Science.gov

Sample records for 4d transition metal

  1. Host Materials for 4d(N) and 5d(N) Transition-Metal Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    ELL COP.Y 0 HDL- TM -90-20 0 to December 1990 N I Host Materials for 4dN and 5dN Transition-Metal Ions by Clyde A. Morrison DTIC ELECTE SFEB13 1991u...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) B. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Harry Diamond Laboratories HDL- TM -90-20 2800 Powder Mill Road Adeiphi...October 1988), Analysis of the optical spectra of triply ionized transition-metal ions in yttrium aluminum garnet ( YAG ), Harry Diamond Laboratories

  2. Quantum Material Properties of 4d and 5d Transition Metal Oxides and Potential Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-26

    quantum criticality near ambient pressure; four-layered hexagonal (4H) and nine-layered rhombohedral (9R) 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND...May-2011 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Quantum Material Properties of 4d and 5d Transition Metal Oxides and...U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Quantum materials; structure-property relationship, quantum

  3. Electronic and magnetic properties of SnS2 monolayer doped with 4d transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wen-Zhi; Xiao, Gang; Rong, Qing-Yan; Chen, Qiao; Wang, Ling-Ling

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the electronic structures and magnetic properties of SnS2 monolayers substitutionally doped with 4-d transition-metal through systematic first principles calculations. The doped complexes exhibit interesting electronic and magnetic behaviors, depending on the interplay between crystal field splitting, Hund's rule, and 4d levels. The system doped with Y is nonmagnetic metal. Both the Zr- and Pd-doped systems remain nonmagnetic semiconductors. Doping results in half-metallic states for Nb-, Ru-, Rh-, Ag, and Cd doped cases, and magnetic semiconductors for systems with Mo and Tc dopants. In particular, the Nb- and Mo-doped systems display long-ranged ferromagnetic ordering with Curie temperature above room temperature, which are primarily attributable to the double-exchange mechanism, and the p-d/p-p hybridizations, respectively. Moreover, The Mo-doped system has excellent energetic stability and flexible mechanical stability, and also possesses remarkable dynamic and thermal (500 K) stability. Our studies demonstrate that Nb- and Mo-doped SnS2 monolayers are promising candidates for preparing 2D diluted magnetic semiconductors, and hence will be a helpful clue for experimentalists.

  4. Performance of Density Functional Theory for Second Row (4d) Transition Metal Thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Laury, Marie L; Wilson, Angela K

    2013-09-10

    The performances of 22 density functionals, including generalized gradient approximation (GGA), hybrid GGAs, hybrid-meta GGAs, and range-separated and double hybrid functionals, in combination with the correlation consistent basis sets and effective core potentials, have been gauged for the prediction of gas phase enthalpies of formation for the TM-4d set, which contains 30 second row transition metal-containing molecules. The enthalpies of formation determined by the 22 density functionals were compared to those generated via the relativistic pseudopotential correlation consistent Composite Approach (rp-ccCA), which has a goal of reproducing energies akin to those from CCSD(T,FC1)-DK/aug-cc-pCV∞Z-DK calculations. B3LYP/cc-pVTZ-PP optimized geometries were used in this study, though structures determined by other functionals also were examined. Of the functionals employed, the double hybrid functionals, B2GP-PLYP and mPW2-PLYP, yielded the best overall results with mean absolute deviations (MADs) from experimental enthalpies of formation of 4.25 and 5.19 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The GGA functionals BP86 and PBEPBE resulted in deviations from experiment of nearly 100 kcal mol(-1) for molecules such as molybdenum carbonyls. The ωB97X-D functional, which includes the separation of exchange energy into long-range and short-range contributions and includes a dispersion correction, resulted in an MAD of 6.52 kcal mol(-1).

  5. Structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of 4d transition metal nitrides TMN (TM=Ru, Rh, Pd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.; Priyanga, G. Sudha; Kavitha, M.; Puvaneswari, S.; Iyakutti, K.

    2014-07-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the structural stability, electronic, structural and mechanical properties of 4d transition metal nitrides TMN (TM=Ru, Rh, Pd) for five different crystal structures, namely NaCl, CsCl, zinc blende, NiAs and wurtzite. Among the considered structures, zinc blende structure is found to be the most stable one among all three nitrides at normal pressure. A structural phase transition from ZB to NiAs phase is predicted at a pressure of 104 GPa, 50.5 GPa and 56 GPa for RuN, RhN and PdN respectively. The electronic structure reveals that these nitrides are metallic. The calculated elastic constants indicate that these nitrides are mechanically stable at ambient condition.

  6. How Evenly Can Approximate Density Functionals Treat the Different Multiplicities and Ionization States of 4d Transition Metal Atoms?

    PubMed

    Luo, Sijie; Truhlar, Donald G

    2012-11-13

    The ability of density functional theory to predict the relative energies of different spin states, especially for systems containing transition metal atoms, is of great importance for many applications. Here, in order to sort out the key factors determining accuracy, we compare the predictions of 60 density functional approximations of 10 different types [local spin density approximation, generalized gradient approximation (GGA), nonseparable gradient approximation (NGA), global-hybrid GGA, range-separated hybrid GGA, range-separated hybrid GGA plus molecular mechanics, meta-GGA, meta-NGA, global-hybrid meta-GGA, and range-separated hybrid meta-GGA] for their ability to represent the spin-flip transitions of all 4d transition metal atoms of groups 3-10 (Y through Pd) and their singly positive cations. We consider all 16 excitation energies connecting the ground states (of the neutral atoms and the cations) to their first excited states of different multiplicities, and we also consider all eight ionization potentials. We also test the Hartree-Fock method. All density functional and Hartree-Fock calculations are converged to a stable solution, in which the spatial symmetry is allowed to be completely broken to achieve the lowest possible energy solution. By analyzing the fractional subshell occupancies and spin contaminations, we are able to sort out the effects of s orbital vs d orbital bias and high-spin vs low-spin bias. A reliable functional should have little or no bias of either type rather than succeeding for a limited subset of cases by cancellation of errors. We find that the widely used correlations of spin splittings to percentage of Hartree-Fock exchange are not borne out by the data, and the correlation functionals also play a significant role. We eventually conclude that SOGGA11-X, B1LYP, B3V5LYP, and MPW3LYP are the most consistently reliable functionals for balanced treatments of 4d transition metal atoms and their cations.

  7. Predicting solid solubility in CoCrFeNiMx (M = 4d transition metal) high-entropy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, Saad; Mao, Huahai; Guo, Sheng

    2017-05-01

    CoCrFeMnNi is a prototype fcc-structured high-entropy alloy. Numerous efforts have been paid to strengthen CoCrFeMnNi, by replacing Mn with other elements for an enhancement of the solid solution strengthening. 4d transition metals, including Zr, Nb, and Mo, are of interest for this purpose, since they have much larger atomic radii than that of Mn. However, Nb and Mo are known to have a low solid solubility in fcc-structured CoCrFeNi. Compared to Nb and Mo, Zr has an even larger atomic radius. The solid solubility of Zr in fcc-structured CoCrFeNi was investigated in this work, combining both experimental studies and thermodynamic calculations. In addition, based on previous results and new results obtained here, methods to predict the solid solubility in CoCrFeNiMx (M = Zr, Nb, and Mo) alloys were developed. Particularly, the average d-orbital energy level, Md, was re-evaluated in the present work, for an improved predictability of the solid solubility in fcc-structured high entropy alloys containing 4d transition metals.

  8. Adsorption of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metal atoms on β 12—Borophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Quiceno, J. C.; Schleder, G. R.; Marinho, E., Jr.; Fazzio, A.

    2017-08-01

    We perform an ab initio study of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of 3d, 4d and 5d transition metals (TM) adsorbed on freestanding and Ag(1 1 1)-supported {β12} -borophene. The stability of TM adsorption is high for all atoms and increases with the period. For the 3d TM adsorption we observed strong exchange effects. The Ag(1 1 1)-surface induced small effects on the calculated properties. Studying the magnetic interaction between TMs, VIB atoms showed direct exchange, while VIIB and Fe showed 2p(B)-mediated indirect exchange. In the ultimate case of a one-dimensional TM array, Ru and Os also show direct exchange effects.

  9. Metal-ceramic interfaces: Overlayer-induced reconstruction and magnetism of 4d transition-metal monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.; Freeman, A.J.

    1995-02-15

    Structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of metal-ceramic interfaces, M/MgO(001) (M=Pd, Rh, and Ru), have been investigated using the full potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method. Ru and Rh monolayers are found to be able to retain large spin magnetic moments on MgO(001) (1.95 {mu}{sub B} and 1.21 {mu}{sub B} for Ru and Ph; respectively) -- indicating, in principle, the potential application of MgO(001) as a benign substrate for 4d monolayer magnetism. Significantly, according to our atomic-force determinations, the metal overlayers induce a sizable buckling reconstruction in the interfacial MgO layer, which enhances the M-MgO binding energy by 0.1 eV. The weak M-0 interaction is mainly via tail effects; however, it affects the density of states at the Fermi level for Pd/Mg0(001) significantly and completely eliminates the small magnetic moment of the free Pd monolaver (0.34{mu}{sub B}).

  10. Accurate electronic free energies of the 3 d ,4 d , and 5 d transition metals at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Grabowski, Blazej; Körmann, Fritz; Freysoldt, Christoph; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Free energies of bulk materials are nowadays routinely computed by density functional theory. In particular for metals, electronic excitations can significantly contribute to the free energy. For an ideal static lattice, this contribution can be obtained at low computational cost, e.g., from the electronic density of states derived at T =0 K or by utilizing the Sommerfeld approximation. The error introduced by these approximations at elevated temperatures is rarely known. The error arising from the ideal lattice approximation is likewise unexplored but computationally much more challenging to overcome. In order to shed light on these issues we have computed the electronic free energies for all 3 d ,4 d , and 5 d transition elements on the ideal lattices of the bcc, fcc, and hcp structures using finite-temperature density-functional theory. For a subset of elements we have explored the impact of explicit thermal vibrations on the electronic free energies by using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We provide an analysis of the observed chemical trends in terms of the electronic density of states and the canonical d band model and quantify the errors in the approximate methods. The electronic contribution to the heat capacities and the corresponding errors due to the different approximations are studied as well.

  11. Robust half-metallic properties in inverse Heusler alloys composed of 4d transition metal elements: Zr2RhZ (Z=Al, Ga, In)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. T.; Lin, T. T.; Rozale, H.; Dai, X. F.; Liu, G. D.

    2016-03-01

    A first-principles approach is used to study the electronic and magnetic properties of Zr2RhZ (Z=Al, Ga, In) alloys in the Hg2CuTi-type structure. The Zr2RhZ (Z=Al, Ga, In) alloys are found to be half-metallic ferrimagnets. The half-metallicity is quite robust against hydrostatic strain and tetragonal deformation in Zr2RhZ (Z=Al, Ga, In) alloys. The magnetization of Zr2RhZ (Z=Al, Ga, In) alloys mainly originates from the 4d electrons of Zr atoms and follows the rule: Mt=Zt-18. Zr2Rh-based alloys do not contain any 3d transition metal element, which implies a wider field to search for new half-metallic materials.

  12. High-pressure Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of 4d and 5d Transition-metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J.-G.

    2011-03-01

    The pressure effect on synthesis of oxides with perovskite A BO3 and perovskite-related structures has become more clear in recent years. The geometric tolerance factor t ≡ (A-O)/ √ 2 (B-O) measures the structural stability. High-pressure synthesis enlarges the range of the t factor where the perovskite structure can be stabilized. For the A BO3 compounds with t 1, high pressure reduces the t factor since the A-O bond is more compressible than the B-O bond. Therefore, perovskite would be the high-pressure phase for ambient-pressure polytype structures. However, the bonding compressibility argument is no longer valid for the ABO3 with t < 1 . Adt / dP 0 isnormallyobtainedfortlessthanbutverycloseto 1 , i . e . theorthorhombicdistortionbecomessmallerunderpressure . Forthosehighlydistortedperovskiteswithtfactorfarlessthanone , pressureenlargesfurthertheorthorhombicdistortionandeventuallyleadstoaphasetransitiontothepost - perovskitephase . Asfor < formula > < ? TeX , high pressure prefers the small-volume perovskite phase relative to a competitive pyrochlore phase . Understanding the pressure effect and the new capacity provided by a Walker-type multianvil press enabled us to expand the perovskite family and to obtain new phases of 4d and 5d oxides. Studies of these new 4d and 5d oxides allow us not only to address long-standing problems, but also to explore exotic physical properties. (1) In the perovskite (A= alkaline earth), we have completed the phase diagram from A= Ca to Sr and to Ba and also accounted for the A-cation size-variance effect. A systematic study of the Curie temperature and the critical behavior as a function of the average A-site size and the size variance as well as external high pressures reveals explicitly the crucial role of the lattice strain on the ferromagnetism. The mean-field critical behaviour near found previously in is not typical of these perovskite ruthenates. is completely suppressed by Pb doping in not due to the steric effect

  13. Quantum anomalous Hall phase and half-metallic phase in ferromagnetic (111) bilayers of 4 d and 5 d transition metal perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Hirak Kumar; Guo, Guang-Yu

    2017-04-01

    Extraordinary electronic phases can form in artificial oxide heterostructures, which will provide a fertile ground for new physics and also give rise to novel device functions. Based on a systematic first-principles density functional theory study of the magnetic and electronic properties of the (111) superlattices (ABO3) 2/(AB'O3)10 of 4 d and 5 d transition metal perovskite (B = Ru, Rh, Ag, Re, Os, Ir, Au; AB'O3=LaAlO3 , SrTiO3) , we demonstrate that due to quantum confinement, bilayers (LaBO3)2 (B = Ru, Re, Os) and (SrBO3)2 (B = Rh, Os, Ir) are ferromagnetic with ordering temperatures up to room temperature. In particular, bilayer (LaOsO3)2 is an exotic spin-polarized quantum anomalous Hall insulator, while the other ferromagnetic bilayers are metallic with large Hall conductances comparable to the conductance quantum. Furthermore, bilayers (LaRuO3)2 and (SrRhO3)2 are half metallic, while the bilayer (SrIrO3)2 exhibits a peculiar colossal magnetic anisotropy. Our findings thus show that 4 d and 5 d metal perovskite (111) bilayers are a class of quasi-two-dimensional materials for exploring exotic quantum phases and also for advanced applications such as low-power nanoelectronics and oxide spintronics.

  14. Theoretical study of inverted sandwich type complexes of 4d transition metal elements: interesting similarities to and differences from 3d transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Yusaku I; Nakao, Yoshihide; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2012-03-08

    Inverted sandwich type complexes (ISTCs) of 4d metals, (μ-η(6):η(6)-C(6)H(6))[M(DDP)](2) (DDPH = 2-{(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)amino}-4-{(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino}pent-2-ene; M = Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Tc), were investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and MRMP2 methods, where a model ligand AIP (AIPH = (Z)-1-amino-3-imino-prop-1-ene) was mainly employed. When going to Nb (group V) from Y (group III) in the periodic table, the spin multiplicity of the ground state increases in the order singlet, triplet, and quintet for M = Y, Zr, and Nb, respectively, like 3d ISTCs reported recently. This is interpreted with orbital diagram and number of d electrons. However, the spin multiplicity decreases to either singlet or triplet in ISTC of Mo (group VI) and to triplet in ISTC of Tc (group VII), where MRMP2 method is employed because the DFT method is not useful here. These spin multiplicities are much lower than the septet of ISTC of Cr and the nonet of that of Mn. When going from 3d to 4d, the position providing the maximum spin multiplicity shifts to group V from group VII. These differences arise from the size of the 4d orbital. Because of the larger size of the 4d orbital, the energy splitting between two d(δ) orbitals of M(AIP) and that between the d(δ) and d(π) orbitals are larger in the 4d complex than in the 3d complex. Thus, when occupation on the d(δ) orbital starts, the low spin state becomes ground state, which occurs at group VI. Hence, the ISTC of Nb (group V) exhibits the maximum spin multiplicity.

  15. Relationships between the surface electronic and chemical properties of doped 4d and 5d late transition metal dioxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhongnan; Kitchin, John R.

    2015-03-01

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to elucidate the underlying physics describing the adsorption energies on doped late transition metal dioxide rutiles. Adsorption energies of atomic oxygen on doped rutiles MD-MHO2, where transition metal MD is doped into MHO2, were expressed in terms of a contribution from adsorption on the pure oxide of the dopant MD and perturbations to this adsorption energy caused by changing its neighboring metal cations and lattice parameters to that of the host oxide MHO2, which we call the ligand and strain effects, respectively. Our analysis of atom projected density of states revealed that the t2g-band center had the strongest correlation with adsorption energies. We show that charge transfer mediated shifts to the t2g-band center describe the ligand effect, and the radii of the atomic orbitals of metal cations can predict the magnitude and direction of this charge transfer. Strain produces systematic shifts to all features of the atom projected density of states, but correlations between the strain effect and the electronic structure were dependent on the chemical identity of the metal cation. The slope of these correlations can be related to the idealized d-band filling. This work elucidates the underlying physics describing adsorption on doped late transition metal oxides and establishes a foundation for models that use known chemical properties for the prediction of reactivity.

  16. Relationships between the surface electronic and chemical properties of doped 4d and 5d late transition metal dioxides

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhongnan; Kitchin, John R.

    2015-03-14

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to elucidate the underlying physics describing the adsorption energies on doped late transition metal dioxide rutiles. Adsorption energies of atomic oxygen on doped rutiles M{sup D}-M{sup H}O{sub 2}, where transition metal M{sup D} is doped into M{sup H}O{sub 2}, were expressed in terms of a contribution from adsorption on the pure oxide of the dopant M{sup D} and perturbations to this adsorption energy caused by changing its neighboring metal cations and lattice parameters to that of the host oxide M{sup H}O{sub 2}, which we call the ligand and strain effects, respectively. Our analysis of atom projected density of states revealed that the t{sub 2g}-band center had the strongest correlation with adsorption energies. We show that charge transfer mediated shifts to the t{sub 2g}-band center describe the ligand effect, and the radii of the atomic orbitals of metal cations can predict the magnitude and direction of this charge transfer. Strain produces systematic shifts to all features of the atom projected density of states, but correlations between the strain effect and the electronic structure were dependent on the chemical identity of the metal cation. The slope of these correlations can be related to the idealized d-band filling. This work elucidates the underlying physics describing adsorption on doped late transition metal oxides and establishes a foundation for models that use known chemical properties for the prediction of reactivity.

  17. Basic nanosystems of early 4d and 5d transition metals: Electronic properties and the effect of spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Anu; Nautiyal, Tashi; Auluck, Sushil

    2008-07-01

    There are various possibilities for the structure as well as for the growth of nanosystems, particularly of nanowires. The ultimate one-dimensional material—linear chains—are difficult to exploit for applications due to their transient nature. Nonetheless these are a good prototype for studying one-dimensional materials and project the kind of behavior one may expect from ultrathin nanowires. Likewise monolayers are the ultimate two-dimensional materials and their study is helpful in understanding the behavior of two-dimensional materials. We present a theoretical study on basic nanosystems—linear chains and monolayers—of the 4d (Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Tc) and 5d (Hf, Ta, W, and Re) transition metals of groups 3-7 by means of an all-electron density functional approach. We have explored all kinds of magnetic configurations: nonmagnetic, ferromagnetic, and antiferromagnetic, by (i) inclusion and (ii) omission of spin-orbit interaction. We find that though this interaction has a marginal effect on nanosystems of 4d transition metals, its impact becomes stronger with lowering of dimensionality. Further it has a significant effect on properties of nanosystems of 5d transition metals as well as those of bulk. It is interesting to note that the monolayers of 5d transition metals seem reluctant to order magnetically despite the general tendency of nanosystems of 4d transition metals and linear chains of 5d transition metals to woo magnetic ordering. The nanosystems with preference for antiferromagnetic ordering are found to be stable at larger nearest-neighbor distances compared to the ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic phases. Specially, antiferromagnetic monolayers of Nb and Mo are predicted to exhibit larger separations with respect to bulk, a feature observed only for some low-dimensional systems. All the monolayers, except Y, are predicted to have a nonmagnetic state almost degenerate with ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic state. Therefore suitable substrate

  18. Modeling STM tips by single absorbed atoms on W(100) films: 3d, 4d and 5d transition metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Werner; Redinger, Josef; Kresse, Georg; Podloucky, Raimund

    2000-03-01

    In order to provide comprehensive data on the electronic structure of realistic STM-tips we have calculated W(100) films with single 3d, 4d and 5d transition metal apex atoms by first principles molecular dynamics and full potential methods. Molecular dynamics using ultrasoft pseudopotentials (VASP) has been used to determine the relaxation of the surface layers. The electronic structure of the relaxed film has been calculated by a first principles full potential method with two-dimensional boundary conditions (FLEUR), which seems most suitable to reproduce subtle surface effects. The results suggest that the chemical nature of the tip apex determines to a high degree achievable corrugations and that correct results for the current and corrugation values in a perturbation approach can only be obtained by including the full electronic structure of the tip.

  19. Magnetic moment and magnetic anisotropy of linear and zigzag 4d and 5d transition metal nanowires: First-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, J. C.; Guo, G. Y.

    2010-03-01

    An extensive ab initio study of the physical properties of both linear and zigzag atomic chains of all 4d and 5d transition metals (TMs) within the generalized gradient approximation by using the accurate projector-augmented wave method, has been carried out. The atomic structures of equilibrium and metastable states were theoretically determined. All the TM linear chains are found to be unstable against the corresponding zigzag structures. All the TM chains, except Nb, Ag, and La, have a stable (or metastable) magnetic state in either the linear or zigzag or both structures. Magnetic states appear also in the sufficiently stretched Nb and La linear chains and in the largely compressed Y and La chains. The spin magnetic moments in the Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, W, Re chains could be large (≥1.0μB/atom) . Structural transformation from the linear to zigzag chains could suppress the magnetism already in the linear chain, induce the magnetism in the zigzag structure, and also cause a change in the magnetic state (ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic or vice verse). The calculations including the spin-orbit coupling reveal that the orbital moments in the Zr, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt chains could be rather large (≥0.1μB/atom) . Importantly, large magnetic anisotropy energy (≥1.0meV/atom) is found in most of the magnetic TM chains, suggesting that these nanowires could have fascinating applications in ultrahigh-density magnetic memories and hard disks. In particular, giant magnetic anisotropy energy (≥10.0meV/atom) could appear in the Ru, Re, Rh, and Ir chains. Furthermore, the magnetic anisotropy energy in several elongated linear chains could be as large as 40.0 meV/atom. A spin-reorientation transition occurs in the Ru, Ir, Ta, Zr, La, Ta, and Ir linear chains when they are elongated. Remarkably, all the 5d as well as Tc and Pd chains show the colossal magnetic anisotropy (i.e., it is impossible to rotate magnetization into certain directions

  20. First principles studies of the dependence of magnetism on the crystal phase in 4d and 5d late transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüger, E.; Osuch, K.

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of inducing ferromagnetic order in 4d and 5d late transition metals through crystal symmetry change. First principles, self-consistent density functional theory calculations, with spin-orbit coupling included, performed at 0 K show that ferromagnetism occurs in the bulk of Rh and Pd at the optimum lattice constant if Rh is in the bcc and Pd in the hcp/dhcp phase. The ferromagnetic order originates in the d-band occupancy of Rh or Pd which locates the Fermi energy at the top of the highest peak of the respective (paramagnetic) density of states induced by the bcc or hcp/dhcp structure. This peak in the density of states is caused by flat bands which lie at the surface of the respective Brillouin zone. For a bcc crystal these flat bands have the eg character and are positioned at the surface of the bcc Brillouin zone along the N-P line. The origin of the flatness of the bands was found to be the translation symmetry of the cubic lattice which causes the bands with the eg character to be narrow along the k-lines whose k-vector directions are furthest off the directions to which the orbitals of the eg symmetry point. Due to the d-band occupancy of Rh these flat bands lie in the paramagnetic state at the Fermi energy, whereas in the ferromagnetic state they exhibit the largest energetic split. This indicates that a smaller degree of orbital overlap narrows electronic bands enhancing the tendency of the system for ferromagnetic band split. For the hcp/dhcp structure the states contributing to the high density of para-magnetic states at the Fermi level of Pd lie in the vicinity of the M-L line of the hcp Brillouin zone boundary, which possesses a high number of symmetry (M and L) points. Moreover, the M-L line is aligned with the stacking sequence direction ([0001]) which is furthest off the densest-packed atomic chain direction of an hcp-crystal and, consequently, the weakest-bond direction in the crystal. This makes the narrow bands along

  1. Oscillator strengths and branching fractions of 4d75p-4d75s Rh II transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazza, Safa

    2017-01-01

    This work reports semi-empirical determination of oscillator strengths, transition probabilities and branching fractions for Rh II 4d75p-4d75s transitions in a wide wavelength range. The angular coefficients of the transition matrix, beforehand obtained in pure SL coupling with help of Racah algebra are transformed into intermediate coupling using eigenvector amplitudes of these two configuration levels determined for this purpose; The transition integral was treated as free parameter in the least squares fit to experimental oscillator strength (gf) values found in literature. The extracted value: <4d75s|r1|4d75p> =2.7426 ± 0.0007 is slightly smaller than that computed by means of ab-initio method. Subsequently to oscillator strength evaluations, transition probabilities and branching fractions were deduced and compared to those obtained experimentally or through another approach like pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock model including core-polarization effects.

  2. e/a determination for 4d- and 5d-transition metal elements and their intermetallic compounds with Mg, Al, Zn, Cd and In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, U.; Sato, H.; Inukai, M.; Zijlstra, E. S.

    2013-08-01

    The present work is devoted to the determination of the effective electrons per atom ratio e/a by means of first-principles full-potential linearized augmented plane wave-Fourier method for elements from Rb to Ag in Period 5 and from Cs to Au in Period 6 of the periodic table and is regarded as a continuation of the preceding work done for elements from K to Cu in Period 4. The value of e/a was determined by reading off the square of the Fermi diameter, ? from the dispersion relation for electrons outside the Muffin-Tin spheres. A straightforward reading of the ordinate at the Fermi level, i.e. local reading method was validated for Rb and Cs in Group 1, Sr in Group 2, Y in Group 3, Pd and Pt in Group 10 and Ag and Au in Group 11. Instead, the nearly free electron (NFE) method was found to be indispensable for TM elements from Zr to Rh in Period 5 and those from Ba to Ir in Period 6. The composition dependence of e/a values for intermetallic compounds in X-TM (X = Mg, Al, Zn, Cd and In) alloy systems was also studied. The new Hume-Rothery electron concentration rule was established by constructing e/uc, the number of electrons per unit cell, vs. square of critical reciprocal lattice vector, ? , diagram for structurally complex metallic alloys having a pseudogap at the Fermi level. A proper use of either the local reading- or the NFE-e/a for the elements as indicated above is found to be essential.

  3. Magnetic dipole transitions in 4d{sup N} configurations of tungsten ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jonauskas, V.; Kisielius, R.; Kyniene, A.; Kucas, S.; Norrington, P. H.

    2010-01-15

    Magnetic dipole transitions between the levels of ground 4d{sup N} configurations of tungsten ions were analyzed by employing a large basis of interacting configurations. Previously introduced configuration interaction strength between two configurations was used to determine the configurations with the largest contribution to wave functions of atomic states for the considered configurations. Collisional-radiative modeling was performed for the levels of the ground configuration coupled through electric dipole transitions with 4p{sup 5}4d{sup N+1} and 4d{sup N-1}4f configurations. New identification of some lines observed in the electron-beam ion trap plasma was proposed based on calculations in which wavelength convergence was reached.

  4. Insight from first principles into the nature of the bonding between water molecules and 4d metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Javier; Michaelides, Angelos; Scheffler, Matthias

    2009-05-01

    We address the nature of the bond between water molecules and metal surfaces through a systematic density-functional theory (DFT) study of H2O monomer adsorption on a series of close-packed transition metal surfaces: Ru(0001), Rh(111), Pd(111), and Ag(111). Aiming to understand the origin behind energetic and structural trends along the 4d series we employ a range of analysis tools such as the electron reactivity function, decomposition of densities of states, electron density differences, and inspection of individual Kohn-Sham orbitals. The results obtained from our DFT calculations allow us to rationalize the bonding between water and transition metal surfaces as a balance of covalent and electrostatic interactions. A frontier orbital scheme based on so-called two-center four-electron interactions between the molecular orbitals of H2O—mainly the 1b1— and d-band states of the surface proves incisive in understanding these systems.

  5. QED Corrections to the 4p - 4d Transition Energies of Copperlike Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M H; Cheng, K T; Johnson, W R; Sapirstein, J

    2006-08-21

    Quantum electrodynamic (QED) corrections to 4p-4d transition energies of several copper-like ions with Z = 70-92 are calculated non-perturbatively in strong external fields to all orders in binding corrections. Dirac-Kohn-Sham potentials are used to account for screening and core-relaxation effects. For the 4p{sub 1/2}-4d{sub 3/2} transition in copperlike bismuth, thorium and uranium, results are in good agreement with empirical QED corrections deduced from differences between transition energies obtained from recent high-precision electron-beam ion-trap (EBIT) measurements and those calculated with the relativistic many-body perturbation theory (RMBPT). These comparisons provide sensitive tests of QED corrections for high angular momentum states in many-electron heavy ions and illustrate the importance of core-relaxation corrections. Comparisons are also made with other theories and with experiment on the 4s-4p transition energies of high-Z Cu-like ions as accuracy checks of the present RMBPT and QED calculations.

  6. QED corrections to the 4p-4d transition energies of copperlike heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M. H.; Cheng, K. T.; Johnson, W. R.; Sapirstein, J.

    2006-10-15

    Quantum electrodynamic (QED) corrections to 4p-4d transition energies of several copperlike ions with Z=70-92 are calculated nonperturbatively in strong external fields to all orders in binding corrections. Dirac-Kohn-Sham potentials are used to account for screening and core-relaxation effects. For the 4p{sub 1/2}-4d{sub 3/2} transition in copperlike bismuth, thorium, and uranium, results are in good agreement with empirical QED corrections deduced from differences between transition energies obtained from recent high-precision electron-beam ion-trap measurements and those calculated with the relativistic many-body perturbation theory (RMBPT). These comparisons provide sensitive tests of QED corrections for high-angular-momentum states in many-electron heavy ions and illustrate the importance of core-relaxation corrections. Comparisons are also made with other theories and with experiments on the 4s-4p transition energies of high-Z Cu-like ions as accuracy checks of the present RMBPT and QED calculations.

  7. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  8. Monolacunary Keggin polyoxometalates connected to ten 4d or 4f metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Pang, Haijun; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Peng, Jun; Ma, Huiyuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Wu, Qingyin

    2013-12-21

    The rational self-assembly of mono-lacunary Keggin clusters with 4d and 4f metal salts via a conventional method has yielded two novel polyoxometalate-based 4d-4f heterometallic compounds containing lacunary Keggin anions connected to ten metal atoms: {[Ag{Ag2(H2O)4}{Ln(H2O)6}2H ⊂ {SiW11Ln(H2O)4O39}2]·nH2O (Ln = Ce and n = 7 for 1, Ln = Pr and n = 3 for 2). Their structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses. A structural feature in 1 and 2 is that each [SiW11O39](8-) cluster (SiW11) is connected to ten metals (five Ag(+) and five Ln(3+) cations), representing the highest number of connected metal atoms to any mono-lacunary Keggin anion to date. This large connectivity leads to a structure with a purely inorganic 3D framework with two kinds of channels along the [100] and [010] directions. The magnetic properties of both compounds show the expected magnetic moments (0.8 and 1.6 amu K mol(-1) per Ce(3+) and Pr(3+) ion, respectively) and confirm the presence of isolated Ce(3+) and Pr(3+) ions.

  9. Numerical Evidence for a Phase Transition in 4D Spin-Foam Quantum Gravity.

    PubMed

    Bahr, Benjamin; Steinhaus, Sebastian

    2016-09-30

    Building on recent advances in defining Wilsonian renormalization group (RG) flows, and the notion of scales in particular, for background-independent theories, we present a first investigation of the renormalization of the 4D spin-foam path integral for quantum gravity, both analytically and numerically. Focusing on a specific truncation of the model using a hypercubic lattice, we compute the RG flow and find strong indications for a phase transition, as well as an interesting interplay between the different observed phases and the (broken) diffeomorphism symmetry of the model. Most notably, it appears that the critical point between the phases, which is a fixed point of the RG flow, is precisely where broken diffeomorphism symmetry is restored, which suggests that it might allow us to define a continuum limit of the quantum gravity theory.

  10. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  12. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-21

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  13. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  14. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  15. Density functional theory investigation of 3d, 4d, and 5d 13-atom metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Piotrowski, Mauricio J.; Piquini, Paulo; Da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    2010-04-15

    The knowledge of the atomic structure of clusters composed by few atoms is a basic prerequisite to obtain insights into the mechanisms that determine their chemical and physical properties as a function of diameter, shape, surface termination, as well as to understand the mechanism of bulk formation. Due to the wide use of metal systems in our modern life, the accurate determination of the properties of 3d, 4d, and 5d metal clusters poses a huge problem for nanoscience. In this work, we report a density functional theory study of the atomic structure, binding energies, effective coordination numbers, average bond lengths, and magnetic properties of the 3d, 4d, and 5d metal (30 elements) clusters containing 13 atoms, M{sub 13}. First, a set of lowest-energy local minimum structures (as supported by vibrational analysis) were obtained by combining high-temperature first-principles molecular-dynamics simulation, structure crossover, and the selection of five well-known M{sub 13} structures. Several new lower energy configurations were identified, e.g., Pd{sub 13}, W{sub 13}, Pt{sub 13}, etc., and previous known structures were confirmed by our calculations. Furthermore, the following trends were identified: (i) compact icosahedral-like forms at the beginning of each metal series, more opened structures such as hexagonal bilayerlike and double simple-cubic layers at the middle of each metal series, and structures with an increasing effective coordination number occur for large d states occupation. (ii) For Au{sub 13}, we found that spin-orbit coupling favors the three-dimensional (3D) structures, i.e., a 3D structure is about 0.10 eV lower in energy than the lowest energy known two-dimensional configuration. (iii) The magnetic exchange interactions play an important role for particular systems such as Fe, Cr, and Mn. (iv) The analysis of the binding energy and average bond lengths show a paraboliclike shape as a function of the occupation of the d states and hence

  16. First-Principles study of quaternary Heusler compounds CoX'FeSi (X' = 4d transition elements) for spintronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Srikrishna; Kundu, Ashish; Ghosh, Subhradip

    2017-05-01

    Using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculation, we have studied structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Quaternary Heusler alloys (QHA) CoX'FeSi where X' is a transition metal with 4d electrons. On the basis of structural properties, electronic structure (DOS) and magnetic moments we investigate these materials in detail to search new materials for spintronics applications and to have a better understanding of the reasons which make these compounds suitable for such potential applications. From our study, CoZrFeSi is found to be half-metal with 100% spin polarization while CoNbFeSi seems to be a nearly half-metal. It is also divulged that half-metallicity in these compounds intricately allied with arrangements of magnetic atoms in the Heusler lattice.

  17. Understanding the Electronic Structure of 4d Metal Complexes: From Molecular Spinors to L-Edge Spectra of a di-Ru Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Alperovich, Igor; Smolentsev, Grigory; Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Jurss, Jonah W.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Soldatov, Alexander; Pushkar, Yulia

    2015-09-17

    L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has demonstrated unique capabilities for the analysis of the electronic structure of di-Ru complexes such as the blue dimer cis,cis-[Ru{sub 2}{sup III}O(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(bpy){sub 4}]{sup 4+} water oxidation catalyst. Spectra of the blue dimer and the monomeric [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} model complex show considerably different splitting of the Ru L{sub 2,3} absorption edge, which reflects changes in the relative energies of the Ru 4d orbitals caused by hybridization with a bridging ligand and spin-orbit coupling effects. To aid the interpretation of spectroscopic data, we developed a new approach, which computes L{sub 2,3}-edges XAS spectra as dipole transitions between molecular spinors of 4d transition metal complexes. This allows for careful inclusion of the spin-orbit coupling effects and the hybridization of the Ru 4d and ligand orbitals. The obtained theoretical Ru L{sub 2,3}-edge spectra are in close agreement with experiment. Critically, existing single-electron methods (FEFF, FDMNES) broadly used to simulate XAS could not reproduce the experimental Ru L-edge spectra for the [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} model complex nor for the blue dimer, while charge transfer multiplet (CTM) calculations were not applicable due to the complexity and low symmetry of the blue dimer water oxidation catalyst. We demonstrated that L-edge spectroscopy is informative for analysis of bridging metal complexes. The developed computational approach enhances L-edge spectroscopy as a tool for analysis of the electronic structures of complexes, materials, catalysts, and reactive intermediates with 4d transition metals.

  18. Observation by two-photon laser spectroscopy of the 4d105sS1/22→4d95s2D5/22 clock transition in atomic silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, T.; Plimmer, M. D.; Juncar, P.; Himbert, M. E.; Louyer, Y.; Knight, D. J. E.

    2006-12-01

    We report the observation of the very narrow 4d105sS1/22→4d95s2D5/22 transition in atomic silver. The frequencies of the hyperfine components in Ag107 and Ag109 have been measured using Doppler-free two-photon laser spectroscopy of a thermal beam and heterodyne calibration with respect to the a1 component of the 62P(4-5) line in molecular iodine near 661nm . For the center of gravity of a mixture of natural abundance, we deduce the value 906641295.77(19)MHz . For the isotope shift, we obtain ν(Ag109)-ν(Ag107)=564.15(37)MHz , from which we deduce the frequency and isotope shift of the 4d105sS1/22→4d106pP3/22 transition at 206nm .

  19. Transition Metal Compounds Towards Holography

    PubMed Central

    Dieckmann, Volker; Eicke, Sebastian; Springfeld, Kristin; Imlau, Mirco

    2012-01-01

    We have successfully proposed the application of transition metal compounds in holographic recording media. Such compounds feature an ultra-fast light-induced linkage isomerization of the transition-metal–ligand bond with switching times in the sub-picosecond regime and lifetimes from microseconds up to hours at room temperature. This article highlights the photofunctionality of two of the most promising transition metal compounds and the photophysical mechanisms that are underlying the hologram recording. We present the latest progress with respect to the key measures of holographic media assembled from transition metal compounds, the molecular embedding in a dielectric matrix and their impressive potential for modern holographic applications. PMID:28817028

  20. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  1. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  2. Theoretical study of the adsorption of 3d- and 4d-metals on a WC(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bakulin, A. V.; Kulkova, S. E.

    2013-08-15

    The interaction of 3d- and 4d-metals with a WC(0001) surface has been studied theoretically by density-functional theory methods depending on surface termination and adsorbate position. The most stable sites of metal adsorption on the surface have been determined. The binding energy of d-metals with the surface is shown to be higher in the case of carbon terminated surface. This is explained by the predominant ionic-covalent contribution to the chemical bond at the interface, with the bond ionicity being determined by charge transfer from the metals to the electronegative carbon. Analysis of the electronic and structural characteristics has revealed the factors affecting the bonding energetics at the metal-carbide interface depending on the metal d-shell filling with electrons.

  3. Selenophene transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    White, Carter James

    1994-07-27

    This research shows that selenophene transition metal complexes have a chemistry that is similar to their thiophene analogs. Selenophene coordination has been demonstrated and confirmed by molecular structure in both the η5- and the η1(Se)-coordination modes. The reaction chemistry of selenophene complexes closely resembles that of the analogous thiophene complexes. One major difference, however, is that selenophene is a better donor ligand than thiophene making the selenophene complexes more stable than the corresponding thiophene complexes. The 77Se NMR chemical shift values for selenophene complexes fall within distinct regions primarily depending on the coordination mode of the selenophene ligand. In the final paper, the C-H bond activation of η1(S)-bound thiophenes, η1(S)-benzothiophene and η1(Se)-bound selenophenes has been demonstrated. The deprotonation and rearrangement of the η1(E)-bound ligand to the carbon bound L-yl complex readily occurs in the presence of base. Reprotonation with a strong acid gives a carbene complex that is unreactive towards nucleophilic attack at the carbene carbon and is stable towards exposure to air. The molecular structure of [Cp(NO)(PPh3)Re(2-benzothioenylcarbene)]O3SCF3 was determined and contains a Re-C bond with substantial double bond character. Methyl substitution for the thienylcarbene or selenylcarbene gives a carbene that rearranges thermally to give back the η1(E)-bound complex. Based on these model reactions, a new mechanism for the H/D exchange of thiophene over the hydrodesulfurization catalyst has been proposed.

  4. Density functional investigation of metal-metal interactions in d4d4 face-shared [M2Cl9]3 - (M = Mn, Tc, Re) systems.

    PubMed

    Cavigliasso, Germán; Stranger, Robert

    2004-04-05

    The molecular and electronic structures of the d(4)d(4) face-shared [M(2)Cl(9)](3)(-) (M = Mn, Tc, Re) dimers have been calculated by density functional methods in order to investigate metal-metal bonding in this series. The electronic structures of these systems have been analyzed using potential energy curves for the broken-symmetry and other spin states arising from the various d(4)d(4) coupling modes, and closed energy cycles have been utilized to identify and quantify the parameters which are most important in determining the preference for electron localization or delocalization and for high-spin or low-spin configurations. In [Tc(2)Cl(9)](3)(-) and [Re(2)Cl(9)](3)(-), the global minimum has been found to be a spin-triplet state arising from the coupling of metal centers with low-spin configurations, and characterized by delocalization of the metal-based electrons in a double (sigma and delta(pi)) bond with a metal-metal separation of 2.57 A. In contrast, high-spin configurations and electron localization are favored in [Mn(2)Cl(9)](3)(-), the global minimum for this species being the ferromagnetic S = 4 state with a rather long metal-metal separation of 3.43 A. These results are consistent with metal-metal overlap and ligand-field effects prevailing over spin polarization effects in the Tc and Re systems, but with the opposite trend being observed in the Mn complex. The ground states and metal-metal bonding observed for the d(4)d(4) systems in this study parallel those previously found for the analogous d(2)d(2) complexes of V, Nb, and Ta, and can be rationalized on the basis that the d(4)d(4) dimer configuration is the hole equivalent of the d(2)d(2) configuration.

  5. Type-II antiferromagnetism in compounds of iron with 4d metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, P. M.; Moruzzi, V. L.; Qiu, S. L.

    1996-11-01

    Previous first-principles calculations on the magnetic phases of nine FeX and Fe2XY compounds in the CsCl structure, where X and Y are 4d elements from Tc to Ag, are extended to include type-II as well as type-I antiferromagnetism. The antiferromagnetism of FeRh and Fe2RuRh is greatly enhanced in the type-II phase and FeRu in the type-II phase becomes the fifth such compound with an antiferromagnetic ground state. However in the weaker antiferromagnets FePd and Fe2RhPd the equilibrium state of the type-II phase has a higher energy than the type-I phase.

  6. Photochemistry of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Perutz, Robin N; Procacci, Barbara

    2016-08-10

    Photochemical reactivity associated with metal-hydrogen bonds is widespread among metal hydride complexes and has played a critical part in opening up C-H bond activation. It has been exploited to design different types of photocatalytic reactions and to obtain NMR spectra of dilute solutions with a single pulse of an NMR spectrometer. Because photolysis can be performed on fast time scales and at low temperature, metal-hydride photochemistry has enabled determination of the molecular structure and rates of reaction of highly reactive intermediates. We identify five characteristic photoprocesses of metal monohydride complexes associated with the M-H bond, of which the most widespread are M-H homolysis and R-H reductive elimination. For metal dihydride complexes, the dominant photoprocess is reductive elimination of H2. Dihydrogen complexes typically lose H2 photochemically. The majority of photochemical reactions are likely to be dissociative, but hydride complexes may be designed with equilibrated excited states that undergo different photochemical reactions, including proton transfer or hydride transfer. The photochemical mechanisms of a few reactions have been analyzed by computational methods, including quantum dynamics. A section on specialist methods (time-resolved spectroscopy, matrix isolation, NMR, and computational methods) and a survey of transition metal hydride photochemistry organized by transition metal group complete the Review.

  7. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

    1994-04-26

    A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  8. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  9. Spatial Control of Functional Response in 4D-Printed Active Metallic Structures

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ji; Franco, Brian; Tapia, Gustavo; Karayagiz, Kubra; Johnson, Luke; Liu, Jun; Arroyave, Raymundo; Karaman, Ibrahim; Elwany, Alaa

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to achieve local control of 3-dimensional thermal history in a metallic alloy, which resulted in designed spatial variations in its functional response. A nickel-titanium shape memory alloy part was created with multiple shape-recovery stages activated at different temperatures using the selective laser melting technique. The multi-stage transformation originates from differences in thermal history, and thus the precipitate structure, at various locations created from controlled variations in the hatch distance within the same part. This is a first example of precision location-dependent control of thermal history in alloys beyond the surface, and utilizes additive manufacturing techniques as a tool to create materials with novel functional response that is difficult to achieve through conventional methods. PMID:28429796

  10. Spatial Control of Functional Response in 4D-Printed Active Metallic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ji; Franco, Brian; Tapia, Gustavo; Karayagiz, Kubra; Johnson, Luke; Liu, Jun; Arroyave, Raymundo; Karaman, Ibrahim; Elwany, Alaa

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate a method to achieve local control of 3-dimensional thermal history in a metallic alloy, which resulted in designed spatial variations in its functional response. A nickel-titanium shape memory alloy part was created with multiple shape-recovery stages activated at different temperatures using the selective laser melting technique. The multi-stage transformation originates from differences in thermal history, and thus the precipitate structure, at various locations created from controlled variations in the hatch distance within the same part. This is a first example of precision location-dependent control of thermal history in alloys beyond the surface, and utilizes additive manufacturing techniques as a tool to create materials with novel functional response that is difficult to achieve through conventional methods.

  11. Transition metals in superheat melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakes, Petr; Wolfbauer, Michael-Patrick

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments with silicate melts doped with transition element oxides was carried out at atmospheric pressures of inert gas at temperatures exceeding liquidus. As predicted from the shape of fO2 buffer curves in T-fO2 diagrams the reducing conditions for a particular oxide-metal pair can be achieved through the T increase if the released oxygen is continuously removed. Experimental studies suggest that transition metals such as Cr or V behave as siderophile elements at temperatures exceeding liquidus temperatures if the system is not buffered by the presence of other oxide of more siderophile element. For example the presence of FeO prevents the reduction of Cr2O3. The sequence of decreasing siderophility of transition elements at superheat conditions (Mo, Ni, Fe, Cr) matches the decreasing degree of depletion of siderophile elements in mantle rocks as compared to chondrites.

  12. Engineering skyrmions in transition-metal multilayers for spintronics.

    PubMed

    Dupé, B; Bihlmayer, G; Böttcher, M; Blügel, S; Heinze, S

    2016-06-03

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized, topologically protected spin structures that have been proposed for storing or processing information due to their intriguing dynamical and transport properties. Important in terms of applications is the recent discovery of interface stabilized skyrmions as evidenced in ultra-thin transition-metal films. However, so far only skyrmions at interfaces with a single atomic layer of a magnetic material were reported, which greatly limits their potential for application in devices. Here we predict the emergence of skyrmions in [4d/Fe2/5d]n multilayers, that is, structures composed of Fe biatomic layers sandwiched between 4d and 5d transition-metal layers. In these composite structures, the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions that control skyrmion formation can be tuned separately by the two interfaces. This allows engineering skyrmions as shown based on density functional theory and spin dynamics simulations.

  13. Engineering skyrmions in transition-metal multilayers for spintronics

    PubMed Central

    Dupé, B.; Bihlmayer, G.; Böttcher, M.; Blügel, S.; Heinze, S.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized, topologically protected spin structures that have been proposed for storing or processing information due to their intriguing dynamical and transport properties. Important in terms of applications is the recent discovery of interface stabilized skyrmions as evidenced in ultra-thin transition-metal films. However, so far only skyrmions at interfaces with a single atomic layer of a magnetic material were reported, which greatly limits their potential for application in devices. Here we predict the emergence of skyrmions in [4d/Fe2/5d]n multilayers, that is, structures composed of Fe biatomic layers sandwiched between 4d and 5d transition-metal layers. In these composite structures, the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interactions that control skyrmion formation can be tuned separately by the two interfaces. This allows engineering skyrmions as shown based on density functional theory and spin dynamics simulations. PMID:27257020

  14. Engineering skyrmions in transition-metal multilayers for spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupé, B.; Bihlmayer, G.; Böttcher, M.; Blügel, S.; Heinze, S.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized, topologically protected spin structures that have been proposed for storing or processing information due to their intriguing dynamical and transport properties. Important in terms of applications is the recent discovery of interface stabilized skyrmions as evidenced in ultra-thin transition-metal films. However, so far only skyrmions at interfaces with a single atomic layer of a magnetic material were reported, which greatly limits their potential for application in devices. Here we predict the emergence of skyrmions in [4d/Fe2/5d]n multilayers, that is, structures composed of Fe biatomic layers sandwiched between 4d and 5d transition-metal layers. In these composite structures, the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions that control skyrmion formation can be tuned separately by the two interfaces. This allows engineering skyrmions as shown based on density functional theory and spin dynamics simulations.

  15. Atomic displacements in transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Nassrin Y.

    Using the order-N locally-self-consistent multiple scattering (LSMS) method, we carry out first-principles studies of the displacement of atoms from their average sites in the vicinity of a vacancy and transition metal impurities in copper. Our approach is to relax the first nearest neighbor distance and to calculate total energy for a number of relaxed geometries. We then obtain the equilibrium configuration of the nuclei from minimization of the total energy.

  16. Reactivity of transition metal solvates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Boris D.

    1991-09-01

    Reactivity data are generalised for one of the most important classes of complexes, solvates, which are quantitatively nearly unstudied. Various approaches to studying and describing the reactivity are compared with respect to solvation of the reagents and the transition state. The specifics and mechanism of ligand substitution in pure and mixed organic solvents are found. The reactivity of simple (homoleptic) and mixed solvates toward macrocycles is examined in detail using porphyrins as an example. The kinetic method of indicator reactions is applied to porphyrins in order to study the state of transition metal salts in organic solvents and the stability of the coordination spheres of acidosalts (MXnn-2), acidosolvates (MX2Sn-2) and their transition states. The concentration dependence of the rate constant of an indicator reaction is demonstrated to be due to a change in the inner coordination sphere and a shift of equilibria between the various coordination complexes. The bibliography includes 38 references.

  17. Required transition from research to clinical application: Report on the 4D treatment planning workshops 2014 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Antje-Christin; Stützer, Kristin; Richter, Christian; Rucinski, Antoni; da Silva, Joakim; Phillips, Justin; Engelsman, Martijn; Shimizu, Shinichi; Werner, Rene; Jakobi, Annika; Göksel, Orçun; Zhang, Ye; Oshea, Tuathan; Fast, Martin; Perrin, Rosalind; Bert, Christoph; Rinaldi, Ilaria; Korevaar, EriK; McClelland, Jamie

    2016-07-01

    Since 2009, a 4D treatment planning workshop has taken place annually, gathering researchers working on the treatment of moving targets, mainly with scanned ion beams. Topics discussed during the workshops range from problems of time resolved imaging, the challenges of motion modelling, the implementation of 4D capabilities for treatment planning, up to different aspects related to 4D dosimetry and treatment verification. This report gives an overview on topics discussed at the 4D workshops in 2014 and 2015. It summarizes recent findings, developments and challenges in the field and discusses the relevant literature of the recent years. The report is structured in three parts pointing out developments in the context of understanding moving geometries, of treating moving targets and of 4D quality assurance (QA) and 4D dosimetry. The community represented at the 4D workshops agrees that research in the context of treating moving targets with scanned ion beams faces a crucial phase of clinical translation. In the coming years it will be important to define standards for motion monitoring, to establish 4D treatment planning guidelines and to develop 4D QA tools. These basic requirements for the clinical application of scanned ion beams to moving targets could e.g. be determined by a dedicated ESTRO task group. Besides reviewing recent research results and pointing out urgent needs when treating moving targets with scanned ion beams, the report also gives an outlook on the upcoming 4D workshop organized at the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) in the Netherlands at the end of 2016. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The metal-non-metal transition in compressed metal vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensel, F.; Marceca, E.; Pilgrim, W. C.

    1998-12-01

    Knowledge of the properties of hydrogen and helium and their mixtures, at temperatures and pressures prevailing in the giant planets is of considerable interest for planetary modelling. In the light of the unfavourable outlook for reliable measurements under these extreme conditions effort has been spent investigating the high-temperature high-pressure properties of fluid metals which are experimentally accessible in the laboratory and which might serve as models for compressed fluid hydrogen. The main emphasis of the paper is on the density dependence of the dynamic structure factor 0953-8984/10/49/026/img1 of liquid rubidium which reveals that a monoatomic-molecular transition occurs in the metal-non-metal transition region of the expanded liquid analogous to that suggested to occur in shock compressed hydrogen. Additional emphasis is on new results of the phase behaviour of dilute mixtures of helium in the near critical metal mercury.

  19. Covalent bonds against magnetism in transition metal compounds.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Sergey V; Khomskii, Daniel I

    2016-09-20

    Magnetism in transition metal compounds is usually considered starting from a description of isolated ions, as exact as possible, and treating their (exchange) interaction at a later stage. We show that this standard approach may break down in many cases, especially in 4d and 5d compounds. We argue that there is an important intersite effect-an orbital-selective formation of covalent metal-metal bonds that leads to an "exclusion" of corresponding electrons from the magnetic subsystem, and thus strongly affects magnetic properties of the system. This effect is especially prominent for noninteger electron number, when it results in suppression of the famous double exchange, the main mechanism of ferromagnetism in transition metal compounds. We study this mechanism analytically and numerically and show that it explains magnetic properties of not only several 4d-5d materials, including Nb2O2F3 and Ba5AlIr2O11, but can also be operative in 3d transition metal oxides, e.g., in CrO2 under pressure. We also discuss the role of spin-orbit coupling on the competition between covalency and magnetism. Our results demonstrate that strong intersite coupling may invalidate the standard single-site starting point for considering magnetism, and can lead to a qualitatively new behavior.

  20. Repumping and spectroscopy of laser-cooled Sr atoms using the (5s5p)3P2-(5s4d)3D2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickelson, P. G.; Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Anzel, P.; De Salvo, B. J.; Nagel, S. B.; Traverso, A. J.; Yan, M.; Killian, T. C.

    2009-12-01

    We describe repumping and spectroscopy of laser-cooled strontium (Sr) atoms using the (5s5p)3P2-(5s4d)3D2 transition. Atom number in a magneto-optical trap is enhanced by driving this transition because Sr atoms that have decayed into the (5s5p)3P2 dark state are repumped back into the (5s2)1S0 ground state. Spectroscopy of 84Sr, 86Sr, 87Sr and 88Sr improves the value of the (5s5p)3P2-(5s4d)3D2 transition frequency and determines the isotope shifts for the transition accurately enough to guide laser-cooling experiments with less abundant isotopes.

  1. Synthesis of transition metal carbonitrides

    DOEpatents

    Munir, Zuhair A. R.; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    1994-01-01

    Transition metal carbonitrides (in particular, titanium carbonitride, TiC.sub.0.5 N.sub.0.5) are synthesized by a self-propagating reaction between the metal (e.g., titanium) and carbon in a nitrogen atmosphere. Complete conversion to the carbonitride phase is achieved with the addition of TiN as diluent and with a nitrogen pressure .gtoreq.0.6 MPa. Thermodynamic phase-stability calculations and experimental characterizations of quenched samples provided revealed that the mechanism of formation of the carbonitride is a two-step process. The first step involves the formation of the nonstoichiometric carbide, TiC.sub.0.5, and is followed by the formation of the product by the incorporation of nitrogen in the defect-structure carbide.

  2. Approximating metal-insulator transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Carlo; Rayanov, Kristian; Pavlov, Boris; Martin, Gaven; Flach, Sergej

    2015-12-01

    We consider quantum wave propagation in one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We propose an iterative construction of quasiperiodic potentials from sequences of potentials with increasing spatial period. At each finite iteration step, the eigenstates reflect the properties of the limiting quasiperiodic potential properties up to a controlled maximum system size. We then observe approximate Metal-Insulator Transitions (MIT) at the finite iteration steps. We also report evidence on mobility edges, which are at variance to the celebrated Aubry-André model. The dynamics near the MIT shows a critical slowing down of the ballistic group velocity in the metallic phase, similar to the divergence of the localization length in the insulating phase.

  3. Alkane Soluble Transition Metal Complexes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    Al I7 𔃼 AKANE SOLUBLE TRANSITION METAL COUP rA’(U ROYAL3 MIARY COL OF SCIENCE SHRIVENHAM (ENGLAND) DEP O CHEMISTRY AND METALLURGY F R HARTLEY OCT 83...Associate Investigator B.G. Murray Chemistry and Metallurgy Departmnt TeRylMilitary College of Science Shrlveahau ftindou1 Wiltshire, UK This work woo...Plenary lecture at the 17th International Conference on Coordination Chemistry , saw" 1376. 2. D.3. Webster, Ady. Oranometal Chbe., 1977, 15,147. 3

  4. Radiative transitions in metallic nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalin, A. S.

    2008-02-01

    In this article, a new theoretical approach to studying light-scattering characteristics of nanosized objects based on the solution to the Thomas-Fermi equation and quasi-classical approximation is considered. It is shown that the distribution of valence electrons in the volume of metallic clusters exhibits a specific structure of "spatial zones." With the aid of quasi-classical wave functions, expressions for the appropriate dipole moments of the transitions between the ground and excited states are obtained; the behavior of the spectrum of gold clusters depending on their sizes is studied; a comparison with existing experimental data is carried out.

  5. Transition Metals and Virulence in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Lauren D; Skaar, Eric P

    2016-11-23

    Transition metals are required trace elements for all forms of life. Due to their unique inorganic and redox properties, transition metals serve as cofactors for enzymes and other proteins. In bacterial pathogenesis, the vertebrate host represents a rich source of nutrient metals, and bacteria have evolved diverse metal acquisition strategies. Host metal homeostasis changes dramatically in response to bacterial infections, including production of metal sequestering proteins and the bombardment of bacteria with toxic levels of metals. In response, bacteria have evolved systems to subvert metal sequestration and toxicity. The coevolution of hosts and their bacterial pathogens in the battle for metals has uncovered emerging paradigms in social microbiology, rapid evolution, host specificity, and metal homeostasis across domains. This review focuses on recent advances and open questions in our understanding of the complex role of transition metals at the host-pathogen interface.

  6. Transition Metals and Virulence in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Lauren D.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Transition metals are required trace elements for all forms of life. Due to their unique inorganic and redox properties, transition metals serve as cofactors for enzymes and other proteins. In bacterial pathogenesis, the vertebrate host represents a rich source of nutrient metals, and bacteria have evolved diverse metal acquisition strategies. Host metal homeostasis changes dramatically in response to bacterial infections, including production of metal sequestering proteins and the bombardment of bacteria with toxic levels of metals. Presumably, in response, bacteria have evolved systems to subvert metal sequestration and toxicity. The coevolution of hosts and their bacterial pathogens in the battle for metals has uncovered emerging paradigms in social microbiology, rapid evolution, host specificity, and metal homeostasis across domains. This review focuses on recent advances and open questions in our understanding of the complex role of transition metals at the host-pathogen interface. PMID:27617971

  7. 2D transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzeli, Sajedeh; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Pasquier, Diego; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2017-08-01

    Graphene is very popular because of its many fascinating properties, but its lack of an electronic bandgap has stimulated the search for 2D materials with semiconducting character. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), which are semiconductors of the type MX2, where M is a transition metal atom (such as Mo or W) and X is a chalcogen atom (such as S, Se or Te), provide a promising alternative. Because of its robustness, MoS2 is the most studied material in this family. TMDCs exhibit a unique combination of atomic-scale thickness, direct bandgap, strong spin-orbit coupling and favourable electronic and mechanical properties, which make them interesting for fundamental studies and for applications in high-end electronics, spintronics, optoelectronics, energy harvesting, flexible electronics, DNA sequencing and personalized medicine. In this Review, the methods used to synthesize TMDCs are examined and their properties are discussed, with particular attention to their charge density wave, superconductive and topological phases. The use of TMCDs in nanoelectronic devices is also explored, along with strategies to improve charge carrier mobility, high frequency operation and the use of strain engineering to tailor their properties.

  8. Hyperfine structure studies of transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.; Kurtz, C.; Hasegawa, S.

    1995-08-01

    This past year our studies of hyperfine structure (hfs) in metastable states of transition metals concentrated on the analysis of hfs in the four-valence electron system, Nb II. Earlier, we measured hfs intervals using the laser-rf double resonance and laser-induced fluorescence methods in a fast-ion beam of Nb{sup +}. The resulting experimental magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole interaction constants are compared to those calculated by a relativistic configuration interaction approach. These are the first hfs data on this refractory element. Theoretically, it is found that the most important contributions to the energy are the pair excitations, valence single excitations and core polarization from the shallow core. However, the inner core polarization is found to be crucial for hfs, albeit unimportant for energy. For the J=2 level at 12805 cm{sup -1}, 4d{sup 4} {sup 3}F. the theoretical relativistic configuration A-value is in agreement with the experimental result to an accuracy of 4%. Other calculated A-values are expected to be of the same accuracy. A paper describing these results was accepted for publication. Experimental studies of the four-valence electron system V{sup +} in the (4s+3d){sup 4} manifold are complete. The theoretical difficulties for the 3d manifold, noted earlier for the three-valence electron Ti{sup +}, as compared to the 4d manifold appear to be repeated in the case of the four-valence electron systems (Nb{sup +} and V{sup +}). Relativistic configuration interaction calculations are underway, after which a paper will be published.

  9. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Baca, A.G.; Esherick, P.; Parmeter, J.E.; Rieger, D.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-09-29

    A method for dry etching of transition metals is disclosed. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorus-containing {pi}-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the {pi}-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the {pi}-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex.

  10. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Baca, Albert G.; Esherick, Peter; Parmeter, John E.; Rieger, Dennis J.; Shul, Randy J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for dry etching of transition metals. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorous-containing .pi.-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the .pi.-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the .pi.-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex.

  11. Superconducting Metallic Glass Transition-Edge-Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A superconducting metallic glass transition-edge sensor (MGTES) and a method for fabricating the MGTES are provided. A single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is deposited on a substrate. The single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is an absorber for the MGTES and is electrically connected to a circuit configured for readout and biasing to sense electromagnetic radiation.

  12. Metal-semiconductor-metal transition in zigzag carbon nanoscrolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Haixia; Zhang, Yang; Fang, Dangqi; Gong, Baihua; Zhang, Erhu; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Similar to rolling up paper, carbon nanoscrolls (CNSs) can be rolled from graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) using physical approaches. Owing to their peculiar one-dimensional nanostructures, CNSs have attracted great attention over the past few years. In this study, we have investigated the effects of bending deformation on the electronic properties of zigzag CNSs (ZCNSs) during the rolling process from zigzag GNRs (ZGNRs) by means of first-principles calculations. It is found that a metal-semiconductor-metal transition is observed. By analyzing charge density and density of states, the origin of this electronic property transition is discussed. Furthermore, we find that the metal-semiconductor-metal transition in ZCNSs is independent of ribbon width as well as spin-orbit interaction. Our results of the metal-semiconductor-metal transition in the ZCNSs are robust and may open potential applications in nano-electromechanical devices based on the ZCNSs.Similar to rolling up paper, carbon nanoscrolls (CNSs) can be rolled from graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) using physical approaches. Owing to their peculiar one-dimensional nanostructures, CNSs have attracted great attention over the past few years. In this study, we have investigated the effects of bending deformation on the electronic properties of zigzag CNSs (ZCNSs) during the rolling process from zigzag GNRs (ZGNRs) by means of first-principles calculations. It is found that a metal-semiconductor-metal transition is observed. By analyzing charge density and density of states, the origin of this electronic property transition is discussed. Furthermore, we find that the metal-semiconductor-metal transition in ZCNSs is independent of ribbon width as well as spin-orbit interaction. Our results of the metal-semiconductor-metal transition in the ZCNSs are robust and may open potential applications in nano-electromechanical devices based on the ZCNSs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07628

  13. Photochemistry of Metal-Metal Bonded Transition Element Complexes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-12

    CONTRACT NO0014-75-C-0880 Task No. NR 051-579 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 25 PHOTOCHEMISTRY OF METAL-METAL BONDED TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPLEXES by Mark S . Wrighton...unlimited. 17, Di:- t. Ii t I / Avolil:J, ; Codc’s ! Photochemistry of Metal-Metal Bonded Transition Element Complexes Mark S . Wrighton, James L. Graff...publication in the ACS Symposium Series, "Reactivity of MetalrMetal Bonds", M. H. Chisholm, ed.) IA c*Addre~ s orrespondence to this author, ; r[ I . - - 1

  14. Interfacial properties of semiconducting transition metal chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaegermann, W.; Tributsch, H.

    This review is aimed at the correlation of structural and electronic properies of semiconducting transition metal chalcogenides with molecular surface processes and mechanisms in photoelectrochemistry, (photo)catalysis, geochemistry and hydrometallurgy. Layer-type, pyrite structured and transition metal cluster containing chalcogenides are selected as model systems to explain the principles involved. Special emphasis is given to the discussion of materials which involve transition metal d- states in the interfacial reaction pathways of holes and electrons. Since they initiate and control heterogeneous coordination chemistry at the surfaces they may provide the possibility of tailoring selective and catalytically demanding reactions. Examples of such mechanisms are presented and discussed in relation to surface properties involved.

  15. Covalent bonds against magnetism in transition metal compounds

    PubMed Central

    Streltsov, Sergey V.; Khomskii, Daniel I.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetism in transition metal compounds is usually considered starting from a description of isolated ions, as exact as possible, and treating their (exchange) interaction at a later stage. We show that this standard approach may break down in many cases, especially in 4d and 5d compounds. We argue that there is an important intersite effect—an orbital-selective formation of covalent metal–metal bonds that leads to an “exclusion” of corresponding electrons from the magnetic subsystem, and thus strongly affects magnetic properties of the system. This effect is especially prominent for noninteger electron number, when it results in suppression of the famous double exchange, the main mechanism of ferromagnetism in transition metal compounds. We study this mechanism analytically and numerically and show that it explains magnetic properties of not only several 4d–5d materials, including Nb2O2F3 and Ba5AlIr2O11, but can also be operative in 3d transition metal oxides, e.g., in CrO2 under pressure. We also discuss the role of spin–orbit coupling on the competition between covalency and magnetism. Our results demonstrate that strong intersite coupling may invalidate the standard single-site starting point for considering magnetism, and can lead to a qualitatively new behavior. PMID:27601669

  16. Electron work function and surface energy of body-centered and face-centered cubic modifications of 4 d- and 5 d-metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, L. P.; Shebzukhova, I. G.

    2016-07-01

    A technique for the evaluation of the electron work function of metallic single crystals and the electron work function anisotropy has been developed in the framework of the electron-statistical method. The surface energy and the electron work function have been calculated for crystal faces of allotropic modifications of 4 d- and 5 d-metals. A change in the electron work function due to the allotropic transformations has been estimated, and the periodic dependence of the electron work function has been determined. It has been shown that the results obtained using the proposed technique correlate with the available experimental data for polycrystals.

  17. Transition metal-free decarboxylative alkylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Guanghui; Sun, Peipei

    2016-11-22

    This review summarizes advances in the decarboxylative alkylation of carboxylic acids and their derivatives under transition metal-free conditions in recent years. Unlike most transition metal-catalyzed decarboxylative coupling reactions which tend to undergo catalytic cycles, the mechanisms of reactions under metal-free conditions are usually diverse and even ambiguous in some cases. This article offers an overview of reaction types and their corresponding mechanisms, highlights some of the advantages and limitations, and focuses on introducing UV and visible light-induced, organocatalyst and peroxide promoted radical processes for decarboxylative alkylation and the formation of C-C bonds.

  18. Transition metal catalysis in confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Leenders, Stefan H A M; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2015-01-21

    Transition metal catalysis plays an important role in both industry and in academia where selectivity, activity and stability are crucial parameters to control. Next to changing the structure of the ligand, introducing a confined space as a second coordination sphere around a metal catalyst has recently been shown to be a viable method to induce new selectivity and activity in transition metal catalysis. In this review we focus on supramolecular strategies to encapsulate transition metal complexes with the aim of controlling the selectivity via the second coordination sphere. As we will discuss, catalyst confinement can result in selective processes that are impossible or difficult to achieve by traditional methods. We will describe the template-ligand approach as well as the host-guest approach to arrive at such supramolecular systems and discuss how the performance of the catalyst is enhanced by confining it in a molecular container.

  19. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi.

    1983-08-16

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB[sub 2], or CrB[sub 2]. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700 C and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface. 4 figs.

  20. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB.sub.2, or CrB.sub.2. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700.degree. C. and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface.

  1. Method of boronizing transition-metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, K.; Shimotake, H.

    1981-08-28

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB/sub 2/, or CrB/sub 2/. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700/sup 0/C and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface.

  2. Transition metal contacts to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Politou, Maria De Gendt, Stefan; Heyns, Marc; Asselberghs, Inge; Radu, Iuliana; Conard, Thierry; Richard, Olivier; Martens, Koen; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Tokei, Zsolt; Lee, Chang Seung; Sayan, Safak

    2015-10-12

    Achieving low resistance contacts to graphene is a common concern for graphene device performance and hybrid graphene/metal interconnects. In this work, we have used the circular Transfer Length Method (cTLM) to electrically characterize Ag, Au, Ni, Ti, and Pd as contact metals to graphene. The consistency of the obtained results was verified with the characterization of up to 72 cTLM structures per metal. Within our study, the noble metals Au, Ag and Pd, which form a weaker bond with graphene, are shown to result in lower contact resistance (Rc) values compared to the more reactive Ni and Ti. X-ray Photo Electron Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization for the latter have shown the formation of Ti and Ni carbides. Graphene/Pd contacts show a distinct intermediate behavior. The weak carbide formation signature and the low Rc values measured agree with theoretical predictions of an intermediate state of weak chemisorption of Pd on graphene.

  3. An insight into fluorescent transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Chia, Y Y; Tay, M G

    2014-09-21

    The emission from transition metal complexes is usually produced from triplet excited states. Owing to strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the fast conversion of singlet to triplet excited states via intersystem crossing (ISC) is facilitated. Hence, in transition metal complexes, emission from singlet excited states is not favoured. Nevertheless, a number of examples of transition metal complexes that fluoresce with high intensity have been found and some of them were even comprehensively studied. In general, three common photophysical characteristics are used for the identification of fluorescent emission from a transition metal complex: emission lifetimes on the nanosecond scale; a small Stokes shift; and intense emission under aerated conditions. For most of the complexes reviewed here, singlet emission is the result of ligand-based fluorescence, which is the dominant emission process due to poor metal-ligand interactions leading to a small metal contribution in the excited states, and a competitive fluorescence rate constant when compared to the ISC rate constant. In addition to the pure fluorescence from metal complexes, another two types of fluorescent emissions were also reviewed, namely, delayed fluorescence and fluorescence-phosphorescence dual emissions. Both emissions also have their respective unique characteristics, and thus they are discussed in this perspective.

  4. Transition Metal and Lanthanide Compounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    hexamethylbenzene niobium and tantalum derivatives; and lanthanide nitrate complexes of certain macrocyclic polyethers and the use of macrocyclic polyether columns for lanthanide separations....New research results in the following areas are briefly described: The synthesis of polyphosphines and their metal complexes including polyphosphines...with terminal methyl and neopentyl groups; reactions of polypyrazolylborates with the metal complexes C5H5Co(CO)(R(f)I(R(f)= perfluoroalkyl group

  5. Microwave-assisted synthesis of transition metal phosphide

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2014-12-30

    A method of synthesizing transition metal phosphide. In one embodiment, the method has the steps of preparing a transition metal lignosulfonate, mixing the transition metal lignosulfonate with phosphoric acid to form a mixture, and subjecting the mixture to a microwave radiation for a duration of time effective to obtain a transition metal phosphide.

  6. Nuclear Scattering from Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hira, Ajit; McKeough, James; Valerio, Mario; Cathey, Tommy

    2016-03-01

    In view of the continued interest in the scattering of light projectiles by metallic nuclei, we present a computational study of the interactions between different nuclear species of atoms such as H through F (Z <= 9) and the nuclei of Silver, Palladium and other metals. Recent work has shown that neutron scattering can be used to record holographic images of materials. We have developed a FORTRAN computer program to compute stopping cross sections and scattering angles in Ag and other metals for the small nuclear projectiles, using Monte Carlo calculation. This code allows for different angles of incidence. Next, simulations were done in the energy interval from 50 to 210 keV. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant experimental data. The data are further analyzed to identify periodic trends in terms of the atomic number of the projectile. Such studies also have potential applications in nuclear physics and in nuclear medicine. Funding from National Science Foundation.

  7. Transition metal catalyzed transformations of unsaturated molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    In this proposal, research in three areas of transition metal catalyzed transformations of small molecules is proposed. The first encompasses metal catalyzed processes for the synthesis of several classes of carbon monoxide containing polymers. This section describes plans for metal catalyzed synthesis of (a) new alternating copolymers of carbon monoxide and olefins, (b) block copolymers consisting of segments of the olefin homopolymer and the olefin- carbon monoxide alternating copolymer, and (c) polycarbonates, polyesters and polyamides. The second section involves the examination of the chemistry of metal complexes incorporating oxo and hydrocarbyl ligands as a model for the heterogeneous oxidation of olefins and alkanes by meal oxides. Specific plans are to mimic in solution two proposed key steps in the heterogeneous oxidations. These are (a) the heterolytic cleavage of an alkyl (or allyl) C-H bond that is assisted by an oxo group, and (a) the transfer of an oxo group to the resultant metal bound alkyl (or allyl) ligand. The third section concerned with the development of a hybrid catalyst system involving both homogeneous and heterogeneous components for the oxidative functionalization of alkanes. The basic idea is to employ a transition metal in the elemental state to activate C-H bonds of alkanes and form surface alkyl groups. An additional transition metal species will be present in solution which will serve to oxidize these surface alkyl groups to ultimately yield oxidatively functionalized organic products. 57 refs.

  8. Holographic lattices and metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yi

    2015-10-01

    This paper is an extension of the talk given at the conference on Gravitation and Cosmology/The Fourth Galileo-Xu Guangqi Meeting. We intend to present a short review on recent progress on the construction of holographic lattices and its application to metal-insulator transition (MIT), which is a fundamentally important phenomenon in condensed matter physics. We will firstly implement the Peierls phase transition by constructing holographic charge density waves which are induced by the spontaneous breaking of translational symmetry. Then we turn to the holographic realization of metal-insulator transition as a quantum critical phenomenon with many strongly correlated electrons involved. The holographic entanglement entropy as a diagnostic for such quantum phase transitions will be briefly mentioned.

  9. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals.

    PubMed

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, Aaron P; Juslin, Niklas; Stoller, Roger E; Wirth, Brian D; Kurtz, Richard J

    2015-06-10

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent, b, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy (N(F) ~ E(MD)(b)). Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, μ, between the high- and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of μ as a function of displacement threshold energy, E(d), is presented for bcc metals.

  10. Intermultiplet transitions in rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stirling, W.G.; McEwen, K.A.; Loong, C.K.

    1985-01-01

    We report here on direct observations of intermultiplet (IM) transitions in the rare-earth metals, Pr, Nd and Tb, made using the chopper spectrometers at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source of Argonne National Laboratory. Despite hydrogen contamination of the polycrystalline samples, we have observed inelastic peaks at small Q arising from IM transitions in Pr (approx.260 MeV), Nd (approx.242 MeV) and Tb (approx.256 MeV) although the latter has not yet been observed unambiguously. Future work will investigate the energy level structure and dynamical properties of rare-earth ions in stoichiometric metallic systems. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Mid-IR Transition Metal Lasers (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    alexandrite was demonstrated in 1979. [2] Cr4+ and Cr2+ infrared laser materials took even longer to be discovered. However, transition metal laser...already been mentioned. Other transition metal laser ions such as Cr3+ in alexandrite [19] and Ti3+ in YAlO3 [20] have excited state absorption (ESA...Washington, DC. 19. Shand, M.L., J.C. Walling, and R.C. Morris, Excited-state absorption in the pump region of alexandrite , Journal of Applied Physics

  12. Cohesion and coordination effects on transition metal surface energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruvireta, Judit; Vega, Lorena; Viñes, Francesc

    2017-10-01

    Here we explore the accuracy of Stefan equation and broken-bond model semiempirical approaches to obtain surface energies on transition metals. Cohesive factors are accounted for either via the vaporization enthalpies, as proposed in Stefan equation, or via cohesive energies, as employed in the broken-bond model. Coordination effects are considered including the saturation degree, as suggested in Stefan equation, employing Coordination Numbers (CN), or as the ratio of broken bonds, according to the bond-cutting model, considering as well the square root dependency of the bond strength on CN. Further, generalized coordination numbers CN bar are contemplated as well, exploring a total number of 12 semiempirical formulations on the three most densely packed surfaces of 3d, 4d, and 5d Transition Metals (TMs) displaying face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), or hexagonal close-packed (hcp) crystallographic structures. Estimates are compared to available experimental surface energies obtained extrapolated to zero temperature. Results reveal that Stefan formula cohesive and coordination dependencies are only qualitative suited, but unadvised for quantitative discussion, as surface energies are highly overestimated, favoring in addition the stability of under-coordinated surfaces. Broken-bond cohesion and coordination dependencies are a suited basis for quantitative comparison, where square-root dependencies on CN to account for bond weakening are sensibly worse. An analysis using Wulff shaped averaged surface energies suggests the employment of broken-bond model using CN to gain surface energies for TMs, likely applicable to other metals.

  13. Metal oxide chemistry in solution: the early transition metal polyoxoanions.

    PubMed

    Day, V W; Klemperer, W G

    1985-05-03

    Many of the early transition elements form large polynuclear metal-oxygen anions containing up to 200 atoms or more. Although these polyoxoanions have been investigated for more than a century, detailed studies of structure and reactivity were not possible until the development of modern x-ray crystallographic and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques. Systematic studies of small polyoxoanions in inert, aprotic solvents have clarified many of the principles governing their structure and reactivity, and also have made possible the preparation of entirely new types of covalent derivatives such as CH(2)Mo(4)O(15)H(3-), C(5)H(5)TiMo(5)O(18)(3-), and (OC)(3)Mn(Nb(2)W(4)O(19))(3-). Since most early transition metal polyoxoanions have structures based on close-packed oxygen arrays containing interstitial metal centers, their chemistry offers a rare opportunity to study chemical transformations in detail on well-defined metal oxide surfaces.

  14. Superconductivity and phase diagrams of the 4d - and 5d -metal-doped iron arsenides SrFe2-xMxAs2 (M=Rh,Ir,Pd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Zhu, Xiyu; Cheng, Peng; Mu, Gang; Jia, Ying; Fang, Lei; Wang, Yonglei; Luo, Huiqian; Zeng, Bin; Shen, Bing; Shan, Lei; Ren, Cong; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2009-07-01

    By substituting the Fe with the 4d - and 5d -transition metals Rh, Ir, and Pd in SrFe2As2 , we have successfully synthesized a series of superconductors SrFe2-xMxAs2 ( M=Rh , Ir, and Pd) and explored the phase diagrams of them. The systematic evolution of the lattice constants indicated that part of the Fe ions were successfully replaced by the transition metals Rh, Ir, and Pd. By increasing the doping content of Rh, Ir, and Pd, the antiferromagnetic (AF) state of the parent phase is suppressed progressively and superconductivity is induced. The general phase diagrams were obtained and found to be similar to the case of doping Co and Ni to the Fe sites. However, the detailed structure of the phase diagram, in terms of how fast to suppress the antiferromagnetic order and induce the superconductivity, varies from one kind of doped element to another. Regarding the close values of the maximum superconducting transition temperatures in doping Co, Rh, and Ir which locate actually in the same column in the periodic table of elements but have very different masses, we argue that the superconductivity is intimately related to the suppression of the AF order, rather than the electron-phonon coupling.

  15. Dimensional diversity in transition metal trihalides

    SciTech Connect

    Jianhua Lin; Miller, G.J. )

    1993-04-14

    Structural variations of the second- and third-row transition metal trihalides are rationalized via tight-binding band calculations and evaluation of Madelung energetic factors. The observed structure for a given metal halide is controlled by both the coordination geometry at the anion and the d electron configuration at the metal. As the polarizability of the halide increases, the M-X-M angle, in general, decreases so that three-dimensional frameworks occur for the fluorides, while layer and chain structures are found for the chlorides, bromides, and iodides. Within a particular halide system, systematic structural trends also occur as the d electron configuration changes. 56 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. OH-transition metal bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The bonding in both CuOH and AgOH has a covalent component that leads to a bent structure. The larger electrostatic stabilization in CuOH leads to a larger D(e) (2.83 eV) compared with AgOH (2.20 eV). Using Ni5OH to model chemisorption of OH on a Ni surface, it is found that OH adsorption in the fourfold hollow of Ni(100) leads to an OH normal to the surface, while adsorption directly above a Ni atom leads to a tilted OH. These qualitative Ni5OH calculations allow for speculation on the observed variation of OH on metal surfaces.

  17. High Pressure Synthesis of Transition Metal Carbonyls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, A. P.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents an experiment which uses readily available starting materials and inexpensive equipment for synthesis of transition metal carbonyls at 1000 atm and which is intended to give students experience in techniques used in research and industry. Safety precautions are emphasized. (Author/SA)

  18. Mesoporous Transition Metal Oxides for Supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Guo, Jin; Wang, Tingfeng; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Dong; Yang, Ying-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Recently, transition metal oxides, such as ruthenium oxide (RuO2), manganese dioxide (MnO2), nickel oxides (NiO) and cobalt oxide (Co3O4), have been widely investigated as electrode materials for pseudo-capacitors. In particular, these metal oxides with mesoporous structures have become very hot nanomaterials in the field of supercapacitors owing to their large specific surface areas and suitable pore size distributions. The high specific capacities of these mesoporous metal oxides are resulted from the effective contacts between electrode materials and electrolytes as well as fast transportation of ions and electrons in the bulk of electrode and at the interface of electrode and electrolyte. During the past decade, many achievements on mesoporous transition metal oxides have been made. In this mini-review, we select several typical nanomaterials, such as RuO2, MnO2, NiO, Co3O4 and nickel cobaltite (NiCo2O4), and briefly summarize the recent research progress of these mesoporous transition metal oxides-based electrodes in the field of supercapacitors. PMID:28347088

  19. Transition metal based borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanthi, Chakram; Liu, Jianjun; Wei, Suhuai; Zhao, Yufeng

    2010-03-01

    Using ab-initio studies based on the density-functional theory, we have calculated binding energies per hydrogen molecule for decomposition reactions of transition metal borohydrides MHxB12H12 to MB12 structures, where M corresponds to Sc, Ti, or V. Depending on the valence of the transition metal, x can be 1, 2, or 3. Crystal structures considered for MB12 included both hypothetical and those found in the international crystallographic structural database. On the other hand, the crystal structure considered for MHxB12H12 belongs to C2/c (space group 15) structure as reported in a previous study [V. Ozolins et al. JACS, 131, 230 (2009)]. Among the structures investigated, Titanium-based metal borohydride structure has the lowest binding energy per hydrogen molecule relative to the cubic TiB12 structure (˜0.37 eV/H2). Our finding should be contrasted with the binding energy/H2 for simple metal based borohydrides (e.g., CaB12H12 ), which has a value of ˜ 1.5 eV/H2, suggesting that transition metals play a significant role in lowering the H2 binding energy in borohydrides.

  20. Extended metal-atom chains with an inert second row transition metal: [Ru5(mu5-tpda)4X2] (tpda2- = tripyridyldiamido dianion, X = Cl and NCS).

    PubMed

    Yin, Caixia; Huang, Gin-Chen; Kuo, Ching-Kuo; Fu, Ming-Dung; Lu, Hao-Cheng; Ke, Jhih-Hong; Shih, Kai-Neng; Huang, Yi-Lin; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Yeh, Chen-Yu; Chen, Chun-hsien; Peng, Shie-Ming

    2008-08-06

    EMACs (extended metal-atom chains) offer a unique platform for the exploration of metal-metal interactions. There has been significant advances on the synthesis of EMACs, such as lengthening the chains up to 11 metal atoms thus far, integrating naphthyridine moieties for tuning the charge carried at metal centers, and manipulation of metal-metal interactions. However, the metal centers in EMACs hitherto are limited to first row transition metals which are more labile than those relatively inert ones with electrons filled in the 4d and 5d shells. In this Communication, the synthesis, crystallographic, magnetic, and electrical conducting studies of [Ru5(mu5-tpda)4Cl2] and [Ru5(mu5-tpda)4(NCS)2], the first pentanuclear EMACs of second-row transition metal, are reported.

  1. Orbital physics in transition-metal oxides

    PubMed

    Tokura; Nagaosa

    2000-04-21

    An electron in a solid, that is, bound to or nearly localized on the specific atomic site, has three attributes: charge, spin, and orbital. The orbital represents the shape of the electron cloud in solid. In transition-metal oxides with anisotropic-shaped d-orbital electrons, the Coulomb interaction between the electrons (strong electron correlation effect) is of importance for understanding their metal-insulator transitions and properties such as high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance. The orbital degree of freedom occasionally plays an important role in these phenomena, and its correlation and/or order-disorder transition causes a variety of phenomena through strong coupling with charge, spin, and lattice dynamics. An overview is given here on this "orbital physics," which will be a key concept for the science and technology of correlated electrons.

  2. Syntheses of transition metal methoxysiloxides.

    PubMed

    Richers, Casseday P; Bertke, Jeffery A; Rauchfuss, Thomas B

    2017-01-31

    The paper describes three methods for the preparation of methoxysiloxide complexes, a rare class of complexes of relevance to room temperature vulcanization (RTV) of polysiloxanes. The salt metathesis reaction involves the use of the recently described reagent NaOSi(OMe)2Me with various metal chlorides to give Cp*2Ti[OSi(OMe)2Me](OMe), ((Me,Me)N2N)NiOSi(OMe)2Me, (IPr)CuOSi(OMe)2Me, and (triphos)CoOSi(OMe)2Me (Cp* = C5Me5, triphos = Me(CH2PPh2)3). Several attempted reactions gave methoxide complexes instead, a pathway that is attributed to the intermediacy of κ(2)-OSi(OMe)2Me species. The diol Cp*2Zr(OH)2 reacts with excess (MeO)3SiMe to give Cp*2Zr[OSi(OMe)2Me]2. In contrast the less nucleophilic Cp*2Ti(OH)2 was unreactive. The third route to methoxysiloxide complexes involves the reaction of Cp*2M(O)(py) with (MeO)3SiMe to give Cp*2M[OSi(OMe)2Me](OMe) in nearly quantitative yield (M = Ti, Zr). The structures of Cp*2Ti[OSi(OMe)2Me](OMe), Cp*2Zr[OSi(OMe)2Me](OMe), (IPr)CuOSi(OMe)2Me, and (triphos)CoOSi(OMe)2Me were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  3. Iodide effects in transition metal catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Maitlis, Peter M; Haynes, Anthony; James, Brian R; Catellani, Marta; Chiusoli, Gian Paolo

    2004-11-07

    The unique properties of I(-) allow it to be involved in several different ways in reactions catalyzed by the late transition metals: in the oxidative addition, the migration, and the coupling/reductive elimination steps, as well as in substrate activation. Most steps are accelerated by I(-)(for example through an increased nucleophilicity of the metal center), but some are retarded, because a coordination site is blocked. The "soft" iodide ligand binds more strongly to soft metals (low oxidation state, electron rich, and polarizable) such as the later and heavier transition metals, than do the other halides, or N- and O-centered ligands. Hence in a catalytic cycle that includes the metal in a formally low oxidation state there will be less tendency for the metal to precipitate (and be removed from the cycle) in the presence of I(-) than most other ligands. Iodide is a good nucleophile and is also easily and reversibly oxidized to I(2). In addition, I(-) can play key roles in purely organic reactions that occur as part of a catalytic cycle. Thus to understand the function of iodide requires careful analysis, since two or sometimes more effects occur in different steps of one single cycle. Each of these topics is illustrated with examples of the influence of iodide from homogeneous catalytic reactions in the literature: methanol carbonylation to acetic acid and related reactions; CO hydrogenation; imine hydrogenation; and C-C and C-N coupling reactions. General features are summarised in the Conclusions.

  4. Spin doping using transition metal phthalocyanine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atxabal, A.; Ribeiro, M.; Parui, S.; Urreta, L.; Sagasta, E.; Sun, X.; Llopis, R.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular spins have become key enablers for exploring magnetic interactions, quantum information processes and many-body effects in metals. Metal-organic molecules, in particular, let the spin state of the core metal ion to be modified according to its organic environment, allowing localized magnetic moments to emerge as functional entities with radically different properties from its simple atomic counterparts. Here, using and preserving the integrity of transition metal phthalocyanine high-spin complexes, we demonstrate the magnetic doping of gold thin films, effectively creating a new ground state. We demonstrate it by electrical transport measurements that are sensitive to the scattering of itinerant electrons with magnetic impurities, such as Kondo effect and weak antilocalization. Our work expands in a simple and powerful way the classes of materials that can be used as magnetic dopants, opening a new channel to couple the wide range of molecular properties with spin phenomena at a functional scale.

  5. Spin doping using transition metal phthalocyanine molecules

    PubMed Central

    Atxabal, A.; Ribeiro, M.; Parui, S.; Urreta, L.; Sagasta, E.; Sun, X.; Llopis, R.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular spins have become key enablers for exploring magnetic interactions, quantum information processes and many-body effects in metals. Metal-organic molecules, in particular, let the spin state of the core metal ion to be modified according to its organic environment, allowing localized magnetic moments to emerge as functional entities with radically different properties from its simple atomic counterparts. Here, using and preserving the integrity of transition metal phthalocyanine high-spin complexes, we demonstrate the magnetic doping of gold thin films, effectively creating a new ground state. We demonstrate it by electrical transport measurements that are sensitive to the scattering of itinerant electrons with magnetic impurities, such as Kondo effect and weak antilocalization. Our work expands in a simple and powerful way the classes of materials that can be used as magnetic dopants, opening a new channel to couple the wide range of molecular properties with spin phenomena at a functional scale. PMID:27941810

  6. Spin doping using transition metal phthalocyanine molecules.

    PubMed

    Atxabal, A; Ribeiro, M; Parui, S; Urreta, L; Sagasta, E; Sun, X; Llopis, R; Casanova, F; Hueso, L E

    2016-12-12

    Molecular spins have become key enablers for exploring magnetic interactions, quantum information processes and many-body effects in metals. Metal-organic molecules, in particular, let the spin state of the core metal ion to be modified according to its organic environment, allowing localized magnetic moments to emerge as functional entities with radically different properties from its simple atomic counterparts. Here, using and preserving the integrity of transition metal phthalocyanine high-spin complexes, we demonstrate the magnetic doping of gold thin films, effectively creating a new ground state. We demonstrate it by electrical transport measurements that are sensitive to the scattering of itinerant electrons with magnetic impurities, such as Kondo effect and weak antilocalization. Our work expands in a simple and powerful way the classes of materials that can be used as magnetic dopants, opening a new channel to couple the wide range of molecular properties with spin phenomena at a functional scale.

  7. First-row transition metal hydrogenation and hydrosilylation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Trovitch, Ryan J.; Mukhopadhyay, Tufan K.; Pal, Raja; Levin, Hagit Ben-Daat; Porter, Tyler M.; Ghosh, Chandrani

    2017-07-18

    Transition metal compounds, and specifically transition metal compounds having a tetradentate and/or pentadentate supporting ligand are described, together with methods for the preparation thereof and the use of such compounds as hydrogenation and/or hydrosilylation catalysts.

  8. Metal Induced Growth of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides at Controlled Locations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhendong; Huang, Qi; Chen, Peng; Guo, Shouhui; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liang, Xuelei; Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Metal induced nucleation is adopted to achieve the growth of transition metal dichalcogenides at controlled locations. Ordered arrays of MoS2 and WS2 have successfully been fabricated on SiO2 substrates by using the patterned Pt/Ti dots as the nucleation sites. Uniform MoS2 monolayers with the adjustable size up to 50 μm are grown surrounding these metal patterns and the mobility of such layer is about 0.86 cm2/V·s. The crystalline flakes of WS2 are also fabricated extending from the metal patterns and the electron mobility of these flakes is up to 11.36 cm2/V·s. PMID:27910917

  9. Insulator to Metal Transition in Fluid Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, R Q; Galli, G

    2003-06-15

    The authors have investigated the insulator to metal transition (ITM) in fluid hydrogen using first principles simulations. Both density functional and quantum Monte Carlo calculations show that the electronic energy gap of the liquid vanishes at about 9 fold compression and 3000 K. At these conditions the computed conductivity values are characteristic of a poor metal. These findings are consistent with those of recent shock wave experiments but the computed conductivity is larger than the measured value. From the ab-initio results they conclude that the ITM is driven by molecular dissociation rather than disorder and that both temperature and pressure play a key role in determining structural changes in the fluid.

  10. Pseudopotential-Based Correlation Consistent Composite Approach (rp-ccCA) for First- and Second-Row Transition Metal Thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Manivasagam, Sivabalan; Laury, Marie L; Wilson, Angela K

    2015-07-02

    The relativistic-pseudopotential correlation consistent composite approach (rp-ccCA) was used to determine the enthalpy of formation (ΔHf) of 24 first row (3d) transition metal compounds. The rp-ccCA-derived ΔHf's were compared to ΔHf's previously obtained with an all-electron composite method for transition metals (ccCA-TM). For the 3d metal systems, rp-ccCA achieves transition metal accuracy, within 3 kcal/mol of reliable experimental data, overall. By utilizing pseudopotentials within the rp-ccCA methodology, we observed a significant computational time savings (53%) in comparison to the all-electron basis sets employed within ccCA-TM. With the proven reliability and accuracy of rp-ccCA, the methodology was employed to construct a calibration set of 210 second-row (4d) transition metal compounds and their ΔHf's. The 4d calibration set is referred to as 4dHf-210. Within the 4dHf-210 set, there were 61 molecules with available experimental data. The average experimental uncertainty was 4.05 kcal/mol and the mean absolute deviation of rp-ccCA was 3.64 kcal/mol, excluding outliers (10 total). This study provides a large set of energetics that can be used to gauge existing and future computational methodologies and to aid experimentalists in reaction design.

  11. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  12. Electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal doped graphyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangan, Abhijeet Sadashiv; Yadav, Asha S.; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2017-05-01

    We have theoretically investigated the interaction of few 3d (V,Mn) and 4d (Y,Zr) transition metals with the γ-graphyne structure using the spin-polarized density functional theory for its potentials application in Hydrogen storage, spintronics and nano-electronics. By doping different TMs we have observed that the system can be either metallic(Y), semi-conducting or half metallic. The system for Y and Zr doped graphyne becomes non-magnetic while V and Mn doped graphyne have a magnetic moments of l μB and 3 μB respectively From bader charge analysis it is seen that there is a charge transfer from the TM atom to the graphyne. Zr and Y have a net charge transfer of 2.15e and 1.73e respectively. Charge density analysis also shows the polarization on the carbon skeleton which becomes larger as the charge transfer for the TM atom increases. Thus we see Y and Zr are better candidates for hydrogen storage devices since they are non-magnetic and have less d electrons which is ideal for kubas-type interactions between hydrogen molecule and TM.

  13. Magnetic and Metal-Insulator Transition in natural Transition Metal Sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renxiong; Metz, Tristin; Liu, I.-Lin; Wang, Kefeng; Wang, Xiangfeng; Jeffries, J. R.; Saha, S. R.; Greene, R. L.; Paglione, J.; Santelli, C. C.; Post, J.,

    In collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, we present detailed studies of a class of natural minerals with potential to harbor correlated behavior. Transition metal sulfide minerals, such as Bornite (Cu5FeS4), are an important family of compounds known for their thermoelectric properties. We will present low temperature experimental studies of magnetic transitions and focus on a compound that exhibits a metal to insulator transition concident with entrance to an antiferromagnetic ground state, suggesting a potentially interesting system with promise for realizing new correlated states of matter in a naturally occurring mineral.

  14. Transitional Metal/Chalcogen Dependant Interactions of Hairpin DNA with Transition Metal Dichalcogenides, MX2.

    PubMed

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Sofer, Zdenek; Pumera, Martin

    2015-08-03

    Owing to the attractive properties that transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) display, they have found recent application in the fabrication of biosensing devices. These devices involve the immobilization of a recognition element such as DNA onto the surface of TMDs. Therefore, it is imperative to examine the interactions between TMDs and DNA. Herein, we explore the effect of different transition metals (Mo and W) and chalcogens (S and Se) on the interactions between hairpin DNA and TMDs of both bulk and t-BuLi exfoliated forms. We discovered that the interactions are strongly dependent on the metal/chalcogen composition in TMDs.

  15. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals

    DOE PAGES

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, Aaron P.; Juslin, Niklas; ...

    2015-01-01

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent, b, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy (N-F similar to E-MD(b)). Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, mu, between the high-and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of mu as a function of displacement threshold energy, E-d,more » is presented for bcc metals.« less

  16. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, Aaron P.; Juslin, Niklas; Stoller, Roger E.; Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent, b, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy (N-F similar to E-MD(b)). Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, mu, between the high-and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of mu as a function of displacement threshold energy, E-d, is presented for bcc metals.

  17. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, A.; Juslin, Niklas; Stoller, Roger E.; Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2015-06-10

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent, $b$, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy ($N_F$$ \\sim$$E_{MD}^b$). Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, $\\mu$, between the high- and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of $\\mu$ as a function of displacement threshold energy, $E_d$, is presented for bcc metals.

  18. Topological crystalline insulators in transition metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Kargarian, Mehdi; Fiete, Gregory A

    2013-04-12

    Topological crystalline insulators possess electronic states protected by crystal symmetries, rather than time-reversal symmetry. We show that the transition metal oxides with heavy transition metals are able to support nontrivial band topology resulting from mirror symmetry of the lattice. As an example, we consider pyrochlore oxides of the form A2M2O7. As a function of spin-orbit coupling strength, we find two Z2 topological insulator phases can be distinguished from each other by their mirror Chern numbers, indicating a different topological crystalline insulators. We also derive an effective k·p Hamiltonian, similar to the model introduced for Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te, and discuss the effect of an on-site Hubbard interaction on the topological crystalline insulator phase using slave-rotor mean-field theory, which predicts new classes of topological quantum spin liquids.

  19. Transition-Metal Substitution Doping in Synthetic Atomically Thin Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Kim, Young Duck; Liang, Liangbo; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Chow, Phil; Tan, Jiawei; Li, Baichang; Li, Lu; Sumpter, Bobby G; Lu, Toh-Ming; Meunier, Vincent; Hone, James; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2016-11-01

    Large-area "in situ" transition-metal substitution doping for chemical-vapor-deposited semiconducting transition-metal-dichalcogenide monolayers deposited on dielectric substrates is demonstrated. In this approach, the transition-metal substitution is stable and preserves the monolayer's semiconducting nature, along with other attractive characteristics, including direct-bandgap photoluminescence.

  20. Pressure-induced electronic phase transitions in transition metal oxides and rare earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, Brian Ross

    Electron correlation can affect profound changes in a material's bulk properties. When the degree of correlation is changed, phase transitions can sometimes result. Applying pressure can inducing changes in the degree of electron correlation by altering the interatomic distances of crystalline materials. This dissertation presents a study of a number of correlated systems at ultrahigh pressures generated by diamond-anvil cells. The Mott transition is an example of a phase transition resulting from changes in the degree of electron correlation. A sharp transition induced by pressure from a highly correlated, insulating state to a weakly correlated, metallic state was predicted for the transition metal monoxides (MnO, FeO, CoO, and NiO) some 50 years ago. Numerous studies aimed at observing this transition have been unsuccessful. We present a study of MnO designed to determine its crystal structure and magnetic properties at high pressure. Our results provide the first observance of the Mott transition in a transition metal monoxide. A high pressure study of various light rare-earth metals using similar techniques to those used to study MnO is presented. Our results show that these materials do not undergo Mott transitions at high pressure as some have suggested. A key signature of the Mott transition, i.e., a vanishing magnetic moment, was absent in the lanthanides. These results suggest that a Kondo-like model, not a Mott transition model, best describes the electron correlation behavior in the lanthanides. A number of related materials were also studied at high pressure. Among these materials, half-metallic chromium dioxide (CrO2) presents a unique opportunity to study the effects of electronic structure on a material's structural properties due to its very common rutile crystal structure. We present a high pressure structural study of CrO2 and compare our findings to other rutile-structured compounds. Strong systernatics are uncovered linking the ambient pressure

  1. Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.

    2011-05-31

    Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

  2. Ferroelectric control of metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xu; Jin, Kui-juan; Ge, Chen; Ma, Zhong-shui; Yang, Guo-zhen

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method of controlling the metal-insulator transition of one perovskite material at its interface with another ferroelectric material based on first principle calculations. The operating principle is that the rotation of oxygen octahedra tuned by the ferroelectric polarization can modulate the superexchange interaction in this perovskite. We designed a tri-color superlattice of (BiFeO3)N/LaNiO3/LaTiO3, in which the BiFeO3 layers are ferroelectric, the LaNiO3 layer is the layer of which the electronic structure is to be tuned, and LaTiO3 layer is inserted to enhance the inversion asymmetry. By reversing the ferroelectric polarization in this structure, there is a metal-insulator transition of the LaNiO3 layer because of the changes of crystal field splitting of the Ni eg orbitals and the bandwidth of the Ni in-plane eg orbital. It is highly expected that a metal-transition can be realized by designing the structures at the interfaces for more materials.

  3. Lanthanoid-transition-metal bonding in bismetallocenes.

    PubMed

    Butovskii, Mikhail V; Oelkers, Benjamin; Bauer, Tobias; Bakker, Jacinta M; Bezugly, Viktor; Wagner, Frank R; Kempe, Rhett

    2014-03-03

    Bismetallocenes [Cp2 LuReCp2 ] and [Cp*2 LaReCp2 ] (Cp=cyclopentadienyl; Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) were prepared using different synthetic strategies. Salt metathesis-performed in aromatic hydrocarbons to avoid degradation pathways caused by THF-were identified as an attractive alternative to alkane elimination. Although alkane elimination is more attractive in the sense of its less elaborate workup, the rate of the reaction shows a strong dependence on the ionic radius of Ln(3+) (Ln=lanthanide) within a given ligand set. Steric hindrance can cause a dramatic decrease in the reaction rate of alkane elimination. In this case, salt metathesis should be considered the better alternative. Covalent bonding interactions between the Ln and transition-metal (TM) cations has been quantified on the basis of the delocalization index. Its magnitude lies within the range characteristic for bonds between transition metals. Secondary interactions were identified between carbon atoms of the Cp ligand of the transition metal and the Ln cation. Model calculations clearly indicated that the size of these interactions depends on the capability of the TM atom to act as an electron donor (i.e., a Lewis base). The consequences can even be derived from structural details. The observed clear dependency of the LuRu and interfragment LuC bonding on the THF coordination of the Lu atom points to a tunable Lewis acidity at the Ln site, which provides a method of significantly influencing the structure and the interfragment bonding.

  4. Aging of Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Li, Baichang; Tan, Jiawei; Chow, Phil; Lu, Toh-Ming; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2016-02-23

    Two-dimensional sheets of transition metal dichalcogenides are an emerging class of atomically thin semiconductors that are considered to be "air-stable", similar to graphene. Here we report that, contrary to current understanding, chemical vapor deposited transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers exhibit poor long-term stability in air. After room-temperature exposure to the environment for several months, monolayers of molybdenum disulfide and tungsten disulfide undergo dramatic aging effects including extensive cracking, changes in morphology, and severe quenching of the direct gap photoluminescence. X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy reveal that this effect is related to gradual oxidation along the grain boundaries and the adsorption of organic contaminants. These results highlight important challenges associated with the utilization of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers in electronic and optoelectronic devices. We also demonstrate a potential solution to this problem, featuring encapsulation of the monolayer sheet by a 10-20 nm thick optically transparent polymer (parylene C). This strategy is shown to successfully prevent the degradation of the monolayer material under accelerated aging (i.e., high-temperature, oxygen-rich) conditions.

  5. Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Minghui; Allen, Amy J.; Nguyen, Minh T.; Ralston, Walter T.; MacLeod, Michelle J.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2013-09-15

    Transition metal nitrides (TMN) have many desirable characteristics such as high hardness and good thermal stability under reducing conditions. This work reports an initial survey of the chemical stability of mesoporous TMNs (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in water at 80 °C at neutral, acidic and alkaline pH. The mesoporous TMNs had specific surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g with average pore sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. The high surface areas of these materials enhance the rate of corrosion per unit mass over that of a bulk material, making detection of corrosion much easier. The products were characterized by Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several nitrides have corrosion rates that are, within error, not distinguishable from zero (±1 Å/day). Of the nitrides examined, CrN appears to be the most corrosion resistant under acidic conditions. None of the nitrides studied are corrosion resistant under alkaline conditions. - Graphical abstract: Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in acidic and alkaline solutions at 80 °C for 2 weeks. Display Omitted - highlights: • Corrosion rates of mesoporous transition metal nitrides in aqueous solution is reported. • The mesoporous TMNs had surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g. • CrN is the most corrosion resistant under the conditions studied.

  6. Thermodynamic Hydricity of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wiedner, Eric S; Chambers, Matthew B; Pitman, Catherine L; Bullock, R Morris; Miller, Alexander J M; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydrides play a critical role in stoichiometric and catalytic transformations. Knowledge of free energies for cleaving metal hydride bonds enables the prediction of chemical reactivity, such as for the bond-forming and bond-breaking events that occur in a catalytic reaction. Thermodynamic hydricity is the free energy required to cleave an M-H bond to generate a hydride ion (H(-)). Three primary methods have been developed for hydricity determination: the hydride transfer method establishes hydride transfer equilibrium with a hydride donor/acceptor pair of known hydricity, the H2 heterolysis method involves measuring the equilibrium of heterolytic cleavage of H2 in the presence of a base, and the potential-pKa method considers stepwise transfer of a proton and two electrons to give a net hydride transfer. Using these methods, over 100 thermodynamic hydricity values for transition metal hydrides have been determined in acetonitrile or water. In acetonitrile, the hydricity of metal hydrides spans a range of more than 50 kcal/mol. Methods for using hydricity values to predict chemical reactivity are also discussed, including organic transformations, the reduction of CO2, and the production and oxidation of hydrogen.

  7. Thermodynamic Hydricity of Transition Metal Hydrides

    DOE PAGES

    Wiedner, Eric S.; Chambers, Matthew B.; Pitman, Catherine L.; ...

    2016-08-02

    Transition metal hydrides play a critical role in stoichiometric and catalytic transformations. Knowledge of free energies for cleaving metal hydride bonds enables the prediction of chemical reactivity, such as for the bond-forming and bondbreaking events that occur in a catalytic reaction. Thermodynamic hydricity is the free energy required to cleave an M-H bond to generate a hydride ion (H-). Three primary methods have been developed for hydricity determination: the hydride transfer method establishes hydride transfer equilibrium with a hydride donor/acceptor pair of known hydricity, the H2 heterolysis method involves measuring the equilibrium of heterolytic cleavage of H2 in the presencemore » of a base, and the potential-pKa method considers stepwise transfer of a proton and two electrons to give a net hydride transfer. Using these methods, over 100 thermodynamic hydricity values for transition metal hydrides have been determined in acetonitrile or water. In acetonitrile, the hydricity of metal hydrides spans a range of more than 50 kcal/mol. Finally, methods for using hydricity values to predict chemical reactivity are also discussed, including organic transformations, the reduction of CO2, and the production and oxidation of hydrogen.« less

  8. Catabolism of hyaluronan: involvement of transition metals

    PubMed Central

    Šoltés, Ladislav; Kogan, Grigorij

    2009-01-01

    One of the very complex structures in the vertebrates is the joint. The main component of the joint is the synovial fluid with its high-molar-mass glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, which turnover is approximately twelve hours. Since the synovial fluid does not contain any hyaluronidases, the fast hyaluronan catabolism is caused primarily by reductive-oxidative processes. Eight transition metals – V23, Mn25, Fe26, Co27, Ni28, Cu29, Zn30, and Mo42 – naturally occurring in living organism are essential for the control of various metabolic and signaling pathways. They are also the key elements in catabolism of hyaluronan in the joint. In this overview, the role of these metals in physiological and pathophysiological catabolism of hyaluronan is described. The participation of these metals in the initiation and propagation of the radical degradation hyaluronan is critically reviewed. PMID:21217859

  9. Spinning around in Transition-Metal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Swart, Marcel; Gruden, Maja

    2016-12-20

    The great diversity and richness of transition metal chemistry, such as the features of an open d-shell, opened a way to numerous areas of scientific research and technological applications. Depending on the nature of the metal and its environment, there are often several energetically accessible spin states, and the progress in accurate theoretical treatment of this complicated phenomenon is presented in this Account. The spin state energetics of a transition metal complex can be predicted theoretically on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) or wave function based methodology, where DFT has advantages since it can be applied routinely to medium-to-large-sized molecules and spin-state consistent density functionals are now available. Additional factors such as the effect of the basis set, thermochemical contributions, solvation, relativity, and dispersion, have been investigated by many researchers, but challenges in unambiguous assignment of spin states still remain. The first DFT studies showed intrinsic spin-state preferences of hybrid functionals for high spin and early generalized gradient approximation functionals for low spin. Progress in the development of density functional approximations (DFAs) then led to a class of specially designed DFAs, such as OPBE, SSB-D, and S12g, and brought a very intriguing and fascinating observation that the spin states of transition metals and the SN2 barriers of organic molecules are somehow intimately linked. Among the many noteworthy results that emerged from the search for the appropriate description of the complicated spin state preferences in transition metals, we mainly focused on the examination of the connection between the spin state and the structures or coordination modes of the transition metal complexes. Changes in spin states normally lead only to changes in the metal-ligand bond lengths, but to the best of our knowledge, the dapsox ligand showed the first example of a transition-metal complex where a

  10. Substitutional 4d and 5d impurities in graphene.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2016-08-21

    We describe the structural and electronic properties of graphene doped with substitutional impurities of 4d and 5d transition metals. The adsorption energies and distances for 4d and 5d metals in graphene show similar trends for the later groups in the periodic table, which are also well-known characteristics of 3d elements. However, along earlier groups the 4d impurities in graphene show very similar adsorption energies, distances and magnetic moments to the 5d ones, which can be related to the influence of the 4d and 5d lanthanide contraction. Surprisingly, within the manganese group, the total magnetic moment of 3 μB for manganese is reduced to 1 μB for technetium and rhenium. We find that compared with 3d elements, the larger size of the 4d and 5d elements causes a high degree of hybridization with the neighbouring carbon atoms, reducing spin splitting in the d levels. It seems that the magnetic adjustment of graphene could be significantly different if 4d or 5d impurities are used instead of 3d impurities.

  11. k-asymmetric spin-splitting at the interface between transition metal ferromagnets and heavy metals

    PubMed Central

    Grytsyuk, Sergiy; Belabbes, Abderrezak; Haney, Paul M.; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Stiles, M. D.; Schwingenschögl, Udo; Manchon, Aurelien

    2016-01-01

    We systematically investigate the spin-orbit coupling-induced band splitting originating from inversion symmetry breaking at the interface between a Co monolayer and 4d (Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, and Ag) or 5d (Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au) transition metals. In spite of the complex band structure of these systems, the odd-in-k spin splitting of the bands displays striking similarities with the much simpler Rashba spin-orbit coupling picture. While we do not find salient correlations between the interfacial magnetic anisotropy and the odd-in-k spin-splitting of the bands, we establish a clear connection between the overall strength of the band splitting and the charge transfer between the d-orbitals at the interface. Furthermore, we show that the spin splitting of the Fermi surface scales with the induced orbital moment, weighted by the spin-orbit coupling. PMID:27441303

  12. k -asymmetric spin splitting at the interface between transition metal ferromagnets and heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grytsyuk, Sergiy; Belabbes, Abderrezak; Haney, Paul M.; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Stiles, M. D.; Schwingenschlögl, Udo; Manchon, Aurelien

    2016-05-01

    We systematically investigate the spin-orbit coupling-induced band splitting originating from inversion symmetry breaking at the interface between a Co monolayer and 4 d (Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, and Ag) or 5 d (Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au) transition metals. In spite of the complex band structure of these systems, the odd-in-k spin splitting of the bands displays striking similarities with the much simpler Rashba spin-orbit coupling picture. We establish a clear connection between the overall strength of the odd-in-k spin splitting of the bands and the charge transfer between the d orbitals at the interface. Furthermore, we show that the spin splitting of the Fermi surface scales with the induced orbital moment, weighted by the spin-orbit coupling.

  13. k-asymmetric spin-splitting at the interface between transition metal ferromagnets and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Grytsyuk, Sergiy; Belabbes, Abderrezak; Haney, Paul M; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Stiles, M D; Schwingenschögl, Udo; Manchon, Aurelien

    2016-05-01

    We systematically investigate the spin-orbit coupling-induced band splitting originating from inversion symmetry breaking at the interface between a Co monolayer and 4d (Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, and Ag) or 5d (Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au) transition metals. In spite of the complex band structure of these systems, the odd-in-k spin splitting of the bands displays striking similarities with the much simpler Rashba spin-orbit coupling picture. While we do not find salient correlations between the interfacial magnetic anisotropy and the odd-in-k spin-splitting of the bands, we establish a clear connection between the overall strength of the band splitting and the charge transfer between the d-orbitals at the interface. Furthermore, we show that the spin splitting of the Fermi surface scales with the induced orbital moment, weighted by the spin-orbit coupling.

  14. Laser materials based on transition metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncorgé, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to review the spectroscopic properties of the main laser materials based on transition metal ions which lead to noticeable laser performance at room temperature and, for very few cases, because of unique properties, when they are operated at cryogenic temperatures. The description also includes the materials which are currently being used as saturable absorbers for passive-Q-switching of a variety of other near- and mid-infrared solid state lasers. A substantial part of the article is devoted first to the description of the energy levels and of the absorption and emission transitions of the transition metal ions in various types of environments by using the well-known Tanabe-Sugano diagrams. It is shown in particular how these diagrams can be used along with other theoretical considerations to understand and describe the spectroscopic properties of ions sitting in crystal field environments of near-octahedral or near-tetrahedral symmetry. The second part is then dedicated to the description (positions and intensities) of the main absorption and emission features which characterize the different types of materials.

  15. Observation by two-photon laser spectroscopy of the 4d{sup 10}5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}{yields}4d{sup 9}5s{sup 2} {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} clock transition in atomic silver

    SciTech Connect

    Badr, T.; Plimmer, M. D.; Juncar, P.; Himbert, M. E.; Louyer, Y.; Knight, D. J. E.

    2006-12-15

    We report the observation of the very narrow 4d{sup 10}5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}{yields}4d{sup 9}5s{sup 2} {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} transition in atomic silver. The frequencies of the hyperfine components in {sup 107}Ag and {sup 109}Ag have been measured using Doppler-free two-photon laser spectroscopy of a thermal beam and heterodyne calibration with respect to the a{sub 1} component of the 62P(4-5) line in molecular iodine near 661 nm. For the center of gravity of a mixture of natural abundance, we deduce the value 906 641 295.77(19) MHz. For the isotope shift, we obtain {nu}({sup 109}Ag)-{nu}({sup 107}Ag)=564.15(37) MHz, from which we deduce the frequency and isotope shift of the 4d{sup 10}5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}{yields}4d{sup 10}6p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} transition at 206 nm.

  16. Ultrafast photophysics of transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Chergui, Majed

    2015-03-17

    The properties of transition metal complexes are interesting not only for their potential applications in solar energy conversion, OLEDs, molecular electronics, biology, photochemistry, etc. but also for their fascinating photophysical properties that call for a rethinking of fundamental concepts. With the advent of ultrafast spectroscopy over 25 years ago and, more particularly, with improvements in the past 10-15 years, a new area of study was opened that has led to insightful observations of the intramolecular relaxation processes such as internal conversion (IC), intersystem crossing (ISC), and intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR). Indeed, ultrafast optical spectroscopic tools, such as fluorescence up-conversion, show that in many cases, intramolecular relaxation processes can be extremely fast and even shorter than time scales of vibrations. In addition, more and more examples are appearing showing that ultrafast ISC rates do not scale with the magnitude of the metal spin-orbit coupling constant, that is, that there is no heavy-atom effect on ultrafast time scales. It appears that the structural dynamics of the system and the density of states play a crucial role therein. While optical spectroscopy delivers an insightful picture of electronic relaxation processes involving valence orbitals, the photophysics of metal complexes involves excitations that may be centered on the metal (called metal-centered or MC) or the ligand (called ligand-centered or LC) or involve a transition from one to the other or vice versa (called MLCT or LMCT). These excitations call for an element-specific probe of the photophysics, which is achieved by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this case, transitions from core orbitals to valence orbitals or higher allow probing the electronic structure changes induced by the optical excitation of the valence orbitals, while also delivering information about the geometrical rearrangement of the neighbor atoms around the atom of

  17. Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, R.; Tatsumi, Y.; Huang, S.; Ling, X.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is reviewed based on our recent theoretical and experimental works. First, we discuss the semi-classical and quantum mechanical description for the polarization dependence of Raman spectra of TMDs in which the optical dipole transition matrix elements as a function of laser excitation energy are important for understanding the polarization dependence of the Raman intensity and Raman tensor. Overviewing the symmetry of TMDs, we discuss the dependence of the Raman spectra of TMDs on layer thickness, polarization, laser energy and the structural phase. Furthermore, we discuss the Raman spectra of twisted bilayer and heterostructures of TMDs. Finally, we give our perspectives on the Raman spectroscopy of TMDs.

  18. Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Saito, R; Tatsumi, Y; Huang, S; Ling, X; Dresselhaus, M S

    2016-09-07

    Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is reviewed based on our recent theoretical and experimental works. First, we discuss the semi-classical and quantum mechanical description for the polarization dependence of Raman spectra of TMDs in which the optical dipole transition matrix elements as a function of laser excitation energy are important for understanding the polarization dependence of the Raman intensity and Raman tensor. Overviewing the symmetry of TMDs, we discuss the dependence of the Raman spectra of TMDs on layer thickness, polarization, laser energy and the structural phase. Furthermore, we discuss the Raman spectra of twisted bilayer and heterostructures of TMDs. Finally, we give our perspectives on the Raman spectroscopy of TMDs.

  19. Switchable Metal-Insulator Phase Transition Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Hajisalem, Ghazal; Nezami, Mohammadreza S; Gordon, Reuven

    2017-05-10

    We investigate the switching of a gap plasmon tunnel junction between conducting and insulating states. Hysteresis is observed in the second and the third harmonic generation power dependence, which arises by thermally induced disorder ("melting") of a two-carbon self-assembled monolayer between an ultraflat gold surface and metal nanoparticles. The hysteresis is observed for a variety of nanoparticle sizes, but not for larger tunnel junctions where there is no appreciable tunneling. By combining quantum corrected finite-difference time-domain simulations with nonlinear scattering theory, we calculate the changes in the harmonic generation between the tunneling and the insulating states, and good agreement is found with the experiments. This paves the way to a new class of metal-insulator phase transition switchable metamaterials, which may provide next-generation information processing technologies.

  20. Multifunctional Ligands in Transition Metal Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated ligands are now being designed that do far more than just fulfil their traditional spectator roles by binding to the metal and providing a sterically-defined binding pocket for the substrate in homogeneous transition metal catalysis. This Focus review emphasizes selected cases in which ligands carry additional functional groups that change the properties of the ligand as a result of an external stimulus or undergo catalytically-relevant ligand-based reactivity. These include proton responsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more protons, ligands having a hydrogen bonding function, electroresponsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more electrons, and photoresponsive ligands capable of undergoing a useful change of properties upon irradiation. Molecular recognition ligands and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) are briefly discussed.

  1. Unconventional Superconductivity in Bilayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao-Xing

    2017-02-24

    Bilayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) belong to a class of materials with two unique features, the coupled spin-valley-layer degrees of freedom and the crystal structure that is globally centrosymmetric but locally noncentrosymmetric. In this Letter, we will show that the combination of these two features can lead to a rich phase diagram for unconventional superconductivity, including intralayer and interlayer singlet pairings and interlayer triplet pairings, in bilayer superconducting TMDs. In particular, we predict that the inhomogeneous Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov state can exist in bilayer TMDs under an in-plane magnetic field. We also discuss the experimental relevance of our results and possible experimental signatures.

  2. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Scalettar, Richard T.; Pickett, Warren E.

    2004-07-01

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (1) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (2) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (3) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  3. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Richard T. Scalettar; Warren E. Pickett

    2005-08-02

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (i) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (ii) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (iii) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  4. Tunable magnetocaloric effect in transition metal alloys

    PubMed Central

    Belyea, Dustin D.; Lucas, M. S.; Michel, E.; Horwath, J.; Miller, Casey W.

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictability of geopolitical tensions and resulting supply chain and pricing instabilities make it imperative to explore rare earth free magnetic materials. As such, we have investigated fully transition metal based “high entropy alloys” in the context of the magnetocaloric effect. We find the NiFeCoCrPdx family exhibits a second order magnetic phase transition whose critical temperature is tunable from 100 K to well above room temperature. The system notably displays changes in the functionality of the magnetic entropy change depending on x, which leads to nearly 40% enhancement of the refrigerant capacity. A detailed statistical analysis of the universal scaling behavior provides direct evidence that heat treatment and Pd additions reduce the distribution of exchange energies in the system, leading to a more magnetically homogeneous alloy. The general implications of this work are that the parent NiFeCoCr compound can be tuned dramatically with FCC metal additives. Together with their relatively lower cost, their superior mechanical properties that aid manufacturability and their relative chemical inertness that aids product longevity, NiFeCoCr-based materials could ultimately lead to commercially viable magnetic refrigerants. PMID:26507636

  5. Simple transition metal oxides (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Basaran, Ali C.; de la Venta, Jose; Ramirez, Juan Gabriel; Saerbeck, Thomas; Valmianski, Ilya; Wang, Siming

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid materials allow the engineering of new material properties by creative uses of proximity effects. When two dissimilar materials are in close physical proximity the properties of each one may be radically modified or occasionally a completely new material emerges. In the area of magnetism, controlling the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic thin films without magnetic fields is an on- going challenge with multiple technological implications for low- energy consumption memory and logic devices. Interesting possibilities include ferromagnets in proximity to dissimilar materials such as antiferromagnets or oxides that undergo metal-insulator transitions. The proximity of ferromagnets to antiferromagnets has given rise to the extensively studied Exchange Bias[1]. Our recent investigations in this field have addressed crucial issues regarding the importance of the antiferromagnetic [2-3] and ferromagnetic [4] bulk for the Exchange Bias and the unusual short time dynamics [5]. In a series of recent studies, we have investigated the magnetic properties of different hybrids of ferromagnets (Ni, Co and Fe) and oxides, which undergo metal-insulator and structural phase transitions. Both the static as well as dynamical properties of the ferromagnets are drastically affected. Static properties such as the coercivity, anisotropy and magnetization [6-8] and dynamical properties such as the microwave response are clearly modified by the proximity effect and give raise to interesting perhaps useful properties. Work supported by US-AFOSR and US-DOE

  6. Transition Metal Nitrides: A First Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ashish; Singh, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    The present work describes the structural stability and electronic and mechanical properties of transition metal nitrides (TmNs: B1 cubic structure (cF8, Fm ‾ overline 3 m)) using first principles density functional theory (DFT) within generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The lattice constant of TmNs increases with increasing the atomic radii of the transition metals. Stability of the TmNs decreases from IVB to VIB groups due to increase in formation energy/atom. The bonding characteristics of these nitrides have been explained based on electronic density of states and charge density. All the TmNs satisfy Born stability criteria in terms of elastic constants except CrN and MoN that do not exist in equilibrium binary phase diagrams. The groups IVB and V-VIB nitrides are associated with brittle and ductile behaviour based on G/B ratios, respectively. The estimated melting temperatures of these nitrides exhibit reasonably good agreement with calculated with B than those of the C11 for all nitrides.

  7. Transition Metal Catalysis Using Functionalized Dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Oosterom, G. Eric; Reek, Joost N. H.; Kamer, Paul C. J.; van Leeuwen, Piet W. N. M.

    2001-05-18

    Dendrimers are well-defined hyperbranched macromolecules with characteristic globular structures for the larger systems. These novel polymers have inspired many chemists to develop new materials and several applications have been explored, catalysis being one of them. The recent impressive strides in synthetic procedures increased the accessibility of functionalized dendrimers, resulting in a rapid development of dendrimer chemistry. The position of the catalytic site(s) as well as the spatial separation of the catalysts appears to be of crucial importance. Dendrimers that are functionalized with transition metals in the core potentially can mimic the properties of enzymes, their efficient natural counterparts, whereas the surface-functionalized systems have been proposed to fill the gap between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. This might yield superior catalysts with novel properties, that is, special reactivity or stability. Both the core and periphery strategies lead to catalysts that are sufficiently larger than most substrates and products, thus separation by modern membrane separation techniques can be applied. These novel homogeneous catalysts can be used in continuous membrane reactors, which will have major advantages particularly for reactions that benefit from low substrate concentrations or suffer from side reactions of the product. Here we review the recent progress and breakthroughs made with these promising novel transition metal functionalized dendrimers that are used as catalysts, and we will discuss the architectural concepts that have been applied.

  8. Tunable magnetocaloric effect in transition metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Belyea, Dustin D; Lucas, M S; Michel, E; Horwath, J; Miller, Casey W

    2015-10-28

    The unpredictability of geopolitical tensions and resulting supply chain and pricing instabilities make it imperative to explore rare earth free magnetic materials. As such, we have investigated fully transition metal based "high entropy alloys" in the context of the magnetocaloric effect. We find the NiFeCoCrPdx family exhibits a second order magnetic phase transition whose critical temperature is tunable from 100 K to well above room temperature. The system notably displays changes in the functionality of the magnetic entropy change depending on x, which leads to nearly 40% enhancement of the refrigerant capacity. A detailed statistical analysis of the universal scaling behavior provides direct evidence that heat treatment and Pd additions reduce the distribution of exchange energies in the system, leading to a more magnetically homogeneous alloy. The general implications of this work are that the parent NiFeCoCr compound can be tuned dramatically with FCC metal additives. Together with their relatively lower cost, their superior mechanical properties that aid manufacturability and their relative chemical inertness that aids product longevity, NiFeCoCr-based materials could ultimately lead to commercially viable magnetic refrigerants.

  9. Tunable magnetocaloric effect in transition metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyea, Dustin D.; Lucas, M. S.; Michel, E.; Horwath, J.; Miller, Casey W.

    2015-10-01

    The unpredictability of geopolitical tensions and resulting supply chain and pricing instabilities make it imperative to explore rare earth free magnetic materials. As such, we have investigated fully transition metal based “high entropy alloys” in the context of the magnetocaloric effect. We find the NiFeCoCrPdx family exhibits a second order magnetic phase transition whose critical temperature is tunable from 100 K to well above room temperature. The system notably displays changes in the functionality of the magnetic entropy change depending on x, which leads to nearly 40% enhancement of the refrigerant capacity. A detailed statistical analysis of the universal scaling behavior provides direct evidence that heat treatment and Pd additions reduce the distribution of exchange energies in the system, leading to a more magnetically homogeneous alloy. The general implications of this work are that the parent NiFeCoCr compound can be tuned dramatically with FCC metal additives. Together with their relatively lower cost, their superior mechanical properties that aid manufacturability and their relative chemical inertness that aids product longevity, NiFeCoCr-based materials could ultimately lead to commercially viable magnetic refrigerants.

  10. Metal Insulator transition in Vanadium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovaini, Azita; Fujita, Shigeji; Suzuki, Akira; Godoy, Salvador

    2012-02-01

    MAR12-2011-000262 Abstract Submitted for the MAR12 Meeting of The American Physical Society Sorting Category: 03.9 (T) On the metal-insulator-transition in vanadium dioxide AZITA JOVAINI, SHIGEJI FUJITA, University at Buffalo, SALVADOR GODOY, UNAM, AKIRA SUZUKI, Tokyo University of Science --- Vanadium dioxide (VO2) undergoes a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at 340 K with the structural change from tetragonal to monoclinic crystal. The conductivity _/ drops at MIT by four orders of magnitude. The low temperature monoclinic phase is known to have a lower ground-state energy. The existence of the k-vector k is prerequisite for the conduction since the k appears in the semiclassical equation of motion for the conduction electron (wave packet). The tetragonal (VO2)3 unit is periodic along the crystal's x-, y-, and z-axes, and hence there is a three-dimensional k-vector. There is a one-dimensional k for a monoclinic crystal. We believe this difference in the dimensionality of the k-vector is the cause of the conductivity drop. Prefer Oral Session X Prefer .

  11. Janus monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ang-Yu; Zhu, Hanyu; Xiao, Jun; Chuu, Chih-Piao; Han, Yimo; Chiu, Ming-Hui; Cheng, Chia-Chin; Yang, Chih-Wen; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Yang, Yiming; Wang, Yuan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Nordlund, Dennis; Yang, Peidong; Muller, David A; Chou, Mei-Yin; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Lain-Jong

    2017-08-01

    Structural symmetry-breaking plays a crucial role in determining the electronic band structures of two-dimensional materials. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to breaking the in-plane symmetry of graphene with electric fields on AB-stacked bilayers or stacked van der Waals heterostructures. In contrast, transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers are semiconductors with intrinsic in-plane asymmetry, leading to direct electronic bandgaps, distinctive optical properties and great potential in optoelectronics. Apart from their in-plane inversion asymmetry, an additional degree of freedom allowing spin manipulation can be induced by breaking the out-of-plane mirror symmetry with external electric fields or, as theoretically proposed, with an asymmetric out-of-plane structural configuration. Here, we report a synthetic strategy to grow Janus monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides breaking the out-of-plane structural symmetry. In particular, based on a MoS2 monolayer, we fully replace the top-layer S with Se atoms. We confirm the Janus structure of MoSSe directly by means of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and prove the existence of vertical dipoles by second harmonic generation and piezoresponse force microscopy measurements.

  12. Methane activation on supported transition metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, Jason Ned

    At present, there is considerable interest in utilizing methane more efficiently as both a fuel source and as a starting material for the production of other, more valuable products. However, methane is a very stable molecule with strong C-H bonds that are difficult to break. This makes methane combustion or the formation of carbon-carbon bonds quite difficult. The present work focuses on the use of supported transition metal catalysts as a means of activating methane (i.e. breaking C-H bonds) at low temperatures to produce valuable products or energy. The conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. A low temperature (<750 K), direct process to effectively convert methane into higher hydrocarbons would be quite desirable. Such a process is thermodynamically feasible if the reaction is broken up into two separate steps. The first step is the adsorption of methane onto a transition metal catalyst at temperatures above about 600 K to produce a surface carbon species. The second step is a low temperature (<373 K) hydrogenation to convert the carbon species into higher hydrocarbons. T. Koerts et al. have pursued this approach by dissociatively absorbing methane onto silica supported transition metal catalysts at temperatures ranging between 573 K and 773 K. The result was a surface carbonaceous species and hydrogen. In the second step, the carbonaceous intermediates produced small alkanes upon hydrogenation around 373 K. A maximum yield to higher hydrocarbons of 13% was obtained on a ruthenium catalyst. The present study was conducted to further investigate the nature of the carbonaceous species reported by Koerts. Methane combustion. This investigation was conducted in an effort to better understand the mechanism of methane combustion on Pd catalysts. In the first part of this study, temperature programmed reduction (TPR) was used to investigate the oxidation and reduction dynamics of a 10 wt% Pd/ZrOsb2 catalyst used for methane combustion. TPR experiments indicate

  13. Magnetic endohedral transition-metal-doped semiconducting-nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Matxain, Jon M; Formoso, Elena; Mercero, Jose M; Piris, Mario; Lopez, Xabier; Ugalde, Jesus M

    2008-01-01

    Endohedral first-row transition-metal-doped TM@Zn(i)S(i) nanoclusters, in which TM stands for the first-row transition-metals from Sc to Zn, and i=12, 16, have been characterized. In these structures the dopant metals are trapped inside spheroidal hollow semiconducting nanoclusters. It is observed that some of the transition metals are trapped in the center of mass of the cluster, whereas others are found to be displaced from that center, leading to structures in which the transition metals display a complex dynamical behavior upon encapsulation. This fact was confirmed by quantum molecular dynamics calculations, which further confirmed the thermal stability of endohedral compounds. In the endohedrally-doped nanoclusters in which the transition-metal atom sits on the center of mass, the host hollow cluster structure remains undistorted after dopant encapsulation. Conversely, if the encapsulated transition-metal atom is displaced from the center of mass, the host hollow cluster structure suffers a very tiny distortion. Additionally, it is found that there is negligible charge transfer between the dopant transition-metal atom and its hollow cluster host and, after encapsulation, the spin densities remain localized on the transition-metal atom. This allows for the atomic-like behavior of the trapped transition-metal atom, which gives rise to their atomic-like magnetic properties. The encapsulation free energies are negative, suggesting that these compounds are thermodynamically stable.

  14. Holographic disorder driven superconductor-metal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areán, D.; Pando Zayas, L. A.; Landea, I. Salazar; Scardicchio, A.

    2016-11-01

    We implement the effects of disorder on a holographic superconductor by introducing a random chemical potential on the boundary. We demonstrate explicitly that increasing disorder leads to the formation of islands where the superconducting order is enhanced and subsequently to the transition to a metal. We study the behavior of the superfluid density and of the conductivity as a function of the strength of disorder. We find explanations for various marked features in the conductivities in terms of hydrodynamic quasinormal modes of the holographic superconductors. These identifications plus a particular disorder-dependent spectral weight shift in the conductivity point to a signature of the Higgs mode in the context of disordered holographic superconductors. We observe that the behavior of the order parameter close to the transition is not mean-field type as in the clean case; rather we find robust agreement with exp (-A |T -Tc|-ν), with ν =1.03 ±0.02 for this disorder-driven smeared transition.

  15. Uniform electron gas for transition metals: Input parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.H. ); Shore, H.B. )

    1993-12-15

    Input parameters are reported for the theory of ideal metals, a uniform electron-gas model of the elemental transition metals. These input parameters, the electron density, and the bonding valence,'' have been given previously for the 3[ital d] and 4[ital d] series of transition metals. Here, we extend our work based on recent calculations of Sigalas [ital et] [ital al]. [Phys. Rev. B 45, 5777 (1992)] to include the 5[ital d] series. We have also calculated the cohesive energies of the 5[ital d] transition metals using the theory of ideal metals with these parameters. The calculations agree with experiment to within [plus minus]25%.

  16. Transition-metal-mediated thiosulfinate ester synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Raseta, M.E.; Cawood, S.A.; Welker, M.E. ); Rheingold, A.L. )

    1989-10-11

    Unlike sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), the coordination and organic reaction chemistry of disulfur monoxide (S{sub 2}O) has received little attention. A few Diels-Alder reactions of simple dienes with S{sub 2}O have been reported. However, there were no reports of direct S{sub 2}O complex synthesis prior to our initial work. The authors recently published a synthesis of 4,5-diphenyl-3,6-dihydro-1,2-dithiin 1-oxide (2) which liberates S{sub 2}O via a transition-metal-assisted retro-Diels-Alder reaction. Here we report further on the unusual reactivity of 2 and its utilization in the synthesis of cyclic thiosulfinate esters.

  17. Theoretical studies of transition metal dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The CASSCF approach was used to perform the MCSCF calculations for a number of transition metal dimers, including the Sc2, Ti2, Cr2, Cu2, TiV, Y2, Nb2, and Mo2 molecules; in addition, CASSCF/CI calculations were carried out for Sc2, Ti2, Cu2, and Y2. The CASSCF procedure is shown to provide a consistent set of calculations for these molecules, from which trends and a simple qualitative picture of the electronic structure may be derived. In particular, the calculations confirmed the ground states of the Sc2 and the TiV, and led to predictions for other molecules in this series. In addition to specific predictions, the study provides a simple qualitative picture of the bonding in these dimers.

  18. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC[sub 0.88] in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V[sub 8]C[sub 7] superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  19. Theoretical studies of transition metal dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The CASSCF approach was used to perform the MCSCF calculations for a number of transition metal dimers, including the Sc2, Ti2, Cr2, Cu2, TiV, Y2, Nb2, and Mo2 molecules; in addition, CASSCF/CI calculations were carried out for Sc2, Ti2, Cu2, and Y2. The CASSCF procedure is shown to provide a consistent set of calculations for these molecules, from which trends and a simple qualitative picture of the electronic structure may be derived. In particular, the calculations confirmed the ground states of the Sc2 and the TiV, and led to predictions for other molecules in this series. In addition to specific predictions, the study provides a simple qualitative picture of the bonding in these dimers.

  20. Transition metal-ligand bonding. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of the bonding of CO, H2O, and NH3 to transition metal atoms is analyzed using the constrained-space-orbital-variation (CSOV) technique. The cooperative effects for Ni(CO)2 are found to be different than those for Ni(H2O)2. The bonding between neutral systems and the positive ions is found to be quite different; NiCO(+) has little pi bonding, while NiCO has strong pi bonding. The positive ion of NiH2O is far more strongly bound than the neutral, while for NiCO the positive ion and neutral are bound by about the same energy.

  1. Transition metal catalysis and nucleophilic fluorination.

    PubMed

    Hollingworth, Charlotte; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2012-03-21

    Transition metal catalyzed transformations using fluorinating reagents have been developed extensively for the preparation of synthetically valuable fluorinated targets. This is a topic of critical importance to facilitate laboratory and industrial chemical synthesis of fluorine containing pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. Translation to (18)F-radiochemistry is also emerging as a vibrant research field because functional imaging based on Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is increasingly used for both diagnosis and pharmaceutical development. This review summarizes how fluoride sources have been used for the catalytic nucleophilic fluorination of various substrates inclusive of aryl triflates, alkynes, allylic halides, allylic esters, allylic trichloroacetimidates, benzylic halides, tertiary alkyl halides and epoxides. Until recently, progress in this field of research has been slow in part because of the challenges associated with the dual reactivity profile of fluoride (nucleophile or base). Despite these difficulties, some remarkable breakthroughs have emerged. This includes the demonstration that Pd(0)/Pd(II)-catalyzed nucleophilic fluorination to access fluoroarenes from aryl triflates is feasible, and the first examples of Tsuji-Trost allylic alkylation with fluoride using either allyl chlorides or allyl precursors bearing O-leaving groups. More recently, allylic fluorides were also made accessible under iridium catalysis. Another reaction, which has been greatly improved based on careful mechanistic work, is the catalytic asymmetric hydrofluorination of meso epoxides. Notably, each individual transition metal catalyzed nucleophilic fluorination reported to date employs a different F-reagent, an observation indicating that this area of research will benefit from a larger pool of nucleophilic fluoride sources. In this context, a striking recent development is the successful design, synthesis and applications of a fluoride-derived electrophilic late stage

  2. 4-D photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  3. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  4. New Gallides and Germanides of Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    The analysis of the average atomic volumes (AAV) of the intermediate phases from the concentration was done in many two-component systems. It was shown that in some systems (namely transition metal with non-transition element from the IIIrd or IVth group of the periodic table) the AAV of the intermediate phases are much more less than the sum of the volumes of the pure components. It means that the formation of the intermediate phases in such systems is accompanied by a rather large decreasing of the volume in comparison with the mixture of elements. For this reason the high pressure conditions are favourable for the formation of the intermediate phases in such systems from the thermodynamical point of view. On the ground of these data the systems W-Ga, W-Ge, Re-Ga, Os-Ga, Sc-Ga, Ta-Ga, were investigated at high pressures and temperatures. It was found that many new phases are crystallised in these systems. All of them are metastable at room pressure. The composition and crystal structures of these phases were investigated at ordinary conditions.

  5. Dynamics of transition-metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, S.; Sugano, S.

    1989-03-01

    The atomic structure and thermodynamic properties of transition-metal 6- and 7-atom clusters are investigated using the molecular dynamics method, where Gupta's potential taking into account many-body interaction is employed. The caloric and the structural fluctuations are studied. The “fluctuating state” is found for N=6 in the region of the temperature near and below the melting point, where clusters undergo structural transition from one isomer to others without making any topological change. The fluctuating state differs from the “coexistence state” found in Ar clusters [1] i.e. the former involves no liquid state. In the liquid state the motion of atom-permutation occurs besides the breathing motion. On the other hand, the fluctuating state is not found for N=7 but only the motion of atom-permutation in the liquid state. The coexistence state is found in both cases of 6- and 7-atom clusters. We also discuss a possibility of larger clusters displaying the fluctuating state.

  6. Polytypism in superhard transition-metal triborides

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yongcheng; Yang, Jiong; Yuan, Xun; Qiu, Wujie; Zhong, Zheng; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    The quest of novel compounds with special structures and unusual functionalities continues to be a central challenge to modern materials science. Even though their exact structures have puzzled scientists for decades, superhard transition-metal borides (TMBs) have long been believed to exist only in simple crystal structures. Here, we report on a polytypic phenomenon in superhard WB3 and MoB3 with a series of energetically degenerate structures due to the random stacking of metal layers amongst the interlocking boron layers. Such polytypism can create a multiphase solid-solution compound with a large number of interfaces amongst different polytypes, and these interfaces will strongly hinder the interlayer sliding movement within each polytype, thereby further increase the hardness of this particular material. Furthermore, in contrast to the conventional knowledge that intrinsically strong chemical bonds in superhard materials should lead to high lattice thermal conductivity, the polytypic TMB3 manifest anomalously low lattice thermal conductivity due to structural disorders and phonon folding. These findings promise to open a new avenue to searching for novel superhard materials with additional functionalities. PMID:24863493

  7. Transition Metal Phosphide Hydroprocessing Catalysts: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, S.; Gott, T; Zhao, H; Lee, Y

    2009-01-01

    The diminishing quality of oil feedstocks coupled with increasingly more stringent environmental regulations limiting the content of sulfur in transportation fuels have given rise to a need for improved hydroprocessing technology. This review begins with a summary of the major improvements in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) catalysts and processes that have been reported in recent years. It then describes a new class of hydroprocessing catalysts, the transition metal phosphides, which have emerged as a promising group of high-activity, stable catalysts. The phosphides have physical properties resembling ceramics, so are strong and hard, yet retain electronic and magnetic properties similar to metals. Their crystal structures are based on trigonal prisms, yet they do not form layered structures like the sulfides. They display excellent performance in HDS and HDN, with the most active phosphide, Ni{sub 2}P, having activity surpassing that of promoted sulfides on the basis of sites titrated by chemisorption (CO for the phosphides, O{sub 2} for the sulfides). In the HDS of difficult heteroaromatics like 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene Ni{sub 2}P operates by the hydrogenation pathway, while in the HDN of substituted nitrogen compounds like 2-methylpiperidine it carries out nucleophilic substitution. The active sites for hydrogenation in Ni{sub 2}P have a square pyramidal geometry, while those for direct hydrodesulfurization have a tetrahedral geometry. Overall, Ni{sub 2}P is a promising catalyst for deep HDS in the presence of nitrogen and aromatic compounds.

  8. Polytypism in superhard transition-metal triborides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yongcheng; Yang, Jiong; Yuan, Xun; Qiu, Wujie; Zhong, Zheng; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-05-27

    The quest of novel compounds with special structures and unusual functionalities continues to be a central challenge to modern materials science. Even though their exact structures have puzzled scientists for decades, superhard transition-metal borides (TMBs) have long been believed to exist only in simple crystal structures. Here, we report on a polytypic phenomenon in superhard WB3 and MoB3 with a series of energetically degenerate structures due to the random stacking of metal layers amongst the interlocking boron layers. Such polytypism can create a multiphase solid-solution compound with a large number of interfaces amongst different polytypes, and these interfaces will strongly hinder the interlayer sliding movement within each polytype, thereby further increase the hardness of this particular material. Furthermore, in contrast to the conventional knowledge that intrinsically strong chemical bonds in superhard materials should lead to high lattice thermal conductivity, the polytypic TMB3 manifest anomalously low lattice thermal conductivity due to structural disorders and phonon folding. These findings promise to open a new avenue to searching for novel superhard materials with additional functionalities.

  9. d-electrons’ occupancy and crystal structure in transition metal sesquioxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, K.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    We present a systematic density functional study of phase relations in transition metal sesquioxides: Y2O3, Rh2O3, and In2O3. Y2O3 and In2O3 undergo pressure-induced transitions accompanied by increase in cation coordination number from 6 to 7. However, in Rh2O3, such transition does not occur up to ~350 GPa. This cannot be explained simply arguments based on ionic radii ratios. Inspection of the electronic structure reveals that, in Rh2O3, the spatial distribution of the partially-occupied 4d states plays a very important role in the extraordinary stability of the Rh2O3(II)-type structure against others with higher coordination numbers. This study suggests that the complexity of phases in 3d/4d-transition-metal sesquioxides is not only due to ratio ionic radii but also by filling of the d states. Research supported by NSF grants ATM 0428774 (VLab) and EAR 0635990. Computations were performed at the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  10. Electronic transitions and multiferroicity in transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haidong

    Four systems have been studied for the localized-itinerant electronic transition in transition-metal oxides: (i) In CaV1- xTixO3, substitution of Ti(IV) introduces Anderson-localized states below a mobility edge mu c that increases with x, crossing epsilon F in the range 0.2 < x< 0.4 and also transforms the strong-correlation fluctuations to localized V(IV): t1e0 configurations for x ≥ 0.1. (ii) The properties of LaTiO3+delta reveal that a hole-poor, strongly correlated electronic phase coexists with a hole-rich, itinerant-electron phase. With delta ≥ 0.03, the hole-rich phase exists as a minority phase of isolated, mobile itinerant-electron clusters embedded in the hole-poor phase. With delta ≥ 0.08, isolated hole-poor clusters are embedded in an itinerant-electron matrix. As delta > 0.08 increases, the hole-poor clusters become smaller and more isolated until they are reduced to super-paramagnetic strong-correlation fluctuations by delta = 0.12. (iii) The data of Y1-xLaxTiO 3 appears to distinguish an itinerant-electron antiferromagnetic phase in the La-rich samples from a localized-electron ferromagnetic phase with a cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion in the Y-rich phase. (iv) The transition at Tt in Mg[Ti2]O4 is a semiconductor-semiconductor transition associated with Ti-Ti dimerization instabilities. The dimerization is caused by lattice instabilities resulting from a double-well Ti-Ti bond potential at a crossover from localized to itinerant electronic behavior. RMn1-xGaxO 3 (R = Ho, Y) and Ho1-xY xMnO3 have been studied for the multiferroicity of RMnO3. Ga doping raises the ferrielectric Curie temperature TC and the Mn-spin reorientation temperature TSR while lowering TN of the Mn spins and the Ho magnetic ordering temperature T 2. The data show an important coupling between the Mn3+-ion and HO3+-ion spins as well as a TSR that is driven by a cooperative MnO5 site rotation and R 3+-ion displacements that modify the c lattice parameter. The data also

  11. Pristine and intercalated transition metal dichalcogenide superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Richard A.

    2015-07-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are quasi-two-dimensional layered compounds that exhibit strongly competing effects of charge-density wave (CDW) formation and superconductivity (SC). The weak van der Waals interlayer bonding between hexagonal layers of octahedral or trigonal prismatic TMD building blocks allows many polytypes to form. In the single layer 1 T polytype materials, one or more CDW states can form, but the pristine TMDs are not superconducting. The 2 H polytypes have two or more Fermi surfaces and saddle bands, allowing for dual orderings, which can be coexisting CDW and SC orderings, two SC gaps as in MgB2, two CDW gaps, and possibly even pseudogaps above the onset TCDW s of CDW orderings. Higher order polytypes allow for multiple CDW gaps and at least one superconducting gap. The CDW transitions TCDW s usually greatly exceed the superconducting transitions at their low Tc values, their orbital order parameters (OPs) are generally highly anisotropic and can even contain nodes, and the SC OPs can be greatly affected by their simultaneous presence. The properties of the CDWs ubiquitously seen in TMDs are remarkably similar to those of the pseudogaps seen in the high-Tc cuprates. In 2H-NbSe2, for example, the CDW renders its general s-wave SC OP orbital symmetry to be highly anisotropic and strongly reduces its Josephson coupling strength (IcRn) with the conventional SC, Pb. Hence, the pristine TMDs are highly "unconventional" in comparison with Pb, but are much more "conventional" than are the ferromagnetic superconductors such as URhGe. Applied pressure and intercalation generally suppress the TMD CDWs, allowing for enhanced SC formation, even in the 1 T polytype materials. The misfit intercalation compound (LaSe)1.14(NbSe2) and many 2 H -TMDs intercalated with organic Lewis base molecules, such as TaS2(pyridine)1/2, have completely incoherent c-axis transport, dimensional-crossover effects, and behave as stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions

  12. Transition metal oxide nanowires synthesized by heating metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Hui; Sun, Yi; He, Lin; Nie, Jia-Cai

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {center_dot} This paper describes a simple and general method to synthesize 3d metal oxide nanowires. {center_dot} Self-catalysis growth mechanism was proposed to explain the growth of the nanowires. {center_dot} The temperature range for the growth of nanowires was estimated by taking into account the Gibbs free energy of reaction. {center_dot} This synthesis approach could be applied to synthesize other one-dimensional structures, such as FeSe and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires. -- Abstract: Here we reported a simple method to synthesize transition metal oxide nanowires. Copper oxide (CuO), zinc oxide (ZnO), and cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanowires were synthesized by heating the copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates under atmosphere condition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to analyze the morphology and microstructure of the nanowires. According to our experimental results, self-catalysis growth mechanism was proposed to explain the growth of the nanowires. The temperature window for the growth of nanowires was estimated by taking into account the Gibbs free energy of reaction. The synthesis approach observed in our experiment could be applied to synthesize other one-dimensional structures, such as FeSe and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires.

  13. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  14. Trends in Ionization Energy of Transition-Metal Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2005-01-01

    A rationale for the difference in the periodic trends in the ionization energy of the transition-metal elements versus the main-group elements is presented. The difference is that in the transition-metal elements, the electrons enter an inner-shell electron orbital, while in the main-group elements, the electrons enter an outer-shell electron…

  15. Trends in Ionization Energy of Transition-Metal Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2005-01-01

    A rationale for the difference in the periodic trends in the ionization energy of the transition-metal elements versus the main-group elements is presented. The difference is that in the transition-metal elements, the electrons enter an inner-shell electron orbital, while in the main-group elements, the electrons enter an outer-shell electron…

  16. Specific features of magnetostriction at electron topological transitions in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikitik, G. P.; Sharlai, Yu. V.

    2017-01-01

    The properties of magnetostriction in metals are studied in cases when the chemical potential of electrons is close to the critical energy of the electron energy spectrum, at which there is an electron topological transition of 2½ or 3½ kind. It is shown that the experimental study of magnetostriction can be an effective method for detecting these transitions in metals.

  17. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Possibility of protecting a mirror of a laseron the 4d — 4p transitions of nickel-like tantalum ionsagainst spontaneous X-rays by means of a filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmatov, Mikhail L.

    2009-11-01

    The possibility of protecting a mirror of a laser on the 4d — 4p transitions of nickel-like tantalum ions against spontaneous X-rays by means of a carbon or potassium filter is considered. It is shown that such filters can transmit 75% — 80% of laser radiation at 44.83 Å, attenuating at least by half the intensity of radiation incident on the mirror in other spectral regions, which considerably suppresses the double-pass amplification.

  18. Critical behavior in the hydrogen insulator-metal transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Mao, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The vibrational Raman spectrum of solid hydrogen has been measured from 77 to 295 K in the vicinity of the recently observed insulator-metal transition and low-temperature phase transition at 150 gigapascals. The measurements provide evidence for a critical point in the pressure-temperature phase boundary of the low-temperature transition. The result suggests that below the critical temperature the insulator-metal transition changes from continuous to discontinuous, consistent with the general criteria originally proposed by Mott (1949) for metallization by band-gap closure. The effect of temperature on hydrogen metallization closely resembles that of the lower-pressure insulator-metal transitions in doped V2O3 alloys.

  19. Critical behavior in the hydrogen insulator-metal transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Mao, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The vibrational Raman spectrum of solid hydrogen has been measured from 77 to 295 K in the vicinity of the recently observed insulator-metal transition and low-temperature phase transition at 150 gigapascals. The measurements provide evidence for a critical point in the pressure-temperature phase boundary of the low-temperature transition. The result suggests that below the critical temperature the insulator-metal transition changes from continuous to discontinuous, consistent with the general criteria originally proposed by Mott (1949) for metallization by band-gap closure. The effect of temperature on hydrogen metallization closely resembles that of the lower-pressure insulator-metal transitions in doped V2O3 alloys.

  20. Stability and magnetic properties of transition metal atoms endohedral BnNn (n=12-28) cages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianguang; Ma, Li; Zhao, Jijun; Wang, Baolin; Wang, Guanghou

    2008-02-28

    First-principles calculations have been conducted to systemically investigate the stability and magnetic properties of 3d and 4d transitional-metal (TM) atoms doped in the BnNn (n=12,16,20,24,28) cages. Among those cages, the B24N24 is the optimal one for encapsulating 3d and 4d TM atoms according to the computed heat of formation. Inside B24N24 cage, 3d and 4d TM dopants belonging to the same group in the Periodic Table exhibit similar magnetic behaviors. Most of the 3d and 4d TM atoms remain magnetic after doped in the B24N24 cage except for Ni, Zr, and Pd. The magnitudes of the remaining moments for 3d (except for Sc, Ti, and V) and 4d dopants are reduced from those of free atoms. The energy gaps are localized at the doped transition metal atoms. Encapsulations of two TM atoms inside the B24N24 cage were also considered.

  1. New Quasi Low-Dimensional 4d and 5d Transition Metal Oxides with Correlated Electronic Properties - Synthesis and Characterizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-17

    as an official Department of the Army position , policy or decision, unless so designated by other documentation. 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY...Zheng Deng, Christoph P. Grams , Joachim Hemberger, Joke Hadermann, Wen-Min Li, Chang-Qing Jin, Felix O. Saouma, Joon I. Jang, Hirofumi Akamatsu...Man-Rong Li, David Walker, Maria Retuerto, Tapati Sarkar, Joke Hadermann, Peter W. Stephens, Mark Croft, Alexander Ignatov, Christoph P. Grams

  2. Transition Metal-Involved Photon Upconversion.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shi; Song, En-Hai; Zhang, Qin-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    Upconversion (UC) luminescence of lanthanide ions (Ln(3+)) has been extensively investigated for several decades and is a constant research hotspot owing to its fundamental significance and widespread applications. In contrast to the multiple and fixed UC emissions of Ln(3+), transition metal (TM) ions, e.g., Mn(2+), usually possess a single broadband emission due to its 3d(5) electronic configuration. Wavelength-tuneable single UC emission can be achieved in some TM ion-activated systems ascribed to the susceptibility of d electrons to the chemical environment, which is appealing in molecular sensing and lighting. Moreover, the UC emissions of Ln(3+) can be modulated by TM ions (specifically d-block element ions with unfilled d orbitals), which benefits from the specific metastable energy levels of Ln(3+) owing to the well-shielded 4f electrons and tuneable energy levels of the TM ions. The electric versatility of d(0) ion-containing hosts (d(0) normally viewed as charged anion groups, such as MoO6(6-) and TiO4(4-)) may also have a strong influence on the electric dipole transition of Ln(3+), resulting in multifunctional properties of modulated UC emission and electrical behaviour, such as ferroelectricity and oxide-ion conductivity. This review focuses on recent advances in the room temperature (RT) UC of TM ions, the UC of Ln(3+) tuned by TM or d(0) ions, and the UC of d(0) ion-centred groups, as well as their potential applications in bioimaging, solar cells and multifunctional devices.

  3. Terahertz spectroscopy of the metal insulator transition in vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, David; Prasankumar, Rohit; Cavalleri, Andrea; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Taylor, Antoinette; Averitt, Richard

    2006-03-01

    We employ terahertz spectroscopy to study the metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2 ). We measure the terahertz frequency conductivity in the metallic phase that has a real conductivity of 1000 &-1circ; cm-1 and a negligible imaginary conductivity. The observed conductivity dynamics are consistent with a photoinduced transition in spatially inhomogeneous regions of the film, followed by a thermally driven transition to the maximum conductivity.

  4. Work function and barrier heights of transition metal silicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, E.; Schulz, S.; Lux-Steiner, M. Ch.; Munz, P.; Gubler, U.; Greuter, F.

    1986-06-01

    The work function of 13 polycrystalline transition metal suicides was measured by photoemission in uhv. Their values are discussed in relationship to their Schottky barrier heights on n-Si. While there appears to be a weak correlation for a certain group of transition metal suicides, the values of the 5 d-noble metal suicides including some of the lattice matched Ni suicides appear to be completely uncorrelated. Experimental values of work functions are compared to the values proposed previously by Freeouf.

  5. Magnetic properties of nanocrystalline transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aus, Martin J.

    1999-09-01

    In the past decade, considerable attention has been devoted to the nanoprocessing of magnetic materials to enhance specific magnetic properties. For nanocrystalline materials in which the grain size approaches the dimensions of the domain wall thickness of conventional materials, considerable changes in magnetic behaviour are expected. In the present work, various electrodeposited ferromagnetic nanocrystalline pure metals and alloys were characterized by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The systems investigated include pure Ni and Co as well as alloys of Ni-P, Ni-Fe and Co-Fe. These studies explored the effect of gram size on coercivity, indicating that the crystallographic texture is more significant than gram size. In addition, these studies reported, for the first time, that saturation magnetization of pore-free electroplated bulk nanocrystalline transition metals and their alloys is relatively little affected by grain size. In contrast, previously reported results for ultra-fine particles and nanomaterials produced from compacted powders showed a strong decrease in saturation magnetization with decreasing grain size. The difference in results for pore-free electrodeposits and ultrafine particles/compacted powders has been attributed to antiferromagnetic surface oxide layers, which is a direct result of large internal porosity in the latter group of materials. Further magnetic studies were completed on nanocrystalline electrodeposits produced by magnetoelectrohydrolysis. The effects of applied magnetic field strength and substrate orientation on saturation magnetization and coercivity of Ni-Fe and Co were explored. The results have shown that both nanoprocessing and electroplating in a magnetic field can improve soft magnetic properties by lowering the coercivity. Thermomagnetic studies examined saturation magnetization as a function of temperature, Curie temperature and coercivity changes during annealing. The Curie temperatures of electrodeposited

  6. A liquid-liquid transition can exist in monatomic transition metals with a positive melting slope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byeongchan; Lee, Geun Woo

    2016-01-01

    Liquid-liquid transitions under high pressure are found in many elemental materials, but the transitions are known to be associated with either sp-valent materials or f-valent rare-earth elements, in which the maximum or a negative slope in the melting line is readily suggestive of the transition. Here we find a liquid-liquid transition with a positive melting slope in transition metal Ti from structural, electronic, and thermodynamic studies using ab-initio molecular dynamics calculations, showing diffusion anomaly, but no density anomaly. The origin of the transition in liquid Ti is a pressure-induced increase of local structures containing very short bonds with directionality in electronic configurations. This behavior appears to be characteristic of the early transition metals. In contrast, the late transition metal liquid Ni does not show the L-L transition with pressure. This result suggests that the possibility of the L-L transition decreases from early to late transition metals as electronic structures of late transition metals barely have a Jahn-Teller effect and bond directionality. Our results generalize that a phase transition in disordered materials is found with any valence band regardless of the sign of the melting slope, but related to the symmetry of electronic structures of constituent elements. PMID:27762334

  7. A liquid-liquid transition can exist in monatomic transition metals with a positive melting slope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeongchan; Lee, Geun Woo

    2016-10-20

    Liquid-liquid transitions under high pressure are found in many elemental materials, but the transitions are known to be associated with either sp-valent materials or f-valent rare-earth elements, in which the maximum or a negative slope in the melting line is readily suggestive of the transition. Here we find a liquid-liquid transition with a positive melting slope in transition metal Ti from structural, electronic, and thermodynamic studies using ab-initio molecular dynamics calculations, showing diffusion anomaly, but no density anomaly. The origin of the transition in liquid Ti is a pressure-induced increase of local structures containing very short bonds with directionality in electronic configurations. This behavior appears to be characteristic of the early transition metals. In contrast, the late transition metal liquid Ni does not show the L-L transition with pressure. This result suggests that the possibility of the L-L transition decreases from early to late transition metals as electronic structures of late transition metals barely have a Jahn-Teller effect and bond directionality. Our results generalize that a phase transition in disordered materials is found with any valence band regardless of the sign of the melting slope, but related to the symmetry of electronic structures of constituent elements.

  8. A liquid-liquid transition can exist in monatomic transition metals with a positive melting slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeongchan; Lee, Geun Woo

    2016-10-01

    Liquid-liquid transitions under high pressure are found in many elemental materials, but the transitions are known to be associated with either sp-valent materials or f-valent rare-earth elements, in which the maximum or a negative slope in the melting line is readily suggestive of the transition. Here we find a liquid-liquid transition with a positive melting slope in transition metal Ti from structural, electronic, and thermodynamic studies using ab-initio molecular dynamics calculations, showing diffusion anomaly, but no density anomaly. The origin of the transition in liquid Ti is a pressure-induced increase of local structures containing very short bonds with directionality in electronic configurations. This behavior appears to be characteristic of the early transition metals. In contrast, the late transition metal liquid Ni does not show the L-L transition with pressure. This result suggests that the possibility of the L-L transition decreases from early to late transition metals as electronic structures of late transition metals barely have a Jahn-Teller effect and bond directionality. Our results generalize that a phase transition in disordered materials is found with any valence band regardless of the sign of the melting slope, but related to the symmetry of electronic structures of constituent elements.

  9. Thermodynamical and structural properties of some liquid transition metals near melting point

    SciTech Connect

    Uçar, Sevilay; Kartal, Sehban; Armağan, Turgay

    2016-03-25

    Structure factor S(q) and thermodynamic properties like entropy (S), isothermal compressibility (χ{sub T}), specific heat (C{sub V}) have been calculated for liquid 3d (Ti, V, Cr and Mn), 4d (Pd, Zr) and 5d (Pt) transition metals. In this work, we have used newly constructed Bretonnet-Silbert potential to describe electron-ion and ion-ion interaction using different reference systems. It is observed that our results are found to be in good agreement with experimental data as well as with other theoretical results.

  10. Energetic characteristics of transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Wojewódka, Andrzej; Bełzowski, Janusz; Wilk, Zenon; Staś, Justyna

    2009-11-15

    Ten transition metal nitrate and perchlorate complexes of hydrazine and ethylenediamine were synthesized, namely [Cu(EN)(2)](ClO(4))(2), [Co(EN)(3)](ClO(4))(3), [Ni(EN)(3)](ClO(4))(2), [Hg(EN)(2)](ClO(4))(2), [Cr(N(2)H(4))(3)](ClO(4))(3), [Cd(N(2)H(4))(3)](ClO(4))(2), [Ni(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(2), [Co(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(3), [Zn(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(2), and [Cd(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(2) based on the lines of the literature reported methods. All of them were tested with applying underwater detonation test and further compared to the typical blasting explosives: RDX, HMX, TNT and PETN. From the above presented complexes [Ni(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(2) (called NHN) and [Co(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(3) (called CoHN) are known as primary explosives and can be used as the standard explosives. Explosion parameters, such as shock wave overpressure, shock wave energy equivalent and bubble energy equivalent, were determined. Evaluated energetic characteristics of the tested compounds are comparable to those of the classic high explosives and are even enhanced in some cases.

  11. The Intriguing Properties of Transition Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, Michael J. R.

    2007-05-01

    Since the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in the cuprates twenty years ago, there has been a resurgence of interest in the transition metal oxides. Work on these systems has been driven both by the fascinating properties that these materials exhibit and by potential applications in technology. A brief general review of the perovskites and their electronic structures is given. This is followed by a discussion of the properties of magnetic oxide systems ABO3 (A=La; B=Mn or Co), specifically focusing on the doped manganites (e.g. La1-x SrxMnO3) and cobaltites (e.g. La1-xSrxCoO3), in which mixed valence states and double exchange are important. Competing electron localizing and delocalizing effects result in rich phase diagrams and interesting transport properties with large magnetoresistance effects. Nanoscale phase separation has been found for a range of x values using a variety of techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron scattering. These discoveries have provided an increased understanding of the role of the interacting magnetic, electronic and lattice structures in these systems.

  12. Transition metal-free olefin polymerization catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Sen, Ayusman; Wojcinski, II, Louis M.; Liu, Shengsheng

    2001-01-01

    Ethylene and/or propylene are polymerized to form high molecular weight, linear polymers by contacting ethylene and/or propylene monomer, in the presence of an inert reaction medium, with a catalyst system which consists essentially of (1) an aluminum alkyl component, such as trimethylaluminum, triethylaluminum, triisobutylaluminum, tri-n-octylaluminum and diethylaluminum hydride and (2) a Lewis acid or Lewis acid derivative component, such as B (C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.3, [(CH.sub.3).sub.2 N (H) (C.sub.6 H.sub.5)].sup.+ [B (C.sub.6 F.sub.5)4].sup.-, [(C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.3 NH].sup.+ [B C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.4 ],.sup.-, [C(C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.3 ].sup.+ [B(C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.4 ].sup.-, (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(OCH.sub.3), (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methylphenoxide), (C.sub.2 H.sub.5)Al(2,6 -di-t-butylphenoxide).sub.2, (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(2,6-di-t-butylphonoxide) , 2,6 -di-t-butylphenol.multidot.methylaluminoxane or an alkylaluminoxane, and which may be completely free any transition metal component(s).

  13. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  14. Topological superconductivity in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Ting; Vaezi, Abolhassan; Fischer, Mark H; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2017-04-11

    Theoretically, it has been known that breaking spin degeneracy and effectively realizing spinless fermions is a promising path to topological superconductors. Yet, topological superconductors are rare to date. Here we propose to realize spinless fermions by splitting the spin degeneracy in momentum space. Specifically, we identify monolayer hole-doped transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD)s as candidates for topological superconductors out of such momentum-space-split spinless fermions. Although electron-doped TMDs have recently been found superconducting, the observed superconductivity is unlikely topological because of the near spin degeneracy. Meanwhile, hole-doped TMDs with momentum-space-split spinless fermions remain unexplored. Employing a renormalization group analysis, we propose that the unusual spin-valley locking in hole-doped TMDs together with repulsive interactions selectively favours two topological superconducting states: interpocket paired state with Chern number 2 and intrapocket paired state with finite pair momentum. A confirmation of our predictions will open up possibilities for manipulating topological superconductors on the device-friendly platform of monolayer TMDs.

  15. Exciton Dynamics in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Galan; Schaibley, John; Xu, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of semiconducting monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, a variety of experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out seeking to understand the intrinsic exciton population recombination and valley relaxation dynamics. Reports of the exciton decay time range from hundreds of femtoseconds to ten nanoseconds, while the valley depolarization time can exceed one nanosecond. At present, however, a consensus on the microscopic mechanisms governing exciton radiative and non-radiative recombination is lacking. The strong exciton oscillator strength resulting in up to ~ 20% absorption for a single monolayer points to ultrafast radiative recombination. However, the low quantum yield and large variance in the reported lifetimes suggest that non-radiative Auger-type processes obscure the intrinsic exciton radiative lifetime. In either case, the electron-hole exchange interaction plays an important role in the exciton spin and valley dynamics. In this article, we review the experiments and theory that have led to these conclusions and comment on future experiments that could complement our current understanding. PMID:28890600

  16. Impact Electrochemistry of Layered Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chee Shan; Tan, Shu Min; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2015-08-25

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit paramount importance in the electrocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction. It is crucial to determine the size of the electrocatalytic particles as well as to establish their electrocatalytic activity, which occurs at the edges of these particles. Here, we show that individual TMD (MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, or WSe2; in general MX2) nanoparticles impacting an electrode surface provide well-defined current "spikes" in both the cathodic and anodic regions. These spikes originate from direct oxidation of the nanoparticles (from M(4+) to M(6+)) at the anodic region and from the electrocatalytic currents generated upon hydrogen evolution in the cathodic region. The positive correlation between the frequency of the impacts and the concentration of TMD nanoparticles is also demonstrated here, enabling determination of the concentration of TMD nanoparticles in colloidal form. In addition, the size of individual TMD nanoparticles can be evaluated using the charge passed during every spike. The capability of detecting both the "indirect" catalytic effect of an impacting TMD nanoparticle as well as "direct" oxidation indicates that the frequency of impacts in both the "indirect" and "direct" scenarios are comparable. This suggests that all TMD nanoparticles, which are electrochemically oxidizable (thus capable of donating electrons to electrodes), are also capable of catalyzing the hydrogen reduction reaction.

  17. Quantum phase transition in a common metal.

    PubMed

    Yeh, A; Soh, Yeong-Ah; Brooke, J; Aeppli, G; Rosenbaum, T F; Hayden, S M

    2002-10-03

    The classical theory of solids, based on the quantum mechanics of single electrons moving in periodic potentials, provides an excellent description of substances ranging from semiconducting silicon to superconducting aluminium. Over the last fifteen years, it has become increasingly clear that there are substances for which the conventional approach fails. Among these are certain rare earth compounds and transition metal oxides, including high-temperature superconductors. A common feature of these materials is complexity, in the sense that they have relatively large unit cells containing heterogeneous mixtures of atoms. Although many explanations have been put forward for their anomalous properties, it is still possible that the classical theory might suffice. Here we show that a very common chromium alloy has some of the same peculiarities as the more exotic materials, including a quantum critical point, a strongly temperature-dependent Hall resistance and evidence for a 'pseudogap'. This implies that complexity is not a prerequisite for unconventional behaviour. Moreover, it should simplify the general task of explaining anomalous properties because chromium is a relatively simple system in which to work out in quantitative detail the consequences of the conventional theory of solids.

  18. Properties of Transition Metal Doped Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykwest, Erik; Limmer, Krista; Brennan, Ray; Blair, Victoria; Ramprasad, Rampi

    Crystallographic texture can have profound effects on the properties of a material. One method of texturing is through the application of an external magnetic field during processing. While this method works with highly magnetic systems, doping is required to couple non-magnetic systems with the external field. Experiments have shown that low concentrations of rare earth (RE) dopants in alumina powders have enabled this kind of texturing. The magnetic properties of RE elements are directly related to their f orbital, which can have as many as 7 unpaired electrons. Since d-block elements can have as many as 5 unpaired electrons the effects of substitutional doping of 3d transition metals (TM) for Al in alpha (stable) and theta (metastable) alumina on the local structure and magnetic properties, in addition to the energetic cost, have been calculated by performing first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. This study has led to the development of general guidelines for the magnetic moment distribution at and around the dopant atom, and the dependence of this distribution on the dopant atom type and its coordination environment. It is anticipated that these findings can aid in the selection of suitable dopants help to guide parallel experimental efforts. This project was supported in part by an internship at the Army Research Laboratory, administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, along with a grant of computer time from the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program.

  19. Topological superconductivity in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yi-Ting; Vaezi, Abolhassan; Fischer, Mark H.; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2017-01-01

    Theoretically, it has been known that breaking spin degeneracy and effectively realizing spinless fermions is a promising path to topological superconductors. Yet, topological superconductors are rare to date. Here we propose to realize spinless fermions by splitting the spin degeneracy in momentum space. Specifically, we identify monolayer hole-doped transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD)s as candidates for topological superconductors out of such momentum-space-split spinless fermions. Although electron-doped TMDs have recently been found superconducting, the observed superconductivity is unlikely topological because of the near spin degeneracy. Meanwhile, hole-doped TMDs with momentum-space-split spinless fermions remain unexplored. Employing a renormalization group analysis, we propose that the unusual spin-valley locking in hole-doped TMDs together with repulsive interactions selectively favours two topological superconducting states: interpocket paired state with Chern number 2 and intrapocket paired state with finite pair momentum. A confirmation of our predictions will open up possibilities for manipulating topological superconductors on the device-friendly platform of monolayer TMDs. PMID:28397804

  20. Atomic frequency reference at 1033 nm for ytterbium (Yb)-doped fiber lasers and applications exploiting a rubidium (Rb) 5S_1/2 to 4D_5/2 one-colour two-photon transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Ritayan; Condylis, Paul C.; Johnathan, Yik Jinen; Hessmo, Björn

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate a two-photon transition of rubidium (Rb) atoms from the ground state (5$S_{1/2}$) to the excited state (4$D_{5/2}$), using a home-built ytterbium (Yb)-doped fiber amplifier at 1033 nm. This is the first demonstration of an atomic frequency reference at 1033 nm as well as of a one-colour two-photon transition for the above energy levels. A simple optical setup is presented for the two-photon transition fluorescence spectroscopy, which is useful for frequency stabilization for a broad class of lasers. This spectroscopy has potential applications in the fiber laser industry as a frequency reference, particularly for the Yb-doped fiber lasers. This two-photon transition also has applications in atomic physics as a background- free high- resolution atom detection and for quantum communication, which is outlined in this article.

  1. Nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Mo, Liuting; Li, Juan; Liu, Qiaoling; Qiu, Liping; Tan, Weihong

    2017-03-15

    In clinical diagnostics, as well as food and environmental safety practices, biosensors are powerful tools for monitoring biological or biochemical processes. Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal nanomaterials, including transition metal chalcogenides (TMCs) and transition metal oxides (TMOs), are receiving growing interest for their use in biosensing applications based on such unique properties as high surface area and fluorescence quenching abilities. Meanwhile, nucleic acid probes based on Watson-Crick base-pairing rules are also being widely applied in biosensing based on their excellent recognition capability. In particular, the emergence of functional nucleic acids in the 1980s, especially aptamers, has substantially extended the recognition capability of nucleic acids to various targets, ranging from small organic molecules and metal ions to proteins and cells. Based on π-π stacking interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids, biosensing systems can be easily assembled. Therefore, the combination of 2D transition metal nanomaterials and nucleic acids brings intriguing opportunities in bioanalysis and biomedicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets in biosensing applications. The structure and properties of 2D transition metal nanomaterials are first discussed, emphasizing the interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids. Then, the applications of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheet-based biosensors are discussed in the context of different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical and electrochemical approaches. Finally, we provide our perspectives on the current challenges and opportunities in this promising field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrashort Beryllium-Beryllium Distances Rivalling Those of Metal-Metal Quintuple Bonds Between Transition Metals.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Caixia; Zhao, Xue-Feng; Wu, Yan-Bo; Wang, Xiaotai

    2016-12-12

    Chemical bonding is at the heart of chemistry. Recent work on high bond orders between homonuclear transition metal atoms has led to ultrashort metal-metal (TM-TM) distances defined as dM-M <1.900 Å. The present work is a computational design and characterization of novel main group species containing ultrashort metal-metal distances (1.728-1.866 Å) between two beryllium atoms in different molecular environments, including a rhombic Be2 X2 (X=C, N) core, a vertical Be-Be axis in a 3D molecular star, and a horizontal Be-Be axis supported by N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands. The ultrashort Be-Be distances are achieved by affixing bridging atoms to attract the beryllium atoms electrostatically or covalently. Among these species are five global minima and one chemically viable diberyllium complex, which provide potential targets for experimental realization.

  3. Solid-solid phase transitions via melting in metals.

    PubMed

    Pogatscher, S; Leutenegger, D; Schawe, J E K; Uggowitzer, P J; Löffler, J F

    2016-04-22

    Observing solid-solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid-solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a 'real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory.

  4. Solid-solid phase transitions via melting in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogatscher, S.; Leutenegger, D.; Schawe, J. E. K.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2016-04-01

    Observing solid-solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid-solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a `real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory.

  5. Solid–solid phase transitions via melting in metals

    PubMed Central

    Pogatscher, S.; Leutenegger, D.; Schawe, J. E. K.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Observing solid–solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid–solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a ‘real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory. PMID:27103085

  6. Transition-Metal Substitution Doping in Synthetic Atomically Thin Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Jian; Kim, Young Duck; Liang, Liangbo; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Chow, Phil; Tan, Jiawei; Li, Baichang; Li, Lu; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Lu, Toh-Ming; Meunier, Vincent; Hone, James; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2016-09-20

    Semiconductor impurity doping has enabled an entire generation of technology. The emergence of alternative semiconductor material systems, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), requires the development of scalable doping strategies. We report an unprecedented one-pot synthesis for transition-metal substitution in large-area, synthetic monolayer TMDCs. Electron microscopy, optical and electronic transport characterization and ab initio calculations indicate that our doping strategy preserves the attractive qualities of TMDC monolayers, including semiconducting transport and strong direct-gap luminescence. These results are expected to encourage exploration of transition-metal substitution in two-dimensional systems, potentially enabling next-generation optoelectronic technology in the atomically-thin regime.

  7. Transition-Metal Substitution Doping in Synthetic Atomically Thin Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Jian; Kim, Young Duck; Liang, Liangbo; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Chow, Phil; Tan, Jiawei; Li, Baichang; Li, Lu; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Lu, Toh-Ming; Meunier, Vincent; Hone, James; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2016-09-20

    Semiconductor impurity doping has enabled an entire generation of technology. The emergence of alternative semiconductor material systems, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), requires the development of scalable doping strategies. We report an unprecedented one-pot synthesis for transition-metal substitution in large-area, synthetic monolayer TMDCs. Electron microscopy, optical and electronic transport characterization and ab initio calculations indicate that our doping strategy preserves the attractive qualities of TMDC monolayers, including semiconducting transport and strong direct-gap luminescence. These results are expected to encourage exploration of transition-metal substitution in two-dimensional systems, potentially enabling next-generation optoelectronic technology in the atomically-thin regime.

  8. Model for continuous thermal metal to insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Chao-Ming; Bi, Zhen; Xu, Cenke

    2017-09-01

    We propose a d -dimensional interacting Majorana fermion model with quenched disorder, which gives us a continuous quantum phase transition between a diffusive thermal metal phase with a finite entropy density to an insulator phase with zero entropy density. This model is based on coupled Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model clusters, and hence has a controlled large-N limit. The metal-insulator transition is accompanied by a spontaneous time-reversal symmetry breaking. We perform controlled calculations to show that the energy diffusion constant jumps to zero discontinuously at the metal-insulator transition, while the time-reversal symmetry-breaking order parameter increases continuously.

  9. Contrasting Behavior of the Z Bonds in X-Z···Y Weak Interactions: Z = Main Group Elements Versus the Transition Metals.

    PubMed

    Joy, Jyothish; Jemmis, Eluvathingal D

    2017-02-06

    In contrast to the increasing family of weak intermolecular interactions in main-group compounds (X-Z···Y, Z = main-group elements), an analysis of the Cambridge Structural Database indicates that electron-saturated (18-electron) transition-metal complexes show reluctance toward weak M bond formation (X-M···Y, M = transition metal). In particular, weak M bonds involving electron-saturated (18-electron) complexes of transition metals with partially filled d-orbitals are not found. We propose that the nature of valence electron density distribution in transition-metal complexes is the primary reason for this reluctance. A survey of the interaction of selected electron-saturated transition-metal complexes with electron-rich molecules (Y) demonstrates the following: shielding the possible σ-hole on the metal center by the core electron density in 3d series, and enhanced electronegativity and relativistic effects in 4d and 5d series, hinders the formation of the M bond. A balance in all the destabilizing effects has been found in the 4d series due to its moderate polarizability and primogenic repulsion from inner core d-electrons. A changeover in the donor-acceptor nature of the metal center toward different types of incoming molecules is also unveiled here. The present study confirms the possibility of M bond as a new supramolecular force in designing the crystal structures of electron-saturated transition-metal complexes by invoking extreme ligand conditions.

  10. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-04-12

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites.

  12. ALLOYING-DRIVEN PHASE STABILITY IN GROUP-VB TRANSITION METALS UNDER COMPRESSION

    SciTech Connect

    Landa, A; Soderlind, P

    2011-04-11

    The change in phase stability of Group-VB (V, Nb, and Ta) transition metals due to pressure and alloying is explored by means of first-principles electronic-structure calculations. It is shown that under compression stabilization or destabilization of the ground-state body-centered cubic (bcc) phase of the metal is mainly dictated by the band-structure energy that correlates well with the position of the Kohn anomaly in the transverse acoustic phonon mode. The predicted position of the Kohn anomaly in V, Nb, and Ta is found to be in a good agreement with data from the inelastic x-ray or neutron scattering measurements. In the case of alloying the change in phase stability is defined by the interplay between the band-structure and Madelung energies. We show that band-structure effects determine phase stability when a particular Group-VB metal is alloyed with its nearest neighbors within the same d-transition series: the neighbor with less and more d electrons destabilize and stabilize the bcc phase, respectively. When V is alloyed with neighbors of a higher (4d- or 5d-) transition series, both electrostatic Madelung and band-structure energies stabilize the body-centered-cubic phase. The opposite effect (destabilization) happens when Nb or Ta is alloyed with neighbors of the 3d-transition series.

  13. Chiral phase transition in lattice QCD as a metal-insulator transition

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garcia, Antonio M.; Osborn, James C.

    2007-02-01

    We investigate the lattice QCD Dirac operator with staggered fermions at temperatures around the chiral phase transition. We present evidence of a metal-insulator transition in the low lying modes of the Dirac operator around the same temperature as the chiral phase transition. This strongly suggests the phenomenon of Anderson localization drives the QCD vacuum to the chirally symmetric phase in a way similar to a metal-insulator transition in a disordered conductor. We also discuss how Anderson localization affects the usual phenomenological treatment of phase transitions a la Ginzburg-Landau.

  14. Electronic and structural properties of transition metals and transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    Electronic and structural properties of transition metals and transition metal surfaces are studied theoretically from first principles, with emphasis on understanding their properties under different physical and chemical environments. A new general self-consistency procedures for calculating the electronic structure of crystalline solids is developed and applied to extend a first-principles pseudopotential linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCOA) method to full point-by-point self-consistency. This scheme is tested by applying to a study of the structural and electronic properties of Si and W - prototypical systems of very different bonding characters. The importance of self-consistency is investigated. Structural properties of Mo and W in the bcc, fcc, and hcp structures are calculated with the new scheme. Equilibrium lattice constants, cohesive energies, bulk moduli, differences in structural energies, and Milliken population analyses are obtained. Structural properties of the W(001)(1 x 1) surface are also calculated with the same method. Surface energy, top layer relaxation, and relaxation energy are obtained with good agreement with available experimental data. The electronic structures of PdH and Pd/sub 4/H are calculated by a pseudopotential mixed basis approach with emphasis on the nature of the Pd-H bonding state and the effect of changing hydrogen concentration.

  15. Mechanisms of transition-metal gettering in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; SEIBT,M.; SCHROTER,W.

    2000-03-23

    The atomic process, kinetics, and equilibrium thermodynamics underlying the gettering of transition-metal impurities in Si are reviewed from a mechanistic perspective. Methods for mathematical modeling of gettering are reviewed and illustrated. Needs for further research are discussed.

  16. Electrolytic separation of crystals of transition-metal oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnott, R. J.; Feretti, A.; Kunnamann, W.

    1969-01-01

    Versatile flux system grows large, well-formed, stoichiometric single crystals of mixed oxides of the transition-metal elements. These crystals have important uses in the microwave field, and applications as lasers and masers in communications.

  17. Atomic Natural Orbital Basis Sets for Transition Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1993-01-01

    We show that atomic natural orbitals are an excellent way to contract transition-metal basis sets, even though the different low-lying electronic states may have very different basis set requirements.

  18. New electron correlation theories for transition metal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Marti, Konrad H; Reiher, Markus

    2011-04-21

    Electronic structure theory faces many computational challenges in transition metal chemistry. Usually, density functional theory is the method of choice for theoretical studies on transition metal complexes and clusters mostly because it is the only feasible one, although its results are not systematically improvable. By contrast, multireference ab initio methods could provide a correct description of the electronic structure, but are limited to small molecules because of the tremendous computational resources required. In recent years, conceptually new ab initio methods emerged that turned out to be promising for theoretical coordination chemistry. We review and discuss two efficient parametrization schemes for the electronic wave function, the matrix product states and the complete-graph tensor network states. Their advantages are demonstrated at example transition metal complexes. Especially, tensor network states might provide the key to accurately describe strongly correlated and magnetic molecular systems in transition metal chemistry.

  19. Metal-metal multiple bonding in C3-symmetric bimetallic complexes of the first row transition metals.

    PubMed

    Krogman, Jeremy P; Thomas, Christine M

    2014-05-25

    Metal-metal multiple bonds have been an intense area of focus in inorganic chemistry for many decades as a result of their fundamentally interesting bonding properties, as well as their potential applications in multielectron transfer and small molecule activation processes. Much of what is known in this field revolves around 2nd and 3rd row transition metals, with fundamental knowledge lacking in the area of bonds between elements of the first transition series. The smaller size and tendency of first row ions to adopt high-spin electron configurations weaken metal-metal interactions and serve to complicate the interpretation of the electronic structure and bonding in bimetallic species containing first row transition metals. Furthermore, traditional tetragonal "paddlewheel" complexes dominate the metal-metal multiple bond literature, and only recently have researchers begun to take advantage of the weaker ligand field in three-fold symmetric bimetallic complexes to encourage more favourable metal-metal bonding interactions. In the past 5 years, several research groups have exploited three-fold symmetric frameworks to investigate new trends in metal-metal bonding involving the first row transition metals. This feature article serves to highlight recent achievements in this area and to use C3-symmetric systems as a model to better understand the fundamental aspects of multiple bonds featuring first row transition metals.

  20. Transition-Metal-Free Biomolecule-Based Flexible Asymmetric Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun; Wang, Hua; Hao, Rui; Guo, Lin

    2016-09-01

    A transition-metal-free asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is successfully fabricated based on an earth-abundant biomass derived redox-active biomolecule, named lawsone. Such an ASC exhibits comparable or even higher energy densities than most of the recently reported transition-metal-based ASCs, and this green ASC generation from renewable resources is promising for addressing current issues of electronic hazard processing, high cost, and unsustainability.

  1. Shining a light on transition metal chalcogenides for sustainable photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Peter D.; McNaughter, Paul D.; Lewis, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Transition metal chalcogenides are an important family of materials that have received significant interest in recent years as they have the potential for diverse applications ranging from use in electronics to industrial lubricants. One of their most exciting properties is the ability to generate electricity from incident light. In this perspective we will summarise and highlight the key results and challenges in this area and explain how transition metal chalcogenides are a good choice for future sustainable photovoltaics. PMID:28626562

  2. Shining a light on transition metal chalcogenides for sustainable photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Peter D; McNaughter, Paul D; Lewis, David J; O'Brien, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Transition metal chalcogenides are an important family of materials that have received significant interest in recent years as they have the potential for diverse applications ranging from use in electronics to industrial lubricants. One of their most exciting properties is the ability to generate electricity from incident light. In this perspective we will summarise and highlight the key results and challenges in this area and explain how transition metal chalcogenides are a good choice for future sustainable photovoltaics.

  3. Early Transition Metal Alkyl and Tetrahydroborate Complexes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, James Allen

    1988-06-01

    An investigation of early transition metal alkyl and tetrahydroborate complexes as catalytic models and ceramic precursors has been initiated. The compounds MX _2 (dmpe)_2, dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane, for M = Ti, V, Cr, and X = Br, I, BH_4, have been prepared. These complexes are paramagnetic and have been shown by X-ray crystallography to have trans-octahedral structures. The BH_4^{-} groups in Ti(BH_4)_2(dmpe) _2 bond to the metal in a bidentate manner. This structure is in marked contrast to the structure of the vanadium analogue, V(BH_4)_2 (dmpe)_2, which displays two unidentate BH_4^{-} groups. Alkylation of Ti(BH_4)_2 (dmpe)_2 with LiMe results in the complex TiMe_2(dmpe) _2 which is diamagnetic in both solution and solid state. Single crystal X-ray and neutron diffraction studies show that there may be strong Ti-C pi -bonding. A tetragonal compression along the C -Ti-C bond vector accounts for the observed diamegnetism. A series of complexes of the formula Ti(BH _4)_3(PR_3)_2 has been prepared where PR_3 = PMe_3, PEt_3, PMe_3Ph, and P(OMe)_3 . The X-ray crystal structure of Ti(BH _4)_3(PMe_3)_2 reveals a pseudo trigonal bipyramidal geometry in which two BH_4^{-} groups display an unusual "side-on" bonding mode. The "side-on" ligation mode has been attributed to a Jahn-Teller distortion of the orbitally degenerate d^1 ground state. In contrast, the non-Jahn-Teller susceptible vanadium analogue, V(BH_4)_3 (PMe_3)_2, possesses a nearly ideal D_{rm 3h} >=ometry with three bidentate tetrahydroborate groups. Addition of excess PMe_3 to V(BH_4)_3(PMe _3)_2<=ads to the vanadium(II) hydride -bridged dimer (V(H)(BH_4)(PMe _3)_2]_2, while addition of PMe_3 and water forms the vanadium(III) oxo dimer (V(BH_4)_2 (PMe_3)_2]_2 [mu-O) which has been structurally characterized. The compound Ti(CH_2CMe _3)_4 can be prepared by addition of Ti(OEt)_4 to LiCH_2 CMe_3. Sublimation of Ti(CH _2CMe_3)_4 over a substrate heated to 250^ circC results in the chemical vapor

  4. Electron Devices Based on Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosun, Mahmut

    Integrated circuits consists of building blocks called transistors. A transistor is a switch that enables logic operations to perform computing. Since the invention of the first integrated circuit, transistors have been scaled down in their dimensions to increase the density of transistors per unit area to enable more functionality. Transistor scaling is continued by introducing novel device structures and materials at each technology node. Due to the challenges such as short channel effects and the power consumption issues, novel materials are investigated as a candidate for next generation transistors. In this thesis, 2-dimensinal layered semiconductors, namely transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are studied to assess their electronic material properties as a candidate channel material for next generation electronic devices. Chapter one, introduces the challenges in the state of the art MOSFET devices. Then the motivation for the use of TMDCs in MOSFETs is explained. In chapter two, doping of the TMDCs is studied to be able to probe the intrinsic electronic properties of the devices fabricated using these materials. Contact resistance can be decreased by doping and TMDC MOSFETs with near-ideal performance metrics are demonstrated. In chapter three the CMOS integration of the devices using TMDCs are examined. Logic operations are conducted by fabricating WSe 2 n-FETs and p-FETs on the same flake. Then vertical 3-dimensional integration of n-FETs and p-FETs are demonstrated using the same gate. These transistors are connected as a CMOS inverter and logic operations are performed. Chapter four presents the band structure engineering study using TMDCs. Mono-multilayer MoS2 junctions are found to have a type-I heterojunction. Optoelectronic properties of this junction are investigated and the junction is shown to have a photoresponse that dominates the photoresponse coming from the contacts. In chapter five, the tunneling devices using TMDCs are studied. Dual

  5. The impact of transition metals on bacterial plant disease.

    PubMed

    Fones, Helen; Preston, Gail M

    2013-07-01

    Metals play essential roles in many biological processes but are toxic when present in excess. This makes their transport and homoeostatic control of particular importance to living organisms. Within the context of plant-pathogen interactions the availability and toxicity of transition metals can have a substantial impact on disease development. Metals are essential for defensive generation of reactive oxygen species and other plant defences and can be used directly to limit pathogen growth. Metal-based antimicrobials are used in agriculture to control plant disease, and there is increasing evidence that metal hyperaccumulating plants use accumulated metal to limit pathogen growth. Pathogens and hosts compete for available metals, with plants possessing mechanisms to withhold essential metals from invading microbes. Pathogens, meanwhile, use low-metal conditions as a signal to recognise and respond to the host environment. Consequently, metal-sensing systems such as fur (iron) and zur (zinc) regulate the expression of pathogenicity and virulence genes; and pathogens have developed sophisticated strategies to acquire metal during growth in plant tissues, including the production of multiple siderophores. This review explores the impact of transition metals on the processes that determine the outcome of bacterial infection in plants, with a particular emphasis on zinc, iron and copper. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bi-phase transition diagrams of metallic thin multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.C.; Liu, W.; Jiang, Q. . E-mail: jiangq@jlu.edu.cn

    2005-02-01

    Phase transitions of metallic multilayers induced by differences in interface energy are considered thermodynamically, based on a thermodynamic model for interface energy and the Goldschmidt premise for lattice contraction. Bi-phase transition diagrams of Co/Cr, Zr/Nb, Ti/Nb and Ti/Al multilayers are constructed, which are in agreement with experimental results.

  7. Configuring bonds between first-row transition metals.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Reed J; Clouston, Laura J; Lu, Connie C

    2015-11-17

    Alfred Werner, who pioneered the field of coordination chemistry, envisioned coordination complexes as a single, transition metal atom at the epicenter of a vast ligand space. The idea that the locus of a coordination complex could be shared by multiple metals held together with covalent bonds would eventually lead to the discovery of the quadruple and quintuple bond, which have no analogues outside of the transition metal block. Metal-metal bonding can be classified into homometallic and heterometallic groups. Although the former is dominant, the latter is arguably more intriguing because of the inherently larger chemical space in which metal-metal bonding can be explored. In 2013, Lu and Thomas independently reported the isolation of heterometallic multiple bonds with exclusively first-row transition metals. Structural and theoretical data supported triply bonded Fe-Cr and Fe-V cores. This Account describes our continued efforts to configure bonds between first-row transition metals from titanium to copper. Double-decker ligands, or binucleating platforms that brace two transition metals in proximity, have enabled the modular synthesis of diverse metal-metal complexes. The resulting complexes are also ideal for investigating the effects of an "ancillary" metal on the properties and reactivities of an "active" metal center. A total of 38 bimetallic complexes have been compiled comprising 18 unique metal-metal pairings. Twenty-one of these bimetallics are strictly isostructural, allowing for a systematic comparison of metal-metal bonding. The nature of the chemical bond between first-row metals is remarkably variable and depends on two primary factors: the total d-electron count, and the metals' relative d-orbital energies. Showcasing the range of covalent bonding are a quintuply bonded (d-d)(10) Mn-Cr heterobimetallic and the singly bonded late-late pairings, e.g., Fe-Co, which adopt unusually high spin states. A long-term goal is to rationally tailor the

  8. High-pressure phase transition of alkali metal-transition metal deuteride Li2PdD2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yansun; Stavrou, Elissaios; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Majumdar, Arnab; Wang, Hui; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Epshteyn, Albert; Purdy, Andrew P.

    2017-06-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of lithium palladium deuteride (Li2PdD2) subjected to pressures up to 50 GPa reveals one structural phase transition near 10 GPa, detected by synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction, and metadynamics simulations. The ambient-pressure tetragonal phase of Li2PdD2 transforms into a monoclinic C2/m phase that is distinct from all known structures of alkali metal-transition metal hydrides/deuterides. The structure of the high-pressure phase was characterized using ab initio computational techniques and from refinement of the powder x-ray diffraction data. In the high-pressure phase, the PdD2 complexes lose molecular integrity and are fused to extended [PdD2]∞ chains. The discovered phase transition and new structure are relevant to the possible hydrogen storage application of Li2PdD2 and alkali metal-transition metal hydrides in general.

  9. High-pressure phase transition of alkali metal-transition metal deuteride Li2PdD2.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yansun; Stavrou, Elissaios; Goncharov, Alexander F; Majumdar, Arnab; Wang, Hui; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Epshteyn, Albert; Purdy, Andrew P

    2017-06-21

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of lithium palladium deuteride (Li2PdD2) subjected to pressures up to 50 GPa reveals one structural phase transition near 10 GPa, detected by synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction, and metadynamics simulations. The ambient-pressure tetragonal phase of Li2PdD2 transforms into a monoclinic C2/m phase that is distinct from all known structures of alkali metal-transition metal hydrides/deuterides. The structure of the high-pressure phase was characterized using ab initio computational techniques and from refinement of the powder x-ray diffraction data. In the high-pressure phase, the PdD2 complexes lose molecular integrity and are fused to extended [PdD2]∞ chains. The discovered phase transition and new structure are relevant to the possible hydrogen storage application of Li2PdD2 and alkali metal-transition metal hydrides in general.

  10. [Non-empirical interatomic potentials for transition metals]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The report is divided into the following sections: potential-energy functions for d-band metals, potential-energy functions for aluminides and quasicrystals, electronic structure of complex structures and quasicrystals, potential-energy functions in transition-metal oxides, applications to defect structure and mechanical properties, and basic theory of interatomic potentials.

  11. [Non-empirical interatomic potentials for transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The report is divided into the following sections: potential-energy functions for d-band metals, potential-energy functions for aluminides and quasicrystals, electronic structure of complex structures and quasicrystals, potential-energy functions in transition-metal oxides, applications to defect structure and mechanical properties, and basic theory of interatomic potentials.

  12. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen.

    PubMed

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A; Ceperley, David M; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-21

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work, we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic body centered cubic atomic hydrogen in its ground state. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transition order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3) a0. We compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin's GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.

  13. Spectroscopic signatures of molecular orbitals in transition metal oxides with a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pchelkina, Z. V.; Streltsov, S. V.; Mazin, I. I.

    2016-11-01

    A tendency to form benzenelike molecular orbitals has recently been shown to be a common feature of the 4 d and 5 d transition metal oxides with a honeycomb lattice. This tendency competes with other interactions such as the spin-orbit coupling and Hubbard correlations and can be partially or completely suppressed. In the calculations, SrRu2O6 presents the cleanest case of well-formed molecular orbitals so far; however, direct experimental evidence for or against this proposition has been missing. In this paper, we show that combined photoemission and optical studies can be used to identify molecular orbitals in SrRu2O6 . Symmetry-driven election selection rules suppress optical transitions between certain molecular orbitals, while photoemission and inverse photoemission measurements are insensitive to them. Comparing the photoemission and optical conductivity spectra, one should be able to observe clear signatures of molecular orbitals.

  14. Trion formation dynamics in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Akashay; Moody, Galan; Schaibley, John R.; ...

    2016-01-05

    Here, we report charged exciton (trion) formation dynamics in doped monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, specifically molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), using resonant two-color pump-probe spectroscopy. When resonantly pumping the exciton transition, trions are generated on a picosecond time scale through exciton-electron interaction. As the pump energy is tuned from the high energy to low energy side of the inhomogeneously broadened exciton resonance, the trion formation time increases by ~50%. This feature can be explained by the existence of both localized and delocalized excitons in a disordered potential and suggests the existence of an exciton mobility edge in transition metal dichalcogenides.

  15. Trion formation dynamics in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Akashay; Moody, Galan; Schaibley, John R.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David G.; Xu, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqun; Tran, Kha; Scott, Marie E.; Overbeck, Vincent; Berghauser, Gunnar; Seifert, Edward J.; Pleskot, Dennis; Gabor, Nathaniel M.; Richter, Marten; Malic, Ermin

    2016-01-05

    Here, we report charged exciton (trion) formation dynamics in doped monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, specifically molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), using resonant two-color pump-probe spectroscopy. When resonantly pumping the exciton transition, trions are generated on a picosecond time scale through exciton-electron interaction. As the pump energy is tuned from the high energy to low energy side of the inhomogeneously broadened exciton resonance, the trion formation time increases by ~50%. This feature can be explained by the existence of both localized and delocalized excitons in a disordered potential and suggests the existence of an exciton mobility edge in transition metal dichalcogenides.

  16. Dielectric breakdown and avalanches at nonequilibrium metal-insulator transitions.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Ashivni; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Zapperi, Stefano; Sethna, James P

    2011-12-30

    Motivated by recent experiments on the finite temperature Mott transition in VO(2) films, we propose a classical coarse-grained dielectric breakdown model where each degree of freedom represents a nanograin which transitions from insulator to metal with increasing temperature and voltage at random thresholds due to quenched disorder. We describe the properties of the resulting nonequilibrium metal-insulator transition and explain the universal characteristics of the resistance jump distribution. We predict that by tuning voltage, another critical point is approached, which separates a phase of boltlike avalanches from percolationlike ones.

  17. Electronic structure of hexafluoride anions of metals in the first and second transition series

    SciTech Connect

    Gutsev, G.L.; Boldyrev, A.I.

    1986-02-01

    The electronic structure of the hexafluoride anions of metals in the first (Ti-Zn) and second (Zr-Cd) transition series has been calculated with the aid of the discrete-variation-X..cap alpha.. method. An analysis of the special features of the electronic structure along the series and periods was based on a comparison of the compositions of the valence MO's of the hexafluorides. The electron affinity of the neutral systems has been calculated under the assumption that it is equal to the first ionization potentials of the respective anions. It has been found that all the hexafluorides of the 3d and 4d metals can be classified as superhalogens. The value of the electron affinity is related to the nature and the structure of the highest occupied MO.

  18. Thermodynamic behavior near a metal-insulator transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paalanen, M. A.; Graebner, J. E.; Bhatt, R. N.; Sachdev, S.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the low-temperature specific heat of phosphorus-doped silicon for densities near the metal-insulator transition show an enhancement over the conduction-band itinerant-electron value. The enhancement increases toward lower temperatures but is less than that found for the spin susceptibility. The data are compared with various theoretical models; the large ratio of the spin susceptibility to specific heat indicates the presence of localized spin excitations in the metallic phase as the metal-insulator transition is approached.

  19. Binding of transition metals to S100 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gilston, Benjamin A.; Skaar, Eric P.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    The S100 proteins are a unique class of EF-hand Ca2+ binding proteins distributed in a cell-specific, tissue-specific, and cell cycle-specific manner in humans and other vertebrates. These proteins are distinguished by their distinctive homodimeric structure, both intracellular and extracellular functions, and the ability to bind transition metals at the dimer interface. Here we summarize current knowledge of S100 protein binding of Zn2+, Cu2+ and Mn2+ ions, focusing on binding affinities, conformational changes that arise from metal binding, and the roles of transition metal binding in S100 protein function. PMID:27430886

  20. Thermodynamic behavior near a metal-insulator transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paalanen, M. A.; Graebner, J. E.; Bhatt, R. N.; Sachdev, S.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the low-temperature specific heat of phosphorus-doped silicon for densities near the metal-insulator transition show an enhancement over the conduction-band itinerant-electron value. The enhancement increases toward lower temperatures but is less than that found for the spin susceptibility. The data are compared with various theoretical models; the large ratio of the spin susceptibility to specific heat indicates the presence of localized spin excitations in the metallic phase as the metal-insulator transition is approached.

  1. Route to transition metal carbide nanoparticles through cyanamide and metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, P.G. Lei, M.; Tang, W.H.

    2008-12-01

    We have designed an efficient route to the synthesis of transition metal carbide nanoparticles starting from an organic reagent cyanamide and transition metal oxides. Four technologically important metal carbide nanoparticles such as tungsten carbide, niobium carbide, tantalum carbide and vanadium carbide were synthesized successfully at moderate temperatures. It is found that cyanamide is an efficient carburization reagent and that the metal oxides are completely transmitted into the corresponding carbide nanoparticles. A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the results of the reaction between cyanamide and the metal oxides.

  2. Density functional calculations on electronic circular dichroism spectra of chiral transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Autschbach, Jochen; Jorge, Francisco E; Ziegler, Tom

    2003-05-05

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) has for the first time been applied to the computation of circular dichroism (CD) spectra of transition metal complexes, and a detailed comparison with experimental spectra has been made. Absorption spectra are also reported. Various Co(III) complexes as well as [Rh(en)(3)](3+) are studied in this work. The resulting simulated CD spectra are generally in good agreement with experimental spectra after corrections for systematic errors in a few of the lowest excitation energies are applied. This allows for an interpretation and assignment of the spectra for the whole experimentally accessible energy range (UV/vis). Solvent effects on the excitations are estimated via inclusion of a continuum solvent model. This significantly improves the computed excitation energies for charge-transfer bands for complexes of charge +3, but has only a small effect on those for neutral or singly charged complexes. The energies of the weak d-to-d transitions of the Co complexes are systematically overestimated due to deficiencies of the density functionals. These errors are much smaller for the 4d metal complex. Taking these systematic errors and the effect of a solvent into consideration, TD-DFT computations are demonstrated to be a reliable tool in order to assist with the assignment and interpretation of CD spectra of chiral transition metal complexes.

  3. Bulk Properties of Transition Metals: A Challenge for the Design of Universal Density Functionals.

    PubMed

    Janthon, Patanachai; Luo, Sijie Andy; Kozlov, Sergey M; Viñes, Francesc; Limtrakul, Jumras; Truhlar, Donald G; Illas, Francesc

    2014-09-09

    Systematic evaluation of the accuracy of exchange-correlation functionals is essential to guide scientists in their choice of an optimal method for a given problem when using density functional theory. In this work, accuracy of one Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA) functional, three meta-GGA functionals, one Nonseparable Gradient Approximation (NGA) functional, one meta-NGA, and three hybrid GGA functionals was evaluated for calculations of the closest interatomic distances, cohesive energies, and bulk moduli of all 3d, 4d, and 5d bulk transition metals that have face centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal closed packed (hcp), or body centered cubic (bcc) structures (a total of 27 cases). Our results show that including the extra elements of kinetic energy density and Hartree-Fock exchange energy density into gradient approximation density functionals does not usually improve them. Nevertheless, the accuracies of the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) and M06-L meta-GGAs and the MN12-L meta-NGA approach the accuracy of the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) GGA, so usage of these functionals may be advisable for systems containing both solid-state transition metals and molecular species. The N12 NGA functional is also shown to be almost as accurate as PBE for bulk transition metals, and thus it could be a good choice for studies of catalysis given its proven good performance for molecular species.

  4. Structure and Electronic Properties of Transition Metal Doped Kaolinite Nanoclay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Liangjie; Yang, Huaming

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a series of transition metal (Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co) doped kaolinite nanoclays were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of metal doping on geometric structure and electronic structure of kaolinite was analyzed. The ferromagnetic (FM), antiferromagnetic (AFM), and nonmagnetic (NM) states of transition metal (TM) doped kaolinite structures were studied. The crystal volume, lattice parameters, bond length, charge, and spin were calculated by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D2). The results indicated that Cr3+ and Fe3+ dopants showed more stable under AFM state, while Mn3+ preferred both AFM and FM states, and Co3+ dopant preferred NM state. Also, the transition metal doping could induce lattice volume expansion and some dopant states in the band gap.

  5. Photoluminescence of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides integrated with VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; DeLello, Kursti; Zhang, Hai-Tian; Zhang, Kehao; Lin, Zhong; Terrones, Mauricio; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2016-12-01

    Integrating a phase transition material with two-dimensional semiconductors can provide a route towards tunable opto-electronic metamaterials. Here, we integrate monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides with vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films grown via molecular beam epitaxy to form a 2D/3D heterostructure. Vanadium dioxide undergoes an insulator-to-metal transition at 60-70 °C, which changes the band alignment between MoS2 and VO2 from a semiconductor-insulator junction to a semiconductor-metal junction. By switching VO2 between insulating and metallic phases, the modulation of photoluminescence emission in the 2D semiconductors was observed. This study demonstrates the feasibility to combine TMDs and functional oxides to create unconventional hybrid optoelectronic properties derived from 2D semiconductors that are linked to functional properties of oxides through proximity coupling.

  6. Binding and catalytic reduction of NO by transition metal aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Hou, Shaolie.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this research is to provide the scientific understanding of processes that actively and selectively reduce NO in dilute exhaust streams, as well as in concentrated streams, to N{sub 2}. Experimental studies of NO chemistry in transition metal-containing aluminosilicate catalysts are being carried out with the aim of determining the chemical rules for NO reduction on non-precious metals. The catalyst supports chosen for this investigation are A and Y zeolites, mordenite, and monoliths based on cordierite. The supported transition metal cations that were examined are principally the first row redox metals, e.g. Cr(2), Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Cu(I). The reactions of interest are the reductions of NO by H{sub 2}, CO, and CH{sub 4}, as well as the disproportionation of NO. Rare earth cations that possess redox properties were placed in the more shielded sites, e.g. Site I in Y zeolite, prior to or simultaneously with the exchange procedure with the transition metal cations. Theoretical calculations of the electronic structure of the transition metal cations in zeolitic sites were carried out by ab initio methods. The aim of this part of the research is to find the best match between the metal-based antibonding orbitals and the antibonding orbitals of the NO molecule such that the N-O bond is weakened and is readily broken. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Heterobimetallic coordination polymers involving 3d metal complexes and heavier transition metals cyanometallates

    SciTech Connect

    Peresypkina, Eugenia V.; Samsonenko, Denis G.; Vostrikova, Kira E.

    2015-04-15

    The results of the first steps in the design of coordination polymers based on penta- and heptacyanometallates of heavier d transitions metals are presented. The 2D structure of the coordination polymers: [(Mn(acacen)){sub 2}Ru(NO)(CN){sub 5}]{sub n} and two complexes composed of different cyanorhenates, [Ni(cyclam)]{sub 2}[ReO(OH)(CN){sub 4}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 1.25} and [Cu(cyclam)]{sub 2}[Re(CN){sub 7}](H{sub 2}O){sub 12}, was confirmed by single crystal XRD study, the rhenium oxidation state having been proved by the magnetic measurements. An amorphism of [M(cyclam)]{sub 3}[Re(CN){sub 7}]{sub 2} (M=Ni, Cu) polymers does not allow to define strictly their dimensionality and to model anisotropic magnetic behavior of the compounds. However, with high probability a honey-comb like layer structure could be expected for [M(cyclam)]{sub 3}[Re(CN){sub 7}]{sub 2} complexes, studied in this work, because such an arrangement is the most common among the bimetallic assemblies of hexa- and octacyanometallates with a ratio [M(cyclam)]/[M(CN){sub n}]=3/2. For the first time was prepared and fully characterized a precursor (n-Bu{sub 4}N){sub 2}[Ru(NO)(CN){sub 5}], soluble in organic media. - Graphical abstract: The very first results in the design of 2D coordination polymers based on penta- and heptacyanometallates of 4d and5d transitions metals are presented. - Highlights: • Design of coordination polymers based on penta- and heptacyanometallates. • New Ru and Re cyanide based heterobimetallic coordination complexes. • Hydrolysis and ox/red processes involving [Re(CN){sub 7}]{sup 3+} during crystallization. • High magnetic anisotropy of [M(cyclam)]{sub 3}[Re(CN){sub 7}]{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub n}, M=Cu, Ni, complexes.

  8. The Metallicities of Stars with and without Transiting Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhave, Lars A.; Latham, David W.

    2015-08-01

    Host star metallicities have been used to infer observational constraints on planet formation throughout the history of the exoplanet field. The giant planet metallicity correlation has now been widely accepted, but questions remain as to whether the metallicity correlation extends to the small terrestrial-sized planets. Here, we report metallicities for a sample of 518 stars in the Kepler field that have no detected transiting planets and compare their metallicity distribution to a sample of stars that hosts small planets ({R}p\\lt 1.7 {R}\\oplus ). Importantly, both samples have been analyzed in a homogeneous manner using the same set of tools (Stellar Parameters Classification tool). We find the average metallicity of the sample of stars without detected transiting planets to be {[{{m}}/{{H}}]}{SNTP,{dwarf}}=-0.02+/- 0.02 {dex} and the sample of stars hosting small planets to be {[{{m}}/{{H}}]}{STP}=-0.02+/- 0.02 {dex}. The average metallicities of the two samples are indistinguishable within the uncertainties, and the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test yields a p-value of 0.68 (0.41σ), indicating a failure to reject the null hypothesis that the two samples are drawn from the same parent population. We conclude that the homogeneous analysis of the data presented here supports the hypothesis that stars hosting small planets have a metallicity similar to stars with no known transiting planets in the same area of the sky.

  9. Low-dimensional coordination polymeric structures in alkali metal complex salts of the herbicide (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4-D).

    PubMed

    Smith, Graham

    2015-02-01

    The Li, Rb and Cs complexes with the herbicide (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4-D), namely poly[[aqua[μ3-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetato-κ(3)O(1):O(1):O(1')]lithium(I)] dihydrate], {[Li(C8H5Cl2O3)(H2O)]·2H2O}n, (I), poly[μ-aqua-bis[μ3-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetato-κ(4)O(1):O(1'):O(1'),Cl(2)]dirubidium(I)], [Rb2(C8H5Cl2O3)2(H2O)]n, (II), and poly[μ-aqua-bis[μ3-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetato-κ(5)O(1):O(1'):O(1'),O(2),Cl(2)]dicaesium(I)], [Cs2(C8H5Cl2O3)2(H2O)]n, (III), respectively, have been determined and their two-dimensional polymeric structures are described. In (I), the slightly distorted tetrahedral LiO4 coordination involves three carboxylate O-atom donors, of which two are bridging, and a monodentate aqua ligand, together with two water molecules of solvation. Conjoined six-membered ring systems generate a one-dimensional coordination polymeric chain which extends along b and interspecies water O-H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions give the overall two-dimensional layers which lie parallel to (001). In hemihydrate complex (II), the irregular octahedral RbO5Cl coordination about Rb(+) comprises a single bridging water molecule which lies on a twofold rotation axis, a bidentate O(carboxy),Cl-chelate interaction and three bridging carboxylate O-atom bonding interactions from the 2,4-D ligand. A two-dimensional coordination polymeric layer structure lying parallel to (100) is formed through a number of conjoined cyclic bridges, including a centrosymmetric four-membered Rb2O2 ring system with an Rb...Rb separation of 4.3312 (5) Å. The coordinated water molecule forms intralayer aqua-carboxylate O-H...O hydrogen bonds. Complex (III) comprises two crystallographically independent (Z' = 2) irregular CsO6Cl coordination centres, each comprising two O-atom donors (carboxylate and phenoxy) and a ring-substituted Cl-atom donor from the 2,4-D ligand species in a tridentate chelate mode, two O-atom donors from bridging carboxylate groups and one from a

  10. A dual-emitting 4d-4f nanocrystalline metal-organic framework as a self-calibrating luminescent sensor for indoor formaldehyde pollution.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ji-Na; Yan, Bing

    2016-06-09

    A dual-emissive 4d-4f Ag(i)-Eu(iii) functionalized MOF nanocomposite was fabricated and utilized as a self-calibrating luminescent nanoprobe for detecting indoor formaldehyde (FA). The implantation of Ag(+) ions can tune the dual-emissive characters of the material. FA can interact with the Ag(+) ions and induce opposite luminescence behaviors of the two emitters in the singular molecular material, thus realizing its recognition. This nanoprobe for FA exhibits many merits, such as excellent selectivity, high sensitivity with a detection limit of 51 ppb, fast response, room-temperature testing ability, easy preparation and low cost. This is the first example of a MOF-implicated self-calibrated sensor for indoor FA detection.

  11. A dual-emitting 4d-4f nanocrystalline metal-organic framework as a self-calibrating luminescent sensor for indoor formaldehyde pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ji-Na; Yan, Bing

    2016-06-01

    A dual-emissive 4d-4f Ag(i)-Eu(iii) functionalized MOF nanocomposite was fabricated and utilized as a self-calibrating luminescent nanoprobe for detecting indoor formaldehyde (FA). The implantation of Ag+ ions can tune the dual-emissive characters of the material. FA can interact with the Ag+ ions and induce opposite luminescence behaviors of the two emitters in the singular molecular material, thus realizing its recognition. This nanoprobe for FA exhibits many merits, such as excellent selectivity, high sensitivity with a detection limit of 51 ppb, fast response, room-temperature testing ability, easy preparation and low cost. This is the first example of a MOF-implicated self-calibrated sensor for indoor FA detection.A dual-emissive 4d-4f Ag(i)-Eu(iii) functionalized MOF nanocomposite was fabricated and utilized as a self-calibrating luminescent nanoprobe for detecting indoor formaldehyde (FA). The implantation of Ag+ ions can tune the dual-emissive characters of the material. FA can interact with the Ag+ ions and induce opposite luminescence behaviors of the two emitters in the singular molecular material, thus realizing its recognition. This nanoprobe for FA exhibits many merits, such as excellent selectivity, high sensitivity with a detection limit of 51 ppb, fast response, room-temperature testing ability, easy preparation and low cost. This is the first example of a MOF-implicated self-calibrated sensor for indoor FA detection. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedure, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, IR spectra, EDX mappings, ICP data, luminescence data, PXRD patterns, UV-Vis spectra, and XPS spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02446g

  12. [Transition metal mediated transformations of small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A.

    1992-01-01

    Work on organotransition metal chemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is summarized. Several cationic palladium(II) complexes with bulky phosphine or pyridine ligands were discovered that are highly selective catalysts for linear dimerization of vinyl monomers and linear polymerization of p-divinylbenzene, the reactions proceeding through a carbocationic mechanism. Our studies were continued on alternating olefin-carbon monoxide copolymers. The copolymerization reaction and reactivity of copolymers were examined. New catalytic systems for alternating copolymerization of [alpha]-olefins with CO were discovered. In the case of styrene derivatives, tactic copolymers were obtained. Poly(ethylenepyrrolediyl) derivatives were synthesized from alternating ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymer and become electronic conductors when doped with iodine. A catalytic system for direct synthesis of polyureas and polyoxamides from and diamines was also discovered. Pt metal catalyzed the oxidation of ethers, esters, and amines to carboxylic acids and the oxidation of olefins to 1,2-diols. Anaerobic and aerobic decomposition of molybdenum(VI)-oxoalkyl compounds were studied for heterogeneous oxidation of alkanes and olefins on Mo(VI)-oxide surfaces. Synthesis of polymer-trapped metal, metal oxide, and metal sulfide nanoclusters (size <1--10 nm) was studied.

  13. Flexible metallic seal for transition duct in turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2014-04-22

    A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a flexible metallic seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

  14. Catalysts comprising magnesium and a transition metal

    SciTech Connect

    Bujadoux, K.

    1984-10-09

    A catalyst comprising the product obtained by bringing into contact a compound of magnesium comprising at least one species selected from the group consisting of magnesium monohalides (MgX), halo-magnesium hydrides (HMgX) and magnesium hydride (MgH/sub 2/), X being a halogen and the said species MgX or HMgX being obtained by thermal decomposition of a powdery organo-magnesium halide R/sub 1/MgX wherein R/sub 1/ is an organic radical; and at least one halide of a transistion metal selected from the group consisting of titanium and vanadium, the valency of said metal in said halide being lower than or equal to 3, the quantities being such that the atomic ratio of magnesium to said transistion metal is between 1 and 25, and a catalyst system including the catalyst that is suitable for use in the polymerization of olefins and particularly ethylene.

  15. Transition-metal-free chemo- and regioselective vinylation of azaallyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minyan; Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Berritt, Simon; Pascual-Escudero, Ana; Yeşilçimen, Ahmet; Yang, Xiaodong; Adrio, Javier; Huang, Georgia; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Kozlowski, Marisa C.; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2017-10-01

    Direct C(sp3)-C(sp2) bond formation under transition-metal-free conditions offers an atom-economical, inexpensive and environmentally benign alternative to traditional transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling reactions. A new chemo- and regioselective coupling protocol between 3-aryl-substituted-1,1-diphenyl-2-azaallyl derivatives and vinyl bromides has been developed. This is the first transition-metal-free cross-coupling of azaallyls with vinyl bromide electrophiles and delivers allylic amines in excellent yields (up to 99%). This relatively simple and mild protocol offers a direct and practical strategy for the synthesis of high-value allylic amine building blocks that does not require the use of transition metals, special initiators or photoredox catalysts. Radical clock experiments, electron paramagnetic resonance studies and density functional theory calculations point to an unprecedented substrate-dependent coupling mechanism. Furthermore, an electron paramagnetic resonance signal was observed when the N-benzyl benzophenone ketimine was subjected to silylamide base, supporting the formation of radical species upon deprotonation. The unique mechanisms outlined herein could pave the way for new approaches to transition-metal-free C-C bond formations.

  16. Flexible transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets for band-selective photodetection

    PubMed Central

    Velusamy, Dhinesh Babu; Kim, Richard Hahnkee; Cha, Soonyoung; Huh, June; Khazaeinezhad, Reza; Kassani, Sahar Hosseinzadeh; Song, Giyoung; Cho, Suk Man; Cho, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ihn; Lee, Jinseong; Oh, Kyunghwan; Choi, Hyunyoug; Park, Cheolmin

    2015-01-01

    The photocurrent conversions of transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets are unprecedentedly impressive, making them great candidates for visible range photodetectors. Here we demonstrate a method for fabricating micron-thick, flexible films consisting of a variety of highly separated transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets for excellent band-selective photodetection. Our method is based on the non-destructive modification of transition metal dichalcogenide sheets with amine-terminated polymers. The universal interaction between amine and transition metal resulted in scalable, stable and high concentration dispersions of a single to a few layers of numerous transition metal dichalcogenides. Our MoSe2 and MoS2 composites are highly photoconductive even at bending radii as low as 200 μm on illumination of near infrared and visible light, respectively. More interestingly, simple solution mixing of MoSe2 and MoS2 gives rise to blended composite films in which the photodetection properties were controllable. The MoS2/MoSe2 (5:5) film showed broad range photodetection suitable for both visible and near infrared spectra. PMID:26333531

  17. Metallization and charge-transfer gap closure of transition-metal iodides under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. Li-Chung

    1993-05-01

    It is shown with resistivity and near-IR absorption measurements that NiI{sub 2}, CoI{sub 2}, and FeI{sub 2} metallize under pressure by closure of the charge-transfer energy gap at pressures of 17, 10, and 23 GPa, respectively, which is close to the antiferromagnetic-diamagnetic transition in NiI{sub 2} and CoI{sub 2}. Thus, the magnetic transitions probably are caused by the metallization; in NiI{sub 2} and CoI{sub 2}, the insulator-metal transitions are first order. Moessbauer and XRD data were also collected. Figs, 46 refs.

  18. Electronic Transitions in f-electron Metals at High Pressures:

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C; Maddox, B; Lazicki, A; Iota, V; Klepeis, J P; McMahan, A

    2007-02-08

    This study was to investigate unusual phase transitions driven by electron correlation effects that occur in many f-band transition metals and are often accompanied by large volume changes: {approx}20% at the {delta}-{alpha} transition in Pu and 5-15% for analogous transitions in Ce, Pr, and Gd. The exact nature of these transitions has not been well understood, including the short-range correlation effects themselves, their relation to long-range crystalline order, the possible existence of remnants of the transitions in the liquid, the role of magnetic moments and order, the critical behavior, and dynamics of the transitions, among other issues. Many of these questions represent forefront physics challenges central to Stockpile materials and are also important in understanding the high-pressure behavior of other f- and d-band transition metal compounds including 3d-magnetic transition monoxide (TMO, TM=Mn, Fe, Co, Ni). The overarching goal of this study was, therefore, to understand the relationships between crystal structure and electronic structure of transition metals at high pressures, by using the nation's brightest third-generation synchrotron x-ray at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Significant progresses have been made, including new discoveries of the Mott transition in MnO at 105 GPa and Kondo-like 4f-electron dehybridization and new developments of high-pressure resonance inelastic x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray emission spectroscopy. These scientific discoveries and technology developments provide new insights and enabling tools to understand scientific challenges in stockpile materials. The project has broader impacts in training two SEGRF graduate students and developing an university collaboration (funded through SSAAP).

  19. Stable isotopes of transition and post-transition metals as tracers in environmental studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, Thomas D.; Baskaran, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The transition and post-transition metals, which include the elements in Groups 3–12 of the Periodic Table, have a broad range of geological and biological roles as well as industrial applications and thus are widespread in the environment. Interdisciplinary research over the past decade has resulted in a broad understanding of the isotope systematics of this important group of elements and revealed largely unexpected variability in isotope composition for natural materials. Significant kinetic and equilibrium isotope fractionation has been observed for redox sensitive metals such as iron, chromium, copper, molybdenum and mercury, and for metals that are not redox sensitive in nature such as cadmium and zinc. In the environmental sciences, the isotopes are increasingly being used to understand important issues such as tracing of metal contaminant sources and fates, unraveling metal redox cycles, deciphering metal nutrient pathways and cycles, and developing isotope biosignatures that can indicate the role of biological activity in ancient and modern planetary systems.

  20. The metal-insulator transition in magnetite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, J. R.; Callen, E.

    1972-01-01

    We describe an electronic model for the low temperature transition in magnetite, in which the average number of electrons on a site is non-integral. The solution of the one-dimensional problem is reviewed, and the connection of the model with the Verwey ordering is discussed. Some of the implication of the three dimensional problem are discussed.

  1. The metal-insulator transition in magnetite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, J. R.; Callen, E.

    1972-01-01

    We describe an electronic model for the low temperature transition in magnetite, in which the average number of electrons on a site is non-integral. The solution of the one-dimensional problem is reviewed, and the connection of the model with the Verwey ordering is discussed. Some of the implication of the three dimensional problem are discussed.

  2. Memristor using a transition metal nitride insulator

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, James E; Marinella, Matthew; Lohn, Andrew John

    2014-10-28

    Apparatus is disclosed in which at least one resistive switching element is interposed between at least a first and a second conducting electrode element. The resistive switching element comprises a metal oxynitride. A method for making such a resistive switching element is also disclosed.

  3. Covalency, Excitons, Double Counting and the Metal-Insulator Transition in Transition Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin

    2012-02-01

    We present single-site dynamical mean-field studies of realistic models of transition metal oxides, including the cuprate superconductors and rare earth nickelates (in bulk and superlattice form). We include orbital multiplet effects and hybridization to ligands. We explicitly calculate the d-d exciton spectra for cuprates, finding sharp exciton lines in both metallic and insulating phases, which should be visible in experiments. We also find that the additional d3z^2-r^2 orbital does not contribute to an additional Fermi surface at any reasonable doping, in contradiction to previous slave-boson studies. The hybridization to ligands is shown to have crucial effects, for example suppressing the ferro-orbital order previously found in Hubbard model studies of nickelates. Hybridization to ligands is shown to be most naturally parametrized by the d-orbital occupancy. For cuprates and nickelates, insulating behavior is found to be present only for a very narrow range of d-occupancy, irrespective of the Coulomb repulsion. The d-occupancy predicted by standard band calculations is found to be very far from the values required to obtain an insulating phase, calling into question the interpretation of these materials as charge transfer insulators. [4pt] This work is done in collaboration with A.J. Millis, M.J. Han, C.A. Marianetti, L. de' Medici, and H.T. Dang, and is supported by NSF-DMR-1006282, the Army Office of Scientific Research, and the Condensed Matter Theory Center and CNAM at University of Maryland. [4pt] [1] X. Wang, H. T. Dang, and A. J. Millis, Phys. Rev. B 84, 014530 (2011).[0pt] [2] X. Wang, M. J. Han, L. de' Medici, C. A. Marianetti, and A. J. Millis, arXiv:1110.2782.[0pt] [3] M. J. Han, X. Wang, C. A. Marianetti, and A. J. Millis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 206804 (2011).

  4. Nanodisperse transition metal electrodes (NTME) for electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Wen, Shi-Jie

    1998-12-01

    Disclosed are transition metal electrodes for electrochemical cells using gel-state and solid-state polymers. The electrodes are suitable for use in primary and secondary cells. The electrodes (either negative electrode or positive electrode) are characterized by uniform dispersion of the transition metal at the nanoscale in the polymer. The transition metal moiety is structurally amorphous, so no capacity fade should occur due to lattice expansion/contraction mechanisms. The small grain size, amorphous structure and homogeneous distribution provide improved charge/discharge cycling performance, and a higher initial discharge rate capability. The cells can be cycled at high current densities, limited only by the electrolyte conductivity. A method of making the electrodes (positive and negative), and their usage in electrochemical cells are disclosed.

  5. Biocompatibility of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Tharajak, Jirasak; Li, Yuncang; Berndt, Christopher C.; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2014-07-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, manganese, and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental compositions of the nanoparticles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The particle size of the nanoparticles was investigated using particle size analyzer, and the zeta potentials were measured using zeta potential analyzer. The phase components of the synthesized transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were studied using Raman spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of the nanoparticles was assessed using osteoblast-like cells. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals strongly influences the physical, chemical properties, and biocompatibility of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  6. An efficient fluctuating charge model for transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Comba, Peter; Martin, Bodo; Sanyal, Avik

    2013-07-05

    A fluctuating charge model for transition metal complexes, based on the Hirshfeld partitioning scheme, spectroscopic energy data from the NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Database and the electronegativity equalization approach, has been developed and parameterized for organic ligands and their high- and low-spin Fe(II) and Fe(III), low-spin Co(III) and Cu(II) complexes, using atom types defined in the Momec force field. Based on large training sets comprising a variety of transition metal complexes, a general parameter set has been developed and independently validated which allows the efficient computation of geometry-dependent charge distributions in the field of transition metal coordination compounds. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nanodisperse transition metal electrodes (NTME) for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Wen, Shi-Jie

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are transition metal electrodes for electrochemical cells using gel-state and solid-state polymers. The electrodes are suitable for use in primary and secondary cells. The electrodes (either negative electrode or positive electrode) are characterized by uniform dispersion of the transition metal at the nanoscale in the polymer. The transition metal moiety is structurally amorphous, so no capacity fade should occur due to lattice expansion/contraction mechanisms. The small grain size, amorphous structure and homogeneous distribution provide improved charge/discharge cycling performance, and a higher initial discharge rate capability. The cells can be cycled at high current densities, limited only by the electrolyte conductivity. A method of making the electrodes (positive and negative), and their usage in electrochemical cells are disclosed.

  8. Transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2013-03-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, chromium and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Phase analysis of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was performed via X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was measured using the water contact angle technique. The surface roughness of all nanoparticles was measured using profilometry. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to determine the temperature at which the decomposition and oxidation of the chelating agents took place. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals influences strongly the microstructure, crystal structure and antibacterial property of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  9. Strong dependence of fluorescence quenching on the transition metal in layered transition metal dichalcogenide nanoflakes for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Pumera, Martin

    2016-08-07

    In recent years, the application of transition metal dichalcogenides for the development of biosensors has been receiving widespread attention from researchers, as demonstrated by the surge in studies present in the field. While different transition metal dichalcogenide materials have been employed for the fabrication of fluorescent biosensors with superior performance, no research has been conducted to draw comparisons across materials containing different transition metals. Herein, the performance of MoS2 and WS2 nanoflakes for the fluorescence detection of nucleic acids is assessed. It is discovered that, at the optimal amount, MoS2 and WS2 nanoflakes exhibit a similar degree of fluorescence quenching, at 75% and 71% respectively. However, MoS2 nanoflakes have better performance in the areas of detection range and selectivity than WS2 nanoflakes. The detection range achieved with MoS2 nanoflakes is 9.60-366 nM while 13.3-143 nM with WS2 nanoflakes. In the context of selectivity, MoS2 nanoflakes display a signal difference of 97.8% between complementary and non-complementary DNA targets, whereas WS2 nanoflakes only exhibit 44.3%. Such research is highly beneficial as it delivers vital insights on how the performance of a fluorescent biosensor can be affected by the transition metal present. Furthermore, these insights can assist in the selection of suitable transition metal dichalcogenide materials for utilization in biosensor development.

  10. Anharmonic Vibrational Spectroscopy on Metal Transition Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latouche, Camille; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    Advances in hardware performance and the availability of efficient and reliable computational models have made possible the application of computational spectroscopy to ever larger molecular systems. The systematic interpretation of experimental data and the full characterization of complex molecules can then be facilitated. Focusing on vibrational spectroscopy, several approaches have been proposed to simulate spectra beyond the double harmonic approximation, so that more details become available. However, a routine use of such tools requires the preliminary definition of a valid protocol with the most appropriate combination of electronic structure and nuclear calculation models. Several benchmark of anharmonic calculations frequency have been realized on organic molecules. Nevertheless, benchmarks of organometallics or inorganic metal complexes at this level are strongly lacking despite the interest of these systems due to their strong emission and vibrational properties. Herein we report the benchmark study realized with anharmonic calculations on simple metal complexes, along with some pilot applications on systems of direct technological or biological interest.

  11. Role of phonons in the metal-insulator phase transition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review, for the transition series oxides, of the Mattis and Lander model, which is one of electrons interacting with lattice vibrations (electron and phonon interaction). The model displays superconducting, insulating, and metallic phases. Its basic properties evolve from a finite crystallographic distortion associated with a dominant phonon mode and the splitting of the Brillouin zone into two subzones, a property of simple cubic and body centered cubic lattices. The order of the metal-insulator phase transition is examined. The basic model has a second-order phase transition and the effects of additional mechanisms on the model are calculated. The way in which these mechanisms affect the magnetically ordered transition series oxides as described by the Hubbard model is discussed.

  12. Magnetism of polyanionic compounds of transition metals (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, I. L.; Volkova, O. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.

    2017-05-01

    The magnetic properties of 3d-transition metal polyanionic compounds differ markedly from those of the monoanionic compounds. The simplest of them can be considered as systems with structures containing cations of a single metal in the Ti-Cu series and several different anions (F-, Cl-, Br-, (OH)-, O2-). Metal orbitals overlap differently with orbitals of the halogen, hydroxyl groups and oxygen causing a wide spread in competition among the different exchange interactions in polyanionic compounds. At the same time, exchange with other cations, including non-transition metals, does not occur in these compounds. The physics of polyanionic magnets remains largely unexplored, since such systems are usually chemically active and require particular care when physical measurements are made.

  13. Covalent functionalization of monolayered transition metal dichalcogenides by phase engineering.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Goswami, Anandarup; Kappera, Rajesh; e Silva, Cecilia de Carvalho Castro; Kaplan, Daniel; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Chemical functionalization of low-dimensional materials such as nanotubes, nanowires and graphene leads to profound changes in their properties and is essential for solubilizing them in common solvents. Covalent attachment of functional groups is generally achieved at defect sites, which facilitate electron transfer. Here, we describe a simple and general method for covalent functionalization of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets (MoS₂, WS₂ and MoSe₂), which does not rely on defect engineering. The functionalization reaction is instead facilitated by electron transfer between the electron-rich metallic 1T phase and an organohalide reactant, resulting in functional groups that are covalently attached to the chalcogen atoms of the transition metal dichalcogenide. The attachment of functional groups leads to dramatic changes in the optoelectronic properties of the material. For example, we show that it renders the metallic 1T phase semiconducting, and gives it strong and tunable photoluminescence and gate modulation in field-effect transistors.

  14. Control of magnetism across metal to insulator transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Venta, J.; Wang, Siming; Ramirez, J. G.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic properties (coercivity and magnetization) of ferromagnetic films are strongly affected by the proximity to materials that undergo a metal to insulator transition. Here, we show that stress associated with structural changes across the metal-insulator phase transition in VO2 and V2O3 produces a magnetoelastic anisotropy in ferromagnetic films (Co and Ni) deposited on top of the oxides. The changes in coercivity are as large as 168% and occur in a very narrow temperature range. This effect can be controlled and inverted by the thickness and the deposition temperature of the ferromagnetic films, which is very flexible for important technological applications.

  15. Electronic structure and properties of silicon-transition metal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, O.; Chiao, L. W.; Tu, K. N.

    1985-04-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the reaction occurring at the interfaces between silicon and transition metals. Using the same approach successfully applied to the study of bulk suicides, the electronic properties of different models of silicon-nickel and silicon-palladium interfaces have been studied. The models investigated include: (a) epitaxial silicon-silicide interfaces; (b) isolated transition metal interstitials near the silicon surfaces; (c) adamantane geometry structures as metastable diffusion layer compounds. The theoretical results are used as a guide in order to interpret the available experimental photoemission data of these complex interfaces.

  16. Metal-insulator transition near a superconducting state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaveh, M.; Mott, N. F.

    1992-03-01

    We show that when the metal-insulation transition occurs near a superconducting state it results in a different critical behavior from that of amorphous metals or uncompensated doped semiconductors. This difference results from the enhancement of the effective electron-electron interaction caused by fluctuations to the superconducting state. This explains the recent experiments of Micklitz and co-workers on amorphous superconducting mixtures Ga-Ar and Bi-Kr.

  17. Estimating the acidity of transition metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes by adding ligand acidity constants.

    PubMed

    Morris, Robert H

    2014-02-05

    A simple equation (pKa(THF) = ∑AL + Ccharge + Cnd + Cd6) can be used to obtain an estimate of the pKa of diamagnetic transition metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes in tetrahydrofuran, and, by use of conversion equations, in other solvents. It involves adding acidity constants AL for each of the ligands in the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-coordinate conjugate base complex of the hydride or dihydrogen complex along with a correction for the charge (Ccharge = -15, 0 or 30 for x = +1, 0 or -1 charge, respectively) and the periodic row of the transition metal (Cnd = 0 for 3d or 4d metal, 2 for 5d metal) as well as a correction for d(6) octahedral acids (Cd6 = 6 for d(6) metal ion in the acid, 0 for others) that are not dihydrogen complexes. Constants AL are provided for 13 commonly occurring ligand types; of these, nine neutral ligands are correlated with Lever's electrochemical ligand parameters EL. This method gives good estimates of the over 170 literature pKa values that range from less than zero to 50 with a standard deviation of 3 pKa units for complexes of the metals chromium to nickel, molybdenum, ruthenium to palladium, and tungsten to platinum in the periodic table. This approach allows a quick assessment of the acidity of hydride complexes found in nature (e.g., hydrogenases) and in industry (e.g., catalysis and hydrogen energy applications). The pKa values calculated for acids that have bulky or large bite angle chelating ligands deviate the most from this correlation. The method also provides an estimate of the base strength of the deprotonated form of the complex.

  18. Alterations in Brain Transition Metals in Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, H. Diana; Chen, Y. Iris; Doros, Gheorghe; Salat, David H.; Chen, Nan-kuei; Kwong, Ken K.; Bush, Ashley; Fox, Jonathan; Hersch, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Aberrant accumulation of transition metals in the brain may have an early and important role in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington disease (HD). Objective To comprehensively evaluate and validate the distribution of metal deposition in the brain using advanced magnetic resonance imaging methods from the premanifest through symptomatic stages of HD. Design Observational study. Setting University imaging center. Participants Twenty-eight HD expanded gene carriers, 34 patients with symptomatic HD, and 56 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were included in the study. Interventions Participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging for the quantification of the phase evolution of susceptibility-weighted images. Main Outcome Measures To verify the identity of the metals responsible for the changes in the phase evolution of the susceptibility signal in the brain and to assess correlations with systemic levels. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to measure transition metal concentrations in postmortem brains. Results In the basal ganglia, progressive increases in the phase evolution were found in HD, beginning in pre-manifest individuals who were far from expected onset and increasing with proximity to expected onset and thereafter. Increases in the cerebral cortex were regionally selective and present only in symptomatic HD. Increases were verified by excessive deposition of brain iron, but a complex alteration in other transition metals was found. Conclusion An important and early role of altered metal homeostasis is suggested in the pathogenesis of HD. PMID:22393169

  19. Transition Metal Complexes of Expanded Porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Sessler, Jonathan L.; Tomat, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the rapid development of new synthetic routes for the preparation of expanded porphyrin macrocycles has allowed exploration of a new frontier consisting of “porphyrin-like” coordination chemistry. In this Account, we summarize our exploratory forays into the still relatively poorly explored area of oligopyrrolic macrocycle metalation chemistry. Specifically, we describe our successful formation of both mono- and binuclear complexes and in doing so highlight the diversity of coordination modes available to expanded porphyrin-type ligands. The nature of the inserted cation, the emerging role of tautomeric equilibria, and the importance of hydrogen-bonding interactions in regulating this chemistry are also discussed. PMID:17397134

  20. The Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Coated Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, David C.; Pederson, Mark R.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    1998-03-01

    Clusters composed of fullerene molecules with an outer shell of transition metal atoms in the composition C_60M_62 (M being a transition metal) have been produced with laser vaporisation techniques(F. Tast, N. Malinowski, S. Frank, M. Heinebrodt, I.M.L. Billas, and T. P. Martin, Z. Phys D 40), 351 (1997).. We have studied several of these very large systems with a parallel version of the all-electron NRLMOL cluster code. Optimized geometries of the metal encased fullerenes C_60Ti_62 and C_60V_62 are presented along with their HOMO-LUMO gaps, electron affinities, ionization energies, and cohesive energies. We compare the stability of these clusters to relaxed met-car structures (e.g. Ti_8C_12) and to relaxed rocksalt metal-carbide fragments (TiC)n with n=8 and 32. In addition to metal-coated fullerenes we consider the possibility of a trilayered structure consisting of a small shell of metal atoms enclosed by a metal coated fullerene. The nature of bonding in these systems is analyzed by studying the electronic charge distributions.

  1. On the character of the optical transitions in closed-shell transition metal oxides doped with Bi(3).

    PubMed

    Amer, M; Boutinaud, P

    2017-01-18

    A criterion is introduced to achieve the assignment of the optical features observed in the excitation spectra of Bi(3+) ions incorporated in closed-shell transition metal oxides. The model is based on the calculation of the energy associated with the lowest (1)S0 → (3)P1 intra-ionic transition of Bi(3+) (A-like transition), the metal-to-metal charge transfer (D-like transition) and the Stokes shift of the corresponding emission.

  2. Observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ranga P; Silvera, Isaac F

    2017-02-17

    Producing metallic hydrogen has been a great challenge in condensed matter physics. Metallic hydrogen may be a room-temperature superconductor and metastable when the pressure is released and could have an important impact on energy and rocketry. We have studied solid molecular hydrogen under pressure at low temperatures. At a pressure of 495 gigapascals, hydrogen becomes metallic, with reflectivity as high as 0.91. We fit the reflectance using a Drude free-electron model to determine the plasma frequency of 32.5 ± 2.1 electron volts at a temperature of 5.5 kelvin, with a corresponding electron carrier density of 7.7 ± 1.1 × 10(23) particles per cubic centimeter, which is consistent with theoretical estimates of the atomic density. The properties are those of an atomic metal. We have produced the Wigner-Huntington dissociative transition to atomic metallic hydrogen in the laboratory.

  3. Observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Ranga P.; Silvera, Isaac F.

    2017-02-01

    Producing metallic hydrogen has been a great challenge in condensed matter physics. Metallic hydrogen may be a room-temperature superconductor and metastable when the pressure is released and could have an important impact on energy and rocketry. We have studied solid molecular hydrogen under pressure at low temperatures. At a pressure of 495 gigapascals, hydrogen becomes metallic, with reflectivity as high as 0.91. We fit the reflectance using a Drude free-electron model to determine the plasma frequency of 32.5 ± 2.1 electron volts at a temperature of 5.5 kelvin, with a corresponding electron carrier density of 7.7 ± 1.1 × 1023 particles per cubic centimeter, which is consistent with theoretical estimates of the atomic density. The properties are those of an atomic metal. We have produced the Wigner-Huntington dissociative transition to atomic metallic hydrogen in the laboratory.

  4. How absorbed hydrogen affects the catalytic activity of transition metals.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Kozlov, Sergey M; Schauermann, Swetlana; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Neyman, Konstantin M

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is commonly governed by surface active sites. Yet, areas just below the surface can also influence catalytic activity, for instance, when fragmentation products of catalytic feeds penetrate into catalysts. In particular, H absorbed below the surface is required for certain hydrogenation reactions on metals. Herein, we show that a sufficient concentration of subsurface hydrogen, H(sub) , may either significantly increase or decrease the bond energy and the reactivity of the adsorbed hydrogen, H(ad) , depending on the metal. We predict a representative reaction, ethyl hydrogenation, to speed up on Pd and Pt, but to slow down on Ni and Rh in the presence of H(sub) , especially on metal nanoparticles. The identified effects of subsurface H on surface reactivity are indispensable for an atomistic understanding of hydrogenation processes on transition metals and interactions of hydrogen with metals in general.

  5. Preparation of nanoporous metal foam from high nitrogen transition metal complexes

    DOEpatents

    Tappan, Bryce C.; Huynh, My Hang V.; Hiskey, Michael A.; Son, Steven F.; Oschwald, David M.; Chavez, David E.; Naud, Darren L.

    2006-11-28

    Nanoporous metal foams are prepared by ignition of high nitrogen transition metal complexes. The ammonium salts of iron(III) tris[bi(tetrazolato)-amine], cobalt(III) tris(bi(tetrazolato)amine), and high nitrogen compounds of copper and silver were prepared as loose powders, pressed into pellets and wafers, and ignited under an inert atmosphere to form nanoporous metal foam monoliths having very high surface area and very low density.

  6. Well-defined transition metal hydrides in catalytic isomerizations.

    PubMed

    Larionov, Evgeny; Li, Houhua; Mazet, Clément

    2014-09-07

    This Feature Article intends to provide an overview of a variety of catalytic isomerization reactions that have been performed using well-defined transition metal hydride precatalysts. A particular emphasis is placed on the underlying mechanistic features of the transformations discussed. These have been categorized depending upon the nature of the substrate and in most cases discussed following a chronological order.

  7. Mechanisms of transition-metal gettering in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. M.; Seibt, M.; Schroeter, W.

    2000-10-01

    The atomic process, kinetics, and equilibrium thermodynamics underlying the gettering of transition-metal impurities in Si are reviewed. Methods for mathematical modeling of gettering are discussed and illustrated. Needs for further research are considered. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Finding new ternary transition metal selenides and sulphides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Awadhesh; Bhutani, Ankita; Eckstein, James N.; Shoemaker, Daniel P.; Wagner, Lucas K.

    The transition metal oxides exhibit many interesting physical properties, and have been explored in detail over time. Recently, the transition metal chalchogenides including selenium and sulfur have been of interest because of their correlated electron properties, as seen in the iron based superconductors and the layered transition metal dichalchogenides. However, the chalchogenides are much less explored than the oxides, and there is an open question of whether there may be new materials heretofore undiscovered. We perform a systematic combined theoretical and experimental search over ternary phase diagrams that are empty in the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database containing cations, transition metals, and one of selenium or sulfur. In these 27 ternary systems, we use a probabilistic model to reduce the likelihood of false negative predictions, which results in a list of 24 candidate materials. We then conduct a variety of synthesis experiments to check the candidate materials for stability. While the prediction method did obtain compositions that are stable, none of the candidate materials formed in our experiments. We come to the conclusion that these phase diagrams are either truly empty or have unusual structures or synthesis requirements. This work was supported by the Center for Emergent Superconductivity, Department of Energy Frontier Research Center under Grant No. DEAC0298CH1088.

  9. Luminescent molecular rods - transition-metal alkynyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah; Wong, Keith Man-Chung

    2005-01-01

    A number of transition-metal complexes have been reported to exhibit rich luminescence, usually originating from phosphorescence. Such luminescence properties of the triplet excited state with a large Stoke's shift, long lifetime, high luminescence quantum yield as well as lower excitation energy, are envisaged to serve as an ideal candidate in the area of potential applications for chemosensors, dye-sensitized solar cells, flat panel displays, optics, new materials and biological sciences. Organic alkynes (poly-ynes), with extended or conjugatedπ-systems and rigid structure with linear geometry, have become a significant research area due to their novel electronic and physical properties and their potential applications in nanotechnology. Owing to the presence of unsaturated sp-hybridized carbon atoms, the alkynyl unit can serve as a versatile building block in the construction of alkynyl transition-metal complexes, not only throughσ-bonding but also viaπ-bonding interactions. By incorporation of linear alkynyl groups into luminescent transition-metal complexes, the alkynyl moiety with goodσ-donor,π-donor andπ-acceptor abilities is envisaged to tune or perturb the emission behaviors, including emission energy (color), intensity and lifetime by its role as an auxiliary ligand as well as to govern the emission origin from its direct involvement. This review summarizes recent efforts on the synthesis of luminescent rod-like alkynyl complexes with different classes of transition metals and details the effects of the introduction of alkynyl groups on the luminescence properties of the complexes.

  10. Microwave assisted synthesis of technologically important transition metal silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidhyanathan, B.; Rao, K.J.

    1997-12-01

    A novel, simple, clean and fast microwave assisted method of preparing important transition metal silicides (MoSi{sub 2}, WSi{sub 2}, CoSi{sub 2}, and TiSi{sub 2}) has been described. Amorphous carbon is used both as a microwave susceptor and as a preventer of oxidation. {copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  11. Biomass transition metal hydrogen-evolution electrocatalysts and electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wei-Fu; Iyer, Shweta; Iyer, Shilpa; Sasaki, Kotaro; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2017-02-28

    A catalytic composition from earth-abundant transition metal salts and biomass is disclosed. A calcined catalytic composition formed from soybean powder and ammonium molybdate is specifically exemplified herein. Methods for making the catalytic composition are disclosed as are electrodes for hydrogen evolution reactions comprising the catalytic composition.

  12. Transition-metal-free trifluoromethylthiolation of N-heteroarenes.

    PubMed

    Honeker, Roman; Ernst, Johannes B; Glorius, Frank

    2015-05-26

    A general and efficient methodology for the direct transition metal free trifluoromethylthiolation of a broad range of biologically relevant N-heteroarenes is reported employing abundant sodium chloride as the catalyst. This method is operationally simple, exhibits high functional group tolerance, and does not require protecting groups.

  13. Rare earth transition metal magnesium compounds—An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodewald, Ute Ch.; Chevalier, Bernard; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2007-05-01

    Intermetallic rare earth-transition metal-magnesium compounds play an important role as precipitations in modern light weight alloys and as host materials for hydrogen storage applications. Recent results on the crystal chemistry, the chemical bonding peculiarities, physical properties, and hydrogenation behavior of these materials are reviewed.

  14. The Electrochemical Synthesis of Transition-Metal Acetylacetonates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, S. R.; Browning, S. R.; Lagowski, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical synthesis of transition-metal acetylacetonates described here can form the basis of assisting in the transformation of an entry-level laboratory course into a research-like environment where all members of a class are working on the same problem, but where each member has a personal responsibility for the synthesis and…

  15. Electrocatalysis using transition metal carbide and oxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Yagya N.

    Carbides are one of the several families of transition metal compounds that are considered economic alternatives to catalysts based on noble metals and their compounds. Phase pure transition metal carbides of group 4-6 metals, in the first three periods, were synthesized using a common eutectic salt flux synthesis method, and their electrocatalytic activities compared under uniform electrochemical conditions. Mo2C showed highest hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities among the nine metal carbides investigated, but all other metal carbides also showed substantial activities. All the metal carbides showed remarkable enhancement in catalytic activities as supports, when compared to traditional graphitic carbon as platinum support. Mo2C, the most active transition metal carbide electrocatalyst, was prepared using four different synthesis routes, and the synthesis route dependent activities compared. Bifunctional Mo 2C that is HER as well as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) active, was achieved when the carbide was templated on a multiwalled carbon nanotube using carbothermic reduction method. Bimetallic carbides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo or W were prepared using a common carbothermic reduction method. Two different stoichiometries of bimetallic carbides were obtained for each system within a 60 °C temperature window. While the bimetallic carbides showed relatively lower electrocatalytic activities towards HER and ORR in comparison to Mo2C and WC, they revealed remarkably higher OER activities than IrO2 and RuO2, the state-of-the-art OER catalysts. Bimetallic oxides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo and W were also prepared using a hydrothermal synthesis method and they also revealed OER activities that are much higher than RuO2 and IrO2. Additionally, the OER activities were dependent on the degree and nature of hydration in the bimetallic oxide crystal lattice, with the completely hydrated, as synthesized, cobalt molybdate and nickel

  16. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiHx, which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  17. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiH x , which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  18. Mechanical failure and glass transition in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    The current majority view on the phenomenon of mechanical failure in metallic glasses appears to be that it is caused by the activity of some structural defects, such as free-volumes or shear transformation zones, and the concentration of such defects is small, only of the order of 1%. However, the recent results compel us to revise this view. Through molecular dynamics simulation it has been shown that mechanical failure is the stress-induced glass transition. According to our theory the concentration of the liquid-like sites (defects) is well over 20% at the glass transition. We suggest that the defect concentration in metallic glasses is actually very high, and percolation of such defects causes atomic avalanche and mechanical failure. In this article we discuss the glass transition, mechanical failure and viscosity from such a point of view.

  19. Distinct metallization and atomization transitions in dense liquid hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Guglielmo; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-03-13

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations driven by accurate quantum Monte Carlo forces on dense liquid hydrogen. There is a recent report of a complete atomization transition between a mixed molecular-atomic liquid and a completely dissociated fluid in an almost unaccessible pressure range [Nat. Commun. 5, 3487 (2014)]. Here, instead, we identify a different transition between the fully molecular liquid and the mixed-atomic fluid at ∼400  GPa, i.e., in a much more interesting pressure range. We provide numerical evidence supporting the metallic behavior of this intermediate phase. Therefore, we predict that the metallization at finite temperature occurs in this partially dissociated molecular fluid, well before the complete atomization of the liquid. At high temperature this first-order transition becomes a crossover, in very good agreement with the experimental observation. Several systematic tests supporting the quality of our large scale calculations are also reported.

  20. Transition Metal Nitrides for Electrocatalytic Energy Conversion: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Xie, Junfeng; Xie, Yi

    2016-03-07

    Electrocatalytic energy conversion has been considered as one of the most efficient and promising pathways for realizing energy storage and energy utilization in modern society. To improve electrocatalytic reactions, specific catalysts are needed to lower the overpotential. In the search for efficient alternatives to noble metal catalysts, transition metal nitrides have attracted considerable interest due to their high catalytic activity and unique electronic structure. Over the past few decades, numerous nitride-based catalysts have been explored with respect to their ability to drive various electrocatalytic reactions, such as the hydrogen evolution reaction and the oxygen evolution reaction to achieve water splitting and the oxygen reduction reaction coupled with the methanol oxidation reaction to construct fuel cells or rechargeable Li-O2 batteries. This Minireview provides a brief overview of recent progress on electrocatalysts based on transition metal nitrides, and outlines the current challenges and future opportunities.

  1. Disorder-Driven Metal-Insulator Transitions in Deformable Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Sante, Domenico; Fratini, Simone; Dobrosavljević, Vladimir; Ciuchi, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    We show that, in the presence of a deformable lattice potential, the nature of the disorder-driven metal-insulator transition is fundamentally changed with respect to the noninteracting (Anderson) scenario. For strong disorder, even a modest electron-phonon interaction is found to dramatically renormalize the random potential, opening a mobility gap at the Fermi energy. This process, which reflects disorder-enhanced polaron formation, is here given a microscopic basis by treating the lattice deformations and Anderson localization effects on the same footing. We identify an intermediate "bad insulator" transport regime which displays resistivity values exceeding the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit and with a negative temperature coefficient, as often observed in strongly disordered metals. Our calculations reveal that this behavior originates from significant temperature-induced rearrangements of electronic states due to enhanced interaction effects close to the disorder-driven metal-insulator transition.

  2. Metal-insulator transition in films of doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Reich, K V; Kramer, Nicolaas J; Fu, Han; Kortshagen, Uwe R; Shklovskii, B I

    2016-03-01

    To fully deploy the potential of semiconductor nanocrystal films as low-cost electronic materials, a better understanding of the amount of dopants required to make their conductivity metallic is needed. In bulk semiconductors, the critical concentration of electrons at the metal-insulator transition is described by the Mott criterion. Here, we theoretically derive the critical concentration nc for films of heavily doped nanocrystals devoid of ligands at their surface and in direct contact with each other. In the accompanying experiments, we investigate the conduction mechanism in films of phosphorus-doped, ligand-free silicon nanocrystals. At the largest electron concentration achieved in our samples, which is half the predicted nc, we find that the localization length of hopping electrons is close to three times the nanocrystals diameter, indicating that the film approaches the metal-insulator transition.

  3. X-ray Emission Spectroscopy in Magnetic 3d-Transition Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Iota, V; Park, J; Baer, B; Yoo, C; Shen, G

    2003-11-18

    different from those of their 4d- and 5d-counter parts. This anomalous behavior has been interpreted in terms of the spin-polarized d-band altering the d-band occupancy [1]. At high pressures, however, the d-valence band is expected to broaden resulting in a suppression or even a complete loss of magnetism. Experimentally, ferromagnetic {alpha}(bcc)-Fe has been confirmed to transform to non-magnetic {var_epsilon}-Fe (hcp) at 10 GPa [2,3]. Recently, we have also observed a similar transition in Co from ferromagnetic {alpha}(hcp)-Co to likely nonmagnetic {beta}(fcc)-Co at 105 GPa[4]. A similar structural phase transition is expected in Ni, probably in the second-order fcc-fcc transition. However, there has been no directly measured change in magnetism associated with the structural phase transition in Co, nor has yet been confirmed such an iso-structural phase transition in Ni. Similar electronic transitions have been proposed in these 3d-transition metal oxides (FeO, CoO and NiO) from high spin (magnetic) to low spin (nonmagnetic) states [5]. In each of these systems, the magnetic transition is accompanied by a first-order structural transition involving large volume collapse (10% in FeO, for example). So far, there have been no electronic measurements under pressure confirming these significant theoretical predictions, although the predicted pressures for the volume collapse transitions are within the experimental pressure range (80-200GPa).

  4. High-temperature thermochemistry of transition metal borides, silicides and related compounds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Klemppa, Ole J.

    2000-10-01

    Earlier this year in collaboration with Dr. Susan V. Meschel we prepared a major review paper which gives a comprehensive summary of what our laboratory has accomplished with support from DOE. This paper is No.43 in the List of Publications provided. It was presented to TMS at its National Meeting in Nashville, TN last March. A copy of the manuscript of this paper was recently mailed to DOE. It has been submitted for publication in Journal of Alloys and Compounds. This review paper summarizes our observed trends in the enthalpies of formation of TR-X and RE-X compounds (where X is a IIIB or IVB element) in their dependence of the atomic number of the transition metal (TR) and the lanthanide metal (RE). In this paper our measured enthalpies of formation for each alloy family are compared for the 3d, 4d and 5d transition metal elements. We also compare our experimental results with predicted values based on Miedema's semi-empirical model. Data are presented for the carbides, silicides, germanides and stannides in Group IVB, and for the borides and aluminides in Group IIIB. During the past year (1999-2000) we have extended our work to compounds of the 3d, 4d and 5d elements with gallium (see papers No.40, No.41, and No.45 in the List of Publications). Fig. 1 (taken from No.45) presents a systematic picture of our experimental values for the most exothermic gallide compounds formed with the transition elements. This figure is characteristic of the other systematic pictures which we have found for the two other IIIB elements which we have studied and for the four IVB elements. These figures are all presented in Ref. No.43. This paper also illustrates how the enthalpy of formation of compounds of the IIIB and IVB elements with the lanthanide elements (with the exception of Pm, Eu and Yb) depend on the atomic number of RE. Finally our results for the RE-X compounds are compared with the predictions of Gschneidner (K.A. Gschneidner, Jr., J. Less Common Metals 17, 1

  5. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-21

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work, we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic body centered cubic atomic hydrogen in its ground state. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transition order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of r{sub s} = 2.27(3) a{sub 0}. We compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin’s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.

  6. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-18

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between the paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic phases of ground state body centered cubic atomic hydrogen. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transition order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3)a0. As a result, we compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.

  7. Thermal conductivity switch: Optimal semiconductor/metal melting transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangnam; Kaviany, Massoud

    2016-10-01

    Scrutinizing distinct solid/liquid (s /l ) and solid/solid (s /s ) phase transitions (passive transitions) for large change in bulk (and homogenous) thermal conductivity, we find the s /l semiconductor/metal (S/M) transition produces the largest dimensionless thermal conductivity switch (TCS) figure of merit ZTCS (change in thermal conductivity divided by smaller conductivity). At melting temperature, the solid phonon and liquid molecular thermal conductivities are comparable and generally small, so the TCS requires localized electron solid and delocalized electron liquid states. For cyclic phase reversibility, the congruent phase transition (no change in composition) is as important as the thermal transport. We identify X Sb and X As (X =Al , Cd, Ga, In, Zn) and describe atomic-structural metrics for large ZTCS, then show the superiority of S/M phonon- to electron-dominated transport melting transition. We use existing experimental results and theoretical and ab initio calculations of the related properties for both phases (including the Kubo-Greenwood and Bridgman formulations of liquid conductivities). The 5 p orbital of Sb contributes to the semiconductor behavior in the solid-phase band gap and upon disorder and bond-length changes in the liquid phase this changes to metallic, creating the large contrast in thermal conductivity. The charge density distribution, electronic localization function, and electron density of states are used to mark this S/M transition. For optimal TCS, we examine the elemental selection from the transition, basic, and semimetals and semiconductor groups. For CdSb, addition of residual Ag suppresses the bipolar conductivity and its ZTCS is over 7, and for Zn3Sb2 it is expected to be over 14, based on the structure and transport properties of the better-known β -Zn4Sb3 . This is the highest ZTCS identified. In addition to the metallic melting, the high ZTCS is due to the electron-poor nature of II-V semiconductors, leading to the

  8. Spectroscopic studies of metal high-k dielectrics: transition metal oxides and silicates, and complex rare earth/transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucovsky, G.; Hong, J. G.; Fulton, C. C.; Zou, Y.; Nemanich, R. J.; Ade, H.; Scholm, D. G.; Freeouf, J. L.

    2004-08-01

    This paper uses X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of electronic structure of the transition metal oxides TiO2, ZrO2 and HfO2, Zr and Hf silicate alloys, and the complex oxides, GdScO3, DyScO3 and HfTiO4. Qualitative and quantitative differences are identified between dipole allowed intra-atomic transitions from core p-states to empty d*- and s*-states, and inter-atomic transitions from transition metal and oxide 1s states to O 2p* that are mixed with transition metal d*- and s*-states for transition metal oxides and silicate alloys. The complex oxide studies have focused on the O K1 edge spectra. Differences between the spectral peak energies of the lowest d*-features in the respective O K1 spectra are demonstrated to scale with optical band gap differences for TiO2, ZrO2 and HfO2, as well as the complex oxides providing important information relevant to applications of TM oxides as high-k gate dielectrics in advanced Si devices. This is demonstrated through scaling relationships between (i) conduction band offset energies between Si and the respective dielectrics, and the optical band gaps, and (ii) the optical band gaps, the conduction band offset energies, and the electron tunneling masses as functions of the atomic d-state energies of the transition metal atoms.

  9. Transition Metal d-Orbital Splitting Diagrams: An Updated Educational Resource for Square Planar Transition Metal Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bo¨rgel, Jonas; Campbell, Michael G.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The presentation of d-orbital splitting diagrams for square planar transition metal complexes in textbooks and educational materials is often inconsistent and therefore confusing for students. Here we provide a concise summary of the key features of orbital splitting diagrams for square planar complexes, which we propose may be used as an updated…

  10. Transition Metal d-Orbital Splitting Diagrams: An Updated Educational Resource for Square Planar Transition Metal Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bo¨rgel, Jonas; Campbell, Michael G.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The presentation of d-orbital splitting diagrams for square planar transition metal complexes in textbooks and educational materials is often inconsistent and therefore confusing for students. Here we provide a concise summary of the key features of orbital splitting diagrams for square planar complexes, which we propose may be used as an updated…

  11. Pressure induced quantum phase transitions in metallic oxides and pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah Tafti, Fazel

    Quantum phase transitions occur as a result of competing ground states. The focus of the present work is to understand quantum criticality and its consequences when the competition is between insulating and metallic ground states. Metal-insulator transitions are studied by means of electronic transport measurements and quantum critical points are approached by applying hydrostatic pressure in two different compounds namely Eu2Ir22O 7 and FeCrAs. The former is a ternary metal oxide and the latter is a ternary metal pnictide. A major component of this work was the development of the ultra-high pressure measurements by means of Anvil cells. A novel design is introduced which minimizes the alignment accessory components hence, making the cell more robust and easier to use. Eu2Ir22O7 is a ternary metal oxide and a member of the pyrochlore iridate family. Resistivity measurements under pressure in moissanite anvil cells show the evolution of the ground state of the system from insulating to metallic. The quantum phase transition at Pc ˜ 6 GPa appears to be continuous. A remarkable correspondence is revealed between the effect of the hydrostatic pressure on Eu2Ir22O7 and the effect of chemical pressure by changing the R size in the R2Ir2O7 series. This suggests that in both cases the tuning parameter controls the t2g bandwidth of the iridium 5d electrons. Moreover, hydrostatic pressure unveils a curious cross-over from incoherent to conventional metallic behaviour at a T* > 150 K in the neighbourhood of Pc, suggesting a connection between the high and low temperature phases. The possibility of a topological semi-metallic ground state, predicted in recent theoretical studies, is explained. FeCrAs is a ternary metal pnictide with Fermi liquid specific heat and susceptibility behaviour but non-metallic non-Fermi liquid resistivity behaviour. Characteristic properties of the compound are explained and compared to those of superconducting pnictides. Antiferromagnetic (AFM

  12. Pseudopotentials for quantum Monte Carlo studies of transition metal oxides

    DOE PAGES

    Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana Palacio, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2016-02-22

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of transition metal oxides are partially limited by the availability of high-quality pseudopotentials that are both accurate in QMC and compatible with major plane-wave electronic structure codes. We have generated a set of neon-core pseudopotentials with small cutoff radii for the early transition metal elements Sc to Zn within the local density approximation of density functional theory. The pseudopotentials have been directly tested for accuracy within QMC by calculating the first through fourth ionization potentials of the isolated transition metal (M) atoms and the binding curve of each M-O dimer. We find the ionization potentialsmore » to be accurate to 0.16(1) eV, on average, relative to experiment. The equilibrium bond lengths of the dimers are within 0.5(1)% of experimental values, on average, and the binding energies are also typically accurate to 0.18(3) eV. The level of accuracy we find for atoms and dimers is comparable to what has recently been observed for bulk metals and oxides using the same pseudopotentials. Our QMC pseudopotential results compare well with the findings of previous QMC studies and benchmark quantum chemical calculations.« less

  13. Pseudopotentials for quantum Monte Carlo studies of transition metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana Palacio, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2016-02-22

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of transition metal oxides are partially limited by the availability of high-quality pseudopotentials that are both accurate in QMC and compatible with major plane-wave electronic structure codes. We have generated a set of neon-core pseudopotentials with small cutoff radii for the early transition metal elements Sc to Zn within the local density approximation of density functional theory. The pseudopotentials have been directly tested for accuracy within QMC by calculating the first through fourth ionization potentials of the isolated transition metal (M) atoms and the binding curve of each M-O dimer. We find the ionization potentials to be accurate to 0.16(1) eV, on average, relative to experiment. The equilibrium bond lengths of the dimers are within 0.5(1)% of experimental values, on average, and the binding energies are also typically accurate to 0.18(3) eV. The level of accuracy we find for atoms and dimers is comparable to what has recently been observed for bulk metals and oxides using the same pseudopotentials. Our QMC pseudopotential results compare well with the findings of previous QMC studies and benchmark quantum chemical calculations.

  14. Cohesion and promotion energies in the transition metals: Implications of the local-density approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, R. E.; Fernando, G. W.; Weinert, M.; Wang, Y. J.; Davenport, J. W.

    1991-04-01

    The accuracy of the local-density (LDA) or local-spin-density (LSDA) approximations when applied to transition metals is of great concern. Estimates of the cohesive energy compare the total energy of the solid with that of the free atom. This involves chosing the reference state of the free atom which, as a rule, will not be the free atom's ground state in LDA or LSDA. Comparing one reference state versus another, e.g., the dn-1s vs dn-2s2 for a transition metal, corresponds to calculating an s-d promotion energy Δ, which may be compared with experiment. Gunnarsson and Jones (GJ) [Phys. Rev. B 31, 7588 (1985)] found for the 3d row that the calculated Δ displayed systematic errors which they attributed to a difference in error within the LSDA in the treatment of the coupling of the outer-core electrons with the d versus non-d valence electrons. This study has been extended to relativistic calculations for the 3d, 4d, and 5d rows and for other promotions. The situation is more complicated than suggested by GJ, and its implications for cohesive energy estimates will be discussed.

  15. Vibrational energy transfer dynamics in ruthenium polypyridine transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Fedoseeva, Marina; Delor, Milan; Parker, Simon C; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Weinstein, Julia A

    2015-01-21

    Understanding the dynamics of the initial stages of vibrational energy transfer in transition metal complexes is a challenging fundamental question which is also of crucial importance for many applications, such as improving the performance of solar devices or photocatalysis. The present study investigates vibrational energy transport in the ground and the electronic excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2, a close relative of the efficient "N3" dye used in dye-sensitized solar cells. Using the emerging technique of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we show that, similarly to other transition-metal complexes, the central Ru heavy atom acts as a "bottleneck" making the energy transfer from small ligands with high energy vibrational stretching frequencies less favorable and thereby affecting the efficiency of vibrational energy flow in the complex. Comparison of the vibrational relaxation times in the electronic ground and excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2 shows that it is dramatically faster in the latter. We propose to explain this observation by the intramolecular electrostatic interactions between the thiocyanate group and partially oxidised Ru metal center, which increase the degree of vibrational coupling between CN and Ru-N modes in the excited state thus reducing structural and thermodynamic barriers that slow down vibrational relaxation and energy transport in the electronic ground state. As a very similar behavior was earlier observed in another transition-metal complex, Re(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2'-bpy)(CO)3Cl, we suggest that this effect in vibrational energy dynamics might be common for transition-metal complexes with heavy central atoms.

  16. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, N.M.; Chen, J.

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme. No Drawings

  17. An Alternative Approach to the Teaching of Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Brian

    1979-01-01

    Presents an alternative approach to teaching Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry with the transition metal chemistry skeleton features of interest. The "skeleton" is intended as a guide to predicting the chemistry of a selected compound. (Author/SA)

  18. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, Nenad M.; Chen, Jian

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme.

  19. An Alternative Approach to the Teaching of Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Brian

    1979-01-01

    Presents an alternative approach to teaching Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry with the transition metal chemistry skeleton features of interest. The "skeleton" is intended as a guide to predicting the chemistry of a selected compound. (Author/SA)

  20. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    DOE PAGES

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; ...

    2015-11-18

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between the paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic phases of ground state body centered cubic atomic hydrogen. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transitionmore » order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3)a0. As a result, we compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.« less

  1. A superconductor to superfluid phase transition in liquid metallic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Babaev, Egor; Sudbø, Asle; Ashcroft, N W

    2004-10-07

    Although hydrogen is the simplest of atoms, it does not form the simplest of solids or liquids. Quantum effects in these phases are considerable (a consequence of the light proton mass) and they have a demonstrable and often puzzling influence on many physical properties, including spatial order. To date, the structure of dense hydrogen remains experimentally elusive. Recent studies of the melting curve of hydrogen indicate that at high (but experimentally accessible) pressures, compressed hydrogen will adopt a liquid state, even at low temperatures. In reaching this phase, hydrogen is also projected to pass through an insulator-to-metal transition. This raises the possibility of new state of matter: a near ground-state liquid metal, and its ordered states in the quantum domain. Ordered quantum fluids are traditionally categorized as superconductors or superfluids; these respective systems feature dissipationless electrical currents or mass flow. Here we report a topological analysis of the projected phase of liquid metallic hydrogen, finding that it may represent a new type of ordered quantum fluid. Specifically, we show that liquid metallic hydrogen cannot be categorized exclusively as a superconductor or superfluid. We predict that, in the presence of a magnetic field, liquid metallic hydrogen will exhibit several phase transitions to ordered states, ranging from superconductors to superfluids.

  2. Polytypic phase transitions in metal intercalated Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengjing; Koski, Kristie J.

    2016-12-01

    The temperature and concentration dependent phase diagrams of zero-valent copper, cobalt, and iron intercalated bismuth selenide are investigated using in situ transmission electron microscopy. Polytypic phase transitions associated with superlattice formation along with order-disorder transitions of the guest intercalant are determined. Dual-element intercalants of CuCo, CuFe, and CoFe-Bi2Se3 are also investigated. Hexagonal and striped domain formation consistent with two-dimensional ordering of the intercalant and Pokrovksy-Talapov theory is identified as a function of concentration. These studies provide a complete picture of the structural behavior of zero-valent metal intercalated Bi2Se3.

  3. Interaction-Driven Metal-Insulator Transition in Strained Graphene.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ho-Kin; Laksono, E; Rodrigues, J N B; Sengupta, P; Assaad, F F; Adam, S

    2015-10-30

    The question of whether electron-electron interactions can drive a metal to insulator transition in graphene under realistic experimental conditions is addressed. Using three representative methods to calculate the effective long-range Coulomb interaction between π electrons in graphene and solving for the ground state using quantum Monte Carlo methods, we argue that, without strain, graphene remains metallic and changing the substrate from SiO_{2} to suspended samples hardly makes any difference. In contrast, applying a rather large-but experimentally realistic-uniform and isotropic strain of about 15% seems to be a promising route to making graphene an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator.

  4. Transition metal doped arsenene: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Minglei; Wang, Sake; Du, Yanhui; Yu, Jin; Tang, Wencheng

    2016-12-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atoms substitutional doping of an arsenene monolayer. Based on the binding energy, the TM-substituted arsenene systems were found to be robust. Magnetic states were obtained for Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Fe doping. More importantly, a half-metallic state resulted from Ti and Mn doping, while the spin-polarized semiconducting state occurred with V, Cr and Fe doping. Our studies demonstrated the potential applications of TM-substituted arsenene for spintronics and magnetic storage devices.

  5. Highly Efficient Transition Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changlong; Ciganda, Roberto; Salmon, Lionel; Gregurec, Danijela; Irigoyen, Joseba; Moya, Sergio; Ruiz, Jaime; Astruc, Didier

    2016-02-24

    A ligand design is proposed for transition metal nanoparticle (TMNP) catalysts in aqueous solution. Thus, a tris(triazolyl)-polyethylene glycol (tris-trz-PEG) amphiphilic ligand, 2, is used for the synthesis of very small TMNPs with Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Pd, Ag, Pt, and Au. These TMNP-2 catalysts were evaluated and compared for the model 4-nitrophenol reduction, and proved to be extremely efficient. High catalytic efficiencies involving the use of only a few ppm metal of PdNPs, RuNPs, and CuNPs were also exemplified in Suzuki-Miyaura, transfer hydrogenation, and click reactions, respectively.

  6. Resonant Ultrasound Studies of Complex Transition Metal Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Henry Bass; Dr. J. R. Gladden

    2008-08-18

    Department of Energy EPSCoR The University of Mississippi Award: DE-FG02-04ER46121 Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy Studies of Complex Transition Metal Oxides The central thrust of this DOE funded research program has been to apply resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS), an elegant and efficient method for determining the elastic stiffness constants of a crystal, to the complex and poorly understood class of materials known as transition metal oxides (TMOs). Perhaps the most interesting and challenging feature of TMOs is their strongly correlated behavior in which spin, lattice, and charge degrees of freedom are strongly coupled. Elastic constants are a measure of the interatomic potentials in a crystal and are thus sensitive probes into the atomic environment. This sensitivity makes RUS an ideal tool to study the coupling of phase transition order parameters to lattice strains. The most significant result of the project has been the construction of a high temperature RUS apparatus capable of making elastic constant measurements at temperatures as high as 1000 degrees Celsius. We have designed and built novel acoustic transducers which can operate as high as 600 degrees Celsius based on lithium niobate piezoelectric elements. For measurement between 600 to 1000 C, a buffer rod system is used in which the samples under test and transducers are separated by a rod with low acoustic attenuation. The high temperature RUS system has been used to study the charge order (CO) transition in transition metal oxides for which we have discovered a new transition occurring about 35 C below the CO transition. While the CO transition exhibits a linear coupling between the strain and order parameter, this new precursor transition shows a different coupling indicating a fundamentally different mechanism. We have also begun a study, in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, to study novel thermoelectric materials at elevated temperatures. These materials include silicon

  7. Exploiting Semiconductor to Metallic Phase Transformation in Layered Transition Metal Dichalcogenides for Ohmic contact Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappera, Rajesh; Voiry, Damien; Jen, Wesley; Yalcin, Sibel Ebru; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya; Chhowalla, Manish; Material Science department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, 08854, USA Team; CenterIntegrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 87544, US Team

    2014-03-01

    Achieving ohmic contacts to transition metal dichalcogenides (MoS2, WS2, WSe2 and MoSe2) has been a challenge for researchers owing to the formation of a large Schottky barrier between metal and semiconductor. This results in low on-currents, mobilities and sub-threshold swings in the devices made with these materials. Here we report a universal strategy using chemical approach to reversibly transform the semiconducting phase (2H) to metallic phase (1T). Taking advantage of the metallic phase, we have fabricated hybrid transistors, which have 1T phase contacts and semiconducting 2H phase of the material as the channel. The metallic phase dramatically reduces the Schottky barrier between the metal and the semiconductor thereby mitigating the high contact resistance issues. This strategy should be applicable to several other applications such as catalysis, supercapacitors and batteries. Detailed synthesis, structural, electrical and optical characterization will be described.

  8. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1995-12-31

    The view that natural gas is thermolytic, coming from decomposing organic debris, has remained almost unchallenged for nearly half a century. Disturbing contradictions exist, however: Oil is found at great depth, at temperatures where only gas should exist and oil and gas deposits show no evidence of the thermolytic debris indicative of oil decomposing to gas. Moreover, laboratory attempts to duplicate the composition of natural gas, which is typically between 60 and 95+ wt% methane in C{sub 1}-C{sub 4}, have produced insufficient amounts of methane (10 to 60%). It has been suggested that natural gas may be generated catalytically, promoted by the transition metals in carbonaceous sedimentary rocks. This talk will discuss experimental results that support this hypothesis. Various transition metals, as pure compounds and in source rocks, will be shown to generate a catalytic gas that is identical to natural gas. Kinetic results suggest robust catalytic activity under moderate catagenetic conditions.

  9. Exciton complexes in low dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Thilagam, A.

    2014-08-07

    We examine the excitonic properties of layered configurations of low dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMDCs) using the fractional dimensional space approach. The binding energies of the exciton, trion, and biexciton in LTMDCs of varying layers are analyzed, and linked to the dimensionality parameter α, which provides insight into critical electro-optical properties (relative oscillator strength, absorption spectrum, exciton-exciton interaction) of the material systems. The usefulness of α is highlighted by its independence of the physical mechanisms underlying the confinement effects of geometrical structures. Our estimates of the binding energies of exciton complexes for the monolayer configuration of transition metal dichalcogenides suggest a non-collinear structure for the trion and a positronium-molecule-like square structure for the biexciton.

  10. Ductile-to-brittle transition in spallation of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Ling, Z.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-10-14

    In this paper, the spallation behavior of a binary metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. With increasing the impact velocity, micro-voids induced by tensile pulses become smaller and more concentrated. The phenomenon suggests a ductile-to-brittle transition during the spallation process. Further investigation indicates that the transition is controlled by the interaction between void nucleation and growth, which can be regarded as a competition between tension transformation zones (TTZs) and shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale. As impact velocities become higher, the stress amplitude and temperature rise in the spall region increase and micro-structures of the material become more unstable. Therefore, TTZs are prone to activation in metallic glasses, leading to a brittle behavior during the spallation process.

  11. Metal-Insulator Transition and Topological Properties of Pyrochlore Iridates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Haule, Kristjan; Vanderbilt, David

    2017-01-01

    Combining density functional theory (DFT) and embedded dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) methods, we study the metal-insulator transition in R2Ir2 O7 (R =Y , Eu, Sm, Nd, Pr, and Bi) and the topological nature of the insulating compounds. Accurate free energies evaluated using the charge self-consistent DFT +DMFT method reveal that the metal-insulator transition occurs for an A -cation radius between that of Nd and Pr, in agreement with experiments. The all-in-all-out magnetic phase, which is stable in the Nd compound but not the Pr one, gives rise to a small Ir4 + magnetic moment of ≈0.4 μB and opens a sizable correlated gap. We demonstrate that within this state-of-the-art theoretical method, the insulating bulk pyrochlore iridates are topologically trivial.

  12. Recent Advances in Transition Metal-Catalyzed Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Matthew J.; Nguyen, Hien M.

    2012-01-01

    Having access to mild and operationally simple techniques for attaining carbohydrate targets will be necessary to facilitate advancement in biological, medicinal, and pharmacological research. Even with the abundance of elegant reports for generating glycosidic linkages, stereoselective construction of α- and β-oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates is by no means trivial. In an era where expanded awareness of the impact we are having on the environment drives the state-of-the-art, synthetic chemists are tasked with developing cleaner and more efficient reactions for achieving their transformations. This movement imparts the value that prevention of waste is always superior to its treatment or cleanup. This review will highlight recent advancement in this regard by examining strategies that employ transition metal catalysis in the synthesis of oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. These methods are mild and effective for constructing glycosidic bonds with reduced levels of waste through utilization of sub-stoichiometric amounts of transition metals to promote the glycosylation. PMID:22924154

  13. Quantum critical transport at a continuous metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, P.; Laad, M. S.; Hassan, S. R.

    2016-08-01

    In contrast to the first-order correlation-driven Mott metal-insulator transition, continuous disorder-driven transitions are intrinsically quantum critical. Here, we investigate transport quantum criticality in the Falicov-Kimball model, a representative of the latter class in the strong disorder category. Employing cluster-dynamical mean-field theory, we find clear and anomalous quantum critical scaling behavior manifesting as perfect mirror symmetry of scaling curves on both sides of the MIT. Surprisingly, we find that the beta function β (g ) scales as log(g ) deep into the bad-metallic phase as well, providing a sound unified basis for these findings. We argue that such strong localization quantum criticality may manifest in real three-dimensional systems where disorder effects are more important than electron-electron interactions.

  14. Spin Transport in Single Layer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Michael; Aji, Vivek

    Inversion symmetry breaking and strong spin orbit coupling in two dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides leads to interesting new phenomena such as the valley hall and spin hall effects. The nontrivial Berry curvature of the bands yields transverse spin currents in applied field. In this talk we characterize the spin transport in hole-doped systems. Due to the large spin-splitting, time-reversal invariance, and the large separation of hole pockets in momentum space, spin flip scattering involves inter-valley processes with large momentum. As such, one expects large spin life times and a large spin hall angle. We analyze the robustness of the phenomena to various scattering processes and explore the viability of transition metal dichalcogenides for spintronic applications. We acknowledge the support of the NSF via Grant NSF DMR-1506707.

  15. Recent Advances in Transition Metal-Catalyzed Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    McKay, Matthew J; Nguyen, Hien M

    2012-08-03

    Having access to mild and operationally simple techniques for attaining carbohydrate targets will be necessary to facilitate advancement in biological, medicinal, and pharmacological research. Even with the abundance of elegant reports for generating glycosidic linkages, stereoselective construction of α- and β-oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates is by no means trivial. In an era where expanded awareness of the impact we are having on the environment drives the state-of-the-art, synthetic chemists are tasked with developing cleaner and more efficient reactions for achieving their transformations. This movement imparts the value that prevention of waste is always superior to its treatment or cleanup. This review will highlight recent advancement in this regard by examining strategies that employ transition metal catalysis in the synthesis of oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. These methods are mild and effective for constructing glycosidic bonds with reduced levels of waste through utilization of sub-stoichiometric amounts of transition metals to promote the glycosylation.

  16. Laser Assisted Additively Manufactured Transition Metal Coating on Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Hitesh D.; Rajamure, Ravi Shanker; Roy, Anurag; Srinivasan, S. G.; Sundararajan, G.; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2016-07-01

    Various physical and chemical properties of surface and subsurface regions of Al can be improved by the formation of transition metal intermetallic phases (Al x TM y ) via coating of the transition metal (TM). The lower equilibrium solid solubility of TM in Al (<1 at.%) is a steep barrier to the formation of solid solutions using conventional alloying methods. In contrast, as demonstrated in the present work, surface engineering via a laser-aided additive manufacturing approach can effectively synthesize TM intermetallic coatings on the surface of Al. The focus of the present work included the development of process control to achieve thermodynamic and kinetic conditions necessary for desirable physical, microstructural and compositional attributes. A multiphysics finite element model was developed to predict the temperature profile, cooling rate, melt depth, dilution of W in Al matrix and corresponding micro-hardness in the coating, and the interface between the coating and the base material and the base material.

  17. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples.

  18. Metallic ferromagnetism-insulating charge order transition in doped manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Van-Nham; Ninh, Quoc-Huy; Tran, Minh-Tien

    2016-04-01

    We show that an interplay of double exchange and impurity randomness can explain the competition between metal-ferromagnetic and insulating charge ordered states in doped manganites. The double exchange is simplified in the Ising type, whereas the randomness is modeled by the Falicov-Kimball binary distribution. The combined model is considered in a framework of dynamical mean-field theory. Using the Kubo-Greenwood formalism, the transport coefficients are explicitly expressed in terms of single-particle spectral functions. Dividing the system into two sublattices we have pointed out a direct calculation to the checkerboard charge order parameter and the magnetizations. Numerical results show us that the checkerboard charge order can settle inside the ferromagnetic state at low temperature. An insulator-metal transition is also found at the point of the checkerboard charge order-ferromagnetic transition.

  19. Metal-insulator and charge ordering transitions in oxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sujay Kumar

    Strongly correlated oxides are a class of materials wherein interplay of various degrees of freedom results in novel electronic and magnetic phenomena. Vanadium oxides are widely studied correlated materials that exhibit metal-insulator transitions (MIT) in a wide temperature range from 70 K to 380 K. In this Thesis, results from electrical transport measurements on vanadium dioxide (VO2) and vanadium oxide bronze (MxV 2O5) (where M: alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal cations) are presented and discussed. Although the MIT in VO2 has been studied for more than 50 years, the microscopic origin of the transition is still debated since a slew of external parameters such as light, voltage, and strain are found to significantly alter the transition. Furthermore, recent works on electrically driven switching in VO2 have shown that the role of Joule heating to be a major cause as opposed to electric field. We explore the mechanisms behind the electrically driven switching in single crystalline nanobeams of VO2 through DC and AC transport measurements. The harmonic analysis of the AC measurement data shows that non-uniform Joule heating causes electronic inhomogeneities to develop within the nanobeam and is responsible for driving the transition in VO2. Surprisingly, field assisted emission mechanisms such as Poole-Frenkel effect is found to be absent and the role of percolation is also identified in the electrically driven transition. This Thesis also provides a new insight into the mechanisms behind the electrolyte gating induced resistance modulation and the suppression of MIT in VO2. We show that the metallic phase of VO2 induced by electrolyte gating is due to an electrochemical process and can be both reversible and irreversible under different conditions. The kinetics of the redox processes increase with temperature; a complete suppression of the transition and the stabilization of the metallic phase are achievable by gating in the rutile metallic phase

  20. Materials Characterization and Microelectronic Implementation of Metal-insulator Transition Materials and Phase Change Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION AND MICROELECTRONIC IMPLEMENTATION OF METAL -INSULATOR TRANSITION MATERIALS...MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION AND MICROELECTRONIC IMPLEMENTATION OF METAL -INSULATOR TRANSITION MATERIALS AND PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS THESIS...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENG-MS-15-M-016 MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION AND MICROELECTRONIC IMPLEMENTATION OF METAL -INSULATOR TRANSITION

  1. Separation observation of metal-insulator transition and structural phase transition in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Tak; Kim, Bong-Jun; Lee, Yong Wook; Chae, Byung Gyu; Yun, Sun Jin; Oh, Soo-Young; Lim, Yong-Sik

    2007-03-01

    An intermediate monoclinic metal phase between the metal-insulator transition (MIT) and the structural phase transition (SPT) is observed with VO2-based two-terminal devices and can be explained in terms of the Mott MIT. The conductivity of this phase linearly increases with increasing temperature up to TSPT 68^oC and becomes maximum at TSPT. The SPT is confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Optical microscopic observation reveals the absence of a local current path in the metal phase. The current uniformly flows throughout the surface of the VO2 film when the MIT occurs. This device can be used as a programmable critical temperature sensor. (References: New J. Phys. 6 (1994) 52 (http://www.njp.org); Appl. Phys. Lett. 86 (2005) 24210); Physica B 369 (2005) 76; cond-mat/0607577; cond-mat/0608085; cond-mat/0609033).

  2. The chemistry and physics of transition metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, E.K.; Jellinek, J.; Knickelbein, M.B.; Riley, S.J.

    1994-06-01

    In this program the authors study the fundamental properties of isolated clusters of transition metal atoms. Experimental studies of cluster chemistry include determination of cluster structure, reactivity, and the nature of cluster-adsorbate interactions. Studies of physical properties include measurements of cluster ionization potentials and photoabsorption cross sections. Theoretical studies focus on the structure and dynamics of clusters, including isomers, phases and phase changes, interactions with molecules, and fragmentation process.

  3. The energetics of ordered intermetallic alloys (of the transition metals)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.E.; Weinert, M.; Davenport, J.W.; Fernando, G.W.; Bennett, L.H.

    1992-10-01

    The atomically ordered phases in ordered transition metal alloys are discussed. This chapter is divided into: physical parameters controlling phase stability (Hume-Rothery, structural maps, Miedema Hamiltonian), wave functions & band theory, comment on entropy terms, cohesive energies (electron promotion energies, Hund`s rule on orbital effects), structural energies/stabilities of elemental solids, total energies and atomic positions, charge transfer (Au alloys, charge tailing), heats of formation of ordered compounds.

  4. The energetics of ordered intermetallic alloys (of the transition metals)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.E.; Weinert, M.; Davenport, J.W. ); Fernando, G.W. . Dept. of Physics); Bennett, L.H. . Metallurgy Div.)

    1992-01-01

    The atomically ordered phases in ordered transition metal alloys are discussed. This chapter is divided into: physical parameters controlling phase stability (Hume-Rothery, structural maps, Miedema Hamiltonian), wave functions band theory, comment on entropy terms, cohesive energies (electron promotion energies, Hund's rule on orbital effects), structural energies/stabilities of elemental solids, total energies and atomic positions, charge transfer (Au alloys, charge tailing), heats of formation of ordered compounds.

  5. Cointercalation of titanium dichalcogenides with transition metals and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, A. A.; Titov, A. N.; Titova, S. G.; Pryanichnikov, S. V.; Chezganov, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    Cointercalated materials are studied, obtained by introducing copper into a TiSe2 lattice preintercalated with transition metals M = Mn, Fe, Co, or Ni. The analysis of the state of cointercalated systems at 950°C shows that copper reduces manganese and iron, but it is incapable of reducing cobalt or nickel. To explain the results, the values of the binding energy of hybrid states M3d/Ti3 d are compared.

  6. Zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal initiators supported by olefin ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, Guillermo C; Chen, Yaofeng

    2011-10-25

    A zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal complex containing the simple and relatively small 3-(arylimino)-but-1-en-2-olato ligand that catalyzes the formation of polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene. A novel feature of this catalyst is that the active species is stabilized by a chelated olefin adduct. The present invention also provides methods of polymerizing olefin monomers using zwitterionic catalysts, particularly polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene.

  7. Unique reactivity of fluorinated molecules with transition metals.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Silvia; Munoz, Sócrates B; Fustero, Santos

    2014-01-01

    Organofluorine and organometallic chemistry by themselves constitute two potent areas in organic synthesis. Thus, the combination of both offers many chemical possibilities and represents a powerful tool for the design and development of new synthetic methodologies leading to diverse molecular structures in an efficient manner. Given the importance of the selective introduction of fluorine atoms into organic molecules and the effectiveness of transition metals in C-C and C-heteroatom bond formation, this review represents an interesting read for this aim.

  8. Preparation of nanocomposites containing nanoclusters of transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, S.B.; Lukehart, C.M., Wittig, J.E.

    1996-10-01

    New nanocomposites containing nanoclusters of transition metals have been prepared and characterized by TEM, XRD, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Organometallic or other coordination compounds functionalized with trialkoxysilyl groups have been synthesized and covalently incorporated into silica xerogels using standard sol-gel techniques. Thermal oxidative treatment of these xerogels in air followed by reduction in hydrogen yielded the desired nanocomposite phases. Using these methods, Mo, Re, Fe, Ru, Os, Pd, Pt, Cu. and Ag nanocomposites have been prepared.

  9. Novel Transition Metal Compounds with Promising Thermoelectric Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caillat, T.; Borshchevsky, A.; Fleurial, J. -P.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in the search for new high temperature thermoelectric materials at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is reviewed. Novel transition metal compounds were selected as potential new high performance thermoelectric materials and criteria of selection are presented and discussed. Samples of these new compounds were prepared at JPL by a variety of techniques. Encouraging experimental results obtained on several of these compounds are reported and show that they have the potential to be the next generation of thermoelectric materials.

  10. The development of a biological interface for transition metal implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Kim R.

    The specific goal of this research was to develop an in vitro model for a root-form endosseous dental implant that contains a periodontal ligament and that is biologically integratable into alveolar bone. This objective was based on the following two hypotheses. (1) The chemical attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to the surface of transition metals increases the number of fibroblast cells attached to the surface of the metal. (2) The chemical attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to the surface of transition metals increases the strength of the fibroblast cell attachment to the surface of the metal. The model needed to have a well-controlled surface that was reproducible. Thus, a layer of Au was deposited over a Ti base, and dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate) (DSP) a chemical containing disulfide groups was adsorbed to the Au. Next, extracellular matrix proteins which are periodontal ligament components were attached to the free end group of the chemical that was adsorbed to the Au. This surface served as an attachment substrate on which additional periodontal ligament components such as fibroblast cells could grow. From this model a new implant interface may be developed. This model was tested using the following polypeptides; collagen type I, collagen type IV, fibronectin, and poly-D-lysine. L929 cells were grown on Ti, Ti + Au, Ti + Au + polypeptide, and Ti + Au + DSP + polypeptide. After 72 hours, the live cells were stained with neutral red. The substrates were then subjected to increasing centrifugal forces. The viable stained cells were fixed onto the substrates and cells were counted. The hypotheses were proven for three polypeptides: fibronectin, collagen type I, and poly-D-lysine. The strongest attachment was found with collagen type I. Collagen type IV did not provide any advantage for attachment over uncoated transition metals.

  11. Optical properties of transition metal oxide quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chungwei; Posadas, Agham; Choi, Miri; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of a quantum well, a structure that confines the electron motion along one or more spatial directions, is a powerful method of controlling the electronic structure and corresponding optical response of a material. For example, semiconductor quantum wells are used to enhance optical properties of laser diodes. The ability to control the growth of transition metal oxide films to atomic precision opens an exciting opportunity of engineering quantum wells in these materials. The wide range of transition metal oxide band gaps offers unprecedented control of confinement while the strong correlation of d-electrons allows for various cooperative phenomena to come into play. Here, we combine density functional theory and tight-binding model Hamiltonian analysis to provide a simple physical picture of transition metal oxide quantum well states using a SrO/SrTiO3/SrO heterostructure as an example. The optical properties of the well are investigated by computing the frequency-dependent dielectric functions. The effect of an external electric field, which is essential for electro-optical devices, is also considered.

  12. The role of transition metal ions chemistry on multiphase chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguillaume, L.; Leriche, M.; Monod, A.; Chaumerliac, N.

    2003-04-01

    A modelling study of the role of transition metal ions chemistry on cloud chemistry is presented. First, new developments of the Model of Multiphase Cloud Chemistry (M2C2) are described: the transition metal ions reactivity and variable photolysis in the aqueous phase. Secondly, three summertime scenarios describing urban, remote and marine conditions are simulated. First, comparisons between results from M2C2 and from CAPRAM2.3 models for the same scenarios (Herrmann et al., 2000) show a good agreement between the two models with respect to their different chemical mechanisms. Secondly, chemical regimes in cloud are analysed to understand the role of transition metal ions chemistry on cloud chemistry. This study focuses on HOx chemistry, which afterwards influences the sulphur and the VOCs chemistry in droplets. The ratio of Fe(II)/Fe(III) exhibits a diurnal variation with values in agreement with the few measurements of Fe speciation available. In the polluted case, sensitivity tests with and without TMI chemistry, show an enhancement of OH concentration in the aqueous phase when TMI chemistry is considered. This implies a more important oxidation of VOCs in droplets, which produces the HO2 radical, the hydrogen peroxide precursor. In fact, the HO2 radical is mainly converted into hydrogen peroxide by reactions between HO2/O2- radicals with Fe(II). This production of hydrogen peroxide leads to a rapid conversion of S(IV) into S(VI) at the beginning of the simulation.

  13. Stabilization of Lithium Transition Metal Silicates in the Olivine Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Xiaoqi; Tripathi, Rajesh; Popov, Guerman; ...

    2017-07-28

    While olivine LiFePO4 shows amongst the best electrochemical properties of Li-ion positive electrodes with respect to rate behavior owing to facile Li+ migration pathways in the framework, replacing the [PO4] 3- polyanion with a silicate [SO4] 4- moitie in olivine is desirable. This would allow additional balancing alkali content and hence electron transfer, and increase the capacity. We demonstrate the first stabilization of a lithium transition-metal silicate (as a pure silicate) in the olivine structure type. Using LiInSiO4 and LiScSiO4 as the parent materials, transition metal (Mn, Fe, Co) substitutions on the In/Sc site were investigated by computational modelling viamore » atomic scale simulation. Transition metal substitution was found to be only favourable for Co, a finding confirmed by the successful solid state synthesis of olivine LixInyCo2-x-ySiO4. Finally, the stabilization of the structure was achieved by entropy provided by cation disorder.« less

  14. Theory of the pairbreaking superconductor-metal transition in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Subir

    2009-03-01

    We present a detailed description of a zero temperature phase transition between superconducting and diffusive metallic states in very thin wires due to a Cooper pair breaking mechanism. The dissipative critical theory contains current reducing fluctuations in the guise of both quantum and thermally activated phase slips. A full cross-over phase diagram is computed via an expansion in the inverse number of complex components of the superconducting order parameter (one in the physical case). The fluctuation corrections to the electrical (σ) and thermal (κ) conductivities are determined, and we find that σ has a non-monotonic temperature dependence in the metallic phase which may be consistent with recent experimental results on ultra-narrow wires. In the quantum critical regime, the ratio of the thermal to electrical conductivity displays a linear temperature dependence and thus the Wiedemann-Franz law is obeyed, with a new universal experimentally verifiable Lorenz number. We also examined the influence of quenched disorder on the superconductor-metal transition. The self-consistent pairing eigenmodes of a quasi-one dimensional wire were determined numerically. Our results support the proposal by Hoyos et al./ (Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 230601 (2007)) that the transition is described by the same strong disorder fixed point describing the onset of ferromagnetism in the quantum Ising model in a transverse field.

  15. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2008-04-01

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO) 2NO(PH 3) 2 and a small proton donor H 2O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H⋯H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions.

  16. Optical properties of transition metal oxide quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chungwei; Posadas, Agham; Choi, Miri; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-21

    Fabrication of a quantum well, a structure that confines the electron motion along one or more spatial directions, is a powerful method of controlling the electronic structure and corresponding optical response of a material. For example, semiconductor quantum wells are used to enhance optical properties of laser diodes. The ability to control the growth of transition metal oxide films to atomic precision opens an exciting opportunity of engineering quantum wells in these materials. The wide range of transition metal oxide band gaps offers unprecedented control of confinement while the strong correlation of d-electrons allows for various cooperative phenomena to come into play. Here, we combine density functional theory and tight-binding model Hamiltonian analysis to provide a simple physical picture of transition metal oxide quantum well states using a SrO/SrTiO{sub 3}/SrO heterostructure as an example. The optical properties of the well are investigated by computing the frequency-dependent dielectric functions. The effect of an external electric field, which is essential for electro-optical devices, is also considered.

  17. Synergistic Antimicrobial Effects of Silver/Transition-metal Combinatorial Treatments.

    PubMed

    Garza-Cervantes, Javier A; Chávez-Reyes, Arturo; Castillo, Elena C; García-Rivas, Gerardo; Antonio Ortega-Rivera, Oscar; Salinas, Eva; Ortiz-Martínez, Margarita; Gómez-Flores, Sara Leticia; Peña-Martínez, Jorge A; Pepi-Molina, Alan; Treviño-González, Mario T; Zarate, Xristo; Elena Cantú-Cárdenas, María; Enrique Escarcega-Gonzalez, Carlos; Morones-Ramírez, J Rubén

    2017-04-18

    Due to the emergence of multi-drug resistant strains, development of novel antibiotics has become a critical issue. One promising approach is the use of transition metals, since they exhibit rapid and significant toxicity, at low concentrations, in prokaryotic cells. Nevertheless, one main drawback of transition metals is their toxicity in eukaryotic cells. Here, we show that the barriers to use them as therapeutic agents could be mitigated by combining them with silver. We demonstrate that synergism of combinatorial treatments (Silver/transition metals, including Zn, Co, Cd, Ni, and Cu) increases up to 8-fold their antimicrobial effect, when compared to their individual effects, against E. coli and B. subtilis. We find that most combinatorial treatments exhibit synergistic antimicrobial effects at low/non-toxic concentrations to human keratinocyte cells, blast and melanoma rat cell lines. Moreover, we show that silver/(Cu, Ni, and Zn) increase prokaryotic cell permeability at sub-inhibitory concentrations, demonstrating this to be a possible mechanism of the synergistic behavior. Together, these results suggest that these combinatorial treatments will play an important role in the future development of antimicrobial agents and treatments against infections. In specific, the cytotoxicity experiments show that the combinations have great potential in the treatment of topical infections.

  18. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-24

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  19. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram; Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-01

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  20. Phonons and the metal-insulator transition in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sung; Alatas, A.

    2005-03-01

    VO2 undergoes a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at TC= 340 K, which is accompanied by a structural phase transition from a high temperature rutile phase to a low temperature monoclinic phase. Although VO2 has been studied extensively for over 40 years, a clear understanding of the origin of the phase transition has not been forthcoming. Still at issue is the relative importance of electron-lattice and electron-electron interactions as driving mechanisms for the MIT. Here, we report the phonon dispersion of VO2, measured along the rutile γ-R direction using high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering. Unusual phonon behavior at the R point, as the MIT is approached, suggests significant electron-phonon coupling.

  1. Control of Exciton Valley Coherence in Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Marie, X.; Liu, B. L.; Amand, T.; Robert, C.; Cadiz, F.; Renucci, P.; Urbaszek, B.

    2016-10-01

    The direct gap interband transitions in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers are governed by chiral optical selection rules. Determined by laser helicity, optical transitions in either the K+ or K- valley in momentum space are induced. Linearly polarized laser excitation prepares a coherent superposition of valley states. Here, we demonstrate the control of the exciton valley coherence in monolayer WSe2 by tuning the applied magnetic field perpendicular to the monolayer plane. We show rotation of this coherent superposition of valley states by angles as large as 30° in applied fields up to 9 T. This exciton valley coherence control on the ps time scale could be an important step towards complete control of qubits based on the valley degree of freedom.

  2. Covalent functionalization of monolayered transition metal dichalcogenides by phase engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiry, Damien; Goswami, Anandarup; Kappera, Rajesh; Silva, Cecilia De Carvalho Castro E.; Kaplan, Daniel; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Chemical functionalization of low-dimensional materials such as nanotubes, nanowires and graphene leads to profound changes in their properties and is essential for solubilizing them in common solvents. Covalent attachment of functional groups is generally achieved at defect sites, which facilitate electron transfer. Here, we describe a simple and general method for covalent functionalization of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets (MoS2, WS2 and MoSe2), which does not rely on defect engineering. The functionalization reaction is instead facilitated by electron transfer between the electron-rich metallic 1T phase and an organohalide reactant, resulting in functional groups that are covalently attached to the chalcogen atoms of the transition metal dichalcogenide. The attachment of functional groups leads to dramatic changes in the optoelectronic properties of the material. For example, we show that it renders the metallic 1T phase semiconducting, and gives it strong and tunable photoluminescence and gate modulation in field-effect transistors.

  3. Transition-metal-nitride films for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribbing, Carl-Gustaf; Roos, Arne

    1997-10-01

    The three transition metal nitrides TiN, ZrN and HfN have remarkably high stability due to their bonding: a mixture of covalent and ionic contributions. The optical properties of these nitride compounds are free-electron like to a surprisingly large extent, in particular in comparison with the corresponding carbides. It is argued that the interband optical excitations of the d-electrons are restricted by selection rules, resulting in a Drude like behavior of these d-electron compounds. Hitherto, one of the main optical applications has been as opaque, wear-resistant replacements for gold-coatings. This review includes the efforts to study, understand and enhance the optical selectivity of group IVB transition metal nitrides as the selective surface in high temperature thermal solar absorbers, as the metal layer in LE-coatings on energy-efficient or solar control windows and as a Langmuir probe coating. The reflectance edge is not in the optimum position for absorber applications and attempts to shift it with alloying were unsuccessful. Recent development of inhomogeneous, cermet- type nitrides hold some promise. The LE-coatings will not reach as high selectivity as the current noble metal based multilayers, but many find use in aggressive environments because of their excellent stability.

  4. Soldering of Carbon Materials Using Transition Metal Rich Alloys.

    PubMed

    Burda, Marek; Lekawa-Raus, Agnieszka; Gruszczyk, Andrzej; Koziol, Krzysztof K K

    2015-08-25

    Joining of carbon materials via soldering has not been possible up to now due to lack of wetting of carbons by metals at standard soldering temperatures. This issue has been a severely restricting factor for many potential electrical/electronic and mechanical applications of nanostructured and conventional carbon materials. Here we demonstrate the formation of alloys that enable soldering of these structures. By addition of several percent (2.5-5%) of transition metal such as chromium or nickel to a standard lead-free soldering tin based alloy we obtained a solder that can be applied using a commercial soldering iron at typical soldering temperatures of approximately 350 °C and at ambient conditions. The use of this solder enables the formation of mechanically strong and electrically conductive joints between carbon materials and, when supported by a simple two-step technique, can successfully bond carbon structures to any metal terminal. It has been shown using optical and scanning electron microscope images as well as X-ray diffraction patterns and energy dispersive X-ray mapping that the successful formation of carbon-solder bonds is possible, first, thanks to the uniform nonreactive dispersion of transition metals in the tin-based matrix. Further, during the soldering process, these free elements diffuse into the carbon-alloy border with no formation of brazing-like carbides, which would damage the surface of the carbon materials.

  5. Towards a metal-semiconductor transition in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, Anders; de Brito Mota, F.; Rivelino, R.

    2017-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) heterosheets built from silicon and boron may exhibit an intrinsic metallic behavior. From density-functional-theory computer simulations, we have demonstrated that a 2D honeycomb binary compound (h-SiB), which exhibits robust structural and thermal stabilities, maintains its metallicity by increasing hydrogen coverages at 25%, 50%, and 75% on boron or silicon sublattices. However, under a total hydrogenation condition (100%) on B or Si sites, h-SiB opens a well-defined bandgap, meaning that it is possible to obtain a metal-insulator transition at zero temperature in 2D. Additional calculations show that the hydrogenation on B sublattices is energetically more favorable than on silicon.

  6. Thermal transport across a continuous metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, P.; Laad, M. S.; Hassan, S. R.

    2017-09-01

    The celebrated Wiedemann-Franz (WF) law is believed to be robust in metals as long as interactions between electrons preserve their fermion-quasiparticle character. We study thermal transport and the fate of the WF law close to a continuous metal-insulator transition (MIT) in the Falicov-Kimball model (FKM) using cluster-dynamical mean-field theory (CDMFT). Surprisingly, as for electrical transport, we find robust and novel quantum critical scaling in thermal transport across the MIT. We unearth the deeper reasons for these novel findings in terms of (i) the specific structure of energy-current correlations for the FKM and (ii) the microscopic electronic processes which facilitate energy transport while simultaneously blocking charge transport close to the MIT. However, within (C)DMFT, we also find that the WF law survives at T ⟶0 in the incoherent metal right up to the MIT, even in absence of Landau quasiparticles.

  7. Peierls potential for crowdions in the bcc transition metals.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, S P; Nguyen-Manh, D

    2008-09-12

    We present the first derivation of the analytic expression for the Peierls-Nabarro potential for crowdion migration using the double sine-Gordon model. The analysis is guided by the group-specific trend in the shapes of the periodic lattice potentials calculated for the body-centered-cubic transition metals in groups 5B and 6B of the periodic table. We combine density-functional calculations of the crowdion's profile and environment with an extended version of the analytical Frenkel-Kontorova model, and determine the effective potential experienced by the defect's center of mass. This reveals important underlying differences between the metals in these groups, which are inaccessible to either the numerical or analytical approaches alone, and accounts for the previously unexplained significantly higher crowdion migration temperatures observed in the metals of group 6B relative to those of group 5B.

  8. Thermophysical Property Measurements of Silicon-Transition Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banish, R. Michael; Erwin, William R.; Sansoucie, Michael P.; Lee, Jonghyun; Gave, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Metals and metallic alloys often have high melting temperatures and highly reactive liquids. Processing reactive liquids in containers can result in significant contamination and limited undercooling. This is particularly true for molten silicon and it alloys. Silicon is commonly termed "the universal solvent". The viscosity, surface tension, and density of several silicon-transition metal alloys were determined using the Electrostatic Levitator system at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The temperature dependence of the viscosity followed an Arrhenius dependence, and the surface tension followed a linear temperature dependence. The density of the melts, including the undercooled region, showed a linear behavior as well. Viscosity and surface tension values were obtain for several of the alloys in the undercooled region.

  9. Capacitive network near the metal insulator transition in Vanadium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, J. G.; Patino, E. J.; Schmidt, R.; Sharoni, A.; Gomez, M. E.; Schuller, I. K.

    2011-03-01

    Recent infrared spectroscopy and transport measurements in nano-scaled junction of VO2 have revealed the existence of phase separation into metallic and insulating phases. Here we present Impedance spectroscopy measurements performed in high quality Vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films for the first time. This technique allows distinguishing between the resistive and capacitive response of the VO2 films and provides the dielectric properties across the metal-insulator transition (MIT). The film capacitance exhibits an unusual increase close to the MIT which implies the formation of a capacitor network produced by the nanoscale phase separation of metallic and insulating phases. This work has been supported by AFOSR, COLCIENCIAS, CENM and Ramon y Cajal Fellowship.

  10. Transition-metal prion protein attachment: Competition with copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2012-02-01

    Prion protein, PrP, is a protein capable of binding copper ions in multiple modes depending on their concentration. Misfolded PrP is implicated in a group of neurodegenerative diseases, which include ``mad cow disease'' and its human form, variant Creutzfeld-Jacob disease. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that attachment of non-copper metal ions to PrP triggers transformations to abnormal forms similar to those observed in prion diseases. In this work, we use hybrid Kohn-Sham/orbital-free density functional theory simulations to investigate copper replacement by other transition metals that bind to PrP, including zinc, iron and manganese. We consider all known copper binding modes in the N-terminal domain of PrP. Our calculations identify modes most susceptible to copper replacement and reveal metals that can successfully compete with copper for attachment to PrP.

  11. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  12. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  13. Metal-insulator transition in oriented poly(p-phenylenevinylene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlskog, M.; Menon, Reghu; Heeger, A. J.; Noguchi, T.; Ohnishi, T.

    1997-03-01

    The transport properties of H2 SO4 -doped, tensile drawn, and oriented poly(phenylenevinylene) have been studied in the metallic, critical, and insulating regimes of the disorder-induced metal-insulator transition (M-I) transition. The temperature dependence of the conductivity, σ(T) and the magnetoconductance (MC) were investigated between room temperature and 1.3 K and in magnetic fields up to 8 T, in freshly doped samples and in samples during controlled dedoping (aging). A complete set of measurements were carried out on a single, fully doped sample that was followed during ageing from the metallic state through the critical regime into the insulting state. The transport properties are characterized as a function of the resistivity ratio (ρr), where ρr=[ρ(1.3 K)/ρ(200 K)]. In the metallic regime (ρr<2), σ∥ (300 K)≅10 000 S/cm and σ⊥ (300 K)≅100 S/cm; for T<4 K, a T1/2 dependence is observed for σ(T), and the MC shows positive and negative contributions at low and high fields, respectively. The positive contribution to the MC vanishes at the M-I transition boundary (ρr≅2). The behaviors of σ(T)and the MC are consistent with the weak localization plus electron-electron interaction model. Very near the M-I transition, a field-induced transition from the metallic to the critical regime was observed \\{σ(T)~T0.1 at 8 T\\}. For samples in the critical regime with 4<ρr<30, σ(T)~TΒ at low temperatures. In the insulating state (ρr>50), ρ(T)~exp(T0/T)x indicating variable-range-hopping transport. Although anisotropic, the field and temperature dependences of the transport are similar both parallel and perpendicular to the chain axis, implying that oriented conducting polymers are anisotropic three-dimensional conductors.

  14. Surface Charge Development on Transition Metal Sulfides: An Electrokinetic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebie, Joakim; Schoonen, Martin A. A.; Fuhrmann, Mark; Strongin, Daniel R.

    1998-02-01

    The isoelectric points, pH i.e.p., of ZnS, PbS, CuFeS 2, FeS, FeS 2, NiS 2, CoS 2, and MnS 2 in NaCl supported electrolyte solutions are estimated to be between pH 3.3 and 0.6, with most of the isoelectric points below pH 2. The first electrokinetic measurements on NiS 2, CoS 2, and MnS 2 are reported here. Below pH i.e.p. the metal-sulfide surfaces are positively charged, above pH i.e.p. the surfaces are negatively charged. The addition of Me 2+ ions shifts the pH i.e.p. and changes the pH dependence considerably. The isoelectric points of the measured transition metal sulfides in the absence of metal ions or dissolved sulfide (H 2S or HS -) are in agreement with those found in earlier studies. The pH range of observed isoelectric points for metal sulfides (0.6-3.3) is compared to the considerably wider pH i.e.p. range (2-12) found for oxides. The correlation between pH i.e.p. and the electronegativities of the metal sulfides suggests that all metal sulfides will have an isoelectric point between pH 0.6 and 3.3. Compared to metal oxides, sulfides exhibit an isoelectric point that is largely independent of the nature of the metal cation in the solid.

  15. Chemical Reactions of Metal-Metal Bonded Compounds of the Transition Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-18

    in the compounds formed by reaction 23 can be used to prepare triangulo -metal complexes with capping i3-CR ligands as is schematically shown in 24. R...8 and Rh2(G-CO)2(C 5- Me5 )2 with the alkylidene compound p-tolyl-C=W(CO) 2Cp. They obtained the alkylidine capped triangulo compounds (XIX) and (XX...are triangulo Lompounds of the type noted in Table 1.2. 2.4. By Reduction of Mononuclear Metal Halides For transition metals with odd numbers of

  16. Polaronic Transport in Phosphate Glasses Containing Transition Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Mark

    The goal of this dissertation is to characterize the basic transport properties of phosphate glasses containing various amounts of TIs and to identify and explain any electronic phase transitions which may occur. The P2 O5-V2O5-WO3 (PVW) glass system will be analyzed to find the effect of TI concentration on conduction. In addition, the effect of the relative concentrations of network forming ions (SiO2 and P2O5) on transport will be studied in the P2O5-SiO2-Fe2O 3 (PSF) system. Also presented is a numerical study on a tight-binding model adapted for the purposes of modelling Gaussian traps, mimicking TI's, which are arranged in an extended network. The results of this project will contribute to the development of fundamental theories on the electronic transport in glasses containing mixtures of transition oxides as well as those containing multiple network formers without discernible phase separation. The present study on the PVW follows up on previous investigation into the effect on mixed transition ions in oxide glasses. Past research has focused on glasses containing transition metal ions from the 3d row. The inclusion of tungsten, a 5d transition metal, adds a layer of complexity through the mismatch of the energies of the orbitals contributing to localized states. The data have indicated that a transition reminiscent of a metal-insulator transition (MIT) occurs in this system as the concentration of tungsten increases. As opposed to some other MIT-like transitions found in phosphate glass systems, there seems to be no polaron to bipolaron conversion. Instead, the individual localization parameter for tungsten noticeably decreases dramatically at the transition point as well as the adiabaticity. Another distinctive feature of this project is the study of the PSF system, which contains two true network formers, phosphorous pentoxide (P2O 5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2). It is not usually possible to do a reliable investigation of the conduction properties of

  17. A Transition to Metallic Hydrogen: Evidence of the Plasma Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    The insulator-metal transition in hydrogen is one of the most outstanding problems in condensed matter physics. The high-pressure metallic phase is now predicted to be liquid atomic from T =0 K to very high temperatures. We have conducted measurements of optical properties of hot dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K in a diamond anvil cell using pulsed laser heating of the sample. We present evidence in two forms: a plateau in the heating curves (average laser power vs temperature) characteristic of a first-order phase transition with latent heat, and changes in transmittance and reflectance characteristic of a metal for temperatures above the plateau temperature. For thick films the reflectance saturates at ~0.5. The phase line of this transition has a negative slope in agreement with theories of the so-called plasma phase transition. The NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H supported this research.

  18. Role of alkali metal promoter in enhancing lateral growth of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Yun, Seok Joon; Zhao, Jiong; Keum, Dong Hoon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Hue Ly, Thuc; Jin, Youngjo; Park, Ji-Hoon; Moon, Byoung Hee; Kim, Sung-Wng; Lee, Young Hee

    2017-09-01

    Synthesis of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) via chemical vapor deposition relies on several factors such as precursor, promoter, substrate, and surface treatment of substrate. Among them, the use of promoter is crucial for obtaining uniform and large-area monolayer TMDs. Although promoters have been speculated to enhance adhesion of precursors to the substrate, their precise role in the growth mechanism has rarely been discussed. Here, we report the role of alkali metal promoter in growing monolayer TMDs. The growth occurred via the formation of sodium metal oxides which prevent the evaporation of metal precursor. Furthermore, the silicon oxide substrate helped to decrease the Gibbs free energy by forming sodium silicon oxide compounds. The resulting sodium metal oxide was anchored within such concavities created by corrosion of silicon oxide. Consequently, the wettability of the precursors to silicon oxide was improved, leading to enhance lateral growth of monolayer TMDs.

  19. Role of alkali metal promoter in enhancing lateral growth of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Yun, Seok Joon; Zhao, Jiong; Keum, Dong Hoon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Ly, Thuc Hue; Jin, Youngjo; Park, Ji-Hoon; Moon, Byoung Hee; Kim, Sung-Wng; Lee, Young Hee

    2017-09-08

    Synthesis of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) via chemical vapor deposition relies on several factors such as precursor, promoter, substrate, and surface treatment of substrate. Among them, the use of promoter is crucial for obtaining uniform and large-area monolayer TMDs. Although promoters have been speculated to enhance adhesion of precursors to the substrate, their precise role in the growth mechanism has rarely been discussed. Here, we report the role of alkali metal promoter in growing monolayer TMDs. The growth occurred via the formation of sodium metal oxides which prevent the evaporation of metal precursor. Furthermore, the silicon oxide substrate helped to decrease the Gibbs free energy by forming sodium silicon oxide compounds. The resulting sodium metal oxide was anchored within such concavities created by corrosion of silicon oxide. Consequently, the wettability of the precursors to silicon oxide was improved, leading to enhance lateral growth of monolayer TMDs.

  20. Control of Magnetic Properties Across Metal to Insulator Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Venta, Jose

    2013-03-01

    Controlling the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic (FM) thin films without magnetic fields is an on-going challenge in condensed matter physics with multiple technological implications. External stimuli and proximity effects are the most used methods to control the magnetic properties. An interesting possibility arises when ferromagnets are in proximity to materials that undergo a metal-insulator (MIT) and structural phase transition (SPT). The stress associated with the structural changes produces a magnetoelastic anisotropy in proximity coupled ferromagnetic films that allows controlling the magnetic properties without magnetic fields. Canonical examples of materials that undergo MIT and SPT are the vanadium oxides (VO2 and V2O3) . VO2 undergoes a metal/rutile to an insulator/monoclinic phase transition at 340 K. In V2O3 the transition at 160 K is from a metallic/rhombohedral to an insulating/ monoclinic phase. We have investigated the magnetic properties of different combinations of ferromagnetic (Ni, Co and Fe) and vanadium oxide thin films. The (0.32%) volume expansion in VO2 or the (1.4%) volume decrease in V2O3 across the MIT produces an interfacial stress in the FM overlayer. We show that the coercivities and magnetizations of the ferromagnetic films grown on vanadium oxides are strongly affected by the phase transition. The changes in coercivity can be as large as 168% and occur in a very narrow temperature interval. These effects can be controlled by the thickness and deposition conditions of the different ferromagnetic films. For VO2/Ni bilayers the large change in the coercivity occurring above room temperature opens the possibilities for technological applications. Work done in collaboration with Siming Wang, J. G. Ramirez, and Ivan K. Schuller. Funded by the US DoE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Award FG03-87ER-45332 and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research No. FA9550-12-1-0381.

  1. Transition metal salt solutions and anaerobic adhesives in dental bonding.

    PubMed

    Ireland, A J; Sherriff, M

    1999-07-01

    The objectives of this experiment were twofold. Firstly to determine whether an anaerobic adhesive could be used to bond steel attachments to etched human enamel, following treatment of this surface with various concentrations of copper (II) sulphate solution. Secondly, to determine the effect of 0.05 M solutions of other transition metal sulphates and chlorides on the same bonding process. Stainless steel attachments were bonded to human enamel using an anaerobic adhesive. In each case the enamel, which had been ground flat, was etched with 37% o-phosphoric acid and then treated with copper (II) sulphate solution prior to bonding. After bench curing for one hour, the specimens were shear tested to failure, and the load at bebond recorded in each case. The effect of varying the concentration of copper (II) sulphate solution was determined. Following determination of the optimal copper (II) sulphate concentration, the experiment was repeated using the same concentration of various other transition metal sulphates and chlorides. The results were analysed using mean force to debond (N) and 95% confidence intervals. Kaplan-Meier survival probabilities and log-rank tests were also performed. Under the conditions of this experiment the optimal concentration of copper (II) sulphate solution was found to be 0.05 M. Of the various transition metal sulphates and chlorides under test, the sulphates appeared to provide a more active surface for the polymerisation of the anaerobic adhesive than the chlorides. Of the sulphate solutions, the most effective was that of copper. Anaerobic adhesives show promise as dental bonding agents capable of bonding metal attachments to enamel following enamel pretreatment with 0.05 M copper (II) sulphate solution.

  2. Disorder and metal-insulator transitions in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hua; Chen, Chui-Zhen; Song, Juntao; Sun, Qing-Feng; Wang, Ziqiang; Xie, X. C.

    The Weyl semimetal (WSM) is a newly proposed quantum state of matter. It has Weyl nodes in bulk excitations and Fermi arcs surface states. We study the effects of disorder and localization in WSMs and find three novel phase transitions.(I) Two Weyl nodes near the Brillouin zone boundary can be annihilated pairwise by disorder scattering, resulting in the opening of a topologically nontrivial gap and a transition from a WSM to a three-dimensional (3D) quantum anomalous Hall state. (II) When the two Weyl nodes are well separated in momentum space, the emergent bulk extended states can give rise to a direct transition from a WSM to a 3D diffusive anomalous Hall metal. (III) Two Weyl nodes can emerge near the zone center when an insulating gap closes with increasing disorder, enabling a direct transition from a normal band insulator to a WSM. We determine the phase diagram by numerically computing the localization length and the Hall conductivity, and propose that the novel phase transitions can be realized on a photonic lattice.

  3. Disorder and Metal-Insulator Transitions in Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chui-Zhen; Song, Juntao; Jiang, Hua; Sun, Qing-feng; Wang, Ziqiang; Xie, X. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Weyl semimetal (WSM) is a newly proposed quantum state of matter. It has Weyl nodes in bulk excitations and Fermi arc surface states. We study the effects of disorder and localization in WSMs and find three novel phase transitions. (i) Two Weyl nodes near the Brillouin zone boundary can be annihilated pairwise by disorder scattering, resulting in the opening of a topologically nontrivial gap and a transition from a WSM to a three-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall state. (ii) When the two Weyl nodes are well separated in momentum space, the emergent bulk extended states can give rise to a direct transition from a WSM to a 3D diffusive anomalous Hall metal. (iii) Two Weyl nodes can emerge near the zone center when an insulating gap closes with increasing disorder, enabling a direct transition from a normal band insulator to a WSM. We determine the phase diagram by numerically computing the localization length and the Hall conductivity, and propose that the novel phase transitions can be realized on a photonic lattice.

  4. Transition metal complexes of isonicotinic acid (2-hydroxybenzylidene)hydrazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Melha, Khlood S.

    2008-06-01

    A new series of transition metal complexes of Schiff base isonicotinic acid (2-hydroxybenzylidene)hydrazide, HL, have been synthesized. The Schiff base reacted with Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Fe(III) and UO 2(II) ions as monobasic tridentate ligand to yield mononuclear complexes of 1:2 (metal:ligand) except that of Cu(II) which form complex of 1:1 (metal:ligand). The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-vis, mass and 1H NMR spectra, as well as magnetic moment, conductance measurements, and thermal analyses. All complexes have octahedral configurations except Cu(II) complex which has an extra square planar geometry distorted towards tetrahedral. While, the UO 2(II) complex has its favour hepta-coordination. The ligand and its metal complexes were tested against one strain Gram +ve bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus), Gram -ve bacteria (Escherichia coli) , and Fungi ( Candida albicans). The tested compounds exhibited higher antibacterial activities.

  5. Transition metal complexes of isonicotinic acid (2-hydroxybenzylidene)hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Abou-Melha, Khlood S

    2008-06-01

    A new series of transition metal complexes of Schiff base isonicotinic acid (2-hydroxybenzylidene)hydrazide, HL, have been synthesized. The Schiff base reacted with Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Fe(III) and UO2(II) ions as monobasic tridentate ligand to yield mononuclear complexes of 1:2 (metal:ligand) except that of Cu(II) which form complex of 1:1 (metal:ligand). The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-vis, mass and 1H NMR spectra, as well as magnetic moment, conductance measurements, and thermal analyses. All complexes have octahedral configurations except Cu(II) complex which has an extra square planar geometry distorted towards tetrahedral. While, the UO2(II) complex has its favour hepta-coordination. The ligand and its metal complexes were tested against one strain Gram +ve bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram -ve bacteria (Escherichia coli), and Fungi (Candida albicans). The tested compounds exhibited higher antibacterial activities.

  6. Interactive animation of 4D performance capture.

    PubMed

    Casas, Dan; Tejera, Margara; Guillemaut, Jean-Yves; Hilton, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    A 4D parametric motion graph representation is presented for interactive animation from actor performance capture in a multiple camera studio. The representation is based on a 4D model database of temporally aligned mesh sequence reconstructions for multiple motions. High-level movement controls such as speed and direction are achieved by blending multiple mesh sequences of related motions. A real-time mesh sequence blending approach is introduced, which combines the realistic deformation of previous nonlinear solutions with efficient online computation. Transitions between different parametric motion spaces are evaluated in real time based on surface shape and motion similarity. Four-dimensional parametric motion graphs allow real-time interactive character animation while preserving the natural dynamics of the captured performance.

  7. Pressure-induced Mott transition in transition-metal iodides (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternak, M. P.; Taylor, R. D.; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-11-01

    Many of the transition-metal (TM) compounds, because of exchange and correlation interactions within the narrow and poorly overlapping d bands, become antiferromagnetic insulators, the Mott insulators (MI). The properties of the MI and their gradual transition into the noncorrelated metallic state (the Mott transition) are of crucial importance for the elucidation of high-temperature superconducting materials features in particular and to magnetism in general. The transition of the MI into a metal can be achieved either by doping or by high pressure. The first method is definitely inappropriate for studying the nature of the Mott transition; for the narrow-band materials the electronic and structural disorder inherent in doping has a strongly perturbing effect. To yield the definitive data on the Mott transition, high-pressure work on well-characterized materials should be sought. The present studies provide for the first time extensive information on the Mott-Hubbard gap closure induced by high pressure. High-pressure studies using diamond anvil cells were conducted with several (TM)I2 compounds. They all have layered structures and order antiferromagnetically at ambient pressure. 129I Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) was used to study the properties of the (TM)2+ sublattice magnetization as a function of pressure and temperature, and x-ray diffraction was used to look for possible crystallographic transitions and to obtain the equation of state. Results show that the high-pressure transition at Pc from a magnetic to a nonmagnetic state is not accompanied by crystallographic changes. Previous studies [M. P. Pasternak et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 790 (1990)] with NiI2 have confirmed the presence of a metallic state at P ≳ Pc. Inherent to the pressure behavior of the magnetic state is the gradual increase of TN in all cases and a slight increase in the TM2+ moments with pressure increase. The collapse of the magnetic state is abrupt for some cases (NiI2) and gradual

  8. Ultrathin and Atomically Flat Transition-Metal Oxide: Promising Building Blocks for Metal-Insulator Electronics.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qingsong; Sakhdari, Maryam; Chamlagain, Bhim; Chuang, Hsun-Jen; Liu, Yi; Cheng, Mark Ming-Cheng; Zhou, Zhixian; Chen, Pai-Yen

    2016-12-21

    We present a new and viable template-assisted thermal synthesis method for preparing amorphous ultrathin transition-metal oxides (TMOs) such as TiO2 and Ta2O5, which are converted from crystalline two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) down to a few atomic layers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were used to characterize the chemical composition and bonding, surface morphology, and atomic structure of these ultrathin amorphous materials to validate the effectiveness of our synthesis approach. Furthermore, we have fabricated metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes using the TiO2 and Ta2O5 as ultrathin insulating layers with low potential barrier heights. Our MIM diodes show a clear transition from direct tunneling to Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, which was not observed in previously reported MIM diodes with TiO2 or Ta2O5 as the insulating layer. We attribute the improved performance of our MIM diodes to the excellent flatness and low pinhole/defect densities in our TMO insulting layers converted from 2D TMDs, which enable the low-threshold and controllable electron tunneling transport. We envision that it is possible to use the ultrathin TMOs converted from 2D TMDs as the insulating layer of a wide variety of metal-insulator and field-effect electronic devices for various applications ranging from microwave mixing, parametric conversion, infrared photodetection, emissive energy harvesting, to ultrafast electronic switching.

  9. Enhancing conductivity of metallic carbon nanotube networks by transition metal adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Ketolainen, T. Havu, V.; Puska, M. J.

    2015-02-07

    The conductivity of carbon nanotube thin films is mainly determined by carbon nanotube junctions, the resistance of which can be reduced by several different methods. We investigate electronic transport through carbon nanotube junctions in a four-terminal configuration, where two metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes are linked by a group 6 transition metal atom. The transport calculations are based on the Green’s function method combined with the density-functional theory. The transition metal atom is found to enhance the transport through the junction near the Fermi level. However, the size of the nanotube affects the improvement in the conductivity. The enhancement is related to the hybridization of chromium and carbon atom orbitals, which is clearly reflected in the character of eigenstates near the Fermi level. The effects of chromium atoms and precursor molecules remaining adsorbed on the nanotubes outside the junctions are also examined.

  10. Spin-exchange interaction between transition metals and metalloids in soft-ferromagnetic metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Santanu; Choudhary, Kamal; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Choi Yim, Haein; Bandyopadhyay, Asis K.; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-06-01

    High-performance magnetic materials have immense industrial and scientific importance in wide-ranging electronic, electromechanical, and medical device technologies. Metallic glasses with a fully amorphous structure are particularly suited for advanced soft-magnetic applications. However, fundamental scientific understanding is lacking for the spin-exchange interaction between metal and metalloid atoms, which typically constitute a metallic glass. Using an integrated experimental and molecular dynamics approach, we demonstrate the mechanism of electron interaction between transition metals and metalloids. Spin-exchange interactions were investigated for a Fe-Co metallic glass system of composition [(Co1-x Fe x )0.75B0.2Si0.05]96Cr4. The saturation magnetization increased with higher Fe concentration, but the trend significantly deviated from simple rule of mixtures. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation was used to identify the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interaction between the transition metals and metalloids. The overlapping band-structure and density of states represent ‘Stoner type’ magnetization for the amorphous alloys in contrast to ‘Heisenberg type’ in crystalline iron. The enhancement of magnetization by increasing iron was attributed to the interaction between Fe 3d and B 2p bands, which was further validated by valence-band study.

  11. Transition metal complexes of an isatinic quinolyl hydrazone

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The importance of the isatinic quinolyl hydrazones arises from incorporating the quinoline ring with the indole ring in the same compound. Quinoline ring has therapeutic and biological activities. On the other hand, isatin (1H-indole-2,3-dione) and its derivatives exhibit a wide range of biological activities. Also, the indole ring occurs in Jasmine flowers and Orange blossoms. Recently, the physiological and biological activities of quinolyl hydrazones arise from their tendency to form metal chelates with transition metal ions. In this context, we have reported to isolate, characterize and study the biological activity of some transition metal complexes of an isatinic quinolyl hydrazone; 3-[2-(4-methyl quinolin-2-yl)hydrazono] indolin-2-one. Results Mono- and binuclear as well as dimeric chelates were obtained from the reaction of a new isatinic quinolyl hydrazone with Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), VO(II) and Pd(II) ions. The ligand showed a variety of modes of bonding viz. (NNO)2-, (NO)- and (NO) per each metal ion supporting its ambidentate and flexidentate characters. The mode of bonding and basicity of the ligand depend mainly on the type of the metal cation and its counter anion. All the obtained Pd(II)- complexes have the preferable square planar geometry (D4h- symmetry) and depend mainly on the mole ratio (M:L). Conclusion The effect of the type of the metal ion for the same anion (Cl-) is obvious from either structural diversity of the isolated complexes (Oh, Td and D4h) or the various modes of bonding. The isatinic hydrazone uses its lactim form in all complexes (Cl-) except complex 5 (SO42-) in which it uses its lactam form. The obtained Pd(II)- complexes (dimeric, mono- and binuclear) are affected by the mole ratio (M:L) and have the square planar (D4h) geometry. Also, the antimicrobial activity is highly influenced by the nature of the metal ion and the order for S. aureus bacteria is as follows: Nickel(II) > Vanadyl(II) > Cobalt

  12. Low temperature synthesis of transition metal oxides containing surfactant ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janauer, Gerald Gilbert

    1998-11-01

    Recently there has been much interest in reacting vanadium oxides hydrothermally with cationic surfactants to form novel layered compounds. A series of new transition metal oxides, however, has also been formed at or near room temperature in open containers. Synthesis, characterization, and proposed mechanisms of formation are the focus of this work. Low temperature reactions of vanadium pentoxide and ammonium transition metallates with long chain amine surfactants, such as dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide yielded interesting new products many of which are layered phases. DTAsb4\\ Hsb2Vsb{10}Osb{28}. 8Hsb2O, a layered highly crystalline phase, is the first such phase for which a single crystal X-ray structure has been determined. The unit cell for this material was found to be triclinic with space group P1-, cell parameters a=9.8945(3)A, b=11.5962(1)A, c=21.9238(2)A, alpha=95.153(2)sp°,\\ beta=93.778(1)sp°, and gamma=101.360(1)sp°. Additionally, a novel tungsten, a molybdenum and a dichromate phase will be discussed. Both the tungsten and the dichromate materials were indexed from their powder diffraction patterns yielding monoclinic unit cells. The tungsten material was found to have a=50.56(4)A, b=54.41(4)A, c=13.12(1)A, and beta=99.21sp°. The dichromate compound was determined to have a=26.757(5)A, b=10.458(2)A, c=14.829(3)A and beta=98.01(1)sp°. Interlayer spacings for the lamellar dichromate and molybdenum phases were d001 = 28.7 A, and d001 = 22.9 A. The synthesis, characterization, composition, and structure of these transition metal oxide-surfactant materials will be discussed.

  13. Holographic metal-insulator transition in higher derivative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yi; Liu, Peng; Wu, Jian-Pin; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a Weyl term into the Einstein-Maxwell-Axion theory in four dimensional spacetime. Up to the first order of the Weyl coupling parameter γ, we construct charged black brane solutions without translational invariance in a perturbative manner. Among all the holographic frameworks involving higher derivative gravity, we are the first to obtain metal-insulator transitions (MIT) when varying the system parameters at zero temperature. Furthermore, we study the holographic entanglement entropy (HEE) of strip geometry in this model and find that the second order derivative of HEE with respect to the axion parameter exhibits maximization behavior near quantum critical points (QCPs) of MIT. It testifies the conjecture in [1,2] that HEE itself or its derivatives can be used to diagnose quantum phase transition (QPT).

  14. Stacking dependent electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides heterobilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yea-Lee; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Ihm, Jisoon

    The systematic study of the electronic structures and optical properties of the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) heterobilayers can significantly improve the designing of new electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we theoretically study the electronic structures and optical properties of TMD heterobilayers using the first-principles methods. The band structures of TMD heterobilayer are shown to be determined by the band alignments of the each layer, the weak interlayer interactions, and angle dependent stacking patterns. The photoluminescence spectra are investigated using the calculated band structures, and the optical absorption spectra are examined by the GW approximations including the electron-hole interaction through the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. It is expected that the weak interlayer interaction gives rise to the substantial interlayer optical transition which will be corresponding to the interlayer exciton.

  15. Theoretical study of transition-metal ions bound to benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical binding energies are reported for all first-row and selected second-row transition metal ions (M+) bound to benzene. The calculations employ basis sets of at least double-zeta plus polarization quality and account for electron correlation using the modified coupled-pair functional method. While the bending is predominantly electrostatic, the binding energies are significantly increased by electron correlation, because the donation from the metal d orbitals to the benzene pi* orbitals is not well described at the self-consistent-field level. The uncertainties in the computed binding energies are estimated to be about 5 kcal/mol. Although the calculated and experimental binding energies generally agree to within their combined uncertainties, it is likely that the true binding energies lie in the lower portion of the experimental range. This is supported by the very good agreement between the theoretical and recent experimental binding energies for AgC6H6(+).

  16. Augmenting Molecular Junctions with Different Transition Metal Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rupan Preet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    2013-11-01

    In this research paper, the effect of the material of electrodes at the nanometer scale was elucidated towards measuring the electron transport properties of a single molecular junction comprising of anthracenedithiol molecule (ADT) stringed to two semi-infinite metallic electrodes using Extended Huckle Theory (EHT)-based semi-empirical modelling approach. The electron transport parameters i.e., I-V curves, Conductance-Voltage curves and transmission spectrum were investigated through ADT molecule by buffering it between different electrodes composed of rhodium, palladium, nickel and copper, all from transition metals series, under finite bias voltages within Keldysh's non equilibrium green function formulism (NEGF). The simulated results revealed that the copper electrodes showed maximum conduction whereas palladium showed least. The maximum conductance of 0.82 G0 and 43 μA current was exhibited by copper and thus affirmed to be the most effective electrode at nanometre scale when compared with other electrodes viz. nickel, rhodium and palladium.

  17. Investigations into Transition Metal Catalyzed Arene Trifluoromethylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yingda; Sanford, Melanie S

    2012-09-01

    Trifluoromethyl-substituted arenes and heteroarenes are widely prevalent in pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. As a result, the development of practical methods for the formation of aryl-CF3 bonds has become an active field of research. Over the past five years, transition metal catalyzed cross-coupling between aryl-X (X = halide, organometallic, or H) and various "CF3" reagents has emerged as a particularly exciting approach for generating aryl-CF3 bonds. Despite many recent advances in this area, current methods generally suffer from limitations such as poor generality, harsh reaction conditions, the requirement for stoichiometric quantities of metals, and/or the use of costly CF3 sources. This Account describes our recent efforts to address some of these challenges by: (1) developing aryl trifluoromethylation reactions involving high oxidation state Pd intermediates, (2) exploiting AgCF3 for C-H trifluoromethylation, and (3) achieving Cu-catalyzed trifluoromethylation with photogenerated CF3•.

  18. Control of plasmonic nanoantennas by reversible metal-insulator transition

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, Yohannes; Marvel, Robert E.; Ziegler, Jed I.; Gamage, Sampath; Javani, Mohammad H.; Stockman, Mark I.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2015-09-11

    We demonstrate dynamic reversible switching of VO2 insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) locally on the scale of 15 nm or less and control of nanoantennas, observed for the first time in the near-field. Using polarization-selective near-field imaging techniques, we simultaneously monitor the IMT in VO2 and the change of plasmons on gold infrared nanoantennas. Structured nanodomains of the metallic VO2 locally and reversibly transform infrared plasmonic dipole nanoantennas to monopole nanoantennas. Fundamentally, the IMT in VO2 can be triggered on femtosecond timescale to allow ultrafast nanoscale control of optical phenomena. In conclusion, these unique features open up promising novel applications in active nanophotonics.

  19. Surface entropy of liquid transition and noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosh, R. C.; Das, Ramprosad; Sen, Sumon C.; Bhuiyan, G. M.

    2015-07-01

    Surface entropy of liquid transition and noble metals has been investigated using an expression obtained from the hard-sphere (HS) theory of liquid. The expression is developed from the Mayer's extended surface tension formula [Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids 380 (2013) 42-47]. For interionic interaction in metals, Brettonet-Silbert (BS) pseudopotentials and embedded atom method (EAM) potentials have been used. The liquid structure is described by the variational modified hypernetted chain (VMHNC) theory. The essential ingredient of the expression is the temperature dependent effective HS diameter (or packing fraction), which is calculated from the aforementioned potentials together with the VMHNC theory. The obtained results for the surface entropy using the effective HS diameter are found to be good in agreement with the available experimental as well as other theoretical values.

  20. Development of microstrain in aged lithium transition metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eung-Ju; Chen, Zonghai; Noh, Hyung-Ju; Nam, Sang Cheol; Kang, Sung; Kim, Do Hyeong; Amine, Khalil; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2014-08-13

    Cathode materials with high energy density for lithium-ion batteries are highly desired in emerging applications in automobiles and stationary energy storage for the grid. Lithium transition metal oxide with concentration gradient of metal elements inside single particles was investigated as a promising high-energy-density cathode material. Electrochemical characterization demonstrated that a full cell with this cathode can be continuously operated for 2500 cycles with a capacity retention of 83.3%. Electron microscopy and high-resolution X-ray diffraction were employed to investigate the structural change of the cathode material after this extensive electrochemical testing. It was found that microstrain developed during the continuous charge/discharge cycling, resulting in cracking of nanoplates. This finding suggests that the performance of the cathode material can be further improved by optimizing the concentration gradient to minimize the microstrain and to reduce the lattice mismatch during cycling.

  1. Dirac cones in transition metal doped boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Min; Cao, Xuewei; Shao, Bin; Zuo, Xu

    2015-05-07

    The transition metal (TM) doped zinc blende boron nitride (c-BN) is studied by using the first principle calculation. TM atoms fill in the interstitials in c-BN and form two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. The generalized gradient approximation and projector augmented wave method are used. The calculated density of states and band structures show that d electrons of TM atoms form impurity bands in the gap of c-BN. When the TM-BN system is in ferromagnetic or non-magnetic state, Dirac cones emerge at the K point in Brillouin zone. When TM is Ti and Co, the Dirac cones are spin polarized and very close to the Fermi level, which makes them promising candidates of Dirac half-metal [H. Ishizuka and Y. Motome, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 237207 (2012)]. While TM is Ni and Cu, the system is non-magnetic and Dirac cones located above the Fermi level.

  2. Theory of the pairbreaking superconductor-metal transition in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Maestro, Adrian; Rosenow, Bernd; Sachdev, Subir

    2009-03-01

    We present a detailed description of a zero temperature phase transition between superconducting and diffusive metallic states in very thin wires due to a Cooper pair breaking mechanism. The dissipative critical theory contains current reducing fluctuations in the guise of both quantum and thermally activated phase slips. A full cross-over phase diagram is computed via an expansion in the inverse number of complex components of the superconducting order parameter (one in the physical case). The fluctuation corrections to the electrical ( σ) and thermal ( κ) conductivities are determined, and we find that σ has a non-monotonic temperature dependence in the metallic phase which may be consistent with recent experimental results on ultra-narrow wires. In the quantum critical regime, the ratio of the thermal to electrical conductivity displays a linear temperature dependence and thus the Wiedemann-Franz law is obeyed, with a new universal experimentally verifiable Lorenz number.

  3. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-09-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential.

  4. The photochemistry of transition metal complexes using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Garino, Claudio; Salassa, Luca

    2013-07-28

    The use of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) to study the photochemistry of metal complexes is becoming increasingly important among chemists. Computational methods provide unique information on the electronic nature of excited states and their atomic structure, integrating spectroscopy observations on transient species and excited-state dynamics. In this contribution, we present an overview on photochemically active transition metal complexes investigated by DFT. In particular, we discuss a representative range of systems studied up to now, which include CO- and NO-releasing inorganic and organometallic complexes, haem and haem-like complexes dissociating small diatomic molecules, photoactive anti-cancer Pt and Ru complexes, Ru polypyridyls and diphosphino Pt derivatives.

  5. Control of plasmonic nanoantennas by reversible metal-insulator transition

    DOE PAGES

    Abate, Yohannes; Marvel, Robert E.; Ziegler, Jed I.; ...

    2015-09-11

    We demonstrate dynamic reversible switching of VO2 insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) locally on the scale of 15 nm or less and control of nanoantennas, observed for the first time in the near-field. Using polarization-selective near-field imaging techniques, we simultaneously monitor the IMT in VO2 and the change of plasmons on gold infrared nanoantennas. Structured nanodomains of the metallic VO2 locally and reversibly transform infrared plasmonic dipole nanoantennas to monopole nanoantennas. Fundamentally, the IMT in VO2 can be triggered on femtosecond timescale to allow ultrafast nanoscale control of optical phenomena. In conclusion, these unique features open up promising novel applications in activemore » nanophotonics.« less

  6. Dinuclear transition metal complexes in carbon nanostructured materials synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayuso, J. I.; Hernández, E.; Delgado, E.

    2013-06-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) were prepared with two similar techniques using organometallic complexes as catalysts precursors. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and pyrolysis with chlorine gas approaches were employed in order to explore the effect of dinuclear transition metal compounds [Fe2(CO)6(μ-S2C6H2X2), (X=OH, Cl)] in synthesis of CNMs. Our to-date results have shown these complexes generate different carbonaceous materials when they are used in bulk, it was also observed that their performances in synthesis differ even though these compounds are analogous. With X=OH complex used in CVD process, metal nanoparticles of ca. 20-50 nm in size and embedded in carbon matrix were obtained. X=C1 complex has been used in pyrolysis experiments and showed an entire volatilisation or no reaction, depending on selected temperature. Furthermore, obtaining of a new tetranuclear iron cluster is presented in this work.

  7. Topological Phase Transition in Metallic Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Rin; Izumida, Wataru; Eto, Mikio

    2017-01-01

    The topological phase transition is theoretically studied in a metallic single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) by applying a magnetic field B parallel to the tube. The Z topological invariant, winding number, is changed discontinuously when a small band gap is closed at a critical value of B, which can be observed as a change in the number of edge states owing to the bulk-edge correspondence. This is confirmed by numerical calculations for finite SWNTs of ˜1 µm length, using a one-dimensional lattice model to effectively describe the mixing between σ and π orbitals and spin-orbit interaction, which are relevant to the formation of the band gap in metallic SWNTs.

  8. Control of plasmonic nanoantennas by reversible metal-insulator transition

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Yohannes; Marvel, Robert E.; Ziegler, Jed I.; Gamage, Sampath; Javani, Mohammad H.; Stockman, Mark I.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate dynamic reversible switching of VO2 insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) locally on the scale of 15 nm or less and control of nanoantennas, observed for the first time in the near-field. Using polarization-selective near-field imaging techniques, we simultaneously monitor the IMT in VO2 and the change of plasmons on gold infrared nanoantennas. Structured nanodomains of the metallic VO2 locally and reversibly transform infrared plasmonic dipole nanoantennas to monopole nanoantennas. Fundamentally, the IMT in VO2 can be triggered on femtosecond timescale to allow ultrafast nanoscale control of optical phenomena. These unique features open up promising novel applications in active nanophotonics. PMID:26358623

  9. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential. PMID:27600651

  10. Transition-metal dopants in tetrahedrally bonded semiconductors: Symmetry and exchange interactions from tight-binding models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortan, Victoria Ramaker

    It has become increasingly apparent that the future of electronic devices can and will rely on the functionality provided by single or few dopant atoms. The most scalable physical system for quantum technologies, i.e. sensing, communication and computation, are spins in crystal lattices. Diamond is an excellent host crystal offering long room temperature spin coherence times and there has been exceptional experimental work done with the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond demonstrating many forms of spin control. Transition metal dopants have additional advantages, large spin-orbit interaction and internal core levels, that are not present in the nitrogen vacancy center. This work explores the implications of the internal degrees of freedom associated with the core d levels using a tight-binding model and the Koster-Slater technique. The core d levels split into two separate symmetry states in tetrahedral bonding environments and result in two levels with different wavefunction spatial extents. For 4 d semiconductors, e.g. GaAs, this is reproduced in the tight-binding model by adding a set of d orbitals on the location of the transition metal impurity and modifying the hopping parameters from impurity to its nearest neighbors. This model does not work in the case of 3d semiconductors, e.g. diamond, where there is no physical reason to drastically alter the hopping from 3 d dopant to host and the difference in wavefunction extent is not as pronounced. In the case of iron dopants in gallium arsenide the split symmetry levels in the band gap are responsible for a decrease in tunneling current when measured with a scanning tunneling microscope due to interference between two elastic tunneling paths and comparison between wavefunction measurements and tight-binding calculations provides information regarding material parameters. In the case of transition metal dopants in diamond there is less distinction between the symmetry split d levels. When considering pairs of

  11. Band engineering in transition metal dichalcogenides: Stacked versus lateral heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2016-06-06

    We calculate a large difference in the band alignments for transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterojunctions when arranged in the stacked layer or lateral (in-plane) geometries, using direct supercell calculations. The stacked case follows the unpinned limit of the electron affinity rule, whereas the lateral geometry follows the strongly pinned limit of alignment of charge neutrality levels. TMDs therefore provide one of the few clear tests of band alignment models, whereas three-dimensional semiconductors give less stringent tests because of accidental chemical trends in their properties.

  12. Flexible Transition Metal Oxide Electronics and Imprint Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Warren B.

    The previous chapters have discussed inorganic low-deposition temperature materials suitable for flexible applications, such as amorphous and nano-crystalline-silicon (Si) and organic conductors. This chapter presents the results of a recently developed inorganic low-temperature materials system, transition metal oxides (TMOs), that appears to be a very promising, new high-performance flexible electronic materials system. An equally, if not more, important part of this chapter, is the presentation of self-aligned imprint lithography (SAIL) a new fabrication method for flexible substrates that solves the layer-to-layer alignment problem.

  13. First-principles study of transition metal carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connétable, Damien

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the physical properties of transition metal carbides compounds associated with the Nb-C, Ti-C, Mo-C and W-C alloys systems using first-principles calculations. The ground-state properties (lattice parameters, cohesive energies and magnetism) were analyzed and compared to the experimental and theoretical literature. The simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental findings concerning atomic positions and structures. Elastic properties, computed using a finite-differences approach, are then discussed in detail. To complete the work, their lattice dynamics properties (phonon spectra) were investigated. These results serve to establish that some structures, which are mechanically stable, are dynamically unstable.

  14. About Alloying of Aluminum Alloys with Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    An attempt is made to advance Elagin's principles of alloying of aluminum alloys with transition metals (TM) such as Mn, Cr, Zr, Ti, V with allowance for the ternary equilibrium and metastable Al - TM - TM phase diagrams. The key moments in the analysis of the phase diagrams are the curves (surfaces) of joint solubility of TM in aluminum, which bound the range of the aluminum solid solution. It is recommended to use combinations of such TM (two and more), the introduction of which into aluminum alloys widens the phase range of the aluminum solid solution.

  15. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  16. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.; Lincoln, Lanny P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  17. Transition metal partially supported graphene: Magnetism and oscillatory electrostatic potentials

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang

    2017-08-07

    Using first-principles calculations here, we show that Mn and Cr layers under graphene exhibit almost zero magnetic moment due to anti-ferromagnetic order, while ferromagnetic coupling in Fe, Co, and Ni leads to large magnetic moment. The transition metal partially supported graphene, with a mixture of supported and pristine areas, exhibits an oscillatory electrostatic potential, thus alternating the electric field across the supported and pristine areas. Such an effect can be utilized to control mass transport and nanostructure self-organization on graphene at the atomic level.

  18. Transition Metal Doped ZnO for Spintronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    Pearton, D. P. Norton, and F. Ren, *Advances in Processing of ZnO,m in Zinc Oxide Bulk, Thin Films, and Nanostructures, C. Jagadish and S. J. Pearton, Ed...transition metal ions," in Zinc Oxide Bulk, Thin Films, and Nanostructures, C. Jagadish and S. J. Pearton, Ed., Elsevier, pp. 555-576, 2006. Id. Papers... Zinc -Oxide and Indium- Zinc -Oxide in C12/Ar and CH4/H2/Ar Chemistries," 2006 Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society, Boston, MA, November 2006 7

  19. Inhomogeneous composition distribution in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shuang; Xu, Mingsheng; Huang, Shuyun; Liang, Tao; Wang, Shengping; Li, Hongfei; Iwai, Hideo; Onishi, Keiko; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Fujita, Daisuke; Ma, Xiangyang; Yang, Deren

    2017-04-01

    Alloying with various compositions is an efficient method to tailor the optoelectronic properties of two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). However, the composition distribution in the monolayer of TMDs alloys lacks detailed investigation. Here, by exploring scanning Auger electron spectroscopy, we investigate the composition distribution in MoS2(1-x)Se2x monolayers with high spatial resolution. Our results demonstrate that inhomogeneous composition distribution exists not only among different nanosheets on a substrate but also within individual nanosheets. Our study would be helpful to develop new methods for controllable synthesis of TMDs alloys and other 2D materials.

  20. Trion and Biexciton in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kezerashvili, Roman Ya; Tsiklauri, Shalva M.

    2017-01-01

    We study the trion and biexciton in transition metal dichalcogenides monolayers within the framework of a nonrelativistic potential model using the method of hyperspherical harmonics (HH). We solve the three- and four-body Schrödinger equations with the Keldysh potential by expanding the wave functions of a trion and biexciton in terms of the antisymmetrized HH. Results of the calculations for the ground state energies are in good agreement with similar calculations for the Keldysh potential and in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements of trion and biexciton binding energies.

  1. Optical Control of Spin Polarization in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Yan, Tengfei; Zhu, Bairen; Yang, Siyuan; Cui, Xiaodong

    2017-02-28

    Optical excitation could generate electrons' spin polarization in some semiconductors with the control of the field polarization. In this article, we report a series of spin-resolved photocurrent experiments on monolayer tungsten disulfide. The experiments demonstrate that the optical excitations with the same helicity could generate opposite spin polarization around the Fermi level by tuning the excitation energy. The mechanism lies in the valley-dependent optical selection rules, the giant spin-orbit coupling, and spin-valley locking in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). These exotic features make monolayer TMDs promising candidates for conceptual semiconductor-based spintronics.

  2. Mott Transition in a Metallic Liquid: Gutzwiller Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Gia-Wei; Barros, Kipton; Batista, Cristian D.; Kress, Joel D.; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2017-06-01

    We present a formulation of quantum molecular dynamics that includes electron correlation effects via the Gutzwiller method. Our new scheme enables the study of the dynamical behavior of atoms and molecules with strong electron interactions. The Gutzwiller approach goes beyond the conventional mean-field treatment of the intra-atomic electron repulsion and captures crucial correlation effects such as band narrowing and electron localization. We use Gutzwiller quantum molecular dynamics to investigate the Mott transition in the liquid phase of a single-band metal and uncover intriguing structural and transport properties of the atoms.

  3. Piezoelectric coefficients of bulk 3R transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konabe, Satoru; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2017-09-01

    The piezoelectric properties of bulk transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) with a 3R structure were investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory combined with the Berry phase treatment. Values for the elastic constant Cijkl , the piezoelectric coefficient eijk , and the piezoelectric coefficient dijk are given for bulk 3R-TMDCs (MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2). The piezoelectric coefficients of bulk 3R-TMDCs are shown to be sufficiently large or comparable to those of conventional bulk piezoelectric materials such as α-quartz, wurtzite GaN, and wurtzite AlN.

  4. A simple, general route to 2-pyridylidene transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Roselló-Merino, Marta; Díez, Josefina; Conejero, Salvador

    2010-12-28

    Pyridinium 2-carboxylates decompose thermally in the presence of a variety of late transition metal precursors to yield the corresponding 2-pyridylidene-like complexes. The mild reaction conditions and structural diversity that can be generated in the heterocyclic ring make this method an attractive alternative for the synthesis of 2-pyridylidene complexes. IR spectra of the Ir(i) carbonyl compounds [IrCl(NHC)(CO)(2)] indicate that these N-heterocyclic carbene ligands are among the strongest σ-electron donors.

  5. The nature of the bonding in the transition metal trimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic structure of the transition metal (TM) trimers was studied by comparing the bonding in the Ca3, Sc3, and Cu3 molecules. The complete active space SCF/externally contracted configuration interaction (CI) ratio for the low-lying states of Sc3 and Sc3(+) and the SCF/CI ratio for Ca3 and Cu3 trimers, all for near equilateral triangle geometries, were calculated. In addition, vertical excitation energies for Cu3 were computed, leading to a new assignment of the upper state in the resonant two-photon ionization spectrum. Based on these studies, bonding in other TM trimers was discussed.

  6. Transition metal partially supported graphene: Magnetism and oscillatory electrostatic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang

    2017-08-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we show that Mn and Cr layers under graphene exhibit almost zero magnetic moment due to anti-ferromagnetic order, while ferromagnetic coupling in Fe, Co, and Ni leads to large magnetic moment. Transition metal partially supported graphene, with a mixture of supported and pristine areas, exhibits an oscillatory electrostatic potential, thus alternating the electric field across the supported and pristine areas. Such an effect can be utilized to control mass transport and nanostructure self-organization on graphene at the atomic level.

  7. Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Metallic Glass Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Şopu, D; Foroughi, A; Stoica, M; Eckert, J

    2016-07-13

    When reducing the size of metallic glass samples down to the nanoscale regime, experimental studies on the plasticity under uniaxial tension show a wide range of failure modes ranging from brittle to ductile ones. Simulations on the deformation behavior of nanoscaled metallic glasses report an unusual extended strain softening and are not able to reproduce the brittle-like fracture deformation as found in experiments. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations we provide an atomistic understanding of the deformation mechanisms of metallic glass nanowires and differentiate the extrinsic size effects and aspect ratio contribution to plasticity. A model for predicting the critical nanowire aspect ratio for the ductile-to-brittle transition is developed. Furthermore, the structure of brittle nanowires can be tuned to a softer phase characterized by a defective short-range order and an excess free volume upon systematic structural rejuvenation, leading to enhanced tensile ductility. The presented results shed light on the fundamental deformation mechanisms of nanoscaled metallic glasses and demarcate ductile and catastrophic failure.

  8. Transition Metal Intercalators as Anticancer Agents—Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Krishant M.; Pages, Benjamin J.; Ang, Dale L.; Gordon, Christopher P.; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R.

    2016-01-01

    The diverse anticancer utility of cisplatin has stimulated significant interest in the development of additional platinum-based therapies, resulting in several analogues receiving clinical approval worldwide. However, due to structural and mechanistic similarities, the effectiveness of platinum-based therapies is countered by severe side-effects, narrow spectrum of activity and the development of resistance. Nonetheless, metal complexes offer unique characteristics and exceptional versatility, with the ability to alter their pharmacology through facile modifications of geometry and coordination number. This has prompted the search for metal-based complexes with distinctly different structural motifs and non-covalent modes of binding with a primary aim of circumventing current clinical limitations. This review discusses recent advances in platinum and other transition metal-based complexes with mechanisms of action involving intercalation. This mode of DNA binding is distinct from cisplatin and its derivatives. The metals focused on in this review include Pt, Ru and Cu along with examples of Au, Ni, Zn and Fe complexes; these complexes are capable of DNA intercalation and are highly biologically active. PMID:27809241

  9. Synthesis, structure and physical properties of selected transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, Joanna Elizabeth Leah

    Monoclinic Nb12O29 has been synthesised by topotactic reduction of H-Nb2O5. It has a complex crystallographic shear structure made up of 3x4 blocks of corner shared NbO6 octahedra. Nb12O29 is mixed d0/d1 compound which, can be written as Nb4+2NB5+10O29. It has been found, using Rietveld refinement of powder neutron diffraction data, to undergo a charge ordering transition at around 12K resulting in a lowering of symmetry from A2/m to Am. Below this transition, one Nb4+ ion is localised on a crystallographically distinct site in the centre of the 3x4 blocks. This charge ordering transition has an associated transition to an incommensurate one dimensional antiferromagnetic state. The nature of the magnetic order has been investigated using susceptibility and SR measurements. Susceptibility measurements reveal that only 48% of the Nb4+ in the system is localised, and its temperature dependence is well fitted to a Bonner-Fisher model for S=1/2 one dimensional antiferromagnets. It is found that the remaining valence electrons in NB12O29 itinerant and contribute to its metallic conductivity. Further evidence for the unique properties of monoclinic Nb12O29 has been obtained by doping the structure with small amounts of diamagnetic Ti4+, which rapidly causes a destruction of the long range magnetic order at only 3% doping, but leaves the metallic conductivity unaffected, as is expected for a one dimensional chain.

  10. Redefining the metal/charge-transfer insulator paradigm in transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hung; Ai, Xinyuan; Marianetti, Chris; Millis, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    The universality of the phase diagram in the variables of interaction strength and d-occupancy, shown for late transition metal oxides in Ref.[1], is examined for two series of early transition metal oxides: (SrVO3, SrCrO3, SrMnO3) and (LaTiO3, LaVO3, LaCrO3) using density functional theory (DFT), DFT+U and DFT+dynamical mean field theory methods. The interaction required to drive the metal-insulator transition is found to depend sensitively on the d-occupancy Nd, and beyond a threshold value of the d-occupancy an insulating state cannot be achieved for any practical value of the interaction. The critical Nd values are determined and compared to ab initio and experimental estimates where available. Additionally, the minimal model for the transition is determined and the crucial role played by the Hunds coupling is demonstrated. [4pt] [1] Xin Wang, M. J. Han, Luca de' Medici, C. A. Marianetti, and Andrew J. Millis (2011). arXiv:1110.2782

  11. Origin of Transitions between Metallic and Insulating States in Simple Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, Ivan I.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-04-17

    Unifying principles that underlie recently discovered transitions between metallic and insulating states in elemental solids under pressure are developed. Using group theory arguments and first principles calculations, we show that the electronic properties of the phases involved in these transitions are controlled by symmetry principles not previously recognized. The valence bands in these systems are described by simple and composite band representations constructed from localized Wannier functions centered on points unoccupied by atoms, and which are not necessarily all symmetrical. The character of the Wannier functions is closely related to the degree of s-p(-d) hybridization and reflects multi-center chemical bonding in these insulating states. The conditions under which an insulating state is allowed for structures having an integer number of atoms per primitive unit cell as well as re-entrant (i.e., metal-insulator-metal) transition sequences are detailed, resulting in predictions of novel behavior such as phases having three-dimensional Dirac-like points. The general principles developed are tested and applied to the alkali and alkaline earth metals, including elements where high-pressure insulating phases have been identified or reported (e.g., Li, Na, and Ca).

  12. Origin of Transitions between Metallic and Insulating States in Simple Metals

    DOE PAGES

    Naumov, Ivan I.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-04-17

    Unifying principles that underlie recently discovered transitions between metallic and insulating states in elemental solids under pressure are developed. Using group theory arguments and first principles calculations, we show that the electronic properties of the phases involved in these transitions are controlled by symmetry principles not previously recognized. The valence bands in these systems are described by simple and composite band representations constructed from localized Wannier functions centered on points unoccupied by atoms, and which are not necessarily all symmetrical. The character of the Wannier functions is closely related to the degree of s-p(-d) hybridization and reflects multi-center chemical bondingmore » in these insulating states. The conditions under which an insulating state is allowed for structures having an integer number of atoms per primitive unit cell as well as re-entrant (i.e., metal-insulator-metal) transition sequences are detailed, resulting in predictions of novel behavior such as phases having three-dimensional Dirac-like points. The general principles developed are tested and applied to the alkali and alkaline earth metals, including elements where high-pressure insulating phases have been identified or reported (e.g., Li, Na, and Ca).« less

  13. Origin of Transitions between Metallic and Insulating States in Simple Metals.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J

    2015-04-17

    Unifying principles that underlie recently discovered transitions between metallic and insulating states in elemental solids under pressure are developed. Using group theory arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the electronic properties of the phases involved in these transitions are controlled by symmetry principles. The valence bands in these systems are described by simple and composite band representations constructed from localized Wannier functions centered on points unoccupied by atoms, and which are not necessarily all symmetrical. The character of the Wannier functions is closely related to the degree of s-p(-d) hybridization and reflects multicenter chemical bonding in these insulating states. The conditions under which an insulating state is allowed for structures having an integer number of atoms per primitive unit cell as well as reentrant (i.e., metal-insulator-metal) transition sequences are detailed, resulting in predictions of behavior such as phases having band-contact lines. The general principles developed are tested and applied to the alkali and alkaline earth metals, including elements where high-pressure insulating phases have been reported (e.g., Li, Na, and Ca).

  14. Ab initio effective core potentials for molecular calculations. Potentials for the transition metal atoms Sc to Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, P.J.; Wadt, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ab initio effective core potentials (ECP's) have been generated to replace the Coulomb, exchange, and core-orthogonality effects of the chemically inert core electron in the transition metal atoms Sc to Hg. For the second and third transition series relative ECP's have been generated which also incorporate the mass--velocity and Darwin relativistic effects into the potential. The ab initio ECP's should facilitate valence electron calculations on molecules containing transition-metal atoms with accuracies approaching all-electron calculations at a fraction of the computational cost. Analytic fits to the potentials are presented for use in multicenter integral evaluation. Gaussian orbital valence basis sets are developed for the (3d,4s,4p), (4d,5s,5p), and (5d,6s,6p) orbitals of the first, second, and third transition series atoms, respectively. All-electron and valence-electron atomic excitation energies are also compared for the low-lying states of Sc--Hg, and the valence-electron calculations are found to reproduce the all-electron excitation energies (typically within a few tenths of an eV).

  15. Selective transformations of cyclopentadienyl ligands of transition-metal and rare-earth metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiting; Zhou, Xigeng

    2013-04-21

    Cyclopentadienyl and substituted cyclopentadienyl ligands are observed in a wide range of organometallic complexes. In addition to serving as ancillary ligands, these ligands have come into their own as intermediates in organometallic reactions, and shown many unique reaction modes involving ring C-H, C-C and C=C bond cleavages. This feature article summarizes the progressive development of cyclopentadienyl-based reactions of metallocene complexes of transition metals and rare-earth metals, with the aim of further developing the fundamental modes of reactivity of such systems together with their synthetic applications.

  16. Thermoelectric material including a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Jihui [Lakeshore, CA; Shi, Xun [Troy, MI; Bai, Shengqiang [Shanghai, CN; Zhang, Wenqing [Shanghai, CN; Chen, Lidong [Shanghai, CN; Yang, Jiong [Shanghai, CN

    2012-01-17

    A thermoelectric material includes a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure having the formula A.sub.8TM.sub.y.sub.1.sup.1TM.sub.y.sub.2.sup.2 . . . TM.sub.y.sub.n.sup.nM.sub.zX.sub.46-y.sub.1.sub.-y.sub.2.sub.- . . . -y.sub.n.sub.-z. In the formula, A is selected from the group consisting of barium, strontium, and europium; X is selected from the group consisting of silicon, germanium, and tin; M is selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, and indium; TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, and TM.sup.n are independently selected from the group consisting of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals; and y.sub.1, y.sub.2, y.sub.n and Z are actual compositions of TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, TM.sup.n, and M, respectively. The actual compositions are based upon nominal compositions derived from the following equation: z=8q.sub.A-|.DELTA.q.sub.1|y.sub.1-|.DELTA.q.sub.2|y.sub.2- . . . -|.DELTA.q.sub.n|y.sub.n, wherein q.sub.A is a charge state of A, and wherein .DELTA.q.sub.1, .DELTA.q.sub.2, .DELTA.q.sub.n are, respectively, the nominal charge state of the first, second, and n-th TM.

  17. Exciton-exciton interaction in transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahnazaryan, V.; Iorsh, I.; Shelykh, I. A.; Kyriienko, O.

    2017-09-01

    We study theoretically the Coulomb interaction between excitons in transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers. We calculate direct and exchange interaction for both ground and excited states of excitons. The screening of the Coulomb interaction, specific to monolayer structures, leads to the unique behavior of the exciton-exciton scattering for excited states, characterized by the nonmonotonic dependence of the interaction as function of the transferred momentum. We find that the nontrivial screening enables the description of TMD exciton interaction strength by approximate formula which includes exciton binding parameters. The influence of screening and dielectric environment on the exciton-exciton interaction was studied, showing qualitatively different behavior for ground state and excited states of excitons. Furthermore, we consider exciton-electron interaction, which for the excited states is governed by the dominant attractive contribution of the exchange component, which increases with the excitation number. The results provide a quantitative description of the exciton-exciton and exciton-electron scattering in transition metal dichalcogenides, and are of interest for the design of perspective nonlinear optical devices based on TMD monolayers.

  18. Wannier function analysis of charge states in transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yundi; Pickett, Warren

    2015-03-01

    The charge (or oxidation) state of a cation has been a crucial concept in analyzing the electronic and magnetic properties of oxides as well as interpreting ``charge ordering'' metal-insulator transitions. In recent years a few methods have been proposed for the objective identification of charge states, beyond the conventional (and occasionally subjective) use of projected densities of states, weighted band structures (fatbands), and Born effective charges. In the past two decades Wannier functions (WFs) and particularly maximally localized WFs (MLWFs), have become an indispensable tool for several different purposes in electronic structure studies. These developments have motivated us to explore the charge state picture from the perspective of MLWFs. We will illustrate with a few transition metal oxide examples such as AgO and YNiO3 that the shape, extent, and location of the charge centers of the MLWFs provide insights into how cation-oxygen hybridization determines chemical bonding, charge distribution, and ``charge ordering.'' DOE DE-FG02-04ER46111.

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Transition Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Lucas

    2006-03-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo is a powerful computational tool to study correlated systems, allowing us to explicitly treat many-body interactions with favorable scaling in the number of particles. It has been regarded as a benchmark tool for first and second row condensed matter systems, although its accuracy has not been thoroughly investigated in strongly correlated transition metal oxides. QMC has also historically suffered from the mixed estimator error in operators that do not commute with the Hamiltonian and from stochastic uncertainty, which make small energy differences unattainable. Using the Reptation Monte Carlo algorithm of Moroni and Baroni(along with contributions from others), we have developed a QMC framework that makes these previously unavailable quantities computationally feasible for systems of hundreds of electrons in a controlled and consistent way, and apply this framework to transition metal oxides. We compare these results with traditional mean-field results like the LDA and with experiment where available, focusing in particular on the polarization and lattice constants in a few interesting ferroelectric materials. This work was performed in collaboration with Lubos Mitas and Jeffrey Grossman.

  20. Nanostructured transition metal oxides for energy storage and conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang

    Lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors and photovoltaic devices have been widely considered as the three major promising alternatives of fossil fuels facing upcoming depletion to power the 21th century. The conventional film configuration of electrochemical electrodes hardly fulfills the high energy and efficiency requirements because heavy electroactive material deposition restricts ion diffusion path, and lowers power density and fault tolerance. In this thesis, I demonstrate that novel nanoarchitectured transition metal oxides (TMOs), e.g. MnO2, V2O 5, and ZnO, and their relevant nanocomposites were designed, fabricated and assembled into devices to deliver superior electrochemical performances such as high energy and power densities, and rate capacity. These improvements could be attributed to the significant enhancement of surface area, shortened ion diffusion distances and facile penetration of electrolyte solution into open structures of networks as well as to the pseudocapacitance domination. The utilization of ForcespinningRTM, a newly developed nanofiber processing technology, for large-scale energy storage and conversion applications is emphasized. This process simplifies the tedious multi-step hybridization synthesis and facilitates the contradiction between the micro-batch production and the ease of large-scale manufacturing. Key Words: Transition metal oxides, energy storage and conversion, ForcespinningRTM, pseudocapacitance domination, high rate capacity

  1. Defects and ferromagnetism in transition metal doped zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapa, Sunil

    Transition metal doped zinc oxide has been studied recently due to its potential application in spintronic devices. The magnetic semiconductor, often called Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors (DMS), has the ability to incorporate both charge and spin into a single formalism. Despite a large number of studies on ferromagnetism in ZnO based DMS and the realization of its room temperature ferromagnetism, there is still a debate about the origin of the ferromagnetism. In this work, the synthesis and characterization of transition metal doped zinc oxide have been carried out. The sol-gel method was used to synthesize thin films, and they were subsequently annealed in air. Characterization of doped zinc oxide films was carried out using the UV-visible range spectrometer, scanning electron microscopy, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), x-ray diffraction(XRD) and positron annihilation spectroscopy. Hysteresis loops were obtained for copper and manganese doped zinc oxide, but a reversed hysteresis loop was observed for 2% Al 3% Co doped zinc oxide. The reversed hysteresis loop has been explained using a two-layer model.

  2. Effects of interband transitions on Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wysin, G M; Chikan, Viktor; Young, Nathan; Dani, Raj Kumar

    2013-08-14

    The Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles is considered based on a quantum model for the dielectric function ϵ(ω) in the presence of a DC magnetic field B. We focus on effects in ϵ(ω) due to interband transitions (IBTs), which are important in the blue and ultraviolet for noble metals used in plasmonics. The dielectric function is found using the perturbation of the electron density matrix due to the optical field of the incident electromagnetic radiation. The calculation is applied to transitions between two bands (d and p, for example) separated by a gap, as one finds in gold at the L-point of the Fermi surface. The result of the DC magnetic field is a shift in the effective optical frequency causing IBTs by ±μBB/ħ, where opposite signs are associated with left/right circular polarizations. The Faraday rotation for a dilute solution of 17 nm diameter gold nanoparticles is measured and compared with both the IBT theory and a simpler Drude model for the bound electron response. Effects of the plasmon resonance mode on Faraday rotation in nanoparticles are also discussed.

  3. Magnetism In 3d Transition Metals at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Iota, V

    2006-02-09

    This research project examined the changes in electronic and magnetic properties of transition metals and oxides under applied pressures, focusing on complex relationship between magnetism and phase stability in these correlated electron systems. As part of this LDRD project, we developed new measurement techniques and adapted synchrotron-based electronic and magnetic measurements for use in the diamond anvil cell. We have performed state-of-the-art X-ray spectroscopy experiments at the dedicated high-pressure beamline HP-CAT (Sector 16 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory), maintained in collaboration with of University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Geophysical Laboratory of The Carnegie Institution of Washington. Using these advanced measurements, we determined the evolution of the magnetic order in the ferromagnetic 3d transition metals (Fe, Co and Ni) under pressure, and found that at high densities, 3d band broadening results in diminished long range magnetic coupling. Our experiments have allowed us to paint a unified picture of the effects of pressure on the evolution of magnetic spin in 3d electron systems. The technical and scientific advances made during this LDRD project have been reported at a number of scientific meetings and conferences, and have been submitted for publication in technical journals. Both the technical advances and the physical understanding of correlated systems derived from this LDRD are being applied to research on the 4f and 5f electron systems under pressure.

  4. Ultrafast exciton relaxation in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Thilagam, A.

    2016-04-28

    We examine a mechanism by which excitons undergo ultrafast relaxation in common monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides. It is shown that at densities ≈1 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2} and temperatures ≤60 K, excitons in well known monolayers (MoS{sub 2}, MoSe{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}, and WSe{sub 2}) exist as point-like structureless electron-hole quasi-particles. We evaluate the average rate of exciton energy relaxation due to acoustic phonons via the deformation potential and the piezoelectric coupling mechanisms and examine the effect of spreading of the excitonic wavefunction into the region perpendicular to the monolayer plane. Our results show that the exciton relaxation rate is enhanced with increase in the exciton temperature, while it is decreased with increase in the lattice temperature. Good agreements with available experimental data are obtained when the calculations are extrapolated to room temperatures. A unified approach taking into account the deformation potential and piezoelectric coupling mechanisms shows that exciton relaxation induced by phonons is as significant as defect assisted scattering and trapping of excitons by surface states in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides.

  5. Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Daniel; Kettemann, Stefan

    2014-08-20

    We study the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT) numerically. In particular we find that while a finite concentration of Ising impurities lowers the critical value of the site-diagonal disorder amplitude W{sub c}, in the presence of Heisenberg impurities, W{sub c} is first increased with increasing exchange coupling strength J due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. The resulting scaling with J is compared to analytical predictions by Wegner [1]. The results are obtained numerically, based on a finite-size scaling procedure for the typical density of states [2], which is the geometric average of the local density of states. The latter can efficiently be calculated using the kernel polynomial method [3]. Although still suffering from methodical shortcomings, our method proves to deliver results close to established results for the orthogonal symmetry class [4]. We extend previous approaches [5] by combining the KPM with a finite-size scaling analysis. We also discuss the relevance of our findings for systems like phosphor-doped silicon (Si:P), which are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition from metal to insulator driven by the interplay of both interaction and disorder, accompanied by the presence of a finite concentration of magnetic moments [6].

  6. Transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric allylic dearomatization reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Chun-Xiang; Zheng, Chao; You, Shu-Li

    2014-08-19

    Dearomatization reactions serve as powerful methods for the synthesis of highly functionalized, three-dimensional structures starting with simple planar aromatic compounds. Among processes of this type, catalytic asymmetric dearomatization (CADA) reactions are attractive owing to the large number of aromatic compounds that are readily available and the fact that they enable direct access to enantiopure polycycles and spirocycles, which frequently are key structural motifs in biologically active natural products and pharmaceuticals. However, as a consequence of their high stabilities, arenes only difficultly participate in dearomatization reactions that take place with high levels of enantioselectivity. Transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution reactions have been demonstrated to be powerful methods for enantioselective formation of C-C and C-X (X = O, N, S, etc.) bonds. However, the scope of these processes has been explored mainly using soft carbon nucleophiles, some hard carbon nucleophiles such as enolates and preformed organometallic reagents, and heteroatom nucleophiles. Readily accessible aromatic compounds have been only rarely used directly as nucleophiles in these reactions. In this Account, we present the results of studies we have conducted aimed at the development of transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric allylic dearomatization reactions. By utilizing this general process, we have devised methods for direct dearomatization of indoles, pyrroles, phenols, naphthols, pyridines, and pyrazines, which produce various highly functionalized structural motifs bearing all-carbon quaternary stereogenic centers in a straightforward manner. In mechanistic investigations of the dearomatization process, we found that the five-membered spiroindolenines serve as intermediates, which readily undergo stereospecific allylic migration to form corresponding tetrahydro-1H-carbazoles upon treatment with a catalytic amount of TsOH. It is worth noting that no

  7. Electron-phonon coupling and structural phase transitions in early transition metal oxides and chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Katie Elizabeth

    Pronounced nonlinear variation of electrical transport characteristics as a function of applied voltage, temperature, magnetic field, strain, or photo-excitation is usually underpinned by electronic instabilities that originate from the complex interplay of spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom. This dissertation focuses on two canonical materials that show pronounced discontinuities in their temperature-dependent resistivity as a result of electron---phonon and electron---electron correlations: orthorhombic TaS3 and monoclinic VO2. Strong electron-phonon interactions in transition metal oxides and chalcogenides results in interesting structural and electronic phase transitions. The properties of the material can be changed drastically in response to external stimuli such as temperature, voltage, or light. Understanding the influence these interactions have on the electronic structure and ultimately transport characteristics is of utmost importance in order to take these materials from a fundamental aspect to prospective applications such as low-energy interconnects, steep-slope transistors, and synaptic neural networks. This dissertation describes synthetic routes to nanoscale TaS3 and VO2, develops mechanistic understanding of their electronic instabilities, and in the case of the latter system explores modulation of the electronic and structural phase transition via the incorporation of substitutional dopant atoms. We start in chapter 2 with a detailed study of the synthesis and electronic transport properties of TaS3, which undergoes a Peierls' distortion to form a charge density wave. Scaling this material down to the nanometer-sized regime allows for interrogation of single or discrete phase coherent domains. Using electrical transport and broad band noise measurements, the dynamics of pinning/depinning of the charge density wave is investigated. Chapter 3 provides a novel synthetic approach to produce high-edge-density MoS2 nanorods. MoS2 is a

  8. First principle study of AlX (X=3d, 4d, 5d elements and Lu) dimer.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Yifang; Wang, Jianchuan; Hou, Yuhua; Zhong, Xiaping; Du, Yong; Feng, Yuanping

    2008-02-21

    The ground state equilibrium bond length, harmonic vibrational frequency, and dissociation energy of AlX (X=3d,4d,5d elements and Lu) dimers are investigated by density functional method B3LYP. The present results are in good agreement with the available experimental and other theoretical values except the dissociation energy of AlCr. The present calculations show that the late transition metal can combine strongly with aluminum compared with the former transition metal. The present calculation also indicates that it is more reasonable to replace La with Lu in the Periodic Table and that the bonding strengths of zinc, cadmium, and mercury with aluminum are very weak.

  9. Materials with intermediate valence ; a comparison with transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, N. F.

    A discussion of metallic intermediate valence materials is given, particularly of hybridisation between the 4f and the conduction band δ. If n, 1 - n are the numbers of ions in each of two charge states, the variation of n with temperature is described. Resistivity is ascribed to scattering of the conduction electrons into the 4f band. The mechanism is compared with that in transition metals and their alloys, particularly Pd1-xAg x. The resistivity can be very large, of order of the Ioffe-Regel value 1/3 e2/ħa. It is argued that both here and in metallic alloys, this can only occur with a two-band model. At high temperatures there is some evidence that s-f scattering does not occur. On discute des matériaux métalliques à valence intermédiaire, en particulier de l'hybridation entre la bande 4f et la bande de conduction. Notant n et 1 - n les nombres d'ions dans chacun des deux états de charge, on décrit la variation de n avec la température. Le mécanisme est comparé avec celui des métaux de transition et de leurs alliages, particulièrement Pd1-xAg x. La résistivité peut être très grande, de l'ordre de la valeur de Ioffe-Regel 1/3 e2/ħa. On donne des arguments tendant à prouver que ceci ne peut se produire que dans le cadre d'un modèle à 2 bandes. Il y a des évidences qu'à haute température la diffusion s-f n'a pas lieu.

  10. Polynuclear transition metal complexes with thiocarbohydrazide and dithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, K. S.; Khan, Sadaf; Nami, Shahab A. A.; El-ajaily, M. M.

    2007-07-01

    Sn(tch) 2{MCl 2} 2 was prepared from the precursor Sn(tch) 2 and MCl 2. It was subsequently allowed to react with diethyldithiocarbamate which yielded the trinuclear complexes of the type Sn(tch) 2{M 2(dtc) 4}, where tch = thiocarbohydrazide, M = Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and dtc = diethyldithiocarbamate. They were characterized on the basis of microanalytical, thermal (TGA/DSC), spectral (IR, UV-vis, EPR, 1H NMR) studies, conductivity measurement and magnetic moment data. On the basis of spectral data a tetrahedral geometry has been proposed for the halide complexes, Sn(tch) 2{MCl 2} 2 except for Cu(II) which exhibits a square planar coordination although the transition metal ion in Sn(tch) 2{M 2(dtc) 4} achieves an octahedral geometry where the dithiocarbamato moiety acts as a symmetrical bidentate ligand. The bidentate nature has been established by the appearance of a sharp single ν(C-S) around 1000 cm -1. A downfield shift observed in NH a and NH b protons on moving from Sn(tch) 2 to Sn(tch) 2{MCl 2} 2 is due to the drift of electrons toward metal atoms. A two-step pyrolysis has been observed in the Sn(tch) 2{MCl 2} 2 complexes while their dithiocarbamato derivatives exhibit a three-stage degradation pattern. Finally, the in vitro antibacterial activity of Sn(tch) 2{M 2(dtc) 4} and the mononuclear Sn(tch) 2 has been carried out on bacterial strains Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi. The compounds were found to be active against the test organisms. The activity of the complexes is enhanced with increasing concentration. The maximum activity in both the strains was achieved by cobalt(II) dithiocarbamate complex. Minimum activity was found for Sn(tch) 2 which generally increases with the introduction of transition metal ion in the complex.

  11. Quantum phase transitions in ultrathin films of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Anthony Michael

    1997-11-01

    Conductance measurements of ultrathin films of amorphous bismuth are presented. The measurements were performed at temperatures down to 0.15K as a function of temperature and film thickness. Such films are known to become superconducting when the conductance reaches ˜4esp2/h. Careful analysis of the insulating state reveals a crossover near esp2/h, with hopping conduction below and weak localization above. A corresponding change in behavior is also evident in plots of G vs. d at esp2/h. A crossover conductance, Gsbcr ˜ (30 ± 1kOmega)sp{-1}, was extracted by examining the derivative of the G vs. d curves. A scaling analysis is performed yielding an excellent collapse of the data with critical exponents nu z = 6.9 ± 0.7. Ultrathin films of Pd (which is not superconducting) also show a crossover, but at Gsbcr ˜ (56 ± 6kOmega)sp{-1}. The Bi and Pd data sets are collapsed together onto the same curve yielding nu z = 7.2 ± 1.0 for Pd. The success of the scaling analysis supports the view that the crossover is the finite temperature signature of a quantum phase transition occurring at T = 0. The transition is between phases identified as (weakly localized) metal and insulator, which may make this the first observation of a metal-insulator transition in a two-dimensional system. The scaling analysis developed for the crossover at esp2/h was applied to the superconductor-insulator transition as well. While the collapse of the data is poor, the analysis yields a single value of the critical exponent nu z = 1.99 ± 0.09. A previous analysis yielded two separate (and inconsistent) values of nu z on the insulating and superconducting sides. The analysis was also applied to the case of the field-driven superconductor-insulator transition. The resulting collapse is excellent yielding a critical exponent nu z = 0.637 ± 0.010. The scaling parameter deviates from a power law in T above 0.7K. Since the data presented only extends down to 0.5K, the critical region accessed is

  12. Plasma-enhanced deposition and processing of transition metals and transition metal silicides for VLSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, D. W.

    1986-05-01

    Radiofrequency (rf) discharges have been used to deposit films of tungsten, molybdenum and titanium silicide. As-deposited tungsten films, from tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen source gases, were metastable (beta W), with significant (>1 atomic percent) fluorine incorporation. Film resistivities were 40-55 micro ohm - cm due to the beta W, but dropped to about 8 micro ohm cm after a short heat treatment at 700 C which resulted in a phase transition to alpha W (bcc form). The high resistivity (>10,000 micro ohm) associated with molybdenum films deposited from molybdenum hexafluoride and hydrogen appeared to be a result of the formation of molybdenum trifluoride in the deposited material. Titanium silicide films formed from a discharge of titanium tetrachloride, silane, and hydrogen, displayed resistivities of about 150 micro ohm cm, due to small amounts of oxygen and chlorine incorporated during deposition. Plasma etching studies of tungsten films with fluorine containing gases suggest that the etchant species for tungsten in these discharges are fluorine atoms.

  13. Controls on Transition Metal Concentrations in Crustal Brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardley, B. W.

    2004-12-01

    as the major controls on transition metal contents of crustal fluids, with little evidence for significant changes in chloride complexing over the range of compositions and conditions encountered in the crust. Preliminary results on low salinity, gas-rich fluid inclusions suggest that their transition metal contents fit on the same trends as those of brines.

  14. DNA nuclease activity of Rev-coupled transition metal chelates.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Jeff C; Keuper, Kevin D; Cowan, J A

    2012-06-07

    Artificial nucleases containing Rev-coupled metal chelates based on combinations of the transition metals Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+) and the chelators DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, NTA, tripeptide GGH, and tetrapeptide KGHK have been tested for DNA nuclease activity. Originally designed to target reactive transition metal chelates (M-chelates) to the HIV-1 Rev response element mRNA, attachment to the arginine-rich Rev peptide also increases DNA-binding affinity for the attached M-chelates. Apparent K(D) values ranging from 1.7 to 3.6 µM base pairs for binding of supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA by Ni-chelate-Rev complexes were observed, as a result of electrostatic attraction between the positively-charged Rev peptide and negatively-charged DNA. Attachment of M-chelates to the Rev peptide resulted in enhancements of DNA nuclease activity ranging from 1-fold (no enhancement) to at least 13-fold (for Cu-DTPA-Rev), for the rate of DNA nicking, with second order rate constants for conversion of DNA(supercoiled) to DNA(nicked) up to 6 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1), and for conversion of DNA(nicked) to DNA(linear) up to 1 × 10(5) M(-1) min(-1). Freifelder-Trumbo analysis and the ratios of linearization and nicking rate constants (k(lin)/k(nick)) revealed concerted mechanisms for nicking and subsequent linearization of plasmid DNA for all of the Rev-coupled M-chelates, consistent with higher DNA residency times for the Rev-coupled M-chelates. Observed rates for Rev-coupled M-chelates were less skewed by differing DNA-binding affinities than for M-chelates lacking Rev, as a result of the narrow range of DNA-binding affinities observed, and therefore relationships between DNA nuclease activity and other catalyst properties, such as coordination unsaturation, the ability to consume ascorbic acid and generate diffusible radicals, and the identity of the metal center, are now clearly illustrated in light of the similar DNA-binding affinities of all M-chelate-Rev complexes. This work

  15. Supported transition metal nanomaterials: Nanocomposites synthesized by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, D. M.; Castano, C. E.; Rojas, J. V.

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructures decorated with transition metal nanoparticles using ionizing radiation as a synthesis method in aqueous solutions represents a clean alternative to existing physical, chemical and physicochemical methods. Gamma irradiation of aqueous solutions generates free radicals, both oxidizing and reducing species, all distributed homogeneously. The presence of oxidant scavengers in situ during irradiation generates a highly reductive environment favoring the reduction of the metal precursors promoting seed formation and nanoparticle growth. Particle growth is controlled by addition of surfactants, polymers or various substrates, otherwise referred to as supports, which enhance the formation of well dispersed nanoparticles. Furthermore, the combination of nanoparticles with supports can offer desirable synergisms not solely presented by the substrate or nanoparticles. Thus, supported nanoparticles offer a huge diversity of applications. Among the ionizing radiation methods to synthesize nanomaterials and modify their characteristics, gamma irradiation is of growing interest and it has shown tremendous potential in morphological control and distribution of particle size by judiciously varying parameters including absorbed dose, dose rate, concentration of metal precursor, and stabilizing agents. In this work, major advances on the synthesis of supported nanoparticles through gamma irradiation are reviewed as well as the opportunities to develop and exploit new composites using gamma-rays and other accessible ionizing radiation sources such as X-rays.

  16. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    PubMed Central

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid. PMID:27966540

  17. Density functional calculation of transition metal adatom adsorption on graphene.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuliang; Yuan, Jianmei; Zhong, Jianxin

    2008-03-19

    The functionalization of graphene (a single graphite layer) by the addition of transition metal atoms of Mn, Fe and Co to its surface has been investigated computationally using density functional theory. In the calculation, the graphene surface supercell was constructed from a single layer of graphite (0001) surface separated by vertical vacuum layers 2 nm thick. We found that the center of the hexagonal ring formed by carbon from graphene is the most stable site for Mn, Fe, Co to stay after optimization. The calculated spin-polarized band structures of the graphene encapsulating the Mn adatom indicate that the conduction bands are modified and move down due to the coupling between the Mn atom and graphene. For Fe adsorbed on the graphene surface, it is semi-half-metallic, and the spin polarization P is found to be 100%. The system of Co adatom on graphene exhibits metallic electronic structure due to the density of states (DOS) peak at the band center with both majority and minority spins. Local density of states analyses indicate a larger promotion of 4s electrons into the 3d state in Fe and Co, resulting in lower local moments compared to an Mn adatom on the graphite surface.

  18. Metal-insulator transition in a switchable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arunabha Shasanka

    2001-11-01

    Rare earth hydride films can be converted reversibly from metallic mirrors to insulating windows simply by changing the surrounding hydrogen gas pressure at room temperature. At low temperatures, in situ doping is not possible in this way as hydrogen cannot diffuse. However, our finding of persistent photoconductivity under ultraviolet illumination enables us to tune yttrium hydride through the T = 0 metal-insulator transition. Conductivity and Hall measurements are used to determine the critical exponents in this system: mu = 1.0 +/- 0.1 and zv = 6.0 +/- 0.5. The simultaneous validity of finite-size scaling in the metal and its failure in the insulator motivates a study of the insulating phase of YHx in greater detail. A new transport regime is discovered which is consistent with our earlier determined values for the critical exponents but entails a new scaling dependence of the conductivity on the carrier density n and temperature T. The unusually large value for the product of the static and dynamic critical exponents appears to signify the important role played by electron-electron interactions in this system. Finally, possible schemes for the mechanism underlying the unusual photoconductivity are discussed.

  19. Nonlinear d10-ML2 Transition-Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Lando P; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the molecular geometries of a series of dicoordinated d10-transition-metal complexes ML2 (M=Co−, Rh−, Ir−, Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu+, Ag+, Au+; L=NH3, PH3, CO) using relativistic density functional theory (DFT) at ZORA-BLYP/TZ2P. Not all complexes have the expected linear ligand–metal–ligand (L–M–L) angle: this angle varies from 180° to 128.6° as a function of the metal as well as the ligands. Our main objective is to present a detailed explanation why ML2 complexes can become bent. To this end, we have analyzed the bonding mechanism in ML2 as a function of the L–M–L angle using quantitative Kohn–Sham molecular orbital (MO) theory in combination with an energy decomposition analysis (EDA) scheme. The origin of bent L–M–L structures is π backdonation. In situations of strong π backdonation, smaller angles increase the overlap of the ligand’s acceptor orbital with a higher-energy donor orbital on the metal-ligand fragment, and therefore favor π backdonation, resulting in additional stabilization. The angle of the complexes thus depends on the balance between this additional stabilization and increased steric repulsion that occurs as the complexes are bent. PMID:24551547

  20. K-CO on transition metals: A local ionic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Charles H.; Schultz, Peter A.; Messmer, Richard P.

    1987-05-01

    The nature of the K-CO interaction on a transition metal surface is addressed when the K:CO stoichiometry is approx. 1. The interaction proposed is transfer of the K 4s electron to CO. A BORN-Haber cycle for this process on a surface has been calculated. The reference state is K plus CO, bound separately to the surface (a). A key point in the cycle is that removal of the electron from K bound to a metal surface (b) is less costly in energy (approx. metal/K surface, i.e., approx. +2.0 eV) than from K in the gas phase (IP = +4.3 eV). This means that the complex is significantly stabilized on the surface. The removed K electron is then transported to the isolated adsorbed CO (c) at a cost of the electron affinity of CO (approx. = 1.5 eV). When the isolated ions are brought together (d) the net stabilization at the equilibrium geometry is approx. - 1.8 eV.

  1. Discovery of elusive structures of multifunctional transition-metal borides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yongcheng; Wu, Zhaobing; Yuan, Xun; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Peihong

    2015-12-01

    A definitive determination of crystal structures is an important prerequisite for designing and exploiting new functional materials. Even though tungsten and molybdenum borides (TMBx) are the prototype for transition-metal light-element compounds with multiple functionalities, their elusive crystal structures have puzzled scientists for decades. Here, we discover that the long-assumed TMB2 phases with the simple hP3 structure (hP3-TMB2) are in fact a family of complex TMB3 polytypes with a nanoscale ordering along the axial direction. Compared with the energetically unfavorable and dynamically unstable hP3-TMB2 phase, the energetically more favorable and dynamically stable TMB3 polytypes explain the experimental structural parameters, mechanical properties, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns better. We demonstrate that such a structural and compositional modification from the hP3-TMB2 phases to the TMB3 polytypes originates from the relief of the strong antibonding interaction between d electrons by removing one third of metal atoms systematically. These results resolve the longstanding structural mystery of this class of metal borides and uncover a hidden family of polytypic structures. Moreover, these polytypic structures provide an additional hardening mechanism by forming nanoscale interlocks that may strongly hinder the interlayer sliding movements, which promises to open a new avenue towards designing novel superhard nanocomposite materials by exploiting the coexistence of various polytypes.

  2. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid.

  3. Catalytic mechanism of transition-metal compounds on Mg hydrogen sorption reaction.

    PubMed

    Barkhordarian, Gagik; Klassen, Thomas; Bormann, Rüdiger

    2006-06-08

    The catalytic mechanisms of transition-metal compounds during the hydrogen sorption reaction of magnesium-based hydrides were investigated through relevant experiments. Catalytic activity was found to be influenced by four distinct physico-thermodynamic properties of the transition-metal compound: a high number of structural defects, a low stability of the compound, which however has to be high enough to avoid complete reduction of the transition metal under operating conditions, a high valence state of the transition-metal ion within the compound, and a high affinity of the transition-metal ion to hydrogen. On the basis of these results, further optimization of the selection of catalysts for improving sorption properties of magnesium-based hydrides is possible. In addition, utilization of transition-metal compounds as catalysts for other hydrogen storage materials is considered.

  4. Metal-insulator-metal transition in NdNiO3 films capped by CoFe2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, M. S.; Song, C.; Peng, J. J.; Cui, B.; Li, F.; Gu, Y. D.; Pan, F.

    2017-02-01

    Metal-insulator transition features as a transformation from a highly charge conductive state to another state where the charge conductivity is greatly suppressed when decreasing the temperature. Here, we demonstrate two consecutive transitions in NdNiO3 films with CoFe2O4 capping, in which the metal-insulator transition occurs at ˜85 K, followed by an unprecedented insulator-metal transition below 40 K. The emerging insulator-metal transition associated with a weak antiferromagnetic behavior is observed in 20 unit cell-thick NdNiO3 with more than 5 unit cell CoFe2O4 capping. Differently, the NdNiO3 films with thinner CoFe2O4 capping only exhibit metal-insulator transition at ˜85 K, accompanied by a strong antiferromagnetic state below 40 K. Charge transfer from Co to Ni, instead of from Fe to Ni, formulates the ferromagnetic interaction between Ni-Ni and Ni-Co atoms, thus suppressing the antiferromagnetic feature and producing a metallic conductive behavior. Furthermore, a phase diagram for the metal-insulator-metal transition in this system is drawn.

  5. Charge-transfer gap closure in transition-metal halides under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.L.; Yu, P.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Insulator-to-metal transition induced by pressure has been studied in three transition metal iodides: NiI{sub 2}, CoI{sub 2} and FeI{sub 2} using optical absorption and resistivity measurements at room temperature. Comparisons between the results obtained by these two techniques suggested that the closure of the charge-transfer gap is the principal mechanism responsible for the insulator-to-metal transition in these materials.

  6. Structures of late transition metal monoxides from Jahn-Teller instabilities in the rock salt lattice.

    PubMed

    Derzsi, Mariana; Piekarz, Przemysław; Grochala, Wojciech

    2014-07-11

    Most late transition metal (LTM) monoxides crystallize in other than a rock salt structure, which is so common in the earlier transition metal monoxides. Here we present theoretical evidence based on density functional theory that an electron-phonon coupling involving a single soft mode in the cubic cell is responsible for the onset of the experimentally observed structures of the late transition metal monoxides.

  7. The half metallic state of transition metal pnictides in Wurtzite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, M. S.; Lambrecht, Walter R. L.

    2004-03-01

    We perform full potential linear muffin tin orbital (FP-LMTO) calculations for a series transition metal pnictides compounds, including CrAs, CrSb, MnAs, MnSb, VAs and VSb etc., in various four and six fold coordinated structures. The volume expansion can stabilize both the Zinc Blende (ZB) and the Wurtzite (WZ) structures. The energy differences between the ZB and WZ structure are very small and for several compound, such as CrSb, VAs, etc., the WZ structure is more stable than the ZB structure. As in ZB structure, the transition metal pnictides are also half metallic in the WZ structure. The density of states at the Fermi level for majority spin, the band gap for minority spin and the valence band maximum (VBM) for minority spin relative to the Fermi level are very close for two different structures, indicating that the half metallic properties are mainly determined by the local tetrahedron environments which is similar for ZB and WZ structures. While the volume increases, minority band gap increases and the relative Fermi level position to the VBM of minority spin decreases. This is different to the semiconductor band gap dependence on the volume and is caused by the exchange interaction between the majority and the minority spins that will increase with the expansion of the volume. The same effect also causes a slight increase of the DOS for majority spin at Fermi level.

  8. Peruvian perovskite Between Transition-metal to PGM/PlatinumGroupMetal Catalytic Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksoed, Wh-

    2016-11-01

    Strongly correlated electronic materials made of simple building blocks, such as a transition-metal ion in an octahedral oxygen cage forming a perovskite structure- Dagotto & Tokura for examples are the high-temperature superconductivity & the CMR/Colossal Magnetoresistance . Helium-4 denotes from LC Case,ScD: "Catalytic Fusion of Deuterium into Helium-4"- 1998 dealt with gaseous D2- "contacted with a supported metallic catalyst at superatmospheric pressure". The catalyst is a platinum-group metal, at about 0.5% - 1% by weight, on activated C. Accompanies Stephen J Geier, 2010 quotes "transition metal complexes", the Energy thus produced is enormous, and because the deuterium is very cheap in the form of heavy water (less than US 1/g), the fuel cost is very low (<<1 %/KwH). "The oceans contain enough deuterium to satisfy the Earth's energy needs for many millions of year" to keep "maria"/Latin name of seas &Deuteronomy to be eternally preserves. Heartfelt Gratitudes to HE. Mr. Prof. Ir. HANDOJO.

  9. Electronic, magnetic and topological properties of transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yundi

    Transition metal oxides have been the ideal platform for designing materials with exotic properties due to the complex interplay between spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom which can be fine-tuned by varying pressure, temperature, and external magnetic field to give rise to novel phases. Transition metal oxides are also a challenge from the theoretical point of view. The (semi)local density approximation for the exchange correlation functional that is often used in density functional calculations fails to adequately describe the many-body effects of 3d and 4f electrons thereby leading to underestimated band gaps. Several techniques, such as hybrid functionals, dynamical mean field theory, and DFT+U, have been developed over the past few decades to account for the many-body effects of 3d and 4f electrons. The DFT+U method, which will be used extensively throughout this thesis, has proved to be very successful in modeling gap opening, structure optimization and predicting transport properties. Rare earth nickelates have attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to their complex phase diagram that arises from the competition between spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom. Of particular interest is the metal-insulator transition that occurs upon cooling for RNiO3 (R=rare earth, except for La) which was found to be accompanied by symmetry lowering, later theorized as the evidence for charge ordering. By using first principles calculations, we found that the charge difference between Ni ions in the "charge-ordered" phase is negligibly small, while various aspects such as core energy levels, spectral weight immediately above and below the Fermi level, and magnetic moments do differ. Using Wannier function analysis, the charge states of Ni ions in the lower symmetry structure are systematically studied and found to correlated to the number of Wannier charge centers at the Ni site. The same approach was applied to study the charge states of Ag I and Ag

  10. Electronic Relaxation Processes of Transition Metal Atoms in Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautsch, Andreas; Lindebner, Friedrich; Koch, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2014-06-01

    Spectroscopy of doped superfluid helium nanodroplets (He_N) gives information about the influence of this cold, chemically inert, and least interacting matrix environment on the excitation and relaxation dynamics of dopant atoms and molecules. We present the results from laser induced fluorescence (LIF), photoionization (PI), and mass spectroscopy of Cr and Cu doped He_N. From these results, we can draw a comprehensive picture of the complex behavior of such transition metal atoms in He_N upon photo-excitation. The strong Cr and Cu ground state transitions show an excitation blueshift and broadening with respect to the bare atom transitions which can be taken as indication for the solvation inside the droplet. From the originally excited states the atoms relax to energetically lower states and are ejected from the He_N. The relaxation processes include bare atom spin-forbidden transitions, which clearly bears the signature of the He_N influence. Two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2CR2PI) also shows the formation of bare atoms and small Cr-He_n and Cu-He_n clusters in their ground and metastable states ^c. Currently, Cr dimer excitation studies are in progress and a brief outlook on the available results will be given. C. Callegari and W. E. Ernst, Helium Droplets as Nanocryostats for Molecular Spectroscopy - from the Vacuum Ultraviolet to the Microwave Regime, in Handbook of High-Resolution Spectroscopy, eds. M. Quack and F. Merkt, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, 2011. A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, J. Phys. Chem. A, 117 (2013) 9621-9625, DOI: 10.1021/jp312336m F. Lindebner, A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. (2014) in press, DOI: 10.1016/j.ijms.2013.12.022 M. Koch, A. Kautsch, F. Lackner, and W. E. Ernst, submitted to J. Phys. Chem. A

  11. Transition metal chalcogenides: ultrathin inorganic materials with tunable electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Heine, Thomas

    2015-01-20

    CONSPECTUS: After the discovery of graphene and the development of powerful exfoliation techniques, experimental preparation of two-dimensional (2D) crystals can be expected for any layered material that is known to chemistry. Besides graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), transition metal chalcogenides (TMC) are among the most studied ultrathin materials. In particular, single-layer MoS2, a direct band gap semiconductor with ∼1.9 eV energy gap, is popular in physics and nanoelectronics, because it nicely complements semimetallic graphene and insulating h-BN monolayer as a construction component for flexible 2D electronics and because it was already successfully applied in the laboratory as basis material for transistors and other electronic and optoelectronic devices. Two-dimensional crystals are subject to significant quantum confinement: compared with their parent layered 3D material, they show different structural, electronic, and optical properties, such as spontaneous rippling as free-standing monolayer, significant changes of the electronic band structure, giant spin-orbit splitting, and enhanced photoluminescence. Most of those properties are intrinsic for the monolayer and already absent for two-layer stacks of the same 2D crystal. For example, single-layer MoS2 is a direct band gap semiconductor with spin-orbit splitting of 150 meV in the valence band, while the bilayer of the same material is an indirect band gap semiconductor without observable spin-orbit splitting. All these properties have been observed experimentally and are in excellent agreement with calculations based on density-functional theory. This Account reports theoretical studies of a subgroup of transition metal dichalcogenides with the composition MX2, with M = Mo, or W and X = Se or S, also referred to as "MoWSeS materials". Results on the electronic structure, quantum confinement, spin-orbit coupling, spontaneous monolayer rippling, and change of electronic properties in the

  12. The 4D nucleome project.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Job; Belmont, Andrew S; Guttman, Mitchell; Leshyk, Victor O; Lis, John T; Lomvardas, Stavros; Mirny, Leonid A; O'Shea, Clodagh C; Park, Peter J; Ren, Bing; Politz, Joan C Ritland; Shendure, Jay; Zhong, Sheng

    2017-09-13

    The 4D Nucleome Network aims to develop and apply approaches to map the structure and dynamics of the human and mouse genomes in space and time with the goal of gaining deeper mechanistic insights into how the nucleus is organized and functions. The project will develop and benchmark experimental and computational approaches for measuring genome conformation and nuclear organization, and investigate how these contribute to gene regulation and other genome functions. Validated experimental technologies will be combined with biophysical approaches to generate quantitative models of spatial genome organization in different biological states, both in cell populations and in single cells.

  13. Identifying the Collective Length in VO2 Metal-Insulator Transitions.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Takeaki; Nishimura, Tomonori; Toriumi, Akira

    2017-03-01

    The "collective length" in VO2 metal-insulator transitions is identified by controlling nanoscale dopant distribution in thin films. The crossover from the local transition to the collective transition is observed, which originates from the increased instability of the metal-insulator domain boundary. This instability renders the transition collective within the "collective length", which will enable the design of collective electronic devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Change of universality class of metal-insulator transition due to magnetic ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, N. A.; Tovar Costa, M. V.; Troper, A.; Japiassú, Gloria M.; Continentino, M. A.

    1999-04-01

    Using a two-band model we report a theory to describe the metal-insulator (MI) transition as a function of an external applied magnetic field in Kondo insulators. To deal with electronic correlations we use a functional integral approach in the static approximation. We show the existence of a critical value of the Coulomb correlation Uc, such that for Utransition is continuous and occurs from a paramagnetic insulator to a paramagnetic metal. In this case this transition is in the universality class of density-driven transitions. For U>Uc, the transition is to a ferromagnetic metal and it is described by different critical exponents.

  15. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  16. Ternary alkali-metal and transition metal or metalloid acetylides as alkali-metal intercalation electrodes for batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, Karoly; Srajer, George; Harkay, Katherine C; Terdik, Joseph Z

    2015-02-10

    Novel intercalation electrode materials including ternary acetylides of chemical formula: A.sub.nMC.sub.2 where A is alkali or alkaline-earth element; M is transition metal or metalloid element; C.sub.2 is reference to the acetylide ion; n is an integer that is 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 when A is alkali element and 0, 1, or 2 when A is alkaline-earth element. The alkali elements are Lithium (Li), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), Rubidium (Rb), Cesium (Cs) and Francium (Fr). The alkaline-earth elements are Berilium (Be), Magnesium (Mg), Calcium (Ca), Strontium (Sr), Barium (Ba), and Radium (Ra). M is a transition metal that is any element in groups 3 through 12 inclusive on the Periodic Table of Elements (elements 21 (Sc) to element 30 (Zn)). In another exemplary embodiment, M is a metalloid element.

  17. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    DOE PAGES

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-08-17

    Here, the research community has been steadily expanding the family of few-atom-thick crystals beyond graphene, discovering new materials or producing known materials in a 2D state and demonstrating their unique properties1, 2. Recently, nanometre-thin 2D transition metal carbides have also joined this family3. Writing in Nature Materials, Chuan Xu and colleagues now report a significant advance in the field, showing the synthesis of large-area, high-quality, nanometre-thin crystals of molybdenum carbide that demonstrate low-temperature 2D superconductivity4. Moreover, they also show that other ultrathin carbide crystals, such as tungsten and tantalum carbides, can be grown by chemical vapour deposition with a highmore » crystallinity and very low defect concentration.« less

  18. Transition metal dichalcogenides based saturable absorbers for pulsed laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanraj, J.; Velmurugan, V.; Sivabalan, S.

    2016-10-01

    Ultrashort pulsed laser is an indispensable tool for the evolution of photonic technology in the present and future. This laser has been progressing tremendously with new pulse regimes and incorporating novel devices inside its cavity. Recently, a nanomaterial based saturable absorber (SA) was used in ultrafast laser that has improved the lasing performance and caused a reduction in the physical dimension when compared to conventional SAs. To date, the nanomaterials that are exploited for the development of SA devices are carbon nanotubes, graphene, topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and black phosphorous. These materials have unique advantages such as high nonlinear optical response, fiber compatibility and ease of fabrication. In these, TMDs are prominent and an emerging two-dimensional nanomaterial for photonics and optoelectronics applications. Therefore, we review the reports of Q-switched and mode-locked pulsed lasers using TMDs (specifically MoS2, MoSe2, WS2 and WSe2) based SAs.

  19. Transition-metal-catalyzed synthesis of phenols and aryl thiols

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shasha

    2017-01-01

    Phenols and aryl thiols are fundamental building blocks in organic synthesis and final products with interesting biological activities. Over the past decades, substantial progress has been made in transition-metal-catalyzed coupling reactions, which resulted in the emergence of new methods for the synthesis of phenols and aryl thiols. Aryl halides have been extensively studied as substrates for the synthesis of phenols and aryl thiols. In very recent years, C–H activation represents a powerful strategy for the construction of functionalized phenols directly from various arenes. However, the synthesis of aryl thiols through C–H activation has not been reported. In this review, a brief overview is given of the recent advances in synthetic strategies for both phenols and aryl thiols. PMID:28405239

  20. Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Growth via Close Proximity Precursor Supply

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Maria; McEvoy, Niall; Hallam, Toby; Kim, Hye-Young; Berner, Nina C.; Hanlon, Damien; Lee, Kangho; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2014-01-01

    Reliable chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is currently a highly pressing research field, as numerous potential applications rely on the production of high quality films on a macroscopic scale. Here, we show the use of liquid phase exfoliated nanosheets and patterned sputter deposited layers as solid precursors for chemical vapour deposition. TMD monolayers were realized using a close proximity precursor supply in a CVD microreactor setup. A model describing the growth mechanism, which is capable of producing TMD monolayers on arbitrary substrates, is presented. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electrical transport measurements reveal the high quality of the TMD samples produced. Furthermore, through patterning of the precursor supply, we achieve patterned growth of monolayer TMDs in defined locations, which could be adapted for the facile production of electronic device components. PMID:25487822

  1. Electric field tuning of band offsets in transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dennis; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-12-01

    We use first-principles calculations to investigate the band structure evolution of W X2 /Mo X2 (X = S, Se) heterobilayers under a perpendicular electric field. We characterize the extent to which the type II band alignment in these compounds can be tuned or inverted electrostatically. Our results demonstrate two effects of the stacking configuration. First, different stackings produce different net dipole moments, resulting in band offset variations that are larger than 0.1 eV. Second, based on symmetry constraints that depend on stacking, a perpendicular electric field may hybridize W X2 and Mo X2 bands that cross at the Brillouin zone corner K . Our results suggest that external electric fields can be used to tune the physics of intralayer and interlayer excitons in heterobilayers of transition metal dichalcogenides.

  2. Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides in Energy Storage and Conversion.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Xia, Xinhui; Shi, Fan; Zhan, Jiye; Tu, Jiangping; Fan, Hong Jin

    2016-05-01

    High-performance electrode materials are the key to advances in the areas of energy conversion and storage (e.g., fuel cells and batteries). In this Review, recent progress in the synthesis and electrochemical application of transition metal carbides (TMCs) and nitrides (TMNs) for energy storage and conversion is summarized. Their electrochemical properties in Li-ion and Na-ion batteries as well as in supercapacitors, and electrocatalytic reactions (oxygen evolution and reduction reactions, and hydrogen evolution reaction) are discussed in association with their crystal structure/morphology/composition. Advantages and benefits of nanostructuring (e.g., 2D MXenes) are highlighted. Prospects of future research trends in rational design of high-performance TMCs and TMNs electrodes are provided at the end.

  3. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.

  4. Heterogeneous Catalytic Oxidation of Simple Alcohols by Transition Metals

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The “exploding” flask demonstration presents a well-known illustration of heterogeneous catalyzed methanol oxidation. We find that for the same vapor pressure, the demonstration also works for all primary and secondary alcohols up to butanol but not for a tertiary alcohol. Also, we show that the demonstration works for a large range of transition metal catalysts. Hence, this demonstration, which is often applied for the repetitive explosions when methanol is used, may also be used to argue the requirement of initial dehydrogenation of the alcohol to an aldehyde in the catalytic reaction mechanism to support the general insensitivity to reactant molecules in heterogeneous catalysis in contrast to biological catalysis and to provide proof for activity trends as often depicted by volcano plots. PMID:28919644

  5. Heterogeneous Catalytic Oxidation of Simple Alcohols by Transition Metals.

    PubMed

    Jacobse, Leon; Vink, Sebastiaan O; Wijngaarden, Sven; Juurlink, Ludo B F

    2017-09-12

    The "exploding" flask demonstration presents a well-known illustration of heterogeneous catalyzed methanol oxidation. We find that for the same vapor pressure, the demonstration also works for all primary and secondary alcohols up to butanol but not for a tertiary alcohol. Also, we show that the demonstration works for a large range of transition metal catalysts. Hence, this demonstration, which is often applied for the repetitive explosions when methanol is used, may also be used to argue the requirement of initial dehydrogenation of the alcohol to an aldehyde in the catalytic reaction mechanism to support the general insensitivity to reactant molecules in heterogeneous catalysis in contrast to biological catalysis and to provide proof for activity trends as often depicted by volcano plots.

  6. Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides in Energy Storage and Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Shi, Fan; Zhan, Jiye; Tu, Jiangping

    2016-01-01

    High‐performance electrode materials are the key to advances in the areas of energy conversion and storage (e.g., fuel cells and batteries). In this Review, recent progress in the synthesis and electrochemical application of transition metal carbides (TMCs) and nitrides (TMNs) for energy storage and conversion is summarized. Their electrochemical properties in Li‐ion and Na‐ion batteries as well as in supercapacitors, and electrocatalytic reactions (oxygen evolution and reduction reactions, and hydrogen evolution reaction) are discussed in association with their crystal structure/morphology/composition. Advantages and benefits of nanostructuring (e.g., 2D MXenes) are highlighted. Prospects of future research trends in rational design of high‐performance TMCs and TMNs electrodes are provided at the end. PMID:27812464

  7. Moderate temperature sodium cells. I - Transition metal disulfide cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, K. M.; Pitts, L.; Schiff, R.

    1980-01-01

    TiS2, VS2, and Nb(1.1)S2 transition metal disulfides were evaluated as cathode materials for a moderate temperature rechargeable Na cell operating at 130 C. The 1st discharge of TiS2 results in a capacity of 0.85 eq/mole; approximately half of the Na in the 1st phase spanning the Na range from zero to 0.30 and almost all the Na in the 2nd phase spanning the 0.37 to 0.80 range are rechargeable. VS2 intercalates up to one mole of Na/mole of VS2 in the 1st discharge; the resulting Na(x)VS2 ternary consists of 3 phases in the 3 ranges of Na from zero to 1. Niobium disulfide undergoes a phase change in the 1st discharge; the average rechargeable capacity in extended cycling of this cathode is 0.50 eq/mole.

  8. On holographic disorder-driven metal-insulator transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggioli, Matteo; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2017-01-01

    We give a minimal holographic model of a disorder-driven metal-insulator transition. It consists in a CFT with a charge sector and a translation-breaking sector that interact in the most generic way allowed by the symmetries and by dynamical consistency. In the gravity dual, it reduces to a Massive Gravity-Maxwell model with a new direct coupling between the gauge field and the metric that is allowed when gravity is massive. We show that the effect of this coupling is to decrease the DC electrical conductivity generically. This gives a nontrivial check that holographic massive gravity can be consistently interpreted as disorder from the CFT perspective. The suppression of the conductivity happens to such an extent that it does not obey any lower bound and it can be very small in the insulating phase. In some cases, the large disorder limit produces gradient instabilities that hint at the formation of modulated phases.

  9. Transition Metals Catalyzed Element-Cyano Bonds Activations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Falck, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Cyano group as a versatile functionalized intermediate has been explored for several decades, as it readily transfers to many useful functionalization groups such as amine, amide, acid, etc., which make it possess high popularization and use value in organic synthesis. Reactions involved with element-cyano bond cleavage can provide not only a new cyano group but also a freshly functionalized skeleton in one-pot, consequently making it of high importance. The highlights reviewed herein include H-CN, Si-CN, C-CN, B-CN, Sn-CN, Ge-CN, S-CN, Halo-CN, N-CN, and O-CN bonds cleavages and will summarize progress in such an important research area. This review article will focus on transition metal catalyzed reactions involving element-cyano bond activation. PMID:25558119

  10. Observation of Interlayer Phonons in Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Rui; Ye, Zhipeng; Ji, Chao; Means-Shively, Casie; Anderson, Heidi; Kidd, Tim; Chiu, Kuan-Chang; Chou, Cheng-Tse; Wu, Jenn-Ming; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Andersen, Trond; Lui, Chun Hung

    Interlayer phonon modes in transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterostructures are observed for the first time. We measured the low-frequency Raman response of MoS2/WSe2 and MoSe2/MoS2 heterobilayers. We discovered a distinct Raman mode (30 - 35 cm-1) that cannot be found in any individual monolayers. By comparing with Raman spectra of Bernal bilayer (2L) MoS2, 2L MoSe2 and 2L WSe2, we identified the new Raman mode as the layer breathing vibration arising from the vertical displacement of the two TMD layers. The layer breathing mode (LBM) only emerges in bilayer regions with atomically close layer-layer proximity and clean interface. In addition, the LBM frequency exhibits noticeable dependence on the rotational angle between the two TMD layers, which implies a change of interlayer separation and interlayer coupling strength with the layer stacking.

  11. Topological and unconventional magnetic states in transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiete, Gregory

    In this talk I describe some recent work on unusual correlated phases that may be found in bulk transition metal oxides with strong spin-orbit coupling. I will focus on model Hamiltonian studies that are motivated by the pyrocholore iridates, though the correlated topological phases described may appear in a much broader class of materials. I will describe a variety of fractionalized topological phases protected by time-reversal and crystalline symmetries: The weak topological Mott insulator (WTMI), the TI* phase, and the topological crystalline Mott insulator (TCMI). If time permits, I will also discuss closely related heterostructures of pyrochlore iridates in a bilayer and trilayer film geometry. These quasi-two dimensional systems may exhibit a number of interesting topological and magnetic phases. This work is generously funded by the ARO, DARPA, and the NSF.

  12. Reactive recording with rare-earth transition metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooho; Kuwahara, Masashi; Atoda, Nobufumi; Tominaga, Junji

    2001-10-01

    Reactive recording was achieved with typical rare-earth transition metal (RE-TM) for magneto-optical recording. Almost the same carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) and much higher modulation were obtained by the reactive recording, compared with conventional phase change (PC) recording. By applying this recording material to a super-resolution near-field structure for terabyte recording, CNR below 100-nm-mark length signal, readout durability, and power margin were greatly improved. To identify the recording mechanism, we examined the magnetic and thermo-optical properties, finding that the film properties of amorphous RE-TM are steeply changed at ˜773 K by crystallization and thermal-activated reaction with dielectric layers.

  13. Surfactant-Modified Diffusion on Transition-Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    FEIBELMAN,PETER J.; KELLOGG,GARY LEE

    1999-12-01

    Wanting to convert surface impurities from a nuisance to a systematically applicable nano-fabrication tool, we have sought to understand how such impurities affect self-diffusion on transition-metal surfaces. Our field-ion microscope experiments reveal that in the presence of surface hydrogen, self-diffusion on Rh(100) is promoted, while on Pt(100), not only is it inhibited, but its mechanism changes. First-principles calculations aimed at learning how oxygen fosters perfect layerwise growth on a growing Pt(111) crystal contradict the idea in the literature that it does so by directly promoting transport over Pt island boundaries. The discovery that its real effect is to burn off adventitious adsorbed carbon monoxide demonstrates the predictive value of state-of-the-art calculation methods.

  14. Geometric decoherence of valley excitons in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Z. R.; Jiang, Z. F.; Xu, Fuming; Wang, B.; Fu, H. C.

    2017-07-01

    We study the effects of the Berry phases of the valley excitons in the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) when the valley excitons are manipulated by an external terahertz field. We find that the decoherence of the valley degree of freedom of the valley excitons is spontaneously induced because of the different Berry phases of valley excitons accumulated along the opposite trajectories under the manipulation of the external field. It is called the geometric decoherence because it completely results from the geometric phases. The obvious phenomenon related to such spontaneous decoherence is the gradual decrement of the dipole moment matrix element of the valley exciton and consequently the decrement of the emitted signals after the valley excitons are recombined. Moreover, another effect due to the Berry phases is the giant Faraday rotation of the polarization of the emitted photons. Such imperfection of the valley degree of freedom is supposed to provide the potential limits of the valleytronics based on the TMDs optoelecronic devices.

  15. Chiral topological excitons in the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Z. R.; Luo, W. Z.; Jiang, Z. F.; Fu, H. C.

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the chiral topological excitons emerging in the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, where a bulk energy gap of valley excitons is opened up by a position dependent external magnetic field. We find two emerging chiral topological nontrivial excitons states, which exactly connects to the bulk topological properties, i.e., Chern number = 2. The dependence of the spectrum of the chiral topological excitons on the width of the magnetic field domain wall as well as the magnetic filed strength is numerically revealed. The chiral topological valley excitons are not only important to the excitonic transport due to prevention of the backscattering, but also give rise to the quantum coherent control in the optoelectronic applications. PMID:28186154

  16. Quantum dot photosensitizers. Interactions with transition metal centers.

    PubMed

    Burks, Peter T; Ford, Peter C

    2012-11-14

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are attractive for potential use as photosensitizers for a variety of applications. These nanomaterials have very high absorption cross-sections and often display strong photoluminescence (PL). Furthermore, QD absorption and emission spectra can be tuned simply by varying their size, and QD surfaces can be modified to access multiple sites for attaching potential acceptors as well as other functionalities. Here we provide an overview of recent studies concerned with the photosensitization of transition metal centers and other acceptors. Particular focus is directed towards potential therapeutic applications and to our own interest in the delivery of small molecule bioregulators to physiological targets. Studies that have addressed factors that control likely energy and charge transfer processes between QD donors and acceptor molecules are also discussed. Understanding the mechanisms of these photosensitization processes can provide design guidelines for successful applications.

  17. Excitonic linewidth and coherence lifetime in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DOE PAGES

    Selig, Malte; Berghäuser, Gunnar; Raja, Archana; ...

    2016-11-07

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides are direct-gap semiconductors with strong light–matter and Coulomb interactions. The latter accounts for tightly bound excitons, which dominate their optical properties. Besides the optically accessible bright excitons, these systems exhibit a variety of dark excitonic states. They are not visible in the optical spectra, but can strongly influence the coherence lifetime and the linewidth of the emission from bright exciton states. We investigate the microscopic origin of the excitonic coherence lifetime in two representative materials (WS2 and MoSe2) through a study combining microscopic theory with spectroscopic measurements. We also show that the excitonic coherence lifetimemore » is determined by phonon-induced intravalley scattering and intervalley scattering into dark excitonic states. Particularly, we identify exciton relaxation processes involving phonon emission into lower-lying dark states that are operative at all temperatures, in WS2.« less

  18. Two-dimensional inorganic analogues of graphene: transition metal dichalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Manoj K.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene marks a major event in the physics and chemistry of materials. The amazing properties of this two-dimensional (2D) material have prompted research on other 2D layered materials, of which layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are important members. Single-layer and few-layer TMDCs have been synthesized and characterized. They possess a wide range of properties many of which have not been known hitherto. A typical example of such materials is MoS2. In this article, we briefly present various aspects of layered analogues of graphene as exemplified by TMDCs. The discussion includes not only synthesis and characterization, but also various properties and phenomena exhibited by the TMDCs. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Fullerenes: past, present and future, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Buckminster Fullerene’. PMID:27501969

  19. Sonochemical synthesis of mesoporous transition metal and rare earth oxides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqin; Yin, Lunxiang; Gedanken, Arahon

    2002-11-01

    Straight-extended layered mesostructures based on transItion metal (Fe, Cr) and rare earth (Y, Ce, La, Sm, Er) oxides are synthesized by sonication for 3 h. After a longer period of sonication (6 h), hexagonal mesostructures based on Y- and Er-oxides are obtained. The surface areas of the Y-based hexagonal mesophases before and after extraction are 46.5, 256 m2/g, respectively. For Er-based hexagonal mesophases, the surface areas before and after extraction are 157 and 225 m2/g. The pore sizes after extraction are 5.0 and 2.2 nm for Y- and Er-based mesophases, respectively. Hexagonal mesostructures are also obtained for Zr-based material after sonication for 3 h and the hexagonal structure is still maintained after calcinations at 400 degrees C for 4 h, although the surface area is only 35 m2/g.

  20. Chiral topological excitons in the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Gong, Z R; Luo, W Z; Jiang, Z F; Fu, H C

    2017-02-10

    We theoretically investigate the chiral topological excitons emerging in the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, where a bulk energy gap of valley excitons is opened up by a position dependent external magnetic field. We find two emerging chiral topological nontrivial excitons states, which exactly connects to the bulk topological properties, i.e., Chern number = 2. The dependence of the spectrum of the chiral topological excitons on the width of the magnetic field domain wall as well as the magnetic filed strength is numerically revealed. The chiral topological valley excitons are not only important to the excitonic transport due to prevention of the backscattering, but also give rise to the quantum coherent control in the optoelectronic applications.