhance imaging performance. The goal of the optical control subsystem is to determine the wavefront aberrations and remove them. Ideally reducing an aberrated image of the object under investigation to a sufficiently clear (usually diffraction-limited) image. Control will likely be distributed over several elements. These elements may include telescope primary segments, telescope secondary, telescope tertiary, deformable mirror(s), fine steering mirror(s), etc. The last two elements, in particular, may have to provide dynamic control. These control subsystems may become elaborate indeed. But robust system performance will require evaluation of the image quality over a substantial range and in a dynamic environment. Candidate systems for improvement in the Earth Sciences Enterprise could include next generation Landsat systems or atmospheric sensors for dynamic imaging of individual, severe storms. The technology developed here could have a substantial impact on the development of new systems in the Space Science Enterprise; such as the Next Generation Space Telescope(NGST) and its follow-on the Next NGST. Large Interferometric Systems of non-zero field, such as Planet Finder and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure, could benefit. These systems most likely will contain large, flexible optormechanical structures subject to dynamic disturbance. Furthermore, large systems for high resolution imaging of planets or the sun from space may also benefit. Tactical and Strategic Defense systems will need to image very small targets as well and could benefit from the technology developed here. We discuss a novel

  2. TH-E-17A-04: Geometric Validation of K-Space Self-Gated 4D-MRI Vs. 4D-CT Using A Respiratory Motion Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Y; Fan, Z; Yang, W; Pang, J; McKenzie, E; Deng, Z; Tuli, R; Sandler, H; Li, D; Fraass, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: 4D-CT is often limited by motion artifacts, low temporal resolution, and poor phase-based target definition. We recently developed a novel k-space self-gated 4D-MRI technique with high spatial and temporal resolution. The goal here is to geometrically validate 4D-MRI using a MRI-CT compatible respiratory motion phantom and comparison to 4D-CT. Methods: 4D-MRI was acquired using 3T spoiled gradient echo-based 3D projection sequences. Respiratory phases were resolved using self-gated k-space lines as the motion surrogate. Images were reconstructed into 10 temporal bins with 1.56×1.56×1.56mm3. A MRI-CT compatible phantom was designed with a 23mm diameter ball target filled with highconcentration gadolinium(Gd) gel embedded in a 35×40×63mm3 plastic box stabilized with low-concentration Gd gel. The whole phantom was driven by an air pump. Human respiratory motion was mimicked using the controller from a commercial dynamic phantom (RSD). Four breathing settings (rates/depths: 10s/20mm, 6s/15mm, 4s/10mm, 3s/7mm) were scanned with 4D-MRI and 4D-CT (slice thickness 1.25mm). Motion ground-truth was obtained from input signals and real-time video recordings. Reconstructed images were imported into Eclipse(Varian) for target contouring. Volumes and target positions were compared with ground-truth. Initial human study was investigated on a liver patient. Results: 4D-MRI and 4D-CT scans for the different breathing cycles were reconstructed with 10 phases. Target volume in each phase was measured for both 4D-CT and 4D-MRI. Volume percentage difference for the 6.37ml target ranged from 6.67±5.33 to 11.63±5.57 for 4D-CT and from 1.47±0.52 to 2.12±1.60 for 4D-MRI. The Mann-Whitney U-test shows the 4D-MRI is significantly superior to 4D-CT (p=0.021) for phase-based target definition. Centroid motion error ranges were 1.35–1.25mm (4D-CT), and 0.31–0.12mm (4D-MRI). Conclusion: The k-space self-gated 4D-MRI we recently developed can accurately determine phase

  3. Dynamic combinatorial self-replicating systems.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Emilie; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to their intrinsic network topologies, dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) represent new tools for investigating fundamental aspects related to self-organization and adaptation processes. Very recently the first examples integrating self-replication features within DCLs have pushed even further the idea of implementing dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) towards minimal systems capable of self-construction and/or evolution. Indeed, feedback loop processes - in particular in the form of autocatalytic reactions - are keystones to build dynamic supersystems which could possibly approach the roots of "Darwinian" evolvability at mesoscale. This topic of current interest also shows significant potentialities beyond its fundamental character, because truly smart and autonomous materials for the future will have to respond to changes of their environment by selecting and by exponentially amplifying their fittest constituents.

  4. Passive dynamic controllers for nonlinear mechanical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Wu, Shih-Chin; Phan, Minh; Longman, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology for model-independant controller design for controlling large angular motion of multi-body dynamic systems is outlined. The controlled system may consist of rigid and flexible components that undergo large rigid body motion and small elastic deformations. Control forces/torques are applied to drive the system and at the same time suppress the vibration due to flexibility of the components. The proposed controller consists of passive second-order systems which may be designed with little knowledge of the system parameter, even if the controlled system is nonlinear. Under rather general assumptions, the passive design assures that the closed loop system has guaranteed stability properties. Unlike positive real controller design, stabilization can be accomplished without direct velocity feedback. In addition, the second-order passive design allows dynamic feedback controllers with considerable freedom to tune for desired system response, and to avoid actuator saturation. After developing the basic mathematical formulation of the design methodology, simulation results are presented to illustrate the proposed approach to a flexible six-degree-of-freedom manipulator.

  5. Enterococcus faecalis promotes osteoclastogenesis and semaphorin 4D expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Deng, Zuhui; Seneviratne, Chaminda J; Cheung, Gary S P; Jin, Lijian; Zhao, Baohong; Zhang, Chengfei

    2015-10-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is considered a major bacterial pathogen implicated in endodontic infections and contributes considerably to periapical periodontitis. This study aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms by which E. faecalis accounts for the bone destruction in periapical periodontitis in vitro. Osteoclast precursor RAW264.7 cells were treated with E. faecalis ATCC 29212 and a wild strain of E. faecalis derived clinically from an infected root canal. The results showed that, to some extent, E. faecalis induced the RAW264.7 cells to form tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated osteoclast-like cells. This pathogen markedly stimulated RAW264.7 cells to express semaphorin 4D (Sema4D), which inhibits bone formation. Once RAW264.7 cells were primed by low-dose receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL), E. faecalis could significantly increase the production of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells and up-regulate the expression of osteoclast-specific markers, including NFATc1, TRAP and cathepsin K. Both p38 and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathways were activated by E. faecalis in RANKL-primed RAW264.7 cells, and meanwhile the expression of Sema4D was highly increased. In conclusion, E. faecalis may greatly contribute to the bone resorption in periapical periodontitis by promoting RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis and expression of Sema4D through activation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathways.

  6. The technology and performance of 4D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Obruchkov, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in 4D ultrasound imaging technology allow clinicians to obtain not only rich visual information but also quantitative data that can be used for diagnosis and treatment. Some argue that the extension of 2D ultrasound is unnecessary and does not offer any benefits to diagnosis, while others argue that it is possible to better assess an abnormality in 3D than 2D. Anatomy can be reconstructed in perspectives that were never seen with conventional 2D US imaging. Advanced rendering techniques in three dimensions can be customized to be sensitive to specific pathology, thus making diagnosis more accurate. Volume and function of certain anatomical components can be measured with greater accuracy. This article reviews physical principles behind the ultrasound technology, how they are applied to advance the field of ultrasound imaging, and maybe reach its limits. Advances in ultrasound technology make 4D ultrasound imaging faster and less dependent on the operator's expertise, thus opening up more research possibilities in the fields of data processing and visualization. Currently, 4D ultrasound is extensively used in the field of obstetrics and interven-tional radiology. The goal of 4D ultrasound is to overcome the limitations posed by its predecessor technology and to be more clinically useful as an imaging tool.

  7. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2,4 - Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid ( 2,4 - D ) ; CASRN 94 - 75 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Asses

  8. GRAM 88 - 4D GLOBAL REFERENCE ATMOSPHERE MODEL-1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    the Jacchia values. Below 25km the atmospheric parameters are computed by the 4-D worldwide atmospheric model of Spiegler and Fowler (1972). This data set is not included. GRAM-88 incorporates a hydrostatic/gas law check in the 0-30 km altitude range to flag and change any bad data points. Between 5km and 30km, an interpolation scheme is used between the 4-D results and the modified Groves values. The output parameters consist of components for: (1) latitude, longitude, and altitude dependent monthly and annual means, (2) quasi-biennial oscillations (QBO), and (3) random perturbations to partially simulate the variability due to synoptic, diurnal, planetary wave, and gravity wave variations. Quasi-biennial and random variation perturbations are computed from parameters determined by various empirical studies and are added to the monthly mean values. The GRAM-88 program is for batch execution on the IBM 3084. It is written in STANDARD FORTRAN 77 under the MVS/XA operating system. The IBM DISPLA graphics routines are necessary for graphical output. The program was developed in 1988.

  9. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  10. A method for deriving a 4D-interpolated balanced planning target for mobile tumor radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Roland, Teboh; Hales, Russell; McNutt, Todd; Wong, John; Simari, Patricio; Tryggestad, Erik

    2012-01-15

    resulting from the new approach was quantified. Results: Analysis of the 4D dose distributions from all five patients showed that while achieving tumor coverage comparable to the ITV approach, the new planning target definition resulted in reductions of lung V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, and V{sub 30} of 6.3% {+-} 1.7%, 10.6% {+-} 3.9%, and 12.9% {+-} 5.5%, respectively, as well as reductions in mean lung dose, mean dose to the GTV-ring and mean heart dose of 8.8% {+-} 2.5%, 7.2% {+-} 2.5%, and 10.6% {+-} 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: The authors have developed a simple and systematic approach to generate a 4D-interpolated balanced planning target volume that implicitly incorporates the dynamics of respiratory-organ motion without requiring 4D-dose computation or optimization. Preliminary results based on 4D-CT data of five previously treated lung patients showed that this new planning target approach may improve normal tissue sparing without sacrificing tumor coverage.

  11. Assessment of regional ventilation and deformation using 4D-CT imaging for healthy human lungs during tidal breathing.

    PubMed

    Jahani, Nariman; Choi, Sanghun; Choi, Jiwoong; Iyer, Krishna; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2015-11-15

    This study aims to assess regional ventilation, nonlinearity, and hysteresis of human lungs during dynamic breathing via image registration of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans. Six healthy adult humans were studied by spiral multidetector-row CT during controlled tidal breathing as well as during total lung capacity and functional residual capacity breath holds. Static images were utilized to contrast static vs. dynamic (deep vs. tidal) breathing. A rolling-seal piston system was employed to maintain consistent tidal breathing during 4D-CT spiral image acquisition, providing required between-breath consistency for physiologically meaningful reconstructed respiratory motion. Registration-derived variables including local air volume and anisotropic deformation index (ADI, an indicator of preferential deformation in response to local force) were employed to assess regional ventilation and lung deformation. Lobar distributions of air volume change during tidal breathing were correlated with those of deep breathing (R(2) ≈ 0.84). Small discrepancies between tidal and deep breathing were shown to be likely due to different distributions of air volume change in the left and the right lungs. We also demonstrated an asymmetric characteristic of flow rate between inhalation and exhalation. With ADI, we were able to quantify nonlinearity and hysteresis of lung deformation that can only be captured in dynamic images. Nonlinearity quantified by ADI is greater during inhalation, and it is stronger in the lower lobes (P < 0.05). Lung hysteresis estimated by the difference of ADI between inhalation and exhalation is more significant in the right lungs than that in the left lungs.

  12. Assessment of regional ventilation and deformation using 4D-CT imaging for healthy human lungs during tidal breathing

    PubMed Central

    Jahani, Nariman; Choi, Jiwoong; Iyer, Krishna; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess regional ventilation, nonlinearity, and hysteresis of human lungs during dynamic breathing via image registration of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans. Six healthy adult humans were studied by spiral multidetector-row CT during controlled tidal breathing as well as during total lung capacity and functional residual capacity breath holds. Static images were utilized to contrast static vs. dynamic (deep vs. tidal) breathing. A rolling-seal piston system was employed to maintain consistent tidal breathing during 4D-CT spiral image acquisition, providing required between-breath consistency for physiologically meaningful reconstructed respiratory motion. Registration-derived variables including local air volume and anisotropic deformation index (ADI, an indicator of preferential deformation in response to local force) were employed to assess regional ventilation and lung deformation. Lobar distributions of air volume change during tidal breathing were correlated with those of deep breathing (R2 ≈ 0.84). Small discrepancies between tidal and deep breathing were shown to be likely due to different distributions of air volume change in the left and the right lungs. We also demonstrated an asymmetric characteristic of flow rate between inhalation and exhalation. With ADI, we were able to quantify nonlinearity and hysteresis of lung deformation that can only be captured in dynamic images. Nonlinearity quantified by ADI is greater during inhalation, and it is stronger in the lower lobes (P < 0.05). Lung hysteresis estimated by the difference of ADI between inhalation and exhalation is more significant in the right lungs than that in the left lungs. PMID:26316512

  13. 4D motion modeling of the coronary arteries from CT images for robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong Ping; Edwards, Eddie; Mei, Lin; Rueckert, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach for coronary artery motion modeling from cardiac Computed Tomography( CT) images. The aim of this work is to develop a 4D motion model of the coronaries for image guidance in robotic-assisted totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass (TECAB) surgery. To utilize the pre-operative cardiac images to guide the minimally invasive surgery, it is essential to have a 4D cardiac motion model to be registered with the stereo endoscopic images acquired intraoperatively using the da Vinci robotic system. In this paper, we are investigating the extraction of the coronary arteries and the modelling of their motion from a dynamic sequence of cardiac CT. We use a multi-scale vesselness filter to enhance vessels in the cardiac CT images. The centerlines of the arteries are extracted using a ridge traversal algorithm. Using this method the coronaries can be extracted in near real-time as only local information is used in vessel tracking. To compute the deformation of the coronaries due to cardiac motion, the motion is extracted from a dynamic sequence of cardiac CT. Each timeframe in this sequence is registered to the end-diastole timeframe of the sequence using a non-rigid registration algorithm based on free-form deformations. Once the images have been registered a dynamic motion model of the coronaries can be obtained by applying the computed free-form deformations to the extracted coronary arteries. To validate the accuracy of the motion model we compare the actual position of the coronaries in each time frame with the predicted position of the coronaries as estimated from the non-rigid registration. We expect that this motion model of coronaries can facilitate the planning of TECAB surgery, and through the registration with real-time endoscopic video images it can reduce the conversion rate from TECAB to conventional procedures.

  14. Dynamical systems approaches to nonlinear problems in systems and circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Salam, F.M.A.; Levi, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Applications of dynamical-systems analysis to nonlinear circuits and physical systems are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include general analytical methods, general simulation methods, nonlinear circuits and systems in electrical engineering, control systems, solids and vibrations, and mechanical systems. Consideration is given to the applicability of the Mel'nikov method to highly dissipative systems, damping in nonlinear solid mechanics, a three-dimensional rotation instrument for displaying strange attractors, a chaotic saddle catastrophe in forced oscillators, soliton experiments in annular Josephson junctions, local bifurcation control, periodic and chaotic motions of a buckled beam experiencing parametric and external excitation, and robust nonlinear computed torque control for robot manipulators.

  15. Computational stability analysis of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikishkov, Yuri Gennadievich

    2000-10-01

    Due to increased available computer power, the analysis of nonlinear flexible multi-body systems, fixed-wing aircraft and rotary-wing vehicles is relying on increasingly complex, large scale models. An important aspect of the dynamic response of flexible multi-body systems is the potential presence of instabilities. Stability analysis is typically performed on simplified models with the smallest number of degrees of freedom required to capture the physical phenomena that cause the instability. The system stability boundaries are then evaluated using the characteristic exponent method or Floquet theory for systems with constant or periodic coefficients, respectively. As the number of degrees of freedom used to represent the system increases, these methods become increasingly cumbersome, and quickly unmanageable. In this work, a novel approach is proposed, the Implicit Floquet Analysis, which evaluates the largest eigenvalues of the transition matrix using the Arnoldi algorithm, without the explicit computation of this matrix. This method is far more computationally efficient than the classical approach and is ideally suited for systems involving a large number of degrees of freedom. The proposed approach is conveniently implemented as a postprocessing step to any existing simulation tool. The application of the method to a geometrically nonlinear multi-body dynamics code is presented. This work also focuses on the implementation of trimming algorithms and the development of tools for the graphical representation of numerical simulations and stability information for multi-body systems.

  16. 4D MR imaging using robust internal respiratory signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, CheukKai; Wen, Zhifei; Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, R. H. N.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Beddar, Sam

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using internal respiratory (IR) surrogates to sort four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance (MR) images. The 4D MR images were constructed by acquiring fast 2D cine MR images sequentially, with each slice scanned for more than one breathing cycle. The 4D volume was then sorted retrospectively using the IR signal. In this study, we propose to use multiple low-frequency components in the Fourier space as well as the anterior body boundary as potential IR surrogates. From these potential IR surrogates, we used a clustering algorithm to identify those that best represented the respiratory pattern to derive the IR signal. A study with healthy volunteers was performed to assess the feasibility of the proposed IR signal. We compared this proposed IR signal with the respiratory signal obtained using respiratory bellows. Overall, 99% of the IR signals matched the bellows signals. The average difference between the end inspiration times in the IR signal and bellows signal was 0.18 s in this cohort of matching signals. For the acquired images corresponding to the other 1% of non-matching signal pairs, the respiratory motion shown in the images was coherent with the respiratory phases determined by the IR signal, but not the bellows signal. This suggested that the IR signal determined by the proposed method could potentially correct the faulty bellows signal. The sorted 4D images showed minimal mismatched artefacts and potential clinical applicability. The proposed IR signal therefore provides a feasible alternative to effectively sort MR images in 4D.

  17. Advances in 4D Treatment Planning for Scanned Particle Beam Therapy — Report of Dedicated Workshops

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Christoph; Graeff, Christian; Riboldi, Marco; Nill, Simeon; Baroni, Guido; Knopf, Antje-Christin

    2014-01-01

    We report on recent progress in the field of mobile tumor treatment with scanned particle beams, as discussed in the latest editions of the 4D treatment planning workshop. The workshop series started in 2009, with about 20 people from 4 research institutes involved, all actively working on particle therapy delivery and development. The first workshop resulted in a summary of recommendations for the treatment of mobile targets, along with a list of requirements to apply these guidelines clinically. The increased interest in the treatment of mobile tumors led to a continuously growing number of attendees: the 2012 edition counted more than 60 participants from 20 institutions and commercial vendors. The focus of research discussions among workshop participants progressively moved from 4D treatment planning to complete 4D treatments, aiming at effective and safe treatment delivery. Current research perspectives on 4D treatments include all critical aspects of time resolved delivery, such as in-room imaging, motion detection, beam application, and quality assurance techniques. This was motivated by the start of first clinical treatments of hepato cellular tumors with a scanned particle beam, relying on gating or abdominal compression for motion mitigation. Up to date research activities emphasize significant efforts in investigating advanced motion mitigation techniques, with a specific interest in the development of dedicated tools for experimental validation. Potential improvements will be made possible in the near future through 4D optimized treatment plans that require upgrades of the currently established therapy control systems for time resolved delivery. But since also these novel optimization techniques rely on the validity of the 4DCT, research focusing on alternative 4D imaging technique, such as MRI based 4DCT generation will continue. PMID:24354749

  18. Systemic risk: the dynamics of model banking systems

    PubMed Central

    May, Robert M.; Arinaminpathy, Nimalan

    2010-01-01

    The recent banking crises have made it clear that increasingly complex strategies for managing risk in individual banks have not been matched by corresponding attention to overall systemic risks. We explore some simple mathematical caricatures for ‘banking ecosystems’, with emphasis on the interplay between the characteristics of individual banks (capital reserves in relation to total assets, etc.) and the overall dynamical behaviour of the system. The results are discussed in relation to potential regulations aimed at reducing systemic risk. PMID:19864264

  19. Systemic risk: the dynamics of model banking systems.

    PubMed

    May, Robert M; Arinaminpathy, Nimalan

    2010-05-06

    The recent banking crises have made it clear that increasingly complex strategies for managing risk in individual banks have not been matched by corresponding attention to overall systemic risks. We explore some simple mathematical caricatures for 'banking ecosystems', with emphasis on the interplay between the characteristics of individual banks (capital reserves in relation to total assets, etc.) and the overall dynamical behaviour of the system. The results are discussed in relation to potential regulations aimed at reducing systemic risk.

  20. Cognitive Science, Representations and Dynamical Systems Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselager, W. F. G. (Pim); Bongers, Raoul M.; van Rooij, Iris

    In this contribution we point out that the assumption of representation in the explanations and models of cognitive science has several disadvantages. We propose that the dynamical systems theory approach, emphasizing the embodied embedded nature of cognition, might provide an important, non-representational alternative. We stress the importance of the challenge, raised by Andy Clark (Clark & Toribio, 1994; Clark, 1997), to dynamical systems theory to deal with 'representation-hungry' cognitive tasks. We indicate a possible way to answer that challenge in a empirically applicable manner. We suggest that investigations of this kind strengthen a motto that can be used as an antidote to the traditional representational cravings of cognitive science: 'Don't use representations in explanation and modeling unless it is absolutely necessary.'

  1. Dynamically variable spot size laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R. (Inventor); Hurst, John F. (Inventor); Middleton, James R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A Dynamically Variable Spot Size (DVSS) laser system for bonding metal components includes an elongated housing containing a light entry aperture coupled to a laser beam transmission cable and a light exit aperture. A plurality of lenses contained within the housing focus a laser beam from the light entry aperture through the light exit aperture. The lenses may be dynamically adjusted to vary the spot size of the laser. A plurality of interoperable safety devices, including a manually depressible interlock switch, an internal proximity sensor, a remotely operated potentiometer, a remotely activated toggle and a power supply interlock, prevent activation of the laser and DVSS laser system if each safety device does not provide a closed circuit. The remotely operated potentiometer also provides continuous variability in laser energy output.

  2. A dynamical system for interacting flapping swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Anand; Ramananarivo, Sophie; Ristroph, Leif; Shelley, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation into the dynamics of interacting flapping swimmers. Our study is motivated by the recent experiments of Becker et al., who studied a one-dimensional array of self-propelled flapping wings that swim within each other's wakes in a water tank. They discovered that the system adopts certain ``schooling modes'' characterized by specific spatial phase relationships between swimmers. To rationalize these phenomena, we develop a discrete dynamical system in which the swimmers are modeled as heaving airfoils that shed point vortices during each flapping cycle. We then apply our model to recent experiments in the Applied Math Lab, in which two tandem flapping airfoils are free to choose both their speed and relative positions. We expect that our model may be used to understand how schooling behavior is influenced by hydrodynamics in more general contexts. Thanks to the NSF for its support.

  3. Quantum speed limits in open system dynamics.

    PubMed

    del Campo, A; Egusquiza, I L; Plenio, M B; Huelga, S F

    2013-02-01

    Bounds to the speed of evolution of a quantum system are of fundamental interest in quantum metrology, quantum chemical dynamics, and quantum computation. We derive a time-energy uncertainty relation for open quantum systems undergoing a general, completely positive, and trace preserving evolution which provides a bound to the quantum speed limit. When the evolution is of the Lindblad form, the bound is analogous to the Mandelstam-Tamm relation which applies in the unitary case, with the role of the Hamiltonian being played by the adjoint of the generator of the dynamical semigroup. The utility of the new bound is exemplified in different scenarios, ranging from the estimation of the passage time to the determination of precision limits for quantum metrology in the presence of dephasing noise.

  4. Micrographia of the twenty-first century: from camera obscura to 4D microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the evolutionary and revolutionary developments of microscopic imaging are overviewed with a perspective on origins. From Alhazen’s camera obscura, to Hooke and van Leeuwenhoek’s two-dimensional optical micrography, and on to three- and four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy, these developments over a millennium have transformed humans’ scope of visualization. The changes in the length and time scales involved are unimaginable, beginning with the visible shadows of candles at the centimetre and second scales, and ending with invisible atoms with space and time dimensions of sub-nanometre and femtosecond. With these advances it has become possible to determine the structures of matter and to observe their elementary dynamics as they unfold in real time. Such observations provide the means for visualizing materials behaviour and biological function, with the aim of understanding emergent phenomena in complex systems. PMID:20123754

  5. Advancement in Understanding Volcanic Processes by 4D Synchrotron X-ray Computed Microtomography Imaging of Rock Textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacci, M.; Arzilli, F.; La Spina, G.

    2015-12-01

    X-ray computed microtomography (μCT) is the only high-resolution, non-destructive technique that allows visualization and processing of geomaterials directly in three-dimensions. This, together with the development of more and more sophisticated imaging techniques, have generated in the last ten years a widespread application of this methodology in Earth Sciences, from structural geology to palaeontology to igneous petrology to volcanology. Here, I will describe how X-ray μCT has contributed to advance our knowledge of volcanic processes and eruption dynamics and illustrate the first, preliminary results from 4D (space+time) X-ray microtomographic experiments of magma kinetics in basaltic systems.

  6. Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere 4D-Var: Formulation and Sensitivity Analysis Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngodock, Hans; Carrier, Matthew; Xu, Liang; Amerault, Clark; Campbell, Tim; Rowley, Clark

    2016-04-01

    The US Navy is currently developing the first coupled ocean-atmosphere four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system to be used for short-term regional forecasting. This project merges the 4D-Var capabilities of the atmospheric component of the Coupled Ocean/Atmospheric Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS©) with the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) through the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). This will provide the coupled ocean-atmosphere forecast with a fully balanced analysis that accounts for all combined observations in both primary fluids (i.e. ocean and atmosphere). In this present work, the formulation of the system is presented in detail along with a series of adjoint sensitivity analysis results using the coupled ocean-atmosphere adjoint model. The sensitivity of the atmosphere (ocean) to each ocean (atmosphere) model variable is analyzed in detail in order to illustrate the usefulness of this approach in the coupled data assimilation system.

  7. Entropic Fluctuations in Gaussian Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, V.; Pillet, C.-A.; Shirikyan, A.

    2016-06-01

    We study nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of a Gaussian dynamical system and compute in closed form the large deviation functionals describing the fluctuations of the entropy production observable with respect to the reference state and the nonequilibrium steady state. The entropy production observable of this model is an unbounded function on the phase space, and its large deviation functionals have a surprisingly rich structure. We explore this structure in some detail.

  8. Dynamical systems and quantum bicrossproduct algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, Oscar; del Olmo, Mariano A.

    2002-06-01

    We present a unified study of some aspects of quantum bicrossproduct algebras of inhomogeneous Lie algebras, such as Poincaré, Galilei and Euclidean in N dimensions. The action associated with the bicrossproduct structure allows us to obtain a nonlinear action over a new group linked to the translations. This new nonlinear action associates a dynamical system with each generator which is the object of our study.

  9. Nested observer for linear hybrid dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Abdi, M.; Bensalah, H.; Cherki, B.

    2009-03-05

    The synthesis of observers for linear hybrid dynamical systems ''HDS,'' is significant from the point of view of the applications (control, diagnoses...); it is still, largely open. We proposed a new approach inspired from a new method of identification, where we could obtain better results with respect to discrimination between the discrete states in conflicts and time necessary to this latter. The results of the suggested technique proved to be satisfactory.

  10. Display Systems Dynamics Requirements for Flying Qualities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-09

    augmentation of the aircraft dynamics by a control system has been studied extensively, with current and evolving standards in existence. Consideration of the...MOTIVATION AND OBJECTIVES Current and emerging military aircraft present a number of challenges with respect to ".." ensuring good flying qualities... current and emerging military aircraft and the often costly consequences of poor design with respect to flying qualifies, such guidelines should be

  11. Non-linear dynamic compensation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yu-Hwan (Inventor); Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A non-linear dynamic compensation subsystem is added in the feedback loop of a high precision optical mirror positioning control system to smoothly alter the control system response bandwidth from a relatively wide response bandwidth optimized for speed of control system response to a bandwidth sufficiently narrow to reduce position errors resulting from the quantization noise inherent in the inductosyn used to measure mirror position. The non-linear dynamic compensation system includes a limiter for limiting the error signal within preselected limits, a compensator for modifying the limiter output to achieve the reduced bandwidth response, and an adder for combining the modified error signal with the difference between the limited and unlimited error signals. The adder output is applied to control system motor so that the system response is optimized for accuracy when the error signal is within the preselected limits, optimized for speed of response when the error signal is substantially beyond the preselected limits and smoothly varied therebetween as the error signal approaches the preselected limits.

  12. Volumetric limiting spatial resolution analysis of four dimensional digital subtraction angiography (4D-DSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Brian; Oberstar, Erick; Royalty, Kevin; Schafer, Sebastian; Strother, Charles; Mistretta, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Static C-Arm CT 3D FDK baseline reconstructions (3D-DSA) are unable to provide temporal information to radiologists. 4D-DSA provides a time series of 3D volumes implementing a constrained image, thresholded 3D-DSA, reconstruction utilizing temporal dynamics in the 2D projections. Volumetric limiting spatial resolution (VLSR) of 4DDSA is quantified and compared to a 3D-DSA reconstruction using the same 3D-DSA parameters. Investigated were the effects of varying over significant ranges the 4D-DSA parameters of 2D blurring kernel size applied to the projection and threshold applied to the 3D-DSA when generating the constraining image of a scanned phantom (SPH) and an electronic phantom (EPH). The SPH consisted of a 76 micron tungsten wire encased in a 47 mm O.D. plastic radially concentric thin walled support structure. An 8-second/248-frame/198° scan protocol acquired the raw projection data. VLSR was determined from averaged MTF curves generated from each 2D transverse slice of every (248) 4D temporal frame (3D). 4D results for SPH and EPH were compared to the 3D-DSA. Analysis of the 3D-DSA resulted in a VLSR of 2.28 and 1.69 lp/mm for the EPH and SPH respectively. Kernel (2D) sizes of either 10x10 or 20x20 pixels with a threshold of 10% of the 3D-DSA as a constraining image provided 4D-DSA VLSR nearest to the 3D-DSA. 4D-DSA algorithms yielded 2.21 and 1.67 lp/mm with a percent error of 3.1% and 1.2% for the EPH and SPH respectively as compared to the 3D-DSA. This research indicates 4D-DSA is capable of retaining the resolution of the 3D-DSA.

  13. Increasingly automated procedure acquisition in dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathe, Nathalie; Kedar, Smadar

    1992-01-01

    Procedures are widely used by operators for controlling complex dynamic systems. Currently, most development of such procedures is done manually, consuming a large amount of paper, time, and manpower in the process. While automated knowledge acquisition is an active field of research, not much attention has been paid to the problem of computer-assisted acquisition and refinement of complex procedures for dynamic systems. The Procedure Acquisition for Reactive Control Assistant (PARC), which is designed to assist users in more systematically and automatically encoding and refining complex procedures. PARC is able to elicit knowledge interactively from the user during operation of the dynamic system. We categorize procedure refinement into two stages: diagnosis - diagnose the failure and choose a repair - and repair - plan and perform the repair. The basic approach taken in PARC is to assist the user in all steps of this process by providing increased levels of assistance with layered tools. We illustrate the operation of PARC in refining procedures for the control of a robot arm.

  14. Dynamic optical coupled system employing Dammann gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Caihui; Zhou, Changhe; Ru, Huayi

    2004-10-01

    With the increasing of the number of users in optical fiber communications, fiber-to-home project has a larger market value. Then the need of dynamic optical couplers, especially of N broad-band couplers, becomes greater. Though some advanced fiber fusion techniques have been developed, they still have many shortcomings. In this paper we propose a dynamic optical coupled system employing even-numbered Dammann gratings, which have the characteristic that the phase distribution in the first half-period accurately equals to that in the second-period with π phase inversion. In our experiment, we divide a conventional even-numbered Dammann grating into two identical gratings. The system can achieve the beam splitter and combiner as the switch between them according to the relative shift between two complementary gratings. When there is no shift between the gratings, the demonstrated 1×8 dynamic optical coupler achieves good uniformity of 0.06 and insertion loss of around 10.8 dB for each channel as a splitter. When the two gratings have an accurate shift of a half-period between them, our system has a low insertion loss of 0.46 dB as a combiner at a wavelength of 1550 nm.

  15. Prediction of dynamical systems by symbolic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quade, Markus; Abel, Markus; Shafi, Kamran; Niven, Robert K.; Noack, Bernd R.

    2016-07-01

    We study the modeling and prediction of dynamical systems based on conventional models derived from measurements. Such algorithms are highly desirable in situations where the underlying dynamics are hard to model from physical principles or simplified models need to be found. We focus on symbolic regression methods as a part of machine learning. These algorithms are capable of learning an analytically tractable model from data, a highly valuable property. Symbolic regression methods can be considered as generalized regression methods. We investigate two particular algorithms, the so-called fast function extraction which is a generalized linear regression algorithm, and genetic programming which is a very general method. Both are able to combine functions in a certain way such that a good model for the prediction of the temporal evolution of a dynamical system can be identified. We illustrate the algorithms by finding a prediction for the evolution of a harmonic oscillator based on measurements, by detecting an arriving front in an excitable system, and as a real-world application, the prediction of solar power production based on energy production observations at a given site together with the weather forecast.

  16. Prediction of dynamical systems by symbolic regression.

    PubMed

    Quade, Markus; Abel, Markus; Shafi, Kamran; Niven, Robert K; Noack, Bernd R

    2016-07-01

    We study the modeling and prediction of dynamical systems based on conventional models derived from measurements. Such algorithms are highly desirable in situations where the underlying dynamics are hard to model from physical principles or simplified models need to be found. We focus on symbolic regression methods as a part of machine learning. These algorithms are capable of learning an analytically tractable model from data, a highly valuable property. Symbolic regression methods can be considered as generalized regression methods. We investigate two particular algorithms, the so-called fast function extraction which is a generalized linear regression algorithm, and genetic programming which is a very general method. Both are able to combine functions in a certain way such that a good model for the prediction of the temporal evolution of a dynamical system can be identified. We illustrate the algorithms by finding a prediction for the evolution of a harmonic oscillator based on measurements, by detecting an arriving front in an excitable system, and as a real-world application, the prediction of solar power production based on energy production observations at a given site together with the weather forecast.

  17. Combined convective and diffusive simulations: VERB-4D comparison with 17 March 2013 Van Allen Probes observations: VERB-4D

    SciTech Connect

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Kellerman, Adam C.; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; Spence, Harlan E.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Baker, Daniel N.

    2015-11-19

    Our study focused on understanding the coupling between different electron populations in the inner magnetosphere and the various physical processes that determine evolution of electron fluxes at different energies. Observations during the 17 March 2013 storm and simulations with a newly developed Versatile Electron Radiation Belt-4D (VERB-4D) are presented. This analysis of the drift trajectories of the energetic and relativistic electrons shows that electron trajectories at transitional energies with a first invariant on the scale of ~100 MeV/G may resemble ring current or relativistic electron trajectories depending on the level of geomagnetic activity. Simulations with the VERB-4D code including convection, radial diffusion, and energy diffusion are presented. Sensitivity simulations including various physical processes show how different acceleration mechanisms contribute to the energization of energetic electrons at transitional energies. In particular, the range of energies where inward transport is strongly influenced by both convection and radial diffusion are studied. Our results of the 4-D simulations are compared to Van Allen Probes observations at a range of energies including source, seed, and core populations of the energetic and relativistic electrons in the inner magnetosphere.

  18. Combined convective and diffusive simulations: VERB-4D comparison with 17 March 2013 Van Allen Probes observations: VERB-4D

    DOE PAGES

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Kellerman, Adam C.; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; ...

    2015-11-19

    Our study focused on understanding the coupling between different electron populations in the inner magnetosphere and the various physical processes that determine evolution of electron fluxes at different energies. Observations during the 17 March 2013 storm and simulations with a newly developed Versatile Electron Radiation Belt-4D (VERB-4D) are presented. This analysis of the drift trajectories of the energetic and relativistic electrons shows that electron trajectories at transitional energies with a first invariant on the scale of ~100 MeV/G may resemble ring current or relativistic electron trajectories depending on the level of geomagnetic activity. Simulations with the VERB-4D code including convection,more » radial diffusion, and energy diffusion are presented. Sensitivity simulations including various physical processes show how different acceleration mechanisms contribute to the energization of energetic electrons at transitional energies. In particular, the range of energies where inward transport is strongly influenced by both convection and radial diffusion are studied. Our results of the 4-D simulations are compared to Van Allen Probes observations at a range of energies including source, seed, and core populations of the energetic and relativistic electrons in the inner magnetosphere.« less

  19. Pathogenesis and significance of glomerular C4d deposition in lupus nephritis: activation of classical and lectin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Kyung; Maeng, Young-In; Lee, Sun-Jae; Lee, In Hee; Bae, Jisuk; Kang, Yu-Na; Park, Byung-Tae; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Immune complex-mediated complement activation through the classic pathway plays a key role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). C4d deposition in renal tissue reflects the prognosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the current study is to investigate the pathogenesis and clinicopathologic significance of glomerular C4d deposition in LN. We retrospectively analyzed clinical and histopathological data of 20 SLE patients with renal biopsy-proven LN and 10 non-SLE renal biopsy samples as control. LN biopsies showed varying degrees of glomerular C4d staining associated with immune complex deposits, IgG (p = 0.015), C1q (p = 0.032) and C3 (p = 0.049). 7 LN biopsies had all of C4d, C1q and C3 deposits in their glomeruli, indicative of the activation of the classical pathway, whereas 2 LN biopsies had C4d and C3 deposits without accompanying C1q deposits, indicating the activation of the lectin pathway. Glomerular C4d deposition was correlated with the LN subtype (p < 0.001). In particular, a diffusely intense and coarsely granular pattern of C4d deposition in all glomeruli was detected in class V membranous LN. However, glomerular C4d deposition was correlated with neither disease activity of SLE nor histological activity and chronicity of LN. In conclusion, the activation of the lectin pathway as well as the classical pathway seems to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of LN. Glomerular C4d staining could be helpful for diagnosing class V membranous LN, although glomerular C4d deposition does not reflect SLE disease activity and histological activity and chronicity. PMID:24133594

  20. Antibody Blockade of Semaphorin 4D Promotes Immune Infiltration into Tumor and Enhances Response to Other Immunomodulatory Therapies.

    PubMed

    Evans, Elizabeth E; Jonason, Alan S; Bussler, Holm; Torno, Sebold; Veeraraghavan, Janaki; Reilly, Christine; Doherty, Michael A; Seils, Jennifer; Winter, Laurie A; Mallow, Crystal; Kirk, Renee; Howell, Alan; Giralico, Susan; Scrivens, Maria; Klimatcheva, Katya; Fisher, Terrence L; Bowers, William J; Paris, Mark; Smith, Ernest S; Zauderer, Maurice

    2015-06-01

    Semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D, CD100) and its receptor plexin-B1 (PLXNB1) are broadly expressed in murine and human tumors, and their expression has been shown to correlate with invasive disease in several human tumors. SEMA4D normally functions to regulate the motility and differentiation of multiple cell types, including those of the immune, vascular, and nervous systems. In the setting of cancer, SEMA4D-PLXNB1 interactions have been reported to affect vascular stabilization and transactivation of ERBB2, but effects on immune-cell trafficking in the tumor microenvironment (TME) have not been investigated. We describe a novel immunomodulatory function of SEMA4D, whereby strong expression of SEMA4D at the invasive margins of actively growing tumors influences the infiltration and distribution of leukocytes in the TME. Antibody neutralization of SEMA4D disrupts this gradient of expression, enhances recruitment of activated monocytes and lymphocytes into the tumor, and shifts the balance of cells and cytokines toward a proinflammatory and antitumor milieu within the TME. This orchestrated change in the tumor architecture was associated with durable tumor rejection in murine Colon26 and ERBB2(+) mammary carcinoma models. The immunomodulatory activity of anti-SEMA4D antibody can be enhanced by combination with other immunotherapies, including immune checkpoint inhibition and chemotherapy. Strikingly, the combination of anti-SEMA4D antibody with antibody to CTLA-4 acts synergistically to promote complete tumor rejection and survival. Inhibition of SEMA4D represents a novel mechanism and therapeutic strategy to promote functional immune infiltration into the TME and inhibit tumor progression.

  1. Controlling fast chaos in delay dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Blakely, Jonathan N; Illing, Lucas; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2004-05-14

    We introduce a novel approach for controlling fast chaos in time-delay dynamical systems and use it to control a chaotic photonic device with a characteristic time scale of approximately 12 ns. Our approach is a prescription for how to implement existing chaos-control algorithms in a way that exploits the system's inherent time delay and allows control even in the presence of substantial control-loop latency (the finite time it takes signals to propagate through the components in the controller). This research paves the way for applications exploiting fast control of chaos, such as chaos-based communication schemes and stabilizing the behavior of ultrafast lasers.

  2. Vertebrate gravity sensors as dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper considers verterbrate gravity receptors as dynamic sensors. That is, it is hypothesized that gravity is a constant force to which an acceleration-sensing system would readily adapt. Premises are considered in light of the presence of kinocilia on hair cells of vertebrate gravity sensors; differences in loading of the sensors among species; and of possible reduction in loading by inclusion of much organic material in otoconia. Moreover, organic-inorganic interfaces may confer a piezoelectric property upon otoconia, which increase the sensitivity of the sensory system to small accelerations. Comparisons with man-made accelerometers are briefly taken up.

  3. Testing relativity with solar system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A major breakthrough is described in the accuracy of Solar System dynamical tests of relativistic gravity. The breakthrough was achieved by factoring in ranging data from Viking Landers 1 and 2 from the surface of Mars. Other key data sources included optical transit circle observations, lunar laser ranging, planetary radar, and spacecraft (Mariner 9 to Mars and Mariner 10 to Mercury). The Solar System model which is used to fit the data and the process by which such fits are performed are explained and results are discussed. The results are fully consistent with the predictions of General Relativity.

  4. Genome constraint through sexual reproduction: application of 4D-Genomics in reproductive biology.

    PubMed

    Horne, Steven D; Abdallah, Batoul Y; Stevens, Joshua B; Liu, Guo; Ye, Karen J; Bremer, Steven W; Heng, Henry H Q

    2013-06-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies have been used to achieve pregnancies since the first successful test tube baby was born in 1978. Infertile couples are at an increased risk for multiple miscarriages and the application of current protocols are associated with high first-trimester miscarriage rates. Among the contributing factors of these higher rates is a high incidence of fetal aneuploidy. Numerous studies support that protocols including ovulation-induction, sperm cryostorage, density-gradient centrifugation, and embryo culture can induce genome instability, but the general mechanism is less clear. Application of the genome theory and 4D-Genomics recently led to the establishment of a new paradigm for sexual reproduction; sex primarily constrains genome integrity that defines the biological system rather than just providing genetic diversity at the gene level. We therefore propose that application of assisted reproductive technologies can bypass this sexual reproduction filter as well as potentially induce additional system instability. We have previously demonstrated that a single-cell resolution genomic approach, such as spectral karyotyping to trace stochastic genome level alterations, is effective for pre- and post-natal analysis. We propose that monitoring overall genome alteration at the karyotype level alongside the application of assisted reproductive technologies will improve the efficacy of the techniques while limiting stress-induced genome instability. The development of more single-cell based cytogenomic technologies are needed in order to better understand the system dynamics associated with infertility and the potential impact that assisted reproductive technologies have on genome instability. Importantly, this approach will be useful in studying the potential for diseases to arise as a result of bypassing the filter of sexual reproduction.

  5. Bone scaffolds loaded with siRNA-Semaphorin4d for the treatment of osteoporosis related bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yufeng; Wei, Lingfei; Miron, Richard J.; Shi, Bin; Bian, Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a prominent disorder affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Recently, semaphorins have been implicated in the cell-cell communication between osteoclasts and osteoblasts and have been associated with the progression of osteoporosis. Previously, we demonstrated that knockdown of semaphorin4d (Sema4d) using siRNA delivered with a bone-targeting system prevented bone loss in an osteoporotic animal model. Here, we used this bone-specific technology containing siRNA-Sema4d and fabricated a PLLA scaffold capable of enhancing bone repair following fracture. We investigated the ability of the implant to release siRNA-Sema4d into the surrounding tissues over time and to influence new bone formation in a 3 mm femur osteoporotic defect model in ovariectomized rats. Delivery of the bone-targeting system released from PLLA scaffolds began 2 hours post-implantation, peaked at 1 day, and was sustained over a 21 day period. μCT analysis demonstrated a significantly higher bone volume/total volume bone mineral density and number of osteoblasts in the rats that were transplanted with scaffolds loaded with siRNA-Sema4d. These results confirm the specific role of Sema4d in bone remodeling and demonstrate that significant increases in the speed and quality of new bone formation occur when siRNA-Sema4d is delivered via a PLLA scaffold. PMID:27254469

  6. Research on new dynamic force calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li

    2008-06-01

    Sinusoidal force calibration method based on electrodynamic shaker and interferometric system was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). In that system a load mass are screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition F(t) = ma(t), where m is the total mass acting on the sensing element of the force transducer and a is the time and spatial-dependent acceleration of the mass, which is directly measured by a laser interferometer. This paper will introduce a new dynamic force calibration system developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electrodynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1N to 20kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. A new air bearing system is developed to increase the performance of shakers and an active vibration isolator is used to reduce enviromental disturbance to the interferometric system.

  7. Literature Review on Dynamic Cellular Manufacturing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri Houshyar, A.; Leman, Z.; Pakzad Moghadam, H.; Ariffin, M. K. A. M.; Ismail, N.; Iranmanesh, H.

    2014-06-01

    In previous decades, manufacturers faced a lot of challenges because of globalization and high competition in markets. These problems arise from shortening product life cycle, rapid variation in demand of products, and also rapid changes in manufcaturing technologies. Nowadays most manufacturing companies expend considerable attention for improving flexibility and responsiveness in order to overcome these kinds of problems and also meet customer's needs. By considering the trend toward the shorter product life cycle, the manufacturing environment is towards manufacturing a wide variety of parts in small batches [1]. One of the major techniques which are applied for improving manufacturing competitiveness is Cellular Manufacturing System (CMS). CMS is type of manufacturing system which tries to combine flexibility of job shop and also productivity of flow shop. In addition, Dynamic cellular manufacturing system which considers different time periods for the manufacturing system becomes an important topic and attracts a lot of attention to itself. Therefore, this paper made attempt to have a brief review on this issue and focused on all published paper on this subject. Although, this topic gains a lot of attention to itself during these years, none of previous researchers focused on reviewing the literature of that which can be helpful and useful for other researchers who intend to do the research on this topic. Therefore, this paper is the first study which has focused and reviewed the literature of dynamic cellular manufacturing system.

  8. Functional Network Dynamics of the Language System

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Lucy R.; Mattar, Marcelo G.; Blank, Idan Asher; Fedorenko, Evelina; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2016-01-01

    During linguistic processing, a set of brain regions on the lateral surfaces of the left frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices exhibit robust responses. These areas display highly correlated activity while a subject rests or performs a naturalistic language comprehension task, suggesting that they form an integrated functional system. Evidence suggests that this system is spatially and functionally distinct from other systems that support high-level cognition in humans. Yet, how different regions within this system might be recruited dynamically during task performance is not well understood. Here we use network methods, applied to fMRI data collected from 22 human subjects performing a language comprehension task, to reveal the dynamic nature of the language system. We observe the presence of a stable core of brain regions, predominantly located in the left hemisphere, that consistently coactivate with one another. We also observe the presence of a more flexible periphery of brain regions, predominantly located in the right hemisphere, that coactivate with different regions at different times. However, the language functional ROIs in the angular gyrus and the anterior temporal lobe were notable exceptions to this trend. By highlighting the temporal dimension of language processing, these results suggest a trade-off between a region's specialization and its capacity for flexible network reconfiguration. PMID:27550868

  9. Model-driven physiological assessment of the mitral valve from 4D TEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Ingmar; Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Georgescu, Bogdan; Houle, Helene; Huber, Martin; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2009-02-01

    Disorders of the mitral valve are second most frequent, cumulating 14 percent of total number of deaths caused by Valvular Heart Disease each year in the United States and require elaborate clinical management. Visual and quantitative evaluation of the valve is an important step in the clinical workflow according to experts as knowledge about mitral morphology and dynamics is crucial for interventional planning. Traditionally this involves examination and metric analysis of 2D images comprising potential errors being intrinsic to the method. Recent commercial solutions are limited to specific anatomic components, pathologies and a single phase of cardiac 4D acquisitions only. This paper introduces a novel approach for morphological and functional quantification of the mitral valve based on a 4D model estimated from ultrasound data. A physiological model of the mitral valve, covering the complete anatomy and eventual shape variations, is generated utilizing parametric spline surfaces constrained by topological and geometrical prior knowledge. The 4D model's parameters are estimated for each patient using the latest discriminative learning and incremental searching techniques. Precise evaluation of the anatomy using model-based dynamic measurements and advanced visualization are enabled through the proposed approach in a reliable, repeatable and reproducible manner. The efficiency and accuracy of the method is demonstrated through experiments and an initial validation based on clinical research results. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time such a patient specific 4D mitral valve model is proposed, covering all of the relevant anatomies and enabling to model the common pathologies at once.

  10. Obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Carlos E.; Zumstein, James E.; Chang, John T.; Leach, Jr.. Richard R.

    2006-12-12

    An obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system for the detection, tracking, and imaging of an individual, animal, or object comprising a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units that produce a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object, and a processing system for said set of return radar signals for detection, tracking, and imaging of the individual, animal, or object. The system provides a radar video system for detecting and tracking an individual, animal, or object by producing a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object with a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units, and processing said set of return radar signals for detecting and tracking of the individual, animal, or object.

  11. Brain tissue segmentation in 4D CT using voxel classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boom, R.; Oei, M. T. H.; Lafebre, S.; Oostveen, L. J.; Meijer, F. J. A.; Steens, S. C. A.; Prokop, M.; van Ginneken, B.; Manniesing, R.

    2012-02-01

    A method is proposed to segment anatomical regions of the brain from 4D computer tomography (CT) patient data. The method consists of a three step voxel classification scheme, each step focusing on structures that are increasingly difficult to segment. The first step classifies air and bone, the second step classifies vessels and the third step classifies white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid. As features the time averaged intensity value and the temporal intensity change value were used. In each step, a k-Nearest-Neighbor classifier was used to classify the voxels. Training data was obtained by placing regions of interest in reconstructed 3D image data. The method has been applied to ten 4D CT cerebral patient data. A leave-one-out experiment showed consistent and accurate segmentation results.

  12. A new spin foam model for 4D gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Krasnov, Kirill

    2008-06-01

    Starting from Plebanski formulation of gravity as a constrained BF theory we propose a new spin foam model for 4D Riemannian quantum gravity that generalizes the well-known Barrett Crane model and resolves the inherent to it ultra-locality problem. The BF formulation of 4D gravity possesses two sectors: gravitational and topological ones. The model presented here is shown to give a quantization of the gravitational sector, and is dual to the recently proposed spin foam model of Engle et al which, we show, corresponds to the topological sector. Our methods allow us to introduce the Immirzi parameter into the framework of spin foam quantization. We generalize some of our considerations to the Lorentzian setting and obtain a new spin foam model in that context as well.

  13. 4D embryonic cardiography using gated optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, M. W.; Rothenberg, F.; Roy, D.; Nikolski, V. P.; Hu, Z.; Watanabe, M.; Wilson, D. L.; Efimov, I. R.; Rollins, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of very early embryonic heart structure and function has technical limitations of spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed a gated technique using optical coherence tomography (OCT) that can rapidly image beating embryonic hearts in four-dimensions (4D), at high spatial resolution (10-15 μm), and with a depth penetration of 1.5 - 2.0 mm that is suitable for the study of early embryonic hearts. We acquired data from paced, excised, embryonic chicken and mouse hearts using gated sampling and employed image processing techniques to visualize the hearts in 4D and measure physiologic parameters such as cardiac volume, ejection fraction, and wall thickness. This technique is being developed to longitudinally investigate the physiology of intact embryonic hearts and events that lead to congenital heart defects.

  14. Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Ran; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Zeno effect shows that frequent observations can slow down or even stop the unitary time evolution of an unstable quantum system. This effect can also be regarded as a physical consequence of the statistical indistinguishability of neighboring quantum states. The accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics under unitary time evolution can be quantitatively estimated by quantum Zeno time in terms of Fisher information. In this work, we investigate the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems by calculating noisy Fisher information when a trace preserving and completely positive map is assumed. We firstly study the consequences of non-Markovian noise on quantum Zeno effect and give the exact forms of the dissipative Fisher information and the quantum Zeno time. Then, for the operator-sum representation, an achievable upper bound of the quantum Zeno time is given with the help of the results in noisy quantum metrology. It is of significance that the noise reducing the accuracy in the entanglement-enhanced parameter estimation can conversely be favorable for the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics of entangled states. PMID:26099840

  15. Computation in Dynamically Bounded Asymmetric Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rutishauser, Ueli; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Douglas, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Previous explanations of computations performed by recurrent networks have focused on symmetrically connected saturating neurons and their convergence toward attractors. Here we analyze the behavior of asymmetrical connected networks of linear threshold neurons, whose positive response is unbounded. We show that, for a wide range of parameters, this asymmetry brings interesting and computationally useful dynamical properties. When driven by input, the network explores potential solutions through highly unstable ‘expansion’ dynamics. This expansion is steered and constrained by negative divergence of the dynamics, which ensures that the dimensionality of the solution space continues to reduce until an acceptable solution manifold is reached. Then the system contracts stably on this manifold towards its final solution trajectory. The unstable positive feedback and cross inhibition that underlie expansion and divergence are common motifs in molecular and neuronal networks. Therefore we propose that very simple organizational constraints that combine these motifs can lead to spontaneous computation and so to the spontaneous modification of entropy that is characteristic of living systems. PMID:25617645

  16. Dynamical Systems Theory: Application to Pedagogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jane L.

    Theories of learning affect how cognition is viewed, and this subsequently leads to the style of pedagogical practice that is used in education. Traditionally, educators have relied on a variety of theories on which to base pedagogy. Behavioral learning theories influenced the teaching/learning process for over 50 years. In the 1960s, the information processing approach brought the mind back into the learning process. The current emphasis on constructivism integrates the views of Piaget, Vygotsky, and cognitive psychology. Additionally, recent scientific advances have allowed researchers to shift attention to biological processes in cognition. The problem is that these theories do not provide an integrated approach to understanding principles responsible for differences among students in cognitive development and learning ability. Dynamical systems theory offers a unifying theoretical framework to explain the wider context in which learning takes place and the processes involved in individual learning. This paper describes how principles of Dynamic Systems Theory can be applied to cognitive processes of students, the classroom community, motivation to learn, and the teaching/learning dynamic giving educational psychologists a framework for research and pedagogy.

  17. 4D flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Bissell, Malenka; Barker, Alex J; Bolger, Ann F; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Ebbers, Tino; Francios, Christopher J; Frydrychowicz, Alex; Geiger, Julia; Giese, Daniel; Hope, Michael D; Kilner, Philip J; Kozerke, Sebastian; Myerson, Saul; Neubauer, Stefan; Wieben, Oliver; Markl, Michael

    2015-08-10

    Pulsatile blood flow through the cavities of the heart and great vessels is time-varying and multidirectional. Access to all regions, phases and directions of cardiovascular flows has formerly been limited. Four-dimensional (4D) flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has enabled more comprehensive access to such flows, with typical spatial resolution of 1.5×1.5×1.5 - 3×3×3 mm(3), typical temporal resolution of 30-40 ms, and acquisition times in the order of 5 to 25 min. This consensus paper is the work of physicists, physicians and biomedical engineers, active in the development and implementation of 4D Flow CMR, who have repeatedly met to share experience and ideas. The paper aims to assist understanding of acquisition and analysis methods, and their potential clinical applications with a focus on the heart and greater vessels. We describe that 4D Flow CMR can be clinically advantageous because placement of a single acquisition volume is straightforward and enables flow through any plane across it to be calculated retrospectively and with good accuracy. We also specify research and development goals that have yet to be satisfactorily achieved. Derived flow parameters, generally needing further development or validation for clinical use, include measurements of wall shear stress, pressure difference, turbulent kinetic energy, and intracardiac flow components. The dependence of measurement accuracy on acquisition parameters is considered, as are the uses of different visualization strategies for appropriate representation of time-varying multidirectional flow fields. Finally, we offer suggestions for more consistent, user-friendly implementation of 4D Flow CMR acquisition and data handling with a view to multicenter studies and more widespread adoption of the approach in routine clinical investigations.

  18. Repairing Stevenson's step in the 4d Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balog, Janos; Niedermayer, Ferenc; Weisz, Peter

    2006-05-01

    In a recent paper Stevenson claimed that analysis of the data on the wave function renormalization constant near the critical point of the 4d Ising model is not consistent with analytical expectations. Here we present data with improved statistics and show that the results are indeed consistent with conventional wisdom once one takes into account the uncertainty of lattice artifacts in the analytical computations.

  19. Phosphodiesterase 4D gene polymorphisms in sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chen-Yu; Tai, Shu-Yu; Wang, Ling-Feng; Hsi, Edward; Chang, Ning-Chia; Wang, Hsun-Mo; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Ho, Kuen-Yao

    2016-09-01

    The phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) gene has been reported as a risk gene for ischemic stroke. The vascular factors are between the hypothesized etiologies of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), and this genetic effect might be attributed for its role in SSNHL. We hypothesized that genetic variants of the PDE4D gene are associated with susceptibility to SSNHL. We conducted a case-control study with 362 SSNHL cases and 209 controls. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected. The genotypes were determined using TaqMan technology. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was tested for each SNP, and genetic effects were evaluated according to three inheritance modes. We carried out sex-specific analysis to analyze the overall data. All three SNPs were in HWE. When subjects were stratified by sex, the genetic effect was only evident in females but not in males. The TT genotype of rs702553 exhibited an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 3.83 (95 % confidence interval = 1.46-11.18) (p = 0.006) in female SSNHL. The TT genotype of SNP rs702553 was associated with female SSNHL under the recessive model (p = 0.004, OR 3.70). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, TT genotype of rs702553 was significantly associated with female SSNHL (p = 0.0043, OR 3.70). These results suggest that PDE4D gene polymorphisms influence the susceptibility for the development of SSNHL in the southern Taiwanese female population.

  20. Combinations of Endothall With 2,4-D and Triclopyr for Eurasian Watermilfoil Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    K. D. Getsinger2, and J. G. Skogerboe2 PURPOSE: This study evaluates combinations of a contact herbicide (endothall) and two systemic auxin -type...plant and typically require two to four weeks for plant mortality to occur. The chemical 2,4-D is a systemic, auxin -type herbicide that is...transported through plants via the symplastic pathway and accumulates in the growing points of shoots and roots (Senseman 2007). The herbicide mimics the auxin

  1. 2D:4D Ratio and its Implications in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jeevanandam, Saravanakumar

    2016-01-01

    Digit ratios, especially 2D:4D ratio, a potential proxy marker for prenatal androgen exposure shows sexual dimorphism. Existing literature and recent research show accumulating evidence on 2D:4D ratio showing correlations with various phenotypic traits in humans. Ratio of 2D:4D is found to correlate negatively to testosterone and positively to oestrogen in the foetus. Interestingly, it is constant since birth and not influenced by the adult hormone levels. Usually, males have lower ratios when compared to females. Prenatal androgen exposure and therefore, digit ratios have been reported to be associated with numerical competencies, spatial skills, handedness, cognitive abilities, academic performance, sperm counts, personalities and prevalence of obesity, migraine, eating disorders, depression, myopia, autism etc. The authors have attempted to write a brief account on the digit ratios and the dimorphism observed in various physiological, psychological and behavioural traits. Also, the authors have discussed the relevant molecular basics and the methods of measurement of digit ratios. PMID:28208851

  2. 4D-Flow validation, numerical and experimental framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, Kurt; Liu, Haining; Canton, Gador; Aliseda, Alberto; Yuan, Chun

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a group of assessment metrics of new 4D MRI flow sequences, an imaging modality that allows for visualization of three-dimensional pulsatile flow in the cardiovascular anatomy through time-resolved three-dimensional blood velocity measurements from cardiac-cycle synchronized MRI acquisition. This is a promising tool for clinical assessment but lacks a robust validation framework. First, 4D-MRI flow in a subject's stenotic carotid bifurcation is compared with a patient-specific CFD model using two different boundary condition methods. Second, Particle Image Velocimetry in a patient-specific phantom is used as a benchmark to compare the 4D-MRI in vivo measurements and CFD simulations under the same conditions. Comparison of estimated and measureable flow parameters such as wall shear stress, fluctuating velocity rms, Lagrangian particle residence time, will be discussed, with justification for their biomechanics relevance and the insights they can provide on the pathophysiology of arterial disease: atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. Lastly, the framework is applied to a new sequence to provide a quantitative assessment. A parametric analysis on the carotid bifurcation pulsatile flow conditions will be presented and an accuracy assessment provided.

  3. Dynamically stable magnetic suspension/bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1996-02-27

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium. However, owing to the limitations imposed by Earnshaw`s Theorem, the magnetic bearing systems to be described do not possess a stable equilibrium at zero rotational speed. Therefore, mechanical stabilizers are provided, in each case, to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. The magnetic forces exerted by these elements, when taken together, levitate the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations. At the same time, this equilibrium is made stable against displacements of the rotating object from its equilibrium position by using combinations of elements that possess force derivatives of such magnitudes and signs that they can satisfy the conditions required for a rotating body to be stably supported by a magnetic bearing system over a finite range of those displacements. 32 figs.

  4. Dynamically stable magnetic suspension/bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1996-01-01

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium. However, owing to the limitations imposed by Earnshaw's Theorem, the magnetic bearing systems to be described do not possess a stable equilibrium at zero rotational speed. Therefore, mechanical stabilizers are provided, in each case, to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. The magnetic forces exerted by these elements, when taken together, levitate the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations. At the same time, this equilibrium is made stable against displacements of the rotating object from its equilibrium position by using combinations of elements that possess force derivatives of such magnitudes and signs that they can satisfy the conditions required for a rotating body to be stably supported by a magnetic bearing system over a finite range of those displacements.

  5. Taking geoscience to the IMAX: 3D and 4D insight into geological processes using micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Katherine; Dingwell, Don; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Withers, Philip; Lee, Peter; Pistone, Mattia; Fife, Julie; Atwood, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Geology is inherently dynamic, and full understanding of any geological system can only be achieved by considering the processes by which change occurs. Analytical limitations mean understanding has largely developed from ex situ analyses of the products of geological change, rather than of the processes themselves. Most methods essentially utilise "snap shot" sampling: and from thin section petrography to high resolution crystal chemical stratigraphy and field volcanology, we capture an incomplete view of a spatially and temporally variable system. Even with detailed experimental work, we can usually only analyse samples before and after we perform an experiment, as routine analysis methods are destructive. Serial sectioning and quenched experiments stopped at different stages can give some insight into the third and fourth dimension, but the true scaling of the processes from the laboratory to the 4D (3D + time) geosphere is still poorly understood. Micro computed tomography (XMT) can visualise the internal structures and spatial associations within geological samples non-destructively. With image resolutions of between 200 microns and 50 nanometres, tomography has the ability to provide a detailed sample assessment in 3D, and quantification of mineral associations, porosity, grain orientations, fracture alignments and many other features. This allows better understanding of the role of the complex geometries and associations within the samples, but the challenge of capturing the processes that generate and modify these structures remains. To capture processes, recent work has focused on developing experimental capability for in situ experiments on geological materials. Data presented will showcase examples from recent experiments where high speed synchrotron x-ray tomography has been used to acquire each 3D image in under 2 seconds. We present a suite of studies that showcase how it is now possible to take quantification of many geological processed into 3D and

  6. Dynamical thermalization in Bose-Hubbard systems.

    PubMed

    Schlagheck, Peter; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study a Bose-Hubbard ring of finite size with disorder containing a finite number of bosons that are subject to an on-site two-body interaction. Our results show that moderate interactions induce dynamical thermalization in this isolated system. In this regime the individual many-body eigenstates are well described by the standard thermal Bose-Einstein distribution for well-defined values of the temperature and the chemical potential, which depend on the eigenstate under consideration. We show that the dynamical thermalization conjecture works well at both positive and negative temperatures. The relations to quantum chaos, quantum ergodicity, and the Åberg criterion are also discussed.

  7. A dynamical systems view of network centrality

    PubMed Central

    Grindrod, Peter; Higham, Desmond J.

    2014-01-01

    To gain insights about dynamic networks, the dominant paradigm is to study discrete snapshots, or timeslices, as the interactions evolve. Here, we develop and test a new mathematical framework where network evolution is handled over continuous time, giving an elegant dynamical systems representation for the important concept of node centrality. The resulting system allows us to track the relative influence of each individual. This new setting is natural in many digital applications, offering both conceptual and computational advantages. The novel differential equations approach is convenient for modelling and analysis of network evolution and gives rise to an interesting application of the matrix logarithm function. From a computational perspective, it avoids the awkward up-front compromises between accuracy, efficiency and redundancy required in the prevalent discrete-time setting. Instead, we can rely on state-of-the-art ODE software, where discretization takes place adaptively in response to the prevailing system dynamics. The new centrality system generalizes the widely used Katz measure, and allows us to identify and track, at any resolution, the most influential nodes in terms of broadcasting and receiving information through time-dependent links. In addition to the classical static network notion of attenuation across edges, the new ODE also allows for attenuation over time, as information becomes stale. This allows ‘running measures’ to be computed, so that networks can be monitored in real time over arbitrarily long intervals. With regard to computational efficiency, we explain why it is cheaper to track good receivers of information than good broadcasters. An important consequence is that the overall broadcast activity in the network can also be monitored efficiently. We use two synthetic examples to validate the relevance of the new measures. We then illustrate the ideas on a large-scale voice call network, where key features are discovered that are

  8. Technology reviews: Dynamic curtain wall systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize die state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  9. Dynamics of Hamiltonian Systems and Memristor Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Makoto; Chua, Leon

    In this paper, we show that any n-dimensional autonomous systems can be regarded as subsystems of 2n-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. One of the two subsystems is identical to the n-dimensional autonomous system, which is called the driving system. Another subsystem, called the response system, can exhibit interesting behaviors in the neighborhood of infinity. That is, the trajectories approach infinity with complicated nonperiodic (chaotic-like) behaviors, or periodic-like behavior. In order to show the above results, we project the trajectories of the Hamiltonian systems onto n-dimensional spheres, or n-dimensional balls by using the well-known central projection transformation. Another interesting behavior is that the transient regime of the subsystems can exhibit Chua corsage knots. We next show that generic memristors can be used to realize the above Hamiltonian systems. Finally, we show that the internal state of two-element memristor circuits can have the same dynamics as n-dimensional autonomous systems.

  10. [Effects of EDTA on the Reductive Dechlorination of 2,4-D by Pd/Fe].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong-yi; Nie, Ya-zhong; Chen, Yong; Lei, Shuang-jian

    2016-02-15

    In Pd/Fe system, zero-valent iron (ZVI) passivation layer is easily formed on the particle surface during the catalytic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated organics, hindering further dechlorination of target contaminants. In this paper, the passivation layer on the Pd/Fe particle surfaces could be eliminated by the chelation of disodium edetate (EDTA) with Fe2+, Fe3+, making the reductive dechlorination continue. The experiment investigated the effects of EDTA addition manner and dosage, pH, Pd loading and temperature on dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) by Pd/Fe. The conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) Phenoxyacetic acid (PA) generation ratio reached 90. 7% within 20 min with EDTA concentration of 25.0 mmol x L(-1) and flow rate of 20 mL x h(-1), while it was only 74.5% after 210 min in the system without EDTA. (2) The EDTA could chelate the Fe2+ and Fe3+ generated from the process of 2,4-D dechlorination by Pd/Fe, preventing or slowing down the formation of passivation layer, and accelerating the reduction efficiency. (3) The appropriate experimental parameters for 2,4-D removal were as follows: EDTA flow rate of 20 mL x h(-1), CEDTA of 25.0 mmol x L(-1), Pd loading of 0.050%, 200 r x min(-1), pH 4.2 and 30.0 degrees C. The removal percentage of 20.0 mg x L(-1) 2,4-D reached nearly up to 100% within 210 min under these conditions. (4) The intermediates of 2, 4-D catalytic dechlorination included 2-chlorophenoxvacetic acid (2-CPA) and trace 4-chloronhenoxyacetic acid (4-CPA), and the end product was PA.

  11. Combining C(4) D and MS as a dual detection approach for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Beutner, Andrea; Cunha, Rafael Rodrigues; Richter, Eduardo Mathias; Matysik, Frank-Michael

    2016-04-01

    The hyphenation of two detectors in combination with separation techniques is a powerful tool to enhance the analytical information. In this work, we present for the first time the coupling of two important detectors for capillary electrophoresis (CE), namely capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4) D) and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS). The elaborated experimental protocol took into account the requirements of separation aspects and the compatibility with both detectors. ESI-TOF-MS requires background electrolytes (BGE) containing only volatile components such as ammonium acetate or formate. These, however, exhibit a rather high conductivity, which is disadvantageous for C(4) D. Thus, the selection of the BGE in an appropriate concentration was undertaken for the determination of various phenolic compounds serving as a model system. The chosen BGE was a 10 mM ammonium acetate/ammonia buffer with a pH of 9. This BGE was a compromise concerning the detection performance of both detectors. The LODs for m-cresol, m- and p-nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol were 3.1 μM (C(4) D), 0.8 μM (MS), 0.8 μM (MS), and 1.5 μM (MS), respectively. Moreover, the overall separation efficiency was excellent illustrating that detector-induced band broadening can be neglected in the CE-C(4) D/MS system. The analytical characteristics for the determination of phenolic compounds show the suitability of this dual detection approach and demonstrate the complementary use of C(4) D and MS detection.

  12. Wind turbine control systems: Dynamic model development using system identification and the fast structural dynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.G.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01

    Mitigating the effects of damaging wind turbine loads and responses extends the lifetime of the turbine and, consequently, reduces the associated Cost of Energy (COE). Active control of aerodynamic devices is one option for achieving wind turbine load mitigation. Generally speaking, control system design and analysis requires a reasonable dynamic model of {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} (i.e., the system being controlled). This paper extends the wind turbine aileron control research, previously conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), by presenting a more detailed development of the wind turbine dynamic model. In prior research, active aileron control designs were implemented in an existing wind turbine structural dynamics code, FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). In this paper, the FAST code is used, in conjunction with system identification, to generate a wind turbine dynamic model for use in active aileron control system design. The FAST code is described and an overview of the system identification technique is presented. An aileron control case study is used to demonstrate this modeling technique. The results of the case study are then used to propose ideas for generalizing this technique for creating dynamic models for other wind turbine control applications.

  13. Extensions to Dynamic System Simulation of Fissile Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Bernardin, John David; Kimpland, Robert Herbert; Spernjak, Dusan

    2015-08-24

    Previous reports have documented the results of applying dynamic system simulation (DSS) techniques to model a variety of fissile solution systems. The SUPO (Super Power) aqueous homogeneous reactor (AHR) was chosen as the benchmark for comparison of model results to experimental data for steadystate operation.1 Subsequently, DSS was applied to additional AHR to verify results obtained for SUPO and extend modeling to prompt critical excursions, ramp reactivity insertions of various magnitudes and rate, and boiling operations in SILENE and KEWB (Kinetic Experiment Water Boiler).2 Additional models for pressurized cores (HRE: Homogeneous Reactor Experiment), annular core geometries, and accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADAHR) were developed and results reported.3 The focus of each of these models is core dynamics; neutron kinetics, thermal hydraulics, radiolytic gas generation and transport are coupled to examine the time-based evolution of these systems from start-up through transition to steady-state. A common characteristic of these models is the assumption that (a) core cooling system inlet temperature and flow and (b) plenum gas inlet pressure and flow are held constant; no external (to core) component operations that may result in dynamic change to these parameters are considered. This report discusses extension of models to include explicit reference to cooling structures and radiolytic gas handling. The accelerator-driven subcritical generic system model described in References 3 and 4 is used as a basis for this extension.

  14. Dynamic Systems Analysis for Turbine Based Aero Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    The aircraft engine design process seeks to optimize the overall system-level performance, weight, and cost for a given concept. Steady-state simulations and data are used to identify trade-offs that should be balanced to optimize the system in a process known as systems analysis. These systems analysis simulations and data may not adequately capture the true performance trade-offs that exist during transient operation. Dynamic systems analysis provides the capability for assessing the dynamic tradeoffs at an earlier stage of the engine design process. The dynamic systems analysis concept, developed tools, and potential benefit are presented in this paper. To provide this capability, the Tool for Turbine Engine Closed-loop Transient Analysis (TTECTrA) was developed to provide the user with an estimate of the closed-loop performance (response time) and operability (high pressure compressor surge margin) for a given engine design and set of control design requirements. TTECTrA along with engine deterioration information, can be used to develop a more generic relationship between performance and operability that can impact the engine design constraints and potentially lead to a more efficient engine.

  15. Electron Dynamics in Finite Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Christopher R.

    The multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) and multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) methods are employed to investigate nonperturbative multielectron dynamics in finite quantum systems. MCTDHF is a powerful tool that allows for the investigation of multielectron dynamics in strongly perturbed quantum systems. We have developed an MCTDHF code that is capable of treating problems involving three dimensional (3D) atoms and molecules exposed to strong laser fields. This code will allow for the theoretical treatment of multielectron phenomena in attosecond science that were previously inaccessible. These problems include complex ionization processes in pump-probe experiments on noble gas atoms, the nonlinear effects that have been observed in Ne atoms in the presence of an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) and the molecular rearrangement of cations after ionization. An implementation of MCTDH that is optimized for two electrons, each moving in two dimensions (2D), is also presented. This implementation of MCTDH allows for the efficient treatment of 2D spin-free systems involving two electrons; however, it does not scale well to 3D or to systems containing more that two electrons. Both MCTDHF and MCTDH were used to treat 2D problems in nanophysics and attosecond science. MCTDHF is used to investigate plasmon dynamics and the quantum breathing mode for several electrons in finite lateral quantum dots. MCTDHF is also used to study the effects of manipulating the potential of a double lateral quantum dot containing two electrons; applications to quantum computing are discussed. MCTDH is used to examine a diatomic model molecular system exposed to a strong laser field; nonsequential double ionization and high harmonic generation are studied and new processes identified and explained. An implementation of MCTDHF is developed for nonuniform tensor product grids; this will allow for the full 3D implementation of MCTDHF and will provide a means to

  16. Direct measurement of core-level relaxation dynamics on a surface- adsorbate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jing; Miaja-Avila, Luis; Saathoff, Guido; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Mathias, Stefan; Aeschlimann, Martin; Bauer, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Electronic coupling between an adsorbate and the surface on which it resides is fundamental to the understanding of many surface interactions. However, the interaction of highly-excited adsorbate states is an area that has been explored only indirectly to-date. In this work, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the lifetime of core-excited states of an atom adsorbed onto a surface. By implementing laser-assisted Auger decay on an adsorbate/surface system, we directly measure the lifetime of the 4d-1 core level of Xenon on Pt(111) to be 7.1 ± 1.1 fs. This result opens up time domain measurements of highly-excited state dynamics in materials systems where, because of complex interactions, energy-resolved measurements provide incomplete information.

  17. Direct measurement of core-level relaxation dynamics on a surface- adsorbate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jing; Miaja-Avila, Luis; Saathoff, Guido; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Mathias, Stefan; Aeschlimann, Martin; Bauer, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Electronic coupling between an adsorbate and the surface on which it resides is fundamental to the understanding of many surface interactions. However, the interaction of highly-excited adsorbate states is an area that has been explored only indirectly to-date. In this work, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the lifetime of core-excited states of an atom adsorbed onto a surface. By implementing laser-assisted Auger decay on an adsorbate/surface system, we directly measure the lifetime of the 4d-1 core level of Xenon on Pt(111) to be 7.1 ± 1.1 fs. This result opens up time domain measurements of highly-excited state dynamics in materials systems where, because of complex interactions, energy-resolved measurements provide incomplete information.

  18. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  19. Solar Dynamic Power System Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Dias, Lakshman G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct various fault simulation studies for diagnosing the type and location of faults in the power distribution system. Different types of faults are simulated at different locations within the distribution system and the faulted waveforms are monitored at measurable nodes such as at the output of the DDCU's. These fault signatures are processed using feature extractors such as FFT and wavelet transforms. The extracted features are fed to a clustering based neural network for training and subsequent testing using previously unseen data. Different load models consisting of constant impedance and constant power are used for the loads. Open circuit faults and short circuit faults are studied. It is concluded from present studies that using features extracted from wavelet transforms give better success rates during ANN testing. The trained ANN's are capable of diagnosing fault types and approximate locations in the solar dynamic power distribution system.

  20. A modular system for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, D. R.; Foutch, D. W.; Shurtleff, G. E.

    This paper describes the Modular System for Compuational Fluid Dynamics (MOSYS), a software facility for the construction and execution of arbitrary solution procedures on multizone, structured body-fitted grids. It focuses on the structure and capabilities of MOSYS and the philosophy underlying its design. The system offers different levels of capability depending on the objectives of the user. It enables the applications engineer to quickly apply a variety of methods to geometrically complex problems. The methods developer can implement new algorithms in a simple form, and immediately apply them to problems of both theoretical and practical interest. And for the code builder it consitutes a toolkit for fast construction of CFD codes tailored to various purposes. These capabilities are illustrated through applications to a particularly complex problem encountered in aircraft propulsion systems, namely, the analysis of a landing aircraft in reverse thrust.

  1. Pseudo-Riemannian manifold of mixmaster dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szydlowski, M.; Lapeta, A.

    1990-08-01

    The local instability of mixmaster dynamical systems and their generalization to higher dimensions is discussed. The mixmaster Hamiltonian dynamical system is reduced to a geodesic flow on the pseudo-Riemannian space. The geometric structure of the mixmaster dynamical system manifold is investigated in connection with the chaotic beha viour in mixmaster world models.

  2. Overview of the GRC Stirling Convertor System Dynamic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Regan, Timothy F.

    2004-01-01

    A Stirling Convertor System Dynamic Model has been developed at the Glenn Research Center for controls, dynamics, and systems development of free-piston convertor power systems. It models the Stirling cycle thermodynamics, heat flow, gas, mechanical, and mounting dynamics, the linear alternator, and the controller. The model's scope extends from the thermal energy input to thermal, mechanical dynamics, and electrical energy out, allowing one to study complex system interactions among subsystems. The model is a non-linear time-domain model containing sub-cycle dynamics, allowing it to simulate transient and dynamic phenomena that other models cannot. The model details and capability are discussed.

  3. Computational biomechanics and experimental validation of vessel deformation based on 4D-CT imaging of the porcine aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazer, Dilana; Finol, Ender A.; Kostrzewa, Michael; Kopaigorenko, Maria; Richter, Götz-M.; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2009-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease results from pathological biomechanical conditions and fatigue of the vessel wall. Image-based computational modeling provides a physical and realistic insight into the patient-specific biomechanics and enables accurate predictive simulations of development, growth and failure of cardiovascular disease. An experimental validation is necessary for the evaluation and the clinical implementation of such computational models. In the present study, we have implemented dynamic Computed-Tomography (4D-CT) imaging and catheter-based in vivo measured pressures to numerically simulate and experimentally evaluate the biomechanics of the porcine aorta. The computations are based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) and simulate the arterial wall response to the transient pressure-based boundary condition. They are evaluated by comparing the numerically predicted wall deformation and that calculated from the acquired 4D-CT data. The dynamic motion of the vessel is quantified by means of the hydraulic diameter, analyzing sequences at 5% increments over the cardiac cycle. Our results show that accurate biomechanical modeling is possible using FEM-based simulations. The RMS error of the computed hydraulic diameter at five cross-sections of the aorta was 0.188, 0.252, 0.280, 0.237 and 0.204 mm, which is equivalent to 1.7%, 2.3%, 2.7%, 2.3% and 2.0%, respectively, when expressed as a function of the time-averaged hydraulic diameter measured from the CT images. The present investigation is a first attempt to simulate and validate vessel deformation based on realistic morphological data and boundary conditions. An experimentally validated system would help in evaluating individual therapies and optimal treatment strategies in the field of minimally invasive endovascular surgery.

  4. Indirect learning control for nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Yeong Soon; Longman, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    In a previous paper, learning control algorithms were developed based on adaptive control ideas for linear time variant systems. The learning control methods were shown to have certain advantages over their adaptive control counterparts, such as the ability to produce zero tracking error in time varying systems, and the ability to eliminate repetitive disturbances. In recent years, certain adaptive control algorithms have been developed for multi-body dynamic systems such as robots, with global guaranteed convergence to zero tracking error for the nonlinear system euations. In this paper we study the relationship between such adaptive control methods designed for this specific class of nonlinear systems, and the learning control problem for such systems, seeking to converge to zero tracking error in following a specific command repeatedly, starting from the same initial conditions each time. The extension of these methods from the adaptive control problem to the learning control problem is seen to be trivial. The advantages and disadvantages of using learning control based on such adaptive control concepts for nonlinear systems, and the use of other currently available learning control algorithms are discussed.

  5. Reliability of dynamic systems under limited information.

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Richard V., Jr.; Grigoriu, Mircea

    2006-09-01

    A method is developed for reliability analysis of dynamic systems under limited information. The available information includes one or more samples of the system output; any known information on features of the output can be used if available. The method is based on the theory of non-Gaussian translation processes and is shown to be particularly suitable for problems of practical interest. For illustration, we apply the proposed method to a series of simple example problems and compare with results given by traditional statistical estimators in order to establish the accuracy of the method. It is demonstrated that the method delivers accurate results for the case of linear and nonlinear dynamic systems, and can be applied to analyze experimental data and/or mathematical model outputs. Two complex applications of direct interest to Sandia are also considered. First, we apply the proposed method to assess design reliability of a MEMS inertial switch. Second, we consider re-entry body (RB) component vibration response during normal re-entry, where the objective is to estimate the time-dependent probability of component failure. This last application is directly relevant to re-entry random vibration analysis at Sandia, and may provide insights on test-based and/or model-based qualification of weapon components for random vibration environments.

  6. Dynamics of coupled human-landscape systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, B. T.; McNamara, D. E.

    2007-11-01

    A preliminary dynamical analysis of landscapes and humans as hierarchical complex systems suggests that strong coupling between the two that spreads to become regionally or globally pervasive should be focused at multi-year to decadal time scales. At these scales, landscape dynamics is dominated by water, sediment and biological routing mediated by fluvial, oceanic, atmospheric processes and human dynamics is dominated by simplifying, profit-maximizing market forces and political action based on projection of economic effect. Also at these scales, landscapes impact humans through patterns of natural disasters and trends such as sea level rise; humans impact landscapes by the effect of economic activity and changes meant to mitigate natural disasters and longer term trends. Based on this analysis, human-landscape coupled systems can be modeled using heterogeneous agents employing prediction models to determine actions to represent the nonlinear behavior of economic and political systems and rule-based routing algorithms to represent landscape processes. A cellular model for the development of New Orleans illustrates this approach, with routing algorithms for river and hurricane-storm surge determining flood extent, five markets (home, labor, hotel, tourism and port services) connecting seven types of economic agents (home buyers/laborers, home developers, hotel owners/ employers, hotel developers, tourists, port services developer and port services owners/employers), building of levees or a river spillway by political agents and damage to homes, hotels or port services within cells determined by the passage or depth of flood waters. The model reproduces historical aspects of New Orleans economic development and levee construction and the filtering of frequent small-scale floods at the expense of large disasters.

  7. Architectural Analysis of Dynamically Reconfigurable Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindvall, Mikael; Godfrey, Sally; Ackermann, Chris; Ray, Arnab; Yonkwa, Lyly

    2010-01-01

    oTpics include: the problem (increased flexibility of architectural styles decrease analyzability, behavior emerges and varies depending on the configuration, does the resulting system run according to the intended design, and architectural decisions can impede or facilitate testing); top down approach to architecture analysis, detection of defects and deviations, and architecture and its testability; currently targeted projects GMSEC and CFS; analyzing software architectures; analyzing runtime events; actual architecture recognition; GMPUB in Dynamic SAVE; sample output from new approach; taking message timing delays into account; CFS examples of architecture and testability; some recommendations for improved testablity; and CFS examples of abstract interfaces and testability; CFS example of opening some internal details.

  8. Dynamic data filtering system and method

    DOEpatents

    Bickford, Randall L; Palnitkar, Rahul M

    2014-04-29

    A computer-implemented dynamic data filtering system and method for selectively choosing operating data of a monitored asset that modifies or expands a learned scope of an empirical model of normal operation of the monitored asset while simultaneously rejecting operating data of the monitored asset that is indicative of excessive degradation or impending failure of the monitored asset, and utilizing the selectively chosen data for adaptively recalibrating the empirical model to more accurately monitor asset aging changes or operating condition changes of the monitored asset.

  9. White Matter and Gray Matter Segmentation in 4D Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Manniesing, Rashindra; Oei, Marcel T H; Oostveen, Luuk J; Melendez, Jaime; Smit, Ewoud J; Platel, Bram; Sánchez, Clara I; Meijer, Frederick J A; Prokop, Mathias; van Ginneken, Bram

    2017-12-01

    Modern Computed Tomography (CT) scanners are capable of acquiring contrast dynamics of the whole brain, adding functional to anatomical information. Soft tissue segmentation is important for subsequent applications such as tissue dependent perfusion analysis and automated detection and quantification of cerebral pathology. In this work a method is presented to automatically segment white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) in contrast- enhanced 4D CT images of the brain. The method starts with intracranial segmentation via atlas registration, followed by a refinement using a geodesic active contour with dominating advection term steered by image gradient information, from a 3D temporal average image optimally weighted according to the exposures of the individual time points of the 4D CT acquisition. Next, three groups of voxel features are extracted: intensity, contextual, and temporal. These are used to segment WM and GM with a support vector machine. Performance was assessed using cross validation in a leave-one-patient-out manner on 22 patients. Dice coefficients were 0.81 ± 0.04 and 0.79 ± 0.05, 95% Hausdorff distances were 3.86 ± 1.43 and 3.07 ± 1.72 mm, for WM and GM, respectively. Thus, WM and GM segmentation is feasible in 4D CT with good accuracy.

  10. Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma-Associated Semaphorin 4D Induces Expansion of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Younis, Rania H; Han, Kyu Lee; Webb, Tonya J

    2016-02-01

    One of the mechanisms by which malignancies can induce immune suppression is through the production of cytokines that affect the maturation and differentiation of inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment. Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) is a proangiogenic cytokine produced by several malignancies, which has been described in the regulation of the immune system. In the present study, we examined the role of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)-secreted Sema4D on myeloid cell differentiation. CD33(+) cells cultured in HNSCC cell line-derived conditioned medium differentiated into myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) (CD33(+)CD11b(+)HLA-DR(-/low)). The addition of anti-Sema4D Ab to HNSCC conditioned medium significantly reduced the expansion of the MDSC population. Similarly, knockdown of Sema4D in an HNSCC cell line resulted in a loss of MDSC function as shown by a decrease in the production of the immune-suppressive cytokines arginase-1, TGF-β, and IL-10 by MDSC, concomitant with recovery of T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production following stimulation of CD3/CD28. Importantly, CD33(+) myeloid and T cells cultured in conditioned medium of HNSCC cells in which Sema4D was knocked down promoted antitumor inflammatory profile, through recovery of the effector T cells (CD4(+)T-bet(+) and CD8(+)T-bet(+)), as well as a decrease in regulatory T cells (CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)). We also showed that Sema4D was comparable to GM-CSF in its induction of MDSC. Collectively, this study describes a novel immunosuppressive role for Sema4D in HNSCC through induction of MDSC, and it highlights Sema4D as a therapeutic target for future studies to enhance the antitumorigenic inflammatory response in HNSCC and other epithelial malignancies.

  11. Dynamics of two-dimensional dipole systems

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, Kenneth I.; Kalman, Gabor J.; Hartmann, Peter; Donko, Zoltan

    2010-09-15

    Using a combined analytical/molecular dynamics approach, we study the current fluctuation spectra and longitudinal and transverse collective mode dispersions of the classical two-dimensional (point) dipole system (2DDS) characterized by the {phi}{sub D}(r)={mu}{sup 2}/r{sup 3} repulsive interaction potential; {mu} is the electric dipole strength. The interest in the 2DDS is twofold. First, the quasi-long-range 1/r{sup 3} interaction makes the system a unique classical many-body system, with a remarkable collective mode behavior. Second, the system may be a good model for a closely spaced semiconductor electron-hole bilayer, a system that is in the forefront of current experimental interest. The longitudinal collective excitations, which are of primary interest for the liquid phase, are acoustic at long wavelengths. At higher wave numbers and for sufficiently high coupling strength, we observe the formation of a deep minimum in the dispersion curve preceded by a sharp maximum; this is identical to what has been observed in the dispersion of the zero-temperature bosonic dipole system, which in turn emulates so-called roton-maxon excitation spectrum of the superfluid {sup 4}He. The analysis we present gives an insight into the emergence of this apparently universal structure, governed by strong correlations. We study both the liquid and the crystalline solid state. We also observe the excitation of combination frequencies, resembling the roton-roton, roton-maxon, etc. structures in {sup 4}He.

  12. Solar dynamic systems for spacecraft power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roschke, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented of a parametric study of the potential for using solar dynamic (SD) power supply systems on deep space probes. The SD systems would consist of a parabolic concentrator to focus solar energy on a thermal receiver for conversion by Brayton, organic Rankine or Stirling engines. The net thermal power and efficiencies available from each of the types of conversion devices were analyzed for a power requirement of 0.5 kWe. Examinations were also carried out of the optical, thermodynamic, materials and size limitations of the devices. The subsystem drivers were found to be the quality of concentrator reflectance and the system temperature level. Lower temperature systems are preferred for farther distances from the sun, mainly due to the required concentrator area. The SD system could be used out to 6 A.U. in optimal conditions. It is concluded that Brayon and Stirling engines have the best chances for further development, and that Rankine systems have already been optimized. Further evaluations are dependent on the definition of specific mission requirements.

  13. Application of control theory to dynamic systems simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auslander, D. M.; Spear, R. C.; Young, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    The application of control theory is applied to dynamic systems simulation. Theory and methodology applicable to controlled ecological life support systems are considered. Spatial effects on system stability, design of control systems with uncertain parameters, and an interactive computing language (PARASOL-II) designed for dynamic system simulation, report quality graphics, data acquisition, and simple real time control are discussed.

  14. 4D numerical observer for lesion detection in respiratory-gated PET

    SciTech Connect

    Lorsakul, Auranuch; Li, Quanzheng; Ouyang, Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges; Trott, Cathryn M.; Hoog, Christopher; Petibon, Yoann; Laine, Andrew F.

    2014-10-15

    compared to the conventional 3D approach applied on the nongated and motion-corrected images. Results: On average, the proposed 4D numerical observer improved the detection SNR by 48.6% (p < 0.005), whereas the 3D methods on motion-corrected images improved by 31.0% (p < 0.005) as compared to the nongated method. For all different conditions of the lesions, the relative SNR measurement (Gain = SNR{sub Observed}/SNR{sub Nongated}) of the 4D method was significantly higher than one from the motion-corrected 3D method by 13.8% (p < 0.02), where Gain{sub 4D} was 1.49 ± 0.21 and Gain{sub 3D} was 1.31 ± 0.15. For the lesion with the highest amplitude of motion, the 4D numerical observer yielded the highest observer-performance improvement (176%). For the lesion undergoing the smallest motion amplitude, the 4D method provided superior lesion detectability compared with the 3D method, which provided a detection SNR close to the nongated method. The investigation on a structure of the 4D numerical observer showed that a Laguerre–Gaussian channel matrix with a volumetric 3D function yielded higher lesion-detection performance than one with a 2D-stack-channelized function, whereas a different kind of channels that have the ability to mimic the human visual system, i.e., difference-of-Gaussian, showed similar performance in detecting uniform and spherical lesions. The investigation of the detection performance when increasing noise levels yielded decreasing detection SNR by 27.6% and 41.5% f