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Sample records for 4d light field

  1. 4D Light Field Imaging System Using Programmable Aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsam

    2012-01-01

    Complete depth information can be extracted from analyzing all angles of light rays emanated from a source. However, this angular information is lost in a typical 2D imaging system. In order to record this information, a standard stereo imaging system uses two cameras to obtain information from two view angles. Sometimes, more cameras are used to obtain information from more angles. However, a 4D light field imaging technique can achieve this multiple-camera effect through a single-lens camera. Two methods are available for this: one using a microlens array, and the other using a moving aperture. The moving-aperture method can obtain more complete stereo information. The existing literature suggests a modified liquid crystal panel [LC (liquid crystal) panel, similar to ones commonly used in the display industry] to achieve a moving aperture. However, LC panels cannot withstand harsh environments and are not qualified for spaceflight. In this regard, different hardware is proposed for the moving aperture. A digital micromirror device (DMD) will replace the liquid crystal. This will be qualified for harsh environments for the 4D light field imaging. This will enable an imager to record near-complete stereo information. The approach to building a proof-ofconcept is using existing, or slightly modified, off-the-shelf components. An SLR (single-lens reflex) lens system, which typically has a large aperture for fast imaging, will be modified. The lens system will be arranged so that DMD can be integrated. The shape of aperture will be programmed for single-viewpoint imaging, multiple-viewpoint imaging, and coded aperture imaging. The novelty lies in using a DMD instead of a LC panel to move the apertures for 4D light field imaging. The DMD uses reflecting mirrors, so any light transmission lost (which would be expected from the LC panel) will be minimal. Also, the MEMS-based DMD can withstand higher temperature and pressure fluctuation than a LC panel can. Robotics need

  2. 4D light-field sensing system for people counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangqi; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Yunlong; Sun, Zhenan

    2016-03-01

    Counting the number of people is still an important task in social security applications, and a few methods based on video surveillance have been proposed in recent years. In this paper, we design a novel optical sensing system to directly acquire the depth map of the scene from one light-field camera. The light-field sensing system can count the number of people crossing the passageway, and record the direction and intensity of rays at a snapshot without any assistant light devices. Depth maps are extracted from the raw light-ray sensing data. Our smart sensing system is equipped with a passive imaging sensor, which is able to naturally discern the depth difference between the head and shoulders for each person. Then a human model is built. Through detecting the human model from light-field images, the number of people passing the scene can be counted rapidly. We verify the feasibility of the sensing system as well as the accuracy by capturing real-world scenes passing single and multiple people under natural illumination.

  3. Multicolor 4D Fluorescence Microscopy using Ultrathin Bessel Light Sheets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Teng; Lau, Sze Cheung; Wang, Ying; Su, Yumian; Wang, Hao; Cheng, Aifang; Herrup, Karl; Ip, Nancy Y; Du, Shengwang; Loy, M M T

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple and efficient method for producing ultrathin Bessel ('non-diffracting') light sheets of any color using a line-shaped beam and an annulus filter. With this robust and cost-effective technology, we obtained two-color, 3D images of biological samples with lateral/axial resolution of 250 nm/400 nm, and high-speed, 4D volume imaging of 20 μm sized live sample at 1 Hz temporal resolution. PMID:27189786

  4. Multicolor 4D Fluorescence Microscopy using Ultrathin Bessel Light Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Teng; Lau, Sze Cheung; Wang, Ying; Su, Yumian; Wang, Hao; Cheng, Aifang; Herrup, Karl; Ip, Nancy Y.; Du, Shengwang; Loy, M. M. T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple and efficient method for producing ultrathin Bessel (‘non-diffracting’) light sheets of any color using a line-shaped beam and an annulus filter. With this robust and cost-effective technology, we obtained two-color, 3D images of biological samples with lateral/axial resolution of 250 nm/400 nm, and high-speed, 4D volume imaging of 20 μm sized live sample at 1 Hz temporal resolution. PMID:27189786

  5. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, David C.; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  6. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation.

    PubMed

    Schedl, David C; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  7. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation.

    PubMed

    Schedl, David C; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported.

  8. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schedl, David C.; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported.

  9. Hyperspectral light field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Raimund; Kenda, Andreas; Tortschanoff, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    A light field camera acquires the intensity and direction of rays from a scene providing a 4D representation L(x,y,u,v) called the light field. The acquired light field allows to virtually change view point and selectively re-focus regions algorithmically, an important feature for many applications in imaging and microscopy. The combination with hyperspectral imaging provides the additional advantage that small objects (beads, cells, nuclei) can be categorised using their spectroscopic signatures. Using an inverse fluorescence microscope, a LCTF tuneable filter and a light field setup as a test-bed, fluorescence-marked beads have been imaged and reconstructed into a 4D hyper-spectral image cube LHSI(x,y,z,λ). The results demonstrate the advantages of the approach for fluorescence microscopy providing extended depth of focus (DoF) and the fidelity of hyper-spectral imaging.

  10. Decoupling Illumination from Isosurface Generation Using 4D Light Transport

    PubMed Central

    Banks, David C.; Beason, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    One way to provide global illumination for the scientist who performs an interactive sweep through a 3D scalar dataset is to pre-compute global illumination, resample the radiance onto a 3D grid, then use it as a 3D texture. The basic approach of repeatedly extracting isosurfaces, illuminating them, and then building a 3D illumination grid suffers from the non-uniform sampling that arises from coupling the sampling of radiance with the sampling of isosurfaces. We demonstrate how the illumination step can be decoupled from the isosurface extraction step by illuminating the entire 3D scalar function as a 3-manifold in 4-dimensional space. By reformulating light transport in a higher dimension, one can sample a 3D volume without requiring the radiance samples to aggregate along individual isosurfaces in the pre-computed illumination grid. PMID:19834238

  11. Confinement Driven by Scalar Field in 4d Non Abelian Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Chabab, Mohamed

    2007-01-12

    We review some of the most recent work on confinement in 4d gauge theories with a massive scalar field (dilaton). Emphasis is put on the derivation of confining analytical solutions to the Coulomb problem versus dilaton effective couplings to gauge terms. It is shown that these effective theories can be relevant to model quark confinement and may shed some light on confinement mechanism. Moreover, the study of interquark potential, derived from Dick Model, in the heavy meson sector proves that phenomenological investigation of tmechanism is more than justified and deserves more efforts.

  12. BPS index and 4d N = 2 superconformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Kazuhiro

    2016-07-01

    We study the BPS index for the four-dimensional rank-one N = 2 superconformal field theories H 0 , H 1 , H 2 , E 6 , E 7 , E 8. We consider compactifications of the E-string theory on T 2 in which these theories arise as low energy limits. Using this realization we clarify the general structure of the BPS index. The index is characterized by two exponents and a sequence of invariants. We determine the exponents and the first few invariants.

  13. Dissipation and residue of 2,4-D in citrus under field condition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weijun; Jiao, Bining; Su, Xuesu; Zhao, Qiyang; Sun, Dali

    2015-05-01

    The dissipation, residues, and risks of 2,4-dicholrophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in citrus under field condition were investigated based on a simple ultra-performance LC (UPLC)-MS/MS method. The results indicated that the residue level of 2,4-D in citrus did not degrade gradually with sampling time under field condition. At pre-harvest intervals (PHI) of 20-40 days, 2,4-D residues were 0.021-0.269 mg/kg in citrus flesh, 0.028-0.337 mg/kg in whole citrus, and 0.028-0.376 mg/kg in citrus peel, all bellow the China maximum residue limit in citrus (1 mg/kg). Risks of 2,4-D were assessed by calculation of risk quotient, and the results revealed no significant health risks after consumption of citrus.

  14. Pressure-field extraction from Lagrangian flow measurements: first experiences with 4D-PTV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeteson, N. J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Rival, D. E.; Michaelis, D.; Schanz, D.; Schröder, A.

    2016-06-01

    As a follow-up to a previous proof-of-principle study, a novel Lagrangian pressure-extraction technique is analytically evaluated, and experimentally validated using dense 4D-PTV data. The technique is analytically evaluated using the semi-three-dimensional Taylor-Green vortex, and it is found that the Lagrangian technique out-performs the standard Eulerian technique when Dirichlet boundary conditions are enforced. However, the Lagrangian technique produces worse estimates of the pressure field when Neumann boundary conditions are enforced on boundaries with strong pressure gradients. The technique is experimentally validated using flow data obtained for the case of a free-falling, index-matched sphere at Re=2100. The experimental data were collected using a four-camera particle tracking velocimetry measurement system, and processed using 4D-PTV. The pressure field is then extracted using both the Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques, and the resulting pressure fields are compared. Qualitatively, the pressure fields agree; however, quantitative differences are found with respect to the magnitude of the pressure minima on the side of the sphere. Finally, the pressure-drag coefficient is estimated using each technique, and the two techniques are found to be in very close agreement. A comparison to a reference value from literature confirms that the drag coefficient estimates are reasonable, demonstrating the validity of the technique.

  15. On 4d rank-one N=3 superconformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishinaka, Takahiro; Tachikawa, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    We study the properties of 4d N=3 superconformal field theories whose rank is one, i.e. those that reduce to a single vector multiplet on their moduli space of vacua. We find that the moduli space can only be of the form ℂ3/ℤ ℓ for ℓ=1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and that the supersymmetry automatically enhances to N=4 for ℓ=1, 2. In addition, we determine the central charges a and c in terms of ℓ, and construct the associated 2d chiral algebras, which turn out to be exotic N=2 supersymmetric W-algebras.

  16. Factors Influencing Dislodgeable 2, 4-D Plant Residues from Hybrid Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L. x C. transvaalensis) Athletic Fields.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Matthew D; Gannon, Travis W; Brosnan, James T; Ahmed, Khalied A; Breeden, Gregory K

    2016-01-01

    Research to date has confirmed 2,4-D residues may dislodge from turfgrass; however, experiments have not been conducted on hybrid bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L. x C. transvaalensis), the most common athletic field turfgrass in subtropical climates. More specifically, previous research has not investigated the effect of post-application irrigation on dislodgeable 2,4-D residues from hybrid bermudagrass and across turfgrass species, research has been nondescript regarding sample time within a d (TWD) or conducted in the afternoon when the turfgrass canopy is dry, possibly underestimating potential for dislodgement. The effect of irrigation and TWD on 2,4-D dislodgeability was investigated. Dislodgeable 2,4-D amine was reduced > 300% following irrigation. From 2 to 7 d after treatment (DAT), ≤ 0.5% of applied 2,4-D was dislodged from irrigated turfgrass, while ≤ 2.3% of applied 2,4-D was dislodged when not irrigated. 2,4-D dislodgeability decreased as TWD increased. Dislodgeable 2,4-D residues declined to < 0.1% of the applied at 1 DAT- 13:00, and increased to 1 to 3% of the applied 2 DAT- 5:00, suggesting 2,4-D re-suspended on treated turfgrass vegetation overnight. In conclusion, irrigating treated turfgrass reduced dislodgeable 2,4-D. 2,4-D dislodgeability increased as TWD decreased, which was attributed to non-precipitation climatic conditions favoring turfgrass canopy wetness. This research will improve turfgrass management practices and research designed to minimize human 2,4-D exposure. PMID:26863005

  17. Factors Influencing Dislodgeable 2, 4-D Plant Residues from Hybrid Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L. x C. transvaalensis) Athletic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khalied A.; Breeden, Gregory K.

    2016-01-01

    Research to date has confirmed 2,4-D residues may dislodge from turfgrass; however, experiments have not been conducted on hybrid bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L. x C. transvaalensis), the most common athletic field turfgrass in subtropical climates. More specifically, previous research has not investigated the effect of post-application irrigation on dislodgeable 2,4-D residues from hybrid bermudagrass and across turfgrass species, research has been nondescript regarding sample time within a d (TWD) or conducted in the afternoon when the turfgrass canopy is dry, possibly underestimating potential for dislodgement. The effect of irrigation and TWD on 2,4-D dislodgeability was investigated. Dislodgeable 2,4-D amine was reduced > 300% following irrigation. From 2 to 7 d after treatment (DAT), ≤ 0.5% of applied 2,4-D was dislodged from irrigated turfgrass, while ≤ 2.3% of applied 2,4-D was dislodged when not irrigated. 2,4-D dislodgeability decreased as TWD increased. Dislodgeable 2,4-D residues declined to < 0.1% of the applied at 1 DAT– 13:00, and increased to 1 to 3% of the applied 2 DAT– 5:00, suggesting 2,4-D re-suspended on treated turfgrass vegetation overnight. In conclusion, irrigating treated turfgrass reduced dislodgeable 2,4-D. 2,4-D dislodgeability increased as TWD decreased, which was attributed to non-precipitation climatic conditions favoring turfgrass canopy wetness. This research will improve turfgrass management practices and research designed to minimize human 2,4-D exposure. PMID:26863005

  18. Central Charges and the Sign of Entanglement in 4D Conformal Field Theories.

    PubMed

    Perlmutter, Eric; Rangamani, Mukund; Rota, Massimiliano

    2015-10-23

    We explore properties of the universal terms in the entanglement entropy and logarithmic negativity in 4D conformal field theories, aiming to clarify the ways in which they behave like the analogous entanglement measures in quantum mechanics. We show that, unlike entanglement entropy in finite-dimensional systems, the sign of the universal part of entanglement entropy is indeterminate. In particular, if and only if the central charges obey a>c, the entanglement across certain classes of entangling surfaces can become arbitrarily negative, depending on the geometry and topology of the surface. The negative contribution is proportional to the product of a-c and the genus of the surface. Similarly, we show that in a>c theories, the logarithmic negativity does not always exceed the entanglement entropy.

  19. 3D and 4D GPR for Stratigraphic and Hydrologic Characterization of Field Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasmueck, M.; Viggiano, D. A.

    2008-05-01

    In a time of almost unlimited mobility, information, and connectivity it is surprising how our knowledge of natural systems becomes fragmented as soon as we enter the ground. Excavation, drilling, and 2D geophysics are unable to capture the spatio-temporal variability inside soil and rock volumes at the 1-10m scale. The problem is the lack of efficient and high-resolution imaging for the near surface domain. We have developed a high- resolution 3D Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) system suitable for data acquisition at field sites. To achieve sharp and repeatable subsurface imaging we have integrated GPR with a rotary laser/IR strobe system. With 40 xyz coordinate updates per second, continuously moving GPR antennae can be tracked centimeter precise. A real-time LED guidance system shows the GPR antenna operator how to follow pre-computed survey tracks. Without having to stake out hundreds of survey tracks anymore one person now can scan an area of up to 600m2 per hour with a dual GPR antenna at 1m/s with 0.1m line spacing. The coordinate and GPR data are fused in real-time providing a first look of the subsurface in horizontal map view for quality control and in-field site assessment during data acquisition. The precision of the laser positioning system enables centimeter accurate repeat surveys to image and quantify water content changes in the vadose zone. To verify quantitative results of such 4D GPR we performed a controlled pond infiltration injecting 3200L of water from a 4x4m temporary pond with a thin soil layer and 5m of unsaturated porous limestone below. A total of sixteen repeated 3D GPR surveys were acquired just before the infiltration and in the following 2 weeks. All data were recorded with 250MHz antennae on a 5x10cm grid covering an area of 18x20m. Data processing included 3D migration and extraction of time shifts between pairs of time- lapse 3D GPR surveys. From the time shifts water content changes were computed using the Topp equation. The

  20. 4-D Cloud Water Content Fields Derived from Operational Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L., Jr.; Minnis, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve operational safety and efficiency, the transportation industry, including aviation, has an urgent need for accurate diagnoses and predictions of clouds and associated weather conditions. Adverse weather accounts for 70% of all air traffic delays within the U.S. National Airspace System. The Federal Aviation Administration has determined that as much as two thirds of weather-related delays are potentially avoidable with better weather information and roughly 20% of all aviation accidents are weather related. Thus, it is recognized that an important factor in meeting the goals of the Next Generation Transportation System (NexGen) vision is the improved integration of weather information. The concept of a 4-D weather cube is being developed to address that need by integrating observed and forecasted weather information into a shared 4-D database, providing an integrated and nationally consistent weather picture for a variety of users and to support operational decision support systems. Weather analyses and forecasts derived using Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models are a critical tool that forecasters rely on for guidance and also an important element in current and future decision support systems. For example, the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) and the recently implemented Rapid Refresh (RR) Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) models provide high frequency forecasts and are key elements of the FAA Aviation Weather Research Program. Because clouds play a crucial role in the dynamics and thermodynamics of the atmosphere, they must be adequately accounted for in NWP models. The RUC, for example, cycles at full resolution five cloud microphysical species (cloud water, cloud ice, rain, snow, and graupel) and has the capability of updating these fields from observations. In order to improve the models initial state and subsequent forecasts, cloud top altitude (or temperature, T(sub c)) derived from operational satellite data, surface observations of

  1. Graphene-layered steps and their fields visualized by 4D electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Tae; Yurtsever, Aycan; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced image contrast has been seen at graphene-layered steps a few nanometers in height by means of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) using synchronous femtosecond pulses of light and electrons. The observed steps are formed by the edges of graphene strips lying on the surface of a graphene substrate, where the strips are hundreds of nanometers in width and many micrometers in length. PINEM measurements reflect the interaction of imaging electrons and induced (near) electric fields at the steps, and this leads to a much higher contrast than that achieved in bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging of the same strips. Theory and numerical simulations support the experimental PINEM findings and elucidate the nature of the electric field at the steps formed by the graphene layers. These results extend the range of applications of the experimental PINEM methodology, which has previously been demonstrated for spherical, cylindrical, and triangular nanostructures, to shapes of high aspect ratio (rectangular strips), as well as into the regime of atomic layer thicknesses. PMID:23690572

  2. Transformation of light double cones in the human retina: the origin of trichromatism, of 4D-spatiotemporal vision, and of patchwise 4D Fourier transformation in Talbot imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauinger, Norbert

    1997-09-01

    The interpretation of the 'inverted' retina of primates as an 'optoretina' (a light cones transforming diffractive cellular 3D-phase grating) integrates the functional, structural, and oscillatory aspects of a cortical layer. It is therefore relevant to consider prenatal developments as a basis of the macro- and micro-geometry of the inner eye. This geometry becomes relevant for the postnatal trichromatic synchrony organization (TSO) as well as the adaptive levels of human vision. It is shown that the functional performances, the trichromatism in photopic vision, the monocular spatiotemporal 3D- and 4D-motion detection, as well as the Fourier optical image transformation with extraction of invariances all become possible. To transform light cones into reciprocal gratings especially the spectral phase conditions in the eikonal of the geometrical optical imaging before the retinal 3D-grating become relevant first, then in the von Laue resp. reciprocal von Laue equation for 3D-grating optics inside the grating and finally in the periodicity of Talbot-2/Fresnel-planes in the near-field behind the grating. It is becoming possible to technically realize -- at least in some specific aspects -- such a cortical optoretina sensor element with its typical hexagonal-concentric structure which leads to these visual functions.

  3. Some chirality-related properties of the 4D massive Dirac propagator and determinant in an arbitrary gauge field

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Jin; Lee, Choonkyu; Min, Hyunsoo

    2010-10-15

    For a 4D massive Dirac field in the background of arbitrary gauge fields, we show that the Dirac propagator and functional determinant are completely determined by knowledge of the corresponding quantities for just one of the chirality sectors of the second-order Dirac operator. This generalizes the related, previously known, statements in (anti)self-dual background gauge fields. The logarithms of the (renormalized) functional determinants from the two chirality sectors are shown to be different only by a term reflecting the integrated chiral anomaly.

  4. Strong-field induced XUV transmission and multiplet splitting in 4d(-1)6p core-excited Xe studied by femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Pfeiffer, Adrian N; Neumark, Daniel M; Leone, Stephen R; Gessner, Oliver

    2012-12-28

    Light-induced coupling of core-excited states of Xe atoms is investigated by femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy with photon energies ranging from 50 eV to 72 eV. Coupling of the 4d(-1)((2)D(5/2))6p((2)P(3/2)) (65.1 eV) and 4d(-1)((2)D(3/2))6p((2)P(1/2)) (67.0 eV) core-excited states to nearby states by a strong infrared laser field leads to a threefold enhancement of XUV transmission. The transmission at 65.1 eV (67.0 eV) changes from 3.2 ± 0.4% (5.9 ± 0.5%) without the coupling laser to 9 ± 2% (22 ± 5%) at the maximum of the laser field. A strong-field induced broad XUV absorption feature between 60 eV and 65 eV is ascribed to splitting of the field-free absorption lines into multiple branches when the Rabi frequencies of the coupling transitions exceed the infrared laser frequency. This picture is supported by a comparison of the strong-field induced absorption spectrum with a numerical integration of the von Neumann equation for a few-level quantum system. The valence hole-alignment of strong-field ionized Xe is revisited, confirming the previously observed reduced alignment compared to theoretical predictions.

  5. A study on quantitative analysis of field size and dose by using gating system in 4D conformal radiation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Youn-Sang; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Kim, Chang-Bok; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag

    2012-10-01

    This study evaluated the gating-based 4-D conformal radiation therapy (4D-CT) treatment planning by a comparison with the common 3-D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CT) treatment planning and examined the change in treatment field size and dose to the tumors and adjacent normal tissues because an unnecessary dose is also included in the 3-D treatment planning for the radiation treatment of tumors in the chest and abdomen. The 3D-CT and gating-based 4D-CT images were obtained from patients who had undergone radiation treatment for chest and abdomen tumors in the oncology department. After establishing a treatment plan, the CT treatment and planning system were used to measure the change in field size for analysis. A dose volume histogram (DVH) was used to calculate the appropriate dose to planning target volume (PTV) tumors and adjacent normal tissue. The difference in the treatment volume of the chest was 0.6 and 0.83 cm on the X- and Y-axis, respectively, for the gross tumor volume (GTV). Accordingly, the values in the 4D-CT treatment planning were smaller and the dose was more concentrated by 2.7% and 0.9% on the GTV and clinical target volume (CTV), respectively. The normal tissues in the surrounding normal tissues were reduced by 3.0%, 7.2%, 0.4%, 1.7%, 2.6% and 0.2% in the bronchus, chest wall, esophagus, heart, lung and spinal cord, respectively. The difference in the treatment volume of the abdomen was 0.72 cm on the X-axis and 0.51 cm on the Y-axis for the GTV; and 1.06 cm on the X-axis and 1.85 cm on the Y-axis for the PTV. Therefore, the values in the 4D-CT treatment planning were smaller. The dose was concentrated by 6.8% and 4.3% on the GTV and PTV, respectively, whereas the adjacent normal tissues in the cord, Lt. kidney, Rt. kidney, small bowels and whole liver were reduced by 3.2%, 4.2%, 1.5%, 6.2% and 12.7%, respectively. The treatment field size was smaller in volume in the case of the 4D-CT treatment planning. In the DVH, the 4D-CT treatment

  6. Phase diagram of 4D field theories with chiral anomaly from holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammon, Martin; Leiber, Julian; Macedo, Rodrigo P.

    2016-03-01

    Within gauge/gravity duality, we study the class of four dimensional CFTs with chiral anomaly described by Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory in five dimensions. In particular we determine the phase diagram at finite temperature, chemical potential and magnetic field. At high temperatures the solution is given by an electrically and magnetically charged AdS Reissner-Nordstroem black brane. For sufficiently large Chern-Simons coupling and at sufficiently low temperatures and small magnetic fields, we find a new phase with helical order, breaking translational invariance spontaneously. For the Chern-Simons couplings studied, the phase transition is second order with mean field exponents. Since the entropy density vanishes in the limit of zero temperature we are confident that this is the true ground state which is the holographic version of a chiral magnetic spiral.

  7. On the 4D generalized Proca action for an Abelian vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allys, Erwan; Beltrán Almeida, Juan P.; Peter, Patrick; Rodríguez, Yeinzon

    2016-09-01

    We summarize previous results on the most general Proca theory in 4 dimensions containing only first-order derivatives in the vector field (second-order at most in the associated Stückelberg scalar) and having only three propagating degrees of freedom with dynamics controlled by second-order equations of motion. Discussing the Hessian condition used in previous works, we conjecture that, as in the scalar galileon case, the most complete action contains only a finite number of terms with second-order derivatives of the Stückelberg field describing the longitudinal mode, which is in agreement with the results of JCAP 05 (2014) 015 and Phys. Lett. B 757 (2016) 405 and complements those of JCAP 02 (2016) 004. We also correct and complete the parity violating sector, obtaining an extra term on top of the arbitrary function of the field Aμ, the Faraday tensor Fμν and its Hodge dual tilde Fμν.

  8. Final Report for ARM Project Measuring 4-D Water Vapor Fields with GPS

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, John

    2006-02-06

    Water vapor is a primary element in the Earth’s climate system. Atmospheric water vapor is central to cloud processes, radiation transfer, and the hydrological cycle. Using funding from Department of Energy (DOE) grant DE-FG03-02ER63327, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) developed new observational techniques to measure atmospheric water vapor and applied these techniques to measure four dimensional water vapor fields throughout the United States Southern Great Plains region. This report summarizes the development of a new observation from ground based Global Positioning System (GPS) stations called Slant Water Vapor (SW) and it’s utilization in retrieving four dimensional water vapor fields. The SW observation represents the integrated amount of water vapor between a GPS station and a transmitting satellite. SW observations provide improved temporal and spatial sampling of the atmosphere when compared to column-integrated quantities such as preciptitable water vapor (PW). Under funding from the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, GPS networks in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) region were deployed to retrieve SW to improve the characterization of water vapor throughout the region. These observations were used to estimate four dimensional water vapor fields using tomographic approaches and through assimilation into the MM5 numerical weather model.

  9. Search for a Minimal N =1 Superconformal Field Theory in 4D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dan; Yonekura, Kazuya

    2016-07-01

    We discuss a candidate for a minimal interacting four-dimensional N =1 superconformal field theory. The model contains a chiral primary operator u satisfying the chiral ring relation u2=0 , and its scaling dimension is Δ (u )=1.5 . The model is derived by turning on a N =1 preserving deformation of N =2 A2 Argyres-Douglas theory. The central charges are given by (a ,c )=(263 /768 ,271 /768 )≃(0.342 ,0.353 ) . There is no moduli space of vacua, no flavor symmetry, and the chiral ring is finite.

  10. Unsupervised 4D myocardium segmentation with a Markov Random Field based deformable model.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Grande, L; Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero, G; Casaseca-de-la-Higuera, P; San-Román-Calvar, J Alberto; Revilla-Orodea, Ana; Martín-Fernández, M; Alberola-López, C

    2011-06-01

    A stochastic deformable model is proposed for the segmentation of the myocardium in Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The segmentation is posed as a probabilistic optimization problem in which the optimal time-dependent surface is obtained for the myocardium of the heart in a discrete space of locations built upon simple geometric assumptions. For this purpose, first, the left ventricle is detected by a set of image analysis tools gathered from the literature. Then, the segmentation solution is obtained by the Maximization of the Posterior Marginals for the myocardium location in a Markov Random Field framework which optimally integrates temporal-spatial smoothness with intensity and gradient related features in an unsupervised way by the Maximum Likelihood estimation of the parameters of the field. This scheme provides a flexible and robust segmentation method which has been able to generate results comparable to manually segmented images for some derived cardiac function parameters in a set of 43 patients affected in different degrees by an Acute Myocardial Infarction.

  11. S-folds and 4d mathcal{N} = 3 superconformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharony, Ofer; Tachikawa, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    S-folds are generalizations of orientifolds in type IIB string theory, such that the geometric identifications are accompanied by non-trivial S-duality transformations. They were recently used by García-Etxebarria and Regalado to provide the first construction of four dimensional mathcal{N} =3 superconformal theories. In this note, we classify the different variants of these mathcal{N} =3-preserving S-folds, distinguished by an analog of discrete torsion, using both a direct analysis of the different torsion classes and the compactification of the S-folds to three dimensional M-theory backgrounds. Upon adding D3-branes, these variants lead to different classes of mathcal{N} =3 superconformal field theories. We also analyze the holographic duals of these theories, and in particular clarify the role of discrete gauge and global symmetries in holography.

  12. Reservoir Characterization around Geothermal Field, West Java, Indonesia Derived from 4-D Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdhora Ry, Rexha; Nugraha, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Observation of micro-seismic events induced by intensive geothermal exploitation in a particular geothermal field, located in West Java region, Indonesia was used to detect the fracture and permeability zone. Using local monitoring seismometer network, tomographic inversions were conducted for the three-dimensional Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs structure of the reservoir for January - December 2007, January - December 2008, and January - December 2009. First, hypocenters location was relocated using joint hypocenter determination (JHD) method in purpose to estimate best location. Then, seismic tomographic inversions were conducted using delay time tomography for dataset of every year respectively. The travel times passing through the three-dimensional velocity model were calculated using ray tracing pseudo-bending method. Norm and gradient damping were added to constrain blocks without ray and to produce smooth solution model. The inversion algorithm was developed in Matlab environment. Our tomographic inversion results from 3-years of observations indicate the presence of low Vp, low Vs, and low Vp/Vs ratio at depths of about 1 - 3 km below sea level. These features were interpreted may be related to steam-saturated rock in the reservoir area of this geothermal field. The locations of the reservoir area were supported by the data of well- trajectory, where the zones of high Vp/Vs were observed around the injection wells and the zones of low Vp/Vs were observed around the production wells. The extensive low Vp/Vs anomaly that occupies the reservoir is getting stronger during the 3-years study period. This is probably attributed to depletion of pore liquid water in the reservoir and replacement with steam. Continuous monitoring of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs is an effective tool for geothermal reservoir characterization and depletion monitoring and can potentially provide information in parts of the reservoir which have not been drilled.

  13. Light fields in the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelevin, V. N.; Kozlyaninov, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of light fields in the ocean is in basic ocean optics. Twenty-six separate studies discuss: (1) the field of solar radiation in the ocean; (2) stationary and nonstationary light fields created in the sea by artificial sources; and (3) the use of optical methods to study biological and hydrodynamic characteristics of the sea.

  14. Field testing Northern U.S. adapted 2,4-D resistant red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) resistant red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) varieties would offer producers more weed control options, particularly in mixed grass/red clover pastures. In the 1980s, work was initiated in Florida to select for 2,4-D tolerant red clover (Taylor, 1989). This Flo...

  15. Dynamic reservoir characterization using 4D multicomponent seismic data and rock physics modeling at Delhi Field, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal Meneses, Carla C.

    Pore pressure and CO2 saturation changes are important to detect and quantify for maximizing oil recovery in Delhi Field. Delhi Field is a enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project with active monitoring by 4D multicomponent seismic technologies. Dynamic rock physics modeling integrates the rich dataset of core, well logs, petrographic thin sections and facies providing a link between reservoir and elastic properties. The dynamic modeling in this high porosity sandstone reservoir shows that P-wave velocity is more sensitive to CO2 saturation while S-wave velocity is more sensitive to pore pressure changes. I use PP and PS seismic data to jointly invert for Vp=Vs ratio and acoustic impedance. This technique has the advantage of adding more information to the non-unique inversion problem. Combining the inversion results from the monitor surveys of June 2010 and August 2011 provides acoustic impedance and Vp=Vs percentage differences. The time-lapse inverted response enables dynamic characterization of the reservoir by fitting the predicted dynamic models (calibrated at the wells). Dynamic reservoir characterization adds value in this stratigraphic complex reservoir. The results indicate that reservoir heterogeneities and pore pressure gradients control the CO2 flow within the Paluxy reservoir. Injectors 148-2 and 140-1 showed CO2 is moving downdip following a distributary channel induced by differential pressure from an updip injector or a barrier caused by a heterogeneity in the reservoir. CO2 anomalies located above the Paluxy injector 148-2 indicates that CO2 is moving from the Paluxy up into the Tuscaloosa Formation. My work demonstrates that reservoir monitoring is necessary for reservoir management at Delhi Field.

  16. Light field display and 3D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwane, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Light field optics and its applications become rather popular in these days. With light field optics or light field thesis, real 3D space can be described in 2D plane as 4D data, which we call as light field data. This process can be divided in two procedures. First, real3D scene is optically reduced with imaging lens. Second, this optically reduced 3D image is encoded into light field data. In later procedure we can say that 3D information is encoded onto a plane as 2D data by lens array plate. This transformation is reversible and acquired light field data can be decoded again into 3D image with the arrayed lens plate. "Refocusing" (focusing image on your favorite point after taking a picture), light-field camera's most popular function, is some kind of sectioning process from encoded 3D data (light field data) to 2D image. In this paper at first I show our actual light field camera and our 3D display using acquired and computer-simulated light field data, on which real 3D image is reconstructed. In second I explain our data processing method whose arithmetic operation is performed not in Fourier domain but in real domain. Then our 3D display system is characterized by a few features; reconstructed image is of finer resolutions than density of arrayed lenses and it is not necessary to adjust lens array plate to flat display on which light field data is displayed.

  17. SU-E-J-246: A Deformation-Field Map Based Liver 4D CBCT Reconstruction Method Using Gold Nanoparticles as Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W; Zhang, Y; Ren, L; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using nanoparticle markers to validate liver tumor motion together with a deformation field map-based four dimensional (4D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstruction method. Methods: A technique for lung 4D-CBCT reconstruction has been previously developed using a deformation field map (DFM)-based strategy. In this method, each phase of the 4D-CBCT is considered as a deformation of a prior CT volume. The DFM is solved by a motion modeling and free-form deformation (MM-FD) technique, using a data fidelity constraint and the deformation energy minimization. For liver imaging, there is low contrast of a liver tumor in on-board projections. A validation of liver tumor motion using implanted gold nanoparticles, along with the MM-FD deformation technique is implemented to reconstruct onboard 4D CBCT liver radiotherapy images. These nanoparticles were placed around the liver tumor to reflect the tumor positions in both CT simulation and on-board image acquisition. When reconstructing each phase of the 4D-CBCT, the migrations of the gold nanoparticles act as a constraint to regularize the deformation field, along with the data fidelity and the energy minimization constraints. In this study, multiple tumor diameters and positions were simulated within the liver for on-board 4D-CBCT imaging. The on-board 4D-CBCT reconstructed by the proposed method was compared with the “ground truth” image. Results: The preliminary data, which uses reconstruction for lung radiotherapy suggests that the advanced reconstruction algorithm including the gold nanoparticle constraint will Resultin volume percentage differences (VPD) between lesions in reconstructed images by MM-FD and “ground truth” on-board images of 11.5% (± 9.4%) and a center of mass shift of 1.3 mm (± 1.3 mm) for liver radiotherapy. Conclusion: The advanced MM-FD technique enforcing the additional constraints from gold nanoparticles, results in improved accuracy

  18. 4D seismic monitoring of the miscible CO2 flood of Hall-Gurney Field, Kansas, U.S

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raef, A.E.; Miller, R.D.; Byrnes, A.P.; Harrison, W.E.

    2004-01-01

    A cost-effective, highly repeatable, 4D-optimized, single-pattern/patch seismic data-acquisition approach with several 3D data sets was used to evaluate the feasibility of imaging changes associated with the " water alternated with gas" (WAG) stage. By incorporating noninversion-based seismic-attribute analysis, the time and cost of processing and interpreting the data were reduced. A 24-ms-thick EOR-CO 2 injection interval-using an average instantaneous frequency attribute (AIF) was targeted. Changes in amplitude response related to decrease in velocity from pore-fluid replacement within this time interval were found to be lower relative to background values than in AIF analysis. Carefully color-balanced AIF-attribute maps established the overall area affected by the injected EOR-CO2.

  19. Biodegradation of phenol, 2,4-DCP, 2,4-D, and 2,4,5-T in field-collected rhizosphere and nonrhizosphere soils

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J.J.; Shann, J.R.

    1995-07-01

    This study investigated xenobiotic biodegradation in rhizosphere soil collected from field-grown plants, grouped for analysis as monocots or dicots. Microbial activity was highest in monocot rhizosphere soils, No differences were seen between these soils in the mineralization of phenol or 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), but there were differences in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) mineralization. The rate constants for 2,4-D or 2,4,5-T mineralization in nonrhizosphere soil. Thus, soils that had a prior association with a plant showed significantly increased rates o mineralization for the more recalcitrant compounds tested. In addition, this enhanced mineralization in the rhizosphere appeared to be dependent on the type of plant involved. 20 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. 4D STUDY OF STRAIN GRADIENTS EVOLUTION IN TWINNED NiMnGa SINGLE CRYSTALS UNDER MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Xu, Ruqing; Barabash, Oleg M; Sozinov, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved 3D X-ray microscopy with a submicron beam size was used to follow the evolution of strains in off-stoichiometric NiMnGa twinned crystals near type I (hard) twin boundary under magnetic field. Laminate A/B microstructure was revealed near the twin boundaries in A variant. Large strain gradients are observed in the C variant in the immediate vicinity of the type I twin boundary: the lattice is under large tensile strains ~0.4% along the c- axes within first micron. Distinct a and b lattice parameter evolution with temperature and magnetic field is demonstrated. In an applied magnetic field the strain field was observed at larger distances from the twin boundary and becomes more complex. Stochastic twin boundary motion was observed after the magnetic field reaches a certain critical value.

  1. Unfolded equations for current interactions of 4d massless fields as a free system in mixed dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfond, O. A.; Vasiliev, M. A.

    2015-03-15

    Interactions of massless fields of all spins in four dimensions with currents of any spin are shown to result from a solution of the linear problem that describes a gluing between a rank-one (massless) system and a rank-two (current) system in the unfolded dynamics approach. Since the rank-two system is dual to a free rank-one higher-dimensional system that effectively describes conformal fields in six space-time dimensions, the constructed system can be interpreted as describing a mixture between linear conformal fields in four and six dimensions. An interpretation of the obtained results in the spirit of the AdS/CFT correspondence is discussed.

  2. Estimation of lung motion fields in 4D CT data by variational non-linear intensity-based registration: A comparison and evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Werner, René; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz; Ehrhardt, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Accurate and robust estimation of motion fields in respiration-correlated CT (4D CT) images, usually performed by non-linear registration of the temporal CT frames, is a precondition for the analysis of patient-specific breathing dynamics and subsequent image-supported diagnostics and treatment planning. In this work, we present a comprehensive comparison and evaluation study of non-linear registration variants applied to the task of lung motion estimation in thoracic 4D CT data. In contrast to existing multi-institutional comparison studies (e.g. MIDRAS and EMPIRE10), we focus on the specific but common class of variational intensity-based non-parametric registration and analyze the impact of the different main building blocks of the underlying optimization problem: the distance measure to be minimized, the regularization approach and the transformation space considered during optimization. In total, 90 different combinations of building block instances are compared. Evaluated on proprietary and publicly accessible 4D CT images, landmark-based registration errors (TRE) between 1.14 and 1.20 mm for the most accurate registration variants demonstrate competitive performance of the applied general registration framework compared to other state-of-the-art approaches for lung CT registration. Although some specific trends can be observed, effects of interchanging individual instances of the building blocks on the TRE are in general rather small (no single outstanding registration variant existing); the same level of accuracy is, however, associated with significantly different degrees of motion field smoothness and computational demands. Consequently, the building block combination of choice will depend on application-specific requirements on motion field characteristics.

  3. New light field camera based on physical based rendering tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ming-Han; Chang, Shan-Ching; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Even though light field technology was first invented more than 50 years ago, it did not gain popularity due to the limitation imposed by the computation technology. With the rapid advancement of computer technology over the last decade, the limitation has been uplifted and the light field technology quickly returns to the spotlight of the research stage. In this paper, PBRT (Physical Based Rendering Tracing) was introduced to overcome the limitation of using traditional optical simulation approach to study the light field camera technology. More specifically, traditional optical simulation approach can only present light energy distribution but typically lack the capability to present the pictures in realistic scenes. By using PBRT, which was developed to create virtual scenes, 4D light field information was obtained to conduct initial data analysis and calculation. This PBRT approach was also used to explore the light field data calculation potential in creating realistic photos. Furthermore, we integrated the optical experimental measurement results with PBRT in order to place the real measurement results into the virtually created scenes. In other words, our approach provided us with a way to establish a link of virtual scene with the real measurement results. Several images developed based on the above-mentioned approaches were analyzed and discussed to verify the pros and cons of the newly developed PBRT based light field camera technology. It will be shown that this newly developed light field camera approach can circumvent the loss of spatial resolution associated with adopting a micro-lens array in front of the image sensors. Detailed operational constraint, performance metrics, computation resources needed, etc. associated with this newly developed light field camera technique were presented in detail.

  4. Scanning Backscatter Lidar Observations for Characterizing 4-D Cloud and Aerosol Fields to Improve Radiative Transfer Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Miller, David O.

    2005-01-01

    Clouds have a powerful influence on atmospheric radiative transfer and hence are crucial to understanding and interpreting the exchange of radiation between the Earth's surface, the atmosphere, and space. Because clouds are highly variable in space, time and physical makeup, it is important to be able to observe them in three dimensions (3-D) with sufficient resolution that the data can be used to generate and validate parameterizations of cloud fields at the resolution scale of global climate models (GCMs). Simulation of photon transport in three dimensionally inhomogeneous cloud fields show that spatial inhomogeneities tend to decrease cloud reflection and absorption and increase direct and diffuse transmission, Therefore it is an important task to characterize cloud spatial structures in three dimensions on the scale of GCM grid elements. In order to validate cloud parameterizations that represent the ensemble, or mean and variance of cloud properties within a GCM grid element, measurements of the parameters must be obtained on a much finer scale so that the statistics on those measurements are truly representative. High spatial sampling resolution is required, on the order of 1 km or less. Since the radiation fields respond almost instantaneously to changes in the cloud field, and clouds changes occur on scales of seconds and less when viewed on scales of approximately 100m, the temporal resolution of cloud properties should be measured and characterized on second time scales. GCM time steps are typically on the order of an hour, but in order to obtain sufficient statistical representations of cloud properties in the parameterizations that are used as model inputs, averaged values of cloud properties should be calculated on time scales on the order of 10-100 s. The Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE) provides exceptional temporal (100 ms) and spatial (30 m) resolution measurements of aerosol and cloud backscatter in three

  5. Digital holography to light field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asundi, Anand; Zuo, Chao

    2014-05-01

    Holography uses wave (physical) optical principles of interference and diffraction to record and display images. Interference allows us to record the amplitude and phase of the optical wave emanating from an object on a film or recording medium and diffraction enables us to see this wave-field, i.e. the amplitude and phase of the object. Visually this corresponds to both perspective and depth information being reconstructed as in the original scene. Digital Holography has enabled quantification of phase which in some applications provides meaningful engineering parameters. There is growing interest in reconstructing this wavefield without interference. Thus the non-interferometric Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) method is gaining increased research, which uses two or more defocused images to reconstruct the phase. Due to its non-interferometric nature, TIE relaxes the stringent beam-coherence requirements for interferometry, extending its applications to various optical fields with arbitrary spatial and temporal coherence. The alternate school of thought emerges from the computer science community primarily deals with ray optics. In a normal imaging system all rays emerging from an object point into are focused to a conjugate image point. Information of ray direction is lost and thus the perspective and depth information. A light field image is one that has information of both amplitude and direction of rays fanning from any object point and thus provides perspective (or what could be termed as phase) of the object wave as well. It would thus be possible to extract phase as we know it from this albeit for a coherent illumination case.

  6. Beebook: light field mapping app

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Donatis, Mauro; Di Pietro, Gianfranco; Rinnone, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade the mobile systems for field digital mapping were developed (see Wikipedia for "Digital geologic mapping"), also against many skeptic traditional geologists. Until now, hardware was often heavy (tablet PC) and software sometime difficult also for expert GIS users. At present, the advent of light tablet and applications makes things easier, but we are far to find a whole solution for a complex survey like the geological one where you have to manage complexities such information, hypothesis, data, interpretation. Beebook is a new app for Android devices, has been developed for fast ad easy mapping work in the field trying to try to solve this problem. The main features are: • off-line raster management, GeoTIFF ed other raster format using; • on-line map visualisation (Google Maps, OSM, WMS, WFS); • SR management and conversion using PROJ.4; • vector file mash-up (KML and SQLite format); • editing of vector data on the map (lines, points, polygons); • augmented reality using "Mixare" platform; • export of vector data in KML, CSV, SQLite (Spatialite) format; • note: GPS or manual point inserting linked to other application files (pictures, spreadsheet, etc.); • form: creation, edition and filling of customized form; • GPS: status control, tracker and positioning on map; • sharing: synchronization and sharing of data, forms, positioning and other information can be done among users. The input methods are different from digital keyboard to fingers touch, from voice recording to stylus. In particular the most efficient way of inserting information is the stylus (or pen): field geologists are familiar with annotation and sketches. Therefore we suggest the use of devices with stylus. The main point is that Beebook is the first "transparent" mobile GIS for tablet and smartphone deriving from previous experience as traditional mapping and different previous digital mapping software ideation and development (MapIT, BeeGIS, Geopaparazzi

  7. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  8. Light field constancy within natural scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mury, Alexander A.; Pont, Sylvia C.; Koenderink, Jan J.

    2007-10-01

    The structure of light fields of natural scenes is highly complex due to high frequencies in the radiance distribution function. However it is the low-order properties of light that determine the appearance of common matte materials. We describe the local light field in terms of spherical harmonics and analyze the qualitative properties and physical meaning of the low-order components. We take a first step in the further development of Gershun's classical work on the light field by extending his description beyond the 3D vector field, toward a more complete description of the illumination using tensors. We show that the three first components, namely, the monopole (density of light), the dipole (light vector), and the quadrupole (squash tensor) suffice to describe a wide range of qualitatively different light fields. In this paper we address a related issue, namely, the spatial properties of light fields within natural scenes. We want to find out to what extent local light fields change from point to point and how different orders behave. We found experimentally that the low-order components of the light field are rather constant over the scenes whereas high-order components are not. Using very simple models, we found a strong relationship between the low-order components and the geometrical layouts of the scenes.

  9. Infrared light field imaging using single carbon nanotube detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Chen, Liangliang; Zhou, Zhanxin; Yang, Ruiguo; Song, Bo; Sun, Zhiyong

    2014-06-01

    The conventional photographs only record the sum total of light rays of each point on image plane so that they tell little about the amount of light traveling along individual rays. The focus and lens aberration problems have challenged photographers since the very beginning therefore light field photography was proposed to solve these problems. Lens array and multiple camera systems are used to capture 4D light rays, by reordering the different views of scene from multiple directions. The coded aperture is another method to encode the angular information in frequency domain. However, infrared light field sensing is still widely opening to research. In the paper, we will propose micro plane mirror optics together with compressive sensing algorithm to record light field in infrared spectrum. The micro mirror reflects objects irradiation and forms a virtual image behind the plane in which the mirror lies. The Digital Micromirror (DMD) consists of millions microscale mirrors which work as CCD array in the camera and it is controlled separately so as to project linear combination of object image onto lens. Coded aperture could be utilized to control angular resolution of infrared light rays. The carbon nanotube based infrared detector, which has ultra high signal to noise ratio and ultra fast responsibility, will sum up all image information on it without image distortion. Based on a number of measurements, compressive sensing algorithm was used to recover images from distinct angles, which could compute different views of scene to reconstruct infrared light field scence. Two innovative applications of full image recovery using nano scale photodetector and DMD based synthetic aperture photography will also be discussed in this paper.

  10. Guidelines for Recreation and Athletic Field Lighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crookham, Joe P.

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines for planning the lighting facilities for recreational and other athletic fields are presented (a softball field is used for an example). Guidelines are given for determining (1) lighting needs and levels of uniformity; (2) lamp choice; (3) structural requirements; (4) operating and maintenance costs; and (5) financing options. (PP)

  11. 4D Electron Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-06-01

    Electron tomography provides three-dimensional (3D) imaging of noncrystalline and crystalline equilibrium structures, as well as elemental volume composition, of materials and biological specimens, including those of viruses and cells. We report the development of 4D electron tomography by integrating the fourth dimension (time resolution) with the 3D spatial resolution obtained from a complete tilt series of 2D projections of an object. The different time frames of tomograms constitute a movie of the object in motion, thus enabling studies of nonequilibrium structures and transient processes. The method was demonstrated using carbon nanotubes of a bracelet-like ring structure for which 4D tomograms display different modes of motion, such as breathing and wiggling, with resonance frequencies up to 30 megahertz. Applications can now make use of the full space-time range with the nanometer-femtosecond resolution of ultrafast electron tomography.

  12. Structured light field 3D imaging.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zewei; Liu, Xiaoli; Peng, Xiang; Yin, Yongkai; Li, Ameng; Wu, Jiachen; Gao, Bruce Z

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a method by means of light field imaging under structured illumination to deal with high dynamic range 3D imaging. Fringe patterns are projected onto a scene and modulated by the scene depth then a structured light field is detected using light field recording devices. The structured light field contains information about ray direction and phase-encoded depth, via which the scene depth can be estimated from different directions. The multidirectional depth estimation can achieve high dynamic 3D imaging effectively. We analyzed and derived the phase-depth mapping in the structured light field and then proposed a flexible ray-based calibration approach to determine the independent mapping coefficients for each ray. Experimental results demonstrated the validity of the proposed method to perform high-quality 3D imaging for highly and lowly reflective surfaces. PMID:27607639

  13. Watermarking scheme for microlens-array-based four-dimensional light field imaging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yucheng; You, Suping; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Bo; Peng, Runling; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a watermark scheme for lenslet-based light field imaging operating on its 4D Fourier domain. In this scheme, the computational light field of the 2D watermark is first obtained. A slice of its frequency spectrum is then generated. After that, the watermark is embedded into the host light field by slice displacement. The experimental simulations show that the proposed scheme is simple in complexity while the robustness is strong. In addition, it does not bring significant artifacts or distortion into the refocused image or the depth map.

  14. Automatic generation of time resolved motion vector fields of coronary arteries and 4D surface extraction using rotational x-ray angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandt, Uwe; Schäfer, Dirk; Grass, Michael; Rasche, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Rotational coronary angiography provides a multitude of x-ray projections of the contrast agent enhanced coronary arteries along a given trajectory with parallel ECG recording. These data can be used to derive motion information of the coronary arteries including vessel displacement and pulsation. In this paper, a fully automated algorithm to generate 4D motion vector fields for coronary arteries from multi-phase 3D centerline data is presented. The algorithm computes similarity measures of centerline segments at different cardiac phases and defines corresponding centerline segments as those with highest similarity. In order to achieve an excellent matching accuracy, an increasing number of bifurcations is included as reference points in an iterative manner. Based on the motion data, time-dependent vessel surface extraction is performed on the projections without the need of prior reconstruction. The algorithm accuracy is evaluated quantitatively on phantom data. The magnitude of longitudinal errors (parallel to the centerline) reaches approx. 0.50 mm and is thus more than twice as large as the transversal 3D extraction errors of the underlying multi-phase 3D centerline data. It is shown that the algorithm can extract asymmetric stenoses accurately. The feasibility on clinical data is demonstrated on five different cases. The ability of the algorithm to extract time-dependent surface data, e.g. for quantification of pulsating stenosis is demonstrated.

  15. The global structure of the visual light field and its relation to the physical light field.

    PubMed

    Kartashova, Tatiana; Sekulovski, Dragan; de Ridder, Huib; Pas, Susan F Te; Pont, Sylvia C

    2016-08-01

    Human observers have been demonstrated to be sensitive to the local (physical) light field, or more precisely, to the primary direction, intensity, and diffuseness of the light at a point in a space. In the present study we focused on the question of whether it is possible to reconstruct the global visual light field, based on observers' inferences of the local light properties. Observers adjusted the illumination on a probe in order to visually fit it in three diversely lit scenes. For each scene they made 36 settings on a regular grid. The global structure of the first order properties of the light field could then indeed be reconstructed by interpolation of light vectors coefficients representing the local settings. We demonstrate that the resulting visual light fields (individual and averaged) can be visualized and we show how they can be compared to physical measurements in the same scenes. Our findings suggest that human observers have a robust impression of the light field that is simplified with respect to the physical light field. In particular, the subtle spatial variations of the physical light fields are largely neglected and the visual light fields were more similar to simple diverging fields than to the actual physical light fields. PMID:27548087

  16. Camera array based light field microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xing; Wu, Jiamin; Zheng, Guoan; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for high-resolution light field microscopy imaging by using a camera array. In this approach, we apply a two-stage relay system for expanding the aperture plane of the microscope into the size of an imaging lens array, and utilize a sensor array for acquiring different sub-apertures images formed by corresponding imaging lenses. By combining the rectified and synchronized images from 5 × 5 viewpoints with our prototype system, we successfully recovered color light field videos for various fast-moving microscopic specimens with a spatial resolution of 0.79 megapixels at 30 frames per second, corresponding to an unprecedented data throughput of 562.5 MB/s for light field microscopy. We also demonstrated the use of the reported platform for different applications, including post-capture refocusing, phase reconstruction, 3D imaging, and optical metrology. PMID:26417490

  17. The visual light field in real scenes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ling; Pont, Sylvia C.; Heynderickx, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Human observers' ability to infer the light field in empty space is known as the “visual light field.” While most relevant studies were performed using images on computer screens, we investigate the visual light field in a real scene by using a novel experimental setup. A “probe” and a scene were mixed optically using a semitransparent mirror. Twenty participants were asked to judge whether the probe fitted the scene with regard to the illumination intensity, direction, and diffuseness. Both smooth and rough probes were used to test whether observers use the additional cues for the illumination direction and diffuseness provided by the 3D texture over the rough probe. The results confirmed that observers are sensitive to the intensity, direction, and diffuseness of the illumination also in real scenes. For some lighting combinations on scene and probe, the awareness of a mismatch between the probe and scene was found to depend on which lighting condition was on the scene and which on the probe, which we called the “swap effect.” For these cases, the observers judged the fit to be better if the average luminance of the visible parts of the probe was closer to the average luminance of the visible parts of the scene objects. The use of a rough instead of smooth probe was found to significantly improve observers' abilities to detect mismatches in lighting diffuseness and directions. PMID:25926970

  18. Biomimetic 4D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydney Gladman, A.; Matsumoto, Elisabetta A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mahadevan, L.; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-04-01

    Shape-morphing systems can be found in many areas, including smart textiles, autonomous robotics, biomedical devices, drug delivery and tissue engineering. The natural analogues of such systems are exemplified by nastic plant motions, where a variety of organs such as tendrils, bracts, leaves and flowers respond to environmental stimuli (such as humidity, light or touch) by varying internal turgor, which leads to dynamic conformations governed by the tissue composition and microstructural anisotropy of cell walls. Inspired by these botanical systems, we printed composite hydrogel architectures that are encoded with localized, anisotropic swelling behaviour controlled by the alignment of cellulose fibrils along prescribed four-dimensional printing pathways. When combined with a minimal theoretical framework that allows us to solve the inverse problem of designing the alignment patterns for prescribed target shapes, we can programmably fabricate plant-inspired architectures that change shape on immersion in water, yielding complex three-dimensional morphologies.

  19. Biomimetic 4D printing.

    PubMed

    Gladman, A Sydney; Matsumoto, Elisabetta A; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Mahadevan, L; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Shape-morphing systems can be found in many areas, including smart textiles, autonomous robotics, biomedical devices, drug delivery and tissue engineering. The natural analogues of such systems are exemplified by nastic plant motions, where a variety of organs such as tendrils, bracts, leaves and flowers respond to environmental stimuli (such as humidity, light or touch) by varying internal turgor, which leads to dynamic conformations governed by the tissue composition and microstructural anisotropy of cell walls. Inspired by these botanical systems, we printed composite hydrogel architectures that are encoded with localized, anisotropic swelling behaviour controlled by the alignment of cellulose fibrils along prescribed four-dimensional printing pathways. When combined with a minimal theoretical framework that allows us to solve the inverse problem of designing the alignment patterns for prescribed target shapes, we can programmably fabricate plant-inspired architectures that change shape on immersion in water, yielding complex three-dimensional morphologies.

  20. Biomimetic 4D printing.

    PubMed

    Gladman, A Sydney; Matsumoto, Elisabetta A; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Mahadevan, L; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Shape-morphing systems can be found in many areas, including smart textiles, autonomous robotics, biomedical devices, drug delivery and tissue engineering. The natural analogues of such systems are exemplified by nastic plant motions, where a variety of organs such as tendrils, bracts, leaves and flowers respond to environmental stimuli (such as humidity, light or touch) by varying internal turgor, which leads to dynamic conformations governed by the tissue composition and microstructural anisotropy of cell walls. Inspired by these botanical systems, we printed composite hydrogel architectures that are encoded with localized, anisotropic swelling behaviour controlled by the alignment of cellulose fibrils along prescribed four-dimensional printing pathways. When combined with a minimal theoretical framework that allows us to solve the inverse problem of designing the alignment patterns for prescribed target shapes, we can programmably fabricate plant-inspired architectures that change shape on immersion in water, yielding complex three-dimensional morphologies. PMID:26808461

  1. The scientific value of 4D visualizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minster, J.; Olsen, K.; Day, S.; Moore, R.; Jordan, T. H.; Maechling, P.; Chourasia, A.

    2006-12-01

    Significant scientific insights derive from viewing measured, or calculated three-dimensional, time-dependent -- that is four-dimensional-- fields. This issue cuts across all disciplines of Earth Sciences. Addressing it calls for close collaborations between "domain" scientists and "IT" visualization specialists. Techniques to display such 4D fields in a intuitive way are a major challenge, especially when the relevant variables to be displayed are not scalars but tensors. This talk will illustrate some attempts to deal with this challenge, using seismic wave fields as specific objects to display. We will highlight how 4D displays can help address very difficult issues of significant scientific import.

  2. High-resolution light field reconstruction using a hybrid imaging system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Li, Lin; Hou, GuangQi

    2016-04-01

    Recently, light field cameras have drawn much attraction for their innovative performance in photographic and scientific applications. However, narrow baselines and constrained spatial resolution of current light field cameras impose restrictions on their usability. Therefore, we design a hybrid imaging system containing a light field camera and a high-resolution digital single lens reflex camera, and these two kinds of cameras share the same optical path with a beam splitter so as to achieve the reconstruction of high-resolution light fields. The high-resolution 4D light fields are reconstructed with a phase-based perspective variation strategy. First, we apply complex steerable pyramid decomposition on the high-resolution image from the digital single lens reflex camera. Then, we perform phase-based perspective-shift processing with the disparity value, which is extracted from the upsampled light field depth map, to create high-resolution synthetic light field images. High-resolution digital refocused images and high-resolution depth maps can be generated in this way. Furthermore, controlling the magnitude of the perspective shift enables us to change the depth of field rendering in the digital refocused images. We show several experimental results to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  3. 4D seismic to image a thin carbonate reservoir during a miscible C02 flood: Hall-Gurney Field, Kansas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raef, A.E.; Miller, R.D.; Franseen, E.K.; Byrnes, A.P.; Watney, W.L.; Harrison, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The movement of miscible CO2 injected into a shallow (900 m) thin (3.6-6m) carbonate reservoir was monitored using the high-resolution parallel progressive blanking (PPB) approach. The approach concentrated on repeatability during acquisition and processing, and use of amplitude envelope 4D horizon attributes. Comparison of production data and reservoir simulations to seismic images provided a measure of the effectiveness of time-lapse (TL) to detect weak anomalies associated with changes in fluid concentration. Specifically, the method aided in the analysis of high-resolution data to distinguish subtle seismic characteristics and associated trends related to depositional lithofacies and geometries and structural elements of this carbonate reservoir that impact fluid character and EOR efforts.

  4. Wave optics theory and 3-D deconvolution for the light field microscope

    PubMed Central

    Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Yang, Samuel; Cohen, Noy; Andalman, Aaron; Deisseroth, Karl; Levoy, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Light field microscopy is a new technique for high-speed volumetric imaging of weakly scattering or fluorescent specimens. It employs an array of microlenses to trade off spatial resolution against angular resolution, thereby allowing a 4-D light field to be captured using a single photographic exposure without the need for scanning. The recorded light field can then be used to computationally reconstruct a full volume. In this paper, we present an optical model for light field microscopy based on wave optics, instead of previously reported ray optics models. We also present a 3-D deconvolution method for light field microscopy that is able to reconstruct volumes at higher spatial resolution, and with better optical sectioning, than previously reported. To accomplish this, we take advantage of the dense spatio-angular sampling provided by a microlens array at axial positions away from the native object plane. This dense sampling permits us to decode aliasing present in the light field to reconstruct high-frequency information. We formulate our method as an inverse problem for reconstructing the 3-D volume, which we solve using a GPU-accelerated iterative algorithm. Theoretical limits on the depth-dependent lateral resolution of the reconstructed volumes are derived. We show that these limits are in good agreement with experimental results on a standard USAF 1951 resolution target. Finally, we present 3-D reconstructions of pollen grains that demonstrate the improvements in fidelity made possible by our method. PMID:24150383

  5. Enhancing the performance of the light field microscope using wavefront coding

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Noy; Yang, Samuel; Andalman, Aaron; Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Deisseroth, Karl; Horowitz, Mark; Levoy, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Light field microscopy has been proposed as a new high-speed volumetric computational imaging method that enables reconstruction of 3-D volumes from captured projections of the 4-D light field. Recently, a detailed physical optics model of the light field microscope has been derived, which led to the development of a deconvolution algorithm that reconstructs 3-D volumes with high spatial resolution. However, the spatial resolution of the reconstructions has been shown to be non-uniform across depth, with some z planes showing high resolution and others, particularly at the center of the imaged volume, showing very low resolution. In this paper, we enhance the performance of the light field microscope using wavefront coding techniques. By including phase masks in the optical path of the microscope we are able to address this non-uniform resolution limitation. We have also found that superior control over the performance of the light field microscope can be achieved by using two phase masks rather than one, placed at the objective’s back focal plane and at the microscope’s native image plane. We present an extended optical model for our wavefront coded light field microscope and develop a performance metric based on Fisher information, which we use to choose adequate phase masks parameters. We validate our approach using both simulated data and experimental resolution measurements of a USAF 1951 resolution target; and demonstrate the utility for biological applications with in vivo volumetric calcium imaging of larval zebrafish brain. PMID:25322056

  6. Enhancing the performance of the light field microscope using wavefront coding.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Noy; Yang, Samuel; Andalman, Aaron; Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Deisseroth, Karl; Horowitz, Mark; Levoy, Marc

    2014-10-01

    Light field microscopy has been proposed as a new high-speed volumetric computational imaging method that enables reconstruction of 3-D volumes from captured projections of the 4-D light field. Recently, a detailed physical optics model of the light field microscope has been derived, which led to the development of a deconvolution algorithm that reconstructs 3-D volumes with high spatial resolution. However, the spatial resolution of the reconstructions has been shown to be non-uniform across depth, with some z planes showing high resolution and others, particularly at the center of the imaged volume, showing very low resolution. In this paper, we enhance the performance of the light field microscope using wavefront coding techniques. By including phase masks in the optical path of the microscope we are able to address this non-uniform resolution limitation. We have also found that superior control over the performance of the light field microscope can be achieved by using two phase masks rather than one, placed at the objective's back focal plane and at the microscope's native image plane. We present an extended optical model for our wavefront coded light field microscope and develop a performance metric based on Fisher information, which we use to choose adequate phase masks parameters. We validate our approach using both simulated data and experimental resolution measurements of a USAF 1951 resolution target; and demonstrate the utility for biological applications with in vivo volumetric calcium imaging of larval zebrafish brain. PMID:25322056

  7. GUCLF: a new light field face database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavendra, R.; Raja, Kiran B.; Yang, Bian; Busch, Christoph

    2013-11-01

    The advancement in face recognition algorithm has a strong relationship with the availability of face databases that exhibit varying factors reflecting real life scenarios. The GUCLF face database is the first of its kind that can strongly influence the advancement in face recognition technology. In this paper, we introduce and describe our new face samples database collected using Lytro light field camera. The database consists of 200 reference samples and 303 probe samples collected from 25 subjects. The reference samples are collected in the controlled conditions using Canon EOS 550D DSLR camera. While probe samples are captured using both conventional digital camera (Sony DSC-S750) and Lytro light field camera. The probe samples are captured in three different scenarios: indoor, corridor and outdoor to include all possible real life conditions. In addition to the database description, this paper also elaborates on possible uses of the collected database and proposes a testing protocol. Further, we also present the quantitative results from the baseline experiments using the Kernel Discriminant Analysis (KDA).

  8. Small form factor full parallax tiled light field display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpaslan, Zahir Y.; El-Ghoroury, Hussein S.

    2015-03-01

    With the recent introduction of Ostendo's Quantum Photonic Imager (QPI) display technology, a very small pixel pitch, emissive display with high brightness and low power consumption became available. We used QPI's to create a high performance light field display tiles with a very small form factor. Using 8 of these QPI light field displays tiled in a 4x2 array we created a tiled full parallax light field display. Each individual light field display tile combines custom designed micro lens array layers with monochrome green QPIs. Each of the light field display tiles can address 1000 x 800 pixels placed under an array of 20 x 16 lenslets with 500 μm diameters. The light field display tiles are placed with small gaps to create a tiled display of approximately 46 mm (W) x 17 mm (H) x 2 mm (D) in mechanical dimensions. The prototype tiled full parallax light field display demonstrates small form factor, high resolution and focus cues.

  9. Nondipole Effects in Xe 4d Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmers, O; Guillemin, R; Wolska, A; Lindle, D W; Rolles, D; Cheng, K T; Johnson, W R; Zhou, H L; Manson, S T

    2004-07-14

    We measured the nondipole parameters for the spin-orbit doublets Xe 4d{sub 5/2} and Xe 4d{sub 3/2} over a photon-energy range from 100 eV to 250 eV at beamline 8.0.1.3 of the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Significant nondipole effects are found at relatively low energies as a result of Cooper minima in dipole channels and interchannel coupling in quadrupole channels. Most importantly, sharp disagreement between experiment and theory, when otherwise excellent agreement was expected, has provided the first evidence of satellite two-electron quadrupole photoionization transitions, along with their crucial importance for a quantitatively accurate theory.

  10. Aberration influenced generation of rotating two-lobe light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, S. P.; Losevsky, N. N.; Prokopova, D. V.; Samagin, S. A.; Volostnikov, V. G.; Vorontsov, E. N.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of aberrations on light fields with a rotating intensity distribution is considered. Light fields were generated with the phase masks developed using the theory of spiral beam optics. The effects of basic aberrations, such as spherical aberration, astigmatism and coma are studied. The experimental implementation of the fields was achieved with the assistance of a liquid crystal spatial light modulator HOLOEYE HEO-1080P, operating in reflection mode. The results of mathematical modelling and experiments have been qualitatively compared.

  11. High-Resolution Light Field Capture With Coded Aperture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Ping; Wang, Li-Chun; Kong, De-Hui; Yin, Bao-Cai

    2015-12-01

    Acquiring light field with larger angular resolution and higher spatial resolution in low cost is the goal of light field capture. Combining or modifying traditional optical cameras is a usual method for designing light field capture equipment, among which most models should deliberate trade-off between angular and spatial resolution, but augmenting coded aperture avoids this consideration by multiplexing information from different views. On the basis of coded aperture, this paper suggests an improved light field camera model that has double measurements and one mask. The two compressive measurements are respectively realized by a coded aperture and a random convolution CMOS imager, the latter is used as imaging sensor of the camera. The single mask design permits high light efficiency, which enables the sampling images to have high clarity. The double measurement design keeps more correlation information, which is conductive to enhancing the reconstructed light field. The higher clarity and more correlation of samplings mean higher quality of rebuilt light field, which also means higher resolution under condition of a lower PSNR requirement for rebuilt light field. Experimental results have verified advantage of the proposed design: compared with the representative mask-based light field camera models, the proposed model has the highest reconstruction quality and a higher light efficiency.

  12. Pros and cons for C4d as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Danielle; Colvin, Robert B; Daha, Mohamed R; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Haas, Mark; Nickeleit, Volker; Salmon, Jane E; Sis, Banu; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Bruijn, Jan A; Bajema, Ingeborg M

    2012-04-01

    The introduction of C4d in daily clinical practice in the late nineties aroused an ever-increasing interest in the role of antibody-mediated mechanisms in allograft rejection. As a marker of classical complement activation, C4d made it possible to visualize the direct link between anti-donor antibodies and tissue injury at sites of antibody binding in a graft. With the expanding use of C4d worldwide several limitations of C4d were identified. For instance, in ABO-incompatible transplantations C4d is present in the majority of grafts but this seems to point at 'graft accommodation' rather than antibody-mediated rejection. C4d is now increasingly recognized as a potential biomarker in other fields where antibodies can cause tissue damage, such as systemic autoimmune diseases and pregnancy. In all these fields, C4d holds promise to detect patients at risk for the consequences of antibody-mediated disease. Moreover, the emergence of new therapeutics that block complement activation makes C4d a marker with potential to identify patients who may possibly benefit from these drugs. This review provides an overview of the past, present, and future perspectives of C4d as a biomarker, focusing on its use in solid organ transplantation and discussing its possible new roles in autoimmunity and pregnancy. PMID:22297669

  13. Intrafield CD variation by stray light from neighboring field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chang-Moon; Song, Jung-Ho; Woo, Sung-Soo; Kwon, Ki-Sung; Ahn, Chang-Nam; Shin, Ki-Soo

    2002-07-01

    The main object of this paper is to investigate the root cause of CD change by neighboring field observed in KrF scanner (max. 0.70NA) and to measure the amount of stray light from neighboring field precisely. Line widths of gate pattern are measured at the isolated and surrounded field and the amount of CD change by neighboring field is found to be proportional to the clear ratio of mask. By exposing with special configuration, it is found that the line width is linearly decreased as the dose of neighboring field increases. From this linear dependency on doses of neighboring field, it is clear that non-negligible amount of light is scattered out into the adjacent field. The amount of this stray light level coming from neighboring field is obtained quantitatively by synthetic analysis of above result and double exposure to mimic background DC light by flare. About 1.2% of stray light from outside of the field is observed at the slit position close to the boundary of neighboring field. Disappearing pad test is also performed to measure the flare from exposure of field itself. Finally, it is obtained the distribution of total stray light - nominal flare plus flare from adjacent field - and it is found to be existed around 0.7% deviation of stray light across the slit.

  14. Simple quality assurance method of dynamic tumor tracking with the gimbaled linac system using a light field.

    PubMed

    Miura, Hideharu; Ozawa, Shuichi; Hayata, Masahiro; Tsuda, Shintaro; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a simple visual method for evaluating the dynamic tumor tracking (DTT) accuracy of a gimbal mechanism using a light field. A single photon beam was set with a field size of 30 × 30 mm2 at a gantry angle of 90°. The center of a cube phantom was set up at the isocenter of a motion table, and 4D modeling was performed based on the tumor and infrared (IR) marker motion. After 4D modeling, the cube phantom was replaced with a sheet of paper, which was placed perpen-dicularly, and a light field was projected on the sheet of paper. The light field was recorded using a web camera in a treatment room that was as dark as possible. Calculated images from each image obtained using the camera were summed to compose a total summation image. Sinusoidal motion sequences were produced by moving the phantom with a fixed amplitude of 20 mm and different breathing periods of 2, 4, 6, and 8 s. The light field was projected on the sheet of paper under three conditions: with the moving phantom and DTT based on the motion of the phantom, with the moving phantom and non-DTT, and with a stationary phantom for comparison. The values of tracking errors using the light field were 1.12 ± 0.72, 0.31 ± 0.19, 0.27 ± 0.12, and 0.15 ± 0.09 mm for breathing periods of 2, 4, 6, and 8s, respectively. The tracking accuracy showed dependence on the breath-ing period. We proposed a simple quality assurance (QA) process for the tracking accuracy of a gimbal mechanism system using a light field and web camera. Our method can assess the tracking accuracy using a light field without irradiation and clearly visualize distributions like film dosimetry. PMID:27685142

  15. Simple quality assurance method of dynamic tumor tracking with the gimbaled linac system using a light field.

    PubMed

    Miura, Hideharu; Ozawa, Shuichi; Hayata, Masahiro; Tsuda, Shintaro; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2016-09-08

    We proposed a simple visual method for evaluating the dynamic tumor tracking (DTT) accuracy of a gimbal mechanism using a light field. A single photon beam was set with a field size of 30 × 30 mm2 at a gantry angle of 90°. The center of a cube phantom was set up at the isocenter of a motion table, and 4D modeling was performed based on the tumor and infrared (IR) marker motion. After 4D modeling, the cube phantom was replaced with a sheet of paper, which was placed perpen-dicularly, and a light field was projected on the sheet of paper. The light field was recorded using a web camera in a treatment room that was as dark as possible. Calculated images from each image obtained using the camera were summed to compose a total summation image. Sinusoidal motion sequences were produced by moving the phantom with a fixed amplitude of 20 mm and different breathing periods of 2, 4, 6, and 8 s. The light field was projected on the sheet of paper under three conditions: with the moving phantom and DTT based on the motion of the phantom, with the moving phantom and non-DTT, and with a stationary phantom for comparison. The values of tracking errors using the light field were 1.12 ± 0.72, 0.31 ± 0.19, 0.27 ± 0.12, and 0.15 ± 0.09 mm for breathing periods of 2, 4, 6, and 8s, respectively. The tracking accuracy showed dependence on the breath-ing period. We proposed a simple quality assurance (QA) process for the tracking accuracy of a gimbal mechanism system using a light field and web camera. Our method can assess the tracking accuracy using a light field without irradiation and clearly visualize distributions like film dosimetry.

  16. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2006-08-22

    This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

  17. Coherent effects in the field of elliptically polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Ch.; Biancalana, Valerio; Cartaleva, Stefka S.; Dancheva, Yordanka V.; Karaulanov, Todor S.; Mariotti, E.; Moi, L.; Nasyrov, K. A.

    2004-06-01

    In the present communication we report on the investigation of the effect of elliptically polarized laser light exciting the Fg=3 Cs D2 absorption line. Coherent resonances in Cs have been studied, obtained in Hanle configuration by scanning of magnetic field parallel to the light propagation direction. The resonances were investigated depending on the polarization of the irradiating light field. It has been observed that for linear polarization dark resonances in the fluorescence are registered, while for circularly polarized light, bright resonances are obtained, probably due to stray orthogonal magnetic field. For elliptical polarization a narrow peak appears superimposed on a broader dip. Theoretical description has been made, which shows that at elliptical polarization and orthogonal magnetic field in the case of weak light fields, a single peak in the excited state population is observed, while strong fields lead to the splitting of this peak into two peaks. The presence of both weak and strong light fields, probably due to reflection of the light beam on the cell walls, could lead to the experimentally observed fluorescence behaviour.

  18. Light field reconstruction robust to signal dependent noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Kun; Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2014-11-01

    Capturing four dimensional light field data sequentially using a coded aperture camera is an effective approach but suffers from low signal noise ratio. Although multiplexing can help raise the acquisition quality, noise is still a big issue especially for fast acquisition. To address this problem, this paper proposes a noise robust light field reconstruction method. Firstly, scene dependent noise model is studied and incorporated into the light field reconstruction framework. Then, we derive an optimization algorithm for the final reconstruction. We build a prototype by hacking an off-the-shelf camera for data capturing and prove the concept. The effectiveness of this method is validated with experiments on the real captured data.

  19. Light Field Imaging Based Accurate Image Specular Highlight Removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoqian; Xu, Chenxue; Wang, Xingzheng; Zhang, Yongbing; Peng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Specular reflection removal is indispensable to many computer vision tasks. However, most existing methods fail or degrade in complex real scenarios for their individual drawbacks. Benefiting from the light field imaging technology, this paper proposes a novel and accurate approach to remove specularity and improve image quality. We first capture images with specularity by the light field camera (Lytro ILLUM). After accurately estimating the image depth, a simple and concise threshold strategy is adopted to cluster the specular pixels into "unsaturated" and "saturated" category. Finally, a color variance analysis of multiple views and a local color refinement are individually conducted on the two categories to recover diffuse color information. Experimental evaluation by comparison with existed methods based on our light field dataset together with Stanford light field archive verifies the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:27253083

  20. Face liveness detection using a light field camera.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sooyeon; Ban, Yuseok; Lee, Sangyoun

    2014-01-01

    A light field camera is a sensor that can record the directions as well as the colors of incident rays. This camera is widely utilized from 3D reconstruction to face and iris recognition. In this paper, we suggest a novel approach for defending spoofing face attacks, like printed 2D facial photos (hereinafter 2D photos) and HD tablet images, using the light field camera. By viewing the raw light field photograph from a different standpoint, we extract two special features which cannot be obtained from the conventional camera. To verify the performance, we compose light field photograph databases and conduct experiments. Our proposed method achieves at least 94.78% accuracy or up to 99.36% accuracy under different types of spoofing attacks. PMID:25436651

  1. Face Liveness Detection Using a Light Field Camera

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sooyeon; Ban, Yuseok; Lee, Sangyoun

    2014-01-01

    A light field camera is a sensor that can record the directions as well as the colors of incident rays. This camera is widely utilized from 3D reconstruction to face and iris recognition. In this paper, we suggest a novel approach for defending spoofing face attacks, like printed 2D facial photos (hereinafter 2D photos) and HD tablet images, using the light field camera. By viewing the raw light field photograph from a different standpoint, we extract two special features which cannot be obtained from the conventional camera. To verify the performance, we compose light field photograph databases and conduct experiments. Our proposed method achieves at least 94.78% accuracy or up to 99.36% accuracy under different types of spoofing attacks. PMID:25436651

  2. Light Field Imaging Based Accurate Image Specular Highlight Removal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haoqian; Xu, Chenxue; Wang, Xingzheng; Zhang, Yongbing; Peng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Specular reflection removal is indispensable to many computer vision tasks. However, most existing methods fail or degrade in complex real scenarios for their individual drawbacks. Benefiting from the light field imaging technology, this paper proposes a novel and accurate approach to remove specularity and improve image quality. We first capture images with specularity by the light field camera (Lytro ILLUM). After accurately estimating the image depth, a simple and concise threshold strategy is adopted to cluster the specular pixels into “unsaturated” and “saturated” category. Finally, a color variance analysis of multiple views and a local color refinement are individually conducted on the two categories to recover diffuse color information. Experimental evaluation by comparison with existed methods based on our light field dataset together with Stanford light field archive verifies the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:27253083

  3. Maximally polarized states for quantum light fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Soto, Luis L.; Yustas, Eulogio C.; Bjoerk, Gunnar; Klimov, Andrei B.

    2007-10-15

    The degree of polarization of a quantum field can be defined as its distance to an appropriate set of states. When we take unpolarized states as this reference set, the states optimizing this degree for a fixed average number of photons N present a fairly symmetric, parabolic photon statistic, with a variance scaling as N{sup 2}. Although no standard optical process yields such a statistic, we show that, to an excellent approximation, a highly squeezed vacuum can be taken as maximally polarized. We also consider the distance of a field to the set of its SU(2) transformed, finding that certain linear superpositions of SU(2) coherent states make this degree to be unity.

  4. APPROXIMATING LIGHT RAYS IN THE SCHWARZSCHILD FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Semerák, O.

    2015-02-10

    A short formula is suggested that approximates photon trajectories in the Schwarzschild field better than other simple prescriptions from the literature. We compare it with various ''low-order competitors'', namely, with those following from exact formulas for small M, with one of the results based on pseudo-Newtonian potentials, with a suitably adjusted hyperbola, and with the effective and often employed approximation by Beloborodov. Our main concern is the shape of the photon trajectories at finite radii, yet asymptotic behavior is also discussed, important for lensing. An example is attached indicating that the newly suggested approximation is usable—and very accurate—for practically solving the ray-deflection exercise.

  5. Gravitational field of a spinning pencil of light

    SciTech Connect

    Mitskievic, N.V.; Kumaradtya, K.K.

    1989-05-01

    An exact solution of Einstein's equations in a vacuum (outside of singularities), belonging to Kundt's class and Petrov type N, is interpreted as the metric of a spinning pencil of light (a linear source infinitely extended in one direction and moving with the speed of light). It is shown that the gravitational fields of two parallel pencils of light do not interact with each other, i.e., the superposition of the metrics of two parallel pencils of light is an exact solution of Einstein's equations in a vacuum.

  6. 4D-fingerprints, universal QSAR and QSPR descriptors.

    PubMed

    Senese, Craig L; Duca, J; Pan, D; Hopfinger, A J; Tseng, Y J

    2004-01-01

    An elusive goal in the field of chemoinformatics and molecular modeling has been the generation of a set of descriptors that, once calculated for a molecule, may be used in a wide variety of applications. Since such universal descriptors are generated free from external constraints, they are inherently independent of the data set in which they are employed. The realization of a set of universal descriptors would significantly streamline such chemoinformatics tasks as virtual high-throughout screening (VHTS) and toxicity profiling. The current study reports the derivation and validation of a potential set of universal descriptors, referred to as the 4D-fingerprints. The 4D-fingerprints are derived from the 4D-molecular similarity analysis. To evaluate the applicability of the 4D-fingerprints as universal descriptors, they are used to generate descriptive QSAR models for 5 independent training sets. Each of the training sets has been analyzed previously by several varying QSAR methods, and the results of the models generated using the 4D-fingerprints are compared to the results of the previous QSAR analyses. It was found that the models generated using the 4D-fingerprints are comparable in quality, based on statistical measures of fit and test set prediction, to the previously reported models for the other QSAR methods. This finding is particularly significant considering the 4D-fingerprints are generated independent of external constraints such as alignment, while the QSAR methods used for comparison all require an alignment analysis.

  7. ICT4D: A Computer Science Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutinen, Erkki; Tedre, Matti

    The term ICT4D refers to the opportunities of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) as an agent of development. Research in that field is often focused on evaluating the feasibility of existing technologies, mostly of Western or Far East Asian origin, in the context of developing regions. A computer science perspective is complementary to that agenda. The computer science perspective focuses on exploring the resources, or inputs, of a particular context and on basing the design of a technical intervention on the available resources, so that the output makes a difference in the development context. The modus operandi of computer science, construction, interacts with evaluation and exploration practices. An analysis of a contextualized information technology curriculum of Tumaini University in southern Tanzania shows the potential of the computer science perspective for designing meaningful information and communication technology for a developing region.

  8. Synthetic gauge fields for light beams in optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    A method to realize artificial magnetic fields for light waves trapped in passive optical cavities with anamorphic optical elements is theoretically proposed. In particular, when a homogeneous magnetic field is realized, a highly degenerate Landau-level structure for the frequency spectrum of the transverse resonator modes is obtained, corresponding to a cyclotron motion of the optical-cavity field. This can be probed by transient excitation of the passive optical resonator. PMID:26125337

  9. Synthetic gauge fields for light beams in optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    A method to realize artificial magnetic fields for light waves trapped in passive optical cavities with anamorphic optical elements is theoretically proposed. In particular, when a homogeneous magnetic field is realized, a highly degenerate Landau-level structure for the frequency spectrum of the transverse resonator modes is obtained, corresponding to a cyclotron motion of the optical-cavity field. This can be probed by transient excitation of the passive optical resonator.

  10. 4-D OCT in Developmental Cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    Although strong evidence exists to suggest that altered cardiac function can lead to CHDs, few studies have investigated the influential role of cardiac function and biophysical forces on the development of the cardiovascular system due to a lack of proper in vivo imaging tools. 4-D imaging is needed to decipher the complex spatial and temporal patterns of biomechanical forces acting upon the heart. Numerous solutions over the past several years have demonstrated 4-D OCT imaging of the developing cardiovascular system. This chapter will focus on these solutions and explain their context in the evolution of 4-D OCT imaging. The first sections describe the relevant techniques (prospective gating, direct 4-D imaging, retrospective gating), while later sections focus on 4-D Doppler imaging and measurements of force implementing 4-D OCT Doppler. Finally, the techniques are summarized, and some possible future directions are discussed.

  11. Augmented reality three-dimensional display with light field fusion.

    PubMed

    Xie, Songlin; Wang, Peng; Sang, Xinzhu; Li, Chengyu

    2016-05-30

    A video see-through augmented reality three-dimensional display method is presented. The system that is used for dense viewpoint augmented reality presentation fuses the light fields of the real scene and the virtual model naturally. Inherently benefiting from the rich information of the light field, depth sense and occlusion can be handled under no priori depth information of the real scene. A series of processes are proposed to optimize the augmented reality performance. Experimental results show that the reconstructed fused 3D light field on the autostereoscopic display is well presented. The virtual model is naturally integrated into the real scene with a consistence between binocular parallax and monocular depth cues. PMID:27410076

  12. Design of light field head-mounted display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Weitao; Wang, Yongtian; Cheng, Dewen; Liu, Yue

    2014-12-01

    A light field head-mounted display (LF-HMD) using a micro structure array (MSA, lens array or pinhole array) is proposed to realize true three dimensional (3D) display. Dense light field of 3D scene is generated inside the exit pupil of HMD and the viewer can obtain correct depth. This method not only solves the huge data problem in true 3D displays, but also alleviates the visual fatigue in traditional HMDs. Design considerations of LF-HMD system have been analyzed in detail and an optical see-through LF-HMD has been designed using a wedge-shaped freeform prism cemented with a freeform lens and a pinhole array. The experimental result shows that the proposed method is capable of generating a dense light field to obtain a corrected perception of depth.

  13. Augmented reality three-dimensional display with light field fusion.

    PubMed

    Xie, Songlin; Wang, Peng; Sang, Xinzhu; Li, Chengyu

    2016-05-30

    A video see-through augmented reality three-dimensional display method is presented. The system that is used for dense viewpoint augmented reality presentation fuses the light fields of the real scene and the virtual model naturally. Inherently benefiting from the rich information of the light field, depth sense and occlusion can be handled under no priori depth information of the real scene. A series of processes are proposed to optimize the augmented reality performance. Experimental results show that the reconstructed fused 3D light field on the autostereoscopic display is well presented. The virtual model is naturally integrated into the real scene with a consistence between binocular parallax and monocular depth cues.

  14. Controlling dielectrics with the electric field of light.

    PubMed

    Schultze, Martin; Bothschafter, Elisabeth M; Sommer, Annkatrin; Holzner, Simon; Schweinberger, Wolfgang; Fiess, Markus; Hofstetter, Michael; Kienberger, Reinhard; Apalkov, Vadym; Yakovlev, Vladislav S; Stockman, Mark I; Krausz, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    The control of the electric and optical properties of semiconductors with microwave fields forms the basis of modern electronics, information processing and optical communications. The extension of such control to optical frequencies calls for wideband materials such as dielectrics, which require strong electric fields to alter their physical properties. Few-cycle laser pulses permit damage-free exposure of dielectrics to electric fields of several volts per ångström and significant modifications in their electronic system. Fields of such strength and temporal confinement can turn a dielectric from an insulating state to a conducting state within the optical period. However, to extend electric signal control and processing to light frequencies depends on the feasibility of reversing these effects approximately as fast as they can be induced. Here we study the underlying electron processes with sub-femtosecond solid-state spectroscopy, which reveals the feasibility of manipulating the electronic structure and electric polarizability of a dielectric reversibly with the electric field of light. We irradiate a dielectric (fused silica) with a waveform-controlled near-infrared few-cycle light field of several volts per angström and probe changes in extreme-ultraviolet absorptivity and near-infrared reflectivity on a timescale of approximately a hundred attoseconds to a few femtoseconds. The field-induced changes follow, in a highly nonlinear fashion, the turn-on and turn-off behaviour of the driving field, in agreement with the predictions of a quantum mechanical model. The ultrafast reversibility of the effects implies that the physical properties of a dielectric can be controlled with the electric field of light, offering the potential for petahertz-bandwidth signal manipulation.

  15. Motion4D-library extended

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    The new version of the Motion4D-library now also includes the integration of a Sachs basis and the Jacobi equation to determine gravitational lensing of pointlike sources for arbitrary spacetimes.New version program summaryProgram title: Motion4D-libraryCatalogue identifier: AEEX_v3_0Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEX_v3_0.htmlProgram obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. IrelandLicensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.htmlNo. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 219 441No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6 968 223Distribution format: tar.gzProgramming language: C++Computer: All platforms with a C++ compilerOperating system: Linux, WindowsRAM: 61 MbytesClassification: 1.5External routines: Gnu Scientic Library (GSL) (http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/)Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEEX_v2_0Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 703Does the new version supersede the previous version?: YesNature of problem: Solve geodesic equation, parallel and Fermi-Walker transport in four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetimes. Determine gravitational lensing by integration of Jacobi equation and parallel transport of Sachs basis.Solution method: Integration of ordinary differential equations.Reasons for new version: The main novelty of the current version is the extension to integrate the Jacobi equation and the parallel transport of the Sachs basis along null geodesics. In combination, the change of the cross section of a light bundle and thus the gravitational lensing effect of a spacetime can be determined. Furthermore, we have implemented several new metrics.Summary of revisions: The main novelty of the current version is the integration of the Jacobi equation and the parallel transport of the Sachs basis along null geodesics. The corresponding set of equations readd2xμdλ2=-Γρ

  16. Two-Dimensional Massless Light Front Fields and Solvable Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinovic̆, L'ubomír; Grangé, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Quantum field theory formulated in terms of light front (LF) variables has a few attractive as well as some puzzling features. The latter hindered a wider acceptance of LF methods. In two space-time dimensions, it has been a long-standing puzzle how to correctly quantize massless fields, in particular fermions. Here we show that two-dimensional massless LF fields (scalar and fermion) can be recovered in a simple way as limits of the corresponding massive fields and thereby quantized without any loss of physical information. Bosonization of the fermion field then follows in a straightforward manner and the solvable models can be studied directly in the LF theory. We sketch the LF operator solution of the Thirring-Wess model and also point out the closeness of the massless LF fields to those of conformal field theory.

  17. Advances in 4D radiation therapy for managing respiration: part I - 4D imaging.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Geoffrey D; Rosu, Mihaela

    2012-12-01

    Techniques for managing respiration during imaging and planning of radiation therapy are reviewed, concentrating on free-breathing (4D) approaches. First, we focus on detailing the historical development and basic operational principles of currently-available "first generation" 4D imaging modalities: 4D computed tomography, 4D cone beam computed tomography, 4D magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D positron emission tomography. Features and limitations of these first generation systems are described, including necessity of breathing surrogates for 4D image reconstruction, assumptions made in acquisition and reconstruction about the breathing pattern, and commonly-observed artifacts. Both established and developmental methods to deal with these limitations are detailed. Finally, strategies to construct 4D targets and images and, alternatively, to compress 4D information into static targets and images for radiation therapy planning are described.

  18. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part I – 4D Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Rosu, Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    Techniques for managing respiration during imaging and planning of radiation therapy are reviewed, concentrating on free-breathing (4D) approaches. First, we focus on detailing the historical development and basic operational principles of currently-available “first generation” 4D imaging modalities: 4D computed tomography, 4D cone beam computed tomography, 4D magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D positron emission tomography. Features and limitations of these first generation systems are described, including necessity of breathing surrogates for 4D image reconstruction, assumptions made in acquisition and reconstruction about the breathing pattern, and commonly-observed artifacts. Both established and developmental methods to deal with these limitations are detailed. Finally, strategies to construct 4D targets and images and, alternatively, to compress 4D information into static targets and images for radiation therapy planning are described. PMID:22784929

  19. The Reaction of Dissociative Recombination in a Strong Light Field

    SciTech Connect

    Golubkov, M. G.; Golubkov, G. V.; Adamson, S. O.; Ryabinkin, I. G.; Apukhtina, N. V.; Dementiev, A. I.

    2008-10-22

    The DR theory of slow electrons with molecular ions in strong monochromatic light field is developed. The potential energy curves of the oxygen molecule O{sub 2}** dissociative states are calculated. Classification of all possible transitions and reaction mechanisms are presented.

  20. Parametrization of light clusters within relativistic mean field models

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Marcio; Providencia, Constanca

    2013-06-10

    Light clusters are included in the equation of state of nuclearmatter within the relativistic mean field theory. The effect of the cluster-meson coupling constants on the dissolution density is discussed. Theoretical and experimental constraints are used to fix the cluster-meson couplings at T Almost-Equal-To 5 MeV.

  1. Analytic expression for in-field scattered light distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Gary L.

    2004-01-01

    Light that is scattered from lenses and mirrors in an optical system produces a halo of stray light around bright objects within the field of view. The angular distribution of scattered light from any one component is usually described by the Harvey model. This paper presents analytic expressions for the scattered irradiance at a focal plane from optical components that scatter light in accordance with the Harvey model. It is found that the irradiance is independent of the location of an optical element within the system, provided the element is not located at or near an intermediate image plane. It is also found that the irradiance has little or no dependence on the size of the element.

  2. Infrared PINEM developed by diffraction in 4D UEM

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haihua; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2016-01-01

    The development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) has enabled not only observations of the ultrafast dynamics of photon–matter interactions at the atomic scale with ultrafast resolution in image, diffraction, and energy space, but photon–electron interactions in the field of nanoplasmonics and nanophotonics also have been captured by the related technique of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) in image and energy space. Here we report a further extension in the ongoing development of PINEM using a focused, nanometer-scale, electron beam in diffraction space for measurements of infrared-light-induced PINEM. The energy resolution in diffraction mode is unprecedented, reaching 0.63 eV under the 200-keV electron beam illumination, and separated peaks of the PINEM electron-energy spectrum induced by infrared light of wavelength 1,038 nm (photon energy 1.2 eV) have been well resolved for the first time, to our knowledge. In a comparison with excitation by green (519-nm) pulses, similar first-order PINEM peak amplitudes were obtained for optical fluence differing by a factor of more than 60 at the interface of copper metal and vacuum. Under high fluence, the nonlinear regime of IR PINEM was observed, and its spatial dependence was studied. In combination with PINEM temporal gating and low-fluence infrared excitation, the PINEM diffraction method paves the way for studies of structural dynamics in reciprocal space and energy space with high temporal resolution. PMID:26848135

  3. Stray light field dependence for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightsey, Paul A.

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large space based astronomical telescope that will operate at cryogenic temperatures. The architecture has the telescope exposed to space, with a large sun shield providing thermal isolation and protection from direct illumination from the sun. The instruments will have the capability to observe over a spectral range from 0.6 μm to 29 μm wavelengths. Stray light analysis has been performed to characterize the stray light getting to the instrument focal planes from the celestial sky. A Radiance Transfer Function (RTF) is defined for the susceptibility of stray light to sky radiance relative to the observatory frame of reference. The stray light is calculated by overlaying the radiance maps of the celestial sky background (both galactic and zodiacal background) onto the RTF map. The product of the two is summed to obtain the total stray light background at the instrument detectors. The orientation of the observatory for observing a given field location in the sky depends on the direction of the sun, hence the day of the year. The variability of stray light with time of year for observing a given sky locations is determined.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory 4D Database

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-02

    4D is an integrated development platform - a single product comprised of the components you need to create and distribute professional applications. You get a graphical design environment, SQL database, a programming language, integrated PHP execution, HTTP server, application server, executable generator, and much more. 4D offers multi-platform development and deployment, meaning whatever you create on a Mac can be used on Windows, and vice-versa. Beyond productive development, 4D is renowned for its great flexibility in maintenance and modification of existing applications, and its extreme ease of implementation in its numerous deployment options. Your professional application can be put into production more quickly, at a lower cost, and will always be instantly scalable. 4D makes it easy, whether you're looking to create a classic desktop application, a client-server system, a distributed solution for Web or mobile clients - or all of the above!

  5. Light pressure of time-dependent fields in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidler, A.; Schnabl, H.; Mulser, P.

    1985-01-01

    An expression of the light pressure Pi is derived for the case of a nearly monochromatic electromagnetic wave with arbitrarily time-dependent amplitude. Thereby Pi is defined as the time-averaged force density exerted on a plasma by the wave. The resulting equations are valid for both transverse and longitudinal waves. The light pressure turns out to consist of two components: the well-known gradient-type term and a new nonstationary solenoidal term. This is true for warm as well as cold plasmas. The importance of the new term for the generation of static magnetic fields is shown, and a model in which shear forces may result is given. Formulas for the nonstationary light pressure developed previously are discussed.

  6. Helical 4D CT and Comparison with Cine 4D CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tinsu

    4D CT was one of the most important developments in radiation oncology in the last decade. Its early development in single slice CT and commercialization in multi-slice CT has radically changed our practice in radiation treatment of lung cancer, and has enabled the stereotactic radiosurgery of early stage lung cancer. In this chapter, we will document the history of 4D CT development, detail the data sufficiency condition governing the 4D CT data collection; present the design of the commercial helical 4D CTs from Philips and Siemens; compare the differences between the helical 4D CT and the GE cine 4D CT in data acquisition, slice thickness, acquisition time and work flow; review the respiratory monitoring devices; and understand the causes of image artifacts in 4D CT.

  7. Near-field observation of light propagation in nanocoax waveguides.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Juan M; Ye, Fan; Rizal, Binod; Burns, Michael J; Naughton, Michael J

    2014-06-16

    We report the observation of propagating modes of visible and near infrared light in nanoscale coaxial (metal-dielectric-metal) structures, using near-field scanning optical microscopy. Together with numerical calculations, we show that the propagated modes have different nature depending on the excitation wavelength, i.e., plasmonic TE11 and TE21 modes in the near infrared and photonic TE31, TE41 and TM11 modes in the visible. Far field transmission out of the nanocoaxes is dominated by the superposition of Fabry-Perot cavity modes resonating in the structures, consistent with theory. Such coaxial optical waveguides may be useful for future nanoscale photonic systems.

  8. Observation of anticorrelation in incoherent thermal light fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Peng Tao; Karmakar, Sanjit; Xie Zhenda; Shih Yanhua

    2011-09-15

    We wish to report a recent experimental observation of anticorrelation from first-order and second-order incoherent thermal fields in the joint photodetection of two independent photodetectors. In the view of classical theory, the nontrivial second-order correlation of thermal light is caused by the statistical correlation of intensity fluctuations, which can be observed only from first-order coherent thermal radiations. What is the physical cause of this observed anticorrelation, then?.

  9. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature. PMID:26108967

  10. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-06-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature.

  11. 4D flow imaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran; Allen, Bradley D.; Garcia, Julio; Jarvis, Kelly B.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important tool for the clinical evaluation of patients with cardiovascular disease. Since its introduction in the late 1980s, 2-dimensional phase contrast MRI (2D PC-MRI) has become a routine part of standard-of-care cardiac MRI for the assessment of regional blood flow in the heart and great vessels. More recently, time-resolved PC-MRI with velocity encoding along all three flow directions and three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage (also termed ‘4D flow MRI’) has been developed and applied for the evaluation of cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the human body. 4D flow MRI allows for the comprehensive evaluation of complex blood flow patterns by 3D blood flow visualization and flexible retrospective quantification of flow parameters. Recent technical developments, including the utilization of advanced parallel imaging techniques such as k-t GRAPPA, have resulted in reasonable overall scan times, e.g., 8-12 minutes for 4D flow MRI of the aorta and 10-20 minutes for whole heart coverage. As a result, the application of 4D flow MRI in a clinical setting has become more feasible, as documented by an increased number of recent reports on the utility of the technique for the assessment of cardiac and vascular hemodynamics in patient studies. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential of 4D flow MRI to provide an improved assessment of hemodynamics which might aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to describe the methods used for 4D flow MRI acquisition, post-processing and data analysis. In addition, the article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D flow MRI and includes a review of applications in the heart, thoracic aorta and hepatic system. PMID:24834414

  12. Phosphodiesterase4D (PDE4D)--A risk factor for atrial fibrillation and stroke?

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Carina; Yasmeen, Saiqa; Iversen, Helle K; Kruuse, Christina

    2015-12-15

    Mutations in the gene encoding phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) enzyme are associated with ischemic stroke; however the functional implications of such mutations are not well understood. PDE4D is part of a complex protein family modulating intracellular signalling by cyclic nucleotides. The PDE4 family includes subtypes A-D, all of which show unique intracellular, cellular and tissue distribution. PDE4D is the major subtype expressed in human atrial myocytes and involved in the pathophysiology of arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation. The PDE4D enzyme hydrolyses cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Though diverging results are reported, several population based studies describe association of various PDE4D single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with cardio-embolic stroke in particular. Functionally, a down regulation of PDE4D variants has been reported in stroke patients. The anti-inflammatory and vasodilator properties of PDE4 inhibitors make them suitable for treatment of stroke and cardiovascular disease. PDE4D has recently been suggested as factor in atrial fibrillation. This review summarizes the possible function of PDE4D in the brain, heart, and vasculature. Further, association of the described SNPs, in particular, with cardioembolic stroke, is reviewed. Current findings on the PDE4D mutations suggest functionality involves an increased cardiac risk factor as well as augmented risk of atrial fibrillation. PMID:26671126

  13. Mapping motion from 4D-MRI to 3D-CT for use in 4D dose calculations: A technical feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Boye, Dirk; Lomax, Tony; Knopf, Antje

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Target sites affected by organ motion require a time resolved (4D) dose calculation. Typical 4D dose calculations use 4D-CT as a basis. Unfortunately, 4D-CT images have the disadvantage of being a 'snap-shot' of the motion during acquisition and of assuming regularity of breathing. In addition, 4D-CT acquisitions involve a substantial additional dose burden to the patient making many, repeated 4D-CT acquisitions undesirable. Here the authors test the feasibility of an alternative approach to generate patient specific 4D-CT data sets. Methods: In this approach motion information is extracted from 4D-MRI. Simulated 4D-CT data sets [which the authors call 4D-CT(MRI)] are created by warping extracted deformation fields to a static 3D-CT data set. The employment of 4D-MRI sequences for this has the advantage that no assumptions on breathing regularity are made, irregularities in breathing can be studied and, if necessary, many repeat imaging studies (and consequently simulated 4D-CT data sets) can be performed on patients and/or volunteers. The accuracy of 4D-CT(MRI)s has been validated by 4D proton dose calculations. Our 4D dose algorithm takes into account displacements as well as deformations on the originating 4D-CT/4D-CT(MRI) by calculating the dose of each pencil beam based on an individual time stamp of when that pencil beam is applied. According to corresponding displacement and density-variation-maps the position and the water equivalent range of the dose grid points is adjusted at each time instance. Results: 4D dose distributions, using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets as input were compared to results based on a reference conventional 4D-CT data set capturing similar motion characteristics. Almost identical 4D dose distributions could be achieved, even though scanned proton beams are very sensitive to small differences in the patient geometry. In addition, 4D dose calculations have been performed on the same patient, but using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets based on

  14. Determining 3D flow fields via multi-camera light field imaging.

    PubMed

    Truscott, Tadd T; Belden, Jesse; Nielson, Joseph R; Daily, David J; Thomson, Scott L

    2013-03-06

    In the field of fluid mechanics, the resolution of computational schemes has outpaced experimental methods and widened the gap between predicted and observed phenomena in fluid flows. Thus, a need exists for an accessible method capable of resolving three-dimensional (3D) data sets for a range of problems. We present a novel technique for performing quantitative 3D imaging of many types of flow fields. The 3D technique enables investigation of complicated velocity fields and bubbly flows. Measurements of these types present a variety of challenges to the instrument. For instance, optically dense bubbly multiphase flows cannot be readily imaged by traditional, non-invasive flow measurement techniques due to the bubbles occluding optical access to the interior regions of the volume of interest. By using Light Field Imaging we are able to reparameterize images captured by an array of cameras to reconstruct a 3D volumetric map for every time instance, despite partial occlusions in the volume. The technique makes use of an algorithm known as synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing, whereby a 3D focal stack is generated by combining images from several cameras post-capture (1). Light Field Imaging allows for the capture of angular as well as spatial information about the light rays, and hence enables 3D scene reconstruction. Quantitative information can then be extracted from the 3D reconstructions using a variety of processing algorithms. In particular, we have developed measurement methods based on Light Field Imaging for performing 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV), extracting bubbles in a 3D field and tracking the boundary of a flickering flame. We present the fundamentals of the Light Field Imaging methodology in the context of our setup for performing 3DPIV of the airflow passing over a set of synthetic vocal folds, and show representative results from application of the technique to a bubble-entraining plunging jet.

  15. Determining 3D Flow Fields via Multi-camera Light Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Belden, Jesse; Nielson, Joseph R.; Daily, David J.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    In the field of fluid mechanics, the resolution of computational schemes has outpaced experimental methods and widened the gap between predicted and observed phenomena in fluid flows. Thus, a need exists for an accessible method capable of resolving three-dimensional (3D) data sets for a range of problems. We present a novel technique for performing quantitative 3D imaging of many types of flow fields. The 3D technique enables investigation of complicated velocity fields and bubbly flows. Measurements of these types present a variety of challenges to the instrument. For instance, optically dense bubbly multiphase flows cannot be readily imaged by traditional, non-invasive flow measurement techniques due to the bubbles occluding optical access to the interior regions of the volume of interest. By using Light Field Imaging we are able to reparameterize images captured by an array of cameras to reconstruct a 3D volumetric map for every time instance, despite partial occlusions in the volume. The technique makes use of an algorithm known as synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing, whereby a 3D focal stack is generated by combining images from several cameras post-capture 1. Light Field Imaging allows for the capture of angular as well as spatial information about the light rays, and hence enables 3D scene reconstruction. Quantitative information can then be extracted from the 3D reconstructions using a variety of processing algorithms. In particular, we have developed measurement methods based on Light Field Imaging for performing 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV), extracting bubbles in a 3D field and tracking the boundary of a flickering flame. We present the fundamentals of the Light Field Imaging methodology in the context of our setup for performing 3DPIV of the airflow passing over a set of synthetic vocal folds, and show representative results from application of the technique to a bubble-entraining plunging jet. PMID:23486112

  16. Introduction to Atomic Dynamics in Intense Light Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Farhad H. M.

    A brief description is given of the early developments leading to the discovery of some of the basic phenomena that occur during the interaction of intense light fields with atomic systems - such as multiphoton ionization (MPI), above-threshold ionization (ATI), and high harmonic generation (HHG). Also outlined are the related theoretical concepts and the nonperturbative "KFR model" for interpreting the phenomena. Recent observation of the breakdown of a popular "tunneling model" (Keldysh γ < 1) is noted and the role of discrete photon effects that can account for the observed parallel momentum distribution is given. Next, the role of e-e correlation in intense-field processes in many-electron atomic systems is discussed. A systematic analysis of intense-field problems using the "intense-field many-body S-matrix theory" (IMST) is outlined. To this end, the basic motivation behind and the derivation of IMST is discussed, and its use is illustrated by application to the problem of nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) that provided a fully quantum analysis of the mechanism behind the NSDI process. Also discussed is how NSDI and its opposite, sequential double ionization (SDI), can both occur in intense fields depending, respectively, on near-infrared and ultraviolet wavelengths of the light field used. A mechanism for multiple ionization is suggested by the IMST diagrams, which can provide a good estimate of the known experimental observations of the ion states vs. intensity in noble gases. Finally, an example is given of the spatial distributions of the charge states that can be produced in the focal region (a "flying reaction vessel"!) of an intense Ti:sapphire laser.

  17. Reflective liquid crystal light valve with hybrid field effect mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boswell, Donald D. (Inventor); Grinberg, Jan (Inventor); Jacobson, Alexander D. (Inventor); Myer, Gary D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    There is disclosed a high performance reflective mode liquid crystal light valve suitable for general image processing and projection and particularly suited for application to real-time coherent optical data processing. A preferred example of the device uses a CdS photoconductor, a CdTe light absorbing layer, a dielectric mirror, and a liquid crystal layer sandwiched between indium-tin-oxide transparent electrodes deposited on optical quality glass flats. The non-coherent light image is directed onto the photoconductor; this reduces the impedance of the photoconductor, thereby switching the AC voltage that is impressed across the electrodes onto the liquid crystal to activate the device. The liquid crystal is operated in a hybrid field effect mode. It utilizes the twisted nematic effect to create a dark off-state (voltage off the liquid crystal) and the optical birefringence effect to create the bright on-state. The liquid crystal thus modulates the polarization of the coherent read-out or projection light responsively to the non-coherent image. An analyzer is used to create an intensity modulated output beam.

  18. Shadow-driven 4D haptic visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Hanson, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Just as we can work with two-dimensional floor plans to communicate 3D architectural design, we can exploit reduced-dimension shadows to manipulate the higher-dimensional objects generating the shadows. In particular, by taking advantage of physically reactive 3D shadow-space controllers, we can transform the task of interacting with 4D objects to a new level of physical reality. We begin with a teaching tool that uses 2D knot diagrams to manipulate the geometry of 3D mathematical knots via their projections; our unique 2D haptic interface allows the user to become familiar with sketching, editing, exploration, and manipulation of 3D knots rendered as projected imageson a 2D shadow space. By combining graphics and collision-sensing haptics, we can enhance the 2D shadow-driven editing protocol to successfully leverage 2D pen-and-paper or blackboard skills. Building on the reduced-dimension 2D editing tool for manipulating 3D shapes, we develop the natural analogy to produce a reduced-dimension 3D tool for manipulating 4D shapes. By physically modeling the correct properties of 4D surfaces, their bending forces, and their collisions in the 3D haptic controller interface, we can support full-featured physical exploration of 4D mathematical objects in a manner that is otherwise far beyond the experience accessible to human beings. As far as we are aware, this paper reports the first interactive system with force-feedback that provides "4D haptic visualization" permitting the user to model and interact with 4D cloth-like objects.

  19. 4D Confocal Imaging of Yeast Organelles.

    PubMed

    Day, Kasey J; Papanikou, Effrosyni; Glick, Benjamin S

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are well suited to visualizing organelles by 4D confocal microscopy. Typically, one or more cellular compartments are labeled with a fluorescent protein or dye, and a stack of confocal sections spanning the entire cell volume is captured every few seconds. Under appropriate conditions, organelle dynamics can be observed for many minutes with only limited photobleaching. Images are captured at a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio and are subsequently processed to generate movies that can be analyzed and quantified. Here, we describe methods for acquiring and processing 4D data using conventional scanning confocal microscopy. PMID:27631997

  20. Awareness of the light field: the case of deformation

    PubMed Central

    van Doorn, Andrea J.; Koenderink, Jan J.; Todd, James T.; Wagemans, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Human observers group local shading patterns into global super-patterns that appear to be illuminated in some unitary fashion. Many years ago, this was noticed for the case of uniform, unidirectional illumination. Recently, we found that it also applies to convergent and divergent illumination flows, but that human observers are blind to rotational light flow patterns (in the sense of being unable to group the local shading patterns). We now report that human observers are also blind to deformation patterns. This is perhaps interesting because convergent, divergent, rotational, and deformation patterns all occur in natural light fields. This is an idiosyncrasy of the human visual system, on par with the fact that visual awareness fails to present the observer with saddle shapes. PMID:23145298

  1. Controlled light field concentration through turbid biological membrane for phototherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fujuan; He, Hexiang; Zhuang, Huichang; Xie, Xiangsheng; Yang, Zhenchong; Cai, Zhigang; Gu, Huaiyu; Zhou, Jianying

    2015-01-01

    Laser propagation through a turbid rat dura mater membrane is shown to be controllable with a wavefront modulation technique. The scattered light field can be refocused into a target area behind the rat dura mater membrane with a 110 times intensity enhancement using a spatial light modulator. The efficient laser intensity concentration system is demonstrated to imitate the phototherapy for human brain tumors. The power density in the target area is enhanced more than 200 times compared with the input power density on the dura mater membrane, thus allowing continued irradiation concentration to the deep lesion without damage to the dura mater. Multibeam inputs along different directions, or at different positions, can be guided to focus to the same spot behind the membrane, hence providing a similar gamma knife function in optical spectral range. Moreover, both the polarization and the phase of the input field can be recovered in the target area, allowing coherent field superposition in comparison with the linear intensity superposition for the gamma knife. PMID:26114042

  2. Constrained reconstructions for 4D intervention guidance.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, J; Flach, B; Kueres, R; Semmler, W; Kachelriess, M; Bartling, S

    2013-05-21

    Image-guided interventions are an increasingly important part of clinical minimally invasive procedures. However, up to now they cannot be performed under 4D (3D + time) guidance due to the exceedingly high x-ray dose. In this work we investigate the applicability of compressed sensing reconstructions for highly undersampled CT datasets combined with the incorporation of prior images in order to yield low dose 4D intervention guidance. We present a new reconstruction scheme prior image dynamic interventional CT (PrIDICT) that accounts for specific image features in intervention guidance and compare it to PICCS and ASD-POCS. The optimal parameters for the dose per projection and the numbers of projections per reconstruction are determined in phantom simulations and measurements. In vivo experiments in six pigs are performed in a cone-beam CT; measured doses are compared to current gold-standard intervention guidance represented by a clinical fluoroscopy system. Phantom studies show maximum image quality for identical overall doses in the range of 14 to 21 projections per reconstruction. In vivo studies reveal that interventional materials can be followed in 4D visualization and that PrIDICT, compared to PICCS and ASD-POCS, shows superior reconstruction results and fewer artifacts in the periphery with dose in the order of biplane fluoroscopy. These results suggest that 4D intervention guidance can be realized with today's flat detector and gantry systems using the herein presented reconstruction scheme.

  3. 4D-Var Developement at GMAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelc, Joanna S.; Todling, Ricardo; Akkraoui, Amal El

    2014-01-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Offce (GMAO) is currently using an IAU-based 3D-Var data assimilation system. GMAO has been experimenting with a 3D-Var-hybrid version of its data assimilation system (DAS) for over a year now, which will soon become operational and it will rapidly progress toward a 4D-EnVar. Concurrently, the machinery to exercise traditional 4DVar is in place and it is desirable to have a comparison of the traditional 4D approach with the other available options, and evaluate their performance in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) DAS. This work will also explore the possibility for constructing a reduced order model (ROM) to make traditional 4D-Var computationally attractive for increasing model resolutions. Part of the research on ROM will be to search for a suitably acceptable space to carry on the corresponding reduction. This poster illustrates how the IAU-based 4D-Var assimilation compares with our currently used IAU-based 3D-Var.

  4. Constrained reconstructions for 4D intervention guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, J.; Flach, B.; Kueres, R.; Semmler, W.; Kachelrieß, M.; Bartling, S.

    2013-05-01

    Image-guided interventions are an increasingly important part of clinical minimally invasive procedures. However, up to now they cannot be performed under 4D (3D + time) guidance due to the exceedingly high x-ray dose. In this work we investigate the applicability of compressed sensing reconstructions for highly undersampled CT datasets combined with the incorporation of prior images in order to yield low dose 4D intervention guidance. We present a new reconstruction scheme prior image dynamic interventional CT (PrIDICT) that accounts for specific image features in intervention guidance and compare it to PICCS and ASD-POCS. The optimal parameters for the dose per projection and the numbers of projections per reconstruction are determined in phantom simulations and measurements. In vivo experiments in six pigs are performed in a cone-beam CT; measured doses are compared to current gold-standard intervention guidance represented by a clinical fluoroscopy system. Phantom studies show maximum image quality for identical overall doses in the range of 14 to 21 projections per reconstruction. In vivo studies reveal that interventional materials can be followed in 4D visualization and that PrIDICT, compared to PICCS and ASD-POCS, shows superior reconstruction results and fewer artifacts in the periphery with dose in the order of biplane fluoroscopy. These results suggest that 4D intervention guidance can be realized with today’s flat detector and gantry systems using the herein presented reconstruction scheme.

  5. Robust sky light polarization detection with an S-wave plate in a light field camera.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Cao, Yu; Liu, Haibo; Liu, Zejin

    2016-05-01

    The sky light polarization navigator has many advantages, such as low cost, no decrease in accuracy with continuous operation, etc. However, current celestial polarization measurement methods often suffer from low performance when the sky is covered by clouds, which reduce the accuracy of navigation. In this paper we introduce a new method and structure based on a handheld light field camera and a radial polarizer, composed of an S-wave plate and a linear polarizer, to detect the sky light polarization pattern across a wide field of view in a single snapshot. Each micro-subimage has a special intensity distribution. After extracting the texture feature of these subimages, stable distribution information of the angle of polarization under a cloudy sky can be obtained. Our experimental results match well with the predicted properties of the theory. Because the polarization pattern is obtained through image processing, rather than traditional methods based on mathematical computation, this method is less sensitive to errors of pixel gray value and thus has better anti-interference performance.

  6. Presentation attack detection for face recognition using light field camera.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, R; Raja, Kiran B; Busch, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    The vulnerability of face recognition systems isa growing concern that has drawn the interest from both academic and research communities. Despite the availability of a broad range of face presentation attack detection (PAD)(or countermeasure or antispoofing) schemes, there exists no superior PAD technique due to evolution of sophisticated presentation attacks (or spoof attacks). In this paper, we present a new perspective for face presentation attack detection by introducing light field camera (LFC). Since the use of a LFC can record the direction of each incoming ray in addition to the intensity, it exhibits an unique characteristic of rendering multiple depth(or focus) images in a single capture. Thus, we present a novel approach that involves exploring the variation of the focus between multiple depth (or focus) images rendered by the LFC that in turn can be used to reveal the presentation attacks. To this extent, we first collect a new face artefact database using LFC that comprises of 80 subjects. Face artefacts are generated by simulating two widely used attacks, such as photo print and electronic screen attack. Extensive experiments carried out on the light field face artefact database have revealed the outstanding performance of the proposed PAD scheme when benchmarked with various well established state-of-the-art schemes. PMID:25622320

  7. Computational photography with plenoptic camera and light field capture: tutorial.

    PubMed

    Lam, Edmund Y

    2015-11-01

    Photography is a cornerstone of imaging. Ever since cameras became consumer products more than a century ago, we have witnessed great technological progress in optics and recording mediums, with digital sensors replacing photographic films in most instances. The latest revolution is computational photography, which seeks to make image reconstruction computation an integral part of the image formation process; in this way, there can be new capabilities or better performance in the overall imaging system. A leading effort in this area is called the plenoptic camera, which aims at capturing the light field of an object; proper reconstruction algorithms can then adjust the focus after the image capture. In this tutorial paper, we first illustrate the concept of plenoptic function and light field from the perspective of geometric optics. This is followed by a discussion on early attempts and recent advances in the construction of the plenoptic camera. We will then describe the imaging model and computational algorithms that can reconstruct images at different focus points, using mathematical tools from ray optics and Fourier optics. Last, but not least, we will consider the trade-off in spatial resolution and highlight some research work to increase the spatial resolution of the resulting images. PMID:26560916

  8. Computational photography with plenoptic camera and light field capture: tutorial.

    PubMed

    Lam, Edmund Y

    2015-11-01

    Photography is a cornerstone of imaging. Ever since cameras became consumer products more than a century ago, we have witnessed great technological progress in optics and recording mediums, with digital sensors replacing photographic films in most instances. The latest revolution is computational photography, which seeks to make image reconstruction computation an integral part of the image formation process; in this way, there can be new capabilities or better performance in the overall imaging system. A leading effort in this area is called the plenoptic camera, which aims at capturing the light field of an object; proper reconstruction algorithms can then adjust the focus after the image capture. In this tutorial paper, we first illustrate the concept of plenoptic function and light field from the perspective of geometric optics. This is followed by a discussion on early attempts and recent advances in the construction of the plenoptic camera. We will then describe the imaging model and computational algorithms that can reconstruct images at different focus points, using mathematical tools from ray optics and Fourier optics. Last, but not least, we will consider the trade-off in spatial resolution and highlight some research work to increase the spatial resolution of the resulting images.

  9. Three-dimensional temperature field measurement of flame using a single light field camera.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Xu, Chuanlong; Zhang, Biao; Hossain, Md Moinul; Wang, Shimin; Qi, Hong; Tan, Heping

    2016-01-25

    Compared with conventional camera, the light field camera takes the advantage of being capable of recording the direction and intensity information of each ray projected onto the CCD (charge couple device) sensor simultaneously. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for reconstructing three-dimensional (3-D) temperature field of a flame based on a single light field camera. A radiative imaging of a single light field camera is also modeled for the flame. In this model, the principal ray represents the beam projected onto the pixel of the CCD sensor. The radiation direction of the ray from the flame outside the camera is obtained according to thin lens equation based on geometrical optics. The intensities of the principal rays recorded by the pixels on the CCD sensor are mathematically modeled based on radiative transfer equation. The temperature distribution of the flame is then reconstructed by solving the mathematical model through the use of least square QR-factorization algorithm (LSQR). The numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to investigate the validity of the proposed method. The results presented in this study show that the proposed method is capable of reconstructing the 3-D temperature field of a flame.

  10. Three-dimensional temperature field measurement of flame using a single light field camera.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Xu, Chuanlong; Zhang, Biao; Hossain, Md Moinul; Wang, Shimin; Qi, Hong; Tan, Heping

    2016-01-25

    Compared with conventional camera, the light field camera takes the advantage of being capable of recording the direction and intensity information of each ray projected onto the CCD (charge couple device) sensor simultaneously. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for reconstructing three-dimensional (3-D) temperature field of a flame based on a single light field camera. A radiative imaging of a single light field camera is also modeled for the flame. In this model, the principal ray represents the beam projected onto the pixel of the CCD sensor. The radiation direction of the ray from the flame outside the camera is obtained according to thin lens equation based on geometrical optics. The intensities of the principal rays recorded by the pixels on the CCD sensor are mathematically modeled based on radiative transfer equation. The temperature distribution of the flame is then reconstructed by solving the mathematical model through the use of least square QR-factorization algorithm (LSQR). The numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to investigate the validity of the proposed method. The results presented in this study show that the proposed method is capable of reconstructing the 3-D temperature field of a flame. PMID:26832496

  11. 4D flow mri post-processing strategies for neuropathologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrauben, Eric Mathew

    4D flow MRI allows for the measurement of a dynamic 3D velocity vector field. Blood flow velocities in large vascular territories can be qualitatively visualized with the added benefit of quantitative probing. Within cranial pathologies theorized to have vascular-based contributions or effects, 4D flow MRI provides a unique platform for comprehensive assessment of hemodynamic parameters. Targeted blood flow derived measurements, such as flow rate, pulsatility, retrograde flow, or wall shear stress may provide insight into the onset or characterization of more complex neuropathologies. Therefore, the thorough assessment of each parameter within the context of a given disease has important medical implications. Not surprisingly, the last decade has seen rapid growth in the use of 4D flow MRI. Data acquisition sequences are available to researchers on all major scanner platforms. However, the use has been limited mostly to small research trials. One major reason that has hindered the more widespread use and application in larger clinical trials is the complexity of the post-processing tasks and the lack of adequate tools for these tasks. Post-processing of 4D flow MRI must be semi-automated, fast, user-independent, robust, and reliably consistent for use in a clinical setting, within large patient studies, or across a multicenter trial. Development of proper post-processing methods coupled with systematic investigation in normal and patient populations pushes 4D flow MRI closer to clinical realization while elucidating potential underlying neuropathological origins. Within this framework, the work in this thesis assesses venous flow reproducibility and internal consistency in a healthy population. A preliminary analysis of venous flow parameters in healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients is performed in a large study employing 4D flow MRI. These studies are performed in the context of the chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency hypothesis. Additionally, a

  12. 4D electron microscopy: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2012-10-16

    achievable with short intense pulses containing a large number of electrons, however, are limited to tens of nanometers and nanoseconds, respectively. This is because Coulomb repulsion is significant in such a pulse, and the electrons spread in space and time, thus limiting the beam coherence. It is therefore not possible to image the ultrafast elementary dynamics of complex transformations. The challenge was to retain the high spatial resolution of a conventional TEM while simultaneously enabling the temporal resolution required to visualize atomic-scale motions. In this Account, we discuss the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) and summarize techniques and applications that illustrate the power of the approach. In UEM, images are obtained either stroboscopically with coherent single-electron packets or with a single electron bunch. Coulomb repulsion is absent under the single-electron condition, thus permitting imaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy, all with high spatiotemporal resolution, the atomic scale (sub-nanometer and femtosecond). The time resolution is limited only by the laser pulse duration and energy carried by the electron packets; the CCD camera has no bearing on the temporal resolution. In the regime of single pulses of electrons, the temporal resolution of picoseconds can be attained when hundreds of electrons are in the bunch. The applications given here are selected to highlight phenomena of different length and time scales, from atomic motions during structural dynamics to phase transitions and nanomechanical oscillations. We conclude with a brief discussion of emerging methods, which include scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM) with convergent beams, and time-resolved imaging of biological structures at ambient conditions with environmental cells.

  13. Interactive animation of 4D performance capture.

    PubMed

    Casas, Dan; Tejera, Margara; Guillemaut, Jean-Yves; Hilton, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    A 4D parametric motion graph representation is presented for interactive animation from actor performance capture in a multiple camera studio. The representation is based on a 4D model database of temporally aligned mesh sequence reconstructions for multiple motions. High-level movement controls such as speed and direction are achieved by blending multiple mesh sequences of related motions. A real-time mesh sequence blending approach is introduced, which combines the realistic deformation of previous nonlinear solutions with efficient online computation. Transitions between different parametric motion spaces are evaluated in real time based on surface shape and motion similarity. Four-dimensional parametric motion graphs allow real-time interactive character animation while preserving the natural dynamics of the captured performance.

  14. Interactive animation of 4D performance capture.

    PubMed

    Casas, Dan; Tejera, Margara; Guillemaut, Jean-Yves; Hilton, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    A 4D parametric motion graph representation is presented for interactive animation from actor performance capture in a multiple camera studio. The representation is based on a 4D model database of temporally aligned mesh sequence reconstructions for multiple motions. High-level movement controls such as speed and direction are achieved by blending multiple mesh sequences of related motions. A real-time mesh sequence blending approach is introduced, which combines the realistic deformation of previous nonlinear solutions with efficient online computation. Transitions between different parametric motion spaces are evaluated in real time based on surface shape and motion similarity. Four-dimensional parametric motion graphs allow real-time interactive character animation while preserving the natural dynamics of the captured performance. PMID:23492379

  15. Founding Gravitation in 4D Euclidean Space-Time Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Franz-Guenter

    2010-11-24

    The Euclidean interpretation of special relativity which has been suggested by the author is a formulation of special relativity in ordinary 4D Euclidean space-time geometry. The natural and geometrically intuitive generalization of this view involves variations of the speed of light (depending on location and direction) and a Euclidean principle of general covariance. In this article, a gravitation model by Jan Broekaert, which implements a view of relativity theory in the spirit of Lorentz and Poincare, is reconstructed and shown to fulfill the principles of the Euclidean approach after an appropriate reinterpretation.

  16. Light deflection and time delay in the solar gravitational field

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    The second nonvanishing order of contribution to light deflection and time delay in the solar gravitational field is studied for a realistic solar model and for a wide range of metric theories of gravity. It is shown that the second-order effects arise at order (GM/c/sup 2/R)/sup 2/ identical to epsilon/sup 4/. To calculate these effects, every component of the solar metric must be known to order epsilon/sup 4/. The parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) metric provides most of those components. However, some extension of the PPN metric is required. This extension leads to the parametrized post-linear (PPL) metric, which is used in all calculations. To study light deflection to order epsilon/sup 4/ requires that the orbits of scattered photons be known to that order. These orbits are solved for, first in the equatorial plane and then in general, and are used to determine the deflection as measured by an observer at rest with respect to the sun. In the equatorial plane there is only a radial component to this deflection. In general, there is another component orthogonal to the radial plane, but knowledge of this component is not necessary to determine the total deflection to order epsilon/sup 4/. The total second-order deflection can be as large as 300..mu.. arcsec (for deflection by Jupiter). Measurements of some second-order terms are within the astrometric capabilities of experiments proposed for the 1990's. The time delay in the round-trip travel time of a radar beam reflected from a planet is due to the variable coordinate speed of the light signal and to the bending of the beam path. The delay is calculated to order epsilon/sup 4/. It is shown that the beam-bending gives a second-order contribution as large as the present-day uncertainties in time delay experiments with the Viking spacecraft.

  17. Light field moment imaging with the ptychographic iterative engine

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhilong; Pan, Xinchen; Liu, Cheng E-mail: ling.wang@biw.kuleuven.be; Zhu, Jianqiang; Wang, Ling E-mail: ling.wang@biw.kuleuven.be

    2014-10-15

    The recently developed Light Field Moment Imaging (LMI) is adopted to show the stereoscopic structure of the sample studied in Coherent Diffractive Imaging (CDI), where 3D image were always generated with complicated experimental procedure such as the rotation of the sample and time-consuming computation. The animation of large view angle can be generated with LMI very quickly, and the 3D structure of sample can be shown vividly. This method can find many applications for the coherent diffraction imaging with x-ray and electron beams, where a glimpse of the hierarchical structure required and the quick and simple 3D view of object is sufficient. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally with a recently developed CDI method called Ptychographic Iterative Engine.

  18. Infrared light gated MoS₂ field effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Fang, Huajing; Lin, Ziyuan; Wang, Xinsheng; Tang, Chun-Yin; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Fan; Chai, Yang; Li, Qiang; Yan, Qingfeng; Chan, H L W; Dai, Ji-Yan

    2015-12-14

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) as a promising 2D material has attracted extensive attentions due to its unique physical, optical and electrical properties. In this work, we demonstrate an infrared (IR) light gated MoS₂ transistor through a device composed of MoS₂ monolayer and a ferroelectric single crystal Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O₃-PbTiO₃ (PMN-PT). With a monolayer MoS₂ onto the top surface of (111) PMN-PT crystal, the drain current of MoS₂ channel can be modulated with infrared illumination and this modulation process is reversible. Thus, the transistor can work as a new kind of IR photodetector with a high IR responsivity of 114%/Wcm⁻². The IR response of MoS₂ transistor is attributed to the polarization change of PMN-PT single crystal induced by the pyroelectric effect which results in a field effect. Our result promises the application of MoS₂ 2D material in infrared optoelectronic devices. Combining with the intrinsic photocurrent feature of MoS₂ in the visible range, the MoS₂ on ferroelectric single crystal may be sensitive to a broadband wavelength of light.

  19. Vertical Microcavity Organic Light-emitting Field-effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Song, Li; Lu, Qipeng; Zhu, Wanbin; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Organic light-emitting field-effect transistors (OLEFETs) are regarded as a novel kind of device architecture for fulfilling electrical-pumped organic lasers. However, the realization of OLEFETs with high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and high brightness simultaneously is still a tough task. Moreover, the design of the resonator structure in LED is far from satisfactory. Here, OLEFETs with EQE of 1.5% at the brightness of 2600 cdm−2, and the corresponding ON/OFF ratio and current efficiency reaches above 104 and 3.1 cdA−1, respectively, were achieved by introducing 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) as a charge generation layer. Moreover, a vertical microcavity based on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and Ag source/drain electrodes is successfully introduced into the high performance OLEFETs, which results in electroluminescent spectrum linewidth narrowing from 96 nm to 6.9 nm. The results manifest the superiority of the vertical microcavity as an optical resonator in OLEFETs, which sheds some light on achieving the electrically pumped organic lasers. PMID:26986944

  20. Infrared light gated MoS₂ field effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Fang, Huajing; Lin, Ziyuan; Wang, Xinsheng; Tang, Chun-Yin; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Fan; Chai, Yang; Li, Qiang; Yan, Qingfeng; Chan, H L W; Dai, Ji-Yan

    2015-12-14

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) as a promising 2D material has attracted extensive attentions due to its unique physical, optical and electrical properties. In this work, we demonstrate an infrared (IR) light gated MoS₂ transistor through a device composed of MoS₂ monolayer and a ferroelectric single crystal Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O₃-PbTiO₃ (PMN-PT). With a monolayer MoS₂ onto the top surface of (111) PMN-PT crystal, the drain current of MoS₂ channel can be modulated with infrared illumination and this modulation process is reversible. Thus, the transistor can work as a new kind of IR photodetector with a high IR responsivity of 114%/Wcm⁻². The IR response of MoS₂ transistor is attributed to the polarization change of PMN-PT single crystal induced by the pyroelectric effect which results in a field effect. Our result promises the application of MoS₂ 2D material in infrared optoelectronic devices. Combining with the intrinsic photocurrent feature of MoS₂ in the visible range, the MoS₂ on ferroelectric single crystal may be sensitive to a broadband wavelength of light. PMID:26698982

  1. Vertical Microcavity Organic Light-emitting Field-effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Song, Li; Lu, Qipeng; Zhu, Wanbin; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Organic light-emitting field-effect transistors (OLEFETs) are regarded as a novel kind of device architecture for fulfilling electrical-pumped organic lasers. However, the realization of OLEFETs with high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and high brightness simultaneously is still a tough task. Moreover, the design of the resonator structure in LED is far from satisfactory. Here, OLEFETs with EQE of 1.5% at the brightness of 2600 cdm(-2), and the corresponding ON/OFF ratio and current efficiency reaches above 10(4) and 3.1 cdA(-1), respectively, were achieved by introducing 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) as a charge generation layer. Moreover, a vertical microcavity based on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and Ag source/drain electrodes is successfully introduced into the high performance OLEFETs, which results in electroluminescent spectrum linewidth narrowing from 96 nm to 6.9 nm. The results manifest the superiority of the vertical microcavity as an optical resonator in OLEFETs, which sheds some light on achieving the electrically pumped organic lasers. PMID:26986944

  2. Spectroscopy of diffuse light in dust clouds. Scattered light and the solar neighbourhood radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, K.; Mattila, K.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The optical surface brightness of dark nebulae is mainly due to scattering of integrated starlight by classical dust grains. It contains information on the impinging interstellar radiation field, cloud structure, and grain scattering properties. We have obtained spectra of the scattered light from 3500 to 9000 Å in two globules, the Thumbprint Nebula and DC 303.8-14.2. Aims. We use observations of the scattered light to study the impinging integrated starlight spectrum as well as the scattered Hα and other line emissions from all over the sky. We search also for the presence of other than scattered light in the two globules. Methods. We obtained long-slit spectra encompassing the whole globule plus adjacent sky in a one-slit setting, thus enabling efficient elimination of airglow and other foreground sky components. We calculated synthetic integrated starlight spectra for the solar neighbourhood using HIPPARCOS-based stellar distributions and the spectral library of Pickles. Results. Spectra are presented separately for the bright rims and dark cores of the globules. The continuum spectral energy distributions and absorption line spectra can be well modelled with the synthetic integrated starlight spectra. Emission lines of Hα +[N II], Hβ, and [S II] are detected and are interpreted in terms of scattered light plus an in situ warm ionized medium component behind the globules. We detected an excess of emission over the wavelength range 5200-8000 Å in DC 303.8-14.2 but the nature of this emission remains open. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under programme ESO No. 073.C-0239(A). Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org.

  3. Abdominal and pancreatic motion correlation using 4D CT, 4D transponders, and a gating belt.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Ricardo; Zou, Wei; Plastaras, John P; Metz, James M; Teo, Boon-Keng; Kassaee, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    The correlation between the pancreatic and external abdominal motion due to respiration was investigated on two patients. These studies utilized four dimensional computer tomography (4D CT), a four dimensional (4D) electromagnetic transponder system, and a gating belt system. One 4D CT study was performed during simulation to quantify the pancreatic motion using computer tomography images at eight breathing phases. The motion under free breathing and breath-hold were analyzed for the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system during treatment. A linear curve was fitted for all data sets and correlation factors were evaluated between the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system data. The 4D CT study demonstrated a modest correlation between the external marker and the pancreatic motion with R-square values larger than 0.8 for the inferior-superior (inf-sup). Then, the relative pressure from the belt gating system correlated well with the 4D electromagnetic transponder system's motion in the anterior-posterior (ant-post) and the inf-post directions. These directions have a correlation value of -0.93 and 0.76, while the lateral only had a 0.03 correlation coefficient. Based on our limited study, external surrogates can be used as predictors of the pancreatic motion in the inf-sup and the ant-post directions. Although there is a low correlation on the lateral direction, its motion is significantly shorter. In conclusion, an appropriate treatment delivery can be used for pancreatic cancer when an internal tracking system, such as the 4D electromagnetic transponder system, is unavailable. PMID:23652242

  4. Abdominal and pancreatic motion correlation using 4D CT, 4D transponders, and a gating belt.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Ricardo; Zou, Wei; Plastaras, John P; Metz, James M; Teo, Boon-Keng; Kassaee, Alireza

    2013-05-06

    The correlation between the pancreatic and external abdominal motion due to respiration was investigated on two patients. These studies utilized four dimensional computer tomography (4D CT), a four dimensional (4D) electromagnetic transponder system, and a gating belt system. One 4D CT study was performed during simulation to quantify the pancreatic motion using computer tomography images at eight breathing phases. The motion under free breathing and breath-hold were analyzed for the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system during treatment. A linear curve was fitted for all data sets and correlation factors were evaluated between the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system data. The 4D CT study demonstrated a modest correlation between the external marker and the pancreatic motion with R-square values larger than 0.8 for the inferior-superior (inf-sup). Then, the relative pressure from the belt gating system correlated well with the 4D electromagnetic transponder system's motion in the anterior-posterior (ant-post) and the inf-post directions. These directions have a correlation value of -0.93 and 0.76, while the lateral only had a 0.03 correlation coefficient. Based on our limited study, external surrogates can be used as predictors of the pancreatic motion in the inf-sup and the ant-post directions. Although there is a low correlation on the lateral direction, its motion is significantly shorter. In conclusion, an appropriate treatment delivery can be used for pancreatic cancer when an internal tracking system, such as the 4D electromagnetic transponder system, is unavailable.

  5. Electromagnetic field enhancement and light localization in deterministic aperiodic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Ashwin

    The control of light matter interaction in periodic and random media has been investigated in depth during the last few decades, yet structures with controlled degree of disorder such as Deterministic Aperiodic Nano Structures (DANS) have been relatively unexplored. DANS are characterized by non-periodic yet long-range correlated (deterministic) morphologies and can be generated by the mathematical rules of symbolic dynamics and number theory. In this thesis, I have experimentally investigated the unique light transport and localization properties in planar dielectric and metal (plasmonics) DANS. In particular, I have focused on the design, nanofabrication and optical characterization of DANS, formed by arranging metal/dielectric nanoparticles in an aperiodic lattice. This effort is directed towards development of on-chip nanophotonic applications with emphasis on label-free bio-sensing and enhanced light emission. The DANS designed as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate is composed of multi-scale aperiodic nanoparticle arrays fabricated by e-beam lithography and are capable of reproducibly demonstrating enhancement factors as high as ˜107. Further improvement of SERS efficiency is achieved by combining DANS formed by top-down approach with bottom-up reduction of gold nanoparticles, to fabricate novel nanostructures called plasmonic "nano-galaxies" which increases the SERS enhancement factors by 2--3 orders of magnitude while preserving the reproducibility. In this thesis, along with presenting details of fabrication and SERS characterization of these "rationally designed" SERS substrates, I will also present results on using these substrates for detection of DNA nucleobases, as well as reproducible label-free detection of pathogenic bacteria with species specificity. In addition to biochemical detection, the combination of broadband light scattering behavior and the ability for the generation of reproducible high fields in DANS make these

  6. Non-spherical particle generation from 4D optofluidic fabrication.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Kevin S; Chung, Aram J

    2016-08-01

    Particles with non-spherical shapes can exhibit properties which are not available from spherical shaped particles. Complex shaped particles can provide unique benefits for areas such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, structural materials, and self-assembly building blocks. Current methods of creating complex shaped particles such as 3D printing, photolithography, and imprint lithography are limited by either slow speeds, shape limitations, or expensive processes. Previously, we presented a novel microfluidic flow lithography fabrication scheme combined with fluid inertia called optofluidic fabrication for the creation of complex shaped three-dimensional (3D) particles. This process was able to address the aforementioned limits and overcome two-dimensional shape limitations faced by traditional flow lithography methods; however, all of the created 3D particle shapes displayed top-down symmetry. Here, by introducing the time dimension into our existing optofluidic fabrication process, we break this top-down symmetry, generating fully asymmetric 3D particles where we termed the process: four-dimensional (4D) optofluidic fabrication. This 4D optofluidic fabrication is comprised of three sequential procedures. First, density mismatched precursor fluids flow past pillars within fluidic channels to manipulate the flow cross sections via fluid inertia. Next, the time dimension is incorporated by stopping the flow and allowing the denser fluids to settle by gravity to create asymmetric flow cross sections. Finally, the fluids are exposed to patterned ultraviolet (UV) light in order to polymerize fully asymmetric 3D-shaped particles. By varying inertial flow shaping, gravity-induced flow shaping, and UV light patterns, 4D optofluidic fabrication can create an infinite set of complex shaped asymmetric particles. PMID:27092661

  7. Non-spherical particle generation from 4D optofluidic fabrication.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Kevin S; Chung, Aram J

    2016-08-01

    Particles with non-spherical shapes can exhibit properties which are not available from spherical shaped particles. Complex shaped particles can provide unique benefits for areas such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, structural materials, and self-assembly building blocks. Current methods of creating complex shaped particles such as 3D printing, photolithography, and imprint lithography are limited by either slow speeds, shape limitations, or expensive processes. Previously, we presented a novel microfluidic flow lithography fabrication scheme combined with fluid inertia called optofluidic fabrication for the creation of complex shaped three-dimensional (3D) particles. This process was able to address the aforementioned limits and overcome two-dimensional shape limitations faced by traditional flow lithography methods; however, all of the created 3D particle shapes displayed top-down symmetry. Here, by introducing the time dimension into our existing optofluidic fabrication process, we break this top-down symmetry, generating fully asymmetric 3D particles where we termed the process: four-dimensional (4D) optofluidic fabrication. This 4D optofluidic fabrication is comprised of three sequential procedures. First, density mismatched precursor fluids flow past pillars within fluidic channels to manipulate the flow cross sections via fluid inertia. Next, the time dimension is incorporated by stopping the flow and allowing the denser fluids to settle by gravity to create asymmetric flow cross sections. Finally, the fluids are exposed to patterned ultraviolet (UV) light in order to polymerize fully asymmetric 3D-shaped particles. By varying inertial flow shaping, gravity-induced flow shaping, and UV light patterns, 4D optofluidic fabrication can create an infinite set of complex shaped asymmetric particles.

  8. Lighting direction and visual field modulate perceived intensity of illumination

    PubMed Central

    McCourt, Mark E.; Blakeslee, Barbara; Padmanabhan, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    When interpreting object shape from shading the visual system exhibits a strong bias that illumination comes from above and slightly from the left. We asked whether such biases in the perceived direction of illumination might also influence its perceived intensity. Arrays of nine cubes were stereoscopically rendered where individual cubes varied in their 3D pose, but possessed identical triplets of visible faces. Arrays were virtually illuminated from one of four directions: Above-Left, Above-Right, Below-Left, and Below-Right (±24.4° azimuth; ±90° elevation). Illumination intensity possessed 15 levels, resulting in mean cube array luminances ranging from 1.31–3.45 cd/m2. A “reference” array was consistently illuminated from Above-Left at mid-intensity (mean array luminance = 2.38 cd/m2). The reference array's illumination was compared to that of matching arrays which were illuminated from all four directions at all intensities. Reference and matching arrays appeared in the left and right visual field, respectively, or vice versa. Subjects judged which cube array appeared to be under more intense illumination. Using the method of constant stimuli we determined the illumination level of matching arrays required to establish subjective equality with the reference array as a function of matching cube visual field, illumination elevation, and illumination azimuth. Cube arrays appeared significantly more intensely illuminated when they were situated in the left visual field (p = 0.017), and when they were illuminated from below (p = 0.001), and from the left (p = 0.001). An interaction of modest strength was that the effect of illumination azimuth was greater for matching arrays situated in the left visual field (p = 0.042). We propose that objects lit from below appear more intensely illuminated than identical objects lit from above due to long-term adaptation to downward lighting. The amplification of perceived intensity of illumination for stimuli situated

  9. Active origami by 4D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Qi; Dunn, Conner K.; Qi, H. Jerry; Dunn, Martin L.

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in three dimensional (3D) printing technology that allow multiple materials to be printed within each layer enable the creation of materials and components with precisely controlled heterogeneous microstructures. In addition, active materials, such as shape memory polymers, can be printed to create an active microstructure within a solid. These active materials can subsequently be activated in a controlled manner to change the shape or configuration of the solid in response to an environmental stimulus. This has been termed 4D printing, with the 4th dimension being the time-dependent shape change after the printing. In this paper, we advance the 4D printing concept to the design and fabrication of active origami, where a flat sheet automatically folds into a complicated 3D component. Here we print active composites with shape memory polymer fibers precisely printed in an elastomeric matrix and use them as intelligent active hinges to enable origami folding patterns. We develop a theoretical model to provide guidance in selecting design parameters such as fiber dimensions, hinge length, and programming strains and temperature. Using the model, we design and fabricate several active origami components that assemble from flat polymer sheets, including a box, a pyramid, and two origami airplanes. In addition, we directly print a 3D box with active composite hinges and program it to assume a temporary flat shape that subsequently recovers to the 3D box shape on demand.

  10. Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting ControlApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

    2005-03-21

    The Subcontract Statement of Work consists of two major tasks. This report is the Final Report in fulfillment of the contract deliverable for Task 1. The purpose of Task 1 was to evaluate existing and emerging protocols and standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The detailed task description follows: Task 1. Evaluate alternative sensor/field buses. The objective of this task is to evaluate existing and emerging standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The protocols to be evaluated will include at least: (1) 1-Wire Net, (2) DALI, (3) MODBUS (or appropriate substitute such as EIB) and (4) ZigBee. The evaluation will include a comparative matrix for comparing the technical performance features of the different alternative systems. The performance features to be considered include: (1) directionality and network speed, (2) error control, (3) latency times, (4) allowable cable voltage drop, (5) topology, and (6) polarization. Specifically, Subcontractor will: (1) Analyze the proposed network architecture and identify potential problems that may require further research and specification. (2) Help identify and specify additional software and hardware components that may be required for the communications network to operate properly. (3) Identify areas of the architecture that can benefit from existing standards and technology and enumerate those standards and technologies. (4) Identify existing companies that may have relevant technology that can be applied to this research. (5) Help determine if new standards or technologies need to be developed.

  11. 4D flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Bissell, Malenka; Barker, Alex J; Bolger, Ann F; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Ebbers, Tino; Francios, Christopher J; Frydrychowicz, Alex; Geiger, Julia; Giese, Daniel; Hope, Michael D; Kilner, Philip J; Kozerke, Sebastian; Myerson, Saul; Neubauer, Stefan; Wieben, Oliver; Markl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile blood flow through the cavities of the heart and great vessels is time-varying and multidirectional. Access to all regions, phases and directions of cardiovascular flows has formerly been limited. Four-dimensional (4D) flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has enabled more comprehensive access to such flows, with typical spatial resolution of 1.5×1.5×1.5 - 3×3×3 mm(3), typical temporal resolution of 30-40 ms, and acquisition times in the order of 5 to 25 min. This consensus paper is the work of physicists, physicians and biomedical engineers, active in the development and implementation of 4D Flow CMR, who have repeatedly met to share experience and ideas. The paper aims to assist understanding of acquisition and analysis methods, and their potential clinical applications with a focus on the heart and greater vessels. We describe that 4D Flow CMR can be clinically advantageous because placement of a single acquisition volume is straightforward and enables flow through any plane across it to be calculated retrospectively and with good accuracy. We also specify research and development goals that have yet to be satisfactorily achieved. Derived flow parameters, generally needing further development or validation for clinical use, include measurements of wall shear stress, pressure difference, turbulent kinetic energy, and intracardiac flow components. The dependence of measurement accuracy on acquisition parameters is considered, as are the uses of different visualization strategies for appropriate representation of time-varying multidirectional flow fields. Finally, we offer suggestions for more consistent, user-friendly implementation of 4D Flow CMR acquisition and data handling with a view to multicenter studies and more widespread adoption of the approach in routine clinical investigations. PMID:26257141

  12. Light field and crosshair quality assurance test using a simple lens system

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Scott W.; Lam, Kwok

    2006-04-15

    We describe here a simple lens system to test the positioning of the field light source and mylar crosshair for radiation therapy linear accelerators. Ideally the light source for the field light and the crosshair should be centered on the axis of rotation of the collimator. The traditional method for testing this coincidence uses the shadow of the crosshair caused by the field light source. The shadow of the crosshair is dependent on the position of both the field light source and mylar crosshair. Geometrically it is possible for the field light source and the mylar crosshair to be off the axis of rotation of the collimator and still cause the shadow of the crosshair to be on the axis of rotation at some distance. Using a lens system the motion of the field light source and crosshair can be observed in sharp focus independently of one another as the collimator is rotated.

  13. 4D-RGB diffractive-optical correlator in the human eye: the hardware for a hierarchy of spectral space-time transformations in color vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauinger, N.

    2005-10-01

    3D space and time in optics and in human vision are linked together in spectral diffractive-optical transformations of the visible world. A 4D-RGB correlator hardware - integrated in an optical imaging system like the human eye - processes a hierarchy of relativistic equilibrium states and a sequence of double-cone transformations. The full chain of light-like events ends in von Laue interference maxima in reciprocal space, where 4D-RGB signals are miniaturized down to the level of individual photoreceptors. The diffractive-optical correlator relates local information to global data in the visual field and illustrates the potential of future development of cameras towards more intelligent 4D optical sensors.

  14. A sinogram warping strategy for pre-reconstruction 4D PET optimization.

    PubMed

    Gianoli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Fontana, Giulia; Kurz, Christopher; Parodi, Katia; Baroni, Guido

    2016-03-01

    A novel strategy for 4D PET optimization in the sinogram domain is proposed, aiming at motion model application before image reconstruction ("sinogram warping" strategy). Compared to state-of-the-art 4D-MLEM reconstruction, the proposed strategy is able to optimize the image SNR, avoiding iterative direct and inverse warping procedures, which are typical of the 4D-MLEM algorithm. A full-count statistics sinogram of the motion-compensated 4D PET reference phase is generated by warping the sinograms corresponding to the different PET phases. This is achieved relying on a motion model expressed in the sinogram domain. The strategy was tested on the anthropomorphic 4D PET-CT NCAT phantom in comparison with the 4D-MLEM algorithm, with particular reference to robustness to PET-CT co-registrations artefacts. The MLEM reconstruction of the warped sinogram according to the proposed strategy exhibited better accuracy (up to +40.90 % with respect to the ideal value), whereas images reconstructed according to the 4D-MLEM reconstruction resulted in less noisy (down to -26.90 % with respect to the ideal value) but more blurred. The sinogram warping strategy demonstrates advantages with respect to 4D-MLEM algorithm. These advantages are paid back by introducing approximation of the deformation field, and further efforts are required to mitigate the impact of such an approximation in clinical 4D PET reconstruction.

  15. Advances in 4D radiation therapy for managing respiration: part II - 4D treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2012-12-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle - an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems.

  16. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part II – 4D Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle – an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems. PMID:22796324

  17. Field Commissioning of a Daylight-Dimming Lighting System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, David B.; Parker, Danny S.

    A Florida elementary school cafeteria, retrofitted with a fluorescent lighting system that dims in response to available daylight, was evaluated through real time measurement of lighting and air conditioning power, work plane illumination, and interior/exterior site conditions. The new system produced a 27 percent reduction in lighting power due…

  18. Light field optical flow for refractive surface reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iffa, Emishaw; Wetzstein, Gordon; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2012-10-01

    This paper discusses a method to reconstruct a transparent ow surface from single camera shot with the aid of a Micro-lens array. An intentionally prepared high frequency background which is placed behind the refractive flow is captured and a curl-free optical flow algorithm is applied between pairs of images taken by different micro-lenses. The computed raw optical ow vector is a blend of motion parallax and background deformation vector due to the underlying flow. Subtracting the motion parallax, which is obtained by calibration, from the total op- optical flow vector yields the background deformation vector. The deflection vectors on each images are used to reconstruct the flow profile. A synthetic data set of fuel injection was used to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed algorithm and good agreement was achieved between the test and reconstructed data. Finally, real light field data of hot air created by a lighter flame is used to reconstruct and show a hot air plume surface.

  19. All the supersymmetric configurations of N=4, d=4 supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellorín, Jorge; Ortín, Tomás

    2005-10-01

    All the supersymmetric configurations of pure, ungauged, N=4, d=4 supergravity are classified in a formalism that keeps manifest the S and T dualities of the theory. We also find simple equations that need to be satisfied by the configurations to be classical solutions of the theory. While the solutions associated to null Killing vectors were essentially classified by Tod (a classification that we refine), we find new configurations and solutions associated to timelike Killing vectors that do not satisfy Tod's rigidity hypothesis (hence, they have a nontrivial U(1) connection) and whose supersymmetry projector is associated to 1-dimensional objects (strings), although they have a trivial axion field.

  20. 4D Clinical Imaging for Dynamic CAD

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    A basic 4D imaging system to capture the jaw motion has been developed that produces high resolution 3D surface data. Fluorescent microspheres are brushed onto the areas of the upper and the lower arches to be imaged, producing a high-contrast random optical pattern. A hand-held imaging device operated at about 10 cm from the mouth captures time-based perspective images of the fluorescent areas. Each set of images, containing both upper and the lower arch data, is converted to a 3d point mesh using photogrammetry, thereby providing an instantaneous relative jaw position. Eight 3d positions per second are captured. Using one of the 3d frames as a reference, incremental transforms are derived to express the free body motion of the mandible. Conventional 3d models of the dentition are directly registered to the reference frame, allowing them to be animated using the derived transforms. PMID:24082882

  1. Soft Route to 4D Tomography.

    PubMed

    Taillandier-Thomas, Thibault; Roux, Stéphane; Hild, François

    2016-07-01

    Based on the assumption that the time evolution of a sample observed by computed tomography requires many less parameters than the definition of the microstructure itself, it is proposed to reconstruct these changes based on the initial state (using computed tomography) and very few radiographs acquired at fixed intervals of time. This Letter presents a proof of concept that for a fatigue cracked sample its kinematics can be tracked from no more than two radiographs in situations where a complete 3D view would require several hundreds of radiographs. This 2 order of magnitude gain opens the way to a "computed" 4D tomography, which complements the recent progress achieved in fast or ultrafast computed tomography, which is based on beam brightness, detector sensitivity, and signal acquisition technologies.

  2. Soft Route to 4D Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillandier-Thomas, Thibault; Roux, Stéphane; Hild, François

    2016-07-01

    Based on the assumption that the time evolution of a sample observed by computed tomography requires many less parameters than the definition of the microstructure itself, it is proposed to reconstruct these changes based on the initial state (using computed tomography) and very few radiographs acquired at fixed intervals of time. This Letter presents a proof of concept that for a fatigue cracked sample its kinematics can be tracked from no more than two radiographs in situations where a complete 3D view would require several hundreds of radiographs. This 2 order of magnitude gain opens the way to a "computed" 4D tomography, which complements the recent progress achieved in fast or ultrafast computed tomography, which is based on beam brightness, detector sensitivity, and signal acquisition technologies.

  3. Earthquake Lights and Estimates of Electric Fields and Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemtchinov, I. V.; Losseva, T. V.

    2003-12-01

    Luminous phenomena were observed during a number of earthquakes, e.g. the 1995 Kobe earthquake in Japan. Estimates based on the eyewitness's reports show that to produce lightning-type and corona-type discharges in the air the electric charge delivered to the ground surface should be of the order of several Coulomb. We assume that this charge was formed and transported by "mechanically produced current" flowing through the fault. The most difficult problem is why these charges survive in the highly conductive soil. The electric conductivity may drastically decrease due to heating and evaporation of water, but only in a thin central part of the fault, while the width of the luminous zone, and thus the width of the zone with high electric field strengths is of the order of hundred meters or even several km. So we propose the mechanism of charge localization - the so-called skin effect. Spreading of the currents and charges is described by a system of diffusion-type electromagnetodynamic equations. There are various models of rupturing during earthquakes. In the wrinkle-like self-healing pulse model the porosity and hydraulic and electric conductivity increase at the leading edge of the ruptured segment and decrease at the trailing edge. Assuming the electrokinetic mechanism as the most effective one we find that the charged fluid flows from these wedge-like ends of the ruptured segment to its center. The two currents flowing in the opposite direction produce magnetic fields with opposite rotation and reconnection due to magnetic diffusion decreases magnetic signals at large distances from the source region. Co-seismic electric and magnetic signals obtained during the Kobe earthquake at two stations at distances of about 100 km from the epicenter do not contradict our estimates and 3D numerical simulations based on our model of electric currents, magnetic fields and mechanical processes of rupturing. We suggest that similar current system may be formed even in the

  4. Questions Students Ask: Why Not Bend Light with an Electric Field?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Heuvelen, Alan

    1983-01-01

    In response to a question, "Why not use a magnetic or electric field to deflect light?," reviews the relation between electric charge and electric/magnetic fields. Discusses the Faraday effect, (describing matter as an intermediary in the rotation of the place of polarization) and other apparent interactions of light with electric/magnetic fields.…

  5. The use of computed radiography plates to determine light and radiation field coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, James R.; Anand, Aman

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Photo-stimulable phosphor computed radiography (CR) has characteristics that allow the output to be manipulated by both radiation and optical light. The authors have developed a method that uses these characteristics to carry out radiation field and light field coincidence quality assurance on linear accelerators. Methods: CR detectors from Kodak were used outside their cassettes to measure both radiation and light field edges from a Varian linear accelerator. The CR detector was first exposed to a radiation field and then to a slightly smaller light field. The light impinged on the detector's latent image, removing to an extent the portion exposed to the light field. The detector was then digitally scanned. A MATLAB-based algorithm was developed to automatically analyze the images and determine the edges of the light and radiation fields, the vector between the field centers, and the crosshair center. Radiographic film was also used as a control to confirm the radiation field size. Results: Analysis showed a high degree of repeatability with the proposed method. Results between the proposed method and radiographic film showed excellent agreement of the radiation field. The effect of varying monitor units and light exposure time was tested and found to be very small. Radiation and light field sizes were determined with an uncertainty of less than 1 mm, and light and crosshair centers were determined within 0.1 mm. Conclusions: A new method was developed to digitally determine the radiation and light field size using CR photo-stimulable phosphor plates. The method is quick and reproducible, allowing for the streamlined and robust assessment of light and radiation field coincidence, with no observer interpretation needed. PMID:24320415

  6. Opening the Black Box of ICT4D: Advancing Our Understanding of ICT4D Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sung Jin

    2013-01-01

    The term, Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D), pertains to programs or projects that strategically use ICTs (e.g. mobile phones, computers, and the internet) as a means toward the socio-economic betterment for the poor in developing contexts. Gaining the political and financial support of the international community…

  7. High-resolution Fourier hologram synthesis from photographic images through computing the light field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ni; Ren, Zhenbo; Lam, Edmund Y

    2016-03-01

    We present a technique for synthesizing the Fourier hologram of a three-dimensional scene from its light field. The light field captures the volumetric information of an object, and an important advantage is that it does not require coherent illumination, as in conventional holography. In this work, we show how to obtain a high-resolution digital hologram with the light field obtained from a series of photographic images captured along the optical axis. The method is verified both by simulations and experimentally captured light field.

  8. Suppression of Arabidopsis flowering by near-null magnetic field is affected by light.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiao; Li, Yue; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Yuxia; Wei, Shufeng

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that a near-null magnetic field suppressed Arabidopsis flowering in white light, which might be related to the function modification of cryptochrome (CRY). To further demonstrate that the effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering is associated with CRY, Arabidopsis wild type and CRY mutant plants were grown in the near-null magnetic field under blue or red light with different light cycle and photosynthetic photon flux density. We found that Arabidopsis flowering was significantly suppressed by near-null magnetic field in blue light with lower intensity (10 µmol/m(2) /s) and shorter cycle (12 h period: 6 h light/6 h dark). However, flowering time of CRY1/CRY2 mutants did not show any difference between plants grown in near-null magnetic field and in local geomagnetic field under detected light conditions. In red light, no significant difference was shown in Arabidopsis flowering between plants in near-null magnetic field and local geomagnetic field under detected light cycles and intensities. These results suggest that changes of blue light cycle and intensity alter the effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering, which is mediated by CRY.

  9. Testing Limits on Matte Surface Color Perception in Three-Dimensional Scenes with Complex Light Fields

    PubMed Central

    Doerschner, K.; Boyaci, H.; Maloney, L. T.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated limits on the human visual system’s ability to discount directional variation in complex lights field when estimating Lambertian surface color. Directional variation in the light field was represented in the frequency domain using spherical harmonics. The bidirectional reflectance distribution function of a Lambertian surface acts as a low-pass filter on directional variation in the light field. Consequently, the visual system needs to discount only the low-pass component of the incident light corresponding to the first nine terms of a spherical harmonics expansion (Basri & Jacobs, 2001; Ramamoorthi & Hanrahan, 2001) to accurately estimate surface color. We test experimentally whether the visual system discounts directional variation in the light field up to this physical limit. Our results are consistent with the claim that the visual system can compensate for all of the complexity in the light field that affects the appearance of Lambertian surfaces. PMID:18053846

  10. Light masking in the field: an experiment with nocturnal and diurnal spiny mice under semi-natural field conditions.

    PubMed

    Rotics, Shay; Dayan, Tamar; Levy, Ofir; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga

    2011-02-01

    Light masking has been studied almost exclusively in the laboratory. The authors populated four field enclosures with locally coexisting nocturnal Acomys cahirinus and diurnal A. russatus, and monitored their body temperatures (T(b)) using implanted temperature-sensitive radio transmitters. A 3-h light pulse was initiated at the beginning of two consecutive nights; preceding nights were controls. A. cahirinus T(b) and calculated activity levels decreased significantly during the light pulse, demonstrating a negative light masking response (light effect on T(b): -0.32 °C ± 0.15 °C; average calculated activity records during the light pulse: 7 ± 1.53, control: 9.8 ± 1.62). Diurnal A. russatus did not respond to the light pulse. We conclude that light masking is not an artifact of laboratory conditions but represents a natural adaptive response in free-living populations.

  11. Light field image sensors based on the Talbot effect

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Albert; Gill, Patrick; Molnar, Alyosha

    2010-01-01

    We present a pixel-scale sensor that uses the Talbot effect to detect the local intensity and incident angle of light. The sensor comprises two local diffraction gratings stacked above a photodiode. When illuminated by a plane wave, the upper grating generates a self-image at the half Talbot depth. The second grating, placed at this depth, blocks or passes light depending upon incident angle. Several such structures, tuned to different incident angles, are sufficient to extract local incident angle and intensity. Furthermore, arrays of such structures are sufficient to localize light sources in three dimensions without any additional optics. PMID:19881658

  12. Localization of 4D gravity on pure geometrical thick branes

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa-Cendejas, Nandinii; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo

    2006-04-15

    We consider the generation of thick brane configurations in a pure geometric Weyl integrable 5D spacetime which constitutes a non-Riemannian generalization of Kaluza-Klein (KK) theory. In this framework, we show how 4D gravity can be localized on a scalar thick brane which does not necessarily respect reflection symmetry, generalizing in this way several previous models based on the Randall-Sundrum (RS) system and avoiding both, the restriction to orbifold geometries and the introduction of the branes in the action by hand. We first obtain a thick brane solution that preserves 4D Poincare invariance and breaks Z{sub 2}-symmetry along the extra dimension which, indeed, can be either compact or extended, and supplements brane solutions previously found by other authors. In the noncompact case, this field configuration represents a thick brane with positive energy density centered at y=c{sub 2}, whereas pairs of thick branes arise in the compact case. Remarkably, the Weylian scalar curvature is nonsingular along the fifth dimension in the noncompact case, in contraposition to the RS thin brane system. We also recast the wave equations of the transverse traceless modes of the linear fluctuations of the classical background into a Schroedinger's equation form with a volcano potential of finite bottom in both the compact and the extended cases. We solve Schroedinger equation for the massless zero mode m{sup 2}=0 and obtain a single bound wave function which represents a stable 4D graviton. We also get a continuum gapless spectrum of KK states with m{sup 2}>0 that are suppressed at y=c{sub 2} and turn asymptotically into plane waves.

  13. Phase and amplitude binning for 4D-CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelnour, A. F.; Nehmeh, S. A.; Pan, T.; Humm, J. L.; Vernon, P.; Schöder, H.; Rosenzweig, K. E.; Mageras, G. S.; Yorke, E.; Larson, S. M.; Erdi, Y. E.

    2007-07-01

    We compare the consistency and accuracy of two image binning approaches used in 4D-CT imaging. One approach, phase binning (PB), assigns each breathing cycle 2π rad, within which the images are grouped. In amplitude binning (AB), the images are assigned bins according to the breathing signal's full amplitude. To quantitate both approaches we used a NEMA NU2-2001 IEC phantom oscillating in the axial direction and at random frequencies and amplitudes, approximately simulating a patient's breathing. 4D-CT images were obtained using a four-slice GE Lightspeed CT scanner operating in cine mode. We define consistency error as a measure of ability to correctly bin over repeated cycles in the same field of view. Average consistency error μe ± σe in PB ranged from 18% ± 20% to 30% ± 35%, while in AB the error ranged from 11% ± 14% to 20% ± 24%. In PB nearly all bins contained sphere slices. AB was more accurate, revealing empty bins where no sphere slices existed. As a proof of principle, we present examples of two non-small cell lung carcinoma patients' 4D-CT lung images binned by both approaches. While AB can lead to gaps in the coronal images, depending on the patient's breathing pattern, PB exhibits no gaps but suffers visible artifacts due to misbinning, yielding images that cover a relatively large amplitude range. AB was more consistent, though often resulted in gaps when no data existed due to patients' breathing pattern. We conclude AB is more accurate than PB. This has important consequences to treatment planning and diagnosis.

  14. 4-D ultrafast shear-wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Provost, Jean; Deffieux, Thomas; Papadacci, Clément; Imbault, Marion; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-06-01

    Over the last ten years, shear wave elastography (SWE) has seen considerable development and is now routinely used in clinics to provide mechanical characterization of tissues to improve diagnosis. The most advanced technique relies on the use of an ultrafast scanner to generate and image shear waves in real time in a 2-D plane at several thousands of frames per second. We have recently introduced 3-D ultrafast ultrasound imaging to acquire with matrix probes the 3-D propagation of shear waves generated by a dedicated radiation pressure transducer in a single acquisition. In this study, we demonstrate 3-D SWE based on ultrafast volumetric imaging in a clinically applicable configuration. A 32 × 32 matrix phased array driven by a customized, programmable, 1024-channel ultrasound system was designed to perform 4-D shear-wave imaging. A matrix phased array was used to generate and control in 3-D the shear waves inside the medium using the acoustic radiation force. The same matrix array was used with 3-D coherent plane wave compounding to perform high-quality ultrafast imaging of the shear wave propagation. Volumetric ultrafast acquisitions were then beamformed in 3-D using a delay-and-sum algorithm. 3-D volumetric maps of the shear modulus were reconstructed using a time-of-flight algorithm based on local multiscale cross-correlation of shear wave profiles in the three main directions using directional filters. Results are first presented in an isotropic homogeneous and elastic breast phantom. Then, a full 3-D stiffness reconstruction of the breast was performed in vivo on healthy volunteers. This new full 3-D ultrafast ultrasound system paves the way toward real-time 3-D SWE. PMID:26067040

  15. Light bending by nonlinear electrodynamics under strong electric and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Taekoon E-mail: tlee@kunsan.ac.kr

    2011-11-01

    We calculate the bending angles of light under the strong electric and magnetic fields by a charged black hole and a magnetized neutron star according to the nonlinear electrodynamics of Euler-Heisenberg interaction. The bending angle of light by the electric field of charged black hole is computed from geometric optics and a general formula is derived for light bending valid for any orientation of the magnetic dipole. The astronomical significance of the light bending by magnetic field of a neutron star is discussed.

  16. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  17. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2005-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2005-04-01 2005-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  18. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2000-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2000-04-01 2000-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a) Each application for an order under section 304(d)...

  19. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  20. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  1. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  2. 76 FR 55814 - 2,4-D; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 2,4-D; Pesticide Tolerances AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This regulation establishes tolerances for residues of 2,4-D in or on teff, bran... 180.142 be amended by establishing a tolerance for residues of the herbicide 2,4-D...

  3. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  4. 4D micro-CT using fast prospective gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaolian; Johnston, Samuel M.; Qi, Yi; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2012-01-01

    Micro-CT is currently used in preclinical studies to provide anatomical information. But, there is also significant interest in using this technology to obtain functional information. We report here a new sampling strategy for 4D micro-CT for functional cardiac and pulmonary imaging. Rapid scanning of free-breathing mice is achieved with fast prospective gating (FPG) implemented on a field programmable gate array. The method entails on-the-fly computation of delays from the R peaks of the ECG signals or the peaks of the respiratory signals for the triggering pulses. Projection images are acquired for all cardiac or respiratory phases at each angle before rotating to the next angle. FPG can deliver the faster scan time of retrospective gating (RG) with the regular angular distribution of conventional prospective gating for cardiac or respiratory gating. Simultaneous cardio-respiratory gating is also possible with FPG in a hybrid retrospective/prospective approach. We have performed phantom experiments to validate the new sampling protocol and compared the results from FPG and RG in cardiac imaging of a mouse. Additionally, we have evaluated the utility of incorporating respiratory information in 4D cardiac micro-CT studies with FPG. A dual-source micro-CT system was used for image acquisition with pulsed x-ray exposures (80 kVp, 100 mA, 10 ms). The cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent containing 123 mg I ml-1 delivered via a tail vein catheter in a dose of 0.01 ml g-1 body weight. The phantom experiment demonstrates that FPG can distinguish the successive phases of phantom motion with minimal motion blur, and the animal study demonstrates that respiratory FPG can distinguish inspiration and expiration. 4D cardiac micro-CT imaging with FPG provides image quality superior to RG at an isotropic voxel size of 88 µm and 10 ms temporal resolution. The acquisition time for either sampling approach is less than 5 min. The

  5. Depth-tunable three-dimensional display with interactive light field control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Songlin; Wang, Peng; Sang, Xinzhu; Li, Chenyu; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-07-01

    A software-defined depth-tunable three-dimensional (3D) display with interactive 3D depth control is presented. With the proposed post-processing system, the disparity of the multi-view media can be freely adjusted. Benefiting from a wealth of information inherently contains in dense multi-view images captured with parallel arrangement camera array, the 3D light field is built and the light field structure is controlled to adjust the disparity without additional acquired depth information since the light field structure itself contains depth information. A statistical analysis based on the least square is carried out to extract the depth information inherently exists in the light field structure and the accurate depth information can be used to re-parameterize light fields for the autostereoscopic display, and a smooth motion parallax can be guaranteed. Experimental results show that the system is convenient and effective to adjust the 3D scene performance in the 3D display.

  6. Near field light intensity distribution analysis in bimodal polymer waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, T.; Gut, K.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents analysis of light intensity distribution and sensitivity in differential interferometer based on bimodal polymer waveguide. Key part is analysis of optimal waveguide layer thickness in structure SiO2/SU-8/H2O for maximum bulk refractive index sensitivity. The paper presents new approach to detecting phase difference between modes through registrations only part of energy propagating in the waveguide. Additionally in this paper the analysis of changes in light distribution when energy in modes is not equal were performed.

  7. Simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) for 4D cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Xuejun

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Image reconstruction and motion model estimation in four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) are conventionally handled as two sequential steps. Due to the limited number of projections at each phase, the image quality of 4D-CBCT is degraded by view aliasing artifacts, and the accuracy of subsequent motion modeling is decreased by the inferior 4D-CBCT. The objective of this work is to enhance both the image quality of 4D-CBCT and the accuracy of motion model estimation with a novel strategy enabling simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).Methods: The proposed SMEIR algorithm consists of two alternating steps: (1) model-based iterative image reconstruction to obtain a motion-compensated primary CBCT (m-pCBCT) and (2) motion model estimation to obtain an optimal set of deformation vector fields (DVFs) between the m-pCBCT and other 4D-CBCT phases. The motion-compensated image reconstruction is based on the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) coupled with total variation minimization. During the forward- and backprojection of SART, measured projections from an entire set of 4D-CBCT are used for reconstruction of the m-pCBCT by utilizing the updated DVF. The DVF is estimated by matching the forward projection of the deformed m-pCBCT and measured projections of other phases of 4D-CBCT. The performance of the SMEIR algorithm is quantitatively evaluated on a 4D NCAT phantom. The quality of reconstructed 4D images and the accuracy of tumor motion trajectory are assessed by comparing with those resulting from conventional sequential 4D-CBCT reconstructions (FDK and total variation minimization) and motion estimation (demons algorithm). The performance of the SMEIR algorithm is further evaluated by reconstructing a lung cancer patient 4D-CBCT.Results: Image quality of 4D-CBCT is greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm in both phantom and patient studies. When all projections are used to reconstruct a 3D-CBCT by FDK, motion

  8. Light Emitting Diodes and Astronomical Environments: Results from in situ Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craine, Brian L.; Craine, Eric R.

    2015-05-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) light fixtures are rapidly becoming industry standards for outdoor lighting. They are promoted on the strength of long lifetimes (hence economic efficiencies), low power requirements, directability, active brightness controls, and energy efficiency. They also tend to produce spectral shifts that are undesirable in astronomical settings, but which can be moderated by filters. LED lighting for continuous roadway and parking lot lighting is particularly popular, and many communities are in the process of retrofitting Low Pressure Sodium (LPS) and other lights by tens of thousands of new LED fixtures at a time. What is the impact of this process on astronomical observatories and on dark skies upon which amateur astronomers rely? We bypass modeling and predictions to make actual measurements of these lights in the field. We report on original ground, airborne, and satellite observations of LED lights and discuss their light budgets, zenith angle functions, and impacts on observatory environs.

  9. Quantum memory for nonstationary light fields based on controlled reversible inhomogeneous broadening

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, B.; Tittel, W.; Gisin, N.; Nilsson, M.; Kroell, S.; Cirac, J. I.

    2006-02-15

    We propose a method for efficient storage and recall of arbitrary nonstationary light fields, such as, for instance, single photon time-bin qubits or intense fields, in optically dense atomic ensembles. Our approach to quantum memory is based on controlled, reversible, inhomogeneous broadening and relies on a hidden time-reversal symmetry of the optical Bloch equations describing the propagation of the light field. We briefly discuss experimental realizations of our proposal.

  10. Spectator field models in light of spectral index after Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: fumi@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp E-mail: gucci@phys.titech.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    We revisit spectator field models including curvaton and modulated reheating scenarios, specifically focusing on their viability in the new Planck era, based on the derived expression for the spectral index in general spectator field models. Importantly, the recent Planck observations give strong preference to a red-tilted power spectrum, while the spectator field models tend to predict a scale-invariant one. This implies that, during inflation, either (i) the Hubble parameter varies significantly as in chaotic inflation, or (ii) a scalar potential for the spectator field has a relatively large negative curvature. Combined with the tight constraint on the non-Gaussianity, the Planck data provides us with rich implications for various spectator field models.

  11. Fluorescent caged compounds of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-d): photorelease technology for controlled release of 2,4-D.

    PubMed

    Atta, Sanghamitra; Jana, Avijit; Ananthakirshnan, Rajakumar; Narayana Dhuleep, Pradeep Singh

    2010-11-24

    A novel controlled-release formulation (CRF) of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was developed to reduce its negative environmental impacts by improving its herbicidal efficacy. The 2,4-D was chemically caged by coupling with photoremovable protecting groups (PRPGs) of coumarin derivatives. Photophysical studies of caged compounds showed that they all exhibited strong fluorescence properties. Controlled release of 2,4-D was achieved by irradiating the caged compounds using UV-vis light (310, 350, and 410 nm). The effect of various factors such as pH, solvent, and different substituents at the seventh position of coumarin moiety on the rate of photorelease was studied. The herbicidal activity of caged compounds and 4-(hydroxymethyl)-7-substituted coumarins was studied against Vigna radiata . The new formulation provided greater control over the release of 2,4-D by UV-vis light and also demonstrated the potential of the PRPGs not only to act as a delivery device but also to possess herbicidal activity after photorelease.

  12. Three-channel dynamic photometric stereo: a new method for 4D surface reconstruction and volume recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Walter; Schulze, Wolfram; Wetter, Thomas; Chen, Chi-Hsien

    2008-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) body surface reconstruction is an important field in health care. A popular method for this purpose is laser scanning. However, using Photometric Stereo (PS) to record lumbar lordosis and the surface contour of the back poses a viable alternative due to its lower costs and higher flexibility compared to laser techniques and other methods of three-dimensional body surface reconstruction. In this work, we extended the traditional PS method and proposed a new method for obtaining surface and volume data of a moving object. The principle of traditional Photometric Stereo uses at least three images of a static object taken under different light sources to obtain 3D information of the object. Instead of using normal light, the light sources in the proposed method consist of the RGB-Color-Model's three colors: red, green and blue. A series of pictures taken with a video camera can now be separated into the different color channels. Each set of the three images can then be used to calculate the surface normals as a traditional PS. This method waives the requirement that the object imaged must be kept still as in almost all the other body surface reconstruction methods. By putting two cameras opposite to a moving object and lighting the object with the colored light, the time-varying surface (4D) data can easily be calculated. The obtained information can be used in many medical fields such as rehabilitation, diabetes screening or orthopedics.

  13. Myocardial motion and function assessment using 4D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Peng-Cheng; Robinson, Glynn P.; Duncan, James S.

    1994-09-01

    This paper describes efforts aimed at more objectively and accurately quantifying the local, regional and global function of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart from 4D image data. Using our shape-based image analysis methods, point-wise myocardial motion vector fields between successive image frames through the entire cardiac cycle will be computed. Quantitative LV motion, thickening, and strain measurements will then be established from the point correspondence maps. In the paper, we will also briefly describe an in vivo experimental model which uses implanted imaging-opaque markers to validate the results of our image analysis methods. Finally, initial experimental results using image sequences from two different modalities will be presented.

  14. Chaos in a 4D dissipative nonlinear fermionic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogmus, Fatma

    2015-12-01

    Gursey Model is the only possible 4D conformally invariant pure fermionic model with a nonlinear self-coupled spinor term. It has been assumed to be similar to the Heisenberg's nonlinear generalization of Dirac's equation, as a possible basis for a unitary description of elementary particles. Gursey Model admits particle-like solutions for the derived classical field equations and these solutions are instantonic in character. In this paper, the dynamical nature of damped and forced Gursey Nonlinear Differential Equations System (GNDES) are studied in order to get more information on spinor type instantons. Bifurcation and chaos in the system are observed by constructing the bifurcation diagrams and Poincaré sections. Lyapunov exponent and power spectrum graphs of GNDES are also constructed to characterize the chaotic behavior.

  15. Very light cosmological scalar fields from a tiny cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Calmet, Xavier

    2007-10-15

    I discuss a mechanism which generates a mass term for a scalar field in an expanding universe. The mass of this field turns out to be generated by the cosmological constant and can be naturally small if protected by a conformal symmetry which is, however, broken in the gravitational sector. The mass is comparable today to the Hubble time. This scalar field could thus impact our Universe today and, for example, be at the origin of a time variation of the couplings and masses of the parameters of the standard model.

  16. Effects of static magnetic fields on light scattering in red chromatophore of goldfish scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.

    2010-05-01

    Light scattering in a guanine crystal plate of goldfish scales was observed with and without static magnetic field exposure. Under a microscopic image with dark-field-illumination, the structural color of the scale by guanine plates was observed, and isolated chromatophores showed a twinkling which was the intermittent light scattering of the light from the side. The light scattering was quenched by static magnetic fields of more than 0.26 tesla (T). The quenching was reversibly occurred when the applied external magnetic fields were changed between ambient fields and 5 T. The quenched light scattering did not improve when the magnetic field was decreased from 5 to 0.3 T. It recovered to the original twinkling state about one minute after reaching an ambient geomagnetic field level. The mechanism of the quenched light scattering was speculated to be concerned with the possible magnetic orientation of guanine crystal plates, which were sustained by protein fibers in the red chromatophore. The diamagnetic complex of guanine crystal plates and protein fibers are the candidates for the nanosized light scattering controller based on the magnetic orientation mechanism.

  17. In-field stray light due to surface scattering effects in infrared imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke; Jiang, Hou-man; Cheng, Xiang-ai

    2011-08-01

    In-field stray light caused by surface scattering is a serious problem in many infrared imaging systems. Light that scattered from lenses in infrared imaging system produces a halo of stray light within the field of view and often degrades the performance of an optical system especially irradiated by intensive light such as laser. The experiments are performed by using infrared thermal imaging system, irradiated by CW DF infrared laser. The relationship between the diameter of saturated area on the detector and the incident laser irradiance is obtained, which can be well explained by the point spread function (PSF) of the optics including both diffraction and scattering components.

  18. Investigation of the light field of a semiconductor diode laser.

    PubMed

    Ankudinov, A V; Yanul, M L; Slipchenko, S O; Shelaev, A V; Dorozhkin, P S; Podoskin, A A; Tarasov, I S

    2014-10-20

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy was applied to study, with sub-wavelength spatial resolution, the near- and the far-field distributions of propagating modes from a high-power laser diode. Simple modeling was also performed and compared with experimental results. The simulated distributions were consistent with the experiment and permitted clarification of the configuration of the transverse modes of the laser. PMID:25401675

  19. Simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) for 4D cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Xuejun

    2014-03-01

    Image reconstruction and motion model estimation in four dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) are conventionally handled as two sequential steps. Due to the limited number of projections at each phase, the image quality of 4D-CBCT is degraded by view aliasing artifacts, and the accuracy of subsequent motion modeling is decreased by the inferior 4DCBCT. The objective of this work is to enhance both the image quality of 4D-CBCT and the accuracy of motion model estimation with a novel strategy enabling simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR). The proposed SMEIR algorithm consists of two alternating steps: 1) model-based iterative image reconstruction to obtain a motion-compensated primary CBCT (m-pCBCT) and 2) motion model estimation to obtain an optimal set of deformation vector fields (DVFs) between the m-pCBCT and other 4D-CBCT phases. The motion-compensated image reconstruction is based on the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction (SART) technique coupled with total variation minimization. During the forward- and back-projection of SART, measured projections from an entire set of 4D-CBCT are used for reconstruction of the m-pCBCT by utilizing the updated DVF. The DVF is estimated by matching the forward projection of the deformed m-pCBCT and measured projections of other phases of 4D-CBCT. The performance of the SMEIR algorithm is quantitatively evaluated on a 4D NCAT phantom. The SMEIR algorithm improves image reconstruction accuracy of 4D-CBCT and tumor motion trajectory estimation accuracy as compared to conventional sequential 4D-CBCT reconstruction and motion estimation.

  20. Goos-Hänchen shift of partially coherent light fields in epsilon-near-zero metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Ziauddin; Chuang, You-Lin; Qamar, Sajid; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2016-05-23

    The Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts in the reflected light are investigated both for p and s polarized partial coherent light beams incident on epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) metamaterials. In contrary to the coherent counterparts, the magnitude of GH shift becomes non-zero for p polarized partial coherent light beam; while GH shift can be relatively large with a small degree of spatial coherence for s polarized partial coherent beam. Dependence on the beam width and the permittivity of ENZ metamaterials is also revealed for partial coherent light fields. Our results on the GH shifts provide a direction on the applications for partial coherent light sources in ENZ metamaterials.

  1. Goos-Hänchen shift of partially coherent light fields in epsilon-near-zero metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziauddin; Chuang, You-Lin; Qamar, Sajid; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2016-05-01

    The Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts in the reflected light are investigated both for p and s polarized partial coherent light beams incident on epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) metamaterials. In contrary to the coherent counterparts, the magnitude of GH shift becomes non-zero for p polarized partial coherent light beam; while GH shift can be relatively large with a small degree of spatial coherence for s polarized partial coherent beam. Dependence on the beam width and the permittivity of ENZ metamaterials is also revealed for partial coherent light fields. Our results on the GH shifts provide a direction on the applications for partial coherent light sources in ENZ metamaterials.

  2. Controlling pulse delay by light and low magnetic fields: slow light in emerald induced by transient spectral hole-burning.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rajitha Papukutty; Riesen, Hans; Rebane, Aleksander

    2013-11-15

    Slow light based on transient spectral hole-burning is reported for emerald, Be(3)Al(2)Si(6)O(18):Cr(3+). Experiments were conducted in π polarization on the R(1)(± 3/2) line (E2 ← A(2)4) at 2.2 K in zero field and low magnetic fields B||c. The hole width was strongly dependent on B||c, and this allowed us to smoothly tune the pulse delay from 40 to 154 ns between zero field and B||c = 15.2 mT. The latter corresponds to a group velocity of 16 km/s. Slow light in conjunction with a linear filter theory can be used as a powerful and accurate technique in time-resolved spectroscopy, e.g., to determine spectral hole-widths as a function of time. PMID:24322070

  3. Radiation of Electron in the Field of Plane Light Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Zelinsky, A.; Drebot, I.V.; Grigorev, Yu.N.; Zvonareva, O.D.; Tatchyn, R.; /SLAC

    2006-02-24

    Results of integration of a Lorentz equation for a relativistic electron moving in the field of running, plane, linear polarized electromagnetic wave are presented in the paper. It is shown that electron velocities in the field of the wave are almost periodic functions of time. For calculations of angular spectrum of electron radiation intensity expansion of the electromagnetic field in a wave zone into generalized Fourier series was used. Expressions for the radiation intensity spectrum are presented in the paper. Derived results are illustrated for electron and laser beam parameters of NSC KIPT X-ray generator NESTOR. It is shown that for low intensity of the interacting electromagnetic wave the results of energy and angular spectrum calculations in the frame of classical electrodynamics completely coincide with calculation results produced using quantum electrodynamics. Simultaneously, derived expressions give possibilities to investigate dependence of energy and angular Compton radiation spectrum on phase of interaction and the interacting wave intensity.

  4. Dual light field and polarization imaging using CMOS diffractive image sensors.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, Suren; Sivaramakrishnan, Sriram; Chuang, Ellen; Guruaribam, Debashree; Wang, Albert; Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-05-15

    In this Letter we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first integrated CMOS image sensor that can simultaneously perform light field and polarization imaging without the use of external filters or additional optical elements. Previous work has shown how photodetectors with two stacks of integrated metal gratings above them (called angle sensitive pixels) diffract light in a Talbot pattern to capture four-dimensional light fields. We show, in addition to diffractive imaging, that these gratings polarize incoming light and characterize the response of these sensors to polarization and incidence angle. Finally, we show two applications of polarization imaging: imaging stress-induced birefringence and identifying specular reflections in scenes to improve light field algorithms for these scenes.

  5. Dual light field and polarization imaging using CMOS diffractive image sensors.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, Suren; Sivaramakrishnan, Sriram; Chuang, Ellen; Guruaribam, Debashree; Wang, Albert; Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-05-15

    In this Letter we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first integrated CMOS image sensor that can simultaneously perform light field and polarization imaging without the use of external filters or additional optical elements. Previous work has shown how photodetectors with two stacks of integrated metal gratings above them (called angle sensitive pixels) diffract light in a Talbot pattern to capture four-dimensional light fields. We show, in addition to diffractive imaging, that these gratings polarize incoming light and characterize the response of these sensors to polarization and incidence angle. Finally, we show two applications of polarization imaging: imaging stress-induced birefringence and identifying specular reflections in scenes to improve light field algorithms for these scenes. PMID:26393758

  6. 4D XCAT phantom for multimodality imaging research

    SciTech Connect

    Segars, W. P.; Sturgeon, G.; Mendonca, S.; Grimes, Jason; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2010-09-15

    realistic, predictive 3D and 4D imaging data from populations of normal and abnormal patients under various imaging parameters, the authors conclude that the XCAT provides an important tool in imaging research to evaluate and improve imaging devices and techniques. In the field of x-ray CT, the phantom may also provide the necessary foundation with which to optimize clinical CT applications in terms of image quality versus radiation dose, an area of research that is becoming more significant with the growing use of CT.

  7. 4D XCAT phantom for multimodality imaging research

    PubMed Central

    Segars, W. P.; Sturgeon, G.; Mendonca, S.; Grimes, Jason; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2010-01-01

    realistic, predictive 3D and 4D imaging data from populations of normal and abnormal patients under various imaging parameters, the authors conclude that the XCAT provides an important tool in imaging research to evaluate and improve imaging devices and techniques. In the field of x-ray CT, the phantom may also provide the necessary foundation with which to optimize clinical CT applications in terms of image quality versus radiation dose, an area of research that is becoming more significant with the growing use of CT. PMID:20964209

  8. Seed conformal blocks in 4D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverri, Alejandro Castedo; Elkhidir, Emtinan; Karateev, Denis; Serone, Marco

    2016-02-01

    We compute in closed analytical form the minimal set of "seed" conformal blocks associated to the exchange of generic mixed symmetry spinor/tensor operators in an arbitrary representation ( ℓ, overline{ℓ} ) of the Lorentz group in four dimensional conformal field theories. These blocks arise from 4-point functions involving two scalars, one (0, | ℓ - overline{7ell;} |) and one (| ℓ - overline{ℓ} |, 0) spinors or tensors. We directly solve the set of Casimir equations, that can elegantly be written in a compact form for any ( ℓ, overline{ℓ} ), by using an educated ansatz and reducing the problem to an algebraic linear system. Various details on the form of the ansatz have been deduced by using the so called shadow formalism. The complexity of the conformal blocks depends on the value of p = | ℓ - overline{ℓ} | and grows with p, in analogy to what happens to scalar conformal blocks in d even space-time dimensions as d increases. These results open the way to bootstrap 4-point functions involving arbitrary spinor/tensor operators in four dimensional conformal field theories.

  9. The 4D-TECS integration for NASA TSRV airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminer, I.; Oshaughnessy, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    The integration of the Total Energy Control System (TECS) concept with 4D navigation is described. This integration was made to increase the operational capacity of modern aircraft and encourage incorporation of this increased capability with the evolving National Airspace System (NAS). Described herein is: 4D smoothing, the basic concepts of TECS, the spoiler integration concept, an algorithm for nulling out time error, speed and altitude profile modes, manual spoiler implementation, 4D logic, and the results of linear and nonlinear analysis.

  10. Killing Weeds with 2,4-D. Extension Bulletin 389.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Oliver C.

    Discussed is the use of the herbicide 2,4-D. Though written for farmers and agricultural workers, the pamphlet considers turf weed control and use of 2,4-D near ornamental plants. Aspects of the use of this herbicide covered are: (1) the common forms of 2,4-D; (2) plant responses and tolerances to the herbicide; (3) dilution and concentration of…

  11. Magnetic-field-induced rotation of light with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Shuai; Ding, Dong-Sheng Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Bao-Sen

    2015-06-29

    Light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) has attractive applications in the fields of precise optical measurements and high capacity optical communications. We study the rotation of a light beam propagating in warm {sup 87}Rb atomic vapor using a method based on magnetic-field-induced circular birefringence. The dependence of the rotation angle on the magnetic field makes it appropriate for weak magnetic field measurements. We quote a detailed theoretical description that agrees well with the experimental observations. The experiment shown here provides a method to measure the magnetic field intensity precisely and expands the application of OAM-carrying light. This technique has advantage in measurement of magnetic field weaker than 0.5 G, and the precision we achieved is 0.8 mG.

  12. Nonstationary elementary-field light randomly triggered by Poisson impulses.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R

    2013-05-01

    A stochastic theory of nonstationary light describing the random emission of elementary pulses is presented. The emission is governed by a nonhomogeneous Poisson point process determined by a time-varying emission rate. The model describes, in the appropriate limits, stationary, cyclostationary, locally stationary, and pulsed radiation, and reduces to a Gaussian theory in the limit of dense emission rate. The first- and second-order coherence theories are solved after the computation of second- and fourth-order correlation functions by use of the characteristic function. The ergodicity of second-order correlations under various types of detectors is explored and a number of observables, including optical spectrum, amplitude, and intensity correlations, are analyzed. PMID:23695325

  13. How-to-Do-It: Leaf Morphology & Light Microenvironments: A Field Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmoreland, David

    1989-01-01

    A field-based exercise which illustrates one aspect of how leaves in multilayered trees take advantage of light microenvironments is presented. Procedures, tree selection and data analysis are discussed. (CW)

  14. Sub-10 nm near-field localization by plasmonic metal nanoaperture arrays with ultrashort light pulses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongki; Kim, Chulhong; Kim, Donghyun

    2015-01-01

    Near-field localization by ultrashort femtosecond light pulses has been investigated using simple geometrical nanoapertures. The apertures employ circular, rhombic, and triangular shapes to localize the distribution of surface plasmon. To understand the geometrical effect on the localization, aperture length and period of the nanoapertures were varied. Aperture length was shown to affect the performance more than aperture period due mainly to intra-aperture coupling of near-fields. Triangular apertures provided the strongest spatial localization below 10 nm in size as well as the highest enhancement of field intensity by more than 7000 times compared to the incident light pulse. Use of ultrashort pulses was found to allow much stronger light localization than with continuous-wave light. The results can be used for super-localization sensing and imaging applications where spatially localized fields can break through the limits in achieving improved sensitivity and resolution. PMID:26628326

  15. Generalized laws of refraction that can lead to wave-optically forbidden light-ray fields.

    PubMed

    Courtial, Johannes; Tyc, Tomáš

    2012-07-01

    The recent demonstration of a metamaterial phase hologram so thin that it can be classified as an interface in the effective-medium approximation [Science 334, 333 (2011)] has dramatically increased interest in generalized laws of refraction. Based on the fact that scalar wave optics allows only certain light-ray fields, we divide generalized laws of refraction into two categories. When applied to a planar cross section through any allowed light-ray field, the laws in the first category always result in a cross section through an allowed light-ray field again, whereas the laws in the second category can result in a cross section through a forbidden light-ray field.

  16. Evaluating the Learning Outcomes of An International Field Trip in Postgraduate Lighting Design Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isoardi, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    Lighting industry professionals work in an international marketplace and encounter a range of social, geographical and cultural challenges associated with this. Education in lighting should introduce students to aspects of these challenges. To achieve this, an international field trip was recently undertaken that sought to provide an authentic…

  17. Raman Generated Magnetic Fields in Laser Light Speckles

    SciTech Connect

    Lasinski, B F; Still, C H; Langdon, A B; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A

    2003-09-02

    In modern 2D and 3D PIC simulations relevant to National Ignition Facility (NIF) parameters, the low frequency magnetic fields associated with the localized fast electron currents generated by Stimulated Raman Scatter have been identified. We consider electron plasma densities from 0.1 to 0.2 of critical density (n{sub c}) and electron plasma temperatures (T{sub e}) from a few keV to over 10 keV in simulations with space scales corresponding to a laser speckle in modeling with our massively parallel PIC code 23. These magnetic fields are {approx} 1 MG, Then the electrons accelerated by the Raman process are magnetized with their Lamor radii on the order of a speckle width. The transport of these hot electrons out of the speckle then becomes a more complex process than generally assumed.

  18. Real-time depth controllable integral imaging pickup and reconstruction method with a light field camera.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Youngmo; Kim, Jonghyun; Yeom, Jiwoon; Lee, Chang-Kun; Lee, Byoungho

    2015-12-10

    In this paper, we develop a real-time depth controllable integral imaging system. With a high-frame-rate camera and a focus controllable lens, light fields from various depth ranges can be captured. According to the image plane of the light field camera, the objects in virtual and real space are recorded simultaneously. The captured light field information is converted to the elemental image in real time without pseudoscopic problems. In addition, we derive characteristics and limitations of the light field camera as a 3D broadcasting capturing device with precise geometry optics. With further analysis, the implemented system provides more accurate light fields than existing devices without depth distortion. We adapt an f-number matching method at the capture and display stage to record a more exact light field and solve depth distortion, respectively. The algorithm allows the users to adjust the pixel mapping structure of the reconstructed 3D image in real time. The proposed method presents a possibility of a handheld real-time 3D broadcasting system in a cheaper and more applicable way as compared to the previous methods.

  19. Phosphodiesterase 4D Inhibitors Limit Prostate Cancer Growth Potential

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Ginny L.; Hammer, Kimberly D.P.; Domenech, Maribella; Frantskevich, Katsiaryna; Malinowski, Rita L.; Bushman, Wade; Beebe, David J.; Marker, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) has recently been implicated as a proliferation-promoting factor in prostate cancer and is over-expressed in human prostate carcinoma. However, the effects of PDE4D inhibition using pharmacological inhibitors have not been examined in prostate cancer. These studies examined the effects of selective PDE4D inhibitors, NVP-ABE171 and cilomilast, as anti-prostate cancer therapies in both in vitro and in vivo models. The effects of PDE4D inhibitors on pathways that are critical in prostate cancer and/or downstream of cyclic AMP (cAMP) were examined. Both NVP-ABE171 and cilomilast decreased cell growth. In vitro, PDE4D inhibitors lead to decreased signaling of the sonic hedgehog (SHH), Androgen Receptor (AR), and MAPK pathways, but growth inhibition was best correlated to the sonic hedgehog pathway. PDE4D inhibition also reduced proliferation of epithelial cells induced by paracrine signaling from co-cultured stromal cells that had activated hedgehog signaling. In addition, PDE4D inhibitors decreased the weight of the prostate in wild-type mice. Prostate cancer xenografts grown in nude mice that were treated with cilomilast or NVP-ABE171 had decreased wet weight and increased apoptosis compared to vehicle treated controls. These studies suggest the pharmacological inhibition of PDE4D using small molecule inhibitors is an effective option for prostate cancer therapy. Implications PDE4D inhibitors decrease the growth of prostate cancer cells in vivo and in vitro, and PDE4D inhibition has therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. PMID:25149359

  20. LC-lens array with light field algorithm for 3D biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Pai; Hsieh, Po-Yuan; Hassanfiroozi, Amir; Martinez, Manuel; Javidi, Bahram; Chu, Chao-Yu; Hsuan, Yun; Chu, Wen-Chun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, liquid crystal lens (LC-lens) array was utilized in 3D bio-medical applications including 3D endoscope and light field microscope. Comparing with conventional plastic lens array, which was usually placed in 3D endoscope or light field microscope system to record image disparity, our LC-lens array has higher flexibility of electrically changing its focal length. By using LC-lens array, the working distance and image quality of 3D endoscope and microscope could be enhanced. Furthermore, the 2D/3D switching ability could be achieved if we turn off/on the electrical power on LClens array. In 3D endoscope case, a hexagonal micro LC-lens array with 350um diameter was placed at the front end of a 1mm diameter endoscope. With applying electric field on LC-lens array, the 3D specimen would be recorded as from seven micro-cameras with different disparity. We could calculate 3D construction of specimen with those micro images. In the other hand, if we turn off the electric field on LC-lens array, the conventional high resolution 2D endoscope image would be recorded. In light field microscope case, the LC-lens array was placed in front of the CMOS sensor. The main purpose of LC-lens array is to extend the refocusing distance of light field microscope, which is usually very narrow in focused light field microscope system, by montaging many light field images sequentially focusing on different depth. With adjusting focal length of LC-lens array from 2.4mm to 2.9mm, the refocusing distance was extended from 1mm to 11.3mm. Moreover, we could use a LC wedge to electrically shift the optics axis and increase the resolution of light field.

  1. 4D cone-beam CT reconstruction using multi-organ meshes for sliding motion modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zichun; Gu, Xuejun; Mao, Weihua; Wang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) strategy was proposed for 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) reconstruction and showed excellent results in both phantom and lung cancer patient studies. In the original SMEIR algorithm, the deformation vector field (DVF) was defined on voxel grid and estimated by enforcing a global smoothness regularization term on the motion fields. The objective of this work is to improve the computation efficiency and motion estimation accuracy of SMEIR for 4D-CBCT through developing a multi-organ meshing model. Feature-based adaptive meshes were generated to reduce the number of unknowns in the DVF estimation and accurately capture the organ shapes and motion. Additionally, the discontinuity in the motion fields between different organs during respiration was explicitly considered in the multi-organ mesh model. This will help with the accurate visualization and motion estimation of the tumor on the organ boundaries in 4D-CBCT. To further improve the computational efficiency, a GPU-based parallel implementation was designed. The performance of the proposed algorithm was evaluated on a synthetic sliding motion phantom, a 4D NCAT phantom, and four lung cancer patients. The proposed multi-organ mesh based strategy outperformed the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, iterative total variation minimization, original SMEIR and single meshing method based on both qualitative and quantitative evaluations.

  2. 4D cone-beam CT reconstruction using multi-organ meshes for sliding motion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zichun; Gu, Xuejun; Mao, Weihua; Wang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) strategy was proposed for 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) reconstruction and showed excellent results in both phantom and lung cancer patient studies. In the original SMEIR algorithm, the deformation vector field (DVF) was defined on voxel grid and estimated by enforcing a global smoothness regularization term on the motion fields. The objective of this work is to improve the computation efficiency and motion estimation accuracy of SMEIR for 4D-CBCT through developing a multi-organ meshing model. Feature-based adaptive meshes were generated to reduce the number of unknowns in the DVF estimation and accurately capture the organ shapes and motion. Additionally, the discontinuity in the motion fields between different organs during respiration was explicitly considered in the multi-organ mesh model. This will help with the accurate visualization and motion estimation of the tumor on the organ boundaries in 4D-CBCT. To further improve the computational efficiency, a GPU-based parallel implementation was designed. The performance of the proposed algorithm was evaluated on a synthetic sliding motion phantom, a 4D NCAT phantom, and four lung cancer patients. The proposed multi-organ mesh based strategy outperformed the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, iterative total variation minimization, original SMEIR and single meshing method based on both qualitative and quantitative evaluations.

  3. 4D GPR Experiments--Towards the Virtual Lysimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasmueck, M.; Viggiano, D. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Drasdis, J. B.; Kruse, S. E.; Or, D.

    2006-05-01

    data shows the shape and size of the imaged wet-bulb closely match the modeling and excavation results. Wetting front propagation was on the order of 0.2-0.5 m/hr. GPR detected retained water 17 hr after completion of the infiltration. In addition to pattern detection, attempts for establishing mass balance are underway. In summary, preliminary results from controlled field experiments show the 4D GPR method has the precision, resolution, and repeatability required for non-invasive detection of water-flow patterns and dynamics in the vadose zone, hence could potentially serve as a virtual lysimeter.

  4. Programmable aperture microscopy: A computational method for multi-modal phase contrast and light field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Feng, Shijie; Zhang, Minliang; Chen, Qian

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple and cost-effective programmable aperture microscope to realize multi-modal computational imaging by integrating a programmable liquid crystal display (LCD) into a conventional wide-field microscope. The LCD selectively modulates the light distribution at the rear aperture of the microscope objective, allowing numerous imaging modalities, such as bright field, dark field, differential phase contrast, quantitative phase imaging, multi-perspective imaging, and full resolution light field imaging to be achieved and switched rapidly in the same setup, without requiring specialized hardwares and any moving parts. We experimentally demonstrate the success of our method by imaging unstained cheek cells, profiling microlens array, and changing perspective views of thick biological specimens. The post-exposure refocusing of a butterfly mouthpart and RFP-labeled dicot stem cross-section is also presented to demonstrate the full resolution light field imaging capability of our system for both translucent and fluorescent specimens.

  5. Field induced transmission of light in ionic ferrofluids of tunable viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Liu, Xiaodong; Lin, Yueqiang; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Ma, Xiaojuan; Huang, Yan

    2004-12-01

    The transmission of light through ionic ferrofluids, in which the viscosity of the carrier liquid can be modulated, is measured under an applied magnetic field. The experimental results show that the transmission intensity would not vary monotonously with time when an external magnetic field is applied. The intensity can get to a stable value if the duration for which the magnetic field applied is long enough. The relaxation time of the variation of the light intensity with time is proportional to the viscosity of the carrier liquid and inversely proportional to the strength of the field. The character of the transmitted light is explained according to a model of microstructured transition relaxing in ferrofluids under an applied magnetic field.

  6. Transmitted light relaxation and microstructure evolution of ferrofluids under gradient magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Li, Decai; Li, Feng; Zhu, Quanshui; Xie, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Using light transmission experiments and optical microscope observations with a longitudinal gradient magnetic field configuration, the relationship between the behavior of the transmitted light relaxation and the microstructure evolution of ionic ferrofluids in the central region of an axisymmetric field is investigated. Under a low-gradient magnetic field, there are two types of relaxation process. When a field is applied, the transmitted light intensity decreases to a minimum within a time on the order of 101-102 s. It is then gradually restored, approaching its initial value within a time on the order of 102 s. This is type I relaxation, which corresponds to the formation of magnetic columns. After the transmission reaches this value, it either increases or decreases slowly, stabilizing within a time on the order of 103 s, according to the direction of the field gradient. This is a type II relaxation, which results from the shadowing effect, corresponding to the motion of the magnetic columns under the application of a gradient force. Under a magnetic field with a centripetal high-gradient (magnetic materials subjected to a force pointing toward the center of the axisymmetric field), the transmitted light intensity decreases monotonously and more slowly than that under a low-gradient field. Magnetic transport and separation resulted from magnetophoresis under high-gradient fields, changing the formation dynamics of the local columns and influencing the final state of the column system.

  7. 4D Printing with Mechanically Robust, Thermally Actuating Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bakarich, Shannon E; Gorkin, Robert; in het Panhuis, Marc; Spinks, Geoffrey M

    2015-06-01

    A smart valve is created by 4D printing of hydrogels that are both mechanically robust and thermally actuating. The printed hydrogels are made up of an interpenetrating network of alginate and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). 4D structures are created by printing the "dynamic" hydrogel ink alongside other static materials. PMID:25864515

  8. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  9. 4D Printing with Mechanically Robust, Thermally Actuating Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bakarich, Shannon E; Gorkin, Robert; in het Panhuis, Marc; Spinks, Geoffrey M

    2015-06-01

    A smart valve is created by 4D printing of hydrogels that are both mechanically robust and thermally actuating. The printed hydrogels are made up of an interpenetrating network of alginate and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). 4D structures are created by printing the "dynamic" hydrogel ink alongside other static materials.

  10. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  11. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  12. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  13. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  14. Modification of enzymatic activity following laser irradiation through the light-induced electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amat, Albert; Waynant, Ronald W.

    2006-02-01

    When cells are irradiated with visible and near-infrared wavelengths a variety of stimulatory effects are observed in their metabolism. To explain the observed light effects, researchers try to identify the chromophores that are involved in the processes. However, the mechanism of light absorption by a chromophore does not explain many of the experimental observations and therefore the primary mechanism for cellular light responses remains unproven. In addition to the ability of photons to produce electronic excitation in chromophores, light induces an alternating electric field in a medium that is able to interact with polar structures and produce dipole transitions. The effect of the light induced electric field in enzymatic molecules is analyzed in the present article, and it will be described how enzymatic activity is enhanced by this mechanism.

  15. Light concentration in the near-field of dielectric spheroidal particles with mesoscopic sizes.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Manuel J; Tobías, Ignacio; Martí, Antonio; Luque, Antonio

    2011-08-15

    This paper presents a numerical study of the light focusing properties of dielectric spheroids with sizes comparable to the illuminating wavelength. An analytical separation-of-variables method is used to determine the electric field distribution inside and in the near-field outside the particles. An optimization algorithm was implemented in the method to determine the particles' physical parameters that maximize the forward scattered light in the near-field region. It is found that such scatterers can exhibit pronounced electric intensity enhancement (above 100 times the incident intensity) in their close vicinity, or along wide focal regions extending to 10 times the wavelength. The results reveal the potential of wavelength-sized spheroids to manipulate light beyond the limitations of macroscopic geometrical optics. This can be of interest for several applications, such as light management in photovoltaics. PMID:21934983

  16. [Improvement of light-cured indirect inlays durability by means of electromagnetic field].

    PubMed

    Nidzel'skiĭ, M Ia; Korotetskaia-Zinkevich, V L

    2014-01-01

    The main strength characteristics of light-cured resins used for replacement of dental hard tissues defects are destructive stress by compression, microhardness, resistance to abrasion, impact and water absorption. The study focuses on some strength features of composite materials for inlays processed by electromagnetic field. Four sample series of light cured resin (Charisma, Heraus Kulzer, Germany) were used to assess strength features changes in various curing methods: 10 control samples were polymerized by conventional light-curing device, while 30 were additionally processed by electromagnetic field of various intensity (60, 80 and 100 Oe, 10 samples for each group). The obtained results confirm the positive effects of electromagnetic field on strength features of light-cured resins which improves the quality of inlays.

  17. Light concentration in the near-field of dielectric spheroidal particles with mesoscopic sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Manuel J.; Tobías, Ignacio; Martí, Antonio; Luque, Antonio

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the light focusing properties of dielectric spheroids with sizes comparable to the illuminating wavelength. An analytical separation-of-variables method is used to determine the electric field distribution inside and in the near-field outside the particles. An optimization algorithm was implemented in the method to determine the particles' physical parameters that maximize the forward scattered light in the near-field region. It is found that such scatterers can exhibit pronounced electric intensity enhancement (above 100 times the incident intensity) in their close vicinity, or along wide focal regions extending to 10 times the wavelength. The results reveal the potential of wavelength-sized spheroids to manipulate light beyond the limitations of macroscopic geometrical optics. This can be of interest for several applications, such as light management in photovoltaics.

  18. Exploring Direct 3D Interaction for Full Horizontal Parallax Light Field Displays Using Leap Motion Controller

    PubMed Central

    Adhikarla, Vamsi Kiran; Sodnik, Jaka; Szolgay, Peter; Jakus, Grega

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of direct 3D gesture interaction with a full horizontal parallax light field display. A light field display defines a visual scene using directional light beams emitted from multiple light sources as if they are emitted from scene points. Each scene point is rendered individually resulting in more realistic and accurate 3D visualization compared to other 3D displaying technologies. We propose an interaction setup combining the visualization of objects within the Field Of View (FOV) of a light field display and their selection through freehand gesture tracked by the Leap Motion Controller. The accuracy and usefulness of the proposed interaction setup was also evaluated in a user study with test subjects. The results of the study revealed high user preference for free hand interaction with light field display as well as relatively low cognitive demand of this technique. Further, our results also revealed some limitations and adjustments of the proposed setup to be addressed in future work. PMID:25875189

  19. Magnetic field topographical survey by magneto-optical space-time light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Sergey V.; Ostrovsky, Andrey S.; Agalidy, Yu. S.

    1993-12-01

    Utilization of magneto-optical spacing light modulators based on Bi-substituted monocrystalline ferrite-garnet films for spatially distributed magnetic field measurements is discussed. Numerous variants of magnetic field topographical survey for different types (audio & video ...) of magnetic signalogramms geometrical parameters control are described. Special usages for magnetic signalogramms criminalistics examination and faint amplitude signalogramms visualization are described too.

  20. Evanescent field: A potential light-tool for theranostics application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polley, Nabarun; Singh, Soumendra; Giri, Anupam; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2014-03-01

    A noninvasive or minimally invasive optical approach for theranostics, which would reinforce diagnosis, treatment, and preferably guidance simultaneously, is considered to be major challenge in biomedical instrument design. In the present work, we have developed an evanescent field-based fiber optic strategy for the potential theranostics application in hyperbilirubinemia, an increased concentration of bilirubin in the blood and is a potential cause of permanent brain damage or even death in newborn babies. Potential problem of bilirubin deposition on the hydroxylated fiber surface at physiological pH (7.4), that masks the sensing efficacy and extraction of information of the pigment level, has also been addressed. Removal of bilirubin in a blood-phantom (hemoglobin and human serum albumin) solution from an enhanced level of 77 μM/l (human jaundice >50 μM/l) to ˜30 μM/l (normal level ˜25 μM/l in human) using our strategy has been successfully demonstrated. In a model experiment using chromatography paper as a mimic of biological membrane, we have shown efficient degradation of the bilirubin under continuous monitoring for guidance of immediate/future course of action.

  1. Improvement of the cine-CT based 4D-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Tinsu; Sun Xiaojun; Luo Dershan

    2007-11-15

    An improved 4D-CT utility has been developed on the GE LightSpeed multislice CT (MSCT) and Discovery PET/CT scanners, which have the cine CT scan capability. Two new features have been added in this 4D-CT over the commercial Advantage 4D-CT from GE. One feature was a new tool for disabling parts of the respiratory signal with irregular respiration and improving the accuracy of phase determination for the respiratory signal from the Varian real-time positioning and monitoring (RPM) system before sorting of the cine CT images into the 4D-CT images. The second feature was to allow generation of the maximum-intensity-projection (MIP), average (AVG) and minimum-intensity-projection (mip) CT images from the cine CT images without a respiratory signal. The implementation enables the assessment of tumor motion in treatment planning with the MIP, AVG, and mip CT images on the GE MSCT and PET/CT scanners without the RPM and the Advantage 4D-CT with a GE Advantage windows workstation. Several clinical examples are included to illustrate this new application.

  2. Light fields with an axially expanded intensity distribution for stable three-dimensional optical trapping.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Susanne; Schaub, Christian; Haist, Tobias; Osten, Wolfgang

    2010-09-13

    We introduce a new kind of light field to improve and simplify the trapping process of axially displaced particles. To this end we employ a light field with an axially expanded intensity distribution, which at the same time enables stable axial trapping. We present simulations of the axial intensity distribution of the novel trapping field and first experimental results, which demonstrate the improvement of the reliability of the axial trapping process. The method can be used to automate trapping of particles that are located outside of the focal plane of the microscope.

  3. Extreme field limits in the interaction of laser light with ultrarelativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Hayashi, Y.; Kando, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Koga, J.; Kondo, K.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A.; Bulanov, S. S.; Zhidkov, A.; Chen, P.; Neely, D.; Kato, Y.; Narozhny, N. B.; Korn, G.

    2012-07-11

    The critical electric field of quantum electrodynamics is so strong that it produces electron-positron pairs from vacuum, converting the energy of light into matter. This field has become feasible through the construction of extremely high power lasers or/and with the sophisticated use of nonlinear processes in relativistic plasmas. A feasibility of the experiments on the collision of laser light and high intensity electromagnetic pulses, generated by relativistic flying mirrors, with relativistic electrons for the studying of extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves is discussed.

  4. An industrial light-field camera applied for 3D velocity measurements in a slot jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredkin, A. V.; Shestakov, M. V.; Tokarev, M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Modern light-field cameras have found their application in different areas like photography, surveillance and quality control in industry. A number of studies have been reported relatively low spatial resolution of 3D profiles of registered objects along the optical axis of the camera. This article describes a method for 3D velocity measurements in fluid flows using an industrial light-field camera and an alternative reconstruction algorithm based on a statistical approach. This method is more accurate than triangulation when applied for tracking small registered objects like tracer particles in images. The technique was used to measure 3D velocity fields in a turbulent slot jet.

  5. Multiple-plane particle image velocimetry using a light-field camera.

    PubMed

    Skupsch, Christoph; Brücker, Christoph

    2013-01-28

    Planar velocity fields in flows are determined simultaneously on parallel measurement planes by means of an in-house manufactured light-field camera. The planes are defined by illuminating light sheets with constant spacing. Particle positions are reconstructed from a single 2D recording taken by a CMOS-camera equipped with a high-quality doublet lens array. The fast refocusing algorithm is based on synthetic-aperture particle image velocimetry (SAPIV). The reconstruction quality is tested via ray-tracing of synthetically generated particle fields. The introduced single-camera SAPIV is applied to a convective flow within a measurement volume of 30 x 30 x 50 mm³.

  6. Attosecond pulse generation with an optimization loop in a light-field-synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Bódi, B; Balogh, E; Tosa, V; Goulielmakis, E; Varjú, K; Dombi, P

    2016-09-19

    We developed an efficient, tailored optimization method for attopulse generation using a light-field-synthesizer [M. Hassan et al., Nature 530, 66 (2016)]. We adapted genetic optimization of single-cycle and sub-cycle waveforms to attosecond pulse generation and achieved significantly improved convergence to many target attosecond pulse shapes. Importantly, we show that the single-atom approach (based on strong field approximation) gives similar results to the more complex and numerically intensive 3D model of the attopulse generation process and that spectrally tunable attosecond pulses can be produced with a light-field synthesizer. PMID:27661930

  7. Extreme field limits in the interaction of laser light with ultrarelativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Hayashi, Y.; Kando, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Koga, J.; Kondo, K.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A.; Bulanov, S. S.; Zhidkov, A.; Chen, P.; Neely, D.; Kato, Y.; Narozhny, N. B.; Korn, G.

    2012-07-01

    The critical electric field of quantum electrodynamics is so strong that it produces electron-positron pairs from vacuum, converting the energy of light into matter. This field has become feasible through the construction of extremely high power lasers or/and with the sophisticated use of nonlinear processes in relativistic plasmas. A feasibility of the experiments on the collision of laser light and high intensity electromagnetic pulses, generated by relativistic flying mirrors, with relativistic electrons for the studying of extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves is discussed.

  8. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  9. Graphene-like optical light field and its interaction with two-level atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembessis, V. E.; Courtial, Johannes; Radwell, N.; Selyem, A.; Franke-Arnold, S.; Aldossary, O. M.; Babiker, M.

    2015-12-01

    The theoretical basis leading to the creation of a light field with a hexagonal honeycomb structure resembling graphene is considered along with its experimental realization and its interaction with atoms. It is argued that associated with such a light field is an optical dipole potential which leads to the diffraction of the atoms, but the details depend on whether the transverse spread of the atomic wave packet is larger than the transverse dimensions of the optical lattice (resonant Kapitza-Dirac effect) or smaller (optical Stern-Gerlach effect). Another effect in this context involves the creation of gauge fields due to the Berry phase acquired by the atom moving in the light field. The experimental realization of the light field with a honeycomb hexagonal structure is described using holographic methods and we proceed to explore the atom diffraction in the Kapitza-Dirac regime as well as the optical Stern-Gerlach regime, leading to momentum distributions with characteristic but different hexagonal structures. The artificial gauge fields too are shown to have the same hexagonal spatial structure and their magnitude can be significantly large. The effects are discussed with reference to typical parameters for the atoms and the fields.

  10. Evanescent photosynthesis: exciting cyanobacteria in a surface-confined light field.

    PubMed

    Ooms, Matthew D; Sieben, Vincent J; Pierobon, Scott C; Jung, Erica E; Kalontarov, Michael; Erickson, David; Sinton, David

    2012-04-14

    The conversion of solar energy to chemical energy useful for maintaining cellular function in photosynthetic algae and cyanobacteria relies critically on light delivery to the microorganisms. Conventional direct irradiation of a bulk suspension leads to non-uniform light distribution within a strongly absorbing culture, and related inefficiencies. The study of small colonies of cells in controlled microenvironments would benefit from control over wavelength, intensity, and location of light energy on the scale of the microorganism. Here we demonstrate that the evanescent light field, confined near the surface of a waveguide, can be used to direct light into cyanobacteria and successfully drive photosynthesis. The method is enabled by the synergy between the penetration depth of the evanescent field and the size of the photosynthetic bacterium, both on the order of micrometres. Wild type Synechococcus elongatus (ATCC 33912) cells are exposed to evanescent light generated through total internal reflection of red (λ = 633 nm) light on a prism surface. Growth onset is consistently observed at intensity levels of 79 ± 10 W m(-2), as measured 1 μm from the surface, and 60 ± 8 W m(-2) as measured by a 5 μm depthwise average. These threshold values agree well with control experiments and literature values based on direct irradiation with daylight. In contrast, negligible growth is observed with evanescent light penetration depths less than the minor dimension of the rod-like bacterium (achieved at larger light incident angles). Collectively these results indicate that evanescent light waves can be used to tailor and direct light into cyanobacteria, driving photosynthesis.

  11. Diurnal and seasonal variation in light and dark respiration in field-grown Eucalyptus pauciflora.

    PubMed

    Way, Danielle A; Holly, Chris; Bruhn, Dan; Ball, Marilyn C; Atkin, Owen K

    2015-08-01

    Respiration from vegetation is a substantial part of the global carbon cycle and the responses of plant respiration to daily and seasonal fluctuations in temperature and light must be incorporated in models of terrestrial respiration to accurately predict these CO2 fluxes. We investigated how leaf respiration (R) responded to changes in leaf temperature (T(leaf)) and irradiance in field-grown saplings of an evergreen tree (Eucalyptus pauciflora Sieb. ex Spreng). Seasonal shifts in the thermal sensitivity of leaf R in the dark (R(dark)) and in the light (R(light)) were assessed by allowing T(leaf) to vary over the day in field-grown leaves over a year. The Q10 of R (i.e., the relative increase in R for a 10 °C increase in T(leaf)) was similar for R(light) and R(dark) and had a value of ∼ 2.5; there was little seasonal change in the Q10 of either R(light) or R(dark), indicating that we may be able to use similar functions to model short-term temperature responses of R in the dark and in the light. Overall, rates of R(light) were lower than those of R(dark), and the ratio of R(light)/R(dark) tended to increase with rising T(leaf), such that light suppression of R was reduced at high T(leaf) values, in contrast to earlier work with this species. Our results suggest we cannot assume that R(light)/R(dark) decreases with increasing T(leaf) on daily timescales, and highlights the need for a better mechanistic understanding of what regulates light suppression of R in leaves.

  12. Two-flow simulation of the natural light field within a canopy of submerged aquatic plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackleson, S. G.; Klemas, V.

    1986-01-01

    A two-flow model is developed to simulate a light field composed of both collimated and diffuse irradiance within natural waters containing a canopy of bottom-adhering plants. To account for the effects of submerging a canopy, the transmittance and reflectance terms associated with each plant structure (leaves, stems, fruiting bodies, etc.) are expressed as functions of the ratio of the refractive index of the plant material to the refractive index of the surrounding media and the internal transmittance of the plant stucture. Algebraic solutions to the model are shown to yield plausible physical explanations for unanticipated variations in volume reflectance spectra. The effect of bottom reflectance on the near-bottom light field is also investigated. These indicate that within light-limited submerged aquatic plant canopies, substrate reflectance may play an important role in determining the amount of light available to the plants and, therefore, canopy productivity.

  13. A novel autonomous real-time position method based on polarized light and geomagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinlong; Chu, Jinkui; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Lu; Wang, Zhiwen

    2015-01-01

    Many animals exploit polarized light in order to calibrate their magnetic compasses for navigation. For example, some birds are equipped with biological magnetic and celestial compasses enabling them to migrate between the Western and Eastern Hemispheres. The Vikings' ability to derive true direction from polarized light is also widely accepted. However, their amazing navigational capabilities are still not completely clear. Inspired by birds' and Vikings' ancient navigational skills. Here we present a combined real-time position method based on the use of polarized light and geomagnetic field. The new method works independently of any artificial signal source with no accumulation of errors and can obtain the position and the orientation directly. The novel device simply consists of two polarized light sensors, a 3-axis compass and a computer. The field experiments demonstrate device performance. PMID:25851793

  14. A novel autonomous real-time position method based on polarized light and geomagnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinlong; Chu, Jinkui; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Lu; Wang, Zhiwen

    2015-01-01

    Many animals exploit polarized light in order to calibrate their magnetic compasses for navigation. For example, some birds are equipped with biological magnetic and celestial compasses enabling them to migrate between the Western and Eastern Hemispheres. The Vikings' ability to derive true direction from polarized light is also widely accepted. However, their amazing navigational capabilities are still not completely clear. Inspired by birds' and Vikings' ancient navigational skills. Here we present a combined real-time position method based on the use of polarized light and geomagnetic field. The new method works independently of any artificial signal source with no accumulation of errors and can obtain the position and the orientation directly. The novel device simply consists of two polarized light sensors, a 3-axis compass and a computer. The field experiments demonstrate device performance. PMID:25851793

  15. A novel autonomous real-time position method based on polarized light and geomagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinlong; Chu, Jinkui; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Lu; Wang, Zhiwen

    2015-04-08

    Many animals exploit polarized light in order to calibrate their magnetic compasses for navigation. For example, some birds are equipped with biological magnetic and celestial compasses enabling them to migrate between the Western and Eastern Hemispheres. The Vikings' ability to derive true direction from polarized light is also widely accepted. However, their amazing navigational capabilities are still not completely clear. Inspired by birds' and Vikings' ancient navigational skills. Here we present a combined real-time position method based on the use of polarized light and geomagnetic field. The new method works independently of any artificial signal source with no accumulation of errors and can obtain the position and the orientation directly. The novel device simply consists of two polarized light sensors, a 3-axis compass and a computer. The field experiments demonstrate device performance.

  16. A novel autonomous real-time position method based on polarized light and geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yinlong; Chu, Jinkui; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Lu; Wang, Zhiwen

    2015-04-01

    Many animals exploit polarized light in order to calibrate their magnetic compasses for navigation. For example, some birds are equipped with biological magnetic and celestial compasses enabling them to migrate between the Western and Eastern Hemispheres. The Vikings' ability to derive true direction from polarized light is also widely accepted. However, their amazing navigational capabilities are still not completely clear. Inspired by birds' and Vikings' ancient navigational skills. Here we present a combined real-time position method based on the use of polarized light and geomagnetic field. The new method works independently of any artificial signal source with no accumulation of errors and can obtain the position and the orientation directly. The novel device simply consists of two polarized light sensors, a 3-axis compass and a computer. The field experiments demonstrate device performance.

  17. Parallel Infrastructure Modeling and Inversion Module for E4D

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-09

    computational demands. 3) The ERT imaging algorithm requires specialized modifications to accomodate high conductivty inclusions within the computational mesh. The solution to each of these challenges was implemented within E4D (formerly FERM3D), which is a parallel ERT imaging code developed at PNNL (IPID #30249). The infrastructure modeling module implement in E4D uses a method of decoupling the model at the metallic interface(s) boundaries, into several well posed sub-problems (one for each distinct metallicinclusion) that are subsequently solved and recombined to form the global solution. The approach is based on the immersed interface method, with has been applied for similar problems in other fields (e.g. semiconductor industry). Comparisons to analytic solutions have shown the results to be very accurate, addressing item 1 above. The solution is implemented about an unstructured mesh, which enables arbitrary shapes to be efficiently modelled, thereby addressing item 2 above. In addition, the algorithm is written in parallel and shows excellent scalability, which also addresses equation 2 above. Finally, because only the boundaries of metallic inclusions are modeled, there are no high conductivity cells within the modeling mesh, and the problem described by item 3 above is no longer applicable.

  18. Biological and molecular responses of Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae) to herbicide 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid).

    PubMed

    Park, Kiyun; Park, Jungan; Kim, Jongkyu; Kwak, Inn-Sil

    2010-05-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is an agricultural contaminant found in rural ground water. It remains to be determined whether neither 2,4-D poses environmental risks, nor is the mechanism of toxicity known at the molecular level. To evaluate the potential ecological risk of 2,4-D, we assessed the biological parameters including the survival rate, adult sex ratio of emerged adults, and mouthpart deformities in Chironomus riparius after long-term exposure to 2,4-D. The larvae were treated with 0.1, 1 or, 10microgL(-1) of 2,4-D for short- and long-term exposure periods. The sex ratio was changed in C. riparius exposed to only 10microgL(-1) of 2,4-D, whereas mouthpart deformities were observed as significantly higher in C. riparius exposed to 0.1microgL(-1) of 2,4-D. Survival rates were not significantly affected by 2,4-D. Furthermore, we evaluated the molecular and biochemical responses of biomarker genes such as gene expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), ferritins and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) in C. riparius exposed to 2,4-D for 24h. The expressions of HSP70, HSP40, HSP90 and GST levels in C. riparius were significantly increased after exposure to a 10microgL(-1) concentration of 2,4-D, whereas ferritin heavy and light chain gene expressions were significantly increased at all concentrations of 2,4-D exposure. Finally, these results may provide an important contribution to our understanding of the toxicology of 2,4-D herbicide in C. riparius. Moreover, the 2,4-D-mediated gene expressions may be generated by 2,4-D is the causative effects on most probable cause of the observed alterations. These biological, molecular and morphological parameters and the measured parameters can be used to monitor 2,4-D toxicity in an aquatic environment.

  19. Goos-Hänchen shift of partially coherent light fields in epsilon-near-zero metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ziauddin; Chuang, You-Lin; Qamar, Sajid; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    The Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts in the reflected light are investigated both for p and s polarized partial coherent light beams incident on epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) metamaterials. In contrary to the coherent counterparts, the magnitude of GH shift becomes non-zero for p polarized partial coherent light beam; while GH shift can be relatively large with a small degree of spatial coherence for s polarized partial coherent beam. Dependence on the beam width and the permittivity of ENZ metamaterials is also revealed for partial coherent light fields. Our results on the GH shifts provide a direction on the applications for partial coherent light sources in ENZ metamaterials. PMID:27211050

  20. Investigation of correlation properties of light fields by Fresnel diffraction from a step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. R.; Tavassoly, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a new method, based on Fresnel diffraction of light from a step, for the study of correlation properties (temporal and spatial) of optical fields. The method renders to measure wavelength, coherence length, and coherence width by recording the visibility of the diffraction fringes versus optical path difference and spacing of the interfering beams. In addition, the method permits to specify the spectral line shape, particularly, of lights with short coherence lengths and the spatial coherence behavior of the lights with short coherence widths. Since, in the introduced method the optical path difference can be varied by changing the light incident angle, practically, in an interval of 90º, a large volume of data is acquired which leads to reliable and accurate study of the subject. The method can be applied easily using modest equipment. We have applied the method to the study of correlation properties of the lights emitted by LED, incandescent bulb, and Hg lamp.

  1. Calcium neuroimaging in behaving zebrafish larvae using a turn-key light field camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz Perez, Carlos; Lauri, Antonella; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Cappetta, Michele; Erdmann, Arne; Westmeyer, Gil Gregor

    2015-09-01

    Reconstructing a three-dimensional scene from multiple simultaneously acquired perspectives (the light field) is an elegant scanless imaging concept that can exceed the temporal resolution of currently available scanning-based imaging methods for capturing fast cellular processes. We tested the performance of commercially available light field cameras on a fluorescent microscopy setup for monitoring calcium activity in the brain of awake and behaving reporter zebrafish larvae. The plenoptic imaging system could volumetrically resolve diverse neuronal response profiles throughout the zebrafish brain upon stimulation with an aversive odorant. Behavioral responses of the reporter fish could be captured simultaneously together with depth-resolved neuronal activity. Overall, our assessment showed that with some optimizations for fluorescence microscopy applications, commercial light field cameras have the potential of becoming an attractive alternative to custom-built systems to accelerate molecular imaging research on cellular dynamics.

  2. A 360-degree floating 3D display based on light field regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinxing; Liu, Xu; Li, Haifeng; Zheng, Zhenrong; Wang, Han; Peng, Yifan; Shen, Weidong

    2013-05-01

    Using light field reconstruction technique, we can display a floating 3D scene in the air, which is 360-degree surrounding viewable with correct occlusion effect. A high-frame-rate color projector and flat light field scanning screen are used in the system to create the light field of real 3D scene in the air above the spinning screen. The principle and display performance of this approach are investigated in this paper. The image synthesis method for all the surrounding viewpoints is analyzed, and the 3D spatial resolution and angular resolution of the common display zone are employed to evaluate display performance. The prototype is achieved and the real 3D color animation image has been presented vividly. The experimental results verified the representability of this method.

  3. Close-range photogrammetry with light field camera: from disparity map to absolute distance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Wang, Zhaomin; Yan, Yizhen; Qu, Weijuan; Zhao, Hongying; Asundi, Anand; Yan, Lei

    2016-09-20

    A new approach to measure the 3D profile of a texture object is proposed utilizing light field imaging, in which three key steps are required: a disparity map is first obtained by detecting the slopes in the epipolar plane image with the multilabel technique; the intrinsic parameters of the light field camera are then extracted by camera calibration; at last, the relationship between disparity values and real distances is built up by depth calibration. In the last step, a linear calibration method is proposed to achieve accurate results. Furthermore, the depth error is also investigated and compensated for by reusing the checkerboard pattern. The experimental results are in good agreement with the 3D models, and also indicate that the light field imaging is a promising 3D measurement technique. PMID:27661572

  4. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Georges; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank; José Sáenz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with optical tweezers as well as to induce significant optical binding forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir–Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as a gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light-induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems. PMID:26096622

  5. Full-Field Pupillary Light Responses, Luminance Thresholds, and Light Discomfort Thresholds in CEP290 Leber Congenital Amaurosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Collison, Frederick T.; Park, Jason C.; Fishman, Gerald A.; McAnany, J. Jason; Stone, Edwin M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate visual function in patients with CEP290 Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA-CEP290), using three full-field tests that can be performed by patients with poor fixation. Methods Six patients (age range, 9–39 years) with LCA-CEP290 participated in the study. Stimuli for all three tests (full-field stimulus test [FST], pupillometry, and light discomfort threshold [LDT] testing) were generated by the Diagnosys ColorDome ganzfeld, by using achromatic stimuli as well as long- and short-wavelength stimuli to target rod and cone photoreceptors with all three tests and, in the latter two tests, melanopsin photoreceptors. Results Dark-adapted FST thresholds in LCA-CEP290 patients were cone mediated and elevated between 4.8 and 6.2 log units above the normal achromatic threshold. The FST threshold was not measurable in one patient. The rod-mediated transient pupillary light reflex (PLR) was absent in all but the youngest patient, where unreliable responses precluded PLR quantification. Cone-mediated transient PLRs were subnormal in five patients, and absent in another. Sustained melanopsin-mediated PLRs were measurable in all patients. Full-field LDT thresholds were elevated compared to normal controls, and were lower for short-wavelengh than for long-wavelength stimuli. Conclusions The FST thresholds and transient PLRs were cone mediated in our cohort LCA-CEP290 patients. Rod-mediated PLRs were undetectable, whereas melanopsin-mediated sustained responses were detected in all patients, suggesting a relative preservation of inner-retina function. The LDT elevations for the patients are somewhat paradoxical, given their subjective perception of photoaversion. Relative aversion to short-wavelength light suggests influence from melanopsin on LDTs in these patients. PMID:26529047

  6. High-resolution full-field spatial coherence gated optical tomography using monochromatic light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vishal; Nandy, Sreyankar; Singh Mehta, Dalip

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate dispersion free, high-resolution full-field spatial coherence gated optical tomography using spatially incoherent monochromatic light source. Spatial coherence properties of light source were synthesized by means of combining a static diffuser and vibrating multi mode fiber bundle. Due to low spatial coherence of light source, the axial resolution of the system was achieved similar to that of conventional optical coherence tomography which utilizes low temporal coherence. Experimental results of fringe visibility versus optical path difference are presented for varying numerical apertures objective lenses. High resolution optically sectioned images of multilayer onion skin, and red blood cells are presented.

  7. C4d staining as immunohistochemical marker in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis of an inflammatory myopathy is often established based on basic histologic studies. Additional immunohistochemical studies are sometimes required to support the diagnosis and the classification of inflammatory myopathies. Staining for major histocompatibility complex 1 (MHC1) often shows increased sarcolemmal labeling in inflammatory myopathies. Endomysial capillary staining C5b-9 (membrane attack complex) is a feature that is reported as frequently associated with dermatomyositis. Immunohistochemical staining for C4d is widely used for various applications including the assessment of antibody-mediated rejection after solid organ transplantation. In the context of dermatomyositis, C4d staining has been described in skin biopsies but not in muscle biopsies. A total of 32 muscle biopsy specimens were examined. The hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides were reviewed, and immunohistochemical studies for MHC1, C5b-9, and C4d were conducted. The staining observed for C5b-9 and C4d was compared. Overall, the staining pattern for C4d mirrored the one observed for C5b-9 in the examined muscle biopsy specimens. There was high and statistically significant (P<0.0001) correlation between the staining seen with these 2 antibodies. Both antibodies labeled the cytoplasm of degenerating necrotic myofibers. In addition, both antibodies showed distinct endomysial capillary labeling in a subset of dermatomyositis. Areas with perifascicular atrophy often exhibited the most prominent vascular labeling for C4d and C5b-9. In conclusion, C4d and C5b-9 show similar expression patterns in muscle biopsies of patients with inflammatory myopathies and both highlight the presence of vascular labeling associated with dermatomyositis. C4d antibodies are widely used and may offer an alternative for C5b-9 staining.

  8. Directional orientation of birds by the magnetic field under different light conditions.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Stapput, Katrin; Thalau, Peter; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    This paper reviews the directional orientation of birds with the help of the geomagnetic field under various light conditions. Two fundamentally different types of response can be distinguished. (i) Compass orientation controlled by the inclination compass that allows birds to locate courses of different origin. This is restricted to a narrow functional window around the total intensity of the local geomagnetic field and requires light from the short-wavelength part of the spectrum. The compass is based on radical-pair processes in the right eye; magnetite-based receptors in the beak are not involved. Compass orientation is observed under 'white' and low-level monochromatic light from ultraviolet (UV) to about 565 nm green light. (ii) 'Fixed direction' responses occur under artificial light conditions such as more intense monochromatic light, when 590 nm yellow light is added to short-wavelength light, and in total darkness. The manifestation of these responses depends on the ambient light regime and is 'fixed' in the sense of not showing the normal change between spring and autumn; their biological significance is unclear. In contrast to compass orientation, fixed-direction responses are polar magnetic responses and occur within a wide range of magnetic intensities. They are disrupted by local anaesthesia of the upper beak, which indicates that the respective magnetic information is mediated by iron-based receptors located there. The influence of light conditions on the two types of response suggests complex interactions between magnetoreceptors in the right eye, those in the upper beak and the visual system.

  9. Directional orientation of birds by the magnetic field under different light conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Stapput, Katrin; Thalau, Peter; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the directional orientation of birds with the help of the geomagnetic field under various light conditions. Two fundamentally different types of response can be distinguished. (i) Compass orientation controlled by the inclination compass that allows birds to locate courses of different origin. This is restricted to a narrow functional window around the total intensity of the local geomagnetic field and requires light from the short-wavelength part of the spectrum. The compass is based on radical-pair processes in the right eye; magnetite-based receptors in the beak are not involved. Compass orientation is observed under ‘white’ and low-level monochromatic light from ultraviolet (UV) to about 565 nm green light. (ii) ‘Fixed direction’ responses occur under artificial light conditions such as more intense monochromatic light, when 590 nm yellow light is added to short-wavelength light, and in total darkness. The manifestation of these responses depends on the ambient light regime and is ‘fixed’ in the sense of not showing the normal change between spring and autumn; their biological significance is unclear. In contrast to compass orientation, fixed-direction responses are polar magnetic responses and occur within a wide range of magnetic intensities. They are disrupted by local anaesthesia of the upper beak, which indicates that the respective magnetic information is mediated by iron-based receptors located there. The influence of light conditions on the two types of response suggests complex interactions between magnetoreceptors in the right eye, those in the upper beak and the visual system. PMID:19864263

  10. Substitutional 4d and 5d impurities in graphene.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2016-08-21

    We describe the structural and electronic properties of graphene doped with substitutional impurities of 4d and 5d transition metals. The adsorption energies and distances for 4d and 5d metals in graphene show similar trends for the later groups in the periodic table, which are also well-known characteristics of 3d elements. However, along earlier groups the 4d impurities in graphene show very similar adsorption energies, distances and magnetic moments to the 5d ones, which can be related to the influence of the 4d and 5d lanthanide contraction. Surprisingly, within the manganese group, the total magnetic moment of 3 μB for manganese is reduced to 1 μB for technetium and rhenium. We find that compared with 3d elements, the larger size of the 4d and 5d elements causes a high degree of hybridization with the neighbouring carbon atoms, reducing spin splitting in the d levels. It seems that the magnetic adjustment of graphene could be significantly different if 4d or 5d impurities are used instead of 3d impurities.

  11. Substitutional 4d and 5d impurities in graphene.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2016-08-21

    We describe the structural and electronic properties of graphene doped with substitutional impurities of 4d and 5d transition metals. The adsorption energies and distances for 4d and 5d metals in graphene show similar trends for the later groups in the periodic table, which are also well-known characteristics of 3d elements. However, along earlier groups the 4d impurities in graphene show very similar adsorption energies, distances and magnetic moments to the 5d ones, which can be related to the influence of the 4d and 5d lanthanide contraction. Surprisingly, within the manganese group, the total magnetic moment of 3 μB for manganese is reduced to 1 μB for technetium and rhenium. We find that compared with 3d elements, the larger size of the 4d and 5d elements causes a high degree of hybridization with the neighbouring carbon atoms, reducing spin splitting in the d levels. It seems that the magnetic adjustment of graphene could be significantly different if 4d or 5d impurities are used instead of 3d impurities. PMID:27439363

  12. Synthesis, biological activities and pharmacokinetic properties of new fluorinated derivatives of selective PDE4D inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brullo, Chiara; Massa, Matteo; Villa, Carla; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Rivera, Daniela; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Fedele, Ernesto; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Bertoni, Simona; Flammini, Lisa; Bruno, Olga

    2015-07-01

    A new series of selective PDE4D inhibitors has been designed and synthesized by replacing 3-methoxy group with 3-difluoromethoxy isoster moiety in our previously reported cathecolic structures. All compounds showed a good PDE4D3 inhibitory activity, most of them being inactive toward other PDE4 isoforms (PDE4A4, PDE4B2 and PDE4C2). Compound 3b, chosen among the synthesized compounds as the most promising in terms of inhibitory activity, selectivity and safety, showed an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared to its non fluorinated analogue. Spontaneous locomotor activity, assessed in an open field apparatus, showed that, differently from rolipram and diazepam, selective PDE4D inhibitors, such as compounds 3b, 5b and 7b, did not affect locomotion, whereas compound 1b showed a tendency to reduce the distance traveled and to prolong the immobility period, possibly due to a poor selectivity.

  13. SU-E-J-241: Creation of Ventilation CT From Daily 4D CTs Or 4D Conebeam CTs Acquired During IGRT for Thoracic Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, A; Ahunbay, E; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to create ventilation CTs from daily 4D CTs or 4D KV conebeam CTs (4DCBCT) acquired during image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for thoracic tumors, and to explore the potential for using the ventilation CTs as a means for early detection of lung injury during radiation treatment. Methods: 4DCT acquired using an in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) and 4DCBCT acquired using the X-ray Volume Imaging (XVI) system (Infinity, Elekta) for representative lung cancer patients were analyzed. These 4D data sets were sorted into 10 phase images. A newly-available deformable image registration tool (ADMIRE, Elekta) is used to deform the phase images at the end of exhale (EE) to the phase images at the end of inhale (EI). The lung volumes at EI and EE were carefully contoured using an intensity-based auto-contour tool and then manually edited. The ventilation images were calculated from the variations of CT numbers of those voxels masked by the lung contour at EI between the registered phase images. The deformable image registration is also performed between the daily 4D images and planning 4DCT, and the resulting deformable field vector (DFV) is used to deform the planning doses to the daily images by an in-house Matlab program. Results: The ventilation images were successfully created. The tide volumes calculated using the ventilation images agree with those measured through volume difference of contours at EE and EI, indicating the accuracy of ventilation images. The association between the delivered doses and the change of lung ventilation from the daily ventilation CTs is identified. Conclusions: A method to create the ventilation CT using daily 4DCTs or 4D KV conebeam CTs was developed and demonstrated.

  14. Investigation of mechanosensation in C. elegans using light field calcium imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Michael; Elmi, Muna; Pawar, Vijay; Srinivasan, Mandayam A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new experimental approach to investigate touch sensation in the model organism C. elegans using light field deconvolution microscopy. By combining fast volumetric image acquisition with controlled indentation of the organism using a high sensitivity force transducer, we are able to simultaneously measure activity in multiple touch receptor neurons expressing the calcium ion indicator GCaMP6s. By varying the applied mechanical stimulus we show how this method can be used to quantify touch sensitivity in C. elegans. We describe some of the challenges of performing light field calcium imaging in moving samples and demonstrate that they can be overcome by simple data processing. PMID:27446713

  15. Light source with carbon nanotubes field emission cathode and rare-earth doped nanocrystalline phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psuja, P.; Strek, W.

    2007-09-01

    In this work we report a new carbon nanotubes field emission (CNT-FED) light source with nanocrystalline phosphors. The nanocrystalline powders of cerium doped yttrium aluminum garnet were obtained by modified Pechini method. The phosphor has been electrophoretically deposited on ITO-glass substrates. The cathode composed of carbon nanotubes was fabricated in the same manner. A light source was assembled and tested. Low-voltage cathodoluminescent spectra and I-V characteristics of fabricated cathodes were measured. A possibility of application of Ce doped nanocrystalline YAG phosphor in the field emission displays (FEDs) was discussed.

  16. Importance of holographic light in the emerging field of mind-body healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Roberta

    2000-10-01

    Healing with color has been researched and documented worldwide for centuries. Every single part of the brain and every cell in the body is effected by light. Chinese and Russian scientists demonstrated that the acupuncture meridians transmit light. Dr. Peter Mandel, German chiropractic physician and acupuncturist, states that the acupuncture points are especially sensitive to electromagnetic waves within the spectrum of visible light and microwave energy, and all cells constantly emit and absorb small pockets of electromagnetic radiation or light, called biophotons. The harmony or disharmony of cells has been documented. Kirlian photography, to photography the aura was invented by Russians Semyon and Valentina Kirlian. Photo therapy and light research are being practiced worldwide. In the United States, Dr. Jacob Lieberman has written an influential book Light Medicine of the Future. In 1992 the first Light Years Ahead conference was held. (#5 1996) Dr. Brian Breiling and Dr. Lee Hartley brought together experts in the field to discuss the many potentials of light therapy. My present research in this area has focused on narrow band frequencies through the use of holography. Its therapeutic applications of color healing in this research are both critical and fundamental. My current work, The Chakras, seven reflection holograms on silver halide, relate to the wheels of light described in the earliest recorded Indian history. I will discus the chakras, this ancient metaphysical system under the new light of popular western metaphors and visionary art, how the chakras relate to the seven colors of the rainbow, the electromagnetic waves, and the connection to color holography in healing light therapy. I will be citing concurrent research in color healing, and the important areas of research that are necessary to have significant impact on future directions. Holography in the future will constitute a major frontier in discovery.

  17. Role of nonlinear refraction in the generation of terahertz field pulses by light fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zabolotskii, A. A.

    2013-07-15

    The generation of microwave (terahertz) pulses without any envelope in a four-level quasi-resonant medium is considered. Two intense quasi-monochromatic laser fields lead to a partial upper-level population. Microwave field pulses cause the transition between these levels. For appropriately chosen scales, the evolution of the fields is shown to be described by the pseudo-spin evolution equations in a microwave field with the inclusion of nonlinear refraction caused by an adiabatic upper-level population. The evolution of terahertz field pulses is described outside the scope of the slow-envelope approximation. When a number of standard approximations are taken into account, this system of equations is shown to be equivalent to an integrable version of the generalized reduced Maxwell-Bloch equations or to the generalized three-wave mixing equations. The soliton solution found by the inverse scattering transform method is used as an example to show that nonlinear refraction leads to a strong compression of the microwave (terahertz) field soliton.

  18. Nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light in the geophysical field range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Rochester, S. M.; Budker, D.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Hovde, D. C.; Gawlik, W.; Pustelny, S.; Zachorowski, J.; Yashchuk, V. V.

    2006-05-01

    Recent work investigating resonant nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) related to long-lived (τrel˜1s) ground-state atomic coherences has demonstrated potential magnetometric sensitivities exceeding 10-11G/Hz for small (≲1μG ) magnetic fields. In the present work, NMOR using frequency-modulated light (FM NMOR) is studied in the regime where the longitudinal magnetic field is in the geophysical range (˜500mG) , of particular interest for many applications. In this regime a splitting of the FM NMOR resonance due to the nonlinear Zeeman effect is observed. At sufficiently high light intensities, there is also a splitting of the FM NMOR resonances due to ac Stark shifts induced by the optical field, as well as evidence of alignment-to-orientation conversion type processes. The consequences of these effects for FM-NMOR-based atomic magnetometry in the geophysical field range are considered.

  19. Control of light trapping in a large atomic system by a static magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipetrov, S. E.; Sokolov, I. M.; Havey, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    We propose to control light trapping in a large ensemble of cold atoms by an external, static magnetic field. For an appropriate choice of frequency and polarization of the exciting pulse, the field is expected to speed up the fluorescence of a dilute atomic system. In a dense ensemble, the field does not affect the early-time superradiant signal but amplifies intensity oscillations at intermediate times and induces a very slow, nonexponential long-time decay. The slowing down of fluorescence is due to the excitation of spatially localized collective atomic states that appear only under a strong magnetic field and have exponentially long lifetimes. Our results therefore pave a way towards experimental observation of the disorder-induced localization of light in cold atomic systems.

  20. Semaphorin 4D Promotes Skeletal Metastasis in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Hua; Buhamrah, Asma; Schneider, Abraham; Lin, Yi-Ling; Zhou, Hua; Bugshan, Amr; Basile, John R

    2016-01-01

    Bone density is controlled by interactions between osteoclasts, which resorb bone, and osteoblasts, which deposit it. The semaphorins and their receptors, the plexins, originally shown to function in the immune system and to provide chemotactic cues for axon guidance, are now known to play a role in this process as well. Emerging data have identified Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) as a product of osteoclasts acting through its receptor Plexin-B1 on osteoblasts to inhibit their function, tipping the balance of bone homeostasis in favor of resorption. Breast cancers and other epithelial malignancies overexpress Sema4D, so we theorized that tumor cells could be exploiting this pathway to establish lytic skeletal metastases. Here, we use measurements of osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function in vitro and a mouse model of skeletal metastasis to demonstrate that both soluble Sema4D and protein produced by the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 inhibits differentiation of MC3T3 cells, an osteoblast cell line, and their ability to form mineralized tissues, while Sema4D-mediated induction of IL-8 and LIX/CXCL5, the murine homologue of IL-8, increases osteoclast numbers and activity. We also observe a decrease in the number of bone metastases in mice injected with MDA-MB-231 cells when Sema4D is silenced by RNA interference. These results are significant because treatments directed at suppression of skeletal metastases in bone-homing malignancies usually work by arresting bone remodeling, potentially leading to skeletal fragility, a significant problem in patient management. Targeting Sema4D in these cancers would not affect bone remodeling and therefore could elicit an improved therapeutic result without the debilitating side effects.

  1. Soil matrix and macropore biodegradation of 2,4-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pivetz, B.E.; Steenhuis, T.S.

    1995-07-01

    Preferential flow of pesticides in macropores can lead to decreased travel times through the vadose zone and increased groundwater contamination. Macropores, however, may present a favorable environment for biodegradation because of greater oxygen, nutrient, and substrate supply, and higher microbial populations in earthworm burrows, compared to the soil matrix. The biodegradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was measured in macropores and soil matrix of packed soil columns (7.0-cm diam., 10-cm length) and undisturbed cores contained as well-defined artificial macropore and the undisturbed cores contained earthworm-burrow macropores. A 50 {mu}g/L 2,4-D solution was continuously applied to the unsaturated soil surface and breakthrough curves (BTCs) indicating pesticide loss in the effluent were obtained from the soil matrix and macropore flow paths. Biodegradation rates were calculated separately for each flow path by comparing the BTCs to BTCs representing abiotic conditions, and dividing the 2,4-D loss by the travel time through each flow path. The biodegradation rates increased with time in both flow paths, and the final biodegradation rate in the macropore region surpassed that of the matrix, presumably because of increased microbial populations in the macropore. Complete loss of the 2,4-D in both flow paths was observed after continuous application of 2,4-D for 400 h, with maximum column-averaged 2,4-D loss rates of 0.879 {mu}g/(L h) in the matrix and 1.073 {mu}g/(L h) in the macropore. Biodegradation of 2,4-D was also observed in the macropore and matrix regions of the undisturbed soil cores. 19 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Semaphorin 4D Promotes Skeletal Metastasis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Hua; Buhamrah, Asma; Schneider, Abraham; Lin, Yi-Ling; Zhou, Hua; Bugshan, Amr; Basile, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Bone density is controlled by interactions between osteoclasts, which resorb bone, and osteoblasts, which deposit it. The semaphorins and their receptors, the plexins, originally shown to function in the immune system and to provide chemotactic cues for axon guidance, are now known to play a role in this process as well. Emerging data have identified Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) as a product of osteoclasts acting through its receptor Plexin-B1 on osteoblasts to inhibit their function, tipping the balance of bone homeostasis in favor of resorption. Breast cancers and other epithelial malignancies overexpress Sema4D, so we theorized that tumor cells could be exploiting this pathway to establish lytic skeletal metastases. Here, we use measurements of osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function in vitro and a mouse model of skeletal metastasis to demonstrate that both soluble Sema4D and protein produced by the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 inhibits differentiation of MC3T3 cells, an osteoblast cell line, and their ability to form mineralized tissues, while Sema4D-mediated induction of IL-8 and LIX/CXCL5, the murine homologue of IL-8, increases osteoclast numbers and activity. We also observe a decrease in the number of bone metastases in mice injected with MDA-MB-231 cells when Sema4D is silenced by RNA interference. These results are significant because treatments directed at suppression of skeletal metastases in bone-homing malignancies usually work by arresting bone remodeling, potentially leading to skeletal fragility, a significant problem in patient management. Targeting Sema4D in these cancers would not affect bone remodeling and therefore could elicit an improved therapeutic result without the debilitating side effects. PMID:26910109

  3. Photoelectric charging of dust particles: Effect of spontaneous and light induced field emission of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Dixit, A.

    2009-09-07

    The authors have analyzed the charging of dust particles in a plasma, taking into account the electron/ion currents to the particles, electron/ion generation and recombination, electric field emission, photoelectric emission and photoelectric field emission of electrons under the influence of light irradiation; the irradiance has been assumed to be at a level, which lets the particles retain the negative sign of the charge. Numerical results and discussion conclude the papers.

  4. 4D measurement system for automatic location of anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Sitnik, Robert; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Rapp, Walter; Kowalski, Marcin; Haex, Bart; Mooshake, Sven

    2006-04-01

    Orthopedics and neurosciences are fields of medicine where the analysis of objective movement parameters is extremely important for clinical diagnosis. Moreover, as there are significant differences between static and dynamic parameters, there is a strong need of analyzing the anatomical structures under functional conditions. In clinical gait analysis the benefits of kinematical methods are undoubted. In this paper we present a 4D (3D + time) measurement system capable of automatic location of selected anatomical structures by locating and tracing the structures' position and orientation in time. The presented system is designed to help a general practitioner in diagnosing selected lower limbs' dysfunctions (e.g. knee injuries) and also determine if a patient should be directed for further examination (e.g. x-ray or MRI). The measurement system components are hardware and software. For the hardware part we adapt the laser triangulation method. In this way we can evaluate functional and dynamic movements in a contact-free, non-invasive way, without the use of potentially harmful radiation. Furthermore, opposite to marker-based video-tracking systems, no preparation time is required. The software part consists of a data acquisition module, an image processing and point clouds (point cloud, set of points described by coordinates (x, y, z)) calculation module, a preliminary processing module, a feature-searching module and an external biomechanical module. The paper briefly presents the modules mentioned above with the focus on the feature-searching module. Also we present some measurement and analysis results. These include: parameters maps, landmarks trajectories in time sequence and animation of a simplified model of lower limbs.

  5. Binary 4D seismic history matching, a metric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassagne, Romain; Obidegwu, Dennis; Dambrine, Julien; MacBeth, Colin

    2016-11-01

    This paper explores 4D seismic history matching and it specifically focuses on the objective function used during the optimisation with seismic data. The objective function is calculated by using binary maps, where one map is obtained from the observed seismic data and the other is from one realisation of the optimisation algorithm from the simulation model. In order to decide which set of parameters is a relevant update for the simulation model, an efficient way is required to measure how similar these two binary images are, during their evaluation within the objective function. Behind this aspect of quantification of the similarities or dissimilarities lies the metric notion, or the art of measuring distances. Four metrics are proposed with this study, the well-known Hamming distance, two widely used metrics, the Hausdorff distance and Mutual Information and a recent metric, called the Current Measure Metric. These metrics will be tested and compared on different case scenarios, designed in accordance to a real field case (gas exsolution) before being used in the second part of the paper. Despite its simplicity, the Hamming distance gives positive results, but the Current Measure Metric appears to be a more efficient choice to cover a wider range of scenarios, these conclusions remain true when tested on synthetic and real dataset in a history matching exercise. Some practical aspects of binary map processes will be examined through the paper, as it is shown that it is more proper to use a derivative free optimisation algorithm and a proper metric should be more inclined to capture global features than local features.

  6. 4D motion animation of coronary arteries from rotational angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, Wolfgang; Rohkohl, Christopher; Schuldhaus, Dominik; Prümmer, Marcus; Lauritsch, Günter; Hornegger, Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Time-resolved 3-D imaging of the heart is a major research topic in the medical imaging community. Recent advances in the interventional cardiac 3-D imaging from rotational angiography (C-arm CT) are now also making 4-D imaging feasible during procedures in the catheter laboratory. State-of-the-art reconstruction algorithms try to estimate the cardiac motion and utilize the motion field to enhance the reconstruction of a stable cardiac phase (diastole). The available data offers a handful of opportunities during interventional procedures, e.g. the ECG-synchronized dynamic roadmapping or the computation and analysis of functional parameters. In this paper we will demonstrate that the motion vector field (MVF) that is output by motion compensated image reconstruction algorithms is in general not directly usable for animation and motion analysis. Dependent on the algorithm different defects are investigated. A primary issue is that the MVF needs to be inverted, i.e. the wrong direction of motion is provided. A second major issue is the non-periodicity of cardiac motion. In algorithms which compute a non-periodic motion field from a single rotation the in depth motion information along viewing direction is missing, since this cannot be measured in the projections. As a result, while the MVF improves reconstruction quality, it is insufficient for motion animation and analysis. We propose an algorithm to solve both problems, i.e. inversion and missing in-depth information in a unified framework. A periodic version of the MVF is approximated. The task is formulated as a linear optimization problem where a parametric smooth motion model based on B-splines is estimated from the MVF. It is shown that the problem can be solved using a sparse QR factorization within a clinical feasible time of less than one minute. In a phantom experiment using the publicly available CAVAREV platform, the average quality of a non-periodic animation could be increased by 39% by applying the

  7. Hamiltonian Light-front Field Theory Within an AdS/QCD Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J.P.; Honkanen, H.; Li, Jun; Maris, P.; Brodsky, S.J.; Harindranath, A.; de Teramond, G.F.; Sternberg, P.; Ng, E.G.; Yang, C.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2009-12-16

    Non-perturbative Hamiltonian light-front quantum field theory presents opportunities and challenges that bridge particle physics and nuclear physics. Fundamental theories, such as Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) offer the promise of great predictive power spanning phenomena on all scales from the microscopic to cosmic scales, but new tools that do not rely exclusively on perturbation theory are required to make connection from one scale to the next. We outline recent theoretical and computational progress to build these bridges and provide illustrative results for nuclear structure and quantum field theory. As our framework we choose light-front gauge and a basis function representation with two-dimensional harmonic oscillator basis for transverse modes that corresponds with eigensolutions of the soft-wall AdS/QCD model obtained from light-front holography.

  8. Photometric light curves for ten rapidly rotating stars in Alpha Persei, the Pleiades, and the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Schild, Rudolph E.; Stauffer, John R.; Jones, Burton F.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from a photometric monitoring program of ten rapidly rotating stars observed during 1991 using the FLWO 48-in. telescope. Brightness variations for an additional six cluster stars observed with the Lick 40-in. telescope are also given. The periods and light curves for seven Alpha Persei members, two Pleiades members, and one naked T Tauri field star are reported.

  9. Formation of temperature fields in doped anisotropic crystals under spatially inhomogeneous light beams passing through them

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, E. V.; Markelov, A. S.; Trushin, V. N. Chuprunov, E. V.

    2013-12-15

    The features of formation of thermal fields in potassium dihydrophosphate crystal doped with potassium permanganate under a 532-nm laser beam passing through it have been investigated. Data on the influence of birefringence on the temperature distribution in an anisotropic crystal whose surface is illuminated by a spatially modulated light beam are presented.

  10. Stabilization of a symmetric artificial sun satellite in a light pressure force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganin, A. Iu.

    1992-10-01

    The paper is concerned with the problem of the motion of a dynamically symmetric satellite along a circular heliocentric orbit in gravitational and light pressure force fields. Three stationary positions of the satellite symmetry axis in orbital coordinates are determined, and it is proved that no other stationary positions exist. For the stationary positions, regions where the sufficient stability conditions are satisfied are determined.

  11. Attosecond Lighthouses: How To Use Spatiotemporally Coupled Light Fields To Generate Isolated Attosecond Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, H.; Quéré, F.

    2012-03-01

    Under the effect of even simple optical components, the spatial properties of femtosecond laser beams can vary over the duration of the light pulse. We show how using such spatiotemporally coupled light fields in high harmonic generation experiments (e.g., in gases or dense plasmas) enables the production of attosecond lighthouses, i.e., sources emitting a collection of angularly well-separated light beams, each consisting of an isolated attosecond pulse. This general effect opens the way to a new generation of light sources, particularly suitable for attosecond pump-probe experiments, and provides a new tool for ultrafast metrology, for instance, giving direct access to fluctuations of the carrier-envelope relative phase of even the most intense ultrashort lasers.

  12. Motion artifacts occurring at the lung/diaphragm interface using 4D CT attenuation correction of 4D PET scans.

    PubMed

    Killoran, Joseph H; Gerbaudo, Victor H; Mamede, Marcelo; Ionascu, Dan; Park, Sang-June; Berbeco, Ross

    2011-11-15

    For PET/CT, fast CT acquisition time can lead to errors in attenuation correction, particularly at the lung/diaphragm interface. Gated 4D PET can reduce motion artifacts, though residual artifacts may persist depending on the CT dataset used for attenuation correction. We performed phantom studies to evaluate 4D PET images of targets near a density interface using three different methods for attenuation correction: a single 3D CT (3D CTAC), an averaged 4D CT (CINE CTAC), and a fully phase matched 4D CT (4D CTAC). A phantom was designed with two density regions corresponding to diaphragm and lung. An 8 mL sphere phantom loaded with 18F-FDG was used to represent a lung tumor and background FDG included at an 8:1 ratio. Motion patterns of sin(x) and sin4(x) were used for dynamic studies. Image data was acquired using a GE Discovery DVCT-PET/CT scanner. Attenuation correction methods were compared based on normalized recovery coefficient (NRC), as well as a novel quantity "fixed activity volume" (FAV) introduced in our report. Image metrics were compared to those determined from a 3D PET scan with no motion present (3D STATIC). Values of FAV and NRC showed significant variation over the motion cycle when corrected by 3D CTAC images. 4D CTAC- and CINE CTAC-corrected PET images reduced these motion artifacts. The amount of artifact reduction is greater when the target is surrounded by lower density material and when motion was based on sin4(x). 4D CTAC reduced artifacts more than CINE CTAC for most scenarios. For a target surrounded by water equivalent material, there was no advantage to 4D CTAC over CINE CTAC when using the sin(x) motion pattern. Attenuation correction using both 4D CTAC or CINE CTAC can reduce motion artifacts in regions that include a tissue interface such as the lung/diaphragm border. 4D CTAC is more effective than CINE CTAC at reducing artifacts in some, but not all, scenarios.

  13. 4-D reconstruction for dynamic fluorescence diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Bin; Luo, Jianwen; Bai, Jing

    2012-11-01

    Dynamic fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is important for the research of drug delivery, medical diagnosis and treatment. Conventionally, dynamic tomographic images are reconstructed frame by frame, independently. This approach fails to account for the temporal correlations in measurement data. Ideally, the entire image sequence should be considered as a whole and a four-dimensional (4-D) reconstruction should be performed. However, the fully 4-D reconstruction is computationally intensive. In this paper, we propose a new 4-D reconstruction approach for dynamic FDOT, which is achieved by applying a temporal Karhunen-Loève (KL) transformation to the imaging equation. By taking advantage of the decorrelation and compression properties of the KL transformation, the complex 4-D optical reconstruction problem is greatly simplified. To evaluate the performance of the method, simulation, phantom, and in vivo experiments (N=7) are performed on a hybrid FDOT/x-ray computed tomography imaging system. The experimental results indicate that the reconstruction images obtained by the KL method provide good reconstruction quality. Additionally, by discarding high-order KL components, the computation time involved with fully 4-D reconstruction can be greatly reduced in contrast to the conventional frame-by-frame reconstruction.

  14. New C4D Sensor with a Simulated Inductor

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Yingchao; Ji, Haifeng; Yang, Shijie; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing

    2016-01-01

    A new capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C4D) sensor with an improved simulated inductor is developed in this work. The improved simulated inductor is designed on the basis of the Riordan-type floating simulated inductor. With the improved simulated inductor, the negative influence of the coupling capacitances is overcome and the conductivity measurement is implemented by the series resonance principle. The conductivity measurement experiments are carried out in three pipes with different inner diameters of 3.0 mm, 4.6 mm and 6.4 mm, respectively. The experimental results show that the designs of the new C4D sensor and the improved simulated inductor are successful. The maximum relative error of the conductivity measurement is less than 5%. Compared with the C4D sensors using practical inductors, the measurement accuracy of the new C4D sensor is comparable. The research results also indicate that the adjustability of a simulated inductor can reduce the requirement for the AC source and guarantee the interchangeableness. Meanwhile, it is recommended that making the potential of one terminal of a simulated inductor stable is beneficial to the running stability. Furthermore, this work indirectly verifies the possibility and feasibility of the miniaturization of the C4D sensor by using the simulated inductor technique and lays a good foundation for future research work. PMID:26828493

  15. Light scattering from liquid crystal director fluctuations in steady magnetic fields up to 25 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Pavan K.; Curtiss, O.; Williams, J. C.; Twieg, R.; Toth, J.; McGill, S.; Jákli, A.; Gleeson, J. T.; Sprunt, S. N.

    2012-07-01

    We report on homodyne dynamic light scattering measurements of orientational fluctuation modes in both calamitic and bent-core nematic liquid crystals, carried out in the new split-helix resistive magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. The relaxation rate and inverse scattered intensity of director fluctuations exhibit a linear dependence on field-squared up to 25 tesla, which is consistent with strictly lowest order coupling of the tensor order parameter Q to field (QαβBαBβ) in the nematic free energy. However, we also observe evidence of field dependence of certain nematic material parameters, an effect which may be expected from the mean field scaling of these quantities with the magnitude of Q and the predicted variation of Q with field.

  16. Light scattering from liquid crystal director fluctuations in steady magnetic fields up to 25 tesla.

    PubMed

    Challa, Pavan K; Curtiss, O; Williams, J C; Twieg, R; Toth, J; McGill, S; Jákli, A; Gleeson, J T; Sprunt, S N

    2012-07-01

    We report on homodyne dynamic light scattering measurements of orientational fluctuation modes in both calamitic and bent-core nematic liquid crystals, carried out in the new split-helix resistive magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. The relaxation rate and inverse scattered intensity of director fluctuations exhibit a linear dependence on field-squared up to 25 tesla, which is consistent with strictly lowest order coupling of the tensor order parameter Q to field (Q(αβ)B(α)B(β)) in the nematic free energy. However, we also observe evidence of field dependence of certain nematic material parameters, an effect which may be expected from the mean field scaling of these quantities with the magnitude of Q and the predicted variation of Q with field. PMID:23005438

  17. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. PMID:27385378

  18. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  19. Advances in 4D Treatment Planning for Scanned Particle Beam Therapy — Report of Dedicated Workshops

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Christoph; Graeff, Christian; Riboldi, Marco; Nill, Simeon; Baroni, Guido; Knopf, Antje-Christin

    2014-01-01

    We report on recent progress in the field of mobile tumor treatment with scanned particle beams, as discussed in the latest editions of the 4D treatment planning workshop. The workshop series started in 2009, with about 20 people from 4 research institutes involved, all actively working on particle therapy delivery and development. The first workshop resulted in a summary of recommendations for the treatment of mobile targets, along with a list of requirements to apply these guidelines clinically. The increased interest in the treatment of mobile tumors led to a continuously growing number of attendees: the 2012 edition counted more than 60 participants from 20 institutions and commercial vendors. The focus of research discussions among workshop participants progressively moved from 4D treatment planning to complete 4D treatments, aiming at effective and safe treatment delivery. Current research perspectives on 4D treatments include all critical aspects of time resolved delivery, such as in-room imaging, motion detection, beam application, and quality assurance techniques. This was motivated by the start of first clinical treatments of hepato cellular tumors with a scanned particle beam, relying on gating or abdominal compression for motion mitigation. Up to date research activities emphasize significant efforts in investigating advanced motion mitigation techniques, with a specific interest in the development of dedicated tools for experimental validation. Potential improvements will be made possible in the near future through 4D optimized treatment plans that require upgrades of the currently established therapy control systems for time resolved delivery. But since also these novel optimization techniques rely on the validity of the 4DCT, research focusing on alternative 4D imaging technique, such as MRI based 4DCT generation will continue. PMID:24354749

  20. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  1. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10–40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  2. On the vectorial structure of non-paraxial radially polarized light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Herrero, R.; Mejías, P. M.; Bosch, S.

    2008-06-01

    To describe in a detailed way the polarization features of non-paraxial radially polarized fields, a simple analytical propagation law is provided in terms of their angular plane-wave spectrum. A comparison between non-paraxial results and paraxial predictions is investigated by introducing a parameter describing the width of the angular spectrum. Two particular examples of radially polarized light fields are also considered: Bessel-type fields whose angular spectrum is confined on a Montgomery's ring, and certain radially polarized Laguerre-Gauss beams.

  3. A 4D Hyperspherical Interpretation of q-Space

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinbor, A. Pasha; Chung, Moo K.; Wu, Yu-Chien; Alexander, Andrew L.; Bendlin, Barbara B.

    2014-01-01

    3D q-space can be viewed as the surface of a 4D hypersphere. In this paper, we seek to develop a 4D hyperspherical interpretation of q-space by projecting it onto a hypersphere and subsequently modeling the q-space signal via 4D hyperspherical harmonics (HSH). Using this orthonormal basis, we analytically derive several quantitative indices and numerically estimate the diffusion ODF. Importantly, we derive the integral transform describing the relationship between the diffusion signal and propagator on a hypersphere. We also show that the HSH basis expends less fitting parameters than other well-established methods to achieve comparable signal and better ODF reconstructions. All in all, this work provides a new way of looking at q-space. PMID:24505799

  4. Electric Field-Assisted Photochemical Water Splitting Should Operate with 287 nm Light.

    PubMed

    Bachler, Vinzenz; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The major photoreaction of water is the homolytic splitting of one O-H bond starting from the 1(1) B1 excited state (λmax = 167 nm). This reaction produces H• and •OH radicals. The combination of two H• atoms leads to the potential energy carrier dihydrogen. However, the energy required to obtain the photoreactive 1(1) B1 electronic state is about 7.4 eV, which cannot be effectively provided by solar radiation. The sun light spectrum on earth comprises the visible and ultraviolet region, but shows vanishing intensity near 7 eV (177.1 nm). This work provides theoretical evidence that the photoreactive 1(1) B1 state of water can be shifted into the ultraviolet (UV-B) light region (≈287 nm) by including explicitly an electric field in the calculations of the water absorption spectrum. To accomplish such bathochromic shift, a large field strength of 3.08 VÅ(-1) is required. The field-dependent excitation energies were calculated by applying the symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction (SAC-CI) procedure. Based on this theoretical analysis, we propose that photochemical water splitting can be accomplished by means of 287 nm light provided the water molecule is favorably oriented by an external electric field and is subsequently activated by a reversal of the field orientation.

  5. Electric Field-Assisted Photochemical Water Splitting Should Operate with 287 nm Light.

    PubMed

    Bachler, Vinzenz; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The major photoreaction of water is the homolytic splitting of one O-H bond starting from the 1(1) B1 excited state (λmax = 167 nm). This reaction produces H• and •OH radicals. The combination of two H• atoms leads to the potential energy carrier dihydrogen. However, the energy required to obtain the photoreactive 1(1) B1 electronic state is about 7.4 eV, which cannot be effectively provided by solar radiation. The sun light spectrum on earth comprises the visible and ultraviolet region, but shows vanishing intensity near 7 eV (177.1 nm). This work provides theoretical evidence that the photoreactive 1(1) B1 state of water can be shifted into the ultraviolet (UV-B) light region (≈287 nm) by including explicitly an electric field in the calculations of the water absorption spectrum. To accomplish such bathochromic shift, a large field strength of 3.08 VÅ(-1) is required. The field-dependent excitation energies were calculated by applying the symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction (SAC-CI) procedure. Based on this theoretical analysis, we propose that photochemical water splitting can be accomplished by means of 287 nm light provided the water molecule is favorably oriented by an external electric field and is subsequently activated by a reversal of the field orientation. PMID:26876336

  6. Inverse Doppler shift and control field as coherence generators for the stability in superluminal light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoor, Fazal; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Khan, Salman

    2015-05-01

    A gain-based four-level atomic medium for the stability in superluminal light propagation using control field and inverse Doppler shift as coherence generators is studied. In regimes of weak and strong control field, a broadband and multiple controllable transparency windows are, respectively, identified with significantly enhanced group indices. The observed Doppler effect for the class of high atomic velocity of the medium is counterintuitive in comparison to the effect of the class of low atomic velocity. The intensity of each of the two pump fields is kept less than the optimum limit reported in [M. D. Stenner and D. J. Gauthier, Phys. Rev. A 67, 063801 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevA.67.063801] for stability in the superluminal light pulse. Consequently, superluminal stable domains with the generated coherence are explored.

  7. Relative charge transfer cross section from Rb (4d)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, M. H.; Camp, H. A.; Trachy, M. L.; Fléchard, X.; Gearba, M. A.; Nguyen, H.; Brédy, R.; Lundeen, S. R.; Depaola, B. D.

    2005-08-01

    Relative charge transfer cross section measurements for the excited state Rb(4d) with 7keV Na+ is reported. The specific channels reported are Na++Rb(4d5/2)→Na(nl)+Rb+ , where the dominant transfer cross sections channels were nl=3d and 4s . Using a combination of a magneto-optical trap and recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (MOTRIMS methodology), the cross sections were measured relative to the previously studied Na++Rb(5s,5p) systems at the same collision energy.

  8. Relative charge transfer cross section from Rb(4d)

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, M.H.; Camp, H.A.; Trachy, M.L.; De Paola, B.D.; Flechard, X.; Gearba, M.A.; Nguyen, H.; Bredy, R.; Lundeen, S.R.

    2005-08-15

    Relative charge transfer cross section measurements for the excited state Rb(4d) with 7 keV Na{sup +} is reported. The specific channels reported are Na{sup +}+Rb(4d{sub 5/2}){yields}Na(nl)+Rb{sup +}, where the dominant transfer cross sections channels were nl=3d and 4s. Using a combination of a magneto-optical trap and recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (MOTRIMS methodology), the cross sections were measured relative to the previously studied Na{sup +}+Rb(5s,5p) systems at the same collision energy.

  9. The 4-D approach to visual control of autonomous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1994-01-01

    Development of a 4-D approach to dynamic machine vision is described. Core elements of this method are spatio-temporal models oriented towards objects and laws of perspective projection in a foward mode. Integration of multi-sensory measurement data was achieved through spatio-temporal models as invariants for object recognition. Situation assessment and long term predictions were allowed through maintenance of a symbolic 4-D image of processes involving objects. Behavioral capabilities were easily realized by state feedback and feed-foward control.

  10. Emerging Applications of Abdominal 4D Flow MRI

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Alzate, Alejandro; Francois, Christopher J.; Wieben, Oliver; Reeder, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Comprehensive assessment of abdominal hemodynamics is crucial for many clinical diagnoses but is challenged by a tremendous complexity of anatomy, normal physiology, and a wide variety of pathologic abnormalities. This article introduces 4D flow MRI as a powerful technique for noninvasive assessment of the hemodynamics of abdominal vascular territories. CONCLUSION Four-dimensional flow MRI provides clinicians with a more extensive and straightforward approach to evaluate disorders that affect blood flow in the abdomen. This review presents a series of clinical cases to illustrate the utility of 4D flow MRI in the comprehensive assessment of the abdominal circulation. PMID:27187681

  11. Achieving High Performance in AC-Field Driven Organic Light Sources

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junwei; Carroll, David L.; Smith, Gregory M.; Dun, Chaochao; Cui, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Charge balance in organic light emitting structures is essential to simultaneously achieving high brightness and high efficiency. In DC-driven organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), this is relatively straight forward. However, in the newly emerging, capacitive, field-activated AC-driven organic devices, charge balance can be a challenge. In this work we introduce the concept of gating the compensation charge in AC-driven organic devices and demonstrate that this can result in exceptional increases in device performance. To do this we replace the insulator layer in a typical field-activated organic light emitting device with a nanostructured, wide band gap semiconductor layer. This layer acts as a gate between the emitter layer and the voltage contact. Time resolved device characterization shows that, at high-frequencies (over 40 kHz), the semiconductor layer allows for charge accumulation in the forward bias, light generating part of the AC cycle and charge compensation in the negative, quiescent part of the AC cycle. Such gated AC organic devices can achieve a non-output coupled luminance of 25,900 cd/m2 with power efficiencies that exceed both the insulator-based AC devices and OLEDs using the same emitters. This work clearly demonstrates that by realizing balanced management of charge, AC-driven organic light emitting devices may well be able to rival today’s OLEDs in performance. PMID:27063414

  12. Achieving High Performance in AC-Field Driven Organic Light Sources.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junwei; Carroll, David L; Smith, Gregory M; Dun, Chaochao; Cui, Yue

    2016-04-11

    Charge balance in organic light emitting structures is essential to simultaneously achieving high brightness and high efficiency. In DC-driven organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), this is relatively straight forward. However, in the newly emerging, capacitive, field-activated AC-driven organic devices, charge balance can be a challenge. In this work we introduce the concept of gating the compensation charge in AC-driven organic devices and demonstrate that this can result in exceptional increases in device performance. To do this we replace the insulator layer in a typical field-activated organic light emitting device with a nanostructured, wide band gap semiconductor layer. This layer acts as a gate between the emitter layer and the voltage contact. Time resolved device characterization shows that, at high-frequencies (over 40 kHz), the semiconductor layer allows for charge accumulation in the forward bias, light generating part of the AC cycle and charge compensation in the negative, quiescent part of the AC cycle. Such gated AC organic devices can achieve a non-output coupled luminance of 25,900 cd/m(2) with power efficiencies that exceed both the insulator-based AC devices and OLEDs using the same emitters. This work clearly demonstrates that by realizing balanced management of charge, AC-driven organic light emitting devices may well be able to rival today's OLEDs in performance.

  13. General relativistic theory of light propagation in the field of gravitational multipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobkov, Pavel

    We consider propagation of electromagnetic signals through the time-dependent gravitational field of an isolated astronomical system emitting gravitational waves. The system is assumed to possess multipole moments of arbitrary order. Working in the linear, weak-field approximation of general relativity, we obtain analytical expressions for light-ray trajectory and observable effects of bending of light, time delay, and gravitational rotation of the polarization plane. The relative positions of the source of light, the isolated system, and the observer are not restricted, which makes our formalism quite general and applicable for most practical situations. Asymptotic expressions for observable effects are obtained in two limiting cases of arrangement of light source, observer, and the source of gravitational waves: the gravitational-lens approximation and the approximation of plane gravitational waves. It is shown that in the gravitational-lens approximation the leading contributions to the effects due to multipole moments of arbitrary order fall off with the impact parameter as 1/d2 and 1/d3 for time delay and deflection of light respectively. Such, stronger than it could be a priori expected, dependance on impact parameter hinders observation of time-dependent effects in gravitational lensing. In the plane-gravitational-wave approximation the expressions for observable effects due to gravitational waves of arbitrary multipolarity are obtained in terms of the transverse-traceless (TT) part of the spacial components of the metric tensor.

  14. Calibration of a wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy system using light emitting diodes as light sources.

    PubMed

    Elder, A D; Frank, J H; Swartling, J; Dai, X; Kaminski, C F

    2006-11-01

    High brightness light emitting diodes are an inexpensive and versatile light source for wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. In this paper a full calibration of an LED based fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy system is presented for the first time. A radio-frequency generator was used for simultaneous modulation of light emitting diode (LED) intensity and the gain of an intensified charge coupled device (CCD) camera. A homodyne detection scheme was employed to measure the demodulation and phase shift of the emitted fluorescence, from which phase and modulation lifetimes were determined at each image pixel. The system was characterized both in terms of its sensitivity to measure short lifetimes (500 ps to 4 ns), and its capability to distinguish image features with small lifetime differences. Calibration measurements were performed in quenched solutions containing Rhodamine 6G dye and the results compared to several independent measurements performed with other measurement methodologies, including time correlated single photon counting, time gated detection, and acousto optical modulator (AOM) based modulation of excitation sources. Results are presented from measurements and simulations. The effects of limited signal-to-noise ratios, baseline drifts and calibration errors are discussed in detail. The implications of limited modulation bandwidth of high brightness, large area LED devices ( approximately 40 MHz for devices used here) are presented. The results show that phase lifetime measurements are robust down to sub ns levels, whereas modulation lifetimes are prone to errors even at large signal-to-noise ratios. Strategies for optimizing measurement fidelity are discussed. Application of the fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy system is illustrated with examples from studies of molecular mixing in microfluidic devices and targeted drug delivery research. PMID:17204064

  15. Experimental studies of collective excitations of a BEC in light-induced gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Hsun; Niffenegger, Robert; Blasing, David; Olson, Abraham; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-05-01

    We present our experimental studies of collective modes including spin dipole mode and scissors mode of a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the presence of Raman light-induced gauge fields and synthetic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). By Raman dressing the mf spin states within the F =1 manifold, we engineer atoms' energy-momentum dispersion to create synthetic SOC, and spin dependent synthetic electric and magnetic fields. We have used spin dependent synthetic electric fields to make two BECs with different spins oscillate and collide in the optical trap. We have studied the effects of SOC on both the momentum damping and thermalization behaviors of the BECs when undergoing such spin dipole oscillations. We have also used spatially dependent synthetic electric fields to excite the scissors mode, which has been used as a probe for superfluidity. We have investigated the effects of the synthetic gauge fields and SOC on the measured scissors mode.

  16. A laser accelerator. [interaction of polarized light beam with electrons in magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, W. B.; Ride, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that a laser can efficiently accelerate charged particles if a magnetic field is introduced to improve the coupling between the particle and the wave. Solving the relativistic equations of motion for an electron in a uniform magnetic field and superposed, circularly polarized electromagnetic wave, it is found that in energy-position phase space an electron traces out a curtate cycloid: it alternately gains and loses energy. If, however, the parameters are chosen so that the electron's oscillations in the two fields are resonant, it will continually accelerate or decelerate depending on its initial position within a wavelength of light. A laboratory accelerator operating under these resonant conditions appears attractive: in a magnetic field of 10,000 gauss, and the fields of a 5 x 10 to the 12th W, 10 micron wavelength laser, an optimally positioned electron would accelerate to 700 MeV in only 10 m.

  17. A hybrid reconstruction algorithm for fast and accurate 4D cone-beam CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Hao; Folkerts, Michael; Jiang, Steve B. E-mail: steve.jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu; Jia, Xun E-mail: steve.jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu; Zhen, Xin; Li, Yongbao; Pan, Tinsu; Cervino, Laura

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: 4D cone beam CT (4D-CBCT) has been utilized in radiation therapy to provide 4D image guidance in lung and upper abdomen area. However, clinical application of 4D-CBCT is currently limited due to the long scan time and low image quality. The purpose of this paper is to develop a new 4D-CBCT reconstruction method that restores volumetric images based on the 1-min scan data acquired with a standard 3D-CBCT protocol. Methods: The model optimizes a deformation vector field that deforms a patient-specific planning CT (p-CT), so that the calculated 4D-CBCT projections match measurements. A forward-backward splitting (FBS) method is invented to solve the optimization problem. It splits the original problem into two well-studied subproblems, i.e., image reconstruction and deformable image registration. By iteratively solving the two subproblems, FBS gradually yields correct deformation information, while maintaining high image quality. The whole workflow is implemented on a graphic-processing-unit to improve efficiency. Comprehensive evaluations have been conducted on a moving phantom and three real patient cases regarding the accuracy and quality of the reconstructed images, as well as the algorithm robustness and efficiency. Results: The proposed algorithm reconstructs 4D-CBCT images from highly under-sampled projection data acquired with 1-min scans. Regarding the anatomical structure location accuracy, 0.204 mm average differences and 0.484 mm maximum difference are found for the phantom case, and the maximum differences of 0.3–0.5 mm for patients 1–3 are observed. As for the image quality, intensity errors below 5 and 20 HU compared to the planning CT are achieved for the phantom and the patient cases, respectively. Signal-noise-ratio values are improved by 12.74 and 5.12 times compared to results from FDK algorithm using the 1-min data and 4-min data, respectively. The computation time of the algorithm on a NVIDIA GTX590 card is 1–1.5 min per phase

  18. Ab initio no core calculations of light nuclei and preludes to Hamiltonian quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J.P.; Maris, P.; Shirokov, A.M.; Honkanen, H.; li, J.; Brodsky, S.J.; Harindranath, A.; Teramond, G.F.de; /Costa Rica U.

    2009-08-03

    Recent advances in ab initio quantum many-body methods and growth in computer power now enable highly precise calculations of nuclear structure. The precision has attained a level sufficient to make clear statements on the nature of 3-body forces in nuclear physics. Total binding energies, spin-dependent structure effects, and electroweak properties of light nuclei play major roles in pinpointing properties of the underlying strong interaction. Eventually,we anticipate a theory bridge with immense predictive power from QCD through nuclear forces to nuclear structure and nuclear reactions. Light front Hamiltonian quantum field theory offers an attractive pathway and we outline key elements.

  19. Two different types of light-dependent responses to magnetic fields in birds.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Ritz, Thorsten; Stapput, Katrin; Thalau, Peter; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2005-08-23

    A model of magnetoreception proposes that the avian magnetic compass is based on a radical pair mechanism, with photon absorption leading to the formation of radical pairs. Analyzing the predicted light dependency by testing migratory birds under monochromatic lights, we found that the responses of birds change with increasing intensity. The analysis of the orientation of European robins under 502 nm turquoise light revealed two types of responses depending on light intensity: under a quantal flux of 8.10(15) quanta m(-2) s(-1), the birds showed normal migratory orientation in spring as well as in autumn, relying on their inclination compass. Under brighter light of 54.10(15) quanta m(-2) s(-1), however, they showed a "fixed" tendency toward north that did not undergo the seasonal change and proved to be based on magnetic polarity, not involving the inclination compass. When birds were exposed to a weak oscillating field, which specifically interferes with radical pair processes, the inclination compass response was disrupted, whereas the response to magnetic polarity remained unaffected. These findings indicate that the normal inclination compass used for migratory orientation is based on a radical-pair mechanism, whereas the fixed direction represents a novel type of light-dependent orientation based on a mechanism of a different nature.

  20. New Approach for Environmental Monitoring and Plant Observation Using a Light-Field Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schima, Robert; Mollenhauer, Hannes; Grenzdörffer, Görres; Merbach, Ines; Lausch, Angela; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of gaining a better understanding of ecosystems and the processes in nature accentuates the need for observing exactly these processes with a higher temporal and spatial resolution. In the field of environmental monitoring, an inexpensive and field applicable imaging technique to derive three-dimensional information about plants and vegetation would represent a decisive contribution to the understanding of the interactions and dynamics of ecosystems. This is particularly true for the monitoring of plant growth and the frequently mentioned lack of morphological information about the plants, e.g. plant height, vegetation canopy, leaf position or leaf arrangement. Therefore, an innovative and inexpensive light-field (plenoptic) camera, the Lytro LF, and a stereo vision system, based on two industrial cameras, were tested and evaluated as possible measurement tools for the given monitoring purpose. In this instance, the usage of a light field camera offers the promising opportunity of providing three-dimensional information without any additional requirements during the field measurements based on one single shot, which represents a substantial methodological improvement in the area of environmental research and monitoring. Since the Lytro LF was designed as a daily-life consumer camera, it does not support depth or distance estimation or rather an external triggering by default. Therefore, different technical modifications and a calibration routine had to be figured out during the preliminary study. As a result, the used light-field camera was proven suitable as a depth and distance measurement tool with a measuring range of approximately one meter. Consequently, this confirms the assumption that a light field camera holds the potential of being a promising measurement tool for environmental monitoring purposes, especially with regard to a low methodological effort in field. Within the framework of the Global Change Experimental Facility Project, founded by

  1. Study of microparticles' anomalous diffusion in active bath using speckle light fields (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pince, Ercag; Sabareesh, Sabareesh K. P.; Volpe, Giorgio; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni S.

    2015-08-01

    Particles undergoing a stochastic motion within a disordered medium is a ubiquitous physical and biological phenomenon. Examples can be given from organelles as molecular machines of cells performing physical tasks in a populated cytoplasm to human mobility in patchy environment at larger scales. Our recent results showed that it is possible to use the disordered landscape generated by speckle light fields to perform advanced manipulation tasks at the microscale. Here, we use speckle light fields to study the anomalous diffusion of micron size silica particles (5 μm) in the presence of active microswimmers. The microswimmers we used in the experiments are motile bacteria, Escherichia coli (E.coli). They constitute an active background constantly agitating passive silica particles within complex optical potentials. The speckle fields are generated by mode mixing inside a multimode optical fiber where a small amount of incident laser power (maximum power = 12 μW/μm2) is needed to obtain an effective random landscape pattern for the purpose of optical manipulation. We experimentally show how complex potentials contribute to the anomalous diffusion of silica particles undergoing collisions with swimming bacteria. We observed an enhanced diffusion of particles interacting with the active bath of E.coli inside speckle light fields: this effect can be tuned and controlled by varying the intensity and the statistical properties of the speckle pattern. Potentially, these results could be of interest for many technological applications, such as the manipulation of microparticles inside optically disordered media of biological interests.

  2. A magnetic field-dependent modulation effect tends to stabilize light transmission through binary ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Lin, Yueqiang; Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Qingmei; Miao, Hua; Fu, Jun; Lin, Lihua

    2012-06-01

    In binary ferrofluids composed of ferromagnetic γ-Fe2O3/Ni2O3 composite nanoparticles (A particles) and noncrystalline Fe2O3 nanoparticles (B particles), the A particles alone will form chain-like aggregates upon application of a magnetic field. Due to both the long-range 'magnetic convergent force' (FC) and the short-range 'magnetic divergent force' (FD), the A-particle chains immersed in the B-particle 'sea' will move in a manner similar to the process of vibrational damping. The apparent damping of the ferrofluids will vary from weak to overdamping according to the motion of the chains, so that the intensity of light transmitted through a ferrofluid film along the direction of the field would tend to stabilize after a period of rapid decrements and increments. In binary ferrofluids, the B-particle system can produce a modulation effect on both the damping and the driving force, further stabilizing the behavior of the transmitted light. At low fields (e.g., 500 Gs, 900 Gs) only the modulation of the viscosity drag force (Fv) is considerable, so that overdamping increases linearly with B-particle volume fraction (ФB), and the variation in the transmitted light is much slower during the process tending towards stability as ФB increases. However, at high fields (e.g., 1300 Gs) the polarization of the B-particle 'sea' is enhanced, so that FD is modulated as well as Fv (i.e., both the practical damping and driving forces are modulated simultaneously). Thus, the apparent overdamping of the binary ferrofluids system will vary non-linearly as ФB increases, and the transmitted light will tend to stabilize faster for ferrofluids with high ΦB than for those with low ФB at an applied magnetic field of 1300 Gs.

  3. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2,4 - Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid ( 2,4 - D ) ; CASRN 94 - 75 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Asses

  4. Enterococcus faecalis promotes osteoclastogenesis and semaphorin 4D expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Deng, Zuhui; Seneviratne, Chaminda J; Cheung, Gary S P; Jin, Lijian; Zhao, Baohong; Zhang, Chengfei

    2015-10-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is considered a major bacterial pathogen implicated in endodontic infections and contributes considerably to periapical periodontitis. This study aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms by which E. faecalis accounts for the bone destruction in periapical periodontitis in vitro. Osteoclast precursor RAW264.7 cells were treated with E. faecalis ATCC 29212 and a wild strain of E. faecalis derived clinically from an infected root canal. The results showed that, to some extent, E. faecalis induced the RAW264.7 cells to form tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated osteoclast-like cells. This pathogen markedly stimulated RAW264.7 cells to express semaphorin 4D (Sema4D), which inhibits bone formation. Once RAW264.7 cells were primed by low-dose receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL), E. faecalis could significantly increase the production of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells and up-regulate the expression of osteoclast-specific markers, including NFATc1, TRAP and cathepsin K. Both p38 and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathways were activated by E. faecalis in RANKL-primed RAW264.7 cells, and meanwhile the expression of Sema4D was highly increased. In conclusion, E. faecalis may greatly contribute to the bone resorption in periapical periodontitis by promoting RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis and expression of Sema4D through activation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathways.

  5. Enhancing 4D PC-MRI in an aortic phantom considering numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratzke, Jonas; Schoch, Nicolai; Weis, Christian; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Speidel, Stefanie; Farag, Mina; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    To date, cardiovascular surgery enables the treatment of a wide range of aortic pathologies. One of the current challenges in this field is given by the detection of high-risk patients for adverse aortic events, who should be treated electively. Reliable diagnostic parameters, which indicate the urge of treatment, have to be determined. Functional imaging by means of 4D phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) enables the time-resolved measurement of blood flow velocity in 3D. Applied to aortic phantoms, three dimensional blood flow properties and their relation to adverse dynamics can be investigated in vitro. Emerging "in silico" methods of numerical simulation can supplement these measurements in computing additional information on crucial parameters. We propose a framework that complements 4D PC-MRI imaging by means of numerical simulation based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The framework is developed on the basis of a prototypic aortic phantom and validated by 4D PC-MRI measurements of the phantom. Based on physical principles of biomechanics, the derived simulation depicts aortic blood flow properties and characteristics. The framework might help identifying factors that induce aortic pathologies such as aortic dilatation or aortic dissection. Alarming thresholds of parameters such as wall shear stress distribution can be evaluated. The combined techniques of 4D PC-MRI and numerical simulation can be used as complementary tools for risk-stratification of aortic pathology.

  6. Projection of phase singularities in moiré fringe onto a light field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Seigo

    2016-06-01

    A moiré pattern, which is a kind of spatial interference between two periodic patterns, is regarded as a spatial modulation of a "field." By defining the displacement field, we reveal that moiré patterns can have a topological phase singularity, similar to a disclination in liquid crystal and, more generally, a vector field treated in the singular optics. We propose that topological singularities in the moiré displacement field can be projected by passing an electromagnetic field through a metasurface. We designed a metasurface constructed from two layers of a metal disk array operating in the terahertz band; then we numerically estimated the spatial distribution of its transmission properties. The phase singularities in the electromagnetic fields coincided with the singularities appearing in the moiré pattern. We found two kinds of singularities, and the phase of the electromagnetic field changed by 2π or 4π around them. These phase changes were independent of the light frequency, implying that the topological properties of the moiré fields were projected onto the electromagnetic field. This feature of moiré metasurfaces can potentially be exploited in spiral phase plate arrays with no frequency dispersion of the phase change.

  7. 4D MR imaging using robust internal respiratory signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, CheukKai; Wen, Zhifei; Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, R. H. N.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Beddar, Sam

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using internal respiratory (IR) surrogates to sort four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance (MR) images. The 4D MR images were constructed by acquiring fast 2D cine MR images sequentially, with each slice scanned for more than one breathing cycle. The 4D volume was then sorted retrospectively using the IR signal. In this study, we propose to use multiple low-frequency components in the Fourier space as well as the anterior body boundary as potential IR surrogates. From these potential IR surrogates, we used a clustering algorithm to identify those that best represented the respiratory pattern to derive the IR signal. A study with healthy volunteers was performed to assess the feasibility of the proposed IR signal. We compared this proposed IR signal with the respiratory signal obtained using respiratory bellows. Overall, 99% of the IR signals matched the bellows signals. The average difference between the end inspiration times in the IR signal and bellows signal was 0.18 s in this cohort of matching signals. For the acquired images corresponding to the other 1% of non-matching signal pairs, the respiratory motion shown in the images was coherent with the respiratory phases determined by the IR signal, but not the bellows signal. This suggested that the IR signal determined by the proposed method could potentially correct the faulty bellows signal. The sorted 4D images showed minimal mismatched artefacts and potential clinical applicability. The proposed IR signal therefore provides a feasible alternative to effectively sort MR images in 4D.

  8. Chern-Simons actions and their gaugings in 4D, N =1 superspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Katrin; Becker, Melanie; Linch, William D.; Robbins, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We gauge the abelian hierarchy of tensor fields in 4D by a Lie algebra mathfrak{g} . The resulting non-abelian tensor hierarchy can be interpreted via a mathfrak{g} -equivariant chain complex. We lift this structure to N = 1 superspace by constructing superfield analogs for the tensor fields, along with covariant superfield strengths. Next we construct Chern-Simons actions, for both the bosonic and N = 1 cases, and note that the condition of gauge invariance can be presented cohomologically. Finally, we provide an explicit realization of these structures by dimensional reduction, for example by reducing the three-form of eleven-dimensional supergravity into a superspace with manifest 4D, N = 1 supersymmetry.

  9. Retrieval of the polarized submarine light field from above surface measurements using polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Robert; McGilloway, Anna; Ottaviani, Matteo; Carrizo, Carlos; Gilerson, Alex; El-Habashi, Ahmed; Ahmed, Sam

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the underwater light field is fundamental to determining the health of the world's oceans and coastal regions. For decades, traditional remote sensing retrieval methods that rely solely on the spectral intensity of the water-leaving light have provided indicators of marine ecosystem health. As the demand for retrieval accuracy rises, use of the polarized nature of light as an additional remote sensing tool is becoming necessary. For two weeks in December 2015, the NOAA NPP-VIIRS Calibration/Validation cruise continuously observed the polarized radiance of the ocean and the sky using a HyperSAS-POL system. Additionally, a full Stokes imaging polarimetric camera was used to acquire images and videos of the sea surface and sky during stations at coincident angles with HyperSAS-POL. Polarized remote sensing reflectance is computed for all viewing elevations present in the polarization images, and the results are compared to vector radiative transfer calculations.

  10. Calcium imaging of neural circuits with extended depth-of-field light-sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Quirin, Sean; Vladimirov, Nikita; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Peterka, Darcy S; Yuste, Rafael; Ahrens, Misha B

    2016-03-01

    Increasing the volumetric imaging speed of light-sheet microscopy will improve its ability to detect fast changes in neural activity. Here, a system is introduced for brain-wide imaging of neural activity in the larval zebrafish by coupling structured illumination with cubic phase extended depth-of-field (EDoF) pupil encoding. This microscope enables faster light-sheet imaging and facilitates arbitrary plane scanning-removing constraints on acquisition speed, alignment tolerances, and physical motion near the sample. The usefulness of this method is demonstrated by performing multi-plane calcium imaging in the fish brain with a 416×832×160  μm field of view at 33 Hz. The optomotor response behavior of the zebrafish is monitored at high speeds, and time-locked correlations of neuronal activity are resolved across its brain. PMID:26974063

  11. Signal Readout Using Small Near-Field Optical Head with Horizontal Light Introduction Through Optical Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kenji; Ichihara, Susumu; Oumi, Manabu; Maeda, Hidetaka; Niwa, Takashi; Mitsuoka, Yasuyuki; Nakajima, Kunio; Ohkubo, Toshifumi; Itao, Kiyoshi

    2003-08-01

    We have developed a small near-field optical head for high-recording-density data storage applications, to overcome the disadvantage of conventional near-field optical heads, such as large light introduction, low optical throughput, and difficulty in controlling the aperture-medium distance. The optical head structure has miniaturized light introduction using an optical fiber placed horizontally. To decrease the optical loss, an integrated microlens focuses on the aperture tip that has a shortened cut-off region. The fabricated optical head (3.2× 3.6× 0.9 mm3) with a φ 200 nm aperture of the same height as the sliders shows a clear readout signal of a 200-nm-wide line and space pattern at a speed of 5.2 MHz. We show that the optical head has the ability to read 4 times the recording density by simulations of the finite difference time domain (FDTD).

  12. Calcium imaging of neural circuits with extended depth-of-field light-sheet microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Quirin, Sean; Vladimirov, Nikita; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Peterka, Darcy S.; Yuste, Rafael; Ahrens, Misha B.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the volumetric imaging speed of light-sheet microscopy will improve its ability to detect fast changes in neural activity. Here, a system is introduced for brain-wide imaging of neural activity in the larval zebrafish by coupling structured illumination with cubic phase extended depth-of-field (EDoF) pupil encoding. This microscope enables faster light-sheet imaging and facilitates arbitrary plane scanning—removing constraints on acquisition speed, alignment tolerances, and physical motion near the sample. The usefulness of this method is demonstrated by performing multi-plane calcium imaging in the fish brain with a 416 × 832 × 160 µm field of view at 33 Hz. The optomotor response behavior of the zebrafish is monitored at high speeds, and time-locked correlations of neuronal activity are resolved across its brain. PMID:26974063

  13. A method for the real-time construction of a full parallax light field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kenji; Aoki, Soko

    2006-02-01

    We designed and implemented a light field acquisition and reproduction system for dynamic objects called LiveDimension, which serves as a 3D live video system for multiple viewers. The acquisition unit consists of circularly arranged NTSC cameras surrounding an object. The display consists of circularly arranged projectors and a rotating screen. The projectors are constantly projecting images captured by the corresponding cameras onto the screen. The screen rotates around an in-plane vertical axis at a sufficient speed so that it faces each of the projectors in sequence. Since the Lambertian surfaces of the screens are covered by light-collimating plastic films with vertical louver patterns that are used for the selection of appropriate light rays, viewers can only observe images from a projector located in the same direction as the viewer. Thus, the dynamic view of an object is dependent on the viewer's head position. We evaluated the system by projecting both objects and human figures and confirmed that the entire system can reproduce light fields with a horizontal parallax to display video sequences of 430x770 pixels at a frame rate of 45 fps. Applications of this system include product design reviews, sales promotion, art exhibits, fashion shows, and sports training with form checking.

  14. Controlling quantum-dot light absorption and emission by a surface-plasmon field.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danhong; Easter, Michelle; Gumbs, Godfrey; Maradudin, A A; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Cardimona, D A; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-11-01

    The possibility for controlling both the probe-field optical gain and absorption, as well as photon conversion by a surface-plasmon-polariton near field is explored for a quantum dot located above a metal surface. In contrast to the linear response in the weak-coupling regime, the calculated spectra show an induced optical gain and a triply-split spontaneous emission peak resulting from the interference between the surface-plasmon field and the probe or self-emitted light field in such a strongly-coupled nonlinear system. Our result on the control of the mediated photon-photon interaction, very similar to the 'gate' control in an optical transistor, may be experimentally observable and applied to ultra-fast intrachip/interchip optical interconnects, improvement in the performance of fiber-optic communication networks, and developments of optical digital computers and quantum communications.

  15. Effective Field Theory and Time-Reversal Violation in Light Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, E.; van Kolck, U.

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the unnaturally small value of the QCD vacuum angle [Formula: see text], time-reversal violation ([Formula: see text]) offers a window into physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. We review the effective field theory framework that establishes a clean connection between (a) [Formula: see text] mechanisms, which can be represented by higher-dimensional operators involving SM fields and symmetries, and (b) hadronic interactions, which allow for controlled calculations of low-energy observables involving strong interactions. The chiral properties of [Formula: see text] mechanisms lead to a pattern that should be identifiable in measurements of the electric dipole moments of the nucleon and light nuclei.

  16. Nanoscale topography and spatial light modulator characterization using wide-field quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Bhaduri, Basanta; Edwards, Chris; Zhou, Renjie; Goddard, Lynford L; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-02-10

    We demonstrate an optical technique for large field of view quantitative phase imaging of reflective samples. It relies on a common-path interferometric design, which ensures high stability without the need for active stabilization. The technique provides single-shot, full-field and robust measurement of nanoscale topography of large samples. Further, the inherent stability allows reliable measurement of the temporally varying phase retardation of the liquid crystal cells, and thus enables real-time characterization of spatial light modulators. The technique's application potential is validated through experimental results. PMID:24663633

  17. Magnetic-Field-Induced Rotation of Polarized Light Emission from Monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Robert; Arora, Ashish; Plechinger, Gerd; Nagler, Philipp; Granados del Águila, Andrés; Ballottin, Mariana V.; Christianen, Peter C. M.; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, Steffen; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias; Bratschitsch, Rudolf

    2016-08-01

    We control the linear polarization of emission from the coherently emitting K+ and K- valleys (valley coherence) in monolayer WS2 with an out-of-plane magnetic field of up to 25 T. The magnetic-field-induced valley Zeeman splitting causes a rotation of the emission polarization with respect to the excitation by up to 35° and reduces the polarization degree by up to 16%. We explain both of these phenomena with a model based on two noninteracting coherent two-level systems. We deduce that the coherent light emission from the valleys decays with a time constant of τc=260 fs .

  18. Electromagnetic vacuum of complex media: Dipole emission versus light propagation, vacuum energy, and local field factors

    SciTech Connect

    Donaire, M.

    2011-02-15

    We offer a unified approach to several phenomena related to the electromagnetic vacuum of a complex medium made of point electric dipoles. To this aim, we apply the linear response theory to the computation of the polarization field propagator and study the spectrum of vacuum fluctuations. The physical distinction among the local density of states which enter the spectra of light propagation, total dipole emission, coherent emission, total vacuum energy, and Schwinger-bulk energy is made clear. Analytical expressions for the spectrum of dipole emission and for the vacuum energy are derived. Their respective relations with the spectrum of external light and with the Schwinger-bulk energy are found. The light spectrum and the Schwinger-bulk energy are determined by the Dyson propagator. The emission spectrum and the total vacuum energy are determined by the polarization propagator. An exact relationship of proportionality between both propagators is found in terms of local field factors. A study of the nature of stimulated emission from a single dipole is carried out. Regarding coherent emission, it contains two components. A direct one which is transferred radiatively and directly from the emitter into the medium and whose spectrum is that of external light. And an indirect one which is radiated by induced dipoles. The induction is mediated by one (and only one) local field factor. Regarding the vacuum energy, we find that in addition to the Schwinger-bulk energy the vacuum energy of an effective medium contains local field contributions proportional to the resonant frequency and to the spectral line width.

  19. Instantaneous three-dimensional sensing using spatial light modulator illumination with extended depth of field imaging

    PubMed Central

    Quirin, Sean; Peterka, Darcy S.; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Imaging three-dimensional structures represents a major challenge for conventional microscopies. Here we describe a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) microscope that can simultaneously address and image multiple targets in three dimensions. A wavefront coding element and computational image processing enables extended depth-of-field imaging. High-resolution, multi-site three-dimensional targeting and sensing is demonstrated in both transparent and scattering media over a depth range of 300-1,000 microns. PMID:23842387

  20. Net effect of many gravitational fields on the intensity of celestial light sources. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cipperly, G.E.

    1982-12-01

    This thesis investigates the lens-like action of the gravitational fields of celestial bodies, which can alter the apparent intensity of more distant sources. Previous work in this area has shown that the chance of an individual body being sufficiently well aligned with a source to cause a very large gravitational intensity change is small. The issue addressed in this study is the possibility of there being a significant total change in the intensity of a source due to the combined effects of the gravitational fields of all celestial bodies, and in particular, the potential impact on intensity distance measurements, that is, determination of the distances of celestial light sources by means of intensity comparisons. It is first shown that the problem can be treated in flat space by associating an appropriate index of refraction with gravitational fields. A wave approach is taken in deriving the total deflection of a ray by the field of a single point mass. A statistical analysis is then performed to determine the expression for the mean total change in the intensity of celestial light sources due to the combined fields of all intervening bodies.

  1. A method to update fault transmissibility multipliers in the flow simulation model directly from 4D seismic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benguigui, Amran; Yin, Zhen; MacBeth, Colin

    2014-04-01

    We propose a new approach to update fault seal estimates in fluid flow simulation models by direct use of 4D seismic amplitudes calibrated by a well geological constraint. The method is suited to compartmentalized reservoirs and based on metrics created from differences in the 4D seismic signature on either side of major faults. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated by application to data from the fault controlled Heidrun field in the Norwegian Sea. The results of this application appear favourable and show that our method can detect variations of fault permeability along the major controlling faults in the field. Updates of the field simulation model with the 4D seismic-derived transmissibilities are observed to decrease the mismatch between the predicted and historical field production data in the majority of wells in our sector of interest.

  2. Pulsed light imaging for wide-field dosimetry of photodynamic therapy in the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott C.; Sexton, Kristian; Chapman, Michael Shane; Maytin, Edward; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy using aminoluvelinic acid (ALA) is an FDA-approved treatment for actinic keratoses, pre-cancerous skin lesions which pose a significant risk for immunocompromised individuals, such as organ transplant recipients. While PDT is generally effective, response rates vary, largely due to variations in the accumulation of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) after ALA application. The ability to quantify PpIX production before treatment could facilitate the use of additional interventions to improve outcomes. While many groups have demonstrated the ability to image PpIX in the clinic, these systems generally require darkening the room lights during imaging, which is unpopular with clinicians. We have developed a novel wide-field imaging system based on pulsed excitation and gated acquisition to image photosensitizer activity in the skin. The tissue is illuminated using four pulsed LED's to excite PpIX, and the remitted light acquired with a synchronized ICCD. This approach facilitates real-time background subtraction of ambient light, precluding the need to darken the exam room. Delivering light in short bursts also allows the use of elevated excitation intensity while remaining under the maximum permissible exposure limits, making the modality more sensitive to photosensitizer fluorescence than standard approaches. Images of tissue phantoms indicate system sensitivity down to 250nM PpIX and images of animals demonstrate detection of PpIX fluorescence in vivo under normal room light conditions.

  3. Manipulation of long-term dynamics in a colloidal active matter system using speckle light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pince, Ercag; Velu, Sabareesh K. P.; Callegari, Agnese; Elahi, Parviz; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni; Volpe, Giorgio

    Particles undergoing a stochastic motion within a disordered medium is a ubiquitous physical and biological phenomena. Examples can be given from organelles performing tasks in the cytoplasm to large animals moving in patchy environment. Here, we use speckle light fields to study the anomalous diffusion in an active matter system consisting of micron-sized silica particles(diameter 5 μm) and motile bacterial cells (E. coli). The speckle light fields are generated by mode mixing inside a multimode optical fiber where a small amount of incident laser power is needed to obtain an effective disordered optical landscape for the purpose of optical manipulation. We experimentally show how complex potentials contribute to the long-term dynamics of the active matter system and observed an enhanced diffusion of particles interacting with the active bacterial bath in the speckle light fields. We showed that this effect can be tuned and controlled by varying the intensity and the statistical properties of the speckle pattern. Potentially, these results could be of interest for many technological applications, such as the manipulation of microparticles inside optically disordered media of biological interest.

  4. Real-time integral imaging system with handheld light field camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Youngmo; Kim, Jonghyun; Yeom, Jiwoon; Lee, Byoungho

    2014-11-01

    Our objective is to construct real-time pickup and display in integral imaging system with handheld light field camera. A micro lens array and high frame rate charge-coupled device (CCD) are used to implement handheld light field camera, and a simple lens array and a liquid crystal (LC) display panel are used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) images in real-time. Handheld light field camera is implemented by adding the micro lens array on CCD sensor. Main lens, which is mounted on CCD sensor, is used to capture the scene. To make the elemental image in real-time, pixel mapping algorithm is applied. With this algorithm, not only pseudoscopic problem can be solved, but also user can change the depth plane of the displayed 3D images in real-time. For real-time high quality 3D video generation, a high resolution and high frame rate CCD and LC display panel are used in proposed system. Experiment and simulation results are presented to verify our proposed system. As a result, 3D image is captured and reconstructed in real-time through integral imaging system.

  5. Large magnetic field effects in electrochemically doped organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Reenen, S.; Kersten, S. P.; Wouters, S. H. W.; Cox, M.; Janssen, P.; Koopmans, B.; Bobbert, P. A.; Kemerink, M.

    2013-09-01

    Large negative magnetoconductance (MC) of ˜12% is observed in electrochemically doped polymer light-emitting diodes at sub-band-gap bias voltages (Vbias). Simultaneously, a positive magnetoefficiency (Mη) of 9% is observed at Vbias = 2 V. At higher bias voltages, both the MC and Mη diminish while a negative magnetoelectroluminescence (MEL) appears. The negative MEL effect is rationalized by triplet-triplet annihilation that leads to delayed fluorescence, whereas the positive Mη effect is related to competition between spin mixing and exciton formation leading to an enhanced singlet:triplet ratio at nonzero magnetic field. The resultant reduction in triplet exciton density is argued to reduce detrapping of polarons in the recombination zone at low-bias voltages, explaining the observed negative MC. Regarding organic magnetoresistance, this study provides experimental data to verify existing models describing magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors, which contribute to better understanding hereof. Furthermore, we present indications of strong magnetic field effects related to interactions between trapped carriers and excitons, which specifically can be studied in electrochemically doped organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Regarding light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs), this work shows that delayed fluorescence from triplet-triplet annihilation substantially contributes to the electroluminescence and the device efficiency.

  6. Optical phase cloaking of 700 nm light waves in the far field by a three-dimensional carpet cloak.

    PubMed

    Ergin, Tolga; Fischer, Joachim; Wegener, Martin

    2011-10-21

    Transformation optics is a design tool that connects the geometry of space and propagation of light. Invisibility cloaking is a corresponding benchmark example. Recent experiments at optical frequencies have demonstrated cloaking for the light amplitude only. In this Letter, we demonstrate far-field cloaking of the light phase by interferometric microscope-imaging experiments on the previously introduced three-dimensional carpet cloak at 700 nm wavelength and for arbitrary polarization of light.

  7. Impact of incorporating visual biofeedback in 4D MRI.

    PubMed

    To, David T; Kim, Joshua P; Price, Ryan G; Chetty, Indrin J; Glide-Hurst, Carri K

    2016-05-08

    Precise radiation therapy (RT) for abdominal lesions is complicated by respiratory motion and suboptimal soft tissue contrast in 4D CT. 4D MRI offers improved con-trast although long scan times and irregular breathing patterns can be limiting. To address this, visual biofeedback (VBF) was introduced into 4D MRI. Ten volunteers were consented to an IRB-approved protocol. Prospective respiratory-triggered, T2-weighted, coronal 4D MRIs were acquired on an open 1.0T MR-SIM. VBF was integrated using an MR-compatible interactive breath-hold control system. Subjects visually monitored their breathing patterns to stay within predetermined tolerances. 4D MRIs were acquired with and without VBF for 2- and 8-phase acquisitions. Normalized respiratory waveforms were evaluated for scan time, duty cycle (programmed/acquisition time), breathing period, and breathing regularity (end-inhale coefficient of variation, EI-COV). Three reviewers performed image quality assessment to compare artifacts with and without VBF. Respiration-induced liver motion was calculated via centroid difference analysis of end-exhale (EE) and EI liver contours. Incorporating VBF reduced 2-phase acquisition time (4.7 ± 1.0 and 5.4 ± 1.5 min with and without VBF, respectively) while reducing EI-COV by 43.8% ± 16.6%. For 8-phase acquisitions, VBF reduced acquisition time by 1.9 ± 1.6 min and EI-COVs by 38.8% ± 25.7% despite breathing rate remaining similar (11.1 ± 3.8 breaths/min with vs. 10.5 ± 2.9 without). Using VBF yielded higher duty cycles than unguided free breathing (34.4% ± 5.8% vs. 28.1% ± 6.6%, respectively). Image grading showed that out of 40 paired evaluations, 20 cases had equivalent and 17 had improved image quality scores with VBF, particularly for mid-exhale and EI. Increased liver excursion was observed with VBF, where superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right EE-EI displacements were 14.1± 5.8, 4.9 ± 2.1, and 1.5 ± 1.0 mm, respectively, with VBF compared to 11.9

  8. Soil depth and temperature effects on microbial degradation of 2,4-D

    SciTech Connect

    Veeh, R.H.; Camper, A.K.; Inskeep, W.P.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous soil factors and climatic conditions affect the degradation rate of pesticides in soils. A major soil factor influencing herbicide degradation is the composition and abundance of the microbiota, which has been shown to vary considerably with soil depth. Another important variable affecting microbial growth and degradation kinetics is temperature. Soil samples from 0- to 30-, 30- to 60-, and 60- to 120-cm depths of two Montana soils were placed in reaction flasks and treated with {sup 14}C-labeled 2,4-D at representative field use rates at temperatures of 10, 17, and 24{degrees}C. A carrier gas was used to continuously evacuate evolved {sup 14}CO{sub 2} into NaOH traps as a measure of 2,4-D degradation. Comparisons of the effects of soil depth and temperature were made by fitting experimental data to both first-order and logistic kinetic models. Degradation rates of 2,4-D decreased significantly with increasing soil depth and were positively correlated with bacterial plate counts. Effects of temperature on degradation rate constants were adequately described using the Arrhenius equation. Degradation rates of 2,4-D and bacterial enumerations were positively correlated with changes in soil organic C as a function of soil depth. These results support the idea that changes in organic C with soil depth could be used as a parameter for estimating changes in degradation rate as a function of soil depth. Efforts to model the transport of 2,4-D in soils should account for variation in degradation rate as a function of soil depth and temperature. 46 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Control of transmission of right circularly polarized laser light in overdense plasma by applied magnetic field pulses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guangjin; Yu, Wei; Yu, M Y; Luan, Shixia; Wu, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The effect of a transient magnetic field on right-hand circularly polarized (RHCP) laser light propagation in overcritical-density plasma is investigated. When the electron gyrofrequency is larger than the wave frequency, RHCP light can propagate along the external magnetic field in an overcritical density plasma without resonance or cutoff. However, when the magnetic field falls to below the cyclotron resonance point, the propagating laser pulse will be truncated and the local plasma electrons resonantly heated. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that when applied to a thin slab, the process can produce intense two-cycle light pulses as well as long-lasting self-magnetic fields. PMID:27300997

  10. Control of transmission of right circularly polarized laser light in overdense plasma by applied magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guangjin; Yu, Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Luan, Shixia; Wu, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The effect of a transient magnetic field on right-hand circularly polarized (RHCP) laser light propagation in overcritical-density plasma is investigated. When the electron gyrofrequency is larger than the wave frequency, RHCP light can propagate along the external magnetic field in an overcritical density plasma without resonance or cutoff. However, when the magnetic field falls to below the cyclotron resonance point, the propagating laser pulse will be truncated and the local plasma electrons resonantly heated. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that when applied to a thin slab, the process can produce intense two-cycle light pulses as well as long-lasting self-magnetic fields.

  11. Assimilation of Meteosat radiance data within the 4D-Var system at ECMWF: Data quality monitoring, bias correction and single-cycle experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Rosemary; Köpken, Christina; Kelly, Graeme; Thépaut, Jean-Noël; Saunders, Roger

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes the direct assimilation of water vapour (WV) clear-sky radiance (CSR) data from geostationary satellites within the context of the ECMWF four-dimensional variational assimilation (4D-Var) system. The assimilation of Meteosat-7 WV CSR data became operational on 9 April 2002. As 4D-Var includes a time dimension, the high temporal resolution of the geostationary radiance data can be exploited to provide information not only on the upper-tropospheric humidity but also on the upper-tropospheric wind field. The data assimilated have a spatial resolution of approximately 80 km and a time resolution of 1 hour. Extensive pre-operational monitoring of the CSR data has been carried out, showing a systematic warm bias of approximately 2-3 K in the Meteosat WV CSR data compared to radiances simulated from model first-guess fields. The systematic biases between the brightness temperatures derived from the model and the observations are investigated and compared to other satellite radiance data. For assimilation purposes this is accounted for by using a bias correction based on a statistical regression. The monitoring also shows contamination of certain time slots caused by intruding solar stray light and a certain degree of residual cloud contamination present in the CSR. Data quality control is introduced to exclude affected data. Initial single-cycle 3D-Var with first guess at appropriate time and 4D-Var experiments demonstrate both the direct and indirect effects of the Meteosat WV CSR data on the model fields, particularly of humidity and wind. The operational implementation of the assimilation of the Meteosat WV CSR data, including results from pre-operational experiments and forecast impacts, is discussed in a companion paper.

  12. Exome sequencing identifies PDE4D mutations in acrodysostosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hane; Graham, John M; Rimoin, David L; Lachman, Ralph S; Krejci, Pavel; Tompson, Stuart W; Nelson, Stanley F; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H

    2012-04-01

    Acrodysostosis is a dominantly-inherited, multisystem disorder characterized by skeletal, endocrine, and neurological abnormalities. To identify the molecular basis of acrodysostosis, we performed exome sequencing on five genetically independent cases. Three different missense mutations in PDE4D, which encodes cyclic AMP (cAMP)-specific phosphodiesterase 4D, were found to be heterozygous in three of the cases. Two of the mutations were demonstrated to have occurred de novo, providing strong genetic evidence of causation. Two additional cases were heterozygous for de novo missense mutations in PRKAR1A, which encodes the cAMP-dependent regulatory subunit of protein kinase A and which has been recently reported to be the cause of a form of acrodysostosis resistant to multiple hormones. These findings demonstrate that acrodysostosis is genetically heterogeneous and underscore the exquisite sensitivity of many tissues to alterations in cAMP homeostasis. PMID:22464252

  13. Intelligent Vehicle Systems: A 4D/RCS Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, Raj

    2007-04-01

    This book presents new research on autonomous mobility capabilities and shows how technological advances can be anticipated in the coming two decades. An in-depth description is presented on the theoretical foundations and engineering approaches that enable these capabilities. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the 4D/RCS reference model architecture and design methodology that has proven successful in guiding the development of autonomous mobility systems. Chapters 2 through 7 provide more detailed descriptions of research that has been conducted and algorithms that have been developed to implement the various aspects of the 4D/RCS reference model architecture and design methodology. Chapters 8 and 9 discuss applications, performance measures, and standards. Chapter 10 provides a history of Army and DARPA research in autonomous ground mobility. Chapter 11 provides a perspective on the potential future developments in autonomous mobility.

  14. Brain tissue segmentation in 4D CT using voxel classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boom, R.; Oei, M. T. H.; Lafebre, S.; Oostveen, L. J.; Meijer, F. J. A.; Steens, S. C. A.; Prokop, M.; van Ginneken, B.; Manniesing, R.

    2012-02-01

    A method is proposed to segment anatomical regions of the brain from 4D computer tomography (CT) patient data. The method consists of a three step voxel classification scheme, each step focusing on structures that are increasingly difficult to segment. The first step classifies air and bone, the second step classifies vessels and the third step classifies white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid. As features the time averaged intensity value and the temporal intensity change value were used. In each step, a k-Nearest-Neighbor classifier was used to classify the voxels. Training data was obtained by placing regions of interest in reconstructed 3D image data. The method has been applied to ten 4D CT cerebral patient data. A leave-one-out experiment showed consistent and accurate segmentation results.

  15. 4D embryonic cardiography using gated optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, M. W.; Rothenberg, F.; Roy, D.; Nikolski, V. P.; Hu, Z.; Watanabe, M.; Wilson, D. L.; Efimov, I. R.; Rollins, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of very early embryonic heart structure and function has technical limitations of spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed a gated technique using optical coherence tomography (OCT) that can rapidly image beating embryonic hearts in four-dimensions (4D), at high spatial resolution (10-15 μm), and with a depth penetration of 1.5 - 2.0 mm that is suitable for the study of early embryonic hearts. We acquired data from paced, excised, embryonic chicken and mouse hearts using gated sampling and employed image processing techniques to visualize the hearts in 4D and measure physiologic parameters such as cardiac volume, ejection fraction, and wall thickness. This technique is being developed to longitudinally investigate the physiology of intact embryonic hearts and events that lead to congenital heart defects.

  16. Theoretical analysis and experiment of subwavelength structure-integrated red AlGaInP light-emitting diodes for uniform field distribution and enhanced light extraction efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil Ju; Song, Young Min

    2016-03-01

    We report theoretical and experimental analysis of antireflective subwavelength structures (SWSs) on GaP substrates to enhance the light output with a uniform light distribution of AlGaInP-based red light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Scaling issues on the optical performance are analyzed by the calculation results from finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) methods. The optical simulation reveals that SWSs with a period of 100-150 nm achieve highest optical output power, while maintaining a uniform light field distribution, in the subwavelength regime. To validate our theoretical results, disordered SWSs with a tapered shape were fabricated on a GaP layer of AlGaInP red LEDs by lithography-free dry etching of Ag nanoparticles. The SWS-integrated LED shows a uniform light output distribution with an improved light output power compared with the conventional LED.

  17. Phosphodiesterase 4D gene polymorphisms in sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chen-Yu; Tai, Shu-Yu; Wang, Ling-Feng; Hsi, Edward; Chang, Ning-Chia; Wang, Hsun-Mo; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Ho, Kuen-Yao

    2016-09-01

    The phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) gene has been reported as a risk gene for ischemic stroke. The vascular factors are between the hypothesized etiologies of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), and this genetic effect might be attributed for its role in SSNHL. We hypothesized that genetic variants of the PDE4D gene are associated with susceptibility to SSNHL. We conducted a case-control study with 362 SSNHL cases and 209 controls. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected. The genotypes were determined using TaqMan technology. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was tested for each SNP, and genetic effects were evaluated according to three inheritance modes. We carried out sex-specific analysis to analyze the overall data. All three SNPs were in HWE. When subjects were stratified by sex, the genetic effect was only evident in females but not in males. The TT genotype of rs702553 exhibited an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 3.83 (95 % confidence interval = 1.46-11.18) (p = 0.006) in female SSNHL. The TT genotype of SNP rs702553 was associated with female SSNHL under the recessive model (p = 0.004, OR 3.70). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, TT genotype of rs702553 was significantly associated with female SSNHL (p = 0.0043, OR 3.70). These results suggest that PDE4D gene polymorphisms influence the susceptibility for the development of SSNHL in the southern Taiwanese female population.

  18. Receptive field properties of neurons in the primary visual cortex under photopic and scotopic lighting conditions

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Kevin R.; Hubel, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the physiology of the primate visual cortex (area V-1) comes mostly from studies done in photopic conditions, in which retinal cones are active and rods play little or no part. Conflicting results have come from research into the effects of dark adaptation on receptive field organization of cells in the retina and the lateral geniculate nucleus. These studies claim either that the effect of the surround disappears with dark adaptation or that it does not. The current study has as its objective a comparison of responses of V-1 cells in awake-alert macaque monkeys under conditions of light and dark adaptation. We reasoned that basic receptive field properties of V-1 cells such as orientation selectivity, direction selectivity, and end-stopping should be preserved in scotopic conditions if the receptive field organization of antecedent cells is maintained in dim light. Our results indicate that dark adaptation does not alter basic V-1 receptive field characteristics such as selectivity for orientation, direction, and bar length. PMID:17688906

  19. Generation of a super-Rayleigh speckle field via a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinzhong; Tai, Yuping; Li, Hehe; Wang, Jingge; Wang, Hui; Nie, Zhaogang

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the generation method and properties of a super-Rayleigh speckle field that had a contrast value greater than 1. First, an exponential factor was added to the complex amplitude of the Rayleigh speckle, and then, its inverse Fourier-transformed phase matrix was applied to a spatial light modulator (SLM). As the collimated light beam illuminated the SLM, the super-Rayleigh speckle field was formed at the SLM's Fourier plane. The effects of the exponential factor, size of the macro-pixel of the SLM, and diameter of the entrance pupil on the contrast values of the super-Rayleigh speckle patterns were investigated. Especially, the influence of different macro-pixel sizes of the SLM was systematically studied. Moreover, the stability region of the super-Rayleigh speckle field was examined. The experimental results showed that the contrast values of the super-Rayleigh speckle field increased exponentially as the exponential factor increased under the same conditions. In addition, the contrast values increased as the size of the macro-pixel or diameter of the entrance pupil increased. Furthermore, as the pupil diameter increased, the width of the stability region decreased according to a negative quadratic index that corresponded to the longitudinal length of a single speckle.

  20. Magnetic field protects plants against high light by slowing down production of singlet oxygen.

    PubMed

    Hakala-Yatkin, Marja; Sarvikas, Päivi; Paturi, Petriina; Mäntysaari, Mika; Mattila, Heta; Tyystjärvi, Taina; Nedbal, Ladislav; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2011-05-01

    Recombination of the primary radical pair of photosystem II (PSII) of photosynthesis may produce the triplet state of the primary donor of PSII. Triplet formation is potentially harmful because chlorophyll triplets can react with molecular oxygen to produce the reactive singlet oxygen (¹O₂). The yield of ¹O₂ is expected to be directly proportional to the triplet yield and the triplet yield of charge recombination can be lowered with a magnetic field of 100-300 mT. In this study, we illuminated intact pumpkin leaves with strong light in the presence and absence of a magnetic field and found that the magnetic field protects against photoinhibition of PSII. The result suggests that radical pair recombination is responsible for significant part of ¹O₂ production in the chloroplast. The magnetic field effect vanished if leaves were illuminated in the presence of lincomycin, an inhibitor of chloroplast protein synthesis, or if isolated thylakoid membranes were exposed to light. These data, in turn, indicate that ¹O₂ produced by the recombination of the primary charge pair is not directly involved in photoinactivation of PSII but instead damages PSII by inhibiting the repair of photoinhibited PSII. We also found that an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lacking α-tocopherol, a scavenger of ¹O₂, is more sensitive to photoinhibition than the wild-type in the absence but not in the presence of lincomycin, confirming that the target of ¹O₂ is the repair mechanism.

  1. A 4D Hyperspherical Interpretation of q-Space

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinbor, A. Pasha; Chung, Moo K.; Wu, Yu-Chien; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Alexander, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    3D q-space can be viewed as the surface of a 4D hypersphere. In this paper, we seek to develop a 4D hyperspherical interpretation of q-space by projecting it onto a hypersphere and subsequently modeling the q-space signal via 4D hyperspherical harmonics (HSH). Using this orthonormal basis, we derive several well-established q-space indices and numerically estimate the diffusion orientation distribution function (dODF). We also derive the integral transform describing the relationship between the diffusion signal and propagator on a hypersphere. Most importantly, we will demonstrate that for hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI) acquisitions low order linear expansion of the HSH basis is sufficient to characterize diffusion in neural tissue. In fact, the HSH basis achieves comparable signal and better dODF reconstructions than other well-established methods, such as Bessel Fourier orientation reconstruction (BFOR), using fewer fitting parameters. All in all, this work provides a new way of looking at q-space. PMID:25624043

  2. 4D-Flow validation, numerical and experimental framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, Kurt; Liu, Haining; Canton, Gador; Aliseda, Alberto; Yuan, Chun

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a group of assessment metrics of new 4D MRI flow sequences, an imaging modality that allows for visualization of three-dimensional pulsatile flow in the cardiovascular anatomy through time-resolved three-dimensional blood velocity measurements from cardiac-cycle synchronized MRI acquisition. This is a promising tool for clinical assessment but lacks a robust validation framework. First, 4D-MRI flow in a subject's stenotic carotid bifurcation is compared with a patient-specific CFD model using two different boundary condition methods. Second, Particle Image Velocimetry in a patient-specific phantom is used as a benchmark to compare the 4D-MRI in vivo measurements and CFD simulations under the same conditions. Comparison of estimated and measureable flow parameters such as wall shear stress, fluctuating velocity rms, Lagrangian particle residence time, will be discussed, with justification for their biomechanics relevance and the insights they can provide on the pathophysiology of arterial disease: atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. Lastly, the framework is applied to a new sequence to provide a quantitative assessment. A parametric analysis on the carotid bifurcation pulsatile flow conditions will be presented and an accuracy assessment provided.

  3. A phantom for testing of 4D-CT for radiotherapy of small lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, L.; Kron, T.; Taylor, M. L.; Callahan, J.; Franich, R. D.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: The use of time-resolved four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) in radiotherapy requires strict quality assurance to ensure the accuracy of motion management protocols. The aim of this work was to design and test a phantom capable of large amplitude motion for use in 4D-CT, with particular interest in small lesions typical for stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods: The phantom of 'see-saw' design is light weight, capable of including various sample materials and compatible with several surrogate marker signal acquisition systems. It is constructed of polymethylmethacrylate (Perspex) and its movement is controlled via a dc motor and drive wheel. It was tested using two CT scanners with different 4D acquisition methods: the Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT (helical scan, pressure belt) and a General Electric Discovery STE PET/CT (axial scan, infrared marker). Amplitudes ranging from 1.5 to 6.0 cm and frequencies of up to 40 cycles per minute were used to study the effect of motion on image quality. Maximum intensity projections (MIPs), as well as average intensity projections (AIPs) of moving objects were investigated and their quality dependence on the number of phase reconstruction bins assessed. Results: CT number discrepancies between moving and stationary objects were found to have no systematic dependence on amplitude, frequency, or specific interphase variability. MIP-delineated amplitudes of motion were found to match physical phantom amplitudes to within 2 mm for all motion scenarios tested. Objects undergoing large amplitude motions (>3.0 cm) were shown to cause artefacts in MIP and AIP projections when ten phase bins were assigned. This problem can be mitigated by increasing the number of phase bins in a 4D-CT scan. Conclusions: The phantom was found to be a suitable tool for evaluating the image quality of 4D-CT motion management technology, as well as providing a quality assurance tool for intercenter/intervendor testing of commercial 4D

  4. Optoelectrofluidic field separation based on light-intensity gradients and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jinsung; Lee, Sanghyun; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2010-11-01

    Optoelectrofluidic field separation (OEFS) of particles under light-intensity gradient (LIG) is reported, where the LIG illumination on the photoconductive layer converts the short-ranged dielectrophoresis (DEP) force to the long-ranged one. The long-ranged DEP force can compete with the hydrodynamic force by alternating current electro-osmosis (ACEO) over the entire illumination area for realizing effective field separation of particles. Results of the field separation and concentration of diverse particle pairs (0.82--16 μm) are well demonstrated, and conditions determining the critical radius and effective particle manipulation are discussed. In addition, expanding the OEFS to biological applications such as rapid cell manipulation and separation will be discussed. The OEFS with LIG strategy could be a promising manipulation method of particles including biological cells in many applications where a rapid manipulation of particles over the entire working area is of interest.

  5. Theory of light-induced effective magnetic field in Rashba ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaiumzadeh, Alireza; Titov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on all-optical magnetization reversal in conductive ferromagnetic thin films we use nonequilibrium formalism to calculate the effective magnetic field induced in a Rashba ferromagnet by a short laser pulse. The main contribution to the effect originates in the direct optical transitions between spin-split subbands. The resulting effective magnetic field is inversely proportional to the impurity scattering rate and can reach the amplitude of a few Tesla in the systems like Co/Pt bilayers. We show that the total light-induced effective magnetic field in ferromagnetic systems is the sum of two contributions: a helicity dependent term, which is an even function of magnetization, and a helicity independent term, which is an odd function of magnetization. The primary role of the spin-orbit interaction is to widen the frequency range for direct optical transitions.

  6. Violet LED light enhances the recruitment of a thrip predator in open fields.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Takumi; Uehara, Takuya; Muraji, Masahiko; Yamaguchi, Terumi; Ichihashi, Takahisa; Suzuki, Takahiro; Kainoh, Yooichi; Shimoda, Masami

    2016-01-01

    The predatory bug Orius sauteri is an indigenous natural enemy of thrips and whiteflies in Asian countries. To put these bugs to practical use in pest management, methods to attract and retain the bugs in agricultural fields are needed. We previously showed that violet light (405 nm) attracts O. sauteri selectively. Many thrips and whiteflies are attracted to UV or green light. In this study, we examined the effect of violet-LED illumination on O. sauteri in pesticide-free eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) cultivation. In three cultivation trials, the density of O. sauteri on eggplant leaves was consistently higher in the illuminated plots; at least twice that of the non-illuminated plots. Simultaneously, the density of thrips declined markedly to less than half that of the non-illuminated plots. We identified three positive effects of violet light including an "immediate-effect" on predator attraction, a "persistent-effect" on predator reproduction, and a "secondary-effect" on the food web structure. Our results showed that illumination with violet light provides a powerful tool for integrated pest management. This is the first report on the use of illumination to manipulate the behavior of natural enemies. PMID:27604315

  7. Violet LED light enhances the recruitment of a thrip predator in open fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Takumi; Uehara, Takuya; Muraji, Masahiko; Yamaguchi, Terumi; Ichihashi, Takahisa; Suzuki, Takahiro; Kainoh, Yooichi; Shimoda, Masami

    2016-09-01

    The predatory bug Orius sauteri is an indigenous natural enemy of thrips and whiteflies in Asian countries. To put these bugs to practical use in pest management, methods to attract and retain the bugs in agricultural fields are needed. We previously showed that violet light (405 nm) attracts O. sauteri selectively. Many thrips and whiteflies are attracted to UV or green light. In this study, we examined the effect of violet-LED illumination on O. sauteri in pesticide-free eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) cultivation. In three cultivation trials, the density of O. sauteri on eggplant leaves was consistently higher in the illuminated plots; at least twice that of the non-illuminated plots. Simultaneously, the density of thrips declined markedly to less than half that of the non-illuminated plots. We identified three positive effects of violet light including an “immediate-effect” on predator attraction, a “persistent-effect” on predator reproduction, and a “secondary-effect” on the food web structure. Our results showed that illumination with violet light provides a powerful tool for integrated pest management. This is the first report on the use of illumination to manipulate the behavior of natural enemies.

  8. Progress in the Field of Constructing Near-Infrared Light-Responsive Drug Delivery Platforms.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fang; Wang, Hanjie; Chang, Jin

    2016-03-01

    Stimuli-responsive materials have taken replace of traditional drug carriers due to their ability to achieve controlled release of their encapsulated contents. A variety of sensitive materials, such as polymers that respond to pH, light, and magnetic fields, are widely used to construct drug carriers, and achieved good results. Specifically, near-infrared light (NIR) responsive materials are of particular interest in drug delivery, as NIR can penetrate body tissue and is minimally absorbed by the body's water and hemoglobin and is less harmful to healthy cells than UV or visible light. Thus, the near-infrared excitation drug delivery systems (NIRDDSs) have some essential advantages just like being efficient to kill tumor cells, accurate to achieve the tumor sites and less damage to human body. Also, in the process of building the carriers, we may achieve a combination of controlled release chemotherapy, photothermal therapy (PTT) or photodynamic therapy (PDT). In addition, besides utilizing as drug delivery platforms, some carriers can achieve multifunctional tumor diagnosis and treatment, such as magnetic resonance imaging, optical imaging, drug carriers and PTT. In this review, based on the mechanism of NIR, we highlight diverse near-infrared light-responsive drug delivery platforms and recent advances in the development of NIRDDSs for cancer therapy primarily. PMID:27455610

  9. New polarisation effects in saturated absorption spectroscopy in the field of counterpropagating light waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhnikov, D. V.; Novokreshchenov, V. K.; Ignatovich, S. M.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of a double structure of saturated absorption resonance in the field of counterpropagating light waves interacting with atomic gas is considered, which was first studied experimentally and theoretically by Vasil'ev et al. [V.V. Vasil'ev et al., J. Exp. Theor. Phys., 112, 770 (2011)]. The effect manifests itself as a new nonlinear resonance formed as a peak in the absorption spectrum of the probe wave. The resonance is observed inside a 'conventional' dip in the spectrum of saturated absorption. Previously, this effect was theoretically described only in the frameworks of the two-level atomic model, i.e., without making allowance for degeneracy of atomic energy levels with respect to the projection of the total angular momentum and for the vector nature of light. We extend the theory of the effect to the case of real atomic systems with degenerate energy levels and arbitrary polarisations of light waves. In particular, on an example of the simple transition Fg = 1 → Fe = 0 we show that polarisation parameters of light waves may significantly affect the contrast of the new effect and the possibility of observing it at all. Conclusions of the work are confirmed both analytically and bnumerically.

  10. Violet LED light enhances the recruitment of a thrip predator in open fields

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Takumi; Uehara, Takuya; Muraji, Masahiko; Yamaguchi, Terumi; Ichihashi, Takahisa; Suzuki, Takahiro; Kainoh, Yooichi; Shimoda, Masami

    2016-01-01

    The predatory bug Orius sauteri is an indigenous natural enemy of thrips and whiteflies in Asian countries. To put these bugs to practical use in pest management, methods to attract and retain the bugs in agricultural fields are needed. We previously showed that violet light (405 nm) attracts O. sauteri selectively. Many thrips and whiteflies are attracted to UV or green light. In this study, we examined the effect of violet-LED illumination on O. sauteri in pesticide-free eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) cultivation. In three cultivation trials, the density of O. sauteri on eggplant leaves was consistently higher in the illuminated plots; at least twice that of the non-illuminated plots. Simultaneously, the density of thrips declined markedly to less than half that of the non-illuminated plots. We identified three positive effects of violet light including an “immediate-effect” on predator attraction, a “persistent-effect” on predator reproduction, and a “secondary-effect” on the food web structure. Our results showed that illumination with violet light provides a powerful tool for integrated pest management. This is the first report on the use of illumination to manipulate the behavior of natural enemies. PMID:27604315

  11. Holographic display system for dynamic synthesis of 3D light fields with increased space bandwidth product.

    PubMed

    Agour, Mostafa; Falldorf, Claas; Bergmann, Ralf B

    2016-06-27

    We present a new method for the generation of a dynamic wave field with high space bandwidth product (SBP). The dynamic wave field is generated from several wave fields diffracted by a display which comprises multiple spatial light modulators (SLMs) each having a comparably low SBP. In contrast to similar approaches in stereoscopy, we describe how the independently generated wave fields can be coherently superposed. A major benefit of the scheme is that the display system may be extended to provide an even larger display. A compact experimental configuration which is composed of four phase-only SLMs to realize the coherent combination of independent wave fields is presented. Effects of important technical parameters of the display system on the wave field generated across the observation plane are investigated. These effects include, e.g., the tilt of the individual SLM and the gap between the active areas of multiple SLMs. As an example of application, holographic reconstruction of a 3D object with parallax effects is demonstrated. PMID:27410593

  12. EMISSION PATTERNS AND LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA RAYS IN THE PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE WITH A CURRENT-INDUCED MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, L.

    2011-12-20

    We study the emission patterns and light curves of gamma rays in the pulsar magnetosphere with a current-induced magnetic field perturbation. Based on the solution of a static dipole with the magnetic field induced by some currents (perturbation field), we derive the solutions of a static as well as a retarded dipole with the perturbation field in the Cartesian coordinates. The static (retarded) magnetic field can be expressed as the sum of the pure static (retarded) dipolar magnetic field and the static (retarded) perturbation field. We use the solution of the retarded magnetic field to investigate the influence of the perturbation field on the emission patterns and light curves, and apply the perturbed solutions to calculate the gamma-ray light curves for the case of the Vela pulsar. We find that the perturbation field induced by the currents will change the emission patterns and then the light curves of gamma rays, especially for a larger perturbation field. Our results indicate that the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) electrons (positrons) can decrease the rotation effect on the magnetosphere and makes emission pattern appear to be smoother relative to that of the pure retarded dipole, but the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) positrons (electrons) can make the emission pattern less smooth.

  13. 4D atlas of the mouse embryo for precise morphological staging.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael D; van Eede, Matthijs C; Spring, Shoshana; Jevtic, Stefan; Boughner, Julia C; Lerch, Jason P; Henkelman, R Mark

    2015-10-15

    After more than a century of research, the mouse remains the gold-standard model system, for it recapitulates human development and disease and is quickly and highly tractable to genetic manipulations. Fundamental to the power and success of using a mouse model is the ability to stage embryonic mouse development accurately. Past staging systems were limited by the technologies of the day, such that only surface features, visible with a light microscope, could be recognized and used to define stages. With the advent of high-throughput 3D imaging tools that capture embryo morphology in microscopic detail, we now present the first 4D atlas staging system for mouse embryonic development using optical projection tomography and image registration methods. By tracking 3D trajectories of every anatomical point in the mouse embryo from E11.5 to E14.0, we established the first 4D atlas compiled from ex vivo 3D mouse embryo reference images. The resulting 4D atlas comprises 51 interpolated 3D images in this gestational range, resulting in a temporal resolution of 72 min. From this 4D atlas, any mouse embryo image can be subsequently compared and staged at the global, voxel and/or structural level. Assigning an embryonic stage to each point in anatomy allows for unprecedented quantitative analysis of developmental asynchrony among different anatomical structures in the same mouse embryo. This comprehensive developmental data set offers developmental biologists a new, powerful staging system that can identify and compare differences in developmental timing in wild-type embryos and shows promise for localizing deviations in mutant development.

  14. Digital in-line holography: 4-D imaging and tracking of micro-structures and organisms in microfluidics and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sucerquia, J.; Xu, W.; Jericho, S. K.; Jericho, M. H.; Tamblyn, I.; Kreuzer, H. J.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, in-line holography as originally proposed by Gabor, supplemented with numerical reconstruction, has been perfected to the point at which wavelength resolution both laterally and in depth is routinely achieved with light by using digital in-line holographic microscopy (DIHM). The advantages of DIHM are: (1) simplicity of the hardware (laser- pinhole-CCD camera), (2) magnification is obtained in the numerical reconstruction, (3) maximum information of the 3-D structure with a depth of field of millimeters, (4) changes in the specimen and the simultaneous motion of many species, can be followed in 4-D at the camera frame rate. We present results obtained with DIHM in biological and microfluidic applications. By taking advantage of the large depth of field and the plane-to-plane reconstruction capability of DIHM, we can produce 3D representations of the paths followed by micron-sized objects such as suspensions of microspheres and biological samples (cells, algae, protozoa, bacteria). Examples from biology include a study of the motion of bacteria in a diatom and the track of algae and paramecium. In microfluidic applications we observe micro-channel flow, motion of bubbles in water and evolution in electrolysis. The paper finishes with new results from an underwater version of DIHM.

  15. The deflection of light induced by the Sun's gravitational field and measured with geodetic VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, O.; Girdiuk, A.

    2015-08-01

    The Sun's gravitational field deflects the apparent positions of close objects in accordance with the formulae of general relativity. Optical astrometry is used to test the prediction, but only with the stars close to the Sun and only during total Solar eclipses. Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is capable of measuring the deflection of the light from distant radio sources anytime and across the whole sky. We show that the effect of light deflection is equivalent to the gravitational delay calculated during the reduction of VLBI data. All reference radio sources display an annual circular motion with the magnitude proportional to their ecliptic latitude. In particular, radio sources near the ecliptic pole draw an annual circle with magnitude of 4~mas. This effect could be easily measured with the current precision of the geodetic VLBI data.

  16. Light emission from an ambipolar semiconducting polymer field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swensen, James S.; Soci, Cesare; Heeger, Alan J.

    2006-02-01

    Ambipolar light-emitting field-effect transistors are fabricated with two different metals for the top-contact source and drain electrodes; a low-work-function metal defining the channel for the source electrode and a high-work-function metal defining the channel for the drain electrode. A thin film of polypropylene-co-1-butene on SiN x is used as the gate dielectric on an n ++-Si wafer, which functioned as the substrate and the gate electrode. Transport data show ambipolar behavior. Recombination of electrons and holes results in a narrow zone of light emission within the channel. The location of the emission zone is controlled by the gate bias.

  17. Light emission from an ambipolar semiconducting polymer field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swensen, James S.; Soci, Cesare; Heeger, Alan J.

    2005-12-01

    Ambipolar light-emitting field-effect transistors are fabricated with two different metals for the top-contact source and drain electrodes; a low-work-function metal defining the channel for the source electrode and a high-work-function metal defining the channel for the drain electrode. A thin film of polypropylene-co-1-butene on SiNx is used as the gate dielectric on an n++-Si wafer, which functioned as the substrate and the gate electrode. Transport data show ambipolar behavior. Recombination of electrons and holes results in a narrow zone of light emission within the channel. The location of the emission zone is controlled by the gate bias.

  18. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from biological systems and the endogenous light field.

    PubMed

    Schwabl, Herbert; Klima, Herbert

    2005-04-01

    Still one of the most astonishing biological electromagnetic phenomena is the ultraweak photon emission (UPE) from living systems. Organisms and tissues spontaneously emit measurable intensities of light, i.e. photons in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum (380-780 nm), in the range from 1 to 1,000 photons x s-1 x cm-2, depending on their condition and vitality. It is important not to confuse UPE from living systems with other biogenic light emitting processes such as bioluminescence or chemiluminescence. This article examines with basic considerations from physics on the quantum nature of photons the empirical phenomenon of UPE. This leads to the description of the non-thermal origin of this radiation. This is in good correspondence with the modern understanding of life phenomena as dissipative processes far from thermodynamic equilibrium. UPE also supports the understanding of life sustaining processes as basically driven by electromagnetic fields. The basic features of UPE, like intensity and spectral distribution, are known in principle for many experimental situations. The UPE of human leukocytes contributes to an endogenous light field of about 1011 photons x s-1 which can be influenced by certain factors. Further research is needed to reveal the statistical properties of UPE and in consequence to answer questions about the underlying mechanics of the biological system. In principle, statistical properties of UPE allow to reconstruct phase-space dynamics of the light emitting structures. Many open questions remain until a proper understanding of the electromagnetic interaction of the human organism can be achieved: which structures act as receptors and emitters for electromagnetic radiation? How is electromagnetic information received and processed within cells?

  19. Three-Dimensional Super-Resolution Morphology by Near-Field Assisted White-Light Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feifei; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Peng; Liu, Zhu; Yu, Haibo; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Wen Jung

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in far-field fluorescent microscopy have enabled nanoscale imaging of biological entities by ingenious applications of fluorescent probes. For non-fluorescence applications, however, scanning probe microscopy still remains one of the most commonly used methods to “image” nanoscale features in all three dimensions, despite its limited throughput and invasiveness to scanned samples. Here, we propose a time-efficient three-dimensional super-resolution microscopy method: near-field assisted white light interferometry (NFWLI). This method takes advantage of topography acquisition using white-light interferometry and lateral near-field imaging via a microsphere superlens. The ability to discern structures in central processing units (CPUs) with minimum feature sizes of approximately 50 nm in the lateral dimensions and approximately 10 nm in the axial dimension within 25 s (40 times faster than atomic force microscopes) was demonstrated. We elaborate in this paper the principles of NFWLI and demonstrate its potential for becoming a practical method for high-speed and non-toxic three-dimensional nanoscale imaging. PMID:27102207

  20. Stress-induced piezoelectric field in GaN-based 450-nm light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Tawfik, Wael Z.; Hyeon, Gil Yong; Lee, June Key

    2014-10-28

    We investigated the influence of the built-in piezoelectric field induced by compressive stress on the characteristics of GaN-based 450-nm light-emitting diodes (LEDs) prepared on sapphire substrates of different thicknesses. As the sapphire substrate thickness was reduced, the compressive stress in the GaN layer was released, resulting in wafer bowing. The wafer bowing-induced mechanical stress altered the piezoelectric field, which in turn reduced the quantum confined Stark effect in the InGaN/GaN active region of the LED. The flat-band voltage was estimated by measuring the applied bias voltage that induced a 180° phase shift in the electro-reflectance (ER) spectrum. The piezoelectric field estimated by the ER spectra changed by ∼110 kV/cm. The electroluminescence spectral peak wavelength was blue-shifted, and the internal quantum efficiency was improved by about 22% at a high injection current of 100 mA. The LED on the 60-μm-thick sapphire substrate exhibited the highest light output power of ∼59 mW at an injection current of 100 mA, with the operating voltage unchanged.

  1. Ligand field density functional theory for the prediction of future domestic lighting.

    PubMed

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Urland, Werner; García-Fuente, Amador; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Daul, Claude

    2014-07-28

    We deal with the computational determination of the electronic structure and properties of lanthanide ions in complexes and extended structures having open-shell f and d configurations. Particularly, we present conceptual and methodological issues based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) enabling the reliable calculation and description of the f → d transitions in lanthanide doped phosphors. We consider here the optical properties of the Pr(3+) ion embedded into various solid state fluoride host lattices, for the prospection and understanding of the so-called quantum cutting process, being important in the further quest of warm-white light source in light emitting diodes (LED). We use the conceptual formulation of the revisited ligand field (LF) theory, fully compatibilized with the quantum chemistry tools: LFDFT. We present methodological advances for the calculations of the Slater-Condon parameters, the ligand field interaction and the spin-orbit coupling constants, important in the non-empirical parameterization of the effective Hamiltonian adjusted from the ligand field theory. The model shows simple procedure using less sophisticated computational tools, which is intended to contribute to the design of modern phosphors and to help to complement the understanding of the 4f(n) → 4f(n-1)5d(1) transitions in any lanthanide system.

  2. Three-Dimensional Super-Resolution Morphology by Near-Field Assisted White-Light Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feifei; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Peng; Liu, Zhu; Yu, Haibo; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Wen Jung

    2016-04-01

    Recent developments in far-field fluorescent microscopy have enabled nanoscale imaging of biological entities by ingenious applications of fluorescent probes. For non-fluorescence applications, however, scanning probe microscopy still remains one of the most commonly used methods to “image” nanoscale features in all three dimensions, despite its limited throughput and invasiveness to scanned samples. Here, we propose a time-efficient three-dimensional super-resolution microscopy method: near-field assisted white light interferometry (NFWLI). This method takes advantage of topography acquisition using white-light interferometry and lateral near-field imaging via a microsphere superlens. The ability to discern structures in central processing units (CPUs) with minimum feature sizes of approximately 50 nm in the lateral dimensions and approximately 10 nm in the axial dimension within 25 s (40 times faster than atomic force microscopes) was demonstrated. We elaborate in this paper the principles of NFWLI and demonstrate its potential for becoming a practical method for high-speed and non-toxic three-dimensional nanoscale imaging.

  3. The polarization efficiency of the emitted light in quantum dots under the presence of external magnetic field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrou, V. N.

    2016-11-01

    A theoretical description of the light polarization within asymmetric self-assembled coupled quantum dots (SACQDs) in the presence of an external magnetic field, is presented. The electron and hole wavefunctions and their energy eigenvalues have been evaluated by considering ellipsoidal shaped quantum dots (QDs). Predictions of circularly light polarization for specific polarization planes, a variety of different QD geometries and the presence of an external magnetic field are displayed and compared. The results show that for some specific polarization planes the circularly light polarization is very sensitive mainly to the size of the QDs asymmetry, the interdot distance and the external magnetic field.

  4. Joint surface reconstruction and 4D deformation estimation from sparse data and prior knowledge for marker-less Respiratory motion tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Berkels, Benjamin; Rumpf, Martin; Bauer, Sebastian; Ettl, Svenja; Arold, Oliver; Hornegger, Joachim

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The intraprocedural tracking of respiratory motion has the potential to substantially improve image-guided diagnosis and interventions. The authors have developed a sparse-to-dense registration approach that is capable of recovering the patient's external 3D body surface and estimating a 4D (3D + time) surface motion field from sparse sampling data and patient-specific prior shape knowledge.Methods: The system utilizes an emerging marker-less and laser-based active triangulation (AT) sensor that delivers sparse but highly accurate 3D measurements in real-time. These sparse position measurements are registered with a dense reference surface extracted from planning data. Thereby a dense displacement field is recovered, which describes the spatio-temporal 4D deformation of the complete patient body surface, depending on the type and state of respiration. It yields both a reconstruction of the instantaneous patient shape and a high-dimensional respiratory surrogate for respiratory motion tracking. The method is validated on a 4D CT respiration phantom and evaluated on both real data from an AT prototype and synthetic data sampled from dense surface scans acquired with a structured-light scanner.Results: In the experiments, the authors estimated surface motion fields with the proposed algorithm on 256 datasets from 16 subjects and in different respiration states, achieving a mean surface reconstruction accuracy of ±0.23 mm with respect to ground truth data—down from a mean initial surface mismatch of 5.66 mm. The 95th percentile of the local residual mesh-to-mesh distance after registration did not exceed 1.17 mm for any subject. On average, the total runtime of our proof of concept CPU implementation is 2.3 s per frame, outperforming related work substantially.Conclusions: In external beam radiation therapy, the approach holds potential for patient monitoring during treatment using the reconstructed surface, and for motion-compensated dose delivery using

  5. Magnetic field dependant backscattering of light in water based ferrofluid containing polymer covered Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brojabasi, Surajit; Philip, John

    2013-02-01

    We probe the effect of applied magnetic field on the backscattering light intensity from a magnetic nanofluid consisting of poly-acrylic acid coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles of diameter, ˜15 nm dispersed in water. We observe a continuous evolution of backscattered speckle pattern as a function of magnetic field strength. The speckle contrast is found to increase linearly with external magnetic field possibly due to the evolution from highly dynamic to static scatterers in the dispersion. The backscattered light intensity is found to diminish with external magnetic field, which is attributed to the delay of light propagation for the formation of standing waves within the scatterer due to the resonances in backscattered efficiency and forward-backward anisotropy factor. Interestingly, the backscattered light intensity completely recovers when magnetic field is switched off. We discuss the possible reasons for the angular variation of backscattered light intensity. Our results suggest that the field dependent light propagation through the magnetic nanofluid may find interesting applications in tunable light controlling devices.

  6. Polarization of near-field light induced with a plasmonic nanoantenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharintsev, Sergey S.; Fishman, Alexander I.; Kazarian, Sergei G.; Salakhov, Myakzyum Kh.

    2015-09-01

    Evaluation and control of a polarization state of optical near fields are of tremendous advantage for locally probing intrinsic molecular orientations of highly anisotropic molecules with a plasmonic (metallic) nanoantenna. In this paper, we report on a physical mechanism of reading a dipole orientation at the apex of a rough cone-shaped gold tip illuminated with radially and azimuthally polarized light. In-plane and out-of-plane arrangement of nonlinear optical chromophores embedded into a glassy polymer is probed with tip-enhanced Raman scattering.

  7. Deep-ultraviolet-light-driven reversible doping of WS2 field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Shehzad, Muhammad Arslan; Seo, Yongho; Eom, Jonghwa

    2014-12-01

    Improvement of the electrical and photoelectric characteristics is essential to achieve an advanced performance of field-effect transistors and optoelectronic devices. Here we have developed a doping technique to drastically improve electrical and photoelectric characteristics of single-layered, bi-layered and multi-layered WS2 field-effect transistors (FET). After illuminating with deep ultraviolet (DUV) light in a nitrogen environment, WS2 FET shows an enhanced charge carrier density, mobility and photocurrent response. The threshold voltage of WS2 FET shifted toward the negative gate voltage, and the positions of E12g and A1g peaks in Raman spectra shifted toward lower wavenumbers, indicating the n-type doping effect of the WS2 FET. The doping effect is reversible. The pristine characteristics of WS2 FET can be restored by DUV light illumination in an oxygen environment. The DUV-driven doping technique in a gas environment provides a very stable, effective, easily applicable way to enhance the performance of WS2 FET.Improvement of the electrical and photoelectric characteristics is essential to achieve an advanced performance of field-effect transistors and optoelectronic devices. Here we have developed a doping technique to drastically improve electrical and photoelectric characteristics of single-layered, bi-layered and multi-layered WS2 field-effect transistors (FET). After illuminating with deep ultraviolet (DUV) light in a nitrogen environment, WS2 FET shows an enhanced charge carrier density, mobility and photocurrent response. The threshold voltage of WS2 FET shifted toward the negative gate voltage, and the positions of E12g and A1g peaks in Raman spectra shifted toward lower wavenumbers, indicating the n-type doping effect of the WS2 FET. The doping effect is reversible. The pristine characteristics of WS2 FET can be restored by DUV light illumination in an oxygen environment. The DUV-driven doping technique in a gas environment provides a very stable

  8. Light quasiparticles dominate electronic transport in molecular crystal field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. Q.; Podzorov, V.; Sai, N.; Martin, Michael C.; Gershenson, M. E.; Di Ventra, M.; Basov, D. N.

    2007-03-01

    We report on an infrared spectroscopy study of mobile holes in the accumulation layer of organic field-effect transistors based on rubrene single crystals. Our data indicate that both transport and infrared properties of these transistors at room temperature are governed by light quasiparticles in molecular orbital bands with the effective masses m[small star, filled]comparable to free electron mass. Furthermore, the m[small star, filled]values inferred from our experiments are in agreement with those determined from band structure calculations. These findings reveal no evidence for prominent polaronic effects, which is at variance with the common beliefs of polaron formation in molecular solids.

  9. Light and electric field control of ferromagnetism in magnetic quantum structures.

    PubMed

    Boukari, H; Kossacki, P; Bertolini, M; Ferrand, D; Cibert, J; Tatarenko, S; Wasiela, A; Gaj, J A; Dietl, T

    2002-05-20

    A strong influence of illumination and electric bias on the Curie temperature and saturation value of the magnetization is demonstrated for semiconductor structures containing a modulation-doped p-type Cd(0.96)Mn(0.04)Te quantum well placed in various built-in electric fields. It is shown that both light beam and bias voltage generate an isothermal and reversible crossover between the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic phases, in the way that is predetermined by the structure design. The observed behavior is in quantitative agreement with the expectations for systems, in which ferromagnetic interactions are mediated by the weakly disordered two-dimensional hole liquid.

  10. Microlens assembly error analysis for light field camera based on Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sai; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Hao-Wei; Liu, Bin; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes numerical analysis of microlens assembly errors in light field cameras using the Monte Carlo method. Assuming that there were no manufacturing errors, home-built program was used to simulate images of coupling distance error, movement error and rotation error that could appear during microlens installation. By researching these images, sub-aperture images and refocus images, we found that the images present different degrees of fuzziness and deformation for different microlens assembly errors, while the subaperture image presents aliasing, obscured images and other distortions that result in unclear refocus images.

  11. Near-field surface plasmon effects on Au-double-slit diffraction for polychromatic light

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The surface plasmon effects on near-field diffraction for polychromatic light are studied. An Au-double-slit is used as the model and Fresnel integral is employed to perform the theoretic analysis. The results are illustrated with numerical examples and they show that, compared with the normal double-slit, the plasmon effect changes the spectral shift from redshift to blueshift and also enhances the intensity peak. This effect can be used in optical data transmission or specific spectral selectors. PMID:25386100

  12. Light quasiparticles dominate electronic transport in molecularcrystal field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.Q.; Podzorov, V.; Sai, N.; Martin, M.C.; Gershenson, M.E.; Di Ventra, M.; Basov, D.N.

    2007-04-30

    We report on an infrared spectroscopy study of mobile holesin the accumulation layer of organic field effect transistors based onrubrene single crystals. Our data indicate that both transport andinfrared properties of these transistors at room temperature are governedby light quasiparticles in molecular orbital bands with the effectivemasses m* comparable to free electron mass. Furthermore, the m* valuesinferred from our experiments are in agreement with those determined fromband structure calculations. These findings reveal no evidence forprominent polaronic effects, which is at variance with the common beliefsof polaron formation in molecular solids.

  13. Ambiguity in running spectral index with an extra light field during inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Matsuda, Tomohiro E-mail: matsuda@sit.ac.jp

    2015-02-01

    At the beginning of inflation there could be extra dynamical scalar fields that will soon disappear (become static) before the end of inflation. In the light of multi-field inflation, those extra degrees of freedom may alter the time-dependence of the original spectrum of the curvature perturbation. It is possible to remove such fields introducing extra number of e-foldings prior to 0N{sub e}∼ 6, however such extra e-foldings may make the trans-Planckian problem worse due to the Lyth bound. We show that such extra scalar fields can change the running of the spectral index to give correction of ± 0.01 without adding significant contribution to the spectral index. The corrections to the spectral index (and the amplitude) could be important in considering global behavior of the corrected spectrum, although they can be neglected in the estimation of the spectrum and its spectral index at the pivot scale. The ambiguity in the running of the spectral index, which could be due to such fields, can be used to nullify tension between BICEP2 and Planck experiments.

  14. 4D Proton treatment planning strategy for mobile lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Yixiu; Zhang Xiaodong; Chang, Joe Y.; Wang He; Wei Xiong; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Balter, Peter A.; Liu, Helen; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei . E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate strategies for designing compensator-based 3D proton treatment plans for mobile lung tumors using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional CT sets for 10 lung cancer patients were used in this study. The internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) was obtained by combining the tumor volumes at different phases of the respiratory cycle. For each patient, we evaluated four planning strategies based on the following dose calculations: (1) the average (AVE) CT; (2) the free-breathing (FB) CT; (3) the maximum intensity projection (MIP) CT; and (4) the AVE CT in which the CT voxel values inside the IGTV were replaced by a constant density (AVE{sub R}IGTV). For each strategy, the resulting cumulative dose distribution in a respiratory cycle was determined using a deformable image registration method. Results: There were dosimetric differences between the apparent dose distribution, calculated on a single CT dataset, and the motion-corrected 4D dose distribution, calculated by combining dose distributions delivered to each phase of the 4DCT. The AVE{sub R}IGTV plan using a 1-cm smearing parameter had the best overall target coverage and critical structure sparing. The MIP plan approach resulted in an unnecessarily large treatment volume. The AVE and FB plans using 1-cm smearing did not provide adequate 4D target coverage in all patients. By using a larger smearing value, adequate 4D target coverage could be achieved; however, critical organ doses were increased. Conclusion: The AVE{sub R}IGTV approach is an effective strategy for designing proton treatment plans for mobile lung tumors.

  15. CMT4D (NDRG1 mutation): genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Emilie; Mathis, Stéphane; Magdelaine, Corinne; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Magy, Laurent; Funalot, Benoît; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2013-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a heterogeneous condition with a large number of clinical, electrophysiological and pathological phenotypes. More than 40 genes are involved. We report a child of gypsy origin with an autosomal recessive demyelinating phenotype. Clinical data, familial history, and electrophysiological studies were in favor of a CMT4 sub-type. The characteristic N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) mutation responsible for this CMT4D phenotype was confirmed: p.R148X. The exact molecular function of the NDRG1 protein has yet to be elucidated.

  16. Oblique sounding using the DPS-4D stations in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosna, Zbysek; Kouba, Daniel; Koucka Knizova, Petra; Arikan, Feza; Arikan, Orhan; Gok, Gokhan; Rejfek, Lubos

    2016-07-01

    The DPS-4D Digisondes are capable of detection of echoes from neighbouring European stations. Currently, a campaign with high-temporal resolution of 5 min is being run. Further, ionograms from regular vertical sounding with 15 min resolution provide us with oblique reflections together with vertical reflections. We analyzed profiles of electron concentration and basic ionospheric parameters derived from the ionograms. We compared results derived from reflections from the ionosphere above the stations (vertical sounding) with information derived from oblique reflections between the stations. This study is supported by the Joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR 14/001 projects.

  17. Lagrangian constraints and renormalization of 4D gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, I. Y.

    2015-04-01

    It has been proposed in [21] that 4D Einstein gravity becomes effectively reduced to 3D after solving the Lagrangian analogues of the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints of the Hamiltonian quantization. The analysis in [21] was carried out at the classical/operator level. We review the proposal and make a transition to the path integral account. We then set the stage for explicitly carrying out the two-loop renormalization procedure of the resulting 3D action. We also address a potentially subtle issue in the gravity context concerning whether renormalizability does not depend on the background around which the original action is expanded.

  18. Actively triggered 4d cone-beam CT acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Martin F.; Wisotzky, Eric; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: 4d cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are usually reconstructed by extracting the motion information from the 2d projections or an external surrogate signal, and binning the individual projections into multiple respiratory phases. In this “after-the-fact” binning approach, however, projections are unevenly distributed over respiratory phases resulting in inefficient utilization of imaging dose. To avoid excess dose in certain respiratory phases, and poor image quality due to a lack of projections in others, the authors have developed a novel 4d CBCT acquisition framework which actively triggers 2d projections based on the forward-predicted position of the tumor.Methods: The forward-prediction of the tumor position was independently established using either (i) an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system based on implanted EM-transponders which act as a surrogate for the tumor position, or (ii) an external motion sensor measuring the chest-wall displacement and correlating this external motion to the phase-shifted diaphragm motion derived from the acquired images. In order to avoid EM-induced artifacts in the imaging detector, the authors devised a simple but effective “Faraday” shielding cage. The authors demonstrated the feasibility of their acquisition strategy by scanning an anthropomorphic lung phantom moving on 1d or 2d sinusoidal trajectories.Results: With both tumor position devices, the authors were able to acquire 4d CBCTs free of motion blurring. For scans based on the EM tracking system, reconstruction artifacts stemming from the presence of the EM-array and the EM-transponders were greatly reduced using newly developed correction algorithms. By tuning the imaging frequency independently for each respiratory phase prior to acquisition, it was possible to harmonize the number of projections over respiratory phases. Depending on the breathing period (3.5 or 5 s) and the gantry rotation time (4 or 5 min), between ∼90 and 145

  19. 4D dynamic imaging of the eye using ultrahigh speed SS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jonathan J.; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Cable, Alex E.; Kraus, Martin F.; Hornegger, Joachim; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in swept-source / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) technology enable in vivo ultrahigh speed imaging, offering a promising technique for four-dimensional (4-D) imaging of the eye. Using an ultrahigh speed tunable vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) light source based SS-OCT prototype system, we performed imaging of human eye dynamics in four different imaging modes: 1) Pupillary reaction to light at 200,000 axial scans per second and 9 μm resolution in tissue. 2) Anterior eye focusing dynamics at 100,000 axial scans per second and 9 μm resolution in tissue. 3) Tear film break up at 50,000 axial scans per second and 19 μm resolution in tissue. 4) Retinal blood flow at 800,000 axial scans per second and 12 μm resolution in tissue. The combination of tunable ultrahigh speeds and long coherence length of the VCSEL along with the outstanding roll-off performance of SS-OCT makes this technology an ideal tool for time-resolved volumetric imaging of the eye. Visualization and quantitative analysis of 4-D OCT data can potentially provide insight to functional and structural changes in the eye during disease progression. Ultrahigh speed imaging using SS-OCT promises to enable novel 4-D visualization of realtime dynamic processes of the human eye. Furthermore, this non-invasive imaging technology is a promising tool for research to characterize and understand a variety of visual functions.

  20. Insight into the mode of action of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) as an herbicide.

    PubMed

    Song, Yaling

    2014-02-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was the first synthetic herbicide to be commercially developed and has commonly been used as a broadleaf herbicide for over 60 years. It is a selective herbicide that kills dicots without affecting monocots and mimics natural auxin at the molecular level. Physiological responses of dicots sensitive to auxinic herbicides include abnormal growth, senescence, and plant death. The identification of auxin receptors, auxin transport carriers, transcription factors response to auxin, and cross-talk among phytohormones have shed light on the molecular action mode of 2,4-D as a herbicide. Here, the molecular action mode of 2,4-D is highlighted according to the latest findings, emphasizing the physiological process, perception, and signal transduction under herbicide treatment.

  1. Magnetic-Field-Induced Rotation of Polarized Light Emission from Monolayer WS_{2}.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert; Arora, Ashish; Plechinger, Gerd; Nagler, Philipp; Granados Del Águila, Andrés; Ballottin, Mariana V; Christianen, Peter C M; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, Steffen; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias; Bratschitsch, Rudolf

    2016-08-12

    We control the linear polarization of emission from the coherently emitting K^{+} and K^{-} valleys (valley coherence) in monolayer WS_{2} with an out-of-plane magnetic field of up to 25 T. The magnetic-field-induced valley Zeeman splitting causes a rotation of the emission polarization with respect to the excitation by up to 35° and reduces the polarization degree by up to 16%. We explain both of these phenomena with a model based on two noninteracting coherent two-level systems. We deduce that the coherent light emission from the valleys decays with a time constant of τ_{c}=260  fs. PMID:27563997

  2. Generation of entangled macroscopic light fields with a coupled gain-loss waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashahri-Ghamsari, Saeid; He, Bing; Xiao, Min

    2016-05-01

    We explore a Parity-Time (PT)-symmetric optical system of two coupled single-mode waveguides. One of the waveguides contains a gain medium, while the second one is with a loss medium. The magnitude of the gain can be adjusted to be equal to that of the loss, so that the PT-symmetric condition will be achieved. Moreover, we add a squeezing element to one of the waveguides. The squeezing can be generated in a parametric down conversion process. Moreover, we have included both amplifying and decaying noises in the process. It is shown that the squeezing intensifies the noise-induced photon emission and leads to the entanglement of the output light fields. Under certain conditions, the noises tend to eliminate the entanglement. If the input beam is strong, the entanglement due to the squeezing can become strong enough to overcome the noise effects, resulting in macroscopic entangled output fields.

  3. Ab-Initio Hamiltonian Approach to Light Nuclei And to Quantum Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J.P.; Honkanen, H.; Li, Jun; Maris, P.; Shirokov, A.M.; Brodsky, S.J.; Harindranath, A.; de Teramond, G.F.; Ng, E.G.; Yang, C.; Sosonkina, M.; /Ames Lab

    2012-06-22

    Nuclear structure physics is on the threshold of confronting several long-standing problems such as the origin of shell structure from basic nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon interactions. At the same time those interactions are being developed with increasing contact to QCD, the underlying theory of the strong interactions, using effective field theory. The motivation is clear - QCD offers the promise of great predictive power spanning phenomena on multiple scales from quarks and gluons to nuclear structure. However, new tools that involve non-perturbative methods are required to build bridges from one scale to the next. We present an overview of recent theoretical and computational progress with a Hamiltonian approach to build these bridges and provide illustrative results for the nuclear structure of light nuclei and quantum field theory.

  4. Modeling of coherent ultrafast magneto-optical experiments: Light-induced molecular mean-field model

    SciTech Connect

    Hinschberger, Y.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2015-12-28

    We present calculations which aim to describe coherent ultrafast magneto-optical effects observed in time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Our approach is based on a nonlinear semi-classical Drude-Voigt model and is used to interpret experiments performed on nickel ferromagnetic thin film. Within this framework, a phenomenological light-induced coherent molecular mean-field depending on the polarizations of the pump and probe pulses is proposed whose microscopic origin is related to a spin-orbit coupling involving the electron spins of the material sample and the electric field of the laser pulses. Theoretical predictions are compared to available experimental data. The model successfully reproduces the observed experimental trends and gives meaningful insight into the understanding of magneto-optical rotation behavior in the ultrafast regime. Theoretical predictions for further experimental studies are also proposed.

  5. Vacuum and magnetic field constraints in a H -/light ion synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arduini, G.; Martin, R. L.; Rossi, S.; Silari, M.

    1994-08-01

    Acceleration of H - ions in a synchrotron imposes severe restrictions on the level of residual pressure in the vacuum chamber and the maximum magnetic field in the magnets of the ring. Significant vacuum requirements are also imposed by the acceleration of ions. This paper discusses these two aspects of the design of a combined H -/light ion synchrotron for radiation therapy. The fractional loss of the accelerated beam induced by the two processes is evaluated on the basis of a general treatment of the physics of these phenomena. The values of the vacuum and magnetic field necessary for normal operation of the machine are specified and a discussion is given of the behaviour of the above quantities as a function of several parameters such as beam energy, composition and pressure of the residual gas in the vacuum chamber and beam extraction time.

  6. The structure of the white-light corona and the large-scale solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sime, D. G.; Mccabe, M. K.

    1990-01-01

    The large-scale density structure of the white-light solar corona is compared to the organization of the solar magnetic field as identified by the appearance of neutral lines in the photosphere to examine whether any consistent relationship exists between the two. During the period covering Carrington rotations 1717 to 1736 brightness enhancements in the low corona tend to lie over the global neutral sheet identified in the photospheric magnetic field. The brightest of these enhancements are associated with neutral lines throguh active regions. These associations are not 1-1, but do hold both in stable and evolving conditions of the corona. A significant number of long-lived neutral lines is found, including filaments seen in H-alpha, for which there are not coronal enhancements.

  7. Pauli-Villars regularization of field theories on the light front

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, John R.

    2010-12-22

    Four-dimensional quantum field theories generally require regularization to be well defined. This can be done in various ways, but here we focus on Pauli-Villars (PV) regularization and apply it to nonperturbative calculations of bound states. The philosophy is to introduce enough PV fields to the Lagrangian to regulate the theory perturbatively, including preservation of symmetries, and assume that this is sufficient for the nonperturbative case. The numerical methods usually necessary for nonperturbative bound-state problems are then applied to a finite theory that has the original symmetries. The bound-state problem is formulated as a mass eigenvalue problem in terms of the light-front Hamiltonian. Applications to quantum electrodynamics are discussed.

  8. Natural and Induced Fracture Diagnostics from 4-D VSP Low Permeability Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mark E. Willis; Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2008-09-30

    Tight gas sand reservoirs generally contain thick gas-charged intervals that often have low porosity and very low permeability. Natural and induced fractures provide the only means of production. The objective of this work is to locate and characterize natural and induced fractures from analysis of scattered waves recorded on 4-D (time lapse) VSP data in order to optimize well placement and well spacing in these gas reservoirs. Using model data simulating the scattering of seismic energy from hydraulic fractures, we first show that it is possible to characterize the quality of fracturing based upon the amount of scattering. In addition, the picked arrival times of recorded microseismic events provide the velocity moveout for isolating the scattered energy on the 4-D VSP data. This concept is applied to a field dataset from the Jonah Field in Wyoming to characterize the quality of the induced hydraulic fractures. The time lapse (4D) VSP data from this field are imaged using a migration algorithm that utilizes shot travel time tables derived from the first breaks of the 3D VSPs and receiver travel time tables based on the microseismic arrival times and a regional velocity model. Four azimuthally varying shot tables are derived from picks of the first breaks of over 200 VSP records. We create images of the fracture planes through two of the hydraulically fractured wells in the field. The scattered energy shows correlation with the locations of the microseismic events. In addition, the azimuthal scattering is different from the azimuthal reflectivity of the reservoir, giving us more confidence that we have separated the scattered signal from simple formation reflectivity. Variation of the scattered energy along the image planes suggests variability in the quality of the fractures in three distinct zones.

  9. Registration based super-resolution reconstruction for lung 4D-CT.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Xiao, Shan; Zhang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Lung 4D-CT plays an important role in lung cancer radiotherapy for tumor localization and treatment planning. In lung 4D-CT data, the resolution in the slice direction is often much lower than the in-plane resolution. For multi-plane display, isotropic resolution is necessary, but the commonly used interpolation operation will blur the images. In this paper, we present a registration based method for super resolution enhancement of the 4D-CT multi-plane images. Our working premise is that the low-resolution images of different phases at the corresponding position can be regarded as input "frames" to reconstruct high resolution images. First, we employ the Demons registration algorithm to estimate the motion field between different "frames". Then, the projections onto convex sets (POCS) approach is employed to reconstruction high-resolution lung images. We show that our method can get clearer lung images and enhance image structure, compared with the cubic spline interpolation and back projection method. PMID:25570484

  10. Registration based super-resolution reconstruction for lung 4D-CT.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Xiao, Shan; Zhang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Lung 4D-CT plays an important role in lung cancer radiotherapy for tumor localization and treatment planning. In lung 4D-CT data, the resolution in the slice direction is often much lower than the in-plane resolution. For multi-plane display, isotropic resolution is necessary, but the commonly used interpolation operation will blur the images. In this paper, we present a registration based method for super resolution enhancement of the 4D-CT multi-plane images. Our working premise is that the low-resolution images of different phases at the corresponding position can be regarded as input "frames" to reconstruct high resolution images. First, we employ the Demons registration algorithm to estimate the motion field between different "frames". Then, the projections onto convex sets (POCS) approach is employed to reconstruction high-resolution lung images. We show that our method can get clearer lung images and enhance image structure, compared with the cubic spline interpolation and back projection method.

  11. 4D CT amplitude binning for the generation of a time-averaged 3D mid-position CT scan.

    PubMed

    Kruis, Matthijs F; van de Kamer, Jeroen B; Belderbos, José S A; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; van Herk, Marcel

    2014-09-21

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to use amplitude binned 4D-CT (A-4D-CT) data for the construction of mid-position CT data and to compare the results with data created from phase-binned 4D-CT (P-4D-CT) data. For the latter purpose we have developed two measures which describe the regularity of the 4D data and we have tried to correlate these measures with the regularity of the external respiration signal. 4D-CT data was acquired for 27 patients on a combined PET-CT scanner. The 4D data were reconstructed twice, using phase and amplitude binning. The 4D frames of each dataset were registered using a quadrature-based optical flow method. After registration the deformation vector field was repositioned to the mid-position. Since amplitude-binned 4D data does not provide temporal information, we corrected the mid-position for the occupancy of the bins. We quantified the differences between the two mid-position datasets in terms of tumour offset and amplitude differences. Furthermore, we measured the standard deviation of the image intensity over the respiration after registration (σregistration) and the regularity of the deformation vector field (Delta J) to quantify the quality of the 4D-CT data. These measures were correlated to the regularity of the external respiration signal (σsignal).The two irregularity measures, Delta J and σregistration, were dependent on each other (p<0.0001, R2=0.80 for P-4D-CT, R2=0.74 for A-4D-CT). For all datasets amplitude binning resulted in lower Delta J and σregistration and large decreases led to visible quality improvements in the mid-position data. The quantity of artefact decrease was correlated to the irregularity of the external respiratory signal.The average tumour offset between the phase and amplitude binned mid-position without occupancy correction was 0.42 mm in the caudal direction (10.6% of the amplitude). After correction this was reduced to 0.16 mm in caudal direction (4.1% of the amplitude

  12. Accurate measurement of interferometer group delay using field-compensated scanning white light interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoke; Wang, Ji; Ge, Jian

    2010-10-10

    Interferometers are key elements in radial velocity (RV) experiments in astronomy observations, and accurate calibration of the group delay of an interferometer is required for high precision measurements. A novel field-compensated white light scanning Michelson interferometer is introduced as an interferometer calibration tool. The optical path difference (OPD) scanning was achieved by translating a compensation prism, such that even if the light source were in low spatial coherence, the interference stays spatially phase coherent over a large interferometer scanning range. In the wavelength region of 500-560 nm, a multimode fiber-coupled LED was used as the light source, and high optical efficiency was essential in elevating the signal-to-noise ratio of the interferogram signal. The achromatic OPD scanning required a one-time calibration, and two methods using dual-laser wavelength references and an iodine absorption spectrum reference were employed and cross-verified. In an experiment measuring the group delay of a fixed Michelson interferometer, Fourier analysis was employed to process the interferogram data. The group delay was determined at an accuracy of 1×10(-5), and the phase angle precision was typically 2.5×10(-6) over the wide wavelength region.

  13. Synthetic White-light Imagery for the Wide-field Imager for Solar Probe Plus (WISPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liewer, P. C.; Thernisien, A. F.; Vourlidas, A.; Howard, R.; DeForest, C. E.; DeJong, E.; Desai, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar Probe Plus trajectory, approaching within 10 solar radii, will enable the white light imager, WISPR, to fly through corona features now only imaged remotely. The dependency of the Thomson scattering on the imaging geometry (distance and angle from the Sun) dictates that the outer WISPR telescope will be sensitive to the emission from plasma close to the spacecraft, in contrast to the situation for imaging from Earth orbit. Thus WISPR will be the first 'local' imager providing a crucial link between the large-scale corona and SPP's in-situ measurements. The high speed at perihelion will provide tomographic-like views of coronal structures at ≤1° resolution. As SPP approaches perihelion, WISPR, with a 95° radial by 58° transverse field of view, will resolve the fine-scale structure with high spatial resolution. To prepare for this unprecedented viewing of the structure of the inner corona, we are creating synthetic white light images and animations from the WISPR viewpoint using the white-light ray-tracing package developed at NRL (available through SolarSoft). We will present simulated observations of multi-strand models of coronal streamers and flux ropes of various size and make comparisons with views from Earth, Solar Orbiter and SPP. Analysis techniques for WISPR images will also be discussed.

  14. TESTING MICROVARIABILITY IN QUASAR DIFFERENTIAL LIGHT CURVES USING SEVERAL FIELD STARS

    SciTech Connect

    De Diego, José A.; De Leo, Mario A.; Verdugo, Tomás; Polednikova, Jana; Bongiovanni, Angel; Pérez García, Ana M.; Cepa, Jordi

    2015-08-15

    Microvariability consists of small timescale variations of low amplitude in the photometric light curves of quasars and represents an important tool to investigate their inner core. Detection of quasar microvariations is challenging because of their non-periodicity, as well as the need for high monitoring frequency and a high signal-to-noise ratio. Statistical tests developed for the analysis of quasar differential light curves usually show either low power or low reliability, or both. In this paper we compare two statistical procedures to perform tests on several stars with enhanced power and high reliability. We perform light curve simulations of variable quasars and non-variable stars and analyze them with statistical procedures developed from the F-test and the analysis of variance. The results show a large improvement in the power of both statistical probes and a larger reliability when several stars are included in the analysis. The results from the simulations agree with those obtained from observations of real quasars. The high power and high reliability of the tests discussed in this paper improve the results that can be obtained from short and long timescale variability studies. These techniques are not limited to quasar variability; on the contrary, they can be easily implemented for other sources, such as variable stars. Their applications to future research and to the analysis of large-field photometric monitoring archives could reveal new variable sources.

  15. Testing Microvariability in Quasar Differential Light Curves Using Several Field Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Diego, José A.; Polednikova, Jana; Bongiovanni, Angel; Pérez García, Ana M.; De Leo, Mario A.; Verdugo, Tomás; Cepa, Jordi

    2015-08-01

    Microvariability consists of small timescale variations of low amplitude in the photometric light curves of quasars and represents an important tool to investigate their inner core. Detection of quasar microvariations is challenging because of their non-periodicity, as well as the need for high monitoring frequency and a high signal-to-noise ratio. Statistical tests developed for the analysis of quasar differential light curves usually show either low power or low reliability, or both. In this paper we compare two statistical procedures to perform tests on several stars with enhanced power and high reliability. We perform light curve simulations of variable quasars and non-variable stars and analyze them with statistical procedures developed from the F-test and the analysis of variance. The results show a large improvement in the power of both statistical probes and a larger reliability when several stars are included in the analysis. The results from the simulations agree with those obtained from observations of real quasars. The high power and high reliability of the tests discussed in this paper improve the results that can be obtained from short and long timescale variability studies. These techniques are not limited to quasar variability; on the contrary, they can be easily implemented for other sources, such as variable stars. Their applications to future research and to the analysis of large-field photometric monitoring archives could reveal new variable sources.

  16. Hamiltonian light-front field theory in a basis function approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J. P.; Honkanen, H.; Li Jun; Maris, P.; Brodsky, S. J.; Harindranath, A.; Sternberg, P.; Ng, E. G.; Yang, C.

    2010-03-15

    Hamiltonian light-front quantum field theory constitutes a framework for the nonperturbative solution of invariant masses and correlated parton amplitudes of self-bound systems. By choosing the light-front gauge and adopting a basis function representation, a large, sparse, Hamiltonian matrix for mass eigenstates of gauge theories is obtained that is solvable by adapting the ab initio no-core methods of nuclear many-body theory. Full covariance is recovered in the continuum limit, the infinite matrix limit. There is considerable freedom in the choice of the orthonormal and complete set of basis functions with convenience and convergence rates providing key considerations. Here we use a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator basis for transverse modes that corresponds with eigensolutions of the soft-wall anti-de Sitter/quantum chromodynamics (AdS/QCD) model obtained from light-front holography. We outline our approach and present illustrative features of some noninteracting systems in a cavity. We illustrate the first steps toward solving quantum electrodynamics (QED) by obtaining the mass eigenstates of an electron in a cavity in small basis spaces and discuss the computational challenges.

  17. Verification of light & radiation field coincidence quality assurance for radiation therapy by using a-Se based DR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Young; Park, Eun-Tae; Choi, Yun-Seon; Cho, Heung-Lae; Ahn, Ki-Jung; Park, Sung-Kwang; Kim, Ji-Na; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Jin-Seon; Hong, Ju-Yeon; Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Kyo-Tae; Oh, Kyung-Min; Kim, Hyunjung; Jo, Sun-Mi; Oh, Won-Yong; Jin, Seong-Jin; Cho, Woong

    2015-04-01

    Currently, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) recommends measuring the surface field size once a week by using an analog film in order to verify light and radiation field coincidence in the Quality Assurance (QA) of radiotherapy. However, the use of the film does not allow for a quantitative method of evaluation, and measuring the light field with radiation field detectors in a 2D array is difficult. Therefore, we used an amorphous-Se (a-Se) digital radiation detection system to measure the light and radiation fields simultaneously for a quantitative QA system, and the feasibility of using such a system was confirmed by ensuring the coincidence of the light and the radiation field measurements. The characteristics of the analog film and the a-Se digital radiation detection system were compared by delivering to each doses of 100, 10 monitor units(MU) of radiation at a rate of 400 MU/min to a radiation field 100 × 100 mm2 in size from a 100 cm source-surface distance (SSD). A 0.5 mm to 0.6 mm difference was measured in the X-axis, and a 0.3 mm difference was measured in the Y-axis. The difference in the measurements of the coincidence of light and the radiation field was less than 0.3 mm, which is relatively insignificant. These results indicate that the use of an a-Se digital radiation detection system is adequate for quality assurance of radiotherapy using light and radiation field coincidence. In addition, the experiment is considered to have provided valuable results in that the a-Se based digital radiation detection system enables simple and accurate QA for clinical radiation therapy by assessing the coincidence in the alignment of the light and the radiation fields.

  18. Spectral, noise and correlation properties of intense squeezed light generated by a coupling in two laser fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kryuchkyan, Gagik YU.; Kheruntsyan, Karen V.

    1994-01-01

    Two schemes of four-wave mixing oscillators with nondegenerate pumps are proposed for above-threehold generation of squeezed light with nonzero mean-field amplitudes. Noise and correlation properties and optical spectra of squeezed-light beams generated in these schemes are discussed.

  19. Functional organization of the human 4D Nucleome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiming; Chen, Jie; Muir, Lindsey A.; Ronquist, Scott; Meixner, Walter; Ljungman, Mats; Ried, Thomas; Smale, Stephen; Rajapakse, Indika

    2015-01-01

    The 4D organization of the interphase nucleus, or the 4D Nucleome (4DN), reflects a dynamical interaction between 3D genome structure and function and its relationship to phenotype. We present initial analyses of the human 4DN, capturing genome-wide structure using chromosome conformation capture and 3D imaging, and function using RNA-sequencing. We introduce a quantitative index that measures underlying topological stability of a genomic region. Our results show that structural features of genomic regions correlate with function with surprising persistence over time. Furthermore, constructing genome-wide gene-level contact maps aided in identifying gene pairs with high potential for coregulation and colocalization in a manner consistent with expression via transcription factories. We additionally use 2D phase planes to visualize patterns in 4DN data. Finally, we evaluated gene pairs within a circadian gene module using 3D imaging, and found periodicity in the movement of clock circadian regulator and period circadian clock 2 relative to each other that followed a circadian rhythm and entrained with their expression. PMID:26080430

  20. Atlas construction for dynamic (4D) PET using diffeomorphic transformations.

    PubMed

    Bieth, Marie; Lombaert, Hervé; Reader, Andrew J; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2013-01-01

    A novel dynamic (4D) PET to PET image registration procedure is proposed and applied to multiple PET scans acquired with the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT), the highest resolution human brain PET scanner available in the world. By extending the recent diffeomorphic log-demons (DLD) method and applying it to multiple dynamic [11C]raclopride scans from the HRRT, an important step towards construction of a PET atlas of unprecedented quality for [11C]raclopride imaging of the human brain has been achieved. Accounting for the temporal dimension in PET data improves registration accuracy when compared to registration of 3D to 3D time-averaged PET images. The DLD approach was chosen for its ease in providing both an intensity and shape template, through iterative sequential pair-wise registrations with fast convergence. The proposed method is applicable to any PET radiotracer, providing 4D atlases with useful applications in high accuracy PET data simulations and automated PET image analysis. PMID:24579121

  1. 488-4D ASH LANDFILL CLOSURE CAP HELP MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.

    2014-11-17

    At the request of Area Completion Projects (ACP) in support of the 488-4D Landfill closure, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) modeling of the planned 488-4D Ash Landfill closure cap to ensure that the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) limit of no more than 12 inches of head on top of the barrier layer (saturated hydraulic conductivity of no more than 1.0E-05 cm/s) in association with a 25-year, 24-hour storm event is not projected to be exceeded. Based upon Weber 1998 a 25-year, 24-hour storm event at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is 6.1 inches. The results of the HELP modeling indicate that the greatest peak daily head on top of the barrier layer (i.e. geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) or high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane) for any of the runs made was 0.079 inches associated with a peak daily precipitation of 6.16 inches. This is well below the SCDHEC limit of 12 inches.

  2. 4D Dynamic Required Navigation Performance Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkelsztein, Daniel M.; Sturdy, James L.; Alaverdi, Omeed; Hochwarth, Joachim K.

    2011-01-01

    New advanced four dimensional trajectory (4DT) procedures under consideration for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) require an aircraft to precisely navigate relative to a moving reference such as another aircraft. Examples are Self-Separation for enroute operations and Interval Management for in-trail and merging operations. The current construct of Required Navigation Performance (RNP), defined for fixed-reference-frame navigation, is not sufficiently specified to be applicable to defining performance levels of such air-to-air procedures. An extension of RNP to air-to-air navigation would enable these advanced procedures to be implemented with a specified level of performance. The objective of this research effort was to propose new 4D Dynamic RNP constructs that account for the dynamic spatial and temporal nature of Interval Management and Self-Separation, develop mathematical models of the Dynamic RNP constructs, "Required Self-Separation Performance" and "Required Interval Management Performance," and to analyze the performance characteristics of these air-to-air procedures using the newly developed models. This final report summarizes the activities led by Raytheon, in collaboration with GE Aviation and SAIC, and presents the results from this research effort to expand the RNP concept to a dynamic 4D frame of reference.

  3. Complete valvular heart apparatus model from 4D cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Grbic, Sasa; Ionasec, Razvan; Vitanovski, Dime; Voigt, Ingmar; Wang, Yang; Georgescu, Bogdan; Navab, Nassir; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-07-01

    The cardiac valvular apparatus, composed of the aortic, mitral, pulmonary and tricuspid valves, is an essential part of the anatomical, functional and hemodynamic characteristics of the heart and the cardiovascular system as a whole. Valvular heart diseases often involve multiple dysfunctions and require joint assessment and therapy of the valves. In this paper, we propose a complete and modular patient-specific model of the cardiac valvular apparatus estimated from 4D cardiac CT data. A new constrained Multi-linear Shape Model (cMSM), conditioned by anatomical measurements, is introduced to represent the complex spatio-temporal variation of the heart valves. The cMSM is exploited within a learning-based framework to efficiently estimate the patient-specific valve parameters from cine images. Experiments on 64 4D cardiac CT studies demonstrate the performance and clinical potential of the proposed method. Our method enables automatic quantitative evaluation of the complete valvular apparatus based on non-invasive imaging techniques. In conjunction with existent patient-specific chamber models, the presented valvular model enables personalized computation modeling and realistic simulation of the entire cardiac system.

  4. Near-field Light Scattering Techniques for Measuring Nanoparticle-Surface Interaction Energies and Forces

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Dakota; Adam, Ian S.; DiPaolo, Brian; Sabharwal, Manit; Shi, Ce; Hart, Robert; Earhart, Christopher; Erickson, David

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are quickly becoming commonplace in many commercial and industrial products, ranging from cosmetics to pharmaceuticals to medical diagnostics. Predicting the stability of the engineered nanoparticles within these products a priori remains an important and difficult challenge. Here we describe our techniques for measuring the mechanical interactions between nanoparticles and surfaces using near-field light scattering. Particle-surface interfacial forces are measured by optically “pushing” a particle against a reference surface and observing its motion using scattered near-field light. Unlike atomic force microscopy, this technique is not limited by thermal noise, but instead takes advantage of it. The integrated waveguide and microfluidic architecture allow for high-throughput measurements of about 1000 particles per hour. We characterize the reproducibility of and experimental uncertainty in the measurements made using the NanoTweezer surface instrument. We report surface interaction studies on gold nanoparticles with 50 nm diameters, smaller than previously reported in the literature using similar techniques. PMID:26855473

  5. Analysis of optically variable devices using a photometric light-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Daniel; Å tolc, Svorad; Huber-Mörk, Reinhold

    2015-03-01

    Diffractive Optically Variable Image Devices (DOVIDs), sometimes loosely referred to as holograms, are popular security features for protecting banknotes, ID cards, or other security documents. Inspection, authentication, as well as forensic analysis of these security features are still demanding tasks requiring special hardware tools and expert knowledge. Existing equipment for such analyses is based either on a microscopic analysis of the grating structure or a point-wise projection and recording of the diffraction patterns. We investigated approaches for an examination of DOVID security features based on sampling the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of DOVIDs using photometric stereo- and light-field-based methods. Our approach is demonstrated on the practical task of automated discrimination between genuine and counterfeited DOVIDs on banknotes. For this purpose, we propose a tailored feature descriptor which is robust against several expected sources of inaccuracy but still specific enough for the given task. The suggested approach is analyzed from both theoretical as well as practical viewpoints and w.r.t. analysis based on photometric stereo and light fields. We show that especially the photometric method provides a reliable and robust tool for revealing DOVID behavior and authenticity.

  6. Deep-ultraviolet-light-driven reversible doping of WS2 field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Shehzad, Muhammad Arslan; Seo, Yongho; Eom, Jonghwa

    2015-01-14

    Improvement of the electrical and photoelectric characteristics is essential to achieve an advanced performance of field-effect transistors and optoelectronic devices. Here we have developed a doping technique to drastically improve electrical and photoelectric characteristics of single-layered, bi-layered and multi-layered WS2 field-effect transistors (FET). After illuminating with deep ultraviolet (DUV) light in a nitrogen environment, WS2 FET shows an enhanced charge carrier density, mobility and photocurrent response. The threshold voltage of WS2 FET shifted toward the negative gate voltage, and the positions of E and A1g peaks in Raman spectra shifted toward lower wavenumbers, indicating the n-type doping effect of the WS2 FET. The doping effect is reversible. The pristine characteristics of WS2 FET can be restored by DUV light illumination in an oxygen environment. The DUV-driven doping technique in a gas environment provides a very stable, effective, easily applicable way to enhance the performance of WS2 FET.

  7. Integration of real-time 3D capture, reconstruction, and light-field display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Pei, Renjing; Liu, Yongchun; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Effective integration of 3D acquisition, reconstruction (modeling) and display technologies into a seamless systems provides augmented experience of visualizing and analyzing real objects and scenes with realistic 3D sensation. Applications can be found in medical imaging, gaming, virtual or augmented reality and hybrid simulations. Although 3D acquisition, reconstruction, and display technologies have gained significant momentum in recent years, there seems a lack of attention on synergistically combining these components into a "end-to-end" 3D visualization system. We designed, built and tested an integrated 3D visualization system that is able to capture in real-time 3D light-field images, perform 3D reconstruction to build 3D model of the objects, and display the 3D model on a large autostereoscopic screen. In this article, we will present our system architecture and component designs, hardware/software implementations, and experimental results. We will elaborate on our recent progress on sparse camera array light-field 3D acquisition, real-time dense 3D reconstruction, and autostereoscopic multi-view 3D display. A prototype is finally presented with test results to illustrate the effectiveness of our proposed integrated 3D visualization system.

  8. A robust procedure for distinctively visualizing zebrafish retinal cell nuclei under bright field light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jinling; Fang, Wei; Zou, Jian; Sun, Ming; Lathrop, Kira; Su, Guanfang; Wei, Xiangyun

    2013-03-01

    To simultaneously visualize individual cell nuclei and tissue morphologies of the zebrafish retina under bright field light microscopy, it is necessary to establish a procedure that specifically and sensitively stains the cell nuclei in thin tissue sections. This necessity arises from the high nuclear density of the retina and the highly decondensed chromatin of the cone photoreceptors, which significantly reduces their nuclear signals and makes nuclei difficult to distinguish from possible high cytoplasmic background staining. Here we optimized a procedure that integrates JB4 plastic embedding and Feulgen reaction for visualizing zebrafish retinal cell nuclei under bright field light microscopy. This method produced highly specific nuclear staining with minimal cytoplasmic background, allowing us to distinguish individual retinal nuclei despite their tight packaging. The nuclear staining is also sensitive enough to distinguish the euchromatin from heterochromatin in the zebrafish cone nuclei. In addition, this method could be combined with in situ hybridization to simultaneously visualize the cell nuclei and mRNA expression patterns. With its superb specificity and sensitivity, this method may be extended to quantify cell density and analyze global chromatin organization throughout the retina or other tissues.

  9. Parameterized source term in the diffusion approximation for enhanced near-field modeling of collimated light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Mengyu; Wang, Shuang; Chen, Xueying; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan

    2016-03-01

    Most analytical methods for describing light propagation in turbid medium exhibit low effectiveness in the near-field of a collimated source. Motivated by the Charge Simulation Method in electromagnetic theory as well as the established discrete source based modeling, we have reported on an improved explicit model, referred to as "Virtual Source" (VS) diffuse approximation (DA), to inherit the mathematical simplicity of the DA while considerably extend its validity in modeling the near-field photon migration in low-albedo medium. In this model, the collimated light in the standard DA is analogously approximated as multiple isotropic point sources (VS) distributed along the incident direction. For performance enhancement, a fitting procedure between the calculated and realistic reflectances is adopted in the nearfield to optimize the VS parameters (intensities and locations). To be practically applicable, an explicit 2VS-DA model is established based on close-form derivations of the VS parameters for the typical ranges of the optical parameters. The proposed VS-DA model is validated by comparing with the Monte Carlo simulations, and further introduced in the image reconstruction of the Laminar Optical Tomography system.

  10. Deep-ultraviolet-light-driven reversible doping of WS2 field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Shehzad, Muhammad Arslan; Seo, Yongho; Eom, Jonghwa

    2015-01-14

    Improvement of the electrical and photoelectric characteristics is essential to achieve an advanced performance of field-effect transistors and optoelectronic devices. Here we have developed a doping technique to drastically improve electrical and photoelectric characteristics of single-layered, bi-layered and multi-layered WS2 field-effect transistors (FET). After illuminating with deep ultraviolet (DUV) light in a nitrogen environment, WS2 FET shows an enhanced charge carrier density, mobility and photocurrent response. The threshold voltage of WS2 FET shifted toward the negative gate voltage, and the positions of E and A1g peaks in Raman spectra shifted toward lower wavenumbers, indicating the n-type doping effect of the WS2 FET. The doping effect is reversible. The pristine characteristics of WS2 FET can be restored by DUV light illumination in an oxygen environment. The DUV-driven doping technique in a gas environment provides a very stable, effective, easily applicable way to enhance the performance of WS2 FET. PMID:25429443

  11. High temporal and high spatial resolution MR angiography (4D-MRA).

    PubMed

    Hadizadeh, D R; Marx, C; Gieseke, J; Schild, H H; Willinek, W A

    2014-09-01

    In the first decade of the twenty-first century, whole-body magnetic resonance scanners with high field strengths (and thus potentially better signal-to-noise ratios) were developed. At the same time, parallel imaging and "echo-sharing" techniques were refined to allow for increasingly high spatial and temporal resolution in dynamic magnetic resonance angiography ("time-resolved" = TR-MRA). This technological progress facilitated tracking the passage of intra-venously administered contrast agent boluses as well as the acquisition of volume data sets at high image refresh rates ("4D-MRA"). This opened doors for many new applications in non-invasive vascular imaging, including simultaneous anatomic and functional analysis of many vascular pathologies including arterio-venous malformations. Different methods were established to acquire 4D-MRA using various strategies to acquire k-space trajectories over time in order to optimize imaging according to clinical needs. These include "keyhole"-based techniques (e. g. 4D-TRAK), TRICKS - both with and without projection - and HYPR-reconstruction, TREAT, and TWIST. Some of these techniques were first introduced in the 1980 s and 1990 s, were later enhanced and modified, and finally implemented in the products of major vendors. In the last decade, a large number of studies on the clinical applications of TR-MRA was published. This manuscript provides an overview of the development of TR-MRA methods and the 4D-MRA techniques as they are currently used in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of vascular diseases in various parts of the body. PMID:24955647

  12. 4D microscope-integrated OCT improves accuracy of ophthalmic surgical maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Shen, Liangbo; Todorich, Bozho; Shieh, Christine; Kuo, Anthony; Toth, Cynthia; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-03-01

    Ophthalmic surgeons manipulate micron-scale tissues using stereopsis through an operating microscope and instrument shadowing for depth perception. While ophthalmic microsurgery has benefitted from rapid advances in instrumentation and techniques, the basic principles of the stereo operating microscope have not changed since the 1930's. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmic imaging and is now the gold standard for preoperative and postoperative evaluation of most retinal and many corneal procedures. We and others have developed initial microscope-integrated OCT (MIOCT) systems for concurrent OCT and operating microscope imaging, but these are limited to 2D real-time imaging and require offline post-processing for 3D rendering and visualization. Our previously presented 4D MIOCT system can record and display the 3D surgical field stereoscopically through the microscope oculars using a dual-channel heads-up display (HUD) at up to 10 micron-scale volumes per second. In this work, we show that 4D MIOCT guidance improves the accuracy of depth-based microsurgical maneuvers (with statistical significance) in mock surgery trials in a wet lab environment. Additionally, 4D MIOCT was successfully performed in 38/45 (84%) posterior and 14/14 (100%) anterior eye human surgeries, and revealed previously unrecognized lesions that were invisible through the operating microscope. These lesions, such as residual and potentially damaging retinal deformation during pathologic membrane peeling, were visualized in real-time by the surgeon. Our integrated system provides an enhanced 4D surgical visualization platform that can improve current ophthalmic surgical practice and may help develop and refine future microsurgical techniques.

  13. Unintended effects of the herbicides 2,4-D and dicamba on lady beetles.

    PubMed

    Freydier, Laurène; Lundgren, Jonathan G

    2016-08-01

    Weed resistance to glyphosate and development of new GM crops tolerant to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and dicamba is expected to lead to increased use of these herbicides in cropland. The lady beetle, Coleomegilla maculata is an important beneficial insect in cropland that is commonly used as an indicator species in safety evaluations of pesticides. Here, we examined the lethal and non-lethal effects of 2,4-D and dicamba active ingredients and commercial formulations to this lady beetle species, and tested for synergistic effects of the herbicides. Second instars of lady beetles were exposed to an experimental treatment, and their mortality, development, weight, sex ratio, fecundity, and mobility was evaluated. Using similar methods, a dose-response study was conducted on 2,4-D with and without dicamba. The commercial formulation of 2,4-D was highly lethal to lady beetle larvae; the LC90 of this herbicide was 13 % of the label rate. In this case, the "inactive" ingredients were a key driver of the toxicity. Dicamba active ingredient significantly increased lady beetle mortality and reduced their body weight. The commercial formulations of both herbicides reduced the proportion of males in the lady beetle population. The herbicides when used together did not act synergistically in their toxicity toward lady beetles versus when the chemistries were used independently. Our work shows that herbicide formulations can cause both lethal and sublethal effects on non-target, beneficial insects, and these effects are sometimes driven by the "inactive" ingredients. The field-level implications of shifts in weed management practices on insect management programs should receive further attention. PMID:27282375

  14. Analogies between classical scalar wave fields in any state of spatial coherence and some quantum states of light.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Román; Cañas, Gustavo; Vinck-Posada, Herbert

    2012-04-01

    The border between the descriptions of the classical optical fields in any state of spatial coherence and the quantum coherence state of light is revisited in the framework of the phase-space representation. Although it is established that such descriptions are not completely equivalent, the exact calculation of the marginal power spectrum leads to new analogies that suggest that some features exclusively attributed to quantum states of light can be also shared by classical optical fields due to their spatial coherence state.

  15. External magnetic field dependent light transmission and scattered speckle pattern in a magnetically polarizable oil-in-water nanoemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brojabasi, Surajit; Lahiri, B. B.; Philip, John

    2014-12-01

    We study the magnetic field dependent light transmission and scattered speckle pattern in a magnetically polarizable oil-in-water emulsion of droplet diameter ~220 nm, where the direction of propagation of light is parallel to the direction of the external magnetic field. Up to a magnetic field of 50 Gauss, the nanoemulsion remains opaque due to intense Mie scattering. Above 50 Gauss, the transmitted light intensity increases with external magnetic field up to a critical field (BC). Further increase in the magnetic field leads to a reduction in the transmitted intensity. The BC shifts to a lower magnetic field with increasing volume fraction (ϕ) and follows a power law dependence with ϕ, indicating a disorder-order transition. The scattered light intensity at the lobe part is found to increase with external magnetic field. The analysis of the lobe part reveals that the speckle contrast increases with external magnetic field due to the coarsening of the linear chain-like aggregates formed along the direction of the external magnetic field. The angular speckle correlation coefficient is found to be symmetrical on either side of the transmitted bright spot and decays exponentially with measurement angles.

  16. Diffuse Galactic Light in the Field of the Translucent High Galactic Latitude Cloud MBM32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ienaka, N.; Kawara, K.; Matsuoka, Y.; Sameshima, H.; Oyabu, S.; Tsujimoto, T.; Peterson, B. A.

    2013-04-01

    We have conducted B-, g-, V-, and R-band imaging in a 45' × 40' field containing part of the high Galactic latitude translucent cloud MBM32, and correlated the intensity of diffuse optical light S ν(λ) with that of 100 μm emission S ν(100 μm). A χ2 minimum analysis is applied to fit a linear function to the measured correlation and derive the slope parameter b(λ) = ΔS ν(λ)/ΔS ν(100 μm) of the best-fit linear function. Compiling a sample by combining our b(λ) and published ones, we show that the b(λ) strength varies from cloud to cloud by a factor of four. Finding that b(λ) decreases as S ν(100 μm) increases in the sample, we suggest that a nonlinear correlation including a quadratic term of S ν(100 μm)2 should be fitted to the measured correlation. The variation of optical depth, which is AV = 0.16-2.0 in the sample, can change b(λ) by a factor of 2-3. There would be some contribution to the large b(λ) variation from the forward-scattering characteristic of dust grains which is coupled to the non-isotropic interstellar radiation field (ISRF). Models of the scattering of diffuse Galactic light (DGL) underestimate the b(λ) values by a factor of two. This could be reconciled by deficiency in UV photons in the ISRF or by a moderate increase in dust albedo. Our b(λ) spectrum favors a contribution from extended red emission (ERE) to the diffuse optical light; b(λ) rises from B to V faster than the models, seems to peak around 6000 Å and decreases toward long wavelengths. Such a characteristic is expected from the models in which the DGL is combined with ERE.

  17. Scanning tunneling microscope light emission: Effect of the strong dc field on junction plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalathingal, Vijith; Dawson, Paul; Mitra, J.

    2016-07-01

    The observed energies of the localized surface plasmons (LSPs) excited at the tip-sample junction of a scanning tunneling microscope, as identified by spectral peaks in the light output, are very significantly redshifted with respect to calculations that use standard optical data for the tip and sample material, gold in this case. We argue that this anomaly depends on the extreme field in the sub-nm tunneling proximity of the tip and the sample, across which a dc bias (1-2 V) is applied. Finite element modeling analysis is presented of a gold nanosphere-plane (NS-P) combination in tunneling proximity and, crucially, in the presence of a high static electric field (˜109V /m ). It is argued that the strong dc field induces nonlinear corrections to the dielectric function of the gold via the effect of a large background polarizability through the nonlinear, χ(3 ) susceptibility contribution. When fed into the model system the modified optical data alters the LSP cavity modes of the NS-P system to indeed reveal a large redshift in energy compared to those of the virgin gold NS-P system. The net outcome may be regarded as equivalent to lowering the bulk plasmon energy, the physical interpretation being that the intense field of the tunneling environment leads to surface charge screening, effectively reducing the density of free electrons available to participate in the plasmon oscillations.

  18. Simulations of 4D edge transport and dynamics using the TEMPEST gyro-kinetic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognlien, T. D.; Cohen, B. I.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorr, M. R.; Hittinger, J. A. F.; Kerbel, G. D.; Nevins, W. M.; Xiong, Z.; Xu, X. Q.

    2006-10-01

    Simulation results are presented for tokamak edge plasmas with a focus on the 4D (2r,2v) option of the TEMPEST continuum gyro-kinetic code. A detailed description of a variety of kinetic simulations is reported, including neoclassical radial transport from Coulomb collisions, electric field generation, dynamic response to perturbations by geodesic acoustic modes, and parallel transport on open magnetic-field lines. Comparison is made between the characteristics of the plasma solutions on closed and open magnetic-field line regions separated by a magnetic separatrix, and simple physical models are used to qualitatively explain the differences observed in mean flow and electric-field generation. The status of extending the simulations to 5D turbulence will be summarized. The code structure used in this ongoing project is also briefly described, together with future plans.

  19. Influence of various reaction parameters on 2,4-D removal in photo/ferrioxalate/H(2)O(2) process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunho; Jeong, Joonseon; Lee, Changha; Kim, Soomyung; Yoon, Jeyong

    2003-06-01

    The influence of various reaction parameters on herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) removal were examined in the photo/ferrioxalate/H(2)O(2) system, with regard to: (1) sulfate, phosphate, and z.rad;OH scavenger, as solution constituent; and (2) light intensity, ferrioxalate, H(2)O(2), and oxalate concentration, as operating parameter. In terms of 2,4-D removal, the photo/ferrioxalate/H(2)O(2) system has always been superior to the photo/Ferric ion/H(2)O(2) system, despite the high presence of anions (sulfate 100 mM, phosphate 1 mM) or z.rad;OH scavenger. Not only the rate of 2,4-D removal, but also the decomposition rate of H(2)O(2) and oxalate proportionally increase with light intensity. The ferrioxalate concentration determines the light absorption fraction, and thus, controls the rates of 2,4-D removal, and the decomposition of H(2)O(2) and oxalate, are predicted from kinetic formulations. The optimal concentration of H(2)O(2) and oxalate, according to the extent of the z.rad;OH scavenging reaction with these reagents, has been demonstrated for 2,4-D removal. It was found that an increasing oxalate concentration, which bears the burden of increased dissolved organic carbon (DOC), does not occur. This is because its decomposition, as a result of the photochemical reduction of the ferric oxalate complex, results in a decrease of the equivalent DOC. The importance of the key reaction factors to be considered, when applying this system to real wastewater treatment, is also discussed. PMID:12697181

  20. Semaphorin 4D Contributes to Rheumatoid Arthritis by Inducing Inflammatory Cytokine Production: Pathogenic and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yuji; Kang, Sujin; Ebina, Kousuke; Shi, Kenrin; Nojima, Satoshi; Kimura, Tetsuya; Ito, Daisuke; Morimoto, Keiko; Nishide, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Takashi; Hirano, Toru; Shima, Yoshihito; Narazaki, Masashi; Tsuboi, Hideki; Saeki, Yukihiko; Tomita, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Toshio; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D)/CD100 has pleiotropic roles in immune activation, angiogenesis, bone metabolism, and neural development. We undertook this study to investigate the role of Sema4D in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Soluble Sema4D (sSema4D) levels in serum and synovial fluid were analyzed by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. Cell surface expression and transcripts of Sema4D were analyzed in peripheral blood cells from RA patients, and immunohistochemical staining of Sema4D was performed in RA synovium. Generation of sSema4D was evaluated in an ADAMTS‐4–treated monocytic cell line (THP‐1 cells). The efficacy of anti‐Sema4D antibody was evaluated in mice with collagen‐induced arthritis (CIA). Results Levels of sSema4D were elevated in both serum and synovial fluid from RA patients, and disease activity markers were correlated with serum sSema4D levels. Sema4D‐expressing cells also accumulated in RA synovium. Cell surface levels of Sema4D on CD3+ and CD14+ cells from RA patients were reduced, although levels of Sema4D transcripts were unchanged. In addition, ADAMTS‐4 cleaved cell surface Sema4D to generate sSema4D in THP‐1 cells. Soluble Sema4D induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin‐6 (IL‐6) production from CD14+ monocytes. IL‐6 and TNFα induced ADAMTS‐4 expression in synovial cells. Treatment with an anti‐Sema4D antibody suppressed arthritis and reduced proinflammatory cytokine production in CIA. Conclusion A positive feedback loop involving sSema4D/IL‐6 and TNFα/ADAMTS‐4 may contribute to the pathogenesis of RA. The inhibition of arthritis by anti‐Sema4D antibody suggests that Sema4D represents a potential therapeutic target for RA. PMID:25707877

  1. Biomechanics of DNA structures visualized by 4D electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Ulrich J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a technique for in situ visualization of the biomechanics of DNA structural networks using 4D electron microscopy. Vibrational oscillations of the DNA structure are excited mechanically through a short burst of substrate vibrations triggered by a laser pulse. Subsequently, the motion is probed with electron pulses to observe the impulse response of the specimen in space and time. From the frequency and amplitude of the observed oscillations, we determine the normal modes and eigenfrequencies of the structures involved. Moreover, by selective “nano-cutting” at a given point in the network, it was possible to obtain Young’s modulus, and hence the stiffness, of the DNA filament at that position. This experimental approach enables nanoscale mechanics studies of macromolecules and should find applications in other domains of biological networks such as origamis. PMID:23382239

  2. Detailed software design of an ultra-parallel ultra-high speed SD-OCT for real-time 4D display at 12 volume/second

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiro-Oka, H.; Choi, D.; Shimizu, K.; Ohbayashi, K.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the software design of an ultra-parallel ultra-high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system. In our system, optical de-multiplexers divide an interferogram into 320 light every 18.7 GHz frequency, instead of a refractive grating for spectroscopy so far used in conventional SD-OCT. These optical elements enable to get rid of a re-sampling process and contribute to reduce the load of computing. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) is performed by field-programmable gate array (FPGA) and real-time 3D OCT images are created on graphics processing unit (GPU). Our system achieves a real-time 3D OCT image display (4D display) with an A-scan, B-scan, and volume rate of 10 MHz, 4 kHz, and 12 volumes per second, respectively.

  3. Influence of preplant applications of 2,4-D, dicamba, tribenuron, and tribenuron plus thifensulfuron on peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field trials were conducted in Georgia, North Carolina, and Texas to evaluate the effects of preplant applications of 2,4-D, dicamba, tribenuron, and tribenuron plus thifensulfuron on peanut yield. Herbicides were applied 30, 15, 7, or 0 days before planting (DBP) in conventional production systems ...

  4. Parallel Wavefront Analysis for a 4D Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti R.

    2011-01-01

    This software provides a programming interface for automating data collection with a PhaseCam interferometer from 4D Technology, and distributing the image-processing algorithm across a cluster of general-purpose computers. Multiple instances of 4Sight (4D Technology s proprietary software) run on a networked cluster of computers. Each connects to a single server (the controller) and waits for instructions. The controller directs the interferometer to several images, then assigns each image to a different computer for processing. When the image processing is finished, the server directs one of the computers to collate and combine the processed images, saving the resulting measurement in a file on a disk. The available software captures approximately 100 images and analyzes them immediately. This software separates the capture and analysis processes, so that analysis can be done at a different time and faster by running the algorithm in parallel across several processors. The PhaseCam family of interferometers can measure an optical system in milliseconds, but it takes many seconds to process the data so that it is usable. In characterizing an adaptive optics system, like the next generation of astronomical observatories, thousands of measurements are required, and the processing time quickly becomes excessive. A programming interface distributes data processing for a PhaseCam interferometer across a Windows computing cluster. A scriptable controller program coordinates data acquisition from the interferometer, storage on networked hard disks, and parallel processing. Idle time of the interferometer is minimized. This architecture is implemented in Python and JavaScript, and may be altered to fit a customer s needs.

  5. Three dimensional dose verification of VMAT plans using the Octavius 4D dosimetric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Young, Tony; Thwaites, David; Holloway, Lois

    2015-01-01

    The Octavius 4D dosimetric system generates a 3D dose matrix based on a measured planar dose and user supplied Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) data. The accuracy of 3D dose matrices reconstructed by the Octavius 4D dosimetric system was systematically studied for an open static field, an open arc field and clinical VMAT plans. The Octavius reconstructed 3D dose matrices were compared with the Treatment Planning System (TPS) calculated 3D dose matrices using 3D gamma (γ) analysis with 2%/2mm and 3%/3mm tolerance criteria. The larger detector size in the 2D detector array of the Octavius system resulted in failed voxels in the high dose gradient regions. For the open arc fields mean (1σ) γ pass rates of 84.5(8.9) % and 94.2(4.5) % were observed with 2%/2mm and 3%/3mm tolerance criteria respectively and for clinical VMAT plans mean (1σ) γ pass rates of 86.8(3.5) % and 96.7(1.4) % were observed.

  6. Reconstruction of 4D-CT data sets acquired during free breathing for the analysis of respiratory motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, Rene; Frenzel, Thorsten; Säring, Dennis; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Handels, Heinz

    2006-03-01

    Respiratory motion is a significant source of error in radiotherapy treatment planning. 4D-CT data sets can be useful to measure the impact of organ motion caused by breathing. But modern CT scanners can only scan a limited region of the body simultaneously and patients have to be scanned in segments consisting of multiple slices. For studying free breathing motion multislice CT scans can be collected simultaneously with digital spirometry over several breathing cycles. The 4D data set is assembled by sorting the free breathing multislice CT scans according to the couch position and the tidal volume. But artifacts can occur because there are no data segments for exactly the same tidal volume and all couch positions. We present an optical flow based method for the reconstruction of 4D-CT data sets from multislice CT scans, which are collected simultaneously with digital spirometry. The optical flow between the scans is estimated by a non-linear registration method. The calculated velocity field is used to reconstruct a 4D-CT data set by interpolating data at user-defined tidal volumes. By this technique, artifacts can be reduced significantly. The reconstructed 4D-CT data sets are used for studying inner organ motion during the respiratory cycle. The procedures described were applied to reconstruct 4D-CT data sets for four tumour patients who have been scanned during free breathing. The reconstructed 4D data sets were used to quantify organ displacements and to visualize the abdominothoracic organ motion.

  7. [Super-resolution reconstruction of lung 4D-CT images based on fast sub-pixel motion estimation].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shan; Wang, Tingting; Lü, Qingwen; Zhang, Yu

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution image reconstruction techniques play an important role for improving image resolution of lung 4D-CT. We presents a super-resolution approach based on fast sub-pixel motion estimation to reconstruct lung 4D-CT images. A fast sub-pixel motion estimation method was used to estimate the deformation fields between "frames", and then iterative back projection (IBP) algorithm was employed to reconstruct high-resolution images. Experimental results showed that compared with traditional interpolation method and super-resolution reconstruction algorithm based on full search motion estimation, the proposed method produced clearer images with significantly enhanced image structure details and reduced time for computation.

  8. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  9. Effect of collisions on dc magnetic-field generation in a plasma by resonance absorption of light

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.C.; Gourdin-Serveniere, A.; Mora, P.; Pellat, R.

    1982-05-01

    The importance of collisional ponderomotive effects on dc magnetic field generation is stressed. Computer simulations show that a weak rate of collision is sufficient to completely modify dc magnetic field generation in the resonant absorption of light, as compared with previous collisionless simulations. The agreement with theoretical predictions is shown.

  10. 4-D Transdimensional Tomography of Iceland Using Ambient Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, D.; Tkalcic, H.; Young, M.

    2012-12-01

    Located at the east of Greenland and immediately south of Arctic Circle, Iceland is the largest volcanic island in the world and represents a unique region of particular interest to geosciences. Various seismological imaging techniques have been deployed to shed light on composition and thickness of the Icelandic crust with serious geodynamic repercussions (for a recent review, see Foulger (2010)). Due to an abundance of active volcanoes, Iceland can be considered a natural laboratory for studying volcanic earthquakes with anomalous seismic radiation (e.g. Tkalcic et al., 2009; Fichtner and Tkalcic, 2010). Temporal changes in the velocity field due to volcanic processes effect seismic waveforms and are important to consider in the context of seismic sources, whose understanding relies on complete understanding of Earth structure. Apart from reflection and refraction studies and teleseismic signals, ambient noise tomography has been recently utilised to image shallow subsurface of Iceland (Gudmundson et al., 2007). The confluence of North Atlantic and Arctic oceans delivers a strong and relatively evenly distributed noise field, therefore making Iceland an ideal place for an ambient noise study. We initially attempt to confirm previous results of Gudmundson et al. (2007) using conventional surface wave tomography derived from Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion, with fast marching method as a method of choice for forward modelling (Rawlinson and Sambridge, 2005). We perform cross-correlation over several three-month time intervals of ambient noise obtained from the HOTSPOT experiment (Foulger et al., 2001) distributed across Iceland and we discuss seasonal variation observed in cross-correlograms. To extend conventional methods of imaging, trans-dimensional and hierarchical Bayesian sampling methods are used to produce a multidimensional posterior probability distribution of seismic velocity field. We use a trans-dimensional Bayesian inverse method, as it has an

  11. SEVIRI 4D-var assimilation analysing the April 2010 Eyjafjallajökull ash dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Anne Caroline; Elbern, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    We present first results of four dimensional variational (4D-var) data assimilation analysis applying SEVIRI observations to the Eulerian regional chemistry and aerosol transport model EURAD-IM (European Air Pollution Dispersion - Inverse Model). Optimising atmospheric dispersion models in terms of volcanic ash transport predictions by observations is especially essential for the aviation industry and associated interests. Remote sensing satellite observations are instrumental for ash detection and monitoring. We choose volcanic ash column retrievals of the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) because as infrared instrument on the geostationary satellite Meteosat Second Generation it delivers measurements with high temporal resolution during day and night. The retrieval method relies on the reverse absorption effect. In the framework of the national initiative ESKP (Earth System Knowledge Platform) and the European ACTRIS-2 (Aerosol, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure) project, we developed new modules (forward and adjoint) within the EURAD-IM, which are able to process SEVIRI ash column data as observational input to the 4D-var system. The focus of the 4D-var analysis is on initial value optimisation of the volcanic ash clouds that were emitted during the explosive Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April 2010. This eruption caused high public interest because of air traffic closures and it was particularly well observed from many different observation systems all over Europe. Considering multiple observation periods simultaneously in one assimilation window generates a continuous trajectory in the phase space and ensures that past observations are considered within their uncertainties. Results are validated mainly by lidar (LIght Detection And Ranging) observations, both ground and satellite based.

  12. Toxicity of mixtures of parathion, toxaphene and/or 2,4-D in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, D J; Rao, N G; Berg, I E; Khattree, R; Chaturvedi, A K

    1990-08-01

    The toxicity of the mixtures of parathion (PA), toxaphene (TOX) and/or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was studied in ICR male mice (21-24 g) by oral intubation, in corn oil, daily for up to 14 days. On Day 15, the exposure was discontinued, and animals were monitored for an additional period of 7 days for the possible reversibility of the toxicity. The body weight gain decreased with the mixtures, as well as with the individual agricultural chemicals (ACs), during the 14-day period. The cholinesterase (ChE) activity in the serum and brain was inhibited in the animals of the groups of PA (1-10 mg kg-1) and PA (5 mg kg-1)-containing mixtures. TOX (50-200 mg kg-1) caused initial inhibitory effects of 20-65% on the serum ChE (Day 1) before producing increases of 53-64% in the enzyme activity by Day 15, with little effects on the brain ChE levels. 2,4-D (50-200 mg kg-1) resulted in significantly elevated levels of the serum ChE, with substantial decreased in the brain ChE activity. The serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase level was up (38-630%) in TOX (50 mg kg-1), 2,4-D (50 mg kg-1) or their mixture group. No pathological changes at the light microscopic level in the brain and liver were noticed. TOX and TOX-containing mixtures significantly increased the liver/body weight ratio and decreased the pentobarbital (60 mg kg-1, i.p., in saline)-induced sleep.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2391407

  13. Light weight, high field, stable, superconducting magnets for advanced transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lubell, M.S.; Dresner, L.; Kenney, W.J.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; Schwenterly, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    Although the Guideway may be the most expensive component of a MAGLEV system, the importance of a suitable magnet system should not be underestimated. The reliability of operation of MAGLEV depends on the superconducting magnets performing to their specifications in a reliable manner (i.e., without training or quenching). Besides reliability the magnets should produce high field, be sufficiently stable to withstand reasonable perturbations, be light weight, be protected in the event of a quench, and be economical (although performance should outweigh cost). We propose to develop superconducting magnets that have these features. Our magnet designs are based on internally cooled, cable-in-conduit superconductor with Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC) as the structural reinforcement. Although the initial work is with metallic superconductors such as NbTi, the processes being developed will be applicable to the High Temperature Ceramic Superconductors when they become suitable for magnet applications.

  14. Photometric Calibration of an EUV Flat Field Spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    May, M; Lepson, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Thorn, D; Chen, H; Hey, D; Smith, A

    2002-07-03

    The photometric calibration of ail extreme ultraviolet flat field spectrometer has been done at the Advanced Light Source at LBNL. This spectrometer is used to record spectrum for atomic physics research from highly charged ions in plasmas created in the Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and SUPEREBIT. Two calibrations were done each with a different gold-coated grating, a 1200 {ell}/mm and a 2400 {ell}/mm, that covered 75-300{angstrom} and 15-160{angstrom}, respectively. The detector for this calibration was a back thinned CCD. The relative calibration was determined for several different incident angles for both gratings. Within the scatter of the data, the calibration was roughly insensitive to the incidence angle for the range of angles investigated.

  15. Photosynthetic accessory pigments - Evidence for the influence of phycoerythrin on the submarine light field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Swift, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    Upwelled water-leaving spectral radiances and the submarine light-field source are theorized to have the physical scattering and absorption effects of photosynthetic accessory pigments. A laser is employed to induce phycoerythrin pigment fluorescence, and the presence of the photosynthetic accessory pigment is measured in oceanic waters with a spectral fluorescence method. Experimental data from active-passive correlation spectroscopy demonstrate that water-leaving spectral radiances of about 600 nm are highly correlated with phycoerythrin pigment fluorescence. Because the data on the phycoerythrin and chlorophyll fluorescences are entered randomly in the correlation the results are considered unambiguous. An estimate of the photopigment is derived that agrees with measurements of its laser-induced fluorescence.

  16. Origin of magnetic field effect enhancement by electrical stress in organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnich, S. A.; Niedermeier, U.; Melzer, C.; Sarfert, W.; von Seggern, H.

    2009-06-01

    Recently, it has been discovered that the magnetic field effect (MFE) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on poly(para-phenylene vinylene) can be enhanced by exposing the diode to moderate electrical stress. Here, we disclose the mechanism behind this way of improving the MFE. We first show that electronic traps in general play an important role for the MFE. Optical depletion of available trap states by infrared illumination leads to a decrease in the MFE. Furthermore, we demonstrate that annealing of the OLED at high temperatures eliminates the MFE improvement of the previously performed electrical conditioning. However, the improvement can be restored by subsequent conditioning at higher current or voltage. Thus it is likely that electrical stress is accompanied by a transformation of the polymer morphology or conformation resulting in a formation of energetic traps for charge carriers.

  17. An Optical Model for Estimating the Underwater Light Field from Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Cheng-Chien; Miller, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    A model of the wavelength-integrated scalar irradiance for a vertically homogeneous water column is developed. It runs twenty thousand times faster than simulations obtained using full Hydrolight code and limits the percentage error to less than 3.7%. Both the distribution of incident sky radiance and a wind-roughened surface are integrated in the model. Our model removes common limitations of earlier models and can be applied to waters with any composition of the inherent optical properties. Implementation of this new model, as well as the ancillary information required for processing global-scale satellite data, is discussed. This new model is fast, accurate, and flexible and therefore provides important information of the underwater light field from remote sensing.

  18. Design, calibration, and characterization of a field radiometer using light-emitting diodes as detectors.

    PubMed

    Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey S; Thome, Kurtis J; Biggar, Stuart F

    2008-12-20

    The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona has developed multispectral ground-viewing radiometers that use light-emitting diodes as detectors. This work describes the optical design, electrical design, and laboratory calibration of a three-channel radiometer that operates in the visible and near-infrared region of the spectrum. The optical and electrical design of the radiometer is introduced, and then the calibration and characterization of the radiometer are described. Laboratory measurements include the spectral responsivity for each channel of the radiometer, the temperature dependence of the total responsivity for each channel, system linearity, field of view, and finally, the absolute radiometric calibration. A solar-radiation-based calibration is used to determine the absolute responsivity.

  19. Light beam diffraction on inhomogeneous holographic photonic PDLC structures under the influence of spatially non-uniform electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkin, A. O.; Sharangovich, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this work the theoretical model of two-dimensional Bragg diffraction of quasimonochromatic light beams on amplitude- and phase- inhomogeneous holographic photonic PDLC structures under the impact of spatially non-uniform electric field is proposed. The selfconsistent solutions for the light diffraction on PDLC structure with uniform amplitude and quasi-quadratic profiles are obtained for the case of influence of linearly varying electric field. The possibility to compensate the PDLC structure response inhomogeneity by the impact of non-unifrom external field is shown.

  20. Research on field of view of optical receiving antenna based on indoor visible light communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Mingguang; Lan, Tian; Zhao, Tao; Zhang, Yilun; Cui, Zhenghua; Ni, Guoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Optical receiving antenna is usually positioned before the detector of an indoor visible light communication (VLC) system in order to collect more optical energy into the detector. Besides optical gain of the antenna, the field of view (FOV) plays also an important role to the performance of a VLC system. In this paper, the signal noise ratio (SNR) and inter-symbol interference (ISI) versus FOV of the antenna are simulated via Line-of-Sight (LOS) and non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS) links within a room with a size of 5m × 5m × 3m. Results show that, the blind area appears while the FOV is less than 40 deg. and the SNR reduces as FOV increases and keeps small when FOV is more than 70 deg.. Furthermore, the average power of ISI rises with the increase of FOV, and the rising trend is relatively moderate when FOV is below 50 deg., while there is a rapid increase between 50 deg. and 70 deg. and finally tends to be stable after 70 deg. Therefore, it is practical to determine the FOV of the optical receiving antenna in the scope of 40 to 50 deg. based on the installment of LED lights on the ceiling here so as to avoid the blind area, attain high SNR, and reduce the influence of ISI. It is also worthwhile in practice to provide an identifiable evidence for the determination of FOV of the optical antenna.

  1. Mechanical quality assurance using light field for linear accelerators with camera calibration.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwangwoo; Choi, Wonhoon; Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Ho; Yoon, Jeongmin; Lee, Chang Geol; Lee, Ik Jae; Cho, Jaeho

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical Quality Assurance (QA) is important to assure spatially precise delivery of external-beam radiation therapy. As an alternative to the conventional-film based method, we have developed a new tool for mechanical QA of LINACs which uses a light field rather than radiation. When light passes through the collimator, a shadow is projected onto a piece of translucent paper and the resulting image is captured by a digital camera via a mirror. With this method, we evaluated the position of the LINAC isocenter and the accuracy of the gantry, collimator, and couch rotation. We also evaluated the accuracy of the digital readouts of the gantry, collimator, and couch rotation. In addition, the treatment couch position indicator was tested. We performed camera calibration as an essential pre-requisite for quantitative measurements of the position of isocenter, the linear motion of the couch, and the rotation angles of the gantry and collimator. Camera calibration reduced the measurement error to submillimeter based on uncertainty in pixel size of the image, while, without calibration, the measurement error of up to 2 mm could occur for an object with a length of 5 cm.

  2. Octavius 4D characterization for flattened and flattening filter free rotational deliveries

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, Conor K.; Hounsell, Alan R.; O’Connell, Barry F.; Grattan, Mark W. D.; Agnew, Christina E.; Irvine, Denise M.

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In this study the Octavius detector 729 ionization chamber (IC) array with the Octavius 4D phantom was characterized for flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter free (FFF) static and rotational beams. The device was assessed for verification with FF and FFF RapidArc treatment plans.Methods: The response of the detectors to field size, dose linearity, and dose rate were assessed for 6 MV FF beams and also 6 and 10 MV FFF beams. Dosimetric and mechanical accuracy of the detector array within the Octavius 4D rotational phantom was evaluated against measurements made using semiflex and pinpoint ionization chambers, and radiochromic film. Verification FF and FFF RapidArc plans were assessed using a gamma function with 3%/3 mm tolerances and 2%/2 mm tolerances and further analysis of these plans was undertaken using film and a second detector array with higher spatial resolution.Results: A warm-up dose of >6 Gy was required for detector stability. Dose-rate measurements were stable across a range from 0.26 to 15 Gy/min and dose response was linear, although the device overestimated small doses compared with pinpoint ionization chamber measurements. Output factors agreed with ionization chamber measurements to within 0.6% for square fields of side between 3 and 25 cm and within 1.2% for 2 × 2 cm{sup 2} fields. The Octavius 4D phantom was found to be consistent with measurements made with radiochromic film, where the gantry angle was found to be within 0.4° of that expected during rotational deliveries. RapidArc FF and FFF beams were found to have an accuracy of >97.9% and >90% of pixels passing 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm, respectively. Detector spatial resolution was observed to be a factor in determining the accurate delivery of each plan, particularly at steep dose gradients. This was confirmed using data from a second detector array with higher spatial resolution and with radiochromic film.Conclusions: The Octavius 4D phantom with associated Octavius detector

  3. Discernment of Possible Organic Magnetic Field Effect Mechanisms Using Polymer Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, R.; Subedi, R. C.; Liang, S.; Nguyen, T. D.

    2014-07-01

    We report studies of magnetic field effect (MFE) in polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (PLEC) using the "super-yellow" poly-(phenylene vynilene) (SY-PPV) polymer in vertical and planar device configurations. The purpose is to discern the existing MFE mechanisms in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) where the current and electroluminescence are strongly modulated by a small applied magnetic field. In particular, we investigate the mutual relationship between magneto-conductance (MC) and magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) by studying the role of polaron density dissociated from polaron pairs (PP) on these magnetic responses. In general, the dissociated polaron density is determined by the PP dissociation rate and the PP density. For the planar PLEC, which possesses a small dissociation rate, we observe small and negative MC at all applied voltages regardless of the emission intensity, while MEL becomes positive when electroluminescence quantum efficiency increases. The MC has a much narrower width than the MEL, indicating that the MC and MEL do not share a common origin. However, MC reverses and has the same width as MEL when the device is exposed to a threshold laser power. For the vertical PLEC, characterized by a large dissociation rate, MC and MEL are positive and have the same width. We discuss the results using the existing MFE mechanism in OLEDs. We show that the PP model can explain the positive MEL and MC, while the negative MC can be explained by the bipolaron model. Finally, we present a possibility to complete an all-organic PLEC magnetic sensor by using an inkjet printer.

  4. Accurate recovery of 4D left ventricular deformations using volumetric B-splines incorporating phase based displacement estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Tustison, Nicholas J.; Amini, Amir A.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, an improved framework for estimation of 3-D left-ventricular deformations from tagged MRI is presented. Contiguous short- and long-axis tagged MR images are collected and are used within a 4-D B-Spline based deformable model to determine 4-D displacements and strains. An initial 4-D B-spline model fitted to sparse tag line data is first constructed by minimizing a 4-D Chamfer distance potential-based energy function for aligning isoparametric planes of the model with tag line locations; subsequently, dense virtual tag lines based on 2-D phase-based displacement estimates and the initial model are created. A final 4-D B-spline model with increased knots is fitted to the virtual tag lines. From the final model, we can extract accurate 3-D myocardial deformation fields and corresponding strain maps which are local measures of non-rigid deformation. Lagrangian strains in simulated data are derived which show improvement over our previous work. The method is also applied to 3-D tagged MRI data collected in a canine.

  5. Respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography: A novel method to reduce imaging dose

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Benjamin J.; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Balik, Salim; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Keall, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A novel method called respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is described whereby imaging dose can be reduced without degrading image quality. RT 4D CBCT utilizes a respiratory signal to trigger projections such that only a single projection is assigned to a given respiratory bin for each breathing cycle. In contrast, commercial 4D CBCT does not actively use the respiratory signal to minimize image dose. Methods: To compare RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, 3600 CBCT projections of a thorax phantom were gathered and reconstructed to generate a ground truth CBCT dataset. Simulation pairs of conventional 4D CBCT acquisitions and RT 4D CBCT acquisitions were developed assuming a sinusoidal respiratory signal which governs the selection of projections from the pool of 3600 original projections. The RT 4D CBCT acquisition triggers a single projection when the respiratory signal enters a desired acquisition bin; the conventional acquisition does not use a respiratory trigger and projections are acquired at a constant frequency. Acquisition parameters studied were breathing period, acquisition time, and imager frequency. The performance of RT 4D CBCT using phase based and displacement based sorting was also studied. Image quality was quantified by calculating difference images of the test dataset from the ground truth dataset. Imaging dose was calculated by counting projections. Results: Using phase based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 47% less imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT. Image quality differences were less than 4% at worst. Using displacement based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 57% less imaging dose on average, than conventional 4D CBCT methods; however, image quality was 26% worse with RT 4D CBCT. Conclusions: Simulation studies have shown that RT 4D CBCT reduces imaging dose while maintaining comparable image quality for phase based 4D CBCT; image quality is degraded for displacement based RT 4D

  6. DIFFUSE GALACTIC LIGHT IN THE FIELD OF THE TRANSLUCENT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDE CLOUD MBM32

    SciTech Connect

    Ienaka, N.; Kawara, K.; Matsuoka, Y.; Oyabu, S.; Sameshima, H.; Tsujimoto, T.; Peterson, B. A.

    2013-04-10

    We have conducted B-, g-, V-, and R-band imaging in a 45' Multiplication-Sign 40' field containing part of the high Galactic latitude translucent cloud MBM32, and correlated the intensity of diffuse optical light S{sub {nu}}({lambda}) with that of 100 {mu}m emission S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m). A {chi}{sup 2} minimum analysis is applied to fit a linear function to the measured correlation and derive the slope parameter b({lambda}) = {Delta}S{sub {nu}}({lambda})/{Delta}S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) of the best-fit linear function. Compiling a sample by combining our b({lambda}) and published ones, we show that the b({lambda}) strength varies from cloud to cloud by a factor of four. Finding that b({lambda}) decreases as S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) increases in the sample, we suggest that a nonlinear correlation including a quadratic term of S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m){sup 2} should be fitted to the measured correlation. The variation of optical depth, which is A{sub V} = 0.16-2.0 in the sample, can change b({lambda}) by a factor of 2-3. There would be some contribution to the large b({lambda}) variation from the forward-scattering characteristic of dust grains which is coupled to the non-isotropic interstellar radiation field (ISRF). Models of the scattering of diffuse Galactic light (DGL) underestimate the b({lambda}) values by a factor of two. This could be reconciled by deficiency in UV photons in the ISRF or by a moderate increase in dust albedo. Our b({lambda}) spectrum favors a contribution from extended red emission (ERE) to the diffuse optical light; b({lambda}) rises from B to V faster than the models, seems to peak around 6000 A and decreases toward long wavelengths. Such a characteristic is expected from the models in which the DGL is combined with ERE.

  7. 4D Dynamic RNP Annual Interim Report-Year 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkelsztein, Daniel M.; Sturdy, James L.; Alaverdi, Omeed; Chung, William W.; Salvano, Daniel; Klooster, Joel; Hochwarth, Joachim K.

    2010-01-01

    This Annual Interim Report summarizes the activities led by Raytheon, in collaboration with GE Aviation and SAIC, and presents the results obtained during the first year of this research effort to expand the RNP concept to 4 dimensions relative to a dynamic frame of reference. Joint Program Development Office (JPDO)Concepts of Operations for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) considers 4 Dimension Trajectory (4DT) procedures a key enabler to Trajectory Based Operations (TBO). The JPDO defines 4DT as a precise description of an aircraft path in space and time . While NextGen assumes that this path is defined within an Earth-reference frame, many 4DT procedure implementations will require an aircraft to precisely navigate relative to a moving reference such as another aircraft to form aggregate flows or a weather cell to allow for flows to shift. Current methods of implementing routes and flight paths rely on aircraft meeting a Required Navigation Performance (RNP) specification and being equipped with a monitoring and alerting capability to annunciate when the aircraft system is unable to meet the performance specification required for the operation. Since all aircraft today operate within the NAS relative to fixed reference points, the current RNP definition is deemed satisfactory. However, it is not well understood how the current RNP construct will support NextGen 4DT procedures where aircraft operate relative to each other or to other dynamic frames of reference. The objective of this research effort is to analyze candidate 4DT procedures from both an Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP) and aircraft perspective, to identify their specific navigational requirements, assess the shortcomings of the current RNP construct to meet these requirements, to propose an extended 4 Dimensional Dynamic RNP (4D Dynamic RNP) construct that accounts for the dynamic spatial and temporal nature of the selected 4DT procedures, and finally, to design an

  8. 4D Ultrasound - Medical Devices for Recent Advances on the Etiology of Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Tomasovic, Sanja; Predojevic, Maja

    2011-01-01

    Children cerebral palsy (CCP) encompasses a group of nonprogessive and noninfectious conditions, which cause light, moderate, and severe deviations in neurological development. Diagnosis of CCP is set mostly by the age of 3 years. The fact that a large number of cerebral damage occurs prenatally and the fact that early intervention in cases of neurological damage is successful, prompted some researchers to explore the possibility of detecting neurologically damaged fetus in the uterus. This research was made possible thanks to the development of two-dimensional ultrasound technology in a real time, which enabled the display of the mobility of the fetus. Advancement of the ultrasound technology has enabled the development of 4D ultrasound where a spontaneous fetal movement can be observed almost in a real time. Estimate of the number and quality of spontaneous fetal movements and stitches on the head, the neurology thumb and a high palate were included in the prenatal neurological screening of the fetus. This raises the question, as to does the fetal behavior reflect, (which was revealed in 2D or 4D ultrasound), fetal neurological development in a manner that will allow the detection of the brain damage. PMID:23407920

  9. Hamiltonian Light-Front Field Theory: Recent Progress and Tantalizing Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vary, J. P.

    2012-05-01

    Fundamental theories, such as quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics promise great predictive power addressing phenomena over vast scales from the microscopic to cosmic scales. However, new non-perturbative tools are required for physics to span from one scale to the next. I outline recent theoretical and computational progress to build these bridges and provide illustrative results for Hamiltonian Light Front Field Theory. One key area is our development of basis function approaches that cast the theory as a Hamiltonian matrix problem while preserving a maximal set of symmetries. Regulating the theory with an external field that can be removed to obtain the continuum limit offers additional possibilities as seen in an application to the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron. Recent progress capitalizes on algorithm and computer developments for setting up and solving very large sparse matrix eigenvalue problems. Matrices with dimensions of 20 billion basis states are now solved on leadership-class computers for their low-lying eigenstates and eigenfunctions.

  10. Magnetic field enhancement of generation-recombination and shot noise in organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Djidjou, T. K.; Basel, Tek; Rogachev, A.; Chen, Ying; Shinar, J.

    2015-03-21

    We have studied the effect of magnetic field on noise in series of 2-methoxy-5-(2′-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene-based organic light emitting diodes with dominant hole injection, dominant electron injection, and balanced electron and hole injection. The noise spectra of the balanced devices revealed the generation-recombination (g-r) noise term, which we associated with bimolecular electron-hole recombination. The presence of the g-r noise term is correlated with the strong organic magnetoresistance (up to 25%) observed in the balanced devices. The noise spectra also have the shot noise contribution with the Fano factor 0.25–0.4. We found that time constant of the g-r term decreases and the magnitude of shot noise increases when magnetic field is applied. This behavior can be consistently explained within the polaron-polaron model of organic magnetoresistance. We have not found any evidence that the magnetoresistance in studied devices is affected by traps.

  11. Automated x-ray/light field congruence using the LINAC EPID panel

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, Wojciech; O'Doherty, Jim; Jones, Matt

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: X-ray/light field alignment is a test described in many guidelines for the routine quality control of clinical linear accelerators (LINAC). Currently, the gold standard method for measuring alignment is through utilization of radiographic film. However, many modern LINACs are equipped with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) that may be used to perform this test and thus subsequently reducing overall cost, processing, and analysis time, removing operator dependency and the requirement to sustain the departmental film processor. Methods: This work describes a novel method of utilizing the EPID together with a custom inhouse designed jig and automatic image processing software allowing measurement of the light field size, x-ray field size, and congruence between them. The authors present results of testing the method for aS1000 and aS500 Varian EPID detectors for six LINACs at a range of energies (6, 10, and 15 MV) in comparison with the results obtained from the use of radiographic film. Results: Reproducibility of the software in fully automatic operation under a range of operating conditions for a single image showed a congruence of 0.01 cm with a coefficient of variation of 0. Slight variation in congruence repeatability was noted through semiautomatic processing by four independent operators due to manual marking of positions on the jig. Testing of the methodology using the automatic method shows a high precision of 0.02 mm compared to a maximum of 0.06 mm determined by film processing. Intraindividual examination of operator measurements of congruence was shown to vary as much as 0.75 mm. Similar congruence measurements of 0.02 mm were also determined for a lower resolution EPID (aS500 model), after rescaling of the image to the aS1000 image size. Conclusions: The designed methodology was proven to be time efficient, cost effective, and at least as accurate as using the gold standard radiographic film. Additionally, congruence testing can be

  12. Light emission from an ambipolar semiconducting polymer field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swensen, James Sherman

    The successful demonstration of light emitting field-effect transistors (LEFETs) has been worked towards for years within the organic electronics community. The belief was held that if an ambipolar FET could be developed with high enough density of both electrons and holes within the channel region of an FET simultaneously, then recombination of those carriers would result in electroluminescence. The challenge to demonstrating such a device centered on the issue of electron transport; why was electron transport not observed for nearly all SCPs in a field-effect transistor? Use of a low dielectric constant material to passivate inorganic dielectrics in order to observe electron transport for semiconducting conjugated polymers in a field-effect transistor was verified. A different material, polypropylene-co-1-butene, was shown to passivate various inorganic insulators to eliminate or reduce trap states such that electron transport can be observed for SCPs. Another challenge to demonstrating an LEFET involved developing a method to deposit a low work function metal as either the source or the drain electrode in the FET structure. In this research, a process was developed in which an SCP FET can be fabricated inside of a nitrogen glove box where one electrode is a high work function metal and the other electrode is a low work function metal with the precision of photolithography using a silicon shadow mask and an angled evaporation technique. As a result, the SCP LED electrodes architecture was successfully transferred to an FET platform as the source and drain electrodes, which we "call two-color electrodes." In summary, by combining the passivation layer technology which allows for electron transport and the silicon shadow mask/angled evaporation technique which gives two color electrodes, ambipolar SCP LEFETs were demonstrated. Transport data show ambipolar behavior. Recombination of electrons and holes result in a narrow zone of light emission within the channel

  13. Multimaterial 4D Printing with Tailorable Shape Memory Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qi; Sakhaei, Amir Hosein; Lee, Howon; Dunn, Conner K; Fang, Nicholas X; Dunn, Martin L

    2016-08-08

    We present a new 4D printing approach that can create high resolution (up to a few microns), multimaterial shape memory polymer (SMP) architectures. The approach is based on high resolution projection microstereolithography (PμSL) and uses a family of photo-curable methacrylate based copolymer networks. We designed the constituents and compositions to exhibit desired thermomechanical behavior (including rubbery modulus, glass transition temperature and failure strain which is more than 300% and larger than any existing printable materials) to enable controlled shape memory behavior. We used a high resolution, high contrast digital micro display to ensure high resolution of photo-curing methacrylate based SMPs that requires higher exposure energy than more common acrylate based polymers. An automated material exchange process enables the manufacture of 3D composite architectures from multiple photo-curable SMPs. In order to understand the behavior of the 3D composite microarchitectures, we carry out high fidelity computational simulations of their complex nonlinear, time-dependent behavior and study important design considerations including local deformation, shape fixity and free recovery rate. Simulations are in good agreement with experiments for a series of single and multimaterial components and can be used to facilitate the design of SMP 3D structures.

  14. Multimaterial 4D Printing with Tailorable Shape Memory Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Qi; Sakhaei, Amir Hosein; Lee, Howon; Dunn, Conner K.; Fang, Nicholas X.; Dunn, Martin L.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new 4D printing approach that can create high resolution (up to a few microns), multimaterial shape memory polymer (SMP) architectures. The approach is based on high resolution projection microstereolithography (PμSL) and uses a family of photo-curable methacrylate based copolymer networks. We designed the constituents and compositions to exhibit desired thermomechanical behavior (including rubbery modulus, glass transition temperature and failure strain which is more than 300% and larger than any existing printable materials) to enable controlled shape memory behavior. We used a high resolution, high contrast digital micro display to ensure high resolution of photo-curing methacrylate based SMPs that requires higher exposure energy than more common acrylate based polymers. An automated material exchange process enables the manufacture of 3D composite architectures from multiple photo-curable SMPs. In order to understand the behavior of the 3D composite microarchitectures, we carry out high fidelity computational simulations of their complex nonlinear, time-dependent behavior and study important design considerations including local deformation, shape fixity and free recovery rate. Simulations are in good agreement with experiments for a series of single and multimaterial components and can be used to facilitate the design of SMP 3D structures.

  15. Multimaterial 4D Printing with Tailorable Shape Memory Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Qi; Sakhaei, Amir Hosein; Lee, Howon; Dunn, Conner K.; Fang, Nicholas X.; Dunn, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new 4D printing approach that can create high resolution (up to a few microns), multimaterial shape memory polymer (SMP) architectures. The approach is based on high resolution projection microstereolithography (PμSL) and uses a family of photo-curable methacrylate based copolymer networks. We designed the constituents and compositions to exhibit desired thermomechanical behavior (including rubbery modulus, glass transition temperature and failure strain which is more than 300% and larger than any existing printable materials) to enable controlled shape memory behavior. We used a high resolution, high contrast digital micro display to ensure high resolution of photo-curing methacrylate based SMPs that requires higher exposure energy than more common acrylate based polymers. An automated material exchange process enables the manufacture of 3D composite architectures from multiple photo-curable SMPs. In order to understand the behavior of the 3D composite microarchitectures, we carry out high fidelity computational simulations of their complex nonlinear, time-dependent behavior and study important design considerations including local deformation, shape fixity and free recovery rate. Simulations are in good agreement with experiments for a series of single and multimaterial components and can be used to facilitate the design of SMP 3D structures. PMID:27499417

  16. Effortless assignment with 4D covariance sequential correlation maps.

    PubMed

    Harden, Bradley J; Mishra, Subrata H; Frueh, Dominique P

    2015-11-01

    Traditional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) assignment procedures for proteins rely on preliminary peak-picking to identify and label NMR signals. However, such an approach has severe limitations when signals are erroneously labeled or completely neglected. The consequences are especially grave for proteins with substantial peak overlap, and mistakes can often thwart entire projects. To overcome these limitations, we previously introduced an assignment technique that bypasses traditional pick peaking altogether. Covariance Sequential Correlation Maps (COSCOMs) transform the indirect connectivity information provided by multiple 3D backbone spectra into direct (H, N) to (H, N) correlations. Here, we present an updated method that utilizes a single four-dimensional spectrum rather than a suite of three-dimensional spectra. We demonstrate the advantages of 4D-COSCOMs relative to their 3D counterparts. We introduce improvements accelerating their calculation. We discuss practical considerations affecting their quality. And finally we showcase their utility in the context of a 52 kDa cyclization domain from a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase.

  17. Multimaterial 4D Printing with Tailorable Shape Memory Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qi; Sakhaei, Amir Hosein; Lee, Howon; Dunn, Conner K; Fang, Nicholas X; Dunn, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    We present a new 4D printing approach that can create high resolution (up to a few microns), multimaterial shape memory polymer (SMP) architectures. The approach is based on high resolution projection microstereolithography (PμSL) and uses a family of photo-curable methacrylate based copolymer networks. We designed the constituents and compositions to exhibit desired thermomechanical behavior (including rubbery modulus, glass transition temperature and failure strain which is more than 300% and larger than any existing printable materials) to enable controlled shape memory behavior. We used a high resolution, high contrast digital micro display to ensure high resolution of photo-curing methacrylate based SMPs that requires higher exposure energy than more common acrylate based polymers. An automated material exchange process enables the manufacture of 3D composite architectures from multiple photo-curable SMPs. In order to understand the behavior of the 3D composite microarchitectures, we carry out high fidelity computational simulations of their complex nonlinear, time-dependent behavior and study important design considerations including local deformation, shape fixity and free recovery rate. Simulations are in good agreement with experiments for a series of single and multimaterial components and can be used to facilitate the design of SMP 3D structures. PMID:27499417

  18. Effortless assignment with 4D covariance sequential correlation maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harden, Bradley J.; Mishra, Subrata H.; Frueh, Dominique P.

    2015-11-01

    Traditional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) assignment procedures for proteins rely on preliminary peak-picking to identify and label NMR signals. However, such an approach has severe limitations when signals are erroneously labeled or completely neglected. The consequences are especially grave for proteins with substantial peak overlap, and mistakes can often thwart entire projects. To overcome these limitations, we previously introduced an assignment technique that bypasses traditional pick peaking altogether. Covariance Sequential Correlation Maps (COSCOMs) transform the indirect connectivity information provided by multiple 3D backbone spectra into direct (H, N) to (H, N) correlations. Here, we present an updated method that utilizes a single four-dimensional spectrum rather than a suite of three-dimensional spectra. We demonstrate the advantages of 4D-COSCOMs relative to their 3D counterparts. We introduce improvements accelerating their calculation. We discuss practical considerations affecting their quality. And finally we showcase their utility in the context of a 52 kDa cyclization domain from a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase.

  19. A technique for estimating 4D-CBCT using prior knowledge and limited-angle projections

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, You; Yin, Fang-Fang; Ren, Lei; Segars, W. Paul

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a technique to estimate onboard 4D-CBCT using prior information and limited-angle projections for potential 4D target verification of lung radiotherapy.Methods: Each phase of onboard 4D-CBCT is considered as a deformation from one selected phase (prior volume) of the planning 4D-CT. The deformation field maps (DFMs) are solved using a motion modeling and free-form deformation (MM-FD) technique. In the MM-FD technique, the DFMs are estimated using a motion model which is extracted from planning 4D-CT based on principal component analysis (PCA). The motion model parameters are optimized by matching the digitally reconstructed radiographs of the deformed volumes to the limited-angle onboard projections (data fidelity constraint). Afterward, the estimated DFMs are fine-tuned using a FD model based on data fidelity constraint and deformation energy minimization. The 4D digital extended-cardiac-torso phantom was used to evaluate the MM-FD technique. A lung patient with a 30 mm diameter lesion was simulated with various anatomical and respirational changes from planning 4D-CT to onboard volume, including changes of respiration amplitude, lesion size and lesion average-position, and phase shift between lesion and body respiratory cycle. The lesions were contoured in both the estimated and “ground-truth” onboard 4D-CBCT for comparison. 3D volume percentage-difference (VPD) and center-of-mass shift (COMS) were calculated to evaluate the estimation accuracy of three techniques: MM-FD, MM-only, and FD-only. Different onboard projection acquisition scenarios and projection noise levels were simulated to investigate their effects on the estimation accuracy.Results: For all simulated patient and projection acquisition scenarios, the mean VPD (±S.D.)/COMS (±S.D.) between lesions in prior images and “ground-truth” onboard images were 136.11% (±42.76%)/15.5 mm (±3.9 mm). Using orthogonal-view 15°-each scan angle, the mean VPD/COMS between the lesion

  20. 2,4-D and IAA Amino Acid Conjugates Show Distinct Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Eyer, Luděk; Vain, Thomas; Pařízková, Barbora; Oklestkova, Jana; Barbez, Elke; Kozubíková, Hana; Pospíšil, Tomáš; Wierzbicka, Roksana; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Fránek, Milan; Strnad, Miroslav; Robert, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    The herbicide 2,4-D exhibits an auxinic activity and therefore can be used as a synthetic and traceable analog to study auxin-related responses. Here we identified that not only exogenous 2,4-D but also its amide-linked metabolite 2,4-D-Glu displayed an inhibitory effect on plant growth via the TIR1/AFB auxin-mediated signaling pathway. To further investigate 2,4-D metabolite conversion, identity and activity, we have developed a novel purification procedure based on the combination of ion exchange and immuno-specific sorbents combined with a sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. In 2,4-D treated samples, 2,4-D-Glu and 2,4-D-Asp were detected at 100-fold lower concentrations compared to 2,4-D levels, showing that 2,4-D can be metabolized in the plant. Moreover, 2,4-D-Asp and 2,4-D-Glu were identified as reversible forms of 2,4-D homeostasis that can be converted to free 2,4-D. This work paves the way to new studies of auxin action in plant development. PMID:27434212

  1. 2,4-D and IAA Amino Acid Conjugates Show Distinct Metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Eyer, Luděk; Vain, Thomas; Pařízková, Barbora; Oklestkova, Jana; Barbez, Elke; Kozubíková, Hana; Pospíšil, Tomáš; Wierzbicka, Roksana; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Fránek, Milan; Strnad, Miroslav; Robert, Stéphanie; Novak, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    The herbicide 2,4-D exhibits an auxinic activity and therefore can be used as a synthetic and traceable analog to study auxin-related responses. Here we identified that not only exogenous 2,4-D but also its amide-linked metabolite 2,4-D-Glu displayed an inhibitory effect on plant growth via the TIR1/AFB auxin-mediated signaling pathway. To further investigate 2,4-D metabolite conversion, identity and activity, we have developed a novel purification procedure based on the combination of ion exchange and immuno-specific sorbents combined with a sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. In 2,4-D treated samples, 2,4-D-Glu and 2,4-D-Asp were detected at 100-fold lower concentrations compared to 2,4-D levels, showing that 2,4-D can be metabolized in the plant. Moreover, 2,4-D-Asp and 2,4-D-Glu were identified as reversible forms of 2,4-D homeostasis that can be converted to free 2,4-D. This work paves the way to new studies of auxin action in plant development. PMID:27434212

  2. Digit ratio (2D:4D) and hand preference for writing in the BBC Internet Study.

    PubMed

    Manning, J T; Peters, M

    2009-09-01

    The ratio of the length of the second to the fourth digit (2D:4D) may be negatively correlated with prenatal testosterone. Hand preference has been linked with prenatal testosterone and 2D:4D. Here we show that 2D:4D is associated with hand preference for writing in a large internet sample (n>170,000) in which participants self-reported their finger lengths. We replicated a significant association between right 2D:4D and writing hand preference (low right 2D:4D associated with left hand preference) as well as a significant correlation between writing hand preference and the difference between left and right 2D:4D or Dr-l (low Dr-l associated with left hand preference). A new significant correlation between left 2D:4D and writing hand preference was also shown (high left 2D:4D associated with left hand preference). There was a clear interaction between writing hand preference and 2D:4D: The left 2D:4D was significantly larger than the right 2D:4D in male and female left-handed writers, and the right hand 2D:4D was significantly larger than the left hand 2D:4D in male and female right-handed writers.

  3. Highly polarized light from stable ordered magnetic fields in GRB 120308A.

    PubMed

    Mundell, C G; Kopač, D; Arnold, D M; Steele, I A; Gomboc, A; Kobayashi, S; Harrison, R M; Smith, R J; Guidorzi, C; Virgili, F J; Melandri, A; Japelj, J

    2013-12-01

    After the initial burst of γ-rays that defines a γ-ray burst (GRB), expanding ejecta collide with the circumburst medium and begin to decelerate at the onset of the afterglow, during which a forward shock travels outwards and a reverse shock propagates backwards into the oncoming collimated flow, or 'jet'. Light from the reverse shock should be highly polarized if the jet's magnetic field is globally ordered and advected from the central engine, with a position angle that is predicted to remain stable in magnetized baryonic jet models or vary randomly with time if the field is produced locally by plasma or magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Degrees of linear polarization of P ≈ 10 per cent in the optical band have previously been detected in the early afterglow, but the lack of temporal measurements prevented definitive tests of competing jet models. Hours to days after the γ-ray burst, polarization levels are low (P < 4 per cent), when emission from the shocked ambient medium dominates. Here we report the detection of P =28(+4)(-4) per cent in the immediate afterglow of Swift γ-ray burst GRB 120308A, four minutes after its discovery in the γ-ray band, decreasing to P = 16(+5)(-4) per cent over the subsequent ten minutes. The polarization position angle remains stable, changing by no more than 15 degrees over this time, with a possible trend suggesting gradual rotation and ruling out plasma or magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Instead, the polarization properties show that GRBs contain magnetized baryonic jets with large-scale uniform fields that can survive long after the initial explosion.

  4. 4D STEM: High efficiency phase contrast imaging using a fast pixelated detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Jones, L.; Ryll, H.; Simson, M.; Soltau, H.; Kondo, Y.; Sagawa, R.; Banba, H.; MacLaren, I.; Nellist, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    Phase contrast imaging is widely used for imaging beam sensitive and weak phase objects in electron microscopy. In this work we demonstrate the achievement of high efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using the pnCCD, a fast direct electron pixelated detector, which records the diffraction patterns at every probe position with a speed of 1000 to 4000 frames per second, forming a 4D STEM dataset simultaneously with the incoherent Z-contrast imaging. Ptychographic phase reconstruction has been applied and the obtained complex transmission function reveals the phase of the specimen. The results using GaN and Ti, Nd- doped BiFeO3 show that this imaging mode is especially powerful for imaging light elements in the presence of much heavier elements.

  5. Red light facilitates the sensed presence elicited by application of weak, burst-firing magnetic fields over the temporal lobes.

    PubMed

    Meli, Salvatore C; Persinger, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the wavelength (color) of ambient lightning should modulate experiences of a sensed presence when the right hemisphere was stimulated by weak, burst-firing magnetic fields, volunteers were exposed for 30 min to this condition or to a sham field while they sat (eyes opened) in either dim red, green, or white light. Subjects exposed to the magnetic field reported significantly more visual sensations along the left side in red light and along the right side in green light. The significant interaction between ambient color and the field treatment was due to the marked increase in experiences of dizziness, sensed presence, "ego-alien" thoughts, and detachment from the body and "being somewhere else" for subjects exposed to the magnetic field while sitting in red light. The concurrence of entoptic images experienced within the upper left peripheral visual field and the sensed presence supported the hypothesis that both are associated with the intrusion of right hemispheric processes into left hemispheric awareness. PMID:19116832

  6. 4D phase-space multiplexing for fluorescent microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hsiou-Yuan; Zhong, Jingshan; Waller, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Phase-space measurements enable characterization of second-order spatial coherence properties and can be used for digital aberration removal or 3D position reconstruction. Previous methods use a scanning aperture to measure the phase space spectrogram, which is slow and light inefficient, while also attenuating information about higher-order correlations. We demonstrate a significant improvement of speed and light throughput by incorporating multiplexing techniques into our phase-space imaging system. The scheme implements 2D coded aperture patterning in the Fourier (pupil) plane of a microscope using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), while capturing multiple intensity images in real space. We compare various multiplexing schemes to scanning apertures and show that our phase-space reconstructions are accurate for experimental data with biological samples containing many 3D fluorophores.

  7. Influence of scattered light on accurate CCD flat fielding --- necessity of modifying baffles of some existent reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. A.; Zhang, C. S.; Sheng, C. J.; Peng, Y. L.

    2005-07-01

    This paper is the continuation of paper [1]. In this paper we further show that the difference between twilight flat field and night sky exposure is mainly due to the existence of scattered light. Like Grundahl and Sorensen, we also made the pinhole images of the 1.56m at the Shanghai Observatory and the 63cm of the Nanjing University to show the existence of scattered light intuitively. Both the 1.56m and the 63cm reflectors have normal designed baffles. Therefore it is the common weakness of all standard designed reflectors having only two baffles mounted in front of the primary and secondary mirrors which are not enough to protect the CCD cameras from scattered light in getting accurate flat fields. It is of great importance to modify the primary mirror baffle of all similar reflectors in order to get more accurate flat fielding.

  8. Assimilation of Meteosat radiance data within the 4D-Var system at ECMWF: Assimilation experiments and forecast impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köpken, Christina; Kelly, Graeme; Thépaut, Jean-Noël

    2004-07-01

    The direct assimilation of water vapour (WV) clear-sky radiances (CSRs) from geostationary satellites within the ECMWF four-dimensional variational assimilation (4D-Var) became operational on 9 April 2002 with the assimilation of radiances from Meteosat-7. To extend the coverage provided by geostationary radiances, the derivation of a similar CSR product from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites GOES-W and GOES-E was initiated and since 14 January 2003 these data have been operationally assimilated as well. This paper discusses results from the pre-operational impact experiments using Meteosat-7 and the subsequent operational implementation of the WV radiance assimilation. The pre-operational data monitoring of the CSRs shows contamination of certain time slots caused by intruding solar stray light and a certain degree of cloud influence present in the CSR. Data quality control is introduced to exclude affected data. When assimilated, the Meteosat WV CSRs correct the upper-tropospheric humidity field in areas of known model problems. While the analysis draws well to Meteosat data, the fit to other conventional observations does not degrade, and the fit to other satellite observations is noticeably improved. This is visible in statistics for the assimilated HIRS-12 as well as for passive Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit B (AMSUB) radiances, both in the pre-operational experiments and in the operational assimilation cycle. The impact on forecast quality is slightly positive to neutral for different areas of the globe. In some experiments a positive impact on upper-level wind fields (around 200 hPa) is seen, especially in the tropics. A relatively large sensitivity is noted of the mean increments and also forecast scores to the bias correction.

  9. Polarized light transmission in ferrofluids loaded with carbon nanotubes in the presence of a uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vales-Pinzón, C.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Medina-Esquivel, R.; Martínez-Torres, P.

    2014-11-01

    Magneto-optic phenomena in ferrofluids have been shown to be related to the formation of chain structures, due to the arrangement of the ferromagnetic particles, induced by an applied magnetic field. In this work, the effects on transmission of polarized light due to anisotropic effects induced by an external magnetic field in ferrofluids with carbon nanotubes are studied. The time response of the system presents two well defined stages, in the first one, which is very short, the fluid behaves as a polarizer. In contrast in the second stage, the effects of light transmission dominate. In this stage the transmitted light intensity grows with time and after a long time reaches a constant stable value. It is shown that these phenomena depend on the carbon nanotubes concentration as well as on the strength of the applied magnetic field. Using a simple model that considers a chain-like structure formation, it is possible to determine the rate of agglomeration of the formed structures and the attenuation coefficient of the transmitted light. The formation of nanostructures leads to variation in the transmitted light, depending on the polarization of the incident light. These magnetic nanostructures can find numerous applications in nanotechnology, optical devices and medicine.

  10. Scientific Subsurface data for EPOS - integration of 3D and 4D data services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschke, Dorit; Hammitzsch, Martin; Wächter, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    The provision of efficient and easy access to scientific subsurface data sets obtained from field studies and scientific observatories or by geological 3D/4D-modeling is an important contribution to modern research infrastructures as they can facilitate the integrated analysis and evaluation as well as the exchange of scientific data. Within the project EPOS - European Plate Observing System, access to 3D and 4D data sets will be provided by 'WP15 - Geological information and modeling' and include structural geology models as well as numerical models, e.g., temperature, aquifers, and velocity. This also includes validated raw data, e.g., seismic profiles, from which the models where derived. All these datasets are of high quality and of unique scientific value as the process of modeling is time and cost intensive. However, these models are currently not easily accessible for the wider scientific community, much less to the public. For the provision of these data sets a data management platform based on common and standardized data models, protocols, and encodings as well as on a predominant use of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) has been devised. The interoperability for disciplinary and domain applications thus highly depends on the adoption of generally agreed technologies and standards (OGC, ISO…) originating from Spatial Data Infrastructure related efforts (e.g., INSPIRE). However, since not many standards for 3D and 4D geological data exists, this work also includes new approaches for project data management, interfaces for tools used by the researchers, and interfaces for the sharing and reusing of data.

  11. Comprehensive 4D velocity mapping of the heart and great vessels by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is able to measure all three directional components of the velocities of blood flow relative to the three spatial dimensions and the time course of the heart cycle. In this article, methods used for the acquisition, visualization, and quantification of such datasets are reviewed and illustrated. Methods Currently, the acquisition of 3D cine (4D) phase contrast velocity data, synchronized relative to both cardiac and respiratory movements takes about ten minutes or more, even when using parallel imaging and optimized pulse sequence design. The large resulting datasets need appropriate post processing for the visualization of multidirectional flow, for example as vector fields, pathlines or streamlines, or for retrospective volumetric quantification. Applications Multidirectional velocity acquisitions have provided 3D visualization of large scale flow features of the healthy heart and great vessels, and have shown altered patterns of flow in abnormal chambers and vessels. Clinically relevant examples include retrograde streams in atheromatous descending aortas as potential thrombo-embolic pathways in patients with cryptogenic stroke and marked variations of flow visualized in common aortic pathologies. Compared to standard clinical tools, 4D velocity mapping offers the potential for retrospective quantification of flow and other hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions Multidirectional, 3D cine velocity acquisitions are contributing to the understanding of normal and pathologically altered blood flow features. Although more rapid and user-friendly strategies for acquisition and analysis may be needed before 4D velocity acquisitions come to be adopted in routine clinical CMR, their capacity to measure multidirectional flows throughout a study volume has contributed novel insights into cardiovascular fluid dynamics in health and disease. PMID:21235751

  12. Optical and mechanical detection of near-field light by atomic force microscopy using a piezoelectric cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Kei; Watanabe, Shunji; Fujii, Toru; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we developed an atomic force microscopy (AFM) system with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) using a microfabricated force-sensing cantilever with a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film. Both optical and mechanical detection techniques were adopted in SNOM to detect scattered light induced by the interaction of the PZT cantilever tip apex and evanescent light, and SNOM images were obtained for each detection scheme. The mechanical detection technique did allow for a clear observation of the light scattered from the PZT cantilever without the interference observed by the optical detection technique, which used an objective lens, a pinhole, and a photomultiplier tube.

  13. One-Wave Optical Phase Conjugation Mirror by Actively Coupling Arbitrary Light Fields into a Single-Mode Reflector.

    PubMed

    Lee, KyeoReh; Lee, Junsung; Park, Jung-Hoon; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2015-10-01

    Rewinding the arrow of time via phase conjugation is an intriguing phenomenon made possible by the wave property of light. Here, we demonstrate the realization of a one-wave optical phase conjugation mirror using a spatial light modulator. An adaptable single-mode filter is created, and a phase-conjugate beam is then prepared by reverse propagation through this filter. Our method is simple, alignment free, and fast while allowing high power throughput in the time-reversed wave, which has not been simultaneously demonstrated before. Using our method, we demonstrate high throughput full-field light delivery through highly scattering biological tissue and multimode fibers, even for quantum dot fluorescence.

  14. A cross-platform solution for light field based 3D telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gengkun; Xiang, Wei; Pickering, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Current telehealth services are dominated by conventional 2D video conferencing systems, which are limited in their capabilities in providing a satisfactory communication experience due to the lack of realism. The "immersiveness" provided by 3D technologies has the potential to promote telehealth services to a wider range of applications. However, conventional stereoscopic 3D technologies are deficient in many aspects, including low resolution and the requirement for complicated multi-camera setup and calibration, and special glasses. The advent of light field (LF) photography enables us to record light rays in a single shot and provide glasses-free 3D display with continuous motion parallax in a wide viewing zone, which is ideally suited for 3D telehealth applications. As far as our literature review suggests, there have been no reports of 3D telemedicine systems using LF technology. In this paper, we propose a cross-platform solution for a LF-based 3D telemedicine system. Firstly, a novel system architecture based on LF technology is established, which is able to capture the LF of a patient, and provide an immersive 3D display at the doctor site. For 3D modeling, we further propose an algorithm which is able to convert the captured LF to a 3D model with a high level of detail. For the software implementation on different platforms (i.e., desktop, web-based and mobile phone platforms), a cross-platform solution is proposed. Demo applications have been developed for 2D/3D video conferencing, 3D model display and edit, blood pressure and heart rate monitoring, and patient data viewing functions. The demo software can be extended to multi-discipline telehealth applications, such as tele-dentistry, tele-wound and tele-psychiatry. The proposed 3D telemedicine solution has the potential to revolutionize next-generation telemedicine technologies by providing a high quality immersive tele-consultation experience. PMID:26689324

  15. A cross-platform solution for light field based 3D telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gengkun; Xiang, Wei; Pickering, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Current telehealth services are dominated by conventional 2D video conferencing systems, which are limited in their capabilities in providing a satisfactory communication experience due to the lack of realism. The "immersiveness" provided by 3D technologies has the potential to promote telehealth services to a wider range of applications. However, conventional stereoscopic 3D technologies are deficient in many aspects, including low resolution and the requirement for complicated multi-camera setup and calibration, and special glasses. The advent of light field (LF) photography enables us to record light rays in a single shot and provide glasses-free 3D display with continuous motion parallax in a wide viewing zone, which is ideally suited for 3D telehealth applications. As far as our literature review suggests, there have been no reports of 3D telemedicine systems using LF technology. In this paper, we propose a cross-platform solution for a LF-based 3D telemedicine system. Firstly, a novel system architecture based on LF technology is established, which is able to capture the LF of a patient, and provide an immersive 3D display at the doctor site. For 3D modeling, we further propose an algorithm which is able to convert the captured LF to a 3D model with a high level of detail. For the software implementation on different platforms (i.e., desktop, web-based and mobile phone platforms), a cross-platform solution is proposed. Demo applications have been developed for 2D/3D video conferencing, 3D model display and edit, blood pressure and heart rate monitoring, and patient data viewing functions. The demo software can be extended to multi-discipline telehealth applications, such as tele-dentistry, tele-wound and tele-psychiatry. The proposed 3D telemedicine solution has the potential to revolutionize next-generation telemedicine technologies by providing a high quality immersive tele-consultation experience.

  16. Home lighting before usual bedtime impacts circadian timing: a field study.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Helen J; Molina, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory studies suggest that evening light before bedtime can suppress melatonin. Here, we measured the range of evening light intensity people can generate with their household lights, and for the first time determined if varying home light before usual bedtime can shift circadian phase. This was a 3-week study with two counterbalanced conditions separated by a 5-day break. In a dim week, eight healthy subjects minimized their home light exposure from 4 h before habitual bedtime until a self-selected bedtime. In a bright week, the subjects maximized their home lighting for the same time. The dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was assessed after each week. On average subjects maximized their lights to approximately 65 lux and minimized their lights to approximately 3 lux. Wrist actigraphy indicated that subjects went to bed slightly later when lights were maximized (average 14 min later, P = 0.05), but wake time did not change. Every subject had a later DLMO after the week of maximum versus minimum light exposure (average 1:03 h later, P < 0.001). These results demonstrate that the light intensity people can generate at home in the few hours before habitual bedtime can alter circadian timing. People should reduce their evening light exposure to lessen circadian misalignment.

  17. Home Lighting Before Usual Bedtime Impacts Circadian Timing: A Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Helen J.; Molina, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory studies suggest that evening light before bedtime can suppress melatonin. Here we measured the range of evening light intensity people can generate with their household lights, and for the first time determined if varying home light before usual bedtime can shift circadian phase. This was a 3-week study with two counterbalanced conditions separated by a 5-day break. In a dim week, 8 healthy subjects minimized their home light exposure from 4 hours before habitual bedtime until a self-selected bedtime. In a bright week, the subjects maximized their home lighting for the same time. The dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was assessed after each week. On average subjects maximized their lights to ~65 lux and minimized their lights to ~3 lux. Wrist actigraphy indicated that subjects went to bed slightly later when lights were maximized (average 14 minutes later, p=0.05), but wake time did not change. Every subject had a later DLMO after the week of maximum versus minimum light exposure (average 1:03 h later, p<0.001). These results demonstrate that the light intensity people can generate at home in the few hours before habitual bedtime can alter circadian timing. People should reduce their evening light exposure to lessen circadian misalignment. PMID:24918238

  18. 4D imaging of protein aggregation in live cells.

    PubMed

    Spokoini, Rachel; Shamir, Maya; Keness, Alma; Kaganovich, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    ubiquitinated are diverted to the IPOD, where they are actively aggregated in a protective compartment. Up until this point, the methodological paradigm of live-cell fluorescence microscopy has largely been to label proteins and track their locations in the cell at specific time-points and usually in two dimensions. As new technologies have begun to grant experimenters unprecedented access to the submicron scale in living cells, the dynamic architecture of the cytosol has come into view as a challenging new frontier for experimental characterization. We present a method for rapidly monitoring the 3D spatial distributions of multiple fluorescently labeled proteins in the yeast cytosol over time. 3D timelapse (4D imaging) is not merely a technical challenge; rather, it also facilitates a dramatic shift in the conceptual framework used to analyze cellular structure. We utilize a cytosolic folding sensor protein in live yeast to visualize distinct fates for misfolded proteins in cellular aggregation quality control, using rapid 4D fluorescent imaging. The temperature sensitive mutant of the Ubc9 protein (Ubc9(ts)) is extremely effective both as a sensor of cellular proteostasis, and a physiological model for tracking aggregation quality control. As with most ts proteins, Ubc9(ts) is fully folded and functional at permissive temperatures due to active cellular chaperones. Above 30 ° C, or when the cell faces misfolding stress, Ubc9(ts) misfolds and follows the fate of a native globular protein that has been misfolded due to mutation, heat denaturation, or oxidative damage. By fusing it to GFP or other fluorophores, it can be tracked in 3D as it forms Stress Foci, or is directed to JUNQ or IPOD. PMID:23608881

  19. GRAM 88 - 4D GLOBAL REFERENCE ATMOSPHERE MODEL-1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    the Jacchia values. Below 25km the atmospheric parameters are computed by the 4-D worldwide atmospheric model of Spiegler and Fowler (1972). This data set is not included. GRAM-88 incorporates a hydrostatic/gas law check in the 0-30 km altitude range to flag and change any bad data points. Between 5km and 30km, an interpolation scheme is used between the 4-D results and the modified Groves values. The output parameters consist of components for: (1) latitude, longitude, and altitude dependent monthly and annual means, (2) quasi-biennial oscillations (QBO), and (3) random perturbations to partially simulate the variability due to synoptic, diurnal, planetary wave, and gravity wave variations. Quasi-biennial and random variation perturbations are computed from parameters determined by various empirical studies and are added to the monthly mean values. The GRAM-88 program is for batch execution on the IBM 3084. It is written in STANDARD FORTRAN 77 under the MVS/XA operating system. The IBM DISPLA graphics routines are necessary for graphical output. The program was developed in 1988.

  20. Fast interactive exploration of 4D MRI flow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennemuth, A.; Friman, O.; Schumann, C.; Bock, J.; Drexl, J.; Huellebrand, M.; Markl, M.; Peitgen, H.-O.

    2011-03-01

    1- or 2-directional MRI blood flow mapping sequences are an integral part of standard MR protocols for diagnosis and therapy control in heart diseases. Recent progress in rapid MRI has made it possible to acquire volumetric, 3-directional cine images in reasonable scan time. In addition to flow and velocity measurements relative to arbitrarily oriented image planes, the analysis of 3-dimensional trajectories enables the visualization of flow patterns, local features of flow trajectories or possible paths into specific regions. The anatomical and functional information allows for advanced hemodynamic analysis in different application areas like stroke risk assessment, congenital and acquired heart disease, aneurysms or abdominal collaterals and cranial blood flow. The complexity of the 4D MRI flow datasets and the flow related image analysis tasks makes the development of fast comprehensive data exploration software for advanced flow analysis a challenging task. Most existing tools address only individual aspects of the analysis pipeline such as pre-processing, quantification or visualization, or are difficult to use for clinicians. The goal of the presented work is to provide a software solution that supports the whole image analysis pipeline and enables data exploration with fast intuitive interaction and visualization methods. The implemented methods facilitate the segmentation and inspection of different vascular systems. Arbitrary 2- or 3-dimensional regions for quantitative analysis and particle tracing can be defined interactively. Synchronized views of animated 3D path lines, 2D velocity or flow overlays and flow curves offer a detailed insight into local hemodynamics. The application of the analysis pipeline is shown for 6 cases from clinical practice, illustrating the usefulness for different clinical questions. Initial user tests show that the software is intuitive to learn and even inexperienced users achieve good results within reasonable processing