Science.gov

Sample records for 4d seismic tomography

  1. 4D Electron Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-06-01

    Electron tomography provides three-dimensional (3D) imaging of noncrystalline and crystalline equilibrium structures, as well as elemental volume composition, of materials and biological specimens, including those of viruses and cells. We report the development of 4D electron tomography by integrating the fourth dimension (time resolution) with the 3D spatial resolution obtained from a complete tilt series of 2D projections of an object. The different time frames of tomograms constitute a movie of the object in motion, thus enabling studies of nonequilibrium structures and transient processes. The method was demonstrated using carbon nanotubes of a bracelet-like ring structure for which 4D tomograms display different modes of motion, such as breathing and wiggling, with resonance frequencies up to 30 megahertz. Applications can now make use of the full space-time range with the nanometer-femtosecond resolution of ultrafast electron tomography.

  2. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  3. Reservoir Characterization around Geothermal Field, West Java, Indonesia Derived from 4-D Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdhora Ry, Rexha; Nugraha, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Observation of micro-seismic events induced by intensive geothermal exploitation in a particular geothermal field, located in West Java region, Indonesia was used to detect the fracture and permeability zone. Using local monitoring seismometer network, tomographic inversions were conducted for the three-dimensional Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs structure of the reservoir for January - December 2007, January - December 2008, and January - December 2009. First, hypocenters location was relocated using joint hypocenter determination (JHD) method in purpose to estimate best location. Then, seismic tomographic inversions were conducted using delay time tomography for dataset of every year respectively. The travel times passing through the three-dimensional velocity model were calculated using ray tracing pseudo-bending method. Norm and gradient damping were added to constrain blocks without ray and to produce smooth solution model. The inversion algorithm was developed in Matlab environment. Our tomographic inversion results from 3-years of observations indicate the presence of low Vp, low Vs, and low Vp/Vs ratio at depths of about 1 - 3 km below sea level. These features were interpreted may be related to steam-saturated rock in the reservoir area of this geothermal field. The locations of the reservoir area were supported by the data of well- trajectory, where the zones of high Vp/Vs were observed around the injection wells and the zones of low Vp/Vs were observed around the production wells. The extensive low Vp/Vs anomaly that occupies the reservoir is getting stronger during the 3-years study period. This is probably attributed to depletion of pore liquid water in the reservoir and replacement with steam. Continuous monitoring of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs is an effective tool for geothermal reservoir characterization and depletion monitoring and can potentially provide information in parts of the reservoir which have not been drilled.

  4. Seismic Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Don L.; Dziewonski, Adam M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes how seismic tomography is used to analyze the waves produced by earthquakes. The information obtained from the procedure can then be used to map the earth's mantle in three dimensions. The resulting maps are then studied to determine such information as the convective flow that propels the crustal plates. (JN)

  5. Soft Route to 4D Tomography.

    PubMed

    Taillandier-Thomas, Thibault; Roux, Stéphane; Hild, François

    2016-07-01

    Based on the assumption that the time evolution of a sample observed by computed tomography requires many less parameters than the definition of the microstructure itself, it is proposed to reconstruct these changes based on the initial state (using computed tomography) and very few radiographs acquired at fixed intervals of time. This Letter presents a proof of concept that for a fatigue cracked sample its kinematics can be tracked from no more than two radiographs in situations where a complete 3D view would require several hundreds of radiographs. This 2 order of magnitude gain opens the way to a "computed" 4D tomography, which complements the recent progress achieved in fast or ultrafast computed tomography, which is based on beam brightness, detector sensitivity, and signal acquisition technologies.

  6. Soft Route to 4D Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillandier-Thomas, Thibault; Roux, Stéphane; Hild, François

    2016-07-01

    Based on the assumption that the time evolution of a sample observed by computed tomography requires many less parameters than the definition of the microstructure itself, it is proposed to reconstruct these changes based on the initial state (using computed tomography) and very few radiographs acquired at fixed intervals of time. This Letter presents a proof of concept that for a fatigue cracked sample its kinematics can be tracked from no more than two radiographs in situations where a complete 3D view would require several hundreds of radiographs. This 2 order of magnitude gain opens the way to a "computed" 4D tomography, which complements the recent progress achieved in fast or ultrafast computed tomography, which is based on beam brightness, detector sensitivity, and signal acquisition technologies.

  7. 4-D reconstruction for dynamic fluorescence diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Bin; Luo, Jianwen; Bai, Jing

    2012-11-01

    Dynamic fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is important for the research of drug delivery, medical diagnosis and treatment. Conventionally, dynamic tomographic images are reconstructed frame by frame, independently. This approach fails to account for the temporal correlations in measurement data. Ideally, the entire image sequence should be considered as a whole and a four-dimensional (4-D) reconstruction should be performed. However, the fully 4-D reconstruction is computationally intensive. In this paper, we propose a new 4-D reconstruction approach for dynamic FDOT, which is achieved by applying a temporal Karhunen-Loève (KL) transformation to the imaging equation. By taking advantage of the decorrelation and compression properties of the KL transformation, the complex 4-D optical reconstruction problem is greatly simplified. To evaluate the performance of the method, simulation, phantom, and in vivo experiments (N=7) are performed on a hybrid FDOT/x-ray computed tomography imaging system. The experimental results indicate that the reconstruction images obtained by the KL method provide good reconstruction quality. Additionally, by discarding high-order KL components, the computation time involved with fully 4-D reconstruction can be greatly reduced in contrast to the conventional frame-by-frame reconstruction.

  8. Time-dependent seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Foulger, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    Of methods for measuring temporal changes in seismic-wave speeds in the Earth, seismic tomography is among those that offer the highest spatial resolution. 3-D tomographic methods are commonly applied in this context by inverting seismic wave arrival time data sets from different epochs independently and assuming that differences in the derived structures represent real temporal variations. This assumption is dangerous because the results of independent inversions would differ even if the structure in the Earth did not change, due to observational errors and differences in the seismic ray distributions. The latter effect may be especially severe when data sets include earthquake swarms or aftershock sequences, and may produce the appearance of correlation between structural changes and seismicity when the wave speeds are actually temporally invariant. A better approach, which makes it possible to assess what changes are truly required by the data, is to invert multiple data sets simultaneously, minimizing the difference between models for different epochs as well as the rms arrival-time residuals. This problem leads, in the case of two epochs, to a system of normal equations whose order is twice as great as for a single epoch. The direct solution of this system would require twice as much memory and four times as much computational effort as would independent inversions. We present an algorithm, tomo4d, that takes advantage of the structure and sparseness of the system to obtain the solution with essentially no more effort than independent inversions require. No claim to original US government works Journal compilation ?? 2010 RAS.

  9. 4D embryonic cardiography using gated optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, M. W.; Rothenberg, F.; Roy, D.; Nikolski, V. P.; Hu, Z.; Watanabe, M.; Wilson, D. L.; Efimov, I. R.; Rollins, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of very early embryonic heart structure and function has technical limitations of spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed a gated technique using optical coherence tomography (OCT) that can rapidly image beating embryonic hearts in four-dimensions (4D), at high spatial resolution (10-15 μm), and with a depth penetration of 1.5 - 2.0 mm that is suitable for the study of early embryonic hearts. We acquired data from paced, excised, embryonic chicken and mouse hearts using gated sampling and employed image processing techniques to visualize the hearts in 4D and measure physiologic parameters such as cardiac volume, ejection fraction, and wall thickness. This technique is being developed to longitudinally investigate the physiology of intact embryonic hearts and events that lead to congenital heart defects.

  10. Binary 4D seismic history matching, a metric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassagne, Romain; Obidegwu, Dennis; Dambrine, Julien; MacBeth, Colin

    2016-11-01

    This paper explores 4D seismic history matching and it specifically focuses on the objective function used during the optimisation with seismic data. The objective function is calculated by using binary maps, where one map is obtained from the observed seismic data and the other is from one realisation of the optimisation algorithm from the simulation model. In order to decide which set of parameters is a relevant update for the simulation model, an efficient way is required to measure how similar these two binary images are, during their evaluation within the objective function. Behind this aspect of quantification of the similarities or dissimilarities lies the metric notion, or the art of measuring distances. Four metrics are proposed with this study, the well-known Hamming distance, two widely used metrics, the Hausdorff distance and Mutual Information and a recent metric, called the Current Measure Metric. These metrics will be tested and compared on different case scenarios, designed in accordance to a real field case (gas exsolution) before being used in the second part of the paper. Despite its simplicity, the Hamming distance gives positive results, but the Current Measure Metric appears to be a more efficient choice to cover a wider range of scenarios, these conclusions remain true when tested on synthetic and real dataset in a history matching exercise. Some practical aspects of binary map processes will be examined through the paper, as it is shown that it is more proper to use a derivative free optimisation algorithm and a proper metric should be more inclined to capture global features than local features.

  11. Transdimensional Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, T.; Sambridge, M.

    2009-12-01

    In seismic imaging the degree of model complexity is usually determined by manually tuning damping parameters within a fixed parameterization chosen in advance. Here we present an alternative methodology for seismic travel time tomography where the model complexity is controlled automatically by the data. In particular we use a variable parametrization consisting of Voronoi cells with mobile geometry, shape and number, all treated as unknowns in the inversion. The reversible jump algorithm is used to sample the transdimensional model space within a Bayesian framework which avoids global damping procedures and the need to tune regularisation parameters. The method is an ensemble inference approach, as many potential solutions are generated with variable numbers of cells. Information is extracted from the ensemble as a whole by performing Monte Carlo integration to produce the expected Earth model. The ensemble of models can also be used to produce velocity uncertainty estimates and experiments with synthetic data suggest they represent actual uncertainty surprisingly well. In a transdimensional approach, the level of data uncertainty directly determines the model complexity needed to satisfy the data. Intriguingly, the Bayesian formulation can be extended to the case where data uncertainty is also uncertain. Experiments show that it is possible to recover data noise estimate while at the same time controlling model complexity in an automated fashion. The method is tested on synthetic data in a 2-D application and compared with a more standard matrix based inversion scheme. The method has also been applied to real data obtained from cross correlation of ambient noise where little is known about the size of the errors associated with the travel times. As an example, a tomographic image of Rayleigh wave group velocity for the Australian continent is constructed for 5s data together with uncertainty estimates.

  12. 4-D Transdimensional Tomography of Iceland Using Ambient Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, D.; Tkalcic, H.; Young, M.

    2012-12-01

    Located at the east of Greenland and immediately south of Arctic Circle, Iceland is the largest volcanic island in the world and represents a unique region of particular interest to geosciences. Various seismological imaging techniques have been deployed to shed light on composition and thickness of the Icelandic crust with serious geodynamic repercussions (for a recent review, see Foulger (2010)). Due to an abundance of active volcanoes, Iceland can be considered a natural laboratory for studying volcanic earthquakes with anomalous seismic radiation (e.g. Tkalcic et al., 2009; Fichtner and Tkalcic, 2010). Temporal changes in the velocity field due to volcanic processes effect seismic waveforms and are important to consider in the context of seismic sources, whose understanding relies on complete understanding of Earth structure. Apart from reflection and refraction studies and teleseismic signals, ambient noise tomography has been recently utilised to image shallow subsurface of Iceland (Gudmundson et al., 2007). The confluence of North Atlantic and Arctic oceans delivers a strong and relatively evenly distributed noise field, therefore making Iceland an ideal place for an ambient noise study. We initially attempt to confirm previous results of Gudmundson et al. (2007) using conventional surface wave tomography derived from Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion, with fast marching method as a method of choice for forward modelling (Rawlinson and Sambridge, 2005). We perform cross-correlation over several three-month time intervals of ambient noise obtained from the HOTSPOT experiment (Foulger et al., 2001) distributed across Iceland and we discuss seasonal variation observed in cross-correlograms. To extend conventional methods of imaging, trans-dimensional and hierarchical Bayesian sampling methods are used to produce a multidimensional posterior probability distribution of seismic velocity field. We use a trans-dimensional Bayesian inverse method, as it has an

  13. Wave Propagation in the Ionosphere Associated With Earthquakes Revealed by GPS- TEC 4D Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watada, S.; Obayashi, M.; Ozawa, S.

    2008-12-01

    Hi-density high-rate sampling GPS network data is ideal for imaging quickly changing 3D structures in the ionosphere. GPS-TEC observation by GEONET in Japan during the 2003 Tokachi-Oki earthquake shows a clear propagating ionospheric disturbance. Heki and Ping (2005) interpreted the phenomena as a propagating sound wave in the thermosphere which was originally radiated into the atmosphere from the earthquake source region. To understand the ionosphere disturbance directly, we developed 4D ionosphere tomography method as an extension of a mantle tomography method to retrieve 3D seismic velocity structure of the mantle from traveltimes of seismic body waves from earthquakes to the seismic stations. We applied this tomography method to 1 Hz GPS-TEC data from GEONET which provides a dense line of sight coverage of space and time above and around the Japanese islands during and the after the earthquake. The image results show dispersive propagating waves, i.e., the phase speed of the waves is different from the wave energy propagation speed. The first phase, which appears first 100 km above the epicenter area, propagates horizontally with a phase speed about 1km/s and the secondary phase propagates slower. A close examination of the propagation of the first phase shows dispersion of the phase. The positive peak of the first phase travels 10% faster than the negative peak so that the peak shape broadens as it proceeds. The amplitude of the positive peak diminishes as it propagates over 1400 km distance from the source region. In contrast to the positive peak, the negative peak first appears as small amplitude and grows after traveling over 1000 km from the source region. Study of the evolution of the 4D GPS-TEC disturbance will provide rich information about the mechanisms of generation and propagation of ionospheric disturbance through the solid-earth-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling. Ionospheric disturbance can be generated from land surface deformation and the ocean

  14. Mantle dynamics and seismic tomography.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, T; Lay, T

    2000-11-01

    Three-dimensional imaging of the Earth's interior, called seismic tomography, has achieved breakthrough advances in the last two decades, revealing fundamental geodynamical processes throughout the Earth's mantle and core. Convective circulation of the entire mantle is taking place, with subducted oceanic lithosphere sinking into the lower mantle, overcoming the resistance to penetration provided by the phase boundary near 650-km depth that separates the upper and lower mantle. The boundary layer at the base of the mantle has been revealed to have complex structure, involving local stratification, extensive structural anisotropy, and massive regions of partial melt. The Earth's high Rayleigh number convective regime now is recognized to be much more interesting and complex than suggested by textbook cartoons, and continued advances in seismic tomography, geodynamical modeling, and high-pressure-high-temperature mineral physics will be needed to fully quantify the complex dynamics of our planet's interior.

  15. 4-D monitoring of the Solfatara crater (Italy) by ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilz, M.; Woith, H.; Parolai, S.; Festa, G.

    2014-12-01

    Imaging shallow subsurface structures and monitoring related temporal variations are two of the main tasks for modern seismology. Although many observations have reported temporal velocity changes, e.g., in volcanic areas and on landslides, new methods based on passive sources like ambient seismic noise can provide accurate spatially and temporally resolved information on the velocity structure and on velocity changes. The success of these passive applications is explained by the fact that these methods are based on surface waves which are always present in the ambient seismic noise wave field because they are excited preferentially by superficial sources. Such surface waves can easily be extracted because they dominate the Green´s function between receivers located at the surface. For real-time monitoring of the shallow velocity structure of the Solfatara crater, one the forty volcanoes in the Campi Flegrei area characterized by an intense hydrothermal activity due to the interaction of deep convection and meteoric water, we have installed a dense network of 50 seismological sensing units covering the whole surface area in the framework of the European project MED-SUV. Continuous recordings of the ambient seismic noise over several days as well as signals of an active vibroseis source have been used. Based on a weighted inversion procedure for 3D-passive imaging using ambient noise cross-correlations of both Rayleigh and Love waves, we will present a high-resolution velocity model of the structure beneath the Solfatara crater. We discuss why and how it is possible to perform high precision and real-time monitoring of temporal changes in the properties of the propagation medium at small scales. In particular, we will focus on the depth resolution of the presented approach and further discuss the perspectives of noise-based real-time 4-D tomography.

  16. Respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography: A novel method to reduce imaging dose

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Benjamin J.; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Balik, Salim; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Keall, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A novel method called respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is described whereby imaging dose can be reduced without degrading image quality. RT 4D CBCT utilizes a respiratory signal to trigger projections such that only a single projection is assigned to a given respiratory bin for each breathing cycle. In contrast, commercial 4D CBCT does not actively use the respiratory signal to minimize image dose. Methods: To compare RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, 3600 CBCT projections of a thorax phantom were gathered and reconstructed to generate a ground truth CBCT dataset. Simulation pairs of conventional 4D CBCT acquisitions and RT 4D CBCT acquisitions were developed assuming a sinusoidal respiratory signal which governs the selection of projections from the pool of 3600 original projections. The RT 4D CBCT acquisition triggers a single projection when the respiratory signal enters a desired acquisition bin; the conventional acquisition does not use a respiratory trigger and projections are acquired at a constant frequency. Acquisition parameters studied were breathing period, acquisition time, and imager frequency. The performance of RT 4D CBCT using phase based and displacement based sorting was also studied. Image quality was quantified by calculating difference images of the test dataset from the ground truth dataset. Imaging dose was calculated by counting projections. Results: Using phase based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 47% less imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT. Image quality differences were less than 4% at worst. Using displacement based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 57% less imaging dose on average, than conventional 4D CBCT methods; however, image quality was 26% worse with RT 4D CBCT. Conclusions: Simulation studies have shown that RT 4D CBCT reduces imaging dose while maintaining comparable image quality for phase based 4D CBCT; image quality is degraded for displacement based RT 4D

  17. Impact of Petrophysical Experiments on Quantitative Interpretation of 4D Seismic Data at Ketzin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A.; Lueth, S.

    2015-12-01

    Petrophysical investigations for CCS concern relationships between physical properties of rocks and geophysical observations for understanding behavior of injected CO2 in a geological formation. In turn 4D seismic surveying is a proven tool for CO2 monitoring. At the Ketzin pilot site (Germany) 4D seismic data have been acquired by means of a baseline (pre-injection) survey in 2005 and monitor surveys in 2009 and 2012. At Ketzin CO2 was injected in supercritical state from 2008 to 2013 in a sandstone saline aquifer (Stuttgart Formation) at a depth of about 650 m. The 4D seismic data from Ketzin reflected a pronounced effect of this injection. Seismic forward modeling using results of petrophysical experiments on two core samples fromthe target reservoir confirmed that effects of the injected CO2 on the 4D seismic data are significant. The petrophysical data were used in that modeling in order to reflect changes due to the CO2 injection in acoustic parameters of the reservoir. These petrophysical data were further used for a successful quantitative interpretation of the 4D seismic data at Ketzin. Now logs from a well (drilled in 2012) penetrating the reservoir containing information about changes in the acoustic parameters of the reservoir due to the CO2 injection are available. These logs were used to estimate impact of the petrophysical data on the qualitative and quantitative interpretation of the 4D seismic data at Ketzin. New synthetic seismograms were computed using the same software and the same wavelet as the old ones apart from the only difference and namely the changes in the input acoustic parameters would not be affected with any petrophysical experiments anymore. Now these changes were put in computing directly from the logs. In turn the new modelled changes due to the injection in the newly computed seismograms do not include any effects of the petrophysical data anymore. Key steps of the quantitative and qualitative interpretation of the 4D seismic

  18. Monitoring High Velocity Salt Tracer via 4D Electrical Resistivity Tomography - Possibility for Salt Tracer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doro, K. O.; Cirpka, O. A.; Patzelt, A.; Leven, C.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogeological testing in a tomographic sequence as shown by the use of hydraulic tomography, allows an improvement of the spatial resolution of subsurface parameters. In this regard, recent studies show increasing interest in tracer tomography which involves sequential and spatially separated tracer injections and the measurement of their corresponding tracer breakthrough at different locations and depths. Such concentration measurements however require large experimental efforts and can be simplified by geophysical tracer monitoring techniques such as electrical resistivity. In this study, we present the use of 4-D, cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for monitoring salt tracer experiments in high velocity flow fields. For our study, we utilized a set up that enables the conduction of salt tracer experiments with complete recovery within 84 hours over a transport distance of 16 m. This allows the repetition of the experiments with different injection depths for a tomographic salt tracer testing. For ERT monitoring, we designed modular borehole electrodes for repeated usage in a flexible manner. We also assess the use of a high speed resistivity data acquisition mode for field scale tracer monitoring ensuring high spatial and temporal resolution without sacrificing data accuracy. We applied our approach at the Lauswiesen test site, Tübingen, Germany. In our 10 m × 10 m tracer monitoring domain with 16 borehole electrodes, we acquired 4650 data points in less than 18 minutes for each monitoring cycle. Inversion results show that the tracer could be successfully imaged using this approach. The results show that repeated salt tracer tests can be efficiently monitored at a high resolution with ERT which gives the possibility for salt tracer tomography at field scale. Our results also provide a data base for extending current hydrogeophysical inversion approaches to field scale data.

  19. Live 4D optical coherence tomography for early embryonic mouse cardiac phenotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Andrew L.; Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-03-01

    Studying embryonic mouse development is important for our understanding of normal human embryogenesis and the underlying causes of congenital defects. Our research focuses on imaging early development in the mouse embryo to specifically understand cardiovascular development using optical coherence tomography (OCT). We have previously developed imaging approaches that combine static embryo culture, OCT imaging and advanced image processing to visualize the whole live mouse embryos and obtain 4D (3D+time) cardiodynamic datasets with cellular resolution. Here, we present the study of using 4D OCT for dynamic imaging of early embryonic heart in live mouse embryos to assess mutant cardiac phenotypes during development, including a cardiac looping defect. Our results indicate that the live 4D OCT imaging approach is an efficient phenotyping tool that can reveal structural and functional cardiac defects at very early stages. Further studies integrating live embryonic cardiodynamic phenotyping with molecular and genetic approaches in mouse mutants will help to elucidate the underlying signaling defects.

  20. The lunar seismic tomography and internal heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, N.; Zhu, P.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, J.

    2012-12-01

    A seismic tomography is presented to show the internal lateral heterogeneities of moon. The lunar seismic tomography is made from the moonquake arrival-time data acquired by the Apollo program during 1971 to 1977. The seismic records obtained from the four seismic station of Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package on the moon. The research target covers the surround of Apollo-12, 14, 15 and 16 landing sites. A preliminary image of three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity structures of lunar interior have been calculated using hundreds of arrival-times of moonquake events from surface to deep mantle. These results show that some evidences of lateral heterogeneities in the lunar mantle and crust, which implies the existence of complex structure inside the moon.

  1. Automated Lung Segmentation and Image Quality Assessment for Clinical 3-D/4-D-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang

    2014-01-01

    4-D-computed tomography (4DCT) provides not only a new dimension of patient-specific information for radiation therapy planning and treatment, but also a challenging scale of data volume to process and analyze. Manual analysis using existing 3-D tools is unable to keep up with vastly increased 4-D data volume, automated processing and analysis are thus needed to process 4DCT data effectively and efficiently. In this paper, we applied ideas and algorithms from image/signal processing, computer vision, and machine learning to 4DCT lung data so that lungs can be reliably segmented in a fully automated manner, lung features can be visualized and measured on the fly via user interactions, and data quality classifications can be computed in a robust manner. Comparisons of our results with an established treatment planning system and calculation by experts demonstrated negligible discrepancies (within ±2%) for volume assessment but one to two orders of magnitude performance enhancement. An empirical Fourier-analysis-based quality measure-delivered performances closely emulating human experts. Three machine learners are inspected to justify the viability of machine learning techniques used to robustly identify data quality of 4DCT images in the scalable manner. The resultant system provides a toolkit that speeds up 4-D tasks in the clinic and facilitates clinical research to improve current clinical practice. PMID:25621194

  2. Global surface wave tomography using seismic hum.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi

    2009-10-01

    The development of global surface wave tomography using earthquakes has been crucial to exploration of the dynamic status of Earth's deep. It is naturally believed that only large earthquakes can generate long-period seismic waves that penetrate deep enough into Earth for such exploration. The discovery of seismic hum, Earth's background free oscillations, which are randomly generated by oceanic and/or atmospheric disturbances, now provides an alternative approach. We present results of global upper-mantle seismic tomography using seismic hum and without referring to earthquakes. At periods of 100 to 400 seconds, the phase-velocity anomalies of Rayleigh waves are measured by modeling the observed cross-correlation functions between every pair of stations from among 54 globally distributed seismic stations. The anomalies are then inverted to obtain the three-dimensional S-wave velocity structure in the upper mantle. Our technique provides a new means for exploring the three-dimensional structure of the interior of terrestrial planets with an atmosphere and/or oceans, particularly Mars. PMID:19797654

  3. Global surface wave tomography using seismic hum.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi

    2009-10-01

    The development of global surface wave tomography using earthquakes has been crucial to exploration of the dynamic status of Earth's deep. It is naturally believed that only large earthquakes can generate long-period seismic waves that penetrate deep enough into Earth for such exploration. The discovery of seismic hum, Earth's background free oscillations, which are randomly generated by oceanic and/or atmospheric disturbances, now provides an alternative approach. We present results of global upper-mantle seismic tomography using seismic hum and without referring to earthquakes. At periods of 100 to 400 seconds, the phase-velocity anomalies of Rayleigh waves are measured by modeling the observed cross-correlation functions between every pair of stations from among 54 globally distributed seismic stations. The anomalies are then inverted to obtain the three-dimensional S-wave velocity structure in the upper mantle. Our technique provides a new means for exploring the three-dimensional structure of the interior of terrestrial planets with an atmosphere and/or oceans, particularly Mars.

  4. A method to update fault transmissibility multipliers in the flow simulation model directly from 4D seismic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benguigui, Amran; Yin, Zhen; MacBeth, Colin

    2014-04-01

    We propose a new approach to update fault seal estimates in fluid flow simulation models by direct use of 4D seismic amplitudes calibrated by a well geological constraint. The method is suited to compartmentalized reservoirs and based on metrics created from differences in the 4D seismic signature on either side of major faults. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated by application to data from the fault controlled Heidrun field in the Norwegian Sea. The results of this application appear favourable and show that our method can detect variations of fault permeability along the major controlling faults in the field. Updates of the field simulation model with the 4D seismic-derived transmissibilities are observed to decrease the mismatch between the predicted and historical field production data in the majority of wells in our sector of interest.

  5. 3D and 4D magnetic susceptibility tomography based on complex MR images

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-11-11

    Magnetic susceptibility is the physical property for T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2*MRI). The invention relates to methods for reconstructing an internal distribution (3D map) of magnetic susceptibility values, .chi. (x,y,z), of an object, from 3D T2*MRI phase images, by using Computed Inverse Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CIMRI) tomography. The CIMRI technique solves the inverse problem of the 3D convolution by executing a 3D Total Variation (TV) regularized iterative convolution scheme, using a split Bregman iteration algorithm. The reconstruction of .chi. (x,y,z) can be designed for low-pass, band-pass, and high-pass features by using a convolution kernel that is modified from the standard dipole kernel. Multiple reconstructions can be implemented in parallel, and averaging the reconstructions can suppress noise. 4D dynamic magnetic susceptibility tomography can be implemented by reconstructing a 3D susceptibility volume from a 3D phase volume by performing 3D CIMRI magnetic susceptibility tomography at each snapshot time.

  6. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yanhua O.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wave speed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding non-uniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and practically. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relative (and thus higher resolution) structural variations in areas close to the stations. Whereas in conventional tomography a measurement made on a single earthquake-station pair provides very limited structural information, in double-difference tomography one earthquake can actually resolve significant details of the structure. The double-difference methodology can be incorporated into the usual adjoint tomography workflow by simply pairing up all conventional measurements; the computational cost of the necessary adjoint simulations is largely unaffected. Rather than adding to the computational burden, the inversion of double-difference measurements merely modifies the construction of the adjoint sources for data assimilation.

  7. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yanhua O.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wavespeed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings, and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding nonuniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and in practice. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relative (and thus higher-resolution) structural variations in areas close to the stations. Whereas in conventional tomography a measurement made on a single earthquake-station pair provides very limited structural information, in double-difference tomography one earthquake can actually resolve significant details of the structure. The double-difference methodology can be incorporated into the usual adjoint tomography workflow by simply pairing up all conventional measurements; the computational cost of the necessary adjoint simulations is largely unaffected. Rather than adding to the computational burden, the inversion of double-difference measurements merely modifies the construction of the adjoint sources for data assimilation.

  8. 4-D imaging and monitoring of the Solfatara crater (Italy) by ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilz, Marco; Parolai, Stefano; Woith, Heiko; Gresse, Marceau; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Imaging shallow subsurface structures and monitoring related temporal variations are two of the main tasks for modern geosciences and seismology. Although many observations have reported temporal velocity changes, e.g., in volcanic areas and on landslides, new methods based on passive sources like ambient seismic noise can provide accurate spatially and temporally resolved information on the velocity structure and on velocity changes. The success of these passive applications is explained by the fact that these methods are based on surface waves which are always present in the ambient seismic noise wave field because they are excited preferentially by superficial sources. Such surface waves can easily be extracted because they dominate the Greeńs function between receivers located at the surface. For real-time monitoring of the shallow velocity structure of the Solfatara crater, one of the forty volcanoes in the Campi Flegrei area characterized by an intense hydrothermal activity due to the interaction of deep convection and meteoric water, we have installed a dense network of 50 seismological sensing units covering the whole surface area in the framework of the European project MED-SUV (The MED-SUV project has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme FP7 under Grant agreement no 308665). Continuous recordings of the ambient seismic noise over several days as well as signals of an active vibroseis source have been used. Based on a weighted inversion procedure for 3D-passive imaging using ambient noise cross-correlations of both Rayleigh and Love waves, we will present a high-resolution shear-wave velocity model of the structure beneath the Solfatara crater and its temporal changes. Results of seismic tomography are compared with a 3-D electrical resistivity model and CO2 flux map.

  9. 4D Optical Coherence Tomography based Microangiography achieved by 1.6 MHz FDML Swept source

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Qin, Wan; Wang, Jingang; Wei, Wei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of an ultra-high speed swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) to achieve optical microangiography (OMAG) of microcirculatory tissue beds in vivo. The system is based on a 1310 nm Fourier domain mode locking (FDML) laser with 1.6MHz A-line rate, providing a frame rate of 3.415 KHz, an axial resolution of ~10 µm and signal to noise ratio of 102 dB. Motion from blood flow causes change in OCT signals between consecutive B-frames acquired at the same location. Intensity based inter-frame subtraction algorithm is applied to extract blood flow from tissue background without any motion correction. We demonstrate the capability of this 1.6 MHz OCT system for 4D optical microangiography of in vivo tissue at a volume rate of 4.7 volumes/s (volume size: 512×200×720 voxels). PMID:25872072

  10. Motion-aware temporal regularization for improved 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mory, Cyril; Janssens, Guillaume; Rit, Simon

    2016-09-01

    Four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) of the free-breathing thorax is a valuable tool in image-guided radiation therapy of the thorax and the upper abdomen. It allows the determination of the position of a tumor throughout the breathing cycle, while only its mean position can be extracted from three-dimensional CBCT. The classical approaches are not fully satisfactory: respiration-correlated methods allow one to accurately locate high-contrast structures in any frame, but contain strong streak artifacts unless the acquisition is significantly slowed down. Motion-compensated methods can yield streak-free, but static, reconstructions. This work proposes a 4D-CBCT method that can be seen as a trade-off between respiration-correlated and motion-compensated reconstruction. It builds upon the existing reconstruction using spatial and temporal regularization (ROOSTER) and is called motion-aware ROOSTER (MA-ROOSTER). It performs temporal regularization along curved trajectories, following the motion estimated on a prior 4D CT scan. MA-ROOSTER does not involve motion-compensated forward and back projections: the input motion is used only during temporal regularization. MA-ROOSTER is compared to ROOSTER, motion-compensated Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (MC-FDK), and two respiration-correlated methods, on CBCT acquisitions of one physical phantom and two patients. It yields streak-free reconstructions, visually similar to MC-FDK, and robust information on tumor location throughout the breathing cycle. MA-ROOSTER also allows a variation of the lung tissue density during the breathing cycle, similar to that of planning CT, which is required for quantitative post-processing.

  11. Motion-aware temporal regularization for improved 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mory, Cyril; Janssens, Guillaume; Rit, Simon

    2016-09-01

    Four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) of the free-breathing thorax is a valuable tool in image-guided radiation therapy of the thorax and the upper abdomen. It allows the determination of the position of a tumor throughout the breathing cycle, while only its mean position can be extracted from three-dimensional CBCT. The classical approaches are not fully satisfactory: respiration-correlated methods allow one to accurately locate high-contrast structures in any frame, but contain strong streak artifacts unless the acquisition is significantly slowed down. Motion-compensated methods can yield streak-free, but static, reconstructions. This work proposes a 4D-CBCT method that can be seen as a trade-off between respiration-correlated and motion-compensated reconstruction. It builds upon the existing reconstruction using spatial and temporal regularization (ROOSTER) and is called motion-aware ROOSTER (MA-ROOSTER). It performs temporal regularization along curved trajectories, following the motion estimated on a prior 4D CT scan. MA-ROOSTER does not involve motion-compensated forward and back projections: the input motion is used only during temporal regularization. MA-ROOSTER is compared to ROOSTER, motion-compensated Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (MC-FDK), and two respiration-correlated methods, on CBCT acquisitions of one physical phantom and two patients. It yields streak-free reconstructions, visually similar to MC-FDK, and robust information on tumor location throughout the breathing cycle. MA-ROOSTER also allows a variation of the lung tissue density during the breathing cycle, similar to that of planning CT, which is required for quantitative post-processing.

  12. Introducing Seismic Tomography with Computational Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, R.; Neves, M. L.; Teodoro, V.

    2011-12-01

    Learning seismic tomography principles and techniques involves advanced physical and computational knowledge. In depth learning of such computational skills is a difficult cognitive process that requires a strong background in physics, mathematics and computer programming. The corresponding learning environments and pedagogic methodologies should then involve sets of computational modelling activities with computer software systems which allow students the possibility to improve their mathematical or programming knowledge and simultaneously focus on the learning of seismic wave propagation and inverse theory. To reduce the level of cognitive opacity associated with mathematical or programming knowledge, several computer modelling systems have already been developed (Neves & Teodoro, 2010). Among such systems, Modellus is particularly well suited to achieve this goal because it is a domain general environment for explorative and expressive modelling with the following main advantages: 1) an easy and intuitive creation of mathematical models using just standard mathematical notation; 2) the simultaneous exploration of images, tables, graphs and object animations; 3) the attribution of mathematical properties expressed in the models to animated objects; and finally 4) the computation and display of mathematical quantities obtained from the analysis of images and graphs. Here we describe virtual simulations and educational exercises which enable students an easy grasp of the fundamental of seismic tomography. The simulations make the lecture more interactive and allow students the possibility to overcome their lack of advanced mathematical or programming knowledge and focus on the learning of seismological concepts and processes taking advantage of basic scientific computation methods and tools.

  13. Formation of secondary porosity in 4D Synchrotron X-ray tomography experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusseis, Florian; Liu, Jie; de Carlo, Francesco; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Schrank, Christoph; Hough, Robert; Gessner, Klaus; Llana-Fúnez, Sergio; Faulkner, Dan; Wheeler, John

    2010-05-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) allows to investigate secondary porosity in three dimensions on the nano- to microscale. We utilised the key advantage of the technique, the rapid data acquisition time (seconds to about half an hour/data set), to study the formation of porosity in natural rock samples in real time (4D). The spacious instrument setup in the experimental hutch allowed us to install an X-ray transparent furnace to heat millimetre-sized samples up to 230 °C (>400 °C in the next generation) in the X-ray beam. We focused on two porosity-generating mechanisms: thermal expansion cracking in Westerly granite and dehydration (volume loss/hydraulic fracturing) of Volterra gypsum. The spatial resolution was 1.3 micron in both experiments. We heated a 2mm diameter cylinder of Westerly Granite stepwise from 50 °C to 230 °C and then quenched it to investigate the effects of thermal expansion cracking on the three-dimensional porosity architecture. The sample was scanned after increasing the temperature in 10 °C steps to record the cracks formed during each heating interval. Preliminary analysis of the heterogeneous 4D displacement fields proved that the approach works well. We documented the opening and closing as well as interconnection of grain boundary- and intragranular cracks. A full quantification is currently under way. This experiment also serves to benchmark numerical simulations of thermal cracking that will be used to upscale the permeability evolution during heating (see abstract of Schrank et al.). A second heating experiment aimed at documenting the fluid escape pathways during the dehydration of gypsum to bassanite. We heated a gypsum sample to 115 °C for increasing periods of time. The reaction progress was directly observed in two-dimensional tomographic projections, 3D tomographic datasets were collected during cooling at 50 °C in between the heating intervals. The experiment demonstrated how a permeable

  14. Temporal sparsity exploiting nonlocal regularization for 4D computed tomography reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Guo, Enyu; Kaestner, Anders; Lionheart, William R. B.; Bent, Julian; Withers, Philip J.; Lee, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray imaging applications in medical and material sciences are frequently limited by the number of tomographic projections collected. The inversion of the limited projection data is an ill-posed problem and needs regularization. Traditional spatial regularization is not well adapted to the dynamic nature of time-lapse tomography since it discards the redundancy of the temporal information. In this paper, we propose a novel iterative reconstruction algorithm with a nonlocal regularization term to account for time-evolving datasets. The aim of the proposed nonlocal penalty is to collect the maximum relevant information in the spatial and temporal domains. With the proposed sparsity seeking approach in the temporal space, the computational complexity of the classical nonlocal regularizer is substantially reduced (at least by one order of magnitude). The presented reconstruction method can be directly applied to various big data 4D (x, y, z+time) tomographic experiments in many fields. We apply the proposed technique to modelled data and to real dynamic X-ray microtomography (XMT) data of high resolution. Compared to the classical spatio-temporal nonlocal regularization approach, the proposed method delivers reconstructed images of improved resolution and higher contrast while remaining significantly less computationally demanding. PMID:27002902

  15. Temporal sparsity exploiting nonlocal regularization for 4D computed tomography reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Guo, Enyu; Kaestner, Anders; Lionheart, William R B; Bent, Julian; Withers, Philip J; Lee, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    X-ray imaging applications in medical and material sciences are frequently limited by the number of tomographic projections collected. The inversion of the limited projection data is an ill-posed problem and needs regularization. Traditional spatial regularization is not well adapted to the dynamic nature of time-lapse tomography since it discards the redundancy of the temporal information. In this paper, we propose a novel iterative reconstruction algorithm with a nonlocal regularization term to account for time-evolving datasets. The aim of the proposed nonlocal penalty is to collect the maximum relevant information in the spatial and temporal domains. With the proposed sparsity seeking approach in the temporal space, the computational complexity of the classical nonlocal regularizer is substantially reduced (at least by one order of magnitude). The presented reconstruction method can be directly applied to various big data 4D (x, y, z+time) tomographic experiments in many fields. We apply the proposed technique to modelled data and to real dynamic X-ray microtomography (XMT) data of high resolution. Compared to the classical spatio-temporal nonlocal regularization approach, the proposed method delivers reconstructed images of improved resolution and higher contrast while remaining significantly less computationally demanding.

  16. Temporal sparsity exploiting nonlocal regularization for 4D computed tomography reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Guo, Enyu; Kaestner, Anders; Lionheart, William R B; Bent, Julian; Withers, Philip J; Lee, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    X-ray imaging applications in medical and material sciences are frequently limited by the number of tomographic projections collected. The inversion of the limited projection data is an ill-posed problem and needs regularization. Traditional spatial regularization is not well adapted to the dynamic nature of time-lapse tomography since it discards the redundancy of the temporal information. In this paper, we propose a novel iterative reconstruction algorithm with a nonlocal regularization term to account for time-evolving datasets. The aim of the proposed nonlocal penalty is to collect the maximum relevant information in the spatial and temporal domains. With the proposed sparsity seeking approach in the temporal space, the computational complexity of the classical nonlocal regularizer is substantially reduced (at least by one order of magnitude). The presented reconstruction method can be directly applied to various big data 4D (x, y, z+time) tomographic experiments in many fields. We apply the proposed technique to modelled data and to real dynamic X-ray microtomography (XMT) data of high resolution. Compared to the classical spatio-temporal nonlocal regularization approach, the proposed method delivers reconstructed images of improved resolution and higher contrast while remaining significantly less computationally demanding. PMID:27002902

  17. A novel method for 4D cone-beam computer-tomography reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Park, Justin C.; Chen, Yunmei; Lan, Guanghui; Lu, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Image quality of Four Dimensional Cone-Beam Computer-Tomography (4DCBCT) is severely impaired by highly insufficient amount of projection data available for each phase. Therefore, making good use of limited projection data is crucial to solve this problem. Noticing that usually only a portion of the images is affected by motion, we separate the moving part (different between phases) of the images from the static part (identical among all phases) with the help of prior image reconstructed using all projection data. Then we update the moving part and the static part of images alternatively through solving minimization problems based on a global (use full projection data) and several local (use projection data for respective phase) linear systems. In the other word, we rebuild a large over-determined linear system for static part from the original under-determined systems and we reduce the number of unknowns in the original system for each phase as well. As a result, image quality for both static part and moving part are greatly improved and reliable 4D CBCT images are then reconstructed.

  18. 4D optical coherence tomography of aortic valve dynamics in a murine mouse model ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Christian; Jannasch, Anett; Faak, Saskia; Waldow, Thomas; Koch, Edmund

    2015-07-01

    The heart and its mechanical components, especially the heart valves and leaflets, are under enormous strain during lifetime. Like all highly stressed materials, also these biological components undergo fatigue and signs of wear, which impinge upon cardiac output and in the end on health and living comfort of affected patients. Thereby pathophysiological changes of the aortic valve leading to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS) as most frequent heart valve disease in humans are of particular interest. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behavior during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug-based options of prevention or therapy. ApoE-/- mice as established model of AVS versus wildtype mice were introduced in an ex vivo artificially stimulated heart model. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behavior of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. OCT and high-speed video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution represent promising tools for the investigation of dynamic behavior and their changes in calcific aortic stenosis disease models in mice.

  19. The mechanics of intermittent methane venting at South Hydrate Ridge inferred from 4D seismic surveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangs, Nathan L. B.; Hornbach, Matthew J.; Berndt, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Sea floor methane vents and seeps direct methane generated by microbial and thermal decompositions of organic matter in sediment into the oceans and atmosphere. Methane vents contribute to ocean acidification, global warming, and providing a long-term (e.g. 500-4000 years; Powell et al., 1998) life-sustaining role for unique chemosynthetic biological communities. However, the role methane vents play in both climate change and chemosynthetic life remains controversial primarily because we do not understand long-term methane flux and the mechanisms that control it ( Milkov et al., 2004; Shakhova et al., 2010; Van Dover, 2000). Vents are inherently dynamic and flux varies greatly in magnitude and even flow direction over short time periods (hours-to-days), often tidally-driven ( Boles et al., 2001; Tryon et al., 1999). But, it remains unclear if flux changes at vents occur on the order of the life-cycle of various species within chemosynthetic communities (months, years, to decades Leifer et al., 2004; Torres et al., 2001) and thus impacts their sustainability. Here, using repeat high-resolution 3D seismic surveys acquired in 2000 and 2008, we demonstrate in 4D that Hydrate Ridge, a vent off the Oregon coast has undergone significant reduction of methane flow and complete interruption in just the past few years. In the subsurface, below a frozen methane hydrate layer, free gas appears to be migrating toward the vent, but currently there is accumulating gas that is unable to reach the seafloor through the gas hydrate layer. At the same time, abundant authigenic carbonates show that the system has been active for several thousands of years. Thus, it is likely that activity has been intermittent because gas hydrates clog the vertical flow pathways feeding the seafloor vent. Back pressure building in the subsurface will ultimately trigger hydrofracturing that will revive fluid-flow to the seafloor. The nature of this mechanism implies regular recurring flow interruptions

  20. Optical diffraction tomography using a digital micromirror device for stable measurements of 4D refractive index tomography of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Taeho; Yoon, Jonghee; Hong, Kihyun; Park, Jinah; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an interferometric microscopy technique capable of measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of transparent samples. Multiple 2-D holograms of a sample illuminated with various angles are measured, from which 3-D RI map of the sample is reconstructed via the diffraction theory. ODT has been proved as a powerful tool for the study of biological cells, due to its non-invasiveness, label-free and quantitative imaging capability. Recently, our group has demonstrated that a digital micromirror device (DMD) can be exploited for fast and precise control of illumination beams for ODT. In this work, we systematically study the precision and stability of the ODT system equipped with a DMD and present measurements of 3-D and 4-D RI maps of various types of live cells including human red blood cells, white blood cells, hepatocytes, and HeLa cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the effective visualization of 3-D RI maps of live cells utilizing the measured information about the values and gradient of RI tomograms.

  1. Seismic crosshole curved ray reflection plus transmission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.; Song, W.; Zhang, M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a new seismic crosshole tomography method, Curved Ray Reflection + Transmission Tomography (CCRTT). The method could enhance the resolution of oil and gas reservoir beds tomography image, and it is suitable for the area with thin reservoir beds and high velocity contrast between the adjacent beds.

  2. Using Distant Sources in Local Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, Bruce; Foulgr, Gillian

    2014-05-01

    Seismic tomography methods such as the 'ACH' method of Aki, Christoffersson & Husebye (1976, 1977) are subject to significant bias caused by the unknown wave-speed structure outside the study volume, whose effects are mathematically of the same order as the local-structure effects being studied. Computational experiments using whole-mantle wave-speed models show that the effects are also of comparable numerical magnitude (Masson & Trampert, 1997). Failure to correct for these effects will significantly corrupt computed local structures. This bias can be greatly reduced by solving for additional parameters defining the shapes, orientations, and arrival times of the incident wavefronts. The procedure is exactly analogous to solving for hypocentral locations in local-earthquake tomography. For planar incident wavefronts, each event adds three free parameters and the forward problem is surprisingly simple: The first-order change in the theoretical arrival time at observation point B resulting from perturbations in the incident-wave time t0 and slowness vector s is δtB ≡ δt0 + δs · rA = δtA, the change in the time of the plane wave at the point A where the un-perturbed ray enters the study volume (Julian and Foulger, submitted). This consequence of Fermat's principle apparently has not previously been recognized. In addition to eliminating the biasing effect of structure outside the study volume, this formalism enables us to combine data from local and distant events in studies of local structure, significantly improving resolution of deeper structure, particularly in places such as volcanic and geothermal areas where seismicity is confined to shallow depths. Many published models that were derived using ACH and similar methods probably contain significant artifacts and are in need of re-evaluation.

  3. Live volumetric (4D) visualization and guidance of in vivo human ophthalmic surgery with intraoperative optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Zevallos, O M; Keller, B; Viehland, C; Shen, L; Waterman, G; Todorich, B; Shieh, C; Hahn, P; Farsiu, S; Kuo, A N; Toth, C A; Izatt, J A

    2016-01-01

    Minimally-invasive microsurgery has resulted in improved outcomes for patients. However, operating through a microscope limits depth perception and fixes the visual perspective, which result in a steep learning curve to achieve microsurgical proficiency. We introduce a surgical imaging system employing four-dimensional (live volumetric imaging through time) microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography (4D MIOCT) capable of imaging at up to 10 volumes per second to visualize human microsurgery. A custom stereoscopic heads-up display provides real-time interactive volumetric feedback to the surgeon. We report that 4D MIOCT enhanced suturing accuracy and control of instrument positioning in mock surgical trials involving 17 ophthalmic surgeons. Additionally, 4D MIOCT imaging was performed in 48 human eye surgeries and was demonstrated to successfully visualize the pathology of interest in concordance with preoperative diagnosis in 93% of retinal surgeries and the surgical site of interest in 100% of anterior segment surgeries. In vivo 4D MIOCT imaging revealed sub-surface pathologic structures and instrument-induced lesions that were invisible through the operating microscope during standard surgical maneuvers. In select cases, 4D MIOCT guidance was necessary to resolve such lesions and prevent post-operative complications. Our novel surgical visualization platform achieves surgeon-interactive 4D visualization of live surgery which could expand the surgeon's capabilities. PMID:27538478

  4. Live volumetric (4D) visualization and guidance of in vivo human ophthalmic surgery with intraoperative optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco-Zevallos, O. M.; Keller, B.; Viehland, C.; Shen, L.; Waterman, G.; Todorich, B.; Shieh, C.; Hahn, P.; Farsiu, S.; Kuo, A. N.; Toth, C. A.; Izatt, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    Minimally-invasive microsurgery has resulted in improved outcomes for patients. However, operating through a microscope limits depth perception and fixes the visual perspective, which result in a steep learning curve to achieve microsurgical proficiency. We introduce a surgical imaging system employing four-dimensional (live volumetric imaging through time) microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography (4D MIOCT) capable of imaging at up to 10 volumes per second to visualize human microsurgery. A custom stereoscopic heads-up display provides real-time interactive volumetric feedback to the surgeon. We report that 4D MIOCT enhanced suturing accuracy and control of instrument positioning in mock surgical trials involving 17 ophthalmic surgeons. Additionally, 4D MIOCT imaging was performed in 48 human eye surgeries and was demonstrated to successfully visualize the pathology of interest in concordance with preoperative diagnosis in 93% of retinal surgeries and the surgical site of interest in 100% of anterior segment surgeries. In vivo 4D MIOCT imaging revealed sub-surface pathologic structures and instrument-induced lesions that were invisible through the operating microscope during standard surgical maneuvers. In select cases, 4D MIOCT guidance was necessary to resolve such lesions and prevent post-operative complications. Our novel surgical visualization platform achieves surgeon-interactive 4D visualization of live surgery which could expand the surgeon’s capabilities.

  5. Live volumetric (4D) visualization and guidance of in vivo human ophthalmic surgery with intraoperative optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Zevallos, O. M.; Keller, B.; Viehland, C.; Shen, L.; Waterman, G.; Todorich, B.; Shieh, C.; Hahn, P.; Farsiu, S.; Kuo, A. N.; Toth, C. A.; Izatt, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Minimally-invasive microsurgery has resulted in improved outcomes for patients. However, operating through a microscope limits depth perception and fixes the visual perspective, which result in a steep learning curve to achieve microsurgical proficiency. We introduce a surgical imaging system employing four-dimensional (live volumetric imaging through time) microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography (4D MIOCT) capable of imaging at up to 10 volumes per second to visualize human microsurgery. A custom stereoscopic heads-up display provides real-time interactive volumetric feedback to the surgeon. We report that 4D MIOCT enhanced suturing accuracy and control of instrument positioning in mock surgical trials involving 17 ophthalmic surgeons. Additionally, 4D MIOCT imaging was performed in 48 human eye surgeries and was demonstrated to successfully visualize the pathology of interest in concordance with preoperative diagnosis in 93% of retinal surgeries and the surgical site of interest in 100% of anterior segment surgeries. In vivo 4D MIOCT imaging revealed sub-surface pathologic structures and instrument-induced lesions that were invisible through the operating microscope during standard surgical maneuvers. In select cases, 4D MIOCT guidance was necessary to resolve such lesions and prevent post-operative complications. Our novel surgical visualization platform achieves surgeon-interactive 4D visualization of live surgery which could expand the surgeon’s capabilities. PMID:27538478

  6. Dosimetric Correction for a 4D-Computed Tomography Dataset using the Free-Form Deformation Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markel, Daniel; Alasti, Hamideh; Chow, James C. L.

    2012-10-01

    A Free-Form Deformable (FFD) image registration algorithm in conjunction with 4D Computed Tomography (CT) images was implemented within a graphical user interface, FFD4D, for dosimetric calculations. The algorithm was developed using the cubic-B-spline method with smoothness corrections and registration point assistance to mark fudicials. Validation of the algorithm was performed with manually measured geometric differences using a QUASAR Respiratory Motion Phantom. In this work, we used the FFD algorithm to demonstrate dosimetric corrections amongst 10 breathing phases of a lung cancer patient using the 4D-CT image datasets. Different methods to enhance the image processing speed for high-performance computing were also discussed.

  7. Mantle Convection Models Constrained by Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, C. J.; Shahnas, M.; Peltier, W. R.; Woodhouse, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    Although available three dimensional models of the lateral heterogeneity of the mantle, based upon the latest advances in seismic tomographic imaging (e.g. Ritsema et al., 2004, JGR) have provided profound insights into aspects of the mantle general circulation that drives continental drift, the compatibility of the tomography with explicit models of mantle mixing has remained illusive. For example, it remains a significant issue as to whether hydrodynamic models of the mixing process alone are able to reconcile the observed detailed pattern of surface plate velocities or whether explicit account must be taken of elastic fracture processes to account for the observed equipartition of kinetic energy between the poloidal and toroidal components of the surface velocity pattern (e.g. Forte and Peltier, 1987, JGR). It is also an issue as to the significance of the role of mantle chemical heterogeneity in determining the buoyancy distribution that drives mantle flow, especially given the expected importance of the spin transition of iron that onsets in the mid-lower mantle, at least in the ferropericlase component of the mineralogy. In this paper we focus upon the application of data assimilation techniques to the development of a model of mantle mixing that is consistent with a modern three dimensional tomography based model of seismic body wave heterogeneity. Beginning with the simplest possible scenario, that chemical heterogeneity is irrelevant to first order, we employ a three dimensional version of the recently published control volume based convection model of Shahnas and Peltier (2010, JGR) as the basis for the assimilation of a three dimensional density field inferred from our preferred tomography model (Ritsema et al., 2004, JGR). The convection model fully incorporates the dynamical influence of the Olivine-Spinel and Spinel-Perovskite+Magnesiowustite solid-solid phase transformations that bracket the mantle transition zone as well as the recently discovered

  8. 4D seismic monitoring of the miscible CO2 flood of Hall-Gurney Field, Kansas, U.S

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raef, A.E.; Miller, R.D.; Byrnes, A.P.; Harrison, W.E.

    2004-01-01

    A cost-effective, highly repeatable, 4D-optimized, single-pattern/patch seismic data-acquisition approach with several 3D data sets was used to evaluate the feasibility of imaging changes associated with the " water alternated with gas" (WAG) stage. By incorporating noninversion-based seismic-attribute analysis, the time and cost of processing and interpreting the data were reduced. A 24-ms-thick EOR-CO 2 injection interval-using an average instantaneous frequency attribute (AIF) was targeted. Changes in amplitude response related to decrease in velocity from pore-fluid replacement within this time interval were found to be lower relative to background values than in AIF analysis. Carefully color-balanced AIF-attribute maps established the overall area affected by the injected EOR-CO2.

  9. Optimal observables for multiparameter seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernauer, Moritz; Fichtner, Andreas; Igel, Heiner

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method for the design of seismic observables with maximum sensitivity to a target model parameter class, and minimum sensitivity to all remaining parameter classes. The resulting optimal observables thereby minimize interparameter trade-offs in multiparameter inverse problems. Our method is based on the linear combination of fundamental observables that can be any scalar measurement extracted from seismic waveforms. Optimal weights of the fundamental observables are determined with an efficient global search algorithm. While most optimal design methods assume variable source and/or receiver positions, our method has the flexibility to operate with a fixed source-receiver geometry, making it particularly attractive in studies where the mobility of sources and receivers is limited. In a series of examples we illustrate the construction of optimal observables, and assess the potentials and limitations of the method. The combination of Rayleigh-wave traveltimes in four frequency bands yields an observable with strongly enhanced sensitivity to 3-D density structure. Simultaneously, sensitivity to S velocity is reduced, and sensitivity to P velocity is eliminated. The original three-parameter problem thereby collapses into a simpler two-parameter problem with one dominant parameter. By defining parameter classes to equal earth model properties within specific regions, our approach mimics the Backus-Gilbert method where data are combined to focus sensitivity in a target region. This concept is illustrated using rotational ground motion measurements as fundamental observables. Forcing dominant sensitivity in the near-receiver region produces an observable that is insensitive to the Earth structure at more than a few wavelengths' distance from the receiver. This observable may be used for local tomography with teleseismic data. While our test examples use a small number of well-understood fundamental observables, few parameter classes and a radially symmetric

  10. Seismic Tomography of the South Carpathian System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, G. W.; Ren, Y.; Dando, B. D.; Houseman, G.; Ionescu, C.; Hegedus, E.; Radovanovic, S.; South Carpathian Project Working Group

    2010-12-01

    The South Carpathian Mountain Range is an enigmatic system, which includes one of the most seismically active regions in Europe today. That region, Vrancea in the SE Carpathians, is well studied and its deep structure may be geologically unique, but the mantle structures beneath the western part of the South Carpathian Range are not well resolved by previous tomographic studies. The South Carpathian Project (SCP) is a major temporary deployment (2009-2011) of seismic broadband systems extending across the eastern Pannonian Basin and the South Carpathian Mountains. In this project we aim to map the upper mantle structure in central Europe with the objective of testing geodynamic models of the process that produced extension in the Pannonian, synchronous with convergence and uplift in the Carpathians. Here, we describe initial results of finite-frequency tomography using body waves to image the mantle of the region. We have selected teleseismic earthquakes with magnitude greater than 5.9, which occurred between 2005 and 2010. The data were recorded on 57 temporary stations deployed in the South Carpathian Project, 56 temporary stations deployed in the earlier Carpathian Basins Project (CBP), and 41 permanent broadband stations. The differential travel times are measured in high, intermediate and low frequencies (0.5-2.0 Hz, 0.1-0.5 Hz and 0.03-0.1 Hz for both P-wave, 0.1-0.5 Hz, 0.05-0.1 Hz and 0.02-0.05 Hz for S-wave), and are inverted to produce P and S-wave velocity maps at different depths in the mantle. An extensive zone of high seismic velocities is located in the Mantle Transition zone beneath the Pannonian Basin, and is related to down-welling associated with an earlier phase of continental convergence in the Pannonian region. These results will be used in conjunction with 3D geodynamical modelling to help understand the geological evolution of this region. SCP working group: G. Houseman, G. Stuart, Y. Ren, B. Dando, P. Lorinczi, School of Earth and

  11. Stochastic seismic tomography by interacting Markov chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottero, Alexis; Gesret, Alexandrine; Romary, Thomas; Noble, Mark; Maisons, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling methods are widely used for non-linear Bayesian inversion where no analytical expression for the forward relation between data and model parameters is available. Contrary to the linear(ized) approaches, they naturally allow to evaluate the uncertainties on the model found. Nevertheless their use is problematic in high-dimensional model spaces especially when the computational cost of the forward problem is significant and/or the a posteriori distribution is multimodal. In this case, the chain can stay stuck in one of the modes and hence not provide an exhaustive sampling of the distribution of interest. We present here a still relatively unknown algorithm that allows interaction between several Markov chains at different temperatures. These interactions (based on importance resampling) ensure a robust sampling of any posterior distribution and thus provide a way to efficiently tackle complex fully non-linear inverse problems. The algorithm is easy to implement and is well adapted to run on parallel supercomputers. In this paper, the algorithm is first introduced and applied to a synthetic multimodal distribution in order to demonstrate its robustness and efficiency compared to a simulated annealing method. It is then applied in the framework of first arrival traveltime seismic tomography on real data recorded in the context of hydraulic fracturing. To carry out this study a wavelet-based adaptive model parametrization has been used. This allows to integrate the a priori information provided by sonic logs and to reduce optimally the dimension of the problem.

  12. Stochastic seismic tomography by interacting Markov chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottero, Alexis; Gesret, Alexandrine; Romary, Thomas; Noble, Mark; Maisons, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling methods are widely used for non-linear Bayesian inversion where no analytical expression for the forward relation between data and model parameters is available. Contrary to the linear(ized) approaches they naturally allow to evaluate the uncertainties on the model found. Nevertheless their use is problematic in high dimensional model spaces especially when the computational cost of the forward problem is significant and/or the a posteriori distribution is multimodal. In this case the chain can stay stuck in one of the modes and hence not provide an exhaustive sampling of the distribution of interest. We present here a still relatively unknown algorithm that allows interaction between several Markov chains at different temperatures. These interactions (based on Importance Resampling) ensure a robust sampling of any posterior distribution and thus provide a way to efficiently tackle complex fully non linear inverse problems. The algorithm is easy to implement and is well adapted to run on parallel supercomputers. In this paper the algorithm is first introduced and applied to a synthetic multimodal distribution in order to demonstrate its robustness and efficiency compared to a Simulated Annealing method. It is then applied in the framework of first arrival traveltime seismic tomography on real data recorded in the context of hydraulic fracturing. To carry out this study a wavelet based adaptive model parametrization has been used. This allows to integrate the a priori information provided by sonic logs and to reduce optimally the dimension of the problem.

  13. Seismic tomography versus temperature and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trampert, J.

    2002-05-01

    Seismic tomography is undoubtedly the most promising tool to probe the structural variations of the Earth's deep interior. These velocity variations are then used to infer lateral variations of temperature and composition. Recently a debate has arisen whether the lateral velocity variations in the lowermost mantle are thermal or compositional in origin. We use recently developed P and S tomographic models together with velocity sensitivities (Trampert et al., 2001) and solve for lateral variations in temperature and composition. This usually simple problem is complicated by the fact that neither the conversion factors nor the tomographic models are perfect. The question then arises what can robustly be inferred. Using the calculated errors on sensitivities together with the discrepancies of existing tomographic models as a proxy for errros, it emerges that temperature variations can be inferred with roughly a 50 % uncertainty and compositional variations are not robust. This puts a strong dampener on our hopes to understand the Earth's deepest interior. There is however some cause for optimism. A recent full model space search for P and S velocity variations has shown that P and S models tend to decorrelate more than is inferred by simple least-squares inversions (Beghein et al., 2002). Using this tomographic model instead significantly decreases the uncertainty on compositional variations. We find in the lowermost mantle rms-temperature variations of 175 (+/- 100) K and rms-compositional variations of 8 (+/- 4) %.

  14. Application of Genetic Algorithms in Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soupios, Pantelis; Akca, Irfan; Mpogiatzis, Petros; Basokur, Ahmet; Papazachos, Constantinos

    2010-05-01

    application of hybrid genetic algorithms in seismic tomography is examined and the efficiency of least squares and genetic methods as representative of the local and global optimization, respectively, is presented and evaluated. The robustness of both optimization methods has been tested and compared for the same source-receiver geometry and characteristics of the model structure (anomalies, etc.). A set of seismic refraction synthetic (noise free) data was used for modeling. Specifically, cross-well, down-hole and typical refraction studies using 24 geophones and 5 shoots were used to confirm the applicability of the genetic algorithms in seismic tomography. To solve the forward modeling and estimate the traveltimes, the revisited ray bending method was used supplemented by an approximate computation of the first Fresnel volume. The root mean square (rms) error as the misfit function was used and calculated for the entire random velocity model for each generation. After the end of each generation and based on the misfit of the individuals (velocity models), the selection, crossover and mutation (typical process steps of genetic algorithms) were selected continuing the evolution theory and coding the new generation. To optimize the computation time, since the whole procedure is quite time consuming, the Matlab Distributed Computing Environment (MDCE) was used in a multicore engine. During the tests, we noticed that the fast convergence that the algorithm initially exhibits (first 5 generations) is followed by progressively slower improvements of the reconstructed velocity models. Thus, to improve the final tomographic models, a hybrid genetic algorithm (GA) approach was adopted by combining the GAs with a local optimization method after several generations, on the basis of the convergence of the resulting models. This approach is shown to be efficient, as it directs the solution search towards a model region close to the global minimum solution.

  15. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Roger N.; Boulanger, Albert; Bagdonas, Edward P.; Xu, Liqing; He, Wei

    1996-01-01

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

  16. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

    1996-12-17

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

  17. MC Kernel: Broadband Waveform Sensitivity Kernels for Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stähler, Simon C.; van Driel, Martin; Auer, Ludwig; Hosseini, Kasra; Sigloch, Karin; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje

    2016-04-01

    We present MC Kernel, a software implementation to calculate seismic sensitivity kernels on arbitrary tetrahedral or hexahedral grids across the whole observable seismic frequency band. Seismic sensitivity kernels are the basis for seismic tomography, since they map measurements to model perturbations. Their calculation over the whole frequency range was so far only possible with approximative methods (Dahlen et al. 2000). Fully numerical methods were restricted to the lower frequency range (usually below 0.05 Hz, Tromp et al. 2005). With our implementation, it's possible to compute accurate sensitivity kernels for global tomography across the observable seismic frequency band. These kernels rely on wavefield databases computed via AxiSEM (www.axisem.info), and thus on spherically symmetric models. The advantage is that frequencies up to 0.2 Hz and higher can be accessed. Since the usage of irregular, adapted grids is an integral part of regularisation in seismic tomography, MC Kernel works in a inversion-grid-centred fashion: A Monte-Carlo integration method is used to project the kernel onto each basis function, which allows to control the desired precision of the kernel estimation. Also, it means that the code concentrates calculation effort on regions of interest without prior assumptions on the kernel shape. The code makes extensive use of redundancies in calculating kernels for different receivers or frequency-pass-bands for one earthquake, to facilitate its usage in large-scale global seismic tomography.

  18. Seismic tomography as a tool for measuring stress in mines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Douglas F.; Williams, T.J.; Denton, D.K.; Friedel, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Spokane Research Center personnel have been investigating the use of seismic tomography to monitor the behavior of a rock mass, detect hazardous ground conditions and assess the mechanical integrity of a rock mass affected by mining. Seismic tomography can be a valuable tool for determining relative stress in deep, >1,220-m (>4,000-ft), underground pillars. If high-stress areas are detected, they can be destressed prior to development or they can be avoided. High-stress areas can be monitored with successive seismic surveys to determine if stress decreases to a level where development can be initiated safely. There are several benefits to using seismic tomography to identify high stress in deep underground pillars. The technique is reliable, cost-effective, efficient and noninvasive. Also, investigators can monitor large rock masses, as well as monitor pillars during the mining cycle. By identifying areas of high stress, engineers will be able to assure that miners are working in a safer environment.Spokane Research Center personnel have been investigating the use of seismic tomography to monitor the behavior of a rock mass, detect hazardous ground conditions and assess the mechanical integrity of a rock mass affected by mining. Seismic tomography can be a valuable tool for determining relative stress in deep, >1,200-m (>4,000-ft), underground pillars. If high-stress areas are detected, they can be destressed prior to development or they can be avoided. High-stress areas can be monitored with successive seismic surveys to determine if stress decreases to a level where development can be initiated safely. There are several benefits to using seismic tomography to identify high stress in deep underground pillars. The technique is reliable, cost-effective, efficient and noninvasive. Also, investigators can monitor large rock masses, as well as monitor pillars during the mining cycle. By identifying areas of high stress. engineers will be able to assure that miners are

  19. Caribbean plate tectonics from seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten Brink, U. S.; Villasenor, A.

    2012-12-01

    New seismic tomography in the Caribbean shows close links between the geometry and dynamics of subducting slabs and the geology of the overriding plate. Unlike most oceanic plates, the Caribbean plate lacks identifiable seafloor magnetic anomalies and fracture zones. The plate's history has therefore been inferred primarily from land geology along the plate boundary, which is complicated by large-scale shear deformation, and from finite rotations of surrounding plates.We used more than 14 million arrival times from 300,000 earthquakes to identify P-wave velocity anomalies. We relate the anomalies to the geometry and dynamics of subducting slabs and to patterns of earthquake activity, volcanism, topographic relief, and tectonic deformation. For example, we detect two separate slabs belonging to the North and South American plates, respectively, which appear to be responsible for morphologic and tectonic differences between the arcs of the Northern (from Guadeloupe northward) and Southern (from Dominica southward) Lesser Antilles. Variations in earthquake activity between Haiti and the Dominican Republic can be explained by a change in slab geometry from an underplated slab beneath Haiti to a subducting slab under the Dominican Republic. A shallow tear in the slab may explain the anomalously deep Puerto Rico Trench and the frequent earthquake swarms there. The westward shift in volcanic activity in the Northern Lesser Antilles from the Miocene Limestone Caribbees to the present arc can be attributed to the limit on convective flow imposed by the 3-D geometry of the slab at depth. A thinned South America slab under the southern Lesser Antilles may result from traction imposed on the slab by a wide forearc wedge. Variations in tectonic deformation of northern South America could be related to the location of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province north of the Maracaibo Block.

  20. Time lapse seismic response (4D) related to industrial-scale CO2 injection at an EOR and CCS site, Cranfield, MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditkof, J.; Meckel, T. A.; Zeng, H.; Hovorka, S. D.

    2011-12-01

    4D seismic response can be used to understand reservoir fluid substitution related to multiphase fluid flow. Time lapse seismic surveys have been conducted internationally at well-known CCS field sites like Otway, Weyburn, and Sleipner as well as downhole measurements at Frio and Cranfield in the United States. We present results from the first 4D survey conducted in the U.S. for CCS purposes. Since 2008 continuous CO2 injection has occurred at an EOR project in Cranfield, Mississippi, also the location of our SECARB CCS demonstration project funded by DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership. 4D response has been characterized after 3 years of injection, where >3 million tons of CO2 remain in the subsurface. Results from 4D stratal slices show a definitive but complicated CO2 response in the injection interval, and no coherent response above or below the injection interval. Clear examples of seismic amplitude response are seen near injection wells. Qualitatively, some areas that have received large amounts of CO2 do not have coherent seismic response, indicating that 4D response to injected CO2 in some parts of the field is likely to be masked by residual oil, gas, and brine related to historic production (1960's). To further quantify the seismic response, well log data shows that Vp decreases before becoming mostly constant, Vs increases linearly, and density slightly decreases in the injection zone. This is a similar expected result to that observed at other sites. Forward seismic modeling and flow simulation have been integrated to understand seismic response in relation to fluid properties and distribution. Seismic understanding may lead to improved understanding of sweep efficiency (capacity) as well as define sensitivity of seismic imaging for quantifying CO2 storage.

  1. Geodynamically Consistent Interpretation of Seismic Tomography under the Hawaiian Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, D.; Samuel, H.

    2006-12-01

    Recent theoretical developments as well as increased data quality and coverage have allowed seismic tomographic imaging to better resolve narrower structures at both shallow and deep mantle depths. However, despite these improvements, the interpretation of tomographic images remains problematic mainly because of: (1) the trade off between temperature and composition and their different influence on mantle flow; (2) the difficulty in determining the extent and continuity of structures revealed by seismic tomography. We present a study on mantle thermal plumes, which illustrate the need to consider both geodynamic and mineral physics for a consistent interpretation of tomographic images in terms of temperature composition and flow. We focus on the identification of thermal plume by seismic tomography beneath the Hawaiian hot spot: a set of 3D numerical experiments is performed in a spherical shell to model a rising plume beneath a moving plate. The thermal structure obtained is converted into body waves seismic velocities using mineral physics considerations. We then build synthetic travel time data by propagating front waves in the obtained seismic structure. This synthetic data will be used to construct a travel time tomographic model, which is compared with actual tomographic models based on data from the ongoing PLUME seismic experiment. This comparison will allow a more consistent and quantitative interpretation of seismic tomography and plume structure under Hawaii.

  2. Super-resolution reconstruction for 4D computed tomography of the lung via the projections onto convex sets approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu E-mail: qianjinfeng08@gmail.com; Wu, Xiuxiu; Yang, Wei; Feng, Qianjin E-mail: qianjinfeng08@gmail.com; Chen, Wufan

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The use of 4D computed tomography (4D-CT) of the lung is important in lung cancer radiotherapy for tumor localization and treatment planning. Sometimes, dense sampling is not acquired along the superior–inferior direction. This disadvantage results in an interslice thickness that is much greater than in-plane voxel resolutions. Isotropic resolution is necessary for multiplanar display, but the commonly used interpolation operation blurs images. This paper presents a super-resolution (SR) reconstruction method to enhance 4D-CT resolution. Methods: The authors assume that the low-resolution images of different phases at the same position can be regarded as input “frames” to reconstruct high-resolution images. The SR technique is used to recover high-resolution images. Specifically, the Demons deformable registration algorithm is used to estimate the motion field between different “frames.” Then, the projection onto convex sets approach is implemented to reconstruct high-resolution lung images. Results: The performance of the SR algorithm is evaluated using both simulated and real datasets. Their method can generate clearer lung images and enhance image structure compared with cubic spline interpolation and back projection (BP) method. Quantitative analysis shows that the proposed algorithm decreases the root mean square error by 40.8% relative to cubic spline interpolation and 10.2% versus BP. Conclusions: A new algorithm has been developed to improve the resolution of 4D-CT. The algorithm outperforms the cubic spline interpolation and BP approaches by producing images with markedly improved structural clarity and greatly reduced artifacts.

  3. 4D optical coherence tomography of the embryonic heart using gated imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Rothenberg, Florence; Roy, Debashish; Nikolski, Vladimir P.; Wilson, David L.; Efimov, Igor R.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2005-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging have been used to image and diagnose diseases of the human heart. By gating the acquisition of the images to the heart cycle (gated imaging), these modalities enable one to produce 3D images of the heart without significant motion artifact and to more accurately calculate various parameters such as ejection fractions [1-3]. Unfortunately, these imaging modalities give inadequate resolution when investigating embryonic development in animal models. Defects in developmental mechanisms during embryogenesis have long been thought to result in congenital cardiac anomalies. Our understanding of normal mechanisms of heart development and how abnormalities can lead to defects has been hampered by our inability to detect anatomic and physiologic changes in these small (<2mm) organs. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has made it possible to visualize internal structures of the living embryonic heart with high-resolution in two- and threedimensions. OCT offers higher resolution than ultrasound (30 um axial, 90 um lateral) and magnetic resonance microscopy (25 um axial, 31 um lateral) [4, 5], with greater depth penetration over confocal microscopy (200 um). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses back reflected light from a sample to create an image with axial resolutions ranging from 2-15 um, while penetrating 1-2 mm in depth [6]. In the past, OCT groups estimated ejection fractions using 2D images in a Xenopus laevis [7], created 3D renderings of chick embryo hearts [8], and used a gated reconstruction technique to produce 2D Doppler OCT image of an in vivo Xenopus laevis heart [9]. In this paper we present a gated imaging system that allowed us to produce a 16-frame 3D movie of a beating chick embryo heart. The heart was excised from a day two (stage 13) chicken embryo and electrically paced at 1 Hz. We acquired 2D images (B-scans) in 62.5 ms, which provides enough temporal resolution to distinguish end

  4. Tracking tracer motion in a 4-D electrical resistivity tomography experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, W. O. C.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J. E.; Nilsson, H.; Kuras, O.; Bai, L.

    2016-05-01

    A new framework for automatically tracking subsurface tracers in electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring images is presented. Using computer vision and Bayesian inference techniques, in the form of a Kalman filter, the trajectory of a subsurface tracer is monitored by predicting and updating a state model representing its movements. Observations for the Kalman filter are gathered using the maximally stable volumes algorithm, which is used to dynamically threshold local regions of an ERT image sequence to detect the tracer at each time step. The application of the framework to the results of 2-D and 3-D tracer monitoring experiments show that the proposed method is effective for detecting and tracking tracer plumes in ERT images in the presence of noise, without intermediate manual intervention.

  5. 4D x-ray phase contrast tomography for repeatable motion of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    X-ray phase contrast tomography based on a grating interferometer was applied to fast and dynamic measurements of biological samples. To achieve this, the scanning procedure in the tomographic scan was improved. A triangle-shaped voltage signal from a waveform generator to a Piezo stage was used for the fast phase stepping in the grating interferometer. In addition, an optical fiber coupled x-ray scientific CMOS camera was used to achieve fast and highly efficient image acquisitions. These optimizations made it possible to perform an x-ray phase contrast tomographic measurement within an 8 min scan with density resolution of 2.4 mg/cm3. A maximum volume size of 13 × 13 × 6 mm3 was obtained with a single tomographic measurement with a voxel size of 6.5 μm. The scanning procedure using the triangle wave was applied to four-dimensional measurements in which highly sensitive three-dimensional x-ray imaging and a time-resolved dynamic measurement of biological samples were combined. A fresh tendon in the tail of a rat was measured under a uniaxial stretching and releasing condition. To maintain the freshness of the sample during four-dimensional phase contrast tomography, the temperature of the bathing liquid of the sample was kept below 10° using a simple cooling system. The time-resolved deformation of the tendon and each fascicle was measured with a temporal resolution of 5.7 Hz. Evaluations of cross-sectional area size, length of the axis, and mass density in the fascicle during a stretching process provided a basis for quantitative analysis of the deformation of tendon fascicle.

  6. Automated 4D lung computed tomography reconstruction during free breathing for conformal radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, Issam M.; Low, Daniel A.; Christensen, Gary E.; Parikh, Parag J.; Song, Joo Hyun; Nystrom, Michelle M.; Lu, Wei; Deasy, Joseph O.; Hubenschmidt, James P.; Wahab, Sasha H.; Mutic, Sasa; Singh, Anurag K.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2004-04-01

    We are developing 4D-CT to provide breathing motion information (trajectories) for radiation therapy treatment planning of lung cancer. Potential applications include optimization of intensity-modulated beams in the presence of breathing motion and intra-fraction target volume margin determination for conformal therapy. The images are acquired using a multi-slice CT scanner while the patient undergoes simultaneous quantitative spirometry. At each couch position, the CT scanner is operated in ciné mode and acquires up to 15 scans of 12 slices each. Each CT scan is associated with the measured tidal volume for retrospective reconstruction of 3D CT scans at arbitrary tidal volumes. The specific tasks of this project involves the development of automated registration of internal organ motion (trajectories) during breathing. A modified least-squares based optical flow algorithm tracks specific features of interest by modifying the eigenvalues of gradient matrix (gradient structural tensor). Good correlations between the measured motion and spirometry-based tidal volume are observed and evidence of internal hysteresis is also detected.

  7. Medium-scale 4-D ionospheric tomography using a dense GPS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Kamp, M. M. J. L.

    2013-01-01

    The ionosphere above Scandinavia in December 2006 is successfully imaged by 4-dimensional tomography using the software package MIDAS from the University of Bath. The method concentrates on medium-scale structures: between 100 km and 2000 km in horizontal size. The input consists of TEC measurements from the dense GPS network Geotrim in Finland. In order to ensure sufficient vertical resolution of the result, EISCAT incoherent scatter radar data from Tromsø are used as additional input to provide the vertical profile information. The TEC offset of the measurements is unknown, but the inversion procedure is able to determine this automatically. This auto-calibration is shown to work well. Comparisons with EISCAT radar results and with occultation results show that the inversion using EISCAT data for profile information is much better able to resolve vertical profiles of irregular structures than the inversion using built-in profiles. Still, with either method the intensities of irregular structures of sizes near the resolution (about 100 km horizontal size) can be underestimated. Also, the accuracy of the inversion worsens above areas where no receivers are available. The ionosphere over Scandinavia in December 2006 often showed a dense E-layer in early morning hours, which generally disappeared during midday when a dense F-layer was present. On 14 December, a strong coronal mass ejection occurred, and many intense irregularities appeared in the ionosphere, which extended to high altitudes.

  8. 4D computerized ionospheric tomography by using GPS measurements and IRI-Plas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuna, Hakan; Arikan, Feza; Arikan, Orhan

    2016-07-01

    approaches onto the obtained results. Combining Kalman methods with the proposed 3D CIT technique creates a robust 4D ionospheric electron density estimation model, and has the advantage of decreasing the computational cost of the proposed method. Results applied on both calm and storm days of the ionosphere show that, new technique produces more robust solutions especially when the number of GPS receiver stations in the region is small. This study is supported by TUBITAK 114E541, 115E915 and Joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR 14/001 projects.

  9. Dynamic reservoir characterization using 4D multicomponent seismic data and rock physics modeling at Delhi Field, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal Meneses, Carla C.

    Pore pressure and CO2 saturation changes are important to detect and quantify for maximizing oil recovery in Delhi Field. Delhi Field is a enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project with active monitoring by 4D multicomponent seismic technologies. Dynamic rock physics modeling integrates the rich dataset of core, well logs, petrographic thin sections and facies providing a link between reservoir and elastic properties. The dynamic modeling in this high porosity sandstone reservoir shows that P-wave velocity is more sensitive to CO2 saturation while S-wave velocity is more sensitive to pore pressure changes. I use PP and PS seismic data to jointly invert for Vp=Vs ratio and acoustic impedance. This technique has the advantage of adding more information to the non-unique inversion problem. Combining the inversion results from the monitor surveys of June 2010 and August 2011 provides acoustic impedance and Vp=Vs percentage differences. The time-lapse inverted response enables dynamic characterization of the reservoir by fitting the predicted dynamic models (calibrated at the wells). Dynamic reservoir characterization adds value in this stratigraphic complex reservoir. The results indicate that reservoir heterogeneities and pore pressure gradients control the CO2 flow within the Paluxy reservoir. Injectors 148-2 and 140-1 showed CO2 is moving downdip following a distributary channel induced by differential pressure from an updip injector or a barrier caused by a heterogeneity in the reservoir. CO2 anomalies located above the Paluxy injector 148-2 indicates that CO2 is moving from the Paluxy up into the Tuscaloosa Formation. My work demonstrates that reservoir monitoring is necessary for reservoir management at Delhi Field.

  10. Experimental characterization of cement-bentonite interaction using core infiltration techniques and 4D computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolder, F.; Mäder, U.; Jenni, A.; Schwendener, N.

    Deep geological storage of radioactive waste foresees cementitious materials as reinforcement of tunnels and as backfill. Bentonite is proposed to enclose spent fuel drums, and as drift seals. The emplacement of cementitious material next to clay material generates an enormous chemical gradient in pore water composition that drives diffusive solute transport. Laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling predict significant mineral alteration at and near interfaces, mainly resulting in a decrease of porosity in bentonite. The goal of this project is to characterize and quantify the cement/bentonite skin effects spatially and temporally in laboratory experiments. A newly developed mobile X-ray transparent core infiltration device was used, which allows performing X-ray computed tomography (CT) periodically without interrupting a running experiment. A pre-saturated cylindrical MX-80 bentonite sample (1920 kg/m3 average wet density) is subjected to a confining pressure as a constant total pressure boundary condition. The infiltration of a hyperalkaline (pH 13.4), artificial OPC (ordinary Portland cement) pore water into the bentonite plug alters the mineral assemblage over time as an advancing reaction front. The related changes in X-ray attenuation values are related to changes in phase densities, porosity and local bulk density and are tracked over time periodically by non-destructive CT scans. Mineral precipitation is observed in the inflow filter. Mineral alteration in the first millimeters of the bentonite sample is clearly detected and the reaction front is presently progressing with an average linear velocity that is 8 times slower than that for anions. The reaction zone is characterized by a higher X-ray attenuation compared to the signal of the pre-existing mineralogy. Chemical analysis of the outflow fluid showed initially elevated anion and cation concentrations compared to the infiltration fluid due to anion exclusion effects related to compaction of

  11. Quantifying the image quality and dose reduction of respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography with patient-measured breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Benjamin J.; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Kipritidis, John; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory triggered four dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is a novel technique that uses a patient’s respiratory signal to drive the image acquisition with the goal of imaging dose reduction without degrading image quality. This work investigates image quality and dose using patient-measured respiratory signals for RT 4D CBCT simulations. Studies were performed that simulate a 4D CBCT image acquisition using both the novel RT 4D CBCT technique and a conventional 4D CBCT technique. A set containing 111 free breathing lung cancer patient respiratory signal files was used to create 111 pairs of RT 4D CBCT and conventional 4D CBCT image sets from realistic simulations of a 4D CBCT system using a Rando phantom and the digital phantom, XCAT. Each of these image sets were compared to a ground truth dataset from which a mean absolute pixel difference (MAPD) metric was calculated to quantify the degradation of image quality. The number of projections used in each simulation was counted and was assumed as a surrogate for imaging dose. Based on 111 breathing traces, when comparing RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, the average image quality was reduced by 7.6% (Rando study) and 11.1% (XCAT study). However, the average imaging dose reduction was 53% based on needing fewer projections (617 on average) than conventional 4D CBCT (1320 projections). The simulation studies have demonstrated that the RT 4D CBCT method can potentially offer a 53% saving in imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT in simulation studies using a wide range of patient-measured breathing traces with a minimal impact on image quality.

  12. SU-E-J-183: Quantifying the Image Quality and Dose Reduction of Respiratory Triggered 4D Cone-Beam Computed Tomography with Patient- Measured Breathing

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B; OBrien, R; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory triggered four dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is a novel technique that uses a patient's respiratory signal to drive the image acquisition with the goal of imaging dose reduction without degrading image quality. This work investigates image quality and dose using patient-measured respiratory signals for RT 4D CBCT simulations instead of synthetic sinusoidal signals used in previous work. Methods: Studies were performed that simulate a 4D CBCT image acquisition using both the novel RT 4D CBCT technique and a conventional 4D CBCT technique from a database of oversampled Rando phantom CBCT projections. A database containing 111 free breathing lung cancer patient respiratory signal files was used to create 111 RT 4D CBCT and 111 conventional 4D CBCT image datasets from realistic simulations of a 4D RT CBCT system. Each of these image datasets were compared to a ground truth dataset from which a root mean square error (RMSE) metric was calculated to quantify the degradation of image quality. The number of projections used in each simulation is counted and was assumed as a surrogate for imaging dose. Results: Based on 111 breathing traces, when comparing RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT the average image quality was reduced by 7.6%. However, the average imaging dose reduction was 53% based on needing fewer projections (617 on average) than conventional 4D CBCT (1320 projections). Conclusion: The simulation studies using a wide range of patient breathing traces have demonstrated that the RT 4D CBCT method can potentially offer a substantial saving of imaging dose of 53% on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT in simulation studies with a minimal impact on image quality. A patent application (PCT/US2012/048693) has been filed which is related to this work.

  13. 5D respiratory motion model based image reconstruction algorithm for 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiulong; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Zhao, Hongkai; Gao, Yu; Thomas, David; Low, Daniel A.; Gao, Hao

    2015-11-01

    4D cone-beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) reconstructs a temporal sequence of CBCT images for the purpose of motion management or 4D treatment in radiotherapy. However the image reconstruction often involves the binning of projection data to each temporal phase, and therefore suffers from deteriorated image quality due to inaccurate or uneven binning in phase, e.g., under the non-periodic breathing. A 5D model has been developed as an accurate model of (periodic and non-periodic) respiratory motion. That is, given the measurements of breathing amplitude and its time derivative, the 5D model parametrizes the respiratory motion by three time-independent variables, i.e., one reference image and two vector fields. In this work we aim to develop a new 4DCBCT reconstruction method based on 5D model. Instead of reconstructing a temporal sequence of images after the projection binning, the new method reconstructs time-independent reference image and vector fields with no requirement of binning. The image reconstruction is formulated as a optimization problem with total-variation regularization on both reference image and vector fields, and the problem is solved by the proximal alternating minimization algorithm, during which the split Bregman method is used to reconstruct the reference image, and the Chambolle's duality-based algorithm is used to reconstruct the vector fields. The convergence analysis of the proposed algorithm is provided for this nonconvex problem. Validated by the simulation studies, the new method has significantly improved image reconstruction accuracy due to no binning and reduced number of unknowns via the use of the 5D model.

  14. Using the STOMP (Seismic TOMography Program) Program for tomography with strong ray bending

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, J.A.; Berryman, J.G.

    1987-08-31

    Accurate tomographic reconstructions of sound wave speed and attenuation are more difficult to obtain than are the corresponding reconstructions for x-rays or high frequency electromagnetic probes. The source of the difficulty is the common occurrence of large contrasts in acoustic or seismic wave speeds, leading to refraction and ray-bending effects. A new algorithm based on Fermat's principle has been developed to treat these problems. A description of the code STOMP (for Seismic TOMography Program) implementing the new algorithm is presented here together with a brief users manual for applications to borehole-to-borehole tomography. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Ambient Seismic Noise Tomography of Southern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Andreas; Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valerie

    2010-05-01

    The noise cross-correlation technique is especially useful in regions like southern Norway since local seismicity is rare and teleseismic records are not able to resolve the upper crust. Within the TopoScandiaDeep project, which aims to investigate the relation between surface topography and lithosphere-asthenosphere structure, we process seismic broadband data from the temporary MAGNUS network in Southern Norway. The receivers were recording 20 months of continuous data between September 2006 and June 2008. Additionally, permanent stations of the National Norwegian Seismic Network, NORSAR and GSN stations in the region are used. After usual preprocessing steps (filtering, prewhitening, temporal normalization), we compute 820 cross-correlation functions from 41 receivers for three month time windows. Evaluation of the azimuthal and temporal variation of signal to noise ratios and f-k analysis of NORSAR array data shows that the dominant propagation direction of seismic noise is south-west to north, corresponding well to the Norwegian coast line. During summer months, the signal to noise ratios decrease and the azimuthal distribution becomes smoother. Time-frequency analysis is applied to measure Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity dispersion curves between each station pair for each three-month correlation stack. The mean and variance of all dispersion curves is computed for each path. After rejection of low-quality data using a signal to noise ratio, minimum wavelength and velocity variance criterion, we obtain a large number of reliable velocity estimates (about 600) for periods between 2 and 15 seconds, which we invert for group velocity maps at respective periods. At all inverted periods, we find positive and negative velocity anomalies for Rayleigh and Love waves that correlate very well with local surface geology. While higher velocities (+5%) can be associated with the Caledonian nappes in the central part of southern Norway, the Oslo Graben is reflected

  16. Yellowstone Attenuation Tomography from Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doungkaew, N.; Seats, K.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study is to create a tomographic attenuation image for the Yellowstone region by analyzing ambient seismic noise. An attenuation image generated from ambient noise should provide more information about the structure and properties beneath Yellowstone, especially the caldera, which is known to be active. I applied the method of Lawrence & Prieto [2011] to examine lateral variations in the attenuation structure of Yellowstone. Ambient noise data were collected from broadband seismic stations located around Yellowstone National Park from 1999-2013. Noise correlation functions derived from cross correlations of the ambient noise at two stations were used to calculate a distance dependent decay (an attenuation coefficient) at each period and distance. An inversion was then performed to isolate and localize the spatial attenuation coefficients within the study area. I observe high amplitude decay of the ambient noise at the Yellowstone caldera, most likely due to elevated temperature and crustal melts caused by volcanism, geothermal heat flow, and hydrothermal activity such as geysers.

  17. Seismic Window Selection and Misfit Measurements for Global Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, W.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M.; Podhorszki, N.; Smith, J. A.; Tromp, J.

    2013-12-01

    Global Adjoint Tomography requires fast parallel processing of large datasets. After obtaing the preprocessed observed and synthetic seismograms, we use the open source software packages FLEXWIN (Maggi et al. 2007) to select time windows and MEASURE_ADJ to make measurements. These measurements define adjoint sources for data assimilation. Previous versions of these tools work on a pair of SAC files---observed and synthetic seismic data for the same component and station, and loop over all seismic records associated with one earthquake. Given the large number of stations and earthquakes, the frequent read and write operations create severe I/O bottlenecks on modern computing platforms. We present new versions of these tools utilizing a new seismic data format, namely the Adaptive Seismic Data Format(ASDF). This new format shows superior scalability for applications on high-performance computers and accommodates various types of data, including earthquake, industry and seismic interferometry datasets. ASDF also provides user-friendly APIs, which can be easily integrated into the adjoint tomography workflow and combined with other data processing tools. In addition to solving the I/O bottleneck, we are making several improvements to these tools. For example, FLEXWIN is tuned to select windows for different types of earthquakes. To capture their distinct features, we categorize earthquakes by their depths and frequency bands. Moreover, instead of only picking phases between the first P arrival and the surface-wave arrivals, our aim is to select and assimilate many other later prominent phases in adjoint tomography. For example, in the body-wave band (17 s - 60 s), we include SKS, sSKS and their multiple, while in the surface-wave band (60 s - 120 s) we incorporate major-arc surface waves.

  18. Common-mask guided image reconstruction (c-MGIR) for enhanced 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Justin C.; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yunmei; Fan, Qiyong; Li, Jonathan G.; Liu, Chihray; Lu, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Compared to 3D cone beam computed tomography (3D CBCT), the image quality of commercially available four-dimensional (4D) CBCT is severely impaired due to the insufficient amount of projection data available for each phase. Since the traditional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK)-based algorithm is infeasible for reconstructing high quality 4D CBCT images with limited projections, investigators had developed several compress-sensing (CS) based algorithms to improve image quality. The aim of this study is to develop a novel algorithm which can provide better image quality than the FDK and other CS based algorithms with limited projections. We named this algorithm ‘the common mask guided image reconstruction’ (c-MGIR). In c-MGIR, the unknown CBCT volume is mathematically modeled as a combination of phase-specific motion vectors and phase-independent static vectors. The common-mask matrix, which is the key concept behind the c-MGIR algorithm, separates the common static part across all phase images from the possible moving part in each phase image. The moving part and the static part of the volumes were then alternatively updated by solving two sub-minimization problems iteratively. As the novel mathematical transformation allows the static volume and moving volumes to be updated (during each iteration) with global projections and ‘well’ solved static volume respectively, the algorithm was able to reduce the noise and under-sampling artifact (an issue faced by other algorithms) to the maximum extent. To evaluate the performance of our proposed c-MGIR, we utilized imaging data from both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The qualities of the images reconstructed with c-MGIR were compared with (1) standard FDK algorithm, (2) conventional total variation (CTV) based algorithm, (3) prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm, and (4) motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR) algorithm, respectively. To improve the efficiency of the

  19. Double-difference seismic tomography method and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haijiang

    We have developed a double-difference (DD) seismic tomography method that uses both absolute arrival times and differential travel times. By taking into account path anomaly biases between event pairs explicitly, DD tomography has the ability to determine the absolute and relative event locations and velocity structure accurately with the direct use of the more accurate differential travel times (from catalog and/or waveform cross correlation (WCC) data). We represented the Earth with a Cartesian (flat-Earth) model at a local scale and used a pseudo-bending ray tracing algorithm to find rays and travel times between events and stations. At a regional scale, the spherical shape of the Earth is taken into account by parameterizing a spherical surface inside a Cartesian volume of grid nodes. Finite-difference ray tracing algorithms are utilized to deal with velocity discontinuities such as Conrad, Moho and subducting slab boundary. The synthetic test shows that DD tomography produces more accurate event locations and velocity structure than standard tomography. The applications of local scale DD tomography to datasets from the Hayward fault and the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault yield a sharper velocity contrast along the fault for the former dataset and a more apparent low-velocity fault zone for the latter dataset. For the Parkfield, California dataset, we use both the absolute and differential S-P data to estimate a more consistent Vp/Vs ratio model with the local geological setting. We have imaged the seismic velocity structure of the subducting slabs beneath Northern Honshu, Japan and the Wellington region, New Zealand with unprecedented resolution by applying the regional scale DD tomography method to the two planes of seismicity of the double seismic zone. Our models support the hypothesis that intermediate depth earthquakes are enabled by dehydration reactions of hydrous minerals. To reduce the mismatch between the ray distribution and the regular

  20. Illumination of Jakarta Basin with Full Seismic Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygin, Erdinc; Fichtner, Andreas; Cummins, Phil; Masturyono, Masturyono

    2015-04-01

    The greater Jakarta area is densely populated with over 20 million residents. The rapid subduction of Australian crust beneath Sundaland, and the alluvial basin covering most of Jakarta increase the seismic hazard that the city is facing during an earthquake. We apply 3D Full Seismic Wave Tomography to invert interstation Green's functions retrieved from stacked correlations of seismic ambient noise recorded at a dense broadband network operated in Jakarta, Indonesia. Over 1200 Green's Functions were used in an iteratively applied adjoint scheme to map 3D velocity structure. The initial model used in the simulations, is derived from the combination of a 2-step procedure of Bayesian tomography and point wise inversions of dispersions curves. The iterative updates on the starting model, reduced the misfits between observed and synthetic Green's functions. Simulations were conducted in a parallelized approach with 128 compute cores. Green's functions were filtered between 0.08 and 0.2 Hz where their signal to noise ration is optimum. Results of the full waveform inversions show a thick very low velocity layer in the north-west part of the city with shortening towards the south east. Shear wave velocities as low as 1 km/s is observed across the region. The resulting model contributes to the quantification of the seismic hazard of Jakarta.

  1. Seismic Waveform Tomography of the Iranian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, A.; Priestley, K.; Jackson, J.

    2001-05-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the detailed velocity structure of Iran, despite the region's importance in the tectonics of the Middle East. Previous studies have concentrated mainly on fundamental mode surface wave dispersion measurements along isolated paths (e.g.~Asudeh, 1982; Cong & Mitchell, 1998; Ritzwoller et.~al, 1998), and the propagation characteristics of crust and upper mantle body waves (e.g. Hearn & Ni 1994; Rodgers et.~al 1997). We use the partitioned waveform inversion method of Nolet (1990) on several hundred regional waveforms crossing the Iranian region to produce a 3-D seismic velocity map for the crust and upper mantle of the area. The method consists of using long period seismograms from earthquakes with well determined focal mechanisms and depths to constrain 1-D path-averaged shear wave models along regional paths. The constraints imposed on the 1-D models by the seismograms are then combined with independent constraints from other methods (e.g.~Moho depths from reciever function analysis etc.), to solve for the 3-D seismic velocity structure of the region. A dense coverage of fundamental mode rayleigh waves at a period of 100~s ensures good resolution of lithospheric scale structure. We also use 20~s period fundamental mode rayleigh waves and some Pnl wavetrains to make estimates of crustal thickness variations and average crustal velocities. A few deeper events give us some coverage of higher mode rayleigh waves and mantle S waves, which sample to the base of the upper mantle. Our crustal thickness estimates range from 45~km in the southern Zagros mountains, to 40~km in central Iran and 35~km towards the north of the region. We also find inconsistencies between the 1-D models required to fit the vertical and the tranverse seismograms, indicating the presence of anisotropy.

  2. Optimizing 4D cone beam computed tomography acquisition by varying the gantry velocity and projection time interval.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Ricky T; Cooper, Benjamin J; Keall, Paul J

    2013-03-21

    Four dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) is an emerging clinical image guidance strategy for tumour sites affected by respiratory motion. In current generation 4DCBCT techniques, both the gantry rotation speed and imaging frequency are constant and independent of the patient's breathing which can lead to projection clustering. We present a mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP) model for respiratory motion guided-4DCBCT (RMG-4DCBCT) which regulates the gantry velocity and projection time interval, in response to the patient's respiratory signal, so that a full set of evenly spaced projections can be taken in a number of phase, or displacement, bins during the respiratory cycle. In each respiratory bin, an image can be reconstructed from the projections to give a 4D view of the patient's anatomy so that the motion of the lungs, and tumour, can be observed during the breathing cycle. A solution to the full MIQP model in a practical amount of time, 10 s, is not possible with the leading commercial MIQP solvers, so a heuristic method is presented. Using parameter settings typically used on current generation 4DCBCT systems (4 min image acquisition, 1200 projections, 10 respiratory bins) and a sinusoidal breathing trace with a 4 s period, we show that the root mean square (RMS) of the angular separation between projections with displacement binning is 2.7° using existing constant gantry speed systems and 0.6° using RMG-4DCBCT. For phase based binning the RMS is 2.7° using constant gantry speed systems and 2.5° using RMG-4DCBCT. The optimization algorithm presented is a critical step on the path to developing a system for RMG-4DCBCT.

  3. The Role of Synthetic Reconstruction Tests in Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlinson, N.; Spakman, W.

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic reconstruction tests are widely used in seismic tomography as a means for assessing the robustness of solutions produced by linear or iterative non-linear inversion schemes. The most common test is the so-called checkerboard resolution test, which uses an alternating pattern of high and low wavespeeds (or some other seismic property such as attenuation). However, checkerboard tests have a number of limitations, including that they (1) only provide indirect evidence of quantitative measures of reliability such as resolution and uncertainty; (2) give a potentially misleading impression of the range of scale-lengths that can be resolved; (3) don't give a true picture of the structural distortion or smearing caused by the data coverage; and (4) result in an inverse problem that is biased towards an accurate reconstruction. The widespread use of synthetic reconstruction tests in seismic tomography is likely to continue for some time yet, so it is important to implement best practice where possible. The goal here is to provide a general set of guidelines, derived from the underlying theory and illustrated by a series of numerical experiments, on their implementation in seismic tomography. In particular, we recommend (1) using a sparse distribution of spikes, rather than the more conventional tightly-spaced checkerboard; (2) using the identical data coverage (e.g. geometric rays) for the synthetic model that was computed for the observation-based model; (3) carrying out multiple tests using anomalies of different scale length; (4) exercising caution when analysing synthetic recovery tests that use anomaly patterns that closely mimic the observation-based model; (5) investigating the trade-off between data noise levels and the minimum wavelength of recovered structure; (6) where possible, test the extent to which preconditioning (e.g. identical parameterization for input and output models) influences the recovery of anomalies.

  4. Seismic tomography Technology for the Water Infiltration Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    J. Descour

    2001-04-30

    NSA Engineering, Inc., conducted seismic tomography surveys in Niche No.3 in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and Alcove No.8 in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) cross drift as part of the Infiltration Experiment being conducted in Niche No.3. NSA Engineering is a direct support contractor to the Yucca Mountain Project. This report documents the work performed from August 14 through 30, 2000, prior to the beginning of the infiltration experiment. The objective of the seismic tomography survey was to investigate the flow path of water between access drifts and more specifically to (Kramer 2000): (1) Conduct a baseline seismic tomography survey prior to the infiltration experiment; (2) Produce 2-D and 3-D tomographic images of the rock volume between Alcove No.8 and Niche No.3; (3) Correlate tomography results with published structural and lithological features, and with other geophysical data such as ground penetrating radar (GPR); and (4) Results of this survey will form a baseline with which to compare subsequent changes to the rock mass. These changes may be as a result of the water infiltration tests that could be conducted in Alcove No.8 in 2001. The scope of this reported work is to use the velocity tomograms to: (a) assess the structures and lithologic features within the surveyed area and/or volume between the two access drifts; and (b) provide information on the structural state of the rock mass as inferred by the velocity signatures of the rock prior to the beginning of the infiltration experiment.

  5. Chemical and biogeophysical impact of four-dimensional (4D) seismic exploration in sub-Saharan Africa, and restoration of dysfunctionalized mangrove forests in the prospect areas.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Leo C; Ayolagha, G; Obute, G C; Ohabuike, H C

    2007-09-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) seismic exploration, an improved geophysical technique for hydrocarbon-data acquisition, was applied for the first time in the Nembe Creek prospect area of Nigeria. The affected soils were slightly alkaline in situ when wet (pH 7.2), but extremely acidic when dry (pH 3.0). The organic carbon content (4.6-26.8%) and other physicochemical properties of soils and water (N, P, and heavy-metal contents, etc.) were higher than the baseline values obtained in 2001 before seismic profiling. Most values also exceeded the baseline compliance standards of the Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA). Rehabilitation of the affected areas was achieved by stabilizing the mangrove floor by liming and appropriate application of nutrients, followed by replanting the cut seismic lines over a distance of 1,372 km with different mangrove species, including juvenile Rhizophora racemosa, R. mangle, and Avicennia species, which were transferred from nursery points. Quicker post-operational intervention is recommended for future 4D surveys, because the time lag between the end of seismic activity and post-impact investigation is critical in determining the relationship between activity and impact: the longer the intervening period, the more mooted the interaction. PMID:17886833

  6. SU-E-J-31: Monitor Interfractional Variation of Tumor Respiratory Motion Using 4D KV Conebeam Computed Tomography for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, A; Prior, P; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4DCT has been widely used to generate internal tumor volume (ITV) for a lung tumor for treatment planning. However, lung tumors may show different respiratory motion on the treatment day. The purpose of this study is to evaluate 4D KV conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) for monitoring tumor interfractional motion variation between simulation and each fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods: 4D KV CBCT was acquired with the Elekta XVI system. The accuracy of 4D KV CBCT for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was tested with a dynamic thorax motion phantom (CIRS, Virginia) with a linear amplitude of 2 cm. In addition, an adult anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson, Rando) with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters embedded at the center and periphery of a slab of solid water was used to measure the dose of 4D KV CBCT and to compare it with the dose with 3D KV CBCT. The image registration was performed by aligning\\ each phase images of 4D KV CBCT to the planning images and the final couch shifts were calculated as a mean of all these individual shifts along each direction.A workflow was established based on these quality assurance tests for lung cancer patients. Results: 4D KV CBCT does not increase imaging dose in comparison to 3D KV CBCT. Acquisition of 4D KV CBCT is 4 minutes as compared to 2 minutes for 3D KV CBCT. Most of patients showed a small daily variation of tumor respiratory motion about 2 mm. However, some patients may have more than 5 mm variations of tumor respiratory motion. Conclusion: The radiation dose does not increase with 4D KV CBCT. 4D KV CBCT is a useful tool for monitoring interfractional variations of tumor respiratory motion before SBRT of lung cancer patients.

  7. Teleseismic Tomography of the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasanmi, Olorunfemi Temitope

    This research investigates the properties of the crust and the upper mantle beneath the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ). The ETSZ is a major seismic feature that is located in the southeastern United States. The zone spans portions of eastern Tennessee, North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and Alabama and is, after the New Madrid seismic zone, the second most active seismic region of the North America east of the Rocky Mountains. This NE trending zone of intraplate seismicity is about 300km long and 100km wide. A striking geophysical anomaly crossing this region is called the New York-Alabama magnetic lineament. The most seismically active part of this zone is along and to the SW of this aeromagnetic anomaly. In this thesis 3-D velocity images of the earth beneath the ETSZ were obtained by using Fast Marching Teleseismic Tomography package. The starting data was adopted from the previous study by Agbaje (2012) and consisted of 2855 residuals from 217 teleseismic events that were recorded by 28 stations within the ETSZ. The tomographic images show significant velocity anomalies, confirming complex tectonic evolution and revealing basement features that can be correlated with regional gravity and magnetic anomalies. The results of the tomographic inversion in the crust agree with the previous tomographic studies that used local earthquake data (Powell et al., 2014). However, the most significant anomaly resolved persists through most of the upper mantle and suggests the presence of a major, southeast dipping, high velocity anomaly located beneath the Blue Ridge province. The anomaly is interpreted to possibly be a fossil slab dating back to the accretion of Carolina terrane during Devonian.

  8. Markov-random-field modeling for linear seismic tomography.

    PubMed

    Kuwatani, Tatsu; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Toriumi, Mitsuhiro

    2014-10-01

    We apply the Markov-random-field model to linear seismic tomography and propose a method to estimate the hyperparameters for the smoothness and the magnitude of the noise. Optimal hyperparameters can be determined analytically by minimizing the free energy function, which is defined by marginalizing the evaluation function. In synthetic inversion tests under various settings, the assumed velocity structures are successfully reconstructed, which shows the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method. The proposed mathematical framework can be applied to inversion problems in various fields in the natural sciences.

  9. Markov-random-field modeling for linear seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwatani, Tatsu; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Toriumi, Mitsuhiro

    2014-10-01

    We apply the Markov-random-field model to linear seismic tomography and propose a method to estimate the hyperparameters for the smoothness and the magnitude of the noise. Optimal hyperparameters can be determined analytically by minimizing the free energy function, which is defined by marginalizing the evaluation function. In synthetic inversion tests under various settings, the assumed velocity structures are successfully reconstructed, which shows the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method. The proposed mathematical framework can be applied to inversion problems in various fields in the natural sciences.

  10. Sleipner CCS site: velocity and attenuation model from seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, G.; Chadwick, R. A.; Williams, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    The results of the travel-time and frequency shift tomographic inversion of the seismic data from one of the high-resolution lines acquired in 2006 on the Sleipner CO2 geological storage site are here presented. The work has been performed within the European project CO2ReMoVe, to produce an accurate model in-depth, of both seismic velocities and attenuation, to constrain better the quantification studies of the project's partners. Tomographic techniques have the advantage of not assuming horizontal layering or uniform lateral velocities, and of enabling an easy comparison of models, even if resulting from seismic data acquired with different geometries, unavoidable in a time-lapse data set. Through an iterative process, the differences in travel-times between observed direct, reflected or refracted arrivals and the same, calculated on a discrete model, with a ray-tracing based on the Fermat's principle, are minimized. Other minimization procedures provide the reflector/refractor geometries in -depth. Analogously, in attenuation tomography, the minimization process takes into account the observed and calculated spectral-centroid frequency-shift, due to the loss of the highest frequency of the seismic wave, while crossing an attenuating medium. The result is a seismic quality factor (Q) model in-depth, and hence of the attenuation that is known to be more sensitive to subtle changes in physical properties than seismic velocity. The model is across the center of the CO2 plume, on the in-line 1838, and is constituted by nine layers, four resulting by a preliminary analysis of the pre-injection 1994 data set, i.e. seabed, a strong reflection in the overburden and the top and bottom of the Utsira Sand, plus additional five horizons, four of which within Utsira Sands, and one just above the top of it. The layers within the reservoir are very close to each other and in some cases they merge together laterally. The accumulation of CO2 in the uppermost layer of the

  11. Causes of intraplate seismicity in central Brazil from travel time seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Marcelo Peres; Azevedo, Paulo Araújo de; Marotta, Giuliano Sant'Anna; Schimmel, Martin; Fuck, Reinhardt

    2016-06-01

    New results of travel time seismic tomography in central Brazil provide evidence that the relatively high seismicity in this region is related to the thinner lithosphere at the limit between the Amazonian and São Francisco paleocontinents. The transition between these paleocontinents is marked by low velocity anomalies, spatially well correlated with the high seismicity region, which are interpreted as related to the lithospheric thinning and consequent rise of the asthenosphere, which have increased the temperature in this region. The low-velocity anomalies suggest a weakness region, favorable to the build-up of stress. The effective elastic thickness and the strain/stress regime for the study area are in agreement with tomographic results. A high-velocity trend is observed beneath the Parnaíba Basin, where low seismicity is observed, indicating the presence of a cratonic core. Our results support the idea that the intraplate seismicity in central Brazil is related to the thin lithosphere underlying parts of the Tocantins Province between the neighboring large cratonic blocks.

  12. TH-E-17A-07: Improved Cine Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4D CT) Acquisition and Processing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, S; Castillo, R; Castillo, E; Pan, T; Ibbott, G; Balter, P; Hobbs, B; Dai, J; Guerrero, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Artifacts arising from the 4D CT acquisition and post-processing methods add systematic uncertainty to the treatment planning process. We propose an alternate cine 4D CT acquisition and post-processing method to consistently reduce artifacts, and explore patient parameters indicative of image quality. Methods: In an IRB-approved protocol, 18 patients with primary thoracic malignancies received a standard cine 4D CT acquisition followed by an oversampling 4D CT that doubled the number of images acquired. A second cohort of 10 patients received the clinical 4D CT plus 3 oversampling scans for intra-fraction reproducibility. The clinical acquisitions were processed by the standard phase sorting method. The oversampling acquisitions were processed using Dijkstras algorithm to optimize an artifact metric over available image data. Image quality was evaluated with a one-way mixed ANOVA model using a correlation-based artifact metric calculated from the final 4D CT image sets. Spearman correlations and a linear mixed model tested the association between breathing parameters, patient characteristics, and image quality. Results: The oversampling 4D CT scans reduced artifact presence significantly by 27% and 28%, for the first cohort and second cohort respectively. From cohort 2, the inter-replicate deviation for the oversampling method was within approximately 13% of the cross scan average at the 0.05 significance level. Artifact presence for both clinical and oversampling methods was significantly correlated with breathing period (ρ=0.407, p-value<0.032 clinical, ρ=0.296, p-value<0.041 oversampling). Artifact presence in the oversampling method was significantly correlated with amount of data acquired, (ρ=-0.335, p-value<0.02) indicating decreased artifact presence with increased breathing cycles per scan location. Conclusion: The 4D CT oversampling acquisition with optimized sorting reduced artifact presence significantly and reproducibly compared to the phase

  13. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2007-06-30

    The objective of this research project was to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in the hopes of observing changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE No.DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data. Attribute analysis was a very useful tool in enhancing changes in seismic character present, but difficult to interpret on time amplitude slices. Lessons learned from and tools/techniques developed during this project will allow high-resolution seismic imaging to be routinely applied to many CO{sub 2} injection programs in a large percentage of shallow carbonate oil fields in the midcontinent.

  14. Seismic Tomography of the Arctic Lithosphere and Asthenosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Andrew; Lebedev, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    Lateral variations in seismic velocities in the upper mantle, mapped by seismic tomography, primarily reflect variations in the temperature of the rocks at depth. Seismic tomography thus provides a proxy for lateral changes in the temperature and thickness of the lithosphere, in addition to delineating the deep boundaries between tectonic blocks with different properties and age of the lithosphere. Our new, 3D tomographic model of the upper mantle and the crust of the Arctic region is constrained by an unprecedentedly large global dataset of broadband waveform fits (over one million seismograms) and provides improved resolution of the lithosphere, compared to other available models. The most prominent high-velocity anomalies, seen down to 150-200 km depths, indicate the cold, thick, stable mantle lithosphere beneath Precambrian cratons. The northern boundaries of the Canadian Shield's and Greenland's cratonic lithosphere closely follow the coastlines, with the Greenland and North American cratons clearly separated from each other. Sharp velocity gradients in western Canada indicate that the craton boundary at depth closely follows the Rocky Mountain Front. High velocities between the Great Bear Arc and Beaufort Sea provide convincing evidence for the recently proposed 'MacKenzie Craton', unexposed at the surface. In Eurasia, cratonic continental lithosphere extends northwards beneath the Barents and eastern Kara Seas. The boundaries of the Archean cratons and intervening Proterozoic belts mapped by tomography indicate the likely offshore extensions of major Phanerozoic sutures and deformation fronts. The old oceanic lithosphere of the Canada Basin is much colder and thicker than the younger lithosphere beneath the adjacent Amundsen Basin, north of the Gakkel Ridge. Beneath the slow-spreading Gakkel Ridge, we detect the expected low-velocity anomaly associated with partial melting in the uppermost mantle; the anomaly is weaker, however, than beneath faster

  15. Seismic tomography of the Massif Central - The plume story revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granet, Michel; Achauer, Ulrich; Barruol, Guilhem

    2010-05-01

    Picking up on the earlier ideas from the 70', that there might be a mantle plume beneath the Massif Central, and following extensive seismological and petrological field work in the French Massif Central in the beginning of the 1990's a small-scale plume beneath the volcanic zone in the central part of the Massif Central, ascending from asthenospheric depths was postulated (Granet et al., 1995 a, b). Including Bouguer gravity and petrophysical modelling arguments this fascinating idea was further established and the name "baby-plume" was created for this kind of phenomena (Sobolev et al., 1997). However, the southeastern end and the depth extension of this plume structure could not be properly established, due to the limited aperture of the seismic arrays used at the time. This triggered a new research program, called TRACK, with the aim of tracking the traces of supposed small-scale continental mantle plume structures by integrated seismological methods. Part of Track was a new seismological field experiment carried out in central-southern part of the Massif Central in 1998/99, with seismic tomography and the study of seismic anisotropy at its core. The joint analysis of both data-sets suggests that the plume deflects to the South-East with depth, in accordance with the flow pattern suggested from SKS-splitting (Barruol and Granet,2002). In this paper we will present the new results (size and depth extent) of the mantle plume beneath the Massif Central and discuss the geodynamic implications.

  16. 4D seismic to image a thin carbonate reservoir during a miscible C02 flood: Hall-Gurney Field, Kansas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raef, A.E.; Miller, R.D.; Franseen, E.K.; Byrnes, A.P.; Watney, W.L.; Harrison, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The movement of miscible CO2 injected into a shallow (900 m) thin (3.6-6m) carbonate reservoir was monitored using the high-resolution parallel progressive blanking (PPB) approach. The approach concentrated on repeatability during acquisition and processing, and use of amplitude envelope 4D horizon attributes. Comparison of production data and reservoir simulations to seismic images provided a measure of the effectiveness of time-lapse (TL) to detect weak anomalies associated with changes in fluid concentration. Specifically, the method aided in the analysis of high-resolution data to distinguish subtle seismic characteristics and associated trends related to depositional lithofacies and geometries and structural elements of this carbonate reservoir that impact fluid character and EOR efforts.

  17. New Results from WOMBAT: Seismic Attenuation Tomography in Southeast Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozgay, S.; Rawlinson, N.; Nayak, A.

    2011-12-01

    New work using data from Australia's WOMBAT array (~600 3-component short-period seismic stations with spacings of 15-50 km) has focused on differential attenuation tomography. We extend prior travel time tomography studies to utilise amplitude data for analysis of the attenuation structure of the lithosphere and upper mantle. We modify the adaptive stacking code of Rawlinson & Kennett (2004) to include frequency-dependent differential δt* attenuation measurements. The method appears to work well with the short-period WOMBAT data, as coherent patterns of δt* are observed for many events. The main advantage of using adaptive stacking is that a large volume of data becomes usable that otherwise has a low signal-to-noise ratio. Analysis of teleseismic P waves recorded mainly from earthquakes in the surrounding subduction zones shows good structural coherency with travel time tomography. We aim to build a comprehensive picture of the attenuation structure of the southeastern portion of Australian continental lithosphere (a region ~1.5x bigger than the area of Texas). Initial results from Southeast Tasmania with high resolution down to >100 km depth clearly delineate the Tamar Fracture System, separating the East and West Tasmanian Terranes. Furthermore, we hope to provide direct comparison and integrative interpretation with travel time anomalies and anisotropy measurements.

  18. 4D Seismic Monitoring at the Ketzin Pilot Site during five years of storage - Results and Quantitative Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüth, Stefan; Ivanova, Alexandra; Ivandic, Monika; Götz, Julia

    2015-04-01

    The Ketzin pilot site for geological CO2-storage has been operative between June 2008 and August 2013. In this period, 67 kt of CO2 have been injected (Martens et al., this conference). Repeated 3D seismic monitoring surveys were performed before and during CO2 injection. A third repeat survey, providing data from the post-injection phase, is currently being prepared for the autumn of 2015. The large scale 3D surface seismic measurements have been complemented by other geophysical and geochemical monitoring methods, among which are high-resolution seismic surface-downhole observations. These observations have been concentrating on the reservoir area in the vicinity of the injection well and provide high-resolution images as well as data for petrophysical quantification of the CO2 distribution in the reservoir. The Ketzin pilot site is a saline aquifer site in an onshore environment which poses specific challenges for a reliable monitoring of the injection CO2. Although much effort was done to ensure as much as possible identical acquisition conditions, a high degree of repeatability noise was observed, mainly due to varying weather conditions, and also variations in the acquisition geometries due to logistical reasons. Nevertheless, time-lapse processing succeeded in generating 3D time-lapse data sets which could be interpreted in terms of CO2 storage related amplitude variations in the depth range of the storage reservoir. The time-lapse seismic data, pulsed-neutron-gamma logging results (saturation), and petrophysical core measurements were interpreted together in order to estimate the amount of injected carbon dioxide imaged by the seismic repeat data. For the first repeat survey, the mass estimation was summed up to 20.5 ktons, which is approximately 7% less than what had been injected then. For the second repeat survey, the mass estimation was summed up to approximately 10-15% less than what had been injected. The deviations may be explained by several factors

  19. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this research project is to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data to observe changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 18 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and six monitor surveys clearly imaged changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators.

  20. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2006-08-31

    The objective of this research project is to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in an attempt to observe changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data.

  1. A proposed framework for consensus-based lung tumour volume auto-segmentation in 4D computed tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Spencer; Brophy, Mark; Palma, David; Louie, Alexander V.; Yu, Edward; Yaremko, Brian; Ahmad, Belal; Barron, John L.; Beauchemin, Steven S.; Rodrigues, George; Gaede, Stewart

    2015-02-01

    This work aims to propose and validate a framework for tumour volume auto-segmentation based on ground-truth estimates derived from multi-physician input contours to expedite 4D-CT based lung tumour volume delineation. 4D-CT datasets of ten non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were manually segmented by 6 physicians. Multi-expert ground truth (GT) estimates were constructed using the STAPLE algorithm for the gross tumour volume (GTV) on all respiratory phases. Next, using a deformable model-based method, multi-expert GT on each individual phase of the 4D-CT dataset was propagated to all other phases providing auto-segmented GTVs and motion encompassing internal gross target volumes (IGTVs) based on GT estimates (STAPLE) from each respiratory phase of the 4D-CT dataset. Accuracy assessment of auto-segmentation employed graph cuts for 3D-shape reconstruction and point-set registration-based analysis yielding volumetric and distance-based measures. STAPLE-based auto-segmented GTV accuracy ranged from (81.51  ±  1.92) to (97.27  ±  0.28)% volumetric overlap of the estimated ground truth. IGTV auto-segmentation showed significantly improved accuracies with reduced variance for all patients ranging from 90.87 to 98.57% volumetric overlap of the ground truth volume. Additional metrics supported these observations with statistical significance. Accuracy of auto-segmentation was shown to be largely independent of selection of the initial propagation phase. IGTV construction based on auto-segmented GTVs within the 4D-CT dataset provided accurate and reliable target volumes compared to manual segmentation-based GT estimates. While inter-/intra-observer effects were largely mitigated, the proposed segmentation workflow is more complex than that of current clinical practice and requires further development.

  2. Reducing disk storage of full-3D seismic waveform tomography (F3DT) through lossy online compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, Peter; Chen, Po; Lee, En-Jui

    2016-08-01

    Full-3D seismic waveform tomography (F3DT) is the latest seismic tomography technique that can assimilate broadband, multi-component seismic waveform observations into high-resolution 3D subsurface seismic structure models. The main drawback in the current F3DT implementation, in particular the scattering-integral implementation (F3DT-SI), is the high disk storage cost and the associated I/O overhead of archiving the 4D space-time wavefields of the receiver- or source-side strain tensors. The strain tensor fields are needed for computing the data sensitivity kernels, which are used for constructing the Jacobian matrix in the Gauss-Newton optimization algorithm. In this study, we have successfully integrated a lossy compression algorithm into our F3DT-SI workflow to significantly reduce the disk space for storing the strain tensor fields. The compressor supports a user-specified tolerance for bounding the error, and can be integrated into our finite-difference wave-propagation simulation code used for computing the strain fields. The decompressor can be integrated into the kernel calculation code that reads the strain fields from the disk and compute the data sensitivity kernels. During the wave-propagation simulations, we compress the strain fields before writing them to the disk. To compute the data sensitivity kernels, we read the compressed strain fields from the disk and decompress them before using them in kernel calculations. Experiments using a realistic dataset in our California statewide F3DT project have shown that we can reduce the strain-field disk storage by at least an order of magnitude with acceptable loss, and also improve the overall I/O performance of the entire F3DT-SI workflow significantly. The integration of the lossy online compressor may potentially open up the possibilities of the wide adoption of F3DT-SI in routine seismic tomography practices in the near future.

  3. Waveform Tomography and its Application to Marine Seismic Refraction Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, S.; Canales, J.

    2008-05-01

    We explore the applicability of two-dimensional seismic waveform tomography to conventional deep-water, long- offset (10s of kilometers) seismic refraction experiments in which ocean-bottom receivers and sea-surface sources are usually spaced several kilometers and a few 100s of meters apart, respectively. In particular, we test the application of waveform tomography to ocean-bottom seismometer (hydrophone) data collected along the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 26°N in the vicinity of the active TAG hydrothermal system, which is thought to be located on the hanging wall of an active oceanic detachment fault [e.g., Canales et al., Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 8, Q08004, 2007]. If successful, waveform tomography could provide detailed velocity information related to fluid flow and alternation along the fault zone that cannot be obtained from traveltime tomography analyses. We use the frequency-domain, elastic-wave equation approach of R.G. Pratt [Geophysics, 64, 888-901, 1999]. Initial data processing consisted of spherical divergence corrections, wavelet shaping and predictive deconvolution using a special design and application window data to obtain a smooth, random amplitude spectrum sans the bubble pulse. Other processing steps included filtering, windowing and offset-dependent amplitude normalization with respect to forward modeled synthetics. Forward modeling is done via the central-difference scheme of finite difference method with the primary modeling parameters being the boundary conditions, time-domain damping parameter to prevent wraparound energy, appropriate quality factor and dispersion coefficient. Source and velocity inversion is done at selected frequencies using "efficient waveform inversion" [Sirgue and Pratt, Geophysics, 69, 231-248 2004] to minimize the misfit of data residuals via the gradient method. Inversion parameters (offset weighting, depth tapering, gradient wave-number filtering and masking) were tested and decided on a

  4. Probing the Detailed Seismic Velocity Structure of Subduction Zones Using Advanced Seismic Tomography Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2005-12-01

    Subduction zones are one of the most important components of the Earth's plate tectonic system. Knowing the detailed seismic velocity structure within and around subducting slabs is vital to understand the constitution of the slab, the cause of intermediate depth earthquakes inside the slab, the fluid distribution and recycling, and tremor occurrence [Hacker et al., 2001; Obara, 2002].Thanks to the ability of double-difference tomography [Zhang and Thurber, 2003] to resolve the fine-scale structure near the source region and the favorable seismicity distribution inside many subducting slabs, it is now possible to characterize the fine details of the velocity structure and earthquake locations inside the slab, as shown in the study of the Japan subduction zone [Zhang et al., 2004]. We further develop the double-difference tomography method in two aspects: the first improvement is to use an adaptive inversion mesh rather than a regular inversion grid and the second improvement is to determine a reliable Vp/Vs structure using various strategies rather than directly from Vp and Vs [see our abstract ``Strategies to solve for a better Vp/Vs model using P and S arrival time'' at Session T29]. The adaptive mesh seismic tomography method is based on tetrahedral diagrams and can automatically adjust the inversion mesh according to the ray distribution so that the inversion mesh nodes are denser where there are more rays and vice versa [Zhang and Thurber, 2005]. As a result, the number of inversion mesh nodes is greatly reduced compared to a regular inversion grid with comparable spatial resolution, and the tomographic system is more stable and better conditioned. This improvement is quite valuable for characterizing the fine structure of the subduction zone considering the highly uneven distribution of earthquakes within and around the subducting slab. The second improvement, to determine a reliable Vp/Vs model, lies in jointly inverting Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs using P, S, and S

  5. Innovations in seismic tomography, their applications and induced seismic events in carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng

    This dissertation presents two innovations in seismic tomography and a new discovery of induced seismic events associated with CO2 injection at an Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) site. The following are brief introductions of these three works. The first innovated work is adaptive ambient seismic noise tomography (AANT). Traditional ambient noise tomography methods using regular grid nodes are often ill posed because the inversion grids do not always represent the distribution of ray paths. Large grid spacing is usually used to reduce the number of inversion parameters, which may not be able to solve for small-scale velocity structure. We present a new adaptive tomography method with irregular grids that provides a few advantages over the traditional methods. First, irregular grids with different sizes and shapes can fit the ray distribution better and the traditionally ill-posed problem can become more stable owing to the different parameterizations. Second, the data in the area with dense ray sampling will be sufficiently utilized so that the model resolution can be greatly improved. Both synthetic and real data are used to test the newly developed tomography algorithm. In synthetic data tests, we compare the resolution and stability of the traditional and adaptive methods. The results show that adaptive tomography is more stable and performs better in improving the resolution in the area with dense ray sampling. For real data, we extract the ambient noise signals of the seismic data near the Garlock Fault region, obtained from the Southern California Earthquake Data Center. The resulting group velocity of Rayleigh waves is well correlated with the geological structures. High velocity anomalies are shown in the cold southern Sierra Nevada, the Tehachapi Mountains and the Western San Gabriel Mountains. The second innovated work is local earthquake tomography with full topography (LETFT). In this work, we develop a new three-dimensional local earthquake tomography

  6. Innovations in seismic tomography, their applications and induced seismic events in carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng

    This dissertation presents two innovations in seismic tomography and a new discovery of induced seismic events associated with CO2 injection at an Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) site. The following are brief introductions of these three works. The first innovated work is adaptive ambient seismic noise tomography (AANT). Traditional ambient noise tomography methods using regular grid nodes are often ill posed because the inversion grids do not always represent the distribution of ray paths. Large grid spacing is usually used to reduce the number of inversion parameters, which may not be able to solve for small-scale velocity structure. We present a new adaptive tomography method with irregular grids that provides a few advantages over the traditional methods. First, irregular grids with different sizes and shapes can fit the ray distribution better and the traditionally ill-posed problem can become more stable owing to the different parameterizations. Second, the data in the area with dense ray sampling will be sufficiently utilized so that the model resolution can be greatly improved. Both synthetic and real data are used to test the newly developed tomography algorithm. In synthetic data tests, we compare the resolution and stability of the traditional and adaptive methods. The results show that adaptive tomography is more stable and performs better in improving the resolution in the area with dense ray sampling. For real data, we extract the ambient noise signals of the seismic data near the Garlock Fault region, obtained from the Southern California Earthquake Data Center. The resulting group velocity of Rayleigh waves is well correlated with the geological structures. High velocity anomalies are shown in the cold southern Sierra Nevada, the Tehachapi Mountains and the Western San Gabriel Mountains. The second innovated work is local earthquake tomography with full topography (LETFT). In this work, we develop a new three-dimensional local earthquake tomography

  7. 4D Time-Lapse Seismic Analysis of Active Gas Seepage Systems on the Vestnesa Ridge, Offshore W-Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunz, S.; Hurter, S.; Plaza-Faverola, A. A.; Mienert, J.

    2014-12-01

    Active gas venting occurs on the Vestnesa Ridge, an elongated sediment drift north of the Molloy Transform and just east of the Molloy Ridge, one of the shortest segments of the slow spreading North-Atlantic Ridge system. The crest of the Vestnesa Ridge at water depth between 1200-1300 m is pierced with fluid-flow features. Seafloor pockmarks vary in size up to 1 km in diameter with significant morphological features consisting of small ridges, diapiric structures and small pits. Detailed hydro-acoustic surveying shows that gas mostly emanates from the small-scale pits, where also hydrates have been recovered by sediment sampling. High-resolution P-Cable 3D seismic data acquired in 2012 show vertical focused fluid flow features beneath the seafloor pockmarks. These co-called chimneys extend down to the free-gas zone underneath a bottom-simulating reflection (BSR). Here, they link up with small fault systems that might provide pathways to the deeper subsurface. The chimney features show a high variability in their acoustic characteristics with alternating blanked or masked zones and high-amplitude anomalies scattered through the whole vertical extent of the chimneys. The amplitude anomalies indicate high-impedance contrasts due to the likely presence of gas or a high-velocity material like gas hydrates or carbonates. In most cases, the high-amplitude anomalies line up along specific vertical pathways that connect nicely with the small-scale pits at the surface where gas bubbles seep from the seafloor. We re-acquired the 3D seismic survey in 2013 for time-lapse seismic studies in order to better understand the origin of the amplitude anomalies and in order to track potentially migrating gas fronts up along the chimney structure. The time-lapse seismic analysis indicates several areas, where gas migration may have led to changes in acoustic properties of the subsurface. These areas are located along chimney structures and the BSR. This work provides a basis for better

  8. Towards 4-D Noise-based Seismic Probing of Volcanoes: Perspectives from a Large-N Nodal Experiment on Piton de la Fournaise Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenguier, F.; Ackerley, N. J.; Nakata, N.; Boué, P.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.; Shapiro, N.

    2015-12-01

    Noise-based seismology is proving to be a complementary approach to active source or earthquake-based methods for imaging and monitoring the Earth's interior and in particular volcanoes and active faults. Until recently, noise-based imaging and monitoring relied only on the inversion of surface waves reconstructed from correlations of mostly microseismic seismic noise. Compared to body-wave tomography, surface wave tomography succeeds in retrieving lateral sub-surface velocity contrasts but is less efficient in resolving velocity perturbations at depth. Moreover reflected body-waves can carry direct information about sharp interfaces at depth. Extracting body-waves from noise correlations is challenging and the use of Large-N seismic arrays proves to be of great benefit for extracting noisy body-waves from noise-correlations by stacking over a large number of receiver pairs and by applying array processing. The purpose of VolcArray Large-N seismic experiment on Piton de la Fournaise Volcano is to extract body-waves travelling directly through the active magma reservoir located at ~2.5 km depth below the summit crater using noise correlations between arrays of seismic nodes. By beamforming noise on individual arrays, we found an unusual strong directional source of body-wave noise. This is thus a favorable context for retrieving the body-wave component of the Green's function between arrays. However, standard correlation techniques between nodes do not allow deciphering between the reconstructed Green's function and artifacts from the correlation of the strong directional source of body-waves. By applying double beamforming to the noise correlations between arrays, we are able to isolate ballistic body-waves travelling across the magma storage zone at depth. The stability of these reconstructed waves over time is encouraging in the perspectives of high resolution monitoring of the volcano feeding system.

  9. Wave-equation based traveltime seismic tomography - Part 1: Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, P.; Zhao, D.; Yang, D.; Yang, X.; Chen, J.; Liu, Q.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a wave-equation based traveltime seismic tomography method with a detailed description of its step-by-step process. First, a linear relationship between the traveltime residual Δt = Tobs - Tsyn and the relative velocity perturbation δc(x) / c(x) connected by a finite-frequency traveltime sensitivity kernel K(x) is theoretically derived using the adjoint method. To accurately calculate the traveltime residual Δt, two automatic arrival-time picking techniques including the envelop energy ratio method and the combined ray and cross-correlation method are then developed to compute the arrival times Tsyn for synthetic seismograms. The arrival times Tobs of observed seismograms are usually determined by manual hand picking in real applications. Traveltime sensitivity kernel K(x) is constructed by convolving a forward wavefield u(t,x) with an adjoint wavefield q(t,x). The calculations of synthetic seismograms and sensitivity kernels rely on forward modelling. To make it computationally feasible for tomographic problems involving a large number of seismic records, the forward problem is solved in the two-dimensional (2-D) vertical plane passing through the source and the receiver by a high-order central difference method. The final model is parameterized on 3-D regular grid (inversion) nodes with variable spacings, while model values on each 2-D forward modelling node are linearly interpolated by the values at its eight surrounding 3-D inversion grid nodes. Finally, the tomographic inverse problem is formulated as a regularized optimization problem, which can be iteratively solved by either the LSQR solver or a non-linear conjugate-gradient method. To provide some insights into future 3-D tomographic inversions, Fréchet kernels for different seismic phases are also demonstrated in this study.

  10. Broadband Waveform Sensitivity Kernels for Large-Scale Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, T.; Stähler, S. C.; van Driel, M.; Hosseini, K.; Auer, L.; Sigloch, K.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic sensitivity kernels, i.e. the basis for mapping misfit functionals to structural parameters in seismic inversions, have received much attention in recent years. Their computation has been conducted via ray-theory based approaches (Dahlen et al., 2000) or fully numerical solutions based on the adjoint-state formulation (e.g. Tromp et al., 2005). The core problem is the exuberant computational cost due to the large number of source-receiver pairs, each of which require solutions to the forward problem. This is exacerbated in the high-frequency regime where numerical solutions become prohibitively expensive. We present a methodology to compute accurate sensitivity kernels for global tomography across the observable seismic frequency band. These kernels rely on wavefield databases computed via AxiSEM (abstract ID# 77891, www.axisem.info), and thus on spherically symmetric models. As a consequence of this method's numerical efficiency even in high-frequency regimes, kernels can be computed in a time- and frequency-dependent manner, thus providing the full generic mapping from perturbed waveform to perturbed structure. Such waveform kernels can then be used for a variety of misfit functions, structural parameters and refiltered into bandpasses without recomputing any wavefields. A core component of the kernel method presented here is the mapping from numerical wavefields to inversion meshes. This is achieved by a Monte-Carlo approach, allowing for convergent and controllable accuracy on arbitrarily shaped tetrahedral and hexahedral meshes. We test and validate this accuracy by comparing to reference traveltimes, show the projection onto various locally adaptive inversion meshes and discuss computational efficiency for ongoing tomographic applications in the range of millions of observed body-wave data between periods of 2-30s.

  11. 2D seismic reflection tomography in strongly anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guangnan; Zhou, Bing; Li, Hongxi; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zelin

    2014-12-01

    Seismic traveltime tomography is an effective method to reconstruct underground anisotropic parameters. Currently, most anisotropic tomographic methods were developed under the assumption of weak anisotropy. The tomographic method proposed here can be implemented for imaging subsurface targets in strongly anisotropic media with a known tilted symmetry axis, since the adopted ray tracing method is suitable for anisotropic media with arbitrary degree. There are three kinds of reflection waves (qP, qSV and qSH waves) that were separately used to invert the blocky abnormal body model. The reflection traveltime tomographiy is developed here because a surface observation system is the most economical and practical way compared with crosswell and VSP. The numerical examples show that the traveltimes of qP reflection wave have inverted parameters {{c}11},{{c}13},{{c}33} \\text{and} {{c}44} successfully. Traveltimes of qSV reflection wave have inverted parameters {{c}11},{{c}33} \\text{and} {{c}44} successfully, with the exception of the {{c}13}, since it is less sensitive than other parameters. Traveltimes of qSH reflection wave also have inverted parameters {{c}44} \\text{and} {{c}66} successfully. In addition, we find that the velocity sensitivity functions (derivatives of phase velocity with respect to elastic moduli parameters) and raypath illuminating angles have a great influence on the qualities of tomograms according to the inversion of theoretical models. Finally, the numerical examples confirm that the reflection traveltime tomography can be applied to invert strongly anisotropic models.

  12. Global seismic tomography using Backus-Gilbert inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroli, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    The appraisal of tomographic models, of fundamental importance towards better understanding the Earth's interior, consists in analysing their resolution and covariance. The discrete theory of Backus-Gilbert, solving all at once the linear problems of model estimation and appraisal, aims at evaluating weighted averages of the true model parameters. Contrary to damped least-squares techniques, one key advantage of Backus-Gilbert inversion is that no subjective regularization is needed to remove the non-uniqueness of the model solution. Indeed, it is often possible to identify unique linear combinations of the parameters even when the parameters themselves are not uniquely defined. In other words, the non-uniqueness can be broken by averaging rather than regularizing. Over the past few decades, many authors have considered that, in addition to a high computational cost, it could be a clumsy affair in the presence of data errors to practically implement the Backus-Gilbert approach to large-scale tomographic applications. In this study, we introduce and adapt to seismic tomography the Subtractive Optimally Localized Averages (SOLA) method, an alternative Backus-Gilbert formulation which retains all its advantages, but is more computationally efficient and versatile in the explicit construction of averaging kernels. As a leitmotiv, we focus on global-scale S-wave tomography and show that the SOLA method can successfully be applied to large-scale, linear and discrete tomographic problems.

  13. Bayesian seismic tomography by parallel interacting Markov chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesret, Alexandrine; Bottero, Alexis; Romary, Thomas; Noble, Mark; Desassis, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    The velocity field estimated by first arrival traveltime tomography is commonly used as a starting point for further seismological, mineralogical, tectonic or similar analysis. In order to interpret quantitatively the results, the tomography uncertainty values as well as their spatial distribution are required. The estimated velocity model is obtained through inverse modeling by minimizing an objective function that compares observed and computed traveltimes. This step is often performed by gradient-based optimization algorithms. The major drawback of such local optimization schemes, beyond the possibility of being trapped in a local minimum, is that they do not account for the multiple possible solutions of the inverse problem. They are therefore unable to assess the uncertainties linked to the solution. Within a Bayesian (probabilistic) framework, solving the tomography inverse problem aims at estimating the posterior probability density function of velocity model using a global sampling algorithm. Markov chains Monte-Carlo (MCMC) methods are known to produce samples of virtually any distribution. In such a Bayesian inversion, the total number of simulations we can afford is highly related to the computational cost of the forward model. Although fast algorithms have been recently developed for computing first arrival traveltimes of seismic waves, the complete browsing of the posterior distribution of velocity model is hardly performed, especially when it is high dimensional and/or multimodal. In the latter case, the chain may even stay stuck in one of the modes. In order to improve the mixing properties of classical single MCMC, we propose to make interact several Markov chains at different temperatures. This method can make efficient use of large CPU clusters, without increasing the global computational cost with respect to classical MCMC and is therefore particularly suited for Bayesian inversion. The exchanges between the chains allow a precise sampling of the

  14. On the use of sensitivity tests in seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlinson, N.; Spakman, W.

    2016-05-01

    Sensitivity analysis with synthetic models is widely used in seismic tomography as a means for assessing the spatial resolution of solutions produced by, in most cases, linear or iterative nonlinear inversion schemes. The most common type of synthetic reconstruction test is the so-called checkerboard resolution test in which the synthetic model comprises an alternating pattern of higher and lower wave speed (or some other seismic property such as attenuation) in 2-D or 3-D. Although originally introduced for application to large inverse problems for which formal resolution and covariance could not be computed, these tests have achieved popularity, even when resolution and covariance can be computed, by virtue of being simple to implement and providing rapid and intuitive insight into the reliability of the recovered model. However, checkerboard tests have a number of potential drawbacks, including (1) only providing indirect evidence of quantitative measures of reliability such as resolution and uncertainty, (2) giving a potentially misleading impression of the range of scale-lengths that can be resolved, and (3) not giving a true picture of the structural distortion or smearing that can be caused by the data coverage. The widespread use of synthetic reconstruction tests in seismic tomography is likely to continue for some time yet, so it is important to implement best practice where possible. The goal of this paper is to develop the underlying theory and carry out a series of numerical experiments in order to establish best practice and identify some common pitfalls. Based on our findings, we recommend (1) the use of a discrete spike test involving a sparse distribution of spikes, rather than the use of the conventional tightly spaced checkerboard; (2) using data coverage (e.g. ray-path geometry) inherited from the model constrained by the observations (i.e. the same forward operator or matrix), rather than the data coverage obtained by solving the forward problem

  15. Detecting low Velocity Anomalies Combining Seismic Reflection With First Arrival Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flecha, I.; Marti, D.; Carbonell, R.

    2002-12-01

    In the present study seismic reflection techniques and high resolution seismic tomography are combined to determine location and geometry of shallow low velocity anomalies. Underground cavities (mines), water flows (formation with loose sand), etc. are geologic features characterized by slow seismic velocities and are targets of considerable social interest. Theoretical considerations (Snell's law) suggest that low velocity anomalies are undersampled and therefore badly resolved by ray tracing methods. A series of synthetics simulations have been carried out to asses the resolving power of the different methodologies. A 400mx50m two dimensional velocity model consisting of a background velocity gradient in depth from 3000 to 4000 m/s which included a rectangular low velocity anomaly (300 m/s). This anomaly was placed between 10m and 30m in depth and between 180m and 220m in length. The synthetic data calculation and the tomographic inversion have been done with absolutely independent programs. The data has been created using a 2D finite differences wave propagation acoustic algorithm. The tomographic inversion has been performed using two different software packages. The first one uses a combination of ray tracing a finite differences schemes to estimate the forward problem and an iterative conjugate gradient matrix solver to calculate the inverse. The second software package uses a modified Vidale scheme (Eikonal equation) to solve the forward problem and a LSQR to solve the inverse problem. The synthetic data were used for the inversions and for the generation of a conventional stacked section simulating a high resolution seismic reflection transect along the velocity model. The conventional stack images the diffractions caused by the velocity anomaly, which provided the location and extent of the low velocity anomaly. The inversions schemes provided estimates of the velocities, however, the tomograms and the ray tracing diagrams indicated a low resolution for

  16. Ambient seismic noise tomography of Jeju Island, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. J.; Rhie, J.; Kim, S.; Kang, T. S.; Kim, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Jeju Island, formed by Cenozoic basaltic eruptions, is an island off the southern coast of the Korean Peninsula. This volcanic island is far from the plate boundaries and the fundamental cause of the volcanic activity in this region is not understood well. To understand the origin of the island, resolving the detailed seismic velocity structures is crucial. Therefore, we applied ambient noise tomography to study the velocity structures of the island. Continuous waveform data recorded at 20 temporary and 3 permanent broad-band seismic stations are used. The group and phase velocity dispersion curves of the fundamental mode Rayleigh waves are extracted from cross-correlograms for 253 station pairs by adopting multiple filter technique. The fast marching method and the subspace method are jointly applied to construct 2-D group and phase velocity maps for periods ranging between 1 and 15 s. 1-D shear wave velocity models and their uncertainties are estimated by the Bayesian technique. The optimal number of the layers are determined at the end of the burn-in period based on the Bayesian Information Criteria (BIC). Final 3-D velocity model of the island is constructed by compiling 1-D models. In our 3-D model, a distinct low velocity anomaly appears beneath Mt. Halla from surface to about 6 km depth. The surficial extent of the anomaly is more or less consistent with the surface geologic feature of the third-stage basaltic eruption reported by previous studies but the vertical extension of the anomaly is not well constrained. To improve the velocity model, especially enhance the vertical resolution of the anomaly, we will apply joint analysis of the surface wave dispersions and teleseismic receiver functions. The improved model will provide more information to infer the tectonic or volcanic implications of the anomaly and unravel the origin of the strange volcanic island in South Korea.

  17. Big Data Challenges in Global Seismic 'Adjoint Tomography' (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, J.; Bozdag, E.; Krischer, L.; Lefebvre, M.; Lei, W.; Smith, J.

    2013-12-01

    The challenge of imaging Earth's interior on a global scale is closely linked to the challenge of handling large data sets. The related iterative workflow involves five distinct phases, namely, 1) data gathering and culling, 2) synthetic seismogram calculations, 3) pre-processing (time-series analysis and time-window selection), 4) data assimilation and adjoint calculations, 5) post-processing (pre-conditioning, regularization, model update). In order to implement this workflow on modern high-performance computing systems, a new seismic data format is being developed. The Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) is designed to replace currently used data formats with a more flexible format that allows for fast parallel I/O. The metadata is divided into abstract categories, such as "source" and "receiver", along with provenance information for complete reproducibility. The structure of ASDF is designed keeping in mind three distinct applications: earthquake seismology, seismic interferometry, and exploration seismology. Existing time-series analysis tool kits, such as SAC and ObsPy, can be easily interfaced with ASDF so that seismologists can use robust, previously developed software packages. ASDF accommodates an automated, efficient workflow for global adjoint tomography. Manually managing the large number of simulations associated with the workflow can rapidly become a burden, especially with increasing numbers of earthquakes and stations. Therefore, it is of importance to investigate the possibility of automating the entire workflow. Scientific Workflow Management Software (SWfMS) allows users to execute workflows almost routinely. SWfMS provides additional advantages. In particular, it is possible to group independent simulations in a single job to fit the available computational resources. They also give a basic level of fault resilience as the workflow can be resumed at the correct state preceding a failure. Some of the best candidates for our particular workflow

  18. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography using fat rays: application to near-surface seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordi, Claudio; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2016-08-01

    Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography does not rely on the high frequency assumption made in classical ray-based tomography. By incorporating the effects of velocity structures in the first Fresnel volume around the central ray, it offers a more realistic and accurate representation of the actual physics of seismic wave propagation and thus, enhanced imaging of near-surface structures is expected. The objective of this work was to apply frequency-dependent first arrival traveltime tomography to surface seismic data that were acquired for exploration scale and near-surface seismic imaging. We adapted a fat ray tomography algorithm from global-earth seismology that calculates the Fresnel volumes based on source and receiver (adjoint source) traveltime fields. The fat ray tomography algorithm was tested on synthetic model data that mimics the dimensions of two field data sets. The field data sets are presented as two case studies where fat ray tomography was applied for near-surface seismic imaging. The data set of the first case study was recorded for high-resolution near-surface imaging of a Quaternary valley (profile length < 1 km); the second data set was acquired for hydrocarbon search (profile length > 10 km). All results of fat ray tomography are compared against the results of classical ray-based tomography. We show that fat ray tomography can provide enhanced tomograms and that it is possible to recover more information on the subsurface when compared to ray tomography. However, model assessment based on the column sum of the Jacobian matrix revealed that especially the deep parts of the structure in the fat ray tomograms might not be adequately covered by fat rays. Furthermore, the performance of the fat ray tomography depends on the chosen input frequency in relation to the scale of the seismic survey. Synthetic data testing revealed that the best results were obtained when the frequency was chosen to correspond to an approximate wavelength

  19. 4D megahertz optical coherence tomography (OCT): imaging and live display beyond 1 gigavoxel/sec (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Robert A.; Draxinger, Wolfgang; Wieser, Wolfgang; Kolb, Jan Philip; Pfeiffer, Tom; Karpf, Sebastian N.; Eibl, Matthias; Klein, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Over the last 20 years, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become a valuable diagnostic tool in ophthalmology with several 10,000 devices sold today. Other applications, like intravascular OCT in cardiology and gastro-intestinal imaging will follow. OCT provides 3-dimensional image data with microscopic resolution of biological tissue in vivo. In most applications, off-line processing of the acquired OCT-data is sufficient. However, for OCT applications like OCT aided surgical microscopes, for functional OCT imaging of tissue after a stimulus, or for interactive endoscopy an OCT engine capable of acquiring, processing and displaying large and high quality 3D OCT data sets at video rate is highly desired. We developed such a prototype OCT engine and demonstrate live OCT with 25 volumes per second at a size of 320x320x320 pixels. The computer processing load of more than 1.5 TFLOPS was handled by a GTX 690 graphics processing unit with more than 3000 stream processors operating in parallel. In the talk, we will describe the optics and electronics hardware as well as the software of the system in detail and analyze current limitations. The talk also focuses on new OCT applications, where such a system improves diagnosis and monitoring of medical procedures. The additional acquisition of hyperspectral stimulated Raman signals with the system will be discussed.

  20. Overview of Results from the Endeavour Seismic Tomography Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Wells, A. E.; Soule, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    We report on our continuing analyses of a multi-scale seismic tomography experiment of the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. In August 2009 we deployed 68 four-component ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) at 64 sites throughout a 90x50 km2 area to record seismic energy from 5567 shots of the 36-element, 6600 in.3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. The experimental geometry utilized 3 nested scales and was designed to image (1) crustal thickness variations within 25 km of the axial high (0 to 900 kyr); (2) the map view heterogeneity and anisotropy of the topmost mantle beneath the spreading axis; (3) the three-dimensional structure of the crustal magmatic system and (4) the detailed three-dimensional, shallow crustal thermal structure beneath the Endeavour vent fields. The 90-km-long Endeavour segment lies between the Cobb and Endeavour overlapping spreading centers (OSCs), which are converging and thus shortening the Endeavour segment. Previous seismic reflection studies indicate that the central Endeavour segment is on a 40-km-wide plateau of greater crustal thickness that is interpreted to have developed when the ridge overrode the mantle melt anomaly associated with the Heckle seamount chain. The central Endeavour is also underlain by an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector that is shallowest and most prominent beneath the hydrothermal fields. Geophysical studies of Endeavour thus permit investigation of the competing effects of tectonic, magmatic and hydrothermal processes on crustal structure and architecture. Ongoing analyses include tomographic inversion of first-arriving P waves that sample the upper- and mid-crustal regions, characterization of off-axis magma bodies via travel time and amplitude anomalies of crustal phases, estimation of regional-scale crustal thickness variations from analysis of PmP arrivals and imaging of mantle structure using Pn to constrain mantle flow and melt distribution [Weekly et al.; Wells et al.; Soule et al

  1. Mapping soil deformation around plant roots using in vivo 4D X-ray Computed Tomography and Digital Volume Correlation.

    PubMed

    Keyes, S D; Gillard, F; Soper, N; Mavrogordato, M N; Sinclair, I; Roose, T

    2016-06-14

    The mechanical impedance of soils inhibits the growth of plant roots, often being the most significant physical limitation to root system development. Non-invasive imaging techniques have recently been used to investigate the development of root system architecture over time, but the relationship with soil deformation is usually neglected. Correlative mapping approaches parameterised using 2D and 3D image data have recently gained prominence for quantifying physical deformation in composite materials including fibre-reinforced polymers and trabecular bone. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) are computational techniques which use the inherent material texture of surfaces and volumes, captured using imaging techniques, to map full-field deformation components in samples during physical loading. Here we develop an experimental assay and methodology for four-dimensional, in vivo X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) and apply a Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) approach to the data to quantify deformation. The method is validated for a field-derived soil under conditions of uniaxial compression, and a calibration study is used to quantify thresholds of displacement and strain measurement. The validated and calibrated approach is then demonstrated for an in vivo test case in which an extending maize root in field-derived soil was imaged hourly using XCT over a growth period of 19h. This allowed full-field soil deformation data and 3D root tip dynamics to be quantified in parallel for the first time. This fusion of methods paves the way for comparative studies of contrasting soils and plant genotypes, improving our understanding of the fundamental mechanical processes which influence root system development.

  2. Mapping soil deformation around plant roots using in vivo 4D X-ray Computed Tomography and Digital Volume Correlation.

    PubMed

    Keyes, S D; Gillard, F; Soper, N; Mavrogordato, M N; Sinclair, I; Roose, T

    2016-06-14

    The mechanical impedance of soils inhibits the growth of plant roots, often being the most significant physical limitation to root system development. Non-invasive imaging techniques have recently been used to investigate the development of root system architecture over time, but the relationship with soil deformation is usually neglected. Correlative mapping approaches parameterised using 2D and 3D image data have recently gained prominence for quantifying physical deformation in composite materials including fibre-reinforced polymers and trabecular bone. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) are computational techniques which use the inherent material texture of surfaces and volumes, captured using imaging techniques, to map full-field deformation components in samples during physical loading. Here we develop an experimental assay and methodology for four-dimensional, in vivo X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) and apply a Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) approach to the data to quantify deformation. The method is validated for a field-derived soil under conditions of uniaxial compression, and a calibration study is used to quantify thresholds of displacement and strain measurement. The validated and calibrated approach is then demonstrated for an in vivo test case in which an extending maize root in field-derived soil was imaged hourly using XCT over a growth period of 19h. This allowed full-field soil deformation data and 3D root tip dynamics to be quantified in parallel for the first time. This fusion of methods paves the way for comparative studies of contrasting soils and plant genotypes, improving our understanding of the fundamental mechanical processes which influence root system development. PMID:27155747

  3. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOEpatents

    He, Wei; Anderson, Roger N.

    1998-01-01

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management.

  4. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOEpatents

    He, W.; Anderson, R.N.

    1998-08-25

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management. 20 figs.

  5. Multi-Resolution Seismic Tomography Based on Recursive Tessellation Hierarchy

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, N A; Myers, S C; Ramirez, A

    2009-07-01

    A 3-D global tomographic model that reconstructs velocity structure at multiple scales and incorporates laterally variable seismic discontinuities is currently being developed. The model parameterization is node-based where nodes are placed along vertices defined by triangular tessellations of a spheroidal surface. The triangular tessellation framework is hierarchical. Starting with a tetrahexahedron representing the whole globe (1st level of the hierarchy, 24 faces), they divide each triangle of the tessellation into daughter triangles. The collection of all daughter triangles comprises the 2nd level of the tessellation hierarchy and further recursion produces an arbitrary number of tessellation levels and arbitrarily fine node-spacing. They have developed an inversion procedure that takes advantage of the recursive properties of the tessellation hierarchies by progressively solving for shorter wavelength heterogeneities. In this procedure, we first perform the tomographic inversion using a tessellation level with coarse node spacing. They find that a coarse node spacing of approximately 8{sup o} is adequate to capture bulk regional properties. They then conduct the tomographic inversion on a 4{sup o} tessellation level using the residuals and inversion results from the 8{sup o} run. In practice they find that the progressive tomography approach is robust, providing an intrinsic regularization for inversion stability and avoids the issue of predefining resolution levels. Further, determining average regional properties with coarser tessellation levels enables long-wavelength heterogeneities to account for sparsely sampled regions (or regions of the mantle where longer wavelength patterns of heterogeneity suffice) while allowing shorter length-scale heterogeneities to emerge where necessary. They demonstrate the inversion approach with a set of synthetic test cases that mimic the complex nature of data arrangements (mixed-determined inversion) common to most

  6. Reducing Disk Storage of Full-3D Seismic Waveform Tomography (F3DT) Through Lossy Online Compression

    DOE PAGES

    Lindstrom, Peter; Chen, Po; Lee, En-Jui

    2016-05-05

    Full-3D seismic waveform tomography (F3DT) is the latest seismic tomography technique that can assimilate broadband, multi-component seismic waveform observations into high-resolution 3D subsurface seismic structure models. The main drawback in the current F3DT implementation, in particular the scattering-integral implementation (F3DT-SI), is the high disk storage cost and the associated I/O overhead of archiving the 4D space-time wavefields of the receiver- or source-side strain tensors. The strain tensor fields are needed for computing the data sensitivity kernels, which are used for constructing the Jacobian matrix in the Gauss-Newton optimization algorithm. In this study, we have successfully integrated a lossy compression algorithmmore » into our F3DT SI workflow to significantly reduce the disk space for storing the strain tensor fields. The compressor supports a user-specified tolerance for bounding the error, and can be integrated into our finite-difference wave-propagation simulation code used for computing the strain fields. The decompressor can be integrated into the kernel calculation code that reads the strain fields from the disk and compute the data sensitivity kernels. During the wave-propagation simulations, we compress the strain fields before writing them to the disk. To compute the data sensitivity kernels, we read the compressed strain fields from the disk and decompress them before using them in kernel calculations. Experiments using a realistic dataset in our California statewide F3DT project have shown that we can reduce the strain-field disk storage by at least an order of magnitude with acceptable loss, and also improve the overall I/O performance of the entire F3DT-SI workflow significantly. The integration of the lossy online compressor may potentially open up the possibilities of the wide adoption of F3DT-SI in routine seismic tomography practices in the near future.« less

  7. High-Resolution Imaging of San Andreas Fault at Parkfield, California, Using Seismic Velocity and Anisotropy Tomography and Seismic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C.; Liu, Y.; Roecker, S.; Lu, R.; Toksoz, N.

    2004-12-01

    We characterized the detailed structure of the San Andreas fault zone at multiple scales using an extensive dataset collected around the SAFOD site from our long-term deployments of PASSCAL and USArray seismic instruments, and the USGS Northern California and UC Berkeley HRSN networks, SAFOD borehole logs, borehole seismometers, and several active-source projects. A suite of techniques are employed to better constrain the internal structure of the fault zone, including seismic travel-time tomography, shear-wave splitting tomography and seismic interferometry. Adaptive-mesh double-difference tomography is used to derive high-resolution Vp and Vs models around the fault zone with the waveform cross-correlation derived differential times. Knowing three-dimensional (3-D) Vp/Vs variations is helpful to have a more complete characterization of the mechanical properties and geological identity of fault zone materials. Vp/Vs variations are reliably determined by the inversion of S-P time differences constructed only from similar P and S ray paths. Our velocity models show the high-velocity granitic rocks on the southwest side of the fault, a complex low-velocity zone beneath and southwest of the surface fault trace, and an extensive low-velocity zone overlying deeper bedrock on the northeast side. We systematically analyzed shear wave splitting for seismic data observed at PASO and UC Berkeley HRSN networks. Although polarization direction of the fast shear wave and the delay time show substantial scatter for different events observed at a common station, there are spatially consistent patterns when projecting them to various depths along corresponding ray paths, derived from a 3-D shear velocity model. We developed a 3-D shear-wave splitting tomography method to image the spatial anisotropy distribution by back projecting shear wave splitting delay times along ray paths. The anisotropy percentage model shows strong heterogeneities, consistent with the strong spatial

  8. High-Resolution Imaging of San Andreas Fault at Parkfield, California, Using Seismic Velocity and Anisotropy Tomography and Seismic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C.; Liu, Y.; Roecker, S.; Lu, R.; Toksoz, N.

    2007-12-01

    We characterized the detailed structure of the San Andreas fault zone at multiple scales using an extensive dataset collected around the SAFOD site from our long-term deployments of PASSCAL and USArray seismic instruments, and the USGS Northern California and UC Berkeley HRSN networks, SAFOD borehole logs, borehole seismometers, and several active-source projects. A suite of techniques are employed to better constrain the internal structure of the fault zone, including seismic travel-time tomography, shear-wave splitting tomography and seismic interferometry. Adaptive-mesh double-difference tomography is used to derive high-resolution Vp and Vs models around the fault zone with the waveform cross-correlation derived differential times. Knowing three-dimensional (3-D) Vp/Vs variations is helpful to have a more complete characterization of the mechanical properties and geological identity of fault zone materials. Vp/Vs variations are reliably determined by the inversion of S-P time differences constructed only from similar P and S ray paths. Our velocity models show the high-velocity granitic rocks on the southwest side of the fault, a complex low-velocity zone beneath and southwest of the surface fault trace, and an extensive low-velocity zone overlying deeper bedrock on the northeast side. We systematically analyzed shear wave splitting for seismic data observed at PASO and UC Berkeley HRSN networks. Although polarization direction of the fast shear wave and the delay time show substantial scatter for different events observed at a common station, there are spatially consistent patterns when projecting them to various depths along corresponding ray paths, derived from a 3-D shear velocity model. We developed a 3-D shear-wave splitting tomography method to image the spatial anisotropy distribution by back projecting shear wave splitting delay times along ray paths. The anisotropy percentage model shows strong heterogeneities, consistent with the strong spatial

  9. Passive seismic tomography application for cave monitoring in DOZ underground mine PT. Freeport Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Wely, Woen; Setiadi, Herlan; Riyanto, Erwin

    2015-04-01

    It is already known that tomography has a great impact for analyzing and mapping unknown objects based on inversion, travel time as well as waveform inversion. Therefore, tomography has used in wide area, not only in medical but also in petroleum as well as mining. Recently, tomography method is being applied in several mining industries. A case study of tomography imaging has been carried out in DOZ ( Deep Ore Zone ) block caving mine, Tembagapura, Papua. Many researchers are undergoing to investigate the properties of DOZ cave not only outside but also inside which is unknown. Tomography takes a part for determining this objective.The sources are natural from the seismic events that caused by mining induced seismicity and rocks deformation activity, therefore it is called as passive seismic. These microseismic travel time data are processed by Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT). The result of the inversion can be used for DOZ cave monitoring. These information must be used for identifying weak zone inside the cave. In addition, these results of tomography can be used to determine DOZ and cave information to support mine activity in PT. Freeport Indonesia.

  10. Passive seismic tomography application for cave monitoring in DOZ underground mine PT. Freeport Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Wely, Woen; Setiadi, Herlan; Riyanto, Erwin

    2015-04-16

    It is already known that tomography has a great impact for analyzing and mapping unknown objects based on inversion, travel time as well as waveform inversion. Therefore, tomography has used in wide area, not only in medical but also in petroleum as well as mining. Recently, tomography method is being applied in several mining industries. A case study of tomography imaging has been carried out in DOZ ( Deep Ore Zone ) block caving mine, Tembagapura, Papua. Many researchers are undergoing to investigate the properties of DOZ cave not only outside but also inside which is unknown. Tomography takes a part for determining this objective.The sources are natural from the seismic events that caused by mining induced seismicity and rocks deformation activity, therefore it is called as passive seismic. These microseismic travel time data are processed by Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT). The result of the inversion can be used for DOZ cave monitoring. These information must be used for identifying weak zone inside the cave. In addition, these results of tomography can be used to determine DOZ and cave information to support mine activity in PT. Freeport Indonesia.

  11. 4-D imaging of sub-second dynamics in pore-scale processes using real-time synchrotron X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Katherine J.; Coban, Sophia B.; McDonald, Samuel A.; Walsh, Joanna N.; Atwood, Robert C.; Withers, Philip J.

    2016-07-01

    A variable volume flow cell has been integrated with state-of-the-art ultra-high-speed synchrotron X-ray tomography imaging. The combination allows the first real-time (sub-second) capture of dynamic pore (micron)-scale fluid transport processes in 4-D (3-D + time). With 3-D data volumes acquired at up to 20 Hz, we perform in situ experiments that capture high-frequency pore-scale dynamics in 5-25 mm diameter samples with voxel (3-D equivalent of a pixel) resolutions of 2.5 to 3.8 µm. The data are free from motion artefacts and can be spatially registered or collected in the same orientation, making them suitable for detailed quantitative analysis of the dynamic fluid distribution pathways and processes. The methods presented here are capable of capturing a wide range of high-frequency nonequilibrium pore-scale processes including wetting, dilution, mixing, and reaction phenomena, without sacrificing significant spatial resolution. As well as fast streaming (continuous acquisition) at 20 Hz, they also allow larger-scale and longer-term experimental runs to be sampled intermittently at lower frequency (time-lapse imaging), benefiting from fast image acquisition rates to prevent motion blur in highly dynamic systems. This marks a major technical breakthrough for quantification of high-frequency pore-scale processes: processes that are critical for developing and validating more accurate multiscale flow models through spatially and temporally heterogeneous pore networks.

  12. Simultaneous Seismic Tomography and Gravity Inversion for Tertiary Basin Geometry Beneath Puget Lowland, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocher, T. M.; Parsons, T.; Blakely, R. J.

    2001-12-01

    We present a simultaneous seismic tomography and gravity inversion model for the subsurface geometry of Tertiary basins underlying the Puget Lowland, Washington. The method extrapolates high-resolution seismic tomography results from Seismic Hazards Investigation of Puget Sound (SHIPS), which covered much of the Lowland, to adjacent regions not well imaged by SHIPS. Our current algorithm uses the initial seismic tomography result to calculate the gravity field assuming Gardner's rule of ρ (kg/m3) = 1740v0.25 for velocities (in km/s) below 6 km/s. We currently use ρ = 2920 kg/m3 for velocities greater than 6 km/s. Iteratively, the method compares the observed and calculated gravity fields, increases or decreases the velocity gradient as necessary, and updates the velocity model for the next iteration of the seismic tomography inversion. This tomography result is subsequently used for another comparison of observed and calculated gravity fields. Currently, the RMS first-arrival travel time misfit (90 msec) produced by this algorithm is identical to that obtained using solely the seismic data, and the RMS gravity error is 9 mgal, slightly higher than desired. Nonetheless, the simultaneous inversion has successfully extended the region of subsurface coverage from that obtained from SHIPS to the core of the accretionary rocks on the Olympic Peninsula and to the Everett and Bellingham basins, where the SHIPS coverage was limited. The inverse model clearly shows accretionary rocks in the Olympic core complex dipping eastward beneath east dipping rocks of the Siletz terrane. We present an overview of our algorithm and summarize the crustal structure inferred from our inversion.

  13. Teleseismic Tomography of the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasanmi, O. T.; Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we perform a tomographic inversion of teleseismic data to investigate the properties of the crust and the uppermost mantle beneath the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ). The ETSZ is a major seismic feature located in the southeastern United States. The zone spans portions of eastern Tennessee, North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and Alabama and is, after the New Madrid seismic zone, the second most active seismic region of the North America east of the Rocky Mountains. Earthquakes in the ETSZ appear to align along a sharp, linear magnetic feature, called the New York-Alabama Lineament (NYAL), which acts as the northwest edge of the seismic zone and is attributed to a strike-slip fault affecting the Precambrian basement. A total of 2652 relative P-wave arrival time residuals from 201 teleseismic events recorded at 28 regional seismic station have been extracted from the continuous records using the adaptive stacking code. The three-dimensional model was computed down to 300km. The tomographic images show significant velocity anomalies, confirming complex tectonic evolution and revealing basement features that can be correlated with regional gravity and magnetic anomalies. One of the main features of the three-dimensional model is a significant velocity contrast across the NYAL that extends through the crust and the uppermost mantle, with high velocity anomalies northwest of the NYAL and lower velocities southwest of the NYAL. Our results support the hypothesis that the lineament is a major basement fault associated with a tectonic boundary produced by merging of the southern Appalachian basement with the Granite-Rhyolite basement during the Grenville orogeny.

  14. Volcano deformation source parameters estimated from InSAR: Sensitivities to uncertainties in seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterlark, Timothy; Donovan, Theodore; Feigl, Kurt L.; Haney, Matthew; Thurber, Clifford H.; Tung, Sui

    2016-04-01

    The eruption cycle of a volcano is controlled in part by the upward migration of magma. The characteristics of the magma flux produce a deformation signature at the Earth's surface. Inverse analyses use geodetic data to estimate strategic controlling parameters that describe the position and pressurization of a magma chamber at depth. The specific distribution of material properties controls how observed surface deformation translates to source parameter estimates. Seismic tomography models describe the spatial distributions of material properties that are necessary for accurate models of volcano deformation. This study investigates how uncertainties in seismic tomography models propagate into variations in the estimates of volcano deformation source parameters inverted from geodetic data. We conduct finite element model-based nonlinear inverse analyses of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data for Okmok volcano, Alaska, as an example. We then analyze the estimated parameters and their uncertainties to characterize the magma chamber. Analyses are performed separately for models simulating a pressurized chamber embedded in a homogeneous domain as well as for a domain having a heterogeneous distribution of material properties according to seismic tomography. The estimated depth of the source is sensitive to the distribution of material properties. The estimated depths for the homogeneous and heterogeneous domains are 2666 ± 42 and 3527 ± 56 m below mean sea level, respectively (99% confidence). A Monte Carlo analysis indicates that uncertainties of the seismic tomography cannot account for this discrepancy at the 99% confidence level. Accounting for the spatial distribution of elastic properties according to seismic tomography significantly improves the fit of the deformation model predictions and significantly influences estimates for parameters that describe the location of a pressurized magma chamber.

  15. Multi-hole seismic modeling in 3-D space and cross-hole seismic tomography analysis for boulder detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Fei; Liu, Jiangping; Wang, Jing; Zong, Yuquan; Yu, Mingyu

    2016-11-01

    A boulder stone, a common geological feature in south China, is referred to the remnant of a granite body which has been unevenly weathered. Undetected boulders could adversely impact the schedule and safety of subway construction when using tunnel boring machine (TBM) method. Therefore, boulder detection has always been a key issue demanded to be solved before the construction. Nowadays, cross-hole seismic tomography is a high resolution technique capable of boulder detection, however, the method can only solve for velocity in a 2-D slice between two wells, and the size and central position of the boulder are generally difficult to be accurately obtained. In this paper, the authors conduct a multi-hole wave field simulation and characteristic analysis of a boulder model based on the 3-D elastic wave staggered-grid finite difference theory, and also a 2-D imaging analysis based on first arrival travel time. The results indicate that (1) full wave field records could be obtained from multi-hole seismic wave simulations. Simulation results describe that the seismic wave propagation pattern in cross-hole high-velocity spherical geological bodies is more detailed and can serve as a basis for the wave field analysis. (2) When a cross-hole seismic section cuts through the boulder, the proposed method provides satisfactory cross-hole tomography results; however, when the section is closely positioned to the boulder, such high-velocity object in the 3-D space would impact on the surrounding wave field. The received diffracted wave interferes with the primary wave and in consequence the picked first arrival travel time is not derived from the profile, which results in a false appearance of high-velocity geology features. Finally, the results of 2-D analysis in 3-D modeling space are comparatively analyzed with the physical model test vis-a-vis the effect of high velocity body on the seismic tomographic measurements.

  16. Advances in 4D radiation therapy for managing respiration: part I - 4D imaging.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Geoffrey D; Rosu, Mihaela

    2012-12-01

    Techniques for managing respiration during imaging and planning of radiation therapy are reviewed, concentrating on free-breathing (4D) approaches. First, we focus on detailing the historical development and basic operational principles of currently-available "first generation" 4D imaging modalities: 4D computed tomography, 4D cone beam computed tomography, 4D magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D positron emission tomography. Features and limitations of these first generation systems are described, including necessity of breathing surrogates for 4D image reconstruction, assumptions made in acquisition and reconstruction about the breathing pattern, and commonly-observed artifacts. Both established and developmental methods to deal with these limitations are detailed. Finally, strategies to construct 4D targets and images and, alternatively, to compress 4D information into static targets and images for radiation therapy planning are described.

  17. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part I – 4D Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Rosu, Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    Techniques for managing respiration during imaging and planning of radiation therapy are reviewed, concentrating on free-breathing (4D) approaches. First, we focus on detailing the historical development and basic operational principles of currently-available “first generation” 4D imaging modalities: 4D computed tomography, 4D cone beam computed tomography, 4D magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D positron emission tomography. Features and limitations of these first generation systems are described, including necessity of breathing surrogates for 4D image reconstruction, assumptions made in acquisition and reconstruction about the breathing pattern, and commonly-observed artifacts. Both established and developmental methods to deal with these limitations are detailed. Finally, strategies to construct 4D targets and images and, alternatively, to compress 4D information into static targets and images for radiation therapy planning are described. PMID:22784929

  18. Mantle xenoliths, seismic tomography, and the tectosphere beneath southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, D.; Boyd, F. R.; Schutt, D.; Bell, D.; Carlson, R.

    2003-04-01

    We impose geologic constraints on seismic 3-D images of the upper mantle beneath southern Africa by calculating seismic velocities and rock densities from approximately 100 geothermobarometrically calibrated mantle xenoliths from the Archean Kaapvaal craton and adjacent Proterozoic mobile belts. Velocity and density estimates are based on the elastic and thermal moduli of constituent minerals at the P-T conditions in the mantle source. Results are consistent with tomographic evidence that cratonic mantle samples are higher in velocity by 0.5-1.5% and lower in density by about 1% relative to off-craton samples at comparable depths. Seismic velocity variations in the xenoliths are controlled dominantly by temperature, with compositional effects playing a secondary role. Composition remains the dominant control for density. At depths of 100-150 km in the upper mantle, the cratonic xenoliths are consistently lower density and higher seismic velocities than non-cratonic xenoliths. Low-T (granular) cratonic xenoliths exhibit a positive velocity-depth curve, rising from about 8.1 km/s at uppermost mantle depths to about 8.25 km/s at 200 km depth. S-wave velocities decrease slightly over the same depth range from about 4.7 km/s in the uppermost mantle to 4.65 km/s at 180 km depth. Velocities for high-T (sheared) lherzolites are widely scattered, ranging from highs close to those of the low-T nodules to velocities as low as 8.05 and 4.47 at depths in excess of 200 km. These low velocities, while not asthenospheric, are inconsistent with seismic tomographic images that indicate high velocity root material extending to depths of at least 250 km. We suggest that the high-T xenoliths may therefore have originated in halos around kimberlite embayments into the tectospheric root. Seismic velocities and densities for the cratonic sample differ significantly from those predicted for both pyrolite (fertile) and eclogite mantle materials. The xenoliths and petrologic models we have

  19. Anisotropic Tomography of Portugal (West Iberia) from ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Graça; Stutzmann, Éléonore; Schimmel, Martin; Dias, Nuno; Kiselev, Sergey; Custódio, Susana; Dundar, Suleyman

    2016-04-01

    Located on the western Iberian Peninsula, Portugal constitutes a key area for accretionary terrane and basin research, providing the best opportunity to probe a crustal formation shaped by the Paleozoic Variscan orogeny followed by the Mesozoic-Cenozoic extensions. The geology of Portugal documents a protracted history from Paleozoic basement formation to the Mesozoic opening of the North Atlantic Ocean. The inheritance of such complex geologic history is yet to be fully determined, playing an important role in the current geodynamic framework influencing, for example, the observed regional seismicity. The physical properties of its crust have largely remained undetermined so far, with unevenly distributed knowledge on the spatial distributions of a detailed crustal structure. Also, the deep seismic reflection/refraction surveys conducted in Western Iberia do not provide a clear picture of the regional characteristics of the crust. Using Seismic Broad Band observations from a dense temporary deployment, conducted between 2010 and 2012 in the scope of the WILAS project and covering the entire Portuguese mainland, we computed a 3D anisotropic model from ambient seismic noise. The dispersion measurements were computed for each station pair using empirical Green's functions generated by cross-correlating one-day-length seismic ambient-noise records. After dispersion analysis, group velocity measurements were regionalized to obtain 2D anisotropic tomographic images. Afterwards, the dispersion curves, extracted from each cell of the 2D group velocity maps, were inverted as a function of depth to obtain a 3D shear wave anisotropic model, using a bayesian approach. A simulated annealing method, in which the number of splines that describes the model, is adapted within the inversion. The models are jointly interpreted with the models gathered from Ps receiver functions as well as with the regional seismicity, enabling to obtain a more detailed picture of the crustal

  20. Seismic Tomography of Siyazan - Shabran Oil and Gas Region Of Azerbaijan by Data of The Seismic Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetirmishli, Gurban; Guliyev, Ibrahim; Mammadov, Nazim; Kazimova, Sabina; Ismailova, Saida

    2016-04-01

    The main purpose of the research was to build a reliable 3D model of the structure of seismic velocities in the earth crust on the territory of Siyazan-Shabran region of Azerbaijan, using the data of seismic telemetry stations spanning Siyazan-Shabran region (Siyazan, Altiagaj, Pirgulu, Guba, Khinalig, Gusar), including 7 mobile telemetry seismic stations. Interest to the problem of research seismic tomography caused by applied environmental objectives, such as the assessment of geological risks, engineering evaluation (stability and safety of wells), the task of exploration and mining operations. In the study region are being actively developed oil fields, and therefore, there is a risk of technogenic earthquakes. It was performed the calculation of first arrival travel times of P and S waves and the corresponding ray paths. Calculate 1D velocity model which is the initial model as a set of horizontal layers (velocity may be constant or changed linearly with depth on each layer, gaps are possible only at the boundaries between the layers). Have been constructed and analyzed the horizontal sections of the three-dimensional velocity model at different depths of the investigated region. By the empirical method was proposed density model of the sedimentary rocks at depths of 0-8 km.

  1. Global tomography from ambient seismic noise cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haned, A.; Stutzmann, E.; Yelles-Chaouche, A.; Schimmel, M.; Kiselev, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Ambient seismic noise is generated in the ocean and recorded worldwide. In order to extract Green function between stations from seismic noise records, we consider the analytical signal and compute the phase correlation to to extract phase coherent signals which after stacking build up the empirical Green function. The ambient noise phase cross-correlations are stacked using the time-frequency domain phase weighted stack (Schimmel et al. 2011). This method is applied to noise data in the period band 30 to 250sec. A bootstrap approach is used to measure group velocity between pairs of stations and to estimate the corresponding error. We show that it is necessary to stack 2 years of data in order to determine reliable group velocity measurements. It is observed by analyzing the convergence that less data are required to extract reliable group velocities at short period than at long periods. This data processing is applied to 150 stations of the global networks GEOSCOPE and GSN. Global maps of group velocities and the corresponding errors are then estimated and inverted to obtain the 3D S-wave model. CRUST2.0 model is used and the S-wave model below the crust is determined using a simulated annealing method in which the number of splines that describes the model is adapted within the inversion. This model is the first global S-wave velocity model derived from seismic noise recordings in the wide period band 30-250sec.

  2. On the Statistical Reliability of Seismic Waveform Tomography - a Crosshole Case Study in Anisotropic Crystalline Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greig, D. W.; Pratt, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    We study a crosshole seismic survey from the Voisey's Bay area in Newfoundland using traveltime tomography and waveform tomography, and we develop images of the seismic velocity of the subsurface. Our waveform tomography method incorporates one-dimensional elliptical anisotropy; anisotropic traveltime tomography is used to generate a starting model for both the velocity and the anisotropy according to the technique developed by Pratt and Chapman (1992). This approach allows us to largely satisfy the half-cycle criterion for waveform tomography, though there is some evidence of cycle-skipping at large offsets. The waveform data are separated into five full-coverage subsets, creating five complete, independent data sets for the same region. Waveform tomography is then performed using frequencies from 300 to 1400 Hz on each of the five data sets, resulting in five independent velocity models of the subsurface. The five models are averaged to generate a single representative model of the subsurface and an image of the population standard deviation is calculated to provide a measure of the variance of the five models. The population standard deviation between the models is in the range of about 100 m/s over most of the target zone. Areas of higher variance tend to suggest artifacts of the inversion. Areas of lower variance are regions in which we have greater confidence in the result. In this way the averaging of the five independent realizations acted as a filter, picking out those velocity features that are present in all models and smoothing out those found in only one or two. The introduction of the standard deviation as a tool to evaluate the results of waveform tomography provides valuable information on the reliability of the waveform tomography approach. Survey design for redundant full coverage will prove useful in future surveys.

  3. A 4D Synchrotron X-Ray-Tomography Study of the Formation of Hydrocarbon- Migration Pathways in Heated Organic-Rich Shale

    SciTech Connect

    Hamed Panahi; Paul Meakin; Francois Renard; Maya Kobchenko; Julien Scheibert; Adriano Mazzini; Bjorn Jamtveit; Anders Malthe-Sorenssen; Dag Kristian Dysthe

    2013-04-01

    with formation of microcracks. The main technical difficulty was numerical extraction of microcracks that have apertures in the 5- to 30-um range (with 5 um being the resolution limit) from a large 3D volume of X-ray attenuation data. The main goal of the work presented here is to develop a methodology to process these 3D data and image the cracks. This methodology is based on several levels of spatial filtering and automatic recognition of connected domains. Supportive petrographic and thermogravimetric data were an important complement to this study. An investigation of the strain field using 2D image correlation analyses was also performed. As one application of the 4D (space + time) microtomography and the developed workflow, we show that fluid generation was accompanied by crack formation. Under different conditions, in the subsurface, this might provide paths for primary migration.

  4. Geodynamically Consistent Interpretation of Seismic Tomography for Thermal and Thermochemical Mantle Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, H.; Bercovici, D.

    2006-05-01

    Recent theoretical developments as well as increased data quality and coverage have allowed seismic tomographic imaging to better resolve narrower structures at both shallow and deep mantle depths. However, despite these improvements, the interpretation of tomographic images remains problematic mainly because of: (1) the trade off between temperature and composition and their different influence on mantle flow; (2) the difficulty in determining the extent and continuity of structures revealed by seismic tomography. We present two geodynamic studies on mantle plumes which illustrate the need to consider both geodynamic and mineral physics for a consistent interpretation of tomographic images in terms of temperature composition and flow. The first study aims to investigate the coupled effect of pressure and composition on thermochemical plumes. Using both high resolution 2D numerical modeling and simple analytical theory we show that the coupled effect of composition and pressure have a first order impact on the dynamics of mantle thermochemical plumes in the lower mantle: (1) For low Si enrichment of the plume relative to a reference pyrolitic mantle, an oscillatory behavior of the plume head is observed; (2) For Si-enriched plume compositions, the chemical density excess of the plume increases with height, leading to stagnation of large plume heads at various depths in the lower mantle. As a consequence, these thermochemical plumes may display broad (~ 1200 km wide and more) negative seismic velocity anomalies at various lower mantle depths, which may not necessarily be associated with upwelling currents. The second study focuses on the identification of thermal mantle plumes by seismic tomography beneath the Hawaiian hot spot: we performed a set of 3D numerical experiments in a spherical shell to model a rising plume beneath a moving plate. The thermal structure obtained is converted into P and S wave seismic velocities using mineral physics considerations. We

  5. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography for near-surface seismic refraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelt, Colin A.; Chen, Jianxiong

    2016-10-01

    Traveltime tomography is the main method by which the Earth's seismic velocity is determined on all scales, from the near-surface (<100 m) to the core. Usually traveltime tomography uses ray theory, an infinite-frequency approximation of wave propagation. A theory developed in global seismology to account for the finite-frequency nature of seismic data, known as finite-frequency traveltime tomography (FFTT), can theoretically provide a more accurate estimation of velocity. But the FFTT theory is generally not applicable to near-surface data because there is no reference velocity model known in advance that is capable of yielding synthetic waveforms that are close enough to the recorded seismograms to yield a reliable delay time. Also, there is usually no reference model for which the unknown velocity model represents a small (linear) perturbation from the reference model. This paper presents a frequency dependent form of non-linear traveltime tomography specifically designed for near-surface seismic data in which a starting model, iterative approach with recalculated travel paths at each iteration, and the calculation of a frequency-dependent total traveltime, as opposed to a delay time, are used. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography (FDTT) involves two modifications to conventional traveltime tomography: (1) the calculation of frequency-dependent traveltimes using wavelength-dependent velocity smoothing (WDVS) and (2) the corresponding sensitivity kernels that arise from using WDVS. Results show that the former modification is essential to achieve significant benefits from FDTT, whereas the latter is optional in that similar results can be achieved using infinite-frequency kernels. The long seismic wavelengths relative to the total path lengths and the size of subsurface heterogeneities of typical near-surface data means the improvements over ray theory tomography are significant. The benefits of FDTT are demonstrated using conventional minimum

  6. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography for near-surface seismic refraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelt, Colin A.; Chen, Jianxiong

    2016-07-01

    Traveltime tomography is the main method by which the Earth's seismic velocity is determined on all scales, from the near-surface (< 100 m) to the core. Usually traveltime tomography uses ray theory, an infinite-frequency approximation of wave propagation. A theory developed in global seismology to account for the finite-frequency nature of seismic data, known as finite-frequency traveltime tomography (FFTT), can theoretically provide a more accurate estimation of velocity. But the FFTT theory is generally not applicable to near-surface data because there is no reference velocity model known in advance that is capable of yielding synthetic waveforms that are close enough to the recorded seismograms to yield a reliable delay time. Also, there is usually no reference model for which the unknown velocity model represents a small (linear) perturbation from the reference model. This paper presents a frequency dependent form of nonlinear traveltime tomography specifically designed for near-surface seismic data in which a starting model, iterative approach with recalculated travel paths at each iteration, and the calculation of a frequency-dependent total traveltime, as opposed to a delay time, are used. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography (FDTT) involves two modifications to conventional traveltime tomography: (1) the calculation of frequency-dependent traveltimes using wavelength-dependent velocity smoothing (WDVS), and (2) the corresponding sensitivity kernels that arise from using WDVS. Results show that the former modification is essential to achieve significant benefits from FDTT, whereas the latter is optional in that similar results can be achieved using infinite-frequency kernels. The long seismic wavelengths relative to the total path lengths and the size of subsurface heterogeneities of typical near-surface data means the improvements over ray theory tomography are significant. The benefits of FDTT are demonstrated using conventional minimum

  7. Interior structure of the Moon: Constraints from seismic tomography, gravity and topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberger, Bernhard; Zhao, Dapeng; Werner, Stephanie C.

    2015-08-01

    Seismic tomography can be combined with constraints from geoid, topography and other surface observations to gain information about mantle structure and dynamics. This approach has been taken with much success for the Earth mantle, and here it is, for the first time, applied to the Moon. Lunar tomography has much lower resolution as for the Earth and is mostly restricted to the near side, nevertheless we can assess under what assumptions the fit between predicted geoid (based on a tomography model) and observed geoid is best. Among the models tested, we find the most similar pattern (correlation about 0.5) if we only consider tomography below 225 km depth, if density anomalies cause little or no dynamic topography and if we compare to the geoid with the flattening (l = 2, m = 0) term removed. This could mean that (a) like for the Earth, seismic anomalies shallower than 225 km are caused by a combination of thermal and compositional effects and therefore cannot be simply converted to density anomalies; (b) the lithosphere is sufficiently thick to prevent dynamic topography more than a small fraction of total topography; and (c) flattening is a "fossil" bulge unrelated to present-day mantle anomalies. However, we have to be cautious with interpreting our results, because for models with a comparatively higher correlation and a conversion from seismic velocity to density anomalies similar to the Earth's upper mantle, the amplitude of the predicted geoid is much lower than observed. This could either mean that the tomography model is strongly damped, or that the geoid is mostly due to shallow causes such as crustal thickness variations, with only a small part coming from the deeper mantle.

  8. Constraint of magnetic models using seismic tomography in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Chen, C. R.; Lin, C. H.; Wen, S.; Huang, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainty is often one of the sufferings when underlying models are constructed by using unitary geophysical data retrieved from field prospections. Velocity-susceptibility models are structured by using velocity obtained from arrival time of seismic waves transferring into susceptibility through characteristics of minerals and/or rocks to integrate two parameters together. Two profiles with intense undulation of geomagnetic anomalies over sediment areas in central-west Taiwan and complex geological structures at the rim of subduction zone in northeast Taiwan are used to examine discrepancy in values derived from prospections and the integrated models via a 2D forward method. Agreements between prospections and models suggest that rocks with high susceptibility can be identified in sediment areas and complex geological areas. Models with two-parameter adaptions shed light on constructing potential and susceptibility models in a more convincing way for further processes of inversion.

  9. Three-Dimensional Seismic Tomography Beneath Tangshan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. C.; Keranen, K. M.; Keller, G.; Qu, G.; Harder, S. H.

    2010-12-01

    The 1976 earthquake in Tangshan, China ranks as the deadliest earthquake in modern times. Though the exact number of casualties remains disputed, it is widely accepted that at least a quarter of a million people died. The high casualty level is surprising since the earthquake was not unusually large (Mw 7.5). Amplification of ground motion by thick sediment fill in the basin underlying the city is a likely cause for the extensive destruction. However, the extent of the unconsolidated material and the broader subsurface geology beneath Tangshan and surrounding areas needs to be better-constrained to properly model predicted ground motion and mitigate the hazards of future earthquakes. From a broader perspective, the Tangshan area is at the northern edge of the Bohai Bay basin province that has experienced both Cenozoic extension and related strike-slip tectonism. In January 2010, our group conducted a three-dimensional seismic investigation centered on the city of Tangshan. In an area of approximately 40 km x 60 km, we deployed 500 REFTEK 125A (“Texan”) recorders at 500 m spacing. A number of different sources, 20 altogether, were recorded during the two-day listening window, which include our large shots, smaller explosive shots from a co-spatial reflection survey, blasts from nearby quarries, and a small (M<1) earthquake. Our preliminary analyses suggest that the sediment fill is, on average, less than 1 km thick. Sediment fill is thinner to the north, as evidenced by outcropping bedrock, and thickens to the south. Sediment seismic velocity is about 1.8 km/s. Upper crustal velocities are 5.2 to 6.6 km/s, and increase to 7.0 km/s at mid-crustal depths.

  10. Seismic Structure of Villarrica Volcano obtained through Local Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora-Stock, Cindy; Thorwart, Martin; Rabbel, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We present a first model of the inner structure of the Villarrica volcano (Southern Chile) derived from P-wave arrival time inversion from local volcano tectonic (VT) events. A total set of 75 DSS-Cube stations was installed at the volcano surroundings between March 1st and 14th, 2012, with 50 of them at the crater, flanks and around the volcano. Volcano tectonic earthquakes located inside the network describe a NS-trending structure between 2 and 7 km below sea level at a transition zone between low and high P-wave velocity zones. The location and trend of the volume is consistent with a branch of the Liquiñe - Ofqui Fault Zone, a long lived arc-parallel 1000 km long strike-slip fault at the Chilean subduction zone. Values for P-wave velocity (Vp) averaged 4.5 km/s, and Vp/Vs ratios gave values of 1.6 to 1.7. The maximum variation of Vp is of the order of ±20%. Checkerboard test and Bootstrap method were applied. Bootstrap method shows that the standard deviation of the tomographic solutions is of the order of ±9%. Resolution given by Checkerboard test is of the order of 2-3 km. We observed three low velocity zones (LVZs) located between 1 and 5 km depth that can be associated with magma and/or other fluids. One main LVZ at 1-2 km towards NNW from the locus of seismicity; and two conduit-like LVZ s reaching from the locus of seismicity towards the surface features of the Los Nevados and Challupén pyroclastic flows (ENE and S of the crater, respectively). These two LVZs are thought to be remnant conduits of these previous eruptions. High velocity zones are observed to the east and below the crater, and can be interpreted as consolidated crustal rocks and volcanic products from previously collapsed caldera.

  11. Seismic tomography and dynamics of geothermal and natural hydrothermal systems in the south of Bandung, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Sule, Rachmat; Diningrat, Wahyuddin; Syahbana, Devy; Schuck, Nicole; Akbar, Fanini; Kusnadi, Yosep; Hendryana, Andri; Nugraha, Andri; Ryannugroho, Riskiray; Jaya, Makki; Erbas, Kemal; Bruhn, David; Pratomo, Bambang

    2015-04-01

    The structure and the dynamics of geothermal reservoirs and hydrothermal systems allows us to better assess geothermal resources in the south of Bandung. A large variety of intense surface manifestations like geysers, hot-steaming grounds, hot water pools, and active volcanoes suggest an intimate coupling between volcanic, tectonic and hydrothermal processes in this area. We deployed a geophysical network around geothermal areas starting with a network of 30 seismic stations including high-dynamic broadband Güralp and Trillium sensors (0.008 - 100 Hz) and 4 short-period (1 Hz) sensors from October 2012 to December 2013. We extended the network in June 2013 with 16 short-period seismometers. Finally, we deployed a geodetic network including a continuously recording gravity meter, a GPS station and tilt-meters. We describe the set-up of the seismic and geodetic networks and we discuss observations and results. The earthquakes locations were estimated using a non-linear algorithm, and revealed at least 3 seismic clusters. We perform joint inversion of hypo-center and velocity tomography and we look at seismic focal mechanisms. We develop seismic ambient noise tomography. We discuss the resulting seismic pattern within the area and relate the structure to the distribution of hydrothermal systems. We aim at searching possible structural and dynamical links between different hydrothermal systems. In addition, we discuss possible dynamical implications of this complex volcanic systems from temporal variations of inferred parameters. The integration of those results allows us achieving a better understanding of the structures and the dynamics of those geothermal reservoirs. This approach contributes to the sustainable and optimal exploitation of the geothermal resource in Indonesia.

  12. Mantle Plume Dynamics Constrained by Seismic Tomography and Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisovic, P.; Forte, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    We construct a time-dependent, compressible mantle convection model in three-dimensional spherical geometry that is consistent with tomography-based instantaneous flow dynamics, using an updated and revised pseudo-spectral numerical method [Glisovic et al., Geophys. J. Int. 2012]. We explored the impact of two end-member surface boundary conditions, for a rigid and plate-like surface, along with geodynamically-inferred radial viscosity profiles. In each case we find that deep-mantle hot upwellings are durable and stable features in the mantle-wide convective circulation. These deeply-rooted mantle plumes show remarkable longevity over very long geological time spans (several hundred million years), mainly owing to the high viscosity in the lower mantle. Our very-long time convection simulations suggest that the deep-mantle plumes beneath the following hotspots: Pitcairn, Easter, Galapagos, Crozet, Kerguelen, Caroline and Cape Verde, are most reliably resolved in the present-day tomographic images.

  13. Noise-based body-wave seismic tomography in an active underground mine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, G.; Brenguier, F.; Campillo, M.; Lynch, R.; Roux, P.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade, ambient noise tomography has become increasingly popular to image the earth's upper crust. The seismic noise recorded in the earth's crust is dominated by surface waves emanating from the interaction of the ocean with the solid earth. These surface waves are low frequency in nature ( < 1 Hz) and not usable for imaging smaller structures associated with mining or oil and gas applications. The seismic noise recorded at higher frequencies are typically from anthropogenic sources, which are short lived, spatially unstable and not well suited for constructing seismic Green's functions between sensors with conventional cross-correlation methods. To examine the use of ambient noise tomography for smaller scale applications, continuous data were recorded for 5 months in an active underground mine in Sweden located more than 1km below surface with 18 high frequency seismic sensors. A wide variety of broadband (10 - 3000 Hz) seismic noise sources are present in an active underground mine ranging from drilling, scraping, trucks, ore crushers and ventilation fans. Some of these sources generate favorable seismic noise, while others are peaked in frequency and not usable. In this presentation, I will show that the noise generated by mining activity can be useful if periods of seismic noise are carefully selected. Although noise sources are not temporally stable and not evenly distributed around the sensor array, good estimates of the seismic Green's functions between sensors can be retrieved for a broad frequency range (20 - 400 Hz) when a selective stacking scheme is used. For frequencies below 100 Hz, the reconstructed Green's functions show clear body-wave arrivals for almost all of the 153 sensor pairs. The arrival times of these body-waves are picked and used to image the local velocity structure. The resulting 3-dimensional image shows a high velocity structure that overlaps with a known ore-body. The material properties of the ore-body differ from

  14. Using nonlinear kernels in seismic tomography: go beyond gradient methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, R.

    2013-05-01

    In quasi-linear inversion, a nonlinear problem is typically solved iteratively and at each step the nonlinear problem is linearized through the use of a linear functional derivative, the Fréchet derivative. Higher order terms generally are assumed to be insignificant and neglected. The linearization approach leads to the popular gradient method of seismic inversion. However, for the real Earth, the wave equation (and the real wave propagation) is strongly nonlinear with respect to the medium parameter perturbations. Therefore, the quasi-linear inversion may have a serious convergence problem for strong perturbations. In this presentation I will compare the convergence properties of the Taylor-Fréchet series and the renormalized Fréchet series, the De Wolf approximation, and illustrate the improved convergence property with numerical examples. I'll also discuss the application of nonlinear partial derivative to least-square waveform inversion. References: Bonnans, J., Gilbert, J., Lemarechal, C. and Sagastizabal, C., 2006, Numirical optmization, Springer. Wu, R.S. and Y. Zheng, 2012. Nonlinear Fréchet derivative and its De Wolf approximation, Expanded Abstracts of Society of Exploration Gephysicists, SI 8.1.

  15. High resolution seismic attenuation tomography at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    SciTech Connect

    Zucca, J.J.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1987-07-10

    Medicine Lake Volcano, a broad shield volcano about 50km east of Mount Shasta in northern California, produced rhylotic eruptions as recently as 400 years ago. Because of this recent activity it is of considerable interest to producers of geothermal energy. In a joint project sponsored by the Geothermal Research Program of the USGS and the Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Division of the US-DOE, the USGS and LLNL conducted an active seismic experiment designed to explore the area beneath and around the caldera. The experiment of eight explosions detonated in a 50 km radius circle around the volcano recorded on a 11 x 15 km grid of 140 seismographs. The travel time data from the experiment have been inverted for structure and are presented elsewhere in this volume. In this paper we present the results of an inversion for 1/Q structure using t* data in a modified Aki inversion scheme. Although the data are noisy, we find that in general attenuative zones correlate with low velocity zones. In particular, we observe a high 1/Q zone roughly in the center of the caldera at 4 km depth in between two large recent dacite flows. This zone could represent the still molten or partially molten source of the flows.

  16. Seismic Tomography of Crustal P and S in Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steck, L.; Phillips, S.; Begnaud, M.; Stead, R.; Rowe, C.; Mackey, K.

    2008-12-01

    We present inversion results for Pg and Sg/Lg travel times for Eurasia using data from the LANL Research Knowledge Base. This database consists of integrated local, regional, and global catalogs with arrivals sorted and merged by event. The epicentral ground truth of each event is tested using the Bondar criteria and we weight events by the square root of their ground truth level with a minimum allowed weight of 1. We assign a GT level of 50 km to those events that do not pass any of the Bondar criteria. We use an inversion method analogous to Pn tomography, whereby we assume a straight ray between source and receiver and project travel time anomalies onto this great circle path. Events are restricted to depths less than 33 km and stations to distances greater than .5 degrees. To accommodate depth uncertainty and near-receiver velocity effects we solve for both event and site terms and damp the site term sum to zero. We employ first difference regularization over a one by one degree grid, and solve the set of equations using the LSQR conjugate gradient method. We invert for Pg and Sg/Lg slowness separately over a region from 0 to 80 degrees north latitude and -20 to 195 degrees east longitude. For Pg, the dataset is comprised of 3,709 stations, 407,131 events, and 1,453,318 travel times. The starting RMS error is reduced through inversion by 30% with respect to IASP91. For Sg/Lg, we use 3,084 stations, 266,751 events, and 1,049,125 travel times and achieve a 26% reduction in RMS error. While the Sg/Lg site terms are about twice as large as those for Pg, the Pg and Sg/Lg site terms show similar geographic patterns. Resolution tests with added Gaussian noise of 3 seconds standard deviation are performed for checkerboards having squares of 2, 4, and 10 degrees width. Pg velocities are highest in subduction zones and lowest in eastern Europe and around the Caspian Sea. The ratio of Pg to Lg velocities is high at zones of convergence, including the Pacific Rim and the

  17. Application of tomography seismic for subsurface modeling of Kelud Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destawan, R.; Bernando, A.; Aziz, M.; Palupi, I. R.

    2016-05-01

    Kelud is a Quaternary volcano formed by the collision between the Indo-Australian plate with the Eurasian plate, exactly in the south of Java. This volcano is included in stratovolcanoes type explosive eruption characteristics. In order observation of subsurface conditions, performed imaging tomography. The research used data recordings from the 4 point observation in 2007. The data processing started from the initial velocity modeling, ray tracing calculations using the method of bending and tomographic velocity model Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs using inversion techniques delay time. Based on the research activities carried out, were resulted velocity structure models Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs and the hypocenter distribution of volcanic earthquakes occurring in Kelud. Velocity structures of Vp and Vs with variations of negative values between -60 to 0% and the value of Vp / Vs positive indicating the presence of hot fluid Kelud from top to sea level. While the positive values of Vs velocity structure between 0 to 20%, which dominate the east and south peaks interpreted as the rest of the frozen magma from previous volcanic activity.

  18. Prediction of subsurface fracture in mining zone of Papua using passive seismic tomography based on Fresnel zone

    SciTech Connect

    Setiadi, Herlan; Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Wely, Woen; Riyanto, Erwin

    2015-04-16

    Fracture prediction in a block cave of underground mine is very important to monitor the structure of the fracture that can be harmful to the mining activities. Many methods can be used to obtain such information, such as TDR (Time Domain Relectometry) and open hole. Both of them have limitations in range measurement. Passive seismic tomography is one of the subsurface imaging method. It has advantage in terms of measurements, cost, and rich of rock physical information. This passive seismic tomography studies using Fresnel zone to model the wavepath by using frequency parameter. Fresnel zone was developed by Nurhandoko in 2000. The result of this study is tomography of P and S wave velocity which can predict position of fracture. The study also attempted to use sum of the wavefronts to obtain position and time of seismic event occurence. Fresnel zone tomography and the summation wavefront can predict location of geological structure of mine area as well.

  19. Using stochastic borehole seismic velocity tomography and Bayesian simulation to estimate Ni, Cu and Co grades.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, Lorenzo; Gloaguen, Erwan; Rondenay, Stephane; Leite, André; McDowell, Glenn; Wheeler, Robert

    2010-05-01

    In the mining industry, classic methods to build a grade model for ore deposits are based on kriging or cokriging of grades for targeted minerals measured in drill core in fertile geological units. As the complexity of the geological geometry increases, so does the complexity of grade estimations. For example, in layered mafic or ultramafic intrusions, it is necessary to know the layering geometry in order to perform kriging of grades in the most fertile zones. Without additional information on geological framwork, the definition of fertile zones is a low-precision exercise that requires extensive experience and good ability from the geologist. Recently, thanks to computer and geophysical tool improvements, seismic tomography became very attractive for many application fields. Indeed, this non-intrusive technique allows inferring the mechanical properties of the ground using travel times and amplitude analysis of the transmitted wavelet between two boreholes, hence provide additional information on the nature of the deposit. Commonly used crosshole seismic velocity tomography algorithms estimate 2D slowness models (inverse of velocity) in the plane between the boreholes using the measured direct wave travel times from the transmitter (located in one of the hole) to the receivers (located in the other hole). Furthermore, geophysical borehole logging can be used to constrain seismic tomography between drill holes. Finally, this project aims to estimate grade of economically worth mineral by integrating seismic tomography data with respectively drill core measured grades acquired by Vale Inco for one of their mine sites in operation. In this study, a new type algorithm that combines geostatistical simulation and tomography in the same process (namely stochastic tomography) has been used. The principle of the stochastic tomography is based on the straight ray approximation and use the linear relationship between travel time and slowness to estimate the slowness

  20. Crustal Structure of Australia from Ambient Seismic Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygin, E.; Kennett, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    We create surface wave tomography for Australian crustal structure by using the group velocity measurements in the period range 1-32 s extracted from the stacked transfer functions of ambient noise between station pairs. Both Rayleigh wave and Love wave group velocity maps are constructed for each period using the vertical and transverse component of the Green's function estimates from the ambient noise. The all of the portable broadband deployments and permanent stations on the continent have been used with over 250 stations in all and up to 7500 paths. The permanent stations fill the gap between the various shorter-term portable deployments. At each period the group velocity maps are constructed with a fully nonlinear tomographic inversion exploiting a subspace technique and the Fast Marching Method for wavefront tracking. For Rayleigh waves the continental coverage is good enough to allow the construction of a 3D shear wavespeed model in a two stage approach. Local group dispersion information is collated for a distribution of points across the continent and inverted for a 1D SV wavespeed profile using a Neighbourhood Algorithm method with weak constraints on the sedimentary thickness and Moho depth. The resulting set of 1D models are then interpolated to produce the final 3D wavespeed model. The group velocity maps show the strong influence of thick sediments at shorter periods, and distinct fast zones associated with cratonic regions. Below the sediments the 3D shear wavespeed model displays significant heterogeneity with only moderate correlation with surface tectonic features. For example, there is no evident expression of the Tasman Line marking the eastern edge of Precambrian outcrop. The large number of available interstation paths extracted from the ambient noise analysis provide detailed shear wavespeed information for crustal structure across the Australian continent for the first time, including regions where there was no prior sampling because of

  1. Crustal structure of Australia from ambient seismic noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygin, Erdinc; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2012-01-01

    Surface wave tomography for Australian crustal structure has been carried out using group velocity measurements in the period range 1-32 s extracted from stacked correlations of ambient noise between station pairs. Both Rayleigh wave and Love wave group velocity maps are constructed for each period using the vertical and transverse component of the Green's function estimates from the ambient noise. The full suite of portable broadband deployments and permanent stations on the continent have been used with over 250 stations in all and up to 7500 paths. The permanent stations provide a useful link between the various shorter-term portable deployments. At each period the group velocity maps are constructed with a fully nonlinear tomographic inversion exploiting a subspace technique and the Fast Marching Method for wavefront tracking. For Rayleigh waves the continental coverage is good enough to allow the construction of a 3D shear wavespeed model in a two stage approach. Local group dispersion information is collated for a distribution of points across the continent and inverted for a 1D SV wavespeed profile using a Neighbourhood Algorithm method. The resulting set of 1D models are then interpolated to produce the final 3D wavespeed model. The group velocity maps show the strong influence of thick sediments at shorter periods, and distinct fast zones associated with cratonic regions. Below the sediments the 3D shear wavespeed model displays significant heterogeneity with only moderate correlation with surface tectonic features. For example, there is no evident expression of the Tasman Line marking the eastern edge of Precambrian outcrop. The large number of available inter-station paths extracted from the ambient noise analysis provide detailed shear wavespeed information for crustal structure across the Australian continent for the first time, including regions where there was no prior sampling because of difficult logistics.

  2. Seismic amplification within the Seattle Basin, Washington State: Insights from SHIPS seismic tomography experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snelson, C.M.; Brocher, T.M.; Miller, K.C.; Pratt, T.L.; Trehu, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent observations indicate that the Seattle sedimentary basin, underlying Seattle and other urban centers in the Puget Lowland, Washington, amplifies long-period (1-5 sec) weak ground motions by factors of 10 or more. We computed east-trending P- and S-wave velocity models across the Seattle basin from Seismic Hazard Investigations of Puget Sound (SHIPS) experiments to better characterize the seismic hazard the basin poses. The 3D tomographic models, which resolve features to a depth of 10 km, for the first time define the P- and S-wave velocity structure of the eastern end of the basin. The basin, which contains sedimentary rocks of Eocene to Holocene, is broadly symmetric in east-west section and reaches a maximum thickness of 6 km along our profile beneath north Seattle. A comparison of our velocity model with coincident amplification curves for weak ground motions produced by the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake suggests that the distribution of Quaternary deposits and reduced velocity gradients in the upper part of the basement east of Seattle have significance in forecasting variations in seismic-wave amplification across the basin. Specifically, eastward increases in the amplification of 0.2- to 5-Hz energy correlate with locally thicker unconsolidated deposits and a change from Crescent Formation basement to pre-Tertiary Cascadia basement. These models define the extent of the Seattle basin, the Seattle fault, and the geometry of the basement contact, giving insight into the tectonic evolution of the Seattle basin and its influence on ground shaking.

  3. Using seismic tomography to characterize fracture systems induced by hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.; Rutledge, J.

    1995-01-01

    Microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing have been studied by many investigators to characterize fracture systems created by the fracturing process and to better understand the locations of energy resources in the earth`s subsurface. The pattern of the locations often contains a great deal of information about the fracture system stimulated during the hydraulic fracturing. Seismic tomography has found applications in many areas for characterizing the subsurface of the earth. It is well known that fractures in rock influence both the P and S velocities of the rock. The influence of the fractures is a function of the geometry of the fractures, the apertures and number of fractures, and the presence of fluids in the fractures. In addition, the temporal evolution of the created fracture system can be inferred from the temporal changes in seismic velocity and the pattern of microearthquake locations. Seismic tomography has been used to infer the spatial location of a fracture system in a reservoir that was created by hydraulic fracturing.

  4. Global seismic tomography with sparsity constraints: Comparison with smoothing and damping regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charléty, Jean; Voronin, Sergey; Nolet, Guust; Loris, Ignace; Simons, Frederik J.; Sigloch, Karin; Daubechies, Ingrid C.

    2013-09-01

    We present a realistic application of an inversion scheme for global seismic tomography that uses as prior information the sparsity of a solution, defined as having few nonzero coefficients under the action of a linear transformation. In this paper, the sparsifying transform is a wavelet transform. We use an accelerated iterative soft-thresholding algorithm for a regularization strategy, which produces sparse models in the wavelet domain. The approach and scheme we present may be of use for preserving sharp edges in a tomographic reconstruction and minimizing the number of features in the solution warranted by the data. The method is tested on a data set of time delays for finite-frequency tomography using the USArray network, the first application in global seismic tomography to real data. The approach presented should also be suitable for other imaging problems. From a comparison with a more traditional inversion using damping and smoothing constraints, we show that (1) we generally retrieve similar features, (2) fewer nonzero coefficients under a properly chosen representation (such as wavelets) are needed to explain the data at the same level of root-mean-square misfit, (3) the model is sparse or compressible in the wavelet domain, and (4) we do not need to construct a heterogeneous mesh to capture the available resolution.

  5. Flat vs. Normal subduction, Central Chile: insights from regional seismic tomography and rock type modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marot, Marianne; Monfret, Tony; Gerbault, Muriel; Nolet, Guust; Ranalli, Giorgio; Pardo, Mario

    2013-04-01

    The Central Chilean subduction zone (27-35°S) is host to a multitude of unexplained phenomena, all likely linked to one another. Here, the 35 Ma oceanic Nazca plate is subducting beneath South America with a well developed, highly seismic flat slab, very well correlated with the subducting Juan Fernandez seamount Ridge (JFR) track, and also with the absence of volcanism at the surface. The upper plate, currently under compression, is composed of a series of accreted terranes of various origins and ages. Although no general consensus on the formation of this flat slab has been yet achieved, there may have been influence of overthickened oceanic crust, delayed eclogitization and consequent fluid retain within the slab, and slab suction due to the high convergence rate with the thick Rio de Plata craton. Therefore, the main questions we address are: Does the slab dehydrate along the flat subducting segment? If so, how hydrated is the slab, at what depth does slab dehydration occur, where are the fluids transported to, and where are they stored? Is magmatism still active beneath the now inactive arc? Are accreted terranes and suture zones important attributes of this subduction zone? Do they possess their own mantle entities? To answer these questions, we analyzed recorded local seismicity and performed regional 3D seismic tomography for Vp and Vs. Combining seismic tomography with 2D instantaneous thermo-mechanical modeling for the regions of flat and normal subduction, we predict rock compositions for these two regions based on published mineral and rock elastic properties. Here, we present a comparison between the normal subduction zone to the south, reflecting typical and expected features, and the flat slab region to the north, exhibiting heterogeneities. Our results agree with other studies for a dry and cold continental mantle above the flat slab. We distinguish the Cuyania terrane with overthickened crust and/or abnormal mantle beneath it. We notice that the

  6. The effects of unaccounted-for elastic anisotropy in isotropic seismic tomographies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenda, Manuele; Bezada, Max; Toomey, Doug R.

    2016-04-01

    The present-day structure of Earth's interior is commonly determined by means of seismic tomography techniques. Most of the tomographic models, however, assume that the mantle is isotropic, which produces a physical inconsistency in regions where significant mantle anisotropy is sampled by a heterogeneous seismic ray distribution. We investigate the possible effects of unaccounted-for anisotropy in seismic imaging of the upper mantle in a subduction setting by carrying out a synthetic test in three steps: (1) We build an anisotropic velocity model of a subduction zone. The model was built from self-consistent estimates of mantle velocity structure and strain-induced anisotropy that are derived from thermo-mechanical and microstructural modeling. (2) We generate P-wave travel-time delay data for this model using an event distribution that is representative of what is typically recorded by a temporary seismic array. The anisotropic travel times are calculated through the prescribed model using a graph-theory ray tracer. (3) We invert the anisotropic synthetic delays under the assumption of isotropy, as is common practice. The tomographic inversion of the synthetic data recovers the input velocity structure fairly well, but delays caused solely by anisotropy result in very significant additional isotropic velocity anomalies that are artificial. Some of these apparent seismic anomalies are nonetheless attractive targets for (mis)interpretation. For example, one of the most notable apparent seismic anomalies is a low velocity zone in the mantle wedge. Our results suggest that significant artifacts may be common in isotropic velocity models of subduction zones and stress the need for mantle imaging that properly handles anisotropy.

  7. Seismic velocity variation along the Izu-Bonin arc estaimated from traveltime tomography using OBS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, K.; Tamura, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Kodaira, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) arc is an intra-oceanic island arc along the convergent plate boundary between the subducting Pacific and overriding Philippine Sea plates. Recent active seismic studies in the Izu-Bonin arc reveal significant along-arc variations in crustal structure [Kodaira et al., 2007]. The thickness of the arc crust shows a remarkable change between thicker Izu (~30 km) and thinner Bonin (~10 km) arcs. In addition to this, several geological and geophysical contrasts, such as seafloor topography and chemical composition of volcanic rocks, between Izu and Bonin arc have been reported [e.g., Yuasa 1992]. We have conducted earthquake observations using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) to reveal seismic velocity structure of the crust and mantle wedge in the Izu-Bonin arc and to investigate origin of the along-arc structure variations. We deployed 40 short-period OBSs in Izu and Bonin area in 2006 and 2009, respectively. The OBS data were processed with seismic data recorded at routine seismic stations on Hachijo-jima, Aoga-shima, and Chichi-jima operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). More than 5000 earthquakes were observed during about three-months observation period in each experiment. We conducted three-dimensional seismic tomography using manually picked P- and S-wave arrival time data. The obtained image shows a different seismic velocity structures in the mantle beneath the volcanic front between Izu and Bonin arcs. Low P-wave velocity anomalies in the mantle beneath the volcanic front in the Izu arc are limited at depths deeper than those in the Bonin arc. On the other hand, P-wave velocity in the low velocity anomalies beneath volcanic front in the Bonin arc is slower than that in the Izu arc. These large-scale along-arc structure variations in the mantle could relate to the geological and geophysical contrasts between Izu and Bonin arcs.

  8. Imaging the continental lithosphere: Perspectives from global and regional anisotropic seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergei; Schaeffer, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Azimuthal seismic anisotropy, the dependence of seismic wave speeds on propagation azimuth, is largely due to fabrics within the Earth's crust and mantle, produced by deformation. It thus provides constraints on the distribution and evolution of deformation within the upper mantle. Lateral variations in isotropic-average seismic velocities reflect variations in the temperature of the rocks at depth. Seismic tomography thus also provides a proxy for lateral changes in the temperature and thickness of the lithosphere. It can map the deep boundaries between tectonic blocks with different properties and age of the lithosphere. Our new global, anisotropic, 3D tomographic models of the upper mantle and the crust are constrained by an unprecedentedly large global dataset of broadband waveform fits (over one million seismograms) and provide improved resolution of the lithosphere at the global scale, compared to other available models. The most prominent high-velocity anomalies, seen down to around 200 km depths, indicate the cold, thick, stable mantle lithosphere beneath Precambrian cratons. The tomography resolves the deep boundaries of the cratons even where they are not exposed and difficult to map at the surface. Our large waveform dataset, with complementary large global networks and high-density regional array data, also produces improved resolution of azimuthal anisotropy patterns, so that regional-scale variations related to lithospheric deformation and mantle flow can be resolved, in particular in densely sampled regions. The depth of the boundary between the cold, rigid lithosphere (preserving ancient, frozen anisotropic fabric) and the rheologically weak asthenosphere (characterized by fabric developed recently) can be inferred from the depth layering of seismic anisotropy and its comparison to the past and present plate motions. Beneath oceans, the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is defined clearly by the layering of anisotropy, with a dependence on

  9. Deep structure of Llaima Volcano from seismic ambient noise tomography: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, L.; Mikesell, T. D.; Rodd, R.; Lees, J. M.; Johnson, J. B.; Ronan, T.

    2015-12-01

    The ambient seismic noise tomography (ANT) method has become an important tool to image crustal structures and magmatic bodies at volcanoes. The frequency band of ambient noise provides complimentary data and added resolution to the deeper volcanic structures when compared to traditional tomography based on local earthquakes. The Llaima Volcano (38° 41.9' S and 71° 43.8' W) is a stratovolcano of basaltic-andesitic composition. Llaima is located in the South Volcanic Zone (ZVS) of the Andes and is listed as one of the most active volcanoes in South America, with a long documented historical record dating back to 1640. Llaima experienced violent eruptions in 1927 and 1957 (Naranjo and Moreno, 1991), and its last eruptive cycle (2008-2010) is considered the most important after the 1957 eruption. Lacking seismic constraints on the deep structure under Llaima, petrologic data have suggested the presence of magmatic bodies (dikes). These bodies likely play an important role in the eruptive dynamics of Llaima (Bouvet de Maisonneuve, C., et al 2012). Analysis of the 2008-2010 seismicity shows a southern zone (approx. 15 km from the Llaima summit) where there were many Very Long Period events occurring prior to the eruptions. This is in agreement with a deformation zone determined by InSAR analysis (Fournier et al, 2010 and Bathke, 2011), but no geologic model based on geophysical imaging has been created yet. Beginning in 2009, staff from the Chilean Geological Survey (SERNAGEOMIN) started to install a permanent seismic network consisting of nine stations. These nine stations have allowed Chilean seismologists to closely monitor the activity at Llaima, but prevented a high-resolution tomographic imaging study. During the summer of 2015, a temporary seismic network consisting of 26 stations was installed around Llaima. In the work presented here, we analyze continuous waveforms recorded between January and April 2015 from a total of 35 broadband stations (permanent and

  10. Time-resolved seismic tomography detects magma intrusions at Mount Etna.

    PubMed

    Patanè, D; Barberi, G; Cocina, O; De Gori, P; Chiarabba, C

    2006-08-11

    The continuous volcanic and seismic activity at Mount Etna makes this volcano an important laboratory for seismological and geophysical studies. We used repeated three-dimensional tomography to detect variations in elastic parameters during different volcanic cycles, before and during the October 2002-January 2003 flank eruption. Well-defined anomalous low P- to S-wave velocity ratio volumes were revealed. Absent during the pre-eruptive period, the anomalies trace the intrusion of volatile-rich (>/=4 weight percent) basaltic magma, most of which rose up only a few months before the onset of eruption. The observed time changes of velocity anomalies suggest that four-dimensional tomography provides a basis for more efficient volcano monitoring and short- and midterm eruption forecasting of explosive activity.

  11. Time-resolved seismic tomography detects magma intrusions at Mount Etna.

    PubMed

    Patanè, D; Barberi, G; Cocina, O; De Gori, P; Chiarabba, C

    2006-08-11

    The continuous volcanic and seismic activity at Mount Etna makes this volcano an important laboratory for seismological and geophysical studies. We used repeated three-dimensional tomography to detect variations in elastic parameters during different volcanic cycles, before and during the October 2002-January 2003 flank eruption. Well-defined anomalous low P- to S-wave velocity ratio volumes were revealed. Absent during the pre-eruptive period, the anomalies trace the intrusion of volatile-rich (>/=4 weight percent) basaltic magma, most of which rose up only a few months before the onset of eruption. The observed time changes of velocity anomalies suggest that four-dimensional tomography provides a basis for more efficient volcano monitoring and short- and midterm eruption forecasting of explosive activity. PMID:16902133

  12. Significantly Improving Regional Seismic Amplitude Tomography at Higher Frequencies by Determining S -Wave Bandwidth

    DOE PAGES

    Fisk, Mark D.; Pasyanos, Michael E.

    2016-05-03

    Characterizing regional seismic signals continues to be a difficult problem due to their variability. Calibration of these signals is very important to many aspects of monitoring underground nuclear explosions, including detecting seismic signals, discriminating explosions from earthquakes, and reliably estimating magnitude and yield. Amplitude tomography, which simultaneously inverts for source, propagation, and site effects, is a leading method of calibrating these signals. A major issue in amplitude tomography is the data quality of the input amplitude measurements. Pre-event and prephase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) tests are typically used but can frequently include bad signals and exclude good signals. The deficiencies ofmore » SNR criteria, which are demonstrated here, lead to large calibration errors. To ameliorate these issues, we introduce a semi-automated approach to assess the bandwidth of a spectrum where it behaves physically. We determine the maximum frequency (denoted as Fmax) where it deviates from this behavior due to inflections at which noise or spurious signals start to bias the spectra away from the expected decay. We compare two amplitude tomography runs using the SNR and new Fmax criteria and show significant improvements to the stability and accuracy of the tomography output for frequency bands higher than 2 Hz by using our assessments of valid S-wave bandwidth. We compare Q estimates, P/S residuals, and some detailed results to explain the improvements. Lastly, for frequency bands higher than 4 Hz, needed for effective P/S discrimination of explosions from earthquakes, the new bandwidth criteria sufficiently fix the instabilities and errors so that the residuals and calibration terms are useful for application.« less

  13. Crustal Structure of the Gulf of Aden Continental Margins, from Afar to Oman, by Ambient Noise Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, F.; Weemstra, C.; Boschi, L.; Leroy, S. D.; Ren, Y.; Stuart, G. W.; Keir, D.; Rolandone, F.; Ahmed, A.; Al Ganad, I.; Khanbari, K. M.; Doubre, C.; Hammond, J. O. S.; Kendall, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Continental rupture processes under mantle plume influence are still poorly known although extensively studied. The Gulf of Aden presents volcanic margins to the west, where they are influenced by the Afar hotspot, and non volcanic margins east of longitude 46° E. We imaged the crustal structure of the Gulf of Aden continental margins from Afar to Oman to evaluate the role of the Afar plume on the evolution of the passive margin and its extent towards the East. We use Ambient Noise Seismic Tomography to better understand the architecture and processes along the Gulf of Aden. This recent method, developed in the last decade, allows us to study the seismic signal propagating between two seismic stations. Ambient Noise Seismic Tomography is thus free from artifacts related to the distribution of earthquakes. We collected continuous records from about 200 permanent or temporary stations since 1999 to compute Rayleigh phase velocity maps over the Gulf of Aden.

  14. SU-E-J-28: Gantry Speed Significantly Affects Image Quality and Imaging Dose for 4D Cone-Beam Computed Tomography On the Varian Edge Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, A; Song, K; Gardner, S; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4D-CBCT facilitates assessment of tumor motion at treatment position. We investigated the effect of gantry speed on 4D-CBCT image quality and dose using the Varian Edge On-Board Imager (OBI). Methods: A thoracic protocol was designed using a 125 kVp spectrum. Image quality parameters were obtained via 4D acquisition using a Catphan phantom with a gating system. A sinusoidal waveform was executed with a five second period and superior-inferior motion. 4D-CBCT scans were sorted into 4 and 10 phases. Image quality metrics included spatial resolution, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), uniformity index (UI), Hounsfield unit (HU) sensitivity, and RMS error (RMSE) of motion amplitude. Dosimetry was accomplished using Gafchromic XR-QA2 films within a CIRS Thorax phantom. This was placed on the gating phantom using the same motion waveform. Results: High contrast resolution decreased linearly from 5.93 to 4.18 lp/cm, 6.54 to 4.18 lp/cm, and 5.19 to 3.91 lp/cm for averaged, 4 phase, and 10 phase 4DCBCT volumes respectively as gantry speed increased from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec. CNRs decreased linearly from 4.80 to 1.82 as the gantry speed increased from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec, respectively. No significant variations in UIs, HU sensitivities, or RMSEs were observed with variable gantry speed. Ion chamber measurements compared to film yielded small percent differences in plastic water regions (0.1–9.6%), larger percent differences in lung equivalent regions (7.5–34.8%), and significantly larger percent differences in bone equivalent regions (119.1–137.3%). Ion chamber measurements decreased from 17.29 to 2.89 cGy with increasing gantry speed from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec. Conclusion: Maintaining technique factors while changing gantry speed changes the number of projections used for reconstruction. Increasing the number of projections by decreasing gantry speed decreases noise, however, dose is increased. The future of 4DCBCT’s clinical utility relies on further

  15. Explore Seismic Velocity Change Associated with the 2010 Kaohsiung Earthquake by Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Chin-Shang; Wu, Yih-Min; Huang, Bor-Shouh; Huang, Win-Gee; Liu, Chun-Chi

    2016-04-01

    A ML 6.4 earthquake occurred on 4 March 2010 in Kaohsiung, the southern part of Taiwan, this shallow earthquake is the largest one of that area in the past few years. Some damages occurred on buildings and bridges after the earthquake, obvious surface deformation up to few cm was observed and the transportation including road and train traffic was also affected near the source area. Some studies about monitoring the velocity change induced by the big earthquake were carried out recently, most of studies used cross-correlation of the ambient noise-based method and indicated velocity drop was observed immediately after the big earthquake. However, this method is not able to constrain the depth of velocity change, and need to assume a homogeneous seismic velocity change during the earthquake. In this study, we selected 25 broadband seismic stations in the southern Taiwan and time period is from 2009/03 to 2011/03. Then we explored the velocity change associated with the 2010 Kaohsiung earthquake by applying ambient noise tomography (ANT) method. ANT is a way of using interferometry to image subsurface seismic velocity variations by using surface wave dispersions extracted from the ambient noise cross-correlation of seismic station-pairs, then the 2-D group velocity map with different periods could be extracted. Compare to ambient noise-based cross-correlation analysis, we estimated sensitivity kernel of dispersion curves and converted 2-D group velocity map from "with the period" to "with the depth" to have more constraints on the depth of velocity change. By subtracting shear velocity between "before" and "after" the earthquake, we could explore velocity change associated with the earthquake. Our result shows velocity reduction about 5-10% around the focal depth after the 2010 Kaohsiung earthquake and the post-seismic velocity recovery was observed with time period increasing, which may suggest a healing process of damaged rocks.

  16. Seismicity, faulting, and structure of the Koyna-Warna seismic region, Western India from local earthquake tomography and hypocenter locations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixit, Madan M.; Kumar, Sanjay; Catchings, Rufus D.; Suman, K.; Sarkar, Dipankar; Sen, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Although seismicity near Koyna Reservoir (India) has persisted for ~50 years and includes the largest induced earthquake (M 6.3) reported worldwide, the seismotectonic framework of the area is not well understood. We recorded ~1800 earthquakes from 6 January 2010 to 28 May 2010 and located a subset of 343 of the highest-quality earthquakes using the tomoDD code of Zhang and Thurber (2003) to better understand the framework. We also inverted first arrivals for 3-D Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs and Poisson's ratio tomography models of the upper 12 km of the crust. Epicenters for the recorded earthquakes are located south of the Koyna River, including a high-density cluster that coincides with a shallow depth (<1.5 km) zone of relatively high Vp and low Vs (also high Vp/Vs and Poisson's ratios) near Warna Reservoir. This anomalous zone, which extends near vertically to at least 8 km depth and laterally northward at least 15 km, is likely a water-saturated zone of faults under high pore pressures. Because many of the earthquakes occur on the periphery of the fault zone, rather than near its center, the observed seismicity-velocity correlations are consistent with the concept that many of the earthquakes nucleate in fractures adjacent to the main fault zone due to high pore pressure. We interpret our velocity images as showing a series of northwest trending faults locally near the central part of Warna Reservoir and a major northward trending fault zone north of Warna Reservoir.

  17. Seismic Tomography of the Arctic: Continental Cratons, Ancient Orogens, Oceanic Lithosphere and Convecting Mantle Beneath (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S.; Schaeffer, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Lateral variations in seismic velocities in the upper mantle, mapped by seismic tomography, reflect primarily the variations in the temperature of the rock at depth. Seismic tomography thus reveals lateral changes in the temperature and thickness of the lithosphere; it maps deep boundaries between tectonic blocks with different properties and with different age of the lithosphere. Our new global, shear-wave tomographic model of the upper mantle and the crust is constrained by an unprecedentedly large number of broadband waveform fits (nearly one million seismograms, with both surface and S waves included) and provides improved resolution of the lithosphere across the whole of the Arctic region, compared to other available models. The most prominent high-velocity anomalies, seen down to 150-200 km depths, indicate the cold, thick, stable mantle lithosphere beneath Precambrian cratons. The northern boundaries of the Canadian Shield's and Greenland's cratonic lithosphere closely follow the coastlines, with the Greenland and North American cratons clearly separated from each other. In Eurasia, in contrast, cratonic lithosphere extends hundreds of kilometres north of the coast of the continent, beneath the Barents and eastern Kara Seas. The boundaries of the Archean cratons mapped by tomography indicate the likely offshore extensions of major Phanerozoic sutures in northern Eurasia. The old oceanic lithosphere of the Canada Basin is much colder and thicker than the younger lithosphere beneath the adjacent Amundsen Basin, north of the Gakkel Ridge. Beneath the slow-spreading Gakkel Ridge, we detect the expected low-velocity anomaly associated with partial melting in the uppermost mantle; the anomaly is weaker, however, than beneath faster-spreading ridges globally. South of the ridge, the Nansen Basin shows higher seismic velocities in the upper mantle beneath it, compared to the Amundsen Basin. At 150-250 km depth, most of the oceanic portions of the central Arctic (the

  18. Crustal structure of Shatsky Rise from joint refraction and reflection seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenaga, J.; Sager, W. W.

    2011-12-01

    Shatsky Rise in the western Pacific is one of a few gigantic oceanic plateaus in the world, with a surface area of ˜ 4.8 ± 105~km2 (about the same size as California). In contrast to other large oceanic plateaus formed during the Cretaceous Quite Period, Shatsky Rise formed during the frequent reversals of magnetic polarity, allowing its tectonic environment to be resolved in detail. It was formed at a rapidly spreading ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction, so the effect of lithospheric lid on magma migration is expected to be minimal, thereby facilitating the petrological interpretation of its seismic structure in terms of parental mantle processes. In the summer of 2010, a seismic refraction survey combined with multichannel seismic profiling was conducted across Shatsky Rise. Twenty eight ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed along two crossing perpendicular lines, and all of the instruments were recovered successfully, yielding a large volume of high-quality wide-angle refraction and reflection data, with the source-receiver distance often exceeding 200~km. In this contribution, we present the P-wave velocity structure of the Shatsky Rise crust, which is constructed by joint refraction and reflection travel time tomography, and also discuss its implications for the origin of Shatsky Rise.

  19. Coherent features of the Alpine mantle slabs imaged by recent seismic tomography studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckl, E.; Brueckl, J.; Keller, G. R.; Dando, B.

    2012-04-01

    The bifurcation of the East Alpine mountain range into branches extending northeastward to the Carpathians and southeastward to the Dinarides represents a triple junction between the European platform (EU), the Adriatic micro-plate (AD), and the Pannonian fragment (PA). During the last decade, controlled source and passive source seismic data have provided a variety of detailed images of the lithosphere and upper mantle in this area. However, the geodynamic interpretation of lithospheric slabs under the Alpine - Adriatic collision zone is still under debate. So far, arguments have been based mainly on images provided by individual seismic tomography studies. In order to enhance robust features of the upper mantle structure, we have averaged four tomographic models, weighted according to their coverage by seismic stations and boundaries of high resolution. We achieved an image of the Alpine slab of unprecedented clarity. It extends coherently from the border between the Western Alps and the Apennines to the EU-AD-PA triple junction, dipping southeastward in the west and nearly vertically in the east. The whole slab can be connected to European mantle lithosphere and a flip of subduction polarity must not be induced. The geometry of the slab infers also additional constraints on the development of the triple junction during the post-collision phase of the Eastern Alps.

  20. Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Julian, B.R.; G.R. Foulger; F. Monastero

    2008-04-01

    Measurements of temporal changes in Earth structure are commonly determined using localearthquake tomography computer programs that invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets separately and assume that any differences in the structural results arise from real temporal variations. This assumption is dangerous because the results of repeated tomography experiments would differ even if the structure did not change, simply because of variation in the seismic ray distribution caused by the natural variation in earthquake locations. Even if the source locations did not change (if only explosion data were used, for example), derived structures would inevitably differ because of observational errors. A better approach is to invert multiple data sets simultaneously, which makes it possible to determine what changes are truly required by the data. This problem is similar to that of seeking models consistent with initial assumptions, and techniques similar to the “damped least squares” method can solve it. We have developed a computer program, dtomo, that inverts multiple epochs of arrival-time measurements to determine hypocentral parameters and structural changes between epochs. We shall apply this program to data from the seismically active Coso geothermal area, California, in the near future. The permanent network operated there by the US Navy, supplemented by temporary stations, has provided excellent earthquake arrival-time data covering a span of more than a decade. Furthermore, structural change is expected in the area as a result of geothermal exploitation of the resource. We have studied the period 1996 through 2006. Our results to date using the traditional method show, for a 2-km horizontal grid spacing, an irregular strengthening with time of a negative VP/VS anomaly in the upper ~ 2 km of the reservoir. This progressive reduction in VP/VS results predominately from an increase of VS with respect to VP. Such a change is expected to result from

  1. Seismic tomography of the Canterbury Plains and the geometry and evolution of seismicity of the Greendale fault system, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Thurber, C. H.; Savage, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    The previously unknown Greendale fault produced the September 4, 2010 M 7.1 Darfield earthquake and later triggered the destructive February 22, 2011 M 6.3 Christchurch earthquake, as well as later M>5 aftershocks east of Christchurch. Surface rupture from the Darfield earthquake indicates up to 5 m of strike-slip motion along the main portion of the Greendale fault, while various geodetic and seismic models also indicate reverse faulting on surrounding smaller faults. We combine seismic data from a variety of sources (permanent network seismometers and strong motion instruments, temporary intermediate to broadband seismometers) to understand the geometry of these various sections of faults and the evolution of seismicity along them for the first four months of aftershocks from the Darfield earthquake. We identify 4 to 5 fault segments that were likely active in the Darfield earthquake and an additional 5 to 6 segments that were active during the study period, prior to the Christchurch earthquake. While relocating hypocenters, we also jointly invert for 3D Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs in the Canterbury region using an extended version of the double-difference tomography code tomoDD (Zhang et al., 2009). In the area of the Greendale and associated faults, Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs are generally reduced from the top 8 km of the average velocity model for the Canterbury region of New Zealand. from the surface to ~8 km depth, below which the resolution begins to decline. Beneath Christchurch and areas immediately to the south and west, Vp and Vs are elevated and Vp/Vs is reduced from the surface to ~8 km depth, corresponding to the location of a negative Bouguer gravity anomaly and an increase in depth to basement (Hicks, 1989). In the northwest portion of the model, Vp and Vs increase when approaching the foothills of the Southern Alps. There are no clearly defined features in the velocity model that cross or are offset by the Greendale fault and no apparent contrast in velocities

  2. Seismic Traveltime Tomography Applied to Data from Miranga Field, Reconcavo Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassrei, A.; Rodrigues, V.

    2015-12-01

    The growing global demand for hydrocarbons has tested the limits of oil exploration and exploitation technologies. Within the seismic methods, tomography is an alternative for the high resolution characterization of reservoirs, enabling a more efficient recovery of new as well as mature fields. In this work, seismic traveltime tomography in the transmission mode was applied to real data from the Miranga Field, Reconcavo Basin, State of Bahia, Brazil. This basin represents a landmark of oil exploration in Brazil and has been intensively studied since the 1950s. Today, the Reconcavo Basin is still the principal oil producer in the State of Bahia, but there is a demand for new technologies, especially for mature fields, to improve hydrocarbon recovery. The objective is to estimate the two-dimensional velocity distribution in the region between the two wells. We have used linearized inversion through the Levenberg-Marquardt scheme. The input data in the system are the traveltimes between the sources and the receivers and the distances propagated by each ray connecting such sources and receivers. Both inputs are provided through acoustic forward modeling. The conjugate gradient algorithm with regularization through derivative matrices was used as an inverse procedure. The tomographic inversion is an ill-posed problem because the existence, uniqueness and stability conditions are not completely satisfied. The linear system is regularized by derivative matrices derived to minimize the instability. This regularization procedure has a crucially important parameter called regularization parameter lambda. For the selection of lambda we used L-curve and Theta-curve. The estimated tomograms were consistent with previous geological knowledge of the area and the P-wave velocity range was consistent. The results showed that traveltime tomography is feasible for the characterization of reservoirs with a high rate of vertical change, similar to the Miranga Field.

  3. Robust inverse scattering full waveform seismic tomography for imaging complex structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Sukmana, Indriani; Wibowo, Satryo; Deny, Agus; Kurniadi, Rizal; Widowati, Sri; Mubarok, Syahrul; Susilowati; Kaswandhi

    2012-06-20

    Seismic tomography becomes important tool recently for imaging complex subsurface. It is well known that imaging complex rich fault zone is difficult. In this paper, The application of time domain inverse scattering wave tomography to image the complex fault zone would be shown on this paper, especially an efficient time domain inverse scattering tomography and their run in cluster parallel computer which has been developed. This algorithm is purely based on scattering theory through solving Lippmann Schwienger integral by using Born's approximation. In this paper, it is shown the robustness of this algorithm especially in avoiding the inversion trapped in local minimum to reach global minimum. A large data are solved by windowing and blocking technique of memory as well as computation. Parameter of windowing computation is based on shot gather's aperture. This windowing technique reduces memory as well as computation significantly. This parallel algorithm is done by means cluster system of 120 processors from 20 nodes of AMD Phenom II. Benchmarking of this algorithm is done by means Marmoussi model which can be representative of complex rich fault area. It is shown that the proposed method can image clearly the rich fault and complex zone in Marmoussi model even though the initial model is quite far from the true model. Therefore, this method can be as one of solution to image the very complex mode.

  4. Characterization of an earth-filled dam through the combined use of electrical resistivity tomography, P- and SH-wave seismic tomography and surface wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, E.; Cercato, M.; De Donno, G.

    2014-07-01

    The determination of the current state of buildings and infrastructures through non-invasive geophysical methods is a topic not yet covered by technical standards, since the application of high resolution geophysical investigations to structural targets is a relatively new technology. Earth-filled dam investigation is a typical engineering application of this type. We propose the integration of Electrical Resistivity Tomography and P- and SH-wave seismic measurements for imaging the geometry of the dam's body and the underlying soil foundations and to characterize the low strain elastic properties. Because S-wave velocity is closely tied to engineering properties such as shear strength, low-velocity zones in the S-wave velocity models are of particular interest. When acquiring seismic data on earth filled dams, it is not uncommon to encounter highly attenuative surface layers. If only lightweight seismic sources are available, the seismic data generally exhibit a narrow frequency bandwidth: the lack of high frequency components generally prevents from having good quality shallow reflections. If there is no possibility to increase the power as well as the frequency content of the seismic source, the integration of other seismic methods than reflection may be the only available way to achieve a reliable near surface seismic characterization. For these reasons, we combined P- and SH-wave tomography with Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves to image the internal and the underlying soil foundations of an earth filled dam located in Central Italy. In the presence of moderate velocity contrasts, tomographic methods have proven successful in imaging near surface variations along both the horizontal and vertical directions. On the other hand, body wave propagation is severely affected by attenuation under the previously described conditions, so that the quality of picked traveltimes dramatically decreases with offset and, consequently, the tomographic investigation

  5. Ground-Truthing Seismic Refraction Tomography for Sinkhole Detection in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, D. R.; Hudyma, N.; Quigley, T. P.; Samakur, C.

    2007-12-01

    In order to provide effective return of storm water runoff to the subsurface aquifer, the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) constructs detention basins adjacent to its transportation facilities. These basins serve as a collection point for runoff within a local drainage area, and the overburden soil above the aquifer provides a natural filter for contaminants in the surface runoff water. However, the geologic setting for many of these basins in Florida is karst, limestone bedrock at shallow depth, and the concentration of water flow in these basins leads to frequent development of sinkholes. These sinkholes are an environmental hazard, as they provide a direct, open conduit for contaminant-laden runoff water to return to the aquifer rather than percolate through the overburden soil. Consequently, FDOT is keenly interested in all aspects of sinkholes, including factors leading to formation, methods of early detection, and effective methods for rapid repair. Recently, FDOT has engaged in a research effort to evaluate the capabilities of a wide range of geophysical investigation tools with regard to detection of sinkhole-prone areas within sites being considered for construction of detention ponds. The geophysical techniques evaluated have included ground penetrating radar (GPR), multi- electrode electrical resistivity (MER), seismic MASW, and seismic refraction tomography. In addition to geophysical testing at the research sites, extensive traditional geotechnical site characterization has been conducted, including boring and sampling of soil and rock, standard penetration tests (SPT), and cone penetration tests (CPT). The proposed paper will evaluate the capabilities of seismic refraction tomography. Comparisons between refraction tomograms and borehole logs, SPT soundings, and CPT soundings suggest that the refraction method can map the laterally-variable top of bedrock surface typical of karst terrane. During a recent ground proving exercise at the

  6. 3D Full Seismic Waveform Tomography of NW Turkey and Surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubuk, Yesim; Fichtner, Andreas; Taymaz, Tuncay

    2015-04-01

    Northward collision of the Arabian plate with the Eurasian plate, and interaction of the motion between dynamic processes originated from the subduction of the African plate beneath the Aegean generated very complex tectonic structures in the study region. Western Turkey is among one of the most active extensional regions in the world and the study area is mainly located where the extensional Aegean and the right-lateral strike-slip North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) intersects. Therefore, the tectonic framework of the NW Turkey and the Marmara region is mainly characterized by the transition between the strike-slip tectonics to the extensional tectonics. The Sea of Marmara region has been subjected to several active and passive seismic investigations, nevertheless the accurate knowledge on the heterogeneity in the crust and upper mantle beneath the study area still remains enigmatic. On small-scale tomography problems, seismograms strongly reflect the effects of heterogeneities and the scattering properties of the Earth. Thus, the knowledge of high-resolution seismic imaging with an improved 3D radially anisotropic crustal model of the NW Turkey will enable better localization of earthquakes, identification of faults as well as the improvement of the seismic hazard assessment. For this purpose, we aim to develop 3D radially anisotropic subsurface structure of the Sea of Marmara and NW Turkey crust based on full waveform adjoint tomography method. The earthquake data were principally obtained from the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) and Earthquake Research Center (AFAD-DAD) database. In addition to this, some of the seismic waveform data extracted from the Hellenic Unified Seismic Network (HUSN) stations that are located within our study region were also used in this study. We have selected and simulated waveforms of earthquakes with magnitudes 4.0 ≤ Mw ≤ 6.7 occurred in the period between 2007-2014 to determine the 3D velocity

  7. Comparing the Gibraltar and Calabrian subduction zones (central western Mediterranean) based on seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argnani, Andrea; Battista Cimini, Giovanni; Frugoni, Francesco; Monna, Stephen; Montuori, Caterina

    2016-04-01

    The Central Western Mediterranean (CWM) was shaped by a complex tectonic and geodynamic evolution. Deep seismicity and tomographic studies point to the existence, under the Alboran and Tyrrhenian Seas, of lithospheric slabs extending down to the bottom of the mantle transition zone, at 660 km depth. Two narrow arcs correspond to the two slabs, the Gibraltar and Calabrian Arcs (e.g., Monna et al., 2013; Montuori et al., 2007). Similarities in the tectonic and mantle structure of the two areas have been explained by a common subduction and roll-back mechanism for the opening of the CWM, in which the two arcs are symmetrical end products. In spite of this unifying model, a wide amount of literature from different disciplines shows that many aspects of the two areas are still controversial. We present a new 3-D tomographic model at mantle scale for the Calabrian Arc and compare it with a recently published 3-D tomographic model for the Gibraltar Arc by Monna et al (2013). The two models are based on non-linear inversion of teleseismic phase arrivals, and have scale and parametrization that allow for a direct comparison. Unlike previous studies the tomographic models here presented include Ocean Bottom Seismometer broadband data, which improved the resolution of the mantle structures in the marine areas surrounding the arcs. We focus on key features of the two models that constrain reconstructions of the geodynamic evolution of the CWM (e.g., Monna et al., 2015). At Tortonian time the opening of the Tyrrhenian basin was in its initial stage, and the Calabrian arc formed subsequently; on the contrary, the Gibraltar arc was almost completely defined. We hypothesize that the complexity of the continental margin approaching the subduction zone played a key role during the final stages of the arc formation. References Monna, S., G. B. Cimini, C. Montuori, L. Matias, W. H. Geissler, and P. Favali (2013), New insights from seismic tomography on the complex geodynamic evolution

  8. REGIONAL SEISMIC AMPLITUDE MODELING AND TOMOGRAPHY FOR EARTHQUAKE-EXPLOSION DISCRIMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W R; Pasyanos, M E; Matzel, E; Gok, R; Sweeney, J; Ford, S R; Rodgers, A J

    2008-07-08

    We continue exploring methodologies to improve earthquake-explosion discrimination using regional amplitude ratios such as P/S in a variety of frequency bands. Empirically we demonstrate that such ratios separate explosions from earthquakes using closely located pairs of earthquakes and explosions recorded on common, publicly available stations at test sites around the world (e.g. Nevada, Novaya Zemlya, Semipalatinsk, Lop Nor, India, Pakistan, and North Korea). We are also examining if there is any relationship between the observed P/S and the point source variability revealed by longer period full waveform modeling (e. g. Ford et al 2008). For example, regional waveform modeling shows strong tectonic release from the May 1998 India test, in contrast with very little tectonic release in the October 2006 North Korea test, but the P/S discrimination behavior appears similar in both events using the limited regional data available. While regional amplitude ratios such as P/S can separate events in close proximity, it is also empirically well known that path effects can greatly distort observed amplitudes and make earthquakes appear very explosion-like. Previously we have shown that the MDAC (Magnitude Distance Amplitude Correction, Walter and Taylor, 2001) technique can account for simple 1-D attenuation and geometrical spreading corrections, as well as magnitude and site effects. However in some regions 1-D path corrections are a poor approximation and we need to develop 2-D path corrections. Here we demonstrate a new 2-D attenuation tomography technique using the MDAC earthquake source model applied to a set of events and stations in both the Middle East and the Yellow Sea Korean Peninsula regions. We believe this new 2-D MDAC tomography has the potential to greatly improve earthquake-explosion discrimination, particularly in tectonically complex regions such as the Middle East. Monitoring the world for potential nuclear explosions requires characterizing seismic

  9. Imaging continental collision and subduction in the Pamir mountain range, Central Asia, by seismic attenuation tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, Bernd; Haberland, Christian; Sippl, Christian; Yuan, Xiaohui; Mechie, James; Schneider, Felix; Tipage Team

    2014-05-01

    Subduction of continental crust is the mode of shortening in continental collision that is the least well understood. It is known to occur, as testified e.g., by now exhumed ultra-high-pressure rocks, despite the fact that continental crust is generally too buoyant to submerge into the mantle. Continental crust may, however, subduct in tow of a leading dense oceanic plate at the last stage of the plate tectonic Wilson cycle. Alternatively, if upper and lower crust detach, the latter, together with the underlying cold mantle lithosphere, may become negatively buoyant, enabling their descent. The Pamir mountains in Central Asia have been one of the few places on Earth, where on-going continental subduction has been postulated based on an active Wadati-Benioff zone. The Pamir is situated on an orographic node northwest of Tibet, between the Tarim and Tajik basins, where the Hindu Kush, Karakorum, western Kunlun Shan and Tien Shan ranges coalesce. It formed in the late Paleogene to Neogene, i.e. approximately during the second half of the India-Asia collision, north of the Western Himalayan Syntaxis, on the Asian (retro)continent. We use tomography of seismic attenuation to image the lithospheric-scale structure of the Pamir orogen. Attenuation tomography has been shown to be a powerful tool to study deep process-related structures particularly in oceanic subduction zones. Attenuation at this scale may be seen as a proxy for rheology and hence is very sensitive to e.g., homologous temperature and deformation. We use data from a two-year seismic deployment of the Tien Shan-Pamir Geodynamic Program (TIPAGE). The whole path attenuation parameter t* is determined by inversion of P-wave velocity spectra from 1790 earthquakes and then inverted for a 3D attenuation model (Qp) employing a recently published 3D velocity model. We find a prominent continuous crescent-shaped high-attenuation anomaly (HAA) that penetrates from upper crustal levels to depths of more than 100 km. At

  10. Seismic attenuation and scattering tomography of rock samples using stochastic wavefields: linking seismology, volcanology, and rock physics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Marco; De Siena, Luca; Benson, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    Seismic attenuation and scattering are two attributes that can be linked with porosity and permeability in laboratory experiments. When measuring these two quantities using seismic waveforms recorder at lithospheric and volcanic scales the areas of highest heterogeneity, as batches of melt and zones of high deformation, produce anomalous values of the measured quantities, the seismic quality factor and scattering coefficient. When employed as indicators of heterogeneity and absorption in volcanic areas these anomalous effects become strong indicators of magma accumulation and tectonic boundaries, shaping magmatic chambers and conduit systems. We perform attenuation and scattering measurements and imaging using seismic waveforms produced in laboratory experiments, at frequencies ranging between the kHz and MHz. As attenuation and scattering are measured from the shape of the envelopes, disregarding phases, we are able to connect the observations with the micro fracturing and petrological quantities previously measured on the sample. Connecting the imaging of dry and saturated samples via these novel attributes with the burst of low-period events with increasing saturation and deformation is a challenge. Its solution could plant the seed for better relating attenuation and scattering tomography measurements to the presence of fluids and gas, therefore creating a novel path for reliable porosity and permeability tomography. In particular for volcanoes, being able to relate attenuation/scattering measurements with low-period micro seismicity could deliver new data to settle the debate about if both source and medium can produce seismic resonance.

  11. Seismic tomography and ambient noise reflection interferometry on Reykjanes, SW Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Verdel, Arie; Ágústsson, Kristján; Blanck, Hanna; Franke, Steven; Metz, Malte; Ryberg, Trond; Weemstra, Cornelius; Hersir, Gylfi; Bruhn, David

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in volcano-seismology and seismic noise interferometry have introduced new processing techniques for assessing subsurface structures and controls on fluid flow in geothermal systems. We present tomographic results obtained from seismic data recorded around geothermal reservoirs located both on-land Reykjanes, SW-Iceland and offshore along Reykjanes Ridge. We gathered records from a network of 234 seismic stations (including 24 Ocean Bottom Seismometers) deployed between April 2014 and August 2015. In order to determine the orientation of the OBS stations, we used Rayleigh waves planar particle motions from large magnitude earthquakes. This method proved suitable using the on-land stations: orientations determined using this method with the orientations measured using a giro-compass agreed. We obtain 3D velocity images from two fundamentally different tomography methods. First, we used local earthquakes to perform travel time tomography. The processing includes first arrival picking of P- and S- phases using an automatic detection and picking technique based on Akaike Information Criteria. We locate earthquakes by using a non-linear localization technique, as a priori information for deriving a 1D velocity model. We then computed 3D velocity models of velocities by joint inversion of each earthquake's location and lateral velocity anomalies with respect to the 1D model. Our models confirms previous models obtained in the area, with enhanced details. Second, we performed ambient noise cross-correlation techniques in order to derive an S velocity model, especially where earthquakes did not occur. Cross-correlation techniques involve the computation of cross- correlation between seismic records, from which Green's functions are estimated. Surface wave inversion of the Green's functions allows derivation of an S wave velocity model. Noise correlation theory furthermore shows that zero-offset P-wave reflectivity at selected station locations can be

  12. High resolution applications of seismic tomography: low velocity anomalies and static corrections using wave-equation datuming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flecha, I.; Marti, D.; Escuder, J.; Perez-Estaun, A.; Carbonell, R.

    2003-04-01

    A detailed characterization of the internal structure and physical properties of shallow surface can be obtained using high-resolution seismic tomography. Two applications of high resolution seismic tomography are presented in this study. Several synthetics simulations have been carried out to asses the resolving power of this methodology in different cases. The first studied case is the detection of low velocity anomalies in the shallow subsoil. Underground cavities (mines), water flows (formation wich loose sand), etc., are geological features present in the shallow subsurface characterized by low seismic velocities, and are targets of considerable social interest. We have considered a 400m×50m two dimensional velocity model consisting of a background velocity gradient in depth from 3 to 4 Km/s which included a rectangular low velocity anomaly (300 m/s). This anomaly was placed between 10m and 30m in depth and between 180m and 220m in length. The inversions schemes provided estimates of the velocity, however the tomograms and the ray tracing diagrams indicated a low resolution for the anomaly. In the second case we have applied wave-equation datuming to pre-stack layer replacement. The standard seismic data processing applies a vertical time shift to the data traces. However, it is not a good option when we are dealing with rugged topography or bathymetry, and when the media presents a high heterogeneity. Wave-equation datuming extrapolates seismic time data to some level datum keeping consistency between raypaths and wavefield propagation. It improves considerably seismic reflectors imaging. In order to implement this technique a velocity model is required, and usually a constant velocity is used to propagate the wavefield; instead of it we have used seismic tomography to provide an accurate velocity model.

  13. The deep structure of south-central Taiwan illuminated by seismic tomography and earthquake hypocenter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camanni, Giovanni; Alvarez-Marron, Joaquina; Brown, Dennis; Ayala, Concepcion; Wu, Yih-Min; Hsieh, Hsien-Hsiang

    2016-06-01

    The Taiwan mountain belt is generally thought to develop above a through-going basal thrust confined to within the sedimentary cover of the Eurasian continental margin. Surface geology, magnetotelluric, earthquake hypocenter, and seismic tomography data suggest, however, that crustal levels below this basal thrust are also currently being involved in the deformation. Here, we combine seismic tomography and earthquake hypocenter data to investigate the deformation that is taking place at depth beneath south-central Taiwan. In this paper, we define the basement as any pre-Eocene rifting rocks, and use a P-wave velocity of 5.2 km/s as a reference for the interface between these rocks and their sedimentary cover. We found that beneath the Coastal Plain and the Western Foothills clustering of hypocenters near the basement-cover interface suggests that this interface is acting as a detachment. This detachment is located below the basal thrust proposed from surface geology for this part of the mountain belt. Inherited basement faults appear to determine the geometry of this detachment, and their inversion in the Alishan area result in the development of a basement uplift and a lateral structure in the thrust system above them. However, across the Shuilikeng and the Chaochou faults, earthquake hypocenters define steeply dipping clusters that extend to greater than 20 km depth, above which higher velocity basement rocks are uplifted beneath the Hsuehshan and Central ranges. We interpret these clusters to form a deeply penetrating, east-dipping ramp that joins westward with the detachment at the basement-cover interface. It is not possible to define a basal thrust to the east, beneath the Central Range.

  14. Testing & Validating: 3D Seismic Travel Time Tomography (Detailed Shallow Subsurface Imaging)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, David; Marzan, Ignacio; Alvarez-Marron, Joaquina; Carbonell, Ramon

    2016-04-01

    A detailed full 3 dimensional P wave seismic velocity model was constrained by a high-resolution seismic tomography experiment. A regular and dense grid of shots and receivers was use to image a 500x500x200 m volume of the shallow subsurface. 10 GEODE's resulting in a 240 channels recording system and a 250 kg weight drop were used for the acquisition. The recording geometry consisted in 10x20m geophone grid spacing, and a 20x20 m stagered source spacing. A total of 1200 receivers and 676 source points. The study area is located within the Iberian Meseta, in Villar de Cañas (Cuenca, Spain). The lithological/geological target consisted in a Neogen sedimentary sequence formed from bottom to top by a transition from gyspum to silstones. The main objectives consisted in resolving the underground structure: contacts/discontinuities; constrain the 3D geometry of the lithology (possible cavities, faults/fractures). These targets were achieved by mapping the 3D distribution of the physical properties (P-wave velocity). The regularly space dense acquisition grid forced to acquire the survey in different stages and with a variety of weather conditions. Therefore, a careful quality control was required. More than a half million first arrivals were inverted to provide a 3D Vp velocity model that reached depths of 120 m in the areas with the highest ray coverage. An extended borehole campaign, that included borehole geophysical measurements in some wells provided unique tight constraints on the lithology an a validation scheme for the tomographic results. The final image reveals a laterally variable structure consisting of four different lithological units. In this methodological validation test travel-time tomography features a high capacity of imaging in detail the lithological contrasts for complex structures located at very shallow depths.

  15. Preliminary Seismic Tomography of Deception Island Volcano, South Shetland Islands (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandomeneghi, D.; Barclay, A. H.; Ben Zvi, T.; Wilcock, W.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Almendros, J.

    2005-12-01

    Deception Island, 62°59' S, 60°41' W, is an active volcano located in Bransfield Strait between the Antarctic Peninsula and the main South Shetland Islands. The volcano has a basal diameter of ~30 km and rises ~1500 m from the seafloor to a maximum height of over 500 m above sea level. The 15-km-diameter emerged island is horseshoe-shaped with a flooded inner bay that is accessible to the ocean through a 500-m-wide passage. The island is composed of volcanic rocks which date from <0.75 Ma to historical eruptions (1842, 1967, 1969 and 1970). The volcano lies in a complicated tectonic setting on the South Shetland block and its origin is poorly understood. The island is situated north of the main axis of the Bransfield Strait, a tensional structure interpreted as an active back-arc basin, but its geochemistry and seismic activity appear to be influenced by arc volcanism that once strongly affected the South Shetland Islands.In January 2005 an extensive seismic survey took place in and around the island, with the participation of researchers from Spain, the United States, Italy, Ireland, Mexico, Argentina and Germany. The main objective of the experiment was to collect a high quality data set that could be used to obtain two and three-dimensional P-wave tomographic images of the volcano. A total of 119 land seismic stations and 14 ocean bottom seismometers were deployed for two rounds of shooting and recorded more than 5000 airgun shots that were distributed within the caldera and around the island. The initial dataset used for the three-dimensional seismic tomography comprises more than 90000 P-wave travel times that were determined using both automatic and manual first-arrival picking procedures. The inversion code makes use of accurate ray tracing procedure and comprehensive topography's information.A preliminary three-dimensional P-wave inversion of the automatically-picked travel times resolves structure down to 4 km depth. The tomographic image is

  16. Wave-equation-based travel-time seismic tomography - Part 1: Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, P.; Zhao, D.; Yang, D.; Yang, X.; Chen, J.; Liu, Q.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a wave-equation-based travel-time seismic tomography method with a detailed description of its step-by-step process. First, a linear relationship between the travel-time residual Δt = Tobs-Tsyn and the relative velocity perturbation δ c(x)/c(x) connected by a finite-frequency travel-time sensitivity kernel K(x) is theoretically derived using the adjoint method. To accurately calculate the travel-time residual Δt, two automatic arrival-time picking techniques including the envelop energy ratio method and the combined ray and cross-correlation method are then developed to compute the arrival times Tsyn for synthetic seismograms. The arrival times Tobs of observed seismograms are usually determined by manual hand picking in real applications. Travel-time sensitivity kernel K(x) is constructed by convolving a~forward wavefield u(t,x) with an adjoint wavefield q(t,x). The calculations of synthetic seismograms and sensitivity kernels rely on forward modeling. To make it computationally feasible for tomographic problems involving a large number of seismic records, the forward problem is solved in the two-dimensional (2-D) vertical plane passing through the source and the receiver by a high-order central difference method. The final model is parameterized on 3-D regular grid (inversion) nodes with variable spacings, while model values on each 2-D forward modeling node are linearly interpolated by the values at its eight surrounding 3-D inversion grid nodes. Finally, the tomographic inverse problem is formulated as a regularized optimization problem, which can be iteratively solved by either the LSQR solver or a~nonlinear conjugate-gradient method. To provide some insights into future 3-D tomographic inversions, Fréchet kernels for different seismic phases are also demonstrated in this study.

  17. Surface-wave Tomography of East African Rift System using Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Kang, T.; Baag, C.; Nyblade, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    The surface-wave tomography technique for the ambient seismic noise is applied to the east African rift system to investigate shallow crustal structures of the region. Even if the technique has been widely used in many regions to investigate crustal structure in the world, there have been difficulties in application of the technique to the east African region because of unstable data conditions of PASSCAL experiments. A meticulous check of record by record enables us of applying the technique to understand the tectonic environment of the region. The long-period data of one month showing good quality in cross-correlation results are used in this study. They are from the 1994-95 Tanzania Passive-Source Seismic Experiment for the Tanzania craton and its surrounding rift zone, and from the 2000-02 Ethiopia/Kenya Broadband Seismic Experiment and the adjacent permanent stations of the African Array for the Ethiopia rift. The Rayleigh- and Love-wave group-speed maps were inverted using LSQR algorithm for several period bands (5 - 50 s). The preliminary group-speed distribution maps yield results roughly consistent with regional geology. The tomographic images of the Tanzania region show a strong high velocity anomaly at the location corresponding to the Tanzania craton and low velocity anomalies at the surrounding rift regions. For the Ethiopia regions, the features of low velocity anomalies roughly agree with the Tertiary volcanic regions. Combining the Tanzania and Ethiopia broadband arrays, the outline of the east African rift system can be identified as the low velocity anomalies in the surface-wave tomographic results. The structural variation with depth and the feature of the regional shear-wave anisotropy of crust will be explored by converting group- speed dispersion curves into shear-wave velocity structure.

  18. An optimal transport approach for seismic tomography: application to 3D full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Mérigot, Q.; Oudet, E.; Virieux, J.

    2016-11-01

    The use of optimal transport distance has recently yielded significant progress in image processing for pattern recognition, shape identification, and histograms matching. In this study, the use of this distance is investigated for a seismic tomography problem exploiting the complete waveform; the full waveform inversion. In its conventional formulation, this high resolution seismic imaging method is based on the minimization of the L 2 distance between predicted and observed data. Application of this method is generally hampered by the local minima of the associated L 2 misfit function, which correspond to velocity models matching the data up to one or several phase shifts. Conversely, the optimal transport distance appears as a more suitable tool to compare the misfit between oscillatory signals, for its ability to detect shifted patterns. However, its application to the full waveform inversion is not straightforward, as the mass conservation between the compared data cannot be guaranteed, a crucial assumption for optimal transport. In this study, the use of a distance based on the Kantorovich-Rubinstein norm is introduced to overcome this difficulty. Its mathematical link with the optimal transport distance is made clear. An efficient numerical strategy for its computation, based on a proximal splitting technique, is introduced. We demonstrate that each iteration of the corresponding algorithm requires solving the Poisson equation, for which fast solvers can be used, relying either on the fast Fourier transform or on multigrid techniques. The development of this numerical method make possible applications to industrial scale data, involving tenths of millions of discrete unknowns. The results we obtain on such large scale synthetic data illustrate the potentialities of the optimal transport for seismic imaging. Starting from crude initial velocity models, optimal transport based inversion yields significantly better velocity reconstructions than those based on

  19. Tectonic implication of local seismic tomography and focal mechanism study in Northeast Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y. C.; Li, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of the stability of host rock and nearby seismic activities are critical for safety issue. Since 2011, a broad-band seismometer array with 15 seismometers has been gradually deployed to date in the study area to collect continuous waveform data for host rock characterization study. In this study, we presented a series of study results, including location/relocation of regional earthquakes, seismic focal mechanisms, and inversion of three dimensional Vp and Vp/Vs models. A double-difference tomography algorithm was adopted in both earthquake relocation and three-dimensional velocity inversion to improve location accuracy and model reliability. Spatial distribution of earthquakes could be separated into two clusters. The eastern group was distributed nearly along the eastern boundary of granite outcrop in the surface; the other group was mainly located beneath the western part of imbricated high-magnetic-susceptibility zones, which were identified by three-dimensional inversion of aeromagnetic data. In-between there exists a clear zone with relatively quiet seismicity. Moreover, our Vp and Vp/Vs inversion results also revealed patterns compatible with previous-mentioned imbricate structures and shown good correlation with the high magnetic susceptibility zones as well. In addition, more than one hundred earthquake events with clear P-wave first motion in waveform were identified for demonstration. Their focal mechanisms were also determined and shown dramatic variation with respect to the depth of hypocenters. Mechanisms of earthquakes in shallow crust with depth less than 10 km are mostly normal faults. In contrast, most of deeper events are reverse faults. It implies that tectonic stress regime in shallow crust is extensional and becomes more compressional in deeper part.

  20. Ambient Seismic Noise Tomography of a Loess High Bank at Dunaszekcső (Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szanyi, Gyöngyvér; Gráczer, Zoltán; Győri, Erzsébet; Kaláb, Zdeněk; Lednická, Markéta

    2016-08-01

    Loess high banks along the right side of the Danube in Hungary are potential subjects of landslides. Small scale ambient seismic noise tomography was used at the Dunaszekcső high bank. The aim of the study was to map near surface velocity anomalies since we assume that the formation of tension cracks—which precede landslides—are represented by low velocities. Mapping Rayleigh wave group velocity distribution can help to image intact and creviced areas and identify the most vulnerable sections. The study area lies at the top of the Castle Hill of Dunaszekcső, which was named after Castellum Lugio, a fortress of Roman origin. The presently active head scarp was formed in April 2011, and our study area was chosen to be at its surroundings. Cross-correlation functions of ambient noise recordings were used to retrieve the dispersion curves, which served as the input of the group velocity tomography. Phase cross-correlation and time-frequency phase weighted stacking was applied to calculate the cross-correlation functions. The average Rayleigh wave group velocity at the loess high bank was found to be 171 ms^{-1}. The group velocity map at a 0.1 s period revealed a low-velocity region, whose location coincides with a highly creviced area, where slope failure takes place along a several meter wide territory. Another low velocity region was found, which might indicate a previously unknown loosened domain. The highest velocities were observed at the supposed remnants of Castellum Lugio.

  1. Crosswell seismic studies in gas hydrate-bearing sediments: P wave velocity and attenuation tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, K.; Haberland, Ch.; Pratt, R. G.; Ryberg, T.; Weber, M. H.; Mallik Working Group

    2003-04-01

    We present crosswell seismic data from the Mallik 2002 Production Research Well Program, an international research project on Gas Hydrates in the Northwest Territories of Canada. The program participants include 8 partners; The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), The Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), United States Geological Survey (USGS), United States Department of the Energy (USDOE), India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MOPNG)/Gas Authority of India (GAIL) and the Chevron-BP-Burlington joint venture group. The crosswell seismic measurements were carried out by making use of two 1160 m deep observation wells (Mallik 3L-38 and 4L-38) both 45 m from and co-planar with the 1188 m deep production research well (5L-38). A high power piezo-ceramic source was used to generate sweeped signals with frequencies between 100 and 2000 Hz recorded with arrays of 8 hydrophones per depth level. A depth range between 800 and 1150 m was covered, with shot and receiver spacings of 0.75 m. High quality data could be collected during the survey which allow for application of a wide range of crosswell seismic methods. The initial data analysis included suppression of tube wave energy and picking of first arrivals. A damped least-squares algorithm was used to derive P-wave velocities from the travel time data. Next, t* values were derived from the decay of the amplitude spectra, which served as input parameters for a damped least-squares attenuation tomography. The initial results of the P-wave velocity and attenuation tomography reveal significant features reflecting the stratigraphic environment and allow for detection and eventually quantification of gas hydrate bearing sediments. A prominent correlation between P velocity and attenuation was found for the gas hydrate layers. This contradicts to the apparently more meaningful inverse correlation as it was determined for the gas hydrates at the Blake Ridge but supports the results from

  2. Development of a State-Wide 3-D Seismic Tomography Velocity Model for California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, C. H.; Lin, G.; Zhang, H.; Hauksson, E.; Shearer, P.; Waldhauser, F.; Hardebeck, J.; Brocher, T.

    2007-12-01

    We report on progress towards the development of a state-wide tomographic model of the P-wave velocity for the crust and uppermost mantle of California. The dataset combines first arrival times from earthquakes and quarry blasts recorded on regional network stations and travel times of first arrivals from explosions and airguns recorded on profile receivers and network stations. The principal active-source datasets are Geysers-San Pablo Bay, Imperial Valley, Livermore, W. Mojave, Gilroy-Coyote Lake, Shasta region, Great Valley, Morro Bay, Mono Craters-Long Valley, PACE, S. Sierras, LARSE 1 and 2, Loma Prieta, BASIX, San Francisco Peninsula and Parkfield. Our beta-version model is coarse (uniform 30 km horizontal and variable vertical gridding) but is able to image the principal features in previous separate regional models for northern and southern California, such as the high-velocity subducting Gorda Plate, upper to middle crustal velocity highs beneath the Sierra Nevada and much of the Coast Ranges, the deep low-velocity basins of the Great Valley, Ventura, and Los Angeles, and a high- velocity body in the lower crust underlying the Great Valley. The new state-wide model has improved areal coverage compared to the previous models, and extends to greater depth due to the data at large epicentral distances. We plan a series of steps to improve the model. We are enlarging and calibrating the active-source dataset as we obtain additional picks from investigators and perform quality control analyses on the existing and new picks. We will also be adding data from more quarry blasts, mainly in northern California, following an identification and calibration procedure similar to Lin et al. (2006). Composite event construction (Lin et al., in press) will be carried out for northern California for use in conventional tomography. A major contribution of the state-wide model is the identification of earthquakes yielding arrival times at both the Northern California Seismic

  3. Modeling the Coast Mountains Batholith, British Columbia, Canada with 3D Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinonez, S. M.; Olaya, J. C.; Miller, K. C.; Romero, R.; Velasco, A. A.; Harder, S. H.; Cerda, I.

    2011-12-01

    The Coast Mountains Batholith on the west coast of British Columbia, Canada comprises a series of granitic to tonalitic plutons; where felsic continental crust is generated from the subduction of mafic oceanic crust by partial melting and fractionation, leaving ultra-mafic roots. In July of 2009, a large controlled-source experiment was conducted along a 400km east - west transect from Bella Bella into central British Columbia. Student volunteers from multiple universities deployed 1,800 one-component and 200 three-component geophones plus 2400 Texan data recorders with 200-m spacing intervals and shot spacing at 30-km. The 18-point sources ranged from 160 to 1,000 kg of high explosive. The geoscience component of the NSF-funded Cyber-ShARE project at UTEP focuses on fusing models developed from different data sets to develop 3-D Earth models. Created in 2007, the Cyber-ShARE Center brings together experts in computer science, computational mathematics, education, earth science, and environmental science. We leverage the Cyber-ShARE work to implement an enhanced 3-D finite difference tomography approach for P-wave delays times (Hole, 1992) with a graphical user interface and visualization framework. In particular, to account for model sensitivity to picked P-wave arrival times, we use a model fusion approach (Ochoa et al., 2010) to generate a model with the lowest RMS residual that a combination of a set of Monte Carlo sample models. In order to make the seismic tomography process more interactive at many points, visualizations of model perturbation at each iteration will help to troubleshoot when a model is not converging to highlight where the RMS residual values are the highest to pinpoint where changes need to be made to achieve model convergence. Finally, a model of the upper mantle using 3-D P-wave tomography will be made to determine the location of these ultra-mafic roots.

  4. Imaging heterogeneity of the crust adjacent to the Dead Sea fault using ambient seismic noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, Vladimir; Meirova, Tatiana; Levshin, Anatoli; Hofstetter, Abraham; Kraeva, Nadezda; Barmin, Mikhail

    2013-04-01

    For the purpose of studying the Earth's crust by means of tomography, we investigated cross-correlation functions emerging from long-term observations of propagating ambient seismic noise at pairs of broadband stations in Israel and Jordan. The data was provided by the eight permanent broadband stations of the Israel Seismic Network evenly distributed over Israel and the 30 stations of the DESERT2000 experiment distributed across the Arava Fault (South of the Dead Sea basin). To eliminate the influence of earthquakes and explosions, we have applied the methodology of Bensen et al. (Geophys J Int 169:1239-1260, 2007), including bandpass filtering and amplitude normalization in time and frequency domain. The cross-correlation functions estimated from continuous recordings of a few months were used to extract Rayleigh waves group velocity dispersion curves using automatic version of the frequency-time analysis procedure. Subsequently, these curves have been converted into the Rayleigh wave group velocity maps in the period range 5-20 s and S waves velocity maps in the depth range 5-15 km. In these maps, four velocity anomalies are prominent. Two of them are outlined by the previous reflection-refraction profiles and body wave tomography studies, i.e. a low velocity anomaly corresponds to the area of the extremely deep (down to 14 km) sedimentary infill in the Southern Dead Sea Basin and a high velocity anomaly in the Southern Jordan corresponds to the area of the Precambrian crystalline rocks of the Nubian Shield on the flanks of the Red Sea. The two other anomalies have not been reported before - the high velocity zone close to the Beersheba city and the low velocity anomaly in the region of Samaria-Carmel mountains - Southern Galilee. They have relatively low resolution and hence need further investigations for approving and contouring. The highest contrast between the average Rayleigh wave group velocity (2.7 km/s) and the anomalies is 10-13 %, comparable, however

  5. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  6. Seismic rays and traveltime tomography of strongly heterogeneous mantle structure: application to the Central Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serretti, Paola; Morelli, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    The structure of the Earth's upper mantle near convergent plate margins, such as along the Nubia-Eurasia collision zone in the Mediterranean, involves strong seismic wave speed contrasts associated with subducting lithospheric slabs and opening backarc basins. In this environment, seismic wave propagation is strongly influenced by heterogeneity, and requires appropriate modelling practice. Although accurate numerical methods are often used to model seismic traveltimes in the crust, only approximate techniques have been used for the mantle, on the assumption that speed contrasts are weaker. We devise, optimize, and test a method aimed at recovering strongly heterogeneous mantle structures using a finite-difference scheme to calculate first-arrival traveltimes and trace seismic rays with high accuracy even in the presence of strong gradients. We adapt this forward scheme—successfully used in local-scale tomography—to spherical geometry through source-specific Earth flattening approximations, and we split calculations in meshes with different step size to model optimally the crust (with a 2 km step) and the mantle (6 km step). We then use an iterative non-linear inversion approach, starting from a simple 1-D prior model. We test the ability of this procedure to reconstruct sample structures, devised to be illustrative for the Mediterranean region, using synthetic data calculated on the real distribution of sources and stations reported by the Bulletins of the International Seismological Centre (ISC). Besides regular checkerboard patterns, we also reconstruct a more representative model. Different strategies are used and compared in linear and non-linear inversion. We find that a linear approach, by which rays are only traced once in the background model, may result in an illusory fit to data. Realistic upper-mantle structures strongly deflect seismic rays, and correct paths can only be found after a few iterations. Although linear inversion seems able to identify

  7. The Crustal Structure of the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone Imaged by means of Seismic Noise Tomography and Potential Fields Inversion Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandmayr, E.; Arroucau, P.; Kuponiyi, A.; Vlahovic, G.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the crustal structure of the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone (ETSZ) by means of group velocity tomography maps from seismic noise data analysis and potential fields inversion with the located Euler deconvolution method. Preliminary tomography results show that, in the uppermost crust, the New York-Alabama (NY-AL) magnetic lineament surface projection represents the boundary between a low velocity anomaly to the NW of the lineament and a high velocity anomaly to the SE of it. The low velocity anomaly migrates towards SE with increasing depth, suggesting a possible SE dipping weak structure in which most of the seismic activity takes place. Inversion of magnetic field data shows that the top of the magnetic basement ranges between 5 and 10 km of depth in the Valley and the Ridge physiographic province while it is shallower (less than 2 km of depth) and locally outcropping in the Blue Ridge province and in the Cumberland Plateau province. The estimated depth of the top of the magnetic basement is in general agreement with existing sedimentary cover map of the broad study area, although the local features of the ETSZ presented in this work are not resolved by previous studies due to poor resolution. The correlation between the magnetic signature and the position of the seismic velocity anomalies support the interpretation of the low velocity zone as a major basement fault, trending NE-SW and juxtaposing Granite-Rhyolite basement to the NW from Grenville southern Appalachian basement to the SE, of which the NY-AL magnetic lineament is the projection on the surface. In order to better constrain our interpretation, inversion of tomography results to obtain absolute shear waves velocity models will be performed as a next step.

  8. Seismic structures beneath Popocatepetl (Mexico) and Gorely (Kamchatka) volcanoes derived from passive tomography studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Pavel; Koulakov, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    A number of active volcanoes are observed in different parts of the world, and they attract great interest of scientists. Comparing their characteristics helps in understanding the origin and mechanisms of their activity. One of the most effective methods for studying the deep structure beneath volcanoes is passive source seismic tomography. In this study we present results of tomographic inversions for two active volcanoes located in different parts of the world: Popocatepetl (Mexico) and Gorely (Kamchatka, Russia). In the past century both volcanoes were actively erupted that explains great interest to their detailed investigations. In both cases we made the full data analysis starting from picking the arrival times from local events. In the case of the Popocatepetl study, a temporary seismological network was deployed by GFZ for the period from December 1999 to July 2000. Note that during this period there were a very few events recorded inside the volcano. Most of recorded earthquakes occurred in surrounding areas and they probably have the tectonic nature. We performed a special analysis to ground the efficiency of using these data for studying seismic structure beneath the network installed on the volcano. The tomographic inversion was performed using the LOTOS code by Koulakov (2009). Beneath the Popocatepetl volcano we have found a zone of strong anti-correlation between P- and S-velocities that leaded to high values of Vp/Vs ratio. Similar features were found for some other volcanoes in previous studies. We interpret these anomalies as zones of high content of fluids and melts that are related to active magma sources. For the case of Gorely volcano we used the data of a temporary network just deployed in summer 2013 by our team from IPGG, Novosibirsk. Luckily, during the field works, the volcano started to manifest strong seismic activity. In this period, 100 - 200 volcanic events occurred daily. We collected the continuous seismic records from 20 stations

  9. Active Source Tomography of Stromboli Volcano (Italy): Results From the 2006 Seismic Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, L.; Patanè, D.; Cocina, O.; Castellano, M.; Sgroi, T.; Favali, P.; de Gori, P.

    2008-12-01

    Stromboli island, located in the Southern Tyrrhenian sea, is the emerged part (about 900 m a.s.l.) of a 3km-high strato-volcano. Its persistent Strombolian activity, documented for over 2000 years, is sometimes interrupted by lava effusions or major explosions. Despite the amount of recent published geophysical studies aimed to clarifying eruption dynamics, the spatial extend and geometrical characteristics of the plumbing system remain poorly understood. In fact, the knowledge of the inner structure and the zones of magma storage is limited to the upper few hundreds meters of the volcanic edifice and P- and S-waves velocity models are available only in restricted areas. In order to obtain a more suitable internal structural and velocity models of the volcano, from 25 November to 2 December 2006, a seismic tomography experiment through active seismics using air-gun sources was carried out and the final Vp model is here presented. The data has been inverted for the Vp structure by using the code Simulps13q, considering a 3D grid of nodes spaced 0.5 km down to 2 km depth, beneath the central part of volcano. The results show a relatively high velocity zones located both in the inner part of the volcanic structure, at about 1km b.s.l. and in the last 200-300 m a.s.l. in correspondence with the volcanic conduit. Slower zones were located around the summit craters in agreement with volcanological and petrological informations for the area. The relatively high velocity zones could suggest the presence of intrusive bodies related to the plumbing system.

  10. Models of crustal thickness for South America from seismic refraction, receiver functions and surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assumpção, Marcelo; Feng, Mei; Tassara, Andrés; Julià, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    An extensive compilation of crustal thicknesses is used to develop crustal models in continental South America. We consider point crustal thicknesses from seismic refraction experiments, receiver function analyses, and surface-wave dispersion. Estimates of crustal thickness derived from gravity anomalies were only included along the continental shelf and in some areas of the Andes to fill large gaps in seismic coverage. Two crustal models were developed: A) by simple interpolation of the point estimates, and B) our preferred model, based on the same point estimates, interpolated with surface-wave tomography. Despite gaps in continental coverage, both models reveal interesting crustal thickness variations. In the Andean range, the crust reaches 75 km in Southern Peru and the Bolivian Altiplano, while crustal thicknesses seem to be close to the global continental average (~ 40 km) in Ecuador and southern Colombia (despite high elevations), and along the southern Andes of Chile-Argentina (elevation lower than 2000 m). In the stable continental platform the average thickness is 38 ± 5 km (1-st. deviation) and no systematic differences are observed among Archean-Paleoproterozoic cratons, NeoProterozoic fold belts, and low-altitude intracratonic sedimentary basins. An exception is the Borborema Province (NE Brazil) with crust ~ 30-35 km thick. Narrow belts surrounding the cratons are suggested in central Brazil, parallel to the eastern and southern border of the Amazon craton, and possibly along the TransBrasiliano Lineament continuing into the Chaco basin, where crust thinner than 35 km is observed. In the sub-Andean region, between the mid-plate cratons and the Andean cordillera, the crust tends to be thinner (~ 35 km) than the average crust in the stable platform, a feature possibly inherited from the old pre-Cambrian history of the continent. We expect that these crustal models will be useful for studies of isostasy, dynamic topography, and crustal evolution of the

  11. Uppermost Mantle Seismic Velocity and Anisotropy in Southwestern Europe and North Africa by Using PN Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, A.; Diaz, J.; Gallart, J.

    2011-12-01

    We present here new images of the seismic velocity and anisotropy variations in the uppermost mantle beneath Southwestern Europe and North Africa, compiled from inversion of Pn phases. The method of Hearn (1996) has been applied to Pn lectures from the catalogs of the International Seismological Center and the Spanish Instituto Geografico Nacional, for the time period 1990-2009. A total of 338,691 Pn arrivals coming from 13,027 earthquakes recorded at 802 stations, with epicentral distances between 220 km and 1400 km have been retained after applying quality criteria (maximum depth, minimum number of recordings, maximum residual values...). Our results, grossly consistent with available 3D tomography images, show significant features well correlated with surface geology: (a) The Pn velocities are higher (>8.2 km/s) beneath major sedimentary basins (western edge of the Alboran Sea, Valencia Through, Guadalquivir, Duero, Aquitaine and Po basins), and lower (<7.8 km/s) in orogenic areas (Betics, Pyrenees, Alps, Apennines chains and Calabrian Arc), confirming the existence of marked variations in crustal thicknesses already documented by active seismic experiments. The lowest velocity values are found under the Betics (<7.5 km/s), while a less pronounced low velocity (7.85 km/s) is observed beneath the Iberian Range, an area where the existence of crustal root is still poorly constrained. (b) Pn anisotropy shows consistent orientations sub-parallel to major orogenic structures, such as Betics, Apennines, Calabrian Arc and Alps. (c) The station delays beneath Betic and Rif ranges are strongly negative, suggesting the presence of crustal thickening all along the Gibraltar Arc System. However, only the Betics have a very strong low-velocity anomaly and a pronounced anisotropy pattern, suggesting that high temperature material may be present there at subcrustal levels.

  12. Landslide characterization using P- and S-wave seismic refraction tomography - The importance of elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, S.; Hagedorn, S.; Dashwood, B.; Maurer, H.; Gunn, D.; Dijkstra, T.; Chambers, J.

    2016-11-01

    In the broad spectrum of natural hazards, landslides in particular are capable of changing the landscape and causing significant human and economic losses. Detailed site investigations form an important component in the landslide risk mitigation and disaster risk reduction process. These investigations usually rely on surface observations, discrete sampling of the subsurface, and laboratory testing to examine properties that are deemed representative of entire slopes. Often this requires extensive interpolations and results in large uncertainties. To compliment and extend these approaches, we present a study from an active landslide in a Lias Group clay slope, North Yorkshire, UK, examining combined P- and S-wave seismic refraction tomography (SRT) as a means of providing subsurface volumetric imaging of geotechnical proxies. The distributions of seismic wave velocities determined from SRT at the study site indicated zones with higher porosity and fissure density that are interpreted to represent the extent and depth of mass movements and weathered bedrock zones. Distinguishing the lithological units was facilitated by deriving the Poisson's ratio from the SRT data as saturated clay and partially saturated sandy silts showed distinctively different Poisson's ratios. Shear and Young's moduli derived from the SRT data revealed the weak nature of the materials in active parts of the landslide (i.e. 25 kPa and 100 kPa respectively). The SRT results are consistent with intrusive (i.e. cone penetration tests), laboratory, and additional geoelectrical data from this site. This study shows that SRT forms a cost-effective method that can significantly reduce uncertainties in the conceptual ground model of geotechnical and hydrological conditions that govern landslide dynamics.

  13. Comparative velocity structure of active Hawaiian volcanoes from 3-D onshore-offshore seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.; Morgan, J.K.; Zelt, C.A.; Okubo, P.G.; Peters, L.; Benesh, N.

    2007-01-01

    We present a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the combined subaerial and submarine portions of the southeastern part of the Island of Hawaii, based on first-arrival seismic tomography of marine airgun shots recorded by the onland seismic network. Our model shows that high-velocity materials (6.5-7.0??km/s) lie beneath Kilauea's summit, Koae fault zone, and the upper Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) and upper and middle East Rift Zone (ERZ), indicative of magma cumulates within the volcanic edifice. A separate high-velocity body of 6.5-6.9??km/s within Kilauea's lower ERZ and upper Puna Ridge suggests a distinct body of magma cumulates, possibly connected to the summit magma cumulates at depth. The two cumulate bodies within Kilauea's ERZ may have undergone separate ductile flow seaward, influencing the submarine morphology of Kilauea's south flank. Low velocities (5.0-6.3??km/s) seaward of Kilauea's Hilina fault zone, and along Mauna Loa's seaward facing Kao'iki fault zone, are attributed to thick piles of volcaniclastic sediments deposited on the submarine flanks. Loihi seamount shows high-velocity anomalies beneath the summit and along the rift zones, similar to the interpreted magma cumulates below Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes, and a low-velocity anomaly beneath the oceanic crust, probably indicative of melt within the upper mantle. Around Kilauea's submarine flank, a high-velocity anomaly beneath the outer bench suggests the presence of an ancient seamount that may obstruct outward spreading of the flank. Mauna Loa's southeast flank is also marked by a large, anomalously high-velocity feature (7.0-7.4??km/s), interpreted to define an inactive, buried volcanic rift zone, which might provide a new explanation for the westward migration of Mauna Loa's current SWRZ and the growth of Kilauea's SWRZ. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A sensitivity analysis on seismic tomography data with respect to CO2 saturation of a CO2 geological sequestration field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chanho; Nguyen, Phung K. T.; Nam, Myung Jin; Kim, Jongwook

    2013-04-01

    Monitoring CO2 migration and storage in geological formations is important not only for the stability of geological sequestration of CO2 but also for efficient management of CO2 injection. Especially, geophysical methods can make in situ observation of CO2 to assess the potential leakage of CO2 and to improve reservoir description as well to monitor development of geologic discontinuity (i.e., fault, crack, joint, etc.). Geophysical monitoring can be based on wireline logging or surface surveys for well-scale monitoring (high resolution and nallow area of investigation) or basin-scale monitoring (low resolution and wide area of investigation). In the meantime, crosswell tomography can make reservoir-scale monitoring to bridge the resolution gap between well logs and surface measurements. This study focuses on reservoir-scale monitoring based on crosswell seismic tomography aiming describe details of reservoir structure and monitoring migration of reservoir fluid (water and CO2). For the monitoring, we first make a sensitivity analysis on crosswell seismic tomography data with respect to CO2 saturation. For the sensitivity analysis, Rock Physics Models (RPMs) are constructed by calculating the values of density and P and S-wave velocities of a virtual CO2 injection reservoir. Since the seismic velocity of the reservoir accordingly changes as CO2 saturation changes when the CO2 saturation is less than about 20%, while when the CO2 saturation is larger than 20%, the seismic velocity is insensitive to the change, sensitivity analysis is mainly made when CO2 saturation is less than 20%. For precise simulation of seismic tomography responses for constructed RPMs, we developed a time-domain 2D elastic modeling based on finite difference method with a staggered grid employing a boundary condition of a convolutional perfectly matched layer. We further make comparison between sensitivities of seismic tomography and surface measurements for RPMs to analysis resolution

  15. Advancements in seismic tomography with application to tunnel detection and volcano imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clippard, James Doyle

    Practical geotomography is an inverse problem with no unique solution. A priori information must be imposed for a stable solution to exist. Commonly used types of a priori information smooth and attenuate anomalies, resulting in 'blurred' tomographic images. Small or discrete anomalies, such as tunnels, magma conduits, or buried channels are extremely difficult imaging objectives. Composite distribution inversion (CDI) is introduced as a theory seeking physically simple, rather than distributionally simple, solutions of non-unique problems. Parameters are assumed to be members of a composite population, including both well-known and anomalous components. Discrete and large amplitude anomalies are allowed, while a well-conditioned inverse is maintained. Tunnel detection is demonstrated using CDI tomography and data collected near the northern border of South Korea. Accurate source and receiver location information is necessary. Borehole deviation corrections are estimated by minimizing the difference between empirical distributions of apparent parameter values as a function of location correction. Improved images result. Traveltime computation and raytracing are the most computationally intensive components of seismic tomography when imaging structurally complex media. Efficient, accurate, and robust raytracing is possible by first recovering approximate raypaths from traveltime fields, and then refining the raypaths to a desired accuracy level. Dynamically binned queuing is introduced. The approach optimizes graph-theoretic traveltime computation costs. Pseudo-bending is modified to efficiently refine raypaths in general media. Hypocentral location density functions and relative phase arrival population analysis are used to investigate the Spring, 1996, earthquake swarm at Akutan Volcano, Alaska. The main swarm is postulated to have been associated with a 0.2 kmsp3 intrusion at a depth of less than four kilometers. Decay sequence seismicity is postulated to be a

  16. A 3D S-wave model of the Valhall subsurface from ambient seismic noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, A.; Landes, M.; Shapiro, N.; Singh, S. C.; Roux, P.

    2013-12-01

    We present a depth inversion of Scholte wave group and phase velocity maps obtained from cross-correlation of 6.5 hours of noise data from the Valhall Life of Field Seismic (LoFS) network. We computed 2 690 040 vertical-vertical component cross-correlations from the 2320 available sensors, turning each sensor into a virtual source emitting Scholte waves. We used a traditional straight-ray surface-wave tomography to compute the group velocity map. The phase velocity maps have been computed using the Eikonal tomography method. For every virtual source, we measured the Scholte wave phase travel times to all other stations and interpolated them on a regular grid. This phase travel-time surface is inverted into phase velocity map via applying the eikonal equation. The contributions from all 2320 virtual sources are stacked to create the final phase velocity map of the Valhall subsurface. Scholte wave isotropic phase velocity maps at periods between 0.65 s and 1.6 s show a coherent geomorphological pattern dominated by paleo-channels in the shallower part. We also retrieved the azimuthal anisotropy and its lateral variations showing a characteristic elliptical pattern around the central exploitation platform. The inversion of these maps in depth using the Neighbourhood Algorithm allowed us to create a high resolution 3D S-wave model of the first 600 m of the Valhall subsurface and to precise the locations of geological structures at depth. These results would have important implication for shear wave statics and monitoring of sea-floor subsidence due to oil extraction. The 3D model could also be a good candidate for a starting model used in full-waveform inversions.

  17. Crustal and uppermost mantle velocity structure beneath northwestern China from seismic ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyi; Li, S.; Song, X. D.; Gong, M.; Li, X.; Jia, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we conduct ambient noise seismic tomography of northwestern China and adjacent regions. The data include 9 months (2009 January to 2009 September) three-component continuous data recorded at 146 seismic stations of newly upgraded China Provincial Digital Seismic Networks and regional Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan networks. Empirical Rayleigh and Love wave Green's functions are obtained from interstation cross-correlations. Group velocity dispersion curves for both Rayleigh and Love waves between 7 and 50 s periods were measured for each interstation path by applying the multiple-filter analysis method with phase-matched processing. The group velocity maps show clear lateral variations which correlate well with major geological structures and tectonic units in the study region. Shear wave velocity structures are inverted from Rayleigh wave and love wave dispersion maps. The results show that the Tibetan Plateau has a very thick crust with a low-velocity zone in its mid-lower crust. Along the northern margin of the plateau where a steep topographic gradient is present, the low-velocity zone does not extend to the Tarim basin which may indicate that crustal materials beneath the Tarim basin are colder and stronger than beneath the plateau, therefore inhibit the extension of mid-lower crustal flow and deformation of the Tibetan Plateau, resulting in very sharp topography contrasts. In the northeastern margin with a gentle topographic gradient toward the Ordos platform, the low-velocity zone diminishes around the eastern KunLun fault. Meanwhile, our results reveal obvious lateral velocity changes in the crust beneath the Tarim basin. In the upper crust, the Manjaer depression in the eastern Tarim basin is featured with very low velocities and the Bachu uplift in the western Tarim basin with high velocities; in the mid-lower crust, the northern Tarim basin in general displays lower velocities than the southern part along latitude ˜40° N with an east

  18. Regional Seismic Tomography in Brazil and Uncertainty Evaluation Through Jackknife Re- Sampling Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, M. P.; Schimmel, M.; Assumpcao, M.

    2007-05-01

    We used the regional seismic tomography to study the upper mantle beneath SE and Central Brazil. This method is based on the inversion of P- and S-wave relative travel time residuals (VanDecar, 1991) obtained from more than 80 stations in an area of 20 x 20 degrees. The ~11000 P and PKP residuals and ~8000 S, ScS, SKS, and SKKS residuals have been obtained from waveform cross-correlations for up to 12 simultaneous stations. Our results show correlations of seismic anomalies with the main tectonic structures and reveal new anomalies not yet observed in previous works. High velocity anomalies in the western portion of the Sao Francisco Craton support the hypothesis that this craton was part of a major Neoproterozoic plate. Low velocity anomalies beneath the Tocantins Province (mainly fold belts between the Amazon and Sao Francisco cratons) are interpreted as due to lithospheric thinning. Assumpcao et al. (2004) showed a good correlation between intraplate seismicity and low velocity anomalies in this region. The slab of the Nazca Plate is observed as a high velocity anomaly beneath the Parana basin (at 700-1200 km depths). At these depths, large low velocity anomalies appear accompanying the slab. Synthetic tests show that these anomalies are artifacts of the inversion generated by the presence of the slab. We use the Jackknife re-sampling method to evaluate the robustness of the tomographic results with respect to the data. The main advantage is that it is not necessary to assume a particular error distribution, since the model variability is accessed directly from the data variability. The approach is based on a random removal of a small percentage of the data (1%) to generate various new subsets, which are inverted to evaluate the model variability. These local estimates include inherently the highly variable ray coverage and measurement errors and can provide confidence in the interpretation of anomalies. This measure should not be interpreted as the resolution

  19. Multi-scale Seismic Waveform Tomography and the Evolution of Oceanic Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, L.; Boschi, L.; Becker, T. W.; van Driel, M.; Stähler, S. C.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Sigloch, K.

    2014-12-01

    The advent of high-resolution seismometer array deployments such as USArray, IberArray or the upcoming AlpArray pave the way for significantly enhanced tomographic resolution across their tectonically complex target areas. The optimal interpretation of these datasets requires a new generation of multiple-resolution tomographic imaging approaches. Our recent anisotropic S-wave tomography model SAVANI is adaptive and multi-scale in the sense that it relies on a data-driven adaptive parameterization scheme, which automatically adjusts grid size to local ray sampling density, where demanded by the data. Such automatic rescaling of the parameterization grid provides an efficient means to stepwise improve upon a global background model by updating the tomographic system whenever new observations become available. Since our method employs phase and dispersion measurements from the complete time- and frequency range of the seismic record, it is akin to other types of waveform inversion and sensitive across the entire depth extent of the mantle. We present our current work towards an update of the purely ray-theoretical first version of SAVANI, which involves the reinterpretation of the regional portion of our global dataset using more accurate full-waveform based sensitivity functions that should facilitate an adequate extraction of high-resolution regional structure in areas where data coverage permits it. Adaptive-resolution tomography models, as developed with our algorithm, honour the multi-scale nature of mantle convection, and have various advantages over purely global models when applied in the study of global and regional geodynamics. We focus here on upper mantle dynamics and the evolution of the oceanic lithosphere. Importantly, we find a distinct decorrelation between anisotropy patterns as observed in our tomography and conceptual half-space cooling models or dynamic predictions of anisotropic texture, respectively. This observation implies that sub

  20. High-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity structure at Newberry Volcano, Oregon Cascade Range

    SciTech Connect

    Achauer, U.; Evans, J.R.; Stauber, D.A.

    1988-09-10

    Compressional wave velocity structure is determined for the upper crust beneath Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, using a high-resolution active-source seismic-tomography method. Newberry Volcano is a bimodal shield volcano east of the axis of the Cascade Range. It is associated both with the Cascade Range and with northwest migrating silicic volcanism in southeast Oregon. High-frequency (approx.7 Hz) crustal phases, nominally Pg and a midcrustal reflected phase, travel upward through a target volume beneath Newberry Volcano to a dense array of 120 seismographs. This arrangement is limited by station spacing to 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 6 km of the crust beneath the volcano's summit caldera. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes are underlain only by small magma chambers. A small low-velocity anomaly delineated abosut 3 km below the summit caldera supports this hypothesis for Newberry Volcano and is interpreted as a possible magma chamber of a few to a few tens of km/sup 3/ in volume. A ring-shaped high-velocity anomaly nearer the surface coincides with the inner mapped ring fractures of the caldera. It also coincides with a circular gravity high, and we interpret it as largely subsolidus silicic cone sheets. The presence of this anomaly and of silicic vents along the ring fractures suggests that the fractures are a likely eruption path between the small magma chamber and the surface.

  1. Upper crustal structure of central Java, Indonesia, from transdimensional seismic ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulfakriza, Z.; Saygin, E.; Cummins, P. R.; Widiyantoro, S.; Nugraha, A. D.; Lühr, B.-G.; Bodin, T.

    2014-04-01

    Delineating the crustal structure of central Java is crucial for understanding its complex tectonic setting. However, seismic imaging of the strong heterogeneity typical of such a tectonically active region can be challenging, particularly in the upper crust where velocity contrasts are strongest and steep body wave ray paths provide poor resolution. To overcome these difficulties, we apply the technique of ambient noise tomography (ANT) to data collected during the Merapi Amphibious Experiment (MERAMEX), which covered central Java with a temporary deployment of over 120 seismometers during 2004 May-October. More than 5000 Rayleigh wave Green's functions were extracted by cross-correlating the noise simultaneously recorded at available station pairs. We applied a fully non-linear 2-D Bayesian probabilistic inversion technique to the retrieved traveltimes. Features in the derived tomographic images correlate well with previous studies, and some shallow structures that were not evident in previous studies are clearly imaged with ANT. The Kendeng Basin and several active volcanoes appear with very low group velocities, and anomalies with relatively high velocities can be interpreted in terms of crustal sutures and/or surface geological features.

  2. Source Stacking for Numerical Wavefield Computations - Application to Global Scale Seismic Mantle Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, L. S.; Romanowicz, B. A.; French, S.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wavefield computations using the Spectral Element Method are now regularly used to recover tomographic images of the upper mantle and crust at the local, regional, and global scales (e.g. Fichtner et al., GJI, 2009; Tape et al., Science 2010; Lekic and Romanowicz, GJI, 2011; French and Romanowicz, GJI, 2014). However, the heaviness of the computations remains a challenge, and contributes to limiting the resolution of the produced images. Using source stacking, as suggested by Capdeville et al. (GJI,2005), can considerably speed up the process by reducing the wavefield computations to only one per each set of N sources. This method was demonstrated through synthetic tests on low frequency datasets, and therefore should work for global mantle tomography. However, the large amplitudes of surface waves dominates the stacked seismograms and these cases can no longer be separated by windowing in the time domain. We have developed a processing approach that helps address this issue and demonstrate its usefulness through a series of synthetic tests performed at long periods (T >60 s) on toy upper mantle models. The summed synthetics are computed using the CSEM code (Capdeville et al., 2002). As for the inverse part of the procedure, we use a quasi-Newton method, computing Frechet derivatives and Hessian using normal mode perturbation theory.

  3. The scientific value of 4D visualizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minster, J.; Olsen, K.; Day, S.; Moore, R.; Jordan, T. H.; Maechling, P.; Chourasia, A.

    2006-12-01

    Significant scientific insights derive from viewing measured, or calculated three-dimensional, time-dependent -- that is four-dimensional-- fields. This issue cuts across all disciplines of Earth Sciences. Addressing it calls for close collaborations between "domain" scientists and "IT" visualization specialists. Techniques to display such 4D fields in a intuitive way are a major challenge, especially when the relevant variables to be displayed are not scalars but tensors. This talk will illustrate some attempts to deal with this challenge, using seismic wave fields as specific objects to display. We will highlight how 4D displays can help address very difficult issues of significant scientific import.

  4. How hot is red? Thermal structure of the melting mantle from seismic tomography and thermobarometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T.; Forsyth, D. W.; Bendersky, C.; Ferguson, D. J.; Gazel, E.; Lee, C.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic tomography is providing ever sharper views of the upper mantle, but the ability to interpret these images continues to be limited by the confounding effects of temperature, water and melt content on S wave velocities (Vs). Globally low Vs is found in many active rift zones (e.g., Basin and Range, East African Rift, mid ocean ridges), and yet it is still not clear if velocities reflect variations in mantle temperature, water concentrations, or melt retention in the mantle. Here we combine Vs results from recent tomographic models with melt thermobarometry to isolate the temperature effect on Vs. We focus on the Western US where we have combined surface and body wave tomography using data from EarthScope's Transportable Array to yield excellent models of Vs to depths of 300 km or more. The widespread basaltic volcanism that has occurred over the past 1 Ma across the region provides samples of the melting mantle. We employ a revised version of the Lee et al. (2009) thermobarometer to estimate pressures and temperatures of last equilibration in the mantle from the Si and Mg compositions of basalts. Results are highly dependent on oxygen fugacity and water content, which we determine with new measurements of water and vanadium in melt inclusions and their olivine hosts. Temperatures and pressures range from ~ 1200°C and 1 GPa (40 km) beneath Big Pine volcanic field to ~ 1450°C and 3.5 GPa (115 km) beneath Lunar Crater volcanic field. Most of the equilibration depths are near the base of the seismically determined lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, although some are deeper, in the low velocity zone, and some are shallower, in the fast seismic lid. Vs in the source regions varies from ~ 4.4 km/s to 3.9 km/s. There is a good negative correlation of Vs with temperature of equilibration, based on nine volcanic fields across the Basin and Range. Other rifting regions around the world, including back-arc basins, the East Pacific Rise and the East Africa Rift, also

  5. Improvements of Travel-time Tomography Models from Joint Inversion of Multi-channel and Wide-angle Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begović, Slaven; Ranero, César; Sallarès, Valentí; Meléndez, Adrià; Grevemeyer, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Commonly multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) and wide-angle seismic (WAS) data are modeled and interpreted with different approaches. Conventional travel-time tomography models using solely WAS data lack the resolution to define the model properties and, particularly, the geometry of geologic boundaries (reflectors) with the required accuracy, specially in the shallow complex upper geological layers. We plan to mitigate this issue by combining these two different data sets, specifically taking advantage of the high redundancy of multichannel seismic (MCS) data, integrated with wide-angle seismic (WAS) data into a common inversion scheme to obtain higher-resolution velocity models (Vp), decrease Vp uncertainty and improve the geometry of reflectors. To do so, we have adapted the tomo2d and tomo3d joint refraction and reflection travel time tomography codes (Korenaga et al, 2000; Meléndez et al, 2015) to deal with streamer data and MCS acquisition geometries. The scheme results in a joint travel-time tomographic inversion based on integrated travel-time information from refracted and reflected phases from WAS data and reflected identified in the MCS common depth point (CDP) or shot gathers. To illustrate the advantages of a common inversion approach we have compared the modeling results for synthetic data sets using two different travel-time inversion strategies: We have produced seismic velocity models and reflector geometries following typical refraction and reflection travel-time tomographic strategy modeling just WAS data with a typical acquisition geometry (one OBS each 10 km). Second, we performed joint inversion of two types of seismic data sets, integrating two coincident data sets consisting of MCS data collected with a 8 km-long streamer and the WAS data into a common inversion scheme. Our synthetic results of the joint inversion indicate a 5-10 times smaller ray travel-time misfit in the deeper parts of the model, compared to models obtained using just

  6. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography of multi-MHz A-scan rates at 1310 nm range and real-time 4D-display up to 41 volumes/second

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-hak; Hiro-Oka, Hideaki; Shimizu, Kimiya; Ohbayashi, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    An ultrafast frequency domain optical coherence tomography system was developed at A-scan rates between 2.5 and 10 MHz, a B-scan rate of 4 or 8 kHz, and volume-rates between 12 and 41 volumes/second. In the case of the worst duty ratio of 10%, the averaged A-scan rate was 1 MHz. Two optical demultiplexers at a center wavelength of 1310 nm were used for linear-k spectral dispersion and simultaneous differential signal detection at 320 wavelengths. The depth-range, sensitivity, sensitivity roll-off by 6 dB, and axial resolution were 4 mm, 97 dB, 6 mm, and 23 μm, respectively. Using FPGAs for FFT and a GPU for volume rendering, a real-time 4D display was demonstrated at a rate up to 41 volumes/second for an image size of 256 (axial) × 128 × 128 (lateral) voxels. PMID:23243560

  7. Ambient seismic noise tomography of SW Iberia integrating seafloor- and land-based data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corela, Carlos; Silveira, Graça; Matias, Luís; Schimmel, Martin; Geissler, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We used ambient seismic noise recorded by 24 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (OBS-BB) deployed in in the Gulf of Cadiz during the EC funded NEAREST project and seven broadband land stations located in the South of Portugal to image the sedimentary and crustal structure beneath the Eastern Atlantic and SW Iberia. We computed ambient noise cross-correlations to obtain empirical Green's functions (EGFs) between all station pairs, and using both sort of sensors, namely seismometers and hydrophones. Despite the great difference between the crustal structure below beneath OBSs and land stations and the recording conditions, we were able to compute high signal-to-noise ratio EGFs, by applying a linear cross-correlation with a running absolute mean average time normalization, followed by a time-frequency phase weighted stack. Dispersion analysis was then applied to the EGFs, between 4 and 20s period. The obtained 395 reliable group velocity dispersion curves, between all station pairs, allowed mapping the lateral variation of Rayleigh wave group velocities, as a function of period. Finally, dispersion curves extracted from each cell of the 2D group velocity maps were inverted, as a function of depth, to obtain the 3D distribution of the shear-wave velocities. The 3-D shear wave velocity model, computed from joint inversion of OBS and land stations data allowed to estimate the thickness of sediments and crust and the Moho depth. Although, we could perceive the impact of the spatial gap between OBSs and land stations, our model displays a good correlation with the main geological features. The main results on the sedimentary layer thickness and on the Moho depth are in agreement with the model proposed by other studies using observations from multi-beam bathymetry and seismic profiling, thus confirming that, not only that ambient noise tomography is a valuable tool to image oceanic domains, but also that we can integrate seafloor- and land-based stations. Publication

  8. Integrative Approach for Inversion of Gravity, Seismic and Tomography Data: Application to Northern Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaban, M. K.; Stolk, W.

    2014-12-01

    Mass anomalies in the Earth's mantle associated with thermal and compositional heterogeneities or with deflected boundaries between layers of different density produce stresses, which initiate mantle convection, plumes, subduction and deformations of the lithosphere. In particularly, the upper mantle plays a key role in controlling surface tectonics. Therefore, knowledge of density heterogeneity of the upper mantle is principal for understanding its dynamics and ongoing tectonic processes. This is particularly important for a complicated region such as Eurasia, where nearly all types of tectonic settings are present. There exist three main problems in construction of 3-D density models of the upper mantle. First, it is necessary to remove before hand the effect of the crust, which substantially masks the upper mantle gravity field. Second, the gravity effects of thermal and compositional density variations should be separated. And finally, the inverse gravity problem is usually underdetermined. In the present study we attempt to create a density model of the upper mantle based on improved interpretation methods and updated initial data sets. The impact of the crust to the observed gravity is estimated based on a new crustal model (Stolk et al., 2013). After removing this effect, we estimate the residual mantle anomalies of the gravity field. In the same way we estimate the residual topography, which is the second principal constraint used in the inversion. The impact of the mantle below 350 km is determined and removed based on recent mantle flow models. 3D density model of the lithosphere and upper mantle is constructed in an iterative inversion with tomography data. Contrary to most of previous studies, the thermal and compositional models are self-consistent. Many principal features of the compositional variations are not resolved by seismic tomography. The obtained density and thermal models can be used to model ongoing tectonic processes. Stolk W., Kaban M

  9. Degradation of the mechanical properties imaged by seismic tomography during an EGS creation at The Geysers (California) and geomechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanne, Pierre; Rutqvist, Jonny; Hutchings, Lawrence; Singh, Ankit; Dobson, Patrick F.; Walters, Mark; Hartline, Craig; Garcia, Julio

    2015-03-01

    Using coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) modeling, we evaluated new seismic tomography results associated with stimulation injection at an EGS demonstration project at the Northwest Geysers geothermal steam field, California. We studied high resolution seismic tomography images built from data recorded during three time periods: a period of two months prior to injection and during two consecutive one month periods after injection started in October 2011. Our analysis shows that seismic velocity decreases in areas of most intense induced microseismicity and this is also correlated with the spatial distribution of calculated steam pressure changes. A detailed analysis showed that shear wave velocity decreases with pressure in areas where pressure is sufficiently high to cause shear reactivation of pre-existing fractures. The analysis also indicates that cooling in a liquid zone around the injection well contributes to reduced shear wave velocity. A trend of reducing compressional wave velocity with fluid pressure was also found, but at pressures much above the pressure required for shear reactivation. We attribute the reduction in shear wave velocity to softening in the rock mass shear modulus associated with shear dislocations and associated changes in fracture surface properties. Also, as the rock mass become more fractured and more deformable this favors reservoir expansion caused by the pressure increase, and so the fracture porosity increases leading to a decrease in bulk density, a decrease in Young modulus and finally a decrease in Vp.

  10. Closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean: Insights from seismic tomography and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzell, E. H.; Bull, A. L.; Shephard, G. E.

    2016-07-01

    The existence of the Palaeozoic and Mesozoic Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean is evident from the Mongol-Okhotsk suture, which stretches from central Mongolia to the Sea of Okhotsk. A lack of sufficient palaeomagnetic data and an otherwise diffuse suture with an abrupt termination to the west has led to difficulties in reconstructing the history, geometry and closure of this ocean. Both the timing and style of the ocean's closure are unclear and have led to several alternative reconstructions. Closure timing ranges between the Late Jurassic (∼155 Ma) and beginning of the Early Cretaceous (∼120 Ma), and the proposed kinematics include contemporaneous subduction along two opposite margins, subduction along only one margin or with a component of left-lateral shear. In the present study, numerical models of mantle convection are coupled with global plate reconstructions to investigate ambiguities regarding the closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean. In order to decipher the tectonic history of this enigmatic region, two end-member scenarios of subduction location - either along the present-day northern or the southern margins of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean - are imposed as kinematic surface boundary conditions for the past 230 Myrs. Through a comparison to seismic tomography, the results indicate a preferred subduction history along the Siberian margin (relative northern margin) of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean. At present-day, the slab remnant is predicted to be located farther west than previously proposed. Furthermore, we find that the subducting slabs in this region generate a hot, dense pile at the same location and with a similar shape as the Perm Anomaly.

  11. Using seismic tomography models to constrain the viscosity structure of the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Farrell, K. A.; Reynolds, J.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Tackley, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past few decades, much work has been done to constrain the viscosity structure of the Earth's mantle using inverse techniques, viscoelastic modelling and post-glacial rebound data. Variations in the Earth's geoid provide constraints on the density structure in the mantle. We begin by deriving density models from a large range of seismic tomography models using appropriate velocity-density scaling factors which vary with depth. We then compute the synthetic geoid to compare with observed gravity anomalies in the Earth. This work improves on past results from geoid inversions by using a larger set of tomographic models, including more recent models. We find there are notable differences between using S- and P- wave tomographic models, with the S-wave models providing a better fit with the observed geoid. We explore the appropriate scaling factor for velocity to density conversion to use for different types of tomographic models. The different tomographic models also result in different viscosity profiles needed to produce the appropriate geoid to fit the observations. A unique viscosity profile corresponding to each tomographic model is not found but rather a family of different viscosity profiles preferred by each model. All models found an increase in the lower mantle viscosity provided the best correlation with the observed geoid but the magnitude of increase varied. Moreover, multiple profiles provide the best correlation when varying both the transition zone and lower mantle viscosity. Using the 3D mantle convection model, Stag-YY (e.g., Tackley, 2008), we are further able to explore the effect of lateral variations in viscosity in addition to the radial variations. REFERENCESTackley, P. J. (2008), Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 171(1-4).

  12. Seismic Tomography Around the Eastern Edge of the Alps From Ambient-Noise-Based Rayleigh Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zigone, Dimitri; Fuchs, Florian; Kolinsky, Petr; Gröschl, Gidera; Apoloner, Maria-Theresia; Qorbani, Ehsan; Schippkus, Sven; Löberich, Eric; Bokelmann, Götz; AlpArray Working Group

    2016-04-01

    Inspecting ambient noise Green's functions is an excellent tool for monitoring the quality of seismic data, and for swiftly detecting changes in the configuration of a seismological station. Those Green's functions readily provide stable information about structural variations near the Earth's surface. We apply the technique to a network consisting of about 40 broadband stations in the area of the Easternmost Alps, in particular those operated by the University of Vienna (AlpArrayAustria) and the Vienna University of Technology. Those data are used to estimate Green's functions between station pairs; the Green's function consist mainly of surface waves, and we use them to investigate crustal structure near the Eastern edge of the Alps. To obtain better signal-to-noise ratios in the noise correlation functions, we adopt a procedure using short time windows (2 hr). Energy tests are performed on the data to remove effects of transient sources and instrumental problems. The resulting 9-component correlation tensor is used to make travel time measurements on the vertical, radial and transverse components. Those measurements can be used to evaluate dispersion using frequency-time analysis for periods between 5-30 seconds. After rejecting paths without sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, we invert the velocity measurements using the Barmin et al. (2001) approach on a 10 km grid size. The obtained group velocity maps reveal complex structures with clear velocity contrasts between sedimentary basins and crystalline rocks. The Bohemian Massif and the Northern Calcareous Alps are associated with fast-velocity bodies. By contrast, the Vienna Basin presents clear low-velocity zones with group velocities down to 2 km/s at period of 7 s. The group velocities are then inverted to 3D images of shear wave speeds using the linear inversion method of Herrmann (2013). The results highlight the complex crustal structure and complement earthquake tomography studies in the region. Updated

  13. The P wave velocity structure of Deception Island, Antarctica, from two-dimensional seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, T. Z.; Barclay, A. H.; Wilcock, W. S.; Zandomeneghi, D.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Almendros, J.

    2006-12-01

    Deception Island is a small (diameter of ~15km) active volcanic island located at the western end of the Bransfield Strait, a region of back-arc extension associated with the recently extinct South Shetland Island Arc. The island has a horseshoe shape with a flooded caldera (Port Foster) that is open to the sea through a narrow passage. The geometry of the island makes it ideal for seismic imaging. In January, 2005, an international team of scientists deployed seismometers on Deception Island and the seafloor in order to record P wave arrivals from airgun shots both within the caldera and around the island. The experiment geometry was designed for high-resolution three-dimensional tomography of the shallow structure of the volcano but also included two linear profiles that were configured to image structure down to 5-10 km depth; a 90 km long-profile was oriented NNW-SSE and extended over 50 km to the south of the island and a 50 km long profile was oriented ENE-WSW and extended equal distances to either side of the island. We have obtained tomographic inversions for two-dimensional P-wave velocity structure along these profiles using shots and stations that lie up 2 km away from the profile. The inversions resolve a pronounced low- velocity anomaly beneath much of the caldera which extends from near the surface to about 3-4 km depth with a maximum anomaly of ~ -1 km/s at 1.5-2km depth. Refracted arrivals for shots within the caldera are consistent with a 1-km-thick layer of sediments infilling the caldera but synthetic inversions suggest that the low velocity anomaly resolved by the inversions is primarily a result of structure at greater depth. The inversion for the NNW-SSE profile resolves a sharp increase in velocities to the northwest of the caldera that coincides with the location of a regional zone of normal faulting that defines the northern boundary of the extension in the Bransfield Strait. The ENE-WSW profile also resolves a high velocity region to the

  14. The Augustine magmatic system as revealed by seismic tomography and relocated earthquake hypocenters from 1994 through 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Syracuse, E.M.; Thurber, C.H.; Power, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    We incorporate 14 years of earthquake data from the Alaska Volcano Observatory with data from a 1975 controlled-source seismic experiment to obtain the three-dimensional P and S wave velocity structure and the first high-precision earthquake locations at Augustine Volcano to be calculated in a fully three-dimensional velocity model. Velocity tomography shows two main features beneath Augustine: a narrow, high-velocity column beneath the summit, extending from ???2 km depth to the surface, and elevated velocities on the south flank. Our relocation results allow a thorough analysis of the spatio-temoral patterns of seismicity and the relationship to the magmatic and eruptive activity. Background seismicity is centered beneath the summit at an average depth of 0.6 km above sea level. In the weeks leading to the January 2006 eruption of Augustine, seismicity focused on a NW-SE line along the trend of an inflating dike. A series of drumbeat earthquakes occurred in the early weeks of the eruption, indicating further magma transport through the same dike system. During the six months following the onset of the eruption, the otherwise quiescent region 1 to 5 km below sea level centered beneath the summit became seismically active with two groups of earthquakes, differentiated by frequency content. The deep longer-period earthquakes occurred during the eruption and are interpreted as resulting from the movement of magma toward the summit, and the post-eruptive shorter-period earthquakes may be due to the relaxation of an emptied magma tube. The seismicity subsequently returned to its normal background rates and patterns. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Seismic tomography shows that upwelling beneath Iceland is confined to the upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foulger, G.R.; Pritchard, M.J.; Julian, B.R.; Evans, J.R.; Allen, R.M.; Nolet, G.; Morgan, W.J.; Bergsson, B.H.; Erlendsson, P.; Jakobsdottir, S.; Ragnarsson, S.; Stefansson, R.; Vogfjord, K.

    2001-01-01

    range ??? 100-300 km beneath east-central Iceland. The anomalous body is approximately cylindrical in the top 250 km but tabular in shape at greater depth, elongated north-south and generally underlying the spreading plate boundary. Such a morphological change and its relationship to surface rift zones are predicted to occur in convective upwellings driven by basal heating, passive upwelling in response to plate separation and lateral temperature gradients. Although we cannot resolve structure deeper than ??? 450 km, and do not detect a bottom to the anomaly, these models suggest that it extends no deeper than the mantle transition zone. Such models thus suggest a shallow origin for the Iceland hotspot rather than a deep mantle plume, and imply that the hotspot has been located on the spreading ridge in the centre of the north Atlantic for its entire history, and is not fixed relative to other Atlantic hotspots. The results are consistent with recent, regional full-thickness mantle tomography and whole-mantle tomography images that show a strong, low-wave-speed anomaly beneath the Iceland region that is confined to the upper mantle and thus do not require a plume in the lower mantle. Seismic and geochemical observations that are interpreted as indicating a lower mantle, or core-mantle boundary origin for the North Atlantic Igneous Province and the Iceland hotspot should be re-examined to consider whether they are consistent with upper mantle processes.

  16. High-resolution 3-D P wave attenuation structure of the New Madrid Seismic Zone using local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisrat, Shishay T.; DeShon, Heather R.; Pesicek, Jeremy; Thurber, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D), high-resolution P wave seismic attenuation model for the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) is determined using P wave path attenuation (t*) values of small-magnitude earthquakes (MD < 3.9). Events were recorded at 89 broadband and short-period seismometers of the Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Zone Network and 40 short-period seismometers of the Portable Array for Numerical Data Acquisition experiment. The amplitude spectra of all the earthquakes are simultaneously inverted for source, path (t*), and site parameters. The t* values are inverted for QP using local earthquake tomography methods and a known 3-D P wave velocity model for the region. The four major seismicity arms of the NMSZ exhibit reduced QP (higher attenuation) than the surrounding crust. The highest attenuation anomalies coincide with areas of previously reported high swarm activity attributed to fluid-rich fractures along the southeast extension of the Reelfoot fault. The QP results are consistent with previous attenuation studies in the region, which showed that active fault zones and fractured crust in the NMSZ are highly attenuating.

  17. Spectral-Element Seismic Wave Propagation Codes for both Forward Modeling in Complex Media and Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Peter, D. B.; Tromp, J.; Komatitsch, D.; Lefebvre, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    We present both SPECFEM3D_Cartesian and SPECFEM3D_GLOBE open-source codes, representing high-performance numerical wave solvers simulating seismic wave propagation for local-, regional-, and global-scale application. These codes are suitable for both forward propagation in complex media and tomographic imaging. Both solvers compute highly accurate seismic wave fields using the continuous Galerkin spectral-element method on unstructured meshes. Lateral variations in compressional- and shear-wave speeds, density, as well as 3D attenuation Q models, topography and fluid-solid coupling are all readily included in both codes. For global simulations, effects due to rotation, ellipticity, the oceans, 3D crustal models, and self-gravitation are additionally included. Both packages provide forward and adjoint functionality suitable for adjoint tomography on high-performance computing architectures. We highlight the most recent release of the global version which includes improved performance, simultaneous MPI runs, OpenCL and CUDA support via an automatic source-to-source transformation library (BOAST), parallel I/O readers and writers for databases using ADIOS and seismograms using the recently developed Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) with built-in provenance. This makes our spectral-element solvers current state-of-the-art, open-source community codes for high-performance seismic wave propagation on arbitrarily complex 3D models. Together with these solvers, we provide full-waveform inversion tools to image the Earth's interior at unprecedented resolution.

  18. Resistivity and Seismic Surface Wave Tomography Results for the Nevşehir Kale Region: Cappadocia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, Nart; Çakır, Özcan; Erduran, Murat; Arif Kutlu, Yusuf

    2014-05-01

    The Nevşehir Kale region located in the middle of Cappadocia with approximately cone shape is investigated for existence of an underground city using the geophysical methods of electrical resistivity and seismic surface wave tomography together. Underground cities are generally known to exist in Cappadocia. The current study has obtained important clues that there may be another one under the Nevşehir Kale region. Two-dimensional resistivity and seismic profiles approximately 4-km long surrounding the Nevşehir Kale are measured to determine the distribution of electrical resistivities and seismic velocities under the profiles. Several high resistivity anomalies with a depth range 8-20 m are discovered to associate with a systematic void structure beneath the region. Because of the high resolution resistivity measurement system currently employed we were able to isolate the void structure from the embedding structure. Low seismic velocity zones associated with the high resistivity depths are also discovered. Using three-dimensional visualization techniques we show the extension of the void structure under the measured profiles.

  19. Mantle seismic structure beneath the MELT region of the east pacific rise from P and S wave tomography

    PubMed

    Toomey; Wilcock; Solomon; Hammond; Orcutt

    1998-05-22

    Relative travel time delays of teleseismic P and S waves, recorded during the Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography (MELT) Experiment, have been inverted tomographically for upper-mantle structure beneath the southern East Pacific Rise. A broad zone of low seismic velocities extends beneath the rise to depths of about 200 kilometers and is centered to the west of the spreading center. The magnitudes of the P and S wave anomalies require the presence of retained mantle melt; the melt fraction near the rise exceeds the fraction 300 kilometers off axis by as little as 1%. Seismic anisotropy, induced by mantle flow, is evident in the P wave delays at near-vertical incidence and is consistent with a half-width of mantle upwelling of about 100 km.

  20. Anatomy of a megathrust: The 2010 M8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake rupture zone imaged using seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Stephen P.; Rietbrock, Andreas; Ryder, Isabelle M. A.; Lee, Chao-Shing; Miller, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    Knowledge of seismic velocities in the seismogenic part of subduction zones can reveal how material properties may influence large ruptures. Observations of aftershocks that followed the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake provide an exceptional dataset to examine the physical properties of a megathrust rupture zone. We manually analysed aftershocks from onshore seismic stations and ocean bottom seismometers to derive a 3-D velocity model of the rupture zone using local earthquake tomography. From the trench to the magmatic arc, our velocity model illuminates the main features within the subduction zone. We interpret an east-dipping high P-wave velocity anomaly (>6.9 km/s) as the subducting oceanic crust and a low P-wave velocity (<6.25 km/s) in the marine forearc as the accretionary complex. We find two large P-wave velocity anomalies (∼7.8 km/s) beneath the coastline. These velocities indicate an ultramafic composition, possibly related to extension and a mantle upwelling during the Triassic. We assess the role played by physical heterogeneity in governing megathrust behaviour. Greatest slip during the Maule earthquake occurred in areas of moderate P-wave velocity (6.5-7.5 km/s), where the interface is structurally more uniform. At shallow depths, high fluid pressure likely influenced the up-dip limit of seismic activity. The high velocity bodies lie above portions of the plate interface where there was reduced coseismic slip and minimal postseismic activity. The northern velocity anomaly may have acted as a structural discontinuity within the forearc, influencing the pronounced crustal seismicity in the Pichilemu region. Our work provides evidence for how the ancient geological structure of the forearc may influence the seismic behaviour of subduction megathrusts.

  1. 2D Time-lapse Seismic Tomography Using An Active Time Constraint (ATC) Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose a 2D seismic time-lapse inversion approach to image the evolution of seismic velocities over time and space. The forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wave-paths are represented by Fresnel volumes rathe...

  2. Abdominal and pancreatic motion correlation using 4D CT, 4D transponders, and a gating belt.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Ricardo; Zou, Wei; Plastaras, John P; Metz, James M; Teo, Boon-Keng; Kassaee, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    The correlation between the pancreatic and external abdominal motion due to respiration was investigated on two patients. These studies utilized four dimensional computer tomography (4D CT), a four dimensional (4D) electromagnetic transponder system, and a gating belt system. One 4D CT study was performed during simulation to quantify the pancreatic motion using computer tomography images at eight breathing phases. The motion under free breathing and breath-hold were analyzed for the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system during treatment. A linear curve was fitted for all data sets and correlation factors were evaluated between the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system data. The 4D CT study demonstrated a modest correlation between the external marker and the pancreatic motion with R-square values larger than 0.8 for the inferior-superior (inf-sup). Then, the relative pressure from the belt gating system correlated well with the 4D electromagnetic transponder system's motion in the anterior-posterior (ant-post) and the inf-post directions. These directions have a correlation value of -0.93 and 0.76, while the lateral only had a 0.03 correlation coefficient. Based on our limited study, external surrogates can be used as predictors of the pancreatic motion in the inf-sup and the ant-post directions. Although there is a low correlation on the lateral direction, its motion is significantly shorter. In conclusion, an appropriate treatment delivery can be used for pancreatic cancer when an internal tracking system, such as the 4D electromagnetic transponder system, is unavailable. PMID:23652242

  3. Abdominal and pancreatic motion correlation using 4D CT, 4D transponders, and a gating belt.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Ricardo; Zou, Wei; Plastaras, John P; Metz, James M; Teo, Boon-Keng; Kassaee, Alireza

    2013-05-06

    The correlation between the pancreatic and external abdominal motion due to respiration was investigated on two patients. These studies utilized four dimensional computer tomography (4D CT), a four dimensional (4D) electromagnetic transponder system, and a gating belt system. One 4D CT study was performed during simulation to quantify the pancreatic motion using computer tomography images at eight breathing phases. The motion under free breathing and breath-hold were analyzed for the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system during treatment. A linear curve was fitted for all data sets and correlation factors were evaluated between the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system data. The 4D CT study demonstrated a modest correlation between the external marker and the pancreatic motion with R-square values larger than 0.8 for the inferior-superior (inf-sup). Then, the relative pressure from the belt gating system correlated well with the 4D electromagnetic transponder system's motion in the anterior-posterior (ant-post) and the inf-post directions. These directions have a correlation value of -0.93 and 0.76, while the lateral only had a 0.03 correlation coefficient. Based on our limited study, external surrogates can be used as predictors of the pancreatic motion in the inf-sup and the ant-post directions. Although there is a low correlation on the lateral direction, its motion is significantly shorter. In conclusion, an appropriate treatment delivery can be used for pancreatic cancer when an internal tracking system, such as the 4D electromagnetic transponder system, is unavailable.

  4. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii from local seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Guoqing; Shearer, Peter M.; Matoza, Robin S.; Okubo, Paul G.; Amelung, Falk

    2016-01-01

    We present a new three-dimensional seismic velocity model of the crustal and upper mantle structure for Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii. Our model is derived from the first-arrival times of the compressional and shear waves from about 53,000 events on and near the Island of Hawaii between 1992 and 2009 recorded by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory stations. The Vp model generally agrees with previous studies, showing high-velocity anomalies near the calderas and rift zones and low-velocity anomalies in the fault systems. The most significant difference from previous models is in Vp/Vs structure. The high-Vp and high-Vp/Vs anomalies below Mauna Loa caldera are interpreted as mafic magmatic cumulates. The observed low-Vp and high-Vp/Vs bodies in the Kaoiki seismic zone between 5 and 15 km depth are attributed to the underlying volcaniclastic sediments. The high-Vp and moderate- to low-Vp/Vs anomalies beneath Kilauea caldera can be explained by a combination of different mafic compositions, likely to be olivine-rich gabbro and dunite. The systematically low-Vp and low-Vp/Vs bodies in the southeast flank of Kilauea may be caused by the presence of volatiles. Another difference between this study and previous ones is the improved Vp model resolution in deeper layers, owing to the inclusion of events with large epicentral distances. The new velocity model is used to relocate the seismicity of Mauna Loa and Kilauea for improved absolute locations and ultimately to develop a high-precision earthquake catalog using waveform cross-correlation data.

  5. Time-Lapse Seismic Tomography and Electrical Resistivity Mapping of a Small Embankment Dam with Possible Zones of Weakness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodajo, L. T.; Hickey, C. J.; Song, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    Earthen dam or levee failure can occur with little to no warning. Internal problems such as seepage and piping are among the major causes of failure in earthen embankment dams and levees. Identifying and mitigating these problems requires a cost effective and non-invasive method of investigating these critical structures. This study focuses on the early detection of internal problems such as seepage and piping using time lapse seismic refraction tomography (SRT) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). For this study, two quarter scale model dams were built at the USDA-ARS Hydraulic Engineering Research Unit in Stillwater, OK. These dams were constructed with two internal compromised zones that would be susceptible to seepage and piping. The zones consist of a sandy region and a region compacted at lower moisture content. Time lapse seismic refraction and electrical resistivity measurements were conducted over a course of two years to monitor changes in the internal structure of the model dams due to seasonal changes, cyclic loadings and internal erosion failure. The results will provide an insight on how compromised zones due to seepage and piping can be identified at an early stage using both SRT and ERT time-lapse measurements and how joint interpretation of these two methods helps in closely identifying what attributed to the compromised zone. [This research was funded by the department of Homeland Security- sponsored Southeast Region Research Initiative (SERRI) at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  6. Structure and Evolution of the North American Upper Mantle: Insight from Integrative Modeling of Gravity, Topography and Seismic Tomography Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, W. D.; Kaban, M. K.; Tesauro, M.

    2014-12-01

    A limitation on the application of geophysical methods for the study of the upper mantle is the effect of lateral variations in the structure of the overlying crust that obscure the signal from the mantle. However, the North American upper mantle is particularly well-suited for geophysical study because crustal corrections can be made based on the results from numerous active- and passive-source seismic investigations that have determined lateral variations in crustal properties, including crustal thickness, P- and S-wave velocities, and crustal density estimated from empirical velocity-density relations. We exploit this knowledge of the crust of North America to construct an integrated 3D model of variations in density, temperature and composition within the upper mantle to a depth of 250 km. Our model is based on a joint analysis of topography, gravity, and seismic tomography data, coupled with mineral physics constraints. In the first step we remove the effect of the laterally-varying crust from the observed gravity field and topography (assuming Airy isostasy) using our crustal model NACr2014 (Tesauro et al., submitted). In the second step the residual mantle gravity field and residual topography (obtained in the first step) are inverted to obtain a 3D density model of the upper mantle. Thermal effects dominate this initial density model. To compensate for the thermal effects we invert for mantle temperatures based on the S-wave velocities determined by two seismic tomography models (S40RTS and NA2007). After removing the thermal effect from the mantle gravity anomalies we are left with the upper mantle density variations that are due to compositional variations. We recover two long-wavelength (5°-10°) features in the upper mantle compositional density model that are not evident in seismic tomography models: (1) a strong (+200 mgal) positive compositional anomaly beneath the Gulf of Mexico, perhaps due to eclogite in the uppermost mantle, and (2) a NE

  7. Incorporating fault zone head wave and direct wave secondary arrival times into seismic tomography: Application at Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, N. L.; Thurber, C. H.; Zhang, H.; Peng, Z.; Zhao, P.

    2011-12-01

    Large crustal faults such as the San Andreas fault (SAF) often juxtapose rocks of significantly different elastic properties, resulting in well-defined bimaterial interfaces. A sharp material contrast across the fault interface is expected to generate fault zone head waves (FZHW's) that spend a large portion of their propagation paths refracting along the bimaterial interface (Ben-Zion 1989, 1990; Ben-Zion & Aki 1990). Because of this FZHW's provide a high-resolution tool for imaging the velocity contrast across the fault. Recently, Zhao et al. (2010) systematically analyzed large data sets of near-fault waveforms recorded by several permanent and temporary seismic networks along the Parkfield section of the SAF. The local-scale tomography study of Zhang et al. (2009) for a roughly 10 km3 volume centered on SAFOD and the more regional-scale study of Thurber et al. (2006) for a 130 km x 120 km x 20 km volume centered on the 2004 Parkfield earthquake rupture provide what are probably the best 3D images of the seismic velocity structure of the area. The former shows a low velocity zone associated with the SAF extending to significant depth, and both image the well-known velocity contrast across the fault. Seismic tomography generally uses just first P and/or S arrivals because of the relative simplicity of phase picking and ray tracing. Adding secondary arrivals such as FZHW's, however, can enhance the resolution of structure and strengthen constraints on earthquake locations and focal mechanisms. We present a model of 3D velocity structure for the Parkfield region that utilizes a combination of arrival times for FZHW's and the associated direct-wave secondary arrivals as well as existing P-wave arrival time data. The resulting image provides a higher-resolution model of the SAF at depth than previously published models. In addition, we plan to measure polarizations of the direct P and S waves and FZHW's and incorporate the data into our updated velocity tomography

  8. A simple algorithm for sequentially incorporating gravity observations in seismic traveltime tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Blakely, R.J.; Brocher, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    The geologic structure of the Earth's upper crust can be revealed by modeling variation in seismic arrival times and in potential field measurements. We demonstrate a simple method for sequentially satisfying seismic traveltime and observed gravity residuals in an iterative 3-D inversion. The algorithm is portable to any seismic analysis method that uses a gridded representation of velocity structure. Our technique calculates the gravity anomaly resulting from a velocity model by converting to density with Gardner's rule. The residual between calculated and observed gravity is minimized by weighted adjustments to the model velocity-depth gradient where the gradient is steepest and where seismic coverage is least. The adjustments are scaled by the sign and magnitude of the gravity residuals, and a smoothing step is performed to minimize vertical streaking. The adjusted model is then used as a starting model in the next seismic traveltime iteration. The process is repeated until one velocity model can simultaneously satisfy both the gravity anomaly and seismic traveltime observations within acceptable misfits. We test our algorithm with data gathered in the Puget Lowland of Washington state, USA (Seismic Hazards Investigation in Puget Sound [SHIPS] experiment). We perform resolution tests with synthetic traveltime and gravity observations calculated with a checkerboard velocity model using the SHIPS experiment geometry, and show that the addition of gravity significantly enhances resolution. We calculate a new velocity model for the region using SHIPS traveltimes and observed gravity, and show examples where correlation between surface geology and modeled subsurface velocity structure is enhanced.

  9. Seismically induced soft-sediment deformation structures revealed by X-ray computed tomography of boring cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Yoshito; Komatsubara, Junko

    2016-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) allows us to visualize three-dimensional structures hidden in boring cores nondestructively. We applied medical X-ray CT to cores containing seismically induced soft-sediment deformation structures (SSDSs) obtained from the Kanto region of Japan, where the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake occurred. The CT images obtained clearly revealed various types of the seismically induced SSDSs embedded in the cores: a propagating sand dyke bent complexly by the preexisting geological structure, deformed laminations of fluidized sandy layers, and two types of downward mass movement (ductile downward folding and brittle normal faulting) as compensation for upward sand transport through sand dykes. Two advanced image analysis techniques were applied to the sand dyke CT images for the first time. The GrowCut algorithm, a specific digital image segmentation technique that uses cellular automata, was used successfully to extract the three-dimensional complex sand dyke structures embedded in the sandy sediments, which would have been difficult to achieve using a conventional image processing technique. Local autocorrelation image analysis was performed to detect the flow pattern aligned along the sand dykes objectively. The results demonstrate that X-ray CT coupled with advanced digital image analysis techniques is a promising approach to studying the seismically induced SSDSs in boring cores.

  10. First local seismic tomography for Red River shear zone, northern Vietnam: Stepwise inversion employing crustal P and Pn waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsin-Hua; Xu, Zhen J.; Wu, Yih-Min; Song, Xiaodong; Huang, Bor-Shouh; Nguyen, Le Minh

    2013-01-01

    The 900-km-long Red River shear zone (RRSZ) lends a compelling support to the continental extrusion model for the tectonic evolution of southeastern Asia, but has been challenged by many of views, as some new records mainly from northern Vietnam, suspecting the dimensions of RRSZ neither in depth nor in displacement are as large as we expected before. However, compared to the northwestern half of the RRSZ in Yunnan province better studied by many fields, the southeastern half in northern Vietnam is relatively poorly constrained by seismic study, due to insufficient stations and data in the past. This study, using a newly deployed portable broadband seismic network, obtained the first local seismic tomography with a stepwise inversion using P and Pn phases. Surface geology, major structures, and rock properties are well correlated and identified in our model, suggesting the RRSZ is a lithospheric structure at least penetrating to the uppermost mantle with mantle thermal anomalies. In general, the crust of northern Vietnam appears to be weak and sits on a relatively hot uppermost mantle, showing a long and complex thermo tectonic history. A mid-lower crustal segmentation of RRSZ is also proposed to compromise the discrepancies recently observed between Yunnan province and northern Vietnam.

  11. Can we go From Tomographically Determined Seismic Velocities to Composition? Amplitude Resolution Issues in Local Earthquake Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, L.

    2007-12-01

    There have been a number of recent papers (i.e. Lee (2003), James et al. (2004), Hacker and Abers (2004), Schutt and Lesher (2006)) which calculate predicted velocities for xenolith compositions at mantle pressures and temperatures. It is tempting, therefore, to attempt to go the other way ... to use tomographically determined absolute velocities to constrain mantle composition. However, in order to do this, it is vital that one is able to accurately constrain not only the polarity of the determined velocity deviations (i.e. fast vs slow) but also how much faster, how much slower relative to the starting model, if absolute velocities are to be so closely analyzed. While much attention has been given to issues concerning spatial resolution in seismic tomography (i.e. what areas are fast, what areas are slow), little attention has been directed at the issue of amplitude resolution (how fast, how slow). Velocity deviation amplitudes in seismic tomography are heavily influenced by the amount of regularization used and the number of iterations performed. Determining these two parameters is a difficult and little discussed problem. I explore the effect of these two parameters on the amplitudes obtained from the tomographic inversion of the Chile Argentina Geophysical Experiment (CHARGE) dataset, and attempt to determine a reasonable solution space for the low Vp, high Vs, low Vp/Vs anomaly found above the flat slab in central Chile. I then compare this solution space to the range in experimentally determined velocities for peridotite end-members to evaluate our ability to constrain composition using tomographically determined seismic velocities. I find that in general, it will be difficult to constrain the compositions of normal mantle peridotites using tomographically determined velocities, but that in the unusual case of the anomaly above the flat slab, the observed velocity structure still has an anomalously high S wave velocity and low Vp/Vs ratio that is most

  12. Cenozoic East Asia plate tectonic reconstructions using constraints of mapped and unfolded slabs from mantle seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. E.; Suppe, J.; Kanda, R. V.

    2012-12-01

    Subducted slabs were mapped in the mantle under East Asia using MITP08 global seismic tomography (Li et al., 2008), Benioff zone seismicities and published local tomography. 3D gridded slab surfaces were constructed by manually picking and correlating the midpoint of fast seismic anomalies along variable cross-section orientations. The mapped slabs were structurally 'unfolded' and restored to the spherical Earth surface to assess their pre-subduction geometries. Gplates software was used to constrain plate tectonic reconstructions using the unfolded slabs. The unfolded SE Asia upper mantle slabs reveal a 'picture puzzle' fit along their edges that suggests a larger NE Indo-Australian ocean once existed that included the Philippine Sea, Molucca Sea and Celebes Sea. Deeper lower mantle detached slabs indicate an early to mid-Cenozoic 'East Asia Sea' between east Sundaland and the Pacific that stretched from the Ryukyu Islands north of present-day Taiwan southward to Sulawesi. The unfolded slab constraints produced gap and overlap incompatibilities when used in published plate tectonic reconstructions. Here a plate tectonic reconstruction incorporating the unfolded slab constraints is proposed that has the Philippine Sea, Molucca Sea and Celebes Sea clustered at the northern margin of Australia during the early Cenozoic. At the mid-Cenozoic these plates moved NNE with 'Australia-like' plate motions and overrode the 'East Asia Sea'. Plate motions were accommodated by N-S transforms at the eastern margin of Sundaland. Between 25 to 15 Ma the Philippine Sea, Molucca Sea and Celebes Sea plates were fragmented from the greater Indo-Australian ocean. The Philippine Sea was captured by the Pacific plate and now has Pacific-like westward motions.

  13. Storage of fluids and melts at subduction zones detectable by seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luehr, B. G.; Koulakov, I.; Rabbel, W.; Brotopuspito, K. S.; Surono, S.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades investigations at active continental margins discovered the link between the subduction of fluid saturated oceanic plates and the process of ascent of these fluids and partial melts forming a magmatic system that leads to volcanism at the earth surface. For this purpose the geophysical structure of the mantle and crustal range above the down going slap has been imaged. Information is required about the slap, the ascent paths, as well as the reservoires of fluids and partial melts in the mantle and the crust up to the volcanoes at the surface. Statistically the distance between the volcanoes of volcanic arcs down to their Wadati Benioff zone results of approximately 100 kilometers in mean value. Surprisingly, this depth range shows pronounced seismicity at most of all subduction zones. Additionally, mineralogical laboratory investigations have shown that dehydration of the diving plate has a maximum at temperature and pressure conditions we find at around 100 km depth. The ascent of the fluids and the appearance of partial melts as well as the distribution of these materials in the crust can be resolved by seismic tomographic methods using records of local natural seismicity. With these methods these areas are corresponding to lowered seismic velocities, high Vp/Vs ratios, as well as increased attenuation of seismic shear waves. The anomalies and their time dependence are controlled by the fluids. The seismic velocity anomalies detected so far are within a range of a few per cent to more than 30% reduction. But, to explore plate boundaries large and complex amphibious experiments are required, in which active and passive seismic investigations should be combined to achieve best results. The seismic station distribution should cover an area from before the trench up to far behind the volcanic chain, to provide under favorable conditions information down to 150 km depth. Findings of different subduction zones will be compared and discussed.

  14. A new Bayesian approach of tomography and seismic event location dedicated to the estimation of the true uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesret, Alexandrine; Noble, Mark; Desassis, Nicolas; Romary, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The monitoring of hydrocarbon reservoirs, geothermal reservoirs and mines commonly relies on the analysis of the induced seismicity. Even if a large amount of microseismic data have been recorded, the relationship between the exploration and the induced seismicity still needs to be better understood. This microseismicity is also interpreted to derive the fracture network and several physical parameters. The first step is thus to locate very precisely the induced seismicity and to estimate its associated uncertainties. The microseismic location errors are mainly due to the lack of knowledge of the wave-propagation medium, the velocity model has thus to be preliminary inverted. We here present a tomography algorithm that estimates the true uncertainties on the resulting velocity model. Including these results, we develop an approach that allows to obtain accurate event locations and their associated uncertainties due to the velocity model uncertainties. We apply a Monte-Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) algorithm to the tomography of calibration shots for a typical 3D geometry hydraulic fracture context. Our formulation is especially useful for ill-posed inverse problem, as it results in a large number of samples of possible solutions from the posterior probability distribution. All these velocity models are consistent with both the data and the prior information. Our non linear approach leads to a very satisfying mean velocity model and to associated meaningful standard deviations. These uncertainty estimates are much more reliable and accurate than sensitivity tests for only one final solution that is obtained with a linearized inversion approach. The Bayesian approach is commonly used for the computation of the posterior probability density function (PDF) of the event location as proposed by Tarantola and Valette in 1982 and Lomax in 2000. We add here the propagation of the posterior distribution of the velocity model to the formulation of the posterior PDF of the event

  15. Recent upper mantle structure beneath Siberia and surrounding areas according to a seismic tomography and numerical thermogravitational convection modeling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushenkova, N.; Chervov, V.; Koulakov, I.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the interaction between the recent lithosphere structure and dynamics of the upper mantle beneath a big segment of Asia. This study is based on the results of seismic tomography using travel times from the ISC catalog (1964-2007) and numerical thermogravitational modeling. The model contains thick lithosphere blocks of the Siberian Craton, the Tarim plate, and remnant parts of the Mongol-Tuva microcontinent. These blocks are alternated with weaker younger lithosphere corresponding to the West-Siberian plate, orogenic belts in southern Siberia and the Arctic shelves to the north. In the tomography part, we have updated a previously published model by Koulakov and Bushenkova (2010) based on a larger dataset including reflected PP and teleseismic P travel times from global catalogues. The lithosphere thickness has been estimated based on seismic anomalies at 250 km depth according to a technique described in (Bushenkova et al., 2008). These estimates were used to define the lithosphere thickness which is then implemented for setting the boundary conditions in numerical modeling and for joint interpretation of the final results. When computing the mantle dynamics, we consider the viscosity which is depends from temperature and pressure. Calculations are performed in the spherical coordinates. To minimize the boundary effects and to take into account the effect of the outside features, we considerably enlarged the calculation area by including the Russian, North- and South China Cratons and the Indian Plate. The modeling results demonstrate formation of steady ascending flows caused by overheating under the cratons (the average temperature of the upper mantle under a craton increases to ~100°) and descending flows on their periphery. The ascending flows spread along the bottom of the cratonic lithosphere and propagate towards its edges which cause smaller-scale convection cells nearly the borders of the cratons. The computed temperature distribution is

  16. Volcano deformation source parameters estimated from InSAR and FEM-based nonlinear inverse methods: Sensitivities to uncertainties in seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterlark, T.; Donovan, T. C.; Feigl, K. L.; Haney, M. M.; Thurber, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    Forward models of volcano deformation, due to a pressurized magma chamber embedded in an elastic domain, can predict observed surface deformation. Inverse models of surface deformation allow us to estimate characteristic parameters that describe the deformation source, such as the position and strength of a pressurized magma chamber embedded in an elastic domain. However, the specific distribution of material properties controls how the pressurization translates to surface deformation in a forward model, or alternatively, how observed surface deformation translates to source parameters in an inverse model. Seismic tomography models can describe the specific distributions of material properties that are necessary for accurate forward and inverse models of volcano deformation. The aim of this project is to investigate how uncertainties in seismic tomography models propagate into variations in the estimates of volcano deformation source parameters inverted from geodetic data. To do so, we combine FEM-based nonlinear inverse analyses of InSAR data for Okmok volcano, Alaska, as an example to estimate sensitivities of source parameters to uncertainties in seismic tomography. More specifically, we use Monte Carlo methods to construct an assembly of FEMs that simulate a pressurized magma chamber in the domain of Okmok. Each FEM simulates a realization of source parameters (three-component magma chamber position), a material property distribution that samples the seismic tomography model with a normal velocity perturbation of +/-10%, and a corresponding linear pressure estimate calculated using the Pinned Mesh Perturbation method. We then analyze the posteriori results to quantify sensitivities of source parameter estimates to the seismic tomography uncertainties. Preliminary results suggest that uncertainties in the seismic tomography do not significantly influence the estimated source parameters at a 95% confidence level. The presence of heterogeneous material properties

  17. 3D imaging of the Corinth rift from a new passive seismic tomography and receiver function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godano, Maxime; Gesret, Alexandrine; Noble, Mark; Lyon-Caen, Hélène; Gautier, Stéphanie; Deschamps, Anne

    2016-04-01

    The Corinth Rift is the most seismically active zone in Europe. The area is characterized by very localized NS extension at a rate of ~ 1.5cm/year, the occurrence of frequent and intensive microseismic crises and occasional moderate to large earthquakes like in 1995 (Mw=6.1). Since the year 2000, the Corinth Rift Laboratory (CRL, http://crlab.eu) consisting in a multidisciplinary natural observatory, aims at understanding the mechanics of faulting and earthquake nucleation in the Rift. Recent studies have improved our view about fault geometry and mechanics within CRL, but there is still a critical need for a better knowledge of the structure at depth both for the accuracy of earthquake locations and for mechanical interpretation of the seismicity. In this project, we aim to analyze the complete seismological database (13 years of recordings) of CRL by using recently developed methodologies of structural imaging, in order to determine at the same time and with high resolution, the local 3D structure and the earthquake locations. We perform an iterative joint determination of 3D velocity model and earthquake coordinates. In a first step, P and S velocity models are determined using first arrival time tomography method proposed by Taillandier et al. (2009). It consists in the minimization of the cost function between observed and theoretical arrival times which is achieved by the steepest descent method (e.g. Tarantola 1987). This latter requires computing the gradient of the cost function by using the adjoint state method (Chavent 1974). In a second step, earthquakes are located in the new velocity model with a non-linear inversion method based on a Bayesian formulation (Gesret et al. 2015). Step 1 and 2 are repeated until the cost function no longer decreases. We present preliminary results consisting in: (1) the adjustement of a 1D velocity model that is used as initial model of the 3D tomography and (2) a first attempt of the joint determination of 3D velocity

  18. Shallow Moho with aseismic upper crust and deep Moho with seismic lower crust beneath the Japanese Islands obtained by seismic tomography using data from dense seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Makoto; Obara, Kazushige

    2015-04-01

    P-wave seismic velocity is well known to be up to 7.0 km/s and over 7.5 km/s in the lower crust and in the mantle, respectively. A large velocity gradient is the definition of the Moho discontinuity between the crust and mantle. In this paper, we investigates the configuration of Moho discontinuity defined as an isovelocity plane with large velocity gradient derived from our fine-scale three-dimensional seismic velocity structure beneath Japanese Islands using data obtained by dense seismic network with the tomographic method (Matsubara and Obara, 2011). Japanese Islands are mainly on the Eurasian and North American plates. The Philippine Sea and Pacific plates are subducting beneath these continental plates. We focus on the Moho discontinuity at the continental side. We calculate the P-wave velocity gradients between the vertical grid nodes since the grid inversion as our tomographic method does not produce velocity discontinuity. The largest velocity gradient is 0.078 (km/s)/km at velocities of 7.2 and 7.3 km/s. We define the iso-velocity plane of 7.2 km/s as the Moho discontinuity. We discuss the Moho discontinuity above the upper boundary of the subducting oceanic plates with consideration of configuration of plate boundaries of prior studies (Shiomi et al., 2008; Kita et al., 2010; Hirata et al, 2012) since the Moho depth derived from the iso-velocity plane denotes the oceanic Moho at the contact zones of the overriding continental plates and the subducting oceanic plates. The Moho discontinuity shallower than 30 km depth is distributed within the tension region like northern Kyushu and coastal line of the Pacific Ocean in the northeastern Japan and the tension region at the Cretaceous as the northeastern Kanto district. These regions have low seismicity within the upper crust. Positive Bouguer anomaly beneath the northeastern Kanto district indicates the ductile material with large density in lower crust at the shallower portion and the aseismic upper crust

  19. Time-dependent seismic tomography of the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Foulger, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    The permanent 18-station network of three-component digital seismometers at the seismically active Coso geothermal area, California, provides high-quality microearthquake (MEQ) data that are well suited to investigating temporal variations in structure related to processes within the geothermal reservoir. A preliminary study [Julian, et al., 2003; Julian, et al., 2004] comparing data from 1996 and 2003 found significant variations in the ratio of the seismic wave-speeds, Vp/Vs, at shallow depths over this time interval. This report describes results of a more detailed study of each year from 1996 through 2004.

  20. Shallow Moho with aseismic upper crust and deep Moho with seismic lower crust beneath the Japanese Islands obtained by seismic tomography using data from dense seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Makoto; Obara, Kazushige

    2015-04-01

    P-wave seismic velocity is well known to be up to 7.0 km/s and over 7.5 km/s in the lower crust and in the mantle, respectively. A large velocity gradient is the definition of the Moho discontinuity between the crust and mantle. In this paper, we investigates the configuration of Moho discontinuity defined as an isovelocity plane with large velocity gradient derived from our fine-scale three-dimensional seismic velocity structure beneath Japanese Islands using data obtained by dense seismic network with the tomographic method (Matsubara and Obara, 2011). Japanese Islands are mainly on the Eurasian and North American plates. The Philippine Sea and Pacific plates are subducting beneath these continental plates. We focus on the Moho discontinuity at the continental side. We calculate the P-wave velocity gradients between the vertical grid nodes since the grid inversion as our tomographic method does not produce velocity discontinuity. The largest velocity gradient is 0.078 (km/s)/km at velocities of 7.2 and 7.3 km/s. We define the iso-velocity plane of 7.2 km/s as the Moho discontinuity. We discuss the Moho discontinuity above the upper boundary of the subducting oceanic plates with consideration of configuration of plate boundaries of prior studies (Shiomi et al., 2008; Kita et al., 2010; Hirata et al, 2012) since the Moho depth derived from the iso-velocity plane denotes the oceanic Moho at the contact zones of the overriding continental plates and the subducting oceanic plates. The Moho discontinuity shallower than 30 km depth is distributed within the tension region like northern Kyushu and coastal line of the Pacific Ocean in the northeastern Japan and the tension region at the Cretaceous as the northeastern Kanto district. These regions have low seismicity within the upper crust. Positive Bouguer anomaly beneath the northeastern Kanto district indicates the ductile material with large density in lower crust at the shallower portion and the aseismic upper crust

  1. Three-dimensional seismic refraction tomography of the crustal structure at the ION site on the Ninetyeast Ridge, Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlindwein, Vera; Bönnemann, Christian; Reichert, Christian; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Flueh, Ernst

    2003-01-01

    We have performed a 3-D seismic refraction tomography of a 48 × 48 km2 area surrounding ODP site 757, which is planned to host an International Ocean Network (ION) permanent seismological observatory, called the Ninetyeast Ridge Observatory (NERO). The study area is located in the southern part of the Ninetyeast Ridge, the trail left by the Kerguelen hotspot on the Indian plate. The GEOMAR Research Centre for Marine Geosciences and the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources acquired 18 wide-angle profiles recorded by 23 ocean bottom hydrophones during cruise SO131 of R/V Sonne in spring 1998. We apply a first arrival traveltime tomography technique using regularized inversion to recover the 3-D velocity structure relative to a 1-D background model that was constructed from a priori information and averaged traveltime data. The final velocity model revealed the crustal structure down to approximately 8 km depth. Resolution tests showed that structures with approximately 6 km horizontal extent can reliably be resolved down to that depth. The survey imaged the extrusive layer of the upper crust of the Ninetyeast Ridge, which varies in thickness between 3 and 4 km. A high-velocity anomaly coinciding with a positive magnetic anomaly represents a volcanic centre from which crust in this area is thought to have formed. A pronounced low-velocity anomaly is located underneath a thick sedimentary cover in a bathymetric depression. However, poor ray coverage of the uppermost kilometre of the crust in this area resulted in smearing of the shallow structure to a larger depth. Tests explicitly including the shallow low-velocity layer confirmed the existence of the deeper structure. The heterogeneity of the upper crust as observed by our study will have consequences for the waveforms of earthquake signals to be recorded by the future seismic observatory.

  2. Seismic tomography of the area of the 2010 Beni-Ilmane earthquake sequence, north-central Algeria.

    PubMed

    Abacha, Issam; Koulakov, Ivan; Semmane, Fethi; Yelles-Chaouche, Abd Karim

    2014-01-01

    The region of Beni-Ilmane (District of M'sila, north-central Algeria) was the site of an earthquake sequence that started on 14 May 2010. This sequence, which lasted several months, was triggered by conjugate E-W reverse and N-S dextral faulting. To image the crustal structure of these active faults, we used a set of 1406 well located aftershocks events and applied the local tomography software (LOTOS) algorithm, which includes absolute source location, optimization of the initial 1D velocity model, and iterative tomographic inversion for 3D seismic P- and S-wave velocities (and the Vp/Vs ratio), and source parameters. The patterns of P-wave low-velocity anomalies correspond to the alignments of faults determined from geological evidence, and the P-wave high-velocity anomalies may represent rigid blocks of the upper crust that are not deformed by regional stresses. The S-wave low-velocity anomalies coincide with the aftershock area, where relatively high values of Vp/Vs ratio (1.78) are observed compared with values in the surrounding areas (1.62-1.66). These high values may indicate high fluid contents in the aftershock area. These fluids could have been released from deeper levels by fault movements during earthquakes and migrated rapidly upwards. This hypothesis is supported by vertical sections across the study area show that the major Vp/Vs anomalies are located above the seismicity clusters.

  3. Upper crustal seismic structure of the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge from traveltime tomography: Implications for oceanic crustal accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, Robert T.; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-04-01

    isotropic and anisotropic P wave velocity structure of the upper oceanic crust on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is studied using refracted traveltime data collected by an active-source, three-dimensional tomography experiment. The isotropic velocity structure is characterized by low crustal velocities in the overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at the segment ends. These low velocities are indicative of pervasive tectonic fracturing and persist off axis, recording the history of ridge propagation. Near the segment center, velocities within the upper 1 km show ridge-parallel bands with low velocities on the outer flanks of topographic highs. These features are consistent with localized thickening of the volcanic extrusive layer from eruptions extending outside of the axial valley that flow down the fault-tilted blocks that form the abyssal hill topography. On-axis velocities are generally relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields likely due to the infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed beneath the most vigorous vent fields in a seismically active region above the axial magma chamber and may reflect increased fracturing and higher temperatures. Seismic anisotropy is high on-axis but decreases substantially off axis over 5-10 km (0.2-0.4 Ma). This decrease coincides with an increase in seismic velocities resolved at depths ≥1 km and is attributed to the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation. The orientation of the fast-axis of anisotropy is ridge-parallel near the segment center but curves near the segment ends reflecting the tectonic fabric within the OSCs.

  4. Uppermost mantle seismic velocity and anisotropy in the Euro-Mediterranean region from Pn and Sn tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, J.; Gil, A.; Gallart, J.

    2013-01-01

    In the last 10-15 years, the number of high quality seismic stations monitoring the Euro-Mediterranean region has increased significantly, allowing a corresponding improvement in structural constraints. We present here new images of the seismic velocity and anisotropy variations in the uppermost mantle beneath this complex area, compiled from inversion of Pn and Sn phases sampling the whole region. The method of Hearn has been applied to the traveltime arrivals of the International Seismological Center catalogue for the time period 1990-2010. A total of 579 753 Pn arrivals coming from 12 377 events recorded at 1 408 stations with epicentral distances between 220 km and 1 400 km have been retained after applying standard quality criteria (maximum depth, minimum number of recordings, maximum residual values …). Our results show significant features well correlated with surface geology and evidence the heterogeneous character of the Euro-Mediterranean lithosphere. The station terms reflect the existence of marked variations in crustal thickness, consistent with available Moho depths inferred from active seismic experiments. The highest Pn velocities are observed along a continuous band from the Po Basin to the northern Ionian Sea. Other high velocity zones include the Ligurian Basin, the Valencia Trough, the southern Alboran Sea and central part of the Algerian margin. Most significant low-velocity values are associated to orogenic belts (Betics, Pyrenees, Alps, Apennines and Calabrian Arc, Dinarides-Hellenides), and low-velocity zones are also identified beneath Sardinia and the Balearic Islands. The introduction of an anisotropic term enhances significantly the lateral continuity of the anomalies, in particular in the most active tectonic areas. Pn anisotropy shows consistent orientations subparallel to major orogenic structures, such as Betics, Apennines, Calabrian Arc and Alps. The Sn tomographic image has lower resolution but confirms independently most of the

  5. Electrical Resistivity, Seismic Refraction Tomography and Drilling Logs to Identify the Heterogeneity and the Preferential Flow in a Shallow Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachhab, A.

    2015-12-01

    The study site is located at the Center for Environmental Education and Research (CEER) at Susquehanna University. Electrical Resistivity and Seismic Refraction Tomography (ERT and SRT), as well as several pumping tests were performed to identify zones of heterogeneities and hydrogeophysical characteristics of a shallow unconfined aquifer. The combination of these methods was selected to study the local geology and the subsurface preferential pathways of groundwater flow. 22 Dipole-Dipole ERT transects with 56 electrodes each and 11 SRT transects with 24 geophones each were performed. Drilling logs of 5 observation wells located within the site were also used. All drilling logs showed clearly the heterogeneity of the aquifer when compared to each other. The combination of ERT and SRT indicated that a potential zone of preferential flow is present within the aquifer and can be accurately identified based on the approach adopted in this study. The drilling logs served to specifically identify the soil and the geological formations making the heterogeneity of the aquifer. 3D ERT and SRT block diagrams were generated to connect all formations shown in the 2D tomography profiles to visualize the pathways of preferential flow and non-conductive formations. While ERT has proven to show saturated areas of the subsurface, SRT was more effective in identifying the bedrock-soil discontinuity and other near surface formations contributing to the local heterogeneity.

  6. A detailed view of the crust and lithospheric mantle beneath eastern Australia from transportable seismic array tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlinson, Nicholas; Pilia, Simone

    2014-05-01

    The WOMBAT transportable seismic array project has been ongoing in eastern Australia since 1998, when a 40 station temporary array of recorders was first installed in western Victoria. To date, 16 consecutive array deployments have taken place with a cumulative total of over 700 stations installed in an area spanning Tasmania, New South Wales, southern Queensland and much of South Australia. Station separation varies between 15 km in Tasmania and 50 km on the mainland, with the majority of stations 3-component 1 Hz instruments, although a number of broadband instruments are interspersed. Although best suited to P-wave tomography, the recorded seismic wavefield has also proven to be useful for ambient noise tomography and crustal receiver functions, thus allowing detailed information on both the crust and lithospheric mantle structure to be retrieved. In order to apply teleseismic tomography using a transportable array of instruments, a robust background model is required which contains the long wavelength features suppressed by the use of relative arrival time residual datasets which are array specific. Here, we use the recently released AuSREM mantle model which is based on regional surface and body wave datasets. Crustal and Moho structure, which is poorly resolved by teleseismic data, is also included (from the AuSREM crustal model) as prior information to minimise smearing of crustal information into the mantle. The final model exhibits a variety of well resolved features, including a low velocity zone associated with Quaternary intraplate volcanism; a pronounced velocity gradient transition zone between the Precambrian shield region of Australia in the west and the Palaeozoic orogens in the east; and the presence of a high velocity salient which extends almost to the east coast in northern New South Wales, which is interpreted to be Precambrian lithosphere. The ambient noise tomography results, which are now continuous between Tasmania and mainland Australia

  7. Imaging the Western Iberia Seismic Structure from the Crust to the Upper Mantle from Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Graça; Kiselev, Sergey; Stutzmann, Eleonore; Schimmel, Martin; Haned, Abderrahmane; Dias, Nuno; Morais, Iolanda; Custódio, Susana

    2015-04-01

    Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) is now widely used to image the subsurface seismic structure, with a resolution mainly dependent on the seismic network coverage. Most of these studies are limited to Rayleigh waves for periods shorter than 40/45 s and, as a consequence, they can image only the crust or, at most, the uppermost mantle. Recently, some studies successfully showed that this analysis could be extended to longer periods, thus allowing a deeper probing. In this work we present the combination of two complementary datasets. The first was obtained from the analysis of ambient noise in the period range 5-50 sec, for Western Iberia, using a dense temporary seismic network that operated between 2010 and 2012. The second one was computed for a global study, in the period range 30-250 sec, from analysis of 150 stations of the global networks GEOSCOPE and GSN. In both datasets, the Empirical Green Functions are computed by phase cross-correlation. The ambient noise phase cross-correlations are stacked using the time-frequency domain phase weighted stack (Schimmel et al. 2011, Geoph. J. Int., 184, 494-506). A bootstrap approach is used to measure the group velocities between pairs of stations and to estimate the corresponding error. We observed a good agreement between the dispersion measurements on both short period and long period datasets for most of the grid nodes. They are then inverted to obtain the 3D S-wave model from the crust to the upper mantle, using a bayesian approach. A simulated annealing method is applied, in which the number of splines that describes the model is adapted within the inversion. We compare the S-wave velocity model at some selected profiles with the S-wave velocity models gathered from Ps and Sp receiver functions joint inversion. Both results, issued from ambient noise tomography and body wave's analysis for the crust and upper mantle are consistent. This work is supported by project AQUAREL (PTDC/CTEGIX/116819/2010) and is a

  8. Linking Microearthquakes and Seismic Tomography on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for Hydrothermal Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Kim, E.

    2013-12-01

    We report on a remarkable correlation between the patterns of microearthquakes and three-dimensional upper crustal velocity anomalies on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Microearthquakes were monitored from 2003-2006 by a small seismic network deployed on the central part of the segment. The velocity model was obtained from a tomography experiment comprising over 5500 shots from a large airgun array that were recorded by ocean bottom seismometers deployed at 64 sites along the Endeavour segment and the adjacent overlapping spreading centers (OSCs). On the segment scale, upper crustal velocities are low in the OSCs indicating that the crust is highly fractured. These low velocities persist off-axis and record the history of ridge propagation. In 2005, two swarm sequences that were interpreted in terms of magmatic intrusions on the limbs of the Endeavour-West Valley OSC were accompanied by extensive seismicity within the overlap basin. Throughout the microearthquake experiment earthquakes were concentrated in a region surrounding the southern tip of the West Valley propagator that coincides closely with the southern limit of the low velocities imaged around the OSC. Beneath the hydrothermal vent fields in the center of the Endeavour segment, the earthquakes were mostly located in a 500-m-thick band immediately above the axial magma chamber. There was a close correlation between the rates of seismicity beneath each vent field and their thermal output. The highest rates of seismicity were observed beneath the High Rise and Main Endeavour fields that each have power outputs of several hundred megawatts. Seismic velocities are generally high beneath the vent fields relative to velocities along the ridge axis immediately to the north and south. However, the High Rise and Main Endeavour fields are underlain by a low velocity region at 2 km depth that coincides with the seismically active region. This is consistent with a region of increased fracturing and

  9. Slab seismicity in the Western Hellenic Subduction Zone: Constraints from tomography and double-difference relocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpaap, Felix; Rondenay, Stéphane; Ottemöller, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The Western Hellenic subduction zone is characterized by a transition from oceanic to continental subduction. In the southern oceanic portion of the system, abundant seismicity reaches intermediate depths of 100-120 km, while the northern continental portion rarely exhibits deep earthquakes. Our study aims to investigate how this oceanic-continental transition affects fluid release and related seismicity along strike, by focusing on the distribution of intermediate depth earthquakes. To obtain a detailed image of the seismicity, we carry out a tomographic inversion for P- and S-velocities and double-difference earthquake relocation using a dataset of unprecedented spatial coverage in this area. Here we present results of these analyses in conjunction with high-resolution profiles from migrated receiver function images obtained from the MEDUSA experiment. We generate tomographic models by inverting data from 237 manually picked, well locatable events recorded at up to 130 stations. Stations from the permanent Greek network and the EGELADOS experiment supplement the 3-D coverage of the modeled domain, which covers a large part of mainland Greece and surrounding offshore areas. Corrections for the sphericity of the Earth and our update to the SIMULR16 package, which now allows S-inversion, help improve our previous models. Flexible gridding focusses the inversion on the domains of highest gradient around the slab, and we evaluate the resolution with checker board tests. We use the resulting velocity model to relocate earthquakes via the Double-Difference method, using a large dataset of differential traveltimes obtained by crosscorrelation of seismograms. Tens of earthquakes align along two planes forming a double seismic zone in the southern, oceanic portion of the subduction zone. With increasing subduction depth, the earthquakes appear closer to the center of the slab, outlining probable deserpentinization of the slab and concomitant eclogitization of dry crustal

  10. Seismicity and structure of Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes, Alaska, using joint body and surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Maceira, M.; Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2015-02-01

    Joint inversions of seismic data recover models that simultaneously fit multiple constraints while playing upon the strengths of each data type. Here we jointly invert 14 years of local earthquake body wave arrival times from the Alaska Volcano Observatory catalog and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves based upon ambient noise measurements for local Vp, Vs, and hypocentral locations at Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes using a new joint inversion algorithm. The velocity structure and relocated seismicity of both volcanoes are significantly more complex than many other volcanoes studied using similar techniques. Seismicity is distributed among several areas beneath or beyond the flanks of both volcanoes, illuminating a variety of volcanic and tectonic features. The velocity structures of the two volcanoes are exemplified by the presence of narrow high-Vp features in the near surface, indicating likely current or remnant pathways of magma to the surface. A single broad low-Vp region beneath each volcano is slightly offset from each summit and centered at approximately 7 km depth, indicating a potential magma chamber, where magma is stored over longer time periods. Differing recovery capabilities of the Vp and Vs data sets indicate that the results of these types of joint inversions must be interpreted carefully.

  11. Seismicity and structure of Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes, Alaska, using joint body and surface wave tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Syracuse, E. M.; Maceira, M.; Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2015-02-18

    Joint inversions of seismic data recover models that simultaneously fit multiple constraints while playing upon the strengths of each data type. Here, we jointly invert 14 years of local earthquake body wave arrival times from the Alaska Volcano Observatory catalog and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves based upon ambient noise measurements for local Vp, Vs, and hypocentral locations at Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes using a new joint inversion algorithm.The velocity structure and relocated seismicity of both volcanoes are significantly more complex than many other volcanoes studied using similar techniques. Seismicity is distributed among several areas beneath or beyond the flanks ofmore » both volcanoes, illuminating a variety of volcanic and tectonic features. The velocity structures of the two volcanoes are exemplified by the presence of narrow high-Vp features in the near surface, indicating likely current or remnant pathways of magma to the surface. A single broad low-Vp region beneath each volcano is slightly offset from each summit and centered at approximately 7 km depth, indicating a potential magma chamber, where magma is stored over longer time periods. Differing recovery capabilities of the Vp and Vs datasets indicate that the results of these types of joint inversions must be interpreted carefully.« less

  12. Seismicity and structure of Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes, Alaska, using joint body and surface wave tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Syracuse, E. M.; Maceira, M.; Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2015-02-18

    Joint inversions of seismic data recover models that simultaneously fit multiple constraints while playing upon the strengths of each data type. Here, we jointly invert 14 years of local earthquake body wave arrival times from the Alaska Volcano Observatory catalog and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves based upon ambient noise measurements for local Vp, Vs, and hypocentral locations at Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes using a new joint inversion algorithm.The velocity structure and relocated seismicity of both volcanoes are significantly more complex than many other volcanoes studied using similar techniques. Seismicity is distributed among several areas beneath or beyond the flanks of both volcanoes, illuminating a variety of volcanic and tectonic features. The velocity structures of the two volcanoes are exemplified by the presence of narrow high-Vp features in the near surface, indicating likely current or remnant pathways of magma to the surface. A single broad low-Vp region beneath each volcano is slightly offset from each summit and centered at approximately 7 km depth, indicating a potential magma chamber, where magma is stored over longer time periods. Differing recovery capabilities of the Vp and Vs datasets indicate that the results of these types of joint inversions must be interpreted carefully.

  13. Development of a High-Resolution Shallow Seismic Refraction Tomography System at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henthorn, R.; Caress, D. W.; Chaffey, M. R.; McGill, P. R.; Kirkwood, W. J.; Burgess, W. C.

    2009-12-01

    The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) is developing a high-resolution marine seismic refraction imaging system that can be deployed and operated using a remotely operated vehicle. Conventional marine seismic refraction methods typically use low-frequency sources and widely-spaced seafloor receivers to image crustal-scale subsurface structure. These systems often employ air-guns towed from a surface vessel to produce acoustic signals ranging from 1-100Hz, and ocean-bottom seismometers to record the refracted signals, resulting in images on the scale of hundreds of kilometers with resolutions no better than hundreds of meters. Images of subsurface structure at resolutions on the order of meters requires closely-spaced, near-seafloor sources and receivers capable of producing and recording higher-frequency signals centered around 3kHz. This poster will describe the first phase development of the High-Resolution Shallow Seismic Refraction Tomography System at MBARI including the science drivers, the design approach and trade-offs, and results from initial field tests conducted in the Monterey Bay. The capability to image fine-scale subsurface structure will augment ongoing research on hydrate deposits. Methane and the other hydrocarbon gases trapped in hydrates are climate-impacting greenhouse gases as well as potential energy sources. Therefore, research regarding the formation, stability, volume, and structure of these globally common deposits has considerable relevance today. High-resolution subsurface imaging can impact many important marine geological topics such as submarine faults, hydrothermal venting, and submarine volcanism. The system combines ROV-mounted transmission of chirp acoustic signals with a roughly 1-6 kHz sweep and an array of high-frequency ocean bottom hydrophone (OBH) receivers. The configuration of closely spaced receivers and a source pinging at tightly-spaced intervals provides the opportunity to pick refracted arrival times

  14. Slow slip events estimated from ground deformation and seismic wave velocity structure estimated from seismic wave tomography in the Tokai region, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, F.; Ohota, Y.; Negishi, H.; Matsubara, M.

    2004-12-01

    Ohota et al. (2004) estimated the fault model of the 2001 Tokai slow slip event based on the re-processing GPS data comparing the ground deformation in 1997-2000. From their discussion, in the period of slow slip event, interplate coupling is tightly remained in the depth of 10-25 km in the plate boundary in the Tokai region. Forward slip consisting of slow slip event is ongoing with a rate of 3 cm/yr at the depth of 25-40 km in the plate boundary. The slow slip event fault locates outside of the 1944 Tonankai earthquake fault model by Tanioka and Satake (2002). It suggests that slow slip event is occurred outside of asperity area of historical large earthquakes along the Nankai Trough. Recently dense seismological network is constructed and seismic wave velocity structure are discussed with detail from the seismic wave tomography method (Matsubara et al.,2004; Kamiya and Kobayashi, 2004). According to their resolution, the low Vp and Vs layer is estimated in the 25-40 km depth of the plate boundary between the Philippine Sea plate and Eurasian plate in the Tokai region. Precisely we discus the location of low Vp and Vs layers, it is located upper part pf the plate boundary with width of 10km, which is corresponded to the lower continental crust..It is located just under northern area of Lake Hamana and Mikawa Bay. Kodaira et al.(2004), they conclude that high Vp/Vs ration distributed in subducting upper ocean crust around 30 km depth of the plate boundary is a occurrence mechanism of the 2001 Tokai slow slip event. From our research, the rate of Vp/Vs in upper part of the subducting oceanic crust is changing with the depth of the plate boundary. Until 25 km depth, velocities of P-wave and S-wave are not low, and the rate Vp/Vs is normal. At depth of 25 - 40 km, velocities of P-wave and S-wave are decreasing, and the rate Vp/Vs is increasing. The depth of high rate is correspond the slow slip fault estimated by Ohota et al.(2004) and hypocenters of unvolcanic low

  15. The Mantle Beneath Southern Africa: Insights from Seismic Tomography and Mantle Xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, D. E.; Bell, D. R.; Boyd, F.; Schutt, D.; Carlson, R. W.

    2004-05-01

    We impose geologic constraints on computed tomographic structure of the upper mantle beneath southern Africa by calculating seismic velocities and rock densities from approximately 120 geothermobarometrically calibrated mantle xenoliths from the Archean Kaapvaal craton and adjacent Proterozoic mobile belts. Velocity and density estimates are based on the elastic and thermal moduli of constituent minerals under equilibrium P-T conditions at the mantle source. The largest sources of error in the velocity estimates derive from inaccurate thermo-barometry and, to a lesser extent, from uncertainties in the elastic constants of the constituent minerals. We show that seismic velocity variations between cratonic and non-cratonic xenoliths are controlled dominantly by differences in calculated temperatures, with compositional effects secondary. Different temperature profiles between cratonic and non-cratonic regions have a relatively minor influence on density, where composition remains the dominant control. Low-T cratonic xenoliths exhibit a positive velocity-depth curve, rising from about 8.13 km/s at uppermost mantle depths to about 8.25 km/s at 180-km depth. S-wave velocities decrease slightly over the same depth interval, from about 4.7 km/s in the uppermost mantle to 4.65 km/s at 180-km depth. P and S-wave velocities for high-T lherzolites are highly scattered, ranging from highs close to those of the low-T xenoliths to lows of 8.05 km/s and 4.5 km/s at depths in excess of 200 km. These low velocities, while not asthenospheric, are inconsistent with seismic tomographic images that indicate high velocity root material extending to depths of at least 250 km. The high-T mantle xenoliths, most of which were erupted ca 80-90 Ma, appear to have been affected by localized non-equilibrium thermal perturbations occurring around the time of the kimberlite eruption as well as by compositional modifications associated with emplacement of metasomatic fluids into the deep

  16. On the scalability of seismic waveform inversion: From ultrasonic experiments to global-scale tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamei, R.; Pratt, R. G.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic waveform inversion endeavors to extract high-resolution subsurface models from full seismic records by using numerical solutions of the full forward wave equation. In the last two decades, waveform inversion has been successfully applied to both active and passive seismic experiments, and has demonstrated superb resolution power over a wide-range of applications. Waveform inversion is still computationally challenging, and is well known to be a strongly non-linear and ill-conditioned inverse problem. Passive and active waveform inversions have largely been developed independently, although both originate from the work of Lailly (1983) and Tarantola (1984). In this presentation, we review a suite of past results from both active and passive source waveform inversions, and attempt to illustrate similarities and shared challenges between them. In active seismics, waveform inversion has been applied to i) ultrasonic breast cancer data to image targets of a few tens of centimeters on a side, ii) cross-well exploration data using frequencies between hundreds and a few thousands of Hz to image targets of the order of hundreds of meters on a side, iii) surface seismic for near-surface engineering problems using frequencies of tens to a few hundreds of Hz to image targets of the order of hundreds of meters to several kilometers, and iv) hydrocarbon exploration and crustal imaging using frequencies of a few, to a few tens of Hz for targets tens of kilometers on a side. In contrast, waveform inversion from passive source data uses much lower frequencies (less than 1 Hz), and images much larger target areas to retrieve iv) crustal scale structures of the order of hundreds of kilometers using data periods of one to several tens of seconds, v) upper-mantle structure on regional scales thousands of kilometers on a side using data periods of ten to a few hundred seconds, and vi) the whole-earth inversions (of order 10,000 km on a side), using a similar frequency range. Our

  17. High resolution seismic imaging of Rainier Mesa using surface reflection and surface to tunnel tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Johnson, L.R.; Karageorgi, E.K.; Peterson, J.E.

    1994-06-01

    In the interpretation of seismic data to infer properties of an explosion source, it is necessary to account for wave propagation effects. In order to understand and remove these propagation effects, it is necessary to have a model. An open question concerning this matter is the detail and accuracy which must be present in the velocity model in order to produce reliable estimates in the estimated source properties. While it would appear that the reliability of the results would be directly related to the accuracy of the velocity and density models used in the interpretation, it may be that certain deficiencies in these models can be compensated by the and amount of seismic data which is used in the inversion. The NPE provided an opportunity to test questions of this sort. In August 1993, two high resolution seismic experiments were performed in N-Tunnel and on the surface of Rainier Mesa above it. The first involved a surface-to-tunnel imaging experiment with sources on the surface and receivers in tunnel U12n.23 about 88 meters west of the NPE. It was possible to estimate the apparent average velocity between the tunnel and the surface. In a separate experiment, a high resolution reflection experiment was performed in order to image the lithology in Rainier Mesa. Good quality, broad band, reflections were obtained from depths extending into the Paleozoic basement. A high velocity layer near the surface is underlain by a thick section of low velocity material, providing a nonuniform but low average velocity between the depth of the NPE and the surface.

  18. Flake tectonics in the Sulu orogen in eastern China as revealed by seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peifen; Liu, Futian; Ye, Kai; Wang, Qingchen; Cong, Bolin; Chen, Hui

    2002-05-01

    Seismic tomographic image reveals a crocodile-like P-waves velocity structure beneath the Sulu orogenic belt, which marks the subduction/collision zone between the Sino-Korean block (SK) and Yangtze block (YZ) in eastern China. It may imply that the upper crust of the YZ was detached from its lower crust and thrust over the SK for a maximum of ~400 km in the Sulu region, whereas the remnant of the subducted Yangtze lithosphere was lay beneath the SK. This crustal detached structure (flake tectonics) might have occurred after the Triassic subduction/collision.

  19. The 3D crustal structure of Northeastern Tibetan area from seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Anhui

    2015-04-01

    The Northeastern Tibetan region is located in the border area of three sub-plates in China, i.e. the Tibetan plateau, North China block and Xinjiang block. Effected simultaneously by the extrusion driven by the India-Eurasia plat collision and the blockage of the Ordos basin, this area has complex geology, strong tectonics activities and suffered from several large historic earthquakes, such as the Haiyuan earthquake (M8.6) in 1920, the Gulang earthquake (M8.0) in 1927. To enhance our understanding of the crustal structure and the interaction between different tectonic blocks of this region, we conduct a three-dimensional (3D) tomographic study by using the arrival time date recorded by regional seismic network. We used 101101 P and 103313 S wave arrival times from 11650 local earthquakes during 1970 to 2013 recorded by 154 permanent seismic stations of the local Seismic Network, installed over five provinces in China, i.e. Gansu, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shanxi, Neimenggu. We first established a 1D primary crustal model from LITHO1.0, an updated crust and lithospheric model of the Earth by weighted averaging. To better performer ray tracing, our inversion involved three discontinuities (including the Moho) with depth variation over the mantle derived from LITHO1.0. Detailed three-dimensional seismic velocity (Vp and Vs) structures of the crust of the Northeastern Tibetan are determined with a horizontal resolution of about 35 km and a depth resolution of 6-20 km. The Poisson's ratio (σ) structure was also estimated after obtained Vp and Vs structures. We detected low-velocity anomalies in the lower crust and relative high-velocity anomalies in the upper crust beneath the Longmenshan faults zone, which are in good agreement with the results of most previous geophysical studies. Our results revealed clear different velocity variation beneath both sides of different tectonic blocks. In addition, we found the correlation between our tomographic result and previous

  20. Lower mantle thermal structure deduced from seismic tomography, mineral physics and numerical modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadek, O.; Yuen, D. A.; Steinbach, V.; Chopelas, A.; Matyska, C.

    1994-01-01

    The long-wavelength thermal anomalies in the lower mantle have been mapped out using several seismic tomographic models in conjunction with thermodynamic parameters derived from high-pressure mineral physics experiments. These parameters are the depth variations of thermal expansivity and of the proportionality factor between changes in density and seismic velocity. The giant plume-like structures in the lower mantle under the Pacific Ocean and Africa have outer fringes with thermal anomalies around 300-400 K, but very high temperatures are found in the center of the plumes near the base of the core-mantle boundary. These extreme values can exceed +1500 K and may reflect large hot thermal anomalies in the lower mantle, which are supported by recent measurements of high melting temperatures of perovskite and iron. Extremely cold anomalies, around -1500 K, are found for anomalies in the deep mantle around the Pacific rim and under South America. Numerical simulations show that large negative thermal anomalies in the mid-lower mantle have modest magnitudes of around -500 K. correlation pattern exists between the present-day locations of cold masses in the lower mantle and the sites of past subduction since the Cretaceous. Results from correlation analysis show that the slab mass-flux in the lower mantle did not conform to a steady-state nature but exhibited time-dependent behavior.

  1. Preliminary Results of Crustal Structure beneath the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone Using Teleseismic Receiver Functions and Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Aziz Zanjani, A.; Hu, S.; Liu, Y.; Herrmann, R. B.; Conder, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    As part of a on-going EarthScope FlexArray project, we deployed 45 broadband seismographs in a 300-km-long linear profile across the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone (WVSZ). Here we present preliminary results of crustal structure beneath WVSZ based on teleseismic receiver functions and ambient noise tomography. We combined waveform data of the temporary stations in 2014 with those of permanent seismic stations and the transportable array stations in our study area since 2011. We found 656 teleseismic events with clear P-wave signals and obtained 2657 good-quality receiver functions of 84 stations using a time-domain iterative deconvolution method. We estimated crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio beneath each station using the H-κ stacking method. A high-resolution crustal structural image along the linear profile was obtained using the Common-Conversion-Point (CCP) stacking method. We also measured Rayleigh-wave phase and group velocities from 5 to 50 s by cross-correlating ambient noises between stations and did joint-inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersions for S-velocity structures beneath selected stations. The results show that the average crustal thickness in the region is 47 km with a gentle increase of crustal thickness from southeast to northwest. A mid-crustal interface is identified in the CCP image that also deepens from 15 km in the southeastern end to >20 km in the northwest. The CCP image shows that the low-velocity sedimentary layer along the profile is broad and is thickest (~10 km) near the center of the Wabash Valley. Beneath the center of the Valley there is a 40-km-wide positive velocity discontinuity at a depth of 40 km in the lower crust that might be the top of a rift pillow in this failed continental rift. Further results using 3D joint inversion and CCP migration will be presented at the meeting.

  2. Inversion of band-limited, downward continued multichannel seismic data by combination of travel-time and full waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gras Andreu, Claudia; Estela Jiménez Tejero, Clara; Dagnino Vázquez, Daniel; Meléndez Catalán, Adrià; Sallarès Casas, Valentí; Rodríguez Ranero, César

    2016-04-01

    Seismic tomography methods and in particular full waveform inversion (FWI) of controlled source data are powerful tools to obtain accurate information of the physical properties of the subsurface. One of their main drawbacks is however the strong non-linearity of the problem, which makes the solution strongly dependent on the initial model and on the low frequency content of the data set. A common strategy to mitigate these issues is to combine the robustness of Travel Time Tomography (TTT) to obtain an appropriate reference model that is subsequently refined by FWI. This combined technique is often used for long-offset acquisition geometries, where refracted waves are present as first arrivals. Conversely, its application to streamer-type multichannel seismic (MCS) data is rare, because these data are intrinsically short offset so the presence of refractions is very limited. In this work we use synthetic data to show how the downward continuation (DC) or redatuming of the MCS data prior to TTT allows obtaining velocity models that can be then used as initial models for FWI even if data lack frequencies below 4 Hz. In summary, the proposed strategy consists of the following steps: 1) We compute the downward continued wavefield using a finite difference solution of the acoustic wave equation in time domain. The solver used for the propagation was developed by the Barcelona Centre for Subsurface Imaging (BCSI) and incorporates a mutli-shooting strategy necessary to back-propagate the wavefield and reduce the computational time. Our new datum level chosen corresponds to the bathymetry of the model. 2) We use the resultant DC MCS wavefield to identify the refracted phases (first arrivals) highlighted by the redatuming process and we invert them applying TTT. The resulting model, which has the low wavenumber information needed to reduce the non-linearity problems of the FWI, is then used as initial model to perform multi-scale FWI of the original MCS data starting at

  3. Short-period Rayleigh wave tomography for Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes, Hawaii, from ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, S.; Haney, M. M.; Wolfe, C. J.; Okubo, P.; Thurber, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging with ambient seismic noise has proven to be a useful complement to earthquake tomography. Ambient noise's surface wave energy at short periods (peaked at ~0.2 Hz) allows imaging of shallow structure (i.e., the uppermost ~10 km), with resolution dependent on the geometry of available inter-station propagation paths instead of earthquake-receiver paths. In addition, data is generated continuously allowing for relatively uniform imaging capabilities through time. These advantages are of great interest in imaging the shallow seismic structure of volcanic systems, since magmatic plumbing systems extend all the way to the surface and can structurally change with time. We here present the first demonstration of ambient noise tomography for the volcanic systems of Kilauea and Mauna Loa on the Island of Hawai'i. Using continuous noise records between May 2007 and December 2009 from the permanent network operated by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, we calculate noise correlation functions (NCFs) (vertical components only) at 0.1-0.9 Hz for more than 700 short-period station pairs. The presence of extended intervals in which volcanic tremor from Pu'u O'o and Halema'uma'u obscures the Green's functions above 0.3 Hz for all station pairs requires the exclusion of those intervals from the analysis. We use the NCF's summed absolute amplitude as a criterion to identify days that are contaminated by tremor. Stacks of the remaining 169 daily, uncontaminated NCFs are used to perform group velocity measurements with automatic frequency time analysis in 0.01 Hz intervals. We ensure quality of the measurements by manually selecting frequency bands in which we trust the automatic measurement for each dispersion curve. Assuming straight (i.e. great circle) propagation paths, we linearly invert for Rayleigh wave group velocity maps at each frequency. Our results in the frequency band from ~0.15 to 0.25 Hz show prominent anomalous high-velocities beneath Kilauea's rift zones

  4. Searching for the Lost Jurassic and Cretaceous Ocean Basins of the Circum-Arctic Linking Plate Models and Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, G. E.; Müller, R.

    2012-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of the circum-Arctic since the breakup of Pangea involves the opening and closing of ocean basins including the Oimyakon, Angayucham, South Anuyi, Amerasia and Eurasia basins. The time-dependent configurations and kinematic history of the basins, adjacent continental terranes, and subduction zones involved are not well understood, and many published tectonic models for particular regions are inconsistent with models for adjacent areas. The age, location, geometry and convergence rates of the subduction zones associated with these ancient ocean basins since at least the Late Jurassic have implications for mantle structure, which can be used as an additional constraint for building plate and plate boundary models. Here we integrate an analysis of both surface and deep mantle observations back to 200 Ma. Based on a digitized set of tectonic features with time-dependent rotational histories we present a refined plate model with topologically closed plate polygons for the circum-Arctic with particular focus on the northern Pacific, Siberian and Alaskan margins (Fig 1). We correlate the location, geometry and timing of subduction zones with associated seismic velocities anomalies from global P and S wave tomography models across different depths. We design a plate model that best matches slabs imaged in seismic tomography in an iterative fashion. This match depends on a combination of relative and absolute plate motions. Therefore we test two end-member absolute plate motion models, evaluating a paleomagnetic model and a model based on hotspot tracks and large igneous provinces. This method provides a novel approach to deciphering the Arctic tectonic history in a global context. Fig 1:Plate reconstruction at 200Ma and 140Ma, visualized using GPlates software. Present-day topography raster (ETOPO2) segmented into major tectonic elements of the circum-Arctic. Plate boundaries delineated in black and selected subduction and arc features labeled in

  5. Seismic anisotropy of the upper mantle beneath Fennoscandia - Preliminary results of anisotropic tomography with novel code AniTomo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munzarova, Helena; Plomerova, Jaroslava; Kissling, Edi; Vecsey, Ludek; Babuska, Vladislav

    2016-04-01

    Seismological investigations of the continental mantle lithosphere, particularly its anisotropic structure, advance our understanding of plate tectonics and formation of continents. Orientation of the anisotropic fabrics reflect stress field during the lithosphere origin and its later deformations. We process teleseismic body waves recorded during passive seismic experiments SVEKALAPKO (1998-1999) and LAPNET (2007-2009), deployed in the south-central and northern Fennoscandia, around the contact of the Archean and Proterozoic parts of the shield, to retrieve both anisotropic and isotropic velocity images of the upper mantle. Standard isotropic teleseismic P-wave tomography distinguishes two major regions of the mantle lithosphere in the northern part of Fennoscandia, boundary of which follows the surface trace of the Baltic-Bothnia Megashear Zone (BBZ). Apart from that, joint interpretation of lateral variations of anisotropic P- and SKS-wave pattern detected domains of mantle lithosphere with differently oriented anisotropic fabrics within those two regions (Vecsey et al., Tectonophysics, 2007; Plomerova et al., Solid Earth, 2011). The retrieved anisotropy reflects fossil fabrics of the mantle lithosphere (Babuska and Plomerova, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 2006). The contact of the Proterozoic and Archean Fennoscandia appears as a broad transition in the south-central Fennoscandia (Vecsey et al., Tectonophysics, 2007), while the contact seems to be more distinct towards the north. We have developed a novel code (AniTomo) that allows us to invert relative P-wave travel time residuals for coupled isotropic-anisotropic P-wave velocity models assuming weak hexagonal anisotropy with symmetry axis oriented generally in 3D. The code was successfully tested on synthetic data and here we present results of its first application to real data. The region of Fennoscandia seems to be a right choice for the first calculation of anisotropic tomography with the new code as this

  6. Seismic imaging beneath southwest Africa based on finite-frequency body wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssof, Mohammad; Yuan, Xiaohui; Tilmann, Frederik; Heit, Benjamin; Weber, Michael; Jokat, Wilfried; Geissler, Wolfram; Laske, Gabi

    2016-04-01

    We present a seismic model of southwest Africa from teleseismic tomographic inversion of the P- and S- wave data recorded by an amphibious temporary seismic network. The area of study is located at the intersection of the Walvis Ridge with the continental margin of northern Namibia, and extends into the Congo craton. Utilizing 3D finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, we invert traveltime residuals of the teleseismic body waves to image seismic structures in the upper mantle. To test the robustness of our tomographic imaging, we employed various resolution assessments that allow us to inspect the extent of smearing effects and to evaluate the optimum regularization weights (i.e., damping and smoothness). These tests include applying different (ir)regular parameterizations, classical checkerboard and anomaly tests and squeezing modeling. Furthermore, we performed different kinds of weighing schemes for the traveltime dataset. These schemes account for balancing between the picks data amount with their corresponding events directions. Our assessment procedure involves also a detailed investigation of the effect of the crustal correction on the final velocity image, which strongly influenced the image resolution for the mantle structures. Our model can resolve horizontal structures of 1° x 1° below the array down to 300-350 km depth. The resulting model is mainly dominated by the difference in the oceanic and continental mantle lithosphere beneath the study area, with second-order features related to their respective internal structures. The fast lithospheric keel of the Congo Craton reaches a depth of ~250 km. The orogenic Damara Belt and continental flood basalt areas are characterized by low velocity perturbations down to a depth of ~150 km, indicating a normal fertile mantle. High velocities in the oceanic lithosphere beneath the Walvis Ridge appear to show signatures of chemical depletion. A pronounced anomaly of fast velocity is imaged underneath continental NW

  7. Full Seismic Waveform Tomography of the Japan region using Adjoint Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steptoe, Hamish; Fichtner, Andreas; Rickers, Florian; Trampert, Jeannot

    2013-04-01

    We present a full-waveform tomographic model of the Japan region based on spectral-element wave propagation, adjoint techniques and seismic data from dense station networks. This model is intended to further our understanding of both the complex regional tectonics and the finite rupture processes of large earthquakes. The shallow Earth structure of the Japan region has been the subject of considerable tomographic investigation. The islands of Japan exist in an area of significant plate complexity: subduction related to the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates is responsible for the majority of seismicity and volcanism of Japan, whilst smaller micro-plates in the region, including the Okhotsk, and Okinawa and Amur, part of the larger North America and Eurasia plates respectively, contribute significant local intricacy. In response to the need to monitor and understand the motion of these plates and their associated faults, numerous seismograph networks have been established, including the 768 station high-sensitivity Hi-net network, 84 station broadband F-net and the strong-motion seismograph networks K-net and KiK-net in Japan. We also include the 55 station BATS network of Taiwan. We use this exceptional coverage to construct a high-resolution model of the Japan region from the full-waveform inversion of over 15,000 individual component seismograms from 53 events that occurred between 1997 and 2012. We model these data using spectral-element simulations of seismic wave propagation at a regional scale over an area from 120°-150°E and 20°-50°N to a depth of around 500 km. We quantify differences between observed and synthetic waveforms using time-frequency misfits allowing us to separate both phase and amplitude measurements whilst exploiting the complete waveform at periods of 15-60 seconds. Fréchet kernels for these misfits are calculated via the adjoint method and subsequently used in an iterative non-linear conjugate-gradient optimization. Finally, we employ

  8. Crustal structure and relocated earthquakes in the Puget Lowland, Washington, from high-resolution seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Wagoner, T. M.; Crosson, R.S.; Creager, K.C.; Medema, G.; Preston, L.; Symons, N.P.; Brocher, T.M.

    2002-01-01

    The availability of regional earthquake data from the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network (PNSN), together with active source data from the Seismic Hazards Investigation in Puget Sound (SHIPS) seismic experiments, has allowed us to construct a new high-resolution 3-D, P wave velocity model of the crust to a depth of about 30 km in the central Puget Lowland. In our method, earthquake hypocenters and velocity model are jointly coupled in a fully nonlinear tomographic inversion. Active source data constrain the upper 10-15 km of the model, and earthquakes constrain the deepest portion of the model. A number of sedimentary basins are imaged, including the previously unrecognized Muckleshoot basin, and the previously incompletely defined Possession and Sequim basins. Various features of the shallow crust are imaged in detail and their structural transitions to the mid and lower crust are revealed. These include the Tacoma basin and fault zone, the Seattle basin and fault zone, the Seattle and Port Ludlow velocity highs, the Port Townsend basin, the Kingston Arch, and the Crescent basement, which is arched beneath the Lowland from its surface exposure in the eastern Olympics. Strong lateral velocity gradients, consistent with the existence of previously inferred faults, are observed, bounding the southern Port Townsend basin, the western edge of the Seattle basin beneath Dabob Bay, and portions of the Port Ludlow velocity high and the Tacoma basin. Significant velocity gradients are not observed across the southern Whidbey Island fault, the Lofall fault, or along most of the inferred location of the Hood Canal fault. Using improved earthquake locations resulting from our inversion, we determined focal mechanisms for a number of the best recorded earthquakes in the data set, revealing a complex pattern of deformation dominated by general arc-parallel regional tectonic compression. Most earthquakes occur in the basement rocks inferred to be the lower Tertiary Crescent

  9. Tomography and Methods of Travel-Time Calculation for Regional Seismic Location

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S; Ballard, S; Rowe, C; Wagoner, G; Antolik, M; Phillips, S; Ramirez, A; Begnaud, M; Pasyanos, M E; Dodge, D A; Flanagan, M P; Hutchenson, K; Barker, G; Dwyer, J; Russell, D

    2007-07-02

    We are developing a laterally variable velocity model of the crust and upper mantle across Eurasia and North Africa to reduce event location error by improving regional travel-time prediction accuracy. The model includes both P and S velocities and we describe methods to compute travel-times for Pn, Sn, Pg, and Lg phases. For crustal phases Pg and Lg we assume that the waves travel laterally at mid-crustal depths, with added ray segments from the event and station to the mid crustal layer. Our work on Pn and Sn travel-times extends the methods described by Zhao and Xie (1993). With consideration for a continent scale model and application to seismic location, we extend the model parameterization of Zhao and Xie (1993) by allowing the upper-mantle velocity gradient to vary laterally. This extension is needed to accommodate the large variation in gradient that is known to exist across Eurasia and North African. Further, we extend the linear travel-time calculation method to mantle-depth events, which is needed for seismic locators that test many epicenters and depths. Using these methods, regional travel times are computed on-the-fly from the velocity model in milliseconds, forming the basis of a flexible travel time facility that may be implemented in an interactive locator. We use a tomographic technique to improve upon a laterally variable starting velocity model that is based on Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratory model compilation efforts. Our tomographic data set consists of approximately 50 million regional arrivals from events that meet the ground truth (GT) criteria of Bondar et al. (2004) and other non-seismic constraints. Each datum is tested to meet strict quality control standards that include comparison with established distance-dependent travel-time residual populations relative to the IASPIE91 model. In addition to bulletin measurements, nearly 50 thousand arrival measurements were made at the national laboratories. The tomographic

  10. Double-Difference Tomography in the West Bohemia Seismic Zone: A Study of the 2011 Earthquake Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löberich, Eric; Alexandrakis, Catherine; Calo, Marco; Vavryčuk, Václav; Buske, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Fluid migration, gas springs and particularly earthquake swarms are indications of ongoing geodynamic processes in the Bohemian Massif. This tectonically active region can be subdivided into several microplates, such as the Moldanubian and Saxothuringian and the block of the Teplá-Barrandian, which formed a complex sutured crust during the Variscian collision. Beyond this subdivision, the geological situation of the Bohemian Massif is further defined by the Eger Rift, the Cheb basin and the Smrčiny pluton. Moreover a thinned crust and lithosphere is typical for the region, whereby the seismic activity is controlled by the Mariánske Láznĕ Fault and the Počatky-Plesná Shear Zone. Former investigations have shown a relationship between the activated fault and the occurrence of swarm earthquakes. In this study, the analysis of the 2011 earthquake swarm was in the focus of the consideration, following previous findings from the 2008 earthquake swarm. Here, the aim is to improve the understanding between the mantle fluids and the generation of earthquake swarms in the West Bohemia Seismic Zone. Thereby double-difference tomography (tomoDD) was applied to the 2011 earthquake swarm data, leading to an enhanced location accuracy of the hypocenters and a sharper image of the fault system, which can be further controlled by hypoDD relocations. The rupture time series and clustering are also investigated. Additionally, a 3D velocity model for the P- and S-wave are derived and evaluated by considering the results of synthetic tests. The P- to S- wave velocity ratio, which is sensitive to the presence of fluids, is calculated directly from the P- and S-wave model and interpreted in relation to the potential presence of mantle fluids. In summary, this study combines the past knowledge about the fault systems and swarms, with the newly calculated velocity model, source migration pattern and cluster analysis. Moreover the earthquake characteristics are investigated in

  11. Imaging the Seattle Fault Zone with high-resolution seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, A.J.; Fisher, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Seattle fault, which trends east-west through the greater Seattle metropolitan area, is a thrust fault that, around 1100 years ago, produced a major earthquake believed to have had a magnitude greater than 7. We present the first high resolution image of the shallow P wave velocity variation across the fault zone obtained by tomographic inversion of first arrivals recorded on a seismic reflection profile shot through Puget Sound adjacent to Seattle. The velocity image shows that above 500 m depth the fault zone extending beneath Seattle comprises three distinct fault splays, the northernmost of which dips to the south at around 60??. The degree of uplift of Tertiary rocks within the fault zone suggests that the slip-rate along the northernmost splay during the Quaternary is 0.5 mm a-1, which is twice the average slip-rate of the Seattle fault over the last 40 Ma.

  12. Structure of the Lesser Antilles subduction forearc and backstop from 3D seismic refraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evain, Mikael; Galve, Audrey; Charvis, Philippe; Laigle, Mireille; Kopp, Heidrun; Bécel, Anne; Weinzierl, Wolfgang; Hirn, Alfred; Flueh, Ernst R.; Gallart, Josep

    2013-09-01

    In 2007 the Sismantilles II experiment was conducted to constrain structure and seismicity in the central Lesser Antilles subduction zone. The seismic refraction data recorded by a network of 27 OBSs over an area of 65 km × 95 km provide new insights on the crustal structure of the forearc offshore Martinique and Dominica islands. The tomographic inversion of first arrival travel times provides a 3D P-wave velocity model down to 15 km. Basement velocity gradients depict that the forearc is made up of two distinct units: A high velocity gradient domain named the inner forearc in comparison to a lower velocity gradient domain located further trenchward named the outer forearc. Whereas the inner forearc appears as a rigid block uplifted and possibly tilted as a whole to the south, short wavelength deformations of the outer forearc basement are observed, beneath a 3 to 6 km thick sedimentary pile, in relation with the subduction of the Tiburon Ridge and associated seafloor reliefs. North, offshore Dominica Island, the outer forearc is 70 km wide. It extends as far as 180 km to the east of the volcanic front where it acts as a backstop on which the accretionary wedge developed. Its width decreases strongly to the south to terminate offshore Martinique where the inner forearc acts as the backstop. The inner forearc is likely the extension at depth of the Mesozoic magmatic crust outcropping to the north in La Désirade Island and along the scarp of the Karukera Spur. The outer forearc could be either the eastern prolongation of the inner forearc, but the crust was thinned and fractured during the past tectonic history of the area or by recent subduction processes, or an oceanic terrane more recently accreted to the island arc.

  13. Crustal velocity structure associated with the eastern Tennessee seismic zone: Vp and Vs images based upon local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Christine A.; Withers, Mitchell M.; Cox, Randel Tom; Vlahovic, Gordana; Arroucau, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We present three-dimensional P and S wave velocity models for the active eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) using arrival time data from more than 1000 local earthquakes. A nonlinear tomography method is used that involves sequential inversion for model and hypocenter parameters. We image several velocity anomalies that persist through most of the inversion volume. Some anomalies support the presence of known features such as an ancient rift zone in northern Tennessee. Other anomalies reveal the presence of basement features that can be correlated with regional gravity and magnetic anomalies. We image a narrow, NE-SW trending, steeply dipping zone of low velocities that extends to a depth of at least 24 km and is associated with the vertical projection of the prominent New York-Alabama magnetic lineament. The low-velocity zone may have an apparent dip to the SE at depths exceeding 15 km. The low-velocity zone is interpreted as a major basement fault juxtaposing Granite-Rhyolite basement to the NW from Grenville southern Appalachian basement to the SE. Relocated hypocenters align in near-vertical segments suggesting reactivation of a distributed zone of deformation associated with a major strike-slip fault. We suggest that the ETSZ represents reactivation of an ancient shear zone established during formation of the super continent Rodinia.

  14. Lithostratigraphic interpretation from joint analysis of seismic tomography and magnetotelluric resistivity models using self-organizing map techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, K.; Muñoz, G.; Moeck, I.

    2012-12-01

    The combined interpretation of different models as derived from seismic tomography and magnetotelluric (MT) inversion represents a more efficient approach to determine the lithology of the subsurface compared with the separate treatment of each discipline. Such models can be developed independently or by application of joint inversion strategies. After the step of model generation using different geophysical methodologies, a joint interpretation work flow includes the following steps: (1) adjustment of a joint earth model based on the adapted, identical model geometry for the different methods, (2) classification of the model components (e.g. model blocks described by a set of geophysical parameters), and (3) re-mapping of the classified rock types to visualise their distribution within the earth model, and petrophysical characterization and interpretation. One possible approach for the classification of multi-parameter models is based on statistical pattern recognition, where different models are combined and translated into probability density functions. Classes of rock types are identified in these methods as isolated clusters with high probability density function values. Such techniques are well-established for the analysis of two-parameter models. Alternatively we apply self-organizing map (SOM) techniques, which have no limitations in the number of parameters to be analysed in the joint interpretation. Our SOM work flow includes (1) generation of a joint earth model described by so-called data vectors, (2) unsupervised learning or training, (3) analysis of the feature map by adopting image processing techniques, and (4) application of the knowledge to derive a lithological model which is based on the different geophysical parameters. We show the usage of the SOM work flow for a synthetic and a real data case study. Both tests rely on three geophysical properties: P velocity and vertical velocity gradient from seismic tomography, and electrical resistivity

  15. Structure of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone from seismic refraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvis, P.; Evain, M.; Galve, A.; Laigle, M.; Ruiz Fernandez, M.; Kopp, H.; Hirn, A.; Flueh, E. R.; Party, T.

    2011-12-01

    In 2007, two wide-angle seismic experiments were conducted to constrain the structure of the central Lesser Antilles subduction zone. During the Sismantilles II experiment, seismic refraction data recorded by a network of 27 OBSs over an area of more than 6000 km2 provide new insights on the crustal structure of the forearc offshore Martinique and Dominica islands. The tomographic inversion of first arrival travel times provides a 3D P-wave velocity model down to 15 km. Basement velocity gradient shows the forearc made of two distinct units: A high velocity gradient domain named the inner forearc in comparison to a lower velocity gradient domain located further trenchward named the outer forearc. The inner forearc is likely the extension at depth of the Mesozoic magmatic crust outcropping to the north in La Désirade Island and along the scarp of the Karukera spur and then represent the eastern limit of the Caribbean Plateau. The outer forearc probably consists of magmatic rocks of a similar origin. It could be either part of the margin of the Caribbean Plateau, like the inner forearc, but the crust was thinned and fractured during the past tectonic history of the area or by recent subduction processes, or an oceanic terrane more recently accreted to the island arc. Whereas the inner forearc appears as a rigid block uplifted and tilted as a whole to the south, short wavelength deformations of the outer forearc basement are observed, beneath a 3 to 6 km thick sedimentary pile, in relation with the subduction of the Tiburon ridge and associated seamounts. North, offshore Dominica Island, the outer forearc is 70 km wide. It extends as far as 180 km to the east of the volcanic front where it acts as a backstop on which the accretionary wedge developed. Its width decreases strongly to the south to terminate offshore Martinique where the inner forearc acts as the backstop. Two dense wide-angle seismic refraction lines, shot during the Trail experiment (2007) provides a 2

  16. Seismic structure of subducted Philippine Sea plate beneath the southern Ryukyu arc by receiver function and local earthquakes tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic coupling of the Ryukyu subduction zone is assumed to be weak from the lack of historical interplate large earthquakes. However, recent investigation of repeating slow slip events (Heki & Kataoka, 2008), shallow low frequency earthquakes (Ando et al., 2012), and source of 1771 Yaeyama mega-tsunami (Nakamura, 2009), showed that the interplate coupling is not weak in the south of Ryukyu Trench. The biannually repeating SSEs (Mw=6.5) occur at the depth of 20-40 km on the upper interface of the subducted Philippine Sea plate beneath Yaeyama region, where earthquake swarm occurred on 1991 and 1992. To reveal the relation among the crustal structure, earthquake swarms, and occurrence of slow slip events (SSE), local earthquake tomography and receiver function (RF) analysis was computed in the southwestern Ryukyu arc. A tomographic inversion was used to determine P and S wave structures beneath Iriomote Island in the southwestern Ryukyu region for comparison with the locations of the SSE. The seismic tomography (Thurber & Eberhart-Phillips, 1999) was employed. The P- and S- wave arrival time data picked manually by Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) are used. The 6750 earthquakes from January 2000 to July 2012 were used. For the calculation of the receiver function, the 212 earthquakes whose magnitudes are over 6.0 and epicentral distances are between 30 and 90 degrees were selected. The teleseicmic waveforms observed at two short-period seismometers of the JMA, and one broadband seismometer of F-net of National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention were used. The water level method (the water level is 0.01) is applied to original waveforms. Assuming that each later phase in a RF is the wave converted from P to S at a depth, I transformed the time domain RF into the depth domain one along each ray path in a reference velocity model. The JMA2001 velocity model is used in this study. The results of tomography show that the low Vp and high Vp

  17. A 3D seismic tomography of the Lesser Antilles Subduction Zone offshore Dominica and Martinique islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evain, Mikaël.; Galve, Audrey; Charvis, Philippe; Laigle, Mireille; Flueh, Ernst; Weinzierl, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Along the eastern border of the Caribbean plate the Lesser Antilles islands form an active volcanic arc above the Atlantic subducting lithosphere. The crustal structure of this convergent margin is presented here from first arrival tomographic inversion of a 3D wide-angle seismic dataset acquired offshore Dominica and Martinique islands by a network of 27 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS). The resulting 3D velocity model shows good resolution from 7-8 km down to ~15 km depth in a 150 km x 150 km area. Though our study area is located at the northern termination of one of the world's largest accretionary prisms we still observe about 5 to 7 km of sediment (v< 4 km/s) in the southeastern corner of our model. Our network is centered on a remarkable bathymetric feature: the Arawak Basin, a 6 km deep basin trending NW-SE, filled with 3 km of sediment on average. The western side of the Arawak Basin is bordered at depth by a basement high, highlighted by the rise of the 6.0-6.5 km/s velocity contours up to 2 km below seafloor. To the east of the Arawak Basin, below the accretionary prism, SW-NE cross-sections show two successive rises of velocity contours from 4.0 to 6.0 km/s. The first one, also clearly seen on the MCS data, is coincident with the eastern border of the Arawak Basin, while the second one seems located ~30 km to the East, below the thick accretionary prism. We interpret these highs as basement uplifts associated with the subduction of the Tiburon ridge. We do not sample the interplate contact mainly due to high seismic attenuation in the accretionary wedge. More insight into the geometry of this contact may arise from the processing of a ~285 km long wide-angle refraction/reflection profile parallel to the convergence that cross our 3D velocity model in its middle and continues across the entire subduction complex. Preliminary tomographic results from this dataset recorded by 45 densely spaced OBS confirm the observations described above. This new 2D line

  18. Seismic tomography reveals the upper-mantle structure beneath the Carpathian-Pannonian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dando, B. D.; Houseman, G.; Stuart, G. W.; Hegedus, E.; Kovacs, A.; Brueckl, E. P.; Hausmann, H.; Radovanovic, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Carpathian Basins Project (CBP) aims to understand the formation of the Miocene-age extensional basins contained within the convergent arc of the Alpine-Carpathian system. To test competing models for the recent geological evolution of the Carpathian-Pannonian lithosphere and upper mantle, we present a new tomographic determination of P-wave velocity structure to depths of 700 km beneath this region. This model is based on inversion of seismic travel-time residuals from 97 broadband seismic stations. We include CBP data from a 15-month deployment of a high resolution network of 46 stations deployed NW-SE across the Vienna and western Pannonian basins through Austria, Hungary and Serbia, together with 10 broadband stations spread across the Pannonian basin and a further 41 permanent broadband stations. We use P-wave arrival times from 232 teleseismic events. To avoid contamination of our inversion results from crustal velocity variations, deterministic corrections are applied to our travel-time residuals using crustal velocity models obtained from controlled source experiments and sediment thickness maps. Our 3-D velocity model images the fast velocity structure of the eastern Alps down to ~350 km. Beneath the Pannonian basin the velocity variation at 300 km depth is dominated by a fast region which extends eastward from the Alpine anomaly and reaches down into the mantle transition zone (MTZ). This fast structure is limited on the North side by slow material beneath the North Carpathians. At depths greater than 450 km, below the eastern Pannonian basin, a slow anomaly extends to the base of the model. Beneath the same region Hetenyi et al. (submitted to GRL), used receiver functions from the CBP dataset, to show a localised depression of the 660 km discontinuity of up to ~40 km. We aim to address how the depression of the 660 km discontinuity and its associated density and velocity variations affect our tomographic images. Our results will help to provide

  19. Can faults become barriers for deep fluid circulation? Insights from high-resolution seismic VSP tomography at the Soultz-sous-Forêts geothermal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calò, Marco; Dorbath, Catherine; Lubrano Lavadera, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) surveys are generally used for modelling converted phases of the seismic body waves propagating in the medium allowing the detection of waves interpreted as reflections on steeply dipping reflecting structures such as faults, abrupt lateral changes of lithology, and fractures. At the Enhanced Geothermal System geothermal field of Soultz-sous-Forêts the analysis of data recorded during a VSP experiment allowed describing the presence of at least two structures near the wells. Here we show how seismic tomography method can be applied to the VSP data to reconstruct the 3-D shape of structures in the volume surrounding the geothermal wells. The three-dimensional P wave velocity model obtained shows positive velocity anomalies associated with the main faults observed by the VSP analysis and negative anomalies in the regions affected by massive hydraulic stimulations performed in the past. This pattern can be explained as a different response of the rock volume to the fluid injections where regions marked by relative pre-existing high permeability were less affected by the hydraulic stimulations. This difference in permeability produced regions that could work as barriers for fluid diffusion through the reservoir. Comparisons of our high resolved model with the location of the induced seismicity and with another model obtained using seismic noise correlation give evidence of the presence of these structures and may explain the poor connection between the wells GPK4 and GPK2-GPK3 system.

  20. The preliminary results: Seismic ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography around Merapi volcano, central Java, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Trichandi, Rahmantara; Yudistira, Tedi; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Zulhan, Zulfakriza; Saygin, Erdinc

    2015-04-24

    Ambient noise tomography is relatively a new method for imaging the shallow structure of the Earth subsurface. We presents the application of this method to produce a Rayleigh wave group velocity maps around the Merapi Volcano, Central Java. Rayleigh waves group velocity maps were reconstructed from the cross-correlation of ambient noise recorded by the DOMERAPI array which consists 43 broadband seismometers. In the processing stage, we first filtered the observation data to separatethe noise from the signal that dominated by the strong volcanic activities. Next, we cross-correlate the filtered data and stack to obtain the Green’s function for all possible station pairs. Then we carefully picked the peak of each Green’s function to estimate the dispersion trend and appliedMultiple Filter Technique to obtain the dispersion curve. Inter-station group velocity curvesare inverted to produceRayleigh wave group velocity maps for periods 1 to 10 s. The resulted Rayleigh group velocity maps show the interesting features around the Merapi Volcano which generally agree with the previous studies. Merapi-Lawu Anomaly (MLA) is emerged as a relatively low anomaly in our group velocity maps.

  1. Extending Seismic Tomography along the San Andreas Fault to the Lower Crust with Low Frequency Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClement, K.; Thurber, C. H.; Shelly, D. R.; Sumy, D. F.; Bennington, N. L.; Peterson, D. E.; Cochran, E.; Harrington, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Similarities within families of low frequency earthquakes (LFE's) occurring within non-volcanic tremor (NVT) beneath the San Andreas fault (SAF) in central California facilitates applying high-precision location techniques to the LFE's and tomographic imaging of the tremor zone. In turn, this will allow us to examine the geometry and character of the SAF deep in the crust and evaluate the lithologies and physical conditions (e.g., fluid content) surrounding the tremor zone. We build on the work of Shelly and coworkers (Shelly et al., 2009; Shelly and Hardebeck, 2010) to stack and pick LFE "tremorgrams" for temporary array stations and other stations not previously analyzed. Our initial work focused on the 2001-2002 Parkfield Area Seismic Observatory (PASO) array and 15 LFE families directly beneath it. Augmenting our existing PASO earthquake and explosion dataset with the LFE picks allows us to extend our PASO tomographic model deeper to include the tremor zone, where we find slightly reduced Vp and more sharply reduced Vs near the LFE locations. We are now expanding our work to include PASO records of more distant LFE families and other seismic stations. We find that the high amplitudes and more frequent recurrence of LFE's to the southeast of PASO results in high quality stacks for most PASO stations. We can also produce good stacks for weaker, less frequent LFE's northwest of PASO. We will present examples of our new tremorgrams along with preliminary LFE relocations. There are three main underlying goals for this project. The first is to extend the existing Vp model and develop the new Vs model to cover the depth range of the NVT present beneath the SAF in the Parkfield region. The presence of ambient and triggered NVT in this area has mainly been attributed to the presence of fluids (Ghosh et al., 2008; Peng et al., 2008, 2009; Nadeau and Guilhem, 2009; Thomas et al., 2011; Hill et al., 2013). The velocity models we will develop will also help constrain the

  2. Seismic Noise Tomography in the Chile Ridge Subduction Region, Northern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, A.; Russo, R.; Comte, D.; Mocanu, V.; Vandecar, J.

    2008-12-01

    We used cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise recorded in the Chile Triple Juntion (CTJ) region to estimate interstation surface wave time-domain Green's functions and to invert resulting travel times for crustal shear wave velocity. Data were recorded at the Chile Ridge Subduction Project temporary network of 39 broadband sensors deployed in the CTJ region by the Universidad de Chile, Santiago, and the University of Florida, from December 2004 to February 2007. Interstation distances ranged from 40 to around 100 km. We selected 30 days with low earthquake activity, and cross-correlated and stacked 24 hours of vertical component data at 34 stations pairs, resulting in nominally 1,122 travel-times along assumed-straight interstation paths. Velocities in two-dimensional cells of 20 km N-S by 30 km E-W extent were calculated using the method of Tarantola (1987). The process was applied to cross correlation pairs determined in three frequency bands, 0.1- 0.2 Hz, corresponding to shallow crustal velocities down to 15 km depth, 0.05 - 0.1 Hz, for velocities down to 30 km, and 0.01 - 0.05 Hz for deeper velocities. Our results show that cell velocities correlate well with known geologic features. We find high crustal velocities where the Patagonian Batholith outcrops or is likely present at depth, and low velocities correlate with the active volcanic arc of the Southern Volcanic Zone (e.g., Volcan Hudson, Volcan Cay). Slow velocities also correlate with well developed sedimentary basins and for the highest frequencies, the glaciers of the Northern Ice Field. A very high velocity anomaly in the southern Andes portion of the study area appears to correlate with outcropping metamorphic rocks and plutonic intrusions.

  3. Seismic Tomography for the Crust and Upper Mantle behind the Japan Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The Pacific plate subducts WNW under the Eurasian plates with a ~30° angle of dip and a rate of ~8 cm/yr from the Japan-Kuril Trench. The Kuril-NE Japan arc of the uppermost mantle, overlying the subducting Pacific slab, is the locus of important processes, including serpentinization of the forearc mantle wedge, repeated genesis of megathrust earthquakes, slab dehydration, arc magmatism and interplate coupling. To improve our knowledge of crustal and upper mantle structures through tomographic imaging, we determined the three-dimensional (3-D) velocity (Vp, Vs) and Vp/Vs structures under the Kuril-NE Japan subduction zone. The Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs models provide compelling evidence for a highly hydrated and serpentinized forearc mantle and the fluids related to low-velocity and high-Vp/Vs anomalies associated with the slab dehydration. Significant slow anomalous Vp and Vs with a high-Vp/Vs ratio are clearly imaged along the volcanic front with an extended depth of ~100 km under the Kuril-NE Japan arc, showing good consistency with the results of previous studies. This is caused mainly by the fluids associated with the extensive dehydration of the subducting Pacific slab. Fluid-related anomalies under the Kuril-NE Japan arc system, attributed to various processes such as slab dehydration and serpentinization of the forearc mantle wedge, are contributed mainly by arc magmatism, interplate coupling and the repeated generation of megathrust earthquakes. The characteristic distribution of high and low Vp/Vs in the forearc continental crust along the trench-parallel direction may reflects the spatial heterogeneity of the amount of the subducted water which related to the difference of the sedimentary unit and seismic activity in the oceanic crust. Our study demonstrates that the directly optimization of Vp/Vs tomographic procedure provides more stable and reliable Vp/Vs image than previous method.

  4. Anisotropic Rayleigh wave tomography of Northeast China using ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhikun; Huang, Jinli; Yao, Huajian

    2016-07-01

    The ambient noise data recorded by 249 seismic stations in the permanent and temporary networks in Northeast China are used to invert for the isotropic phase velocity and azimuthal anisotropy of Rayleigh waves in the period band 5-50 s. The inversion results reflect the structure from the shallow crust to upper mantle up to approximately 120 km depth. Beneath the Songliao basin, both the fast direction in shallow crust and strike of a low-velocity anomaly in the middle crust are NNE-SSW, which is coincident with the main tectonic trend of the (Paleo) Pacific tectonic domain. This indicates that the rifting of the Songliao basin is influenced by the subduction of (Paleo) Pacific plate. The upper mantle of Songliao block (except the central area of Songliao basin) to the west of Mudanjiang fault, and the east of the North-South Gravity Lineament, is characterized by high-velocity and weak anisotropy up to approximately ​120 km depth. We infer that there is delamination of lithospheric mantle beneath the Songliao block. Obvious N-S, NE-SW, and E-W trending fast directions are found in the lithospheric mantles of the east, west, and south sides of Songliao block, respectively, which coincide with the strikes of the Paleozoic tectonic in these areas. This suggests that the frozen-in anisotropic fabric in the lithospheric mantle can be used to indicate the historical deformation of the lithosphere. In the northern margin of the North China Craton, the spatial variations of phase velocity and azimuthal anisotropy are more dramatic than those in Northeast China blocks, which indicates that the lithosphere of the North China Craton has experienced more complicated tectonic evolution than that of the Northeast China blocks.

  5. Deep structure of Porcupine Basin and nature of the Porcupine Median Ridge from seismic refraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watremez, L.; Chen, C.; Prada, M.; Minshull, T. A.; O'Reilly, B.; Reston, T. J.; Wagner, G.; Gaw, V.; Klaeschen, D.; Shannon, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Porcupine Basin is a narrow V-shaped failed rifted basin located offshore SW Ireland. It is of Permo-Triassic to Cenozoic age, with the main rifting phase in the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. Porcupine Basin is a key study area to learn about the processes of continental extension and to understand the thermal history of this rifted basin. Previous studies show increasing stretching factors, from less than 1.5 to the North to more than 6 to the South. A ridge feature, the Porcupine Median Ridge, has been identified in the middle of the southernmost part of the basin. During the last three decades, this ridge has been successively interpreted as a volcanic structure, a diapir of partially serpentinized mantle, or a block of continental crust. Its nature still remains debated today. In this study, we use arrival times from refractions and wide-angle reflections in the sedimentary, crustal and mantle layers to image the crustal structure of the thinnest part of the basin, the geometry of the continental thinning from margin to margin, and the Porcupine Median Ridge. The final velocity model is then compared with coincident seismic reflection data. We show that (1) the basin is asymmetric, (2) P-wave velocities in the uppermost mantle are lower than expected for unaltered peridotites, implying upper-mantle serpentinisation, (3) the nature of Porcupine Median Ridge is probably volcanic, and (4) the amount of thinning is greater than shown in previous studies. We discuss the thermal implications of these results for the evolution of this rift system and the processes leading to the formation of failed rifts. This project is funded by the Irish Shelf Petroleum Studies Group (ISPSG) of the Irish Petroleum Infrastructure Programme Group 4.

  6. Anisotropic Rayleigh wave tomography of Northeast China using ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhikun; Huang, Jinli; Yao, Huajian

    2016-04-01

    The ambient noise data recorded by 249 seismic stations in the permanent and temporary networks in Northeast China are used to invert for the isotropic phase velocity maps and azimuthal anisotropy of Rayleigh waves in the period band 5 to 50 s. The inversion results reflect the structure from the shallow crust to upper mantle up to a depth of approximately 120 km. Beneath the Songliao basin, both the fast direction in shallow crust and strike of a low-velocity anomaly in the middle crust are NNE-SSW, which is coincident with the main tectonic trend of the (Paleo) Pacific tectonic domain. This indicates that the rifting of the Songliao basin was influenced by the subduction of (Paleo) Pacific plate. The upper mantle of Songliao block (except the central area of Songliao basin) to the west of Mudanjiang fault, and the east of the North-South Gravity Lineament, is characterized by high-velocity and weak anisotropy at the depth up to ~120 km. We infer that there was delamination of lithospheric mantle beneath the Songliao block. Obvious N-S, NE-SW, and E-W trending fast directions are found in the lithospheric mantles of the east, west, and south sides of Songliao block, respectively, which coincide with the strikes of the Paleozoic tectonic in these areas. This suggests that the frozen-in anisotropic fabric in the lithospheric mantle can be used to indicate the historical deformation of the lithosphere. In the northern margin of the North China Craton, the spatial variations of phase velocity and azimuthal anisotropy are more dramatic than those in Northeast China blocks, which indicates that the lithosphere of the North China Craton has experienced more complicated tectonic evolution than that of the Northeast China blocks.

  7. Anisotropic Rayleigh wave tomography of Northeast China using ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhikun; Huang, Jinli; Yao, Huajian

    2016-07-01

    The ambient noise data recorded by 249 seismic stations in the permanent and temporary networks in Northeast China are used to invert for the isotropic phase velocity and azimuthal anisotropy of Rayleigh waves in the period band 5-50 s. The inversion results reflect the structure from the shallow crust to upper mantle up to approximately 120 km depth. Beneath the Songliao basin, both the fast direction in shallow crust and strike of a low-velocity anomaly in the middle crust are NNE-SSW, which is coincident with the main tectonic trend of the (Paleo) Pacific tectonic domain. This indicates that the rifting of the Songliao basin is influenced by the subduction of (Paleo) Pacific plate. The upper mantle of Songliao block (except the central area of Songliao basin) to the west of Mudanjiang fault, and the east of the North-South Gravity Lineament, is characterized by high-velocity and weak anisotropy up to approximately ​120 km depth. We infer that there is delamination of lithospheric mantle beneath the Songliao block. Obvious N-S, NE-SW, and E-W trending fast directions are found in the lithospheric mantles of the east, west, and south sides of Songliao block, respectively, which coincide with the strikes of the Paleozoic tectonic in these areas. This suggests that the frozen-in anisotropic fabric in the lithospheric mantle can be used to indicate the historical deformation of the lithosphere. In the northern margin of the North China Craton, the spatial variations of phase velocity and azimuthal anisotropy are more dramatic than those in Northeast China blocks, which indicates that the lithosphere of the North China Craton has experienced more complicated tectonic evolution than that of the Northeast China blocks.

  8. Curie temperature depths in the Alps and the Po Plain (northern Italy): Comparison with heat flow and seismic tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speranza, Fabio; Minelli, Liliana; Pignatelli, Alessandro; Gilardi, Matteo

    2016-08-01

    We report on the spectral analysis of the aeromagnetic residuals of the Alps and the Po Plain (northern Italy) to derive the Curie point depth (CPD), assumed to represent the 550 °C isotherm depth. We analysed both the aeromagnetic residuals of northern Italy gathered by Agip (now Eni) and the recent EMAG2 compilation. We used the centroid method on 44 and 96 (respectively) 100 × 100 km2 windows considering both a random and a fractal magnetization distribution, but found that, at least for the Alps, the fractal model yields unrealistically shallow CPDs. Analyses considering a random magnetization model give CPDs varying between 12 and 39 km (22 to 24 km on average considering the two data sets) in the Po Plain, representing the Adriatic-African foreland area of the Alps, in substantial agreement with recently reported heat flow values of 60-70 mW/m2. In the Alps, the Eni data set yields shallow CPDs ranging between 6 and 23 km (13 km on average). EMAG2 analysis basically confirms the "hot" Alpine crust, but reduces it to three 50-100 km wide patches elongated along the chain, where CPDs vary between 10 and 15 km. Such "hot" Alpine domains occur just north of maximum (50-55 km) crustal thickness zones of the Alps and correspond to low seismic wave velocity anomalies recently documented in the 20-22 to 35-38 km depth interval, whereas no relation is apparent with local geology. Assuming an average crustal thermal conductivity of 2.5 W/m °C and a steady-state conductive model, CPDs from the hot zones of the Alps translate into heat flow values of 110-120 mW/m2, and to a basal heat flow from the mantle exceeding 100 mW/m2 that is significantly greater than that expected in a mountain range. Thus we conclude that the steady-state conductive model does not apply for the Alps and granitic melts occur at ∼15-40 km depths, consistently with seismic tomography evidence.

  9. Seismic attenuation tomography of the Tonga-Fiji region using phase pair methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Erich G.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Dorman, Leroy M.; Hildebrand, John; Webb, Spahr C.

    1999-03-01

    The anelastic structure of the region surrounding the Tonga slab and Lau back arc spreading center in the southwest Pacific is studied using data from 12 broadband island stations and 30 ocean bottom seismographs. Two differential attenuation methods determine δt* over the frequency band 0.1 to 3.5 Hz for earthquakes in the Tonga slab. The S-P method measures the difference in spectral decay between P and S waves arriving at the same station. The P-P method measures the difference in spectral decay for P waves with different paths through the upper mantle. Eight hundred sixty phase pairs are used to invert for two-dimensional 1/Qα structure using a nonnegative least squares algorithm. A grid search method determines the Qα/Qβ ratio most compatible with both the S-P and P-P differential measurements. The highest attenuation (Qα = 90) is found within the upper 100 km beneath the active portions of the Lau Basin extending westward to the Lau Ridge. These regions probably delineate the source region for the back arc spreading center magmas, expected to be within the upper 100 km based on petrological considerations. The high attenuation regions also correlate well with zones of low P wave velocity determined by regional velocity tomography. Somewhat lower attenuation is found beneath the Fiji Plateau than beneath the Lau Basin. The entire back arc is characterized by a gradual decrease in attenuation to a depth of 300 to 400 km. The slab is imaged as a region of low attenuation (Qα > 900) material. A Qα/Qβ ratio of 1.75 provides the best fit between the S-P and P-P data sets upon inversion. Spectral stacking shows no frequency dependence within the frequency band analyzed.

  10. Visualization of seismic tomography on Google Earth: Improvement of KML generator and its web application to accept the data file in European standard format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Y.; Yanaka, H.; Tsuboi, S.

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a conversion tool for the data of seismic tomography into KML, called KML generator, and made it available on the web site (http://www.jamstec.go.jp/pacific21/google_earth). The KML generator enables us to display vertical and horizontal cross sections of the model on Google Earth in three-dimensional manner, which would be useful to understand the Earth's interior. The previous generator accepts text files of grid-point data having longitude, latitude, and seismic velocity anomaly. Each data file contains the data for each depth. Metadata, such as bibliographic reference, grid-point interval, depth, are described in other information file. We did not allow users to upload their own tomographic model to the web application, because there is not standard format to represent tomographic model. Recently European seismology research project, NEIRES (Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology), advocates that the data of seismic tomography should be standardized. They propose a new format based on JSON (JavaScript Object Notation), which is one of the data-interchange formats, as a standard one for the tomography. This format consists of two parts, which are metadata and grid-point data values. The JSON format seems to be powerful to handle and to analyze the tomographic model, because the structure of the format is fully defined by JavaScript objects, thus the elements are directly accessible by a script. In addition, there exist JSON libraries for several programming languages. The International Federation of Digital Seismograph Network (FDSN) adapted this format as a FDSN standard format for seismic tomographic model. There might be a possibility that this format would not only be accepted by European seismologists but also be accepted as the world standard. Therefore we improve our KML generator for seismic tomography to accept the data file having also JSON format. We also improve the web application of the generator so that the

  11. High velocity anomaly beneath the Deccan volcanic province: Evidence from seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iyer, H.M.; Gaur, V.K.; Rai, S.S.; Ramesh, D.S.; Rao, C.V.R.; Srinagesh, D.; Suryaprakasam, K.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of teleseismic P-wave residuals observed at 15 seismograph stations operated in the Deccan volcanic province (DVP) in west central India points to the existence of a large, deep anomalous region in the upper mantle where the velocity is a few per cent higher than in the surrounding region. The seismic stations were operated in three deployments together with a reference station on precambrian granite at Hyderabad and another common station at Poona. The first group of stations lay along a west-northwesterly profile from Hyderabad through Poona to Bhatsa. The second group roughly formed an L-shaped profile from Poona to Hyderabad through Dharwar and Hospet. The third group of stations lay along a northwesterly profile from Hyderabad to Dhule through Aurangabad and Latur. Relative residuals computed with respect to Hyderabad at all the stations showed two basic features: a large almost linear variation from approximately +1s for teleseisms from the north to-1s for those from the southeast at the western stations, and persistance of the pattern with diminishing magnitudes towards the east. Preliminary ray-plotting and three-dimensional inversion of the P-wave residual data delineate the presence of a 600 km long approximately N-S trending anomalous region of high velocity (1-4% contrast) from a depth of about 100 km in the upper mantle encompassing almost the whole width of the DVP. Inversion of P-wave relative residuals reveal the existence of two prominent features beneath the DVP. The first is a thick high velocity zone (1-4% faster) extending from a depth of about 100 km directly beneath most of the DVP. The second feature is a prominent low velocity region which coincides with the westernmost part of the DVP. A possible explanation for the observed coherent high velocity anomaly is that it forms the root of the lithosphere which coherently translates with the continents during plate motions, an architecture characteristic of precambrian shields. The low

  12. Seismic tomography and deformation modeling of the junction of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorbath, C.; Oppenheimer, D.; Amelung, F.; King, G.

    1996-01-01

    Local earthquake P traveltime data is inverted to obtain a three-dimensional tomographic image of the region centered on the junction of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults. The resulting velocity model is then used to relocate more than 17,000 earthquakes and to produce a model of fault structure in the region. These faults serve as the basis for modeling the topography using elastic dislocation methods. The region is of interest because active faults join, it marks the transition zone from creeping to locked fault behavior on the San Andreas fault, it exhibits young topography, and it has a good spatial distribution of seismicity. The tomographic data set is extensive, consisting of 1445 events, 96 stations, and nearly 95,000 travel time readings. Tomographic images are resolvable to depths of 12 km and show significant velocity contrasts across the San Andreas and Calaveras faults, a low-velocity zone associated with the creeping section of the San Andreas fault, and shallow low-velocity sediments in the southern Santa Clara valley and northern Salinas valley. Relocated earthquakes only occur where vp>5 km/s and indicate that portions of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults are non vertical, although we cannot completely exclude the possibility that all or part of this results from ray tracing problems. The new dips are more consistent with geological observations that dipping faults intersect the surface where surface traces have been mapped. The topographic modeling predicts extensive subsidence in regions characterized by shallow low-velocity material, presumably the result of recent sedimentation. Some details of the topography at the junction of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults are not consistent with the modeling results, suggesting that the current position of this "triple junction" has changed with time. The model also predicts those parts of the fault subject to contraction or extension perpendicular to the fault strike and hence the sense of any

  13. 3D Anisotropic Velocity Structure beneath the Kii Peninsula from P-wave Traveltime Tomography: Diagnostics of Seismic Anisotropy in a Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishise, M.; Koketsu, K.; Miyake, H.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy is one of key elements to understand geodynamics such as mantle convection, plate tectonics, and evolutional process of the crust. Thus, it is crucial to investigate seismic anisotropy in the subduction zone where various phenomena are attributed to dynamic processes caused by interaction among adjacent plates. Actually, recent studies of seismic anisotropy show that the determination of a 3D seismic anisotropy structure can be potential diagnostics of a geological lineament structure inside the crust, and probe earthquake rupture areas and rupture nucleation points. In this study, we have evaluated the three-dimensional (3D) P-wave anisotropic velocity structure in the Kii Peninsula, southwest Japan, as well as the isotropic velocity structure by P-wave travel times tomography. The study area lies on the Eurasian (Amulian) plate above the subducting Philippine Sea Plate. This belongs to an accretionary prism, which is being developed at the margin of the Asian Continent, and is characterized by E-W trending metamorphic belts including a segment of the active faults zone called the Median Tectonic Line (MTL). Additionally, the Kii Peninsula region is presumed to be source regions of megathrust earthquakes along the Nankai trough. The resultant images of both the isotropic and anisotropic tomography show that the upper crust is characterized by E-W trending structure similar to that of the geological structure over the peninsula region. Because deformation of the crust such as preferred mineral alignment and recrystallization associated with planar structures produces significant seismic anisotropy, the plausible factor of the crustal feature is interpreted as E-W orientation of the regional metamorphic belt. Furthermore, in the resultant tomographic image, the E-W trending pattern is found within the deeper crust. This fact indicates that the lineament structure is sustained in the deeper crust. Since our tomography has good resolution in the

  14. Integrated test plan for crosswell compressional and shear wave seismic tomography for site characterization at the VOC Arid Site

    SciTech Connect

    Elbring, G.J.; Narbutovskih, S.M.

    1994-02-01

    This integrated test plan describes the demonstration of the crosswell acoustic tomography technique as part of the Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). The purpose of this demonstration is to image the subsurface seismic velocity structure and to relate the resulting velocity model to lithology and saturation. In fiscal year (FY) 1994 an initial fielding will test three different downhole sources at two different sites at the Hanford US Department of Energy facility to identify which sources will provide the energy required to propagate between existing steel-cased wells at these two sites. Once this has been established, a second fielding will perform a full compressional and shear wave tomographic survey at the most favorable site. Data reduction, analysis, and interpretation of this full data set will be completed by the end of this fiscal year. Data collection for a second survey will be completed by the end of the fiscal year, and data reduction for this data set will be completed in FY 1995. The specific need is detailed subsurface characterization with minimum intrusion. This technique also has applications for long term vadose zone monitoring for both Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste storage facilities and for remediation monitoring. Images produced are continuous between boreholes. This is a significant improvement over the single point data derived solely from core information. Saturation changes, either naturally occurring (e.g., perched water tables) or remediation induced (e.g., water table mounding from injection wells or during inwell air sparging) could be imaged. These crosswell data allow optimal borehole placement for groundwater remediation, associated monitoring wells and possibly evaluation of the effective influence of a particular remediation technique.

  15. Tectonic interactions between India and Arabia since the Jurassic reconstructed from marine geophysics, ophiolite geology, and seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Carmen; Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Spakman, Wim

    2015-05-01

    Gondwana breakup since the Jurassic and the northward motion of India toward Eurasia were associated with formation of ocean basins and ophiolite obduction between and onto the Indian and Arabian margins. Here we reconcile marine geophysical data from preserved oceanic basins with the age and location of ophiolites in NW India and SE Arabia and seismic tomography of the mantle below the NW Indian Ocean. The North Somali and proto-Owen basins formed due to 160-133 Ma N-S extension between India and Somalia. Subsequent convergence destroyed part of this crust, simultaneous with the uplift of the Masirah ophiolites. Most of the preserved crust in the Owen Basin may have formed between 84 and 74 Ma, whereas the Mascarene and the Amirante basins accommodated motion between India and Madagascar/East Africa between 85 and circa 60 Ma and 75 and circa 66 Ma, respectively. Between circa 84 and 45 Ma, oblique Arabia-India convergence culminated in ophiolite obduction onto SE Arabia and NW India and formed the Carlsberg slab in the lower mantle below the NW Indian Ocean. The NNE-SSW oriented slab may explain the anomalous bathymetry in the NW Indian Ocean and may be considered a paleolongitudinal constraint for absolute plate motion. NW India-Asia collision occurred at circa 20 Ma deforming the Sulaiman ranges or at 30 Ma if the Hindu Kush slab north of the Afghan block reflects intra-Asian subduction. Our study highlights that the NW India ophiolites have no relationship with India-Asia motion or collision but result from relative India-Africa/Arabia motions instead.

  16. Stress interaction at the Lazufre volcanic region, as constrained by InSAR, seismic tomography and boundary element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas R.; Lundgren, Paul; Spica, Zack; Legrand, Denis

    2016-04-01

    The Azufre-Lastarria volcanic complex in the central Andes has been recognized as a major region of magma intrusion. Both deep and shallow inflating reservoirs inferred through InSAR time series inversions, are the main sources of a multi-scale deformation accompanied by pronounced fumarolic activity. The possible interactions between these reservoirs, as well as the path of propagating fluids and the development of their pathways, however, have not been investigated. Results from recent seismic noise tomography in the area show localized zones of shear wave velocity anomalies, with a low shear wave velocity region at 1 km depth and another one at 4 km depth beneath Lastarria. Although the inferred shallow zone is in a good agreement with the location of the shallow deformation source, the deep zone does not correspond to any deformation source in the area. Here, using the boundary element method (BEM), we have performed an in-depth continuum mechanical investigation of the available ascending and descending InSAR data. We modelled the deep source, taking into account the effect of topography and complex source geometry on the inversion. After calculating the stress field induced by this source, we apply Paul's criterion (a variation on Mohr-Coulomb failure) to recognize locations that are liable for failure. We show that the locations of tensile and shear failure almost perfectly coincide with the shallow and deep anomalies as identified by shear wave velocity, respectively. Based on the stress-change models we conjecture that the deep reservoir controls the development of shallower hydrothermal fluids; a hypothesis that can be tested and applied to other volcanoes.

  17. Evolution in the knowledge of the origin of the Atlas Mountains topography: from structural geology to seismic wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayarza, Puy; Teixell, Antonio; Carbonell, Ramón; Arboleya, Maria Luisa; Palomeras, Immaculada; Kchickach, Azzouz; Charroud, Mohammed; Levander, Alan

    2014-05-01

    P and Pn) that indicate that the Moho is an asymmetric feature that locally defines a crustal root characteristic of young orogens. The crust-mantle boundary is modeled at relatively shallow depths (30-41 km) in accordance with other geophysical data, thus supporting the idea of a 'mantle upwelling' as main contributor to the High Atlas topography (Ayarza et al., submitted). Finally, MT experiments indicated that the Atlas lower crust and upper mantle are highly conductive and might contain partly molten material (Anahnah et al., 2011; Ledo et al., 2011). Seismic wave tomography and receiver function analysis have concluded that low P and S-wave velocities exist in the Atlas upper mantle (Bezada et al., 2013; Miller and Becker, 2014; Palomeras et al., 2014; Thurner et al, 2014), further supporting the existence of this asthenospheric feature and validating the models that emphasized the importance of dynamic topography for the Atlas orogenic belt.

  18. Seismic Tomography Reveals Breaking Crust and Lithosphere Beneath a Classic Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, T. B.; Rau, R.; Kuo-Chen, H.; Lee, Y.; Ouimet, W. B.; Van Soest, M. C.; Huang, C.; Wu, F. T.

    2013-12-01

    erosion, or lower rock uplift rates along the range crest. We propose that the surfaces represent relict topography that formed prior to a recent acceleration in rock uplift rate, consistent with the presence of a propagating crustal-scale crack and slab breakoff. Taken together, these results raise questions about the notion of steady state topography and critically tapered wedges in Taiwan. Kuo-Chen, H., Wu, F., and Roecker, S. W., 2012, Three-dimensional P velocity structures of the lithosphere beneath Taiwan from the analysis of TAIGER and related seismic data sets: Journal Geophysical Research, v. 117, no. B06306. Ching, K.-E., Hsieh, M.-L., Johnson, K., Chen, K.-H., Rau, R.-J., and Yang, M., 2011, Modern vertical deformation rates and mountain building in Taiwan from precise leveling and continuous GPS observations, 2000-2008: Journal Geophysical Research, v. 116, no. B08406.

  19. Shallow Faulting in Morelia, Mexico, Based on Seismic Tomography and Geodetically Detected Land Subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Vergara-Huerta, F.; Chaussard, E.; Wdowinski, S.; DeMets, C.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.

    2013-12-01

    Subsidence has been a common occurrence in several cities in central Mexico for the past three decades. This process causes substantial damage to the urban infrastructure and housing in several cities and it is a major factor to be considered when planning urban development, land-use zoning and hazard mitigation strategies. Since the early 1980's the city of Morelia in Central Mexico has experienced subsidence associated with groundwater extraction in excess of natural recharge from rainfall. Previous works have focused on the detection and temporal evolution of the subsidence spatial distribution. The most recent InSAR analysis confirms the permanence of previously detected rapidly subsiding areas such as the Rio Grande Meander area and also defines 2 subsidence patches previously undetected in the newly developed suburban sectors west of Morelia at the Fraccionamiento Del Bosque along, south of Hwy. 15 and another patch located north of Morelia along Gabino Castañeda del Rio Ave. Because subsidence-induced, shallow faulting develops at high horizontal strain localization, newly developed a subsidence areas are particularly prone to faulting and fissuring. Shallow faulting increases groundwater vulnerability because it disrupts discharge hydraulic infrastructure and creates a direct path for transport of surface pollutants into the underlying aquifer. Other sectors in Morelia that have been experiencing subsidence for longer time have already developed well defined faults such as La Colina, Central Camionera, Torremolinos and La Paloma faults. Local construction codes in the vicinity of these faults define a very narrow swath along which housing construction is not allowed. In order to better characterize these fault systems and provide better criteria for future municipal construction codes we have surveyed the La Colina and Torremolinos fault systems in the western sector of Morelia using seismic tomographic techniques. Our results indicate that La Colina Fault

  20. First-arrival traveltime tomography of regional-scale seismic-reflection data to image near-surface Quaternary and Tertiary sediments in Northern Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstetter, Florian; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Horstmeyer, Heinrich; Hertrich, Marian; Buechi, Marius W.

    2014-05-01

    Regional-scale seismic-reflection data have usually a limited potential for imaging the shallow (<100 m) subsurface. However, resolving near-surface units is of significant interest for various purposes such as weathering-layer corrections in seismic-reflection processing but also to study Quaternary sediments and their geologic history. In this study, we inverted the first-arrival traveltimes of a recently acquired regional-scale seismic-exploration data set from Northern Switzerland. The overall motivation was to complement the seismic-reflection investigations and to image the shallow subsurface with seismic-refraction tomography. Whereas the surface distribution of the Quaternary and Tertiary sediments is mapped in detail in the investigation area, the highly variable thickness of the Quaternary sediments (up to 150 m) is only constrained at a few borehole locations. We focused on a ~9 km long stretch of a 2-D seismic-reflection profile that was acquired with short source and receiver intervals varying between 6 and 12 m. A total of 450'000 traveltimes was picked from mostly Vibroseis and few dynamite data with varying quality due to partly strong sweep-correlation noise and the data were inverted using a regularized inversion scheme. The robustness of the velocity models was assessed based on traveltime residuals, start model and free-parameter variation, and ray coverage. The final tomograms image the subsurface down to a depth of ~700 m. Shallow low (< 2000 m/s) seismic velocity zones correlate well with mapped Quaternary sediment units in the valleys. Geological and seismic-velocity information from three boreholes allows to correlate a distinct velocity increase at ~50 to 100 m depth with the Quaternary-Tertiary sediment interface. Velocity isolines allow tracing the Quaternary-sediment thickness away from the boreholes and significantly aid in updating a pre-existing Quaternary-sediment thickness model. An extensive about 100 m thick body with very low

  1. Measurement of near-surface seismic compressional wave velocities using refraction tomography at a proposed construction site on the Presidio of Monterey, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, Michael H.; Burton, Bethany L.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is determining the feasibility of constructing a new barracks building on the U.S. Army Presidio of Monterey in Monterey, California. Due to the presence of an endangered orchid in the proposed area, invasive techniques such as exploratory drill holes are prohibited. To aid in determining the feasibility, budget, and design of this building, a compressional-wave seismic refraction survey was proposed by the U.S. Geological Survey as an alternative means of investigating the depth to competent bedrock. Two sub-parallel profiles were acquired along an existing foot path and a fence line to minimize impacts on the endangered flora. The compressional-wave seismic refraction tomography data for both profiles indicate that no competent rock classified as non-rippable or marginally rippable exists within the top 30 feet beneath the ground surface.

  2. Probing the structure of a caldera for geothermal assessment using enhanced passive seismic tomography. The example of the Campi Flregrei (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calo, M.; Tramelli, A.; Troise, C.; de Natale, G.

    2015-12-01

    Campi Flegrei (southern Italy) is one of the most studied calderas of the world due to its geothermal potential that was exploited since Romans' age, and its eruption and seismic risk, affecting a densely populated region. The caldera is marked by strong vertical deformations of the soil called bradyseisms, which are often accompanied by seismic crises. In particular the bradyseismic crises of 1982-84 are remembered for the large number of earthquakes that exceeded 16000 events recorded. Seismicity has been used to model the distribution of the elastic parameters with the aim to study the volcano behavior. However, till now seismic velocity models, calculated with standard tomography, failed in resolving small structures (<1.5-2km) located also at shallow depth, which could be responsible of small eruption as the last one that originated the Monte Nuovo monogenic cone in 1538. Here we show Vp and Vp/Vs models carried out by applying an enhanced seismic tomography that uses the Double Difference method (DD, Zhang and Thurber, 2003) complemented with the Weighted Average Model post-processing (WAM, Calò et al., 2009, Calò et al., 2011, 2013). The 3D models obtained with this procedure benefit of the high resolving power due to DD method, which uses both absolute and differential data, and of the improved reliability offered by WAM, which allows to overcome the drawbacks of the standard inversion methods. Our approach allowed to image structures with linear dimension of 0.5-1.2km, resulting in an improvement of the resolving power at least two times of the other published models (e.g. Priolo et al., 2012). Results show small bodies of high Vp and Vp/Vs at shallow depth (2.5-3.5 km) that could be associated either with magmatic intrusions or fluid saturated rocks, probably responsible of unrest episodes. At shallower depth (0.5-2.0 km), the Vp/Vs model is able to discern between water- and gas- bearing regions giving insight on the assessment of the potential of the

  3. Electrical resistivity and Seismic Refraction Tomography to Detect Heavy Metals Pathways in the Tailings of the Abandoned Mine of Zeïda, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekayir, A.; Lachhab, A.; Rouai, M.; Benyassine, E. M.; Boujamaoui, M.; Parisot, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The abandoned mine Zeïda (Pb) located at the center of the High Moulouya watershed is believed to have produced a total of 640,000 tons of concentrated Pb within 14 years of activities (1972-1985). Today, the mine has been abandoned with one of the largest tailings pits in Morocco without supervision and concern of environmental impacts. Several studies have shown the existence of high levels of heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Cr, Co, Cd and Ni) in samples (water and soil) taken from and around the tailings (Laghlimi et al, 2014, Benyassine et al, 2013, Iavarzzo, 2012, Makhoukh et al, 2011, Baghdad et al, 2008, Bouabdli et al, 2005). In this study, several electrical and seismic tomography profiles were taken to explore the thickness of the tailings and the potential pathways of contaminants to the aquifer. Because heavy metals were found in the surrounding areas of the tailings, there are concerns about their seepage into the groundwater aquifer. A total of 6 electric resistivity profiles together with another 16 seismic refraction profiles were completed over the 3 major mining waste piles to study this contamination. Analysis of both electric and seismic tomography profiles showed: 1) the thickness of tailings range from few cm to above 20m depending on where the survey was performed, 2) the contamination pathways of heavy metal pollutants occur predominantly right above the thickest areas of sandstone formation, and 3) water ponds at the surface of the tailing piles forms directly above the thickest part of the sandstone layer

  4. Investigating the San Andreas Fault System in the Northern Salton Trough by a Combination of Seismic Tomography and Pre-stack Depth Migration: Results from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, K.; Ryberg, T.; Fuis, G. S.; Goldman, M.; Catchings, R.; Rymer, M. J.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Salton Trough in southern California is a tectonically active pull-apart basin which was formed in migrating step-overs between strike-slip faults, of which the San Andreas fault (SAF) and the Imperial fault are current examples. It is located within the large-scale transition between the onshore SAF strike-slip system to the north and the marine rift system of the Gulf of California to the south. Crustal stretching and sinking formed the distinct topographic features and sedimentary successions of the Salton Trough. The active SAF and related fault systems can produce potentially large damaging earthquakes. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), funded by NSF and USGS, was undertaken to generate seismic data and images to improve the knowledge of fault geometry and seismic velocities within the sedimentary basins and underlying crystalline crust around the SAF in this key region. The results from these studies are required as input for modeling of earthquake scenarios and prediction of strong ground motion in the surrounding populated areas and cities. We present seismic data analysis and results from tomography and pre-stack depth migration for a number of seismic profiles (Lines 1, 4-7) covering mainly the northern Salton Trough. The controlled-source seismic data were acquired in 2011. The seismic lines have lengths ranging from 37 to 72 km. On each profile, 9-17 explosion sources with charges of 110-460 kg were recorded by 100-m spaced vertical component receivers. On Line 7, additional OBS data were acquired within the Salton Sea. Travel times of first arrivals were picked and inverted for initial 1D velocity models. Alternatively, the starting models were derived from the crustal-scale velocity models developed by the Southern California Earthquake Center. The final 2D velocity models were obtained using the algorithm of Hole (1992; JGR). We have also tested the tomography packages FAST and SIMUL2000, resulting in similar velocity structures. An

  5. Seismic Velocity Structure Across the Quebrada and Gofar Oceanic Transform Faults from 2D Refraction Tomography - A Comparison of Faults with High and Low Seismic Slip Deficits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E. C.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.; Lizarralde, D.

    2009-12-01

    We perform two 2-D tomographic inversions using data collected as a part of the Quebrada-Discovery-Gofar (QDG) Transform Fault Active/Passive Experiment. The QDG transform faults are located in the southern Pacific Ocean and offset the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at approximately 4° south. In the spring of 2008, two ~100 km refraction profiles were collected, each using 8 short period Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) from OBSIP and over 900 shots from the RV Marcus Langseth, across the easternmost segments of the Quebrada and Gofar transform faults. The two refraction profiles are modeled using a 2-D tomographic code that allows joint inversion of the Pg, PmP, and Pn arrivals (Korenaga et al., 2000). Variations in crustal velocity and thickness, as well as the width and depth extent of a significant low velocity zone within and below the transform valley provide some insight into the material properties of each of the fault-zones. Reduced seismic velocities that are 0.5 to over 1.0 km/s slower than velocities associated with the oceanic crust outside the fault zone may indicate the highly fractured fault zone lithology. The low velocity zone associated with the Quebrada fault also extends to the south of the active fault zone, beneath a fossil fault trace. Because Gofar is offset by an intratransform spreading center, we are able to compare ‘normal’ oceanic crust produced at the EPR to the south of the fault with crust associated with the ~15 km intratransform spreading center to the north. These two high slip rate (14 cm/yr) faults look similar morphologically and demonstrate comparable microseismicity characteristics, however their abilities to generate large earthquakes differ significantly. Gofar generates large earthquakes (Mw ~6) regularly every few years, but in the past 24 years only one large (Mw 5.6) event has been reliably located on Quebrada. The contrasting seismic behavior of these faults represents the range of behavior observed in the global

  6. 4-D OCT in Developmental Cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    Although strong evidence exists to suggest that altered cardiac function can lead to CHDs, few studies have investigated the influential role of cardiac function and biophysical forces on the development of the cardiovascular system due to a lack of proper in vivo imaging tools. 4-D imaging is needed to decipher the complex spatial and temporal patterns of biomechanical forces acting upon the heart. Numerous solutions over the past several years have demonstrated 4-D OCT imaging of the developing cardiovascular system. This chapter will focus on these solutions and explain their context in the evolution of 4-D OCT imaging. The first sections describe the relevant techniques (prospective gating, direct 4-D imaging, retrospective gating), while later sections focus on 4-D Doppler imaging and measurements of force implementing 4-D OCT Doppler. Finally, the techniques are summarized, and some possible future directions are discussed.

  7. Time-dependent convection models of mantle thermal structure constrained by seismic tomography and geodynamics: implications for mantle plume dynamics and CMB heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glišović, P.; Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.

    2012-08-01

    One of the outstanding problems in modern geodynamics is the development of thermal convection models that are consistent with the present-day flow dynamics in the Earth's mantle, in accord with seismic tomographic images of 3-D Earth structure, and that are also capable of providing a time-dependent evolution of the mantle thermal structure that is as 'realistic' (Earth-like) as possible. A successful realization of this objective would provide a realistic model of 3-D mantle convection that has optimal consistency with a wide suite of seismic, geodynamic and mineral physical constraints on mantle structure and thermodynamic properties. To address this challenge, we have constructed a time-dependent, compressible convection model in 3-D spherical geometry that is consistent with tomography-based instantaneous flow dynamics, using an updated and revised pseudo-spectral numerical method. The novel feature of our numerical solutions is that the equations of conservation of mass and momentum are solved only once in terms of spectral Green's functions. We initially focus on the theory and numerical methods employed to solve the equation of thermal energy conservation using the Green's function solutions for the equation of motion, with special attention placed on the numerical accuracy and stability of the convection solutions. A particular concern is the verification of the global energy balance in the dissipative, compressible-mantle formulation we adopt. Such validation is essential because we then present geodynamically constrained convection solutions over billion-year timescales, starting from present-day seismically constrained thermal images of the mantle. The use of geodynamically constrained spectral Green's functions facilitates the modelling of the dynamic impact on the mantle evolution of: (1) depth-dependent thermal conductivity profiles, (2) extreme variations of viscosity over depth and (3) different surface boundary conditions, in this case mobile

  8. Three-dimensional seismic tomography from P wave and S wave microearthquake travel times and rock physics characterization of the Campi Flegrei Caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, T.; Virieux, J.; Capuano, P.; Russo, G.

    2005-03-01

    The Campi Flegrei (CF) Caldera experiences dramatic ground deformations unsurpassed anywhere in the world. The source responsible for this phenomenon is still debated. With the aim of exploring the structure of the caldera as well as the role of hydrothermal fluids on velocity changes, a multidisciplinary approach dealing with three-dimensional delay time tomography and rock physics characterization has been followed. Selected seismic data were modeled by using a tomographic method based on an accurate finite difference travel time computation which simultaneously inverts P wave and S wave first-arrival times for both velocity model parameters and hypocenter locations. The retrieved P wave and S wave velocity images as well as the deduced Vp/Vs images were interpreted by using experimental measurements of rock physical properties on CF samples to take into account steam/water phase transition mechanisms affecting P wave and S wave velocities. Also, modeling of petrophysical properties for site-relevant rocks constrains the role of overpressured fluids on velocity. A flat and low Vp/Vs anomaly lies at 4 km depth under the city of Pozzuoli. Earthquakes are located at the top of this anomaly. This anomaly implies the presence of fractured overpressured gas-bearing formations and excludes the presence of melted rocks. At shallow depth, a high Vp/Vs anomaly located at 1 km suggests the presence of rocks containing fluids in the liquid phase. Finally, maps of the Vp*Vs product show a high Vp*Vs horseshoe-shaped anomaly located at 2 km depth. It is consistent with gravity data and well data and might constitute the on-land remainder of the caldera rim, detected below sea level by tomography using active source seismic data.

  9. Brain tissue segmentation in 4D CT using voxel classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boom, R.; Oei, M. T. H.; Lafebre, S.; Oostveen, L. J.; Meijer, F. J. A.; Steens, S. C. A.; Prokop, M.; van Ginneken, B.; Manniesing, R.

    2012-02-01

    A method is proposed to segment anatomical regions of the brain from 4D computer tomography (CT) patient data. The method consists of a three step voxel classification scheme, each step focusing on structures that are increasingly difficult to segment. The first step classifies air and bone, the second step classifies vessels and the third step classifies white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid. As features the time averaged intensity value and the temporal intensity change value were used. In each step, a k-Nearest-Neighbor classifier was used to classify the voxels. Training data was obtained by placing regions of interest in reconstructed 3D image data. The method has been applied to ten 4D CT cerebral patient data. A leave-one-out experiment showed consistent and accurate segmentation results.

  10. High-resolution seismic tomography of the 2015 Mw7.8 Gorkha earthquake, Nepal: Evidence for the crustal tearing of the Himalayan rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Shunping; Liu, Hongbing; Bai, Ling; Liu, Yanbing; Sun, Quan

    2016-09-01

    The Mw7.8 Gorkha earthquake struck Nepal and ruptured the boundary between the Indian and Eurasian plates. We conducted 2-D Pg wave tomography to clarify the seismogenic structure and try to understand causal mechanisms for this large earthquake, using the aftershock data recorded by 15 broadband seismic stations located near the China-Nepal border. Our high-resolution results show that coseismic slip area of the main shock is consistent with the high P wave velocity anomaly, and the region of maximum slip has a larger area with higher velocity than the region of initial slip, possibly resulting in the dominant low-frequency radiation of energy observed after the dominant high-frequency radiation of energy in the source rupture process. The boundary between these regions of contrasting high and low seismic velocity anomalies suggests a potential crustal tearing at the southern end of the Tangra Yum Co Rift, possibly resulting from different thrust speeds in the Greater Himalaya.

  11. Joint interpretation of seismic tomography and new magnetotelluric results provide evidence for support of high topography in the Southern Rocky Mountains and High Plains of eastern Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feucht, D. W.; Sheehan, A. F.; Bedrosian, P.

    2015-12-01

    A recent magnetotelluric (MT) survey in central Colorado, USA, when interpreted alongside existing seismic tomography, reveals potential mechanisms of support for high topography both regionally and locally. Broadband and long period magnetotelluric data were collected at twenty-three sites along a 330 km E-W profile across the Southern Rocky Mountains and High Plains of central North America as part of the Deep RIFT Electrical Resistivity (DRIFTER) experiment. Remote-reference data processing yielded high quality MT data over a period range of 100 Hz to 10,000 seconds. A prominent feature of the regional geo-electric structure is the Denver Basin, which contains a thick package of highly conductive shales and porous sandstone aquifers. One-dimensional forward modeling was performed on stations within the Denver Basin to estimate depth to the base of this shallow conductor. Those estimates were then used to place a horizontal penalty cut in the model mesh of a regularized two-dimensional inversion. Two-dimensional modeling of the resistivity structure reveals two major anomalous regions in the lithosphere: 1) a high conductivity region in the crust under the tallest peaks of the Rocky Mountains and 2) a lateral step increase in lithospheric resistivity beneath the plains. The Rocky Mountain crustal anomaly coincides with low seismic wave speeds and enhanced heat flow and is thus interpreted as evidence of partial melt and/or high temperature fluids emplaced in the crust by tectonic activity along the Rio Grande Rift. The lateral variation in the mantle lithosphere, while co-located with a pronounced step increase in seismic velocity, appears to be a gradational boundary in resistivity across eastern Colorado and could indicate a small degree of compositional modification at the edge of the North American craton. These inferred conductivity mechanisms, namely crustal melt and modification of mantle lithosphere, likely contribute to high topography locally in the

  12. Seismic surface-wave dispersion profiling versus shear-wave refraction tomography on a granite-micaschists contact at Plœmeur hydrological observatory (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquet, S.; Bodet, L.; Dhemaied, A.; Guérin, R.; Longuevergne, L.; Faycal, R.

    2013-12-01

    Despite well-known generation and detection issues, shear (S-) wave-related techniques grow in popularity with the increase of multicomponent data acquisitions in hydrocarbon exploration. In the meantime, recent studies demonstrated that pressure (P-) wave reflection, P-wave refraction and surface-wave dispersion data could be simultaneously acquired and analyzed for the characterization of the investigated medium. Retrieving 2D P-wave velocity (Vp) and S-wave velocity (Vs) sections with a single standard acquisition setup appears promising and attractive in terms of time and equipment costs, more particularly in the context of near-surface applications (at depth lower than 100 m). The literature even shows recent attempts of using Vp/Vs ratio to estimate hydrological parameters of aquifer systems. But refraction tomography and surface-wave dispersion inversion obviously involve distinct characteristics of the wavefield and different assumptions about the medium. The methods consequently provide results of different resolutions and investigation depths. We addressed these issues thanks to a seismic survey conducted on a well-known granite-micaschists contact at Plœmeur hydrological observatory (France). We performed simultaneous P-wave refraction tomography and surface-wave profiling, along with SH-wave refraction tomography, on a line intersecting the contact zone. The combined interpretation of Vp and Vs sections retrieved from refraction tomography helps defining the lateral extent of the contact zone, when only one section is insufficient. As for surface-wave profiling, we used offset moving windows and dispersion stacking techniques to extract a collection of local dispersion measurements along the line. We then inverted each dispersion curve separately and reconstructed a pseudo-2D Vs section along the profile. Three different window sizes were tested. They provide sections evidently different in terms of lateral resolution and investigation depth. To select

  13. Collision and subduction structure of the Izu-Bonin arc, central Japan: Recent studies from refraction/wide-angle reflection analysis and seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, R.; Iwasaki, T.; Sato, H.; Abe, S.; Hirata, N.

    2009-12-01

    Since the middle Miocene, the Izu-Bonin arc has been colliding from south with the Honshu arc in central Japan associated with subduction of the Philippine Sea plate. This process is responsible for forming a complex crustal structure called the Izu collision zone. Geological studies indicate the several geological blocks derived from the Izu-Bonin arc, such as the Misaka Mountains (MM), the Tanzawa Mountains (TM) and the Izu Peninsula (IP), were accreted onto the Honshu crust in the course of the collision, forming several tectonic boundaries in and around this collision zone (e.g. Amano, 1991). Recent seismic experiments succeeded in revealing the deep crustal structure in the eastern part of the Izu collision zone by reflection analysis (Sato et al., 2005) and refraction/wide-angle reflection analysis (Arai et al., 2009). Although these studies delineate the collision boundary between the Honshu crust and TM, and the upper surface of the subducting Philippine Sea plate, the southern part of the profile including the Kozu-Matsuda Fault (KMF, the tectonic boundary between TM and IP) is not well constrained due to the poor ray coverage. Moreover, clear images of tectonic boundaries are not obtained for the central or western part of the collision zone. In order to construct the structure model dominated by collision and subduction for the whole part of the collision zone, we carried out the following two analyses: (1) refraction tomography of active source data including another profile line in the western part of the collision zone (Sato et al., 2006), and (2) seismic tomography combining active and passive source data. In the analysis (1), we applied first arrival seismic tomography (Zelt and Barton, 1998) to the refraction data .We inverted over 39,000 travel times to construct a P wave velocity model for the 75-km-long transect, and a fine-scale structure with strong lateral heterogeneity was recovered. We conducted checkerboard resolution test to evaluate a

  14. Seismic tomography reveals the feeding system of the Toba supervolcano from the slab to the shallow reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, Ivan; Kasatkina, Ekaterina; Shapiro, Nikolay M.; Jaupart, Claude; Vasilevsky, Alexander; El Khrepy, Sami; Al-Arifi, Nassir

    2016-04-01

    In the Toba Caldera, several large explosive eruptions occurred in the recent geological past, including the world's largest Pleistocene eruption 74,000 years ago. The major cause of this particular behavior might be the subduction of the water rich Investigator Fracture Zone (IFZ) just underneath the continental crust of Sumatra. We present a new model of the P and S seismic velocities beneath the Toba region based of inversion of the P and S arrival times from local seismicity recorded by two networks installed in 1995 and 2008. The derived seismic anomalies clearly reveal a complex multilevel magma system beneath Toba. A large amount of volatile enriched melts is generated in the subducting IFZ at ~150 km depth that is visible as a low velocity anomaly and increased seismicity. The fluids may react with peridotites in the mantle wedge and transform them into phlogopite or amphibole bearing rocks having lower melting temperature. The ascending flow of partially molten magma is expressed as a vertical low-velocity anomaly. At depths of 30-50 km, it forms a large reservoir with strong negative anomaly of shear velocity and much weaker P-wave velocity anomaly that testifies the presence of significant amounts of melt. Following the -7% contour line of the S-wave velocity anomaly, we estimate its volume as 100x25x20=50,000 km3. Differentiated light and volatile enriched fractions from this reservoir are buoyant enough to ascend into the upper crust and to form the shallow silicic magma reservoir, which is directly responsible for supereruptions. The results of our tomographic model suggest that the Toba magma generating engine continues to be active at present and, despite its current period of inactivity, this volcano might generate strong eruptions in the future.

  15. Crustal high-velocity anomaly at the East European Craton margin in SE Poland (TESZ) modelled by 3-D seismic tomography of refracted and reflected arrivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Środa, Piotr; Dec, Monika

    2016-04-01

    The area of Trans-European Suture Zone in SE Poland represents a contact of major tectonic units of different consolidation age - from the Precambrian East European Craton, through Palaeozoic West European Platform to Cenozoic Carpathian orogen. The region was built by several phases of crustal accretion, which resulted in a complex collage of tectonic blocks. In 2000, this region was studied by several seismic wide-angle profiles of CELEBRATION 2000 experiment, providing a dense coverage of seismic data in SE Poland and allowing for detailed investigations of the crustal structure and properties in this area. Beneath the marginal part of the EEC, the 2-D modelling of in-line data form several CELEBRATION profiles revealed a prominent high P-wave velocity anomaly in the upper crust, with Vp of 6.7-7.1 km/s, starting at 10-16 km depth (e.g., Środa et al., 2006). Anomalously high velocities are observed in the area located approximately beneath Lublin trough, to the NE of Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone. Based on 3-D tomography of first arrivals of in- and off-line CELEBRATION 2000 recordings (Malinowski et al., 2008), elevated velocities are also reported in the same area and seem to continue to the SW, off the craton margin. Gravimetric modelling also revealed anomalously high density in the same region at similar depths. High seismic velocities and densities are interpreted as indicative for a pronounced mafic intrusion, possibly related to extensional processes at the EEC margin. Previous 3-D models of the high-velocity intrusion were based on first arrivals (crustal refractions) only. In this study, also off-line reflections (not modelled up to now) are used, in order to enlarge the data set and to better constrain the geometry and properties of the velocity anomaly. A code for 3-D joint tomographic inversion of refracted and reflected arrivals, with model parametrization allowing for velocity discontinuities was used (Rawlinson, 2007). With this approach, besides the

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory 4D Database

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-02

    4D is an integrated development platform - a single product comprised of the components you need to create and distribute professional applications. You get a graphical design environment, SQL database, a programming language, integrated PHP execution, HTTP server, application server, executable generator, and much more. 4D offers multi-platform development and deployment, meaning whatever you create on a Mac can be used on Windows, and vice-versa. Beyond productive development, 4D is renowned for its great flexibility in maintenance and modification of existing applications, and its extreme ease of implementation in its numerous deployment options. Your professional application can be put into production more quickly, at a lower cost, and will always be instantly scalable. 4D makes it easy, whether you're looking to create a classic desktop application, a client-server system, a distributed solution for Web or mobile clients - or all of the above!

  17. The three-dimensional structure beneath the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) based on local earthquake seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, P. Y.; Koulakov, I. Yu

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a new seismic velocity model (P- and S-wave velocities and Vp/Vs ratio) beneath the Popocatépetl volcano to a depth of ~ 4 km below sea level (bsl). This model is based on the tomographic inversion of P- and S-wave arrival time data from earthquakes in the region of the volcano. These data were recorded by the 15 stations of a temporary seismic network that was deployed on the volcano in 1999 and 2000. The recording period was during a relatively quiet period between two strong eruptions, which occurred before and after the experiment. This period is characterized by low levels of volcano-related seismicity. Most of the recorded events occurred across an area much larger than the network. In this study, we conducted several synthetic tests, which validate the use of the out-of-network events to improve the resolution of the tomographic inversion beneath the stations. In the resulting model, we see that the main volcanic edifice is associated with high velocities that have a mushroom shape and that these high velocities are most prominent in the P-wave model. This feature may indicate the presence of overpressured solidified igneous rocks, which comprise the edifice of Popocatépetl. Below the summit of the volcano, we observe a prominent high Vp/Vs anomaly, which reaches a value of 1.9. This anomaly probably indicates the existence of cracks and pores filled with melts and fluids, and it may represent a fracture zone that serves as a conduit feeding the volcano. This model characterizes the interior structure of the Popocatépetl volcano prior to the strong September 2000 eruption, which occurred a few months after the termination of the experiment.

  18. Evolution of seismic layer 2B across the Juan de Fuca Ridge from hydrophone streamer 2-D traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kori R.; Nedimović, Mladen R.; Canales, J. Pablo; Carbotte, Suzanne M.

    2011-05-01

    How oceanic crust evolves has important implications for understanding both subduction earthquake hazards and energy and mass exchange between the Earth's interior and the oceans. Although considerable work has been done characterizing the evolution of seismic layer 2A, there has been little analysis of the processes that affect layer 2B after formation. Here we present high-resolution 2-D tomographic models of seismic layer 2B along ˜300 km long multichannel seismic transects crossing the Endeavour, Northern Symmetric, and Cleft segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. These models show that seismic layer 2B evolves rapidly following a different course than layer 2A. The upper layer 2B velocities increase on average by 0.8 km/s and reach a generally constant velocity of 5.2 ± 0.3 km/s within the first 0.5 Myr after crustal formation. This suggests that the strongest impact on layer 2B evolution may be that of mineral precipitation due to "active" hydrothermal circulation centered about the ridge crest and driven by the heat from the axial magma chamber. Variations in upper layer 2B velocity with age at time scales ≥0.5 Ma show correlation about the ridge axis indicating that in the long term, crustal accretion processes affect both sides of the ridge axis in a similar way. Below the 0.5 Ma threshold, differences in 2B velocity are likely imprinted during crustal formation or early crustal evolution. Layer 2B velocities at propagator wakes (5.0 ± 0.2 km/s), where enhanced faulting and cracking are expected, and at areas that coincide with extensional or transtensional faulting are on average slightly slower than in normal mature upper layer 2B. Analysis of the layer 2B velocities from areas where the hydrothermal patterns are known shows that the locations of current and paleohydrothermal discharge and recharge zones are marked by reduced and increased upper layer 2B velocities, respectively. Additionally, the distance between present up-flow and down-flow zones is

  19. Seismic tomography of the Colorado Rocky Mountains upper mantle from CREST: Lithosphere-asthenosphere interactions and mantle support of topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCarthy, J. K.; Aster, R. C.; Dueker, K.; Hansen, S.; Schmandt, B.; Karlstrom, K.

    2014-09-01

    The CREST experiment (Colorado Rocky Mountains Experiment and Seismic Transects) integrated the EarthScope USArray Transportable Array with portable and permanent stations to provide detailed seismic imaging of crust and mantle properties beneath the highest topography region of the Rocky Mountains. Inverting approximately 14,600 P- and 3600 S-wave arrival times recorded at 160 stations for upper mantle Vp and Vs structure, we find that large Vp perturbations relative to AK135 of 7% and Vs variations of 8% take place over very short (approaching tens of kilometers) lateral distances. Highest heterogeneity is observed in the upper 300 km of the mantle, but well resolved low velocity features extend to the top of the transition zone in portions of these images. The previously noted low velocity upper mantle Aspen Anomaly is resolved into multiple features. The lowest Vp and Vs velocities in the region are found beneath the San Juan Mountains, which is clearly distinguished from other low velocity features of the northern Rio Grande Rift, Taos/Latir region, Aspen region, and below the Never Summer Mountains. We suggest that the San Juan anomaly, and a similar feature below the Taos/Latir region of northern New Mexico, are related to delamination and remnant heat (and melt) beneath these sites of extraordinarily voluminous middle-Cenozoic volcanism. We interpret a northeast-southwest grain in velocity structure that parallels the Colorado Mineral belt to depths near 150 km as being reflective of control by uppermost mantle Proterozoic accretionary lithospheric architecture. Further to the north and west, the Wyoming province and northern Colorado Plateau show high velocity features indicative of thick (∼150 km) preserved Archean and Proterozoic lithosphere, respectively. Overall, we interpret the highly heterogeneous uppermost mantle velocity structure beneath the southern Rocky Mountains as reflecting interfingered chemical Proterozoic lithosphere that has been, is

  20. Evidence for a low permeability fluid trap in the Nový Kostel Seismic Zone, Czech Republic, using double-difference tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Calo, M.; Vavrycuk, V.

    2012-12-01

    The West Bohemia/Vogtland region is the border area between the Czech Republic and Germany known for frequent occurrences of earthquake swarms. The most prominent earthquake swarms occurred recently in 1985/86, 1997, 2000 (Fischer and Horálek, 2003) and 2008 (Fischer et al., 2010). They comprised thousands of microearthquakes, their duration was between 2 weeks to 2 months, and the activity focused typically at depths ranging from 7 to 12 km. The seismic activity is concentrated mostly at the same epicentral area, called the Nový Kostel Zone. This zone is located on the edge of the Cheb Basin, Eger Rift, and at the junction of the Mariánské-Lázně Fault with the Počátky-Plesná Shear Zone. Numerous gas vents and mineral springs within and around the Cheb Basin indicate that uprising magmatic fluids may act as a swarm trigger. In this study, we apply double-difference tomography to investigate the structure within and around the Nový Kostel focal zone. We use data from the 2008 earthquake swarm, as it has been extensively analyzed, and focal mechanisms, principal faults, tectonic stress, source migration and other basic characteristics are known. We selected about 500 microearthquakes recorded at 22 local seismic stations of the West Bohemia Network (WEBNET). The events were inverted for the 3-D seismic structure using the TomoDD code (Zhang and Thurber, 2003) and post-processed using the Weighted Average Model method (Calò et al., 2011). The application of double-difference tomography is advantageous for this setting as swarm foci are closely spaced and form a dense cluster. The geometry of the focal zone and the WEBNET network configuration offer good raypath coverage in all directions. Applying double-difference tomography we produce and interpret 3-D models of the P and S velocities. In this work, we interpret 3-D models of the P velocity and P-to-S ratio in and around the focal zone. The P-to-S model was obtained by calculating directly the ratio

  1. Helical 4D CT and Comparison with Cine 4D CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tinsu

    4D CT was one of the most important developments in radiation oncology in the last decade. Its early development in single slice CT and commercialization in multi-slice CT has radically changed our practice in radiation treatment of lung cancer, and has enabled the stereotactic radiosurgery of early stage lung cancer. In this chapter, we will document the history of 4D CT development, detail the data sufficiency condition governing the 4D CT data collection; present the design of the commercial helical 4D CTs from Philips and Siemens; compare the differences between the helical 4D CT and the GE cine 4D CT in data acquisition, slice thickness, acquisition time and work flow; review the respiratory monitoring devices; and understand the causes of image artifacts in 4D CT.

  2. Upper mantle structure beneath southern African cratons from seismic finite-frequency P- and S-body wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssof, M.; Thybo, H.; Artemieva, I. M.; Levander, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present a 3D high-resolution seismic model of the southern African cratonic region from teleseismic tomographic inversion of the P- and S-body wave dataset recorded by the Southern African Seismic Experiment (SASE). Utilizing 3D sensitivity kernels, we invert traveltime residuals of teleseismic body waves to calculate velocity anomalies in the upper mantle down to a 700 km depth with respect to the ak135 reference model. Various resolution tests allow evaluation of the extent of smearing effects and help defining the optimum inversion parameters (i.e., damping and smoothness) for regularizing the inversion calculations. The fast lithospheric keels of the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons reach depths of 300-350 km and 200-250 km, respectively. The paleo-orogenic Limpopo Belt is represented by negative velocity perturbations down to a depth of ˜ 250 km, implying the presence of chemically fertile material with anomalously low wave speeds. The Bushveld Complex has low velocity down to ˜ 150 km, which is attributed to chemical modification of the cratonic mantle. In the present model, the finite-frequency sensitivity kernels allow to resolve relatively small-scale anomalies, such as the Colesberg Magnetic Lineament in the suture zone between the eastern and western blocks of the Kaapvaal Craton, and a small northern block of the Kaapvaal Craton, located between the Limpopo Belt and the Bushveld Complex.

  3. TOMO3D: 3-D joint refraction and reflection traveltime tomography parallel code for active-source seismic data—synthetic test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, A.; Korenaga, J.; Sallarès, V.; Miniussi, A.; Ranero, C. R.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new 3-D traveltime tomography code (TOMO3D) for the modelling of active-source seismic data that uses the arrival times of both refracted and reflected seismic phases to derive the velocity distribution and the geometry of reflecting boundaries in the subsurface. This code is based on its popular 2-D version TOMO2D from which it inherited the methods to solve the forward and inverse problems. The traveltime calculations are done using a hybrid ray-tracing technique combining the graph and bending methods. The LSQR algorithm is used to perform the iterative regularized inversion to improve the initial velocity and depth models. In order to cope with an increased computational demand due to the incorporation of the third dimension, the forward problem solver, which takes most of the run time (˜90 per cent in the test presented here), has been parallelized with a combination of multi-processing and message passing interface standards. This parallelization distributes the ray-tracing and traveltime calculations among available computational resources. The code's performance is illustrated with a realistic synthetic example, including a checkerboard anomaly and two reflectors, which simulates the geometry of a subduction zone. The code is designed to invert for a single reflector at a time. A data-driven layer-stripping strategy is proposed for cases involving multiple reflectors, and it is tested for the successive inversion of the two reflectors. Layers are bound by consecutive reflectors, and an initial velocity model for each inversion step incorporates the results from previous steps. This strategy poses simpler inversion problems at each step, allowing the recovery of strong velocity discontinuities that would otherwise be smoothened.

  4. The incorporation of fault zone head wave and direct wave secondary arrival times and arrival polarizations into seismic tomography: Application to the Parkfield, California area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, N. L.; Thurber, C. H.; Peng, Z.; Zhao, P.

    2012-12-01

    We present a 3D P-wave velocity (Vp) model of the Parkfield region that utilizes existing P-wave arrival time data, including fault zone head waves (FZHW), plus new data from direct wave secondary arrivals (DWSA). The first-arrival and DWSA travel times are obtained as the global and local minimum travel time paths, respectively. The inclusion of DWSA results in as much as a 10% increase in the across-fault velocity contrast for the Vp model at Parkfield relative to Thurber et al. (2006). Viewed along strike, three pronounced velocity contrast regions are observed: a pair of strong positive velocity contrasts (SW fast), one NW of the 1966 Parkfield hypocenter and the other SE of the 2004 Parkfield hypocenter, and a strong negative velocity contrast (NE fast) between the two hypocenters. The negative velocity contrast partially to entirely encompasses peak coseismic slip estimated in several slip models for the 2004 earthquake, suggesting that the negative velocity contrast played a part in defining the rupture patch of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. We expand on this work by modifying our seismic tomography algorithm to incorporate arrival polarizations (azimuths). Synthetic tests will be presented to demonstrate the improvements in velocity structure when arrival polarizations are incorporated. These tests will compare the synthetic model recovered when FZHW/DWSA arrivals as well as existing P-wave arrival time data are inverted to that recovered with the same dataset with the inclusion of arrival polarizations. We plan to extend this work to carry out a full scale seismic tomography/relocation inversion at Parkfield, CA utilizing arrival polarizations from all first-P arrivals, and FZHW/DWSA arrivals as well as existing P-wave arrival time data. This effort requires the determination of polarization data for all P-waves and FZHW's at Parkfield. To this end, we use changes in the arrival azimuth from fault normal to source-receiver direction to identify FZHW and

  5. Tomography of the subducting Cocos plate in central Mexico using data from the installation of a prototype wireless seismic network: Images of a truncated slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husker, Allen Leroy, Jr.

    The central Mexican subduction zone exhibits an oblique strike of the volcanic arc, the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB), with respect to the trench, flat-slab subduction, and has no Wadati-Benioff zone. The oblique strike of the TMVB is explained by the changing rate of subduction at the trench. The shape of the slab beyond the flat slab section has been unknown until now due to a lack of seismicity, but inferred by the position of the volcanic arc. Here we use data from the Middle America Seismic Experiment (MASE) to image the slab both with tomography and inverting for a slab temperature model. MASE is a collaboration between the Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (CENS) at UCLA, the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), and the California Institute of Technology (CIT). The data used in this study was from the MASE seismic network. It consisted of 100 seismic stations running, in a line, every 5-6 km from Acapulco, north through TMVB, and to almost the Gulf of Mexico. Half of the seismic stations were the typical standalone style station. These stations were visited once a month to change memory disks and for maintenance. The other 50 stations were developed to send data wirelessly through the network to a base station where the data is linked to the Internet. The 50 stations, called the Wirelessly Linked Seismological Network (WiLSoN), utilize standard Internet tools and protocols to make it both robust and portable to other systems. WiLSoN is described and compared to the standalone stations. The time to permit and install WiLSoN was double that of the standalone network. However, the benefits of WiLSoN included near real-time data and knowledge of system health as compared to only once a month visits to collect data from the standalone stations. However, the data collected from the standalone sites was more complete than that collected from WiLSoN. The lack of data completeness is attributed to the development of both software and hardware for

  6. 4D flow imaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran; Allen, Bradley D.; Garcia, Julio; Jarvis, Kelly B.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important tool for the clinical evaluation of patients with cardiovascular disease. Since its introduction in the late 1980s, 2-dimensional phase contrast MRI (2D PC-MRI) has become a routine part of standard-of-care cardiac MRI for the assessment of regional blood flow in the heart and great vessels. More recently, time-resolved PC-MRI with velocity encoding along all three flow directions and three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage (also termed ‘4D flow MRI’) has been developed and applied for the evaluation of cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the human body. 4D flow MRI allows for the comprehensive evaluation of complex blood flow patterns by 3D blood flow visualization and flexible retrospective quantification of flow parameters. Recent technical developments, including the utilization of advanced parallel imaging techniques such as k-t GRAPPA, have resulted in reasonable overall scan times, e.g., 8-12 minutes for 4D flow MRI of the aorta and 10-20 minutes for whole heart coverage. As a result, the application of 4D flow MRI in a clinical setting has become more feasible, as documented by an increased number of recent reports on the utility of the technique for the assessment of cardiac and vascular hemodynamics in patient studies. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential of 4D flow MRI to provide an improved assessment of hemodynamics which might aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to describe the methods used for 4D flow MRI acquisition, post-processing and data analysis. In addition, the article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D flow MRI and includes a review of applications in the heart, thoracic aorta and hepatic system. PMID:24834414

  7. 3-D Tomography Study of Seismic Refraction/Wide-Angle Reflection Data Across the Variscides, SW Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, B. M.; Landes, M.; Readman, P. W.; Shannon, P. M.; Prodehl, C.

    2002-12-01

    The VARNET-96 seismic experiment acquired three seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiles in order to examine the crustal structure in the south-west of Ireland. 170 seismic stations were used on 300 recording sites. The shotpoint geometry was designed to allow for both in-line and off-line fan shot recordings on the three profiles. A total of 34 water shots was fired. Results from 3-D raytrace and inversion modelling illustrate the pervasive lateral heterogeneity of the study area south of the Shannon Estuary. Palaeozoic strata at the south coast are about 5-6 km thick associated with the sedimentary infill of the Munster and South Munster Basins. To the north, shallow upper crust in the vicinity of the Killarney-Mallow Fault Zone is followed by a 3-4 km thick sedimentary succession in the Dingle-Shannon Basin. A zone of high-velocity upper crust (6.4-6.6 km/s) beneath the South Munster Basin correlates with a gravity high between the Kenmare-Killarney and the Leinster Granite gravity lows. Other high-velocity zones were found beneath Dingle Bay and the Kenmare River region and may be associated with the deep traces of the Killarney-Mallow Fault Zone and the Cork-Kenmare Line. The 3-D velocity model was taken as a basis for the computation of PmP reflected arrivals from the crust-mantle boundary. The Moho depth varies from about 28-29 km at the south coast to about 32-33 km beneath the Dingle-Shannon Basin, the region where the 2-D inline model shows a south-dipping reflector in the upper mantle. Pervasive Variscan deformation appears to be confined to the sedimentary and upper crustal structure and has not deformed the entire crust supporting a thin-skinned tectonic model for Variscan deformation. Deep-crustal variations only occur where they can be correlated with major tectonic features such as the Caledonian Iapetus Suture near the Shannon Estuary. The shallowing of the Moho towards the coast may result from Mesozoic crustal extension in the adjacent

  8. Phosphodiesterase4D (PDE4D)--A risk factor for atrial fibrillation and stroke?

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Carina; Yasmeen, Saiqa; Iversen, Helle K; Kruuse, Christina

    2015-12-15

    Mutations in the gene encoding phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) enzyme are associated with ischemic stroke; however the functional implications of such mutations are not well understood. PDE4D is part of a complex protein family modulating intracellular signalling by cyclic nucleotides. The PDE4 family includes subtypes A-D, all of which show unique intracellular, cellular and tissue distribution. PDE4D is the major subtype expressed in human atrial myocytes and involved in the pathophysiology of arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation. The PDE4D enzyme hydrolyses cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Though diverging results are reported, several population based studies describe association of various PDE4D single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with cardio-embolic stroke in particular. Functionally, a down regulation of PDE4D variants has been reported in stroke patients. The anti-inflammatory and vasodilator properties of PDE4 inhibitors make them suitable for treatment of stroke and cardiovascular disease. PDE4D has recently been suggested as factor in atrial fibrillation. This review summarizes the possible function of PDE4D in the brain, heart, and vasculature. Further, association of the described SNPs, in particular, with cardioembolic stroke, is reviewed. Current findings on the PDE4D mutations suggest functionality involves an increased cardiac risk factor as well as augmented risk of atrial fibrillation. PMID:26671126

  9. High-resolution 3-D S-wave Tomography of upper crust structures in Yilan Plain from Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai-Xun; Chen, Po-Fei; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Chen, Li-Wei; Gung, YuanCheng

    2015-04-01

    The Yilan Plain (YP) in NE Taiwan locates on the western YP of the Okinawa Trough and displays high geothermal gradients with abundant hot springs, likely resulting from magmatism associated with the back-arc spreading as attested by the offshore volcanic island (Kueishantao). YP features NS distinctive characteristics that the South YP exhibits thin top sedimentary layer, high on-land seismicity and significant SE movements, relative those of the northern counterpart. A dense network (~2.5 km station interval) of 89 Texan instruments was deployed in Aug. 2014, covering most of the YP and its vicinity. The ray path coverage density of each 0.015 degree cells are greater than 150 km that could provide the robustness assessment of tomographic results. We analyze ambient noise signals to invert a high-resolution 3D S-wave model for shallow velocity structures in and around YP. The aim is to investigate the velocity anomalies corresponding to geothermal resources and the NS geological distinctions aforementioned. We apply the Welch's method to generate empirical Rayleigh wave Green's functions between two stations records of continuous vertical components. The group velocities of thus derived functions are then obtained by the multiple-filter analysis technique measured at the frequency range between 0.25 and 1 Hz. Finally, we implement a wavelet-based multi-scale parameterization technique to construct 3D model of S-wave velocity. Our first month results exhibit low velocity in the plain, corresponding existing sediments, those of whole YP show low velocity offshore YP and those of high-resolution south YP reveal stark velocity contrast across the Sanshin fault. Key words: ambient seismic noises, Welch's method, S-wave, Yilan Plain

  10. A 3D Seismic Velocity Model Offshore Southern California from Ambient Noise Tomography of the ALBACORE OBS Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, M. D.; Bowden, D. C.; Tsai, V. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific-North America plate boundary in Southern California extends far west of the coastline, and a 12-month ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) array spanned the western side of the plate boundary to image lithospheric seismic velocities. Velocities are modeled through stacked cross correlations of ambient noise data. Twelve months of continuous data were used from 22 OBS stations and ~30 coastal and island Southern California Seismic Network stations. Particular attention has been paid to improving signal-to-noise ratios in the noise correlations with OBS stations by removing the effects of instrument tilt and infragravity waves. Different applications of preprocessing techniques allow us to distinguish the fundamental and first higher order Rayleigh modes, especially in deep water OBS pairs where the water layer dominates crustal sensitivity of the fundamental mode. Standard time domain and frequency domain methods are used to examine surface wave dispersion curves for group and phase velocities between 5 and 50 second periods, and these are inverted for 3D velocity structure. The results define the transition in three dimensions from continental lithospheric structure in the near-shore region to oceanic structure west of the continental borderland. While the most prominent features of the model relate to thinning of the crust west of the Patton Escarpment, other notable anomalies are present north-to-south throughout the continental borderland and along the coast from the Los Angeles Basin to the Peninsular Ranges. The velocity model will help describe the region's tectonic history, as well as provide new constraints for determination of earthquake relocations and rupture styles.

  11. Seismic refraction and electrical resistivity tomography to investigate subsurface controls on vegetation distribution in a mountain watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, W.; Bradford, J. H.; Seyfried, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate subsurface controls on the distribution of vegetation at two sites located within the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory (CZO). Located in southwestern Idaho, the Reynolds Creek CZO extends over a steep elevation-climatic gradient (mean annual precipitation 250 - 1100 mm/yr, mean annual temperature 5.5 °C to 11°C). The existing, publically available hydroclimatic data are long-term and spatially extensive, including precipitation (>50 yr), snow course SWE (>50 yr), temperature (30-50 yr), soil moisture and temperature (>10 yr), and some soil depth data. Both sites we investigated were at elevation greater than 2000m, and both sites showed abrupt changes in vegetation with no surface expression of changes in the underlying geology. The first site, termed Dry Meadow (DM), consists of a grassy meadow that transitions from being saturated to the surface during the spring runoff to dry with a water table at a depth of 4-6m in the late summer. The grassy meadow transitions abruptly to sage brush dominated terrain with no significant change in elevation. The second site, termed the Aspen Grove (AG), shows an abrupt transition from dry grassy terrain to an Aspen grove along a constant, and low gradient hill slope. At both sites we acquired high density seismic refraction data (1m receiver spacing) along transects that ranged from 95 to 160 m. Additionally we acquired 107 m long electrical resistivity profiles in both dipole-dipole and Wenner arrays with 2 m electrode spacing. At both sites, both seismic and ERT data indicate a distinct and abrupt drop in depth to the top of the weathered rock surface of 10-15 m. These topographic lows in the bedrock may be either erosional or structurally controlled, but in either case create accommodation space for the accumulation of sediment and an altered groundwater distribution that can accommodate a shift in the dominant vegetation type.

  12. Recent structure of the lithosphere beneath Siberia and surrounding areas based on the results of seismic tomography and numerical thermo-gravity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushenkova, N.; Chervov, V.; Koulakov, I.

    2010-12-01

    In this study we investigate recent structure of the lithosphere and dynamics of the sub-lithosphere mantle beneath a large part of Eurasia based on results of seismic tomography and numerical modeling. The study area includes rigid old lithospheric blocks, such as Siberian Craton, Tarim plate, remnant parts of the Tuva-Mongolia continent, as well as more recent structures such as West-Siberian plate and orogenic belts in southern Siberia. Thickness of the lithosphere was estimated based on the regional tomographic model by Koulakov and Bushenkova (2010) using a method described by Bushenkova et al., (2008). These estimates were used to define the boundary conditions in numerical modeling. To reduce the marginal effects, the modeling area was considerably enlarged with Russian, North- and South China plates. However, the Indian plate and its movement were not taken into account in this model. The numerical modeling was performed in a spherical segment limited by latitude 0 E-150 E, longitude 0-80 N and depth 0-700 km using a regular grid of 151x81x36 and time step of 10 Ma. Here we solve numerically the Navier-Stokes equations using the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation in spherical coordinates. In our model viscosity depends on the pressure and temperature. The modeling shows that ascending flows and higher temperature (up to 100 degrees) are usually associated with thick lithosphere of cratons. These flows determine the shapes of convective cells far outside the craton and generate another ascending flow in non-cratonic areas. The areas with thin lithosphere are usually associated with descending flows and colder mantle. One of examples is an area between Siberian craton to the north and Tarim and North China plates to the south where the estimated thickness of the lithosphere is between 40-75 km. There we observe descending flows in the numerical model and lower temperatures according to the tomography result. Besides the tomography results, the numerical model

  13. IMRT treatment planning on 4D geometries for the era of dynamic MLC tracking.

    PubMed

    Suh, Yelin; Murray, Walter; Keall, Paul J

    2014-12-01

    The problem addressed here was to obtain optimal and deliverable dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf sequences from four-dimensional (4D) geometries for dynamic MLC tracking delivery. The envisaged scenario was where respiratory phase and position information of the target was available during treatment, from which the optimal treatment plan could be further adapted in real time. A tool for 4D treatment plan optimization was developed that integrates a commercially available treatment planning system and a general-purpose optimization system. The 4D planning method was applied to the 4D computed tomography planning scans of three lung cancer patients. The optimization variables were MLC leaf positions as a function of monitor units and respiratory phase. The objective function was the deformable dose-summed 4D treatment plan score. MLC leaf motion was constrained by the maximum leaf velocity between control points in terms of monitor units for tumor motion parallel to the leaf travel direction and between phases for tumor motion parallel to the leaf travel direction. For comparison and a starting point for the 4D optimization, three-dimensional (3D) optimization was performed on each of the phases. The output of the 4D IMRT planning process is a leaf sequence which is a function of both monitor unit and phase, which can be delivered to a patient whose breathing may vary between the imaging and treatment sessions. The 4D treatment plan score improved during 4D optimization by 34%, 4%, and 50% for Patients A, B, and C, respectively, indicating 4D optimization generated a better 4D treatment plan than the deformable sum of individually optimized phase plans. The dose-volume histograms for each phase remained similar, indicating robustness of the 4D treatment plan to respiratory variations expected during treatment delivery. In summary, 4D optimization for respiratory phase-dependent treatment planning with dynamic MLC motion tracking improved the 4D treatment plan

  14. Shadow-driven 4D haptic visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Hanson, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Just as we can work with two-dimensional floor plans to communicate 3D architectural design, we can exploit reduced-dimension shadows to manipulate the higher-dimensional objects generating the shadows. In particular, by taking advantage of physically reactive 3D shadow-space controllers, we can transform the task of interacting with 4D objects to a new level of physical reality. We begin with a teaching tool that uses 2D knot diagrams to manipulate the geometry of 3D mathematical knots via their projections; our unique 2D haptic interface allows the user to become familiar with sketching, editing, exploration, and manipulation of 3D knots rendered as projected imageson a 2D shadow space. By combining graphics and collision-sensing haptics, we can enhance the 2D shadow-driven editing protocol to successfully leverage 2D pen-and-paper or blackboard skills. Building on the reduced-dimension 2D editing tool for manipulating 3D shapes, we develop the natural analogy to produce a reduced-dimension 3D tool for manipulating 4D shapes. By physically modeling the correct properties of 4D surfaces, their bending forces, and their collisions in the 3D haptic controller interface, we can support full-featured physical exploration of 4D mathematical objects in a manner that is otherwise far beyond the experience accessible to human beings. As far as we are aware, this paper reports the first interactive system with force-feedback that provides "4D haptic visualization" permitting the user to model and interact with 4D cloth-like objects.

  15. 4D Confocal Imaging of Yeast Organelles.

    PubMed

    Day, Kasey J; Papanikou, Effrosyni; Glick, Benjamin S

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are well suited to visualizing organelles by 4D confocal microscopy. Typically, one or more cellular compartments are labeled with a fluorescent protein or dye, and a stack of confocal sections spanning the entire cell volume is captured every few seconds. Under appropriate conditions, organelle dynamics can be observed for many minutes with only limited photobleaching. Images are captured at a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio and are subsequently processed to generate movies that can be analyzed and quantified. Here, we describe methods for acquiring and processing 4D data using conventional scanning confocal microscopy. PMID:27631997

  16. Seismic tomography and azimuthal anisotropy for the Southern and Eastern Alps from ambient noise cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qorbani, Ehsan; Zigone, Dimitri; Kolinsky, Petr; Fuchs, Florian; Bokelmann, Götz; AlpArray-EASI Working Group

    2016-04-01

    The eastern part of the Alpine chain is considered as an area of complex tectonics and lithospheric structure. Having a relatively dense network of stations in this region provides an opportunity to study the crustal and lithospheric velocity structure using ambient-noise correlations methods. We used continuous data recorded during 2014 at 50 permanent stations located in Austria, Germany, northern Italy, and Slovenia, along with data from 8 temporary stations of the Eastern Alpine Seismic Investigation (EASI) profile. Cross correlation of ambient noise are performed in order to estimate the Green's functions of surface waves propagating between station pairs. Dispersion curves of Rayleigh and Love waves are constructed between 2 and 30 seconds and are then inverted to obtain group velocity maps at different frequency (depth) levels. We present here a new crustal-lithospheric velocity model for the Southern and Eastern Alps, which reveals clear spatial velocity variation and contrasts, associated with major faults, deformed and damaged zones. In this study, we also assess the azimuthal anisotropy from the group velocity measurements. The new finding together with the previous results from SKS splitting and receiver function provides 3D images of anisotropy at scales ranging from crust to upper mantle. This allows us to discuss the strain field and deformation pattern within both shallow and lithospheric-asthenospheric depth, in relation with the most prominent tectonic processes in the region, such as eastward extrusion of the ALCAPA block (Eastern Alps, Western Carpathian, and Pannonian Basin).

  17. Magma source beneath the Bezymianny volcano and its interconnection with Klyuchevskoy inferred from local earthquake seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. I.; Koulakov, I. Yu.; West, M.; Jakovlev, A. V.; Gordeev, E. I.; Senyukov, S.; Chebrov, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    We present a new 3D model of P and S wave velocities and Vp/Vs ratio to 20 km depth beneath the active Klyuchevskoy and Bezymianny volcanoes (Kamchatka, Russia). In this study, we use travel time data from local seismicity recorded by temporary stations of the PIRE experiment from October 24 to December 15, 2009 and permanent stations operated by the Kamchatkan Branch of Geophysical Survey (KBGS). The calculations were performed using the LOTOS code (Koulakov, 2009). The resolution limitations were explored using a series of synthetic tests with checkerboard patterns in the horizontal and vertical sections. At shallow depths, the resulting Vp and Vs anomalies tend to alternate on opposite sides of the lineation connecting the most active volcanic centers of the Klyuchevskoy Volcanic Group (KVG). This prominent lineation suggests the presence of a large fault zone passing throughout the KVG, consistent with regional tectonics. We suggest that this fault zone weakens the crust creating a natural pathway for magmas to reach the upper crust. Beneath Bezymianny volcano we observe a shallow anomaly of high Vp/Vs ratio extending to 5-6 km depth. Beneath Klyuchevskoy another high Vp/Vs anomaly is observed, at deeper depths of 7 and 15 km. These findings are consistent with the regional-scale model of Koulakov et al. (2013a) and provide some explanation for how very different eruption styles can be maintained at two volcanoes in close proximity over numerous eruption cycles.

  18. A Detailed 3D Seismic Velocity Structure of the Subducting Pacific Slab Beneath Hokkaido, Tohoku and Kanto, Japan, by Double-Difference Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Y.; Nakajima, J.; Kita, S.; Okada, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    2007-12-01

    Three-dimensional heterogeneous structure beneath northeastern (NE) Japan has been investigated by previous studies and an inclined seismic low-velocity zone is imaged in the mantle wedge sub-parallel to the down-dip direction of the subducting slab (Zhao et al., 1992, Nakajima et al., 2001). However, the heterogeneous structure within the slab has not been well studied even though it is very important to understand the whole process of water transportation from the slab to the surface. Here we show a detailed 3D seismic velocity structure within the subducted Pacific slab around Japan and propose a water-transportation path from the slab to the mantle wedge. In this study, we estimated 3D velocity structure within the Pacific slab by the double-difference tomography (Zhang and Thurber, 2003). We divided the study area, from Hokkaido to Kanto, into 6 areas due to the limitation of memory and computation time. In each area, arrival-time data of 7,500-17,000 events recorded at 70-170 stations were used in the analysis. The total number of absolute travel-time data was about 140,000-312,000 for P wave and 123,000-268,000 for S wave, and differential data were about 736,000-1,920,000 for P wave and 644,000-1,488,000 for S wave. Horizontal and vertical grid separations are 10-25 km and 6.5 km, respectively. RMS residuals of travel times for P wave decreased from 0.23s to 0.09s and for S wave from 0.35s to 0.13s. The obtained results are as follows: (1) a remarkable low-Vs zone exists in the uppermost part of the subducting slab, (2) it extends down to a depth of about 80 km, (3) the termination of this low-Vs zone almost corresponds to the "seismic belt" recently detected in the upper plane of the double seismic zone (Kita et al.,2006; Hasegawa et al., 2007), (4) at depths deeper than 80 km, a low-Vs and high-Vp/Vs zone is apparently distributed in the mantle wedge, immediately above the slab crust. We consider that these features reflect water-transportation processes

  19. Constrained reconstructions for 4D intervention guidance.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, J; Flach, B; Kueres, R; Semmler, W; Kachelriess, M; Bartling, S

    2013-05-21

    Image-guided interventions are an increasingly important part of clinical minimally invasive procedures. However, up to now they cannot be performed under 4D (3D + time) guidance due to the exceedingly high x-ray dose. In this work we investigate the applicability of compressed sensing reconstructions for highly undersampled CT datasets combined with the incorporation of prior images in order to yield low dose 4D intervention guidance. We present a new reconstruction scheme prior image dynamic interventional CT (PrIDICT) that accounts for specific image features in intervention guidance and compare it to PICCS and ASD-POCS. The optimal parameters for the dose per projection and the numbers of projections per reconstruction are determined in phantom simulations and measurements. In vivo experiments in six pigs are performed in a cone-beam CT; measured doses are compared to current gold-standard intervention guidance represented by a clinical fluoroscopy system. Phantom studies show maximum image quality for identical overall doses in the range of 14 to 21 projections per reconstruction. In vivo studies reveal that interventional materials can be followed in 4D visualization and that PrIDICT, compared to PICCS and ASD-POCS, shows superior reconstruction results and fewer artifacts in the periphery with dose in the order of biplane fluoroscopy. These results suggest that 4D intervention guidance can be realized with today's flat detector and gantry systems using the herein presented reconstruction scheme.

  20. 4D-Var Developement at GMAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelc, Joanna S.; Todling, Ricardo; Akkraoui, Amal El

    2014-01-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Offce (GMAO) is currently using an IAU-based 3D-Var data assimilation system. GMAO has been experimenting with a 3D-Var-hybrid version of its data assimilation system (DAS) for over a year now, which will soon become operational and it will rapidly progress toward a 4D-EnVar. Concurrently, the machinery to exercise traditional 4DVar is in place and it is desirable to have a comparison of the traditional 4D approach with the other available options, and evaluate their performance in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) DAS. This work will also explore the possibility for constructing a reduced order model (ROM) to make traditional 4D-Var computationally attractive for increasing model resolutions. Part of the research on ROM will be to search for a suitably acceptable space to carry on the corresponding reduction. This poster illustrates how the IAU-based 4D-Var assimilation compares with our currently used IAU-based 3D-Var.

  1. Constrained reconstructions for 4D intervention guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, J.; Flach, B.; Kueres, R.; Semmler, W.; Kachelrieß, M.; Bartling, S.

    2013-05-01

    Image-guided interventions are an increasingly important part of clinical minimally invasive procedures. However, up to now they cannot be performed under 4D (3D + time) guidance due to the exceedingly high x-ray dose. In this work we investigate the applicability of compressed sensing reconstructions for highly undersampled CT datasets combined with the incorporation of prior images in order to yield low dose 4D intervention guidance. We present a new reconstruction scheme prior image dynamic interventional CT (PrIDICT) that accounts for specific image features in intervention guidance and compare it to PICCS and ASD-POCS. The optimal parameters for the dose per projection and the numbers of projections per reconstruction are determined in phantom simulations and measurements. In vivo experiments in six pigs are performed in a cone-beam CT; measured doses are compared to current gold-standard intervention guidance represented by a clinical fluoroscopy system. Phantom studies show maximum image quality for identical overall doses in the range of 14 to 21 projections per reconstruction. In vivo studies reveal that interventional materials can be followed in 4D visualization and that PrIDICT, compared to PICCS and ASD-POCS, shows superior reconstruction results and fewer artifacts in the periphery with dose in the order of biplane fluoroscopy. These results suggest that 4D intervention guidance can be realized with today’s flat detector and gantry systems using the herein presented reconstruction scheme.

  2. Testing Models of Magmatic and Hydrothermal Segmentation: A Three-Dimensional Seismic Tomography Experiment at the Endeavour Ridge (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Weekly, R. T.; Wells, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    Competing models for what controls the segmentation and intensity of ridge crest processes are at odds on the scale of mantle and crustal magmatic segmentation, the distribution of hydrothermal venting with respect to a volcanic segment and the properties of the thermal boundary layer that transports energy between the magmatic and hydrothermal systems. The presence of an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector beneath the central portion of the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge, as well as systematic along axis changes in seafloor depth, ridge crest morphology and hydrothermal venting provide an ideal target for testing conflicting hypotheses. In late summer 2009, we conducted an active source seismic experiment on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. A total of 5,567 airgun shots from the 36-gun, 6,600 in3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth were recorded by 68 short-period ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed at 64 sites. The experimental geometry utilized 3 nested scales and was designed to image (1) crustal thickness variations within 25 km of the axial high (0 to 900 kyr); (2) the map view heterogeneity and anisotropy of the topmost mantle beneath the spreading axis; (3) the three-dimensional structure of the crustal magmatic system and (4) the detailed three-dimensional, shallow crustal thermal structure beneath the Endeavour vent fields. At the segment scale, six 100-km-long ridge-parallel shot lines were obtained at distances of 16, 23 and 30 km to both sides of the ridge axis with OBSs on all but the outer lines. At the along-axis scale of the AMC reflector, shot lines are spaced 1 km apart and OBSs 8 km apart within a 60 x 20 km2 region. At the vent field scale, shots were obtained on a 500 x 500 m2 grid and OBSs spaced 5 km apart within a 20 x 10 km2 region. All the shooting lines were collected with a 9 m source depth to obtain impulsive arrivals at shorter ranges but the outer lines were also shot with a 15 m source depth

  3. Upper-mantle seismic structure beneath SE and Central Brazil from P- and S-wave regional traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Marcelo Peres; Schimmel, Martin; Assumpção, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    We present models for the upper-mantle velocity structure beneath SE and Central Brazil using independent tomographic inversions of P- and S-wave relative arrival-time residuals (including core phases) from teleseismic earthquakes. The events were recorded by a total of 92 stations deployed through different projects, institutions and time periods during the years 1992-2004. Our results show correlations with the main tectonic structures and reveal new anomalies not yet observed in previous works. All interpretations are based on robust anomalies, which appear in the different inversions for P- and S-waves. The resolution is variable through our study volume and has been analyzed through different theoretical test inversions. High-velocity anomalies are observed in the western portion of the São Francisco Craton, supporting the hypothesis that this Craton was part of a major Neoproterozoic plate (San Franciscan Plate). Low-velocity anomalies beneath the Tocantins Province (mainly fold belts between the Amazon and São Francisco Cratons) are interpreted as due to lithospheric thinning, which is consistent with the good correlation between intraplate seismicity and low-velocity anomalies in this region. Our results show that the basement of the Paraná Basin is formed by several blocks, separated by suture zones, according to model of Milani & Ramos. The slab of the Nazca Plate can be observed as a high-velocity anomaly beneath the Paraná Basin, between the depths of 700 and 1200 km. Further, we confirm the low-velocity anomaly in the NE area of the Paraná Basin which has been interpreted by VanDecar et al. as a fossil conduct of the Tristan da Cunha Plume related to the Paraná flood basalt eruptions during the opening of the South Atlantic.

  4. The anisotropic structure in the crust in the northern part of North China from ambient seismic noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanyuan V.; Gao, Yuan; Li, Aibing; Lu, Laiyu; Shi, Yutao; Zhang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    We have measured radial anisotropy in the crust beneath the northern part of North China by jointly inverting Rayleigh and Love wave phase velocities at periods less than 35 s from 14 months of ambient noise data recorded by 222 broad-band seismic stations. We also estimate the azimuthal anisotropy of phase velocity from Rayleigh wave data. The fast direction of azimuthal anisotropy varies with periods, NE-SW orientation at short and intermediate periods (10-16 s) and NW-SE orientation at periods larger than 20 s. The NE-SW oriented fast direction of azimuthal anisotropy may be related to the fossilized structural fabrics due to the compression during the Indosinian orogeny from late Palaeozoic to middle Mesozoic. The NW-SE trend of anisotropic fabric in the lower crust and uppermost mantle is probably associated with the later lithospheric extension. The observed radial anisotropy also shows a two-layer feature, negative radial anisotropy (Vsh < Vsv) in the upper crust and positive (Vsh > Vsv) in the middle-lower crust. The compressional tectonics from late Palaeozoic to middle Mesozoic may cause crustal materials align vertically throughout the crust. This vertical fabric could make Vsh slower than Vsv. However, the lithospheric extension in the late Mesozoic to Cenozoic time could overprint the older fabric in the middle and lower crust by magma intrusion and underplating. Horizontal alignment of the material or intruded melt sills due to the extension probably produce the observed strong positive radial anisotropy in the middle and lower crust.

  5. Tomography 3D models of S wave from cross-correlation of seismic noise to explore irregularities of subsoil under the artificial lake of Chapultepec Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas-Soto, M.; Valdes, J. E.; Escobedo-Zenil, D.

    2013-05-01

    In June 2006, the base of the artificial lake in Chapultepec Park collapsed. 20 thousand liters of water were filtered to the ground through a crack increasing the dimensions of initial gap. Studies indicated that the collapse was due to saturated material associated with a sudden and massive water filtration process. Geological studies indicates that all the area of this section the subsoil is composed of vulcano-sedimentary materials that were economically exploited in the mid-20th century, leaving a series of underground mines that were rehabilitated for the construction of the Park. Currently, the Lake is rehabilitated and running for recreational activities. In this study we have applied two methods of seismic noise correlation; seismic interferometry (SI) in time domain and the Spatial Power Auto Correlation (SPAC) in frequency domain, in order to explore the 3D subsoil velocity structure. The aim is to highlight major variations in velocity that can be associated with irregularities in the subsoil that may pose a risk to the stability of the Lake. For this purpose we use 96 vertical geophones of 4.5 Hz with 5-m spacing that conform a semi-circular array that provide a length of 480 m around the lake zone. For both correlation methods, we extract the phase velocity associated with the dispersion characteristics between each pair of stations in the frequency range from 4 to 12 Hz. In the SPAC method the process was through the dispersion curve, and in SI method we use the time delay of the maximum amplitude in the correlation pulse, which was previously filtered in multiple frequency bands. The results of both processes were captured in 3D velocity volumes (in the case SI a process of traveltime tomography was applied). We observed that in the frequency range from 6 to 8 Hz, appear irregular structures, with high velocity contrast in relation with the shear wave velocity of surface layer (ten thick m of saturated sediments). One of these anomalies is related

  6. 4D Proton treatment planning strategy for mobile lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Yixiu; Zhang Xiaodong; Chang, Joe Y.; Wang He; Wei Xiong; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Balter, Peter A.; Liu, Helen; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei . E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate strategies for designing compensator-based 3D proton treatment plans for mobile lung tumors using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional CT sets for 10 lung cancer patients were used in this study. The internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) was obtained by combining the tumor volumes at different phases of the respiratory cycle. For each patient, we evaluated four planning strategies based on the following dose calculations: (1) the average (AVE) CT; (2) the free-breathing (FB) CT; (3) the maximum intensity projection (MIP) CT; and (4) the AVE CT in which the CT voxel values inside the IGTV were replaced by a constant density (AVE{sub R}IGTV). For each strategy, the resulting cumulative dose distribution in a respiratory cycle was determined using a deformable image registration method. Results: There were dosimetric differences between the apparent dose distribution, calculated on a single CT dataset, and the motion-corrected 4D dose distribution, calculated by combining dose distributions delivered to each phase of the 4DCT. The AVE{sub R}IGTV plan using a 1-cm smearing parameter had the best overall target coverage and critical structure sparing. The MIP plan approach resulted in an unnecessarily large treatment volume. The AVE and FB plans using 1-cm smearing did not provide adequate 4D target coverage in all patients. By using a larger smearing value, adequate 4D target coverage could be achieved; however, critical organ doses were increased. Conclusion: The AVE{sub R}IGTV approach is an effective strategy for designing proton treatment plans for mobile lung tumors.

  7. tomo3d: a new 3-D joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomography code for active-source seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, A.; Korenaga, J.; Sallares, V.; Ranero, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    We present the development state of tomo3d, a code for three-dimensional refraction and reflection travel-time tomography of wide-angle seismic data based on the previous two-dimensional version of the code, tomo2d. The core of both forward and inverse problems is inherited from the 2-D version. The ray tracing is performed by a hybrid method combining the graph and bending methods. The graph method finds an ordered array of discrete model nodes, which satisfies Fermat's principle, that is, whose corresponding travel time is a global minimum within the space of discrete nodal connections. The bending method is then applied to produce a more accurate ray path by using the nodes as support points for an interpolation with beta-splines. Travel time tomography is formulated as an iterative linearized inversion, and each step is solved using an LSQR algorithm. In order to avoid the singularity of the sensitivity kernel and to reduce the instability of inversion, regularization parameters are introduced in the inversion in the form of smoothing and damping constraints. Velocity models are built as 3-D meshes, and velocity values at intermediate locations are obtained by trilinear interpolation within the corresponding pseudo-cubic cell. Meshes are sheared to account for topographic relief. A floating reflector is represented by a 2-D grid, and depths at intermediate locations are calculated by bilinear interpolation within the corresponding square cell. The trade-off between the resolution of the final model and the associated computational cost is controlled by the relation between the selected forward star for the graph method (i.e. the number of nodes that each node considers as its neighbors) and the refinement of the velocity mesh. Including reflected phases is advantageous because it provides a better coverage and allows us to define the geometry of those geological interfaces with velocity contrasts sharp enough to be observed on record sections. The code also

  8. tomo3d: a new 3-D joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomography code for active-source seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, A.; Korenaga, J.; Sallarès, V.; Ranero, C. R.

    2012-04-01

    We present the development state of tomo3d, a code for three-dimensional refraction and reflection travel-time tomography of wide-angle seismic data based on the previous two-dimensional version of the code, tomo2d. The core of both forward and inverse problems is inherited from the 2-D version. The ray tracing is performed by a hybrid method combining the graph and bending methods. The graph method finds an ordered array of discrete model nodes, which satisfies Fermat's principle, that is, whose corresponding travel time is a global minimum within the space of discrete nodal connections. The bending method is then applied to produce a more accurate ray path by using the nodes as support points for an interpolation with beta-splines. Travel time tomography is formulated as an iterative linearized inversion, and each step is solved using an LSQR algorithm. In order to avoid the singularity of the sensitivity kernel and to reduce the instability of inversion, regularization parameters are introduced in the inversion in the form of smoothing and damping constraints. Velocity models are built as 3-D meshes, and velocity values at intermediate locations are obtained by trilinear interpolation within the corresponding pseudo-cubic cell. Meshes are sheared to account for topographic relief. A floating reflector is represented by a 2-D grid, and depths at intermediate locations are calculated by bilinear interpolation within the corresponding square cell. The trade-off between the resolution of the final model and the associated computational cost is controlled by the relation between the selected forward star for the graph method (i.e. the number of nodes that each node considers as its neighbors) and the refinement of the velocity mesh. Including reflected phases is advantageous because it provides a better coverage and allows us to define the geometry of those geological interfaces with velocity contrasts sharp enough to be observed on record sections. The code also

  9. Seismic Tomography of the Continental United States from a Joint Inversion of Surface Waves and Body Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golos, E. M.; Yao, H.; Zhang, H.; Fang, H.; Burdick, S.; Schaeffer, A. J.; Vernon, F.; Lebedev, S.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present a model of seismic velocity anomalies for the entire continental United States—coast to coast, surface to lower mantle—using a joint body wave-surface wave inversion. This technique (Zhang et al., 2014), performed on a global adaptively-spaced grid, exploits the good vertical resolution at shallow depths of surface wave data, and the sampling of the deep mantle by teleseismic body (P and S) waves. The resultant model has better resolution at all depths than either method alone, enabling evaluation of interactions between lithospheric and mantle processes. We utilize the depth-dependence of surface wave sensitivity kernels to express surface wave phase velocity data directly in terms of spatial velocity structure (Fang et al., 2015). The data used are Rayleigh wave phase velocities from earthquakes and ambient noise (Schaeffer and Lebedev, 2013; Ekström, 2014) and S phase travel times from USArray, measured at the Array National Facility (ANF). We include a suite of synthetic tests to verify the performance of the inversion and compare it to results from traditional tomographic methods. We also use P arrivals and the influence of Vp on Rayleigh wave propagation speed to generate a preliminary model of Vp variations, independent from but consistent with the Vs model. Our model corroborates the well-established pattern of slow anomalies in the western US, especially in the Basin and Range and Rio Grande Rift regions. New details emerge in the eastern US, thanks to increasing data from the region. A distinction is observed between widespread fast lithospheric anomalies, associated with stable cratonic material, and deeper fast features, associated with the remnants of the Farallon Plate. It has been proposed that these fragments, near the mantle transition zones, still affect mantle dynamics (Forte et al., 2007), so better resolution of these anomalies is an important advancement. In addition, slower velocities are observed beneath the Appalachians and

  10. Subduction-to-Strike-Slip-Transition in the Southeastern Caribbean Imaged Using Deeply-Penetrating Seismic Reflection Lines and Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, T.; Vargas, C. A.; Mann, P.; Latchman, J.

    2010-12-01

    The subduction-to-strike-slip transition (SSST) zone of the southeastern Caribbean is one of thirty identified locations where active subduction and strike-slip tectonic styles transition along strongly curved and seismogenic plate boundaries. This SSST zone provides a field laboratory for understanding how sedimentary basins, faults, basement areas and subducted slabs change from an area of dominantly westward-directed subduction beneath the Lesser Antilles arc to an area of dominantly east-west strike-slip faulting along northern South America. We use two geophysical data types to image the lithosphere and study the relationships between lithospheric scale deformation and basin scale response to the transitional tectonic configuration. Interpretation of deeply-penetrating seismic reflection lines recorded down to 16 seconds two-way time, or depths of about 18 km, is combined with tomographic slices of the upper mantle and lower crust which were constructed using the coda method on ~ 700 earthquakes in the depth range of 70-250 km. Results from the tomographic study are compared with nine seismogenic zones in the southeast Caribbean SSST zone which are defined based on the depth, and focal mechanism of earthquake events. These zones include: (1) the Paria slab tear region; (2) Caribbean/South American strike-slip zone; (3) Hinge area separating continental margin in Trinidad from Tobago forearc basin; (4) Central Range -strike-slip fault zone, onshore Trinidad; (5) Underthrust zone of South American beneath southern onshore and offshore eastern Trinidad, including the prolific hydrocarbon-bearing Columbus Basin; (6) Venezuela foreland and fold-thrust belt; (7) flexural bulge area of oceanic crust located east of Barbados accretionary prism (BAP); (8) Subducted slab beneath the stabilized and supracomplex zones of the BAP; (9) Inner accretionary prism of the BAP. Primary controls on the seismogenic character of each curving tectonic belt include the strike of the

  11. Interactive animation of 4D performance capture.

    PubMed

    Casas, Dan; Tejera, Margara; Guillemaut, Jean-Yves; Hilton, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    A 4D parametric motion graph representation is presented for interactive animation from actor performance capture in a multiple camera studio. The representation is based on a 4D model database of temporally aligned mesh sequence reconstructions for multiple motions. High-level movement controls such as speed and direction are achieved by blending multiple mesh sequences of related motions. A real-time mesh sequence blending approach is introduced, which combines the realistic deformation of previous nonlinear solutions with efficient online computation. Transitions between different parametric motion spaces are evaluated in real time based on surface shape and motion similarity. Four-dimensional parametric motion graphs allow real-time interactive character animation while preserving the natural dynamics of the captured performance.

  12. Nondipole Effects in Xe 4d Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmers, O; Guillemin, R; Wolska, A; Lindle, D W; Rolles, D; Cheng, K T; Johnson, W R; Zhou, H L; Manson, S T

    2004-07-14

    We measured the nondipole parameters for the spin-orbit doublets Xe 4d{sub 5/2} and Xe 4d{sub 3/2} over a photon-energy range from 100 eV to 250 eV at beamline 8.0.1.3 of the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Significant nondipole effects are found at relatively low energies as a result of Cooper minima in dipole channels and interchannel coupling in quadrupole channels. Most importantly, sharp disagreement between experiment and theory, when otherwise excellent agreement was expected, has provided the first evidence of satellite two-electron quadrupole photoionization transitions, along with their crucial importance for a quantitatively accurate theory.

  13. Interactive animation of 4D performance capture.

    PubMed

    Casas, Dan; Tejera, Margara; Guillemaut, Jean-Yves; Hilton, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    A 4D parametric motion graph representation is presented for interactive animation from actor performance capture in a multiple camera studio. The representation is based on a 4D model database of temporally aligned mesh sequence reconstructions for multiple motions. High-level movement controls such as speed and direction are achieved by blending multiple mesh sequences of related motions. A real-time mesh sequence blending approach is introduced, which combines the realistic deformation of previous nonlinear solutions with efficient online computation. Transitions between different parametric motion spaces are evaluated in real time based on surface shape and motion similarity. Four-dimensional parametric motion graphs allow real-time interactive character animation while preserving the natural dynamics of the captured performance. PMID:23492379

  14. Seismic velocity anisotropy and heterogeneity beneath the Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography Experiment (MELT) region of the East Pacific Rise from analysis of P and S body waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, W.C.; Toomey, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    We use teleseismic P and S delay times and shear wave splitting measurements to constrain isotropic and anisotropic heterogeneity in the mantle beneath the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR). The data comprise 462 P and S delay times and 18 shear wave splitting observations recorded during the Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography (MELT) Experiment. We estimate the mantle melt content (F) and temperature (T) variation from the isotropic velocity variation. Our results indicate that the maximum variation in F beneath our array is between zero and ???1.2%, and maximum variation in T is between zero and ???100 K. We favor an explanation having partial contributions from both T and F. We approximate the seismic anisotropy of the upper mantle with hexagonal symmetry, consistent with the assumption of two dimensionality of mantle flow. Our new tomographic technique uses a nonlinear inversion of P and slow S polarization delay times to simultaneously solve for coupled VP and VS heterogeneity throughout the model and for the magnitude of anisotropy within discrete domains. The domain dimensions and the dip of the anisotropy are fixed for each inversion but are varied in a grid search, obtaining the misfit of the models to the body wave delay data and to split times of vertically propagating S waves. The data misfit and the isotropic heterogeneity are sensitive to domain dimensions and dip of anisotropy. In a region centered beneath the SEPR the best average dip of the hexagonal symmetry axis is horizontal or dipping shallowly (<30??) west. Given the resolution of our data, a subaxial region characterized by vertically aligned symmetry axes may exist but is limited to be <80 km deep. We infer that the mantle flow beneath the SEPR is consistent with shallow asthenospheric return flow from the direction of the South Pacific superswell.

  15. HuBLE-UK, the Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment: Insights into the Formation of the Canadian Shield From Seismic Tomography and Shear-Wave Splitting.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastow, Ian; Thompson, David; Kendall, J.-Michael; Helffrich, George; Wookey, James; Snyder, David; Eaton, David; Darbyshire, Fiona

    2010-05-01

    Hudson Bay lies in the Precambrian core of North America that comprises the Canadian Shield and contiguous platform regions. The region is underlain by one of Earth's largest lithospheric keels and is the site of one of the largest negative geoid anomalies. We have deployed a network of 12 broadband seismic stations in the northern part of Hudson Bay that complement existing POLARIS and CNSN networks in the region. Here we present SKS shear-wave splitting analyses, independent tomographic inversion of P- and S-wave travel-time data, and receiver function results in order to: 1) understand better the origin and evolution of the Hudson Bay cratonic interior basin; 2) to illuminate possible relationships between the lithospheric keel, sub-lithospheric mantle flow and formation of the Hudson Bay basin; 3) to improve understanding of postglacial isostatic rebound; 4) to map the lithospheric structure of the Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO) in a region characterized by extreme salient-reentrant geometry, possibly analogous to the western syntaxis of the Himalayan front. SKS fast directions appear sensitive to Paleoproterozoic THO lithospheric fabrics, not trends that would be predicted by mantle flow or plate motion basal drag hypotheses. SKS delay times vary from 0.5-1.6s, which indicate a lithospheric-scale anisotropic layer at least 150km thick. Tomographic images of the region also shed new light on the THO and neighboring Archean terranes. Our work complements ongoing HuBLE studies that focus on dispersion analysis of teleseismic Rayleigh waves, and applications of ambient noise tomography that extract additional complementary information about lithospheric structure of the region.

  16. HuBLE-UK, the Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment: Insights into the Formation of the Canadian Shield From Seismic Tomography and Shear-Wave Splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastow, I. D.; Kendall, J. M.; Helffrich, G. R.; Wookey, J.; Thompson, D. A.; Snyder, D. B.; Eaton, D. W.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2009-12-01

    Hudson Bay lies in the Precambrian core of North America that comprises the Canadian Shield and contiguous platform regions. The region is underlain by one of Earth's largest lithospheric keels and is the site of one of the largest negative geoid anomalies. We have deployed a network of 12 broadband seismic stations in the northern part of Hudson Bay that complement existing POLARIS and CNSN networks in the region. Here we present SKS shear-wave splitting analyses and independent tomographic inversion of P- and S-wave travel-time data in order to: 1) understand better the origin and evolution of the Hudson Bay cratonic interior basin; 2) to illuminate possible relationships between the lithospheric keel, sub-lithospheric mantle flow and formation of the Hudson Bay basin; 3) to improve understanding of postglacial isostatic rebound; 4) to map the lithospheric structure of the Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO) in a region characterized by extreme salient-reentrant geometry, possibly analogous to the western syntaxis of the Himalayan front. SKS fast directions appear sensitive to Paleoproterozoic THO lithospheric fabrics, not trends that would be predicted by mantle flow or plate motion basal drag hypotheses. SKS delay times vary from 0.5-1.6s, which indicate a lithospheric-scale anisotropic layer at least 150km thick. Tomographic images of the region also shed new light on the THO and neighboring Archean terranes. Our work complements ongoing HuBLE studies that focus on receiver function study, dispersion analysis of teleseismic Rayleigh waves, and applications of ambient noise tomography that extract additional complementary information about lithospheric structure of the region.

  17. Actively triggered 4d cone-beam CT acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Martin F.; Wisotzky, Eric; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: 4d cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are usually reconstructed by extracting the motion information from the 2d projections or an external surrogate signal, and binning the individual projections into multiple respiratory phases. In this “after-the-fact” binning approach, however, projections are unevenly distributed over respiratory phases resulting in inefficient utilization of imaging dose. To avoid excess dose in certain respiratory phases, and poor image quality due to a lack of projections in others, the authors have developed a novel 4d CBCT acquisition framework which actively triggers 2d projections based on the forward-predicted position of the tumor.Methods: The forward-prediction of the tumor position was independently established using either (i) an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system based on implanted EM-transponders which act as a surrogate for the tumor position, or (ii) an external motion sensor measuring the chest-wall displacement and correlating this external motion to the phase-shifted diaphragm motion derived from the acquired images. In order to avoid EM-induced artifacts in the imaging detector, the authors devised a simple but effective “Faraday” shielding cage. The authors demonstrated the feasibility of their acquisition strategy by scanning an anthropomorphic lung phantom moving on 1d or 2d sinusoidal trajectories.Results: With both tumor position devices, the authors were able to acquire 4d CBCTs free of motion blurring. For scans based on the EM tracking system, reconstruction artifacts stemming from the presence of the EM-array and the EM-transponders were greatly reduced using newly developed correction algorithms. By tuning the imaging frequency independently for each respiratory phase prior to acquisition, it was possible to harmonize the number of projections over respiratory phases. Depending on the breathing period (3.5 or 5 s) and the gantry rotation time (4 or 5 min), between ∼90 and 145

  18. Back-Projecting Volcano and Geyser Seismic Signals to Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, C. L.; Lawrence, J. F.; Ebinger, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic and hydrothermal systems are generally characterized by persistent, low-amplitude seismic "noise" with no clear onset or end. Outside of active eruptions and earthquakes, which tend to occur only a small fraction of the time, seismic records and spectrograms from these systems are dominated by long-duration "noise" (typically around 1-5Hz) generated by ongoing processes in the systems' subsurface. Although it has been shown that these low-amplitude signals can represent a series of overlapping low-magnitude displacements related to fluid and volatile movement at depth, because of their "noisy" properties compared to typical active or earthquake sources they are difficult to image using traditional seismic techniques (i.e. phase-picking). In this study we present results from applying a new ambient noise back-projection technique to improve seismic source imaging of diffuse signals found in volcanic and hydrothermal systems. Using this new method we show how the distribution of all seismic sources - particularly sources associated with volcanic tremor - evolves during a proposed intrusion in early June 2010 at Sierra Negra Volcano on the Galápagos Archipelago off the coast of Ecuador. We use a known velocity model for the region (Tepp et al., 2014) to correlate and back-project seismic signals from all available receiver-pairs to potential subsurface source locations assuming bending raypaths and accounting for topography. We generate 4D time-lapsed images of the source field around Sierra Negra before, during and after the proposed intrusion and compare the consistency of our observations with previously identified seismic event locations and tomography results from the same time period. Preliminary results from applying the technique to a dense grid of geophones surrounding a periodically erupting geyser at El Tatio Geyser Field in northern Chile (>2000 eruptions recorded) will also be presented.

  19. Fast X-ray micro-CT for real-time 4D observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, H.; Yoshida, K.; Tsuji, T.; Koyama, T.; Tsusaka, Y.; Kagoshima, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Fast X-ray computed tomography (CT) system with sub-second order measurement for single CT acquisition has been developed. The system, consisting of a high-speed sample rotation stage and a high-speed X-ray camera, is constructed at synchrotron radiation beamline in order to utilize fully intense X-rays. A time-resolving CT movie (i.e. 4D CT) can be available by operating the fast CT system continuously. Real-time observation of water absorbing process of super-absorbent polymer (SAP) has been successfully performed with the 4D CT operation.

  20. Active origami by 4D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Qi; Dunn, Conner K.; Qi, H. Jerry; Dunn, Martin L.

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in three dimensional (3D) printing technology that allow multiple materials to be printed within each layer enable the creation of materials and components with precisely controlled heterogeneous microstructures. In addition, active materials, such as shape memory polymers, can be printed to create an active microstructure within a solid. These active materials can subsequently be activated in a controlled manner to change the shape or configuration of the solid in response to an environmental stimulus. This has been termed 4D printing, with the 4th dimension being the time-dependent shape change after the printing. In this paper, we advance the 4D printing concept to the design and fabrication of active origami, where a flat sheet automatically folds into a complicated 3D component. Here we print active composites with shape memory polymer fibers precisely printed in an elastomeric matrix and use them as intelligent active hinges to enable origami folding patterns. We develop a theoretical model to provide guidance in selecting design parameters such as fiber dimensions, hinge length, and programming strains and temperature. Using the model, we design and fabricate several active origami components that assemble from flat polymer sheets, including a box, a pyramid, and two origami airplanes. In addition, we directly print a 3D box with active composite hinges and program it to assume a temporary flat shape that subsequently recovers to the 3D box shape on demand.

  1. Advances in 4D radiation therapy for managing respiration: part II - 4D treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2012-12-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle - an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems.

  2. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part II – 4D Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle – an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems. PMID:22796324

  3. Predicting lower mantle heterogeneity from 4-D Earth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, Nicolas; Williams, Simon; Müller, Dietmar; Gurnis, Michael; Bower, Dan J.

    2016-04-01

    basal layer ˜ 4% denser than ambient mantle. Increasing convective vigour (Ra ≈ 5 x 108) or decreasing the density of the basal layer decreases both the accuracy and sensitivity of the predicted lower mantle structure. References: D. J. Bower, M. Gurnis, N. Flament, Assimilating lithosphere and slab history in 4-D Earth models. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 238, 8-22 (2015). V. Lekic, S. Cottaar, A. Dziewonski, B. Romanowicz, Cluster analysis of global lower mantle tomography: A new class of structure and implications for chemical heterogeneity. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 357, 68-77 (2012).

  4. A new computerized ionosphere tomography model using the mapping function and an application to the study of seismic-ionosphere disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jian; Yao, Yibin; Liu, Lei; Zhai, Changzhi; Wang, Zemin

    2016-08-01

    A new algorithm for ionosphere tomography using the mapping function is proposed in this paper. First, the new solution splits the integration process into four layers along the observation ray, and then, the single-layer model (SLM) is applied to each integration part using a mapping function. Next, the model parameters are estimated layer by layer with the Kalman filtering method by introducing the scale factor (SF) γ to solve the ill-posed problem. Finally, the inversed images of different layers are combined into the final CIT image. We utilized simulated data from 23 IGS GPS stations around Europe to verify the estimation accuracy of the new algorithm; the results show that the new CIT model has better accuracy than the SLM in dense data areas and the CIT residuals are more closely grouped. The stability of the new algorithm is discussed by analyzing model accuracy under different error levels (the max errors are 5TECU, 10TECU, 15TECU, respectively). In addition, the key preset parameter, SFγ , which is given by the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI2012). The experiment is designed to test the sensitivity of the new algorithm to SF variations. The results show that the IRI2012 is capable of providing initial SF values. Also in this paper, the seismic-ionosphere disturbance (SID) of the 2011 Japan earthquake is studied using the new CIT algorithm. Combined with the TEC time sequence of Sat.15, we find that the SID occurrence time and reaction area are highly related to the main shock time and epicenter. According to CIT images, there is a clear vertical electron density upward movement (from the 150-km layer to the 450-km layer) during this SID event; however, the peak value areas in the different layers were different, which means that the horizontal movement velocity is not consistent among the layers. The potential physical triggering mechanism is also discussed in this paper. Compared with the SLM, the RMS of the new CIT model is improved by

  5. Plume's buoyancy and heat fluxes from the deep mantle estimated by an instantaneous mantle flow simulation based on the S40RTS global seismic tomography model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masaki

    2012-11-01

    It is still an open question as to how much heat is transported from the deep mantle to the upper mantle by mantle upwelling plumes, which would impose a strong constraint on models of the thermal evolution of the earth. Here I perform numerical computations of instantaneous mantle flow based on a recent highly resolved global seismic tomography model (S40RTS), apply new simple fluid dynamics theories to the plume's radius and velocity, considering a Poiseuille flow assumption and a power-law relationship between the boundary layer thickness and Rayleigh number, and estimate the plume's buoyancy and heat fluxes from the deep lower mantle under varying plume viscosity. The results show that for some major mantle upwelling plumes with localized strong ascent velocity under the South Pacific and Africa, the buoyancy fluxes of each plume beneath the ringwoodite to perovskite + magnesiowüstite ("660-km") phase decomposition boundary are comparable to those inferred from observed hotspot swell volumes on the earth, i.e., on the order of 1 Mg s-1, when the plume viscosity is 1019-1020 Pa s. This result, together with previous numerical simulations of mantle convection and the gentle Clausius-Clapeyron slope for the 660-km phase decomposition derived from recent high-pressure measurements under dehydrated/hydrated conditions in the mantle transition zone, implies that mantle upwelling plumes in the lower mantle penetrate the 660-km phase decomposition boundary without significant loss in thermal buoyancy because of the weak thermal barrier at the 660-km boundary. The total plume heat flux under the South Pacific is estimated to be about 1 TW beneath the 660-km boundary, which is significantly smaller than the core-mantle boundary heat flux. Previously published scaling laws for the plume's radius and velocity based on a plume spacing theory, which explains well plume dynamics in three-dimensional time-dependent mantle convection, suggest that these plume fluxes depend

  6. Active high-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity and attenuation structure at Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California Cascade Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, John R.; Zucca, John J.

    1988-12-01

    We determine compressional wave velocity and attenuation structures for the upper crust beneath Medicine Lake volcano in northeast California using a high-resolution active source seismic tomography method. Medicine Lake volcano is a basalt through rhyolite shield volcano of the Cascade Range, lying east of the range axis. The Pg wave from eight explosive sources which has traveled upward through the target volume to a dense array of 140 seismographs provides 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 7 km of the crust beneath the volcano. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes of this type are underlain only by small silicic magma chambers. We image a low-velocity low-Q region not larger than a few tens of cubic kilometers in volume beneath the summit caldera, supporting the hypothesis. A shallower high-velocity high-density feature, previously known to be present, is imaged for the first time in full plan view; it is east-west elongate, paralleling a topographic lineament between Medicine Lake volcano and Mount Shasta. This lineament is interpreted to be the result of an old crustal weakness now affecting the emplacement of magma, both on direct ascent from the lower crust and mantle and in migration from the shallow silicic chamber to summit vents. Differences between this high-velocity feature and the equivalent feature at Newbeny volcano, a volcano in central Oregon resembling Medicine Lake volcano, may partly explain the scarcity of surface hydrothermal features at Medicine Lake volcano. A major low-velocity low-Q feature beneath the southeast flank of the volcano, in an area with no Holocene vents, is interpreted as tephra, flows, and sediments from the volcano deeply ponded on the downthrown side of the Gillem fault, a normal fault mapped at the surface north of the volcano. A high-Q normal-velocity feature beneath the north rim of the summit caldera may be a small, possibly hot, subsolidus intrusion. A high-velocity low-Q region

  7. ICT4D: A Computer Science Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutinen, Erkki; Tedre, Matti

    The term ICT4D refers to the opportunities of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) as an agent of development. Research in that field is often focused on evaluating the feasibility of existing technologies, mostly of Western or Far East Asian origin, in the context of developing regions. A computer science perspective is complementary to that agenda. The computer science perspective focuses on exploring the resources, or inputs, of a particular context and on basing the design of a technical intervention on the available resources, so that the output makes a difference in the development context. The modus operandi of computer science, construction, interacts with evaluation and exploration practices. An analysis of a contextualized information technology curriculum of Tumaini University in southern Tanzania shows the potential of the computer science perspective for designing meaningful information and communication technology for a developing region.

  8. 4D Clinical Imaging for Dynamic CAD

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    A basic 4D imaging system to capture the jaw motion has been developed that produces high resolution 3D surface data. Fluorescent microspheres are brushed onto the areas of the upper and the lower arches to be imaged, producing a high-contrast random optical pattern. A hand-held imaging device operated at about 10 cm from the mouth captures time-based perspective images of the fluorescent areas. Each set of images, containing both upper and the lower arch data, is converted to a 3d point mesh using photogrammetry, thereby providing an instantaneous relative jaw position. Eight 3d positions per second are captured. Using one of the 3d frames as a reference, incremental transforms are derived to express the free body motion of the mandible. Conventional 3d models of the dentition are directly registered to the reference frame, allowing them to be animated using the derived transforms. PMID:24082882

  9. Opening the Black Box of ICT4D: Advancing Our Understanding of ICT4D Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sung Jin

    2013-01-01

    The term, Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D), pertains to programs or projects that strategically use ICTs (e.g. mobile phones, computers, and the internet) as a means toward the socio-economic betterment for the poor in developing contexts. Gaining the political and financial support of the international community…

  10. Four-dimensional (4D) PET/CT imaging of the thorax

    SciTech Connect

    Nehmeh, S.A.; Erdi, Y.E.; Pan, T.

    2004-12-01

    We have reported in our previous studies on the methodology, and feasibility of 4D-PET (Gated PET) acquisition, to reduce respiratory motion artifact in PET imaging of the thorax. In this study, we expand our investigation to address the problem of respiration motion in PET/CT imaging. The respiratory motion of four lung cancer patients were monitored by tracking external markers placed on the thorax. A 4D-CT acquisition was performed using a 'step-and-shoot' technique, in which computed tomography (CT) projection data were acquired over a complete respiratory cycle at each couch position. The period of each CT acquisition segment was time stamped with an 'x-ray ON' signal, which was recorded by the tracking system. 4D-CT data were then sorted into 10 groups, according to their corresponding phase of the breathing cycle. 4D-PET data were acquired in the gated mode, where each breathing cycle was divided into ten 0.5 s bins. For both CT and PET acquisitions, patients received audio prompting to regularize breathing. The 4D-CT and 4D-PET data were then correlated according to respiratory phase. The effect of 4D acquisition on improving the co-registration of PET and CT images, reducing motion smearing, and consequently increase the quantitation of the SUV, were investigated. Also, quantitation of the tumor motions in PET, and CT, were studied and compared. 4D-PET with matching phase 4D-CTAC showed an improved accuracy in PET-CT image co-registration of up to 41%, compared to measurements from 4D-PET with clinical-CTAC. Gating PET data in correlation with respiratory motion reduced motion-induced smearing, thereby decreasing the observed tumor volume, by as much as 43%. 4D-PET lesions volumes showed a maximum deviation of 19% between clinical CT and phase- matched 4D-CT attenuation corrected PET images. In CT, 4D acquisition resulted in increasing the tumor volume in two patients by up to 79%, and decreasing it in the other two by up to 35%. Consequently, these

  11. Vessels as 4-D curves: global minimal 4-D paths to extract 3-D tubular surfaces and centerlines.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Yezzi, Anthony

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we propose an innovative approach to the segmentation of tubular structures. This approach combines all of the benefits of minimal path techniques such as global minimizers, fast computation, and powerful incorporation of user input, while also having the capability to represent and detect vessel surfaces directly which so far has been a feature restricted to active contour and surface techniques. The key is to represent the trajectory of a tubular structure not as a 3-D curve but to go up a dimension and represent the entire structure as a 4-D curve. Then we are able to fully exploit minimal path techniques to obtain global minimizing trajectories between two user supplied endpoints in order to reconstruct tubular structures from noisy or low contrast 3-D data without the sensitivity to local minima inherent in most active surface techniques. In contrast to standard purely spatial 3-D minimal path techniques, however, we are able to represent a full tubular surface rather than just a curve which runs through its interior. Our representation also yields a natural notion of a tube's "central curve." We demonstrate and validate the utility of this approach on magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and computed tomography (CT) images of coronary arteries. PMID:17896594

  12. 4-D ultrafast shear-wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Provost, Jean; Deffieux, Thomas; Papadacci, Clément; Imbault, Marion; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-06-01

    Over the last ten years, shear wave elastography (SWE) has seen considerable development and is now routinely used in clinics to provide mechanical characterization of tissues to improve diagnosis. The most advanced technique relies on the use of an ultrafast scanner to generate and image shear waves in real time in a 2-D plane at several thousands of frames per second. We have recently introduced 3-D ultrafast ultrasound imaging to acquire with matrix probes the 3-D propagation of shear waves generated by a dedicated radiation pressure transducer in a single acquisition. In this study, we demonstrate 3-D SWE based on ultrafast volumetric imaging in a clinically applicable configuration. A 32 × 32 matrix phased array driven by a customized, programmable, 1024-channel ultrasound system was designed to perform 4-D shear-wave imaging. A matrix phased array was used to generate and control in 3-D the shear waves inside the medium using the acoustic radiation force. The same matrix array was used with 3-D coherent plane wave compounding to perform high-quality ultrafast imaging of the shear wave propagation. Volumetric ultrafast acquisitions were then beamformed in 3-D using a delay-and-sum algorithm. 3-D volumetric maps of the shear modulus were reconstructed using a time-of-flight algorithm based on local multiscale cross-correlation of shear wave profiles in the three main directions using directional filters. Results are first presented in an isotropic homogeneous and elastic breast phantom. Then, a full 3-D stiffness reconstruction of the breast was performed in vivo on healthy volunteers. This new full 3-D ultrafast ultrasound system paves the way toward real-time 3-D SWE. PMID:26067040

  13. Impact of 4D image quality on the accuracy of target definition.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Tine Bjørn; Hansen, Christian Rønn; Westberg, Jonas; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2016-03-01

    Delineation accuracy of target shape and position depends on the image quality. This study investigates whether the image quality on standard 4D systems has an influence comparable to the overall delineation uncertainty. A moving lung target was imaged using a dynamic thorax phantom on three different 4D computed tomography (CT) systems and a 4D cone beam CT (CBCT) system using pre-defined clinical scanning protocols. Peak-to-peak motion and target volume were registered using rigid registration and automatic delineation, respectively. A spatial distribution of the imaging uncertainty was calculated as the distance deviation between the imaged target and the true target shape. The measured motions were smaller than actual motions. There were volume differences of the imaged target between respiration phases. Imaging uncertainties of >0.4 cm were measured in the motion direction which showed that there was a large distortion of the imaged target shape. Imaging uncertainties of standard 4D systems are of similar size as typical GTV-CTV expansions (0.5-1 cm) and contribute considerably to the target definition uncertainty. Optimising and validating 4D systems is recommended in order to obtain the most optimal imaged target shape.

  14. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  15. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2005-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2005-04-01 2005-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  16. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2000-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2000-04-01 2000-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a) Each application for an order under section 304(d)...

  17. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  18. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  19. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  20. 76 FR 55814 - 2,4-D; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 2,4-D; Pesticide Tolerances AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This regulation establishes tolerances for residues of 2,4-D in or on teff, bran... 180.142 be amended by establishing a tolerance for residues of the herbicide 2,4-D...

  1. 17 CFR 260.4d-8 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Content. 260.4d-8 Section 260.4d-8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, TRUST INDENTURE ACT OF 1939 Rules Under Section 304 § 260.4d-8 Content. (a)...

  2. Evaluation of 4D CT acquisition methods designed to reduce artifacts.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Sarah J; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Pan, Tinsu; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Balter, Peter; Hobbs, Brian; Guerrero, Thomas

    2015-03-08

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) is used to account for respiratory motion in radiation treatment planning, but artifacts resulting from the acquisition and postprocessing limit its accuracy. We investigated the efficacy of three experimental 4D CT acquisition methods to reduce artifacts in a prospective institutional review board approved study. Eighteen thoracic patients scheduled to undergo radiation therapy received standard clinical 4D CT scans followed by each of the alternative 4D CT acquisitions: 1) data oversampling, 2) beam gating with breathing irregularities, and 3) rescanning the clinical acquisition acquired during irregular breathing. Relative values of a validated correlation-based artifact metric (CM) determined the best acquisition method per patient. Each 4D CT was processed by an extended phase sorting approach that optimizes the quantitative artifact metric (CM sorting). The clinical acquisitions were also postprocessed by phase sorting for artifact comparison of our current clinical implementation with the experimental methods. The oversampling acquisition achieved the lowest artifact presence among all acquisitions, achieving a 27% reduction from the current clinical 4D CT implementation (95% confidence interval = 34-20). The rescan method presented a significantly higher artifact presence from the clinical acquisition (37%; p < 0.002), the gating acquisition (26%; p < 0.005), and the oversampling acquisition (31%; p < 0.001), while the data lacked evidence of a significant difference between the clinical, gating, and oversampling methods. The oversampling acquisition reduced artifact presence from the current clinical 4D CT implementation to the largest degree and provided the simplest and most reproducible implementation. The rescan acquisition increased artifact presence significantly, compared to all acquisitions, and suffered from combination of data from independent scans over which large internal anatomic shifts occurred.

  3. Resolution enhancement of lung 4D-CT data using multiscale interphase iterative nonlocal means

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yu; Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu Guorong; Feng Qianjin; Chen Wufan; Lian Jun; Shen Dinggang

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computer tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in lung cancer radiotherapy due to its capability in providing important tumor motion information. However, the prolonged scanning duration required by 4D-CT causes considerable increase in radiation dose. To minimize the radiation-related health risk, radiation dose is often reduced at the expense of interslice spatial resolution. However, inadequate resolution in 4D-CT causes artifacts and increases uncertainty in tumor localization, which eventually results in extra damages of healthy tissues during radiotherapy. In this paper, the authors propose a novel postprocessing algorithm to enhance the resolution of lung 4D-CT data. Methods: The authors' premise is that anatomical information missing in one phase can be recovered from the complementary information embedded in other phases. The authors employ a patch-based mechanism to propagate information across phases for the reconstruction of intermediate slices in the longitudinal direction, where resolution is normally the lowest. Specifically, the structurally matching and spatially nearby patches are combined for reconstruction of each patch. For greater sensitivity to anatomical details, the authors employ a quad-tree technique to adaptively partition the image for more fine-grained refinement. The authors further devise an iterative strategy for significant enhancement of anatomical details. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm using a publicly available lung data that consist of 10 4D-CT cases. The authors' algorithm gives very promising results with significantly enhanced image structures and much less artifacts. Quantitative analysis shows that the authors' algorithm increases peak signal-to-noise ratio by 3-4 dB and the structural similarity index by 3%-5% when compared with the standard interpolation-based algorithms. Conclusions: The authors have developed a new algorithm to improve the resolution of 4D-CT. It outperforms

  4. The Use of Gated and 4D CT Imaging in Planning for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Warren D. . E-mail: wdsou001@umaryland.edu; Nazareth, Daryl P.; Zhang Bin; Deyoung, Chad; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Kwok, Young; Yu, Cedric X.; Regine, William F.

    2007-07-01

    The localization of treatment targets is of utmost importance for patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), where the dose per fraction is large. While both setup or respiration-induced motion components affect the localization of the treatment volume, the purpose of this work is to describe our management of the intrafraction localization uncertainty induced by normal respiration. At our institution, we have implemented gated computed tomography (CT) acquisition with an active breathing control system (ABC), and 4-dimensional (4D) CT using a skin-based marker and retrospective respiration phase-based image sorting. During gated simulation, 3D CT images were acquired corresponding to end-inhalation and end-exhalation. For 4D CT imaging, 3D CT images were acquired corresponding to 8 phases of the respiratory cycle. In addition to gated or 4D CT images, we acquired a conventional free-breathing CT (FB). For both gated and 4D CT images, the target contours were registered to the FB scan in the planning system. These contours were then combined in the FB image set to form the internal target volume (ITV). Dynamic conformal arc treatment plans were generated for the ITV using the FB scan and the gated or 4D scans with an additional 7-mm margin for patient setup uncertainty. We have described our results for a pancreas and a lung tumor case. Plans were normalized so that the PTV received 95% of the prescription dose. The dose distribution for all the critical structures in the pancreas and lung tumor cases resulted in increased sparing when the ITV was defined using gated or 4D CT images than when the FB scan was used. Our results show that patient-specific target definition using gated or 4D CT scans lead to improved normal tissue sparing.

  5. Validation of a 4D-PET Maximum Intensity Projection for Delineation of an Internal Target Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Dunn, Leon; Thompson, Mick; Siva, Shankar; Aarons, Yolanda; Binns, David; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The delineation of internal target volumes (ITVs) in radiation therapy of lung tumors is currently performed by use of either free-breathing (FB) {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) or 4-dimensional (4D)-CT maximum intensity projection (MIP). In this report we validate the use of 4D-PET-MIP for the delineation of target volumes in both a phantom and in patients. Methods and Materials: A phantom with 3 hollow spheres was prepared surrounded by air then water. The spheres and water background were filled with a mixture of {sup 18}F and radiographic contrast medium. A 4D-PET/CT scan was performed of the phantom while moving in 4 different breathing patterns using a programmable motion device. Nine patients with an FDG-avid lung tumor who underwent FB and 4D-PET/CT and >5 mm of tumor motion were included for analysis. The 3 spheres and patient lesions were contoured by 2 contouring methods (40% of maximum and PET edge) on the FB-PET, FB-CT, 4D-PET, 4D-PET-MIP, and 4D-CT-MIP. The concordance between the different contoured volumes was calculated using a Dice coefficient (DC). The difference in lung tumor volumes between FB-PET and 4D-PET volumes was also measured. Results: The average DC in the phantom using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was lowest for FB-PET/CT (DCAir = 0.72/0.67, DCBackground 0.63/0.62) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DCAir = 0.84/0.83, DCBackground = 0.78/0.73). The average DC in the 9 patients using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was also lowest for FB-PET/CT (DC = 0.45/0.44) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DC = 0.72/0.73). In the 9 lesions, the target volumes of the FB-PET using 40% and PET edge, respectively, were on average 40% and 45% smaller than the 4D-PET-MIP. Conclusion: A 4D-PET-MIP produces volumes with the highest concordance with 4D-CT-MIP across multiple breathing patterns and lesion sizes in both a phantom and among patients. Freebreathing PET/CT consistently

  6. Clinical Utility of 4D FDG-PET/CT Scans in Radiation Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Sher, David J.; Allen, Aaron M.; Larson, Elysia; Chen, Aileen B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The potential role of four-dimensional (4D) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in radiation treatment planning, relative to standard three-dimensional (3D) PET/CT, was examined. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with non-small-cell lung cancer had sequential 3D and 4D [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT scans in the treatment position prior to radiation therapy. The gross tumor volume and involved lymph nodes were contoured on the PET scan by use of three different techniques: manual contouring by an experienced radiation oncologist using a predetermined protocol; a technique with a constant threshold of standardized uptake value (SUV) greater than 2.5; and an automatic segmentation technique. For each technique, the tumor volume was defined on the 3D scan (VOL3D) and on the 4D scan (VOL4D) by combining the volume defined on each of the five breathing phases individually. The range of tumor motion and the location of each lesion were also recorded, and their influence on the differences observed between VOL3D and VOL4D was investigated. Results: We identified and analyzed 22 distinct lesions, including 9 primary tumors and 13 mediastinal lymph nodes. Mean VOL4D was larger than mean VOL3D with all three techniques, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.01). The range of tumor motion and the location of the tumor affected the magnitude of the difference. For one case, all three tumor definition techniques identified volume of moderate uptake of approximately 1 mL in the hilar region on the 4D scan (SUV maximum, 3.3) but not on the 3D scan (SUV maximum, 2.3). Conclusions: In comparison to 3D PET, 4D PET may better define the full physiologic extent of moving tumors and improve radiation treatment planning for lung tumors. In addition, reduction of blurring from free-breathing images may reveal additional information regarding regional disease.

  7. Semiautomatic method to identify the best phase for gated RT in lung region by 4D-PET/CT acquisitions

    SciTech Connect

    Mancosu, Pietro; Danna, Massimo; Bettinardi, Valentino; Aquilina, Mark Anthony; Lobefalo, Francesca; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Scorsetti, Marta

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Delineating tumor motion by four-dimensional positron emission tomography/computed tomography (4D-PET/CT) is a crucial step for gated radiotherapy (RT). This article quantitatively evaluates semiautomatic algorithms for tumor shift estimation in the lung region due to patient respiration by 4D-PET/CT, in order to support the selection of the best phases for gated RT, by considering the most stable phases of the breathing cycle. Methods: Three mobile spheres and ten selected lesions were included in this study. 4D-PET/CT data were reconstructed and classified into six/ten phases. The semiautomatic algorithms required the generation of single sets of images representative of the full target motion, used as masks for segmenting the phases. For 4D-CT, a pre-established HU range was used, whereas three thresholds (100%, 80%, and 40%) were evaluated for 4D-PET. By using these segmentations, the authors estimated the lesion motion from the shifting centroids, and the phases with the least motion were also deduced including the phases with a curve slope less than 2 mm/{Delta}phase. The proposed algorithms were validated by comparing the results to those generated entirely by manual contouring. Results: In the phantom study, the mean difference between the manual contour and the semiautomatic technique was 0.1{+-}0.1 mm for 4D-CT and 0.2{+-}0.1 mm for the 4D-PET based on 40% threshold. In the patients' series, the mean difference was 0.9{+-}0.6 mm for 4D-CT and 0.8{+-}0.2 mm for the 4D-PET based on 40% threshold. Conclusions: Estimation of lesion motion by the proposed semiautomatic algorithm can be used to evaluate tumor motion due to breathing.

  8. 4D electron microscopy: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2012-10-16

    achievable with short intense pulses containing a large number of electrons, however, are limited to tens of nanometers and nanoseconds, respectively. This is because Coulomb repulsion is significant in such a pulse, and the electrons spread in space and time, thus limiting the beam coherence. It is therefore not possible to image the ultrafast elementary dynamics of complex transformations. The challenge was to retain the high spatial resolution of a conventional TEM while simultaneously enabling the temporal resolution required to visualize atomic-scale motions. In this Account, we discuss the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) and summarize techniques and applications that illustrate the power of the approach. In UEM, images are obtained either stroboscopically with coherent single-electron packets or with a single electron bunch. Coulomb repulsion is absent under the single-electron condition, thus permitting imaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy, all with high spatiotemporal resolution, the atomic scale (sub-nanometer and femtosecond). The time resolution is limited only by the laser pulse duration and energy carried by the electron packets; the CCD camera has no bearing on the temporal resolution. In the regime of single pulses of electrons, the temporal resolution of picoseconds can be attained when hundreds of electrons are in the bunch. The applications given here are selected to highlight phenomena of different length and time scales, from atomic motions during structural dynamics to phase transitions and nanomechanical oscillations. We conclude with a brief discussion of emerging methods, which include scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM) with convergent beams, and time-resolved imaging of biological structures at ambient conditions with environmental cells.

  9. Parallel Infrastructure Modeling and Inversion Module for E4D

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-09

    Electrical resistivity tomography ERT is a method of imaging the electrical conductivity of the subsurface. Electrical conductivity is a useful metric for understanding the subsurface because it is governed by geomechanical and geochemical properties that drive subsurface systems. ERT works by injecting current into the subsurface across a pair of electrodes, and measuring the corresponding electrical potential response across another pair of electrodes. Many such measurements are strategically taken across an array of electrodes to produce an ERT data set. These data are then processed through a computationally demanding process known as inversion to produce an image of the subsurface conductivity structure that gave rise to the measurements. Data can be inverted to provide 2D images, 3D images, or in the case of time-lapse 3D imaging, 4D images. ERT is generally not well suited for environments with buried electrically conductive infrastructure such as pipes, tanks, or well casings, because these features tend to dominate and degrade ERT images. This reduces or eliminates the utility of ERT imaging where it would otherwise be highly useful for, for example, imaging fluid migration from leaking pipes, imaging soil contamination beneath leaking subusurface tanks, and monitoring contaminant migration in locations with dense network of metal cased monitoring wells. The location and dimension of buried metallic infrastructure is often known. If so, then the effects of the infrastructure can be explicitly modeled within the ERT imaging algorithm, and thereby removed from the corresponding ERT image. However,there are a number of obstacles limiting this application. 1) Metallic infrastructure cannot be accurately modeled with standard codes because of the large contrast in conductivity between the metal and host material. 2) Modeling infrastructure in true dimension requires the computational mesh to be highly refined near the metal inclusions, which increases

  10. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in scanned ion beam therapy: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Christopher; Bauer, Julia; Unholtz, Daniel; Richter, Daniel; Stützer, Kristin; Bert, Christoph; Parodi, Katia

    2015-08-01

    At the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, patient irradiation with scanned proton and carbon ion beams is verified by offline positron emission tomography (PET) imaging: the {β+} -activity measured within the patient is compared to a prediction calculated on the basis of the treatment planning data in order to identify potential delivery errors. Currently, this monitoring technique is limited to the treatment of static target structures. However, intra-fractional organ motion imposes considerable additional challenges to scanned ion beam radiotherapy. In this work, the feasibility and potential of time-resolved (4D) offline PET-based treatment verification with a commercial full-ring PET/CT (x-ray computed tomography) device are investigated for the first time, based on an experimental campaign with moving phantoms. Motion was monitored during the gated beam delivery as well as the subsequent PET acquisition and was taken into account in the corresponding 4D Monte-Carlo simulations and data evaluation. Under the given experimental conditions, millimeter agreement between the prediction and measurement was found. Dosimetric consequences due to the phantom motion could be reliably identified. The agreement between PET measurement and prediction in the presence of motion was found to be similar as in static reference measurements, thus demonstrating the potential of 4D PET-based treatment verification for future clinical applications.

  11. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in scanned ion beam therapy: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Christopher; Bauer, Julia; Unholtz, Daniel; Richter, Daniel; Stützer, Kristin; Bert, Christoph; Parodi, Katia

    2015-08-21

    At the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, patient irradiation with scanned proton and carbon ion beams is verified by offline positron emission tomography (PET) imaging: the β+-activity measured within the patient is compared to a prediction calculated on the basis of the treatment planning data in order to identify potential delivery errors. Currently, this monitoring technique is limited to the treatment of static target structures. However, intra-fractional organ motion imposes considerable additional challenges to scanned ion beam radiotherapy. In this work, the feasibility and potential of time-resolved (4D) offline PET-based treatment verification with a commercial full-ring PET/CT (x-ray computed tomography) device are investigated for the first time, based on an experimental campaign with moving phantoms. Motion was monitored during the gated beam delivery as well as the subsequent PET acquisition and was taken into account in the corresponding 4D Monte-Carlo simulations and data evaluation. Under the given experimental conditions, millimeter agreement between the prediction and measurement was found. Dosimetric consequences due to the phantom motion could be reliably identified. The agreement between PET measurement and prediction in the presence of motion was found to be similar as in static reference measurements, thus demonstrating the potential of 4D PET-based treatment verification for future clinical applications. PMID:26237315

  12. Motion4D-library extended

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    The new version of the Motion4D-library now also includes the integration of a Sachs basis and the Jacobi equation to determine gravitational lensing of pointlike sources for arbitrary spacetimes.New version program summaryProgram title: Motion4D-libraryCatalogue identifier: AEEX_v3_0Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEX_v3_0.htmlProgram obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. IrelandLicensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.htmlNo. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 219 441No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6 968 223Distribution format: tar.gzProgramming language: C++Computer: All platforms with a C++ compilerOperating system: Linux, WindowsRAM: 61 MbytesClassification: 1.5External routines: Gnu Scientic Library (GSL) (http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/)Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEEX_v2_0Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 703Does the new version supersede the previous version?: YesNature of problem: Solve geodesic equation, parallel and Fermi-Walker transport in four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetimes. Determine gravitational lensing by integration of Jacobi equation and parallel transport of Sachs basis.Solution method: Integration of ordinary differential equations.Reasons for new version: The main novelty of the current version is the extension to integrate the Jacobi equation and the parallel transport of the Sachs basis along null geodesics. In combination, the change of the cross section of a light bundle and thus the gravitational lensing effect of a spacetime can be determined. Furthermore, we have implemented several new metrics.Summary of revisions: The main novelty of the current version is the integration of the Jacobi equation and the parallel transport of the Sachs basis along null geodesics. The corresponding set of equations readd2xμdλ2=-Γρ

  13. Performance evaluation and optimization of BM4D-AV denoising algorithm for cone-beam CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuidong; Tian, Xiaofei; Zhang, Dinghua; Zhang, Hua

    2015-12-01

    The broadening application of cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in medical diagnostics and nondestructive testing, necessitates advanced denoising algorithms for its 3D images. The block-matching and four dimensional filtering algorithm with adaptive variance (BM4D-AV) is applied to the 3D image denoising in this research. To optimize it, the key filtering parameters of the BM4D-AV algorithm are assessed firstly based on the simulated CBCT images and a table of optimized filtering parameters is obtained. Then, considering the complexity of the noise in realistic CBCT images, possible noise standard deviations in BM4D-AV are evaluated to attain the chosen principle for the realistic denoising. The results of corresponding experiments demonstrate that the BM4D-AV algorithm with optimized parameters presents excellent denosing effect on the realistic 3D CBCT images.

  14. Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation. 24. Seismic Refraction Tomography for Volume Analysis of Saturated Alluvium in the Straight Creek Drainage and Its Confluence With Red River, Taos County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, Michael H.; Burton, Bethany L.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a research effort directed by the New Mexico Environment Department to determine pre-mining water quality of the Red River at a molybdenum mining site in northern New Mexico, we used seismic refraction tomography to create subsurface compressional-wave velocity images along six lines that crossed the Straight Creek drainage and three that crossed the valley of Red River. Field work was performed in June 2002 (lines 1-4) and September 2003 (lines 5-9). We interpreted the images to determine depths to the water table and to the top of bedrock. Depths to water and bedrock in boreholes near the lines correlate well with our interpretations based on seismic data. In general, the images suggest that the alluvium in this area has a trapezoidal cross section. Using a U.S. Geological Survey digital elevation model grid of surface elevations of this region and the interpreted elevations to water table and bedrock obtained from the seismic data, we generated new models of the shape of the buried bedrock surface and the water table through surface interpolation and extrapolation. Then, using elevation differences between the two grids, we calculated volumes of dry and wet alluvium in the two drainages. The Red River alluvium is about 51 percent saturated, whereas the much smaller volume of alluvium in the tributary Straight Creek is only about 18 percent saturated. When combined with average ground-water velocity values, the information we present can be used to determine discharge of Straight Creek into Red River relative to the total discharge of Red River moving past Straight Creek. This information will contribute to more accurate models of ground-water flow, which are needed to determine the pre-mining water quality in the Red River.

  15. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. PMID:27385378

  16. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.