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Sample records for 4d ultrafast electron

  1. 4D multiple-cathode ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, John Spencer; Liu, Haihua; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2014-01-01

    Four-dimensional multiple-cathode ultrafast electron microscopy is developed to enable the capture of multiple images at ultrashort time intervals for a single microscopic dynamic process. The dynamic process is initiated in the specimen by one femtosecond light pulse and probed by multiple packets of electrons generated by one UV laser pulse impinging on multiple, spatially distinct, cathode surfaces. Each packet is distinctly recorded, with timing and detector location controlled by the cathode configuration. In the first demonstration, two packets of electrons on each image frame (of the CCD) probe different times, separated by 19 picoseconds, in the evolution of the diffraction of a gold film following femtosecond heating. Future elaborations of this concept to extend its capabilities and expand the range of applications of 4D ultrafast electron microscopy are discussed. The proof-of-principle demonstration reported here provides a path toward the imaging of irreversible ultrafast phenomena of materials, and opens the door to studies involving the single-frame capture of ultrafast dynamics using single-pump/multiple-probe, embedded stroboscopic imaging. PMID:25006261

  2. Perspective: 4D ultrafast electron microscopy—Evolutions and revolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorokhov, Dmitry; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2016-02-01

    In this Perspective, the evolutionary and revolutionary developments of ultrafast electron imaging are overviewed with focus on the "single-electron concept" for probing methodology. From the first electron microscope of Knoll and Ruska [Z. Phys. 78, 318 (1932)], constructed in the 1930s, to aberration-corrected instruments and on, to four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM), the developments over eight decades have transformed humans' scope of visualization. The changes in the length and time scales involved are unimaginable, beginning with the micrometer and second domains, and now reaching the space and time dimensions of atoms in matter. With these advances, it has become possible to follow the elementary structural dynamics as it unfolds in real time and to provide the means for visualizing materials behavior and biological functions. The aim is to understand emergent phenomena in complex systems, and 4D UEM is now central for the visualization of elementary processes involved, as illustrated here with examples from past achievements and future outlook.

  3. Seeing in 4D with electrons: Development of ultrafast electron microscopy at Caltech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer Baskin, J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2014-02-01

    The vision to develop 4D electron microscopy, a union of the capabilities of electron microscopy with ultrafast techniques to capture clearly defined images of the nanoscale structure of a material at each step in the course of its chemical or physical transformations, has been pursued at Caltech for the last decade. In this contribution, we will give a brief overview of the capabilities of three currently active Caltech 4D microscopy laboratories. Ongoing work is illustrated by a description of the most recent application of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), a field made possible only by the development of the 4D ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). An appendix gives the various applications made so far and the historic roots of the development at Caltech. xml:lang="fr"

  4. Biological imaging with 4D ultrafast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, David J; Barwick, Brett; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-06-01

    Advances in the imaging of biological structures with transmission electron microscopy continue to reveal information at the nanometer length scale and below. The images obtained are static, i.e., time-averaged over seconds, and the weak contrast is usually enhanced through sophisticated specimen preparation techniques and/or improvements in electron optics and methodologies. Here we report the application of the technique of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) to imaging of biological specimens with femtosecond (fs) temporal resolution. In PINEM, the biological structure is exposed to single-electron packets and simultaneously irradiated with fs laser pulses that are coincident with the electron pulses in space and time. By electron energy-filtering those electrons that gained photon energies, the contrast is enhanced only at the surface of the structures involved. This method is demonstrated here in imaging of protein vesicles and whole cells of Escherichia coli, both are not absorbing the photon energy, and both are of low-Z contrast. It is also shown that the spatial location of contrast enhancement can be controlled via laser polarization, time resolution, and tomographic tilting. The high-magnification PINEM imaging provides the nanometer scale and the fs temporal resolution. The potential of applications is discussed and includes the study of antibodies and immunolabeling within the cell.

  5. Biological imaging with 4D ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Flannigan, David J.; Barwick, Brett; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the imaging of biological structures with transmission electron microscopy continue to reveal information at the nanometer length scale and below. The images obtained are static, i.e., time-averaged over seconds, and the weak contrast is usually enhanced through sophisticated specimen preparation techniques and/or improvements in electron optics and methodologies. Here we report the application of the technique of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) to imaging of biological specimens with femtosecond (fs) temporal resolution. In PINEM, the biological structure is exposed to single-electron packets and simultaneously irradiated with fs laser pulses that are coincident with the electron pulses in space and time. By electron energy-filtering those electrons that gained photon energies, the contrast is enhanced only at the surface of the structures involved. This method is demonstrated here in imaging of protein vesicles and whole cells of Escherichia coli, both are not absorbing the photon energy, and both are of low-Z contrast. It is also shown that the spatial location of contrast enhancement can be controlled via laser polarization, time resolution, and tomographic tilting. The high-magnification PINEM imaging provides the nanometer scale and the fs temporal resolution. The potential of applications is discussed and includes the study of antibodies and immunolabeling within the cell. PMID:20479261

  6. Ordered water structure at hydrophobic graphite interfaces observed by 4D, ultrafast electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2009-01-01

    Interfacial water has unique properties in various functions. Here, using 4-dimensional (4D), ultrafast electron crystallography with atomic-scale spatial and temporal resolution, we report study of structure and dynamics of interfacial water assembly on a hydrophobic surface. Structurally, vertically stacked bilayers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface were determined to be ordered, contrary to the expectation that the strong hydrogen bonding of water on hydrophobic surfaces would dominate with suppressed interfacial order. Because of its terrace morphology, graphite plays the role of a template. The dynamics is also surprising. After the excitation of graphite by an ultrafast infrared pulse, the interfacial ice structure undergoes nonequilibrium “phase transformation” identified in the hydrogen-bond network through the observation of structural isosbestic point. We provide the time scales involved, the nature of ice-graphite structural dynamics, and relevance to properties related to confined water. PMID:19246378

  7. Ultrafast Elemental and Oxidation-State Mapping of Hematite by 4D Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, Zixue; Baskin, J Spencer; Zhou, Wuzong; Thomas, John M; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2017-04-05

    We describe a new methodology that sheds light on the fundamental electronic processes that occur at the subsurface regions of inorganic solid photocatalysts. Three distinct kinds of microscopic imaging are used that yield spatial, temporal, and energy-resolved information. We also carefully consider the effect of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), first reported by Zewail et al. in 2009. The value of this methodology is illustrated by studying afresh a popular and viable photocatalyst, hematite, α-Fe2O3 that exhibits most of the properties required in a practical application. By employing high-energy electron-loss signals (of several hundred eV), coupled to femtosecond temporal resolution as well as ultrafast energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy in 4D, we have, inter alia, identified Fe(4+) ions that have a lifetime of a few picoseconds, as well as associated photoinduced electronic transitions and charge transfer processes.

  8. 4D scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy: Single-particle imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ortalan, Volkan; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-07-20

    We report the development of 4D scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM). The method was demonstrated in the imaging of silver nanowires and gold nanoparticles. For the wire, the mechanical motion and shape morphological dynamics were imaged, and from the images we obtained the resonance frequency and the dephasing time of the motion. Moreover, we demonstrate here the simultaneous acquisition of dark-field images and electron energy loss spectra from a single gold nanoparticle, which is not possible with conventional methods. The local probing capabilities of ST-UEM open new avenues for probing dynamic processes, from single isolated to embedded nanostructures, without being affected by the heterogeneous processes of ensemble-averaged dynamics. Such methodology promises to have wide-ranging applications in materials science and in single-particle biological imaging.

  9. 4D scanning ultrafast electron microscopy: visualization of materials surface dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Omar F; Yang, Ding-Shyue; Pal, Samir Kumar; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-05-25

    The continuous electron beam of conventional scanning electron microscopes (SEM) limits the temporal resolution required for the study of ultrafast dynamics of materials surfaces. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM) as a time-resolved method with resolutions in both space and time. The approach is demonstrated in the investigation of the dynamics of semiconducting and metallic materials visualized using secondary-electron images and backscattering electron diffraction patterns. For probing, the electron packet was photogenerated from the sharp field-emitter tip of the microscope with a very low number of electrons in order to suppress space-charge repulsion between electrons and reach the ultrashort temporal resolution, an improvement of orders of magnitude when compared to the traditional beam-blanking method. Moreover, the spatial resolution of SEM is maintained, thus enabling spatiotemporal visualization of surface dynamics following the initiation of change by femtosecond heating or excitation. We discuss capabilities and potential applications of S-UEM in materials and biological science.

  10. On the dynamical nature of the active center in a single-site photocatalyst visualized by 4D ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Su, Zixue; Thomas, John Meurig; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the dynamical nature of the catalytic active site embedded in complex systems at the atomic level is critical to developing efficient photocatalytic materials. Here, we report, using 4D ultrafast electron microscopy, the spatiotemporal behaviors of titanium and oxygen in a titanosilicate catalytic material. The observed changes in Bragg diffraction intensity with time at the specific lattice planes, and with a tilted geometry, provide the relaxation pathway: the Ti4+=O2− double bond transformation to a Ti3+−O1− single bond via the individual atomic displacements of the titanium and the apical oxygen. The dilation of the double bond is up to 0.8 Å and occurs on the femtosecond time scale. These findings suggest the direct catalytic involvement of the Ti3+−O1− local structure, the significance of nonthermal processes at the reactive site, and the efficient photo-induced electron transfer that plays a pivotal role in many photocatalytic reactions. PMID:26729878

  11. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  12. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability. PMID:20696933

  13. 4D electron microscopy: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2012-10-16

    achievable with short intense pulses containing a large number of electrons, however, are limited to tens of nanometers and nanoseconds, respectively. This is because Coulomb repulsion is significant in such a pulse, and the electrons spread in space and time, thus limiting the beam coherence. It is therefore not possible to image the ultrafast elementary dynamics of complex transformations. The challenge was to retain the high spatial resolution of a conventional TEM while simultaneously enabling the temporal resolution required to visualize atomic-scale motions. In this Account, we discuss the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) and summarize techniques and applications that illustrate the power of the approach. In UEM, images are obtained either stroboscopically with coherent single-electron packets or with a single electron bunch. Coulomb repulsion is absent under the single-electron condition, thus permitting imaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy, all with high spatiotemporal resolution, the atomic scale (sub-nanometer and femtosecond). The time resolution is limited only by the laser pulse duration and energy carried by the electron packets; the CCD camera has no bearing on the temporal resolution. In the regime of single pulses of electrons, the temporal resolution of picoseconds can be attained when hundreds of electrons are in the bunch. The applications given here are selected to highlight phenomena of different length and time scales, from atomic motions during structural dynamics to phase transitions and nanomechanical oscillations. We conclude with a brief discussion of emerging methods, which include scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM) with convergent beams, and time-resolved imaging of biological structures at ambient conditions with environmental cells.

  14. Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors for 4D tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, V.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bellora, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Cirio, R.; Durando, S.; Ferrero, M.; Galloway, Z.; Gruey, B.; Freeman, P.; Mashayekhi, M.; Mandurrino, M.; Monaco, V.; Mulargia, R.; Obertino, M. M.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, N.; Staiano, A.; Wilder, M.; Woods, N.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2017-02-01

    We review the progress toward the development of a novel type of silicon detectors suited for tracking with a picosecond timing resolution, the so called Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors. The goal is to create a new family of particle detectors merging excellent position and timing resolution with GHz counting capabilities, very low material budget, radiation resistance, fine granularity, low power, insensitivity to magnetic field, and affordability. We aim to achieve concurrent precisions of ~ 10 ps and ~ 10 μm with a 50 μm thick sensor. Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors are based on the concept of Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors, which are silicon detectors with an internal multiplication mechanism so that they generate a signal which is factor ~ 10 larger than standard silicon detectors.

  15. Ultrafast free electron quantum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Maria Gabriel

    Free electron quantum optics is an emerging sub-field of physics that uses laser light, often in combination with nano-structures, to manipulate electrons in free space. Integration of femtosecond lasers into this technology is facilitating the move of free electron quantum optics into the ultrafast regime. A vision for this technology is ultrahigh temporal resolution in free electron time-of-flight experiments. Such a system would make fundamental physics studies involving small forces accessible that are not feasible with current technology. Realization of this vision will require an ultrafast source and an ultrafast detection scheme. Tungsten nano-tip sources capable of generating sub-100 fs electron pulses are already in use in our lab. Elsewhere, this type of source has been reported to emit on a sub-cycle timescale. Following up on a proposed scheme for observing sub-cycle emission, a two-color interferometer has been built and pump-probe electron emission measurements have been performed. Other efforts to develop ultrafast sources have involved implementing additional control parameters. GaAs has been investigated as a possible ultrafast source of spin-polarized electrons, and tungsten nano-tips have been modified with an ion beam to create a double tip source. Spin control and transverse separation control are expected to make studies of Pauli degeneracy pressure possible. The temporal resolution of current electronic particle detectors is ~1 ns. Schemes involving the interaction of laser pulses with nanostructures could improve this resolution by several orders of magnitude. As a first step towards a femtosecond electron switch, the temporal resolution of a nano-fabricated plasmonic antenna has been measured in a femtosecond pump-probe experiment. The possibility of an ultrafast diffraction switch has also been analyzed for nonrelativistic and relativistic electrons. In an application of a free electron time-of-flight system, the prediction of

  16. Ultrafast Science Opportunities with Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Durr, Hermann

    2016-04-28

    X-rays and electrons are two of the most fundamental probes of matter. When the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first x-ray free electron laser, began operation in 2009, it transformed ultrafast science with the ability to generate laser-like x-ray pulses from the manipulation of relativistic electron beams. This document describes a similar future transformation. In Transmission Electron Microscopy, ultrafast relativistic (MeV energy) electron pulses can achieve unsurpassed spatial and temporal resolution. Ultrafast temporal resolution will be the next frontier in electron microscopy and can ideally complement ultrafast x-ray science done with free electron lasers. This document describes the Grand Challenge science opportunities in chemistry, material science, physics and biology that arise from an MeV ultrafast electron diffraction & microscopy facility, especially when coupled with linac-based intense THz and X-ray pump capabilities.

  17. Ultrafast Electron Microscopes: Design Criteria, Electron Sources, and Column Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Joel A.

    Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy, and its picosecond/femtosecond subclass Ultrafast Electron Microscopy, is an emerging field in instrumentation science. It attempts to combine the nanoscale spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopes with the temporal resolution of modern ultrafast lasers. In this thesis, I present my contributions to this young field. These include a novel model for simulating the dynamics of ultrafast electron pulses in electron microscope systems, design criteria for constructing such a system, and theoretical and experimental groundwork geared towards selecting a useful photocathode for electron pulse generation. I also present the prototype ultrafast electron microscope system being built at UIC.

  18. Ultrafast Electron Diffraction: How It Works

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A new technology at SLAC uses high-energy electrons to unravel motions in materials that are faster than a tenth of a trillionth of a second, opening up new research opportunities in ultrafast science.

  19. Ultrafast Electron Diffraction: How It Works

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-05

    A new technology at SLAC uses high-energy electrons to unravel motions in materials that are faster than a tenth of a trillionth of a second, opening up new research opportunities in ultrafast science.

  20. Local control approach to ultrafast electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vindel-Zandbergen, Patricia; Meier, Christoph; Sola, Ignacio R.

    2016-10-01

    We study ultrafast electron transfer between separated nuclei using local control theory. By imposing electron ionization and electron transport through the continuum, different local control formulations are used to increase the yield of retrapping the electron at the desired nuclei. The control mechanism is based on impulsive de-excitation. Both symmetric and asymmetric nuclear arrangements are analyzed, as well as the role of the nuclear motion.

  1. 4D ultrafast ultrasound flow imaging: in vivo quantification of arterial volumetric flow rate in a single heartbeat.

    PubMed

    Correia, Mafalda; Provost, Jean; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2016-12-07

    We present herein 4D ultrafast ultrasound flow imaging, a novel ultrasound-based volumetric imaging technique for the quantitative mapping of blood flow. Complete volumetric blood flow distribution imaging was achieved through 2D tilted plane-wave insonification, 2D multi-angle cross-beam beamforming, and 3D vector Doppler velocity components estimation by least-squares fitting. 4D ultrafast ultrasound flow imaging was performed in large volumetric fields of view at very high volume rate (>4000 volumes s(-1)) using a 1024-channel 4D ultrafast ultrasound scanner and a 2D matrix-array transducer. The precision of the technique was evaluated in vitro by using 3D velocity vector maps to estimate volumetric flow rates in a vessel phantom. Volumetric Flow rate errors of less than 5% were found when volumetric flow rates and peak velocities were respectively less than 360 ml min(-1) and 100 cm s(-1). The average volumetric flow rate error increased to 18.3% when volumetric flow rates and peak velocities were up to 490 ml min(-1) and 1.3 m s(-1), respectively. The in vivo feasibility of the technique was shown in the carotid arteries of two healthy volunteers. The 3D blood flow velocity distribution was assessed during one cardiac cycle in a full volume and it was used to quantify volumetric flow rates (375  ±  57 ml min(-1) and 275  ±  43 ml min(-1)). Finally, the formation of 3D vortices at the carotid artery bifurcation was imaged at high volume rates.

  2. 4D ultrafast ultrasound flow imaging: in vivo quantification of arterial volumetric flow rate in a single heartbeat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Mafalda; Provost, Jean; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2016-12-01

    We present herein 4D ultrafast ultrasound flow imaging, a novel ultrasound-based volumetric imaging technique for the quantitative mapping of blood flow. Complete volumetric blood flow distribution imaging was achieved through 2D tilted plane-wave insonification, 2D multi-angle cross-beam beamforming, and 3D vector Doppler velocity components estimation by least-squares fitting. 4D ultrafast ultrasound flow imaging was performed in large volumetric fields of view at very high volume rate (>4000 volumes s-1) using a 1024-channel 4D ultrafast ultrasound scanner and a 2D matrix-array transducer. The precision of the technique was evaluated in vitro by using 3D velocity vector maps to estimate volumetric flow rates in a vessel phantom. Volumetric Flow rate errors of less than 5% were found when volumetric flow rates and peak velocities were respectively less than 360 ml min-1 and 100 cm s-1. The average volumetric flow rate error increased to 18.3% when volumetric flow rates and peak velocities were up to 490 ml min-1 and 1.3 m s-1, respectively. The in vivo feasibility of the technique was shown in the carotid arteries of two healthy volunteers. The 3D blood flow velocity distribution was assessed during one cardiac cycle in a full volume and it was used to quantify volumetric flow rates (375  ±  57 ml min-1 and 275  ±  43 ml min-1). Finally, the formation of 3D vortices at the carotid artery bifurcation was imaged at high volume rates.

  3. Ultrafast Dynamics of Electrons in Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vöhringer, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Solvated electrons were first discovered in solutions of metals in liquid ammonia. The physical and chemical properties of these species have been studied extensively for many decades using an arsenal of electrochemical, spectroscopic, and theoretical techniques. Yet, in contrast to their hydrated counterpart, the ultrafast dynamics of ammoniated electrons remained completely unexplored until quite recently. Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy on metal-ammonia solutions and femtosecond multiphoton ionization spectroscopy on the neat ammonia solvent have provided new insights into the optical properties and the reactivities of this fascinating species. This article reviews the nature of the optical transition, which gives the metal-ammonia solutions their characteristic blue appearance, in terms of ultrafast relaxation processes involving bound and continuum excited states. The recombination processes following the injection of an electron via photoionization of the solvent are discussed in the context of the electronic structure of the liquid and the anionic defect associated with the solvated electron.

  4. Development of Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscope Capability.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Kimberlee Chiyoko; Talin, Albert Alec; Chandler, David W.; Michael, Joseph R.

    2016-11-01

    Modern semiconductor devices rely on the transport of minority charge carriers. Direct examination of minority carrier lifetimes in real devices with nanometer-scale features requires a measurement method with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolutions. Achieving nanometer spatial resolutions at sub-nanosecond temporal resolution is possible with pump-probe methods that utilize electrons as probes. Recently, a stroboscopic scanning electron microscope was developed at Caltech, and used to study carrier transport across a Si p-n junction [ 1 , 2 , 3 ] . In this report, we detail our development of a prototype scanning ultrafast electron microscope system at Sandia National Laboratories based on the original Caltech design. This effort represents Sandia's first exploration into ultrafast electron microscopy.

  5. Biomechanics of DNA structures visualized by 4D electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Ulrich J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a technique for in situ visualization of the biomechanics of DNA structural networks using 4D electron microscopy. Vibrational oscillations of the DNA structure are excited mechanically through a short burst of substrate vibrations triggered by a laser pulse. Subsequently, the motion is probed with electron pulses to observe the impulse response of the specimen in space and time. From the frequency and amplitude of the observed oscillations, we determine the normal modes and eigenfrequencies of the structures involved. Moreover, by selective “nano-cutting” at a given point in the network, it was possible to obtain Young’s modulus, and hence the stiffness, of the DNA filament at that position. This experimental approach enables nanoscale mechanics studies of macromolecules and should find applications in other domains of biological networks such as origamis. PMID:23382239

  6. Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-12

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0045 Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules Martin Centurion UNIVERSITY OF NEBRSKA Final Report 01/12...Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0149 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Institution name University of Nebraska - Lincoln Grant/Contract Title The full title of the funded effort. Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in

  7. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Rudakov, F.M.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; Cardoza, J.D.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  8. Ultrafast electronic dynamics driven by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendrell, Oriol

    2016-05-01

    The transfer of electrical charge on a microscopic scale plays a fundamental role in chemistry, in biology, and in technological applications. In this contribution, we will discuss situations in which nuclear motion plays a central role in driving the electronic dynamics of photo-excited or photo-ionized molecular systems. In particular, we will explore theoretically the ultrafast transfer of a double electron hole between the functional groups of glycine after K-shell ionization and subsequent Auger decay. Although a large energy gap of about 15 eV initially exists between the two electronic states involved and coherent electronic dynamics play no role in the hole transfer, we will illustrate how the double hole can be transferred within 3 to 4 fs between both functional ends of the glycine molecule driven solely by specific nuclear displacements and non-Born-Oppenheimer effects. This finding challenges the common wisdom that nuclear dynamics of the molecular skeleton are unimportant for charge transfer processes at the few-femtosecond time scale and shows that they can even play a prominent role. We thank the Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging and the Volkswagen Foundation for financial support.

  9. Real-Space Mapping of Surface Trap States in CIGSe Nanocrystals Using 4D Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bose, Riya; Bera, Ashok; Parida, Manas R; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Shaheen, Basamat S; Alarousu, Erkki; Sun, Jingya; Wu, Tom; Bakr, Osman M; Mohammed, Omar F

    2016-07-13

    Surface trap states in copper indium gallium selenide semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), which serve as undesirable channels for nonradiative carrier recombination, remain a great challenge impeding the development of solar and optoelectronics devices based on these NCs. In order to design efficient passivation techniques to minimize these trap states, a precise knowledge about the charge carrier dynamics on the NCs surface is essential. However, selective mapping of surface traps requires capabilities beyond the reach of conventional laser spectroscopy and static electron microscopy; it can only be accessed by using a one-of-a-kind, second-generation four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscope (4D S-UEM) with subpicosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolutions. Here, we precisely map the collective surface charge carrier dynamics of copper indium gallium selenide NCs as a function of the surface trap states before and after surface passivation in real space and time using S-UEM. The time-resolved snapshots clearly demonstrate that the density of the trap states is significantly reduced after zinc sulfide (ZnS) shelling. Furthermore, the removal of trap states and elongation of carrier lifetime are confirmed by the increased photocurrent of the self-biased photodetector fabricated using the shelled NCs.

  10. Ultrafast Electron Pulse (e,2e) Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony; Madsen, Lars

    2012-06-01

    Techniques for producing ultrafast electron pulses have been proposedootnotetextP. Baum and A.H. Zewail, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 18409 (2007); S.A. Hilbert, C. Ulterwaal, B. Barwick, H. Betalaan, and A.H. Zewail, ibid. 106, 10558 (2009). and prospects for using such pulses to image electron dynamics in the H atom and the hydrogen molecular ion have been theoretically demonstrated.ootnotetextH.-C. Shao and A.F. Starace, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 263201 (2010). The (e,2e) process provides a means to directly image the momentum distribution of the target.ootnotetextM.A. Coplan, J.H. Moore, and J.P. Doering, Rev. Mod. Phys. 66, 985 (1994). We explore here the possibility of observing the time dependence of a coherent superposition of target orbitals by means of the (e,2e) process with ultrafast incident electron pulses. Using scattering theory for a longitudinally coherent beam,ootnotetextF. Robicheaux, Phys. Rev. A 62, 062706 (2000). we find that the momentum distribution of a coherent state of the H atom can be retrieved.

  11. Ultrafast Electron Dynamics in Solar Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Ponseca, Carlito S; Chábera, Pavel; Uhlig, Jens; Persson, Petter; Sundström, Villy

    2017-08-23

    Electrons are the workhorses of solar energy conversion. Conversion of the energy of light to electricity in photovoltaics, or to energy-rich molecules (solar fuel) through photocatalytic processes, invariably starts with photoinduced generation of energy-rich electrons. The harvesting of these electrons in practical devices rests on a series of electron transfer processes whose dynamics and efficiencies determine the function of materials and devices. To capture the energy of a photogenerated electron-hole pair in a solar cell material, charges of opposite sign have to be separated against electrostatic attractions, prevented from recombining and being transported through the active material to electrodes where they can be extracted. In photocatalytic solar fuel production, these electron processes are coupled to chemical reactions leading to storage of the energy of light in chemical bonds. With the focus on the ultrafast time scale, we here discuss the light-induced electron processes underlying the function of several molecular and hybrid materials currently under development for solar energy applications in dye or quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, polymer-fullerene polymer solar cells, organometal halide perovskite solar cells, and finally some photocatalytic systems.

  12. Ultrafast electron dynamics in gold nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westcott, Sarah Linda

    2001-10-01

    In metallic nanostructures, the interaction of excited electrons with the nanostructure surface may result in electron relaxation dynamics that are significantly different than those predicted by electron-lattice coupling. These ultrafast electron dynamics were monitored by pump-probe measurements of the time-resolved change in transmission. Using femtosecond pulses from a cavity-dumped titanium-doped sapphire laser, two types of nanoparticles with a core-shell geometry were studied. Nanoshells are nanoparticles with a dielectric core surrounded by a continuous thin metal shell. For nanoshells, the plasmon resonance wavelength is tunable by changing the core and shell dimensions. For nanoshells with a gold sulfide core and a gold shell, two conditions were observed under which electron relaxation was different than predicted by electron-phonon coupling. First, electron relaxation occurred more rapidly for gold-gold sulfide nanoshells embedded in polymer films than for nanoshells dispersed in water, with lifetimes of 1.6 ps and 3 to 5 ps, respectively. Second, for nanoshells dispersed in water, the electron relaxation lifetime decreased with adsorption of p-aminobenzoic acid (to 1.7 ps) or aniline (to 1.9 ps) on the nanoshells. With adsorbed n-propylamine or p-mercaptobenzoic acid, electron relaxation transpired in 2.8 ps or 2.4 ps, respectively. Density functional theory calculations indicated that the molecules leading to the fastest electron relaxation possessed the largest induced dipole moments near a metal surface. Semicontinuous gold films grown around a silica nanoparticle core exhibited spectral and dynamical optical signatures of the percolation threshold. Compared to continuous shells, the electron dynamics in the semicontinuous shell layer were dramatically different as additional induced bleaching was observed in the first 500 fs. The observed dynamics are consistent with a rate equation model in which the electrons are initially excited in localized

  13. Probing Structural and Electronic Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Plemmons, DA; Suri, PK; Flannigan, DJ

    2015-05-12

    In this Perspective, we provide an overview,of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). We begin by briefly discussing the emergence of methods for probing ultrafast structural dynamics and the information that can be obtained. Distinctions are drawn between the two main types a probes for femtosecond (fs) dynamics fast electrons and X-ray photons and emphasis is placed on hour the nature of charged particles is exploited in ultrafast electron-based' experiments:. Following this, we describe the versatility enabled by the ease with which electron trajectories and velocities can be manipulated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM): hardware configurations, and we emphasize how this is translated to the ability to measure scattering intensities in real, reciprocal, and energy space from presurveyed and selected rianoscale volumes. Owing to decades of ongoing research and development into TEM instrumentation combined with advances in specimen holder technology, comprehensive experiments can be conducted on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. Next, we describe the basic operating concepts, of UEM, and we emphasize that its development has led to extension of several of the formidable capabilities of TEM into the fs domain, dins increasing the accessible temporal parameter spade by several orders of magnitude. We then divide UEM studies into those conducted in real (imaging), reciprocal (diffraction), and energy (spectroscopy) spate. We begin each of these sections by providing a brief description of the basic operating principles and the types of information that can be gathered followed by descriptions of how these approaches are applied in UM, the type of specimen parameter space that can be probed, and an example of the types of dynamics that can be resolved. We conclude with an Outlook section, wherein we share our perspective on some future directions of the field pertaining to continued instrument development and

  14. Four-Dimensional Ultrafast Electron Microscopy: Insights into an Emerging Technique.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Aniruddha; Eliason, Jeffrey K; Sun, Jingya; Bose, Riya; Flannigan, David J; Mohammed, Omar F

    2017-01-11

    Four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D-UEM) is a novel analytical technique that aims to fulfill the long-held dream of researchers to investigate materials at extremely short spatial and temporal resolutions by integrating the excellent spatial resolution of electron microscopes with the temporal resolution of ultrafast femtosecond laser-based spectroscopy. The ingenious use of pulsed photoelectrons to probe surfaces and volumes of materials enables time-resolved snapshots of the dynamics to be captured in a way hitherto impossible by other conventional techniques. The flexibility of 4D-UEM lies in the fact that it can be used in both the scanning (S-UEM) and transmission (UEM) modes depending upon the type of electron microscope involved. While UEM can be employed to monitor elementary structural changes and phase transitions in samples using real-space mapping, diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and tomography, S-UEM is well suited to map ultrafast dynamical events on materials surfaces in space and time. This review provides an overview of the unique features that distinguish these techniques and also illustrates the applications of both S-UEM and UEM to a multitude of problems relevant to materials science and chemistry.

  15. Ultrafast electron transport in graphene and magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast terahertz spectroscopy is an ideal tool for observation of dynamics of charge, lattice and spin in solids on the most elementary timescale: in the regime ωτ ~ 1, where ω is the electromagnetic wave oscillation frequency, and τ is the characteristic timescale at which the fundamental phenomena in the three subsystems comprising the solid occur. In this paper two case studies will be discussed. (i) Ultrafast electron transport in graphene. We will show, that the free-carrier conductivity of graphene in arbitrary ultrafast, (sub-)picosecond electric fields is defined by the thermodynamic balance maintained within the electronic structure of graphene acting as thermalized electron gas. Within this simple thermodynamic picture, the electron gas quasi-instantaneously increases its temperature by absorbing the energy of driving ultrafast electric field, and at the same time cools down via a time-retarded, few picosecond-long process of phonon emission. The asymmetry in electron heating and cooling dynamics leads to heat accumulation in the electron population of graphene, concomitantly lowering the chemical potential for hotter electrons, and thereby reducing the intraband conductivity of graphene - an effect crucially important for understanding of ultrafast graphene transistors and photodetectors. (ii) We will also discuss the fundamental observation of spin-controlled electron conduction of Fermilevel electrons in ferromagnetic metals, and will directly quantify the Mott picture of conduction in ferromagnets - the effect directly employed in modern magnetic sensor technologies such as giant magnetoresistance.

  16. Space charge effects in ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhensheng; Zhang, He; Duxbury, P. M.; Berz, Martin; Ruan, Chong-Yu

    2012-02-01

    Understanding space charge effects is central for the development of high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy techniques for imaging material transformation with atomic scale detail at the fs to ps timescales. We present methods and results for direct ultrafast photoelectron beam characterization employing a shadow projection imaging technique to investigate the generation of ultrafast, non-uniform, intense photoelectron pulses in a dc photo-gun geometry. Combined with N-particle simulations and an analytical Gaussian model, we elucidate three essential space-charge-led features: the pulse lengthening following a power-law scaling, the broadening of the initial energy distribution, and the virtual cathode threshold. The impacts of these space charge effects on the performance of the next generation high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging systems are evaluated.

  17. Development of an ultrafast electron source based on a cold-field emission gun for ultrafast coherent TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Giuseppe Mario; Houdellier, Florent; Abeilhou, Pierre; Arbouet, Arnaud

    2017-07-01

    We report on the design of a femtosecond laser-driven electron source for ultrafast coherent transmission electron microscopy. The proposed architecture allows introducing an ultrafast laser beam inside the cold field emission source of a commercial TEM, aligning and focusing the laser spot on the apex of the nanoemitter. The modifications of the gun assembly do not deteriorate the performances of the electron source in conventional DC mode and allow easy switching between the conventional and ultrafast laser-driven emission modes. We describe here this ultrafast electron source and discuss its properties.

  18. Spatiotemporal Observation of Electron-Impact Dynamics in Photovoltaic Materials Using 4D Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Basamat S; Sun, Jingya; Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F

    2017-06-01

    Understanding light-triggered charge carrier dynamics near photovoltaic-material surfaces and at interfaces has been a key element and one of the major challenges for the development of real-world energy devices. Visualization of such dynamics information can be obtained using the one-of-a-kind methodology of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM). Here, we address the fundamental issue of how the thickness of the absorber layer may significantly affect the charge carrier dynamics on material surfaces. Time-resolved snapshots indicate that the dynamics of charge carriers generated by electron impact in the electron-photon dynamical probing regime is highly sensitive to the thickness of the absorber layer, as demonstrated using CdSe films of different thicknesses as a model system. This finding not only provides the foundation for potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of devices in the fields of chemical and materials research, but also has impact on the use and interpretation of electron beam-induced current for optimization of photoactive materials in these devices.

  19. Ultrafast electron microscopy integrated with a direct electron detection camera

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Min; Kim, Young Jae; Kim, Ye-Jin; Kwon, Oh-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade, we have witnessed the rapid growth of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), which provides intuitive means to watch atomic and molecular motions of matter. Yet, because of the limited current of the pulsed electron beam resulting from space-charge effects, observations have been mainly made to periodic motions of the crystalline structure of hundreds of nanometers or higher by stroboscopic imaging at high repetition rates. Here, we develop an advanced UEM with robust capabilities for circumventing the present limitations by integrating a direct electron detection camera for the first time which allows for imaging at low repetition rates. This approach is expected to promote UEM to a more powerful platform to visualize molecular and collective motions and dissect fundamental physical, chemical, and materials phenomena in space and time. PMID:28529964

  20. Ultrafast spectroscopy of correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Benjamin Andrew

    This dissertation attempts to illuminate and expand our understanding of charge dynamics in a number of different semiconductor materials, in particular the behavior of electron-hole pairs which are correlated via the long-range Coulomb interaction. Terahertz spectroscopy gives us direct access to probe the fundamental excitations of quasiparticles in a wide range of materials systems. By probing the low-energy excitations of materials on short time scales, one can learn a great deal about their quasiparticles and dynamics as well as explore new tools for their manipulation. Carriers in semiconductors, existing either as bound electron-hole pairs or "free" carriers (or both), are particularly amenable to this avenue of study. The internal structure of excitons in semiconductors lies energetically in the far- to mid-infrared. Free carriers moving under the influence of a free-space electric field reveal much about themselves. By exploiting this unique window, one can both characterize and manipulate these systems in novel ways, as well as seek to understand the physics of new materials. I study the ferromagnetic semiconductor gallium manganese phosphide (GaMnP) to better understand the role of charge carriers in the origins of ferromagnetism. By applying the tools of terahertz spectroscopy, I am able to make contact free measurements of hole populations in a novel GaMnP film. I exploit THz spectroscopy to provide a direct gauge of bound and unbound pair densities in gallium arsenide quantum wells, enabling the observation of the excitonic fine structure as it evolves under high-density conditions. And finally I have observed for the first time stimulated emission of far-infrared radiation from internal transitions in excitons in the semiconductor Cu 2O. Broadband THz spectroscopy is employed to directly map out the ultrafast dynamics, spectral positions, and line broadenings of intra-excitonic transitions. This work has opened up new possibilities for the quantum

  1. Ultrafast electron dynamics in phenylalanine initiated by attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calegari, F.; Ayuso, D.; Trabattoni, A.; Belshaw, L.; De Camillis, S.; Anumula, S.; Frassetto, F.; Poletto, L.; Palacios, A.; Decleva, P.; Greenwood, J. B.; Martín, F.; Nisoli, M.

    2014-10-01

    In the past decade, attosecond technology has opened up the investigation of ultrafast electronic processes in atoms, simple molecules, and solids. Here, we report the application of isolated attosecond pulses to prompt ionization of the amino acid phenylalanine and the subsequent detection of ultrafast dynamics on a sub-4.5-femtosecond temporal scale, which is shorter than the vibrational response of the molecule. The ability to initiate and observe such electronic dynamics in polyatomic molecules represents a crucial step forward in attosecond science, which is progressively moving toward the investigation of more and more complex systems.

  2. Ultrafast electron dynamics in phenylalanine initiated by attosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Calegari, F; Ayuso, D; Trabattoni, A; Belshaw, L; De Camillis, S; Anumula, S; Frassetto, F; Poletto, L; Palacios, A; Decleva, P; Greenwood, J B; Martín, F; Nisoli, M

    2014-10-17

    In the past decade, attosecond technology has opened up the investigation of ultrafast electronic processes in atoms, simple molecules, and solids. Here, we report the application of isolated attosecond pulses to prompt ionization of the amino acid phenylalanine and the subsequent detection of ultrafast dynamics on a sub-4.5-femtosecond temporal scale, which is shorter than the vibrational response of the molecule. The ability to initiate and observe such electronic dynamics in polyatomic molecules represents a crucial step forward in attosecond science, which is progressively moving toward the investigation of more and more complex systems.

  3. Photon gating in four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohammed T; Liu, Haihua; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2015-10-20

    Ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) is a pivotal tool for imaging of nanoscale structural dynamics with subparticle resolution on the time scale of atomic motion. Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), a key UEM technique, involves the detection of electrons that have gained energy from a femtosecond optical pulse via photon-electron coupling on nanostructures. PINEM has been applied in various fields of study, from materials science to biological imaging, exploiting the unique spatial, energy, and temporal characteristics of the PINEM electrons gained by interaction with a "single" light pulse. The further potential of photon-gated PINEM electrons in probing ultrafast dynamics of matter and the optical gating of electrons by invoking a "second" optical pulse has previously been proposed and examined theoretically in our group. Here, we experimentally demonstrate this photon-gating technique, and, through diffraction, visualize the phase transition dynamics in vanadium dioxide nanoparticles. With optical gating of PINEM electrons, imaging temporal resolution was improved by a factor of 3 or better, being limited only by the optical pulse widths. This work enables the combination of the high spatial resolution of electron microscopy and the ultrafast temporal response of the optical pulses, which provides a promising approach to attain the resolution of few femtoseconds and attoseconds in UEM.

  4. Photon gating in four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohammed T.; Liu, Haihua; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) is a pivotal tool for imaging of nanoscale structural dynamics with subparticle resolution on the time scale of atomic motion. Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), a key UEM technique, involves the detection of electrons that have gained energy from a femtosecond optical pulse via photon–electron coupling on nanostructures. PINEM has been applied in various fields of study, from materials science to biological imaging, exploiting the unique spatial, energy, and temporal characteristics of the PINEM electrons gained by interaction with a “single” light pulse. The further potential of photon-gated PINEM electrons in probing ultrafast dynamics of matter and the optical gating of electrons by invoking a “second” optical pulse has previously been proposed and examined theoretically in our group. Here, we experimentally demonstrate this photon-gating technique, and, through diffraction, visualize the phase transition dynamics in vanadium dioxide nanoparticles. With optical gating of PINEM electrons, imaging temporal resolution was improved by a factor of 3 or better, being limited only by the optical pulse widths. This work enables the combination of the high spatial resolution of electron microscopy and the ultrafast temporal response of the optical pulses, which provides a promising approach to attain the resolution of few femtoseconds and attoseconds in UEM. PMID:26438835

  5. Dynamic diffraction effects and coherent breathing oscillations in ultrafast electron diffraction in layered 1T-TaSeTe

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Linlin; Sun, Shuaishuai; Guo, Cong; Li, Zhongwen; Sun, Kai; Liu, Yu; Lu, Wenjian; Sun, Yuping; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropic lattice movements due to the difference between intralayer and interlayer bonding are observed in the layered transition-metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaSeTe following femtosecond laser pulse excitation. Our ultrafast electron diffraction investigations using 4D-transmission electron microscopy (4D-TEM) clearly reveal that the intensity of Bragg reflection spots often changes remarkably due to the dynamic diffraction effects and anisotropic lattice movement. Importantly, the temporal diffracted intensity from a specific crystallographic plane depends on the deviation parameter s, which is commonly used in the theoretical study of diffraction intensity. Herein, we report on lattice thermalization and structural oscillations in layered 1T-TaSeTe, analyzed by dynamic diffraction theory. Ultrafast alterations of satellite spots arising from the charge density wave in the present system are also briefly discussed. PMID:28470025

  6. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Weathersby, S P; Brown, G; Centurion, M; Chase, T F; Coffee, R; Corbett, J; Eichner, J P; Frisch, J C; Fry, A R; Gühr, M; Hartmann, N; Hast, C; Hettel, R; Jobe, R K; Jongewaard, E N; Lewandowski, J R; Li, R K; Lindenberg, A M; Makasyuk, I; May, J E; McCormick, D; Nguyen, M N; Reid, A H; Shen, X; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Vecchione, T; Vetter, S L; Wu, J; Yang, J; Dürr, H A; Wang, X J

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  7. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Centurion, M.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K.; Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D.; Nguyen, M. N.; Reid, A. H.; Shen, X.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Vecchione, T.; Vetter, S. L.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Dürr, H. A.; Wang, X. J.

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  8. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K. Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  9. Ultrafast electron transport across nano gaps in nanowire circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Potma, Eric O.

    2015-07-31

    In this Program we aim for a closer look at electron transfer through single molecules. To achieve this, we use ultrafast laser pulses to time stamp an electron tunneling event in a molecule that is connected between two metallic electrodes, while reading out the electron current. A key aspect of this project is the use of metallic substrates with plasmonic activity to efficiently manipulate the tunneling probability. The first Phase of this program is concerned with developing highly sensitive tools for the ultrafast optical manipulation of tethered molecules through the evanescent surface field of plasmonic substrates. The second Phase of the program aims to use these tools for exercising control over the electron tunneling probability.

  10. 4D in-vivo ultrafast ultrasound imaging using a row-column addressed matrix and coherently-compounded orthogonal plane waves.

    PubMed

    Flesch, Martin; Pernot, Mathieu; Provost, Jean; Ferin, Guillaume; Nguyen-Dinh, An; Tanter, Mickael; Deffieux, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    4D ultrafast ultrasound imaging was recently shown using a 2D matrix (i.e., fully populated) connected to a 1024-channel ultrafast ultrasound scanner. In this study, we investigate the Row-Column Addressing (RCA) matrix approach, which allows a reduction of independent channels from N x N to N + N, with a dedicated beamforming strategy for ultrafast ultrasound imaging based on the coherent compounding of Orthogonal Plane Wave (OPW). OPW is based on coherent compounding of plane wave transmissions in one direction with receive beamforming along the orthogonal direction and its orthogonal companion sequence. Such coherent recombination of complementary orthogonal sequences leads to virtual transmit focusing in both directions which results into a final isotropic Point Spread Function (PSF). In this study, a 32 x 32 2D matrix array probe (1024 channels), centered at 5 MHz was considered. An RCA array, of same footprint with 32 + 32 elements (64 channels), was emulated by summing the elements either along a line or a column in software prior to beamforming. This approach allowed for the direct comparison of the 32 + 32 RCA scheme to the optimal fully sampled 32 x 32 2D matrix configuration, which served as the gold standard. This approach was first studied through PSF simulations and then validated experimentally on a phantom consisting of anechoic cysts and echogenic wires. The Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR) and the lateral resolution of the RCA approach were found to be approximately equal to half (in decibel) and twice the values, respectively, obtained when using the 2D matrix approach. Results in a Doppler phantom and the human humeral artery in vivo confirmed that OPW compound imaging using emulated RCA matrix can achieve a power Doppler with sufficient contrast to recover the vein shape and provides an accurate Doppler spectrum.

  11. Photo-excited hot carrier dynamics in hydrogenated amorphous silicon imaged by 4D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Bolin; Najafi, Ebrahim; Li, Heng; Minnich, Austin J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2017-09-01

    Charge carrier dynamics in amorphous semiconductors has been a topic of intense research that has been propelled by modern applications in thin-film solar cells, transistors and optical sensors. Charge transport in these materials differs fundamentally from that in crystalline semiconductors owing to the lack of long-range order and high defect density. Despite the existence of well-established experimental techniques such as photoconductivity time-of-flight and ultrafast optical measurements, many aspects of the dynamics of photo-excited charge carriers in amorphous semiconductors remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate direct imaging of carrier dynamics in space and time after photo-excitation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) by scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (SUEM). We observe an unexpected regime of fast diffusion immediately after photoexcitation, together with spontaneous electron-hole separation and charge trapping induced by the atomic disorder. Our findings demonstrate the rich dynamics of hot carrier transport in amorphous semiconductors that can be revealed by direct imaging based on SUEM.

  12. Photo-excited hot carrier dynamics in hydrogenated amorphous silicon imaged by 4D electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bolin; Najafi, Ebrahim; Li, Heng; Minnich, Austin J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2017-09-01

    Charge carrier dynamics in amorphous semiconductors has been a topic of intense research that has been propelled by modern applications in thin-film solar cells, transistors and optical sensors. Charge transport in these materials differs fundamentally from that in crystalline semiconductors owing to the lack of long-range order and high defect density. Despite the existence of well-established experimental techniques such as photoconductivity time-of-flight and ultrafast optical measurements, many aspects of the dynamics of photo-excited charge carriers in amorphous semiconductors remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate direct imaging of carrier dynamics in space and time after photo-excitation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) by scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (SUEM). We observe an unexpected regime of fast diffusion immediately after photoexcitation, together with spontaneous electron-hole separation and charge trapping induced by the atomic disorder. Our findings demonstrate the rich dynamics of hot carrier transport in amorphous semiconductors that can be revealed by direct imaging based on SUEM.

  13. 4D in vivo ultrafast ultrasound imaging using a row-column addressed matrix and coherently-compounded orthogonal plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesch, M.; Pernot, M.; Provost, J.; Ferin, G.; Nguyen-Dinh, A.; Tanter, M.; Deffieux, T.

    2017-06-01

    4D ultrafast ultrasound imaging was recently shown using a 2D matrix (i.e. fully populated) connected to a 1024-channel ultrafast ultrasound scanner. In this study, we investigate the row-column addressing (RCA) matrix approach, which allows a reduction of independent channels from N  ×  N to N  +  N, with a dedicated beamforming strategy for ultrafast ultrasound imaging based on the coherent compounding of orthogonal plane wave (OPW). OPW is based on coherent compounding of plane wave transmissions in one direction with receive beamforming along the orthogonal direction and its orthogonal companion sequence. Such coherent recombination of complementary orthogonal sequences leads to the virtual transmit focusing in both directions which results into a final isotropic point spread function (PSF). In this study, a 32  ×  32 2D matrix array probe (1024 channels), centered at 5 MHz was considered. An RCA array, of same footprint with 32  +  32 elements (64 channels), was emulated by summing the elements either along a line or a column in software prior to beamforming. This approach allowed for the direct comparison of the 32  +  32 RCA scheme to the optimal fully sampled 32  ×  32 2D matrix configuration, which served as the gold standard. This approach was first studied through PSF simulations and then validated experimentally on a phantom consisting of anechoic cysts and echogenic wires. The contrast-to-noise ratio and the lateral resolution of the RCA approach were found to be approximately equal to half (in decibel) and twice the values, respectively, obtained when using the 2D matrix approach. Results in a Doppler phantom and the human humeral artery in vivo confirmed that ultrafast Doppler imaging can be achieved with reduced performances when compared against the equivalent 2D matrix. Volumetric anatomic Doppler rendering and voxel-based pulsed Doppler quantification are presented as well. OPW compound imaging

  14. Ultrafast demagnetization by hot electrons: Diffusion or super-diffusion?

    PubMed Central

    Salvatella, G.; Gort, R.; Bühlmann, K.; Däster, S.; Vaterlaus, A.; Acremann, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast demagnetization of ferromagnetic metals can be achieved by a heat pulse propagating in the electron gas of a non-magnetic metal layer, which absorbs a pump laser pulse. Demagnetization by electronic heating is investigated on samples with different thicknesses of the absorber layer on nickel. This allows us to separate the contribution of thermalized hot electrons compared to non-thermal electrons. An analytical model describes the demagnetization amplitude as a function of the absorber thickness. The observed change of demagnetization time can be reproduced by diffusive heat transport through the absorber layer. PMID:27795975

  15. Ultrafast electron microscopy in materials science, biology, and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    King, Wayne E.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Frank, Alan; Reed, Bryan; Schmerge, John F.; Siwick, Bradley J.; Stuart, Brent C.; Weber, Peter M.

    2005-06-01

    The use of pump-probe experiments to study complex transient events has been an area of significant interest in materials science, biology, and chemistry. While the emphasis has been on laser pump with laser probe and laser pump with x-ray probe experiments, there is a significant and growing interest in using electrons as probes. Early experiments used electrons for gas-phase diffraction of photostimulated chemical reactions. More recently, scientists are beginning to explore phenomena in the solid state such as phase transformations, twinning, solid-state chemical reactions, radiation damage, and shock propagation. This review focuses on the emerging area of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), which comprises ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM). The topics that are treated include the following: (1) The physics of electrons as an ultrafast probe. This encompasses the propagation dynamics of the electrons (space-charge effect, Child's law, Boersch effect) and extends to relativistic effects. (2) The anatomy of UED and DTEM instruments. This includes discussions of the photoactivated electron gun (also known as photogun or photoelectron gun) at conventional energies (60-200 keV) and extends to MeV beams generated by rf guns. Another critical aspect of the systems is the electron detector. Charge-coupled device cameras and microchannel-plate-based cameras are compared and contrasted. The effect of various physical phenomena on detective quantum efficiency is discussed. (3) Practical aspects of operation. This includes determination of time zero, measurement of pulse-length, and strategies for pulse compression. (4) Current and potential applications in materials science, biology, and chemistry. UEM has the potential to make a significant impact in future science and technology. Understanding of reaction pathways of complex transient phenomena in materials science, biology, and chemistry will provide fundamental

  16. Dynamics of chemical bonding mapped by energy-resolved 4D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Fabrizio; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2009-07-10

    Chemical bonding dynamics are fundamental to the understanding of properties and behavior of materials and molecules. Here, we demonstrate the potential of time-resolved, femtosecond electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for mapping electronic structural changes in the course of nuclear motions. For graphite, it is found that changes of milli-electron volts in the energy range of up to 50 electron volts reveal the compression and expansion of layers on the subpicometer scale (for surface and bulk atoms). These nonequilibrium structural features are correlated with the direction of change from sp2 [two-dimensional (2D) graphene] to sp3 (3D-diamond) electronic hybridization, and the results are compared with theoretical charge-density calculations. The reported femtosecond time resolution of four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy represents an advance of 10 orders of magnitude over that of conventional EELS methods.

  17. Ultrafast voltage sampling using single-electron wavepackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, N.; Fletcher, J. D.; Humphreys, D. A.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Jones, G. A. C.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Pepper, M.; Janssen, T. J. B. M.; Kataoka, M.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate an ultrafast voltage sampling technique using a stream of electron wavepackets. Electrons are emitted from a single-electron pump and travel through electron waveguides towards a detector potential barrier. Our electrons sample an instantaneous voltage on the gate upon arrival at the detector barrier. Fast sampling is achieved by minimising the duration that the electrons interact with the barrier, which can be made as small as a few picoseconds. The value of the instantaneous voltage can be determined by varying the gate voltage to match the barrier height to the electron energy, which is used as a stable reference. The test waveform can be reconstructed by shifting the electron arrival time against it. Although we find that the our current system is limited by the experimental line bandwidth to 12-18 GHz, we argue that this method has scope to increase the bandwidth of voltage sampling to 100 GHz and beyond.

  18. Ultrafast electron diffraction with megahertz MeV electron pulses from a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, L. W.; Lin, L.; Huang, S. L.; Quan, S. W.; Hao, J. K.; Zhu, F.; Wang, F.; Liu, K. X.; Jiang, T.; Zhu, P. F.; Fu, F.; Wang, R.; Zhao, L.; Xiang, D.

    2015-11-30

    We report ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction operating at the megahertz repetition rate where the electron beam is produced in a superconducting radio-frequency (rf) photoinjector. We show that the beam quality is sufficiently high to provide clear diffraction patterns from gold and aluminium samples. With the number of electrons, several orders of magnitude higher than that from a normal conducting photocathode rf gun, such high repetition rate ultrafast MeV electron diffraction may open up many new opportunities in ultrafast science.

  19. Femtosecond processes and ultrafast biological electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Satoru; Sung, H. C.; Hayashi, M.; Lin, S. H.

    1995-02-01

    In this paper, we report the calculated femtosecond transient spectra of the primary electron transfer in the bacterial reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. The excitation dependence of the time-resolved spectra is simulated. The effects of vibrational coherence on the time-resolved spectra are discussed. The electron transfer accompanying vibrational relaxation is theoretically investigated using the single-vibronic level electron transfer rate constants. The effects of multi-modes and temperature on the electron transfer rate constants are also reported.

  20. Ultrafast electron diffraction from aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin

    2015-08-17

    The aim of this project was to record time-resolved electron diffraction patterns of aligned molecules and to reconstruct the 3D molecular structure. The molecules are aligned non-adiabatically using a femtosecond laser pulse. A femtosecond electron pulse then records a diffraction pattern while the molecules are aligned. The diffraction patterns are then be processed to obtain the molecular structure.

  1. Prospects for Electron Imaging with Ultrafast Time Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M R; Reed, B W; Torralva, B R; Browning, N D

    2007-01-26

    Many pivotal aspects of material science, biomechanics, and chemistry would benefit from nanometer imaging with ultrafast time resolution. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of short-pulse electron imaging with t10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution, sufficient to characterize phenomena that propagate at the speed of sound in materials (1-10 kilometer/second) without smearing. We outline resolution-degrading effects that occur at high current density followed by strategies to mitigate these effects. Finally, we present a model electron imaging system that achieves 10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution.

  2. Imaging rotational dynamics of nanoparticles in liquid by 4D electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xuewen; Chen, Bin; Tang, Jau; Hassan, Mohammed Th.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2017-02-01

    In real time and space, four-dimensional electron microscopy (4D EM) has enabled observation of transient structures and morphologies of inorganic and organic materials. We have extended 4D EM to include liquid cells without the time resolution being limited by the response of the detector. Our approach permits the imaging of the motion and morphological dynamics of a single, same particle on nanometer and ultrashort time scales. As a first application, we studied the rotational dynamics of gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution. A full transition from the conventional diffusive rotation to superdiffusive rotation and further to a ballistic rotation was observed with increasing asymmetry of the nanoparticle morphology. We explored the underlying physics both experimentally and theoretically according to the morphological asymmetry of the nanoparticles.

  3. Unusual molecular material formed through irreversible transformation and revealed by 4D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Renske M; Tissot, Antoine; Hauser, Andreas; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2013-05-28

    Four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy (EM) uniquely combines the high spatial resolution to pinpoint individual nano-objects, with the high temporal resolution necessary to address the dynamics of their laser-induced transformation. Here, using 4D-EM, we demonstrate the in situ irreversible transformation of individual nanoparticles of the molecular framework Fe(pyrazine)Pt(CN)4. The newly formed material exhibits an unusually large negative thermal expansion (i.e. contraction), which is revealed by time-resolved imaging and diffraction. Negative thermal expansion is a unique property exhibited by only few materials. Here we show that the increased flexibility of the metal-cyanide framework after the removal of the bridging pyrazine ligands is responsible for the negative thermal expansion behavior of the new material. This in situ visualization of single nanostructures during reactions should be extendable to other classes of reactive systems.

  4. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer from Peroxide Dianion.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Bryce L; Maher, Andrew G; Nava, Matthew; Lopez, Nazario; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-06-18

    The encapsulation of peroxide dianion by hexacarboxamide cryptand provides a platform for the study of electron transfer of isolated peroxide anion. Photoinitiated electron transfer (ET) between freely diffusing Ru(bpy)3(2+) and the peroxide dianion occurs with a rate constant of 2.0 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). A competing electron transfer quenching pathway is observed within an ion pair. Picosecond transient spectroscopy furnishes a rate constant of 1.1 × 10(10) s(-1) for this first-order process. A driving force dependence for the ET rate within the ion pair using a series of Ru(bpy)3(2+) derivatives allows for the electronic coupling and reorganization energies to be assessed. The ET reaction is nonadiabatic and dominated by a large inner-sphere reorganization energy, in accordance with that expected for the change in bond distance accompanying the conversion of peroxide dianion to superoxide anion.

  5. The evolution of ultrafast electron microscope instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Reed, B W; Armstrong, M R; Browning, N D; Campbell, G H; Evans, J E; LaGrange, T; Masiel, D J

    2009-08-01

    Extrapolating from a brief survey of the literature, we outline a vision for the future development of time-resolved electron probe instruments that could offer levels of performance and flexibility that push the limits of physical possibility. This includes a discussion of the electron beam parameters (brightness and emittance) that limit performance, the identification of a dimensionless invariant figure of merit for pulsed electron guns (the number of electrons per lateral coherence area, per pulse), and calculations of how this figure of merit determines the trade-off of spatial against temporal resolution for different imaging modes. Modern photonics' ability to control its fundamental particles at the quantum level, while enjoying extreme flexibility and a very large variety of operating modes, is held up as an example and a goal. We argue that this goal may be approached by combining ideas already in the literature, suggesting the need for large-scale collaborative development of next-generation time-resolved instruments.

  6. Ultrafast terahertz electrodynamics of photonic and electronic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on using ultrafast laser pulses to study Terahertz (THz) electrodynamics of photonic and electronic nanostructures and microstructures. Ultrafast timeresolved (optical, NIR, MIR, THz) pump-probe spectroscopy setup has been successfully built, which enables me to perform a series of relevant experiments. Firstly, a novel high e ciency and compact THz wave emitter based on split-ring-resonators has been developed and characterized. The emitter can be pumped at any wavelength by tailoring the magnetic resonance and could generate gapless THz waves covering the entire THz band. Secondly, two kinds of new photonic structures for THz wave manipulation have been successfully designed and characterized. One is based on the 1D and 2D photo-imprinted di ractive elements. The other is based on the photoexcited double-split-ring-resonator metamaterials. Both structures are exible and can modulate THz waves with large tunability. Thirdly, the dark excitons in semiconducting singlewalled carbon nanotubes are studied by optical pump and THz probe spectroscopy, which provides the rst insights into the THz responses of nonequilibrium excitonic correlations and dynamics from the dark ground states in carbon nanotubes. Next, several on-going projects are brie y presented such as the study of ultrafast THz dynamics of Dirac fermions in topological insulator Bi2Se3 with Mid-infrared excitation. Finally, the thesis ends with a summary of the completed experiments and an outlook of the future plan.

  7. Ultrafast studies of coexisting electronic order in cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, James; Thewalt, Eric; Alpichshev, Zhanybek; Sternbach, Aaron; McLeod, Alex; Ji, L.; Veit, Mike; Dorrow, Chelsey; Koralek, Jake; Xhao, Xudong; Barisic, Neven; Kemper, Alexander; Gedik, Nuh; Greven, Martin; Basov, Dimitri; Orenstein, Joe

    The cuprate family of high temperature superconductors displays a variety of electronic phases which emerge when charge carriers are added to the antiferromagnetic parent compound. These electronic phases are characterized by subtle differences in the low energy electronic excitations. Ultrafast time-resolved reflectivity (TRR) provides an ideal tool for investigating the cuprate phase diagram, as small changes in the electronic structure can produce significant contrast in the non-equilibrium reflectivity. Here we present TRR measurements of cuprate superconductors, focusing on the model single-layer cuprate HgBa2CuO4+δ. We observe a cusp-like feature in the quasiparticle lifetime near the superconducting transition temperature Tc. This feature can be understood using a model of coherently-mixed charge-density wave and superconducting pairing. We propose extending this technique to the nanoscale using ultrafast scattering scanning near-field microscopy (u-SNOM). This will allow us to explore how these electronic phases coexist and compete in real-space.

  8. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingya; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Shaheen, Basamat S; Yang, Haoze; Mohammed, Omar F

    2016-03-17

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser's relatively large penetration depth and consequently these techniques record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and subpicosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample's surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystal and its powder film. We also discuss the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  9. Ultrafast Manipulation of Electron Spin Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, J. A.; Awschalom, D. D.; Knobel, R.; Samarth, N.

    2002-03-01

    A technique is developed with the potential for coherent all-optical control over electron spins in semiconductors on femtosecond time scales.footnote J.A. Gupta et al., Science 292, 2458 (2001) The experiments show that optical “tipping” pulses can enact significant rotations of electron spins through an effective magnetic field generated when the tipping pulse energy is tuned below the semiconductor bandgap (the optical Stark effect). Measurements of Stark shifts in ZnCdSe quantum wells suggest that field strengths of order 20T are achieved. Rotations due to this effective field approaching 90 degrees were measured as changes in the amplitude of spin precession following optical excitation in a transverse magnetic field. A prototype sequence of two tipping pulses indicates that the rotation is reversible, a result that establishes the coherent nature of the tipping process.

  10. Ultrafast dynamics of electrons at interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, Jason Douglas

    1999-05-03

    Electronic states of a thin layer of material on a surface possess unique physical and chemical properties. Some of these properties arise from the reduced dimensionality of the thin layer with respect to the bulk or the properties of the electric field where two materials of differing dielectric constants meet at an interface. Other properties are related to the nature of the surface chemical bond. Here, the properties of excess electrons in thin layers of Xenon, Krypton, and alkali metals are investigated, and the bound state energies and effective masses of the excess electrons are determined using two-photon photoemission. For Xenon, the dependence of bound state energy, effective mass, and lifetime on layer thickness from one to nine layers is examined. Not all quantities were measured at each coverage. The two photon photoemission spectra of thin layers of Xenon on a Ag(111) substrate exhibit a number of sharp, well-defined peaks. The binding energy of the excess electronic states of Xenon layers exhibited a pronounced dependence on coverage. A discrete energy shift was observed for each additional atomic layer. At low coverage, a series of states resembling a Rydberg series is observed. This series is similar to the image state series observed on clean metal surfaces. Deviations from image state energies can be described in terms of the dielectric constant of the overlayer material and its effect on the image potential. For thicker layers of Xe (beyond the first few atomic layers), the coverage dependence of the features begins to resemble that of quantum well states. Quantum well states are related to bulk band states. However, the finite thickness of the layer restricts the perpendicular wavevector to a discrete set of values. Therefore, the spectrum of quantum well states contains a series of peaks which correspond to the various allowed values of the perpendicular wavevector. Analysis of the quantum well spectrum yields electronic band structure

  11. Irreversible chemical reactions visualized in space and time with 4D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Tae; Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-02-16

    We report direct visualization of irreversible chemical reactions in space and time with 4D electron microscopy. Specifically, transient structures are imaged following electron transfer in copper-tetracyanoquinodimethane [Cu(TCNQ)] crystals, and the oxidation/reduction process, which is irreversible, is elucidated using the single-shot operation mode of the microscope. We observed the fast, initial structural rearrangement due to Cu(+) reduction and the slower growth of metallic Cu(0) nanocrystals (Ostwald ripening) following initiation of the reaction with a pulse of visible light. The mechanism involves electron transfer from TCNQ anion-radical to Cu(+), morphological changes, and thermally driven growth of discrete Cu(0) nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous carbon skeleton of TCNQ. This in situ visualization of structures during reactions should be extendable to other classes of reactive systems.

  12. Electronic/photonic interfaces for ultrafast data processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Overberg, Mark E.; Geib, Kent Martin; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Hsu, Alan Yuan-Chun; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Finnegan, Patrick Sean

    2008-09-01

    This report summarizes a 3-month program that explored the potential areas of impact for electronic/photonic integration technologies, as applied to next-generation data processing systems operating within 100+ Gb/s optical networks. The study included a technology review that targeted three key functions of data processing systems, namely receive/demultiplexing/clock recovery, data processing, and transmit/multiplexing. Various technical approaches were described and evaluated. In addition, we initiated the development of high-speed photodetectors and hybrid integration processes, two key elements of an ultrafast data processor. Relevant experimental results are described herein.

  13. Electronic and magnetic properties of SnS2 monolayer doped with 4d transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wen-Zhi; Xiao, Gang; Rong, Qing-Yan; Chen, Qiao; Wang, Ling-Ling

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the electronic structures and magnetic properties of SnS2 monolayers substitutionally doped with 4-d transition-metal through systematic first principles calculations. The doped complexes exhibit interesting electronic and magnetic behaviors, depending on the interplay between crystal field splitting, Hund's rule, and 4d levels. The system doped with Y is nonmagnetic metal. Both the Zr- and Pd-doped systems remain nonmagnetic semiconductors. Doping results in half-metallic states for Nb-, Ru-, Rh-, Ag, and Cd doped cases, and magnetic semiconductors for systems with Mo and Tc dopants. In particular, the Nb- and Mo-doped systems display long-ranged ferromagnetic ordering with Curie temperature above room temperature, which are primarily attributable to the double-exchange mechanism, and the p-d/p-p hybridizations, respectively. Moreover, The Mo-doped system has excellent energetic stability and flexible mechanical stability, and also possesses remarkable dynamic and thermal (500 K) stability. Our studies demonstrate that Nb- and Mo-doped SnS2 monolayers are promising candidates for preparing 2D diluted magnetic semiconductors, and hence will be a helpful clue for experimentalists.

  14. Adapting High Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Ultrafast Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoby, Cheyne Matthew

    This thesis explores the use of ultrashort bunches generated by a radiofrequency electron photoinjector driven by a femtosecond laser. Rf photoinjector technology has been developed to generate ultra high brightness beams for advanced accelerators and to drive advanced light source applications. The extremely good quality of the beams generated by this source has played a key role in the development of 4th generation light sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source, thus opening the way to studies of materials science and biological systems with high temporal and spatial resolution. At the Pegasus Photoinjector Lab, we have developed the application of a BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6-cell rf photoinjector as a tool for ultrafast science in its own right. It is the aim of this work to explore the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, give descriptions of the novel ultrafast diagnostics developed to be able to characterize the electron bunch and synchronize it with a pump laser, and share some of the scientific results that were obtained with this technology at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. This dissertation explains the requirements of the drive laser source and describes the principles of rf photoinjector design and operation necessary to produce electron bunches with an rms longitudinal length < 100 femtoseconds containing 107 - 108 electrons per bunch. In this condition, when the laser intensity is sufficiently high, multiphoton photoemission is demonstrated to be more efficient in terms of charge yield than single photon photoemission. When a short laser pulse hits the cathode the resulting beam dynamics are dominated by a strong space charge driven longitudinal expansion which leads to the creation of a nearly ideal uniformly filled ellipsoidal distribution. These beam distributions are characterized by linear space charge forces and hence by high peak brightness and small transverse emittances. This regime of operation of the RF photoinjector is also termed the

  15. Ultrafast electron dynamics following outer-valence ionization: The impact of low-lying relaxation satellite states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lünnemann, Siegfried; Kuleff, Alexander I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2009-04-01

    Low-lying relaxation satellites give rise to ultrafast electron dynamics following outer-valence ionization of a molecular system. To demonstrate the impact of such satellites, the evolution of the electronic cloud after sudden removal of an electron from the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic unsaturated nitroso compound 2-nitroso[1,3]oxazolo[5,4-d][1,3]oxazole is traced in real time and space using ab initio methods only. Our results show that the initially created hole charge remains stationary but on top of it the system reacts by an ultrafast π-π ∗ excitation followed by a cyclic excitation-de-excitation process which leads to a redistribution of the charge. The π-π ∗ excitation following the removal of the HOMO electron takes place on a subfemtosecond time scale and the period of the excitation-de-excitation alternations is about 1.4 fs. In real space the processes of excitation and de-excitation represent ultrafast delocalization and localization of the charge. The results are analyzed by simple two- and three-state models.

  16. Cardiac function and perfusion dynamics measured on a beat-by-beat basis in the live mouse using ultra-fast 4D optoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Steven J.; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The fast heart rate (~7 Hz) of the mouse makes cardiac imaging and functional analysis difficult when studying mouse models of cardiovascular disease, and cannot be done truly in real-time and 3D using established imaging modalities. Optoacoustic imaging, on the other hand, provides ultra-fast imaging at up to 50 volumetric frames per second, allowing for acquisition of several frames per mouse cardiac cycle. In this study, we combined a recently-developed 3D optoacoustic imaging array with novel analytical techniques to assess cardiac function and perfusion dynamics of the mouse heart at high, 4D spatiotemporal resolution. In brief, the heart of an anesthetized mouse was imaged over a series of multiple volumetric frames. In another experiment, an intravenous bolus of indocyanine green (ICG) was injected and its distribution was subsequently imaged in the heart. Unique temporal features of the cardiac cycle and ICG distribution profiles were used to segment the heart from background and to assess cardiac function. The 3D nature of the experimental data allowed for determination of cardiac volumes at ~7-8 frames per mouse cardiac cycle, providing important cardiac function parameters (e.g., stroke volume, ejection fraction) on a beat-by-beat basis, which has been previously unachieved by any other cardiac imaging modality. Furthermore, ICG distribution dynamics allowed for the determination of pulmonary transit time and thus additional quantitative measures of cardiovascular function. This work demonstrates the potential for optoacoustic cardiac imaging and is expected to have a major contribution toward future preclinical studies of animal models of cardiovascular health and disease.

  17. Special issue on ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishikawa, Akiyoshi; Martin, Fernando; Vrakking, Marc

    2013-07-01

    Your invitation to submit. Journal of Physics. B: Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics (JPhysB) is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics to appear in 2014, and invites you to submit a paper. Within the last decade, a number of novel approaches have emerged, both experimental and theoretical, that allow the investigation of (time-resolved) molecular dynamics in novel ways not anticipated before. Experimentally, the introduction of novel light sources such as high-harmonic generation and XUV/x-ray free electron lasers, and the emergence of novel detection strategies, such as time-resolved electron/x-ray diffraction and the fully coincident detection of electrons and fragment ions in reaction microscopes, has significantly expanded the arsenal of available techniques, and has taken studies of molecular dynamics into new domains of spectroscopic, spatial and temporal resolution, the latter including first explorations into the attosecond domain. Along the way, particular types of molecular dynamics, such as dynamics around conical intersections, have gained an increased prominence, sparked by an emerging realization about the essential role that this dynamics plays in relaxation pathways in important bio-molecular systems. The progress on the theoretical side has been no less impressive. Novel generations of supercomputers and a series of novel computational strategies have allowed nearly exact calculations in small molecules, as well as highly successful approximate calculations in large, polyatomic molecules. Frequent and intensive collaborations involving both theory and experiment have been essential for the progress that has been accomplished. The special issue 'Ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics' seeks to provide an overview of some of the most important developments in the field, while at the same time indicating how studies of (time-resolved) molecular dynamics are likely to evolve in the coming

  18. Photoinduced nanobubble-driven superfast diffusion of nanoparticles imaged by 4D electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xuewen; Chen, Bin; Tang, Jau; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamics of active or propulsive Brownian particles in nonequilibrium status have recently attracted great interest in many fields including artificial micro/nanoscopic motors and biological entities. Understanding of their dynamics can provide insight into the statistical properties of physical and biological systems far from equilibrium. We report the translational dynamics of photon-activated gold nanoparticles (NPs) in water imaged by liquid-cell four-dimensional electron microscopy (4D-EM) with high spatiotemporal resolution. Under excitation of femtosecond laser pulses, we observed that those NPs exhibit superfast diffusive translation with a diffusion constant four to five orders of magnitude greater than that in the absence of laser excitation. The measured diffusion constant follows a power-law dependence on the laser fluence and a linear increase with the laser repetition rate, respectively. This superfast diffusion of the NPs is induced by a strong random driving force arising from the photoinduced steam nanobubbles (NBs) near the NP surface. In contrast, the NPs exhibit a superfast ballistic translation at a short time scale down to nanoseconds. Combining with a physical model simulation, this study reveals a photoinduced NB propulsion mechanism for propulsive motion, providing physical insights into better design of light-activated artificial micro/nanomotors. The liquid-cell 4D-EM also provides the potential of studying other numerical dynamical behaviors in their native environments. PMID:28875170

  19. Probing Transient Electron Dynamics Using Ultrafast X Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucksbaum, Philip

    2016-05-01

    Linear x-ray absorption in atoms or molecules creates highly excited multi-electron quantum systems, which relax rapidly by fluorescence or Auger emission. These relaxation rates are usually less than a few femtoseconds in duration, and so they can reveal transient elecronic states in molecules as they undergo photo-induced transformations. I will show recent results from femtosecond x-ray experiments that display this phenomenon. There are efforts underway to push the temporal resolving power of ultrafast x-ray pulses into the attosecond regime, using stronger fields to initiate nonlinear absorption processes such as transient stimulated electronic Raman scattering. I will discuss current progress and future prospects for research in this area. This research is supported through Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Lab by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Science Program.

  20. Ultrafast structural and electronic dynamics of the metallic phase in a layered manganite.

    PubMed

    Piazza, L; Ma, C; Yang, H X; Mann, A; Zhu, Y; Li, J Q; Carbone, F

    2014-01-01

    The transition between different states in manganites can be driven by various external stimuli. Controlling these transitions with light opens the possibility to investigate the microscopic path through which they evolve. We performed femtosecond (fs) transmission electron microscopy on a bi-layered manganite to study its response to ultrafast photoexcitation. We show that a photoinduced temperature jump launches a pressure wave that provokes coherent oscillations of the lattice parameters, detected via ultrafast electron diffraction. Their impact on the electronic structure are monitored via ultrafast electron energy loss spectroscopy, revealing the dynamics of the different orbitals in response to specific structural distortions.

  1. Special issue on ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Fernando; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi; Vrakking, Marc

    2014-06-01

    In the last few years, the advent of novel experimental and theoretical approaches has made possible the investigation of (time-resolved) molecular dynamics in ways not anticipated before. Experimentally, the introduction of novel light sources such as high-harmonic generation (HHG) and XUV/x-ray free electron lasers, and the emergence of novel detection strategies, such as time-resolved electron/x-ray diffraction and the fully coincident detection of electrons and fragment ions in reaction microscopes, has significantly expanded the arsenal of available techniques, and has taken studies of molecular dynamics into new domains of spectroscopic, spatial and temporal resolution, the latter including first explorations into the attosecond domain, thus opening completely new avenues for imaging electronic and nuclear dynamics in molecules. Along the way, particular types of molecular dynamics, e.g., dynamics around conical intersections, have gained an increased prominence, sparked by the realization of the essential role that this dynamics plays in relaxation pathways in important bio-molecular systems. In the short term, this will allow one to uncover and control the dynamics of elementary chemical processes such as, e.g., ultrafast charge migration, proton transfer, isomerization or multiple ionization, and to address new key questions about the role of attosecond coherent electron dynamics in chemical reactivity. The progress on the theoretical side has been no less impressive. Novel generations of supercomputers and a series of novel computational strategies have allowed nearly exact calculations in small molecules, as well as highly successful approximate calculations in large, polyatomic molecules, including biomolecules. Frequent and intensive collaborations involving both theory and experiment have been essential for the progress that has been accomplished. The special issue 'Ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics' seeks to provide an overview of the current

  2. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Delocalized Excited States of the Hydrated Electron

    SciTech Connect

    Paul F. Barbara

    2005-09-28

    Research under support of this grant has been focused on the understanding of highly delocalized ''conduction-band-like'' excited states of solvated electrons in bulk water, in water trapped in the core of reverse micelles, and in alkane solvents. We have strived in this work to probe conduction-band-like states by a variety of ultrafast spectroscopy techniques. (Most of which were developed under DOE support in a previous funding cycle.) We have recorded the optical spectrum of the hydrated electron for the first time. This was accomplished by applying a photo-detrapping technique that we had developed in a previous funding cycle, but had not yet been applied to characterize the actual spectrum. In the cases of reverse micelles, we have been investigating the potential role of conduction bands in the electron attachment process and the photoinduced detrapping, and have published two papers on this topic. Finally, we have been exploring solvated electrons in isooctane from various perspectives. All of these results strongly support the conclusion that optically accessible, highly delocalized electronic states exist in these various media.

  3. Using attosecond pulses to probe ultrafast electronic motions inside atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, L. A.; Hu, S. X.

    2006-05-01

    With using an efficient and accurate parallel solver for the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation, we have performed full-dimensional numerical simulations of the proposed attosecond pump-probe for exploring the extremely fast motion of an electronic wave packet inside atoms. Pumped by a broadband femtosecond UV pulse, one electron of ground-state Helium can be launched into a superposition of low-lying excited states, thus forming a bound wavepacket oscillating relative to the atomic core. A time-delayed attosecond EUV (probe) pulse then ionizes the atom causing three-body breakup. Measuring either the energy sharing of the ionized electrons or the total ionization probability as a function of the time delay traces out the internal motion of the excited electron. Our simulations have shown that an ultrashort oscillating period of 2 fs can be followed for several cylces. This opens the prospect of a wealth of similar pump-probe experiments to examine ultrafast electronic motions.

  4. Ultrafast modulation of electronic structure by coherent phonon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisshaupt, J.; Rouzée, A.; Woerner, M.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Elsaesser, T.; Shirley, E. L.; Borgschulte, A.

    2017-02-01

    Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a laser-driven high-harmonic source is used to map ultrafast changes of x-ray absorption by femtometer-scale coherent phonon displacements. In LiBH4, displacements along an Ag phonon mode at 10 THz are induced by impulsive Raman excitation and give rise to oscillatory changes of x-ray absorption at the Li K edge. Electron density maps from femtosecond x-ray diffraction data show that the electric field of the pump pulse induces a charge transfer from the BH4- to neighboring Li+ ions, resulting in a differential Coulomb force that drives lattice vibrations in this virtual transition state.

  5. Nonequilibrium phase transitions in cuprates observed by ultrafast electron crystallography.

    PubMed

    Gedik, Nuh; Yang, Ding-Shyue; Logvenov, Gennady; Bozovic, Ivan; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2007-04-20

    Nonequilibrium phase transitions, which are defined by the formation of macroscopic transient domains, are optically dark and cannot be observed through conventional temperature- or pressure-change studies. We have directly determined the structural dynamics of such a nonequilibrium phase transition in a cuprate superconductor. Ultrafast electron crystallography with the use of a tilted optical geometry technique afforded the necessary atomic-scale spatial and temporal resolutions. The observed transient behavior displays a notable "structural isosbestic" point and a threshold effect for the dependence of c-axis expansion (Deltac) on fluence (F), with Deltac/F = 0.02 angstrom/(millijoule per square centimeter). This threshold for photon doping occurs at approximately 0.12 photons per copper site, which is unexpectedly close to the density (per site) of chemically doped carriers needed to induce superconductivity.

  6. Ultrafast imaging of plasmons in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lummen, Tom T. A.; Berruto, Gabriele; Toma, Andrea; Lamb, Raymond J.; McGrouther, Damien; Carbone, Fabrizio

    2016-03-01

    Miniaturized plasmonic and photonic integrated circuits are generally considered as the core of future generations of optoelectronic devices, due to their potential to bridge the size-compatibility gap between photonics and electronics. However, as the nanoscale is approached in increasingly small plasmonic and photonic systems, experimentally observing their behavior involves ever more stringent requirements in terms of both temporal and spatial resolution. This talk focuses on the use of time-resolved Photon-Induced Near-Field Electron Microscopy (PINEM) to study the excitation, propagation, (self-)interference and dynamics of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in various plasmonic nanostructures with both nanometer and ultrafast resolution in a transmission electron microscope. Using this field-ofview technique, we directly show how photo-excited plasmonic interference patterns are controlled through the combination of excitation polarization and nanostructure geometry. Moreover, we capture the propagation of the photoinduced self-interfering plasmonic wave, clearly demonstrating the effects of axial confinement in nanostructured plasmonic thin film stacks.

  7. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics of Tertiary Amines upon Electronic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinxin; Minitti, Michael P.; Deb, Sanghamitra; Zhang, Yao; Budarz, James; Weber, Peter M.

    2011-06-01

    The structural response of several tertiary amines to electronic excitation has been investigated using Rydberg Fingerprint Spectroscopy. The 3p Rydberg states are reached by excitation with a 5.93 eV photon while 3s states are populated by electronic relaxation from 3p state. We observe binding energy shifts on ultrafast time scales in all peaks that reflect the structural change of the molecular ion cores. The shifts are in the range of 15 meV to 30 meV, within time scales of less than 500 fs, depending on the specific molecular systems and the nature of the electronic state. In cases where the p states are spectrally separate, the trends of the energy shifts are different for the p_z and p_x_y Rydberg states whereas the p_z and s states are similar. This suggests that the response of the Rydberg states to structural displacements depends on the symmetry. Very fast binding energy shifts, observed on sub-picosecond time scales, are attributed to the structural adjustment from a pyramidal to a planar structure upon Rydberg excitation. The quantitative values of the binding energy shifts can also be affected by laser chirp, which we model using simulations.

  8. Ultrafast electron optics: Propagation dynamics of femtosecond electron packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwick, Bradley J.; Dwyer, Jason R.; Jordan, Robert E.; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2002-08-01

    Time-resolved electron diffraction harbors great promise for resolving the fastest chemical processes with atomic level detail. The main obstacles to achieving this real-time view of a chemical reaction are associated with delivering short electron pulses with sufficient electron density to the sample. In this article, the propagation dynamics of femtosecond electron packets in the drift region of a photoelectron gun are investigated with an N-body numerical simulation and mean-field model. It is found that space-charge effects can broaden the electron pulse to many times its original length and generate many eV of kinetic energy bandwidth in only a few nanoseconds. There is excellent agreement between the N-body simulation and the mean-field model for both space-charge induced temporal and kinetic energy distribution broadening. The numerical simulation also shows that the redistribution of electrons inside the packet results in changes to the pulse envelope and the development of a spatially linear axial velocity distribution. These results are important for (or have the potential to impact on) the interpretation of time-resolved electron diffraction experiments and can be used in the design of photoelectron guns and streak tubes with temporal resolution of several hundred femtoseconds.

  9. Ultrafast electron injection into photo-excited organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Cvetko, Dean; Fratesi, Guido; Kladnik, Gregor; Cossaro, Albano; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Venkataraman, Latha; Morgante, Alberto

    2016-08-10

    Charge transfer rates at metal/organic interfaces affect the efficiencies of devices for organic based electronics and photovoltaics. A quantitative study of electron transfer rates, which take place on the femtosecond timescale, is often difficult, especially since in most systems the molecular adsorption geometry is unknown. Here, we use X-ray resonant photoemission spectroscopy to measure ultrafast charge transfer rates across pyridine/Au(111) interfaces while also controlling the molecular orientation on the metal. We demonstrate that a bi-directional charge transfer across the molecule/metal interface is enabled upon creation of a core-exciton on the molecule with a rate that has a strong dependence on the molecular adsorption angle. Through density functional theory calculations, we show that the alignment of molecular levels relative to the metal Fermi level is dramatically altered when a core-hole is created on the molecule, allowing the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital to fall partially below the metal Fermi level. We also calculate charge transfer rates as a function of molecular adsorption geometry and find a trend that agrees with the experiment. These findings thus give insight into the charge transfer dynamics of a photo-excited molecule on a metal surface.

  10. Attosecond electron emission probes of ultrafast nanolocalized fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    Ongoing experimental and theoretical work on the temporal and spatial characterization of nanolocalized plasmonic fields will be presented. Because of their broad spectral bandwidth, plasmons in metal nanoparticles undergo ultrafast dynamics with timescales as short as a few hundred attoseconds. So far, the spatiotemporal dynamics of optical fields localized on the nanoscale has been hidden from direct access in the real space and time domain. Our ultimate goal is to characterize the nanoplasmonic fields not only on a nanometer spatial scale but also on ~100 attosecond temporal scale. Information about the nanoplasmonic fields, which are excited by few-cycle laser pulses with stable electric field waveform, can be obtained by the measurement of photoemitted electrons. We will present recent results on the large acceleration of recollision electrons in nanolocalized fields near dielectric nanoparticles following the excitation by 5-fs near-infrared laser pulses with controlled electric field waveforms. This work has been carried out in collaboration with Th. Fennel (University of Rostock), E. Ruehl (FU Berlin), and M.I. Stockman (GSU Atlanta). We acknowledge support by the DFG via Emmy-Noether program and SPP1391.

  11. Clocking the anisotropic lattice dynamics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gaolong; Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Zhongwen; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2015-02-12

    Recent advances in the four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscope (4D-UTEM) with combined spatial and temporal resolutions have made it possible to directly visualize structural dynamics of materials at the atomic level. Herein, we report on our development on a 4D-UTEM which can be operated properly on either the photo-emission or the thermionic mode. We demonstrate its ability to obtain sequences of snapshots with high spatial and temporal resolutions in the study of lattice dynamics of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). This investigation provides an atomic level description of remarkable anisotropic lattice dynamics at the picosecond timescales. Moreover, our UTEM measurements clearly reveal that distinguishable lattice relaxations appear in intra-tubular sheets on an ultrafast timescale of a few picoseconds and after then an evident lattice expansion along the radial direction. These anisotropic behaviors in the MWCNTs are considered arising from the variety of chemical bonding, i.e. the weak van der Waals bonding between the tubular planes and the strong covalent sp(2)-hybridized bonds in the tubular sheets.

  12. Clocking the anisotropic lattice dynamics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Gaolong; Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Zhongwen; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in the four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscope (4D-UTEM) with combined spatial and temporal resolutions have made it possible to directly visualize structural dynamics of materials at the atomic level. Herein, we report on our development on a 4D-UTEM which can be operated properly on either the photo-emission or the thermionic mode. We demonstrate its ability to obtain sequences of snapshots with high spatial and temporal resolutions in the study of lattice dynamics of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). This investigation provides an atomic level description of remarkable anisotropic lattice dynamics at the picosecond timescales. Moreover, our UTEM measurements clearly reveal that distinguishable lattice relaxations appear in intra-tubular sheets on an ultrafast timescale of a few picoseconds and after then an evident lattice expansion along the radial direction. These anisotropic behaviors in the MWCNTs are considered arising from the variety of chemical bonding, i.e. the weak van der Waals bonding between the tubular planes and the strong covalent sp2-hybridized bonds in the tubular sheets.

  13. Role of electron-electron interference in ultrafast time-resolved imaging of electronic wavepackets

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, Gopal; Santra, Robin

    2013-04-07

    Ultrafast time-resolved x-ray scattering is an emerging approach to image the dynamical evolution of the electronic charge distribution during complex chemical and biological processes in real-space and real-time. Recently, the differences between semiclassical and quantum-electrodynamical (QED) theory of light-matter interaction for scattering of ultrashort x-ray pulses from the electronic wavepacket were formally demonstrated and visually illustrated by scattering patterns calculated for an electronic wavepacket in atomic hydrogen [G. Dixit, O. Vendrell, and R. Santra, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, 11636 (2012)]. In this work, we present a detailed analysis of time-resolved x-ray scattering from a sample containing a mixture of non-stationary and stationary electrons within both the theories. In a many-electron system, the role of scattering interference between a non-stationary and several stationary electrons to the total scattering signal is investigated. In general, QED and semiclassical theory provide different results for the contribution from the scattering interference, which depends on the energy resolution of the detector and the x-ray pulse duration. The present findings are demonstrated by means of a numerical example of x-ray time-resolved imaging for an electronic wavepacket in helium. It is shown that the time-dependent scattering interference vanishes within semiclassical theory and the corresponding patterns are dominated by the scattering contribution from the time-independent interference, whereas the time-dependent scattering interference contribution do not vanish in the QED theory and the patterns are dominated by the scattering contribution from the non-stationary electron scattering.

  14. Free electron laser-driven ultrafast rearrangement of the electronic structure in Ti

    PubMed Central

    Principi, E.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Cucini, R.; Bencivenga, F.; Battistoni, A.; Gessini, A.; Mincigrucci, R.; Saito, M.; Di Fonzo, S.; D'Amico, F.; Di Cicco, A.; Gunnella, R.; Filipponi, A.; Giglia, A.; Nannarone, S.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy density extreme ultraviolet radiation delivered by the FERMI seeded free-electron laser has been used to create an exotic nonequilibrium state of matter in a titanium sample characterized by a highly excited electron subsystem at temperatures in excess of 10 eV and a cold solid-density ion lattice. The obtained transient state has been investigated through ultrafast absorption spectroscopy across the Ti M2,3-edge revealing a drastic rearrangement of the sample electronic structure around the Fermi level occurring on a time scale of about 100 fs. PMID:26798835

  15. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode.

    PubMed

    Bücker, K; Picher, M; Crégut, O; LaGrange, T; Reed, B W; Park, S T; Masiel, D J; Banhart, F

    2016-12-01

    High temporal resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques have shown significant progress in recent years. Using photoelectron pulses induced by ultrashort laser pulses on the cathode, these methods can probe ultrafast materials processes and have revealed numerous dynamic phenomena at the nanoscale. Most recently, the technique has been implemented in standard thermionic electron microscopes that provide a flexible platform for studying material's dynamics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, the electron pulses in such an ultrafast transmission electron microscope are characterized in detail. The microscope is based on a thermionic gun with a Wehnelt electrode and is operated in a stroboscopic photoelectron mode. It is shown that the Wehnelt bias has a decisive influence on the temporal and energy spread of the picosecond electron pulses. Depending on the shape of the cathode and the cathode-Wehnelt distance, different emission patterns with different pulse parameters are obtained. The energy spread of the pulses is determined by space charge and Boersch effects, given by the number of electrons in a pulse. However, filtering effects due to the chromatic aberrations of the Wehnelt electrode allow the extraction of pulses with narrow energy spreads. The temporal spread is governed by electron trajectories of different length and in different electrostatic potentials. High temporal resolution is obtained by excluding shank emission from the cathode and aberration-induced halos in the emission pattern. By varying the cathode-Wehnelt gap, the Wehnelt bias, and the number of photoelectrons in a pulse, tradeoffs between energy and temporal resolution as well as beam intensity can be made as needed for experiments. Based on the characterization of the electron pulses, the optimal conditions for the operation of ultrafast TEMs with thermionic gun assembly are elaborated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrafast Molecular Three-Electron Collective Auger Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feifel, Raimund

    2016-06-01

    A new class of many-electron Auger transitions in atoms was initially proposed over 40 years ago, but the first tentative evidence for its real existence was only adduced by Lee et al. in 1993, on the basis of the resonant Auger spectrum of Kr. Using a multi-electron coincidence technique with synchrotron radiation, we unambiguously showed very recently that the transition suggested by Lee et al. in Kr really does take place, but with a rather small branching ratio. Related inter-atomic three-electron transitions in rare gas clusters were recently predicted by Averbukh and Kolorenc and demonstrated by Ouchi et al.. From consideration of the energy levels involved it seems that the basic three-electron process could occur in molecules too, wherever a double inner-valence shell vacancy lies at a higher energy than the molecular triple ionisation onset. Experiments on CH_3F reveal for the first time the existence of this new decay pathway there, and calculations show that despite its three-electron nature, its effective oscillator strength is orders of magnitudes higher than in atoms, allowing an efficient competition with both molecular dissociation and two-electron decay channels on the ultrafast time scale. The dramatic enhancement of the molecular three-electron Auger transition can be explained in terms of a partial breakdown of the molecular orbital picture of ionisation. We predict that the collective decay pathway will be significant in a wide variety of heteroatomic molecules ionised by extreme UV and soft X-rays, particularly at Free-Electron-Lasers where double inner-shell vacancies can be created efficiently by two-photon transitions. G.N. Ogurtsov et al., Sov. Phys. Tech. Phys. 15, 1656 (1971) and V.V. Afrosimov et al., JETP Lett. 21, 249 (1975). I. Lee, R. Wehlitz, U. Becker and M. Ya. Amusia, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 26, L41 (1993). J.H.D. Eland, R.J. Squibb, M. Mucke, S. Zagorodskikh, P. Linusson, and R. Feifel, New J. Phys. 17, 122001 (2015). V

  17. Ultrafast science: A multiscale modeling approach to femtosecond electron diffraction and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portman, Jenni Minttu Eleonora

    The focus of this work is the study of processes at the edge of the current space and time resolutions. This includes both efforts in the development of an ultrafast electron microscope (UEM) and in the study of correlated electron systems that reflect measurements taken with this instrument. The development of a reliable ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging system requires a low emittance source of photoemitted electrons and an understanding of how the properties of the generated bunch depend on the photocathode properties. In order to gain more understanding of this process, we combine the so-called three-step photoemission model with N-particle electron simulations. By using the Fast Multipole Method to treat space charge effects, we are able to follow the time evolution of pulses containing over 106 electrons and investigate the role of laser fluence and extraction field on the total number of electrons that escape the surface as well as virtual cathode physics and the limits to spatio-temporal and spectroscopic resolution originating from the image charge on the surface and from the profile of the exciting laser pulse. The results of these simulations are compared to experimental images of the photoemission process collected using the shadow imaging technique. By contrasting the effect of varying surface properties (leading to expanding or pinned image charge) and laser profiles (Gaussian, uniform and elliptical) under different extraction field strengths and numbers of generated electrons, we quantify the effect of these experimental parameters on macroscopic pulse properties such as emittance, brightness (4D and 6D), coherence length and energy spread. Based on our results, we outline optimal conditions of pulse generation for UEM systems. With our knowledge of the photoemitted pulse properties, we also present our development of a design for the whole UEM column using the Analytic Gaussian model. We summarize the derivation of the equations governing

  18. High-temporal-resolution electron microscopy for imaging ultrafast electron dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. Th.; Baskin, J. S.; Liao, B.; Zewail, A. H.

    2017-07-01

    Ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) has been demonstrated as an effective table-top technique for imaging the temporally evolving dynamics of matter with a subparticle spatial resolution on the timescale of atomic motion. However, imaging the faster motion of electron dynamics in real time has remained beyond reach. Here we demonstrate more than an order of magnitude (16 times) enhancement in the typical temporal resolution of UEM by generating isolated ∼30 fs electron pulses, accelerated at 200 keV, via the optical-gating approach, with sufficient intensity to probe efficiently the electronic dynamics of matter. Moreover, we investigate the feasibility of attosecond optical gating to generate isolated subfemtosecond electron pulses and attain the desired temporal resolution in electron microscopy to establish 'attomicroscopy' to allow the imaging of electron motion in the act.

  19. Unexpectedly marginal effect of electronic correlations on ultrafast demagnetization after femtosecond laser-pulse excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, W.; Huang, H.; Briones, J.; Teeny, N.; Mueller, B. Y.; Haag, M.; Kuhn, T.; Fähnle, M.

    2017-06-01

    The treatment of ultrafast demagnetization after femtosecond laser-pulse excitation of a ferromagnetic film is usually done by a theory based on Fermi's golden rule which neglects the effects of electronic correlations. In the present paper the contribution of spin-flip electron-phonon scatterings to the ultrafast demagnetization of Ni is calculated by this theory and by the density-matrix theory in which the correlations are taken into account. The unexpected result is that the correlations which are essential for the ultrafast dynamics of nonmagnetic phenomena have only a marginal effect for the considered magnetic problem. From this point of view the use of Fermi's golden rule in all former papers on ultrafast demagnetization is justified.

  20. An ultrafast electron microscope gun driven by two-photon photoemission from a nanotip cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Bormann, Reiner; Strauch, Stefanie; Schäfer, Sascha Ropers, Claus

    2015-11-07

    We experimentally and numerically investigate the performance of an advanced ultrafast electron source, based on two-photon photoemission from a tungsten needle cathode incorporated in an electron microscope gun geometry. Emission properties are characterized as a function of the electrostatic gun settings, and operating conditions leading to laser-triggered electron beams of very low emittance (below 20 nm mrad) are identified. The results highlight the excellent suitability of optically driven nano-cathodes for the further development of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy.

  1. Simultaneous investigation of ultrafast structural dynamics and transient electric field by sub-picosecond electron pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Run-Ze; Zhu, Pengfei; Chen, Long; Chen, Jie E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn; Cao, Jianming

    2014-05-14

    The ultrafast structure dynamics and surface transient electric field, which are concurrently induced by laser excited electrons of an aluminum nanofilm, have been investigated simultaneously by the same transmission electron diffraction patterns. These two processes are found to be significantly different and distinguishable by tracing the time dependent changes of electron diffraction and deflection angles, respectively. This study also provides a practical means to evaluate simultaneously the effect of transient electric field during the study of structural dynamics under low pump fluence by transmission ultrafast electron diffraction.

  2. Probing phase transitions at surfaces with ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn von Hoegen, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The multitude of possible processes that can occur at surfaces cover many orders of magnitude in the time domain. While large scale growth and structure formation happens on a timescale of minutes and seconds, diffusion is already much faster, but can still be observed by electron microscopy. Many other processes as chemical reactions, phonon dynamics, or phase transitions, however, take place on the femto- and picosecond timescale and are yet way to fast for imaging techniques. In order to study such ultrafast processes at surfaces we have combined modern surface science techniques with fs laser pulses in a pump probe scheme. We use a RHEED setup with grazing incident electrons of 7 - 30 keV to ensure surface sensitivity. In order to overcome the velocity mismatch between light and electrons a tilted pulse front scheme is used to achieve a time resolution of less than 2 ps. The sample is excited with 800 nm photons with a pulse energy of 0.5 mJ at 5 kHz repetition rate. The huge potential of this technique for the study of transient surface phenomena is demonstrated with the non-equilibrium dynamics of the In induced c(8x2) reconstruction on Si(111). This surface exhibits a Peierls-like phase transition at 100 K from a c(8x2) groundstate, which is accompanied by the formation of a charge density wave (CDW), to (4x1) excited state. Upon excitation by the fs-laser pulse this structural phase transition is driven into the excited (4x1) state at a sample temperature of 20 K. The surface is only excited electronically, the CDW is lifted by photo doping and the surface remains up to 500 ps in a super cooled excited (4x1) state. Relaxation into the c(8x2) groundstate happens delayed through the nucleation of the c(8x2) at defects which triggers a 1-dim. recrystallisation front which propagates with the velocity of sound. Utilizing the Debye Waller effect, the excitation, conversion and relaxation of vibrational excitations in monolayer adsorbate systems like the Pb

  3. Ultrafast electron microscopy: Instrument response from the single-electron to high bunch-charge regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plemmons, Dayne A.; Flannigan, David J.

    2017-09-01

    We determine the instrument response of an ultrafast electron microscope equipped with a conventional thermionic electron gun and absent modifications beyond the optical ports. Using flat, graphite-encircled LaB6 cathodes, we image space-charge effects as a function of photoelectron-packet population and find that an applied Wehnelt bias has a negligible effect on the threshold levels (>103 electrons per pulse) but does appear to suppress blurring at the upper limits (∼105 electrons). Using plasma lensing, we determine the instrument-response time for 700-fs laser pulses and find that single-electron packets are laser limited (1 ps), while broadening occurs well below the space-charge limit.

  4. 4-d magnetism: Electronic structure and magnetism of some Mo-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Bose, S. K.; Kudrnovský, J.

    2017-02-01

    We report results of a first-principles density-functional study of alloys of the 4 d -element Mo with group IV elements Si, Ge and Sn in zinc blende (ZB) and rock salt (RS) structures. The study was motivated by a similar study of ours based on the 4 d -element Tc, which showed the presence of half-metallic states with integer magnetic moment (1μB) per formula unit in TcX (X=C, Si, Ge) alloys. The calculated Curie temperatures for the ferromagnetic (FM) phases were low, around or less than 300 K. Searching for the possibility of 4 d -based alloys with higher Curie temperatures we have carried out the study involving the elements Mo, Ru and Rh. Among these the most promising case appears to be that involving the element Mo. Among the MoX (X=Si, Ge, Sn) alloys in ZB and RS structures, both MoGe and MoSn in ZB structures are found to possess an integer magnetic moment of 2μB per formula unit. ZB MoSn can be classified as a marginal/weak half-metal or a spin gapless semiconductor, while ZB MoGe would be best described as a gapless magnetic semiconductor. The calculated Curie temperatures are in the range 300-700 K. Considering the theoretical uncertainty in the band gaps due not only to the treatment of exchange and correlation effects, but density functional theory itself, these classifications may change somewhat, but both merit investigation from the viewpoint of potential spintronic application. Based on their higher Curie temperatures, Mo-based alloys would serve such purpose better than the previously reported Tc-based ones.

  5. An ultrafast nanotip electron gun triggered by grating-coupled surface plasmons

    SciTech Connect

    Schröder, Benjamin; Sivis, Murat; Bormann, Reiner; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-12-07

    We demonstrate multiphoton photoelectron emission from gold nanotips induced by nanofocusing surface plasmons, resonantly excited on the tip shaft by a grating coupler. The tip is integrated into an electron gun assembly, which facilitates control over the spatial emission sites and allows us to disentangle direct grating emission from plasmon-triggered apex emission. The nanoscale source size of this electron gun concept enables highly coherent electron pulses with applications in ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  6. An ultrafast nanotip electron gun triggered by grating-coupled surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Benjamin; Sivis, Murat; Bormann, Reiner; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate multiphoton photoelectron emission from gold nanotips induced by nanofocusing surface plasmons, resonantly excited on the tip shaft by a grating coupler. The tip is integrated into an electron gun assembly, which facilitates control over the spatial emission sites and allows us to disentangle direct grating emission from plasmon-triggered apex emission. The nanoscale source size of this electron gun concept enables highly coherent electron pulses with applications in ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  7. Theory of time-resolved nonresonant x-ray scattering for imaging ultrafast coherent electron motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Gopal; Slowik, Jan Malte; Santra, Robin

    2014-04-01

    Future ultrafast x-ray light sources might image ultrafast coherent electron motion in real space and in real time. For a rigorous understanding of such an imaging experiment, we extend the theory of nonresonant x-ray scattering to the time domain. The role of energy resolution of the scattering detector is investigated in detail. We show that time-resolved nonresonant x-ray scattering with no energy resolution offers an opportunity to study time-dependent electronic correlations in nonequilibrium quantum systems. Furthermore, our theory presents a unified description of ultrafast x-ray scattering from electronic wave packets and the dynamical imaging of ultrafast dynamics using inelastic x-ray scattering by Abbamonte and co-workers. We examine closely the relation of the scattering signal and the linear density response of electronic wave packets. Finally, we demonstrate that time-resolved x-ray scattering from a crystal consisting of identical electronic wave packets recovers the instantaneous electron density.

  8. Identification of competing ionization processes in the generation of ultrafast electron bunches from cold-atom electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speirs, Rory W.; McCulloch, Andrew J.; Sparkes, Ben M.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2017-05-01

    We make direct measurements of the duration of ultrafast cold-electron bunches produced by photoionization of laser-cooled atoms. We show that the bunch duration can vary by up to six orders of magnitude for relatively small changes in laser wavelength that enhance or inhibit specific photoexcitation pathways and below-threshold tunneling. By selecting a two-color multiphoton excitation process, bunches with durations as low as the measurement resolution limit of 130 ps are measured using a streak technique. Verification that ultrafast cold-electron bunches can be generated by photoionization of cold atoms is an important step towards their application in high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and injectors for particle accelerators.

  9. Modeling ultrafast exciton migration within the electron donor domains of bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics

    DOE PAGES

    Bednarz, Mateusz; Lapin, Joel; McGillicuddy, Ryan; ...

    2017-02-21

    Recent experimental studies revealed that charge carriers harvested by bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics can be collected on ultrafast time scales. To investigate ultrafast exciton mobility, we construct simple, nonatomistic models of a common polymeric electron donor material. We first explore the relationship between the magnitude of energetic noise in the model Hamiltonian and the spatial extent of resulting eigenstates. We then employ a quantum master equation approach to simulate migration of chromophore-localized initial excited states. Excitons initially localized on a single chromophore at the center of the model delocalize down polymer chains and across pi-stacked chromophores through a coherent, wavelikemore » mechanism during the first few tens of femtoseconds. We explore the dependence of this coherent delocalization on coupling strength and on the magnitude of energetic noise. At longer times we observe continued migration toward a uniform population distribution that proceeds through an incoherent, diffusive mechanism. A series of simulations modeling exciton harvesting in domains of varying size demonstrates that smaller domains enhance ultrafast exciton harvesting yield. Finally, our nonatomistic model falls short of quantitative accuracy but demonstrates that excitons are mobile within electron donor domains on ultrafast time scales and that coherent exciton transport can enhance ultrafast exciton harvesting.« less

  10. 4d electron Ruthenate systems: their unique and new magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungran; Shin, Yeongjae; Anwar, M. S.; Sugimoto, Yusuke; Lee, Mincheol; Kang, Sungjin; Yonezawa, Shingo; Maeno, Yoshiteru; Noh, Taewon

    The Ruddlesden-Popper series (PR) of Srn+1RunO3n+1 has attract much interest of their unique physical properties. Among them, SrRuO3 (n = ∞) (SRO) is the only ferromagnetic metallic oxide especially in Ru 4d transition metal oxides. Bulk SRO has orthorhombic structure showing the Curie temperature (TC) ~ 160 K. It is well known that RuO6 octahedral distortion plays critical roles in its mangetic properties. In film systems, such RuO6 octahedra can be easily controlled by strain-engineering. In this talk, with high quality SRO films fully strained (-1.7%-1%) using various substrates, we systematically studied their structural changes and associated magnetic properties. Compared to theoretical predictions, the structural changes can be explained, while the magnetic property changes cannot be understood. Surprisingly, when SRO113 is grown on its PR series of Sr2RuO4 (n=1) (SRO214) single crystal, the exact substrate of SRO214 magnetization results in strongly enhanced magnetization (M > 3 μB/Ru, TC ~ 160 K), which has never found SRO113 (001) since the low-spin configuration of SRO113 prevent M never exceed 2 μB/Ru. The mystery of M in SRO113 (especially SRO113/SRO214) will be further discussed.

  11. Ultrafast electronic relaxation of excited state vitamin B 12 in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoıˆt

    2008-06-01

    The time evolution of electronically excited vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) has been observed for the first time in the gas phase. It reveals an ultrafast decay to a state corresponding to metal excitation. This decay is interpreted as resulting from a ring to metal electron transfer. This opens the observation of the excited state of other complex biomimetic systems in the gas phase, the key to the characterisation of their complex evolution through excited electronic states.

  12. Ultrafast electronic dynamics in polyatomic molecules studied using femtosecond vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshinori

    2014-06-01

    Time-resolved velocity map photoelectron imaging is performed using sub-20 fs deep ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet pulses to study electronic dynamics of isolated polyatomic molecules. The non-adiabatic dynamics of pyrazine, furan and carbon disulfide (CS2) are described as examples. Also described is sub-picosecond time-resolved x-ray direct absorption spectroscopy using a hard x-ray free electron laser (SACLA) and a synchronous near ultraviolet laser to study ultrafast electronic dynamics in solutions.

  13. Comparison of ultrafast electron and X-ray diffraction - A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanou, Minas; Saita, Kenichiro; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.; Kirrander, Adam

    2017-09-01

    We compare ultrafast electron and X-ray diffraction using quantum molecular dynamics simulations in photoexcited ethylene. The simulations of ethylene are done using the ab-initio multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (AI-MCE) approach, with electronic structure calculations at the SA3-CASSCF(2,2)/cc-ppVDZ level. The diffraction signal is calculated using the independent atom model. We find that the electron diffraction is more sensitive to the nuclear wavepacket, and the dynamics of the hydrogen atoms in particular.

  14. Graphene-layered steps and their fields visualized by 4D electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Tae; Yurtsever, Aycan; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced image contrast has been seen at graphene-layered steps a few nanometers in height by means of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) using synchronous femtosecond pulses of light and electrons. The observed steps are formed by the edges of graphene strips lying on the surface of a graphene substrate, where the strips are hundreds of nanometers in width and many micrometers in length. PINEM measurements reflect the interaction of imaging electrons and induced (near) electric fields at the steps, and this leads to a much higher contrast than that achieved in bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging of the same strips. Theory and numerical simulations support the experimental PINEM findings and elucidate the nature of the electric field at the steps formed by the graphene layers. These results extend the range of applications of the experimental PINEM methodology, which has previously been demonstrated for spherical, cylindrical, and triangular nanostructures, to shapes of high aspect ratio (rectangular strips), as well as into the regime of atomic layer thicknesses. PMID:23690572

  15. Graphene-layered steps and their fields visualized by 4D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Tae; Yurtsever, Aycan; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2013-06-04

    Enhanced image contrast has been seen at graphene-layered steps a few nanometers in height by means of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) using synchronous femtosecond pulses of light and electrons. The observed steps are formed by the edges of graphene strips lying on the surface of a graphene substrate, where the strips are hundreds of nanometers in width and many micrometers in length. PINEM measurements reflect the interaction of imaging electrons and induced (near) electric fields at the steps, and this leads to a much higher contrast than that achieved in bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging of the same strips. Theory and numerical simulations support the experimental PINEM findings and elucidate the nature of the electric field at the steps formed by the graphene layers. These results extend the range of applications of the experimental PINEM methodology, which has previously been demonstrated for spherical, cylindrical, and triangular nanostructures, to shapes of high aspect ratio (rectangular strips), as well as into the regime of atomic layer thicknesses.

  16. Electron and lattice dynamics of transition metal thin films observed by ultrafast electron diffraction and transient optical measurements

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, A.; Shimojima, T.; Nakano, M.; Iwasa, Y.; Ishizaka, K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the ultrafast dynamics of electrons and lattice in transition metal thin films (Au, Cu, and Mo) investigated by a combination of ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and pump-probe optical methods. For a single-crystalline Au thin film, we observe the suppression of the diffraction intensity occuring in 10 ps, which direcly reflects the lattice thermalization via the electron-phonon interaction. By using the two-temperature model, the electron-phonon coupling constant (g) and the electron and lattice temperatures (Te, Tl) are evaluated from UED, with which we simulate the transient optical transmittance. The simulation well agrees with the experimentally obtained transmittance data, except for the slight deviations at the initial photoexcitation and the relaxed quasi-equilibrium state. We also present the results similarly obtained for polycrystalline Au, Cu, and Mo thin films and demonstrate the electron and lattice dynamics occurring in metals with different electron-phonon coupling strengths. PMID:28004010

  17. Ultrafast time dynamics studies of periodic lattices with free electron laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Quevedo, W.; Busse, G.; Hallmann, J.; More, R.; Petri, M.; Rajkovic, I.; Krasniqi, F.; Rudenko, A.; Tschentscher, T.; Stojanovic, N.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Tolkiehn, M.; Techert, S.

    2012-11-01

    It has been proposed that radiation from free electron laser (FEL) at Hamburg (FLASH) can be used for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments based on the near-infrared (NIR) pump/FEL probe scheme. Here, investigation probing the ultrafast structural dynamics of periodic nano-crystalline organic matter (silver behenate) with such a scheme is reported. Excitation with a femtosecond NIR laser leads to an ultrafast lattice modification which time evolution has been studied through the scattering of vacuum ultraviolet FEL pulses. The found effect last for 6 ps and underpins the possibility for studying nanoperiodic dynamics down to the FEL source time resolution. Furthermore, the possibility of extending the use of silver behenate (AgBh) as a wavelength and temporal calibration tool for experiments with soft x-ray/FEL sources is suggested.

  18. Ultrafast Plasmon-Enhanced Hot Electron Generation at Ag Nanocluster/Graphite Heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shijing; Liu, Liming; Dai, Yanan; Ren, Jindong; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2017-04-12

    Hot electron processes at metallic heterojunctions are central to optical-to-chemical or electrical energy transduction. Ultrafast nonlinear photoexcitation of graphite has been shown to create hot thermalized electrons at temperatures corresponding to the solar photosphere in less than 25 fs. Plasmonic resonances in metallic nanoparticles are also known to efficiently generate hot electrons. Here we combine Ag nanoparticles with graphite (Gr) to study the ultrafast hot electron generation and dynamics in their plasmonic heterojunctions by means of time-resolved two-photon photoemission (2PP) spectroscopy. Tuning the wavelength of p-polarized femtosecond excitation pulses we find enhancement of 2PP yields by two orders-of-magnitude, which we attribute to excitation of a surface normal Mie plasmon mode of Ag/Gr heterojunctions at 3.6 eV. The 2PP spectra include contributions from: i) coherent two-photon absorption of an occupied interface state 0.2 eV below Fermi level, which electronic structure calculations assign to chemisorption-induced charge transfer; and ii) hot electrons in the π*-band of graphite, which are excited through the coherent screening response of the substrate. Ultrafast pump-probe measurements show that the interface state photoemission occurs via virtual intermediate states, whereas the characteristic lifetimes attribute the hot electrons to the population of the π*-band of Gr via the plasmon dephasing. Our study directly probes the mechanisms for enhanced hot electron generation and decay in a model plasmonic heterojunction.

  19. Design and commissioning of an aberration-corrected ultrafast spin-polarized low energy electron microscope with multiple electron sources.

    PubMed

    Wan, Weishi; Yu, Lei; Zhu, Lin; Yang, Xiaodong; Wei, Zheng; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Feng, Jun; Kunze, Kai; Schaff, Oliver; Tromp, Ruud; Tang, Wen-Xin

    2016-12-27

    We describe the design and commissioning of a novel aberration-corrected low energy electron microscope (AC-LEEM). A third magnetic prism array (MPA) is added to the standard AC-LEEM with two prism arrays, allowing the incorporation of an ultrafast spin-polarized electron source alongside the standard cold field emission electron source, without degrading spatial resolution. The high degree of symmetries of the AC-LEEM are utilized while we design the electron optics of the ultrafast spin-polarized electron source, so as to minimize the deleterious effect of time broadening, while maintaining full control of electron spin. A spatial resolution of 2nm and temporal resolution of 10ps (ps) are expected in the future time resolved aberration-corrected spin-polarized LEEM (TR-AC-SPLEEM). The commissioning of the three-prism AC-LEEM has been successfully finished with the cold field emission source, with a spatial resolution below 2nm.

  20. Direct monitoring of ultrafast electron and hole dynamics in perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Piotr; Cohen, Boiko; Javier Ramos, Francisco; Di Nunzio, Maria; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Grätzel, Michael; Ahmad, Shahzada; Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2015-06-14

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have emerged as cost effective efficient light-to-electricity conversion devices. Unravelling the time scale and the mechanisms that govern the charge carrier dynamics is of paramount importance for a clear understanding and further optimization of the perovskite based devices. For the classical FTO/bulk titania blocking layer/mesoporous titania/perovskite/Spiro-OMeTAD (FTO/TPS) cell, further detailed and systematic studies of the ultrafast events related to exciton generation, electron and hole transfer, ultrafast relaxation are still needed. We characterize the initial ultrafast processes attributed to the exciton-perovskite lattice interactions influenced by charge transfer to the electron and hole transporters that precede the exciton diffusion into free charge carriers occurring in the sensitizer. Time-resolved transient absorption studies of the FTO/perovskite and FTO/TPS samples under excitation at different wavelengths and at low fluence 2 (μJ cm(-2)) indicate the sub-picosecond electron and hole injection into titania and Spiro-OMeTAD, respectively. Furthermore, the power-dependent femtosecond transient absorption measurements support the ultrafast charge transfer and show strong Auger-type multiparticle interactions at early times. We reveal that the decays of the internal trap states are the same for both films, while those at surfaces differ. The contribution of the former in the recombination is small, thus increasing the survival probability of the charges in the excited perovskite.

  1. Generalized GW+Boltzmann Approach for the Description of Ultrafast Electron Dynamics in Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Battiato, Marco; Aguilera, Irene; Sánchez-Barriga, Jaime

    2017-07-17

    Quantum-phase transitions between trivial insulators and topological insulators differ from ordinary metal-insulator transitions in that they arise from the inversion of the bulk band structure due to strong spin-orbit coupling. Such topological phase transitions are unique in nature as they lead to the emergence of topological surface states which are characterized by a peculiar spin texture that is believed to play a central role in the generation and manipulation of dissipationless surface spin currents on ultrafast timescales. Here, we provide a generalized G W +Boltzmann approach for the description of ultrafast dynamics in topological insulators driven by electron-electron and electron-phonon scatterings. Taking the prototypical insulator Bi 2 Te 3 as an example, we test the robustness of our approach by comparing the theoretical prediction to results of time- and angle-resolved photoemission experiments. From this comparison, we are able to demonstrate the crucial role of the excited spin texture in the subpicosecond relaxation of transient electrons, as well as to accurately obtain the magnitude and strength of electron-electron and electron-phonon couplings. Our approach could be used as a generalized theory for three-dimensional topological insulators in the bulk-conducting transport regime, paving the way for the realization of a unified theory of ultrafast dynamics in topological materials.

  2. Vibrational coherence probes the mechanism of ultrafast electron transfer in polymer-fullerene blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yin; Clafton, Scott N.; Pensack, Ryan D.; Kee, Tak W.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2014-09-01

    The conversion of photoexcitations into charge carriers in organic solar cells is facilitated by the dissociation of excitons at the donor/acceptor interface. The ultrafast timescale of charge separation demands sophisticated theoretical models and raises questions about the role of coherence in the charge-transfer mechanism. Here, we apply two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy to study the electron transfer process in poly(3-hexylthiophene)/PCBM (P3HT/PCBM) blends. We report dynamics maps showing the pathways of charge transfer that clearly expose the significance of hot electron transfer. During this ultrafast electron transfer, vibrational coherence is directly transferred from the P3HT exciton to the P3HT hole polaron in the crystalline domain. This result reveals that the exciton converts to a hole with a similar spatial extent on a timescale far exceeding other photophysical dynamics including vibrational relaxation.

  3. Accurate electronic free energies of the 3 d ,4 d , and 5 d transition metals at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Grabowski, Blazej; Körmann, Fritz; Freysoldt, Christoph; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Free energies of bulk materials are nowadays routinely computed by density functional theory. In particular for metals, electronic excitations can significantly contribute to the free energy. For an ideal static lattice, this contribution can be obtained at low computational cost, e.g., from the electronic density of states derived at T =0 K or by utilizing the Sommerfeld approximation. The error introduced by these approximations at elevated temperatures is rarely known. The error arising from the ideal lattice approximation is likewise unexplored but computationally much more challenging to overcome. In order to shed light on these issues we have computed the electronic free energies for all 3 d ,4 d , and 5 d transition elements on the ideal lattices of the bcc, fcc, and hcp structures using finite-temperature density-functional theory. For a subset of elements we have explored the impact of explicit thermal vibrations on the electronic free energies by using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We provide an analysis of the observed chemical trends in terms of the electronic density of states and the canonical d band model and quantify the errors in the approximate methods. The electronic contribution to the heat capacities and the corresponding errors due to the different approximations are studied as well.

  4. Anomalous ultrafast dynamics of hot plasmonic electrons in nanostructures with hot spots.

    PubMed

    Harutyunyan, Hayk; Martinson, Alex B F; Rosenmann, Daniel; Khorashad, Larousse Khosravi; Besteiro, Lucas V; Govorov, Alexander O; Wiederrecht, Gary P

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of light and matter in metallic nanosystems is mediated by the collective oscillation of surface electrons, called plasmons. After excitation, plasmons are absorbed by the metal electrons through inter- and intraband transitions, creating a highly non-thermal distribution of electrons. The electron population then decays through electron-electron interactions, creating a hot electron distribution within a few hundred femtoseconds, followed by a further relaxation via electron-phonon scattering on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In the spectral domain, hot plasmonic electrons induce changes to the plasmonic resonance of the nanostructure by modifying the dielectric constant of the metal. Here, we report on the observation of anomalously strong changes to the ultrafast temporal and spectral responses of these excited hot plasmonic electrons in hybrid metal/oxide nanostructures as a result of varying the geometry and composition of the nanostructure and the excitation wavelength. In particular, we show a large ultrafast, pulsewidth-limited contribution to the excited electron decay signal in hybrid nanostructures containing hot spots. The intensity of this contribution correlates with the efficiency of the generation of highly excited surface electrons. Using theoretical models, we attribute this effect to the generation of hot plasmonic electrons from hot spots. We then develop general principles to enhance the generation of energetic electrons through specifically designed plasmonic nanostructures that could be used in applications where hot electron generation is beneficial, such as in solar photocatalysis, photodetectors and nonlinear devices.

  5. Anomalous ultrafast dynamics of hot plasmonic electrons in nanostructures with hot spots

    DOE PAGES

    Harutyunyan, Hayk; Martinson, Alex B. F.; Rosenmann, Daniel; ...

    2015-08-03

    The interaction of light and matter in metallic nanosystems is mediated by the collective oscillation of surface electrons, called plasmons. After excitation, plasmons are absorbed by the metal electrons through inter- and intraband transitions, creating a highly non-thermal distribution of electrons. The electron population then decays through electron-electron interactions, creating a hot electron distribution within a few hundred femtoseconds, followed by a further relaxation via electron-phonon scattering on the timescale of a few pico-seconds. In the spectral domain, hot plasmonic electrons induce changes to the plasmonic resonance of the nanostructure by modifying the dielectric constant of the metal. Here, wemore » report on the observation of anomalously strong changes to the ultrafast temporal and spectral responses of these excited hot plasmonic electrons in hybrid metal/oxide nanostructures as a result of varying the geometry and composition of the nanostructure and the excitation wavelength. In particular, we show a large ultrafast, pulsewidth-limited contribution to the excited electron decay signal in hybrid nanostructures containing hot spots. The intensity of this contribution correlates with the efficiency of the generation of highly excited surface electrons. Using theoretical models, we attribute this effect to the generation of hot plasmonic electrons from hot spots. Finally, we then develop general principles to enhance the generation of energetic electrons through specifically designed plasmonic nanostructures that could be used in applications where hot electron generation is beneficial, such as in solar photocatalysis, photodetectors and nonlinear devices.« less

  6. Anomalous ultrafast dynamics of hot plasmonic electrons in nanostructures with hot spots

    SciTech Connect

    Harutyunyan, Hayk; Martinson, Alex B. F.; Rosenmann, Daniel; Khorashad, Larousse Khosravi; Besteiro, Lucas V.; Govorov, Alexander O.; Wiederrecht, Gary P.

    2015-08-03

    The interaction of light and matter in metallic nanosystems is mediated by the collective oscillation of surface electrons, called plasmons. After excitation, plasmons are absorbed by the metal electrons through inter- and intraband transitions, creating a highly non-thermal distribution of electrons. The electron population then decays through electron-electron interactions, creating a hot electron distribution within a few hundred femtoseconds, followed by a further relaxation via electron-phonon scattering on the timescale of a few pico-seconds. In the spectral domain, hot plasmonic electrons induce changes to the plasmonic resonance of the nanostructure by modifying the dielectric constant of the metal. Here, we report on the observation of anomalously strong changes to the ultrafast temporal and spectral responses of these excited hot plasmonic electrons in hybrid metal/oxide nanostructures as a result of varying the geometry and composition of the nanostructure and the excitation wavelength. In particular, we show a large ultrafast, pulsewidth-limited contribution to the excited electron decay signal in hybrid nanostructures containing hot spots. The intensity of this contribution correlates with the efficiency of the generation of highly excited surface electrons. Using theoretical models, we attribute this effect to the generation of hot plasmonic electrons from hot spots. Finally, we then develop general principles to enhance the generation of energetic electrons through specifically designed plasmonic nanostructures that could be used in applications where hot electron generation is beneficial, such as in solar photocatalysis, photodetectors and nonlinear devices.

  7. Structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of 4d transition metal nitrides TMN (TM=Ru, Rh, Pd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.; Priyanga, G. Sudha; Kavitha, M.; Puvaneswari, S.; Iyakutti, K.

    2014-07-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the structural stability, electronic, structural and mechanical properties of 4d transition metal nitrides TMN (TM=Ru, Rh, Pd) for five different crystal structures, namely NaCl, CsCl, zinc blende, NiAs and wurtzite. Among the considered structures, zinc blende structure is found to be the most stable one among all three nitrides at normal pressure. A structural phase transition from ZB to NiAs phase is predicted at a pressure of 104 GPa, 50.5 GPa and 56 GPa for RuN, RhN and PdN respectively. The electronic structure reveals that these nitrides are metallic. The calculated elastic constants indicate that these nitrides are mechanically stable at ambient condition.

  8. Ultrafast Studies on Electron Transfer in the Betaines: Evidence for Local Heating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-18

    should limit the rate. 12-14 In inverted regime reactions, intrarnolecular vibrational modes can a&elerate the reaction by reducing the effective...is the reverse ET or ground state recovery. This electron transfer occurs in the inverted regime. Therefore, we expect that intramolecular vibrational ... modes will be important in ET dynamics. We have used ultrafast pump probe spectroscopy to investigate the ET kinetics of the lowest electronic

  9. Hot-Electron-Induced Ultrafast Demagnetization in Co/Pt Multilayers.

    PubMed

    Bergeard, N; Hehn, M; Mangin, S; Lengaigne, G; Montaigne, F; Lalieu, M L M; Koopmans, B; Malinowski, G

    2016-09-30

    Using specially engineered structures to tailor the optical absorption in a metallic multilayer, we analyze the magnetization dynamics of a Co/Pt multilayer buried below a thick Cu layer. We demonstrate that hot electrons alone can very efficiently induce ultrafast demagnetization. Simulations based on hot electron ballistic transport implemented within a microscopic model that accounts for local dissipation of angular momentum nicely reproduce the experimental results, ruling out contribution of pure thermal transport.

  10. Discrete Chromatic Aberrations Arising from Photoinduced Electron-Photon Interactions in Ultrafast Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Plemmons, Dayne A; Flannigan, David J

    2016-05-26

    In femtosecond ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) experiments, the initial excitation period is composed of spatiotemporal overlap of the temporally commensurate pump photon pulse and probe photoelectron packet. Generation of evanescent near-fields at the nanostructure specimens produces a dispersion relation that enables coupling of the photons (ℏω = 2.4 eV, for example) and freely propagating electrons (200 keV, for example) in the near-field. Typically, this manifests as discrete peaks occurring at integer multiples (n) of the photon energy in the low-loss/gain region of electron-energy spectra (i.e., at 200 keV ± nℏω eV). Here, we examine the UEM imaging resolution implications of the strong inelastic near-field interactions between the photons employed in optical excitation and the probe photoelectrons. We find that the additional photoinduced energy dispersion occurring when swift electrons pass through intense evanescent near-fields results in a discrete chromatic aberration that limits the spatial resolving power to several angstroms during the excitation period.

  11. Direct observation of ultrafast many-body electron dynamics in an ultracold Rydberg gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Sommer, Christian; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido; Goto, Haruka; Koyasu, Kuniaki; Chiba, Hisashi; Weidemüller, Matthias; Ohmori, Kenji

    2016-11-01

    Many-body correlations govern a variety of important quantum phenomena such as the emergence of superconductivity and magnetism. Understanding quantum many-body systems is thus one of the central goals of modern sciences. Here we demonstrate an experimental approach towards this goal by utilizing an ultracold Rydberg gas generated with a broadband picosecond laser pulse. We follow the ultrafast evolution of its electronic coherence by time-domain Ramsey interferometry with attosecond precision. The observed electronic coherence shows an ultrafast oscillation with a period of 1 femtosecond, whose phase shift on the attosecond timescale is consistent with many-body correlations among Rydberg atoms beyond mean-field approximations. This coherent and ultrafast many-body dynamics is actively controlled by tuning the orbital size and population of the Rydberg state, as well as the mean atomic distance. Our approach will offer a versatile platform to observe and manipulate non-equilibrium dynamics of quantum many-body systems on the ultrafast timescale.

  12. Direct observation of ultrafast many-body electron dynamics in an ultracold Rydberg gas.

    PubMed

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Sommer, Christian; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido; Goto, Haruka; Koyasu, Kuniaki; Chiba, Hisashi; Weidemüller, Matthias; Ohmori, Kenji

    2016-11-16

    Many-body correlations govern a variety of important quantum phenomena such as the emergence of superconductivity and magnetism. Understanding quantum many-body systems is thus one of the central goals of modern sciences. Here we demonstrate an experimental approach towards this goal by utilizing an ultracold Rydberg gas generated with a broadband picosecond laser pulse. We follow the ultrafast evolution of its electronic coherence by time-domain Ramsey interferometry with attosecond precision. The observed electronic coherence shows an ultrafast oscillation with a period of 1 femtosecond, whose phase shift on the attosecond timescale is consistent with many-body correlations among Rydberg atoms beyond mean-field approximations. This coherent and ultrafast many-body dynamics is actively controlled by tuning the orbital size and population of the Rydberg state, as well as the mean atomic distance. Our approach will offer a versatile platform to observe and manipulate non-equilibrium dynamics of quantum many-body systems on the ultrafast timescale.

  13. Direct observation of ultrafast many-body electron dynamics in an ultracold Rydberg gas

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Sommer, Christian; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido; Goto, Haruka; Koyasu, Kuniaki; Chiba, Hisashi; Weidemüller, Matthias; Ohmori, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Many-body correlations govern a variety of important quantum phenomena such as the emergence of superconductivity and magnetism. Understanding quantum many-body systems is thus one of the central goals of modern sciences. Here we demonstrate an experimental approach towards this goal by utilizing an ultracold Rydberg gas generated with a broadband picosecond laser pulse. We follow the ultrafast evolution of its electronic coherence by time-domain Ramsey interferometry with attosecond precision. The observed electronic coherence shows an ultrafast oscillation with a period of 1 femtosecond, whose phase shift on the attosecond timescale is consistent with many-body correlations among Rydberg atoms beyond mean-field approximations. This coherent and ultrafast many-body dynamics is actively controlled by tuning the orbital size and population of the Rydberg state, as well as the mean atomic distance. Our approach will offer a versatile platform to observe and manipulate non-equilibrium dynamics of quantum many-body systems on the ultrafast timescale. PMID:27849054

  14. Ultrafast structural dynamics of boron nitride nanotubes studied using transmitted electrons.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongwen; Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Zi-An; Zhang, Ming; Cao, Gaolong; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2017-08-31

    We investigate the ultrafast structural dynamics of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) upon femtosecond optical excitation using ultrafast electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. Analysis of the time-resolved (100) and (002) diffraction profiles reveals highly anisotropic lattice dynamics of BNNTs, which can be attributed to the distinct nature of the chemical bonds in the tubular structure. Moreover, the changes in (002) diffraction positions and intensities suggest that the lattice response of BNNTs to the femtosecond laser excitation involves a fast and a slow lattice dynamic process. The fast process with a time constant of about 8 picoseconds can be understood to be a result of electron-phonon coupling, while the slow process with a time constant of about 100 to 300 picoseconds depending on pump laser fluence is tentatively associated with an Auger recombination effect. In addition, we discuss the power-law relationship of a three-photon absorption process in the BNNT nanoscale system.

  15. Coulomb interaction-induced jitter amplification in RF-compressed high-brightness electron source ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yingpeng; Pei, Minjie; Qi, Dalong; Li, Jing; Yang, Yan; Jia, Tianqing; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong

    2017-02-01

    We have theoretically and experimentally demonstrated an RF compression-based jitter-amplification effect in high-brightness electron source ultrafast electron diffraction (UED), which degrades the temporal resolution significantly. A detailed analysis and simulations reveal the crucial role of the longitudinal and transverse Coulomb interaction for this jitter-amplification effect, which accord very well with experimental results. An optimized compact UED structure for full compression has been proposed, which can suppress the jitter by half and improve the temporal resolution to sub-100 fs. This Coulomb interaction-induced jitter amplification exists in nearly the whole ultrafast physics field where laser-electron synchronization is required. Moreover, it cannot be suppressed completely. The quantified explanation for the mechanism and optimization provides important guidance for photocathode accelerators and other compression-based ultrashort electron pulse generation and precise control.

  16. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  17. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E.; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-01

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven `quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  18. Ultrafast Electrons and X-rays as Probe of Biomolecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Ganesh

    The structure-function relation in Biology suggests that every biological molecule has evolved its structure to carry out a specific function. However, for many of these processes (such as those with catalytic activity) the structure of the biomolecule changes during the course of a reaction. Understanding the structure-function relation thus becomes a question of understanding biomolecular dynamics that span a variety of timescales (from electronic rearrangements in the femtoseconds to side-chain alteration in the microseconds and more). This dissertation deals with the study of biomolecular dynamics in the ultrafast timescales (fs-ns) using electron and X-ray probes in both time and frequency domains. It starts with establishing the limitations of traditional electron diffraction coupled with molecular replacement to study biomolecular structure and proceeds to suggest a pulsed electron source Hollow-Cone Transmission Electron Microscope as an alternative scheme to pursue ultrafast biomolecular imaging. In frequency domain, the use of Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy as a tool to access ultrafast nuclear dynamics in the steady state, is detailed with the new monochromated NiON UltraSTEM and examples demonstrating this instrument's capability are provided. Ultrafast X-ray spectroscopy as a tool to elucidate biomolecular dynamics is presented in studying X-ray as a probe, with the study of the photolysis of Methylcobalamin using time-resolved laser pump--X-ray probe absorption spectroscopy. The analysis in comparison to prior literature as well as DFT based XAS simulations offer good agreement and understanding to the steady state spectra but are so far inadequate in explaining the time-resolved data. However, the trends in the absorption simulations for the transient intermediates show a strong anisotropic dependence on the axial ligation, which would define the direction for future studies on this material to achieve a solution.

  19. Bulk-sensitive Mo 4d electronic structure of Sr2FeMoO6 probed by high-energy Mo L3 resonant photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, H. P.; Prado, F.; Caneiro, A.; Vicentin, F. C.; Mossanek, R. J. O.; Abbate, M.

    2017-05-01

    We studied the Mo 4d electronic structure of Sr2FeMoO6 using high-energy Mo L 3 resonant photoemission. The experimental spectra are in good agreement with modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) band structure calculations. The energy dependence of the spectra can be explained by the changes in the photoemission cross-sections. The Mo L 3 resonant spectrum shows Mo 4d character below the Fermi level and mixed Mo 4d-O 2p character around 8.0 eV. The Mo 4d weight in the resonant spectrum is in good agreement with the calculated interference between the direct and decay terms. The high photon energy used in this study (about 2520 eV) provides a bulk-sensitive determination of the Mo 4d electronic structure.

  20. Ultrafast excited state relaxation dynamics of electron deficient porphyrins: Conformational and electronic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okhrimenko, Albert N.

    Metallo-tetrapyrroles (MTP) are highly stable macrocyclic pi-systems that display interesting properties that make them potential candidates for various applications. Among these applications are optoelectronics, magnetic materials, photoconductive materials, non-linear optical materials and photo tumor therapeutic drugs. These applications are generally related to their high stability and efficient light absorption ability in the visible and near-infrared region of the optical spectrum. Metallo porphyrins are well known and widely studied representatives of metallotetrapyrroles. Electron deficient substituents in the meso positions are well known to greatly influence the interaction between the metal d-orbitals and the nitrogen orbitals of the tetrapyrrole macrocycle. In this work, a series of electron deficient porphyrins has been studied to gain some knowledge about the change in the excited state dynamics with structural and electronic modifications. Among these porphyrins is nickel and iron modified species bearing perfluoro-, perprotio-, p-nitrophenyl- and perfluorophenyl-meso substituents. Ultrafast transient absorption spectrometry has been used as the main research instrument along with other spectroscopic and electrochemical methods. A new technique has been employed to study the photophysical properties of zinc (II) tetraphenylporphine cation radical. It employs a combination of controlled potential coulometry and femtosecond absorption spectrometry. The fast transient lifetime of 17 ps of the pi-cation species originates in very efficient mixing of the a2u HOMO cation orbital that places electronic density mainly on pyrrolic nitrogens and metal d-orbitals. That explains the lack of any emission of the cationic species. This non-radiative decay process might elucidate the processes taking place in photosynthetic systems when electron is removed from porphyrinic moiety and the hole is produced. In this work zinc(II) meso-tetraphenylporphine radial cation

  1. Generalized GW+Boltzmann Approach for the Description of Ultrafast Electron Dynamics in Topological Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Battiato, Marco; Sánchez-Barriga, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Quantum-phase transitions between trivial insulators and topological insulators differ from ordinary metal-insulator transitions in that they arise from the inversion of the bulk band structure due to strong spin–orbit coupling. Such topological phase transitions are unique in nature as they lead to the emergence of topological surface states which are characterized by a peculiar spin texture that is believed to play a central role in the generation and manipulation of dissipationless surface spin currents on ultrafast timescales. Here, we provide a generalized GW+Boltzmann approach for the description of ultrafast dynamics in topological insulators driven by electron–electron and electron–phonon scatterings. Taking the prototypical insulator Bi2Te3 as an example, we test the robustness of our approach by comparing the theoretical prediction to results of time- and angle-resolved photoemission experiments. From this comparison, we are able to demonstrate the crucial role of the excited spin texture in the subpicosecond relaxation of transient electrons, as well as to accurately obtain the magnitude and strength of electron–electron and electron–phonon couplings. Our approach could be used as a generalized theory for three-dimensional topological insulators in the bulk-conducting transport regime, paving the way for the realization of a unified theory of ultrafast dynamics in topological materials. PMID:28773171

  2. Electron dynamics at GaAs-AlGaAs heterojunction studied by ultrafast spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontyev, A. V.; Ivanin, K. V.; Mitrofanova, T. G.; Lobkov, V. S.; Samartsev, V. V.

    2013-12-01

    In this letter the electron and spin dynamics at GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction was studied by ultrafast spectroscopy techniques (photon echo and transient grating studies). Relaxation times and diffusion coefficients of photoexcited electrons and spins were obtained using pure optical setup. The estimated spin diffusion coefficient value of 160 cm2/s is relatively high and comparable to the electron diffusion coefficient of 200 cm2/s. This feature makes GaAs/AlGaAs heterosructure a promising material for practical application in semiconductor spintronics.

  3. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Faure, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  4. Real-Space Imaging of Carrier Dynamics of Materials Surfaces by Second-Generation Four-Dimensional Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingya; Melnikov, Vasily A; Khan, Jafar I; Mohammed, Omar F

    2015-10-01

    In the fields of photocatalysis and photovoltaics, ultrafast dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination on material surfaces, are among the key factors that determine the overall energy conversion efficiency. A precise knowledge of these dynamical events on the nanometer (nm) and femtosecond (fs) scales was not accessible until recently. The only way to access such fundamental processes fully is to map the surface dynamics selectively in real space and time. In this study, we establish a second generation of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) and demonstrate the ability to record time-resolved images (snapshots) of material surfaces with 650 fs and ∼5 nm temporal and spatial resolutions, respectively. In this method, the surface of a specimen is excited by a clocking optical pulse and imaged using a pulsed primary electron beam as a probe pulse, generating secondary electrons (SEs), which are emitted from the surface of the specimen in a manner that is sensitive to the local electron/hole density. This method provides direct and controllable information regarding surface dynamics. We clearly demonstrate how the surface morphology, grains, defects, and nanostructured features can significantly impact the overall dynamical processes on the surface of photoactive-materials. In addition, the ability to access two regimes of dynamical probing in a single experiment and the energy loss of SEs in semiconductor-nanoscale materials will also be discussed.

  5. Ultrafast Carrier Dynamics and Hot Electron Extraction in Tetrapod-Shaped CdSe Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Jing, Pengtao; Ji, Wenyu; Yuan, Xi; Qu, Songnan; Xie, Renguo; Ikezawa, Michio; Zhao, Jialong; Li, Haibo; Masumoto, Yasuaki

    2015-04-22

    The ultrafast carrier dynamics and hot electron extraction in tetrapod-shaped CdSe nanocrystals was studied by femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. The carriers relaxation process from the higher electronic states (CB2, CB3(2), and CB4) to the lowest electronic state (CB1) was demonstrated to have a time constant of 1.04 ps, resulting from the spatial electron transfer from arms to a core. The lowest electronic state in the central core exhibited a long decay time of 5.07 ns in agreement with the reported theoretical calculation. The state filling mechanism and Coulomb blockade effect in the CdSe tetrapod were clearly observed in the pump-fluence-dependent transient absorption spectra. Hot electrons were transferred from arm states into the electron acceptor molecules before relaxation into core states.

  6. Non-thermal hot electrons ultrafastly generating hot optical phonons in graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Y.; Togashi, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Tanaka, M.; Taniuchi, T.; Kiss, T.; Nakajima, M.; Suemoto, T.; Shin, S.

    2011-08-01

    Investigation of the non-equilibrium dynamics after an impulsive impact provides insights into couplings among various excitations. A two-temperature model (TTM) is often a starting point to understand the coupled dynamics of electrons and lattice vibrations: the optical pulse primarily raises the electronic temperature Tel while leaving the lattice temperature Tl low; subsequently the hot electrons heat up the lattice until Tel = Tl is reached. This temporal hierarchy owes to the assumption that the electron-electron scattering rate is much larger than the electron-phonon scattering rate. We report herein that the TTM scheme is seriously invalidated in semimetal graphite. Time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TrPES) of graphite reveals that fingerprints of coupled optical phonons (COPs) occur from the initial moments where Tel is still not definable. Our study shows that ultrafast-and-efficient phonon generations occur beyond the TTM scheme, presumably associated to the long duration of the non-thermal electrons in graphite.

  7. Characterization of fast photoelectron packets in weak and strong laser fields in ultrafast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Plemmons, Dayne A; Tae Park, Sang; Zewail, Ahmed H; Flannigan, David J

    2014-11-01

    The development of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) and variants thereof (e.g., photon-induced near-field electron microscopy, PINEM) has made it possible to image atomic-scale dynamics on the femtosecond timescale. Accessing the femtosecond regime with UEM currently relies on the generation of photoelectrons with an ultrafast laser pulse and operation in a stroboscopic pump-probe fashion. With this approach, temporal resolution is limited mainly by the durations of the pump laser pulse and probe electron packet. The ability to accurately determine the duration of the electron packets, and thus the instrument response function, is critically important for interpretation of dynamics occurring near the temporal resolution limit, in addition to quantifying the effects of the imaging mode. Here, we describe a technique for in situ characterization of ultrashort electron packets that makes use of coupling with photons in the evanescent near-field of the specimen. We show that within the weakly-interacting (i.e., low laser fluence) regime, the zero-loss peak temporal cross-section is precisely the convolution of electron packet and photon pulse profiles. Beyond this regime, we outline the effects of non-linear processes and show that temporal cross-sections of high-order peaks explicitly reveal the electron packet profile, while use of the zero-loss peak becomes increasingly unreliable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Direct and simultaneous observation of ultrafast electron and hole dynamics in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zürch, Michael; Chang, Hung-Tzu; Borja, Lauren J.; Kraus, Peter M.; Cushing, Scott K.; Gandman, Andrey; Kaplan, Christopher J.; Oh, Myoung Hwan; Prell, James S.; Prendergast, David; Pemmaraju, Chaitanya D.; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding excited carrier dynamics in semiconductors is crucial for the development of photovoltaics and efficient photonic devices. However, overlapping spectral features in optical pump-probe spectroscopy often render assignments of separate electron and hole carrier dynamics ambiguous. Here, ultrafast electron and hole dynamics in germanium nanocrystalline thin films are directly and simultaneously observed by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy in the extreme ultraviolet at the germanium M4,5 edge. We decompose the spectra into contributions of electronic state blocking and photo-induced band shifts at a carrier density of 8 × 1020 cm-3. Separate electron and hole relaxation times are observed as a function of hot carrier energies. A first-order electron and hole decay of ~1 ps suggests a Shockley-Read-Hall recombination mechanism. The simultaneous observation of electrons and holes with extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy paves the way for investigating few- to sub-femtosecond dynamics of both holes and electrons in complex semiconductor materials and across junctions.

  9. Direct and simultaneous observation of ultrafast electron and hole dynamics in germanium

    DOE PAGES

    Zurch, Michael; Chang, Hung -Tzu; Borja, Lauren J.; ...

    2017-06-01

    Understanding excited carrier dynamics in semiconductors is crucial for the development of photovoltaics and efficient photonic devices. However, overlapping spectral features in optical pump-probe spectroscopy often render assignments of separate electron and hole carrier dynamics ambiguous. Here, ultrafast electron and hole dynamics in germanium nanocrystalline thin films are directly and simultaneously observed by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy in the extreme ultraviolet at the germanium M4,5 edge. We decompose the spectra into contributions of electronic state blocking and photo-induced band shifts at a carrier density of 8 × 1020 cm–3. Separate electron and hole relaxation times are observed as a functionmore » of hot carrier energies. A first-order electron and hole decay of ~1 ps suggests a Shockley–Read–Hall recombination mechanism. Furthermore, the simultaneous observation of electrons and holes with extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy paves the way for investigating few- to sub-femtosecond dynamics of both holes and electrons in complex semiconductor materials and across junctions.« less

  10. Electron acceleration and kinetic energy tailoring via ultrafast terahertz fields.

    PubMed

    Greig, S R; Elezzabi, A Y

    2014-11-17

    We propose a mechanism for tuning the kinetic energy of surface plasmon generated electron pulses through control of the time delay between a pair of externally applied terahertz pulses. Varying the time delay results in translation, compression, and broadening of the kinetic energy spectrum of the generated electron pulse. We also observe that the electrons' kinetic energy dependence on the carrier envelope phase of the surface plasmon is preserved under the influence of a terahertz electric field.

  11. Electron-Ion Equilibration in Ultrafast Heated Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, T. G.; Hartley, N. J.; Borm, B.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Harris, J. W. O.; Hochhaus, D. C.; Kaempfer, T.; Li, K.; Neumayer, P.; Pattison, L. K.; Pfeifer, F.; Richardson, S.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Uschmann, I.; Gregori, G.

    2014-04-01

    We have employed fast electrons produced by intense laser illumination to isochorically heat thermal electrons in solid density carbon to temperatures of ˜10 000 K. Using time-resolved x-ray diffraction, the temperature evolution of the lattice ions is obtained through the Debye-Waller effect, and this directly relates to the electron-ion equilibration rate. This is shown to be considerably lower than predicted from ideal plasma models. We attribute this to strong ion coupling screening the electron-ion interaction.

  12. Ultrafast imprinting of topologically protected magnetic textures via pulsed electrons

    DOE PAGES

    Schaffer, A. F.; Durr, H. A.; Berakdar, J.

    2017-07-17

    Short electron pulses are demonstrated to trigger and control magnetic excitations, even at low electron current densities. We show that the tangential magnetic field surrounding a picosecond electron pulse can imprint topologically protected magnetic textures such as skyrmions in a sample with a residual Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya spin-orbital coupling. Characteristics of the created excitations such as the topological charge can be steered via the duration and the strength of the electron pulses. Here, the study points to a possible way for a spatiotemporally controlled generation of skyrmionic excitations.

  13. Ultrafast imprinting of topologically protected magnetic textures via pulsed electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, A. F.; Dürr, H. A.; Berakdar, J.

    2017-07-01

    Short electron pulses are demonstrated to trigger and control magnetic excitations, even at low electron current densities. We show that the tangential magnetic field surrounding a picosecond electron pulse can imprint topologically protected magnetic textures such as skyrmions in a sample with a residual Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya spin-orbital coupling. Characteristics of the created excitations such as the topological charge can be steered via the duration and the strength of the electron pulses. The study points to a possible way for a spatiotemporally controlled generation of skyrmionic excitations.

  14. Bunch evolution study in optimization of MeV ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xian-Hai; Du, Ying-Chao; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2014-12-01

    Megaelectronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising detection tool for ultrafast processes. The quality of diffraction image is determined by the transverse evolution of the probe bunch. In this paper, we study the contributing terms of the emittance and space charge effects to the bunch evolution in the MeV UED scheme, employing a mean-field model with an ellipsoidal distribution as well as particle tracking simulation. The small transverse dimension of the drive laser is found to be critical to improve the reciprocal resolution, exploiting both smaller emittance and larger transverse bunch size before the solenoid. The degradation of the reciprocal spatial resolution caused by the space charge effects should be carefully controlled.

  15. Ultrafast studies of electron dynamics at metal-dielectric interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Nien-Hui

    1998-10-01

    Femtosecond time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy has been used to study fundamental aspects of excited electron dynamics at metal-dielectric interfaces, including layer-by-layer evolution of electronic structure and two-dimensional electron localization. On bare Ag(111), the lifetimes of image states are dominated by their position with respect to the projected bulk band structure. The n = 2 state has a shorter lifetime than the n = 1 state due to degeneracy with the bulk conduction band. As the parallel momentum of the n = 1 image electron increases, the lifetime decreases. With decreasing temperatures, the n = 1 image electrons, with zero or nonzero parallel momentum, all become longer lived. Adsorption of one to three layers of n-heptane results in an approximately exponential increase in lifetime as a function of layer thickness. This results from the formation of a tunneling barrier through which the interfacial electrons must decay, consistent with the repulsive bulk electron affinity of n-alkanes. The lifetimes of the higher quantum states indicate that the presence of the monolayer significantly reduces coupling of the image states to the bulk band structure. These results are compared with predictions of a dielectric continuum model. The study of electron lateral motion shows that optical excitation creates interfacial electrons in quasifree states for motion parallel to the n-heptane/Ag(111) interface. These initially delocalized electrons decay into a localized state within a few hundred femtoseconds. The localized electrons then decay back to the metal by tunneling through the adlayer potential barrier. The localization time depends strongly on the electron's initial parallel momentum and exhibits a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence. The experimental findings are consistent with a 2-D self-trapping process in which electrons become localized by interacting with the topmost plane of the alkane layer. The energy dependence of

  16. Ultrafast spatiotemporal relaxation dynamics of excited electrons in a metal nanostructure detected by femtosecond-SNOM.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Yue, Song; Chen, Jianjun; Gong, Qihuang

    2010-06-21

    Ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved pump-probe signal near a gold nano-slit is detected by femtosecond-SNOM. By employing two-color pump-probe configuration and probing at the interband transition wavelength of the gold, signal contributed by surface plasmon polariton is avoided and spatiotemporal evolvement of excited electrons is successfully observed. From the contrast decaying of the periodical distribution of the pump-probe signal, ultrafast diffusion of excited electrons with a time scale of a few hundred femtoseconds is clearly identified. For comparison, such phenomenon cannot be observed by the one-color pump-probe configuration.

  17. Ultrafast core-loss spectroscopy in four-dimensional electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    van der Veen, Renske M.; Penfold, Thomas J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate ultrafast core-electron energy-loss spectroscopy in four-dimensional electron microscopy as an element-specific probe of nanoscale dynamics. We apply it to the study of photoexcited graphite with femtosecond and nanosecond resolutions. The transient core-loss spectra, in combination with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, reveal the elongation of the carbon-carbon bonds, even though the overall behavior is a contraction of the crystal lattice. A prompt energy-gap shrinkage is observed on the picosecond time scale, which is caused by local bond length elongation and the direct renormalization of band energies due to temperature-dependent electron–phonon interactions. PMID:26798793

  18. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, T.; Trigo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Li, R.; Vecchione, T.; Shen, X.; Weathersby, S.; Coffee, R.; Hartmann, N.; Reis, D. A.; Wang, X. J.; Dürr, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement.

  19. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, T.; Trigo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Dürr, H. A.; Li, R.; Vecchione, T.; Shen, X.; Weathersby, S.; Coffee, R.; Hartmann, N.; Wang, X. J.; Reis, D. A.

    2016-01-25

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement.

  20. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, T.; Trigo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Li, R.; Vecchione, T.; Shen, X.; Weathersby, S.; Coffee, R.; Hartmann, N.; Reis, D. A.; Wang, X. J.; Dürr, H. A.

    2016-01-25

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement.

  1. Ultrafast electron diffraction optimized for studying structural dynamics in thin films and monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Badali, D. S.; Gengler, R. Y. N.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2016-01-01

    A compact electron source specifically designed for time-resolved diffraction studies of free-standing thin films and monolayers is presented here. The sensitivity to thin samples is achieved by extending the established technique of ultrafast electron diffraction to the “medium” energy regime (1–10 kV). An extremely compact design, in combination with low bunch charges, allows for high quality diffraction in a lensless geometry. The measured and simulated characteristics of the experimental system reveal sub-picosecond temporal resolution, while demonstrating the ability to produce high quality diffraction patterns from atomically thin samples. PMID:27226978

  2. Ultrafast dynamics in solids probed by femtosecond time-resolved broadband electronic sum frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, Laura; Wolf, Martin; Stähler, Julia

    2016-11-01

    Time-resolved sum frequency generation is an established tool to investigate the ultrafast vibrational dynamics with surface and interface specificity, which can be extended to the regime of electronic transitions using a white light continuum as demonstrated previously by studies of liquid interfaces. We expand this technique to the investigation of solid single crystal samples. In particular, we demonstrate the potential of electronic sum frequency generation by probing the non-equilibrium dynamics at excitonic resonances in ZnO with a sensitivity as small as 0.6% and with a time resolution of 160 fs.

  3. Coherently driven, ultrafast electron-phonon dynamics in transport junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, Joshua E.; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-07-28

    Although the vast majority of studies of transport via molecular-scale heterojunctions have been conducted in the (static) energy domain, experiments are currently beginning to apply time domain approaches to the nanoscale transport problem, combining spatial with temporal resolution. It is thus an opportune time for theory to develop models to explore both new phenomena in, and new potential applications of, time-domain, coherently driven molecular electronics. In this work, we study the interaction of a molecular phonon with an electronic wavepacket transmitted via a conductance junction within a time-domain model that treats the electron and phonon on equal footing and spans the weak to strong electron-phonon coupling strengths. We explore interference between two coherent energy pathways in the electronic subspace, thus complementing previous studies of coherent phenomena in conduction junctions, where the stationary framework was used to study interference between spatial pathways. Our model provides new insights into phase decoherence and population relaxation within the electronic subspace, which have been conventionally treated by density matrix approaches that often rely on phenomenological parameters. Although the specific case of a transport junction is explored, our results are general, applying also to other instances of coupled electron-phonon systems.

  4. Multiobjective optimizations of a novel cryocooled dc gun based ultrafast electron diffraction beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bartnik, Adam; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line utilizing a 225 kV dc gun with a novel cryocooled photocathode system and buncher cavity. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final rms bunch length at the sample location have been performed for three different sample radii: 50, 100, and 200 μ m , for two final bunch charges: 1 05 electrons (16 fC) and 1 06 electrons (160 fC). Example optimal solutions are analyzed, and the effects of disordered induced heating estimated. In particular, a relative coherence length of Lc ,x/σx=0.27 nm /μ m was obtained for a final bunch charge of 1 05 electrons and final bunch length of σt≈100 fs . For a final charge of 1 06 electrons the cryogun produces Lc ,x/σx≈0.1 nm /μ m for σt≈100 - 200 fs and σx≥50 μ m . These results demonstrate the viability of using genetic algorithms in the design and operation of ultrafast electron diffraction beam lines.

  5. Direct observation of martensitic phase-transformation dynamics in iron by 4D single-pulse electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Soon; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Baskin, J Spencer; Barwick, Brett; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2009-11-01

    The in situ martensitic phase transformation of iron, a complex solid-state transition involving collective atomic displacement and interface movement, is studied in real time by means of four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy. The iron nanofilm specimen is heated at a maximum rate of approximately 10(11) K/s by a single heating pulse, and the evolution of the phase transformation from body-centered cubic to face-centered cubic crystal structure is followed by means of single-pulse, selected-area diffraction and real-space imaging. Two distinct components are revealed in the evolution of the crystal structure. The first, on the nanosecond time scale, is a direct martensitic transformation, which proceeds in regions heated into the temperature range of stability of the fcc phase, 1185-1667 K. The second, on the microsecond time scale, represents an indirect process for the hottest central zone of laser heating, where the temperature is initially above 1667 K and cooling is the rate-determining step. The mechanism of the direct transformation involves two steps, that of (barrier-crossing) nucleation on the reported nanosecond time scale, followed by a rapid grain growth typically in approximately 100 ps for 10 nm crystallites.

  6. Electronic structure of warm dense copper studied by ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cho, B I; Engelhorn, K; Correa, A A; Ogitsu, T; Weber, C P; Lee, H J; Feng, J; Ni, P A; Ping, Y; Nelson, A J; Prendergast, D; Lee, R W; Falcone, R W; Heimann, P A

    2011-04-22

    We use time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy to investigate the unoccupied electronic density of states of warm dense copper that is produced isochorically through the absorption of an ultrafast optical pulse. The temperature of the superheated electron-hole plasma, which ranges from 4000 to 10 000 K, was determined by comparing the measured x-ray absorption spectrum with a simulation. The electronic structure of warm dense copper is adequately described with the high temperature electronic density of state calculated by the density functional theory. The dynamics of the electron temperature is consistent with a two-temperature model, while a temperature-dependent electron-phonon coupling parameter is necessary.

  7. Influence of cathode geometry on electron dynamics in an ultrafast electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shaozheng; Piazza, Luca; Cao, Gaolong; Park, Sang Tae; Reed, Bryan W; Masiel, Daniel J; Weissenrieder, Jonas

    2017-09-01

    Efforts to understand matter at ever-increasing spatial and temporal resolutions have led to the development of instruments such as the ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UEM) that can capture transient processes with combined nanometer and picosecond resolutions. However, analysis by UEM is often associated with extended acquisition times, mainly due to the limitations of the electron gun. Improvements are hampered by tradeoffs in realizing combinations of the conflicting objectives for source size, emittance, and energy and temporal dispersion. Fundamentally, the performance of the gun is a function of the cathode material, the gun and cathode geometry, and the local fields. Especially shank emission from a truncated tip cathode results in severe broadening effects and therefore such electrons must be filtered by applying a Wehnelt bias. Here we study the influence of the cathode geometry and the Wehnelt bias on the performance of a photoelectron gun in a thermionic configuration. We combine experimental analysis with finite element simulations tracing the paths of individual photoelectrons in the relevant 3D geometry. Specifically, we compare the performance of guard ring cathodes with no shank emission to conventional truncated tip geometries. We find that a guard ring cathode allows operation at minimum Wehnelt bias and improve the temporal resolution under realistic operation conditions in an UEM. At low bias, the Wehnelt exhibits stronger focus for guard ring than truncated tip cathodes. The increase in temporal spread with bias is mainly a result from a decrease in the accelerating field near the cathode surface. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the temporal dispersion is also influenced by the intrinsic angular distribution in the photoemission process and the initial energy spread. However, a smaller emission spot on the cathode is not a dominant driver for enhancing time resolution. Space charge induced temporal broadening shows a close to

  8. Influence of cathode geometry on electron dynamics in an ultrafast electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Shaozheng; Piazza, Luca; Cao, Gaolong; Park, Sang Tae; Reed, Bryan W.; Masiel, Daniel J.; Weissenrieder, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Efforts to understand matter at ever-increasing spatial and temporal resolutions have led to the development of instruments such as the ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UEM) that can capture transient processes with combined nanometer and picosecond resolutions. However, analysis by UEM is often associated with extended acquisition times, mainly due to the limitations of the electron gun. Improvements are hampered by tradeoffs in realizing combinations of the conflicting objectives for source size, emittance, and energy and temporal dispersion. Fundamentally, the performance of the gun is a function of the cathode material, the gun and cathode geometry, and the local fields. Especially shank emission from a truncated tip cathode results in severe broadening effects and therefore such electrons must be filtered by applying a Wehnelt bias. Here we study the influence of the cathode geometry and the Wehnelt bias on the performance of a photoelectron gun in a thermionic configuration. We combine experimental analysis with finite element simulations tracing the paths of individual photoelectrons in the relevant 3D geometry. Specifically, we compare the performance of guard ring cathodes with no shank emission to conventional truncated tip geometries. We find that a guard ring cathode allows operation at minimum Wehnelt bias and improve the temporal resolution under realistic operation conditions in an UEM. At low bias, the Wehnelt exhibits stronger focus for guard ring than truncated tip cathodes. The increase in temporal spread with bias is mainly a result from a decrease in the accelerating field near the cathode surface. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the temporal dispersion is also influenced by the intrinsic angular distribution in the photoemission process and the initial energy spread. However, a smaller emission spot on the cathode is not a dominant driver for enhancing time resolution. Space charge induced temporal broadening shows a close to

  9. 10-fs-level synchronization of photocathode laser with RF-oscillator for ultrafast electron and X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Heewon; Han, Byungheon; Shin, Junho; Hou, Dong; Chung, Hayun; Baek, In Hyung; Jeong, Young Uk; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafast electron-based coherent radiation sources, such as free-electron lasers (FELs), ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and Thomson-scattering sources, are becoming more important sources in today’s ultrafast science. Photocathode laser is an indispensable common subsystem in these sources that generates ultrafast electron pulses. To fully exploit the potentials of these sources, especially for pump-probe experiments, it is important to achieve high-precision synchronization between the photocathode laser and radio-frequency (RF) sources that manipulate electron pulses. So far, most of precision laser-RF synchronization has been achieved by using specially designed low-noise Er-fibre lasers at telecommunication wavelength. Here we show a modular method that achieves long-term (>1 day) stable 10-fs-level synchronization between a commercial 79.33-MHz Ti:sapphire laser oscillator and an S-band (2.856-GHz) RF oscillator. This is an important first step toward a photocathode laser-based femtosecond RF timing and synchronization system that is suitable for various small- to mid-scale ultrafast X-ray and electron sources.

  10. 10-fs-level synchronization of photocathode laser with RF-oscillator for ultrafast electron and X-ray sources

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Heewon; Han, Byungheon; Shin, Junho; Hou, Dong; Chung, Hayun; Baek, In Hyung; Jeong, Young Uk; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafast electron-based coherent radiation sources, such as free-electron lasers (FELs), ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and Thomson-scattering sources, are becoming more important sources in today’s ultrafast science. Photocathode laser is an indispensable common subsystem in these sources that generates ultrafast electron pulses. To fully exploit the potentials of these sources, especially for pump-probe experiments, it is important to achieve high-precision synchronization between the photocathode laser and radio-frequency (RF) sources that manipulate electron pulses. So far, most of precision laser-RF synchronization has been achieved by using specially designed low-noise Er-fibre lasers at telecommunication wavelength. Here we show a modular method that achieves long-term (>1 day) stable 10-fs-level synchronization between a commercial 79.33-MHz Ti:sapphire laser oscillator and an S-band (2.856-GHz) RF oscillator. This is an important first step toward a photocathode laser-based femtosecond RF timing and synchronization system that is suitable for various small- to mid-scale ultrafast X-ray and electron sources. PMID:28067288

  11. 10-fs-level synchronization of photocathode laser with RF-oscillator for ultrafast electron and X-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Yang, Heewon; Han, Byungheon; Shin, Junho; Hou, Dong; Chung, Hayun; Baek, In Hyung; Jeong, Young Uk; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-09

    Ultrafast electron-based coherent radiation sources, such as free-electron lasers (FELs), ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and Thomson-scattering sources, are becoming more important sources in today's ultrafast science. Photocathode laser is an indispensable common subsystem in these sources that generates ultrafast electron pulses. To fully exploit the potentials of these sources, especially for pump-probe experiments, it is important to achieve high-precision synchronization between the photocathode laser and radio-frequency (RF) sources that manipulate electron pulses. So far, most of precision laser-RF synchronization has been achieved by using specially designed low-noise Er-fibre lasers at telecommunication wavelength. Here we show a modular method that achieves long-term (>1 day) stable 10-fs-level synchronization between a commercial 79.33-MHz Ti:sapphire laser oscillator and an S-band (2.856-GHz) RF oscillator. This is an important first step toward a photocathode laser-based femtosecond RF timing and synchronization system that is suitable for various small- to mid-scale ultrafast X-ray and electron sources.

  12. Theoretical studies on the femtosecond real-time measurement of ultrafast electronic decay in polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, G.; Schneider, R.; Domcke, W.

    1989-06-01

    We present a computer simulation of the real-time detection of ultrafast electronic decay dynamics in polyatomic molecules with femtosecond laser pulses. The intramolecular non-Born-Oppenheimer quantum dynamics is treated numerically exactly for a two-state three-mode vibronic coupling model representing the conically intersecting S1 and S2 excited states of pyrazine. The pump-probe signal is evaluated in lowest order perturbation theory with respect to the radiation-matter interaction by numerical integration over the pump and probe pulses. We discuss in some detail the dependence of the pump-probe signal on the properties of the laser pulses (frequencies and pulse durations). The calculations predict a dramatic (˜12 000 cm-1) and ultrafast (˜20 fs) red shift of the stimulated-emission signal as well as distinctive quantum beats in the pump-probe signal as a function of the delay time. Both effects are very pronounced and should therefore be relatively easily detectable experimentally. They are expected to be generic features of ultrafast internal-conversion processes in polyatomic molecules.

  13. Probing ultrafast dynamics of 5f electrons in crystalline UO2

    SciTech Connect

    An, Yong Q; Taylor, Antoinette J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Rodriguez, George

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics of photoexcited carriers of Mott insulators attracts considerable attention in modern condensed matter physics. Cubic structured UO{sub 2} is a model system for understanding the physics of strongly correlated electrons in Mott insulators. Its 5f electrons may produce special electronic states and dynamics because of their complex nature. It shows an anti ferromagnetic transition at T{sub N} = 30.8 K. Several recent theoretical works have predicted the ground states and Mott characteristics of crystalline UO{sub 2}. It is believed that the band gap of UO{sub 2} is on the order of {approx} 2 eV and excitations across the gap are of the f-f character. We have performed ultrafast optical studies of carrier dynamics related to the Mott gap and its Hubbard bands with femtosecond pump-probe transient reflection measurements. From pump-probe reflectance measurements, we find the lifetimes of photoexcited 5f electrons in crystalline UO{sub 2}, {approx} 1.2 ns for midgap states and {approx} 2 {mu}s for upper Hubbard band states at low temperatures, and identify magnetic transitions.

  14. Ultrafast static and diffusion-controlled electron transfer at Ag29 nanocluster/molecular acceptor interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Shawkat M.; Abdulhalim, Lina G.; Besong, Tabot M. D.; Soldan, Giada; Bakr, Osman M.; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient absorption of visible light and a long-lived excited state lifetime of silver nanoclusters (Ag29 NCs) are integral properties for these new clusters to serve as light-harvesting materials. Upon optical excitation, electron injection at Ag29 NC/methyl viologen (MV2+) interfaces is very efficient and ultrafast. Interestingly, our femto- and nanosecond time-resolved results demonstrate clearly that both dynamic and static electron transfer mechanisms are involved in photoluminescence quenching of Ag29 NCs.Efficient absorption of visible light and a long-lived excited state lifetime of silver nanoclusters (Ag29 NCs) are integral properties for these new clusters to serve as light-harvesting materials. Upon optical excitation, electron injection at Ag29 NC/methyl viologen (MV2+) interfaces is very efficient and ultrafast. Interestingly, our femto- and nanosecond time-resolved results demonstrate clearly that both dynamic and static electron transfer mechanisms are involved in photoluminescence quenching of Ag29 NCs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05328e

  15. Photoinduced phase transitions in vanadium dioxide revealed by ultrafast electron diffraction and mid-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Kunal; Morrison, Vance; Chatelain, Robert; Hendaoui, Ali; Bruhacs, Andrew; Chaker, Mohamed; Siwick, Bradley

    2015-03-01

    The complex interplay between strong electron-electron correlations and structural distortions is thought to determine the electronic properties of many oxides, but the respective role of these two contributions is often difficult to determine. We report combined radio-frequency compressed ultrafast electron diffraction (RF-UED) and infrared transmissivity experiments in which we directly monitor and separate the lattice and charge density reorganizations associated with the optically induced semiconductor-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide. These studies have uncovered a previously unreported photoinduced transition to a metastable phase retaining the periodic lattice distortion characteristic of the insulating phase, but differing by a reorganization of charge density along the vanadium dimer chains and a transition to metal-like mid IR optical properties. These results demonstrate that UED is able to follow details of both lattice and electronic structural dynamics on the ultrafast timescale. Supported by Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Canada Research Chairs program, NSERC PGS-D and CGS-D fellowships, and Fonds de Récherche du Québec-Nature et Technologies.

  16. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  17. Ultrafast electron dynamics in epitaxial graphene investigated with time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulstrup, Søren; Johannsen, Jens Christian; Crepaldi, Alberto; Cilento, Federico; Zacchigna, Michele; Cacho, Cephise; Chapman, Richard T.; Springate, Emma; Fromm, Felix; Raidel, Christian; Seyller, Thomas; Parmigiani, Fulvio; Grioni, Marco; Hofmann, Philip

    2015-04-01

    In order to exploit the intriguing optical properties of graphene it is essential to gain a better understanding of the light-matter interaction in the material on ultrashort timescales. Exciting the Dirac fermions with intense ultrafast laser pulses triggers a series of processes involving interactions between electrons, phonons and impurities. Here we study these interactions in epitaxial graphene supported on silicon carbide (semiconducting) and iridium (metallic) substrates using ultrafast time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TR-ARPES) based on high harmonic generation. For the semiconducting substrate we reveal a complex hot carrier dynamics that manifests itself in an elevated electronic temperature and an increase in linewidth of the π band. By analyzing these effects we are able to disentangle electron relaxation channels in graphene. On the metal substrate this hot carrier dynamics is found to be severely perturbed by the presence of the metal, and we find that the electronic system is much harder to heat up than on the semiconductor due to screening of the laser field by the metal.

  18. Electron work function and surface energy of body-centered and face-centered cubic modifications of 4 d- and 5 d-metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, L. P.; Shebzukhova, I. G.

    2016-07-01

    A technique for the evaluation of the electron work function of metallic single crystals and the electron work function anisotropy has been developed in the framework of the electron-statistical method. The surface energy and the electron work function have been calculated for crystal faces of allotropic modifications of 4 d- and 5 d-metals. A change in the electron work function due to the allotropic transformations has been estimated, and the periodic dependence of the electron work function has been determined. It has been shown that the results obtained using the proposed technique correlate with the available experimental data for polycrystals.

  19. Ultrafast XUV spectroscopy: Unveiling the nature of electronic couplings in molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmers, Henry Robert

    Molecules are traditionally treated quantum mechanically using the Born-Oppenheimer formalism. In this formalism, different electronic states of the molecule are treated independently. However, most photo-initiated phenomena occurring in nature are driven by the couplings between different electronic states in both isolated molecules and molecular aggregates, and therefore occur beyond the Born-Oppenheimer formalism. These couplings are relevant in reactions relating to the perception of vision in the human eye, the oxidative damage and repair of DNA, the harvesting of light in photosynthesis, and the transfer of charge across large chains of molecules. While these reaction dynamics have traditionally been studied with visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy, attosecond XUV pulses formed through the process of high harmonic generation form a perfect tool for probing coupled electronic dynamics in molecules. In this thesis, I will present our work in using ultrafast, XUV spectroscopy to study these dynamics in molecules of increasing complexity. We begin by probing the relaxation dynamics of superexcited states in diatomic O 2. These states can relax via two types of electronic couplings, either through autoionization or neutral dissociation. We find that our pump-probe scheme can disentangle the two relaxation mechanisms and independently measure their contributing lifetimes. Next, we present our work in observing a coherent electron hole wavepacket initiated by the ionization of polyatomic CO 2 near a conical intersection. The electron-nuclear couplings near the conical intersection drive the electron hole between different orbital configurations. We find that we can not only measure the lifetime of quantum coherence in the electron hole wavepacket, but also control its evolution with a strong, infrared probing field. Finally, we propose an experiment to observe the migration of an electron hole across iodobenzene on the few-femtosecond timescale. We present

  20. Ultrafast molecular imaging by laser-induced electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, M.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Cornaggia, C.; Saugout, S.; Charron, E.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2011-05-15

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structures of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time scale using the laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO{sub 2} molecule excited by a near-infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  1. Ultrafast electron trapping in ligand-exchanged quantum dot assemblies.

    PubMed

    Turk, Michael E; Vora, Patrick M; Fafarman, Aaron T; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R; Kikkawa, James M

    2015-02-24

    We use time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence and absorption to characterize the low-temperature optical properties of CdSe quantum dot solids after exchanging native aliphatic ligands for thiocyanate and subsequent thermal annealing. In contrast to trends established at room temperature, our data show that at low temperature the band-edge absorptive bleach is dominated by 1S3/2h hole occupation in the quantum dot interior. We find that our ligand treatments, which bring enhanced interparticle coupling, lead to faster surface state electron trapping, a greater proportion of surface-related photoluminescence, and decreased band-edge photoluminescence lifetimes.

  2. Impact of ultrafast electronic damage in single-particle x-ray imaging experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, U.; Kabachnik, N. M.; Weckert, E.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    2012-11-01

    In single-particle coherent x-ray diffraction imaging experiments, performed at x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), samples are exposed to intense x-ray pulses to obtain single-shot diffraction patterns. The high intensity induces electronic dynamics on the femtosecond time scale in the system, which can reduce the contrast of the obtained diffraction patterns and adds an isotropic background. We quantify the degradation of the diffraction pattern from ultrafast electronic damage by performing simulations on a biological sample exposed to x-ray pulses with different parameters. We find that the contrast is substantially reduced and the background is considerably strong only if almost all electrons are removed from their parent atoms. This happens at fluences of at least one order of magnitude larger than provided at currently available XFEL sources.

  3. Ultrafast Electron Diffraction Tomography for Structure Determination of the New Zeolite ITQ-58

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this work a new ultrafast data collection strategy for electron diffraction tomography is presented that allows reducing data acquisition time by one order of magnitude. This methodology minimizes the radiation damage of beam-sensitive materials, such as microporous materials. This method, combined with the precession of the electron beam, provides high quality data enabling the determination of very complex structures. Most importantly, the implementation of this new electron diffraction methodology is easily affordable in any modern electron microscope. As a proof of concept, we have solved a new highly complex zeolitic structure named ITQ-58, with a very low symmetry (triclinic) and a large unit cell volume (1874.6 Å3), containing 16 silicon and 32 oxygen atoms in its asymmetric unit, which would be very difficult to solve with the state of the art techniques. PMID:27478889

  4. Communication: Effects of thermionic-gun parameters on operating modes in ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, Erik; Schliep, Karl B.; Suri, Pranav K.; Flannigan, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast electron microscopes with thermionic guns and LaB6 sources can be operated in both the nanosecond, single-shot and femtosecond, single-electron modes. This has been demonstrated with conventional Wehnelt electrodes and absent any applied bias. Here, by conducting simulations using the General Particle Tracer code, we define the electron-gun parameter space within which various modes may be optimized. The properties of interest include electron collection efficiency, temporal and energy spreads, and effects of laser-pulse duration incident on the LaB6 source. We find that collection efficiencies can reach 100% for all modes, despite there being no bias applied to the electrode. PMID:26798820

  5. Ultrafast Electron Trapping in Ligand-Exchanged Quantum Dot Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikkawa, J. M.; Turk, M. E.; Vora, P. M.; Fafarman, A. T.; Diroll, B. T.; Murray, C. B.; Kagan, C. R.

    2015-03-01

    We use time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence and absorption to characterize the low-temperature (10 K) optical properties of CdSe quantum dot (QD) solids with different ligand and annealing preparation. Close-packed CdSe quantum dot solids are prepared with native aliphatic ligands and with thiocyanate with and without thermal annealing. Using sub-picosecond, broadband time-resolved photoluminescence and absorption, we find that ligand exchange increases the rate of carrier surface trapping. We further determine that holes within the QD core, rather than electrons, can bleach the band-edge transition in these samples at low temperature, a finding that comes as a surprise given what is known about the surface treatment in these QDs. We find that our ligand treatments lead to faster electron trapping to the quantum dot surface, a greater proportion of surface photoluminescence, and an increased rate of nonradiative decay due to enhanced interparticle coupling upon exchange and annealing. All aspects of this work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under Award No. DE-SC0002158.

  6. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer in viologen-linked BODIPY dyes.

    PubMed

    Frath, Denis; Yarnell, James E; Ulrich, Gilles; Castellano, Felix N; Ziessel, Raymond

    2013-10-07

    New boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes linked to viologen are prepared and their photophysical and electrochemical properties are investigated. Both synthesized molecules have similar electronic absorption spectra with the absorption maximum localized at 517 and 501 nm for dye 1 and dye 2, respectively. They exhibit well-defined redox behavior, highlighting the presence of BODIPY and viologen subunits, with little perturbation of the redox potential of both subunits with respect to the parent compounds. Both dyes are heavily quenched by photoinduced electron transfer from the BODIPY to the viologen subunit. The transient absorption technique demonstrates that dye 2 forms the viologen radical within a timeframe of 7.1 ps, and that the charge-separated species has a lifetime of 59 ps. Sustained irradiation of dye 2 in the presence of a tertiary amine allows for the accumulation of BODIPY-methyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (BODIPY-MV(+)), as observed by its characteristic absorption at 396 and 603 nm. However, dye 2 does not generate catalytic amounts of hydrogen under standard conditions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Ultrafast Coherent Diffraction Imaging with X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Barty, A; Benner, W; Bogan, M; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S; London, R; Marchesini, S; Spiller, E; Szoke, A; Woods, B; Boutet, S; Hodgson, K; Hajdu, J; Bergh, M; Burmeister, F; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Maia, F; Seibert, M M; der Spoel, D v

    2006-08-22

    The ultrafast pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers will enable imaging of non-periodic objects at near-atomic resolution [1, Neutze]. These objects could include single molecules, protein complexes, or virus particles. The specimen would be completely destroyed by the pulse in a Coulomb explosion, but that destruction will only happen after the pulse. The scattering from the sample will give structural information about the undamaged object. There are many technical challenges that must be addressed before carrying out such experiments at an XFEL, which we are doing so with experiments at FLASH, the soft-X-ray FEL at DESY.

  8. Ultrafast Electronic Band Gap Control in an Excitonic Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, Selene; Herzog, Marc; Golež, Denis; Werner, Philipp; Eckstein, Martin; Katayama, Naoyuki; Nohara, Minoru; Takagi, Hide; Mizokawa, Takashi; Monney, Claude; Stähler, Julia

    2017-08-01

    We report on the nonequilibrium dynamics of the electronic structure of the layered semiconductor Ta2NiSe5 investigated by time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. We show that below the critical excitation density of FC=0.2 mJ cm-2 , the band gap narrows transiently, while it is enhanced above FC . Hartree-Fock calculations reveal that this effect can be explained by the presence of the low-temperature excitonic insulator phase of Ta2 NiSe5 , whose order parameter is connected to the gap size. This work demonstrates the ability to manipulate the band gap of Ta2 NiSe5 with light on the femtosecond time scale.

  9. Ultrafast photo-induced electron-transfer from coumarin dyes adsorbed on semiconductor nanoclusters surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Castner, E.W. Jr.; Murakoshi, Kei; Yanagida, Shozo

    1997-12-31

    Photosensitizers adsorbed directly on semiconductor surfaces provide the basis for solar photoelectrochemical devices. Semiconductor nanoclusters in solution allow for simple preparation of the photosensitized surface, with very large surface area. To optimize the efficiency of the photoelectrochemical cycle, one must know the rates of forward and reverse electron-transfer from the excited state dye to the semiconductor conduction band. We present measurements of the ultrafast forward electron-transfer rates for three coumarin dyes (Coumarins 343, D-1421, and D-126) bound by the carboxylic acid group to the metal cationic sites of TiO{sub 2} and ZnO semiconductor nanocluster surfaces. These rates are obtained directly from the ultrafast fluorescence dynamics, measured using the femotosecond upconversion technique. Coumarins 343 and D-1421 on TiO{sub 2} nanoclusters in aqueous solution display very rapid forward electron-transfer with rate constants exceeding 10{sup 13} s{sup -1}. Substantially slower rates are observed for the same coumarin TiO{sub 2} systems in methanol solution.

  10. Imaging surface acoustic wave dynamics in semiconducting polymers by scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Ebrahim; Liao, Bolin; Scarborough, Timothy; Zewail, Ahmed

    2017-08-24

    Understanding the mechanical properties of organic semiconductors is essential to their electronic and photovoltaic applications. Despite a large volume of research directed toward elucidating the chemical, physical and electronic properties of these materials, little attention has been directed toward understanding their thermo-mechanical behavior. Here, we report the ultrafast imaging of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on the surface of the Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) thin film at the picosecond and nanosecond timescales. We then use these images to measure the propagation velocity of SAWs, which we then employ to determine the Young's modulus of P3HT. We further validate our experimental observation by performing a semi-empirical transient thermoelastic finite element analysis. Our findings demonstrate the potential of ultrafast electron microscopy to not only probe charge carrier dynamics in materials as previously reported, but also to measure their mechanical properties with great accuracy. This is particularly important when in situ characterization of stiffness for thin devices and nanomaterials is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrafast spectroscopic investigations of cadmium chalcogenides: Nanoscale electronic relaxation and transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, Bryan Thomas

    Harnessing solar energy more effectively remains one of the most important scientific challenges in recent history. Various strategies have been developed to capture the sun's energy to generate usable electricity. Recently, advances in chemistry have allowed researchers to synthesize semiconducting nanocrystals which show great promise in capturing and converting solar energy in a cheap and efficient way. In this dissertation, aspects of energy conversion processes in semiconducting nanocrystals are explored to elucidate their potential for photovoltaic applications. Various forms of linear and non-linear optical spectroscopy techniques were employed to explore electronic relaxation and transfer phenomena in nanoscale cadmium chalcogenide materials and heterojunctions. Ultrafast transient absorption studies were performed on various sizes of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and quantum rods (QRs) with similar bandedge energies. These studies reviled that QRs have increased intraband relaxation times when compared with QDs as a result of an ultrafast formation of a 1D exciton along the elongated axis of the QR. The formation of the 1D exciton reduces the electron-to-hole scattering potential, consequently reducing the Auger thermalization mechanism. Furthermore, QD samples made in film form showed increased intraband relaxation times as a result of a hydrazine treatment which removed (in part) the organic ligands attached to the surface. As a result of removing the ligands, the ligand based relaxation pathway for the holes was also reduced, causing longer intraband relaxation. In addition to the studies on CdSe nanocrystals (NCs), ultrafast spectroscopy was used to study aspects of charge transfer in CdS -- TiO2 NC heterojunctions. This study revealed a means of increasing photo-induced ultrafast charge transfer in successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) CdS--TiO2 NC heterojunctions using pulsed laser sintering of TiO2 nanocrystals. The enhanced charge

  12. Ultrafast Intramolecular Electron and Proton Transfer in Bis(imino)isoindole Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Eric; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M

    2015-06-04

    Concerted motion of electrons and protons in the excited state is pertinent to a wide range of chemical phenomena, including those relevant for solar-to-fuel light harvesting. The excited state dynamics of small proton-bearing molecules are expected to serve as models for better understanding such phenomena. In particular, for designing the next generation of multielectron and multiproton redox catalysts, understanding the dynamics of more than one proton in the excited state is important. Toward this goal, we have measured the ultrafast dynamics of intramolecular excited state proton transfer in a recently synthesized dye with two equivalent transferable protons. We have used a visible ultrafast pump to initiate the proton transfer in the excited state, and have probed the transient absorption of the molecule over a wide bandwidth in the visible range. The measurement shows that the signal which is characteristic of proton transfer emerges within ∼710 fs. To identify whether both protons were transferred in the excited state, we have measured the ultrafast dynamics of a related derivative, where only a single proton was available for transfer. The measured proton transfer time in that molecule was ∼427 fs. The observed dynamics in both cases were reasonably fit with single exponentials. Supported by the ultrafast observations, steady-state fluorescence, and preliminary computations of the relaxed excited states, we argue that the doubly protonated derivative most likely transfers only one of its two protons in the excited state. We have performed calculations of the frontier molecular orbitals in the Franck-Condon region. The calculations show that in both derivatives, the excitation is primarily from the HOMO to LUMO causing a large rearrangement of the electronic charge density immediately after photoexcitation. In particular, charge density is shifted away from the phenolic protons and toward the proton acceptor nitrogens. The proton transfer is

  13. Advances in Ultrafast Control and Probing of Correlated-Electron Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Simon; Rini, Matteo; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Cavalleri, Andrea

    2011-02-24

    Here in this paper, we present recent results on ultrafast control and probing of strongly correlated-electron materials. We focus on magnetoresistive manganites, applying excitation and probing wavelengths that cover the mid-IR to the soft X-rays. In analogy with near-equilibrium filling and bandwidth control of phase transitions, our approach uses both visible and mid-IR pulses to stimulate the dynamics by exciting either charges across electronic bandgaps or specific vibrational resonances. Lastly, x-rays are used to unambiguously measure the microscopic electronic, orbital, and structural dynamics. Our experiments dissect and separate the nonequilibrium physics of these compounds, revealing the complex interplay and evolution of spin, lattice, charge, and orbital degrees of freedoms in the time domain.

  14. Ultrafast electron diffraction and direct observation of transient structures in a chemical reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianming; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    1999-01-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction is a unique method for the studies of structural changes of complex molecular systems. In this contribution, we report direct ultrafast electron diffraction study of the evolution of short-lived intermediates in the course of a chemical change. Specifically, we observe the transient intermediate in the elimination reaction of 1,2-diiodotetrafluoroethane (C2F4I2) to produce the corresponding ethylene derivative by the breakage of two carbon–iodine, C—I, bonds. The evolution of the ground-state intermediate (C2F4I radical) is directly revealed in the population change of a single chemical bond, namely the second C—I bond. The elimination of two iodine atoms was shown to be nonconcerted, with reaction time of the second C—I bond breakage being 17 ± 2 ps. The structure of the short-lived C2F4I radical is more favorable to the classical radical structure than to the bridged radical structure. This leap in our ability to record structural changes on the ps and shorter time scales bodes well for many future applications in complex molecular systems. PMID:9892634

  15. Effect of donor orientation on ultrafast intermolecular electron transfer in coumarin-amine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, P. K.; Nath, S.; Bhasikuttan, A. C.; Kumbhakar, M.; Mohanty, J.; Sarkar, S. K.; Mukherjee, T.; Pal, H.

    2008-09-21

    Effect of donor amine orientation on nondiffusive ultrafast intermolecular electron transfer (ET) reactions in coumarin-amine systems has been investigated using femtosecond fluorescence upconversion measurements. Intermolecular ET from different aromatic and aliphatic amines used as donor solvents to the excited coumarin-151 (C151) acceptor occurs with ultrafast rates such that the shortest fluorescence lifetime component ({tau}{sub 1}) is the measure of the fastest ET rate ({tau}{sub 1}={tau}{sub ET}{sup fast}=(k{sub ET}{sup fast}){sup -1}), assigned to the C151-amine contact pairs in which amine donors are properly oriented with respect to C151 to maximize the acceptor-donor electronic coupling (V{sub el}). It is interestingly observed that as the amine solvents are diluted by suitable diluents (either keeping solvent dielectric constant similar or with increasing dielectric constant), the {tau}{sub 1} remains almost in the similar range as long as the amine dilution does not cross a certain critical limit, which in terms of the amine mole fraction (x{sub A}) is found to be {approx}0.4 for aromatic amines and {approx}0.8 for aliphatic amines. Beyond these dilutions in the two respective cases of the amine systems, the {tau}{sub 1} values are seen to increase very sharply. The large difference in the critical x{sub A} values involving aromatic and aliphatic amine donors has been rationalized in terms of the largely different orientational restrictions for the ET reactions as imposed by the aliphatic (n-type) and aromatic ({pi}-type) nature of the amine donors [A. K. Satpati et al., J. Mol. Struct. 878, 84 (2008)]. Since the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the n-type aliphatic amines is mostly centralized at the amino nitrogen, only some specific orientations of these amines with respect to the close-contact acceptor dye [also of {pi}-character; A. K. Satpati et al., J. Mol. Struct. 878, 84 (2008) and E. W. Castner et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 2869

  16. Effects of electron-phonon coupling and electron diffusion on ripples growth on ultrafast-laser-irradiated metals

    SciTech Connect

    Colombier, J. P.; Garrelie, F.; Faure, N.; Reynaud, S.; Bounhalli, M.; Audouard, E.; Stoian, R.; Pigeon, F.

    2012-01-15

    Metals exposed to ultrafast laser irradiation close to ablative regimes show often a submicron-scale (near 0.5 {mu}m) periodic organization of the surface as ripples. Using two classes of metallic materials (transition and noble), we have determined that the ripples amplitude is strongly correlated to the material transport properties, namely electron-phonon relaxation strength, electronic diffusion, and to the energy band characteristics of the electronic laser excitation. This particularly depends on the topology of the electronic structure, including d-band effects on electronic excitation. Comparing the effects of electron-phonon nonequilibrium lifetimes for the different metals under similar irradiation conditions, we indicate how the electron-phonon coupling strength affects the electronic thermal diffusion, the speed of phase transformation and impacts on the ripples contrast. The highest contrast is observed for ruthenium, where the electron-phonon coupling is the strongest, followed by tungsten, nickel, and copper, the latter with the least visible contrast. The dependence of surface patterns contrast with fluence is linked to the dependence of the relaxation characteristics with the electronic temperature.

  17. Visualization of carrier dynamics in p(n)-type GaAs by scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jongweon; Hwang, Taek Yong; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2014-02-11

    Four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy is used to investigate doping- and carrier-concentration-dependent ultrafast carrier dynamics of the in situ cleaved single-crystalline GaAs(110) substrates. We observed marked changes in the measured time-resolved secondary electrons depending on the induced alterations in the electronic structure. The enhancement of secondary electrons at positive times, when the electron pulse follows the optical pulse, is primarily due to an energy gain involving the photoexcited charge carriers that are transiently populated in the conduction band and further promoted by the electron pulse, consistent with a band structure that is dependent on chemical doping and carrier concentration. When electrons undergo sufficient energy loss on their journey to the surface, dark contrast becomes dominant in the image. At negative times, however, when the electron pulse precedes the optical pulse (electron impact), the dynamical behavior of carriers manifests itself in a dark contrast which indicates the suppression of secondary electrons upon the arrival of the optical pulse. In this case, the loss of energy of material's electrons is by collisions with the excited carriers. These results for carrier dynamics in GaAs(110) suggest strong carrier-carrier scatterings which are mirrored in the energy of material's secondary electrons during their migration to the surface. The approach presented here provides a fundamental understanding of materials probed by four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy, and offers possibilities for use of this imaging technique in the study of ultrafast charge carrier dynamics in heterogeneously patterned micro- and nanostructured material surfaces and interfaces.

  18. Visualization of carrier dynamics in p(n)-type GaAs by scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jongweon; Hwang, Taek Yong; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2014-01-01

    Four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy is used to investigate doping- and carrier-concentration-dependent ultrafast carrier dynamics of the in situ cleaved single-crystalline GaAs(110) substrates. We observed marked changes in the measured time-resolved secondary electrons depending on the induced alterations in the electronic structure. The enhancement of secondary electrons at positive times, when the electron pulse follows the optical pulse, is primarily due to an energy gain involving the photoexcited charge carriers that are transiently populated in the conduction band and further promoted by the electron pulse, consistent with a band structure that is dependent on chemical doping and carrier concentration. When electrons undergo sufficient energy loss on their journey to the surface, dark contrast becomes dominant in the image. At negative times, however, when the electron pulse precedes the optical pulse (electron impact), the dynamical behavior of carriers manifests itself in a dark contrast which indicates the suppression of secondary electrons upon the arrival of the optical pulse. In this case, the loss of energy of material’s electrons is by collisions with the excited carriers. These results for carrier dynamics in GaAs(110) suggest strong carrier–carrier scatterings which are mirrored in the energy of material’s secondary electrons during their migration to the surface. The approach presented here provides a fundamental understanding of materials probed by four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy, and offers possibilities for use of this imaging technique in the study of ultrafast charge carrier dynamics in heterogeneously patterned micro- and nanostructured material surfaces and interfaces. PMID:24469803

  19. Ultrafast multi-MeV gamma-ray beam produced by laser-accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shun; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Jiancai; Xu, Tongjun; Yu, Yong; Li, Jinfeng; Lu, Xiaoming; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Xinliang; Liang, Xiaoyan; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2017-09-01

    Ultrafast multi-MeV high-flux gamma-ray beams have been experimentally produced via bremsstrahlung radiation of laser-accelerated energetic electrons through millimeter-thick copper targets. By optimizing the electron bunches to the charge of 10 nC in a clustering argon gas target, the obtained gamma-ray beam significantly increases to 1010 photons per shot. The gamma-ray beam spectrum has been measured using a differential filtering detector and has a broad spectrum up to 15 MeV, which is approximately consistent with the Geant4 simulation. The generated high-flux high-energy gamma-ray beams are promising sources for photonuclear reaction, non-destructive inspection and clinical applications.

  20. Theory of ultrafast optical manipulation of electron spins in quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jinshuang; Li, Xin-Qi

    2005-12-01

    Based on a multiparticle-state stimulated Raman adiabatic passage approach, a comprehensive theoretical study of the ultrafast optical manipulation of electron spins in quantum wells is presented. In addition to corroborating experimental findings [Gupta et al., Science 292, 2458 (2001)], we improve the expression for the optical-pulse-induced effective magnetic field, in comparison with the one obtained via the conventional single-particle ac Stark shift. Further study of the effect of hole-spin relaxation reveals that, while the coherent optical manipulation of electron spin in undoped quantum wells would deteriorate in the presence of relatively fast hole-spin relaxation, the coherent control in doped systems can be quite robust against decoherence. The implications of the present results on quantum dots will also be discussed.

  1. Interplay of electron heating and saturable absorption in ultrafast extreme ultraviolet transmission of condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cicco, Andrea; Hatada, Keisuke; Giangrisostomi, Erika; Gunnella, Roberto; Bencivenga, Filippo; Principi, Emiliano; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Filipponi, Adriano

    2014-12-01

    High intensity pulses obtained by modern extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and x-ray photon sources allows the observation of peculiar phenomena in condensed matter. Experiments performed at the Fermi@Elettra FEL-1 free-electron-laser source at 23.7, 33.5, and 37.5 eV on Al thin films, for an intermediate-fluence range up to about 20 J /cm2, show evidence for a nonmonotonic EUV transmission trend. A decreasing transmission up to about 5 -10 J /cm2 is followed by an increase at higher fluence, associated with saturable absorption effects. The present findings are interpreted within a simplified three-channel model, showing that an account of the interplay between ultrafast electron heating and saturation effects is required to explain the observed transmission trend.

  2. Ultrafast control of electron spin in a quantum dot using geometric phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovsky, V. S.; Rudin, S.

    2012-12-01

    We propose a scheme to perform arbitrary unitary operations on a single electron-spin qubit in a quantum dot. The design is solely based on the geometrical phase that the qubit state acquires after a cyclic evolution in the parameter space. The scheme is utilizing ultrafast linearly-chirped pulses providing adiabatic excitation of the qubit states and the geometric phase is fully controlled by the relative phase between pulses. The analytic expression of the evolution operator for the electron spin in a quantum dot, which provides a clear geometrical interpretation of the qubit dynamics is obtained. Using parameters of InGaN/GaN, GaN/AlN quantum dots we provide an estimate for the time scale of the qubit rotations and parameters of the external fields.

  3. Microbunching instability in relativistic electron bunches: direct observations of the microstructures using ultrafast YBCO detectors.

    PubMed

    Roussel, E; Evain, C; Szwaj, C; Bielawski, S; Raasch, J; Thoma, P; Scheuring, A; Hofherr, M; Ilin, K; Wünsch, S; Siegel, M; Hosaka, M; Yamamoto, N; Takashima, Y; Zen, H; Konomi, T; Adachi, M; Kimura, S; Katoh, M

    2014-08-29

    Relativistic electron bunches circulating in accelerators are subjected to a dynamical instability leading to microstructures at millimeter to centimeter scale. Although this is a well-known fact, direct experimental observations of the structures, or the field that they emit, remained up to now an open problem. Here, we report the direct, shot-by-shot, time-resolved recording of the shapes (including envelope and carrier) of the pulses of coherent synchrotron radiation that are emitted, and that are a "signature" of the electron bunch microstructure. The experiments are performed on the UVSOR-III storage ring, using electrical field sensitive YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin-film ultrafast detectors. The observed patterns are subjected to permanent drifts, that can be explained from a reasoning in phase space, using macroparticle simulations.

  4. Ultrafast electron diffraction: determination of radical structure with picosecond time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.; Ihee, H.; Zewail, A. H.

    1998-06-01

    Using ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) with the temporal diffraction-difference method recently developed in this laboratory, we report accurate determination of the radical (CF 2) structure in the dissociation of diiododifluoromethane (CF 2I 2) with picosecond time resolution. Time-zero was clocked accurately within 2 ps and both iodine atoms were found to be liberated in less than 4 ps. The structure, absolute fraction, and electronic state of the radical were determined. The CF 2 radical was found to be in X1A1 ground state with C-F and F⋯F distances of 1.30(±0.02) Å and 2.06(±0.06) Å, respectively.

  5. Nanowires: Enhanced Optoelectronic Performance of a Passivated Nanowire-Based Device: Key Information from Real-Space Imaging Using 4D Electron Microscopy (Small 17/2016).

    PubMed

    Khan, Jafar I; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Sun, Jingya; Priante, Davide; Bose, Riya; Shaheen, Basamat S; Ng, Tien Khee; Zhao, Chao; Bakr, Osman M; Ooi, Boon S; Mohammed, Omar F

    2016-05-01

    Selective mapping of surface charge carrier dynamics of InGaN nanowires before and after surface passivation with octadecylthiol (ODT) is reported by O. F. Mohammed and co-workers on page 2313, using scanning ultrafast electron microscopy. In a typical experiment, the 343 nm output of the laser beam is used to excite the microscope tip to generate pulsed electrons for probing, and the 515 nm output is used as a clocking excitation pulse to initiate dynamics. Time-resolved images demonstrate clearly that carrier recombination is significantly slowed after ODT treatment, which supports the efficient removal of surface trap states. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. ADVANCED CONCEPTS: Design of an MeV ultra-fast electron diffraction experiment at Tsinghua university

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ren-Kai; Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Huang, Wen-Hui; Du, Ying-Chao; Shi, Jia-Ru; Yan, Li-Xin

    2009-06-01

    Time-resolved MeV ultra-fast electron diffraction (UED) is a powerful tool for structure dynamics studies. In this paper, we present a design of a MeV UED facility based on a photocathode RF gun at Tsinghua University. Electron beam qualities are optimized with numerical simulations, indicating that resolutions of 250 fs and 0.01 A, and bunch charge exceeding 105 electrons are expected with technically achievable machine parameters. Status of experiment preparation is also presented.

  7. Ultrafast electron-lattice coupling dynamics in VO2 and V2O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Elsa; Gilbert Corder, Stephanie N.; Yun, Sun Jin; Wang, Siming; Ramírez, Juan Gabriel; West, Kevin; Zhang, Jingdi; Kittiwatanakul, Salinporn; Schuller, Ivan K.; Lu, Jiwei; Wolf, Stuart A.; Kim, Hyun-Tak; Liu, Mengkun; Averitt, Richard D.

    2017-09-01

    Ultrafast optical pump-optical probe and optical pump-terahertz probe spectroscopy were performed on vanadium dioxide (VO2) and vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3 ) thin films over a wide temperature range. A comparison of the experimental data from these two different techniques and two different vanadium oxides, in particular a comparison of the spectral weight oscillations generated by the photoinduced longitudinal acoustic modulation, reveals the strong electron-phonon coupling that exists in both materials. The low-energy Drude response of V2O3 appears more amenable than VO2 to ultrafast strain control. Additionally, our results provide a measurement of the temperature dependence of the sound velocity in both systems, revealing a four- to fivefold increase in VO2 and a three- to fivefold increase in V2O3 across the insulator-to-metal phase transition. Our data also confirm observations of strong damping and phonon anharmonicity in the metallic phase of VO2, and suggest that a similar phenomenon might be at play in the metallic phase of V2O3 . More generally, our simple table-top approach provides relevant and detailed information about dynamical lattice properties of vanadium oxides, paving the way to similar studies in other complex materials.

  8. Conservation of vibrational coherence in ultrafast electronic relaxation: The case of diplatinum complexes in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monni, Roberto; Auböck, Gerald; Kinschel, Dominik; Aziz-Lange, Kathrin M.; Gray, Harry B.; Vlček, Antonín; Chergui, Majed

    2017-09-01

    We report the results of ultrafast transient absorption studies of tetrakis(μ-pyrophosphito)diplatinate(II), [Pt2(μ-P2O5H2)4]4- (Pt(pop)) and its perfluoroborated derivative [Pt2(μ-P2O5(BF2)4]4- (Pt(pop-BF2)) in water and acetonitrile upon excitation of high lying (<300 nm) UV absorption bands. We observe an ultrafast relaxation channel from high lying states to the lowest triplet state that partly (Pt(pop) in H2O, Pt(pop-BF2)) or fully (Pt(pop) in MeCN) bypasses the lowest singlet excited state. As a consequence, vibrational wave packets are detected in the lowest triplet state and/or the lowest excited singlet of both complexes, even though the electronic relaxation cascade spans ca. 2 and 1.3 eV, respectively. In the case of Pt(pop-BF2), coherent wave packets generated by optical excitation of the lowest singlet 1A2u state also are reported. Overall, the reported dephasing times of the Pt-Pt oscillator in the ground, singlet and triplet states do not depend much on the solvent or the molecular structure.

  9. Using Betatron Emissions from Laser Wakefield Accelerated Electrons to Probe Ultra-fast Warm Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotick, Jordan; Schumaker, Will; Condamine, Florian; Albert, Felicie; Barbrel, Benjamin; Galtier, Eric; Granados, Eduardo; Ravasio, Alessandra; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been shown to produce short X-ray pulses from betatron oscillations of electrons within the plasma wake. These betatron X-rays pulses have a broad, synchrotron-like energy spectrum and a duration on the order of the driving laser pulse, thereby enabling probing of ultrafast interactions. Using the 1 J, 40fs short-pulse laser at the Matter in Extreme Conditions experimental station at LCLS, we have implemented LWFA to generate and subsequently characterized betatron X-rays. Notch filtering and single photon counting techniques were used to measure the betatron X-ray spectrum while the spatial profile was measured using X-ray CCDs and image plates. We used an ellipsoidal mirror to focus the soft betatron X-rays for pump-probe studies on various targets in conjunction with LCLS X-ray and optical laser pulses. This experimental platform provides the conditions necessary to do a detailed study of warm-dense matter dynamics on the ultrafast time-scale.

  10. Ultrafast electron-phonon coupling at the metal-dielectric interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qiaomu

    The pump-probe technique is an ultrafast spectroscopy method of detecting the dynamics of energy carriers such as electrons, phonons, and holes with transient thermal reflectance measurement. A laser beam is divided into a pump beam and probe beam with different wavelength or polarization and time delay. According to the transient reflectance result, this method could be applied to investigate the interaction between electron-phonon and electron-electron coupling with a high temporal resolution on the order of 10 femtoseconds. Energy transfer of photo-excited electrons in a metal film to the dielectric substrate at the metal-dielectric interface is important for understanding the ultrafast heat transfer process across the two materials. Many researches have been conducted in finding this energy transfer process in different materials. In this thesis, by measuring the transient reflectance variation, the two-temperature model (TTM) is used to analyze the interface metal electron and dielectric substrate coupling. In order to relate temperature to the reflectance change, a temperature and wavelength dependent Drude-Lorentz model was developed which represents the temperature dependent dielectric constant and can be used to calculate reflectance variation. Ultrafast pump-and-probe interband transition measurements on Au-Si samples were carried out, where the probe photon energy was chosen to be close to the interband transition threshold (ITT) of gold to minimize the influence of non-equilibrium or non-thermalized electrons on the optical response, and to increase the signal to noise ratio for reflectance change. In the experiment, different pump fluences have been used to test the transient reflectance variation on Au-Si samples of different thicknesses. The pump wavelength is taken as 800 nm while the probe wavelength is taken as 490 nm. A thick gold of 1000 nm thickness has been used to determine the electron-phonon coupling strength represented by a constant G 0

  11. Solving the jitter problem in microwave compressed ultrafast electron diffraction instruments: Robust sub-50 fs cavity-laser phase stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Otto, M. R.; René de Cotret, L. P.; Stern, M. J.; Siwick, B. J.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the compression of electron pulses in a high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction instrument using phase-locked microwave signals directly generated from a mode-locked femtosecond oscillator. Additionally, a continuous-wave phase stabilization system that accurately corrects for phase fluctuations arising in the compression cavity from both power amplification and thermal drift induced detuning was designed and implemented. An improvement in the microwave timing stability from 100 fs to 5 fs RMS is measured electronically, and the long-term arrival time stability (>10 h) of the electron pulses improves to below our measurement resolution of 50 fs. These results demonstrate sub-relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction with compressed pulses that is no longer limited by laser-microwave synchronization. PMID:28852686

  12. Measurement of two low-temperature energy gaps in the electronic structure of antiferromagnetic USb2 using ultrafast optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qi, J; Durakiewicz, T; Trugman, S A; Zhu, J-X; Riseborough, P S; Baumbach, R; Bauer, E D; Gofryk, K; Meng, J-Q; Joyce, J J; Taylor, A J; Prasankumar, R P

    2013-08-02

    Ultrafast optical spectroscopy is used to study the antiferromagnetic f-electron system USb(2). We observe the opening of two charge gaps at low temperatures (electronic structure. Analysis of our data indicates that one gap is due to hybridization between localized f-electron and conduction electron bands, while band renormalization involving magnons leads to the emergence of the second gap. These experiments thus enable us to shed light on the complex electronic structure emerging at the Fermi surface in f-electron systems.

  13. Ultrafast electronic response of graphene to a strong and localized electric field

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Elisabeth; Wilhelm, Richard A.; Pétuya, Rémi; Smejkal, Valerie; Kozubek, Roland; Hierzenberger, Anke; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Aldazabal, Iñigo; Kazansky, Andrey K.; Libisch, Florian; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Schleberger, Marika; Facsko, Stefan; Borisov, Andrei G.; Arnau, Andrés; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    The way conduction electrons respond to ultrafast external perturbations in low dimensional materials is at the core of the design of future devices for (opto)electronics, photodetection and spintronics. Highly charged ions provide a tool for probing the electronic response of solids to extremely strong electric fields localized down to nanometre-sized areas. With ion transmission times in the order of femtoseconds, we can directly probe the local electronic dynamics of an ultrathin foil on this timescale. Here we report on the ability of freestanding single layer graphene to provide tens of electrons for charge neutralization of a slow highly charged ion within a few femtoseconds. With values higher than 1012 A cm−2, the resulting local current density in graphene exceeds previously measured breakdown currents by three orders of magnitude. Surprisingly, the passing ion does not tear nanometre-sized holes into the single layer graphene. We use time-dependent density functional theory to gain insight into the multielectron dynamics. PMID:28000666

  14. Resolving the role of femtosecond heated electrons in ultrafast spin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mendil, J.; Nieves, P.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.; Walowski, J.; Santos, T.; Pisana, S.; Münzenberg, M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetization manipulation is essential for basic research and applications. A fundamental question is, how fast can the magnetization be reversed in nanoscale magnetic storage media. When subject to an ultrafast laser pulse, the speed of the magnetization dynamics depends on the nature of the energy transfer pathway. The order of the spin system can be effectively influenced through spin-flip processes mediated by hot electrons. It has been predicted that as electrons drive spins into the regime close to almost total demagnetization, characterized by a loss of ferromagnetic correlations near criticality, a second slower demagnetization process takes place after the initial fast drop of magnetization. By studying FePt, we unravel the fundamental role of the electronic structure. As the ferromagnet Fe becomes more noble in the FePt compound, the electronic structure is changed and the density of states around the Fermi level is reduced, thereby driving the spin correlations into the limit of critical fluctuations. We demonstrate the impact of the electrons and the ferromagnetic interactions, which allows a general insight into the mechanisms of spin dynamics when the ferromagnetic state is highly excited, and identifies possible recording speed limits in heat-assisted magnetization reversal. PMID:24496221

  15. Ultrafast electronic response of graphene to a strong and localized electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Elisabeth; Wilhelm, Richard A.; Pétuya, Rémi; Smejkal, Valerie; Kozubek, Roland; Hierzenberger, Anke; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Aldazabal, Iñigo; Kazansky, Andrey K.; Libisch, Florian; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Schleberger, Marika; Facsko, Stefan; Borisov, Andrei G.; Arnau, Andrés; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2016-12-01

    The way conduction electrons respond to ultrafast external perturbations in low dimensional materials is at the core of the design of future devices for (opto)electronics, photodetection and spintronics. Highly charged ions provide a tool for probing the electronic response of solids to extremely strong electric fields localized down to nanometre-sized areas. With ion transmission times in the order of femtoseconds, we can directly probe the local electronic dynamics of an ultrathin foil on this timescale. Here we report on the ability of freestanding single layer graphene to provide tens of electrons for charge neutralization of a slow highly charged ion within a few femtoseconds. With values higher than 1012 A cm-2, the resulting local current density in graphene exceeds previously measured breakdown currents by three orders of magnitude. Surprisingly, the passing ion does not tear nanometre-sized holes into the single layer graphene. We use time-dependent density functional theory to gain insight into the multielectron dynamics.

  16. Relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction from molecules in the gas phase (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Guehr, Markus; Vecchione, Theodore; Robinson, Matthew S.; Li, Renkai; Hartmann, Nick; Shen, Xiaozhe; Centurion, Martin; Wang, Xijie

    2016-10-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a powerful technique that can be used to resolve structural changes of gas molecules during a photochemical reaction. However, the temporal resolution in pump-probe experiments has been limited to the few-ps level by the space-charge effect that broadens the electron pulse duration and by velocity mismatch between the pump laser pulses and the probe electron pulses, making only long-lived intermediate states accessible. Taking advantage of relativistic effects, Mega-electron-volt (MeV) electrons can be used to suppress both the space-charge effect and the velocity mismatch, and hence to achieve a temporal resolution that is fast enough to follow coherent nuclear motion in the target molecules. In this presentation, we show the first MeV UED experiments on gas phase targets. These experiments not only demonstrate that femtosecond temporal resolution is achieved, but also show that the spatial resolution is not compromised. This unprecedented combination of spatiotemporal resolution is sufficient to image coherent nuclear motions, and opens the door to a new class of experiments where the structural changes can be followed simultaneously in both space and time.

  17. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of Photoexcited Zinc-Porphyrin: Electronic-Vibrational Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Baxter; Nieto-Pescador, Jesus; Gundlach, Lars

    2016-08-02

    Cyclic tetrapyrroles are the active core of compounds with crucial roles in living systems, such as hemoglobin and chlorophyll, and in technology as photocatalysts and light absorbers for solar energy conversion. Zinc-tetraphenylporphyrin (Zn-TPP) is a prototypical cyclic tetrapyrrole that has been intensely studied in past decades. Because of its importance for photochemical processes the optical properties are of particular interest, and, accordingly, numerous studies have focused on light absorption and excited-state dynamics of Zn-TPP. Relaxation after photoexcitation in the Soret band involves internal conversion that is preceded by an ultrafast process. This relaxation process has been observed by several groups. Until now, it has not been established if it involves a higher lying ”dark” state or vibrational relaxation in the excited S2 state. Here we combine high time resolution electronic and vibrational spectroscopy to show that this process constitutes vibrational relaxation in the anharmonic 2 potential.

  18. Ultrafast myoglobin structural dynamics observed with an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Levantino, Matteo; Schirò, Giorgio; Lemke, Henrik Till; ...

    2015-04-02

    Light absorption can trigger biologically relevant protein conformational changes. The light induced structural rearrangement at the level of a photoexcited chromophore is known to occur in the femtosecond timescale and is expected to propagate through the protein as a quake-like intramolecular motion. Here we report direct experimental evidence of such ‘proteinquake’ observed in myoglobin through femtosecond X-ray solution scattering measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. An ultrafast increase of myoglobin radius of gyration occurs within 1 picosecond and is followed by a delayed protein expansion. As the system approaches equilibrium it undergoes damped oscillations withmore » a ~3.6-picosecond time period. Our results unambiguously show how initially localized chemical changes can propagate at the level of the global protein conformation in the picosecond timescale.« less

  19. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of Photoexcited Zinc-Porphyrin: Electronic-Vibrational Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Baxter; Nieto-Pescador, Jesus; Gundlach, Lars

    2016-08-02

    Cyclic tetrapyrroles are the active core of compounds with crucial roles in living systems, such as hemoglobin and chlorophyll, and in technology as photocatalysts and light absorbers for solar energy conversion. Zinc-tetraphenylporphyrin (Zn-TPP) is a prototypical cyclic tetrapyrrole that has been intensely studied in past decades. Because of its importance for photochemical processes the optical properties are of particular interest, and, accordingly, numerous studies have focused on light absorption and excited-state dynamics of Zn-TPP. Relaxation after photoexcitation in the Soret band involves internal conversion that is preceded by an ultrafast process. This relaxation process has been observed by several groups. Until now, it has not been established if it involves a higher lying ”dark” state or vibrational relaxation in the excited S2 state. Here we combine high time resolution electronic and vibrational spectroscopy to show that this process constitutes vibrational relaxation in the anharmonic 2 potential.

  20. Ultrafast myoglobin structural dynamics observed with an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Levantino, Matteo; Schirò, Giorgio; Lemke, Henrik Till; Cottone, Grazia; Glownia, James Michael; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Mathieu; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Cupane, Antonio; Cammarata, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Light absorption can trigger biologically relevant protein conformational changes. The light-induced structural rearrangement at the level of a photoexcited chromophore is known to occur in the femtosecond timescale and is expected to propagate through the protein as a quake-like intramolecular motion. Here we report direct experimental evidence of such ‘proteinquake’ observed in myoglobin through femtosecond X-ray solution scattering measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. An ultrafast increase of myoglobin radius of gyration occurs within 1 picosecond and is followed by a delayed protein expansion. As the system approaches equilibrium it undergoes damped oscillations with a ~3.6-picosecond time period. Our results unambiguously show how initially localized chemical changes can propagate at the level of the global protein conformation in the picosecond timescale. PMID:25832715

  1. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of Photoexcited Zinc-Porphyrin: Electronic-Vibrational Coupling.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Baxter; Nieto-Pescador, Jesus; Gundlach, Lars

    2016-08-18

    Cyclic tetrapyrroles are the active core of compounds with crucial roles in living systems, such as hemoglobin and chlorophyll, and in technology as photocatalysts and light absorbers for solar energy conversion. Zinc-tetraphenylporphyrin (Zn-TPP) is a prototypical cyclic tetrapyrrole that has been intensely studied in past decades. Because of its importance for photochemical processes the optical properties are of particular interest, and, accordingly, numerous studies have focused on light absorption and excited-state dynamics of Zn-TPP. Relaxation after photoexcitation in the Soret band involves internal conversion that is preceded by an ultrafast process. This relaxation process has been observed by several groups. Hitherto, it has not been established if it involves a higher lying "dark" state or vibrational relaxation in the excited S2 state. Here we combine high time resolution electronic and vibrational spectroscopy to show that this process constitutes vibrational relaxation in the anharmonic S2 potential.

  2. Ultrafast myoglobin structural dynamics observed with an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Levantino, Matteo; Schirò, Giorgio; Lemke, Henrik Till; Cottone, Grazia; Glownia, James Michael; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Mathieu; Ihee, Hyotcherl; KAIST, Daejeon; Cupane, Antonio; Cammarata, Marco

    2015-04-02

    Light absorption can trigger biologically relevant protein conformational changes. The light induced structural rearrangement at the level of a photoexcited chromophore is known to occur in the femtosecond timescale and is expected to propagate through the protein as a quake-like intramolecular motion. Here we report direct experimental evidence of such ‘proteinquake’ observed in myoglobin through femtosecond X-ray solution scattering measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. An ultrafast increase of myoglobin radius of gyration occurs within 1 picosecond and is followed by a delayed protein expansion. As the system approaches equilibrium it undergoes damped oscillations with a ~3.6-picosecond time period. Our results unambiguously show how initially localized chemical changes can propagate at the level of the global protein conformation in the picosecond timescale.

  3. Mapping multidimensional electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics with single-element detection and compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Spokoyny, Boris; Ray, Supratim; Sarvari, Fahad; Harel, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing allows signals to be efficiently captured by exploiting their inherent sparsity. Here we implement sparse sampling to capture the electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecular systems using phase-resolved 2D coherent spectroscopy. Until now, 2D spectroscopy has been hampered by its reliance on array detectors that operate in limited spectral regions. Combining spatial encoding of the nonlinear optical response and rapid signal modulation allows retrieval of state-resolved correlation maps in a photosynthetic protein and carbocyanine dye. We report complete Hadamard reconstruction of the signals and compression factors as high as 10, in good agreement with array-detected spectra. Single-point array reconstruction by spatial encoding (SPARSE) Spectroscopy reduces acquisition times by about an order of magnitude, with further speed improvements enabled by fast scanning of a digital micromirror device. We envision unprecedented applications for coherent spectroscopy using frequency combs and super-continua in diverse spectral regions.

  4. Mapping multidimensional electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics with single-element detection and compressive sensing

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Spokoyny, Boris; Ray, Supratim; Sarvari, Fahad; Harel, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing allows signals to be efficiently captured by exploiting their inherent sparsity. Here we implement sparse sampling to capture the electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecular systems using phase-resolved 2D coherent spectroscopy. Until now, 2D spectroscopy has been hampered by its reliance on array detectors that operate in limited spectral regions. Combining spatial encoding of the nonlinear optical response and rapid signal modulation allows retrieval of state-resolved correlation maps in a photosynthetic protein and carbocyanine dye. We report complete Hadamard reconstruction of the signals and compression factors as high as 10, in good agreement with array-detected spectra. Single-point array reconstruction by spatial encoding (SPARSE) Spectroscopy reduces acquisition times by about an order of magnitude, with further speed improvements enabled by fast scanning of a digital micromirror device. We envision unprecedented applications for coherent spectroscopy using frequency combs and super-continua in diverse spectral regions. PMID:26804546

  5. Alignment dependent ultrafast electron-nuclear dynamics in molecular high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mu-Zi; Jia, Guang-Rui; Bian, Xue-Bin

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) process of diatomic molecular ion H2+ in non-Born-Oppenheimer approximations (NBOA). The corresponding three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved with arbitrary alignment angles. It is found that the nuclear motion can lead to spectral modulation of HHG in both the tunneling and multiphoton ionization regimes. The universal redshifts of the whole spectrum are unique in molecular HHG. The spectral width of HHG increases in NBOA. We calculated possible influences on redshifts of HHG in real experimental conditions and found that redshifts decrease with the increase of alignment angles of the molecules and are sensitive to the initial vibrational states. It can be used to extract the ultrafast electron-nuclear dynamics and image molecular structure. It will be instructive to related experiments.

  6. Imaging polyatomic molecules with ultrafast laser-induced electron diffraction (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, Chii-Dong

    2016-10-01

    Molecular structure determination of chemical reactions or processes has been one of the grand challenges in physics, chemistry, and biology. To image these processes, it typically requires sub-Angstrom spatial and femtosecond temporal resolutions. One of the standard imaging techniques, X-ray diffraction, however, currently suffers from temporal jitters and is available only at large facilities. Furthermore, it also suffers from very low elastic scattering cross sections, which make it difficult to apply to gas phase molecules. Another technique, ultrafast electron diffraction (UED), overcomes this low cross section problem, but the temporal resolution is still limited to hundreds of femtoseconds, mainly due to Coulomb repulsion in electron beam and velocity mismatch between laser-pump pulse and electron probe pulse in a typical pump-probe scheme. The recently proposed laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) is based on two basic ideas. First, an electron wave packet can be generated from a target itself by an intense laser pulse and driven back within the subsequent half-cycle of the laser to rescatter from the parent ion, thus realizing a self-imaging process. Laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCS) can then be extracted from high-energy electron spectra, as demonstrated by the Quantitative Rescattering theory (QRS). Second, the target structure information can be retrieved from the DCS. This retrieval is further simplified by using back-scattered electrons with collision energy of about 100 eV, for which the independent-atom model (IAM) can be employed to quite accurately simulate the DCS. Demonstration of ultrafast imaging with the LIED has been reported so far on simple diatomic molecules. Here we discuss recent progress in LIED with polyatomic molecules in two examples. The first one is aligned acetylene (C2H2) and the second one is benzene (C6H6). In both cases, two bond lengths, C-C and C-H have been successfully retrieved. For even more

  7. Static and Dynamic Electron Microscopy Investigations at the Atomic and Ultrafast Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, Pranav Kumar

    Advancements in the electron microscopy capabilities - aberration-corrected imaging, monochromatic spectroscopy, direct-electron detectors - have enabled routine visualization of atomic-scale processes with millisecond temporal resolutions in this decade. This, combined with progress in the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holder technology and nanofabrication techniques, allows comprehensive experiments on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. The development of ultrafast (sub-nanosecond) time-resolved TEM with ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) has further pushed the envelope of in situ TEM to sub-nanosecond temporal resolution while maintaining sub-nanometer spatial resolution. A plethora of materials phenomena - including electron-phonon coupling, phonon transport, first-order phase transitions, bond rotation, plasmon dynamics, melting, and dopant atoms arrangement - are not yet clearly understood and could be benefitted with the current in situ TEM capabilities having atomic-level and ultrafast precision. Better understanding of these phenomena and intrinsic material dynamics (e.g. how phonons propagate in a material, what time-scales are involved in a first-order phase transition, how fast a material melts, where dopant atoms sit in a crystal) in new-generation and technologically important materials (e.g. two-dimensional layered materials, semiconductor and magnetic devices, rare-earth-element-free permanent magnets, unconventional superconductors) could bring a paradigm shift in their electronic, structural, magnetic, thermal and optical applications. Present research efforts, employing cutting-edge static and dynamic in situ electron microscopy resources at the University of Minnesota, are directed towards understanding the atomic-scale crystallographic structural transition and phonon transport in an iron-pnictide parent compound LaFeAsO, studying the mechanical stability of fast moving hard-drive heads in heat

  8. Ultra-fast electron capture by electrosterically-stabilized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandi, Khashayar; Findlater, Alexander D.; Mahimwalla, Zahid; MacNeil, Connor S.; Awoonor-Williams, Ernest; Zahariev, Federico; Gordon, Mark S.

    2015-07-01

    Ultra-fast pre-solvated electron capture has been observed for aqueous solutions of room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) surface-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs; ~9 nm). The extraordinarily large inverse temperature dependent rate constants (ke ~ 5 × 1014 M-1 s-1) measured for the capture of electrons in solution suggest electron capture by the AuNP surface that is on the timescale of, and therefore in competition with, electron solvation and electron-cation recombination reactions. The observed electron transfer rates challenge the conventional notion that radiation induced biological damage would be enhanced in the presence of AuNPs. On the contrary, AuNPs stabilized by non-covalently bonded ligands demonstrate the potential to quench radiation-induced electrons, indicating potential applications in fields ranging from radiation therapy to heterogeneous catalysis.Ultra-fast pre-solvated electron capture has been observed for aqueous solutions of room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) surface-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs; ~9 nm). The extraordinarily large inverse temperature dependent rate constants (ke ~ 5 × 1014 M-1 s-1) measured for the capture of electrons in solution suggest electron capture by the AuNP surface that is on the timescale of, and therefore in competition with, electron solvation and electron-cation recombination reactions. The observed electron transfer rates challenge the conventional notion that radiation induced biological damage would be enhanced in the presence of AuNPs. On the contrary, AuNPs stabilized by non-covalently bonded ligands demonstrate the potential to quench radiation-induced electrons, indicating potential applications in fields ranging from radiation therapy to heterogeneous catalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Calculations and procedure for the synthesis and determination of the gold nanoparticle concentration, μSR sample preparation, determination of rate constants for electron

  9. Understanding the Electronic Structure of 4d Metal Complexes: From Molecular Spinors to L-Edge Spectra of a di-Ru Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Alperovich, Igor; Smolentsev, Grigory; Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Jurss, Jonah W.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Soldatov, Alexander; Pushkar, Yulia

    2015-09-17

    L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has demonstrated unique capabilities for the analysis of the electronic structure of di-Ru complexes such as the blue dimer cis,cis-[Ru{sub 2}{sup III}O(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(bpy){sub 4}]{sup 4+} water oxidation catalyst. Spectra of the blue dimer and the monomeric [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} model complex show considerably different splitting of the Ru L{sub 2,3} absorption edge, which reflects changes in the relative energies of the Ru 4d orbitals caused by hybridization with a bridging ligand and spin-orbit coupling effects. To aid the interpretation of spectroscopic data, we developed a new approach, which computes L{sub 2,3}-edges XAS spectra as dipole transitions between molecular spinors of 4d transition metal complexes. This allows for careful inclusion of the spin-orbit coupling effects and the hybridization of the Ru 4d and ligand orbitals. The obtained theoretical Ru L{sub 2,3}-edge spectra are in close agreement with experiment. Critically, existing single-electron methods (FEFF, FDMNES) broadly used to simulate XAS could not reproduce the experimental Ru L-edge spectra for the [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} model complex nor for the blue dimer, while charge transfer multiplet (CTM) calculations were not applicable due to the complexity and low symmetry of the blue dimer water oxidation catalyst. We demonstrated that L-edge spectroscopy is informative for analysis of bridging metal complexes. The developed computational approach enhances L-edge spectroscopy as a tool for analysis of the electronic structures of complexes, materials, catalysts, and reactive intermediates with 4d transition metals.

  10. Infrared PINEM developed by diffraction in 4D UEM

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haihua; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2016-01-01

    The development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) has enabled not only observations of the ultrafast dynamics of photon–matter interactions at the atomic scale with ultrafast resolution in image, diffraction, and energy space, but photon–electron interactions in the field of nanoplasmonics and nanophotonics also have been captured by the related technique of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) in image and energy space. Here we report a further extension in the ongoing development of PINEM using a focused, nanometer-scale, electron beam in diffraction space for measurements of infrared-light-induced PINEM. The energy resolution in diffraction mode is unprecedented, reaching 0.63 eV under the 200-keV electron beam illumination, and separated peaks of the PINEM electron-energy spectrum induced by infrared light of wavelength 1,038 nm (photon energy 1.2 eV) have been well resolved for the first time, to our knowledge. In a comparison with excitation by green (519-nm) pulses, similar first-order PINEM peak amplitudes were obtained for optical fluence differing by a factor of more than 60 at the interface of copper metal and vacuum. Under high fluence, the nonlinear regime of IR PINEM was observed, and its spatial dependence was studied. In combination with PINEM temporal gating and low-fluence infrared excitation, the PINEM diffraction method paves the way for studies of structural dynamics in reciprocal space and energy space with high temporal resolution. PMID:26848135

  11. Infrared PINEM developed by diffraction in 4D UEM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haihua; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2016-02-23

    The development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) has enabled not only observations of the ultrafast dynamics of photon-matter interactions at the atomic scale with ultrafast resolution in image, diffraction, and energy space, but photon-electron interactions in the field of nanoplasmonics and nanophotonics also have been captured by the related technique of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) in image and energy space. Here we report a further extension in the ongoing development of PINEM using a focused, nanometer-scale, electron beam in diffraction space for measurements of infrared-light-induced PINEM. The energy resolution in diffraction mode is unprecedented, reaching 0.63 eV under the 200-keV electron beam illumination, and separated peaks of the PINEM electron-energy spectrum induced by infrared light of wavelength 1,038 nm (photon energy 1.2 eV) have been well resolved for the first time, to our knowledge. In a comparison with excitation by green (519-nm) pulses, similar first-order PINEM peak amplitudes were obtained for optical fluence differing by a factor of more than 60 at the interface of copper metal and vacuum. Under high fluence, the nonlinear regime of IR PINEM was observed, and its spatial dependence was studied. In combination with PINEM temporal gating and low-fluence infrared excitation, the PINEM diffraction method paves the way for studies of structural dynamics in reciprocal space and energy space with high temporal resolution.

  12. 4d{sup -1} photoelectron spectra and subsequent N{sub 4,5}OO Auger electron spectra of atomic Sb

    SciTech Connect

    Patanen, M.; Heinaesmaeki, S.; Urpelainen, S.; Aksela, S.; Aksela, H.

    2010-05-15

    4d{sup -1} photoelectron and subsequent N{sub 4,5}OO Auger electron spectra of Sb have been measured using synchrotron radiation. Features created by an open shell electronic structure of atomic Sb in the spectra have been interpreted using multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock calculations. The results are compared with the molecular Sb{sub 4} and the comparison shows that the relaxation pathways of the hole states in atomic and molecular Sb are very different, so that different groups of states are populated in the corresponding Auger spectra.

  13. Ultrafast terahertz snapshots of excitonic Rydberg states and electronic coherence in an organometal halide perovskite

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Liang; Men, Long; Liu, Zhaoyu; ...

    2017-06-01

    How photoexcitations evolve into Coulomb-bound electron and hole pairs, called excitons, and unbound charge carriers is a key cross-cutting issue in photovoltaics and optoelectronics. Until now, the initial quantum dynamics following photoexcitation remains elusive in the hybrid perovskite system. Furthermore we reveal excitonic Rydberg states with distinct formation pathways by observing the multiple resonant, internal quantum transitions using ultrafast terahertz quasi-particle transport. Nonequilibrium emergent states evolve with a complex co-existence of excitons, carriers and phonons, where a delayed buildup of excitons under on- and off-resonant pumping conditions allows us to distinguish between the loss of electronic coherence and hot statemore » cooling processes. The nearly ~1 ps dephasing time, efficient electron scattering with discrete terahertz phonons and intermediate binding energy of ~13.5 meV in perovskites are distinct from conventional photovoltaic semiconductors. In addition to providing implications for coherent energy conversion, these are potentially relevant to the development of light-harvesting and electron-transport devices.« less

  14. Direct observation of ultrafast-electron-transfer reactions unravels high effectiveness of reductive DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jenny; Ma, Yuhan; Luo, Ting; Bristow, Robert G.; Jaffray, David A.; Lu, Qing-Bin

    2011-01-01

    Both water and electron-transfer reactions play important roles in chemistry, physics, biology, and the environment. Oxidative DNA damage is a well-known mechanism, whereas the relative role of reductive DNA damage is unknown. The prehydrated electron (), a novel species of electrons in water, is a fascinating species due to its fundamental importance in chemistry, biology, and the environment. is an ideal agent to observe reductive DNA damage. Here, we report both the first in situ femtosecond time-resolved laser spectroscopy measurements of ultrafast-electron-transfer (UET) reactions of with various scavengers (KNO3, isopropanol, and dimethyl sulfoxide) and the first gel electrophoresis measurements of DNA strand breaks induced by and OH• radicals co-produced by two-UV-photon photolysis of water. We strikingly found that the yield of reductive DNA strand breaks induced by each is twice the yield of oxidative DNA strand breaks induced by each OH• radical. Our results not only unravel the long-standing mystery about the relative role of radicals in inducing DNA damage under ionizing radiation, but also challenge the conventional notion that oxidative damage is the main pathway for DNA damage. The results also show the potential of femtomedicine as a new transdisciplinary frontier and the broad significance of UET reactions of in many processes in chemistry, physics, biology, and the environment. PMID:21730183

  15. Electro-optic sampling for time resolving relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Scoby, C. M.; Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.; Gutierrez, M.; Tran, T.

    2009-01-22

    The Pegasus laboratory at UCLA features a state-of-the-art electron photoinjector capable of producing ultrashort (<100 fs) high-brightness electron bunches at energies of 3.75 MeV. These beams recently have been used to produce static diffraction patterns from scattering off thin metal foils, and it is foreseen to take advantage of the ultrashort nature of these bunches in future pump-probe time-resolved diffraction studies. In this paper, single shot 2-d electro-optic sampling is presented as a potential technique for time of arrival stamping of electron bunches used for diffraction. Effects of relatively low bunch charge (a few 10's of pC) and modestly relativistic beams are discussed and background compensation techniques to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio are explored. From these preliminary tests, electro-optic sampling is suitable to be a reliable nondestructive time stamping method for relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction at the Pegasus lab.

  16. Ultrafast electron and hole transfer in bulk heterojunctions of low-bandgap polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Oleg V.; Pavelyev, Vlad G.; de Gier, Hilde D.; Havenith, Remco W. A.; van Loosdrecht, Paul H. M.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2016-12-01

    In modern bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells, blends of low-bandgap polymer and [70]PCBM acceptor are used in the active layer. In this combination, the polymer absorbs photons from the red and near-IR parts of the solar spectrum, while the blue and near-UV photons are harvested by [70]PCBM. As a result, both electron transfer from polymer to [70]PCBM and hole transfer from [70]PCBM to polymer are of utmost importance in free charge generation and have to be optimized simultaneously. Here we study electron and hole transfer processes in BHJ blends of two low-bandgap polymers, BTT-DPP and PCPDTBT, by ultrafast photoinduced spectroscopy (PIA). By tracking the PIA dynamics, we observed substantially different charge separation pathways in BHJs of the two polymers with [70]PCBM. From the photoinduced anisotropy dynamics, we demonstrated that in the PCPDTBT:[70]PCBM system both electron and hole transfer processes are highly efficient, while in the BTTBPP:[ 70]PCBM electron transfer is blocked due to the unfortunate energy level alignment leaving hole transfer the only pathway to free charge generation. Calculations at the density functional theory level are used to gain more insight into our findings. The presented results highlight the importance of the energy level alignment on the charge separation process.

  17. Ultrafast terahertz snapshots of excitonic Rydberg states and electronic coherence in an organometal halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liang; Men, Long; Liu, Zhaoyu; Mudryk, Yaroslav; Zhao, Xin; Yao, Yongxin; Park, Joong M.; Shinar, Ruth; Shinar, Joseph; Ho, Kai-Ming; Perakis, Ilias E.; Vela, Javier; Wang, Jigang

    2017-06-01

    How photoexcitations evolve into Coulomb-bound electron and hole pairs, called excitons, and unbound charge carriers is a key cross-cutting issue in photovoltaics and optoelectronics. Until now, the initial quantum dynamics following photoexcitation remains elusive in the hybrid perovskite system. Here we reveal excitonic Rydberg states with distinct formation pathways by observing the multiple resonant, internal quantum transitions using ultrafast terahertz quasi-particle transport. Nonequilibrium emergent states evolve with a complex co-existence of excitons, carriers and phonons, where a delayed buildup of excitons under on- and off-resonant pumping conditions allows us to distinguish between the loss of electronic coherence and hot state cooling processes. The nearly ~1 ps dephasing time, efficient electron scattering with discrete terahertz phonons and intermediate binding energy of ~13.5 meV in perovskites are distinct from conventional photovoltaic semiconductors. In addition to providing implications for coherent energy conversion, these are potentially relevant to the development of light-harvesting and electron-transport devices.

  18. Ultrafast terahertz probes of transient conducting and insulating phases in an electron-hole gas.

    PubMed

    Kaindl, R A; Carnahan, M A; Hägele, D; Lövenich, R; Chemla, D S

    2003-06-12

    Many-body systems in nature exhibit complexity and self-organization arising from seemingly simple laws. For example, the long-range Coulomb interaction between electrical charges has a simple form, yet is responsible for a plethora of bound states in matter, ranging from the hydrogen atom to complex biochemical structures. Semiconductors form an ideal laboratory for studying many-body interactions of electronic quasiparticles among themselves and with lattice vibrations and light. Oppositely charged electron and hole quasiparticles can coexist in an ionized but correlated plasma, or form bound hydrogen-like pairs called excitons. The pathways between such states, however, remain elusive in near-visible optical experiments that detect a subset of excitons with vanishing centre-of-mass momenta. In contrast, transitions between internal exciton levels, which occur in the far-infrared at terahertz (1012 s(-1)) frequencies, are independent of this restriction, suggesting their use as a probe of electron-hole pair dynamics. Here we employ an ultrafast terahertz probe to investigate directly the dynamical interplay of optically-generated excitons and unbound electron-hole pairs in GaAs quantum wells. Our observations reveal an unexpected quasi-instantaneous excitonic enhancement, the formation of insulating excitons on a 100-ps timescale, and the conditions under which excitonic populations prevail.

  19. Direct observation of ultrafast-electron-transfer reactions unravels high effectiveness of reductive DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jenny; Ma, Yuhan; Luo, Ting; Bristow, Robert G; Jaffray, David A; Lu, Qing-Bin

    2011-07-19

    Both water and electron-transfer reactions play important roles in chemistry, physics, biology, and the environment. Oxidative DNA damage is a well-known mechanism, whereas the relative role of reductive DNA damage is unknown. The prehydrated electron (e(pre)-), a novel species of electrons in water, is a fascinating species due to its fundamental importance in chemistry, biology, and the environment. e(pre)- is an ideal agent to observe reductive DNA damage. Here, we report both the first in situ femtosecond time-resolved laser spectroscopy measurements of ultrafast-electron-transfer (UET) reactions of e(pre)- with various scavengers (KNO(3), isopropanol, and dimethyl sulfoxide) and the first gel electrophoresis measurements of DNA strand breaks induced by e(pre)- and OH(•) radicals co-produced by two-UV-photon photolysis of water. We strikingly found that the yield of reductive DNA strand breaks induced by each e(pre)- is twice the yield of oxidative DNA strand breaks induced by each OH(•) radical. Our results not only unravel the long-standing mystery about the relative role of radicals in inducing DNA damage under ionizing radiation, but also challenge the conventional notion that oxidative damage is the main pathway for DNA damage. The results also show the potential of femtomedicine as a new transdisciplinary frontier and the broad significance of UET reactions of e(pre)- in many processes in chemistry, physics, biology, and the environment.

  20. Current Theoretical Challenges in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Electron-Proton Nonadiabaticity, Proton Relays, and Ultrafast Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological and chemical processes. The motions of the electrons, transferring protons, solute nuclei, and solvent nuclei occur on a wide range of timescales and are often strongly coupled. As a result, the theoretical description of these processes requires a combination of quantum and classical methods. This perspective discusses three of the current theoretical challenges in the field of PCET. The first challenge is the calculation of electron-proton nonadiabatic effects, which are significant for these reactions because the hydrogen tunneling is often faster than the electronic transition. The second challenge is the modeling of electron transfer coupled to proton transport along hydrogen-bonded networks. The third challenge is the simulation of the ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium photoinduced PCET reactions in solution. Insights provided by theoretical studies may assist in the design of more effective catalysts for energy conversion processes. The proton relay portion of this review is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  1. Current Theoretical Challenges in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Electron Proton Nonadiabaticity, Proton Relays, and Ultrafast Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological and chemical processes. The motions of the electrons, transferring protons, solute nuclei, and solvent nuclei occur on a wide range of time scales and are often strongly coupled. As a result, the theoretical description of these processes requires a combination of quantum and classical methods. This Perspective discusses three of the current theoretical challenges in the field of PCET. The first challenge is the calculation of electron proton nonadiabatic effects, which are significant for these reactions because the hydrogen tunneling is often faster than the electronic transition. The second challenge is the modeling of electron transfer coupled to proton transport along hydrogen-bonded networks. The third challenge is the simulation of the ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium photoinduced PCET reactions in solution. Insights provided by theoretical studies may assist in the design of more effective catalysts for energy conversion processes. The proton relay portion of this review is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  2. Ultrafast scattering processes of hot electrons in InSb studied by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimura, H.; Kanasaki, J.; Tanimura, K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast scattering processes of hot electrons photoinjected into the conduction band of InSb have been studied using time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The nascent distributions of hot-electron packets are captured directly in energy and momentum spaces, and their ultrafast scattering processes are traced at femtosecond temporal resolution on a state-resolved basis. Hot electrons injected in the Γ valley with excess energies above the minimum of the L valley show ultrafast intervalley scattering, with transition times of the order of 40 fs. The relaxation processes in the L valley are resolved in energy and momentum spaces, including their backscattering into the Γ valley during relaxation. In contrast, relaxation of hot electrons with excess energy below the minimum of the L valley is governed by the direct impact ionization (IMP). We reveal state-selective features of the IMP process, and we have determined the direct IMP rate to be 7 ×1012s-1 for hot electrons with excess energy in the range of 0.35 to 0.6 eV. The direct IMP process results in a rapid increase, within 300 fs after excitation, of the electron density at the conduction band minimum (CBM), and phonon-assisted IMP by hot electrons scattered in the L valley and those backscattered into the Γ valley persistently enhances the electron density up to 8 ps after excitation. By analyzing correlations between the IMP rates of hot electrons and the electron densities near the CBM, an important role of a transient Auger recombination is proposed to quantify the yield of low-energy electrons generated in the IMP process.

  3. Single-shot Monitoring of Ultrafast Processes via X-ray Streaking at a Free Electron Laser.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, Michele; Makita, Mikako; Howald, Ludovic; Kleibert, Armin; Vodungbo, Boris; Maldonado, Pablo; Raabe, Jörg; Jaouen, Nicolas; Redlin, Harald; Tiedtke, Kai; Oppeneer, Peter M; David, Christian; Nolting, Frithjof; Lüning, Jan

    2017-08-03

    The advent of x-ray free electron lasers has extended the unique capabilities of resonant x-ray spectroscopy techniques to ultrafast time scales. Here, we report on a novel experimental method that allows retrieving with a single x-ray pulse the time evolution of an ultrafast process, not only at a few discrete time delays, but continuously over an extended time window. We used a single x-ray pulse to resolve the laser-induced ultrafast demagnetisation dynamics in a thin cobalt film over a time window of about 1.6 ps with an excellent signal to noise ratio. From one representative single shot measurement we extract a spin relaxation time of (130 ± 30) fs with an average value, based on 193 single shot events of (113 ± 20) fs. These results are limited by the achieved experimental time resolution of 120 fs, and both values are in excellent agreement with previous results and theoretical modelling. More generally, this new experimental approach to ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy paves the way to the study of non-repetitive processes that cannot be investigated using traditional repetitive pump-probe schemes.

  4. Ultrafast studies of excess electrons in liquid acetonitrile: revisiting the solvated electron/solvent dimer anion equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Doan, Stephanie C; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2013-04-25

    We examine the ultrafast relaxation dynamics of excess electrons injected into liquid acetonitrile using air- and water-free techniques and compare our results to previous work on this system [Xia, C. et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2002, 117, 8855]. Excess electrons in liquid acetonitrile take on two forms: a "traditional" solvated electron that absorbs in the near-IR, and a solvated molecular dimer anion that absorbs weakly in the visible. We find that excess electrons initially produced via charge-transfer-to-solvent excitation of iodide prefer to localize as solvated electrons, but that there is a subsequent equilibration to form the dimer anion on an ~80 ps time scale. The spectral signature of this interconversion between the two forms of the excess electron is a clear isosbestic point. The presence of the isosbestic point makes it possible to fully deconvolute the spectra of the two species. We find that solvated molecular anion absorbs quite weakly, with a maximum extinction coefficient of ~2000 M(-1)cm(-1). With the extinction coefficient of the dimer anion in hand, we are also able to determine the equilibrium constant for the two forms of excess electron, and find that the molecular anion is favored by a factor of ~4. We also find that relatively little geminate recombination takes place, and that the geminate recombination that does take place is essentially complete within the first 20 ps. Finally, we show that the presence of small amounts of water in the acetonitrile can have a fairly large effect on the observed spectral dynamics, explaining the differences between our results and those in previously published work.

  5. Ultrafast-electron-diffraction studies of predamaged tungsten excited by femtosecond optical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, M.; Chen, Z.; Li, R.; Wang, Y.; Shen, X.; Dunning, M.; Weathersby, S.; Makasyuk, I.; Coffee, R.; Zhen, Q.; Kim, J.; Reid, A.; Jobe, K.; Hast, C.; Tsui, Y.; Wang, X.; Glenzer, S.

    2016-10-01

    Tungsten is considered as the main candidate material for use in the divertor of magnetic confinement fusion reactors. However, radiation damage is expected to occur because of its direct exposure to the high flux of hot plasma and energetic neutrons in fusion environment. Hence, understanding the material behaviors of W under these adverse conditions is central to the design of magnetic fusion reactors. To do that, we have recently developed an MeV ultrafast electron diffraction probe to resolve the structural evolution of optically excited tungsten. To simulate the radiation damage effect, the tungsten samples were bombarded with 500 keV Cu ions. The pre-damaged and pristine W's were excited by 130fs, 400nm laser pulses, and the subsequent heated system was probed with 3.2MeV electrons. The pump probe measurement shows that the ion bombardment to the W leads to larger decay in Bragg peak intensities as compared to pristine W, which may be due to a phonon softening effect. The measurement also shows that pre-damaged W transitions into complete liquid phase for conditions where pristine W stays solid. Our new capability is able to test the theories of structural dynamics of W under conditions relevant to fusion reactor environment. The research was funded by DOE Fusion Energy Science under FWP #100182.

  6. Ultrafast electron diffraction: Excited state structures and chemistries of aromatic carbonyls

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang Tae; Feenstra, Jonathan S.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2006-05-07

    The photophysics and photochemistry of molecules with complex electronic structures, such as aromatic carbonyls, involve dark structures of radiationless processes. With ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) of isolated molecular beams it is possible to determine these transient structures, and in this contribution we examine the nature of structural dynamics in two systems, benzaldehyde and acetophenone. Both molecules are seen to undergo a bifurcation upon excitation (S{sub 2}). Following femtosecond conversion to S{sub 1}, the bifurcation leads to the formation of molecular dissociation products, benzene and carbon monoxide for benzaldehyde, and benzoyl and methyl radicals for acetophenone, as well as intersystem crossing to the triplet state in both cases. The structure of the triplet state was determined to be 'quinoidlike' of {pi}{pi}* character with the excitation being localized in the phenyl ring. For the chemical channels, the product structures were also determined. The difference in photochemistry between the two species is discussed with respect to the change in large amplitude motion caused by the added methyl group in acetophenone. This discussion is also expanded to compare these results with the prototypical aliphatic carbonyl compounds, acetaldehyde and acetone. From these studies of structural dynamics, experimental and theoretical, we provide a landscape picture for, and the structures involved in, the radiationless pathways which determine the fate of molecules following excitation. For completeness, the UED methodology and the theoretical framework for structure determination are described in this full account of an earlier communication [J. S. Feenstra et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 221104 (2005)].

  7. Monitoring one-electron photo-oxidation of guanine in DNA crystals using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, James P.; Poynton, Fergus E.; Keane, Páraic M.; Gurung, Sarah P.; Brazier, John A.; Cardin, David J.; Winter, Graeme; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Towrie, Michael; Cardin, Christine J.; Kelly, John M.; Quinn, Susan J.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the molecular origins of diseases caused by ultraviolet and visible light, and also to develop photodynamic therapy, it is important to resolve the mechanism of photoinduced DNA damage. Damage to DNA bound to a photosensitizer molecule frequently proceeds by one-electron photo-oxidation of guanine, but the precise dynamics of this process are sensitive to the location and the orientation of the photosensitizer, which are very difficult to define in solution. To overcome this, ultrafast time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy was performed on photoexcited ruthenium polypyridyl-DNA crystals, the atomic structure of which was determined by X-ray crystallography. By combining the X-ray and TRIR data we are able to define both the geometry of the reaction site and the rates of individual steps in a reversible photoinduced electron-transfer process. This allows us to propose an individual guanine as the reaction site and, intriguingly, reveals that the dynamics in the crystal state are quite similar to those observed in the solvent medium.

  8. Free-Energy-Gap Law for Ultrafast Charge Recombination of Ion Pairs Formed by Intramolecular Photoinduced Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Alexey E; Malykhin, Roman; Ivanov, Anatoly I

    2017-01-26

    In this article, regularities of ultrafast charge recombination (CR) kinetics in photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer in polar solvents are studied. The kinetics of charge separation and ensuing ultrafast CR are simulated within the framework of the multichannel stochastic model. This model accounts for the reorganization of both the solvent and a number of intramolecular high-frequency vibrational modes. The solvent relaxation is described in terms of two relaxation modes. For ultrafast CR, the free-energy-gap law strongly depends on the parameters: the electronic coupling, reorganization energy of intramolecular high-frequency vibrational modes, and the vibrational and solvent relaxation times. The semilog dependence of the CR rate constant on the free-energy gap varies from a parabolic shape to a nearly linear one with increasing the electronic coupling and decreasing the vibrational relaxation time. The dynamic solvent effect in CR is predicted to be large in the area of strong exergonicity and small in the area of weak exergonicity. This regularity is opposite to that observed for the thermal reactions.

  9. The first picoseconds in bacterial photosynthesis--ultrafast electron transfer for the efficient conversion of light energy.

    PubMed

    Zinth, Wolfgang; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2005-05-01

    In this Minireview, we describe the function of the bacterial reaction centre (RC) as the central photosynthetic energy-conversion unit by ultrafast spectroscopy combined with structural analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, pigment exchange and theoretical modelling. We show that primary energy conversion is a stepwise process in which an electron is transferred via neighbouring chromophores of the RC. A well-defined chromophore arrangement in a rigid protein matrix, combined with optimised energetics of the different electron carriers, allows a highly efficient charge-separation process. The individual molecular reactions at room temperature are well described by conventional electron-transfer theory.

  10. A systematic study of thermodynamic and transport properties of layered 4d and 5d correlated electron systemsph.d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikara, Shalinee

    Correlated electron materials have been at the forefront of condensed matter research in the past couple of decades. Correlation in materials, especially, with open d and f electronic shells often lead to very exciting and intriguing phenomenon like high temperature superconductivity, Mott metal-insulator transition, colossal magnetoresistance (CMR). This thesis focuses on triple-layered Sr4Ru3O10, Sr substituted double layered (Ca1 - xAx) 3Ru2O7 (A = Ba, Sr) and 5d system Sr2IrO4 and Sr3Ir2O7. Triple-layered Sr4Ru3O10 displays interesting phenomena ranging from quantum oscillations, tunneling magnetoresistance, unusual low temperature specific heat, strong spin-lattice coupling to switching behavior. The central feature, however, is the unique borderline magnetism: along the c-axis. Sr4Ru3O10 shows spontaneous ferromagnetism, indicating a strong Coulomb exchange interaction, U and a large density of states at the Fermi surface, g( EF), hence Ug(EF) ≥ 1 (Stoner criterion). But within the ab-plane it features a pronounced peak in magnetization and a first-order metamagnetic transition. The coexistence of the interlayer ferromagnetism and the intralayer metamagnetism makes Sr4Ru3O10 a really unique system. Also, in this thesis the spin-valve behavior exhibited by impurity doping at the Ca site by Ba and Sr in the double layered Ca3Ru2O 7 is reported. Spin valve effect is a phenomenon only realized in multilayer thin films. Here, spin valve is observed in bulk single crystals of impurity doped Ca3Ru2O7, Ca3(Ru 1-xCrx) 2O7 and (Ca1 - xAx) 3Ru2O7 (A = Ba, Sr). 5d Iridates are expected to be more metallic and less magnetic than their 3d and 4f counterparts because of the extended 5d orbitals. In marked contrast, many iridates are magnetic insulators with exotic properties. The focus in this thesis is on Sr2IrO4 which diplays a novel Jeff = 1=2 Mott state. Magnetic, electrical, and thermal measurements on single-crystals of Sr2IrO4, reveal a novel giant magneto

  11. Relationships between the surface electronic and chemical properties of doped 4d and 5d late transition metal dioxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhongnan; Kitchin, John R.

    2015-03-01

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to elucidate the underlying physics describing the adsorption energies on doped late transition metal dioxide rutiles. Adsorption energies of atomic oxygen on doped rutiles MD-MHO2, where transition metal MD is doped into MHO2, were expressed in terms of a contribution from adsorption on the pure oxide of the dopant MD and perturbations to this adsorption energy caused by changing its neighboring metal cations and lattice parameters to that of the host oxide MHO2, which we call the ligand and strain effects, respectively. Our analysis of atom projected density of states revealed that the t2g-band center had the strongest correlation with adsorption energies. We show that charge transfer mediated shifts to the t2g-band center describe the ligand effect, and the radii of the atomic orbitals of metal cations can predict the magnitude and direction of this charge transfer. Strain produces systematic shifts to all features of the atom projected density of states, but correlations between the strain effect and the electronic structure were dependent on the chemical identity of the metal cation. The slope of these correlations can be related to the idealized d-band filling. This work elucidates the underlying physics describing adsorption on doped late transition metal oxides and establishes a foundation for models that use known chemical properties for the prediction of reactivity.

  12. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of Photoexcited Zinc-Porphyrin: Electronic-Vibrational Coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Abraham, Baxter; Nieto-Pescador, Jesus; Gundlach, Lars

    2016-08-02

    Cyclic tetrapyrroles are the active core of compounds with crucial roles in living systems, such as hemoglobin and chlorophyll, and in technology as photocatalysts and light absorbers for solar energy conversion. Zinc-tetraphenylporphyrin (Zn-TPP) is a prototypical cyclic tetrapyrrole that has been intensely studied in past decades. Because of its importance for photochemical processes the optical properties are of particular interest, and, accordingly, numerous studies have focused on light absorption and excited-state dynamics of Zn-TPP. Relaxation after photoexcitation in the Soret band involves internal conversion that is preceded by an ultrafast process. This relaxation process has been observed by several groups.more » Until now, it has not been established if it involves a higher lying ”dark” state or vibrational relaxation in the excited S2 state. Here we combine high time resolution electronic and vibrational spectroscopy to show that this process constitutes vibrational relaxation in the anharmonic 2 potential.« less

  13. Ultrafast relaxation dynamics of electronically excited piperidine: ionization signatures of Rydberg/valence evolution.

    PubMed

    Klein, Liv B; Thompson, James O F; Crane, Stuart W; Saalbach, Lisa; Sølling, Theis I; Paterson, Martin J; Townsend, Dave

    2016-09-14

    We have investigated the electronic relaxation dynamics of gas-phase piperidine (a secondary aliphatic amine) using time-resolved photoelectron imaging. Following 200 nm excitation, spectrally sharp and highly anisotropic photoelectron data reveal ultrafast (60 fs) internal conversion between the initially excited 3px Rydberg state and the lower-lying 3s Rydberg state, mediated by the evolution of nσ* valence character along the 3px N-C bond. This behaviour is in good agreement with previously reported findings for several tertiary aliphatic amines. In contrast to the these systems, however, much broader photoelectron signals exhibiting only very small angular anisotropy and two distinct decay timescales (180 fs and 1.7 ps) were also observed. As confirmed by our supporting calculations, this is attributable to nσ* valence character now evolving along the N-H stretching coordinate within the 3s Rydberg state as the molecule starts dissociating to yield H atom photoproducts in conjunction with ground state piperidinyl radicals. By analogy with systems such as ammonia and morpholine, we conclude this event may occur either promptly or, alternatively, via a "frustrated" process where the system repeatedly traverses the upper cone of a conical intersection with the ground state until the required region of phase space is sampled to facilitate non-adiabatic population transfer. Our findings reveal the role of several different nuclear coordinate motions in driving stepwise internal conversion across multiple potential energy surfaces and the distinct photoionization signatures that are associated with these processes.

  14. Ultrafast coherent X-ray diffractive imaging with the FLASH Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.; Barty, A.; Benner, W. H.; Bogan, M. J.; Boutet, S.; Cavalleri, A.; Düsterer, S.; Frank, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Iwan, B.; Marchesini, S.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Siebert, M. M.; Treusch, R.; Woods, B. W.

    High-resolution ultrafast coherent diffractive imaging has been carried out at the FLASH FEL. Reconstructed images show no effect of sample destruction. Time resolved imaging was achieved by time-delay holography and with a synchronized optical laser.

  15. Relationships between the surface electronic and chemical properties of doped 4d and 5d late transition metal dioxides

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhongnan; Kitchin, John R.

    2015-03-14

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to elucidate the underlying physics describing the adsorption energies on doped late transition metal dioxide rutiles. Adsorption energies of atomic oxygen on doped rutiles M{sup D}-M{sup H}O{sub 2}, where transition metal M{sup D} is doped into M{sup H}O{sub 2}, were expressed in terms of a contribution from adsorption on the pure oxide of the dopant M{sup D} and perturbations to this adsorption energy caused by changing its neighboring metal cations and lattice parameters to that of the host oxide M{sup H}O{sub 2}, which we call the ligand and strain effects, respectively. Our analysis of atom projected density of states revealed that the t{sub 2g}-band center had the strongest correlation with adsorption energies. We show that charge transfer mediated shifts to the t{sub 2g}-band center describe the ligand effect, and the radii of the atomic orbitals of metal cations can predict the magnitude and direction of this charge transfer. Strain produces systematic shifts to all features of the atom projected density of states, but correlations between the strain effect and the electronic structure were dependent on the chemical identity of the metal cation. The slope of these correlations can be related to the idealized d-band filling. This work elucidates the underlying physics describing adsorption on doped late transition metal oxides and establishes a foundation for models that use known chemical properties for the prediction of reactivity.

  16. Verifying 4D gated radiotherapy using time-integrated electronic portal imaging: a phantom and clinical study

    PubMed Central

    van Sörnsen de Koste, John R; Cuijpers, Johan P; de Geest, Frank GM; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Slotman, Ben J; Senan, Suresh

    2007-01-01

    Background Respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT) can decrease treatment toxicity by allowing for smaller treatment volumes for mobile tumors. RGRT is commonly performed using external surrogates of tumor motion. We describe the use of time-integrated electronic portal imaging (TI-EPI) to verify the position of internal structures during RGRT delivery Methods TI-EPI portals were generated by continuously collecting exit dose data (aSi500 EPID, Portal vision, Varian Medical Systems) when a respiratory motion phantom was irradiated during expiration, inspiration and free breathing phases. RGRT was delivered using the Varian RPM system, and grey value profile plots over a fixed trajectory were used to study object positions. Time-related positional information was derived by subtracting grey values from TI-EPI portals sharing the pixel matrix. TI-EPI portals were also collected in 2 patients undergoing RPM-triggered RGRT for a lung and hepatic tumor (with fiducial markers), and corresponding planning 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) scans were analyzed for motion amplitude. Results Integral grey values of phantom TI-EPI portals correlated well with mean object position in all respiratory phases. Cranio-caudal motion of internal structures ranged from 17.5–20.0 mm on planning 4DCT scans. TI-EPI of bronchial images reproduced with a mean value of 5.3 mm (1 SD 3.0 mm) located cranial to planned position. Mean hepatic fiducial markers reproduced with 3.2 mm (SD 2.2 mm) caudal to planned position. After bony alignment to exclude set-up errors, mean displacement in the two structures was 2.8 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively, and corresponding reproducibility in anatomy improved to 1.6 mm (1 SD). Conclusion TI-EPI appears to be a promising method for verifying delivery of RGRT. The RPM system was a good indirect surrogate of internal anatomy, but use of TI-EPI allowed for a direct link between anatomy and breathing patterns. PMID:17760960

  17. Ultrafast dynamics of multiple exciton harvesting in the CdSe-ZnO system: electron injection versus Auger recombination.

    PubMed

    Zídek, Karel; Zheng, Kaibo; Abdellah, Mohamed; Lenngren, Nils; Chábera, Pavel; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2012-12-12

    We study multiple electron transfer from a CdSe quantum dot (QD) to ZnO, which is a prerequisite for successful utilization of multiple exciton generation for photovoltaics. By using ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy we observe competition between electron injection into ZnO and quenching of multiexcitons via Auger recombination. We show that fast electron injection dominates over biexcitonic Auger recombination and multiple electrons can be transferred into ZnO. A kinetic component with time constant of a few tens of picoseconds was identified as the competition between injection of the second electron from a doubly excited QD and a trion Auger recombination. Moreover, we demonstrate that the multiexciton harvesting efficiency changes significantly with QD size. Within a narrow QD diameter range from 2 to 4 nm, the efficiency of electron injection from a doubly excited QD can vary from 30% to 70% in our system.

  18. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  19. High quality single shot ultrafast MeV electron diffraction from a photocathode radio-frequency gun.

    PubMed

    Fu, Feichao; Liu, Shengguang; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Jie; Cao, Jianming

    2014-08-01

    A compact ultrafast electron diffractometer, consisting of an s-band 1.6 cell photocathode radio-frequency gun, a multi-function changeable sample chamber, and a sensitive relativistic electron detector, was built at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. High-quality single-shot transmission electron diffraction patterns have been recorded by scattering 2.5 MeV electrons off single crystalline gold and polycrystalline aluminum samples. The high quality diffraction pattern indicates an excellent spatial resolution, with the ratio of the diffraction ring radius over the ring rms width beyond 10. The electron pulse width is estimated to be about 300 fs. The high temporal and spatial resolution may open new opportunities in various areas of sciences.

  20. High quality single shot ultrafast MeV electron diffraction from a photocathode radio-frequency gun

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Feichao; Liu, Shengguang; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao Zhang, Jie; Cao, Jianming

    2014-08-15

    A compact ultrafast electron diffractometer, consisting of an s-band 1.6 cell photocathode radio-frequency gun, a multi-function changeable sample chamber, and a sensitive relativistic electron detector, was built at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. High-quality single-shot transmission electron diffraction patterns have been recorded by scattering 2.5 MeV electrons off single crystalline gold and polycrystalline aluminum samples. The high quality diffraction pattern indicates an excellent spatial resolution, with the ratio of the diffraction ring radius over the ring rms width beyond 10. The electron pulse width is estimated to be about 300 fs. The high temporal and spatial resolution may open new opportunities in various areas of sciences.

  1. 4D-QSAR investigation and pharmacophore identification of pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepines using electron conformational-genetic algorithm method.

    PubMed

    Özalp, A; Yavuz, S Ç; Sabancı, N; Çopur, F; Kökbudak, Z; Sarıpınar, E

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present the results of pharmacophore identification and bioactivity prediction for pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine derivatives using the electron conformational-genetic algorithm (EC-GA) method as 4D-QSAR analysis. Using the data obtained from quantum chemical calculations at PM3/HF level, the electron conformational matrices of congruity (ECMC) were constructed by EMRE software. The ECMC of the lowest energy conformer of the compound with the highest activity was chosen as the template and compared with the ECMCs of the lowest energy conformer of the other compounds within given tolerances to reveal the electron conformational submatrix of activity (ECSA, i.e. pharmacophore) by ECSP software. A descriptor pool was generated taking into account the obtained pharmacophore. To predict the theoretical activity and select the best subset of variables affecting bioactivities, the nonlinear least square regression method and genetic algorithm were performed. For four types of activity including the GI50, TGI, LC50 and IC50 of the pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4] benzodiazepine series, the r(2)train, r(2)test and q(2) values were 0.858, 0.810, 0.771; 0.853, 0.848, 0.787; 0.703, 0.787, 0.600; and 0.776, 0.722, 0.687, respectively.

  2. Ultrafast gating of a mid-infrared laser pulse by a sub-pC relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cesar, D. B.; Musumeci, P.; Alesini, D.

    2015-12-21

    In this paper we discuss a relative time-of-arrival measurement scheme between an electron beam and a mid-infrared laser pulse based on the electron-beam controlled transmission in semiconductor materials. This technique can be used as a time-stamping diagnostic in ultrafast electron diffraction or microscopy. In particular, our characterization of Germanium demonstrates that sub-ps time-of-arrival sensitivity could be achieved in a single shot and with very low charge beams (<1 pC). Detailed measurements as a function of the beam charge and the laser wavelength offer insights on the free carrier dynamics in the semiconductor upon excitation by the electron beam.

  3. Ultrafast nonequilibrium ion and electron dynamics of a neon plasma produced by an ultra-intense x-ray pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Cheng; Li, Yongjun; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2017-06-01

    Ultrafast nonequilibrium ion and electron dynamics of a neon plasma produced in the interaction with an ultra-intense x-ray pulse is investigated theoretically. Electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is obtained by solving Fokker-Planck equation, which is implemented self-consistently in a time-dependent rate equation in the framework of detailed-level-accounting approximation. Evolution dynamics of EEDF are presented at a variety of ion density in interaction with x-ray pulses of different laser intensities. Thermalization of free electrons is demonstrated after the x-ray pulses have turned off. The results are compared with two other simplified models, i.e., one is a relaxation model and the second uses the Maxwellian approach. Large discrepancies in the EEDF are found and the effects of detailed treatment of electron dynamics on population distributions are demonstrated and discussed.

  4. Ultrafast electron diffraction and electron microscopy: present status and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishchenko, A. A.; Aseyev, S. A.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Panchenko, V. Ya; Ryabov, E. A.

    2014-07-01

    Acting as complementary research tools, high time-resolved spectroscopy and diffractometry techniques proceeding from various physical principles open up new possibilities for studying matter with necessary integration of the 'structure-dynamics-function' triad in physics, chemistry, biology and materials science. Since the 1980s, a new field of research has started at the leading research laboratories, aimed at developing means of filming the coherent dynamics of nuclei in molecules and fast processes in biological objects ('atomic and molecular movies'). The utilization of ultrashort laser pulse sources has significantly modified traditional electron beam approaches to and provided high space-time resolution for the study of materials. Diffraction methods using frame-by-frame filming and the development of the main principles of the study of coherent dynamics of atoms have paved the way to observing wave packet dynamics, the intermediate states of reaction centers, and the dynamics of electrons in molecules, thus allowing a transition from the kinetics to the dynamics of the phase trajectories of molecules in the investigation of chemical reactions.

  5. Single-shot, ultrafast diagnostics of light-speed plasma structures and accelerating GeV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yen-Yu; Shaw, Joseph M.; Welch, James; Weichman, Kathleen; Hannasch, Andrea; LaBerge, Maxwell; Henderson, Watson; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Bernstein, Aaron; Downer, Mike

    2017-03-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated ultrafast diagnostics to visualize the laser wakefield acceleration process in a single-shot mode. We measured the Faraday rotation of a probe pulse due to the magnetic field induced by GeV electrons in low-density plasmas. In addition, we improved the temporal resolution of Frequency Domain Streak Camera (FDSC) to ˜10 fs by broadening the bandwidth of the probe beam, enabling visualization of the bubble dynamics. A prototype experiment using the broad bandwidth FDSC was performed.

  6. Unexpectedly broad photoelectron spectrum as a signature of ultrafast electronic relaxation of Rydberg states of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Shunsuke; Sato, Motoki; Suzuki, Toshinori; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu.

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of CO2 excited into Rydberg states lying 0.2 eV below the ionization threshold is studied by means of time resolved photoelectron imaging. Over 3 eV broad photoelectron spectra are measured for all pump-probe delay times. Quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that the spectral broadening is due to ultrafast electronic relaxation of Rydberg states and identify the likely relaxation pathways. Experiment and theory bracket the relaxation time between 15 and 65 fs. A weak time independent ionization signal is attributed to CO2 trapped in near-threshold triplet states.

  7. Basic nanosystems of early 4d and 5d transition metals: Electronic properties and the effect of spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Anu; Nautiyal, Tashi; Auluck, Sushil

    2008-07-01

    There are various possibilities for the structure as well as for the growth of nanosystems, particularly of nanowires. The ultimate one-dimensional material—linear chains—are difficult to exploit for applications due to their transient nature. Nonetheless these are a good prototype for studying one-dimensional materials and project the kind of behavior one may expect from ultrathin nanowires. Likewise monolayers are the ultimate two-dimensional materials and their study is helpful in understanding the behavior of two-dimensional materials. We present a theoretical study on basic nanosystems—linear chains and monolayers—of the 4d (Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Tc) and 5d (Hf, Ta, W, and Re) transition metals of groups 3-7 by means of an all-electron density functional approach. We have explored all kinds of magnetic configurations: nonmagnetic, ferromagnetic, and antiferromagnetic, by (i) inclusion and (ii) omission of spin-orbit interaction. We find that though this interaction has a marginal effect on nanosystems of 4d transition metals, its impact becomes stronger with lowering of dimensionality. Further it has a significant effect on properties of nanosystems of 5d transition metals as well as those of bulk. It is interesting to note that the monolayers of 5d transition metals seem reluctant to order magnetically despite the general tendency of nanosystems of 4d transition metals and linear chains of 5d transition metals to woo magnetic ordering. The nanosystems with preference for antiferromagnetic ordering are found to be stable at larger nearest-neighbor distances compared to the ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic phases. Specially, antiferromagnetic monolayers of Nb and Mo are predicted to exhibit larger separations with respect to bulk, a feature observed only for some low-dimensional systems. All the monolayers, except Y, are predicted to have a nonmagnetic state almost degenerate with ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic state. Therefore suitable substrate

  8. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Galtier, E.; Harmand, M.; Leguay, P. M.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozkan, C.; Störmer, M.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, Th.; Heimann, P. A.; Dorchies, F.

    2014-04-17

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level of the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.

  9. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; ...

    2014-04-17

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level ofmore » the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.« less

  10. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, J; Fourment, C; Cho, B I; Engelhorn, K; Galtier, E; Harmand, M; Leguay, P M; Lee, H J; Nagler, B; Nakatsutsumi, M; Ozkan, C; Störmer, M; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, Th; Heimann, P A; Dorchies, F

    2014-04-17

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called "molecular movie" within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level of the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.

  11. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Galtier, E.; Harmand, M.; Leguay, P. M.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozkan, C.; Störmer, M.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, Th; Heimann, P. A.; Dorchies, F.

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level of the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes. PMID:24740172

  12. Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-07-25

    This report summarizes a 2011 workshop that addressed the potential role of rapid, time-resolved electron microscopy measurements in accelerating the solution of important scientific and technical problems. A series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Science workshops have highlighted the critical role advanced research tools play in addressing scientific challenges relevant to biology, sustainable energy, and technologies that will fuel economic development without degrading our environment. Among the specific capability needs for advancing science and technology are tools that extract more detailed information in realistic environments (in situ or operando) at extreme conditions (pressure and temperature) and as a function of time (dynamic and time-dependent). One of the DOE workshops, Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next Generation Instrumentation and Beyond, specifically addressed the importance of electron-based characterization methods for a wide range of energy-relevant Grand Scientific Challenges. Boosted by the electron optical advancement in the last decade, a diversity of in situ capabilities already is available in many laboratories. The obvious remaining major capability gap in electron microscopy is in the ability to make these direct in situ observations over a broad spectrum of fast (µs) to ultrafast (picosecond [ps] and faster) temporal regimes. In an effort to address current capability gaps, EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, organized an Ultrafast Electron Microscopy Workshop, held June 14-15, 2011, with the primary goal to identify the scientific needs that could be met by creating a facility capable of a strongly improved time resolution with integrated in situ capabilities. The workshop brought together more than 40 leading scientists involved in applying and/or advancing electron microscopy to address important scientific problems of relevance to DOE’s research

  13. Real-time observation of multiexcitonic states in ultrafast singlet fission using coherent 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bakulin, Artem A; Morgan, Sarah E; Kehoe, Tom B; Wilson, Mark W B; Chin, Alex W; Zigmantas, Donatas; Egorova, Dassia; Rao, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Singlet fission is the spin-allowed conversion of a spin-singlet exciton into a pair of spin-triplet excitons residing on neighbouring molecules. To rationalize this phenomenon, a multiexcitonic spin-zero triplet-pair state has been hypothesized as an intermediate in singlet fission. However, the nature of the intermediate states and the underlying mechanism of ultrafast fission have not been elucidated experimentally. Here, we study a series of pentacene derivatives using ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and unravel the origin of the states involved in fission. Our data reveal the crucial role of vibrational degrees of freedom coupled to electronic excitations that facilitate the mixing of multiexcitonic states with singlet excitons. The resulting manifold of vibronic states drives sub-100 fs fission with unity efficiency. Our results provide a framework for understanding singlet fission and show how the formation of vibronic manifolds with a high density of states facilitates fast and efficient electronic processes in molecular systems.

  14. Ultrafast electron transfer from low band gap conjugated polymer to quantum dots in hybrid photovoltaic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couderc, Elsa; Greaney, Matthew J.; Thornbury, William; Brutchey, Richard L.; Bradforth, Stephen E.

    2014-09-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy is used in conjunction with chemical doping experiments to study the photo-generation of charges in hybrid thin films composed of PCPDTBT and CdSe quantum dots. We show how we use chemical doping experiments to de-convolute the spectral signatures of the transient states in the near infrared.

  15. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Charge Stabilization in Donor-Acceptor Dyads Capable of Harvesting Near-Infrared Light.

    PubMed

    Bandi, Venugopal; Gobeze, Habtom B; D'Souza, Francis

    2015-08-03

    To harvest energy from the near-infrared (near-IR) and infrared (IR) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, which constitutes nearly 70 % of the solar radiation, there is a great demand for near-IR and IR light-absorbing sensitizers that are capable of undergoing ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer when connected to a suitable electron acceptor. Towards achieving this goal, in the present study, we report multistep syntheses of dyads derived from structurally modified BF2-chelated azadipyrromethene (ADP; to extend absorption and emission into the near-IR region) and fullerene as electron-donor and electron-acceptor entities, respectively. The newly synthesized dyads were fully characterized based on optical absorbance, fluorescence, geometry optimization, and electrochemical studies. The established energy level diagram revealed the possibility of electron transfer either from the singlet excited near-IR sensitizer or singlet excited fullerene. Femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption studies were performed to gather evidence of excited state electron transfer and to evaluate the kinetics of charge separation and charge recombination processes. These studies revealed the occurrence of ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer leading to charge stabilization in the dyads, and populating the triplet states of ADP, benzanulated-ADP and benzanulated thiophene-ADP in the respective dyads, and triplet state of C60 in the case of BF2 -chelated dipyrromethene derived dyad during charge recombination. The present findings reveal that these sensitizers are suitable for harvesting light energy from the near-IR region of the solar spectrum and for building fast-responding optoelectronic devices operating under near-IR radiation input. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Ultrafast single-electron transfer in coupled quantum dots driven by a few-cycle chirped pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wen-Xing; Chen, Ai-Xi; Bai, Yanfeng; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2014-04-14

    We theoretically study the ultrafast transfer of a single electron between the ground states of a coupled double quantum dot (QD) structure driven by a nonlinear chirped few-cycle laser pulse. A time-dependent Schrödinger equation without the rotating wave approximation is solved numerically. We demonstrate numerically the possibility to have a complete transfer of a single electron by choosing appropriate values of chirped rate parameters and the intensity of the pulse. Even in the presence of the spontaneous emission and dephasing processes of the QD system, high-efficiency coherent transfer of a single electron can be obtained in a wide range of the pulse parameters. Our results illustrate the potential to utilize few-cycle pulses for the excitation in coupled quantum dot systems through the nonlinear chirp parameter control, as well as a guidance in the design of experimental implementation.

  17. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer in the micelle and the gel phase of a PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Ujjwal; Ghosh, Subhadip; Dey, Shantanu; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2008-04-28

    Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) to coumarin dyes is studied in the micelle and the gel phase of a triblock copolymer, (PEO){sub 20}-(PPO){sub 70}-(PEO){sub 20} (Pluronic P123) by picosecond and femtosecond emission spectroscopies. The rate of PET in a P123 micelle and gel is found to be nonexponential and faster than the slow components of solvation dynamics. In a P123 micelle and gel, PET occurs on multiple time scales ranging from a subpicosecond time scale to a few nanoseconds. In the gel phase, the highest rate constant (9.3x10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) of ET for C152 is about two times higher than that (3.8x10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) observed in micelle phase. The ultrafast components of electron transfer (ET) exhibits a bell shaped dependence with the free energy change which is similar to the Marcus inversion. Possible reasons for slower PET in P123 micelle compared to other micelles and relative to P123 gel are discussed.

  18. Ultrafast Dynamics of a Nucleobase Analogue Illuminated by a Short Intense X-ray Free Electron Laser Pulse

    DOE PAGES

    Nagaya, K.; Motomura, K.; Kukk, E.; ...

    2016-06-16

    Understanding x-ray radiation damage is a crucial issue for both medical applications of x rays and x-ray free-electron-laser (XFEL) science aimed at molecular imaging. Decrypting the charge and fragmentation dynamics of nucleobases, the smallest units of a macro-biomolecule, contributes to a bottom-up understanding of the damage via cascades of phenomena following x-ray exposure. We investigate experimentally and by numerical simulations the ultrafast radiation damage induced on a nucleobase analogue (5-iodouracil) by an ultrashort (10 fs) high-intensity radiation pulse generated by XFEL at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron Laser (SACLA). The present study elucidates a plausible underlying radiosensitizing mechanism of 5-iodouracil.more » This mechanism is independent of the exact composition of 5-iodouracil and thus relevant to other such radiosensitizers. Furthermore, we found that despite a rapid increase of the net molecular charge in the presence of iodine, and of the ultrafast release of hydrogen, the other atoms are almost frozen within the 10-fs duration of the exposure. Finally, this validates single-shot molecular imaging as a consistent approach, provided the radiation pulse used is brief enough.« less

  19. Ultrafast Dynamics of a Nucleobase Analogue Illuminated by a Short Intense X-ray Free Electron Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, K.; Motomura, K.; Kukk, E.; Fukuzawa, H.; Wada, S.; Tachibana, T.; Ito, Y.; Mondal, S.; Sakai, T.; Matsunami, K.; Koga, R.; Ohmura, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Kanno, M.; Rudenko, A.; Nicolas, C.; Liu, X.-J.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, J.; Anand, M.; Jiang, Y. H.; Kim, D.-E.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Kono, H.; Miron, C.; Yao, M.; Ueda, K.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding x-ray radiation damage is a crucial issue for both medical applications of x rays and x-ray free-electron-laser (XFEL) science aimed at molecular imaging. Decrypting the charge and fragmentation dynamics of nucleobases, the smallest units of a macro-biomolecule, contributes to a bottom-up understanding of the damage via cascades of phenomena following x-ray exposure. We investigate experimentally and by numerical simulations the ultrafast radiation damage induced on a nucleobase analogue (5-iodouracil) by an ultrashort (10 fs) high-intensity radiation pulse generated by XFEL at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron Laser (SACLA). The present study elucidates a plausible underlying radiosensitizing mechanism of 5-iodouracil. This mechanism is independent of the exact composition of 5-iodouracil and thus relevant to other such radiosensitizers. Furthermore, we found that despite a rapid increase of the net molecular charge in the presence of iodine, and of the ultrafast release of hydrogen, the other atoms are almost frozen within the 10-fs duration of the exposure. This validates single-shot molecular imaging as a consistent approach, provided the radiation pulse used is brief enough.

  20. 4-D photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  1. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  2. Evidence of apoptotic effects of 2,4-D and butachlor on walking catfish, Clarias batrachus, by transmission electron microscopy and DNA degradation studies.

    PubMed

    Ateeq, Bushra; Farah, M Abul; Ahmad, Waseem

    2006-01-25

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death is characterized morphologically by chromatin condensation, cell shrinkage, fragmentation of the nucleus and cytoplasm, and consequently formation of apoptotic bodies. It has also been best characterized by the cleavage of DNA into nucleosomal size fragments of 180-200 bp or multiples of the same. Contrary to this, under extreme conditions, the cells were found to show adaptive response to apoptosis and unable to regulate their own death; necrosis is therefore predominantly observed. In the present study, we showed induction of apoptosis in Clarias batrachus due to sublethal concentration of 2,4-D and butachlor at multiple exposure time. The first phase of the study involved light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for ultrastructural abnormalities of the germinal tissues. While, in the second phase of the study, DNA degradation of blood and hepatic tissue was resolved on agarose gel electrophoresis. In histopathological studies, large numbers of stage II oocytes were noted for nuclear blebbing irrespective of the test chemical. Some of the butachlor-exposed oocytes showed vacuolation and electron dense cytoplasm along with thickened nuclear envelope, having close association with the lysosomes on the cytoplasmic side. Some oocytes undergo nuclear blebbing having inner dense core and translucent cytoplasm. Leydig cells were slightly hypertrophied and few appeared pycnotic, a process involving necrotic changes in which the cell nuclei were characterized by rounding up and condensation resulting in hyperchromatic staining or pycnosis. In testicular tissue, spermatogonial nuclei had irregular large clumps of heterochromatin adjoining the nuclear membrane indicating initial stage of apoptotic cell death. Electrophoretic separation resulted in a ladder pattern of blood DNA and smear like pattern of hepatic DNA. These results indicate that the above herbicides are able to induce apoptosis both at molecular as

  3. Development of high-brightness ultrafast electron microscope for studying nanoscale dynamics associated with strongly correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhensheng

    Strongly correlated-electron materials are a class of materials that exhibit numerous intriguing emergent phenomena, including metal-to-insulator transition, colossal magnetoresistance, high-temperature superconductivity, etc. These phenomena are beyond the reach of the conventional solid state physics, which is based on the band theory. Instead, strong electron-electron correlations are found to play important roles, which leads to complicated interplay between different degrees of freedoms (charge, lattice, spins...). In this thesis, ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is used to investigate the photo-induced ultrafast structural dynamics of strongly correlated materials, among which VO2 is taken as an exemplar system, one that reveals the fundamental physics behind photo-induced phase transitions, electron-electron correlation on nanometer scales, and the electron-phonon coupling in this exotic class of materials. The phenomena presented here are expected to have more general significance as they may reflect the physics to which other strongly correlated materials also conform. In polycrystalline VO2 thin films, the structural changes resulting from photoexcitation with femtosecond laser pulses with different wavelengths are observed to lead to non-thermal phase transitions, which require less energy compared to the phase transitions induced by thermal excitation. The details of the structural change are extracted from the UED results revealing stepwise atomic movements after photoexcitation, which suggests the phase transition starts with a dilation of the correlated d electrons. On the other hand, the structural phase transition is found to be decoupled from the metal-to-insulator transition when the sample dimension is reduced to the sub-micrometer scale, which is attributed to the interface charge doping effects from different substrates. A new phase (M3, monoclinic metallic phase) is distinguished, which has not been discussed by the existing theoretical

  4. Water-Stable, Hydroxamate Anchors for Functionalization of TiO2 Surfaces with Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, W.R.; Milot, R.L.; Song, H.; Snoeberger III, R.C.; Batista, Victor S.; Schmuttenmaer, C.A.; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2010-01-01

    A novel class of derivatized hydroxamic acid linkages for robust sensitization of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) under various aqueous conditions is described. The stability of linkages bound to metal oxides under various conditions is important in developing photocatalytic cells which incorporate transition metal complexes for solar energy conversion. In order to compare the standard carboxylate anchor to hydroxamates, two organic dyes differing only in anchoring groups were synthesized and attached to TiO{sub 2} NPs. At acidic, basic, and close to neutral pH, hydroxamic acid linkages resist detachment compared to the labile carboxylic acids. THz spectroscopy was used to compare ultrafast interfacial electron transfer (IET) into the conduction band of TiO{sub 2} for both linkages and found similar IET characteristics. Observable electron injection and stronger binding suggest that hydroxamates are a suitable class of anchors for designing water stable molecules for functionalizing TiO{sub 2}.

  5. Single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction for structure dynamic studies of warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, M. Z.; Shen, X.; Chen, Z.; Li, R. K.; Dunning, M.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Zheng, Q.; Weathersby, S. P.; Reid, A. H.; Coffee, R.; Makasyuk, I.; Edstrom, S.; McCormick, D.; Jobe, K.; Hast, C.; Glenzer, S. H.; Wang, X.

    2016-08-04

    We have developed a single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast-electron-diffraction system to measure the structural dynamics of warm dense matter. The electron probe in this system is featured by a kinetic energy of 3.2 MeV and a total charge of 20 fC, with the FWHM pulse duration and spot size at sample of 350 fs and 120 µm respectively. We demonstrate its unique capability by visualizing the atomic structural changes of warm dense gold formed from a laser-excited 35-nm freestanding single-crystal gold foil. The temporal evolution of the Bragg peak intensity and of the liquid signal during solid-liquid phase transition are quantitatively determined. This experimental capability opens up an exciting opportunity to unravel the atomic dynamics of structural phase transitions in warm dense matter regime

  6. Single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction for structure dynamic studies of warm dense matter

    DOE PAGES

    Mo, M. Z.; Shen, X.; Chen, Z.; ...

    2016-08-04

    We have developed a single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast-electron-diffraction system to measure the structural dynamics of warm dense matter. The electron probe in this system is featured by a kinetic energy of 3.2 MeV and a total charge of 20 fC, with the FWHM pulse duration and spot size at sample of 350 fs and 120 µm respectively. We demonstrate its unique capability by visualizing the atomic structural changes of warm dense gold formed from a laser-excited 35-nm freestanding single-crystal gold foil. The temporal evolution of the Bragg peak intensity and of the liquid signal during solid-liquid phase transition are quantitatively determined.more » This experimental capability opens up an exciting opportunity to unravel the atomic dynamics of structural phase transitions in warm dense matter regime« less

  7. Single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction for structure dynamic studies of warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, M. Z.; Shen, X.; Chen, Z.; Li, R. K.; Dunning, M.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Zheng, Q.; Weathersby, S. P.; Reid, A. H.; Coffee, R.; Makasyuk, I.; Edstrom, S.; McCormick, D.; Jobe, K.; Hast, C.; Glenzer, S. H.; Wang, X.

    2016-08-04

    We have developed a single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast-electron-diffraction system to measure the structural dynamics of warm dense matter. The electron probe in this system is featured by a kinetic energy of 3.2 MeV and a total charge of 20 fC, with the FWHM pulse duration and spot size at sample of 350 fs and 120 µm respectively. We demonstrate its unique capability by visualizing the atomic structural changes of warm dense gold formed from a laser-excited 35-nm freestanding single-crystal gold foil. The temporal evolution of the Bragg peak intensity and of the liquid signal during solid-liquid phase transition are quantitatively determined. This experimental capability opens up an exciting opportunity to unravel the atomic dynamics of structural phase transitions in warm dense matter regime

  8. Single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction for structure dynamic studies of warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, M. Z. Shen, X.; Chen, Z.; Li, R. K.; Dunning, M.; Zheng, Q.; Weathersby, S. P.; Reid, A. H.; Coffee, R.; Makasyuk, I.; Edstrom, S.; McCormick, D.; Jobe, K.; Hast, C.; Glenzer, S. H.; Wang, X.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.

    2016-11-15

    We have developed a single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast-electron-diffraction system to measure the structural dynamics of warm dense matter. The electron probe in this system is featured by a kinetic energy of 3.2 MeV and a total charge of 20 fC, with the FWHM pulse duration and spot size at sample of 350 fs and 120 μm respectively. We demonstrate its unique capability by visualizing the atomic structural changes of warm dense gold formed from a laser-excited 35-nm freestanding single-crystal gold foil. The temporal evolution of the Bragg peak intensity and of the liquid signal during solid-liquid phase transition are quantitatively determined. This experimental capability opens up an exciting opportunity to unravel the atomic dynamics of structural phase transitions in warm dense matter regime.

  9. Ultrafast and nanoscale diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.

    2016-10-01

    Charge carrier transport across interfaces of dissimilar materials (including vacuum) is the essence of all electronic devices. Ultrafast charge transport across a nanometre length scale is of fundamental importance in the miniaturization of vacuum and plasma electronics. With the combination of recent advances in electronics, photonics and nanotechnology, these miniature devices may integrate with solid-state platforms, achieving superior performance. This paper reviews recent modelling efforts on quantum tunnelling, ultrafast electron emission and transport, and electrical contact resistance. Unsolved problems and challenges in these areas are addressed.

  10. Effects of single atom doping on the ultrafast electron dynamics of M1Au24(SR)18 (M = Pd, Pt) nanoclusters

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Meng; Qian, Huifeng; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; ...

    2016-02-29

    Atomically precise, doped metal clusters are receiving wide research interest due to their synergistic properties dependent on the metal composition. To understand the electronic properties of doped clusters, it is highly desirable to probe the excited state behavior. Here, we report the ultrafast relaxation dynamics of doped M1@Au24(SR)18 (M = Pd, Pt; R = CH2CH2Ph) clusters using femtosecond visible and near infrared transient absorption spectroscopy. Three relaxation components are identified for both mono-doped clusters: (1) sub-picosecond relaxation within the M1Au12 core states; (2) core to shell relaxation in a few picoseconds; and (3) relaxation back to the ground state inmore » more than one nanosecond. Despite similar relaxation pathways for the two doped nanoclusters, the coupling between the metal core and surface ligands is accelerated by over 30% in the case of the Pt dopant compared with the Pd dopant. Compared to Pd doping, the case of Pt doping leads to much more drastic changes in the steady state and transient absorption of the clusters, which indicates that the 5d orbitals of the Pt atom are more strongly mixed with Au 5d and 6s orbitals than the 4d orbitals of the Pd dopant. These results demonstrate that a single foreign atom can lead to entirely different excited state spectral features of the whole cluster compared to the parent Au25(SR)18 cluster. As a result, the detailed excited state dynamics of atomically precise Pd/Pt doped gold clusters help further understand their properties and benefit the development of energy-related applications.« less

  11. Effects of single atom doping on the ultrafast electron dynamics of M1Au24(SR)18 (M = Pd, Pt) nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meng; Qian, Huifeng; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Jin, Rongchao

    2016-04-07

    Atomically precise, doped metal clusters are receiving wide research interest due to their synergistic properties dependent on the metal composition. To understand the electronic properties of doped clusters, it is highly desirable to probe the excited state behavior. Here, we report the ultrafast relaxation dynamics of doped M1@Au24(SR)18 (M = Pd, Pt; R = CH2CH2Ph) clusters using femtosecond visible and near infrared transient absorption spectroscopy. Three relaxation components are identified for both mono-doped clusters: (1) sub-picosecond relaxation within the M1Au12 core states; (2) core to shell relaxation in a few picoseconds; and (3) relaxation back to the ground state in more than one nanosecond. Despite similar relaxation pathways for the two doped nanoclusters, the coupling between the metal core and surface ligands is accelerated by over 30% in the case of the Pt dopant compared with the Pd dopant. Compared to Pd doping, the case of Pt doping leads to much more drastic changes in the steady state and transient absorption of the clusters, which indicates that the 5d orbitals of the Pt atom are more strongly mixed with Au 5d and 6s orbitals than the 4d orbitals of the Pd dopant. These results demonstrate that a single foreign atom can lead to entirely different excited state spectral features of the whole cluster compared to the parent Au25(SR)18 cluster. The detailed excited state dynamics of atomically precise Pd/Pt doped gold clusters help further understand their properties and benefit the development of energy-related applications.

  12. Ultrafast internal conversion of excited cytosine via the lowest pipi electronic singlet state.

    PubMed

    Merchán, Manuela; Serrano-Andrés, Luis

    2003-07-09

    Computational evidence at the CASPT2 level supports that the lowest excited state pipi* contributes to the S1/S0 crossing responsible for the ultrafast decay of singlet excited cytosine. The computed radiative lifetime, 33 ns, is consistent with the experimentally derived value, 40 ns. The nOpi* state does not play a direct role in the rapid repopulation of the ground state; it is involved in a S2/S1 crossing. Alternative mechanisms through excited states pisigma* or nNpi* are not competitive in cytosine.

  13. Monitoring Ultrafast Chemical Dynamics by Time-Domain X-ray Photo- and Auger-Electron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Oliver; Gühr, Markus

    2016-01-19

    The directed flow of charge and energy is at the heart of all chemical processes. Extraordinary efforts are underway to monitor and understand the concerted motion of electrons and nuclei with ever increasing spatial and temporal sensitivity. The element specificity, chemical sensitivity, and temporal resolution of ultrafast X-ray spectroscopy techniques hold great promise to provide new insight into the fundamental interactions underlying chemical dynamics in systems ranging from isolated molecules to application-like devices. Here, we focus on the potential of ultrafast X-ray spectroscopy techniques based on the detection of photo- and Auger electrons to provide new fundamental insight into photochemical processes of systems with various degrees of complexity. Isolated nucleobases provide an excellent testing ground for our most fundamental understanding of intramolecular coupling between electrons and nuclei beyond the traditionally applied Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Ultrafast electronic relaxation dynamics enabled by the breakdown of this approximation is the major component of the nucleobase photoprotection mechanisms. Transient X-ray induced Auger electron spectroscopy on photoexcited thymine molecules provides atomic-site specific details of the extremely efficient coupling that converts potentially bond changing ultraviolet photon energy into benign heat. In particular, the time-dependent spectral shift of a specific Auger band is sensitive to the length of a single bond within the molecule. The X-ray induced Auger transients show evidence for an electronic transition out of the initially excited state within only ∼200 fs in contrast to theoretically predicted picosecond population trapping behind a reaction barrier. Photoinduced charge transfer dynamics between transition metal complexes and semiconductor nanostructures are of central importance for many emerging energy and climate relevant technologies. Numerous demonstrations of photovoltaic and

  14. Study of beam loading and its compensation in the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser injector linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Shankar Pant, K. K.

    2014-12-15

    The RF properties of an accelerating structure, and the pulse structure and charge per bunch in the electron beam propagating through it are important parameters that determine the impact of beam loading in the structure. The injector linac of the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser (CUTE-FEL) has been operated with two different pulse structures during initial commissioning experiments and the effect of beam loading on the accelerated electron beam parameters has been studied analytically for these two pulse structures. This paper discusses the analytical study of beam loading in a Standing Wave, Plane Wave Transformer linac employed in the CUTE-FEL setup, and a possible technique for its compensation for the electron beam parameters of the CUTE-FEL. A parametric study has been performed to study beam loading for different beam currents and to optimize injection time of the electron beam to compensate beam loading. Results from the parametric study have also been used to explain previously observed results from acceleration experiments in the CUTE-FEL setup.

  15. Picosecond infared study of ultrafast electron transfer and vibrational energy relaxation in a mixed-valent ruthenium dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Doorn, S.K.; Stoutland, P.O.; Dyer, R.B.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1992-04-08

    Mixed-valent transition-metal dimers have become key systems for understanding many fundamental aspects of electron-transfer dynamics. The mixed-valent dimer [(NC){sub 5}Ru{sup II}CNRu{sup III}-(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup 1-} is an interesting member of this class. In this complex, the ruthenium centers are strongly coupled through a short cyanide bridge, but because the [(NC){sub 5}Ru{sub III}CNRu{sub II}(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sub -1} state of this systems lies approximately 8000cm{sup -1} higher in energy, the odd electron is localized on the ruthenium cyanide center. Optical excitation onto the metal-metal charge transfer (MMCT) band leads to reduction of the ruthenium ammine site. This state is highly unstable with respect to back electron transfer. The MMCT excitation is followed by back electron transfer, which may occur on very short time scales, allowing one to observe effects due to ultrafast reorganization processes, to discern excited state/ground state coupling phenomena, and to test modern electron-transfer theories. In this communication, the authors report a picosecond infrared study of the dynamics of [(NC){sub 5}Ru{sup II}CNRu{sup III} (NH{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup 1-} following MMCT optical excitation. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Study of beam loading and its compensation in the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser injector linac.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K K

    2014-12-01

    The RF properties of an accelerating structure, and the pulse structure and charge per bunch in the electron beam propagating through it are important parameters that determine the impact of beam loading in the structure. The injector linac of the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser (CUTE-FEL) has been operated with two different pulse structures during initial commissioning experiments and the effect of beam loading on the accelerated electron beam parameters has been studied analytically for these two pulse structures. This paper discusses the analytical study of beam loading in a Standing Wave, Plane Wave Transformer linac employed in the CUTE-FEL setup, and a possible technique for its compensation for the electron beam parameters of the CUTE-FEL. A parametric study has been performed to study beam loading for different beam currents and to optimize injection time of the electron beam to compensate beam loading. Results from the parametric study have also been used to explain previously observed results from acceleration experiments in the CUTE-FEL setup.

  17. Tuning of Magnetic Optical Response in a Dielectric Nanoparticle by Ultrafast Photoexcitation of Dense Electron-Hole Plasma.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Sergey; Kudryashov, Sergey; Mukhin, Ivan; Mozharov, Alexey; Milichko, Valentin; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel

    2015-09-09

    We propose a novel approach for efficient tuning of optical properties of a high refractive index subwavelength nanoparticle with a magnetic Mie-type resonance by means of femtosecond laser irradiation. This concept is based on ultrafast photoinjection of dense (>10(20) cm(-3)) electron-hole plasma within such nanoparticle, drastically changing its transient dielectric permittivity. This allows manipulation by both electric and magnetic nanoparticle responses, resulting in dramatic changes of its scattering diagram and scattering cross section. We experimentally demonstrate 20% tuning of reflectance of a single silicon nanoparticle by femtosecond laser pulses with wavelength in the vicinity of the magnetic dipole resonance. Such a single-particle nanodevice enables designing of fast and ultracompact optical switchers and modulators.

  18. Ultrafast Terahertz Probe of Transient Evolution of Charged and Neutral Phase of Photoexcited Electron-hole Gas in Monolayer Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuefeng; Ji, Qingqing; Gao, Zhihan; Ge, Shaofeng; Qiu, Jun; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Yanfeng; Sun, Dong

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the dynamical formation of excitons from photoexcited electron-hole plasma and its subsequent decay dynamics in monolayer MoS2 grown by chemical vapor deposition using ultrafast pump and terahertz probe spectroscopy under temperature down to 78 K. The observed transient THz transmission can be fit with two decay components: a fast component with decay lifetime of 20 ps, which is attributed to exciton life time including the exciton formation and subsequent intraexciton relaxation; a slow component with extremely long decay lifetime of several ns which is attributed to long live dark exciton or localized exciton state. Further temperature and pump fluence dependent studies of the two decay components verify the above relaxation dynamics. The measured time resolved evolution of photoexcited carriers provides new opportunities in developing novel optoelectronic and excitonic devices based on monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides.

  19. Optimal control of ultrafast laser driven many-electron dynamics in a polyatomic molecule: N-methyl-6-quinolone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klamroth, Tillmann

    2006-04-01

    We report time-dependent configuration interaction singles calculations for the ultrafast laser driven many-electron dynamics in a polyatomic molecule, N-methyl-6-quinolone. We employ optimal control theory to achieve a nearly state-selective excitation from the S0 to the S1 state, on a time scale of a few (≈6) femtoseconds. The optimal control scheme is shown to correct for effects opposing a state-selective transition, such as multiphoton transitions and other, nonlinear phenomena, which are induced by the ultrashort and intense laser fields. In contrast, simple two-level π pulses are not effective in state-selective excitations when very short pulses are used. Also, the dependence of multiphoton and nonlinear effects on the number of states included in the dynamical simulations is investigated.

  20. Electron-ion relaxation time dependent signal enhancement in ultrafast double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-07-22

    We investigated the emission properties of collinear double-pulse compared to single-pulse ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Our results showed that the significant signal enhancement noticed in the double pulse scheme is strongly correlated to the characteristic electron-ion relaxation time and hence to the inter-pulse delays. Spectroscopic excitation temperature analysis showed that the improvement in signal enhancement is caused by the delayed pulse efficient reheating of the pre-plume. The signal enhancement is also found to be related to the upper excitation energy of the selected lines, i.e., more enhancement noticed for lines originating from higher excitation energy levels, indicating reheating is the major mechanism behind the signal improvement.

  1. Ultrafast optical nonlinearity, electronic absorption, vibrational spectra and solvent effect studies of ninhydrin.

    PubMed

    Sajan, D; Devi, T Uma; Safakath, K; Philip, Reji; Němec, Ivan; Karabacak, M

    2013-05-15

    FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis spectra of the nonlinear optical molecule ninhydrin have been recorded and analyzed. The equilibrium geometry, bonding features, and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers have been investigated with the help of B3LYP density functional theory method. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra is carried out with the aid of normal coordinate analysis following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology. Solvent effects have been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory in combination with the polarized continuum model. Natural bond orbital analysis confirms the occurrence of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the molecule. Employing the open-aperture z-scan technique, nonlinear optical absorption of the sample has been studied in the ultrafast and short-pulse excitation regimes, using 100 fs and 5 ns laser pulses respectively. It is found that ninhydrin exhibits optical limiting for both excitations, indicating potential photonic applications.

  2. Ultrafast hydrogen-bonding dynamics in the electronic excited state of photoactive yellow protein revealed by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Hamada, Norio; Abe, Kenta; Yoshizawa, Masayuki

    2012-12-27

    The ultrafast structural dynamics in the electronic excited state of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is studied by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy. Stimulated Raman spectra in the electronic excited state, S(1), can be obtained by using a Raman pump pulse in resonance with the S(1)-S(0) transition. This is confirmed by comparing the experimental results with numerical calculations based on the density matrix treatment. We also investigate the hydrogen-bonding network surrounding the wild-type (WT)-PYP chromophore in the ground and excited states by comparing its stimulated Raman spectra with those of the E46Q-PYP mutant. We focus on the relative intensity of the Raman band at 1555 cm(-1), which includes both vinyl bond C═C stretching and ring vibrations and is sensitive to the hydrogen-bonding network around the phenolic oxygen of the chromophore. The relative intensity for the WT-PYP decreases after actinic excitation within the 150 fs time resolution and reaches a similar intensity to that for E46Q-PYP. These observations indicate that the WT-PYP hydrogen-bonding network is immediately rearranged in the electronic excited state to form a structure similar to that of E46Q-PYP.

  3. Ultrafast saturation of electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and comparison for pulse durations in the nanosecond to femtosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaik, Anil K.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2016-02-01

    The saturation threshold of a probe pulse in an ultrafast electronic-resonance-enhanced (ERE) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) configuration is calculated. We demonstrate that while the underdamping condition is a sufficient condition for saturation of ERE-CARS with the long-pulse excitations, a transient gain must be achieved to saturate the ERE-CARS signal for the ultrafast probe regime. We identify that the area under the probe pulse can be used as a definitive parameter to determine the criterion for a saturation threshold for ultrafast ERE-CARS. From a simplified analytical solution and a detailed numerical calculation based on density-matrix equations, the saturation threshold of ERE-CARS is compared for a wide range of probe-pulse durations from the 10-ns to the 10-fs regime. The theory explains both qualitatively and quantitatively the saturation thresholds of resonant transitions and also gives a predictive capability for other pulse duration regimes. The presented criterion for the saturation threshold will be useful in establishing the design parameters for ultrafast ERE-CARS.

  4. Charge-transfer and impulsive electronic-to-vibrational energy conversion in ferricyanide: ultrafast photoelectron and transient infrared studies.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, José; Arrell, Christopher A; Longetti, Luca; Chergui, Majed; Helbing, Jan

    2017-07-05

    The photophysics of ferricyanide in H2O, D2O and ethylene glycol was studied upon excitation of ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) transitions by combining ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of liquids and transient vibrational spectroscopy. Upon 400 nm excitation in water, the PES results show a prompt reduction of the Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) and a back electron transfer in ∼0.5 ps concomitant with the appearance and decay of a strongly broadened infrared absorption at ∼2065 cm(-1). In ethylene glycol, the same IR absorption band decays in ∼1 ps, implying a strong dependence of the back electron transfer on the solvent. Thereafter, the ground state ferric species is left vibrationally hot with significant excitation of up to two quanta of the CN-stretch modes, which completely decay on a 10 ps time scale. Under 265 nm excitation even higher CN-stretch levels are populated. Finally, from a tiny residual transient IR signal, we deduce that less than 2% of the excited species undergo photoaquation, in line with early flash photolysis experiments. The latter is more significant at 265 nm compared to 400 nm excitation, which suggests photodissociation in this system is an unlikely statistical process related to the large excess of vibrational energy.

  5. Variation of the ultrafast fluorescence quenching in 2,6-sulfanyl-core-substituted naphthalenediimides by electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Pugliesi, Igor; Krok, Patrizia; Lochbrunner, Stefan; Błaszczyk, Alfred; von Hänisch, Carsten; Mayor, Marcel; Riedle, Eberhard

    2010-12-09

    The ultrafast fluorescence quenching of 2,6-sulfanyl-core-substituted naphthalenediimides was investigated by transient spectroscopy. We find a strong dependence of the relaxation on the chemical structure of the substituent. Direct linking of an aryl rest to the sulfur atom leads to a strong red shift of the fluorescence in 1 ps and the disappearance of the emission in 5-7 ps depending on the polarity and viscosity of the solvent. This complex behavior is interpreted with the help of quantum chemical calculations. The calculations suggest that the initial relaxation corresponds to a planarization of the substituents and an associated partial electron transfer. This is followed by a twisting of the phenylsulfanyl substituents out of the molecular plane that allows a complete localization of the electron-donating orbital on the aryl group. Finally the back transfer happens in another 5-7 ps. For an additional methylene spacer group between the sulfur and the aryl, this sequence of relaxation steps is not possible and a simple exponential decay, slower by about 1 order of magnitude, is found.

  6. Role of thermal excitation in ultrafast energy transfer in chlorosomes revealed by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jun, Sunhong; Yang, Cheolhee; Kim, Tae Wu; Isaji, Megumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Jeongho

    2015-07-21

    Chlorosomes are the largest light harvesting complexes in nature and consist of many bacteriochlorophyll pigments forming self-assembled J-aggregates. In this work, we use two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) to investigate ultrafast dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) in chlorosomes and their temperature dependence. From time evolution of the measured 2D electronic spectra of chlorosomes, we directly map out the distribution of the EET rate among the manifold of exciton states in a 2D energy space. In particular, it is found that the EET rate varies gradually depending on the energies of energy-donor and energy-acceptor states. In addition, from comparative 2D-ES measurements at 77 K and room temperature, we show that the EET rate exhibits subtle dependence on both the exciton energy and temperature, demonstrating the effect of thermal excitation on the EET rate. This observation suggests that active thermal excitation at room temperature prevents the excitation trapping at low-energy states and thus promotes efficient exciton diffusion in chlorosomes at ambient temperature.

  7. Soft Route to 4D Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillandier-Thomas, Thibault; Roux, Stéphane; Hild, François

    2016-07-01

    Based on the assumption that the time evolution of a sample observed by computed tomography requires many less parameters than the definition of the microstructure itself, it is proposed to reconstruct these changes based on the initial state (using computed tomography) and very few radiographs acquired at fixed intervals of time. This Letter presents a proof of concept that for a fatigue cracked sample its kinematics can be tracked from no more than two radiographs in situations where a complete 3D view would require several hundreds of radiographs. This 2 order of magnitude gain opens the way to a "computed" 4D tomography, which complements the recent progress achieved in fast or ultrafast computed tomography, which is based on beam brightness, detector sensitivity, and signal acquisition technologies.

  8. Direct spectroscopic evidence of ultrafast electron transfer from a low band gap polymer to CdSe quantum dots in hybrid photovoltaic thin films.

    PubMed

    Couderc, Elsa; Greaney, Matthew J; Brutchey, Richard L; Bradforth, Stephen E

    2013-12-11

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy is used to study charge transfer dynamics in hybrid films composed of the low band gap polymer PCPDTBT and CdSe quantum dots capped with tert-butylthiol ligands. By selectively exciting the polymer, a spectral signature for electrons on the quantum dots appears on ultrafast time scales (≲ 65 fs), which indicates ultrafast electron transfer. From this time scale, the coupling between the polymer chains and the quantum dots is estimated to be J ≳ 17 meV. The reduced quantum dot acceptors exhibit an unambiguous spectral bleach signature, whose amplitude allows for the first direct calculation of the absolute electron transfer yield in a hybrid solar cell (82 ± 5%). We also show that a limitation of the hybrid system is rapid and measurable geminate recombination due to the small separation of the initial charge pair. The fast recombination is consistent with the internal quantum efficiency of the corresponding solar cell. We therefore have identified and quantified a main loss mechanism in this type of third generation solar cell.

  9. Time-of-Flight Elastic and Inelastic Neutron Scattering Studies on the Localized 4d Electron Layered Perovskite La5Mo4O16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Kazuki; Kajimoto, Ryoichi; Mizuno, Yusuke; Kamazawa, Kazuya; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Hoshikawa, Akinori; Yoshida, Yukihiko; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Ishigaki, Toru; Kawamura, Yukihiko; Ibuka, Soshi; Yokoo, Tetsuya; Itoh, Shinichi; Katsufuji, Takuro

    2017-06-01

    The magnetic structure and spin-wave excitations in the quasi-square-lattice layered perovskite compound La5Mo4O16 were studied by a combination of neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering techniques using polycrystalline sample. Neutron powder diffraction refinement revealed that the magnetic structure is ferrimagnetic in the ab plane with antiferromagnetic stacking along the c-axis where the magnetic propagation vector is k = (0,0,1/2). The ordered magnetic moments are estimated to be 0.54(2)μB for Mo5+ (4d1) ions and 1.07(3)μB for Mo4+ (4d2) ions at 4 K, which are about half of the expected values. The inelastic neutron scattering results display strong easy-axis magnetic anisotropy along the c-axis due to the spin-orbit interaction in Mo ions evidenced by the spin gap at the magnetic zone center. The model Hamiltonian consisting of in-plane anisotropic exchange interactions, the interlayer exchange interaction, and easy-axis single-ion anisotropy can explain our inelastic neutron scattering data well. Strong Ising-like anisotropy and weak interlayer coupling compared with the intralayer exchange interaction can explain both the high-temperature magnetoresistance and long-time magnetization decay recently observed in La5Mo4O16.

  10. Ultrafast Charge Recombination Dynamics in Ternary Electron Donor-Acceptor Complexes: (Benzene)2-Tetracyanoethylene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chih-Chung; Hung, Chih-Chang; Cheng, Po-Yuan

    2016-12-08

    The charge-transfer (CT) state relaxation dynamics of the binary (1:1) and ternary (2:1) benzene/tetracyanoethylene (BZ/TCNE) complexes are reported. Steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved broadband fluorescence (TRFL) spectra of TCNE dissolved in a series of BZ/CCl4 mixed solvents are measured to elucidate the spectroscopic properties of the BZ/TCNE complexes and their CT-state relaxation dynamics. Both steady-state and TRFL spectra exhibit marked BZ concentration dependences, which can be attributed to the formation of two types of 2:1 complexes in the ground and excited states. By combining with the density functional theory (DFT) calculations, it was concluded that the BZ concentration dependence of the absorption spectra is mainly due to the formation and excitation of the sandwich-type 2:1 ternary complexes, whereas the changes in fluorescence spectra at high BZ concentrations are due to the formation of the asymmetric-type 2:1 ternary complex CT1 state. A unified mechanism involving both direct excitation and secondary formation of the 2:1 complexes CT states are proposed to account for the observations. The equilibrium charge recombination (CR) time constant of the 1:1 CT1 state is determined to be ∼150 ps in CCl4, whereas that of the 2:1 DDA-type CT1 state becomes ∼70 ps in 10% BZ/CCl4 and ∼34 ps in pure BZ. The CR rates and the CT1-S0 energy gap of these complexes in different solvents exhibit a correlation conforming to the Marcus inverted region. It is concluded that partial charge resonance occurring between the two adjacent BZs in the asymmetric-type 2:1 CT1-state reduces the CR reaction exothermicity and increases the CR rate.

  11. Ultrafast harmonic rf kicker design and beam dynamics analysis for an energy recovery linac based electron circulator cooler ring

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Yulu; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert A.; ...

    2016-08-01

    An ultrafast kicker system is being developed for the energy recovery linac (ERL) based electron circulator cooler ring (CCR) in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC, previously named MEIC). In the CCR, the injected electron bunches can be recirculated while performing ion cooling for 10–30 turns before the extraction, thus reducing the recirculation beam current in the ERL to 1/10–1/30 (150mA–50 mA) of the cooling beam current (up to 1.5 A). Assuming a bunch repetition rate of 476.3 MHz and a recirculating factor of 10 in the CCR, the kicker is required to operate at a pulse repetitionmore » rate of 47.63 MHz with pulse width of around 2 ns, so that only every 10th bunch in the CCR will experience a transverse kick while the rest of the bunches will not be disturbed. Such a kicker pulse can be synthesized by ten harmonic modes of the 47.63 MHz kicker pulse repetition frequency, using up to four quarter wavelength resonator (QWR) based deflecting cavities. In this paper, several methods to synthesize such a kicker waveform will be discussed and a comparison of their beam dynamics performance is made using ELEGANT. Four QWR cavities are envisaged with high transverse shunt impedance requiring less than 100 W of total rf power for a Flat-Top kick pulse. Multipole fields due to the asymmetry of this type of cavity are analyzed. The transverse emittance growth due to the sextupole component is simulated in ELEGANT. In conclusion, off-axis injection and extraction issues and beam optics using a multicavity kick-drift scheme will also be discussed.« less

  12. A simple electron time-of-flight spectrometer for ultrafast vacuum ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Arrell, C A; Ojeda, J; Sabbar, M; Okell, W A; Witting, T; Siegel, T; Diveki, Z; Hutchinson, S; Gallmann, L; Keller, U; van Mourik, F; Chapman, R T; Cacho, C; Rodrigues, N; Turcu, I C E; Tisch, J W G; Springate, E; Marangos, J P; Chergui, M

    2014-10-01

    We present a simple electron time of flight spectrometer for time resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquid samples using a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) source produced by high-harmonic generation. The field free spectrometer coupled with the time-preserving monochromator for the VUV at the Artemis facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory achieves an energy resolution of 0.65 eV at 40 eV with a sub 100 fs temporal resolution. A key feature of the design is a differentially pumped drift tube allowing a microliquid jet to be aligned and started at ambient atmosphere while preserving a pressure of 10(-1) mbar at the micro channel plate detector. The pumping requirements for photoelectron (PE) spectroscopy in vacuum are presented, while the instrument performance is demonstrated with PE spectra of salt solutions in water. The capability of the instrument for time resolved measurements is demonstrated by observing the ultrafast (50 fs) vibrational excitation of water leading to temporary proton transfer.

  13. Nanoscale heat transport from Ge hut, dome, and relaxed clusters on Si(001) measured by ultrafast electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Frigge, T. Hafke, B.; Tinnemann, V.; Krenzer, B.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.

    2015-02-02

    The thermal transport properties of crystalline nanostructures on Si were studied by ultra-fast surface sensitive time-resolved electron diffraction. Self-organized growth of epitaxial Ge hut, dome, and relaxed clusters was achieved by in-situ deposition of 8 monolayers of Ge on Si(001) at 550 °C under UHV conditions. The thermal response of the three different cluster types subsequent to impulsive heating by fs laser pulses was determined through the Debye-Waller effect. Time resolved spot profile analysis and life-time mapping was employed to distinguish between the thermal response of the different cluster types. While dome clusters are cooling with a time constant of τ = 150 ps, which agrees well with numerical simulations, the smaller hut clusters with a height of 2.3 nm exhibit a cooling time constant of τ = 50 ps, which is a factor of 1.4 slower than expected.

  14. A simple electron time-of-flight spectrometer for ultrafast vacuum ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of liquid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Arrell, C. A. Ojeda, J.; Mourik, F. van; Chergui, M.; Sabbar, M.; Gallmann, L.; Keller, U.; Okell, W. A.; Witting, T.; Siegel, T.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S.; Tisch, J. W.G.; Marangos, J. P.; Chapman, R. T.; Cacho, C.; Rodrigues, N.; Turcu, I. C.E.; Springate, E.

    2014-10-01

    We present a simple electron time of flight spectrometer for time resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquid samples using a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) source produced by high-harmonic generation. The field free spectrometer coupled with the time-preserving monochromator for the VUV at the Artemis facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory achieves an energy resolution of 0.65 eV at 40 eV with a sub 100 fs temporal resolution. A key feature of the design is a differentially pumped drift tube allowing a microliquid jet to be aligned and started at ambient atmosphere while preserving a pressure of 10⁻¹ mbar at the micro channel plate detector. The pumping requirements for photoelectron (PE) spectroscopy in vacuum are presented, while the instrument performance is demonstrated with PE spectra of salt solutions in water. The capability of the instrument for time resolved measurements is demonstrated by observing the ultrafast (50 fs) vibrational excitation of water leading to temporary proton transfer.

  15. Ultrafast charge-transfer-to-solvent dynamics of iodide in tetrahydrofuran. 2. Photoinduced electron transfer to counterions in solution.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Arthur E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2008-04-24

    The excited states of atomic anions in liquids are bound only by the polarization of the surrounding solvent. Thus, the electron-detachment process following excitation to one of these solvent-bound states, known as charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) states, provides a useful probe of solvent structure and dynamics. These transitions and subsequent relaxation dynamics also are influenced by other factors that alter the solution environment local to the CTTS anion, including the presence of cosolutes, cosolvents, and other ions. In this paper, we examine the ultrafast CTTS dynamics of iodide in liquid tetrahydrofuran (THF) with a particular focus on how the solvent dynamics and the CTTS electron-ejection process are altered in the presence of various counterions. In weakly polar solvents such as THF, iodide salts can be strongly ion-paired in solution; the steady-state UV-visible absorption spectroscopy of various iodide salts in liquid THF indicates that the degree of ion-pairing changes from strong to weak to none as the counterion is switched from Na+ to tetrabutylammonium (t-BA+) to crown-ether-complexed Na+, respectively. In our ultrafast experiments, we have excited the I- CTTS transition of these various iodide salts at 263 nm and probed the dynamics of the CTTS-detached electrons throughout the visible and near-IR. In the previous paper of this series (Bragg, A. E.; Schwartz, B. J. J. Phys. Chem. B 2008, 112, 483-494), we found that for "counterion-free" I- (obtained by complexing Na+ with a crown ether) the CTTS electrons were ejected approximately 6 nm from their partner iodine atoms, the result of significant nonadiabatic coupling between the CTTS excited state and extended electronic states supported by the naturally existing solvent cavities in liquid THF, which also serve as pre-existing electron traps. In contrast, for the highly ion-paired NaI/THF system, we find that approximately 90% of the CTTS electrons are "captured" by a nearby Na+ to form (Na

  16. Photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer from aromatic amines to pentafluorophenyl porphyrin combined with ultrafast charge recombination persistence with Marcus inverted region.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Munisamy, Venkatesan; Ramakrishna, Bheerappagari; Kumar, Pippara Hemant; Mandal, Haraprasad; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2017-02-15

    The dynamics of photoinduced bimolecular reductive electron transfer between meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (H2F20TPP), an acceptor (A), and five aromatic amines (donor (D)) with varying oxidation potentials (aniline (AN), N-methylaniline (MAN), N-ethylaniline (EAN), N,N-dimethylaniline (DMAN) and N,N-diethylaniline (DEAN)) in dichloromethane (DCM) as a solvent as well as in neat donor solvents were investigated by employing nanosecond to femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy upon S2 excitation of H2F20TPP. Systematic studies of time-resolved fluorescence quenching dependent on the donor concentration in the concentration range of 0.01-2 M and finally in neat donor solvents broadly enabled us to determine the electron transfer dynamics in three regimes of electron transfer: stationary or diffusion-controlled electron transfer, non-stationary electron transfer and intrinsic or ultrafast electron transfer. Depending upon the electron-donating ability of the studied donors, intrinsic electron transfer was found to occur in the time domain of ∼1-9 ps and diffusion-controlled ET dynamics was observed in the time domain of 200-500 ps, whereas the maximum limit of non-stationary electron transfer could be observed in the time domain of 15-50 ps. Femtosecond transient absorption studies together with global and target analysis helped to identify the spectral signature of the (H2F20TPP˙(-)) radical anion as the product of ET. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever evidence that shows the spectra of an anion as the product of ET for any porphyrin-based electron transfer dynamics. However, transient absorption measurements confirm that intrinsic ET occurs in the Qy state, whereas diffusion-controlled ET occurs in the hot Qx as well as in the thermal equilibrium Qx state. The most remarkable fact derived from the measurements of transient absorption was that the rate of

  17. Ultra-fast and ultra-intense x-ray sciences: first results from the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Coffee, R. N.; Hastings, J. B.; Huang, Z.; Lee, R. W.; Schorb, S.; Corlett, J. N.; Denes, P.; Emma, P.; Falcone, R. W.; Schoenlein, R. W.; Doumy, G.; Kanter, E. P.; Kraessig, B.; Southworth, S.; Young, L.; Fang, L.; Hoener, M.; Berrah, N.; Roedig, C.; DiMauro, L. F.

    2013-08-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) produce femtosecond x-ray pulses with unprecedented intensities that are uniquely suited for studying many phenomena in atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics. A compilation of the current developments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and future plans for the LCLS-II and Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) are outlined. The AMO instrumentation at LCLS and its performance parameters are summarized. A few selected experiments representing the rapidly developing field of ultra-fast and peak intensity x-ray AMO sciences are discussed. These examples include fundamental aspects of intense x-ray interaction with atoms, nonlinear atomic physics in the x-ray regime, double core-hole spectroscopy, quantum control experiments with FELs and ultra-fast x-ray induced dynamics in clusters. These experiments illustrate the fundamental aspects of the interaction of intense short pulses of x-rays with atoms, molecules and clusters that are probed by electron and ion spectroscopies as well as ultra-fast x-ray scattering.

  18. Electronic dynamics by ultrafast pump photoelectron detachment probed by ionization: a dynamical simulation of negative-neutral-positive in LiH(-).

    PubMed

    Mignolet, B; Levine, R D; Remacle, F

    2014-08-21

    The control of electronic dynamics in the neutral electronic states of LiH before the onset of significant nuclei motion is investigated using a negative-neutral-positive (NeNePo) ultrafast IR pump-attoescond pulse train (APT) probe scheme. Starting from the ground state of the anion (LiH(-)), multiphoton ultrafast electron detachment and subsequent excitation of the neutral by a few femtosecond intense IR pulse produces a non-equilibrium electronic density in neutral LiH. The coherent electronic wave packet is then probed by angularly resolved photoionization to the cation by an APT generated from a replica of the pump IR pulse at several time delays. Realistic parameters for the pump and the APT are used. Several NeNePo schemes are simulated using different IR carrier frequencies, showing that the delay between the successive attosecond pulses in the train can be used as a filter to probe the different pairs of states present in the coherent electronic wave packet produced by the pump pulse. The dynamical simulations include the pump and the probe pulses to all orders by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using a coupled equation scheme for the manifolds of the anion, neutral, and cation subspaces. We show that an incomplete molecular orientation of the molecule in the laboratory frame does not prevent probing the electronic density localization by angularly resolved photoelectron maps.

  19. Numerical simulation of THz-wave-assisted electron diffraction for ultrafast molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanya, Reika; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2017-03-01

    A scheme for achieving high temporal resolution in gas electron diffraction is proposed, in which time-dependent electron diffraction patterns can be obtained from energy-resolved angular distributions of electrons scattered by molecules in dynamical processes under the presence of a single-cycle THz-wave pulse. Derived formulae of the differential cross section and numerical simulations of electron signals scattered by Ar atoms and C l2 molecules show that the temporal resolution of the proposed method can be <10 fs in the pump-probe measurement without scanning the time delay.

  20. An ultrafast spectroscopic and quantum mechanical investigation of multiple emissions in push-pull pyridinium derivatives bearing different electron donors.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, B; Benassi, E; Cesaretti, A; Fortuna, C G; Spalletti, A; Barone, V; Elisei, F

    2015-08-28

    A joint experimental and theoretical approach, involving state-of-the-art femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion measurements and quantum mechanical computations including vibronic effects, was employed to get a deep insight into the excited state dynamics of two cationic dipolar chromophores (Donor-π-Acceptor(+)) where the electron deficient portion is a N-methyl pyridinium and the electron donor a trimethoxyphenyl or a pyrene, respectively. The ultrafast spectroscopic investigation, and the time resolved area normalised emission spectra in particular, revealed a peculiar multiple emissive behaviour and allowed the distinct emitting states to be remarkably distinguished from solvation dynamics, occurring in water in a similar timescale. The two and three emissions experimentally detected for the trimethoxyphenyl and pyrene derivatives, respectively, were associated with specific local emissive minima in the potential energy surface of S1 on the ground of quantum-mechanical calculations. A low polar and planar Locally Excited (LE) state together with a highly polar and Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) state is identified to be responsible for the dual emission of the trimethoxyphenyl compound. Interestingly, the more complex photobehaviour of the pyrenyl derivative was explained considering the contribution to the fluorescence coming not only from the LE and TICT states but also from a nearly Planar Intramolecular Charge Transfer (PICT) state, with both the TICT and the PICT generated from LE by progressive torsion around the quasi-single bond between the methylpyridinium and the ethene bridge. These findings point to an interconversion between rotamers for the pyrene compound taking place in its excited state against the Non-equilibrated Excited Rotamers (NEER) principle.

  1. Ultrafast electron diffraction study of single-crystal (EDO-TTF)2SbF6: Counterion effect and dimensionality reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lai Chung; Jiang, Yifeng; Mueller-Werkmeister, Henrike M.; Lu, Cheng; Moriena, Gustavo; Ishikawa, Manabu; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Yamochi, Hideki; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2017-09-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction is a sensitive tool to directly study molecular dynamics in structural detail. Here, we report the influence of counterion size on the photoinduced insulator-to-metal phase transition in two derivatives of the organic salt (EDO-TTF)2XF6. For X = P, three dominant motions are present and the molecules undergo the transition, whereas in the case of X = Sb, only two dominant motions are found and the molecules do not evolve into the metallic state. This reduction in dimensionality is supported by a novel data analysis method involving singular value decomposition of time-resolved electron diffraction data in reciprocal space.

  2. Ultrafast events in the electron photodetachment from the hexacyanoferrate(II) complex in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommeret, Stanislas; Naskrecki, Ryszard; van der Meulen, Peter; Ménard, Marjorie; Vigneron, Georges; Gustavsson, Thomas

    1998-05-01

    Following excitation of the hexacyanoferrate(II) complex in water with a 40 fs laser pulse at 267 nm, the absorption of the hydrated electron rises with a global time constant of 510 fs, whereas the characteristic absorption of the hexacyanoferrate(III) appears almost instantaneously. A transient absorption band around 490 nm is tentatively assigned to the charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) state of the hexacyanoferrate(II). Its ultra-rapid decay (≪60 fs) is due to the electronic repulsion between the electron and its parent core.

  3. Quantum computers based on electron spins controlled by ultrafast off-resonant single optical pulses.

    PubMed

    Clark, Susan M; Fu, Kai-Mei C; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-07-27

    We describe a fast quantum computer based on optically controlled electron spins in charged quantum dots that are coupled to microcavities. This scheme uses broadband optical pulses to rotate electron spins and provide the clock signal to the system. Nonlocal two-qubit gates are performed by phase shifts induced by electron spins on laser pulses propagating along a shared waveguide. Numerical simulations of this scheme demonstrate high-fidelity single-qubit and two-qubit gates with operation times comparable to the inverse Zeeman frequency.

  4. Optical manipulation of ultrafast electron and nuclear motion on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Petek, Hrvoje

    2009-12-02

    We study the unoccupied electronic structure and dynamics of chemisorbed atoms and molecules on metal surfaces by time resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PP). spectroscopy, low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM), and theory. Our research concerns simple atomic adsorbates such as alkali and alkaline earth atoms, which provide fundamentally important models for adsorbate-surface interactions, and more complex adsorbates such as fullerenes on noble metals, which illustrate emergent interfacial properties that derive from intrinsic molecular attributes, and moleculemolecule and molecule-surface interactions. Our goal is to understand how these interactions contribute to formation of the interfacial electronic structure, and how thus formed electronic properties affect interfacial phenomena of importance to energy transduction and storage. Moreover, we explore how the interfacial electronic excitation drives dynamical phenomena such as charge transfer and surface femtochemistry.

  5. Ultrafast Electron Dynamics in Gold in the Presence of Laser Excited Surface Plasma Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, M.

    2010-02-02

    Surface plasmon excitation with ultrashort intense laser pulses enhances efficiently laser absorption in metals and creates local high fields and non-equilibrium hot electrons population that have attractivity for numerous applications such as the development of intense sources of high-energy particles or photons and in the fast ignitor scheme in the framework of inertial fusion. In this context, the knowledge of the dynamics of relaxation of the collective electrons behavior is of importance. Using gold grating, we have investigated electrons relaxation in the presence of laser excited surface plasmon waves using a multiple-wavelengh femtosecond pump-probe technique. The results yield evidence of longer relaxation time in the presence of the collective excitation than that of individual electronic states.

  6. Ultrafast extreme-ultraviolet ARPES studies of electronic dynamics in two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Jan Heye; Maklar, Julian; Joucken, Frédéric; Wang, He; Xu, Yiming; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Lanzara, Alessandra; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2017-02-01

    The intriguing electronic properties of two-dimensional materials motivates experiments to resolve their rapid, microscopic interactions and dynamics across momentum space. Essential insight into the electronic momentum-space dynamics can be obtained directly via time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES). We discuss the development of a high-repetition rate trARPES setup that employs a bright source of narrowband, extreme-UV harmonics around 22.3 eV, and its application to sensitive studies of materials dynamics. In the bulk transition-metal dichalcogenide MoSe2 momentum-space quasiparticle scattering is observed after resonant excitation at the K-point exciton line, resulting in the time-delayed buildup of electrons at the Σ-point conduction band minimum. We will discuss this and other aspects of the non-equilibrium electronic response accessible with the extreme-UV trARPES probe.

  7. Ultrafast relaxation inside proteins: Calculation and measurement of electron-vibration coupling in enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, B. M.; Walker, R. C.; Mercer, I. P.; Gould, I. R.; Klug, D. R.

    Electron-vibration coupling in alcohol dehydrogenase and zinc substituted myoglobin was calculated using a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method. Good agreement with experimental measurements demonstrates the viability of the method.

  8. Accelerating calculations of ultrafast time-resolved electronic spectra with efficient quantum dynamics methods.

    PubMed

    Wehrle, Marius; Sulc, Miroslav; Vanícek, Jirí

    2011-01-01

    We explore three specific approaches for speeding up the calculation of quantum time correlation functions needed for time-resolved electronic spectra. The first relies on finding a minimum set of sufficiently accurate electronic surfaces. The second increases the time step required for convergence of exact quantum simulations by using different split-step algorithms to solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The third approach lowers the number of trajectories needed for convergence of approximate semiclassical dynamics methods.

  9. Ultrafast spectroscopy of the solvent dependence of electron transfer in a perylenebisimide dimer.

    PubMed

    Holman, Michael W; Yan, Ping; Adams, David M; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Silva, Carlos

    2005-09-29

    We investigate the photoinduced intramolecular electron-transfer (IET) behavior of a perylenebisimide dimer in a variety of solvents using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Overlapping photoinduced absorptions and stimulated emission give rise to complicated traces, but they are well fit with a simple kinetic model. IET rates were found to depend heavily on solvent dielectric constant. Good quantitative agreement with rates derived from fluorescence quantum yield and time-resolved fluorescence measurements was found for forward electron transfer and charge recombination rates.

  10. Real Time Quantification of Ultrafast Photoinduced Bimolecular Electron Transfer Rate: Direct Probing of the Transient Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Puspal; Biswas, Somnath; Sen, Pratik

    2015-08-27

    Fluorescence quenching studies through steady-state and time-resolved measurements are inadequate to quantify the bimolecular electron transfer rate in bulk homogeneous solution due to constraints from diffusion. To nullify the effect of diffusion, direct evaluation of the rate of formation of a transient intermediate produced upon the electron transfer is essential. Methyl viologen, a well-known electron acceptor, produces a radical cation after accepting an electron, which has a characteristic strong and broad absorption band centered at 600 nm. Hence it is a good choice to evaluate the rate of photoinduced electron transfer reaction employing femtosecond broadband transient absorption spectroscopy. The time constant of the aforementioned process between pyrene and methyl viologen in methanol has been estimated to be 2.5 ± 0.4 ps using the same technique. The time constant for the backward reaction was found to be 14 ± 1 ps. These values did not change with variation of concentration of quencher, i.e., methyl viologen. Hence, we can infer that diffusion has no contribution in the estimation of rate constants. However, on changing the solvent from methanol to ethanol, the time constant of the electron transfer reaction has been found to increase and has accounted for the change in solvent reorganization energy.

  11. Ultrafast spectroscopy of electron transfer dynamics in liquids; excitation transfer studies of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei A.

    The transfer of an electron from a donor to an acceptor is the fundamental step in a wide range of chemical and biological processes. As a result, electron-transfer reactions have been the focus of numerous theoretical and experimental efforts aimed at understanding the kinetics and mechanism of the transfer event. Liquid solvents are an important medium for electron-transfer processes. The influences of the distance dependence, diffusion, the radial distribution function, and the hydrodynamic effect have been incorporated into the theory of electron transfer in solution, as well as into the theory of electron transfer between donors and acceptors in the head group regions of micelles. The development of new laser system with a pulse duration of tens of femtoseconds, with tunable wavelength allowed us to study these processes on a considerably shorter time scale than previous studies. This allowed us to observe not only the diffusion controlled but also the kinetics of electron transfer for donor/acceptor pairs that are in close proximity. In one set of experiments we have studied the kinetics of electron transfer in electron accepting molecule (rhodamine 3B) dissolved in electron donating solvent (N,N-dimethylaniline). The data for the forward electron transfer and geminate recombination are approximated by the statistical theory of the electron transfer. Optical anisotropy observed in the experiment demonstrates the orientation dependence of the electron transfer rate. In further experiments we investigated the electron transfer in non-hydrogen bonding liquids of increasing viscosity. The effective value of the donor/acceptor electronic coupling was found to decrease with viscosity. Electron transfer experiments were also carried out on the surface of micelles. The systems studied are the hole donor octadecyl-rhodamine B (ODRB) and the hole acceptor N,N-dimethyl-aniline (DMA) in micelles made of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and

  12. Roadmap on ultrafast optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Derryck T.; Heyl, Christoph M.; Thomson, Robert R.; Trebino, Rick; Steinmeyer, Günter; Fielding, Helen H.; Holzwarth, Ronald; Zhang, Zhigang; Del'Haye, Pascal; Südmeyer, Thomas; Mourou, Gérard; Tajima, Toshiki; Faccio, Daniele; Harren, Frans J. M.; Cerullo, Giulio

    2016-09-01

    The year 2015 marked the 25th anniversary of modern ultrafast optics, since the demonstration of the first Kerr lens modelocked Ti:sapphire laser in 1990 (Spence et al 1990 Conf. on Lasers and Electro-Optics, CLEO, pp 619-20) heralded an explosion of scientific and engineering innovation. The impact of this disruptive technology extended well beyond the previous discipline boundaries of lasers, reaching into biology labs, manufacturing facilities, and even consumer healthcare and electronics. In recognition of such a milestone, this roadmap on Ultrafast Optics draws together articles from some of the key opinion leaders in the field to provide a freeze-frame of the state-of-the-art, while also attempting to forecast the technical and scientific paradigms which will define the field over the next 25 years. While no roadmap can be fully comprehensive, the thirteen articles here reflect the most exciting technical opportunities presented at the current time in Ultrafast Optics. Several articles examine the future landscape for ultrafast light sources, from practical solid-state/fiber lasers and Raman microresonators to exotic attosecond extreme ultraviolet and possibly even zeptosecond x-ray pulses. Others address the control and measurement challenges, requiring radical approaches to harness nonlinear effects such as filamentation and parametric generation, coupled with the question of how to most accurately characterise the field of ultrafast pulses simultaneously in space and time. Applications of ultrafast sources in materials processing, spectroscopy and time-resolved chemistry are also discussed, highlighting the improvements in performance possible by using lasers of higher peak power and repetition rate, or by exploiting the phase stability of emerging new frequency comb sources.

  13. Modelling ultrafast laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rethfeld, Baerbel; Ivanov, Dmitriy S.; E Garcia, Martin; Anisimov, Sergei I.

    2017-05-01

    This review is devoted to the study of ultrafast laser ablation of solids and liquids. The ablation of condensed matter under exposure to subpicosecond laser pulses has a number of peculiar properties which distinguish this process from ablation induced by nanosecond and longer laser pulses. The process of ultrafast ablation includes light absorption by electrons in the skin layer, energy transfer from the skin layer to target interior by nonlinear electronic heat conduction, relaxation of the electron and ion temperatures, ultrafast melting, hydrodynamic expansion of heated matter accompanied by the formation of metastable states and subsequent formation of breaks in condensed matter. In case of ultrashort laser excitation, these processes are temporally separated and can thus be studied separately. As for energy absorption, we consider peculiarities of the case of metal irradiation in contrast to dielectrics and semiconductors. We discuss the energy dissipation processes of electronic thermal wave and lattice heating. Different types of phase transitions after ultrashort laser pulse irradiation as melting, vaporization or transitions to warm dense matter are discussed. Also nonthermal phase transitions, directly caused by the electronic excitation before considerable lattice heating, are considered. The final material removal occurs from the physical point of view as expansion of heated matter; here we discuss approaches of hydrodynamics, as well as molecular dynamic simulations directly following the atomic movements. Hybrid approaches tracing the dynamics of excited electrons, energy dissipation and structural dynamics in a combined simulation are reviewed as well.

  14. Theory of ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer from a bulk semiconductor to a quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Andrew M. Ramakrishna, S.; Weiss, Emily A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-04-14

    This paper describes analytical and numerical results from a model Hamiltonian method applied to electron transfer (ET) from a quasicontinuum (QC) of states to a set of discrete states, with and without a mediating bridge. Analysis of the factors that determine ET dynamics yields guidelines for achieving high-yield electron transfer in these systems, desired for instance for applications in heterogeneous catalysis. These include the choice of parameters of the laser pulse that excites the initial state into a continuum electronic wavepacket and the design of the coupling between the bridge molecule and the donor and acceptor. The vibrational mode on a bridging molecule between donor and acceptor has an influence on the yield of electron transfer via Franck-Condon factors, even in cases where excited vibrational states are only transiently populated. Laser-induced coherence of the initial state as well as energetic overlap is crucial in determining the ET yield from a QC to a discrete state, whereas the ET time is influenced by competing factors from the coupling strength and the coherence properties of the electronic wavepacket.

  15. Ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion irradiation: Response of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} to intense electronic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Tracy, Cameron L.; Cusick, Alex B.; Abere, Michael J.; Yalisove, Steven M.; Torralva, Ben; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2015-04-27

    In order to investigate the response of materials to extreme conditions, there are several approaches to depositing extremely high concentrations of energy into very small volumes of material, including ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. In this study, crystalline-to-crystalline phase transformations in cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} have been investigated using ultrafast laser irradiation. The phases produced by the extreme conditions of irradiation were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited a cubic-to-monoclinic phase transformation, as evidenced by the appearance of the monoclinic (402{sup ¯}), (003), (310), and (112{sup ¯}) peaks in the GIXRD pattern and of four A{sub g} and three B{sub g} Raman modes. ZrO{sub 2} underwent a monoclinic-to-tetragonal phase transformation, as evidenced by the emergence of the tetragonal (101) peak in the GIXRD pattern and of E{sub g} and A{sub 1g} Raman modes. The new phases formed by ultrafast laser irradiation are high temperature polymorphs of the two materials. No evidence of amorphization was seen in the GIXRD data, though Raman spectroscopy indicated point defect accumulation. These results are identical to those produced by irradiation with SHIs, which also deposit energy in materials primarily through electronic excitation. The similarity in damage process and material response between ultrafast laser and SHI irradiation suggests a fundamental relationship between these two techniques.

  16. Ultrafast Interfacial Electron and Hole Transfer from CsPbBr3 Perovskite Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaifeng; Liang, Guijie; Shang, Qiongyi; Ren, Yueping; Kong, Degui; Lian, Tianquan

    2015-10-14

    Recently reported colloidal lead halide perovskite quantum dots (QDs) with tunable photoluminescence (PL) wavelengths covering the whole visible spectrum and exceptionally high PL quantum yields (QYs, 50-90%) constitute a new family of functional materials with potential applications in light-harvesting and -emitting devices. By transient absorption spectroscopy, we show that the high PL QYs (∼79%) can be attributed to negligible electron or hole trapping pathways in CsPbBr3 QDs: ∼94% of lowest excitonic states decayed with a single-exponential time constant of 4.5 ± 0.2 ns. Furthermore, excitons in CsPbBr3 QDs can be efficiently dissociated in the presence of electron or hole acceptors. The half-lives of electron transfer (ET) to benzoquinone and subsequent charge recombination are 65 ± 5 ps and 2.6 ± 0.4 ns, respectively. The half-lives for hole transfer (HT) to phenothiazine and the subsequent charge recombination are 49 ± 6 ps and 1.0 ± 0.2 ns, respectively. The lack of electron and hole traps and fast interfacial ET and HT rates are key properties that may enable the development of efficient lead halide perovskite QDs-based light-harvesting and -emitting devices.

  17. Theory of ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer: Contributions of direct charge transfer excitations to the absorbance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Luxia; Willig, Frank; May, Volkhard

    2007-04-07

    Absorption spectra related to heterogeneous electron transfer are analyzed with the focus on direct charge transfer transition from the surface attached molecule into the semiconductor band states. The computations are based on a model of reduced dimensionality with a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate but a complete account for the continuum of conduction band states. The applicability of this model to perylene on TiO{sub 2} has been demonstrated in a series of earlier papers. Here, based on a time-dependent formulation, the absorbance is calculated with the inclusion of charge transfer excitations. A broad parameter set inspired by the perylene TiO{sub 2} systems is considered. In particular, the description generalizes the Fano effect to heterogeneous electron transfer reactions. Preliminary simulations of measured spectra are presented for perylene-catechol attached to TiO{sub 2}.

  18. Ultrafast electron transfer at organic semiconductor interfaces: Importance of molecular orientation

    DOE PAGES

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do -Hwan; ...

    2014-12-04

    Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximatelymore » 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.« less

  19. Ultrafast electron transfer at organic semiconductor interfaces: Importance of molecular orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do -Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2014-12-04

    Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  20. Ultrafast Optical Control of the Electronic Properties of Zr Te5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, G.; Sterzi, A.; Crepaldi, A.; Diego, M.; Cilento, F.; Zacchigna, M.; Bugnon, Ph.; Berger, H.; Magrez, A.; Grioni, M.; Parmigiani, F.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the Zr Te5 electronic properties, studied at equilibrium and out of equilibrium, by means of time and angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Our results unveil the dependence of the electronic band structure across the Fermi energy on the sample temperature. This finding is regarded as the dominant mechanism responsible for the anomalous resistivity observed at T*˜160 K along with the change of the charge carrier character from holelike to electronlike. Having addressed these long-lasting questions, we prove the possibility to control, at the ultrashort time scale, both the binding energy and the quasiparticle lifetime of the valence band. These experimental evidences pave the way for optically controlling the thermoelectric and magnetoelectric transport properties of Zr Te5 .

  1. OSA Trends in Optics and Photonics Series. Volume 13: Ultrafast Electronics and Optoelectronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    Monolithically - Integrated Circuit for All Optical Generation of Millimeter-Wave Frequencies 91 G. Allen Vawter, Alan Mar, Vince Hietala, John Zolper...generation using hybrid mode-locking of a monolithic DBR laser," Electron. Lett., 1995, 31, pp. 733-734. [3] T. Hoshida, H. F. Liu, M. R. H. Daza, M...400 500 Time (ps) Figure 3. Pulse response of the RCE photodiode A Complete Monolithically - Integrated Circuit for All Optical Generation of

  2. Comparison of influence of incorporated 3d-, 4d- and 4f-metal chlorides on electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamova, M. V.

    2013-06-01

    In the present work, the channels of single-walled carbon nanotubes were filled with melts of ZnCl2, CdCl2, and TbCl3 by a capillary method with subsequent slow cooling. The detailed study of electronic structure of filled nanotubes was performed using Raman, optical absorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The obtained data are in mutual agreement and it proves that the filling of carbon nanotube channels with all these salts leads to the charge transfer from nanotube walls to the incorporated compounds, thus acceptor doping of nanotubes takes place. It was found out that encapsulated terbium chloride has the largest influence on the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes.

  3. Breaking the Attosecond, Angstrom and TV/M Field Barriers with Ultra-Fast Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, James; Andonian, Gerard; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Hemsing, Erik; Marcus, Gabriel; Marinelli, Agostino; Musumeci, Pietro; O'Shea, Brendan; O'Shea, Finn; Pellegrini, Claudio; Schiller, David; Travish, Gil; Bucksbaum, Philip; Hogan, Mark; Krejcik, Patrick; Ferrario, Massimo; Full, Steven; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

    2012-06-22

    Recent initiatives at UCLA concerning ultra-short, GeV electron beam generation have been aimed at achieving sub-fs pulses capable of driving X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) in single-spike mode. This use of very low Q beams may allow existing FEL injectors to produce few-100 attosecond pulses, with very high brightness. Towards this end, recent experiments at the LCLS have produced {approx}2 fs, 20 pC electron pulses. We discuss here extensions of this work, in which we seek to exploit the beam brightness in FELs, in tandem with new developments in cryogenic undulator technology, to create compact accelerator-undulator systems that can lase below 0.15 {angstrom}, or be used to permit 1.5 {angstrom} operation at 4.5 GeV. In addition, we are now developing experiments which use the present LCLS fs pulses to excite plasma wakefields exceeding 1 TV/m, permitting a table-top TeV accelerator for frontier high energy physics applications.

  4. Ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics in brominated aluminum corroles: Energy relaxation and triplet formation

    PubMed Central

    Stensitzki, T.; Yang, Y.; Berg, A.; Mahammed, A.; Gross, Z.; Heyne, K.

    2016-01-01

    We combined femtosecond (fs) VIS pump–IR probe spectroscopy with fs VIS pump–supercontinuum probe spectroscopy to characterize the photoreaction of the hexacoordinated Al(tpfc-Br8)(py)2 in a comprehensive way. Upon fs excitation at ∼400 nm in the Soret band, the excitation energy relaxes with a time constant of (250 ± 80) fs to the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. This is evident from the rise time of the stimulated emission signal in the visible spectral range. On the same time scale, narrowing of broad infrared signals in the C=C stretching region around 1500 cm−1 is observed. Energy redistribution processes are visible in the vibrational and electronic dynamics with time constants between ∼2 ps and ∼20 ps. Triplet formation is detected with a time constant of (95 ± 3) ps. This is tracked by the complete loss of stimulated emission. Electronic transition of the emerging triplet absorption band overlaps considerably with the singlet excited state absorption. In contrast, two well separated vibrational marker bands for triplet formation were identified at 1477 cm−1 and at 1508 cm−1. These marker bands allow a precise identification of triplet dynamics in corrole systems. PMID:27226980

  5. Ultrafast optical coherent control of individual electron and hole spins in a semiconductor quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Greve, Kristiaan

    2012-02-01

    We report on the complete optical coherent control of individual electron and hole spin qubits in InAs quantum dots. With a magnetic field in Voigt geometry, broadband, detuned optical pulses couple the spin-split ground states, resulting in Rabi flopping. In combination with the Larmor precession around the external magnetic field, this allows an arbitrary single-qubit operation to be realized in less than 20 picoseconds [1,2]. Slow fluctuations in the spin's environment lead to shot-to-shot variations in the Larmor precession frequency. In a time-ensemble measurement, these would prevent a measurement of the true decoherence of the qubit, and instead give rise to ensemble dephasing. This effect was overcome by implementing a spin echo measurement scheme for both electron and hole spins, where an optical π-pulse refocuses the spin coherence and filters out the slow variations in Larmor precession frequency. We measured coherence times up to 3 microseconds [2,3]. Finally, our optical pulse manipulation scheme allows us to probe the hyperfine interaction between the single spin and the nuclei in the quantum dot. Interesting non-Markovian dynamics could be observed in the free-induction decay of a single electron spin, whereas the complete absence of such effects illustrates the reduction of the hyperfine interaction for hole spin qubits. We measured and modeled these effects, and explain the non-Markovian electron spin dynamics as involving a feedback effect resulting from both the strong Overhauser shift of the electron spin and spin dependent nuclear relaxation [2,4]. [4pt] [1] D. Press, T. D. Ladd, B. Zhang and Y. Yamamoto, Nature 456, 218 (2008)[0pt] [2] K. De Greve, P. McMahon, D. Press et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 872 (2011)[0pt] [3] D. Press, K. De Greve, P. McMahon et al., Nat. Phot. 4, 367 (2010)[0pt] [4] T. D. Ladd, D. Press, K. De Greve et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 107401 (2010)

  6. Equilibrium and ultrafast kinetic studies manipulating electron transfer: A short-lived flavin semiquinone is not sufficient for electron bifurcation

    DOE PAGES

    Hoben, John P.; Lubner, Carolyn E.; Ratzloff, Michael W.; ...

    2017-06-14

    Flavin-based electron transfer bifurcation is emerging as a fundamental and powerful mechanism for conservation and deployment of electrochemical energy in enzymatic systems. In this process, a pair of electrons is acquired at intermediate reduction potential (i.e. intermediate reducing power) and each electron is passed to a different acceptor, one with lower and the other with higher reducing power, leading to 'bifurcation'. It is believed that a strongly reducing semiquinone species is essential for this process, and it is expected that this species should be kinetically short-lived. We now demonstrate that presence of a short-lived anionic flavin semiquinone (ASQ) is notmore » sufficient to infer existence of bifurcating activity, although such a species may be necessary for the process. We have used transient absorption spectroscopy to compare the rates and mechanisms of decay of ASQ generated photochemically in bifurcating NADH-dependent ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase and the non-bifurcating flavoproteins nitroreductase, NADH oxidase and flavodoxin. We found that different mechanisms dominate ASQ decay in the different protein environments, producing lifetimes ranging over two orders of magnitude. Capacity for electron transfer among redox cofactors vs. charge recombination with nearby donors can explain the range of ASQ lifetimes we observe. In conclusion, our results support a model wherein efficient electron propagation can explain the short lifetime of the ASQ of bifurcating NADH-dependent ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase I, and can be an indication of capacity for electron bifurcation.« less

  7. Equilibrium and ultrafast kinetic studies manipulating electron transfer: A short-lived flavin semiquinone is not sufficient for electron bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Hoben, John P; Lubner, Carolyn E; Ratzloff, Michael W; Schut, Gerrit J; Nguyen, Diep M N; Hempel, Karl W; Adams, Michael W W; King, Paul W; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2017-08-25

    Flavin-based electron transfer bifurcation is emerging as a fundamental and powerful mechanism for conservation and deployment of electrochemical energy in enzymatic systems. In this process, a pair of electrons is acquired at intermediate reduction potential (i.e. intermediate reducing power), and each electron is passed to a different acceptor, one with lower and the other with higher reducing power, leading to "bifurcation." It is believed that a strongly reducing semiquinone species is essential for this process, and it is expected that this species should be kinetically short-lived. We now demonstrate that the presence of a short-lived anionic flavin semiquinone (ASQ) is not sufficient to infer the existence of bifurcating activity, although such a species may be necessary for the process. We have used transient absorption spectroscopy to compare the rates and mechanisms of decay of ASQ generated photochemically in bifurcating NADH-dependent ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase and the non-bifurcating flavoproteins nitroreductase, NADH oxidase, and flavodoxin. We found that different mechanisms dominate ASQ decay in the different protein environments, producing lifetimes ranging over 2 orders of magnitude. Capacity for electron transfer among redox cofactors versus charge recombination with nearby donors can explain the range of ASQ lifetimes that we observe. Our results support a model wherein efficient electron propagation can explain the short lifetime of the ASQ of bifurcating NADH-dependent ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase I and can be an indication of capacity for electron bifurcation.

  8. Design and implementation of an optimal laser pulse front tilting scheme for ultrafast electron diffraction in reflection geometry with high temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Pennacchio, Francesco; Vanacore, Giovanni M.; Mancini, Giulia F.; Oppermann, Malte; Jayaraman, Rajeswari; Musumeci, Pietro; Baum, Peter; Carbone, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction is a powerful technique to investigate out-of-equilibrium atomic dynamics in solids with high temporal resolution. When diffraction is performed in reflection geometry, the main limitation is the mismatch in group velocity between the overlapping pump light and the electron probe pulses, which affects the overall temporal resolution of the experiment. A solution already available in the literature involved pulse front tilt of the pump beam at the sample, providing a sub-picosecond time resolution. However, in the reported optical scheme, the tilted pulse is characterized by a temporal chirp of about 1 ps at 1 mm away from the centre of the beam, which limits the investigation of surface dynamics in large crystals. In this paper, we propose an optimal tilting scheme designed for a radio-frequency-compressed ultrafast electron diffraction setup working in reflection geometry with 30 keV electron pulses containing up to 105 electrons/pulse. To characterize our scheme, we performed optical cross-correlation measurements, obtaining an average temporal width of the tilted pulse lower than 250 fs. The calibration of the electron-laser temporal overlap was obtained by monitoring the spatial profile of the electron beam when interacting with the plasma optically induced at the apex of a copper needle (plasma lensing effect). Finally, we report the first time-resolved results obtained on graphite, where the electron-phonon coupling dynamics is observed, showing an overall temporal resolution in the sub-500 fs regime. The successful implementation of this configuration opens the way to directly probe structural dynamics of low-dimensional systems in the sub-picosecond regime, with pulsed electrons. PMID:28713841

  9. Ultrafast nonradiative dynamics in electronically excited hexafluorobenzene by femtosecond time-resolved mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studzinski, Harald; Zhang, Song; Wang, Yanmei; Temps, Friedrich

    2008-04-01

    The fast nonradiative decay dynamics of the lowest two excited ππ * electronic states (S2 and S3) of hexafluorobenzene have been investigated by using femtosecond time-resolved time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The molecules were excited at wavelengths between 265nm⩾λpump⩾217nm and probed by four- and three-photon ionization at λprobe=775nm. The observed temporal profiles exhibit two exponential decay times (τ1=0.54-0.1ps and τ2=493-4.67ps, depending on the excitation wavelength) and a superimposed coherent oscillation with vibrational frequency νosc=97cm-1 and damping time τD that is two to three times longer than the respective τ1. The first decay component (τ1) is assigned to rapid radiationless transfer from the excited optically bright ππ * electronic state (S2 or S3, respectively) through a conical intersection (CI) to the lower-lying optically dark πσ * state (S1) of the molecule; the second component (τ2) is attributed to the subsequent slower relaxation from the S1 state back to the electronic ground state (S0). τ2 dramatically decreases with increasing vibronic excitation energy up to the CI connecting the πσ * with the S0 state. The coherent oscillation is identified as nuclear motion along the out-of-plane vibration ν16a (notation as for benzene), which has e2u symmetry and acts as coupling mode between the ππ * and πσ * states.

  10. Ultrafast laser-driven microlens to focus and energy-select mega-electron volt protons.

    PubMed

    Toncian, Toma; Borghesi, Marco; Fuchs, Julien; d'Humières, Emmanuel; Antici, Patrizio; Audebert, Patrick; Brambrink, Erik; Cecchetti, Carlo Alberto; Pipahl, Ariane; Romagnani, Lorenzo; Willi, Oswald

    2006-04-21

    We present a technique for simultaneous focusing and energy selection of high-current, mega-electron volt proton beams with the use of radial, transient electric fields (10(7) to 10(10) volts per meter) triggered on the inner walls of a hollow microcylinder by an intense subpicosecond laser pulse. Because of the transient nature of the focusing fields, the proposed method allows selection of a desired range out of the spectrum of the polyenergetic proton beam. This technique addresses current drawbacks of laser-accelerated proton beams, such as their broad spectrum and divergence at the source.

  11. Ultrafast electron crystallography of the cooperative reaction path in vanadium dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Baum, Peter; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved electron diffraction with atomic-scale spatial and temporal resolution was used to unravel the transformation pathway in the photoinduced structural phase transition of vanadium dioxide. Results from bulk crystals and single-crystalline thin-films reveal a common, stepwise mechanism: First, there is a femtosecond V−V bond dilation within 300 fs, second, an intracell adjustment in picoseconds and, third, a nanoscale shear motion within tens of picoseconds. Experiments at different ambient temperatures and pump laser fluences reveal a temperature-dependent excitation threshold required to trigger the transitional reaction path of the atomic motions. PMID:27376103

  12. Endstation for ultrafast magnetic scattering experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, L.; Gutt, C.; Streit-Nierobisch, S.; Walther, M.; Gruebel, G.; Schaffert, S.; Pfau, B.; Flewett, S.; Geilhufe, J.; Eisebitt, S.; Buettner, F.; Guenther, C. M.; Kobs, A.; Hille, M.; Stickler, D.; Froemter, R.; Oepen, H. P.; Luening, J.

    2013-01-15

    An endstation for pump-probe small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is presented. The endstation houses a solid-state absorber, optical incoupling for pump-probe experiments, time zero measurement, sample chamber, and detection unit. It can be used at all FLASH beamlines in the whole photon energy range offered by FLASH. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by showing the results of resonant magnetic SAXS measurements on cobalt-platinum multilayer samples grown on freestanding Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes and pump-laser-induced grid structures in multilayer samples.

  13. Endstation for ultrafast magnetic scattering experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, L.; Gutt, C.; Streit-Nierobisch, S.; Walther, M.; Schaffert, S.; Pfau, B.; Geilhufe, J.; Büttner, F.; Flewett, S.; Günther, C. M.; Eisebitt, S.; Kobs, A.; Hille, M.; Stickler, D.; Frömter, R.; Oepen, H. P.; Lüning, J.; Grübel, G.

    2013-01-01

    An endstation for pump-probe small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is presented. The endstation houses a solid-state absorber, optical incoupling for pump-probe experiments, time zero measurement, sample chamber, and detection unit. It can be used at all FLASH beamlines in the whole photon energy range offered by FLASH. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by showing the results of resonant magnetic SAXS measurements on cobalt-platinum multilayer samples grown on freestanding Si_3N_4 membranes and pump-laser-induced grid structures in multilayer samples.

  14. Ultrafast energy and electron transfers in structurally well addressable BODIPY-porphyrin-fullerene polyads.

    PubMed

    Gao, Di; Aly, Shawkat M; Karsenti, Paul-Ludovic; Brisard, Gessie; Harvey, Pierre D

    2017-01-25

    Two electron transfer polyads built upon [C60]-[ZnP]-[BODIPY] (1) and [ZnP]-[ZnP](-[BODIPY])(-[C60]) (2), where [C60] = N-methyl-2-phenyl-3,4-fulleropyrrolidine, [BODIPY] = boron dipyrromethane, and [ZnP] = zinc(ii) porphyrin, were synthesized along with their corresponding energy transfer polyads [ZnP]-[BODIPY] (1a) and [ZnP]-[ZnP]-[BODIPY] (2a) as well as relevant models. These polyads were studied using cyclic voltammetry, DFT computations, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, and fs transient absorption spectroscopy. The rates for energy transfer, kET, [BODIPY]* → [ZnP] are ∼2.8 × 10(10) s(-1) for both 1a and 2a, with an efficiency of 99%. Concurrently, the fast appearance of the [C60](-)˙ anion for 1 and 2 indicates that the charge separation occurs on the 20-30 ps timescale with the rates of electron transfer, ket, [ZnP]*/[C60] → [ZnP](+)˙/[C60](-)˙ of ∼0.9 × 10(10) to ∼3.8 × 10(10) s(-1). The latter value is among the fastest for these types of polyads. Conversely, the charge recombination operates on the ns timescale. These rates are comparable to or faster than those reported for other more flexible [C60]-[ZnP]-[BODIPY] polyads, which can be rationalized by the donor-acceptor separations.

  15. Ultrafast Self-Healing Nanocomposites via Infrared Laser and Their Application in Flexible Electronics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuwen; Li, Jinhui; Zhang, Guoping; Yao, Yimin; Li, Gang; Sun, Rong; Wong, Chingping

    2017-01-25

    The continuous evolution toward flexible electronics with mechanical robust property and restoring structure simultaneously places high demand on a set of polymeric material substrate. Herein, we describe a composite material composed of a polyurethane based on Diels-Alder chemistry (PU-DA) covalently linked with functionalized graphene nanosheets (FGNS), which shows mechanical robust and infrared (IR) laser self-healing properties at ambient conditions and is therefore suitable for flexible substrate applications. The mechanical strength can be tuned by varying the amount of FGNS and breaking strength can reach as high as 36 MPa with only 0.5 wt % FGNS loading. On rupture, the initial mechanical properties are restored with more than 96% healing efficiency after 1 min irradiation time by 980 nm IR laser. Especially, this is the highest value of healing efficiency reported in the self-healable materials based on DA chemistry systems until now, and the composite exhibits a high volume resistivity up to 5.6 × 10(11) Ω·cm even the loading of FGNS increased to 1.0 wt %. Moreover, the conductivity of the broken electric circuit which was fabricated by silver paste drop-cast on the healable composite substrate was completely recovered via IR laser irradiating bottom substrate mimicking human skin. These results demonstrate that the FGNS-PU-DA nanocomposite can be used as self-healing flexible substrate for the next generation of intelligent flexible electronics.

  16. Spot profile analysis and lifetime mapping in ultrafast electron diffraction: Lattice excitation of self-organized Ge nanostructures on Si(001)

    PubMed Central

    Frigge, T.; Hafke, B.; Tinnemann, V.; Witte, T.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast high energy electron diffraction in reflection geometry is employed to study the structural dynamics of self-organized Germanium hut-, dome-, and relaxed clusters on Si(001) upon femtosecond laser excitation. Utilizing the difference in size and strain state the response of hut- and dome clusters can be distinguished by a transient spot profile analysis. Surface diffraction from {105}-type facets provide exclusive information on hut clusters. A pixel-by-pixel analysis of the dynamics of the entire diffraction pattern gives time constants of 40, 160, and 390 ps, which are assigned to the cooling time constants for hut-, dome-, and relaxed clusters. PMID:26798797

  17. Ultrafast triggered transient energy storage by atomic layer deposition into porous silicon for integrated transient electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Anna; Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Share, Keith; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-03-01

    Here we demonstrate the first on-chip silicon-integrated rechargeable transient power source based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of vanadium oxide (VOx) into porous silicon. A stable specific capacitance above 20 F g-1 is achieved until the device is triggered with alkaline solutions. Due to the rational design of the active VOx coating enabled by ALD, transience occurs through a rapid disabling step that occurs within seconds, followed by full dissolution of all active materials within 30 minutes of the initial trigger. This work demonstrates how engineered materials for energy storage can provide a basis for next-generation transient systems and highlights porous silicon as a versatile scaffold to integrate transient energy storage into transient electronics.Here we demonstrate the first on-chip silicon-integrated rechargeable transient power source based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of vanadium oxide (VOx) into porous silicon. A stable specific capacitance above 20 F g-1 is achieved until the device is triggered with alkaline solutions. Due to the rational design of the active VOx coating enabled by ALD, transience occurs through a rapid disabling step that occurs within seconds, followed by full dissolution of all active materials within 30 minutes of the initial trigger. This work demonstrates how engineered materials for energy storage can provide a basis for next-generation transient systems and highlights porous silicon as a versatile scaffold to integrate transient energy storage into transient electronics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (i) Experimental details for ALD and material fabrication, ellipsometry film thickness, preparation of gel electrolyte and separator, details for electrochemical measurements, HRTEM image of VOx coated porous silicon, Raman spectroscopy for VOx as-deposited as well as annealed in air for 1 hour at 450 °C, SEM and transient behavior dissolution tests of uniformly coated VOx on

  18. Ultrafast triggered transient energy storage by atomic layer deposition into porous silicon for integrated transient electronics.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Anna; Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Share, Keith; Pint, Cary L

    2016-04-14

    Here we demonstrate the first on-chip silicon-integrated rechargeable transient power source based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of vanadium oxide (VOx) into porous silicon. A stable specific capacitance above 20 F g(-1) is achieved until the device is triggered with alkaline solutions. Due to the rational design of the active VOx coating enabled by ALD, transience occurs through a rapid disabling step that occurs within seconds, followed by full dissolution of all active materials within 30 minutes of the initial trigger. This work demonstrates how engineered materials for energy storage can provide a basis for next-generation transient systems and highlights porous silicon as a versatile scaffold to integrate transient energy storage into transient electronics.

  19. Ultrafast electron dynamics at the Dirac node of the topological insulator Sb2Te3

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Siyuan; Ishida, Yukiaki; Kuroda, Kenta; Sumida, Kazuki; Ye, Mao; Wang, Jiajia; Pan, Hong; Taniguchi, Masaki; Qiao, Shan; Shin, Shik; Kimura, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are a new quantum state of matter. Their surfaces and interfaces act as a topological boundary to generate massless Dirac fermions with spin-helical textures. Investigation of fermion dynamics near the Dirac point (DP) is crucial for the future development of spintronic devices incorporating topological insulators. However, research so far has been unsatisfactory because of a substantial overlap with the bulk valence band and a lack of a completely unoccupied DP. Here, we explore the surface Dirac fermion dynamics in the TI Sb2Te3 by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TrARPES). Sb2Te3 has an in-gap DP located completely above the Fermi energy (EF). The excited electrons in the upper Dirac cone stay longer than those below the DP to form an inverted population. This was attributed to a reduced density of states (DOS) near the DP. PMID:26294343

  20. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of a High Density Electron-Hole Plasma in High Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinho; Reitze, Dave H.; Kono, Junichiro; Belyanin, Alexey; Solomon, Glenn; McGill, Steve

    2009-03-01

    We study the inter-Landau level relaxation dynamics of a dense electron-hole plasma in high magnetic fields (up to 31 T). Intense 150 fs pump pulses create carrier densities approaching 10^13/cm^2 in In0.2Ga0.8As/GaAs multiple quantum wells. Relaxation dynamics are probed as a function of Landau level (LL) and magnetic field using time-resolved transient absorption (TRTA) and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL), which provide complementary information about the relaxation processes. Manifestly non-exponential decays of the TRTA signals are observed at high fields (above 15 T). TRPL emissions measured in the plane of the wells reveal the presence of multiple emission bursts from the LLs at high magnetic fields, suggesting a complicated relaxation process mediated by the field whereby carriers get trapped in a specific LL, emit PL though recombination, and then `reload' as the carriers relax down to the previously occupied LLs.

  1. Ultrafast electron dynamics at the Dirac node of the topological insulator Sb2Te3.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Siyuan; Ishida, Yukiaki; Kuroda, Kenta; Sumida, Kazuki; Ye, Mao; Wang, Jiajia; Pan, Hong; Taniguchi, Masaki; Qiao, Shan; Shin, Shik; Kimura, Akio

    2015-08-21

    Topological insulators (TIs) are a new quantum state of matter. Their surfaces and interfaces act as a topological boundary to generate massless Dirac fermions with spin-helical textures. Investigation of fermion dynamics near the Dirac point (DP) is crucial for the future development of spintronic devices incorporating topological insulators. However, research so far has been unsatisfactory because of a substantial overlap with the bulk valence band and a lack of a completely unoccupied DP. Here, we explore the surface Dirac fermion dynamics in the TI Sb2Te3 by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TrARPES). Sb2Te3 has an in-gap DP located completely above the Fermi energy (EF). The excited electrons in the upper Dirac cone stay longer than those below the DP to form an inverted population. This was attributed to a reduced density of states (DOS) near the DP.

  2. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Doppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Forster, E.; Gode, S.; Gregori, G.; Harmand, M.; Hilbert, V.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Mithen, J. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbaumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; White, T. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.; Tschentscher, T.

    2015-09-25

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities of ${10}^{15}-{10}^{16}\\;$ W cm–2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about $25$ and $40\\;\\mathrm{eV}$ for simulated delay times up to $+70\\;\\mathrm{fs}$ after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8–18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and $30\\;$eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. In conclusion, we resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser–matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.

  3. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    DOE PAGES

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; ...

    2015-09-25

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities ofmore » $${10}^{15}-{10}^{16}\\;$$ W cm–2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about $25$ and $$40\\;\\mathrm{eV}$$ for simulated delay times up to $$+70\\;\\mathrm{fs}$$ after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8–18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and $$30\\;$$eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. In conclusion, we resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser–matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.« less

  4. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Döppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Förster, E.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Harmand, M.; Hilbert, V.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Mithen, J. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; White, T. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.; Tschentscher, T.

    2015-11-01

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities of {10}15-{10}16 W cm-2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about 25 and 40 {eV} for simulated delay times up to +70 {fs} after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8-18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and 30 eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. We resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser-matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.

  5. Ultrafast probing of ejection dynamics of Rydberg atoms and molecular fragments from electronically excited helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Bünermann, Oliver; Kornilov, Oleg; Haxton, Daniel J; Leone, Stephen R; Neumark, Daniel M; Gessner, Oliver

    2012-12-07

    The ejection dynamics of Rydberg atoms and molecular fragments from electronically excited helium nanodroplets are studied with time-resolved extreme ultraviolet ion imaging spectroscopy. At excitation energies of 23.6 ± 0.2 eV, Rydberg atoms in n = 3 and n = 4 states are ejected on different time scales and with significantly different kinetic energy distributions. Specifically, n = 3 Rydberg atoms are ejected with kinetic energies as high as 0.85 eV, but their appearance is delayed by approximately 200 fs. In contrast, n = 4 Rydberg atoms appear within the time resolution of the experiment with considerably lower kinetic energies. Major features in the Rydberg atom kinetic energy distributions for both principal quantum numbers can be described within a simple elastic scattering model of localized perturbed atomic Rydberg atoms that are expelled from the droplet due to their repulsive interaction with the surrounding helium bath. Time-dependent kinetic energy distributions of He(2) (+) and He(3) (+) ions are presented that support the formation of molecular ions in an indirect droplet ionization process and the ejection of neutral Rydberg dimers on a similar time scale as the n = 3 Rydberg atoms.

  6. Ultrafast laser induced electronic and structural modifications in bulk fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchik, K.; D'Amico, C.; Velpula, P. K.; Mauclair, C.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y.; Stoian, R.

    2013-10-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses can modify the inner structure of fused silica, generating refractive index changes varying from soft positive (type I) light guiding forms to negative (type II) values with void presence and anisotropic sub-wavelength modulation. We investigate electronic and structural material changes in the type I to type II transition via coherent and incoherent secondary light emission reflecting free carrier behavior and post-irradiation material relaxation in the index change patterns. Using phase contrast microscopy, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy, we determine in a space-resolved manner defect formation, redistribution and spatial segregation, and glass network reorganization paths in conditions marking the changeover between type I and type II photoinscription regimes. We first show characteristic patterns of second harmonic generation in type I and type II traces, indicating the collective involvement of free carriers and polarization memory. Second, incoherent photoemission from resonantly and non-resonantly excited defect states reveals accumulation of non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs) in positive index domains and oxygen deficiency centers (ODCs) with O2- ions segregation in void-like regions and in the nanostructured domains, reflecting the interaction strength. Complementary Raman investigations put into evidence signatures of the different environments where photo-chemical densification (bond rearrangements) and mechanical effects can be indicated. NBOHCs setting in before visible index changes serve as precursors for subsequent compaction build-up, indicating a scenario of cold, defect-assisted densification for the soft type I irradiation regime. Additionally, we observe hydrodynamic effects and severe bond-breaking in type II zones with indications of phase transition. These observations illuminate densification paths in fused silica in low power irradiation regimes, and equally in energetic ranges, characterized by

  7. Plasmonic enhanced ultrafast switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Harris, Tom.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Barrick, Todd A.

    2009-09-01

    Ultrafast electronic switches fabricated from defective material have been used for several decades in order to produce picosecond electrical transients and TeraHertz radiation. Due to the ultrashort recombination time in the photoconductor materials used, these switches are inefficient and are ultimately limited by the amount of optical power that can be applied to the switch before self-destruction. The goal of this work is to create ultrafast (sub-picosecond response) photoconductive switches on GaAs that are enhanced through plasmonic coupling structures. Here, the plasmonic coupler primarily plays the role of being a radiation condenser which will cause carriers to be generated adjacent to metallic electrodes where they can more efficiently be collected.

  8. Ultrafast Optical Electronics Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-28

    probe beam, while the longitudinal crystal, fabricated of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KD*P), is used to measure field components that are...clad between 0.1 4am p+ cap layer and a I .m n buffer layer grown on top of the semi- insulating (SI) substrate. Tunneling is only possible through the...Twenty-five periods of the double-QW structure were grown on an n -type GaAs substrate and n -type GaAs buffer layer. A semitransparent Al Schottky 11 CF

  9. Instrumentation for Ultrafast Electronics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-30

    the * ~set by the finite cutoff frequencies of the periodically ICca noivselmaurthvlagstabtar *loaded lines, the line losses due to FF1 input and output...tries. respeclisclx (001I8-9480/󈨚/11200 - 1 356$0)1lAX 1980 IFF[I RODWIA.I. el al: [RAVIAiNG-WAVE AMPLIFIIRS 1137 Vs,g GND 4 2 Zd 1 TPU T’ FE ZFFT FET...From this data the reflection coefficient, loss , and dispersion can be calculated. Scanning " perpendicular to the conductor allows for measurement of

  10. Ultrafast radiative heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Renwen; Manjavacas, Alejandro; García de Abajo, F Javier

    2017-02-23

    Light absorption in conducting materials produces heating of their conduction electrons, followed by relaxation into phonons within picoseconds, and subsequent diffusion into the surrounding media over longer timescales. This conventional picture of optical heating is supplemented by radiative cooling, which typically takes place at an even lower pace, only becoming relevant for structures held in vacuum or under extreme thermal isolation. Here, we reveal an ultrafast radiative cooling regime between neighboring plasmon-supporting graphene nanostructures in which noncontact heat transfer becomes a dominant channel. We predict that more than 50% of the electronic heat energy deposited on a graphene disk can be transferred to a neighboring nanoisland within a femtosecond timescale. This phenomenon is facilitated by the combination of low electronic heat capacity and large plasmonic field concentration in doped graphene. Similar effects should occur in other van der Waals materials, thus opening an unexplored avenue toward efficient heat management.Electron relaxation, which is the dominant release channel of electronic heat in nanostructures, occurs with characteristic times of several picoseconds. Here, the authors predict that an ultrafast (femtosecond) radiative cooling regime takes place in plasmonically active neighboring graphene nanodisks prior to electron relaxation.

  11. Ultrafast, Light-Induced Electron Transfer in a Perylene Diimide Chromophore-Donor Assembly on TiO 2

    SciTech Connect

    Brennaman, M. Kyle; Norris, Michael R.; Gish, Melissa K.; Grumstrup, Erik M.; Alibabaei, Leila; Ashford, Dennis L.; Lapides, Alexander M.; Papanikolas, John M.; Templeton, Joseph L.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2015-12-03

    Surface-bound, perylenediimide (PDI)-based molecular assemblies have been synthesized on nanocrystalline TiO2 by reaction of a dianhydride with a surface-bound aniline and succinimide bonding. In a second step, the Fe(II) polypyridyl complex [FeII(tpy-PhNH2)2]2+ was added to the outside of the film, also by succinimide bonding. Ultrafast transient absorption measurements in 0.1 M HClO4 reveal that electron injection into TiO2 by 1PDI* does not occur, but rather leads to the ultrafast formation of the redox-separated pair PDI•+,PDI•–, which decays with complex kinetics (τ1 = 0.8 ps, τ2 = 15 ps, and τ3 = 1500 ps). With the added Fe(II) polypyridyl complex, rapid (<25 ps) oxidation of Fe(II) by the PDI•+,PDI•– redox pair occurs to give Fe(III),PDI•– persisting for >400 μs in the film environment.

  12. Temperature dependence of the hydrated electron's excited-state relaxation. II. Elucidating the relaxation mechanism through ultrafast transient absorption and stimulated emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Erik P.; Zho, Chen-Chen; Challa, Jagannadha R.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2017-08-01

    The structure of the hydrated electron, particularly whether it exists primarily within a cavity or encompasses interior water molecules, has been the subject of much recent debate. In Paper I [C.-C. Zho et al., J. Chem. Phys. 147, 074503 (2017)], we found that mixed quantum/classical simulations with cavity and non-cavity pseudopotentials gave different predictions for the temperature dependence of the rate of the photoexcited hydrated electron's relaxation back to the ground state. In this paper, we measure the ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of the photoexcited hydrated electron as a function of temperature to confront the predictions of our simulations. The ultrafast spectroscopy clearly shows faster relaxation dynamics at higher temperatures. In particular, the transient absorption data show a clear excess bleach beyond that of the equilibrium hydrated electron's ground-state absorption that can only be explained by stimulated emission. This stimulated emission component, which is consistent with the experimentally known fluorescence spectrum of the hydrated electron, decreases in both amplitude and lifetime as the temperature is increased. We use a kinetic model to globally fit the temperature-dependent transient absorption data at multiple temperatures ranging from 0 to 45 °C. We find the room-temperature lifetime of the excited-state hydrated electron to be 137 ±40 fs, in close agreement with recent time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) experiments and in strong support of the "non-adiabatic" picture of the hydrated electron's excited-state relaxation. Moreover, we find that the excited-state lifetime is strongly temperature dependent, changing by slightly more than a factor of two over the 45 °C temperature range explored. This temperature dependence of the lifetime, along with a faster rate of ground-state cooling with increasing bulk temperature, should be directly observable by future TRPES experiments. Our data also suggest

  13. Effects of single atom doping on the ultrafast electron dynamics of M1Au24(SR)18 (M = Pd, Pt) nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Meng; Qian, Huifeng; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Jin, Rongchao

    2016-02-29

    Atomically precise, doped metal clusters are receiving wide research interest due to their synergistic properties dependent on the metal composition. To understand the electronic properties of doped clusters, it is highly desirable to probe the excited state behavior. Here, we report the ultrafast relaxation dynamics of doped M1@Au24(SR)18 (M = Pd, Pt; R = CH2CH2Ph) clusters using femtosecond visible and near infrared transient absorption spectroscopy. Three relaxation components are identified for both mono-doped clusters: (1) sub-picosecond relaxation within the M1Au12 core states; (2) core to shell relaxation in a few picoseconds; and (3) relaxation back to the ground state in more than one nanosecond. Despite similar relaxation pathways for the two doped nanoclusters, the coupling between the metal core and surface ligands is accelerated by over 30% in the case of the Pt dopant compared with the Pd dopant. Compared to Pd doping, the case of Pt doping leads to much more drastic changes in the steady state and transient absorption of the clusters, which indicates that the 5d orbitals of the Pt atom are more strongly mixed with Au 5d and 6s orbitals than the 4d orbitals of the Pd dopant. These results demonstrate that a single foreign atom can lead to entirely different excited state spectral features of the whole cluster compared to the parent Au25(SR)18 cluster. As a result, the detailed excited state dynamics of atomically precise Pd/Pt doped gold clusters help further understand their properties and benefit the development of energy-related applications.

  14. Exploring the time-scale of photo-initiated interfacial electron transfer through first-principles interpretation of ultrafast X-ray spectroscopy (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prendergast, David; Pemmaraju, Sri Chaitanya Das

    2015-09-01

    With the advent of X-ray free electron lasers and table-top high-harmonic-generation X-ray sources, we can now explore changes in electronic structure on ultrafast time scales -- at or less than 1ps. Transient X-ray spectroscopy of this kind provides a direct probe of relevant electronic levels related to photoinitiated processes and associated interfacial electron transfer as the initial step in solar energy conversion. However, the interpretation of such spectra is typically fraught with difficulty, especially since we rarely have access to spectral standards for nonequilibrium states. To this end, direct first-principles simulations of X-ray absorption spectra can provide the necessary connection between measurements and reliable models of the atomic and electronic structure. We present examples of modeling excited states of materials interfaces relevant to solar harvesting and their corresponding X-ray spectra in either photoemission or absorption modalities. In this way, we can establish particular electron transfer mechanisms to reveal detailed working principles of materials systems in solar applications and provide insight for improved efficiency.

  15. Electron-Mediated Relaxation Following Ultrafast Pumping of Strongly Correlated Materials: Model Evidence of a Correlation-Tuned Crossover between Thermal and Nonthermal States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, B.; Kemper, A. F.; Sentef, M.; Devereaux, T. P.; Freericks, J. K.

    2013-08-01

    We examine electron-electron mediated relaxation following ultrafast electric field pump excitation of the fermionic degrees of freedom in the Falicov-Kimball model for correlated electrons. The results reveal a dichotomy in the temporal evolution of the system as one tunes through the Mott metal-to-insulator transition: in the metallic regime relaxation can be characterized by evolution toward a steady state well described by Fermi-Dirac statistics with an increased effective temperature; however, in the insulating regime this quasithermal paradigm breaks down with relaxation toward a nonthermal state with a complicated electronic distribution as a function of momentum. We characterize the behavior by studying changes in the energy, photoemission response, and electronic distribution as functions of time. This relaxation may be observable qualitatively on short enough time scales that the electrons behave like an isolated system not in contact with additional degrees of freedom which would act as a thermal bath, especially when using strong driving fields and studying materials whose physics may manifest the effects of correlations.

  16. Electron-phonon interactions in MoS{sub 2} probed with ultrafast two-dimensional visible/far-infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xunmin; Chen, Hailong; Wen, Xiewen; Zheng, Junrong

    2015-06-07

    An ultrafast two-dimensional visible/far-IR spectroscopy based on the IR/THz air biased coherent detection method and scanning the excitation frequencies is developed. The method allows the responses in the far-IR region caused by various electronic excitations in molecular or material systems to be observed in real time. Using the technique, the relaxation dynamics of the photo-excited carriers and electron/phonon coupling in bulk MoS{sub 2} are investigated. It is found that the photo-generation of excited carriers occurs within two hundred fs and the relaxation of the carriers is tens of ps. The electron-phonon coupling between the excitations of electrons and the phonon mode E{sub 1u} of MoS{sub 2} is also directly observed. The electron excitation shifts the frequency of the phonon mode 9 cm{sup −1} higher, resulting in an absorption peak at 391 cm{sup −1} and a bleaching peak at 382 cm{sup −1}. The frequency shift diminishes with the relaxation of the carriers.

  17. Semiclassical study of quantum coherence and isotope effects in ultrafast electron transfer reactions coupled to a proton and a phonon bath.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Charulatha

    2011-11-28

    The linearized semiclassical initial value representation is employed to describe ultrafast electron transfer processes coupled to a phonon bath and weakly coupled to a proton mode. The goal of our theoretical investigation is to understand the influence of the proton on the electronic dynamics in various bath relaxation regimes. More specifically, we study the impact of the proton on coherences and analyze if the coupling to the proton is revealed in the form of an isotope effect. This will be important in distinguishing reactions in which the proton does not undergo significant rearrangement from those in which the electron transfer is accompanied by proton transfer. Unlike other methodologies widely employed to describe nonadiabatic electron transfer, this approach treats the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom consistently. However, due to the linearized approximation, quantum interference effects are not captured accurately. Our study shows that at small phonon bath reorganization energies, coherent oscillations and isotope effect are observed in both slow and fast bath regimes. The coherences are more substantially damped by deuterium in comparison to the proton. Further, in contrast to the dynamics of the spin-boson model, the coherences are not long-lived. At large bath reorganization energies, the decay is incoherent in the slow and fast bath regimes. In this case, the extent of the isotope effect depends on the relative relaxation timescales of the proton mode and the phonon bath. The isotope effect is magnified for baths that relax on picosecond timescales in contrast to baths that relax in femtoseconds.

  18. A general method for baseline-removal in ultrafast electron powder diffraction data using the dual-tree complex wavelet transform

    PubMed Central

    René de Cotret, Laurent P.; Siwick, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    The general problem of background subtraction in ultrafast electron powder diffraction (UEPD) is presented with a focus on the diffraction patterns obtained from materials of moderately complex structure which contain many overlapping peaks and effectively no scattering vector regions that can be considered exclusively background. We compare the performance of background subtraction algorithms based on discrete and dual-tree complex (DTCWT) wavelet transforms when applied to simulated UEPD data on the M1–R phase transition in VO2 with a time-varying background. We find that the DTCWT approach is capable of extracting intensities that are accurate to better than 2% across the whole range of scattering vector simulated, effectively independent of delay time. A Python package is available. PMID:28083543

  19. Ultrafast decay of electronically excited singlet cytosine via a pi,pi* to n(O),pi* state switch.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nina; Blancafort, Lluís; Olivucci, Massimo; Kohler, Bern; Robb, Michael A

    2002-06-19

    Singlet fluorescence lifetimes of adenosine, cytidine, guanosine, and thymidine, determined by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy (Pecourt, J.-M. L.; Peon, J.; Kohler, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2000, 122, 9348. Pecourt, J.-M. L.; Peon, J.; Kohler, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 10370), show that the excited states produced by 263 nm light in these nucleosides decay in the subpicosecond range (290-720 fs). Ultrafast radiationless decay to the ground state greatly reduces the probability of photochemical damage. In this work we present a theoretical study of isolated cytosine, the chromophore of cytidine. The experimental lifetime of 720 fs indicates that there must be an ultrafast decay channel for this species. We have documented the possible decay channels and approximate energetics, using a valence-bond derived analysis to rationalize the structural details of the paths. The mechanism favored by our calculations and the experimental data involves (1) a two-mode decay coordinate composed of initial bond length inversion followed by internal vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) to populate a carbon pyramidalization mode, (2) a state switch between the pi,pi* and nO,pi* (excitation from oxygen lone pair) excited states, and (3) decay to the ground state through a conical intersention. A second decay path through the nN,pi* state (excitation from the nitrogen lone pair), with a higher barrier, involves out-of-plane bending of the amino substituent.

  20. PREFACE: Ultrafast biophotonics Ultrafast biophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Min; Reid, Derryck; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2010-08-01

    The use of light to explore biology can be traced to the first observations of tissue made with early microscopes in the mid-seventeenth century, and has today evolved into the discipline which we now know as biophotonics. This field encompasses a diverse range of activities, each of which shares the common theme of exploiting the interaction of light with biological material. With the rapid advancement of ultrafast optical technologies over the last few decades, ultrafast lasers have increasingly found applications in biophotonics, to the extent that the distinctive new field of ultrafast biophotonics has now emerged, where robust turnkey ultrafast laser systems are facilitating cutting-edge studies in the life sciences to take place in everyday laboratories. The broad spectral bandwidths, precision timing resolution, low coherence and high peak powers of ultrafast optical pulses provide unique opportunities for imaging and manipulating biological systems. Time-resolved studies of bio-molecular dynamics exploit the short pulse durations from such lasers, while other applications such as optical coherence tomography benefit from the broad optical bandwidths possible by using super-continuum generation and additionally allowing for high speed imaging with speeds as high as 47 000 scans per second. Continuing progress in laser-system technology is accelerating the adoption of ultrafast techniques across the life sciences, both in research laboratories and in clinical applications, such as laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) eye surgery. Revolutionizing the field of optical microscopy, two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy has enabled higher spatial resolution with improved depth penetration into biological specimens. Advantages of this nonlinear optical process include: reduced photo-interactions, allowing for extensive imaging time periods; simultaneously exciting multiple fluorescent molecules with only one excitation wavelength; and

  1. Ultrafast forward and backward electron transfer dynamics of coumarin 337 in hydrogen-bonded anilines as studied with femtosecond UV-pump/IR-probe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Hirendra N; Verma, Sandeep; Nibbering, Erik T J

    2011-02-10

    Femtosecond infrared spectroscopy is used to study both forward and backward electron transfer (ET) dynamics between coumarin 337 (C337) and the aromatic amine solvents aniline (AN), N-methylaniline (MAN), and N,N-dimethylaniline (DMAN), where all the aniline solvents can donate an electron but only AN and MAN can form hydrogen bonds with C337. The formation of a hydrogen bond with AN and MAN is confirmed with steady state FT-IR spectroscopy, where the C═O stretching vibration is a direct marker mode for hydrogen bond formation. Transient IR absorption measurements in all solvents show an absorption band at 2166 cm(-1), which has been attributed to the C≡N stretching vibration of the C337 radical anion formed after ET. Forward electron transfer dynamics is found to be biexponential with time constants τ(ET)(1) = 500 fs, τ(ET)(2) = 7 ps in all solvents. Despite the presence of hydrogen bonds of C337 with the solvents AN and MAN, no effect has been found on the forward electron transfer step. Because of the absence of an H/D isotope effect on the forward electron transfer reaction of C337 in AN, hydrogen bonds are understood to play a minor role in mediating electron transfer. In contrast, direct π-orbital overlap between C337 and the aromatic amine solvents causes ultrafast forward electron transfer dynamics. Backward electron transfer dynamics, in contrast, is dependent on the solvent used. Standard Marcus theory explains the observed backward electron transfer rates.

  2. The 4D nucleome project.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Job; Belmont, Andrew S; Guttman, Mitchell; Leshyk, Victor O; Lis, John T; Lomvardas, Stavros; Mirny, Leonid A; O'Shea, Clodagh C; Park, Peter J; Ren, Bing; Politz, Joan C Ritland; Shendure, Jay; Zhong, Sheng

    2017-09-13

    The 4D Nucleome Network aims to develop and apply approaches to map the structure and dynamics of the human and mouse genomes in space and time with the goal of gaining deeper mechanistic insights into how the nucleus is organized and functions. The project will develop and benchmark experimental and computational approaches for measuring genome conformation and nuclear organization, and investigate how these contribute to gene regulation and other genome functions. Validated experimental technologies will be combined with biophysical approaches to generate quantitative models of spatial genome organization in different biological states, both in cell populations and in single cells.

  3. Stable, polarized betatron raditation: x-ray absorption spectroscopy in WDM unveiling ultrafast electron heating (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahieu, Benoît; Doepp, Andreas S.; Lifschitz, Agustin; Doche, Antoine; Thaury, Cédric; Corde, Sébastien; Gautier, Julien; Guillaume, Emilien; Malka, Victor; Rousse, Antoine; Jourdain, Noémie; Lecherbourg, Ludovic; Dorchies, Fabien; Ta Phuoc, Kim

    2017-05-01

    Betatron radiation from laser-plasma accelerators reproduces the principle of a synchrotron on a millimeter scale, but featuring femtosecond duration. Here we present the outcome of our latest developments, which now allow us to produce stable and polarized X-ray bursts. Moreover, the X-ray polarization can simply be adjusted by tuning the polarization of the laser driving the process. The excellent stability of the source is expressed in terms of pointing, flux, transverse distribution and critical energy of the spectrum. These combined features make our betatron source particularly suitable for applications in ultrafast X-ray science. In this presentation we will describe the generation process, relying on the ionization injection scheme for laser-plasma acceleration. We will show experimental measurements, numerical results and first applications in time-resolved spectroscopy.

  4. Sub-nanometer-scale measurements of the interaction of ultrafast soft x-ray free-electron-laser pulses with matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S; Chapman, H; Krzywinski, J; Sobierajski, R; London, R; Bionta, R; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Nietubyc, R; Juha, L; Kuba, J; Bajt, S; Spiller, E; Baker, S; Kjornrattanawanich, B; Gullikson, E; Tschentscher, T; Plonjes, E; Toleikis, S

    2006-08-02

    Femtosecond pulses from soft-x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) [1] are ideal for directly probing matter at atomic length scales and timescales of atomic motion. An important component of understanding ultrafast phenomena of light-matter interactions is concerned with the onset of atomic motion which is impeded by the atoms inertia. This delay of structural changes will enable atomic-resolution flash-imaging [2-3] to be performed at upcoming x-ray FELs [4-5] with pulses intense enough to record the x-ray scattering from single molecules [6]. We explored this ultrafast high-intensity regime with the FLASH soft-x-ray FEL [7-8] by measuring the reflectance of nanostructured multilayer mirrors using pulses with fluences far in excess of the mirrors damage threshold. Even though the nanostructures were ultimately completely destroyed, we found that they maintained their integrity and reflectance characteristics during the 25-fs-long pulse, with no evidence for any structural changes during that time over lengths greater than 3 {angstrom}. In the recently built FLASH FEL [7], x-rays are produced from short electron pulses oscillating in a periodic magnet array, called an undulator, by the principle of self-amplification of spontaneous emission [9-10]. The laser quality of the x-ray pulses can be quantified by the peak spectral brilliance of the source, which is 10{sup 28} photons/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1% bandwidth) [8]; this is up to seven orders of magnitude higher than modern third-generation synchrotron sources. For our studies, the machine operated with pulses of 25 fs duration at a wavelength of 32.5 nm and energies up to 21 {micro}J. We focused these pulses to 3 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} onto our nanostructured samples, resulting in an the unprecedented heating rate of 5 x 10{sup 18} K/s, while probing the irradiated structures at the nanometer length scale. The x-ray reflectivity of periodic nanometer-scale multilayers [11] is very sensitive to changes in the atomic

  5. 4d Photoionization of Free Singly Charged Xenon Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottwald, A.; Gerth, Ch.; Richter, M.

    1999-03-01

    Electron spectroscopy in direct 4d photoionization of free Xe+ ions has been realized for the first time, applying various timing and coincidence techniques to suppress and to monitor on line the strong fluctuating background. The ionization energies of 4d5/2 and 4d3/2 electrons of Xe+\\(5p5 2P3/2\\) and Xe+\\(5p5 2P1/2\\) were determined and compared to calculated RHF(CI) values and to corresponding results of neutral Xe\\(5p6 1S0\\) atoms to study the influence of the outer-shell electron occupation on the 4d-1 inner-shell process.

  6. Jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra and carbonyl wagging and ring-puckering potential energy functions of cyclobutanone and its 2,2,4,4-d4 isotopomer in the S1(n,π*) electronic excited state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Chiang, Whe-Yi; Laane, Jaan

    1994-03-01

    The jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra of cyclobutanone and its 2,2,4,4-d4 isotopomer have been recorded in the 305-335 nm region. The electronic band origin of the d0 molecule for the S1(n,π*) state of A2 symmetry occurs at 30 292 cm-1 (30 265 cm-1 for the d4 molecule). The observed spectra consisting of more than 50 bands for each isotopomer involve ν7, ν8, and ν9 (the three A1 ring vibrations) as well as ν20(C=O in-plane wag), ν26 (C=O out-of-plane wag), and ν27 (ring puckering). Five bands associated with the excited vibrational states of ν26 in the S1(n,π*) electronic state were observed for each isotopic species, and these were used to determine the one-dimensional potential energy functions for the C=O out-of-plane wagging. The C=O wagging angle was determined to be 39° and the barrier to inversion is 2149 cm-1 (2188 cm-1 for the deuteride). For the ring-puckering in the S1 state the lowest three vibrational energy spacings were found to be 106, 166, and 185 cm-1 as compared to values of 35, 57, and 65 cm-1 in the S0 ground state. Several ring-puckering potential energy functions with varying degrees of asymmetry are capable of reproducing the observed results. In all cases, however, the v=0 puckering state lies above any barrier to planarity. A two-dimensional potential function which fits the observed data was also determined in terms of the wagging and puckering coordinates.

  7. E4D_RT

    SciTech Connect

    2016-03-22

    Time-lapse ERT imaging for monitoring both natural and engineered subsurface processes has advanced rapidly over the past 15-20 years. However, imaging results generally required a significant amount of manual and computational effort, and therefore were not available while the process was occurring. Although the value of real-time imaging was recognized, several obstacles prevented it's implementation. E4D_RT addresses these obstacles by 1) providing specialized algorithms that negate the need for user intervention, thereby automating the time-lapse data processing steps, 2) linking field data collection systems with parallel supercomputing systems via wireless data transfer link, and 3) addressing the computational burdens by utilizing distributed memory supercomputing resources, thereby enabling rapid data processing and imaging results.

  8. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkamp, Max A.; Lin, Ming-Fu; Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2016-06-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide (perovskite) is a leading candidate for use in next-generation solar cell devices. However, the photophysics responsible for its strong photovoltaic qualities are not fully understood. Ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) absorption was used to investigate electron and hole dynamics in perovskite by observing transitions from a common inner-shell level (I 4d) to the valence and conduction bands. Ultrashort (30 fs) pulses of XUV radiation with a broad spectrum (40-70 eV) were generated via high-harmonic generation using a tabletop instrument. Transient absorption measurements with visible pump and XUV probe directly observed the relaxation of charge carriers in perovskite after above-band excitation in the femtosecond and picosecond time ranges.

  9. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin X; Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J; Jackson, Nicholas E; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Mara, Michael W; Stickrath, Andrew B; Zhu, Diling; Lemke, Henrik; Chollet, Matthieu; Hoffman, Brian M; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-12-16

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(ii) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were measured for optically excited states at a timescale from 100 fs to 50 ps, providing insight into its sub-ps electronic and structural relaxation processes. Importantly, a transient reduced state Ni(i) (π, 3dx(2)-y(2)) electronic state is captured through the interpretation of a short-lived excited state absorption on the low-energy shoulder of the edge, which is aided by the computation of X-ray transitions for postulated excited electronic states. The observed and computed inner shell to valence orbital transition energies demonstrate and quantify the influence of the electronic configuration on specific metal orbital energies. A strong influence of the valence orbital occupation on the inner shell orbital energies indicates that one should not use the transition energy from 1s to other orbitals to draw conclusions about the d-orbital energies. For photocatalysis, a transient electronic configuration could influence d-orbital energies up to a few eV and any attempt to steer the reaction pathway should account for this to ensure that external energies can be used optimally in driving desirable processes. NiTMP structural evolution and the influence of the porphyrin macrocycle conformation on relaxation kinetics can be likewise inferred from this study.

  10. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lin X.; Shelby, Megan L.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Jackson, Nicholas E.; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Mara, Michael W.; Stickrath, Andrew B.; Zhu, Diling; Lemke, Henrik; Chollet, Matthieu; Hoffman, Brian M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were successfully measured for optically excited state at a timescale from 100 fs to 50 ps, providing insight into its sub-ps electronic and structural relaxation processes. Importantly, a transient reduced state Ni(I) (π, 3dx2-y2) electronic state is captured through the interpretation of a short-lived excited state absorption on the low-energy shoulder of the edge, which is aided by the computation of X-ray transitions for postulated excited electronic states. The observed and computed inner shell to valence orbital transition energies demonstrate and quantify the influence of electronic configuration on specific metal orbital energies. A strong influence of the valence orbital occupation on the inner shell orbital energies indicates that one should not use the transition energy from 1s to other orbitals to draw conclusions about the d-orbital energies. For photocatalysis, a transient electronic configuration could influence d-orbital energies up to a few eV and any attempt to steer the reaction pathway should account for this to ensure that external energies can be used optimally in driving desirable processes. NiTMP structural evolution and the influence of the porphyrin macrocycle conformation on relaxation kinetics can be likewise inferred from this study.

  11. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B.; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J.; Fierro, José Luis G.; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices.Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an

  12. Ultrafast technologies for photonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prucnal, Paul R.; Baby, Varghese; Xu, Lei; Glesk, Ivan

    2004-10-01

    Considerable progress has been in the last decade in the fields of photonic networks and ultra-fast optics. The past few years has seen the widespread use of wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) to provide enormous point-to-point capacity in the backbone and metro area networks. Remarkable progress in electronics, in terms of both costs and performance speeds, has to some extent alleviated the 'electronic bottleneck'. Developments in fiber-optics such as novel fiber types and Raman amplification have opened up additional wavelength regions of operation resulting in great expansion of usable fiber bandwidth. There exist unique opportunities for ultrafast technologies - a subject of much interest in the last decade and reaching a point of maturity - to complement these advances and spark the next generation networks. In our talk, we will mention two networking environments very different from WDM - (1) optical time division multiplexing (OTDM) and (2) optical code division multiple access (OCDMA). We will look at the potential of both these scenarios for different applications, focusing in particular on the latter as an approach that provides maximum flexibility to utilize the immense bandwidth of the optical fiber. We will also describe various ultra-fast technologies that have been developed e.g. .high repetition rate pulsed lasers, ultra-fast optical switches, time delay elements etc. which have a direct relevance to both these types of networks.

  13. Ultrafast charge separation and recombination dynamics in lead sulfide quantum dot-methylene blue complexes probed by electron and hole intraband transitions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Rodríguez-Córdoba, William; Lian, Tianquan

    2011-06-22

    Lead salt quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as attractive materials for solar energy conversion because of their broad spectral response, long exciton lifetime, and efficient multiexciton generation. However, charge separation dynamics from these QDs remain poorly understood. In this study we investigate charge separation and recombination dynamics in PbS-methylene blue (MB(+)) complexes by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. We show that while the 1S electrons and holes in excited PbS QDs lead to overlapping transient absorption features in the visible and near-IR regions, their intraband absorptions in the mid-IR can be monitored independently to directly follow the charge separation and recombination processes. The charge separation and recombination rates in PbS-MB(+) complexes were found to be (2.7 ± 0.2) × 10(12) and (1.1 ± 0.2) × 10(11) s(-1), respectively. The ultrafast charge separation rate suggests the possibility of hot electron injection and multiexciton dissociation from these strongly quantum confined QDs, consistent with recent reports of these phenomena at lead salt QD/TiO(2) interfaces.

  14. Impact of metal ions in porphyrin-based applied materials for visible-light photocatalysis: key information from ultrafast electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kar, Prasenjit; Sardar, Samim; Alarousu, Erkki; Sun, Jingya; Seddigi, Zaki S; Ahmed, Saleh A; Danish, Ekram Y; Mohammed, Omar F; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2014-08-11

    Protoporphyrin IX-zinc oxide (PP-ZnO) nanohybrids have been synthesized for applications in photocatalytic devices. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and steady-state infrared, absorption, and emission spectroscopies have been used to analyze the structural details and optical properties of these nanohybrids. Time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption techniques have been applied to study the ultrafast dynamic events that are key to photocatalytic activities. The photocatalytic efficiency under visible-light irradiation in the presence of naturally abundant iron(III) and copper(II) ions has been found to be significantly retarded in the former case, but enhanced in the latter case. More importantly, femtosecond (fs) transient absorption data have clearly demonstrated that the residence of photoexcited electrons from the sensitizer PP in the centrally located iron moiety hinders ground-state bleach recovery of the sensitizer, affecting the overall photocatalytic rate of the nanohybrid. The presence of copper(II) ions, on the other hand, offers additional stability against photobleaching and eventually enhances the efficiency of photocatalysis. In addition, we have also explored the role of UV light in the efficiency of photocatalysis and have rationalized our observations from femtosecond- to picosecond-resolved studies.

  15. Ultrafast small-angle x-ray scattering from laser-produced plasmas using an x-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roedel, Christian; Pelka, Alexander; Kluge, Thomas; Roedel, Melanie; Cowan, Thomas; Kemp, Andreas; Fletcher, Luke; Schumaker, Will; Goede, Sebastian; Galtier, Eric; Lee, Hae Ja; Glenzer, Siegfried; SLAC/Uni JEna Team; HZDR Team; LLNL Team; SLAC Team

    2016-10-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) using ultrashort x-ray pulses from free electron lasers has the potential to resolve transient phenomena in dense laser-produced plasmas with nanometer spatial and femtosecond temporal resolution. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrated ultrafast SAXS from a laser-irradiated wire target using the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). A 5 µm Al wire was irradiated with a high-intensity laser pulse (up to 200 mJ, 50 fs) leading to a rapidly expanding laser plasma. X-ray pulses from the free-electron laser (60 fs, 5.5 keV) probe the laser produced plasma 80 ps after the interaction. The SAXS data reveals that an indentation of the dense plasma is initiated due to plasma expansion. The measurements will be discussed using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the laser plasma interaction. This work was supported by the Volkswagen Foundation and DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  16. Modulation of ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer in H-bonding environment: PET from aniline to coumarin 153 in the presence of an inert co-solvent cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Barman, Nabajeet; Hossen, Tousif; Mondal, Koushik; Sahu, Kalyanasis

    2015-12-28

    Despite intensive research, the role of the H-bonding environment on ultrafast PET remains illusive. For example, coumarin 153 (C153) undergoes ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer (PET) in electron-donating solvents, in both aniline (AN) and N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA), despite their very different H-bonding abilities. Thus, donor-acceptor (AN-C153) H-bonding may have only a minor role in PET (Yoshihara and co-workers, J. Phys. Chem. A, 1998, 102, 3089). However, donor-acceptor H-bonding may be somehow less effective in the neat H-bonding environment but could become dominant in the presence of an inert solvent (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, 16, 6159). We successfully applied and tested the proposal here. The nature of PET modulation of C153 in the presence of a passive component cyclohexane is found to be very different for aniline and DMA. Upon addition of cyclohexane to DMA, the PET process gradually becomes retarded but in the case of AN, the PET rate was indeed found to be accelerated at some intermediate composition (mole fraction of aniline, XAN∼ 0.74) compared to that of neat aniline. It is intuitive that cyclohexane may replace some of the donors (AN or DMA) from the vicinity of the acceptor and, thus, should disfavour PET. However, in the hydrogen bonding environment using molecular dynamics simulation, for the first time, we show that the average number of aniline molecules orienting their N-H group in the proximity of the C=O group of C153 is actually higher at the intermediate mole fraction (0.74) of aniline in a mixture rather than in neat aniline. This small but finite excess of C153-AN H-bonding already present in the ground state may possibly account for the anomalous effect. The TD-DFT calculations presented here showed that the intermolecular H-bonding between C153 and AN strengthens from 21.1 kJ mol(-1) in the ground state to 33.0 kJ mol(-1) in the excited state and, consequently, H-bonding may assist PET according to the Zhao and Han

  17. Ultrafast charge division imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan; Woo, Brian; Odom, Robert W.

    2000-11-01

    We have developed position computing electronics having less than 60 ns dead times for resistive anode encoders, a form of charge division imaging detector. These electronics are at least a factor of 5 faster than anything available commercially and are based on using a fast, self-resetting charge integrator and subrange digital division techniques. Our primary application for this detector is secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)/ions imaging and we demonstrate that SIMS imaging applications using these ultrafast electronics can readily be performed at ion intensities above 106 cps. This article discusses the overall electronics design and presents experimental data on dead-time measurements, detector lateral resolution, and SIMS imaging.

  18. Ultrafast coherent heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.A.

    1992-03-01

    This paper considers the possibility of developing ultrafast thermodynamic engine cycles that operate by the exchange of internal phase heat with the environment. These engines operate on the basis of the first and second laws of thermodynamics which are written in a form where the entropy and internal energy are complex numbers which rotate in an internal space during an ultrafast process. Several types of cyclic engines are considered in which the magnitudes of both the entropy and internal energy remain fixed during each portion of the cycle. The efficiencies are calculated for internal phase engine cycles of the type: Carnot, Otto, Diesel, Stirling, Ericsson and Brayton. These efficiencies are complex numbers whose real parts represent measured efficiencies that must always be less than unity. A brief discussion is given of the application of broken symmetry internal phase engine cycles to practical power sources and to the thermodynamic processes that occur in high speed computer memories. The possibility of developing high-Tc superconducting electron-pair engines is considered.

  19. The Verification of the Usefulness of Electronic Nose Based on Ultra-Fast Gas Chromatography and Four Different Chemometric Methods for Rapid Analysis of Spirit Beverages

    PubMed Central

    Śliwińska, Magdalena; Namieśnik, Jacek; Wardencki, Waldemar; Dymerski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Spirit beverages are a diverse group of foodstuffs. They are very often counterfeited which cause the appearance of low quality products or wrongly labelled products on the market. It is important to find a proper quality control and botanical origin method enabling the same time preliminary check of the composition of investigated samples, which was the main goal of this work. For this purpose, the usefulness of electronic nose based on ultra-fast gas chromatography (fast GC e-nose) was verified. A set of 24 samples of raw spirits, 33 samples of vodkas, and 8 samples of whisky were analysed by fast GC e-nose. Four data analysis methods were used. The PCA was applied for the visualization of dataset, observation of the variation inside groups of samples, and selection of variables for the other three statistical methods. The SQC method was utilized to compare the quality of the samples. Both the DFA and SIMCA data analysis methods were used for discrimination of vodka, whisky, and spirits samples. The fast GC e-nose combined with four statistical methods can be used for rapid discrimination of raw spirits, vodkas, and whisky and in the same for preliminary determination of the composition of investigated samples. PMID:27446633

  20. Dynamics of the 3MLCT in Ru(II) terpyridyl complexes probed by ultrafast spectroscopy: evidence of excited-state equilibration and interligand electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Joshua T; Vallett, Paul J; Damrauer, Niels H

    2012-11-29

    Ground- and excited-state properties of [Ru(tpy)(2)](2+), [Ru(tpy)(ttpy)](2+), and [Ru(ttpy)(2)](2+) (where tpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine and ttpy = 4'-(4-methylphenyl)-2,2':6',2″-terpyridine) in room temperature acetonitrile have been investigated using linear absorption, electrochemical, and ultrafast transient pump-probe techniques. Spectroelectrochemistry was used to assign features observed in the transient spectra while single wavelength kinetics collected at a variety of probe wavelengths were used to monitor temporal evolution of the MLCT excited state. From these data, the excited-state lifetime of each complex was recovered and the rate limiting decay step was identified. In the bis-heteroleptic complex [Ru(tpy)(ttpy)](2+), photoexcitation to the (1)MLCT manifold generates both tpy-localized and ttpy-localized excited states. Accordingly, interligand electron transfer (ILET) from tpy-localized to the ttpy-localized (3)MLCT excited states is observable and the time scale has been measured to be 3 ps. For the homoleptic complex [Ru(tpy)(2)](2+), evidence for equilibration of the (3)MLCT excited-state population with the (3)MC has been observed and the time scale is reported at 2 ps.

  1. Ultrafast time-resolved electron diffraction revealing the nonthermal dynamics of near-UV photoexcitation-induced amorphization in Ge2Sb2Te5

    PubMed Central

    Hada, Masaki; Oba, Wataru; Kuwahara, Masashi; Katayama, Ikufumi; Saiki, Toshiharu; Takeda, Jun; Nakamura, Kazutaka G.

    2015-01-01

    Because of their robust switching capability, chalcogenide glass materials have been used for a wide range of applications, including optical storages devices. These phase transitions are achieved by laser irradiation via thermal processes. Recent studies have suggested the potential of nonthermal phase transitions in the chalcogenide glass material Ge2Sb2Te5 triggered by ultrashort optical pulses; however, a detailed understanding of the amorphization and damage mechanisms governed by nonthermal processes is still lacking. Here we performed ultrafast time-resolved electron diffraction and single-shot optical pump-probe measurements followed by femtosecond near-ultraviolet pulse irradiation to study the structural dynamics of polycrystalline Ge2Sb2Te5. The experimental results present a nonthermal crystal-to-amorphous phase transition of Ge2Sb2Te5 initiated by the displacements of Ge atoms. Above the fluence threshold, we found that the permanent amorphization caused by multi-displacement effects is accompanied by a partial hexagonal crystallization. PMID:26314613

  2. The Verification of the Usefulness of Electronic Nose Based on Ultra-Fast Gas Chromatography and Four Different Chemometric Methods for Rapid Analysis of Spirit Beverages.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewska, Paulina; Śliwińska, Magdalena; Namieśnik, Jacek; Wardencki, Waldemar; Dymerski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Spirit beverages are a diverse group of foodstuffs. They are very often counterfeited which cause the appearance of low quality products or wrongly labelled products on the market. It is important to find a proper quality control and botanical origin method enabling the same time preliminary check of the composition of investigated samples, which was the main goal of this work. For this purpose, the usefulness of electronic nose based on ultra-fast gas chromatography (fast GC e-nose) was verified. A set of 24 samples of raw spirits, 33 samples of vodkas, and 8 samples of whisky were analysed by fast GC e-nose. Four data analysis methods were used. The PCA was applied for the visualization of dataset, observation of the variation inside groups of samples, and selection of variables for the other three statistical methods. The SQC method was utilized to compare the quality of the samples. Both the DFA and SIMCA data analysis methods were used for discrimination of vodka, whisky, and spirits samples. The fast GC e-nose combined with four statistical methods can be used for rapid discrimination of raw spirits, vodkas, and whisky and in the same for preliminary determination of the composition of investigated samples.

  3. Stacking order dynamics in the quasi-two-dimensional dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2 probed with MeV ultrafast electron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Le Guyader, L.; Chase, T.; Reid, A. H.; ...

    2017-05-03

    Transitions between different charge density wave (CDW) states in quasi-two-dimensional materials may be accompanied also by changes in the inter-layer stacking of the CDW. Using MeV ultrafast electron diffraction, the out-of-plane stacking order dynamics in the quasi-two-dimensional dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2 is investigated for the first time. From the intensity of the CDW satellites aligned around the commensurate l = 1/6 characteristic stacking order, it is found out that this phase disappears with a 0.3 ps time constant. Simultaneously, in the same experiment, the emergence of the incommensurate phase, with a slightly slower 2.0 ps time constant, is determined from the intensitymore » of the CDW satellites aligned around the incommensurate l = 1/3 characteristic stacking order. Finally, these results might be of relevance in understanding the metallic character of the laser-induced metastable “hidden” state recently discovered in this compound.« less

  4. EDITORIAL: Ultrafast magnetization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrands, Burkard

    2008-09-01

    This Cluster Issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics is devoted to ultrafast magnetization processes. It reports on the scientific yield of the Priority Programme 1133 'Ultrafast Magnetization Processes' which was funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the period 2002-2008 in three successive two-year funding periods, supporting research of 17-18 groups in Germany. Now, at the end of this Priority Programme, the members feel that the achievements made in the course of the programme merit communication to the international scientific community in a concerted way. Therefore, each of the projects of the last funding period presents a key result in a published contribution to this Cluster Issue. The purpose of the funding by a Priority Programme is to advance knowledge in an emerging field of research through collaborative networked support over several locations. Priority Programmes are characterized by their enhanced quality of research through the use of new methods and forms of collaboration in emerging fields, by added value through interdisciplinary cooperation, and by networking. The aim of the Priority Programme 1133 'Ultrafast Magnetization Processes' may be well characterized by the call for projects in June 2001 after the programme was approved by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft: 'The aim of the priority programme is the achievement of a basic understanding of the temporal evolution of fast magnetization processes in magnetically ordered films, multilayers and micro-structured systems. The challenge lies in the advancement of the field of ultrafast magnetization processes into the regime of a few femtoseconds to nanoseconds, a topic not yet well explored. A general aim is to understand the fundamental mechanisms needed for applications in ultrafast magneto-electronic devices. The fundamental topic to be addressed is the response of the magnetization of small structures upon the application of pulsed magnetic fields, laser pulses or

  5. Combined convective and diffusive simulations: VERB-4D comparison with 17 March 2013 Van Allen Probes observations: VERB-4D

    DOE PAGES

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Kellerman, Adam C.; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; ...

    2015-11-19

    Our study focused on understanding the coupling between different electron populations in the inner magnetosphere and the various physical processes that determine evolution of electron fluxes at different energies. Observations during the 17 March 2013 storm and simulations with a newly developed Versatile Electron Radiation Belt-4D (VERB-4D) are presented. This analysis of the drift trajectories of the energetic and relativistic electrons shows that electron trajectories at transitional energies with a first invariant on the scale of ~100 MeV/G may resemble ring current or relativistic electron trajectories depending on the level of geomagnetic activity. Simulations with the VERB-4D code including convection,more » radial diffusion, and energy diffusion are presented. Sensitivity simulations including various physical processes show how different acceleration mechanisms contribute to the energization of energetic electrons at transitional energies. In particular, the range of energies where inward transport is strongly influenced by both convection and radial diffusion are studied. Our results of the 4-D simulations are compared to Van Allen Probes observations at a range of energies including source, seed, and core populations of the energetic and relativistic electrons in the inner magnetosphere.« less

  6. Combined convective and diffusive simulations: VERB-4D comparison with 17 March 2013 Van Allen Probes observations: VERB-4D

    SciTech Connect

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Kellerman, Adam C.; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; Spence, Harlan E.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Baker, Daniel N.

    2015-11-19

    Our study focused on understanding the coupling between different electron populations in the inner magnetosphere and the various physical processes that determine evolution of electron fluxes at different energies. Observations during the 17 March 2013 storm and simulations with a newly developed Versatile Electron Radiation Belt-4D (VERB-4D) are presented. This analysis of the drift trajectories of the energetic and relativistic electrons shows that electron trajectories at transitional energies with a first invariant on the scale of ~100 MeV/G may resemble ring current or relativistic electron trajectories depending on the level of geomagnetic activity. Simulations with the VERB-4D code including convection, radial diffusion, and energy diffusion are presented. Sensitivity simulations including various physical processes show how different acceleration mechanisms contribute to the energization of energetic electrons at transitional energies. In particular, the range of energies where inward transport is strongly influenced by both convection and radial diffusion are studied. Our results of the 4-D simulations are compared to Van Allen Probes observations at a range of energies including source, seed, and core populations of the energetic and relativistic electrons in the inner magnetosphere.

  7. ULTRAFAST ELECTRON SPIN DYNAMICS OF AS-GROWN Ga1-xMnxAs WITH APPROPRIATE Mn DOPING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Han

    2013-06-01

    The electron spin dynamics in the as-grown Ga1-xMnxAs films with appropriate Mn doping of x 2-5% is studied using time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements. Due to the existence of Mn interstitials, the s-d exchange scattering is found to play an important role for the as-grown Ga1-xMnxAs, and compete with p-d exchange coupling to dominate the electron spin relaxation process. The contribution of electron-electron Coulomb scattering to the electron spin dynamics for the as-grown Ga1-x MnxAs appears to be as important as that of the annealed ones. Our findings are fundamentally important for better understanding the electron spin dynamics in Ga1-xMnxAs for its future spintronic applications.

  8. AIMS simulation study of ultrafast electronically nonadiabatic chemistry of methyl azide and UV-VIS spectroscopic study of azido-based energetic plasticizer bis(1,3-diazido prop-2-yl)malonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Jayanta; Banerjee, Shaibal; Bhattacharya, Atanu

    2017-09-01

    To gain insight into the ultrafast electronically nonadiabatic chemistry of azido-based energetic plasticizer, we have explored the nonadiabatic chemical dynamics of an azido-based model analog molecule, methyl azide (MAz), using ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulation and electronic structure theory calculations. Molecular nitrogen (N2) is predicted to be the initial product of MAz following its electronic excitation to the S1 electronically excited state. AIMS-based simulation reveals that electronically excited azido-based molecules undergo extremely fast (approximately in 40 femtoseconds) relaxation to the ground state via the (S1/S0)CI conical intersection. Furthermore, this relaxation process involves the Nsbnd N bond elongation along with the bending of N3 moiety. This is the first report on the electronically non-adiabatic chemical dynamics (in ultrafast time domain) of methyl azide. Finally, using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, we comment on the electronically nonadiabatic chemistry of azido-based energetic plasticizer, bis(1,3-diazido prop-2-yl)malonate.

  9. Electric current induced ultrafast demagnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Richard B.; Yang, Yang; Gorchon, Jon; Lambert, Charles-Henri; Salahuddin, Sayeef; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2017-07-01

    We report the magnetic response of Co/Pt multilayers to picosecond electrical heating. Using photoconductive Auston switches, we generate electrical pulses with 5.5 ps duration and hundreds of pico-Joules to pass through Co/Pt multilayers. The electrical pulse heats the electrons in the Co/Pt multilayers and causes an ultrafast reduction in the magnetic moment. A comparison between optical and electrically induced demagnetization of the Co/Pt multilayers reveals significantly different dynamics for optical vs electrical heating. We attribute the disparate dynamics to the dependence of the electron-phonon interaction on the average energy and the total number of initially excited electrons.

  10. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    PubMed Central

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter. PMID:25744080

  11. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-03-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter.

  12. Semiconductors Under Ion Radiation: Ultrafast Electron-Ion Dynamics in Perfect Crystals and the Effect of Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheng-Wei; Schleife, André

    Stability and safety issues have been challenging difficulties for materials and devices under radiation such as solar panels in outer space. On the other hand, radiation can be utilized to modify materials and increase their performance via focused-ion beam patterning at nano-scale. In order to grasp the underlying processes, further understanding of the radiation-material and radiation-defect interactions is required and inevitably involves the electron-ion dynamics that was traditionally hard to capture. By applying Ehrenfest dynamics based on time-dependent density functional theory, we have been able to perform real-time simulation of electron-ion dynamics in MgO and InP/GaP. By simulating a high-energy proton penetrating the material, the energy gain of electronic system can be interpreted as electronic stopping power and the result is compared to existing data. We also study electronic stopping in the vicinity of defects: for both oxygen vacancy in MgO and interface of InP/GaP superlattice, electronic stopping shows strong dependence on the velocity of the proton. To study the energy transfer from electronic system to lattice, simulations of about 100 femto-seconds are performed and we analyze the difference between Ehrenfest and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

  13. Ultrafast electronic response of Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces: From early excitonic transients to saturated image potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silkin, V. M.; Lazić, P.; Došlić, N.; Petek, H.; Gumhalter, B.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of attosecond to femtosecond screening and emergent potentials that govern the dynamics and energetics of electrons and holes excited in the various stages of multiphoton photoemission processes and control the photoelectron yield in recently reported experiments [X. Cui, C. Wang, A. Argondizzo, S. Garrett-Roe, B. Gumhalter, and H. Petek, Nat. Phys. 10, 505 (2014), 10.1038/nphys2981]. The study is focused on the dynamical screening of holes created in preexistent quasi-two-dimensional Shockley state bands on Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces and of electrons excited to the intermediate and emerging screened states. Using the formalism of self-consistent electronic response, we analyze first the effects of screening on the dynamics of photoexcited electrons and holes and then of the Coulomb correlated photoexcited pair. Special attention is paid to the correlated primary electron-hole states, which commence as transient surface excitons and develop in the course of screening into uncorrelated electrons and holes propagating in the image potential and surface state bands, respectively. The obtained results enable to establish a consistent picture of transient electron dynamics at Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces that are becoming accessible by the time-, energy-, and momentum-resolved pump-probe multiphoton photoelectron spectroscopies.

  14. 4-D OCT in Developmental Cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    Although strong evidence exists to suggest that altered cardiac function can lead to CHDs, few studies have investigated the influential role of cardiac function and biophysical forces on the development of the cardiovascular system due to a lack of proper in vivo imaging tools. 4-D imaging is needed to decipher the complex spatial and temporal patterns of biomechanical forces acting upon the heart. Numerous solutions over the past several years have demonstrated 4-D OCT imaging of the developing cardiovascular system. This chapter will focus on these solutions and explain their context in the evolution of 4-D OCT imaging. The first sections describe the relevant techniques (prospective gating, direct 4-D imaging, retrospective gating), while later sections focus on 4-D Doppler imaging and measurements of force implementing 4-D OCT Doppler. Finally, the techniques are summarized, and some possible future directions are discussed.

  15. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    DOE PAGES

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; ...

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset andmore » at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. As a result, our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.« less

  16. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    PubMed Central

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H.; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions. PMID:26733106

  17. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    SciTech Connect

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H.; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. As a result, our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.

  18. Natural dyes adsorbed on TiO2 nanowire for photovoltaic applications: enhanced light absorption and ultrafast electron injection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Sheng; Ren, Jun; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2008-10-01

    We investigate the electronic coupling between a TiO2 nanowire and a natural dye sensitizer, using state-of-the-art time-dependent first-principles calculations. The model dye molecule, cyanidin, is deprotonated into the quinonoidal form upon adsorption on the wire surface. This results in its highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) being located in the middle of the TiO2 bandgap and its lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) being close to the TiO2 conduction band minimum (CBM), leading to greatly enhanced visible light absorption with two prominent peaks at 480 and 650 nm. We find that excited electrons are injected into the TiO2 conduction band within a time scale of 50 fs with negligible electron-hole recombination and energy dissipation, even though the dye LUMO is located 0.1-0.3 eV lower than the CBM of the TiO2 nanowire.

  19. Ultrafast fluorescence quenching dynamics of Atto655 in the presence of N-acetyltyrosine and N-acetyltryptophan in aqueous solution: proton-coupled electron transfer versus electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Yuan, Shuwei; Lu, Rong; Yu, Anchi

    2013-06-20

    We studied the ultrafast fluorescence quenching dynamics of Atto655 in the presence of N-acetyltyrosine (AcTyr) and N-acetyltryptophan (AcTrp) in aqueous solution with femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. We found that the charge-transfer rate between Atto655 and AcTyr is about 240 times smaller than that between Atto655 and AcTrp. The pH value and D2O dependences of the excited-state decay kinetics of Atto655 in the presence of AcTyr and AcTrp reveal that the quenching of Atto655 fluorescence by AcTyr in aqueous solution is via a proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) process and that the quenching of Atto655 fluorescence by AcTrp in aqueous solution is via an electron-transfer process. With the version of the semiclassical Marcus ET theory, we derived that the electronic coupling constant for the PCET reaction between Atto655 and AcTyr in aqueous solution is 8.3 cm(-1), indicating that the PCET reaction between Atto655 and AcTyr in aqueous solution is nonadiabatic.

  20. Substitutional 4d and 5d impurities in graphene.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2016-08-21

    We describe the structural and electronic properties of graphene doped with substitutional impurities of 4d and 5d transition metals. The adsorption energies and distances for 4d and 5d metals in graphene show similar trends for the later groups in the periodic table, which are also well-known characteristics of 3d elements. However, along earlier groups the 4d impurities in graphene show very similar adsorption energies, distances and magnetic moments to the 5d ones, which can be related to the influence of the 4d and 5d lanthanide contraction. Surprisingly, within the manganese group, the total magnetic moment of 3 μB for manganese is reduced to 1 μB for technetium and rhenium. We find that compared with 3d elements, the larger size of the 4d and 5d elements causes a high degree of hybridization with the neighbouring carbon atoms, reducing spin splitting in the d levels. It seems that the magnetic adjustment of graphene could be significantly different if 4d or 5d impurities are used instead of 3d impurities.

  1. Production and synchronization of electron beams from RF photoinjector/compressor systems for ultra-fast applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. C.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2001-05-01

    The RF photoinjector, when coupled with a magnetic pulse compression system, is now a ubiquitous tool for production of sub-picosecond electron beam pulses which are to be used in advanced accelerator and light source experiments. As the time-scale for both pulse lengths and synchronization to external systems approaches the femtosecond level, a clear understanding of the longitudinal dynamics of the electron injector is required. This paper presents an analysis of the longitudinal beam dynamics of electron bunches in the photoinjector/compressor system from birth at the photocathode, through their initial violent acceleration in the RF gun, and subsequent phase space manipulation in the post-acceleration linac and magnetic chicane. The phenomena of phase focusing due to RF forces, and defocusing due to longitudinal space-charge, are discussed, as is the process of magnetic pulse compression. The issues relevant to synchronization of electron pulses with external lasers are examined, using the examples of beat-wave acceleration and Compton light sources, and solutions involving appropriate compressor configurations are proposed. Diagnosis of the relevant physical effects in such schemes is discussed.

  2. Ultrafast photoinduced charge transfer in pi-conjugated electron systems: Effects of structure, delocalization, and energetics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanze, Kirk S.; Jones, Austin; Gish, Melissa; Zeman, Charles J.; Alsam, Amani A.; Aly, Shawkat M.; Papanikolas, John M.; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-09-01

    Photoinduced charge transfer is a key step in the mechanism of charge generation in organic solar cells. Charge transfer typically occurs from a photoexcited conjugated polymer donor to an electron acceptor. In an effort to better understand the primary events in solar cells, we have investigated photoinduced charge transfer in model donor-acceptor systems consisting of pi-conjugated oligomer donors that are covalently linked to diimide electron acceptors. These studies utilized oligo(thiophene), oligo(phenylene ethynylene) and oligo(fluorene) pi-conjugated systems with lengths varying from 4 to 12 repeat units linked to naphthalene diimide electron acceptors. Excitation with 100 femtosecond pulses at wavelengths correspoinding to the conjugated oligomer absorption band(s) leads to rapid photoinduced charge transfer to produce a charge separated state, (oligomer+)-(NDI-), which subsequently decays on timescales ranging from 100 ps to 5 ns. The dynamics of the forward and reverse electron transfer reactions depend strongly on the structure and length of the pi-conjugated oligomers, with the fastest rates occurring for oligo(thiophene)s, and considerably slower rates for oligo(phenylene ethynylene)s. The talk will discuss the structure-property relationships and energetic correlations that control the dynamics of charge separation and recombination.

  3. Ultrafast pseudospin dynamics in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushin, M.; Grupp, A.; Soavi, G.; Budweg, A.; De Fazio, D.; Sassi, U.; Lombardo, A.; Ferrari, A. C.; Belzig, W.; Leitenstorfer, A.; Brida, D.

    2015-10-01

    Interband optical transitions in graphene are subject to pseudospin selection rules. Impulsive excitation with linearly polarized light generates an anisotropic photocarrier occupation in momentum space that evolves at time scales shorter than 100 fs. Here, we investigate the evolution of nonequilibrium charges towards an isotropic distribution by means of fluence-dependent ultrafast spectroscopy and develop an analytical model able to quantify the isotropization process. In contrast to conventional semiconductors, the isotropization is governed by optical phonon emission, rather than electron-electron scattering, which nevertheless contributes in shaping the anisotropic photocarrier occupation within the first few femtoseconds.

  4. On the participation of photoinduced N-H bond fission in aqueous adenine at 266 and 220 nm: a combined ultrafast transient electronic and vibrational absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Gareth M; Marroux, Hugo J B; Grubb, Michael P; Ashfold, Michael N R; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2014-11-26

    A combination of ultrafast transient electronic absorption spectroscopy (TEAS) and transient vibrational absorption spectroscopy (TVAS) is used to investigate whether photoinduced N–H bond fission, mediated by a dissociative 1πσ(*) state, is active in aqueous adenine (Ade) at 266 and 220 nm. In order to isolate UV/visible and IR spectral signatures of the adeninyl radical (Ade[-H]), formed as a result of N–H bond fission, TEAS and TVAS are performed on Ade in D2O under basic conditions (pD = 12.5), which forms Ade[-H](-) anions via deprotonation at the N7 or N9 sites of Ade's 7H and 9H tautomers. At 220 nm we observe one-photon detachment of an electron from Ade[-H](-), which generates solvated electrons (eaq(-)) together with Ade[-H] radicals, with clear signatures in both TEAS and TVAS. Additional wavelength dependent TEAS measurements between 240–260 nm identify a threshold of 4.9 ± 0.1 eV (∼250 nm) for this photodetachment process in D2O. Analogous TEAS experiments on aqueous Ade at pD = 7.4 generate a similar photoproduct signal together with eaq(-) after excitation at 266 and 220 nm. These eaq(-) are born from ionization of Ade, together with Ade(+) cations, which are indistinguishable from Ade[-H] radicals in TEAS. Ade(+) and Ade[-H] are found to have different signatures in TVAS and we verify that the pD = 7.4 photoproduct signal observed in TEAS following 220 nm excitation is solely due to Ade(+) cations. Based on these observations, we conclude that: (i) N–H bond fission in aqueous Ade is inactive at wavelengths ≥220 nm; and (ii) if such a channel exists in aqueous solution, its threshold is strongly blue-shifted relative to the onset of the same process in gas phase 9H-Ade (≤233 nm). In addition, we extract excited state lifetimes and vibrational cooling dynamics for 9H-Ade and Ade[-H](-). In both cases, excited state lifetimes of <500 fs are identified, while vibrational cooling occurs within a time frame of 4–5 ps. In contrast, 7H

  5. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of Photoexcited Heme Model Compounds: Observation of Multiple Electronic Spin States and Vibrational Cooling.

    PubMed

    Govind, Chinju; Karunakaran, Venugopal

    2017-04-13

    Hemin is a unique model compound of heme proteins carrying out variable biological functions. Here, the excited state relaxation dynamics of heme model compounds in the ferric form are systematically investigated by changing the axial ligand (Cl/Br), the peripheral substituent (vinyl/ethyl-meso), and the solvent (methanol/DMSO) using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy upon excitation at 380 nm. The relaxation time constants of these model compounds are obtained by global analysis. Excited state deactivation pathway of the model compounds comprising the decay of the porphyrin excited state (S*) to ligand to metal charge transfer state (LMCT, τ1), back electron transfer from metal to ligand (MLCT, τ2), and relaxation to the ground state through different electronic spin states of iron (τ3 and τ4) are proposed along with the vibrational cooling processes. This is based on the excited state absorption spectral evolution, similarities between the transient absorption spectra of the ferric form and steady state absorption spectra of the low-spin ferrous form, and the data analysis. The observation of an increase of all the relaxation time constants in DMSO compared to the methanol reflects the stabilization of intermediate states involved in the electronic relaxation. The transient absorption spectra of met-myoglobin are also measured for comparison. Thus, the transient absorption spectra of these model compounds reveal the involvement of multiple iron spin states in the electronic relaxation dynamics, which could be an alternative pathway to the ground state beside the vibrational cooling processes and associated with the inherent features of the heme b type.

  6. Thermodynamic picture of ultrafast charge transport in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Mics, Zoltán; Tielrooij, Klaas-Jan; Parvez, Khaled; Jensen, Søren A.; Ivanov, Ivan; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Bonn, Mischa; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The outstanding charge transport properties of graphene enable numerous electronic applications of this remarkable material, many of which are expected to operate at ultrahigh speeds. In the regime of ultrafast, sub-picosecond electric fields, however, the very high conduction properties of graphene are not necessarily preserved, with the physical picture explaining this behaviour remaining unclear. Here we show that in graphene, the charge transport on an ultrafast timescale is determined by a simple thermodynamic balance maintained within the graphene electronic system acting as a thermalized electron gas. The energy of ultrafast electric fields applied to graphene is converted into the thermal energy of its entire charge carrier population, near-instantaneously raising the electronic temperature. The dynamic interplay between heating and cooling of the electron gas ultimately defines the ultrafast conductivity of graphene, which in a highly nonlinear manner depends on the dynamics and the strength of the applied electric fields. PMID:26179498

  7. Ultra-fast framing camera tube

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, Ralph

    1981-01-01

    An electronic framing camera tube features focal plane image dissection and synchronized restoration of the dissected electron line images to form two-dimensional framed images. Ultra-fast framing is performed by first streaking a two-dimensional electron image across a narrow slit, thereby dissecting the two-dimensional electron image into sequential electron line images. The dissected electron line images are then restored into a framed image by a restorer deflector operated synchronously with the dissector deflector. The number of framed images on the tube's viewing screen is equal to the number of dissecting slits in the tube. The distinguishing features of this ultra-fast framing camera tube are the focal plane dissecting slits, and the synchronously-operated restorer deflector which restores the dissected electron line images into a two-dimensional framed image. The framing camera tube can produce image frames having high spatial resolution of optical events in the sub-100 picosecond range.

  8. Advances in 4D radiation therapy for managing respiration: part I - 4D imaging.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Geoffrey D; Rosu, Mihaela

    2012-12-01

    Techniques for managing respiration during imaging and planning of radiation therapy are reviewed, concentrating on free-breathing (4D) approaches. First, we focus on detailing the historical development and basic operational principles of currently-available "first generation" 4D imaging modalities: 4D computed tomography, 4D cone beam computed tomography, 4D magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D positron emission tomography. Features and limitations of these first generation systems are described, including necessity of breathing surrogates for 4D image reconstruction, assumptions made in acquisition and reconstruction about the breathing pattern, and commonly-observed artifacts. Both established and developmental methods to deal with these limitations are detailed. Finally, strategies to construct 4D targets and images and, alternatively, to compress 4D information into static targets and images for radiation therapy planning are described.

  9. OSA Proceedings on Ultrafast Electronics and Optoelectronics Held in San Francisco, California on January 25 -27, 1993. Volume 14,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-27

    Gb/s NRZ signal. Since monolithic OEIC es such as bistable memory LDs, and ultra- devices have advantages of reduced cost and fast nonlinear-optical...4 T TB ( I - kT/2A + • • - ) ; (9a) tATz -- <(,,-_ )2> = B2 (kT/2 )2,& (9b) where gE =_ I/RE is the differential emitter where c, a- 4mW•mWNB/2A. It...Lett. 53, 373-375 (1988). InP High Electron Mobility Transistors: Status and Promise Loi D. Nguyen Hughes Research Laboratories, 3011 Malibu Canyon Roa4

  10. Cooperative catalysis: electron-rich Fe-H complexes and DMAP, a successful "joint venture" for ultrafast hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Susanne; Hettmanczyk, Lara; Klein, Johannes E M N; Plietker, Bernd

    2014-08-01

    A series of defined iron-hydrogen complexes was prepared in a straightforward one-pot approach. The structure and electronic properties of such complexes were investigated by means of quantum-chemical analysis. These new complexes were then applied in the dehydrogenative silylation of methanol. The complex (dppp)(CO)(NO)FeH showed a remarkable activity with a TOF of more than 600 000 h(-1) of pure hydrogen gas within seconds. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Attosecond Light and Science at the Time-scale of the Electron - Coherent X-Rays from Tabletop Ultrafast Lasers

    ScienceCinema

    Margaret, Murnane [University of Colorado, Boulder and NIST

    2016-07-12

    Ever since the invention of the laser 50 years ago and its application in nonlinear optics, scientists have been striving to extend coherent laser beams into the x-ray region of the spectrum. Very recently however, the prospects for tabletop coherent sources at very short wavelengths, even in the hard x-ray region of the spectrum at wavelengths < 1nm, have brightened considerably. This advance is possible by taking nonlinear optics techniques to an extreme - physics that is the direct result of a new ability to manipulate electrons on the fastest, attosecond, time-scales of our natural world. Several applications have already been demonstrated, including making a movie of how electrons rearrange in a chemical bond changes shape as a molecule breaks apart, following how fast a magnetic material can flip orientation, understanding how fast heat flows in a nanocircuit, or building a microscope without lenses. Nature 460, 1088 (2009); Science 317, 775 (2007); Physical Review Letters 103, 257402 (2009); Nature Materials 9, 26 (2010); Nature 463, 214 (2010); Science 322, 1207 (2008).

  12. Ultrafast photodriven intramolecular electron transfer from an iridium-based water-oxidation catalyst to perylene diimide derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Vagnini, Michael T.; Smeigh, Amanda L.; Blakemore, James D.; Eaton, Samuel W.; Schley, Nathan D.; D’Souza, Francis; Crabtree, Robert H.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Co, Dick T.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Photodriving the activity of water-oxidation catalysts is a critical step toward generating fuel from sunlight. The design of a system with optimal energetics and kinetics requires a mechanistic understanding of the single-electron transfer events in catalyst activation. To this end, we report here the synthesis and photophysical characterization of two covalently bound chromophore-catalyst electron transfer dyads, in which the dyes are derivatives of the strong photooxidant perylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximide) (PDI) and the molecular catalyst is the Cp∗Ir(ppy)Cl metal complex, where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine. Photoexcitation of the PDI in each dyad results in reduction of the chromophore to PDI•- in less than 10 ps, a process that outcompetes any generation of 3∗PDI by spin-orbit-induced intersystem crossing. Biexponential charge recombination largely to the PDI-Ir(III) ground state is suggestive of multiple populations of the PDI•--Ir(IV) ion-pair, whose relative abundance varies with solvent polarity. Electrochemical studies of the dyads show strong irreversible oxidation current similar to that seen for model catalysts, indicating that the catalytic integrity of the metal complex is maintained upon attachment to the high molecular weight photosensitizer. PMID:22586073

  13. Attosecond Light and Science at the Time-scale of the Electron - Coherent X-Rays from Tabletop Ultrafast Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret, Murnane

    2010-03-31

    Ever since the invention of the laser 50 years ago and its application in nonlinear optics, scientists have been striving to extend coherent laser beams into the x-ray region of the spectrum. Very recently however, the prospects for tabletop coherent sources at very short wavelengths, even in the hard x-ray region of the spectrum at wavelengths < 1nm, have brightened considerably. This advance is possible by taking nonlinear optics techniques to an extreme - physics that is the direct result of a new ability to manipulate electrons on the fastest, attosecond, time-scales of our natural world. Several applications have already been demonstrated, including making a movie of how electrons rearrange in a chemical bond changes shape as a molecule breaks apart, following how fast a magnetic material can flip orientation, understanding how fast heat flows in a nanocircuit, or building a microscope without lenses. Nature 460, 1088 (2009); Science 317, 775 (2007); Physical Review Letters 103, 257402 (2009); Nature Materials 9, 26 (2010); Nature 463, 214 (2010); Science 322, 1207 (2008).

  14. Imaging molecules from within: Ultrafast angstroem-scale structure determination of molecules via photoelectron holography using free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Krasniqi, F.; Rolles, D.; Najjari, B.; Voitkiv, A.; Strueder, L.; Ullrich, J.

    2010-03-15

    A scheme based on (i) upcoming brilliant x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) sources, (ii) innovative energy and angular-dispersive large-area electron imagers, and (iii) the well-known photoelectron holography is elaborated that provides time-dependent three-dimensional structure determination of small to medium-sized molecules with Angstroem spatial and femtosecond time resolution. Inducing molecular dynamics, wave-packet motion, dissociation, passage through conical intersections, or isomerization by a pump pulse this motion is visualized by the x-ray FEL probe pulse launching keV photoelectrons within a few femtoseconds from specific and well-defined sites, deep core levels of individual atoms, inside the molecule. On their way out, the photoelectrons are diffracted generating a hologram on the detector that encodes the molecular structure at the instant of photoionization, thus providing 'femtosecond snapshot images of the molecule from within'. Detailed calculations in various approximations of increasing sophistication are presented and three-dimensional retrieval of the spatial structure of the molecule with Angstroem spatial resolution is demonstrated. Due to the large photoabsorption cross sections the method extends x-ray-diffraction-based time-dependent structure investigations envisioned at FEL's to new classes of samples that are not accessible by any other method. Among them are dilute samples in the gas phase such as aligned, oriented, or conformer-selected molecules, ultracold ensembles and/or molecular or cluster objects containing mainly light atoms that do not scatter x rays efficiently.

  15. First Results on Ultrafast and Ultraintense X-Ray Studies of Molecular Photoabsorption using the LCLS Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrah, Nora

    2010-03-01

    The study of atomic and molecular inner-shell photoionization with conventional x-ray sources is dominated by processes involving the production of single core holes. However, the unprecedented short pulses and peak power at x-ray wavelengths of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory provides new research opportunities and opens the door to study ultra fast, nonlinear x-ray physics. We have used the LCLS to investigate fundamental questions concerning laser pulse duration dependent ionization as well as examine the creation and decay of multiple core-holes. In particular, we focused on double core-holes ionization in N2. We measured the photoelectron, Auger and secondary electron relaxation pathways subsequent to multiple core vacancies in molecules as well as the fragmentation patterns and the charge-state distributions of the resulting ions as a function of wavelength, pulse duration and intensity. The new light source allows the characterization of the molecular ionization and dissociation dynamics and provides new insight into the interaction of matter with intense short pulses. In addition we expect our results to contribute to the foundation for future imaging experiments on molecules. The LCLS photon beam was focused to about 2μm^2 area producing an intense x-ray laser beam of up to 10^18 W/cm^2. We have used x-ray pulses with duration from about 7fs to 280 fs and a photon energy of 1.1 keV to investigate the production of multiple core holes. We have observed the multiple ionization of N2 resulting in fragment ions of up to bare N^7+ [1]. Furthermore, evidence for double core hole has been observed. The experiment was performed at the LCLS AMO beamline which is equipped with an ion time-of-flight spectrometer to determine the ion charge state distribution as well five angle and energy resolving electron time-of-flight spectrometers to detect the emitted photoelectrons and Auger electrons. [4pt] [1] Work done in

  16. Multielectron spectroscopy: the xenon 4d hole double auger decay.

    PubMed

    Penent, F; Palaudoux, J; Lablanquie, P; Andric, L; Feifel, R; Eland, J H D

    2005-08-19

    A magnetic bottle spectrometer of the type recently developed by Eland et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 053003 (2003).] has been implemented for use with synchrotron radiation, allowing multidimensional electron spectroscopy. Its application to the Xe 4d double Auger decay reveals all the energy pathways involved. The dominant path is a cascade process with a rapid (6 fs) ejection of a first Auger electron followed by the slower (>23 fs) emission of a second Auger electron. Weaker processes implying 3 electron processes are also revealed, namely, direct double Auger and associated Rydberg series.

  17. Ultrafast spin-polarized electron dynamics in the unoccupied topological surface state of Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugini, D.; Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Yi, H.; Chen, C.; Zhou, X.; Manzoni, C.; Dallera, C.; Cerullo, G.; Carpene, E.

    2017-08-01

    The three-dimensional topological insulator Bi2Se3 presents two cone-like dispersive topological surface states centered at the \\barΓ point. One of them is unoccupied in equilibrium conditions and located 1.8 eV above the other one lying close to the Fermi level. In this work we employ time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with circularly polarized pump photons to selectively track the spin dynamics of the empty topological states. We observe that spin-polarized electrons flow along the topological cone and recombine towards the unpolarized bulk states on a timescale of few tens of femtoseconds. This provides direct evidence of the capability to trigger a spin current with circularly polarized light.

  18. Optimized PET imaging for 4D treatment planning in radiotherapy: the virtual 4D PET strategy.

    PubMed

    Gianoli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Fontana, Giulia; Giri, Maria G; Grigolato, Daniela; Ferdeghini, Marco; Cavedon, Carlo; Baroni, Guido

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the performance of a novel strategy, referred to as "virtual 4D PET", aiming at the optimization of hybrid 4D CT-PET scan for radiotherapy treatment planning. The virtual 4D PET strategy applies 4D CT motion modeling to avoid time-resolved PET image acquisition. This leads to a reduction of radioactive tracer administered to the patient and to a total acquisition time comparable to free-breathing PET studies. The proposed method exploits a motion model derived from 4D CT, which is applied to the free-breathing PET to recover respiratory motion and motion blur. The free-breathing PET is warped according to the motion model, in order to generate the virtual 4D PET. The virtual 4D PET strategy was tested on images obtained from a 4D computational anthropomorphic phantom. The performance was compared to conventional motion compensated 4D PET. Tests were also carried out on clinical 4D CT-PET scans coming from seven lung and liver cancer patients. The virtual 4D PET strategy was able to recover lesion motion, with comparable performance with respect to the motion compensated 4D PET. The compensation of the activity blurring due to motion was successfully achieved in terms of spill out removal. Specific limitations were highlighted in terms of partial volume compensation. Results on clinical 4D CT-PET scans confirmed the efficacy in 4D PET count statistics optimization, as equal to the free-breathing PET, and recovery of lesion motion. Compared to conventional motion compensation strategies that explicitly require 4D PET imaging, the virtual 4D PET strategy reduces clinical workload and computational costs, resulting in significant advantages for radiotherapy treatment planning.

  19. New Insights into the Composition and Texture of Lunar Regolith Using Ultrafast Automated Electron-Beam Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Wentworth, Susan J.; Schrader, Christian M.; Stoeser, Doug; Botha, Pieter WSK; Butcher, Alan R.; Horsch, Hanna E.; Benedictus, Aukje; Gottlieb, Paul; McKay, David

    2008-01-01

    Sieved grain mounts of Apollo 16 drive tube samples have been examined using QEMSCAN - an innovative electron beam technology. By combining multiple energy-dispersive X-ray detectors, fully automated control, and off-line image processing, to produce digital mineral maps of particles exposed on polished surfaces, the result is an unprecedented quantity of mineralogical and petrographic data, on a particle-by-particle basis. Experimental analysis of four size fractions (500-250 microns, 150-90 microns, 75-45 microns and < 20 microns), prepared from two samples (64002,374 and 64002,262), has produced a robust and uniform dataset which allows for the quantification of mineralogy; texture; particle shape, size and density; and the digital classification of distinct particle types in each measured sample. These preliminary data show that there is a decrease in plagioclase modal content and an opposing increase in glass modal content, with decreasing particle size. These findings, together with data on trace phases (metals, sulphides, phosphates, and oxides), provide not only new insights into the make-up of lunar regolith at the Apollo 16 landing site, but also key physical parameters which can be used to design lunar simulants, and compute Figures of Merit for each material produced.

  20. Ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of water and aqueous N-methylacetamide: Comparison of different electronic structure/molecular dynamics approaches.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J R; Corcelli, S A; Skinner, J L

    2004-11-08

    Kwac and Cho [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 2247 (2003)] have recently developed a combined electronic structure/molecular dynamics approach to vibrational spectroscopy in liquids. The method involves fitting ab initio vibrational frequencies for a solute in a cluster of solvent molecules to a linear combination of the electrostatic potentials on the solute atoms due to the charges on the solvent molecules. These authors applied their method to the N-methylacetamide-D/D(2)O system. We (S. A. Corcelli, C. P. Lawrence, and J. L. Skinner, [J. Chem. Phys. 120, 8107 (2004)]) have recently explored a closely related method, where instead of the electrostatic potential, the solute vibrational frequencies are fit to the components of the electric fields on the solute atoms due to the solvent molecules. We applied our method to the HOD/D(2)O and HOD/H(2)O systems. In order to make a direct comparison of these two approaches, in this paper we apply their method to the water system, and our method to the N-methylacetamide system. For the water system we find that the electric field method is superior to the potential approach, as judged by comparison with experiments for the absorption line shape. For the N-methylacetamide system the two methods are comparable.

  1. Ultrafast Photodriven Intramolecular Electron Transfer from a Zinc Porphyrin to a Readily Reduced Diiron Hydrogenase Model Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Co, Dick T.; Stern, C. L.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2010-06-10

    Diiron complexes modeled on the active site of the [FeFe] hydrogenases having the general formula [Fe2(μ-R)(CO)6-n(L)n], where commonly R = alkyl or aryl dithiolate and L = CO, CN-, or PR3, are a promising class of catalysts for use in photodriven H2 production. However, many of these catalysts are difficult to photoreduce using chromophores that absorb visible light. Here we report the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of a naphthalene-4,5-dicarboximide-1,8-dithiolate diiron complex [NMI-Fe2S2(CO)6, 1] and a covalently linked, fixed-distance zinc 5,10,15-tri-n-pentyl-20-phenylporphyrin-NMI-Fe2S2(CO)6 donor-acceptor dyad (2). The electron-withdrawing nature of the NMI group makes the diiron complex among the most easily reduced hydrogenase mimics reported to date (-0.74 V vs SCE). In the presence of triflic acid, the cyclic voltammogram of 1 showed an increase in current at the first reduction wave at -0.78 V and a new reduction wave at -1.4 V. As the acid concentration was increased, the current at -0.78 V remained constant while the current at -1.4 V increased significantly, which is consistent with a catalytic proton reduction process. Selective photoexcitation of the Zn porphyrin in 2 with 553 nm, 110 fs laser pulses in both toluene and CH2Cl2 yielded transient absorption spectra showing a distinct peak at 616 nm, which has been assigned to [NMI-Fe2S2(CO)6]-• on the basis of spectroelectrochemical measurements on 1. The 616 nm peak was used to monitor the charge separation (CS) and charge recombination (CR) dynamics of 2, which yielded τCS = 12 ± 1 ps and τCR = 3.0 ± 0.2 ns in toluene and τCS = 24 ± 1 ps and τCR = 57 ± 1 ps in CH2Cl2. Photoexcitation of the disulfide precursor to

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory 4D Database

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-02

    4D is an integrated development platform - a single product comprised of the components you need to create and distribute professional applications. You get a graphical design environment, SQL database, a programming language, integrated PHP execution, HTTP server, application server, executable generator, and much more. 4D offers multi-platform development and deployment, meaning whatever you create on a Mac can be used on Windows, and vice-versa. Beyond productive development, 4D is renowned for its great flexibility in maintenance and modification of existing applications, and its extreme ease of implementation in its numerous deployment options. Your professional application can be put into production more quickly, at a lower cost, and will always be instantly scalable. 4D makes it easy, whether you're looking to create a classic desktop application, a client-server system, a distributed solution for Web or mobile clients - or all of the above!

  3. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Henn, T.; Kiessling, T. Ossau, W.; Molenkamp, L. W.; Biermann, K.; Santos, P. V.

    2013-12-15

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast “white light” supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  4. Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Processes in Ultrafast Time Domain: Evidence for Effects of Hydrogen-Bond Stabilization on Photoinduced Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Dey, Ananta; Dana, Jayanta; Aute, Sunil; Maity, Partha; Das, Amitava; Ghosh, Hirendra N

    2017-03-08

    The proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reaction is investigated for a newly synthesized imidazole-anthraquinone biomimetic model with a photoactive Ru(II) -polypyridyl moiety that is covalently coupled to the imidazole fragment. Intramolecular H-bonding interactions between imidazole and anthraquinone moieties favor the PCET process; this can be correlated to an appreciable positive shift in the one-electron reduction potential of the coordinated anthraquinone moiety functionalized with the imidazole fragment. This can also be attributed to the low luminescence quantum yield of the Ru(II) -polypyridyl complex used. The dynamics of the intramolecular electron-transfer (ET) and PCET processes are studied by using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The steady-state spectroscopic studies and the results of the time-resolved absorption studies confirm that H-bonded water molecules play a major role in both ET and PCET dynamics as a proton relay in the excited state. The electron-transfer process is followed by a change in the H-bonding equilibrium between AQ and imidazole in acetonitrile solvent, and protonation of AQ(.-) by water leads to PCET in the presence of water. A slower forward and backward electron-transfer rate is observed in the presence of D2 O compared with that in H2 O. These results provide further experimental support for a detailed understanding of the PCET process.

  5. Electron-lattice energy relaxation in laser-excited thin-film Au-insulator heterostructures studied by ultrafast MeV electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Shen, X; Zheng, Q; Chase, T; Coffee, R; Jerman, M; Li, R K; Ligges, M; Makasyuk, I; Mo, M; Reid, A H; Rethfeld, B; Vecchione, T; Weathersby, S P; Dürr, H A; Wang, X J

    2017-09-01

    We apply time-resolved MeV electron diffraction to study the electron-lattice energy relaxation in thin film Au-insulator heterostructures. Through precise measurements of the transient Debye-Waller-factor, the mean-square atomic displacement is directly determined, which allows to quantitatively follow the temporal evolution of the lattice temperature after short pulse laser excitation. Data obtained over an extended range of laser fluences reveal an increased relaxation rate when the film thickness is reduced or the Au-film is capped with an additional insulator top-layer. This behavior is attributed to a cross-interfacial coupling of excited electrons in the Au film to phonons in the adjacent insulator layer(s). Analysis of the data using the two-temperature-model taking explicitly into account the additional energy loss at the interface(s) allows to deduce the relative strength of the two relaxation channels.

  6. Electron-lattice energy relaxation in laser-excited thin-film Au-insulator heterostructures studied by ultrafast MeV electron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Shen, X.; Zheng, Q.; Chase, T.; Coffee, R.; Jerman, M.; Li, R. K.; Ligges, M.; Makasyuk, I.; Mo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Rethfeld, B.; Vecchione, T.; Weathersby, S. P.; Dürr, H. A.; Wang, X. J.

    2017-01-01

    We apply time-resolved MeV electron diffraction to study the electron-lattice energy relaxation in thin film Au-insulator heterostructures. Through precise measurements of the transient Debye-Waller-factor, the mean-square atomic displacement is directly determined, which allows to quantitatively follow the temporal evolution of the lattice temperature after short pulse laser excitation. Data obtained over an extended range of laser fluences reveal an increased relaxation rate when the film thickness is reduced or the Au-film is capped with an additional insulator top-layer. This behavior is attributed to a cross-interfacial coupling of excited electrons in the Au film to phonons in the adjacent insulator layer(s). Analysis of the data using the two-temperature-model taking explicitly into account the additional energy loss at the interface(s) allows to deduce the relative strength of the two relaxation channels. PMID:28795080

  7. 4D flow imaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran; Allen, Bradley D.; Garcia, Julio; Jarvis, Kelly B.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important tool for the clinical evaluation of patients with cardiovascular disease. Since its introduction in the late 1980s, 2-dimensional phase contrast MRI (2D PC-MRI) has become a routine part of standard-of-care cardiac MRI for the assessment of regional blood flow in the heart and great vessels. More recently, time-resolved PC-MRI with velocity encoding along all three flow directions and three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage (also termed ‘4D flow MRI’) has been developed and applied for the evaluation of cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the human body. 4D flow MRI allows for the comprehensive evaluation of complex blood flow patterns by 3D blood flow visualization and flexible retrospective quantification of flow parameters. Recent technical developments, including the utilization of advanced parallel imaging techniques such as k-t GRAPPA, have resulted in reasonable overall scan times, e.g., 8-12 minutes for 4D flow MRI of the aorta and 10-20 minutes for whole heart coverage. As a result, the application of 4D flow MRI in a clinical setting has become more feasible, as documented by an increased number of recent reports on the utility of the technique for the assessment of cardiac and vascular hemodynamics in patient studies. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential of 4D flow MRI to provide an improved assessment of hemodynamics which might aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to describe the methods used for 4D flow MRI acquisition, post-processing and data analysis. In addition, the article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D flow MRI and includes a review of applications in the heart, thoracic aorta and hepatic system. PMID:24834414

  8. Ultrafast laser IR countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailov, Michael K.

    2009-05-01

    Directional Infrared Countermeasures (DIRCM) is an effective technique to defeat heat-seeking missiles. The major problem of existing DIRCM is that it may work like a beacon for threats that are not susceptible to the jamming code implemented: attracting a missile instead of re-directing it away from the aircraft. Ultra-fast laser pulse technology is discussed as an alternative to a conventional laser DIRCM. An ultra-fast laser is capable of providing a different type of countermeasure which is compatible with existing laser based DIRCM pointing systems as it requires much less peak power than damage inducing systems. A foundation of ultra-fast technology is its unique ability to alter the intrinsic characteristics of the semiconductor. In this paper, we will only consider the effects of a mild lattice disturbance caused by relatively low energy ultra-fast (femto-second) and, to some extent, fast (pico-second) laser pulses.

  9. 4D DSA reconstruction using tomosynthesis projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, Marc; Slagowski, Jordan M.; Mistretta, Charles A.; Strother, Charles M.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the use of tomosynthesis in 4D DSA to improve the accuracy of reconstructed vessel time-attenuation curves (TACs). It is hypothesized that a narrow-angle tomosynthesis dataset for each time point can be exploited to reduce artifacts caused by vessel overlap in individual projections. 4D DSA reconstructs time-resolved 3D angiographic volumes from a typical 3D DSA scan consisting of mask and iodine-enhanced C-arm rotations. Tomosynthesis projections are obtained either from a conventional C-arm rotation, or from an inverse geometry scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system. In the proposed method, rays of the tomosynthesis dataset which pass through multiple vessels can be ignored, allowing the non-overlapped rays to impart temporal information to the 4D DSA. The technique was tested in simulated scans of 2 mm diameter vessels separated by 2 to 5 cm, with TACs following either early or late enhancement. In standard 4D DSA, overlap artifacts were clearly present. Use of tomosynthesis projections in 4D DSA reduced TAC artifacts caused by vessel overlap, when a sufficient fraction of non-overlapped rays was available in each time frame. In cases where full overlap between vessels occurred, information could be recovered via a proposed image space interpolation technique. SBDX provides a tomosynthesis scan for each frame period in a rotational acquisition, whereas a standard C-arm geometry requires the grouping of multiple frames.

  10. GL4D: a GPU-based architecture for interactive 4D visualization.

    PubMed

    Chu, Alan; Fu, Chi-Wing; Hanson, Andrew J; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes GL4D, an interactive system for visualizing 2-manifolds and 3-manifolds embedded in four Euclidean dimensions and illuminated by 4D light sources. It is a tetrahedron-based rendering pipeline that projects geometry into volume images, an exact parallel to the conventional triangle-based rendering pipeline for 3D graphics. Novel features include GPU-based algorithms for real-time 4D occlusion handling and transparency compositing; we thus enable a previously impossible level of quality and interactivity for exploring lit 4D objects. The 4D tetrahedrons are stored in GPU memory as vertex buffer objects, and the vertex shader is used to perform per-vertex 4D modelview transformations and 4D-to-3D projection. The geometry shader extension is utilized to slice the projected tetrahedrons and rasterize the slices into individual 2D layers of voxel fragments. Finally, the fragment shader performs per-voxel operations such as lighting and alpha blending with previously computed layers. We account for 4D voxel occlusion along the 4D-to-3D projection ray by supporting a multi-pass back-to-front fragment composition along the projection ray; to accomplish this, we exploit a new adaptation of the dual depth peeling technique to produce correct volume image data and to simultaneously render the resulting volume data using 3D transfer functions into the final 2D image. Previous CPU implementations of the rendering of 4D-embedded 3-manifolds could not perform either the 4D depth-buffered projection or manipulation of the volume-rendered image in real-time; in particular, the dual depth peeling algorithm is a novel GPU-based solution to the real-time 4D depth-buffering problem. GL4D is implemented as an integrated OpenGL-style API library, so that the underlying shader operations are as transparent as possible to the user.

  11. High-Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Gases at ZnO/ZnMgO Interfaces for Ultra-Fast Electronics Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-17

    THz sources and electronics, ZnO superlattices , ZnO/ZnMgO heterostructures 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18...5 2.3 Device Fabrication and Measurement...unlimited. 3 List of Figures Figure 1 : He-ion microscope image of a fabricated ZnMgO device with multiple Ti/Au wiring contacts for longitudinal and

  12. Ultrafast electronic relaxation processes in semiconductor nanoparticles (silver iodide, silver iodide/silver sulfide, silver bromide/silver sulfide, silver sulfide, cupric sulfide, and copper sulfide) and carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brelle, Michael Chris

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation examines primarily the ultrafast dynamics of excited state charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticles. The dissertation also briefly examines the excited state lifetimes of a few carotenoids. Understanding the dynamic properties of charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticles is crucial for the further development of applications utilizing these systems. The dynamic properties including shallow and deep trapping as well as recombination have been studied in a variety of semiconductor nanoparticle systems. Kinetic modeling was utilized to assist in the assignment of all observed signals and the nature of the decays. The first observation of ultrafast trapping in silver halides was observed in AgI nanoparticles including the identification that interstitial silver ions may act as deep traps. Several interesting phenomena were observed in Ag2S and CuxS nanoparticles including dark shallow trap states and shallow trap state saturation leading to increased transient absorption over transient bleach with increasing excitation intensity. These observations have provided further insight into the relaxation pathways for charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticle systems. Lifetimes of the S2 excited states of four carotenoids have also been determined. The S2 lifetime for beta-carotene was confirmed from previous fluorescence up-conversion experiments whereas the S2 lifetimes that were previously unknown for three carotenoids, violaxanthin, neaxanthin, and lutein were discovered. These experiments together demonstrate the capabilities of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to characterize and better understand the processes involved in the ultrafast relaxation events in both molecular and nanoparticle systems.

  13. Ultrafast science using Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have considerable benefits for ultrafast science. Laser wakefield acceleration provides radiation pulses that have femtosecond duration and intrinsic synchronisation with the laser source, allowing for pump-probe measurements with unprecedented temporal resolution. These pulses can be used to study ultrafast dynamical phenomena in plasma and dense material, such as transient magnetic fields, rapidly evolving plasma dynamics and crystal lattice oscillations. In this talk, I will review recent experiments in laser wakefield acceleration and energetic photon generation using the laser systems HERCULES and Lambda-Cubed at the University of Michigan and their use for capturing the dynamics of laser-pumped samples. Studies of the electron beam hosing instability and the generation of annular phase space distributions increase X-ray flux while maintaining its femtosecond duration. Single-shot, spectrally resolved absorption measurements in laser pumped foils can be made on ultrafast timescales using this broadband photon source. Ultrafast electron radiography is able to temporally resolve relativistically expanding magnetic fields in high-intensity laser-solid interactions and the evolution of electric fields in low density plasma. Time-resolved electron diffraction captures structural dynamics in crystalline silicon. I will also discuss the technological needs for and potential impact of such revolutionary compact radiation sources for ultrafast science in the future. US Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-12-1-0310, the US National Science Foundation Grants No. 1054164, 0935197, 1535628 and 0810979, US Department of Energy Grant No. DE-NA0002372 and Army Research Office Grant No. W911NF1.

  14. Shadow-driven 4D haptic visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Hanson, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Just as we can work with two-dimensional floor plans to communicate 3D architectural design, we can exploit reduced-dimension shadows to manipulate the higher-dimensional objects generating the shadows. In particular, by taking advantage of physically reactive 3D shadow-space controllers, we can transform the task of interacting with 4D objects to a new level of physical reality. We begin with a teaching tool that uses 2D knot diagrams to manipulate the geometry of 3D mathematical knots via their projections; our unique 2D haptic interface allows the user to become familiar with sketching, editing, exploration, and manipulation of 3D knots rendered as projected imageson a 2D shadow space. By combining graphics and collision-sensing haptics, we can enhance the 2D shadow-driven editing protocol to successfully leverage 2D pen-and-paper or blackboard skills. Building on the reduced-dimension 2D editing tool for manipulating 3D shapes, we develop the natural analogy to produce a reduced-dimension 3D tool for manipulating 4D shapes. By physically modeling the correct properties of 4D surfaces, their bending forces, and their collisions in the 3D haptic controller interface, we can support full-featured physical exploration of 4D mathematical objects in a manner that is otherwise far beyond the experience accessible to human beings. As far as we are aware, this paper reports the first interactive system with force-feedback that provides "4D haptic visualization" permitting the user to model and interact with 4D cloth-like objects.

  15. 4D-Var Developement at GMAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelc, Joanna S.; Todling, Ricardo; Akkraoui, Amal El

    2014-01-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Offce (GMAO) is currently using an IAU-based 3D-Var data assimilation system. GMAO has been experimenting with a 3D-Var-hybrid version of its data assimilation system (DAS) for over a year now, which will soon become operational and it will rapidly progress toward a 4D-EnVar. Concurrently, the machinery to exercise traditional 4DVar is in place and it is desirable to have a comparison of the traditional 4D approach with the other available options, and evaluate their performance in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) DAS. This work will also explore the possibility for constructing a reduced order model (ROM) to make traditional 4D-Var computationally attractive for increasing model resolutions. Part of the research on ROM will be to search for a suitably acceptable space to carry on the corresponding reduction. This poster illustrates how the IAU-based 4D-Var assimilation compares with our currently used IAU-based 3D-Var.

  16. Ultra-fast intensified frame images from an electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasma at 2.45 GHz: Some space distributions of visible and monochromatic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortázar, O. D.; Megía-Macías, A.; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H.

    2014-02-01

    First results from an ultra-fast frame image acquisition diagnostic coupled to a 2.45 GHz microwave hydrogen discharge are presented. The plasma reactor has been modified to include a transparent doubled shielded quartz window allowing to viewing the full plasma volume. Pictures describing the breakdown process at 1 μs exposure time have been obtained for integrated visible light signal, Balmer-alpha, Balmer-beta lines, and Fulcher-band. Several different plasma emission distributions are reported. The distribution depends on the magnetic field configuration, incident microwave power, and neutral gas pressure.

  17. Ultra-fast intensified frame images from an electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasma at 2.45 GHz: some space distributions of visible and monochromatic emissions.

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Megía-Macías, A; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A; Tarvainen, O; Komppula, J; Koivisto, H

    2014-02-01

    First results from an ultra-fast frame image acquisition diagnostic coupled to a 2.45 GHz microwave hydrogen discharge are presented. The plasma reactor has been modified to include a transparent doubled shielded quartz window allowing to viewing the full plasma volume. Pictures describing the breakdown process at 1 μs exposure time have been obtained for integrated visible light signal, Balmer-alpha, Balmer-beta lines, and Fulcher-band. Several different plasma emission distributions are reported. The distribution depends on the magnetic field configuration, incident microwave power, and neutral gas pressure.

  18. 4 d -inner-shell ionization of X e+ ions and subsequent Auger decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalal, M. A.; Lablanquie, P.; Andric, L.; Palaudoux, J.; Penent, F.; Bučar, K.; Žitnik, M.; Püttner, R.; Jänkälä, K.; Cubaynes, D.; Guilbaud, S.; Bizau, J.-M.

    2017-07-01

    We have studied X e+4 d inner-shell photoionization in a direct experiment on X e+ ions, merging an ion and a photon beam and detecting the ejected electrons with a cylindrical mirror analyzer. The measured 4 d photoelectron spectrum is compared to the 4 d core valence double ionization spectrum of the neutral Xe atom, obtained with a magnetic bottle spectrometer. This multicoincidence experiment gives access to the spectroscopy of the individual X e2 +4 d-15 p-1 states and to their respective Auger decays, which are found to present a strong selectivity. The experimental results are interpreted with the help of ab initio calculations.

  19. Perspective: Ultrafast magnetism and THz spintronics

    SciTech Connect

    Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus

    2016-10-14

    This year the discovery of femtosecond demagnetization by laser pulses is 20 years old. For the first time, this milestone work by Bigot and coworkers gave insight directly into the time scales of microscopic interactions that connect the spin and electron system. While intense discussions in the field were fueled by the complexity of the processes in the past, it now became evident that it is a puzzle of many different parts. Rather than providing an overview that has been presented in previous reviews on ultrafast processes in ferromagnets, this perspective will show that with our current depth of knowledge the first applications are developed: THz spintronics and all-optical spin manipulation are becoming more and more feasible. The aim of this perspective is to point out where we can connect the different puzzle pieces of understanding gathered over 20 years to develop novel applications. Based on many observations in a large number of experiments. Differences in the theoretical models arise from the localized and delocalized nature of ferromagnetism. Transport effects are intrinsically non-local in spintronic devices and at interfaces. We review the need for multiscale modeling to address the processes starting from electronic excitation of the spin system on the picometer length scale and sub-femtosecond time scale, to spin wave generation, and towards the modeling of ultrafast phase transitions that altogether determine the response time of the ferromagnetic system. Today, our current understanding gives rise to the first usage of ultrafast spin physics for ultrafast magnetism control: THz spintronic devices. This makes the field of ultrafast spin-dynamics an emerging topic open for many researchers right now.

  20. Perspective: Ultrafast magnetism and THz spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus

    2016-10-01

    This year the discovery of femtosecond demagnetization by laser pulses is 20 years old. For the first time, this milestone work by Bigot and coworkers gave insight directly into the time scales of microscopic interactions that connect the spin and electron system. While intense discussions in the field were fueled by the complexity of the processes in the past, it now became evident that it is a puzzle of many different parts. Rather than providing an overview that has been presented in previous reviews on ultrafast processes in ferromagnets, this perspective will show that with our current depth of knowledge the first applications are developed: THz spintronics and all-optical spin manipulation are becoming more and more feasible. The aim of this perspective is to point out where we can connect the different puzzle pieces of understanding gathered over 20 years to develop novel applications. Based on many observations in a large number of experiments. Differences in the theoretical models arise from the localized and delocalized nature of ferromagnetism. Transport effects are intrinsically non-local in spintronic devices and at interfaces. We review the need for multiscale modeling to address the processes starting from electronic excitation of the spin system on the picometer length scale and sub-femtosecond time scale, to spin wave generation, and towards the modeling of ultrafast phase transitions that altogether determine the response time of the ferromagnetic system. Today, our current understanding gives rise to the first usage of ultrafast spin physics for ultrafast magnetism control: THz spintronic devices. This makes the field of ultrafast spin-dynamics an emerging topic open for many researchers right now.

  1. Interactive animation of 4D performance capture.

    PubMed

    Casas, Dan; Tejera, Margara; Guillemaut, Jean-Yves; Hilton, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    A 4D parametric motion graph representation is presented for interactive animation from actor performance capture in a multiple camera studio. The representation is based on a 4D model database of temporally aligned mesh sequence reconstructions for multiple motions. High-level movement controls such as speed and direction are achieved by blending multiple mesh sequences of related motions. A real-time mesh sequence blending approach is introduced, which combines the realistic deformation of previous nonlinear solutions with efficient online computation. Transitions between different parametric motion spaces are evaluated in real time based on surface shape and motion similarity. Four-dimensional parametric motion graphs allow real-time interactive character animation while preserving the natural dynamics of the captured performance.

  2. Ultrafast studies of solution dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.H.; Dyer, R.B.; Callender, R.H.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Fast chemical dynamics generally must be initiated photochemically. This limits the applicability of modern laser methods for following the structural changes that occur during chemical and biological reactions to those systems that have an electronic chromophore that has a significant yield of photoproduct when excited. This project has developed a new and entirely general approach to ultrafast initiation of reactions in solution: laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump). The results open entire new fields of study of ultrafast molecular dynamics in solution. The authors have demonstrated the T-jump technique on time scales of 50 ps and longer, and have applied it to study of the fast events in protein folding. They find that a general lifetime of alpha-helix formation is ca 100 ns, and that tertiary folds (in apomyoglobin) form in ca 100 {mu}s.

  3. Respiratory gating and 4-D tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Tiezhi

    2004-12-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a new intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery process developed at the University of Wisconsin and TomoTherapy Inc. Tomotherapy may be of advantage in lung cancer treatment due to its rotational delivery mode. As with conventional IMRT delivery, however, intrafraction respiratory motion during a tomotherapy treatment causes unnecessary radiation to the healthy tissue. Possible solutions to these problems associated with intrafraction motion have been studied in this thesis. A spirometer is useful for monitoring breathing because of its direct correlation with lung volume changes. However, its inherent drift prevents its application in long-term breathing monitoring. With calibration and stabilization algorithms, a spirometer is able to provide accurate, long-term lung volume change measurements. Such a spirometer system is most suited for deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) treatments. An improved laser-spirometer combined system has also been developed for target tracking in 4-D treatment. Spirometer signals are used to calibrate the displacement measurements into lung volume changes, thereby eliminating scaling errors from daily setup variations. The laser displacement signals may also be used to correct spirometer drifts during operation. A new 4-D treatment technique has been developed to account for intrafraction motion in treatment planning. The patient's breathing and the beam delivery are synchronized, and the target motion/deformation is incorporated into treatment plan optimization. Results show that this new 4D treatment technique significantly reduces motion effects and provides improved patient tolerance.

  4. The d4/d3 redox pairs [MX(CO)(eta-RC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CR)Tp']z (z=0 and 1): structural consequences of electron transfer and implications for the inverse halide order.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher J; Bartlett, Ian M; Carlton, Susannah; Connelly, Neil G; Harding, David J; Hayward, Owen D; Orpen, A Guy; Patron, Elena; Ray, Christopher D; Rieger, Philip H

    2007-01-07

    The d4 halide complexes [MX(CO)(eta-RC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CR)Tp'] {X=F, Cl, Br or I; R=Me or Ph; M=Mo or W; Tp'=hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate} undergo one-electron oxidation to the d3 monocations [MX(CO)(eta-RC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CR)Tp']+, isolable for M=W, R=Me. X-Ray structural studies on the redox pairs [WX(CO)(eta-MeC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CMe)Tp']z (X=Cl and Br, z=0 and 1), the ESR spectra of the cations [WX(CO)(eta-RC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CR)Tp']+ (X=F, Cl, Br or I; R=Me or Ph), and DFT calculations on [WX(CO)(eta-MeC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CMe)Tp']z (X=F, Cl, Br and I; z=0 and 1) are consistent with electron removal from a HOMO (of the d4 complexes) which is pi-antibonding with respect to the W-X bond, pi-bonding with respect to the W-C(O) bond, and delta-bonding with respect to the W-Calkyne bonds. The dependence of both oxidation potential and nu(CO) for [MX(CO)(eta-RC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CR)Tp'] shows an inverse halide order which is consistent with an ionic component to the M-X bond; the small size of fluorine and its closeness to the metal centre leads to the highest energy HOMO and the lowest oxidation potential. In the cations [MX(CO)(eta-RC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CR)Tp']+ electronegativity effects become more important, leading to a conventional order for Cl, Br and I. However, high M-F pi-donation is still facilitated by the short M-F distance.

  5. 4D CT lung ventilation images are affected by the 4D CT sorting method

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian; Johnston, Eric; Maxim, Peter G.; Diehn, Maximilian; Eclov, Neville; Barquero, Cristian; Loo, Billy W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) ventilation imaging is a novel promising technique for lung functional imaging. The current standard 4D CT technique using phase-based sorting frequently results in artifacts, which may deteriorate the accuracy of ventilation imaging. The purpose of this study was to quantify the variability of 4D CT ventilation imaging due to 4D CT sorting. Methods: 4D CT image sets from nine lung cancer patients were each sorted by the phase-based method and anatomic similarity-based method, designed to reduce artifacts, with corresponding ventilation images created for each method. Artifacts in the resulting 4D CT images were quantified with the artifact score which was defined based on the difference between the normalized cross correlation for CT slices within a CT data segment and that for CT slices bordering the interface between adjacent CT data segments. The ventilation variation was quantified using voxel-based Spearman rank correlation coefficients for all lung voxels, and Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) for the spatial overlap of low-functional lung volumes. Furthermore, the correlations with matching single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation images (assumed ground truth) were evaluated for three patients to investigate which sorting method provides higher physiologic accuracy. Results: Anatomic similarity-based sorting reduced 4D CT artifacts compared to phase-based sorting (artifact score, 0.45 ± 0.14 vs 0.58 ± 0.24, p = 0.10 at peak-exhale; 0.63 ± 0.19 vs 0.71 ± 0.31, p = 0.25 at peak-inhale). The voxel-based correlation between the two ventilation images was 0.69 ± 0.26 on average, ranging from 0.03 to 0.85. The DSC was 0.71 ± 0.13 on average. Anatomic similarity-based sorting yielded significantly fewer lung voxels with paradoxical negative ventilation values than phase-based sorting (5.0 ± 2.6% vs 9.7 ± 8.4%, p = 0.05), and improved the correlation with SPECT ventilation regionally. Conclusions

  6. Electronic properties of the boroxine–gold interface: evidence of ultra-fast charge delocalization† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details about the calculations, further theoretical results, STM images of the thermally annealed TPB monolayer and XPS data analysis procedure are reported. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc05632f Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Toffoli, Daniele; Stredansky, Matus; Feng, Zhijing; Balducci, Gabriele; Furlan, Sara; Stener, Mauro; Ustunel, Hande; Cvetko, Dean; Kladnik, Gregor; Morgante, Alberto; Verdini, Alberto; Dri, Carlo; Comelli, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    We performed a combined experimental and theoretical study of the assembly of phenylboronic acid on the Au(111) surface, which is found to lead to the formation of triphenylboroxines by spontaneous condensation of trimers of molecules. The interface between the boroxine group and the gold surface has been characterized in terms of its electronic properties, revealing the existence of an ultra-fast charge delocalization channel in the proximity of the oxygen atoms of the heterocyclic group. More specifically, the DFT calculations show the presence of an unoccupied electronic state localized on both the oxygen atoms of the adsorbed triphenylboroxine and the gold atoms of the topmost layer. By means of resonant Auger electron spectroscopy, we demonstrate that this interface state represents an ultra-fast charge delocalization channel. Boroxine groups are among the most widely adopted building blocks in the synthesis of covalent organic frameworks on surfaces. Our findings indicate that such systems, typically employed as templates for the growth of organic films, can also act as active interlayers that provide an efficient electronic transport channel bridging the inorganic substrate and organic overlayer. PMID:28580111

  7. Progress in Ultrafast Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Masahiro

    2005-08-01

    Recent progress in ultrafast photonics is reviewed with special emphasis on the research and development activities in Japanese research institutions in the field of optical communication and related measurement technologies. After summarizing the physical natures of ultrashort optical pulses, selected topics are reviewed on such as (1) ultrahigh-bit-rate optical communication employing the combination of optical time division multiplexing (OTDM) and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), (2) optical components for ultrafast photonics with emphasis on all optical switches including semiconductor optical amplifiers, cascaded second order frequency converters, semiconductor saturable absorber switches, organic dye saturable absorber switches and bistable semiconductor lasers, (3) microwave photonics, emphasizing millimeter-wave/photonic communication technologies, and (4) high-speed optical measurements featuring both compact femtosecond pulse source development and rf magnetic field imaging. Some comments on the future prospect of ultrafast photonics are also given. It is concluded that in order to bring the powerful and versatile capability of ultrafast photonics into the real world, further collaboration between photonics specialists and production engineers/information specialists is strongly desired.

  8. Distributed ultrafast fibre laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueming; Cui, Yudong; Han, Dongdong; Yao, Xiankun; Sun, Zhipei

    2015-01-01

    A traditional ultrafast fibre laser has a constant cavity length that is independent of the pulse wavelength. The investigation of distributed ultrafast (DUF) lasers is conceptually and technically challenging and of great interest because the laser cavity length and fundamental cavity frequency are changeable based on the wavelength. Here, we propose and demonstrate a DUF fibre laser based on a linearly chirped fibre Bragg grating, where the total cavity length is linearly changeable as a function of the pulse wavelength. The spectral sidebands in DUF lasers are enhanced greatly, including the continuous-wave (CW) and pulse components. We observe that all sidebands of the pulse experience the same round-trip time although they have different round-trip distances and refractive indices. The pulse-shaping of the DUF laser is dominated by the dissipative processes in addition to the phase modulations, which makes our ultrafast laser simple and stable. This laser provides a simple, stable, low-cost, ultrafast-pulsed source with controllable and changeable cavity frequency. PMID:25765454

  9. Oblique sounding using the DPS-4D stations in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosna, Zbysek; Kouba, Daniel; Koucka Knizova, Petra; Arikan, Feza; Arikan, Orhan; Gok, Gokhan; Rejfek, Lubos

    2016-07-01

    The DPS-4D Digisondes are capable of detection of echoes from neighbouring European stations. Currently, a campaign with high-temporal resolution of 5 min is being run. Further, ionograms from regular vertical sounding with 15 min resolution provide us with oblique reflections together with vertical reflections. We analyzed profiles of electron concentration and basic ionospheric parameters derived from the ionograms. We compared results derived from reflections from the ionosphere above the stations (vertical sounding) with information derived from oblique reflections between the stations. This study is supported by the Joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR 14/001 projects.

  10. SU-D-18C-01: A Novel 4D-MRI Technology Based On K-Space Retrospective Sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Yin, F; Cai, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Current 4D-MRI techniques lack sufficient temporal/spatial resolution and consistent tumor contrast. To overcome these limitations, this study presents the development and initial evaluation of an entirely new framework of 4D-MRI based on k-space retrospective sorting. Methods: An important challenge of the proposed technique is to determine the number of repeated scans(NR) required to obtain sufficient k-space data for 4D-MRI. To do that, simulations using 29 cancer patients' respiratory profiles were performed to derive the relationship between data acquisition completeness(Cp) and NR, also relationship between NR(Cp=95%) and the following factors: total slice(NS), respiratory phase bin length(Lb), frame rate(fr), resolution(R) and image acquisition starting-phase(P0). To evaluate our technique, a computer simulation study on a 4D digital human phantom (XCAT) were conducted with regular breathing (fr=0.5Hz; R=256×256). A 2D echo planer imaging(EPI) MRI sequence were assumed to acquire raw k-space data, with respiratory signal and acquisition time for each k-space data line recorded simultaneously. K-space data was re-sorted based on respiratory phases. To evaluate 4D-MRI image quality, tumor trajectories were measured and compared with the input signal. Mean relative amplitude difference(D) and cross-correlation coefficient(CC) are calculated. Finally, phase-sharing sliding window technique was applied to investigate the feasibility of generating ultra-fast 4D-MRI. Result: Cp increased with NR(Cp=100*[1-exp(-0.19*NR)], when NS=30, Lb=100%/6). NR(Cp=95%) was inversely-proportional to Lb (r=0.97), but independent of other factors. 4D-MRI on XCAT demonstrated highly accurate motion information (D=0.67%, CC=0.996) with much less artifacts than those on image-based sorting 4D-MRI. Ultra-fast 4D-MRI with an apparent temporal resolution of 10 frames/second was reconstructed using the phase-sharing sliding window technique. Conclusions: A novel 4D

  11. Active origami by 4D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Qi; Dunn, Conner K.; Qi, H. Jerry; Dunn, Martin L.

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in three dimensional (3D) printing technology that allow multiple materials to be printed within each layer enable the creation of materials and components with precisely controlled heterogeneous microstructures. In addition, active materials, such as shape memory polymers, can be printed to create an active microstructure within a solid. These active materials can subsequently be activated in a controlled manner to change the shape or configuration of the solid in response to an environmental stimulus. This has been termed 4D printing, with the 4th dimension being the time-dependent shape change after the printing. In this paper, we advance the 4D printing concept to the design and fabrication of active origami, where a flat sheet automatically folds into a complicated 3D component. Here we print active composites with shape memory polymer fibers precisely printed in an elastomeric matrix and use them as intelligent active hinges to enable origami folding patterns. We develop a theoretical model to provide guidance in selecting design parameters such as fiber dimensions, hinge length, and programming strains and temperature. Using the model, we design and fabricate several active origami components that assemble from flat polymer sheets, including a box, a pyramid, and two origami airplanes. In addition, we directly print a 3D box with active composite hinges and program it to assume a temporary flat shape that subsequently recovers to the 3D box shape on demand.

  12. Supercurrent anomalies in 4d SCFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Ioannis

    2017-07-01

    We use holographic renormalization of minimal N=2 gauged supergravity in order to derive the general form of the quantum Ward identities for 3d N=2 and 4d N=1 superconformal theories on general curved backgrounds, including an arbitrary fermionic source for the supercurrent. The Ward identities for 4d N=1 theories contain both bosonic and fermionic global anomalies, which we determine explicitly up to quadratic order in the supercurrent source. The Ward identities we derive apply to any superconformal theory, independently of whether it admits a holographic dual, except for the specific values of the a and c anomaly coefficients, which are equal due to our starting point of a two-derivative bulk supergravity theory. We show that the fermionic anomalies lead to an anomalous transformation of the supercurrent under rigid supersymmetry on backgrounds admitting Killing spinors, even if all superconformal anomalies are numerically zero on such backgrounds. The anomalous transformation of the supercurrent under rigid supersymmetry leads to an obstruction to the Q-exactness of the stress tensor in supersymmetric vacua, and may have implications for the applicability of localization techniques. We use this obstruction to the Q-exactness of the stress tensor, together with the Ward identities, in order to determine the general form of the stress tensor and R-current one-point functions in supersymmetric vacua, which allows us to obtain general expressions for the supersymmetric Casimir charges and partition function.

  13. 4D geomorphological evolution of intertropical islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastier, Anne-Morwenn; Bezos, Antoine; Husson, Laurent; Pedoja, Kevin; Arias, Camilo; Elliot, Mary; Lacroix, Pascal; Imran, Andi Muhammad

    2017-04-01

    Coral reef terraces record joint variations of sea level and surface elevation. U/Th ratings on corals along with topographic/bathymetric profiles and eustatic reconstitutions allow to locally determine the vertical rate of ground motion, while numerical modelling of reef sequences allows to unravel the processes controlling the architecture of sequences, and high-resolution DEMs facilitates the detailed mapping of the sequences of reef terraces. Alltogether, these methods allow to extrapolate the local vertical rates towards an unprecedented resolution for 4D kinematics. We applied our method to uplifting islands of the tectonically active Buton Archipelago, SE Sulawesi, Indonesia. The area undergoes a general uplift revealed by the ubiquitous occurrence of uplifted and folded reef sequences. We dated some 40 samples using U/Th, acquired sonar and dGPS profiles, and constructed high-res DEMs (Pleiades). Local vertical rates (from 0.2 to 0.28 mm/yr) were determined. Detailed geomorphological mapping of the lateral variations of the terraces are converted into time and space variations of uplift rates. Extrapolating the higher, undated terraces permits to reconstruct the overall 4D geomorphology history over the last Ma. In turns, these results give a unique view on the structural kinematics.

  14. 4d Spectra from BPS Quiver Dualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espahbodi, Sam

    We attack the question of BPS occupancy in a wide class of 4d N = 2 quantum field theories. We first review the Seiberg-Witten approach to finding the low energy Wilsonian effective action actions of such theories. In particular, we analyze the case of Gaiotto theories, which provide a large number of non-trivial examples in a unified framework. We then turn to understanding the massive BPS spectrum of such theories, and in particular their relation to BPS quivers. We present a purely 4d characterization of BPS quivers, and explain how a quiver's representation theory encodes the solution to the BPS occupancy problem. Next, we derive a so called mutation method, based on exploiting quiver dualities, to solve the quiver's representation theory. This method makes previously intractable calculations nearly trivial in many examples. As a particular highlight, we apply our methods to understand strongly coupled chambers in ADE SYM gauge theories with matter. Following this, we turn to the general story of quivers for theories of the Gaiotto class. We present a geometric approach to attaining quivers for the rank 2 theories, leading to a very elegant solution which includes a specification of quiver superpotentials. Finally, we solve these theories by an unrelated method based on gauging flavor symmetries in their various dual weakly coupled Lagrangian descriptions. After seeing that this method agrees in the rank 2 case, we will apply our new approach to the case of rank n.

  15. Qualitative characteristics and comparison of volatile fraction of vodkas made from different botanical materials by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and the electronic nose based on the technology of ultra-fast gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewska, Paulina; Śliwińska, Magdalena; Dymerski, Tomasz; Wardencki, Waldemar; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2017-03-01

    Vodka is a spirit-based beverage made from ethyl alcohol of agricultural origin. At present, increasingly more vodka brands have labels that specify the botanical origin of the product. Until now, the techniques for distinguishing between vodkas of different botanical origin have been costly, time-consuming and insufficient for making a distinction between vodka produced from similar raw materials. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to find a fast and relatively inexpensive technique for conducting such tests. In the present study, we employed comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and an electronic nose based on the technology of ultra-fast GC with chemometric methods such as partial least square discriminant analysis, discriminant function analysis and soft independent modeling of class analogy. Both techniques allow a distinction between the vodkas produced from different raw materials. In the case of GC×GC, the differences between vodkas were more noticeable than in the analysis by electronic nose; however, the electronic nose allowed the significantly faster analysis of vodkas. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Four-dimensional electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-04-09

    The discovery of the electron over a century ago and the realization of its dual character have given birth to one of the two most powerful imaging instruments: the electron microscope. The electron microscope's ability to resolve three-dimensional (3D) structures on the atomic scale is continuing to affect different fields, including materials science and biology. In this Review, we highlight recent developments and inventions made by introducing the fourth dimension of time in electron microscopy. Today, ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) enables a resolution that is 10 orders of magnitude better than that of conventional microscopes, which are limited by the video-camera rate of recording. After presenting the central concept involved, that of single-electron stroboscopic imaging, we discuss prototypical applications, which include the visualization of complex structures when unfolding on different length and time scales. The developed UEM variant techniques are several, and here we illucidate convergent-beam and near-field imaging, as well as tomography and scanning-pulse microscopy. We conclude with current explorations in imaging of nanomaterials and biostructures and an outlook on possible future directions in space-time, 4D electron microscopy.

  17. Imaging the Temporal Evolution of Molecular Orbitals during Ultrafast Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sann, H.; Havermeier, T.; Müller, C.; Kim, H.-K.; Trinter, F.; Waitz, M.; Voigtsberger, J.; Sturm, F.; Bauer, T.; Wallauer, R.; Schneider, D.; Weller, M.; Goihl, C.; Tross, J.; Cole, K.; Wu, J.; Schöffler, M. S.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Jahnke, T.; Simon, M.; Dörner, R.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the temporal evolution of molecular frame angular distributions of Auger electrons emitted during ultrafast dissociation of HCl following a resonant single-photon excitation. The electron emission pattern changes its shape from that of a molecular σ orbital to that of an atomic p state as the system evolves from a molecule into two separated atoms.

  18. Advances in 4D radiation therapy for managing respiration: part II - 4D treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2012-12-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle - an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems.

  19. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part II – 4D Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle – an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems. PMID:22796324

  20. Auger decay of 4 d inner-shell holes in atomic Hg leading to triple ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, J.; Beerwerth, R.; Roos, A. Hult; Squibb, R. J.; Singh, R.; Zagorodskikh, S.; Talaee, O.; Koulentianos, D.; Eland, J. H. D.; Fritzsche, S.; Feifel, R.

    2017-07-01

    Formation of triply ionized states upon the creation of 4 d inner-shell holes in atomic Hg is investigated by using synchrotron radiation of 730 eV photon energy and a versatile multielectron coincidence detection technique in combination with multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. By carefully selecting Coster-Kronig electrons detected only in coincidence with a 4 d photoelectron, the Coster-Kronig spectrum has been extracted and the corresponding branching ratios of the 4 d hole have been determined. The results are found to differ from previously established experimental ratios based on electron impact ionization but to agree now better with theory. We also present an Auger cascade analysis of pathways leading to triply ionized states of atomic Hg upon removal of a 4 d inner-shell electron.

  1. Ultrafast dynamics of hemin aggregates.

    PubMed

    Nath, Arpita; Dharmadhikari, J A; Dharmadhikari, A K; Mathur, D; Mazumdar, S

    2017-09-27

    The effects of solvents on the conformation of hemin and their implications on the dynamics of the complex have been studied using the time-resolved optical Kerr effect (OKE) with 35 fs laser pulses (at a central wavelength of 800 nm). The OKE enabled estimation to be made of the third-order nonlinear electronic susceptibility (χ((3))) of hemin solutions: it was found to be significantly smaller than that in hemin thin films. The real and imaginary components of χ((3)) were negative in both the solvents, suggesting that one-photon as well as two-photon absorption processes contribute to the nonlinear electronic susceptibility of hemin. Our study of the ultrafast heme dynamics not only unveils the instantaneous electronic response related to electronic susceptibility but also brings to the fore a novel libration process that has hitherto remained undetected. The hindered rotation in the femtosecond domain that may be responsible for this libration process possibly stems from π-π hemin oligomers formed in aqueous solution. The present results provide new insights into the conformational dynamics in the self-assembly of heme oligomers that may also be significant in certain pathogenic conditions where free heme is formed in biological systems.

  2. ICT4D: A Computer Science Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutinen, Erkki; Tedre, Matti

    The term ICT4D refers to the opportunities of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) as an agent of development. Research in that field is often focused on evaluating the feasibility of existing technologies, mostly of Western or Far East Asian origin, in the context of developing regions. A computer science perspective is complementary to that agenda. The computer science perspective focuses on exploring the resources, or inputs, of a particular context and on basing the design of a technical intervention on the available resources, so that the output makes a difference in the development context. The modus operandi of computer science, construction, interacts with evaluation and exploration practices. An analysis of a contextualized information technology curriculum of Tumaini University in southern Tanzania shows the potential of the computer science perspective for designing meaningful information and communication technology for a developing region.

  3. Controlled Source 4D Seismic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Morency, C.; Tromp, J.

    2009-12-01

    Earth's material properties may change after significant tectonic events, e.g., volcanic eruptions, earthquake ruptures, landslides, and hydrocarbon migration. While many studies focus on how to interpret observations in terms of changes in wavespeeds and attenuation, the oil industry is more interested in how we can identify and locate such temporal changes using seismic waves generated by controlled sources. 4D seismic analysis is indeed an important tool to monitor fluid movement in hydrocarbon reservoirs during production, improving fields management. Classic 4D seismic imaging involves comparing images obtained from two subsequent seismic surveys. Differences between the two images tell us where temporal changes occurred. However, when the temporal changes are small, it may be quite hard to reliably identify and characterize the differences between the two images. We propose to back-project residual seismograms between two subsequent surveys using adjoint methods, which results in images highlighting temporal changes. We use the SEG/EAGE salt dome model to illustrate our approach. In two subsequent surveys, the wavespeeds and density within a target region are changed, mimicking possible fluid migration. Due to changes in material properties induced by fluid migration, seismograms recorded in the two surveys differ. By back propagating these residuals, the adjoint images identify the location of the affected region. An important issue involves the nature of model. For instance, are we characterizing only changes in wavespeed, or do we also consider density and attenuation? How many model parameters characterize the model, e.g., is our model isotropic or anisotropic? Is acoustic wave propagation accurate enough or do we need to consider elastic or poroelastic effects? We will investigate how imaging strategies based upon acoustic, elastic and poroelastic simulations affect our imaging capabilities.

  4. Suppression of the molecular ultra-fast dissociation in bromomethane clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Rander, T.; Lindblad, A.; Bradeanu, I.; Svensson, S.; Björneholm, O.; Öhrwall, G.

    2014-12-14

    We address the influence of clustering on the ultra-fast dissociation of bromomethane. Valence and core photo-electron spectroscopy, partial electron yield absorption, and resonant Auger spectroscopy have been used together with ab initio calculations to investigate the properties of the ultra-fast dissociation. The ratio of ultra-fast dissociation of molecules in clusters as compared to free molecules is determined to be significantly reduced. We propose partial delocalization of the excited electronic state as being responsible for this behavior.

  5. Ultrafast reduction of the total magnetization in iron

    SciTech Connect

    Fognini, A. Michlmayr, T. U.; Salvatella, G.; Vaterlaus, A.; Acremann, Y.; Wetli, C.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Beye, M.; Eschenlohr, A.; Pontius, N.; Föhlisch, A.; Stamm, C.; Hieke, F.; Dell'Angela, M.; Wurth, W.; Jong, S. de; Dürr, H. A.; and others

    2014-01-20

    Surprisingly, if a ferromagnet is exposed to an ultrafast laser pulse, its apparent magnetization is reduced within less than a picosecond. Up to now, the total magnetization, i.e., the average spin polarization of the whole valence band, was not detectable on a sub-picosecond time scale. Here, we present experimental data, confirming the ultrafast reduction of the total magnetization. Soft x-ray pulses from the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) extract polarized cascade photoelectrons from an iron layer excited by a femtosecond laser pulse. The spin polarization of the emitted electrons is detected by a Mott spin polarimeter.

  6. Ultrafast limited-angle-type x-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bieberle, M.; Fischer, F.; Schleicher, E.; Hampel, U.; Koch, D.; Aktay, K. S. d. C.; Menz, H.-J.; Mayer, H.-G.

    2007-09-17

    The authors present an ultrafast electron beam x-ray computed tomography technique usable for imaging of fast processes, such as multiphase flows or moving parts in technical or biological objects. The setup consists of an electron beam unit with fast deflection capability and an ultrafast multielement x-ray detector and achieves 10 000 frames/s image rate. Since full sampling of the Radon space requires an angular overlap of source path and detector which strongly decreases axial resolution, the authors devised a limited-angle-type tomography. As a demonstration they visualized the movement of particles and gas bubbles rising in a stagnant liquid.

  7. Ultrafast fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermann, Martin E.; Hartl, Ingmar

    2013-11-01

    Ultrafast fibre lasers are fundamental building blocks of many photonic systems used in industrial and medical applications as well as for scientific research. Here, we review the essential components and operation regimes of ultrafast fibre lasers and discuss how they are instrumental in a variety of applications. In regards to laser technology, we discuss the present state of the art of large-mode-area fibres and their utilization in high-power, chirped-pulse amplification systems. In terms of commercial applications, we introduce industrial micromachining and medical imaging, and describe emerging applications in the mid-infrared and extreme-ultraviolet spectral regions, as facilitated by frequency shifting induced by fibre frequency combs.

  8. Ultrafast photophysics of transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Chergui, Majed

    2015-03-17

    The properties of transition metal complexes are interesting not only for their potential applications in solar energy conversion, OLEDs, molecular electronics, biology, photochemistry, etc. but also for their fascinating photophysical properties that call for a rethinking of fundamental concepts. With the advent of ultrafast spectroscopy over 25 years ago and, more particularly, with improvements in the past 10-15 years, a new area of study was opened that has led to insightful observations of the intramolecular relaxation processes such as internal conversion (IC), intersystem crossing (ISC), and intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR). Indeed, ultrafast optical spectroscopic tools, such as fluorescence up-conversion, show that in many cases, intramolecular relaxation processes can be extremely fast and even shorter than time scales of vibrations. In addition, more and more examples are appearing showing that ultrafast ISC rates do not scale with the magnitude of the metal spin-orbit coupling constant, that is, that there is no heavy-atom effect on ultrafast time scales. It appears that the structural dynamics of the system and the density of states play a crucial role therein. While optical spectroscopy delivers an insightful picture of electronic relaxation processes involving valence orbitals, the photophysics of metal complexes involves excitations that may be centered on the metal (called metal-centered or MC) or the ligand (called ligand-centered or LC) or involve a transition from one to the other or vice versa (called MLCT or LMCT). These excitations call for an element-specific probe of the photophysics, which is achieved by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this case, transitions from core orbitals to valence orbitals or higher allow probing the electronic structure changes induced by the optical excitation of the valence orbitals, while also delivering information about the geometrical rearrangement of the neighbor atoms around the atom of

  9. Opening the Black Box of ICT4D: Advancing Our Understanding of ICT4D Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sung Jin

    2013-01-01

    The term, Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D), pertains to programs or projects that strategically use ICTs (e.g. mobile phones, computers, and the internet) as a means toward the socio-economic betterment for the poor in developing contexts. Gaining the political and financial support of the international community…

  10. Opening the Black Box of ICT4D: Advancing Our Understanding of ICT4D Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sung Jin

    2013-01-01

    The term, Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D), pertains to programs or projects that strategically use ICTs (e.g. mobile phones, computers, and the internet) as a means toward the socio-economic betterment for the poor in developing contexts. Gaining the political and financial support of the international community…

  11. Resolving Ultrafast Heating of Dense Cryogenic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Harmand, M.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Förster, E.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Hilbert, V.; Hochhaus, D.; Holst, B.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Mithen, J. P.; Mitzner, R.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Roling, S.; Schulz, M.; Siemer, B.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; White, T.; Wöstmann, M.; Zacharias, H.; Döppner, T.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the dynamics of ultrafast heating in cryogenic hydrogen initiated by a ≲300 fs, 92 eV free electron laser x-ray burst. The rise of the x-ray scattering amplitude from a second x-ray pulse probes the transition from dense cryogenic molecular hydrogen to a nearly uncorrelated plasmalike structure, indicating an electron-ion equilibration time of ˜0.9 ps. The rise time agrees with radiation hydrodynamics simulations based on a conductivity model for partially ionized plasma that is validated by two-temperature density-functional theory.

  12. Ultrafast dynamics of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Brinks, Daan; Hildner, Richard; van Dijk, Erik M H P; Stefani, Fernando D; Nieder, Jana B; Hernando, Jordi; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-04-21

    The detection of individual molecules has found widespread application in molecular biology, photochemistry, polymer chemistry, quantum optics and super-resolution microscopy. Tracking of an individual molecule in time has allowed identifying discrete molecular photodynamic steps, action of molecular motors, protein folding, diffusion, etc. down to the picosecond level. However, methods to study the ultrafast electronic and vibrational molecular dynamics at the level of individual molecules have emerged only recently. In this review we present several examples of femtosecond single molecule spectroscopy. Starting with basic pump-probe spectroscopy in a confocal detection scheme, we move towards deterministic coherent control approaches using pulse shapers and ultra-broad band laser systems. We present the detection of both electronic and vibrational femtosecond dynamics of individual fluorophores at room temperature, showing electronic (de)coherence, vibrational wavepacket interference and quantum control. Finally, two colour phase shaping applied to photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes is presented, which allows investigation of the persistent coherence in photosynthetic complexes under physiological conditions at the level of individual complexes.

  13. Spatiotemporal directional analysis of 4D echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini-Casadevall, Elsa D.; Laine, Andrew F.; Takuma, Shin; Homma, Shunichi

    2000-12-01

    Speckle noise corrupts ultrasonic data by introducing sharp changes in an echocardiographic image intensity profile, while attenuation alters the intensity of equally significant cardiac structures. These properties introduce inhomogeneity in the spatial domain and suggests that measures based on phase information rather than intensity are more appropriate for denoising and cardiac border detection. The present analysis method relies on the expansion of temporal ultrasonic volume data on complex exponential wavelet-like basis functions called Brushlets. These basis functions decompose a signal into distinct patterns of oriented textures. Projected coefficients are associated with distinct 'brush strokes' of a particular size and orientation. 4D overcomplete brushlet analysis is applied to temporal echocardiographic values. We show that adding the time dimension in the analysis dramatically improves the quality and robustness of the method without adding complexity in the design of a segmentation tool. We have investigated mathematical and empirical methods for identifying the most 'efficient' brush stroke sizes and orientations for decomposition and reconstruction on both phantom and clinical data. In order to determine the 'best tiling' or equivalently, the 'best brushlet basis', we use an entorpy-based information cost metric function. Quantitative validation and clinical applications of this new spatio-temporal analysis tool are reported for balloon phantoms and clinical data sets.

  14. Role of Electron-Driven Proton-Transfer Processes in the Ultrafast Deactivation of Photoexcited Anionic 8-oxoGuanine-Adenine and 8-oxoGuanine-Cytosine Base Pairs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Karsili, Tolga N V; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2017-01-14

    It has been reported that 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanosine (8-oxo-G), which is the main product of oxidative damage of DNA, can repair cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesions when incorporated into DNA or RNA strands in